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Sample records for acute appendicitis methods

  1. Accuracies of diagnostic methods for acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Seob; Jeong, Jin Ho; Lee, Jong In; Lee, Jong Hoon; Park, Jea Kun; Moon, Hyoun Jong

    2013-01-01

    The objectives were to evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasonography, computed tomography, and physical examination for diagnosing acute appendicitis with analyzing their accuracies and negative appendectomy rates in a clinical rather than research setting. A total of 2763 subjects were enrolled. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value and negative appendectomy rate for ultrasonography, computed tomography, and physical examination were calculated. Confirmed positive acute appendicitis was defined based on pathologic findings, and confirmed negative acute appendicitis was defined by pathologic findings as well as on clinical follow-up. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for ultrasonography were 99.1, 91.7, 96.5, and 97.7 per cent, respectively; for computed tomography, 96.4, 95.4, 95.6, and 96.3 per cent, respectively; and for physical examination, 99.0, 76.1, 88.1, and 97.6 per cent, respectively. The negative appendectomy rate was 5.8 per cent (5.2% in the ultrasonography group, 4.3% in the computed tomography group, and 12.2% in the physical examination group). Ultrasonography/computed tomography should be performed routinely for diagnosis of acute appendicitis. However, in view of its advantages, ultrasonography should be performed first. Also, if the result of a physical examination is negative, imaging studies after physical examination can be unnecessary.

  2. [Schistosomiasis and acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Jacinta; Santos, Ângela; Clemente, Horácio; Lourenço, Augusto; Costa, Sandra; Grácio, Maria Amélia; Belo, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Acute appendicitis associated to Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni infection has been found in patients submitted to urgent appendectomy at the Hospital Américo Boavida in Luanda. Due to the high prevalence and morbidity caused by schistosomiasis (or bilharziasis) in the country, we suspect that the involvement of Schistosoma infection on appendicular pathology could be very frequent, in particular for those individuals more exposed to the parasite transmission. We report two clinical cases of acute appendicitis whose surgical specimens of the appendix revealed S. haematobium and S. mansoni eggs in histological samples. The reported patients live in endemic areas and have been exposed to schistosome during childhood, which may explain the infection's chronicity. Information of these clinical cases could be relevant, particularly for surgery specialists and clinical pathologists, due to the possibility of finding more patients with concurrent appendicitis and schistosomiasis.

  3. AIR SCORE ASSESSMENT FOR ACUTE APPENDICITIS

    PubMed Central

    VON-MÜHLEN, Bruno; FRANZON, Orli; BEDUSCHI, Murilo Gamba; KRUEL, Nicolau; LUPSELO, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdomen. Approximately 7% of the population will be affected by this condition during full life. The development of AIR score may contribute to diagnosis associating easy clinical criteria and two simple laboratory tests. Aim: To evaluate the score AIR (Appendicitis Inflammatory Response score) as a tool for the diagnosis and prediction of severity of acute appendicitis. Method: Were evaluated all patients undergoing surgical appendectomy. From 273 patients, 126 were excluded due to exclusion criteria. All patients were submitted o AIR score. Results: The value of the C-reactive protein and the percentage of leukocytes segmented blood count showed a direct relationship with the phase of acute appendicitis. Conclusion: As for the laboratory criteria, serum C-reactive protein and assessment of the percentage of the polymorphonuclear leukocytes count were important to diagnosis and disease stratification. PMID:26537139

  4. Obstructive Uropathy Secondary to Missed Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hydronephrosis is a rare complication of acute appendicitis. We present a case of missed appendicitis in a 52-year-old female which presented as a right-sided hydronephrosis. 2 days after admission to the Department of Urology CT revealed acute appendicitis for what open appendectomy was performed. Acute appendicitis can lead to obstructive uropathy by periappendiceal inflammation due to adjacency. Urologists, surgeons, and emergency physicians should be aware of this rare complication of atypical acute appendicitis.

  5. Abdominal actinomycosis mimicking acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Robert Joseph; Riela, Steven; Patel, Ravi; Misra, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old Hispanic woman presented to the emergency department, reporting worsening sharp lower right quadrant abdominal pain for 3 days. CT of the abdomen and pelvis showed evidence of inflammation in the peritoneal soft tissues adjacent to an enlarged and thick-walled appendix, an appendicolith, no abscess formation and a slightly thickened caecum consistent with acute appendicitis. During laparoscopic appendectomy, the caecum was noted to be firm, raising suspicion of malignancy. Surgical oncology team was consulted and open laparotomy with right hemicolectomy was performed. Pathology reported that the ileocaecal mass was not a malignancy but was, rather, actinomycosis. The patient was discharged after 10 days of intravenous antibiotics in the hospital, with the diagnosis of abdominal actinomycosis. Although the original clinical and radiological findings in this case were highly suggestive of acute appendicitis, abdominal actinomycosis should be in the differential for right lower quadrant pain as it may be treated non-operatively.

  6. [Acute appendicitis caused by Balantidium coli].

    PubMed

    González Sánchez, O

    1978-01-01

    A patient who was surgically treated for acute appendicitis is presented. In the sections of cecal appendix many Balantidium coli trophozoites were found. The history, characteristics, habitat, location, biological aspects and reproduction of this parasite are commented. PMID:358326

  7. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  8. Gastrointestinal Zygomycosis Masquerading as Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Tak; Chang, Tammy T.; Gill, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    Zygomycosis is a rare invasive opportunistic fungal infection that occurs in the setting of hematologic malignancies, chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, and immunosuppressive therapies. We report the first case of disseminated appendiceal zygomycosis due to Absidia spp. in a neutropenic patient who initially presented as acute appendicitis. A 63-year-old woman with acute myeloid leukemia presented as acute appendicitis while receiving induction chemotherapy and ultimately succumbed to overwhelming disseminated zygomycosis. Initial symptoms included loose stools and right lower abdominal pain unresponsive to broad-spectrum antibiotics. Clinical examination and cross-sectional imaging suggested acute appendicitis. The final diagnosis was established by histological evaluations of the ileocecectomy specimen, which showed angioinvasive fungal organisms within the necrotic appendiceal wall with characteristics typical of zygomycetes. Fungal cultures demonstrated Absidia spp. The patient was treated with amphotericin B but expired in the setting of fungal sepsis. A diagnosis of a fungal infection, including zygomycosis, should be considered in all chemotherapy-induced neutropenic patients who present with symptoms of acute appendicitis. A high index of clinical suspicion with prompt histologic and culture diagnosis of zygomycosis may reduce the high mortality and morbidity associated with zygomycosis of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27403107

  9. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of acute appendicitis in surgical indication.

    PubMed

    Takada, T; Yasuda, H; Uchiyama, K; Hasegawa, H; Shikata, J

    1986-01-01

    The visualization rate and cross section width of the appendix were compared with the severity of appendicitis by using ultrasonography in 77 patients with acute appendicitis. An appendicitis echo was obtained in 100% of phlegmonous and gangrenous appendicitis cases in which emergency surgery was indicated, but in only 32% of catarrhal appendicitis cases in which conservative therapy was generally indicated. The cross section width of the appendix was 19.00 +/- 2.76 mm in gangrenous appendicitis, 15.22 +/- 3.73 mm in phlegmonous appendicitis and 9.50 +/- 1.76 mm in catarrhal appendicitis; i.e. the severer the inflammation the longer the diameter (p less than 0.01). A fluid echo, which suggests the existence of a complication, was observed in patients with gangrenous and phlegmonous appendicitis. The above facts suggest that ultrasonographic examination can be useful in assessing the severity of acute appendicitis.

  10. [BACTERIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF AN ACUTE APPENDICITIS].

    PubMed

    Zhuchenko, O P

    2016-03-01

    Peculiarities of microflora in the appendix mucosa and abdominal exudate in different morphological forms of an acute appendicitis (AA) were studied up. In accordance to the bacteriological investigations data, anaerobic, and aerobic microorganisms in AA were revealed in a monoculture and in association, more frequently--obligate anaer- obes (bacteroids) with E. coli--in 82 (80.39%) observations, staphylococcus--in 52 (50.98%), fecal streptococcus--in 19 (18.63%). With progression of inflammatory process and destructive changes in the appendix wall the quantity of bacteroids and enterobacteria have had enhanced, while the quantity of lacto- and bifidumflora-- reduced. PMID:27514082

  11. [BACTERIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF AN ACUTE APPENDICITIS].

    PubMed

    Zhuchenko, O P

    2016-03-01

    Peculiarities of microflora in the appendix mucosa and abdominal exudate in different morphological forms of an acute appendicitis (AA) were studied up. In accordance to the bacteriological investigations data, anaerobic, and aerobic microorganisms in AA were revealed in a monoculture and in association, more frequently--obligate anaer- obes (bacteroids) with E. coli--in 82 (80.39%) observations, staphylococcus--in 52 (50.98%), fecal streptococcus--in 19 (18.63%). With progression of inflammatory process and destructive changes in the appendix wall the quantity of bacteroids and enterobacteria have had enhanced, while the quantity of lacto- and bifidumflora-- reduced.

  12. Risk factors of delayed diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children: for early detection of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jea Yeon; Jo, Jeong Hyun; Hann, Tchah; Kim, Seong Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the risk factors of a delayed diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children undergoing an appendectomy. Methods This retrospective study involved children aged below 18 years, who underwent an appendectomy. After dividing them into a delayed diagnosis group and nondelayed diagnosis group according to the time interval between the initial hospital visit and final diagnosis, the risk factors of delayed diagnosis were identified using logistic regression analysis. Results Among 712 patients, 105 patients (14.7%) were classified in the delayed diagnosis group; 92 patients (12.9%) were diagnosed using ultrasonography (US), and both US and computed tomography were performed in 38 patients (5.3%). More patients in the delayed diagnosis group underwent US (P=0.03). Spring season and prior local clinic visit were significantly associated with a delayed diagnosis. Fever and diarrhea were more common in the delayed diagnosis group (fever: odds ratio [OR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.81; diarrhea: OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.08–3.46; P<0.05). These patients showed symptoms for a longer duration (OR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.78–3.78; P<0.05), and the admission course (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.11–1.44; P<0.05) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.19–1.82; P<0.05) were associated with the delayed diagnosis. Conclusion To decrease the rate of delayed diagnoses of acute appendicitis, symptoms such as fever and diarrhea, seasonal variations, admission course, and CRP levels should be considered and children with a longer duration of symptoms should be closely monitored. PMID:27721841

  13. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... function. A blockage inside of the appendix causes appendicitis. The blockage leads to increased pressure, problems with ... to pass gas Low fever Not everyone with appendicitis has all these symptoms. Appendicitis is a medical ...

  14. Peritoneal interleukin-8 in acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Zeillemaker, A M; Hoynck van Papendrecht, A A; Hart, M H; Roos, D; Verbrugh, H A; Leguit, P

    1996-05-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a chemoattractant that is highly selective for neutrophils. This study was designed to investigate the presence of IL-8 in peritoneal fluid of patients with acute appendicitis. The clinical circumstances underlying the secretion of IL-8 by mesothelium and its mechanism of activation have not been defined. In an in vitro model for bacterial peritonitis the role of bacteria in activating human mesothelial cells to secrete IL-8 was studied. Cultured human mesothelium was incubated with various species of pathogenic bacteria, isolated from peritoneal exudate fluids of patients with appendicitis. The amount of IL-8 secreted by the cultured mesothelial cells was determined in an IL-8 ELISA, as IL-8 was present in the original peritoneal fluid of these patients. Peritoneal fluids from patients with a perforated appendix were found to contain a significantly higher concentration of IL-8 compared to peritoneal fluids from patients with nonperforating appendicitis (121.6 (57.8) ng/ml versus 0.2 (0.07) ng/ml, respectively; mean (SEM), P < or = 0.01). Species of Bacteroïdes and Fusobacterium necrophorum induced IL-8 secretion from cultured mesothelial monolayers to levels comparable to those found in peritoneal fluids in vivo. Heat-killed bacteria and bacterial supernatant were also able to stimulate mesothelium to secrete IL-8. The results suggest that in the early phase of bacterial peritonitis the influx of PMN is regulated by bacteria-induced IL-8 secretion by the mesothelium lining the peritoneal cavity.

  15. Mixed Adenocarcinoid Tumor Presenting as Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Regeti, Kalyani; Jehangir, Waqas; Zafar, Shoaib; Sen, Shuvendu; Sidhom, Ibrahim; Yousif, Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Mixed adenocarcinoid tumors are not uncommon neoplasms of appendix. The clinical presentation of these tumors is often similar to that of acute appendicitis or may present as asymptomatic. These tumors are found incidentally during histopathological examination of the resected appendix following appendectomy or other abdominal procedures. Mixed adenocarcinoids usually behave as adenocarcinomas with rapid metastasis, so prognosis depends upon how aggressive the tumor behaves. The present study reports a case of a 53-year-old male who presented with abdominal pain and fever for 1 day and underwent successful appendectomy and recovered later. Subsequently, a mixed adenocarcinoma with carcinoid features of the appendix was diagnosed by histopathological examination. Follow-up examination of the patient in 3 months revealed metastasis of carcinoma to the peritoneum with adenocarcinoma features.

  16. [Change in pancreatic exocrine function in acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Iu A

    1979-10-01

    In order to study changes in the functional state of the pancreas 1572 investigations of the blood and urine amylase, atoxylresistant lipase of the blood serum before operation were performed in different postoperative periods in 131 patients with acute appendicitis. The enzyme activity was established to increase, especially in destructive forms of appendicitis and in elderly patients.

  17. Acute appendicitis complicated by pylephlebitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ricardo; Fernandes, Teresa; Oliveira, Maria I; Castro, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Pylephlebitis is defined as septic thrombophlebitis of the portal vein. It is a rare but serious complication of an intraabdominal infection, more commonly diverticulitis and appendicitis. It has an unspecific clinical presentation and the diagnosis is difficult. The authors report a case of a 21-year-old man with acute appendicitis complicated by pylephlebitis. The diagnosis was made with contrast enhanced CT.

  18. Endometrial decidualization: a rare cause of acute appendicitis during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Skyle J.; Kaur, Anupinder; Wullschleger, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    Appendicular endometriosis is a rare and poorly understood pathology that affects women in their reproductive years. In the gravid woman, ectopic endometrial tissue undergoes decidualization. This physiological process can result in acute appendicitis in exceptional cases. Here we describe a patient in her second trimester of pregnancy who presented with right iliac fossa pain and clinical, laboratory and imaging findings consistent with acute appendicitis. A laparoscopic appendectomy was performed with intraoperative findings suspicious for malignancy. Histological analysis made the surprising diagnosis of decidualized endometriosis causing luminal constriction resulting in acute appendicitis. We also detail the challenging diagnostic and management issues faced by clinicians in such cases. PMID:27106612

  19. Solitary caecum diverticulitis mimicking acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Hot, Semih; Eğin, Seracettin; Gökçek, Berk; Yeşiltaş, Metin; Alemdar, Ali; Akan, Arzu; Karahan, Servet Rüştü

    2015-12-01

    Solitary cecum diverticulum is a benign formation, but it can be complicated with inflammation, perforation and bleeding. Cecum diverticulitis (CD) is the most common complication of caecal diverticulum and it has the highest incidence among Asians, but it is a rare condition in the western world. The incidence of colonic diverticular disease can vary according to national origin, cultural structure and nutritional habits. CD is not common in our country, but it is an important situation because of its clinical similarity with the commonly seen acute right side abdominal diseases like acute appendicitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult, and hence, the actual frequency is not known. The treatment of CD can vary from medical therapy to right hemi colectomy. In this study, we presented ten CD cases on whom surgical resection was performed in our surgery unit during the last 8 years. Our purpose was to increase the awareness of surgeons about this situation, and so, make them pay attention for not having their first experience in the operating room. PMID:27054646

  20. [Potentialities of echography in the diagnosis of uncomplicated acute appendicitis in children].

    PubMed

    Filippkin, M A; Shchitinin, V E; Pykov, M I; Galkina, I A

    1997-01-01

    Ultrasonography was performed in 97 children admitted to hospital for suspected acute appendicitis. According to the results of primary surgical examinations and the magnitude of clinical manifestations, all the patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 comprised 53 patients with clinically diagnosed acute appendicitis and with a worded indication for an emergency surgical intervention; this group was formed for describing the ultrasonic semiotics of different types of acute appendicitis in children. Group 2 (n = 44) was enrolled to study the differential diagnostic potentialities of echography in the primary diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children with acute stomach ache and they are diagnostically unclear. All echocardiographic findings are supported by intraoperative data and pathohistological evidence. The ultrasonic semiotics of different forms of uncomplicated acute appendicitis is described, the optimal procedure has been developed for examining children with this pathology. The results of the study confirm the high informative value of the proposed algorithm of an echographic examination and sensitivity of the method as to the patients of this group. Thus, the sensitivity of the echographic method in uncomplicated acute appendicitis was 88%.

  1. Acute appendicitis: What is the gold standard of treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Ruffolo, Cesare; Fiorot, Alain; Pagura, Giulia; Antoniutti, Michele; Massani, Marco; Caratozzolo, Ezio; Bonariol, Luca; Calia di Pinto, Francesco; Bassi, Nicolò

    2013-01-01

    McBurney’s procedure represented the gold-standard for acute appendicitis until 1981, but nowadays the number of laparoscopic appendectomies has progressively increased since it has been demonstrated to be a safe procedure, with excellent cosmetic results and it also allows a shorter hospitalization, a quicker and less painful postoperative recovery. The aim of this editorial was to perform a review of the literature in order to address controversial issues in the treatment of acute appendicitis. PMID:24379603

  2. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed? What Is Appendicitis? Your appendix (say: uh-PEN-dix) is a small, finger-shaped pouch connected ... or swells up, it's called appendicitis (say: uh-pen-di-SYE-tis). Both kids and adults can ...

  3. Systematic review of blunt abdominal trauma as a cause of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Toumi, Zaher; Chan, Anthony; Hadfield, Matthew B; Hulton, Neil R

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acute appendicitis commonly presents as an acute abdomen. Cases of acute appendicitis caused by blunt abdominal trauma are rare. We present a systematic review of appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma. The aim of this review was to collate and report the clinical presentations and experience of such cases. SUBJECTS AND METHODS A literature review was performed using PubMed, Embase and Medline and the keywords ‘appendicitis’, ‘abdominal’ and ‘trauma’. RESULTS The initial search returned 381 papers, of which 17 articles were included. We found 28 cases of acute appendicitis secondary to blunt abdominal trauma reported in the literature between 1991 and 2009. Mechanisms of injury included road-traffic accidents, falls, assaults and accidents. Presenting symptoms invariably included abdominal pain, but also nausea, vomiting and anorexia. Only 12 patients had computed tomography scans and 10 patients had ultrasonography. All reported treatment was surgical and positive for appendicitis. CONCLUSIONS Although rare, the diagnosis of acute appendicitis must be considered following direct abdominal trauma especially if the patient complains of abdominal right lower quadrant pain, nausea and anorexia. Haemodynamically stable patients who present shortly after blunt abdominal trauma with right lower quadrant pain and tenderness should undergo urgent imaging with a plan to proceed to appendicectomy if the imaging suggested an inflammatory process within the right iliac fossa. PMID:20513274

  4. Acute abdominal pain in childhood, with special reference to cases not due to acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Jones, P F

    1969-02-01

    Appendicitis is not the only common cause of acute abdominal pain in childhood. Almost equally common is an acute episode which in its early stages resembles acute appendicitis but which subsides without treatment in 24 to 48 hours. The clinical features of this syndrome are contrasted with those of appendicitis. The two conditions cannot always be distinguished on clinical grounds, leading to admission to hospital for observation and the finding of a normal appendix in 14% of operations for suspected appendicitis. Reasons are given for abandoning attempts to diagnose acute mesenteric adenitis at the bedside.

  5. [Antibacterial therapy in surgery of patients with acute destructive appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Bezrodnyĭ, B H; Kolosovych, I V; Iovitsa, A V; Martynovych, L D; Sydorenko, R A; Sysak, O M

    2012-01-01

    Character of microflora of exsudate of abdominals and mucosis microflora of vermicular appendix is studied for patients with the destructive forms of appendicitis with the purpose of development of variants of antibacterial therapy at surgical treatment of patients with acute appendicitis. The patients with the destructive forms of appendicitis, which were on treatment in a municipal clinical hospital N 4 Kyiv for period 2004-2010. An Inflammatory-destructive process in an appendix is conditioned by both aerobic (Escherichia coli - 46,6 %, Enterobacter - 4,2 %, Citrobacter - 4,2 %, Klebsiella - 3,3 %, Pseudomonas aeruginosa - 5,8 %, Staphylococcus - 4,2 %) and anaerobic microorganisms (Bacteroides - 100 %) and increase Candida - 17,5 %. Antibacterial therapy is effective at 46,7 % patients with acute appendicitis. At 49,6 % patients acute appendicitis develops on a background dysbiotic intestinal disturbances. Clinically the effective charts of empiric antibacterial monotherapy 6 days it is been: Moxifloxacini intravenously 400 mgs one time in twenty-four hours during, Ertapenemi for a 1 g one time in twenty-four hours intravenously and combined - Aztreonami for a 1 g twice in twenty-four hours and of Clindamycini for 600 mgs twice in twenty-four hours, intramuscular during; Cefepimumi for a 1 g twice in twenty-four hours and of Clindamycini for 600 mgs twice in twenty-four hours, intramuscular.

  6. A young man with concurrent acute appendicitis and incarcerated right indirect inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Ditsatham, Chagkrit; Somwangprasert, Areewan; Watcharachan, Kirati; Wongmaneerung, Phanchaporn

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acute appendicitis and incarcerated hernia rarely present in the same episode. Our study reports patient presentation, diagnosis method, and treatment of an unusual case at the Chiang Mai University Hospital. Method Case report. Result A 20-year-old man visited the Chiang Mai University Hospital with right lower quadrant pain and a right groin mass which could not be reduced. The computerized tomography scan showed acute appendicitis and omentum in the hernia sac. Operative treatment was an appendectomy and herniorrhaphy. The treatment was successful, and the patient was discharged from our hospital without any complications. Conclusion Concurrent acute appendicitis and incarcerated hernia are very rare, but should be kept in mind if a patient presents with right lower quadrant pain and a right groin mass. Further investigation may be helpful if the diagnosis is uncertain. Operative priority treatment depends on each individual case. PMID:26834499

  7. Abdominal CT Does Not Improve Outcome for Children with Suspected Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Miano, Danielle I.; Silvis, Renee M.; Popp, Jill M.; Culbertson, Marvin C.; Campbell, Brendan; Smith, Sharon R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute appendicitis in children is a clinical diagnosis, which often requires preoperative confirmation with either ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) studies. CTs expose children to radiation, which may increase the lifetime risk of developing malignancy. US in the pediatric population with appropriate clinical follow up and serial exam may be an effective diagnostic modality for many children without incurring the risk of radiation. The objective of the study was to compare the rate of appendiceal rupture and negative appendectomies between children with and without abdominal CTs; and to evaluate the same outcomes for children with and without USs to determine if there were any associations between imaging modalities and outcomes. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review including emergency department (ED) and inpatient records from 1/1/2009–2/31/2010 and included patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Results 1,493 children, aged less than one year to 20 years, were identified in the ED with suspected appendicitis. These patients presented with abdominal pain who had either a surgical consult or an abdominal imaging study to evaluate for appendicitis, or were transferred from an outside hospital or primary care physician office with the stated suspicion of acute appendicitis. Of these patients, 739 were sent home following evaluation in the ED and did not return within the subsequent two weeks and were therefore presumed not to have appendicitis. A total of 754 were admitted and form the study population, of which 20% received a CT, 53% US, and 8% received both. Of these 57%, 95% CI [53.5,60.5] had pathology-proven appendicitis. Appendicitis rates were similar for children with a CT (57%, 95% CI [49.6,64.4]) compared to those without (57%, 95% CI [52.9,61.0]). Children with perforation were similar between those with a CT (18%, 95% CI [12.3,23.7]) and those without (13%, 95% CI [10.3,15.7]). The proportion of children with a

  8. Acute appendicitis following endoscopic mucosal resection of cecal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Yukako; Tokuhisa, Junya; Shimada, Nagasato; Gomi, Tatsuya; Maetani, Iruru

    2015-07-21

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) allows the removal of flat or sessile lesions, laterally spreading tumors, and carcinoma of the colon or the rectum limited to the mucosa or the superficial submucosa. Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency requiring emergency surgery, and it is also a rare complication of diagnostic colonoscopy and therapeutic endoscopy, including EMR. In the case presented here, a 53-year-old female underwent colonoscopy due to a positive fecal occult blood test and was diagnosed with cecal adenoma. She was referred to our hospital and admitted for treatment. The patient had no other symptoms. EMR was performed, and 7 h after the surgery, the patient experienced right -lower abdominal pain. Laboratory tests performed the following day revealed a WBC count of 16000/mm(3), a neutrophil count of 14144/mm(3), and a C-reactive protein level of 2.20 mg/dL, indicating an inflammatory response. Computed tomography also revealed appendiceal wall thickening and swelling, so acute appendicitis following EMR was diagnosed. Antibiotics were initiated leading to total resolution of the symptoms, and the patient was discharged on the sixth post-operative day. Pathological analysis revealed a high-grade cecal tubular adenoma. Such acute appendicitis following EMR is extremely rare, and EMR of the cecum may be a rare cause of acute appendicitis.

  9. [Contribution of abdominal sonography in acute appendicitis diagnostics--our experience].

    PubMed

    Smíd, D; Skalický, T; Treska, V

    2009-08-01

    Acute apendicitis is the most frequent case of acute abdomen. During a two year period (2006-2007) it was performed in Department of Surgery of Faculty Hospital in Pilsen 678 appendectomies, 30 days post-operative mortality rate was 0%. Abdomen ultrasonography like helping method to clinic examination was performed in 313 patients, suspect of acute appendicitis was in 191 patients (61%), in remaining patients was normal ultrasound picture.

  10. WSES Jerusalem guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Birindelli, Arianna; Kelly, Micheal D; Catena, Fausto; Weber, Dieter G; Sartelli, Massimo; Sugrue, Michael; De Moya, Mark; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Bhangu, Aneel; Agresta, Ferdinando; Moore, Ernest E; Soreide, Kjetil; Griffiths, Ewen; De Castro, Steve; Kashuk, Jeffry; Kluger, Yoram; Leppaniemi, Ari; Ansaloni, Luca; Andersson, Manne; Coccolini, Federico; Coimbra, Raul; Gurusamy, Kurinchi S; Campanile, Fabio Cesare; Biffl, Walter; Chiara, Osvaldo; Moore, Fred; Peitzman, Andrew B; Fraga, Gustavo P; Costa, David; Maier, Ronald V; Rizoli, Sandro; Balogh, Zsolt J; Bendinelli, Cino; Cirocchi, Roberto; Tonini, Valeria; Piccinini, Alice; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Jovine, Elio; Persiani, Roberto; Biondi, Antonio; Scalea, Thomas; Stahel, Philip; Ivatury, Rao; Velmahos, George; Andersson, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis (AA) is among the most common cause of acute abdominal pain. Diagnosis of AA is challenging; a variable combination of clinical signs and symptoms has been used together with laboratory findings in several scoring systems proposed for suggesting the probability of AA and the possible subsequent management pathway. The role of imaging in the diagnosis of AA is still debated, with variable use of US, CT and MRI in different settings worldwide. Up to date, comprehensive clinical guidelines for diagnosis and management of AA have never been issued. In July 2015, during the 3rd World Congress of the WSES, held in Jerusalem (Israel), a panel of experts including an Organizational Committee and Scientific Committee and Scientific Secretariat, participated to a Consensus Conference where eight panelists presented a number of statements developed for each of the eight main questions about diagnosis and management of AA. The statements were then voted, eventually modified and finally approved by the participants to The Consensus Conference and lately by the board of co-authors. The current paper is reporting the definitive Guidelines Statements on each of the following topics: 1) Diagnostic efficiency of clinical scoring systems, 2) Role of Imaging, 3) Non-operative treatment for uncomplicated appendicitis, 4) Timing of appendectomy and in-hospital delay, 5) Surgical treatment 6) Scoring systems for intra-operative grading of appendicitis and their clinical usefulness 7) Non-surgical treatment for complicated appendicitis: abscess or phlegmon 8) Pre-operative and post-operative antibiotics. PMID:27437029

  11. Diagnostic Performance on Low Dose Computed Tomography For Acute Appendicitis Among Attending and Resident Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Chen; Wong, Yon-Cheong; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Huan-Wu; Wang, Li-Jen; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Wu, Patricia Wanping; Irama, Wiwan; Chen, Wei Yuan; Chang, Chee-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) techniques can reduce exposure to radiation. Several previous studies have shown that radiation dose reduction in LDCT does not decrease the diagnostic performance for appendicitis among attending radiologists. But, the LDCT diagnostic performance for acute appendicitis in radiology residents with variable training levels has not been well discussed. Objectives To compare inter-observer and intra-observer differences of diagnostic performance on non-enhanced LDCT (NE-LDCT) and contrast-enhanced standard dose CT (CE-SDCT) for acute appendicitis among attending and resident radiologists. Patients and Methods This retrospective study included 101 patients with suspected acute appendicitis who underwent NE-LDCT and CE-SDCT. The CT examinations were interpreted and recorded on a five-point scale independently by three attending radiologists and three residents with 4, 1 and 1 years of training. Diagnostic performance for acute appendicitis of all readers on both examinations was represented by area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Inter-observer and intra-observer AUC values were compared using Jackknife FROC software on both modalities. The diagnostic accuracy of each reader on NE-LDCT was compared with body mass index (BMI) subgroups and noise using independent T test. Results Diagnostic performances for acute appendicitis were not statistically different for attending radiologists at both examinations. Better performance was noted on the CE-SDCT with a borderline significant difference (P = 0.05) for senior radiology resident. No statistical difference of AUC values was observed between attending radiologists and fourth year resident on both examinations. Statistically significant differences of AUC values were observed between attending radiologists and first year residents (P = 0.001 ~ 0.018) on NE-LDCT. Diagnostic accuracies of acute appendicitis on NE-LDCT for each reader were not significantly

  12. Evaluation of Clinical Alvarado Scoring System and CT Criteria in the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Gunes Tatar, Idil; Yilmaz, Kerim Bora; Sahin, Alpaslan; Aydin, Hasan; Akinci, Melih; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim was to evaluate the clinical Alvarado scoring system and computed tomography (CT) criteria for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Material and Methods. 117 patients with acute abdominal pain who underwent abdominal CT were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patient demographics, clinical Alvarado scoring, CT images, and pathologic results of the patients were evaluated. Results. 39 of the 53 patients who were operated on had pathologically proven acute appendicitis. CT criteria of appendiceal diameter, presence of periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, appendicolith, and white blood cell (WBC) count were significantly correlated with the inflammation of the appendix. The best cut-off value for appendiceal diameter was 6.5 mm. The correlation between appendiceal diameter and WBC count was 80% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). The correlation between appendiceal diameter and Alvarado score was 78.7% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). Conclusion. Presence of CT criteria of appendiceal diameter above 6.5 mm, periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, and appendicolith should prompt the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Since patients with acute appendicitis may not always show the typical signs and symptoms, CT is a helpful imaging modality for patients with relatively low Alvarado score and leukocytosis and when physical examination is confusing. PMID:27242926

  13. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase in acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, I; Gajda, R

    1994-01-01

    The activity of alpha-amylase was measured in isolated granulocytes, serum and urine of 35 patients with acute appendicitis. The measurements were performed before operation and on the 7th day after operation. Slightly increased activity of alpha-amylase was found in the serum and urine of 15 patients. On the 7th day after operation the activity of this enzyme reached normal value. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase was elevated in 22 patients. In 2 of them the increased activity still maintained on the 7th day after operation. Positive correlation between the serum and granulocyte alpha-amylase activities was found. These observations allow to conclude that granulocytes are the source of increased alpha-amylase activity in the serum of patients with acute appendicitis.

  14. Does breast feeding provide protection against acute appendicitis? A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Alves, João Guilherme Bezerra; Figueiroa, José Natal; Barros, Isabela

    2008-10-01

    Breast feeding stimulates a more tolerant lymphoid tissue at the base of the appendix and this could provide protection against acute appendicitis. Two studies reported that children and adolescents with appendicitis were less likely to have been breast fed. In a case-control study of 200 children with histologically confirmed acute appendicitis matched by 200 siblings with the same sex and difference age - up to three-year-old - we found breast feeding in at least the first two months of life and for more than four months provides protection against acute appendicitis. These findings suggesting that breast feeding may possibly give protection against the development of appendicitis.

  15. Evaluation of Tc-99m leukocyte scan in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.A.; Marcus, C.S.; Henneman, P.L.; Inkelis, S.H.; Wilson, S.E.

    1987-05-01

    A new /sup 99m/Tc Microlite leukocyte scan was performed in 38 patients to assess its value in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Autologous leukocytes are labeled with /sup 99m/Tc by inducing phagocytosis of /sup 99m/Tc albumin microcolloid particles. The advantages of this test over the standard indium-111 scan include superior imaging capability, a marked reduction (greater than 75%) in the radiation dose, and performance of the test including labeling, in less than 3 hr. Imaging is performed at 5-90 min postinjection of labeled cells. There were 19 male and 19 female patients with ages ranging from 10 to 80 years, in whom the diagnosis of appendicitis was indeterminate on clinical examination. Of the 13 of the 38 patients (34%) who came to surgery 12 had acute appendicitis. The WBC scan correctly identified 10 of the 12 cases of appendicitis. There were two false-negative studies. In the nonoperative group of 25 patients admitted for observation, 21 studies were reported as negative and four identified other sites of inflammation. All patients with a negative study have remained asymptomatic on follow-up. With a sensitivity of 83% (10/12) and a specificity of 100% (26/26) the /sup 99m/Tc leukocyte scan provides a rapid and highly accurate method for diagnosis of appendicitis in this preliminary study of patients with equivocal clinical exams.

  16. Acute appendicitis: modern understanding of pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Bhangu, Aneel; Søreide, Kjetil; Di Saverio, Salomone; Assarsson, Jeanette Hansson; Drake, Frederick Thurston

    2015-09-26

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common abdominal emergencies worldwide. The cause remains poorly understood, with few advances in the past few decades. To obtain a confident preoperative diagnosis is still a challenge, since the possibility of appendicitis must be entertained in any patient presenting with an acute abdomen. Although biomarkers and imaging are valuable adjuncts to history and examination, their limitations mean that clinical assessment is still the mainstay of diagnosis. A clinical classification is used to stratify management based on simple (non-perforated) and complex (gangrenous or perforated) inflammation, although many patients remain with an equivocal diagnosis, which is one of the most challenging dilemmas. An observed divide in disease course suggests that some cases of simple appendicitis might be self-limiting or respond to antibiotics alone, whereas another type often seems to perforate before the patient reaches hospital. Although the mortality rate is low, postoperative complications are common in complex disease. We discuss existing knowledge in pathogenesis, modern diagnosis, and evolving strategies in management that are leading to stratified care for patients.

  17. Primary choriocarcinoma of appendix mimicking acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Enam Murshed; Chakrabarti, Amrita; Dwary, Amit Dutt

    2015-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma is a malignant trophoblastic cancer, the incidence of primary choriocarcinoma (PCC) of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) being extremely rare, with only 14 cases being reported in worldwide literature. Here we present an extremely rare case of PCCof the appendix in a 32-year-old male who presented with acute pain abdomen. Histopathological examination revealed PCC of the appendix. Examination of the testis was unremarkable. Further investigations revealed a very high serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (b-HCG) titer with a normal carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Radiological imaging showed multiple areas of liver metastasis. Chemotherapy-based treatment with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) regime was advised, however the patient failed to follow-up for further management. PMID:26881617

  18. Appendiceal stump closure by metal endoclip in the management of complicated acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Closure of appendicular stump has been performed in different ways; however, the use of the metal endoclip in complicated grades of acute appendicitis, has not been evaluated yet in a prospective way. Objective To establish the effectiveness of appendiceal stump closure by metal endoclip for complicated appendicitis. Method From January 2009 to January 2011 were evaluated 131 consecutive patients who underwent a laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated acute appendicitis. From those, 118 underwent appendiceal stump closure by metal endoclip. The patient’s age ranged from 12 to 75 years old (31.7 ± 13.3) and 52.7% were male. Complicated appendicitis refers to gangrenous and/or perforated appendix, which may lead to abscess formation and degrees of peritonitis. The outcomes viability, operative time, infection complication, operative complications, and conversion rate were chosen to evaluate the procedure. Results The appendiceal stump closure by metal endoclip was used in 90% of cases. The presence of appendix base necrosis was the most important factor involved in failure of the procedure. Laparoscopic knot (1.5%), laparoscopic endo-suture (3.8%) and video assisted laparotomy (4.7%) were the alternatives used in difficult cases. The mean operative time was (67.54 ± 28.13 minutes). The wound and intra-abdominal infection rates were 2.54% and 5.08%, respectively. There were no operative complications and the conversion rate was 0.85%. Conclusion The appendiceal stump closure by metal endoclip, in complicated grades of acute appendicitis, is a safe and effective procedure. In patients with appendix base necrosis it should be avoided in favor of other alternatives. PMID:24047531

  19. Nematode infection: A rare mimic of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Hotchen, Andrew; Chin, Kian; Raja, Mahzar

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acute appendicitis is a common condition seen in all surgical units. One rare condition that can mimic acute appendicitis is a nematode infection of the bowel. There have been few reported cases of nematode infection within the appendix and none that have been accompanied by intra-operative pictures. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 16-year-old female presented with a 12 h history of right iliac fossa pain and mild pyrexia. Bloods showed a neutrophilia and normal C-reactive protein. Laparoscopy was performed which revealed a non-inflamed appendix. The appendix was dissected and a live nematode was visualised exiting the base of the appendix. Anti-helminthics were given and the infection resolved. DISCUSSION Nematode infection is most commonly seen in Africa, Asia and South America. When seen within the United Kingdom (UK), it is seen most commonly within high-risk populations. Testing for these infections is not routine within the UK and when they are performed, the results take a considerable amount of time to return. These tests should be considered within high-risk populations so that unnecessary surgery can be avoided. CONCLUSION This case highlights the importance of considering rare causes of right iliac fossa pain including nematode infection in a young patient. The case highlights this by giving intra-operative pictures of live nematodes upon dissection of the appendix. PMID:25024022

  20. Acute Appendicitis and Pneumatosis in a Duplicated Appendix With Schistosoma Remnants.

    PubMed

    Handra-Luca, Adriana; Bisseret, Damien; Dragoescu, Ema

    2016-02-01

    Appendiceal pneumatosis is rare, reported either in the context of acute appendicitis or enterocolitis. Here, we report the case of an elderly adult in whom the acute appendicitis was associated with pneumatosis and occurred in the context of a malformed appendix with pathogenic organism remnants. A 72-year-old man presented with abdominal pain 3 weeks after posttraumatic dorsolumbar surgery. The computed tomography scan showed acute appendicitis and 2 diverticula. On microscopy, the appendix showed acute appendicitis along with a Cave-Wallbridge type A duplication. In addition, several optically clear spaces were observed in the entire appendiceal wall consistent with pneumatosis of the appendix. Focally, calcified structures suggesting pathogenic organisms such as Schistosoma were noted as well. In conclusion, we report a case of appendiceal pneumatosis occurring in the context of acute appendicitis in a duplicated appendix, with presence of calcified structures suggestive of pathogenic organisms.

  1. Isolated superior mesenteric venous thrombophlebitis with acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Mohsen Mohamed; Abdalla, Mohaed Fahmy; Bedair, Said

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Isolated superior mesentericveinous thrmbophlebitis is a rarely recognised condition associated with a high morbidity. It usually develops secondary to infection in the drainage area of the portal venous system, like appendix. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of neglected perforated acute appendicitis complicated by superior mesenteric venous pyelephlebitis patiant represented with a vague pain to right of umlicus, which is atypical this why cat scan was done and showed obstructed superiormesentric vein, portal vein was free with acute appendicitis. Appendicectomy and treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, anticoagulation, and platelets led to a full recovery. Follow-up imaging after one month revealed complete canalization of superior mesentric vein. DISCUSSION Abdominal pain if atypical like our case report need imaging diagnosis. Modern diagnostic imaging techniques help the early diagnosis of acute phase pylephlebitis. CT can detect primary source of infection, extent of pylephlebitis, CT scan is the most reliable initially. Ultrasound scan with color flow Doppler is also a sensitive test for confirming partial patency of the portal vein and portal vein thrombosis accidentally discovered complete obliteration of superior mesenteric vein with thrombosis which remained not propagated by serial Doppler ultrasound of liver. Appropriate treatment should be initiated as soon as possible. To avoid extension to portal vein. The principal treatment for pylephlebitis is to remove the source of infection as appendicectomy. Anticoagulants must be used. Regarding the treatment of portal thrombosis, post operative use of heparin has been advocated. CONCLUSION Cat scan play an important role in case of atypical abdominal pain. PMID:23500734

  2. Are antibiotics a safe and effective treatment for acute uncomplicated appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Moraga, Felipe; Ahumada, Vanessa; Crovari, Fernando

    2016-01-26

    Acute appendicitis is a common cause of acute abdominal pain and the most frequent cause of emergency abdominal surgery. In the last two decades, growing evidence has been published about the use of antibiotics as the exclusive treatment for acute appendicitis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified only one systematic review including one pertinent randomized trial. We generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of antibiotics to treat acute uncomplicated appendicitis may be less effective than appendectomy and probably increases major complications compared with appendectomy.

  3. Are antibiotics a safe and effective treatment for acute uncomplicated appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Moraga, Felipe; Ahumada, Vanessa; Crovari, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common cause of acute abdominal pain and the most frequent cause of emergency abdominal surgery. In the last two decades, growing evidence has been published about the use of antibiotics as the exclusive treatment for acute appendicitis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified only one systematic review including one pertinent randomized trial. We generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of antibiotics to treat acute uncomplicated appendicitis may be less effective than appendectomy and probably increases major complications compared with appendectomy. PMID:26817927

  4. Appendicular mass complicating acute appendicitis in a patient with dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Low, Y N; Cheong, B M K

    2016-04-01

    Abdominal pain with dengue fever can be a diagnostic challenge. Typically, pain is localised to the epigastric region or associated with hepatomegaly. Patients can also present with acute abdomen. We report a case of a girl with dengue fever and right iliac fossa pain. The diagnosis of acute appendicitis was made only after four days of admission. An appendicular mass and a perforated appendix was noted during appendectomy. The patient recovered subsequently. Features suggestive of acute appendicitis are persistent right iliac fossa pain, localised peritonism, persistent fever and leucocytosis. Repeated clinical assessment is important to avoid missing a concurrent diagnosis like acute appendicitis. PMID:27326951

  5. Macroamylasemia in a patient with acute appendicitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Um, J W; Kim, K H; Kang, M S; Choe, J H; Bae, J W; Hong, Y S; Suh, S O; Kim, Y C; Whang, C W; Kim, S M

    1999-12-01

    Macroamylasemia is a condition of persistent, elevated serum amylase activity with no apparent clinical symptoms of a pancreatic disorder. In Korea, however, no such case has been reported to date. We report a case of a 17-year-old female diagnosed with macroamylasemia and acute appendicitis. One day earlier, she developed epigastric and right lower quadrant abdominal pain. She was characterized by high level of serum amylase, but normal lipase. Amylase isoenzyme analysis demonstrated increased fraction of salivary type and follow-up amylase level was persistently increased. Immunofixation disclosed the macroamylase binding with an immunoglobulin, consisting of IgA and kappa chain. The patient was treated by appendectomy, and the abdominal pain subsided.

  6. Lessons Learned With Laparoscopic Management of Complicated Grades of Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Junior, Cleber Soares; Costa, Evandro de Freitas Campos; Alves, Paula de Assis Pereira; de Faria, Carolina Vieira; Cangussu, Igor Vitoi; Costa, Luisa Pires; Gomes, Camila Couto; Gomes, Felipe Couto

    2014-01-01

    Background Laparoscopy has not been consolidated as the approach of first choice in the management of complicated appendicitis. Methodological flaws and absence of disease stratification criteria have been implicated in that less evidence. The objective is to study the safe and effectiveness of laparoscopy in the management of complicated appendicitis according to laparoscopic grading system. Method From January 2008 to January 2011, 154 consecutive patients who underwent a laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated appendicitis were evaluated in the prospective way. The patient’s age ranged from 12 to 75 years old (31.7 ± 13.3) and 58.3% were male. Complicated appendicitis refers to gangrenous and/or perforated appendix and were graded as 3A (segmental necrosis), 3B (base necrosis), 4A (abscess), 4B (regional peritonitis) and 5 (diffuse peritonitis). The outcomes including operative time, infection complication, operative complications and conversion rate were chosen to evaluate the procedure. Results The grade 3A was the most frequent with 50 (32.4%) patients. The mean operative time was 69.4 ± 26.3 minutes. The grade 4A showed the highest mean operative time (80.1 ± 26.7 minutes). The wound and intra-abdominal infection rates were 2.6 and 4.6%, respectively. The base necrosis was the most important factor associated with the conversion (5.2%). The grades 4A and 5 were associated with greater possibility of intra-abdominal collection. There were no operative complications. Conclusion The laparoscopic management of all complicated grades of acute appendicitis is safe and effective and should be the procedure of first choice. The laparoscopic grading system allows us to assess patients in the same disease stage. PMID:24883151

  7. Intestinal Schistosomiasis as Unusual Aetiology for Acute Appendicitis, Nowadays a Rising Disease in Western Countries

    PubMed Central

    López de Cenarruzabeitia, I.; Landolfi, S.; Armengol Carrasco, M.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal schistosomiasis as unusual aetiology for acute appendicitis, nowadays a rising disease in western countries. Recent changes in global migration has led to an immigration growth in our scenario, upsurging people coming from endemic areas of schistosomiasis. Schistosomal appendicitis, seldom reported in developed countries, is now an expected incrising entity in our hospitals during the near future. Due to this circumstances, we believe that schistosomiasis should be consider as a rising source for acute appendicitis in western countries. In order to illustrate this point, we present a case of a 45-years-old black man, from Africa, was admitted via A&E because of acute abdominal pain, located in right lower quadrant. Acute appendicitis was suspected, and he underwent laparotomy and appendectomy. Pathological study by microscope revealed a gangrenous appendix with abscesses and parasitic ova into the submucosal layer of the appendix, suggesting Schistosomiasis. PMID:22792502

  8. Round ligament lipoma mimicking acute appendicitis in a 24-week pregnant female: a case report.

    PubMed

    Miller, T J; Paulk, D G

    2013-04-01

    An exhaustive search of the literature using the Pub Med database revealed no reports of round ligament lipomas mimicking acute appendicitis in pregnant patients. There are relatively few articles on round ligament lipomas and even less on round ligament lipomas during pregnancy. This case report is on a 27-year-old 24-week pregnant female who presented with signs and symptoms similar to acute appendicitis who in fact had a large right pelvic round ligament lipoma that was causing her pain.

  9. Torsion of omental fibrous pseudotumour mimicking acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, Thomas E.; Ozmen, John; Fenton-Lee, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Unusual pathologies are occasionally found at laparoscopy when appendicitis is suspected. We present a case of strangulated inflammatory fibrous pseudotumour of the omentum presenting in a similar fashion to appendicitis. The infarcted omentum was excised, facilitating prompt resolution of symptoms. PMID:26811304

  10. An accurate test for acute appendicitis: In-111 WBC imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, D.A.; Weber, P.M.; Kang, I.Y.; dosRemedios, L.V.; Jasko, I.A.

    1985-05-01

    The decision to operate when acute appendicitis (APPY) is suspected is often difficult. Surgeons accept up to a 20% false positive rate to avoid any delay that may result in appendiceal rupture and peritonitis. The authors have successfully improved early diagnostic accuracy by using abdominal imaging beginning 2 hours after injecting In-111 labeled WBC. Patients with clear-cut (APPY) had laparotomy and were not studied. Those who were to be observed in the ER for possible (APPY) had their leukocytes harvested, labeled with In-111 oxine, and reinjected. Abnormal localized activity in the right lower quadrant (RLQ) imaged at 2 hours was graded relative to bone marrow activity (8M): 0, 1+BM. When available the surgical specimen was imaged for In-111 activity. Of 31 patients studied there were 13 with positive scans for (APPY) all surgically confirmed. There were 4 additional abnormal studies all demonstrating known diagnostic patterns, 2 of pertonitis and 2 of colitis. There were 14 negative studies in 8 of whom the clinical course was benign; the remaining 6 had laparotomy with 3 having (APPY) and 3 not. Thus there were no false positives and 3 false negatives. One case negative at 2 hours had appendiceal activity later. The 3 cases with 3+ activity all had apendiceal abscesses. This new application of In-111 oxine WBC imaging is safe, simple, sensitive and specific. It shortens the time to surgical intervention and should reduce the surgical false positive rate.

  11. Analysis of Recurrence Management in Patients Who Underwent Nonsurgical Treatment for Acute Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tsung-Jung; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Tsai, Chung-Yu; Kang, Chi-Hsiang; Huang, Wei-Chun; Chang, Hong-Tai; Chen, I-Shu

    2016-03-01

    The recurrence rate for acute appendicitis treated nonoperatively varies between studies. Few studies have adequately evaluated the management of these patients when appendicitis recurs. We aimed to explore the recurrence rate and management of patients with acute appendicitis that were first treated nonoperatively.We identified patients in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database who were hospitalized due to acute appendicitis for the first time between 2000 and 2010 and received nonsurgical treatment. The recurrence and its management were recorded. Data were analyzed to access the risk factors for recurrence and factors that influenced the management of recurrent appendicitis.Among the 239,821 patients hospitalized with acute appendicitis for the first time, 12,235 (5.1%) patients were managed nonoperatively. Of these, 864 (7.1%) had a recurrence during a median follow-up of 6.5 years. Appendectomy was performed by an open and laparoscopic approach in 483 (55.9%) and 258 (29.9%) patients, respectively. The remaining 123 (14.2%) patients were again treated nonsurgically. Recurrence was independently associated with young age, male sex, percutaneous abscess drainage, and medical center admission by multivariable analysis. In addition, age <18, a (CCI) <2, medical center admission, and a longer time to recurrence were correlated with using laparoscopy to treat recurrence. Neither type of appendicitis, percutaneous abscess drainage, nor length of first time hospital stay had an influence on the selection of surgical approach.In conclusion, a laparoscopic appendectomy can be performed in recurrent appendicitis cases, and its application may not be related to previous appendicitis severity.

  12. Acute isolated appendicitis due to Aspergillus carneus in a neutropenic child with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Decembrino, Nunzia; Zecca, Marco; Tortorano, Anna Maria; Mangione, Francesca; Lallitto, Fabiola; Introzzi, Francesca; Bergami, Elena; Marone, Piero; Tamarozzi, Francesca; Cavanna, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of isolated acute appendicitis due to Aspergillus carneus in a neutropenic child with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated according to the AIEOP AML 2002/01 protocol. Despite prophylaxis with acyclovir, ciprofloxacin and fluconazole administered during the neutropenic phase, 16 days after the end of chemotherapy the child developed fever without identified infective foci, which prompted a therapy shift to meropenem and liposomial amphotericin B. After five days of persisting fever he developed ingravescent abdominal lower right quadrant pain. Abdominal ultrasound was consistent with acute appendicitis and he underwent appendectomy with prompt defervescence. PAS+ fungal elements were found at histopathology examination of the resected vermiform appendix, and galactomannan was low positive. A. carneus, a rare species of Aspergillus formerly placed in section Flavipedes and recently considered a member of section Terrei, was identified in the specimen. Treatment with voriconazole was promptly started with success. No other site of Aspergillus localization was detected. Appendicitis is rarely caused by fungal organisms and isolated intestinal aspergillosis without pulmonary infection is unusual. To our knowledge, this is the first report of infection due to A. carneus in a child and in a primary gastrointestinal infection.

  13. [Nature of the relation of acute appendicitis morbidity to meteorological and heliogeophysical factors].

    PubMed

    Khaavel', A A; Birkenfeldt, R R

    1978-04-01

    The authors analyzed 2009 appendicitis case records for the period from 1964 to 1973. In a sea climate region an evident season distribution of the apendicitis morbidity was found, with the rise of the incidence rate in January, March and April. The rise of the appendicitis incidence rate during the periods of vast fluctuations of air temperature, increase of air humidity and decrease of actual duration of sun radiance was established. The rise of the incidence of acute appendicitis was also noted during the months of a great and extremely great magnetic storms.

  14. Co-infection with Enterobius vermicularis and Taenia saginata mimicking acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Saravi, Kasra H; Fakhar, Mahdi; Nematian, Javad; Ghasemi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we describe an unusual case of verminous appendicitis due to Enterobius vermicularis and Taenia saginata in a 29-year-old woman from Iran. The histopathological examinations and parasitological descriptions of both worms found in the appendix lumen are discussed. The removed appendix exhibited the macroscopic and microscopic features of acute appendicitis. Antihelminthic therapy was initiated with single doses of praziquantel for the taeniasis and mebendazole for the enterobiasis, and the patient was discharged. PMID:26754203

  15. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Becker, Christoph D; Verdun, Francis R; Gervaz, Pascal; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) >or= 18.5. In slim patients (BMI<18.5), sensitivity to diagnose appendicitis was 50% (2/4) for LDCT and 100% (4/4) for standard CT, while specificity was identical for both techniques (67%, 2/3). LDCT may play a role in the diagnostic workup of patients with a BMI >or= 18.5.

  16. Acute Appendicitis Is Associated with Peptic Ulcers: A Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2015-12-08

    Despite some studies having indicated a possible association between appendicitis and duodenal ulcers, this association was mainly based on regional samples or limited clinician experiences, and as such, did not permit unequivocal conclusions. In this case-control study, we examined the association of acute appendicitis with peptic ulcers using a population-based database. We included 3574 patients with acute appendicitis as cases and 3574 sex- and age-matched controls. A Chi-squared test showed that there was a significant difference in the prevalences of prior peptic ulcers between cases and controls (21.7% vs. 16.8%, p < 0.001). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of prior peptic ulcers for cases was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24~1.54, p < 0.001) compared to controls. The results further revealed that younger groups demonstrated higher ORs for prior peptic ulcers among cases than controls. In particular, the adjusted OR for cases < 30 years old was as high as 1.65 (95% CI = 1.25~2.19; p < 0.001) compared to controls. However, we failed to observe an association of acute appendicitis with peptic ulcers in the ≥ 60-year age group (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.93~1.52). We concluded that there is an association between acute appendicitis and a previous diagnosis of peptic ulcers.

  17. [DYNAMICS OF INDICES OF A LOCAL IMMUNITY IN AN ACUTE APPENDICITIS].

    PubMed

    Zhuchenko, O P

    2016-02-01

    Abstract The results of investigation on dynamics of a local immunity indices in an acute appendicitis, depending on the pathological process stage as well as on bacteriological investigation of parietal microflora of processus vermicularis, were adduced. The sIgA and lisocymal dynamics have witnessed that while a destructive process progressing their concentration was enhanced, and in a gangrenous acute appendicitis they practically disappeared. Due to affection of a barrier function of the processus vermicularis wall a favorable conditions were created for the microorganisms intramural translocation as well as to abdominal cavity.

  18. Is single port incisionless-intracorporeal conventional equipment-endoscopic surgery feasible in patients with retrocecal acute appendicitis?

    PubMed Central

    Karakus, Suleyman Cuneyt; Koku, Naim; Ertaskin, Idris

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Since laparoscopic appendectomy was first described, various modifications, such as single port incisionless-intracorporeal conventional equipment-endoscopic surgery (SPICES), have been described for reducing pain and improving cosmetic results. In the retrocecal and retrocolic positions, attachments to the lateral peritoneum and cecum may lead to difficulties during SPICES, which is performed with only one port. Here, we present the effects of variations in the position of the vermiform appendix in treating acute appendicitis with SPICES. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 52 children who underwent SPICES for acute appendicitis between March 2010 and November 2011 in our institution. One group (group A) consisted of 30 patients (mean age, 10.5 ± 2.5 years) with retrocecal appendix, while the other group (group B) included 22 patients (mean age, 10.9 ± 2.3 years) with the appendix lying free in the peritoneal cavity. Results There were no significant differences between groups in terms of patient age, gender, success rate of SPICES, mean operating time, mean follow-up period, overall complication rates or mean postoperative hospitalization period. Conclusion These results suggest that SPICES is a safe and feasible approach even in patients with retrocecal acute appendicitis. PMID:23908965

  19. Congenital absence of appendix: A Surgeon's dilemma during surgery for acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Bikasha Bihary

    2016-01-01

    Congenital absence of the vermiform appendix is very rare in human beings with a reported incidence of 1 in 100,000 cases. Here, we report an incidence of a surgeon's dilemma to detect such a rare finding during surgery for a diagnosed case of acute appendicitis. PMID:27695217

  20. How to improve the clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis in resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    This article is a general review of the diagnostic tools that the clinician can use for the early diagnosis of acute appendicitis with emphasis on the Alvarado Score, and it is aimed principally to the medical practitioners in different parts of the world where the diagnostic facilities and technological resources are limited.

  1. Congenital absence of appendix: A Surgeon's dilemma during surgery for acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Bikasha Bihary

    2016-01-01

    Congenital absence of the vermiform appendix is very rare in human beings with a reported incidence of 1 in 100,000 cases. Here, we report an incidence of a surgeon's dilemma to detect such a rare finding during surgery for a diagnosed case of acute appendicitis.

  2. The cost effectiveness of early management of acute appendicitis underlies the importance of curative surgical services to a primary healthcare programme

    PubMed Central

    Aldous, C; Handley, J; Clarke, D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Appendicitis in the developing world is a cause of significant preventable morbidity. This prospective study from a regional hospital in South Africa constructs a robust cost model that demonstrates the cost effectiveness of an efficient curative surgical service in a primary healthcare-orientated system. Methods A prospective audit of all patients with acute appendicitis admitted to Edendale Hospital was undertaken from September 2010 to September 2011. A microcosting approach was used to construct a cost model based on the estimated cost of operative and perioperative interventions together with the associated hospital stay. For cost analysis, patients were divided into the following cohorts: uncomplicated appendicitis, complicated appendicitis with localised intra-abdominal sepsis, complicated appendicitis with generalised intra-abdominal sepsis, with and without intensive care unit admission. Results Two hundred patients were operated on for acute appendicitis. Of these, 36% (71/200) had uncomplicated appendicitis and 57% (114/200) had perforation. Pathologies other than appendicitis were present in 8% (15/200) and these patients were excluded. Of the perforated appendices, 45% (51/114) had intra-abdominal contamination that was localised while 55% (63/114) generalised sepsis. The mean cost for each patient was: 6,578 ZAR (£566) for uncomplicated appendicitis; 14,791 ZAR (£1,272) for perforation with localised intra-abdominal sepsis and 34,773 ZAR (£2,990) for perforation with generalised intra-abdominal sepsis without intensive care admission. With intensive care admission it was 77,816 ZAR (£6,692). The total cost of managing acute appendicitis was 4,272,871 ZAR (£367,467). Almost 90% of this total cost was owing to advanced disease with abdominal sepsis and therefore potentially preventable. Conclusions Early uncomplicated appendicitis treated appropriately carries little morbidity and is relatively inexpensive to treat. As the pathology

  3. Acute appendicitis due to Cytomegalovirus in an apparently immunocompetent patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In healthy subjects, Cytomegalovirus infection can be asymptomatic or manifest as mononucleosis syndrome, but organ disease has also been reported. However, in immunocompromised patients this infection can lead to its most significant and severe disease and even mortality. When Cytomegalovirus causes a gastrointestinal tract infection, it more commonly manifests with luminal tract disease and is usually characterized by ulcerative lesions. Appendicitis is a rare manifestation, and has been reported mainly in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients or patients with other causes of immunocompromise. Case presentation The authors report on a case of acute primary Cytomegalovirus infection complicated with acute appendicitis due to Cytomegalovirus in an apparently immunocompetent 24-year-old Caucasian man also suffering from primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis was based on clinical manifestations, serology results, as well as microbiological and histological findings. Treatment consisted of surgery and anti-Cytomegalovirus therapy. Conclusions Cytomegalovirus should be included among the etiologic agents of acute appendicitis in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis. Currently, there are no definitive data regarding the frequency of Cytomegalovirus appendicitis and the role of anti-Cytomegalovirus treatment in human immunodeficiency virus-negative and apparently immunocompetent subjects. PMID:24612821

  4. Acute appendicitis mimicking intestinal obstruction in a patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Han; Chang, Cheng-Chih; Yang, Bor-Yau; Lin, Paul Y; Wang, Chia-Siu

    2012-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of the secretory glands caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. The clinical manifestations of CF are repetitive lung infections, biliary cirrhosis, pancreatic abnormalities, and gastrointestinal disorders. We report a 21-year-old Taiwanese man with CF who had abdominal pain for 2 days. The diagnosis of CF had been confirmed by peripheral blood analysis of the CFTR gene 5 years before admission. He presented to the emergency department with nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, and crampy abdominal pain, which is atypical for acute appendicitis. The physical examination and a series of studies revealed intestinal obstruction, but acute appendicitis could not be ruled out. After conservative treatment, together with empiric antibiotics, the refractory abdominal pain and leukocytosis with a left-shift warranted surgical intervention. A diagnostic laparoscopy revealed a swollen, hyperemic appendix, a severely distended small intestine, and serous ascites. The laparoscopic procedure was converted to a laparotomy for open disimpaction and appendectomy. He was discharged on the eighth postoperative day. The histologic examination of the appendix was consistent with early appendicitis. In conclusion, acute abdominal pain in adult CF patients is often associated with intestinal obstruction syndrome. The presentation of concurrent appendicitis may be indolent and lead not only to diagnostic difficulties, but also a number of therapeutic choices.

  5. Feasibility of a Nonoperative Management Strategy for Uncomplicated Acute Appendicitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Minneci, Peter C; Sulkowski, Jason P; Nacion, Kristine M; Mahida, Justin B; Cooper, Jennifer N; Moss, R. Lawrence; Deans, Katherine J

    2014-01-01

    Background Urgent operation has been considered the only appropriate management of acute appendicitis in children for decades. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of non-operative management of uncomplicated acute appendicitis in children. Study Design A prospective non-randomized clinical trial of children with uncomplicated acute appendicitis comparing non-operative management to urgent appendectomy was performed. The primary outcome is the 30-day success rate of non-operative management. Secondary outcomes include comparisons of disability days, missed school days, hospital length of stay (LOS), and measures of quality of life and healthcare satisfaction. Results Seventy-seven patients were enrolled during October 2012–October 2013; 30 chose non-operative management and 47 chose surgery. There were no significant differences in demographic or clinical characteristics. The immediate and 30-day success rates of non-operative management were 93% (n=28/30) and 90% (n=27/30). There was no evidence of progression of appendicitis to rupture at the time of surgery in the three patients that failed non-operative management. Compared to the surgery group, the non-operative group had fewer disability days (3 vs. 17 days, p<0.0001), returned to school more quickly (3 vs. 5 days, p=0.008), and exhibited higher quality of life scores in both the child (93 vs. 88, p=0.01) and the parent (96 vs. 90, p=0.03), but incurred a longer LOS (38 vs. 20 hours, p<0.0001). Conclusions Non-operative management of uncomplicated acute appendicitis in children is feasible with a high 30-day success rate and short-term benefits including a quicker recovery and improved quality of life scores. Additional follow-up will allow for determination of a longer-term success rate, safety, and cost-effectiveness. PMID:24951281

  6. A Novel Oxidative Stress Mediator in Acute Appendicitis: Thiol/Disulphide Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ozyazici, Sefa; Karateke, Faruk; Turan, Umit; Kuvvetli, Adnan; Kilavuz, Huseyin; Karakaya, Burak; Ozaltun, Pınar; Alısık, Murat; Erel, Ozcan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the role of a novel oxidative stress marker, thiol/disulphide homeostasis, in patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis (AA). Methods. In this study, seventy-one (43 male and 28 female) patients diagnosed with AA and 71 (30 male and 41 female) healthy volunteers were included. Age, gender, body mass index (BMI), haemoglobin (Hb), white blood cell (WBC), c-reactive protein (CRP), and thiol/disulphide homeostasis parameters (native thiol, total thiol, disulphide, disulphide/native thiol, native thiol/total thiol, and disulphide/total thiol ratios) were compared between the groups. Thiol/disulphide homeostasis was determined by a newly developed method by Erel and Neselioglu. Results. The native thiol, total thiol, and the native thiol/total thiol ratio levels were statistically significantly decreased in the AA compared with the control group (p < 0.001). Disulphide level and the ratios of disulphide/native thiol and disulphide/total thiol were higher in the AA group than in the control group (p < 0.001). There was a negative correlation of CRP with native thiol, total thiol, and native thiol/total thiol ratio while there was a positive correlation of CRP with disulphide/native thiol and disulphide/total thiol in the AA group. In the stepwise regression model, risk factors as disulphide/native thiol (OR = 1.368; p = 0.018) and CRP (OR = 1.635; p = 0.003) were determined as predictors of perforated appendicitis compared to the nonperforated group. Conclusion. This is the first study examining the thiol/disulphide homeostasis as a diagnostic aid in AA and establishing thiol/disulphide homeostatis balance shifted towards the disulphide formation due to thiol oxidation. Further studies are needed to optimize the use of this novel oxidative stress marker in AA. PMID:27642237

  7. A Novel Oxidative Stress Mediator in Acute Appendicitis: Thiol/Disulphide Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Umit; Kuvvetli, Adnan; Kilavuz, Huseyin; Karakaya, Burak; Ozaltun, Pınar; Alısık, Murat; Erel, Ozcan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the role of a novel oxidative stress marker, thiol/disulphide homeostasis, in patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis (AA). Methods. In this study, seventy-one (43 male and 28 female) patients diagnosed with AA and 71 (30 male and 41 female) healthy volunteers were included. Age, gender, body mass index (BMI), haemoglobin (Hb), white blood cell (WBC), c-reactive protein (CRP), and thiol/disulphide homeostasis parameters (native thiol, total thiol, disulphide, disulphide/native thiol, native thiol/total thiol, and disulphide/total thiol ratios) were compared between the groups. Thiol/disulphide homeostasis was determined by a newly developed method by Erel and Neselioglu. Results. The native thiol, total thiol, and the native thiol/total thiol ratio levels were statistically significantly decreased in the AA compared with the control group (p < 0.001). Disulphide level and the ratios of disulphide/native thiol and disulphide/total thiol were higher in the AA group than in the control group (p < 0.001). There was a negative correlation of CRP with native thiol, total thiol, and native thiol/total thiol ratio while there was a positive correlation of CRP with disulphide/native thiol and disulphide/total thiol in the AA group. In the stepwise regression model, risk factors as disulphide/native thiol (OR = 1.368; p = 0.018) and CRP (OR = 1.635; p = 0.003) were determined as predictors of perforated appendicitis compared to the nonperforated group. Conclusion. This is the first study examining the thiol/disulphide homeostasis as a diagnostic aid in AA and establishing thiol/disulphide homeostatis balance shifted towards the disulphide formation due to thiol oxidation. Further studies are needed to optimize the use of this novel oxidative stress marker in AA.

  8. A Novel Oxidative Stress Mediator in Acute Appendicitis: Thiol/Disulphide Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Umit; Kuvvetli, Adnan; Kilavuz, Huseyin; Karakaya, Burak; Ozaltun, Pınar; Alısık, Murat; Erel, Ozcan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the role of a novel oxidative stress marker, thiol/disulphide homeostasis, in patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis (AA). Methods. In this study, seventy-one (43 male and 28 female) patients diagnosed with AA and 71 (30 male and 41 female) healthy volunteers were included. Age, gender, body mass index (BMI), haemoglobin (Hb), white blood cell (WBC), c-reactive protein (CRP), and thiol/disulphide homeostasis parameters (native thiol, total thiol, disulphide, disulphide/native thiol, native thiol/total thiol, and disulphide/total thiol ratios) were compared between the groups. Thiol/disulphide homeostasis was determined by a newly developed method by Erel and Neselioglu. Results. The native thiol, total thiol, and the native thiol/total thiol ratio levels were statistically significantly decreased in the AA compared with the control group (p < 0.001). Disulphide level and the ratios of disulphide/native thiol and disulphide/total thiol were higher in the AA group than in the control group (p < 0.001). There was a negative correlation of CRP with native thiol, total thiol, and native thiol/total thiol ratio while there was a positive correlation of CRP with disulphide/native thiol and disulphide/total thiol in the AA group. In the stepwise regression model, risk factors as disulphide/native thiol (OR = 1.368; p = 0.018) and CRP (OR = 1.635; p = 0.003) were determined as predictors of perforated appendicitis compared to the nonperforated group. Conclusion. This is the first study examining the thiol/disulphide homeostasis as a diagnostic aid in AA and establishing thiol/disulphide homeostatis balance shifted towards the disulphide formation due to thiol oxidation. Further studies are needed to optimize the use of this novel oxidative stress marker in AA. PMID:27642237

  9. The impact of diagnostic delay on the course of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Cappendijk, V; Hazebroek, F

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The diagnosis of acute appendicitis is often delayed, which may complicate the further course of the disease.
AIMS—To review appendectomy cases in order to determine the incidence of diagnostic delay, the underlying factors, and impact on the course of the disease.
METHODS—Records of all children who underwent appendectomy from 1994 to 1997 were reviewed. The 129 cases were divided into group A (diagnostic period within 48 hours) and group B (diagnostic period 48 hours or more).
RESULTS—In the group with diagnostic delay, significantly more children had first been referred to a paediatrician rather than to a surgeon. In almost half of the cases in this group initial diagnosis was not appendicitis but gastroenteritis. The perforation rate in group A was 24%, and in group B, 71%. Children under 5 years of age all presented in the delayed group B and had a perforation rate of 82%. The delayed group showed a higher number of postoperative complications and a longer hospitalisation period.
CONCLUSIONS—Appendicitis is hard to diagnose when, because of a progressing disease process, the classical clinical picture is absent. The major factor in diagnostic delay is suspected gastroenteritis. Early surgical consultation in a child with deteriorating gastroenteritis is advised. Ultrasonographs can be of major help if abdominal signs and symptoms are non-specific for appendicitis.

 PMID:10869003

  10. [Validation of a diagnostic scoring system (Ohmann score) in acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Zielke, A; Sitter, H; Rampp, T A; Schäfer, E; Hasse, C; Lorenz, W; Rothmund, M

    1999-07-01

    A diagnostic scoring system, recently published by Ohmann et al. in this journal, was validated by analyzing the clinicopathological data of a consecutive series of 2,359 patients, admitted for suspicion of acute appendicitis. The results of the scoring system were compared to the results of clinical evaluation by junior (provisional) and senior surgeons (final clinical diagnosis). To assess the diagnostic ability of the score, the accuracy and positive predictive value were defined as the major diagnostic performance parameters; the rate of theoretical negative laparotomies and that of diagnostic errors served as the major procedural performance parameters. Of 2,359 patients admitted for suspected acute appendicitis, 662 were proven to have acute appendicitis by histology, for a prevalence of 28%. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the provisional clinical diagnosis were 0.50, 0.94, 0.77, 0.83, and 0.82; 0.93, for the score 0.63, 0.93, 0.77, 0.86 and 0.84, and for the final clinical diagnosis 0.90, 0.94, 0.85, 0.96, and 0.93, respectively. Of the main diagnostic performance parameter, the accuracy of the score was significantly better than that of provisional clinical diagnosis (P < 0.05, chi 2 test). The score yielded a rate of negative appendecomies and laparotomies of 14.3 and 12.3%. With respect to the rate of overlooked cases of acute apendicitis, the score demonstrated a superior performance, with only 6 cases missed (0.9%). However, the number of patients with acute appendicitis, including those with perforated disease, who were not identified by the score, was almost four times that of the final clinical diagnosis (245 vs 63). With regard to the main procedural performance parameter, the score resulted in a significantly smaller number of diagnostic errors than the provisional clinical investigator (P < 0.05, chi 2 test). The results of this study indicate that the diagnostic scoring

  11. Perforated appendicitis masquerading as acute pancreatitis in a morbidly obese patient.

    PubMed

    Forster, Michael-J; Akoh, Jacob-A

    2008-03-21

    Diagnosis and treatment of common conditions in morbidly obese patients still pose a challenge to physicians and surgeons. Sometimes too much reliance is put on investigations that can lead to a misdiagnosis. This case demonstrates an obese woman admitted under the medical team with a presumed diagnosis of pneumonia, who was later found to have an acute abdomen and raised amylase, which led to an assumed diagnosis of pancreatitis. She died within 24 h of admission and post mortem confirmed the cause of death as systemic sepsis due to perforated appendicitis, with no evidence of pancreatitis. Significantly elevated serum amylase level may occur in non-pancreatitic acute abdomen.

  12. The Role of DNA Amplification and Cultural Growth in Complicated Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Tocchioni, Francesca; Tani, Chiara; Bartolini, Laura; Moriondo, Maria; Nieddu, Francesco; Pecile, Patrizia; Azzari, Chiara; Messineo, Antonio; Ghionzoli, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial growth of peritoneal fluid specimens obtained during surgical procedures for acute appendicitis may be useful to optimize further antibiotic therapy in complicated cases. DNA amplification represents a fast technique to detect microbial sequences. We aimed to compare the potential of DNA amplification versus traditional bacterial growth culture highlighting advantages and drawbacks in a surgical setting. Peritoneal fluid specimens were collected during surgery from 36 children who underwent appendectomy between May and December 2012. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and cultures were performed on each sample. RT-PCR showed an amplification of 16S in 18/36 samples, Escherichia coli (in 7 cases), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3), Fusobacterium necrophorum (3), Adenovirus (2), E.coli (1), Klebsiella pneumoniae (1), Serratia marcescens/Enterobacter cloacae (1). Bacterial growth was instead observed only in four patients (3 E.coli and 1 P.aeruginosa and Bacteroides ovatus). Preoperative C-reactive protein and inflammation degree, the most reliable indicators of bacterial translocation, were elevated as expected. DNA amplification was a quick and useful method to detect pathogens and it was even more valuable in detecting aggressive pathogens such as anaerobes, difficult to preserve in biological cultures; its drawbacks were the lack of biological growths and of antibiograms. In our pilot study RT-PCR and cultures did not influence the way patients were treated. PMID:27777701

  13. Hepatobiliary scan with delayed gallbladder visualization in a case of acute appendicitis

    SciTech Connect

    Smathers, R.L.; Harman, P.K.; Wanebo, H.J.; Read, M.E.

    1982-05-01

    A 40-year-old woman presented with acute epigastric pain with vomiting. Within 24 hours, the pain spread to the right periumbilical region. /sup 99m/Tc disofenin hepatobiliary scan failed to demonstrate the gallbladder on a 60-minute view. The presumative diagnosis of acute cholecystitis was thought to be confirmed on this basis by the patient's physicians. However, a 75-minute view demonstrated filling of the gallbladder. In hepatobiliary scanning for acute abdominal pain, delayed views (2 to 24 hours) are recommended when the gallbladder is not visualized on the 60-minute view. If the gallbladder is visualized, cystic duct obstruction can be excluded and diagnoses such as pancreatitis, acalculous cholecystitis, and acute appendicitis should be investigated.

  14. The Role of Digital Rectal Examination for Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Toshihiko; Nishiwaki, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Noguchi, Yoshinori; Fukuma, Shingo; Yamazaki, Shin; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Digital rectal examination (DRE) has been traditionally recommended to evaluate acute appendicitis, although several reports indicate its lack of utility for this diagnosis. No meta-analysis has examined DRE for diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Objectives To assess the role of DRE for diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Data Sources Cochrane Library, PubMed, and SCOPUS from the earliest available date of indexing through November 23, 2014, with no language restrictions. Study Selection Clinical studies assessing DRE as an index test for diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Data Extraction and Synthesis Two independent reviewers extracted study data and assessed the quality, using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 tool. Bivariate random-effects models were used for the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) as point estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Main Outcomes and Measures The main outcome measure was the diagnostic performance of DRE for diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Results We identified 19 studies with a total of 7511 patients. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.49 (95% CI 0.42–0.56) and 0.61 (95% CI 0.53–0.67), respectively. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 1.24 (95% CI 0.97–1.58) and 0.85 (95% CI 0.70–1.02), respectively. The DOR was 1.46 (0.95–2.26). Conclusion and Relevance Acute appendicitis cannot be ruled in or out through the result of DRE. Reconsideration is needed for the traditional teaching that rectal examination should be performed routinely in all patients with suspected appendicitis. PMID:26332867

  15. Oxidative stress markers in laparoscopic vs. open appendectomy for acute appendicitis: A double-blind randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Aktimur, Recep; Gokakin, Ali Kagan; Deveci, Koksal; Atabey, Mustafa; Topcu, Omer

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress is a complicated process, which was defined as an increase in prooxidants and decrease in antioxidants caused by various mechanisms, including inflammation and surgical trauma. The association between acute appendicitis and oxidative stress has been showed in previous studies. However, comparison of oxidative stress in laparoscopic or open appendectomy (OA) has not been established. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients who were diagnosed as acute appendicitis between October 2012 and January 2013 were randomized to open (OA, n = 50) and laparoscopic appendectomy (LA, n = 50). Blood samples for oxidative stress markers (total oxidant status [TOS] and total antioxidant status [TAS]), C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cells (WBC’s) were collected just before the surgery and 24 h after surgery. RESULTS: There were no differences in preoperative values of WBC and CRP between LA and OA groups (P = 0.523 and 0.424), however, in postoperative 24th h, CRP was reduced in LA group (P = 0.031). There were no differences in preoperative levels of TOS, TAS, and oxidative stress index (OSI) between LA and OA groups. In the postoperative 24th h, TOS and OSI were found to be significantly higher in OA group when compared to LA group (P = 0.017 and 0.002) whereas no difference was detected in TAS level in the postoperative 24th h (P = 0.172). CONCLUSIONS: This double-blind, randomized clinical trial provides evidence that LA for uncomplicated appendicitis is associated with significantly lower oxidative stress compared with OA. Some of the advantages of LA may be attributed to the significant reduction of oxidative stress in these patients. PMID:27073307

  16. Meta‐analysis of antibiotics versus appendicectomy for non‐perforated acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Sallinen, V.; Akl, E. A.; You, J. J.; Agarwal, A.; Shoucair, S.; Vandvik, P. O.; Agoritsas, T.; Heels‐Ansdell, D.; Guyatt, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background For more than a century, appendicectomy has been the treatment of choice for appendicitis. Recent trials have challenged this view. This study assessed the benefits and harms of antibiotic therapy compared with appendicectomy in patients with non‐perforated appendicitis. Methods A comprehensive search was conducted for randomized trials comparing antibiotic therapy with appendicectomy in patients with non‐perforated appendicitis. Key outcomes were analysed using random‐effects meta‐analysis, and the quality of evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Results Five studies including 1116 patients reported major complications in 25 (4·9 per cent) of 510 patients in the antibiotic and 41 (8·4 per cent) of 489 in the appendicectomy group: risk difference −2·6 (95 per cent c.i. –6·3 to 1·1) per cent (low‐quality evidence). Minor complications occurred in 11 (2·2 per cent) of 510 and 61 (12·5 per cent) of 489 patients respectively: risk difference −7·2 (−18·1 to 3·8) per cent (very low‐quality evidence). Of 550 patients in the antibiotic group, 47 underwent appendicectomy within 1 month: pooled estimate 8·2 (95 per cent c.i. 5·2 to 11·8) per cent (high‐quality evidence). Within 1 year, appendicitis recurred in 114 of 510 patients in the antibiotic group: pooled estimate 22·6 (15·6 to 30·4) per cent (high‐quality evidence). For every 100 patients with non‐perforated appendicitis, initial antibiotic therapy compared with prompt appendicectomy may result in 92 fewer patients receiving surgery within the first month, and 23 more experiencing recurrent appendicitis within the first year. Conclusion The choice of medical versus surgical management in patients with clearly uncomplicated appendicitis is value‐ and preference‐dependent, suggesting a change in practice towards shared decision‐making is necessary. PMID:26990957

  17. Treating appendicitis with antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-03-01

    A nonsurgical approach using antimicrobial agents has been advocated as the initial treatment of uncomplicated appendicitis. Several studies and meta-analyses explored this approach. Because many of these studies included individuals with resolving appendicitis, their results were biased. Antimicrobials, however, are warranted and needed for the management of surgical high-risk patients with perforated appendicitis and those with localized abscess or phlegmon. Randomized placebo-controlled trials that focus on early identification of complicated acute appendicitis patients needing surgery and that prospectively evaluate the optimal use of antibiotic treatment in patients with uncomplicated acute appendicitis are warranted.

  18. Conservative treatment of acute appendicitis: heresy or an effective and acceptable alternative to surgery?

    PubMed

    Sakorafas, George H; Mastoraki, Aikaterini; Lappas, Christos; Sampanis, Dimitrios; Danias, Nikolaos; Smyrniotis, Vassileios

    2011-02-01

    For more than a century, emergency appendectomy has been a 'surgical dogma' in the management of acute appendicitis (AA). During recent decades, however, there is an increasing body of evidence suggesting that selected patients with AA could be treated conservatively. This approach has many advantages, including high success and low recurrence rates, reduced morbidity and mortality, less pain, shorter hospitalization and sick leave, and reduced costs. Despite that conservative management of AA cannot be used for all patients with AA (for example, in the presence of peritonitis), it could be preferred in a large percentage of patients with mild infection (as evidenced by clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings). PMID:21164348

  19. Evaluation of a sequential multi-modality imaging algorithm for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in the pregnant female.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Vijay; LeBedis, Christina; Kelly, Jacqueline R; Uyeda, Jennifer; Soto, Jorge A; Anderson, Stephan W

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of a sequential multi-modality imaging algorithm for diagnosing acute appendicitis in pregnancy. This IRB-approved, HIPAA compliant study included 127 consecutive pregnant patients imaged for suspected appendicitis between October 2007 and May 2012; all patients initially underwent ultrasound (US) examination, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) if results of US were negative or equivocal. Computerized tomography (CT) was reserved for cases with inconclusive US and MRI results. The EMR was reviewed, recording results of imaging examinations and clinical outcomes. The diagnostic performance of this sequential multi-modality imaging algorithm was calculated with pathology correlation. Two (1.9 %) of the 127 US examinations reported suspected appendicitis; 125 (98.4 %) were inconclusive. Of the 125 patients with inconclusive US examinations, 103 underwent MRI, of which eight (6.2 %) demonstrated findings of acute appendicitis. Of the 103 patients that received MRI, nine (8.7 %) underwent CT. One patient had a CT performed directly after an inconclusive US exam. No additional cases of appendicitis were detected with CT. The sensitivity and specificity of US alone was 12.5 and 99.2 %, respectively; MRI was 100 and 93.6 %; the sequential multi-modality modality algorithm including US, CT, and MRI was 100 and 98.3 %. The diagnostic performance of this sequential multi-modality imaging algorithm for diagnosing acute appendicitis in pregnancy is high. Given the low yield of US, MRI should be considered the first-line imaging test. Although CT was employed in a small fraction of inconclusive MRI examinations, it still has a role in the diagnostic work-up of the pregnant patient with suspected appendicitis.

  20. Accuracy of the new radiographic sign of fecal loading in the cecum for differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis in comparison with other inflammatory diseases of right abdomen: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Petroianu, A; Alberti, LR

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: To assess the importance of the new radiographic sign of faecal loading in the cecum for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis, in comparison with other inflammatory diseases, and to verify the maintenance of this radiographic sign after surgical treatment of appendicitis. Methods: 470 consecutive patients admitted to the hospital due to acute abdomen were prospectively studied: Group 1 [n=170] – diagnosed with acute appendicitis, subdivided into: Subgroup 1A – [n=100] – submitted to an abdominal radiographic study before surgical treatment, Subgroup 1B – [n=70] – patients who had plain abdominal X-rays done before the surgical procedure and also the following day; Group 2 [n=100] – right nephrolithiasis; Group 3 [n=100] – right acute inflammatory pelvic disease; Group 4 [n=100] – acute cholecystitis. The patients of Groups 2,3 and 4 were submitted to abdominal radiography during the pain episode. Results: The sign of faecal loading in the cecum, characterized by hypo transparency interspersed with multiple small foci of hyper transparent images, was present in 97 patients of Subgroup 1A, in 68 patients of Subgroup 1B, in 19 patients of Group 2, in 12 patients of Group 3 and in 13 patients of Group 4. During the postoperative period the radiographic sign disappeared in 66 of the 68 cases that had presented with the sign. The sensitivity of the radiographic sign for acute appendicitis was 97.05% and its specificity was 85.33%. The positive predictive value for acute appendicitis was 78.94% and its negative predictive value was 98. 08%. Discussion: The radiographic image of faecal loading in the cecum is associated with acute appendicitis and disappears after appendectomy. This sign is uncommon in other acute inflammatory diseases of the right side of the abdomen. PMID:22574093

  1. Vacation Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Tempel, Michael B.; Harrison, Shannon; Zhu, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: When someone plans a vacation, one of the last things taken into consideration is the possibility of contracting an illness while away. Unfortunately, if people develop abdominal pain while planning for a vacation, they usually proceed with the vacation and do not consider getting medical attention for their pain. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of being on vacation and its association with ruptured appendicitis. Methods: From January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008, the incidence of ruptured appendicitis cases at Florida Hospital–Celebration Health, located 5 miles from Walt Disney World, was compared with that of Florida Hospital–Orlando, approximately 30 miles away from Walt Disney World. We evaluated whether patients “on vacation” versus residents of Orlando have an increased incidence of ruptured appendicitis. Results: Of patients treated for presumed appendicitis, 60.59% at Florida Hospital–Celebration Health had ruptured appendicitis during this time versus 20.42% at Florida Hospital–Orlando. Of those 266 patients seen at Florida Hospital–Celebration Health, 155 were on vacation versus only 21 at Florida Hospital–Orlando. Conclusion: Although there is not a direct cause and effect, it is clear that there is a higher incidence of ruptured appendicitis in patients on vacation versus in the regular community in the Orlando, Florida area. PMID:23743367

  2. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed. PMID:26091450

  3. Comparison and efficacy of LigaSure and rubber band ligature in closing the inflamed cecal stump in a rat model of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Jan, Chia-Ing; Yang, Horng-Ren; Huang, Po-Han; Jeng, Long-Bin; Su, Wen-Pang; Chen, Hui-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Safety of either LigaSure or rubber band in closing inflamed appendiceal stump in acute appendicitis has been less investigated. In this study, cecal ligation followed by resecting inflamed cecum was performed to mimic appendectomy in a rat model of acute appendicitis. Rats were sacrificed immediately (Group A) and 7 days (Group B) after cecal resection, respectively. The cecal stumps were closed by silk ligature (S), 5 mm LigaSure (L), or rubber band (R). Seven days after cecal resection, the LigaSure (BL) and silk subgroups (BS) had significantly less intra-abdominal adhesion and better laparotomy wound healing than rubber band subgroup (BR). The initial bursting pressure at cecal stump was comparable among the three methods; along with tissue healing process, both BL and BS provided a higher bursting pressure than BR 7 days after appendectomy. BL subgroup had more abundant hydroxyproline deposition than BS and BR subgroup. Furthermore, serum TNF-α in BR group kept persistently increasing along with time after cecal resection. Thus, the finding that LigaSure but not rubber band is safe in sealing off the inflamed cecal stump in rat model of acute appendicitis suggests the possibility of applying LigaSure for appendectomy via single port procedure or natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES).

  4. Suppurative appendicitis presenting as acute scrotum confounded by a testicular appendage

    PubMed Central

    Shumon, Syed; Bennett, John; Lawson, Geoffrey; Small, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Patients presenting with testicular pain and swelling mandate an urgent urology review and scrotal exploration to prevent testicle loss due to torsion. Other pathology masquerading as torsion is extremely rare but can occur. We present one such case. A 14-year-old male presented with a 1-day history of right testicular swelling and tenderness. He was apyrexial and denied any other symptoms. Blood tests demonstrated raised inflammatory markers. He had lower left-sided abdominal tenderness with a swollen, erythematous right hemiscrotum. During an urgent scrotal exploration for testicular torsion, a purulent hydrocele with a patent process vaginalis was noted, but no torsion. Post-operative abdominal pain mandated a general surgical review and subsequent appendicectomy. The patient made a full recovery. Acute suppurative appendicitis presenting as a urological emergency is extremely rare. To make a correct diagnosis and prevent multiple surgeries, a joint urological and general surgical assessment with a high index of suspicion is required. PMID:26966225

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Mucinous Appendiceal Neoplasm Presented as Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Kehagias, Ioannis; Markopoulos, Georgios; Papandreou, Thanasis; Kraniotis, Pantelis

    2016-01-01

    Appendiceal mucocele is a rare cause of acute abdomen. Mucinous appendiceal neoplasms represent 0.2–0.7% of all appendix specimens. The aim of this study is to report a case of a mucinous appendiceal neoplasm presented as acute appendicitis, discussing the clinical and surgical approach in the emergency setting. A 72-year-old female patient was admitted to the emergency department with a clinical examination indicative of acute abdomen. The patient underwent abdominal computed tomography scan which revealed a cystic lesion in the right iliac fossa measuring 8.3 × 5.2 × 4.1 cm, with calcified walls, and a mean density indicative of high protein content. The patient was taken to the operating room and a right hemicolectomy was performed. The postoperative course was unremarkable. The histopathological examination revealed a low-grade mucinous appendiceal neoplasm with negative regional lymph nodes. Ultrasound and CT are useful in diagnosing appendiceal mucocele and synchronous cancers in the emergency setting. The initial operation should include appendectomy and resection of the appendicular mesenteric fat along with any fluid collection for cytologic examination. During urgent appendectomy it is important to consider every mucocele as malignant in order to avoid iatrogenic perforation causing pseudomyxoma peritonei. Although laparotomy is recommended, the laparoscopic approach is not contraindicated. PMID:27066284

  6. Diagnosing acute appendicitis using a nonoral contrast CT protocol in patients with a BMI of less than 25.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Vijay; Bates, David D B; Buch, Karen; Uyeda, Jennifer; Zhao, Kathy M; Storer, Lindsey A; Roberts, Marisa B; Lebedis, Christina A; Soto, Jorge A; Anderson, Stephan W

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the accuracy for the diagnosis of appendicitis in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute, nontraumatic abdominal pain and a body mass index (BMI) of less than 25 before and after the implementation of a nonoral contrast computed tomography (CT) protocol with intravenous contrast. The IRB approved this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study; informed consent was waived. This study included 736 adult patients with a BMI of less than 25 presenting to our ED with acute, nontraumatic abdominal pain over two distinct 6-month time periods. An oral and intravenous contrast-enhanced protocol was utilized in the first cohort (group A), and an intravenous contrast-enhanced protocol without oral contrast was utilized in the second cohort (group B). Three abdominal fellowship-trained readers retrospectively reviewed all CT studies and electronic medical records, including surgical/pathology reports that served as reference standards. Group A consisted of 359 patients; 41 patients had surgically proven appendicitis. The sensitivity and specificity of the readers for diagnosing appendicitis in group A ranged from 95.2-100 and 98.1-99.5 %, respectively. Group B consisted of 372 patients; 39 had surgically proven appendicitis. The sensitivity and specificity of the readers in group B ranged from 92.0-100 and 98.6-100 %, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in sensitivity or specificity for CT scans performed in groups A and B. In patients with a BMI of less than 25, an intravenous contrast-enhanced CT protocol without oral contrast demonstrates similar accuracy to an intravenous contrast-enhanced protocol with oral contrast for diagnosing acute appendicitis. PMID:27392572

  7. Stump Appendicitis: A Clinical Enigma.

    PubMed

    Çiftci, F; Abdurrahman, I; Tatar, Z

    2015-01-01

    Appendectomy is one of the most frequently performed operations. Stump appendicitis, as a postoperative complication of appendectomy, is inflammation of the remnant residue when an incomplete excision occurs. We present a patient with stump appendicitis who had been operated on, laparoscopically, for acute appendicitis 6 months before. The patient was diagnosed with acute appendicitis, underwent surgery, and was discharged on postoperative day 3 without complications. Stump appendicitis is a rare cause of acute abdominal disease but should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Ultrasonography is helpful in the diagnosis.

  8. A Feasibility Study of Real-Time Remote CT Reading for Suspected Acute Appendicitis Using an iPhone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changsun; Kang, Bossng; Choi, Hyuk Joong; Park, Joon Bum

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of an iPhone-based remote control system as a real-time remote computed tomography (CT) reading tool for suspected appendicitis using a third-generation (3G) network under suboptimal illumination. One hundred twenty abdominal CT scans were selected; 60 had no signs of appendicitis, whereas the remaining 60 had signs of appendicitis. The 16 raters reviewed the images using the liquid crystal display (LCD) monitor of a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) workstation, as well as using an iPhone connected to the PACS workstation via a remote control system. We graded the probability of the presence of acute appendicitis for each examination using a five-point Likert scale. The overall sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of suspected appendicitis using the iPhone and the LCD monitor were high, and they were not significantly different (sensitivity P = 1.00, specificity P = 0.14). The average areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for all CT readings with the iPhone and LCD monitor were 0.978 (confidence interval 0.965-0.991) and 0.974 (0.960-0.988), respectively, and the two devices did not have significantly different diagnostic performances (P = 0.55). The inter-rater agreement for both devices was very good; the kappa value for the iPhone was 0.809 (0.793-0.826), and that for the LCD monitor was 0.817 (0.801-0.834). Each rater had moderate-to-very good intra-observer agreement between the two devices. We verified the feasibility of an iPhone-based remote control system as a real-time remote CT reading tool for identifying suspected appendicitis using a 3G network and suboptimal illumination.

  9. A Feasibility Study of Real-Time Remote CT Reading for Suspected Acute Appendicitis Using an iPhone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changsun; Kang, Bossng; Choi, Hyuk Joong; Park, Joon Bum

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of an iPhone-based remote control system as a real-time remote computed tomography (CT) reading tool for suspected appendicitis using a third-generation (3G) network under suboptimal illumination. One hundred twenty abdominal CT scans were selected; 60 had no signs of appendicitis, whereas the remaining 60 had signs of appendicitis. The 16 raters reviewed the images using the liquid crystal display (LCD) monitor of a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) workstation, as well as using an iPhone connected to the PACS workstation via a remote control system. We graded the probability of the presence of acute appendicitis for each examination using a five-point Likert scale. The overall sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of suspected appendicitis using the iPhone and the LCD monitor were high, and they were not significantly different (sensitivity P = 1.00, specificity P = 0.14). The average areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for all CT readings with the iPhone and LCD monitor were 0.978 (confidence interval 0.965-0.991) and 0.974 (0.960-0.988), respectively, and the two devices did not have significantly different diagnostic performances (P = 0.55). The inter-rater agreement for both devices was very good; the kappa value for the iPhone was 0.809 (0.793-0.826), and that for the LCD monitor was 0.817 (0.801-0.834). Each rater had moderate-to-very good intra-observer agreement between the two devices. We verified the feasibility of an iPhone-based remote control system as a real-time remote CT reading tool for identifying suspected appendicitis using a 3G network and suboptimal illumination. PMID:25700617

  10. The accuracy of the Alvarado score in predicting acute appendicitis in the black South African population needs to be validated

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Victor Y.; Van Der Linde, Stefan; Aldous, Colleen; Handley, Jonathan J.; Clarke, Damian L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Alvarado score is the most widely used clinical prediction tool to facilitate decision-making in patients with acute appendicitis, but it has not been validated in the black South African population, which has much wider differential diagnosis than developed world populations. We investigated the applicability of this score to our local population and sought to introduce a checklist for rural doctors to facilitate early referral. Methods We analyzed patients with proven appendicitis for the period January 2008 to December 2012. Alvarado scores were retrospectively assigned based on patients’ admission charts. We generated a clinical probability score (1–4 = low, 5–6 = intermediate, 7–10 = high). Results We studied 1000 patients (54% male, median age 21 yr). Forty percent had inflamed, nonperforated appendices and 60% had perforated appendices. Alvarado scores were 1–4 in 20.9%, 5–6 in 35.7% and 7–10 in 43.4%, indicating low, intermediate and high clincial probability, respectively. In our subgroup analysis of 510 patients without generalized peritonitis, Alvarado scores were 1–4 in 5.5%, 5–6 in 18.1% and 7–10 in 76.4%, indicating low, intermediate and high clinical probability, respectively. Conclusion The widespread use of the Alvarado score has its merits, but its applicability in the black South African population is unclear, with a significant proportion of patients with the disease being potentially missed. Further prospective validation of the Alvarado score and possible modification is needed to increase its relevance in our setting. PMID:25078937

  11. Outpatient Antibiotic Use and the Incidence of Acute Appendicitis in Finland: A Nationwide Study from 1990–2008

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Pekka; Huovinen, Pentti; Herzig, Karl H.; Alajääski, Jennyl; Salminen, Paulina; Paajanen, Hannu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The incidence of acute appendicitis (AA) has decreased in Finland. We hypothesized that changing trends in outpatient antibiotic use might explain at least part of this declining incidence of AA. Methods The number of all patients with AA in Finland was extracted from the national data base from 1990 to 2008. For comparison, the incidence of acute diverticulitis of the colon (AD) was also recorded. All outpatient prescriptions of antibiotics belonging to the major groups of these drugs were also recorded. We used unit root and co-integration analyses for statistical analysis of the data in the study. Results The incidence of AA in Finland declined from 14.5 to 9.8 per 10,000 inhabitants (32%) and the incidence of AD increased by 47% between 1993 and 2007. The total outpatient use of antibiotics did not increase during this same period, but the use of antibiotics effective widely against colonic pathogens (macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and cephalosporins) increased significantly. No correlation was found between the incidence of AA, that of AD, and the use of different groups of antibiotics. Conclusions Our nationwide registry study indicated that changes in outpatient antibiotic use do not explain the decreasing trend in AA in Finland. Other factors, such as improved diagnosis of AA, may have some role in the decreasing incidence of AA. PMID:23859685

  12. Lessons to be learned: a case study approach--acute appendicitis masquerading as macroamylasaemia.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Muniappan; Salam, Imroz

    2008-05-01

    Macroamylasaemia is a condition in which serum amylase is elevated in the presence of a low to normal urinary amylase and normal renal function. It is rare but can masquerade as other clinical disorders. Discussed here is a case report of a patient who presented initially with abdominal pain (later recognized as being due to gangrenous appendicitis) and in whom there was a very high serum amylase level, leading to an erroneous initial diagnosis and management as acute pancreatitis. The CT scan of the abdomen was normal without any evidence of pancreatitis. Subsequently, the renal amylase:creatinine clearance ratio (C(am)/C(cr)) was found to be low, being characteristic and diagnostic of macroamylasaemia; the latter was, in turn, the cause for the elevated serum amylase level. The underlying macroamylasaemia had thus masqueraded as pancreatitis. The patient underwent appendicectomy and hence made an excellent recovery. It is vitally important to recognize this condition in order to avoid both an incorrect diagnosis and inappropriate treatment/management.

  13. Outcomes of laparoscopic and open appendectomy for acute appendicitis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Masoomi, Hossein; Mills, Steven D; Dolich, Matthew O; Dang, Phat; Carmichael, Joseph C; Nguyen, Ninh T; Stamos, Michael J

    2011-10-01

    The aims of this study were to compare outcomes of appendectomy between acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and nonAIDS patients and laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) versus open appendectomy (OA) in AIDS patients. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, from 2006 to 2008, clinical data of patients with AIDS who underwent LA and OA were evaluated. A total of 800 patients with AIDS underwent appendectomy during these years. Patients with AIDS had a significantly higher postoperative complication rate (22.56% vs 10.36%), longer length of stay [(LOS) 4.9 vs 2.9 days], and higher mortality (0.61% vs 0.16%) compared with non-AIDS patients. In nonperforated cases in patients with AIDS, LA was associated with a significantly lower complication rate (11.25% vs 21.61%), lower mortality (0.0% vs 2.78%), and shorter mean LOS (3.22 days vs 4.82 days) compared with OA. In perforated cases in patients with AIDS, LA had a significantly lower complication rate (27.52% vs 57.50%), and shorter mean LOS (5.92 days vs 9.67 days) compared with OA. No mortality was reported in either group. In patients with AIDS, LA has a lower morbidity, lower mortality, and shorter LOS compared with OA. Laparoscopic appendectomy should be considered as a preferred operative option for acute appendicitis in patients with AIDS.

  14. Barium appendicitis: A single institution review in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Hideki; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Kubota, Tadao; Mizokami, Ken

    2016-01-01

    AIM To review clinical experience with barium appendicitis at a single institution. METHODS A retrospective review of patients admitted with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis, from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2015 was performed. Age, gender, computed tomography (CT) scan findings if available, past history of barium studies, pathology, and the presence of perforation or the development of complications were reviewed. If the CT scan revealed high density material in the appendix, the maximum CT scan radiodensity of the material is measured in Hounsfield units (HU). Barium appendicitis is defined as: (1) patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis; (2) the patient has a history of a prior barium study; and (3) the CT scan shows high density material in the appendix. Patients who meet all three criteria are considered to have barium appendicitis. RESULTS In total, 396 patients were admitted with the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in the study period. Of these, 12 patients (3.0%) met the definition of barium appendicitis. Of these 12 patients, the median CT scan radiodensity of material in the appendix was 10000.8 HU, ranging from 3066 to 23423 HU (± 6288.2). In contrast, the median CT scan radiodensity of fecaliths in the appendix, excluding patients with barium appendicitis, was 393.1 HU, ranging from 98 to 2151 HU (± 382.0). The CT scan radiodensity of material in the appendices of patients with barium appendicitis was significantly higher than in patients with nonbarium fecaliths (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION Barium appendicitis is not rare in Japan. Measurement of the CT scan radiodensity of material in the appendix may differentiate barium appendicitis from routine appendicitis. PMID:27721929

  15. Appendicitis: a continuing challenge.

    PubMed

    Pal, K M; Khan, A

    1998-07-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common surgical emergency in urban setting, of a developing country. The computerised hospital patient database at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, was utilised to obtain records of all adults with a histologically proven diagnosis of acute appendicitis. A review of patients treated over a 18 month period was undertaken. One hundred and three appendicectomies were performed for acute appendicitis during this period. The diagnosis was clinical in all cases. Investigations like leucocyte count and lower abdominal ultrasound scan were used to improve diagnostic accuracy without a clear advantage. A number of routine investigations like, haemoglobin estimation and urea, creatinine, electrolyte measurements, did not provide additional information. The duration of antibiotic treatment in acute simple appendicitis was empiric and could be reduced to a single preoperative dose. Peritoneal fluid culture studies had a poor yield (26%) and results were not found to effect management in acute simple appendicitis. The routine use of Ampicillin in all cases of bacterial peritonitis needs re-evaluation, as a high incidence (73%) of resistance was seen. Studies to define the role and duration of treatment, with a single antibiotic, in acute simple appendicitis should be undertaken. Acute appendicitis is probably the most frequently considered surgical differential diagnosis at any hospital dealing with acute surgical conditions. The established treatment continues to be surgical removal of the inflamed organ. The diagnosis and decision to operate both are accepted to be based on clinical judgement, though a number of investigative manoeuvres have been described to reduce the negative appendicectomy rate. Other areas of debate are the number and length of antibiotic treatment and use of bacterial culture studies in cases of simple acute appendicitis. To analyse present practice and identify areas for study and change, a retrospective study was

  16. Serum, Saliva, and Urine Irisin with and Without Acute Appendicitis and Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bakal, Unal; Aydin, Suleyman; Sarac, Mehmet; Kuloglu, Tuncay; Kalayci, Mehmet; Artas, Gokhan; Yardim, Meltem; Kazez, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    A 112-amino-acid protein irisin (IRI) is widely expressed in many organs, but we currently do not know whether appendix tissue and blood cells express it. If appendix tissue and neutrophil cells express IRI, measuring its concentration in biological fluids might be helpful in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis (AA), since neutrophil cells are the currently gold-standard laboratory parameters for the diagnosis of AA. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the suitability of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based measurements of the proposed myokine IRI for the discrimination of patients with AA from those with acute abdominal pain (AP) and healthy controls. Moreover, immunoreactivity to IRI was investigated in appendix tissues and blood cells. Samples were collected on admission (T1), 24 hours (T2), and 72 hours (T3) postoperatively from patients with suspected AA and from patients with AP corresponding to T1–T3, whereas control subject blood was once corresponding to T1. IRI was measured in serum, saliva, and urine by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas in appendix tissue and blood cells, IRI was detected by immunohistohcemistry. Appendix tissue and blood cells (except for erythrocytes) are new sources of IRI. Basal saliva, urine, and serum levels were higher in children with AA compared with postoperative levels (T2) that start to decline after surgery. This is in line with the finding that IRI levels are higher in children with AA when compared with those with AP or control subject levels, most likely due to a large infiltration of neutrophil cells in AA that release its IRI into body fluids. Measurement of IRI in children with AA parallels the increase or decrease in the neutrophil count. This new finding shows that the measurement of IRI and neutrophil count can together improve the diagnosis of AA, and it can distinguish it from AP. IRI can be a candidate marker for the diagnosis of AA and offers an additional parameter to

  17. Schistosomiasis Presenting as a Case of Acute Appendicitis with Chronic Mesenteric Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mosli, Mohammed H; Chan, Wilson W; Morava-Protzner, Izabella; Kuhn, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    The manifestations of schistosomiasis typically result from the host inflammatory response to parasitic eggs that are deposited in the mucosa of either the gastrointestinal tract or bladder. We present here a case of a 50-year-old gentleman with a rare gastrointestinal presentation of both schistosomal appendicitis and mesenteric thrombosis. PMID:27366174

  18. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-06-01

    The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed.

  19. Influence of body habitus and use of oral contrast on reader confidence in patients with suspected acute appendicitis using 64 MDCT.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stephan W; Rhea, James T; Milch, Holly N; Ozonoff, Al; Lucey, Brian C; Soto, Jorge A

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate how body habitus affects reader confidence in diagnosing acute appendicitis and appendiceal visualization using 64 MDCT technology with and without oral contrast. We conducted a HIPAA compliant, IRB approved study of adult patients presenting to the Emergency Department with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Subjects were randomized to two groups: 64 MDCT scans performed with oral and intravenous contrast or scans performed solely with intravenous contrast. Three radiologists established their confidence about the presence of appendicitis as well as recording whether the appendix was visualized. Reader confidence in diagnosing acute appendicitis was compared between the two groups for the three readers. The impact of patient BMI and estimated intra-abdominal fat on reader confidence in diagnosing appendicitis was determined. Finally, a comparison of the effect of BMI and intra-abdominal fat on appendiceal visualization between the two groups was carried out. Three hundred three patients were enrolled in this study. There was a statistically significant difference in confidence based on BMI for reader 2, group 1 in diagnosing appendicitis. No further statistically significant differences in reader confidence for diagnosing appendicitis based on BMI or intra-abdominal fat were identified. There was no influence of BMI or intra-abdominal fat on appendiceal visualization. Increasing BMI was seen to improve reader confidence for one of three readers in patients that received both oral and intravenous contrast. No further effects of BMI or intra-abdominal fat on confidence in diagnosing or excluding appendicitis were seen. Neither BMI nor intra-abdominal fat were seen to influence appendiceal visualization.

  20. A randomized comparative study of sulbactam plus ampicillin vs. metronidazole plus cefotaxime in the management of acute appendicitis in children.

    PubMed

    Foster, M C; Kapila, L; Morris, D L; Slack, R C

    1986-01-01

    Sulbactam is a beta-lactamase inhibitor that, when combined with ampicillin, gives the latter antibiotic a broad spectrum of activity, making it suitable for use as a prophylactic agent in acute appendicitis. In a single-blind, randomized trial, the efficacy of sulbactam plus ampicillin was compared with that of metronidazole plus cefotaxime. Thirty-five children undergoing appendectomy received intravenous sulbactam and ampicillin, while 38 children received metronidazole and cefotaxime. Single doses were given unless the appendix was considered gangrenous or perforated, in which case the drugs were administered for 72 hr. There were three wound infections in the group given sulbactam and ampicillin and five in the group given metronidazole and cefotaxime. The combination of sulbactam and ampicillin was well tolerated and appeared to be at least as effective as that of metronidazole and cefotaxime in the prevention of sepsis following appendectomy. PMID:3026017

  1. The influence of age and gender on the utility of computed tomography to diagnose acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Antevil, Jared; Rivera, Louis; Langenberg, Bret; Brown, Carlos V R

    2004-10-01

    Few studies have examined the effects of age and gender on the utility of diagnostic computed tomography (CT) for appendicitis. We retrospectively studied all adult patients undergoing appendectomy from January 2000 through December 2002 (633 patients). Patients 15-30 years old ("younger") were compared to patients >30 ("older") and further subdivided by gender. CT accuracy and the influence of CT on negative appendectomy (NA) rates for each group were evaluated. CT was associated with a lower NA rate in older patients (23% vs 8%, P = 0.004) but had no effect on NA rate in younger patients (26% vs 20%, P = 0.2). Appendiceal CT had greater sensitivity, negative predictive value, and accuracy in older than in younger patients. When subdivided by gender, CT was associated with lower NA rates for all female patients but had no effect in either age group of men. Although CT may be more accurate in patients older than 30 years, it has the greatest benefit in female patients, where it is associated with lower NA rates in all adult patients. CT should be strongly considered for all female patients before operation for suspected appendicitis. Further study is needed to determine which, if any, male patients benefit from preoperative CT.

  2. A Feasibility Study of Smartphone-Based Telesonography for Evaluating Cardiac Dynamic Function and Diagnosing Acute Appendicitis with Control of the Image Quality of the Transmitted Videos.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changsun; Cha, Hyunmin; Kang, Bo Seung; Choi, Hyuk Joong; Lim, Tae Ho; Oh, Jaehoon

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to prove the feasibility of the remote interpretation of real-time transmitted ultrasound videos of dynamic and static organs using a smartphone with control of the image quality given a limited internet connection speed. For this study, 100 cases of echocardiography videos (dynamic organ)-50 with an ejection fraction (EF) of ≥50 s and 50 with EF <50 %-and 100 cases of suspected pediatric appendicitis (static organ)-50 with signs of acute appendicitis and 50 with no findings of appendicitis-were consecutively selected. Twelve reviewers reviewed the original videos using the liquid crystal display (LCD) monitor of an ultrasound machine and using a smartphone, to which the images were transmitted from the ultrasound machine. The resolution of the transmitted echocardiography videos was reduced by approximately 20 % to increase the frame rate of transmission given the limited internet speed. The differences in diagnostic performance between the two devices when evaluating left ventricular (LV) systolic function by measuring the EF and when evaluating the presence of acute appendicitis were investigated using a five-point Likert scale. The average areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for each reviewer's interpretations using the LCD monitor and smartphone were respectively 0.968 (0.949-0.986) and 0.963 (0.945-0.982) (P = 0.548) for echocardiography and 0.972 (0.954-0.989) and 0.966 (0.947-0.984) (P = 0.175) for abdominal ultrasonography. We confirmed the feasibility of remotely interpreting ultrasound images using smartphones, specifically for evaluating LV function and diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis; the images were transferred from the ultrasound machine using image quality-controlled telesonography.

  3. IS INTERVAL APPENDECTOMY INDICATED AFTER NON-OPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE APPENDICITIS IN PATIENTS WITH CANCER? A RETROSPECTIVE REVIEW FROM A SINGLE INSTITUTION

    PubMed Central

    SAMDANI, TUSHAR; FANCHER, TIFFANY T.; PIERACCI, FREDERIC M.; EACHEMPATI, SOUMITRA; RASHIDI, LAILA; NASH, GARRETT M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Interval appendectomy (IA) is a controversial subject, with little consensus on its use in patients undergoing treatment for malignancy. We sought to determine the frequency of recurrent appendicitis in cancer patients managed non-operatively (NOM) during index hospitalization for acute appendicitis (AA). Methods Clinical presentation,cancer treatment,follow-up were collected from electronic medical records of patients with CT scan-confirmed AA treated at a single institution between 7/1999 and 7/2009. Results Seventy-two of 109 AA patients underwent appendectomy during index hospitalization (IHA); 34 of these 109 were NOM during index hospitalization. Median index length of NOM patients’ stay was 6 days (0–55), median age 59 (18–80). Indications for NOM were presence of abscess or phlegmon (14), mild symptoms (13), high surgical risk (3), end-stage cancer (3), patient declining surgery (1). Eight NOM patients underwent percutaneous drainage of abdominal abscess (median total duration of IV + oral antibiotics = 12 days (0–55)). There were 6 deaths (1 IHA, 5 NOM): 4 sepsis, 2 cancer progression. At median 19-month follow-up (range 1–103), 4 NOM patients surviving index hospitalization had recurrent AA (11.7%) at 2 (n=2) and 3 months (n=2) after first episode. Overall, 6 had IA (17.6%) 1–7 months post-AA; 25 remained asymptomatic, without IA. Conclusion Among patients at a cancer center managed non-operatively at index hospitalization for AA, recurrent AA was early (<4 months) but uncommon. IA should be offered to those with recurrent symptoms, but appears to have a very limited role after several months of asymptomatic follow-up. PMID:25975342

  4. Radiation appendicitis: demonstration with graded compression US

    SciTech Connect

    Puylaert, J.B.; Hoekstra, F.; de Vries, B.C.; Rutgers, P.H.; Lalisang, R.I.; Ooms, E.C.

    1987-08-01

    In a patient who had received presurgical radiation therapy for extensive rectal carcinoma, ultrasonography with graded compression disclosed an inflamed appendix. The patient had no clinical signs of acute appendicitis. At laparotomy for resection of the rectal carcinoma, the appendix appeared grossly abnormal and was removed. Pathologic examination showed severe radiation enteritis of the appendix. The sonographic appearance of radiation appendicitis closely resembled that of acute appendicitis.

  5. Complicated acute appendicitis within a right inguinal hernia sac (Amyand’s hernia): report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Kouskos, E; Komaitis, S; Kouskou, M; Despotellis, M; Sanidas, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: The term Amyand’s hernia refers to a rare clinical situation characterized by the presence of a normal or inflammed appendix within the sac of an inguinal hernia. The situation may be asymptomatic or may present as an incarcerated hernia in case of strangulation or acute appendicitis occurring inside the hernia sac. Description of the case: We present the case of a right Amyand’s hernia on a 88-years-old male that presented to our emergency department with a severely tender and swollen inguinal mass that was diagnosed as a strangulated inguinal hernia – inguinal abcess and underwent emergency operation. The intraoperative findings included a severely inflamed and perforated appendix along with healthy part of the caecum inside the sac. Appendectomy with subsequent primary hernia repair without mesh was performed with excellent outcome. Conclusion: Because of the fact that most of such rare cases are managed by urgent surgery with no preoperative diagnosis, every surgeon should be prepared for the possibility of coping with such an unexpected situation. PMID:25125958

  6. Surgical audit: A prospective study of the morbidity and mortality of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Malatani, T S; Latif, A A; Al-Saigh, A; Cheema, M A; Abu-Eshy, S

    1991-03-01

    Between March and September 1989, acute apendicitis was clinically diagnosed in 317 patients who were studied as part of a prospective surgical audit. The study was designed to determine the accuracy of diagnosis, comparison of the macroscopic appearance of the appendix at operation, and subsequent histopathology and complications associated with the morbidity and mortality of emergency appendectomy. The clinical diagnosis was correct in 278 patients (88%). Thirty-nine (12%) of the patients had a negative laparotomy. There was no mortality, and wound infection was the source of increased morbidity in 37 (12%) patients. The highest incidence of wound infection was among those who had pus in the peritoneum (20%) or had a perforated or gangrenous appendix (25%). When the macroscopic appearance of the appendix was compared with the subsequent histopathological findings, a false positive error of 7% and a false negative error of 42% was found. During appendectomy the gross appearance of the appendix must be carefully noted so that a meticulous surgical technique can be complemented by appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis against wound infection, started at the time of surgery.

  7. Paradigm Shifts in the Treatment of Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Mak, Grace Zee; Loeff, Deborah S

    2016-07-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of emergent surgery in children. Historically, surgical dogma dictated emergent appendectomy due to concern for impending perforation. Recently, however, there has been a paradigm shift in both the understanding of its pathophysiology as well as its treatment to more nonoperative management. No longer is it considered a spectrum from uncomplicated appendicitis inevitably progressing to complicated appendicitis over time. Rather, uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis are now considered two distinct pathophysiologic entities. This change requires not only educating the patients and their families but also the general practitioners who will be managing treatment expectations and caring for patients long term. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of appendicitis, including the differentiation between uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis, as well as the new treatment paradigms. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(7):e235-e240.]. PMID:27403670

  8. LOCAT (low-dose computed tomography for appendicitis trial) comparing clinical outcomes following low- vs standard-dose computed tomography as the first-line imaging test in adolescents and young adults with suspected acute appendicitis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Computed tomography is widely used to diagnose acute appendicitis. Many adolescents and young adults are exposed to the associated radiation. A recent single-institution trial has reported promising results for low-dose computed tomography; however, this technique has not yet been widely adopted. LOCAT (low-dose computed tomography for appendicitis trial), a multi-institution randomized controlled non-inferiority trial, aims to compare low-dose computed tomography and standard-dose computed tomography as the first-line imaging tests for adolescents and young adults, and therefore to test the generalizability of the previous single-institution trial results. Methods/Design Participants with suspected appendicitis are randomly assigned to either the low-dose group (with a typical effective dose of 2 mSv) or the standard-dose group (as used in normal practice at each participating site, typically 8 mSv). The primary end point is the negative appendectomy rate (the percentage of the number of uninflamed appendices that were removed among all non-incidental appendectomies), which is a consequence of false-positive diagnoses, with a non-inferiority margin of 4.5 percentage points. The key secondary end point is the appendiceal perforation rate, which is a consequence of delayed (or false-negative) diagnoses. Participant recruitment will be continued until the number of non-incidental appendectomies for each group exceeds 444. The total number of expected participants approximates 3,000, including those not undergoing appendectomy. Discussion In addition to the study protocol, we elaborate on several challenging or potentially debatable components of the study design, including the broad eligibility criteria, choice of the primary end point, potential effect of using advanced imaging techniques on study results, determining and adjusting the radiation doses, ambiguities in reference standards, rationale for the non-inferiority margin, use of the intention

  9. The NOTA study: non-operative treatment for acute appendicitis: prospective study on the efficacy and safety of antibiotic treatment (amoxicillin and clavulanic acid) in patients with right sided lower abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Giorgini, Eleonora; Biscardi, Andrea; Villani, Silvia; Clemente, Nicola; Senatore, Gianluca; Filicori, Filippo; Antonacci, Nicola; Baldoni, Franco; De Werra, Carlo; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2011-01-01

    Background Case control studies that randomly assign patients with diagnosis of acute appendicitis to either surgical or non-surgical treatment yield a relapse rate of approximately 14% at one year. It would be useful to know the relapse rate of patients who have, instead, been selected for a given treatment based on a thorough clinical evaluation, including physical examination and laboratory results (Alvarado Score) as well as radiological exams if needed or deemed helpful. If this clinical evaluation is useful, the investigators would expect patient selection to be better than chance, and relapse rate to be lower than 14%. Once the investigators have established the utility of this evaluation, the investigators can begin to identify those components that have predictive value (such as blood analysis, or US/CT findings). This is the first step toward developing an accurate diagnostic-therapeutic algorithm which will avoid risks and costs of needless surgery. Methods/design This will be a single-cohort prospective observational study. It will not interfere with the usual pathway, consisting of clinical examination in the Emergency Department (ED) and execution of the following exams at the physician's discretion: full blood count with differential, C reactive protein, abdominal ultrasound, abdominal CT. Patients admitted to an ED with lower abdominal pain and suspicion of acute appendicitis and not needing immediate surgery, are requested by informed consent to undergo observation and non operative treatment with antibiotic therapy (Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid). The patients by protocol should not have received any previous antibiotic treatment during the same clinical episode. Patients not undergoing surgery will be physically examined 5 days later. Further follow-up will be conducted at 7, 15 days, 6 months and 12 months. The study will conform to clinical practice guidelines and will follow the recommendations of the Declaration of Helsinki. The protocol

  10. Self-localization in US of appendicitis: an addition to graded compression.

    PubMed

    Chesbrough, R M; Burkhard, T K; Balsara, Z N; Goff, W B; Davis, D J

    1993-05-01

    Graded-compression ultrasound (US) of the right lower quadrant (RLQ) has been a valuable addition to the diagnostic evaluation of acute appendicitis. In an effort to expedite the sonographic evaluation and improve diagnostic accuracy, a method of self-localization was added to the standard graded-compression examination. A total of 236 patients with signs of appendicitis were studied. Eighty-five percent (121 of 142) of the patients with proved appendicitis were able to decisively self-localize their pain. Of the patients without appendicitis who still had significant disease in the RLQ, 88% (29 of 33) were able to self-localize their pain, with an accuracy rate of 86% for significant disease. Among patients without significant disease, only 15% (nine of 61) self-localized their pain. This "sonographic self-localization sign" reduced the time of the examination and was a valuable addition to standard graded-compression US of the appendix.

  11. Appendicitis in mature patients.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, R P; Cochran, J L; Russell, W L; Bard, R M

    1985-01-01

    All patients greater than 50 years of age (N = 96) admitted with a pre- or postoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis from 1971 to 1980 were reviewed. A comparative series of 91 patients aged 25 to 50 years was similarly reviewed. Noninflammatory diseases of the appendix and incidental appendectomies were excluded. Detailed study of symptoms, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, radiographic evaluation, concomitant diseases, hospital course, surgical findings, complications, and mortality were completed. Comparison of patients aged 25 to 50 to patients older than 50 years revealed a statistically significant increased incidence of perforation in the older group (p less than 0.0001). Sixty-five per cent of the older group showed greater incidence of perforation. Further analysis of this series yields the hypothesis that the increased incidence of perforation is related to a significant decrease in the frequency of classic presentation in the greater-than-50 age group, a significant decrease in frequency of correct admission diagnosis and a significant delay between admission and surgical procedure in the older group. A more rapid pathophysiologic progression of appendicitis with increasing age was noted. A much higher percentage of older patients was undiagnosed until the surgical procedure. In this group, there was a longer duration of symptoms, less frequent classic presentation, and decreased frequency of right lower quadrant guarding and tenderness as compared to patients with correct diagnosis prior to surgery. Complications were much more frequent in older patients and higher still in those with perforation. Analysis of findings by decade of life revealed an anticipated high incidence of perforated appendicitis in patients greater than 50, but also showed a continuation of the high incidence of perforation into the decade 40 to 50. There were three deaths in the entire study group (1.6%) all occurring in the older age group with postoperative

  12. Appendicitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Taking Your Child's Temperature What Happens in the Operating Room? Going to the Hospital Belly Pain Word! Peritonitis Appendicitis Hernias What's It Like to Have Surgery? Appendicitis Digestive System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  13. Appendicitis Presenting Concurrently with Cecal Arteriovenous Malformation in a Child.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Sahil P; Rosenberg, Eric; Portalatin, Manuel E; Fakhoury, Elias; Madlinger, Robert V

    2015-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a commonly diagnosed surgical problem in the pediatric population. Arterio-venous malformations (AVM) of the colonic tract are rarely reported in the pediatric literature. A 13-year old boy who presented with acute appendicitis with concurrent cecal AVM is reported in whom appendectomy was done. Later on radiological investigations AVM was confirmed.

  14. Effect of surgical timing and outcomes for appendicitis severity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Maru; Kim, Sung Jeep

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of time of surgery for acute appendicitis on surgical outcomes to optimize the timing of appendectomies. Methods Medical records of patients who underwent an appendectomy were reviewed to obtain data on time of symptom onset, time of hospital presentation, and start times of surgery. Surgical findings were used to define appendicitis as either uncomplicated or complicated. The uncomplicated group included patients with simple, focal, or suppurative appendicitis, and the complicated group included patients with gangrenous, perforated appendicitis or periappendiceal abscess formation. The 2 groups were analyzed by age, sex, and time. Results A total of 192 patients were analyzed. The mean time from symptom onset to start of operation showed a significant difference between both groups (1,652.9 minutes vs. 3,383.8 minutes, P < 0.001). The mean time from hospital visit to start of operation showed no difference between both groups (398.7 minutes vs. 402.0 minutes, P = 0.895). Operating within 24 hours of symptom onset had a relative risk of 1.738 (95% confidence interval, 1.319–2.425) for complications. Operating more than 36 hours after symptom onset was associated with an increased risk of postoperative ileus and a longer hospital stay. Conclusion Complicated appendicitis is associated with a delay in surgery from symptom onset rather than a delay at hospital arrival. Surgeons should take into account the time from symptom onset when deciding on the timing of appendectomy. We recommend that appendectomy be performed within 36 hours from symptom onset. PMID:27478814

  15. Appendicitis in the Pediatric Age Group

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, Samuel B.; Nazem, Ahmad

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of 35 patients aged 2 to 20 years who were seen at the District of Columbia General Hospital and Howard University Hospital over a three-year period (1984 to 1986) was performed. All patients were operated on with a preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis. A normal appendix was found in 17 percent of patients, of which the majority was adolescent girls. Of those patients with acute appendicitis, 41 percent had perforated appendices, and one half of these were judged to be complicated. At diagnosis or at reoperation, one half of the patients were maintained on single-antibiotic therapy, the other half were maintained on triple-antibiotic therapy. The average hospital stay was 26.6 days, with no significant difference between those patients on single- or triple-antibiotic coverage. The average hospital stay for patients with uncomplicated appendicitis was six days. PMID:3385787

  16. [History of surgical treatment of appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Meljnikov, Igor; Radojcić, Branka; Grebeldinger, Slobodan; Radojcić, Nikola

    2009-01-01

    Most of the history of appendicitis and appendectomy has been made during the past two centuries. Jacopo Berengario da Carpi gave the first description of this structure in 1522. Gabriele Fallopio, in 1561, appears to have been the first writer to compare the appendix to a worm. In1579 Caspar Bauhin proposed the ingenious theory that the appendix served in intrauterine life as a receptacle for the faexes. Many of anatomists added more or less insignificant ideas concerning the structure of the appendix and entered upon useless controversy concerning the name, function, position of the appendix vermiformis. The first successful appendectomy was performed in 1735 by Claudius Amyand. Geillaume Dupuytren considered that acute inflammation of the right side of the abdomen arose from disease of the caecum and not the appendix. As surgeons were wary of opening the abdomen for examination, early stages of appendicitis remained unknown. John Parkinson was able to give a good description of fatal appendicitis in 1812. Surgeons began draining localised abscesses which had already formed. In 1880 Robert Lawson Tait made the first diagnosis of appendicitis and surgically removed the appendix. In 1886 Reginald Heber Fitz published a study on appendicitis and named the procedure an appendectomy. In 1889, Tait split open and drained an inflamed appendix without removing it. Charles McBurney proposed his original muscle splitting operation in 1893 and this was modified by Robert Fulton Weir in 1900. Today we have a multiplicity of signs and symptoms, helping to diagnose appendicitis, and there are a lot of techniques for operation with little essential difference throughout. Kurt Semm performed the first laparoscopic appendectomy in 1981 which became a new gold standard in surgical treatment of acute and chronic appendicitis. PMID:20391748

  17. Rare Appendicitis-Like Syndrome: The Case of the Obstructing Broccoli

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen; Narh-Martey, Patrick; Dhaliwal, Amanpreet; Persson, Jessica; Orr, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of acute appendicitis can be somewhat obscure in a patient that presents with right lower quadrant abdominal pain. The advancement and ease of imaging have made CT scanning readily available in the emergency department. Management can be challenging when the patient has a high likelihood of appendicitis based on clinical suspicion and negative CT scan. The purpose of this case report is to demonstrate how an obstructing bezoar caused an appendicitis-like syndrome in a patient with negative CT scan and clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis. This case report will discuss the appendicitis-like syndrome of an obstructing bezoar and an approach at management. PMID:24864147

  18. [Changes in the fat-acid spectrum of high-density lipoproteins as observed in men and women with acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Osochuk, S S; Konevalova, N Iu

    2005-01-01

    Differences in the reaction of the fat-acid spectrum of high-density lipoproteins (HDLP and HDLP3) and ethers of transfer-protein cholesterol (ETPC) as well as in the activity of lecithin cholesterin acetyltransferase and the content of cholesterol were compared for male and female patients (of the second mature age) with appendicitis. It was concluded that the female patients with appendicitis had, versus healthy women of the same age, a lower share of poly-unsaturated fat acids (PUFA) in the HDLP content and, possibly, a compensatorily intensified activity of the delta9-desaturase system; the changes were concomitant with a reduced functional HDLP activity. Within the discussed age span, the female patients with appendicitis had, versus the male patients, a more drastically reduced content of PUFA in HDLP, which was accompanied by a more intense modification of their functional activity with an active metabolism of PUFA (possibly of the omega9-row) due to ETPC.

  19. Indium-/sup 111/ leukocyte imaging in appendicitis

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, D.A.; Weber, P.M.; Kang, I.Y.; dos Remedios, L.V.; Jasko, I.A.; Sawicki, J.E.

    1987-04-01

    Indium-/sup 111/-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was applied to the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Thirty-two patients observed in the hospital for possible appendicitis were prospectively studied. Scanning was done 2 hr after radiopharmaceutical injection. Thirteen scans were positive for acute appendicitis, and all but one were confirmed at laparotomy. In addition, two cases of colitis and two cases of peritonitis were detected. Of 15 negative studies, 11 had a benign course. Four patients with negative studies had laparotomy; two were found to have appendicitis and two had a normal appendix. Of 14 proven cases of appendicitis, 12 scans were positive for appendicitis with one false-positive scan, providing a sensitivity of 86%. Specificity was 93%: all negative cases except one had negative scans. Overall accuracy was 91% (29 of 32), comparing favorably with the accepted false-positive laparotomy rate of 25%. Use of In-/sup 111/-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy serves to reduce the false-positive laparotomy rate and to shorten the clinical observation time in patients with acute appendicitis.

  20. Laparoscopic versus Open Surgery in Complicated Appendicitis in Children Less Than 5 Years Old: A Six-Year Single-Centre Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lonati, L.; Garofalo, S.; Tommasoni, N.; Ferrero, L.; Cerrina, A.; Dallan, C.; Schleef, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency in the pediatric population. The peak incidence occurs in the first decade of life, while it is uncommon to face appendicitis in children younger than 5 years of age. Laparoscopy is now demonstrated to be the optimal approach also to treat complicated appendicitis, but in very young children this standardized operation is not always easy to perform. Material and Methods. From January 2009 to December 2015 we operated on 525 acute appendicitis, with 120 patients less than 5 years of age. Results. 90 children had a complicated appendicitis (localized or diffuse peritonitis): 43 (48%) were operated on by open approach and 47 (52%) by laparoscopy. The overall incidence of postoperative complications was greater in the open appendectomy group (63% versus 26%) and all severe complications requiring reintervention (6% of cases: 3 postoperative abscesses resolved with ultrasound guided percutaneous abscess drainage; 1 tubal surgery for salpingitis; 1 adhesion-related ileus requiring relaparotomy) were mostly associated with open surgery. Conclusions. Laparoscopic surgery resulted as the best approach for treating complicated appendicitis also in younger children, with minor and less severe postoperative complications compared to open surgery. PMID:27747272

  1. Diagnostic Value of White Blood Cell and C-Reactive Protein in Pediatric Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Buyukbese Sarsu, Sevgi; Sarac, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute appendicitis (AA) associated with acute phase reaction is the most prevalent disease which requires emergency surgery. Its delayed diagnosis and unnecessarily performed appendectomies lead to numerous complications. In our study, we aimed to detect the role of WBC and CRP in the exclusion of acute and complicated appendicitis and diagnostic accuracy in pediatric age group. Methods. Appendectomized patient groups were constructed based on the results of histological evaluation. The area under a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was performed to examine diagnostic accuracy. Results. When WBC and CRP were used in combination, based on cut-off values of ≥13.1 × 10(3)/μL for WBC counts and ≥1.17 mg/dL for CRP level, diagnostic parameters were as follows: sensitivity, 98.7%; specificity, 71.3%; PPV, 50.6%; NPV, 99.5%; diagnostic accuracy, 77.6%; LR(+), 3.44; LR(-), 0.017. AUC values were 0.845 (95% CI 0.800-0.891) for WBC and 0.887 (95% CI 0.841-0.932) for CRP. Conclusions. For complicated appendicitis, CRP has the highest degree of diagnostic accuracy. The diagnosis of appendicitis should be made primarily based on clinical examination, and obviously more specific and systemic inflammatory markers are needed. Combined use of cut-off values of WBC (≥13100/μL) and CRP (≥1.17 mg/L) yields a higher sensitivity and NPV for the diagnosis of complicated appendicitis. PMID:27274988

  2. Fiber Intake and Childhood Appendicitis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brender, Jean D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Parents of 135 children with appendicitis and of 212 comparison children were interviewed about their children's diet. Results suggest that a liberal intake of whole-grain breads and cereals may decrease the risk of appendicitis during childhood. (KH)

  3. Operative management of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    St Peter, Shawn D; Snyder, Charles L

    2016-08-01

    Appendectomy has been the standard of care for appendicitis since the late 1800s, and remains one of the most common operations performed in children. The advent of data-driven medicine has led to questions about every aspect of the operation-whether appendectomy is even necessary, when it should be performed (timing), how the procedure is done (laparoscopic variants versus open and irrigation versus no irrigation), length of hospital stay, and antibiotic duration. The goal of this analysis is to review the current status of, and available data regarding, the surgical management of appendicitis in children. PMID:27521710

  4. A curious cause of appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Stewart-Parker, Emma Patricia; Atta, Mustafa; Doddi, Sudeendra

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 10-year-old boy presented to the emergency department with central abdominal pain, loose stool and vomiting. He was diagnosed with gastroenteritis, but was well enough to be discharged. The next day he reattended with ongoing diarrhoea and vomiting, with the pain now localised to the right iliac fossa (RIF). Acute appendicitis was suspected, and he was taken for laparoscopic appendicectomy. At surgery, a gangrenous appendix was found, with pus extending from the pelvis up to the liver. The appendix was excised and thorough peritoneal washout performed. Postoperatively, he received 48 hours of intravenous antibiotics and was discharged home. Unfortunately the boy presented again 11 days later with right lower quadrant pain and fever. Ultrasound revealed a collection in the RIF, and he returned to theatre for washout. His recovery was slow until the peritoneal pus sent for bacterial culture grew Salmonella enteritidis, identification of which facilitated appropriate antibiotic treatment. PMID:27489071

  5. [Current diagnostic-therapeutic trends in treatment of pediatric appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Malnati, R; Capasso, G; Stagni, S; Bua, L; Albisetti, A; Erenbourg, L; Paesano, P L

    1994-03-01

    Acute appendicitis is the first cause of emergency surgery in children. Actually, emergency abdominal sonography has evolved in differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children to differentiate it from other causes of acute abdomen as mesenteric lymphoadenitis, acute right pyelonephritis, acute diverticulitis in Meckel's diverticulum, intestinal intussusception, regional enterits, primary peritonitis, anaphylactoid purpura of Henoch-Schonlein. The aim of this study is the evaluation of the usefulness of abdominal sonography in diagnosing acute appendicitis in our current series of pediatric patients. We have operated 102 patients afflicted by appendicitis admitted to the pediatric department of Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano in a period of 5 years and operated on for appendectomy. In the last 2 years 36 patients were evaluated with abdominal sonography. This diagnostic tool showed in 34 (94.4%) a liquid effusion, sometimes thick of the right iliac fossa. In 2 patients the appendix had thickened layers, was edematous and the lumen was clearly filled with debris. Abdominal sonography has given a clear cut picture of the acute inflammatory process of the appendix. None of these patients has suffered from septic or obstructive complications. Mean duration of hospital stay was 6.35 days (3-15 days). Differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis can be extremely variable, from simple, paradigmatic situations to the most intriguing ones. This concept is well emphasized by William Silen when he says that "differential diagnosis of acute appendicits is an encyclopedic compendium of every abdominal disease that causes pain" in the 11th edition of Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Clinical Importance of the Heel Drop Test and a New Clinical Score for Adult Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Shin; Lee, Hyeji; Choi, Wookjin; Ahn, Ryeok; Hong, Jung-Suk; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong Woo; Lee, Yoon-Seon; Lim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective We tried to evaluate the accuracy of the heel drop test in patients with suspected appendicitis and tried to develop a new clinical score, which incorporates the heel drop test and other parameters, for the diagnosis of this condition. Methods We performed a prospective observational study on adult patients with suspected appendicitis at two academic urban emergency departments between January and August 2015. The predictive characteristics of each parameter, along with heel drop test results were calculated. A composite score was generated by logistic regression analysis. The performance of the generated score was compared to that of the Alvarado score. Results Of the 292 enrolled patients, 165 (56.5%) had acute appendicitis. The heel drop test had a higher predictive value than rebound tenderness. Variables and their points included in the new (MESH) score were pain migration (2), elevated white blood cell (WBC) >10,000/μL (3), shift to left (2), and positive heel drop test (3). The MESH score had a higher AUC than the Alvarado score (0.805 vs. 0.701). Scores of 5 and 11 were chosen as cut-off values; a MESH score ≥5 compared to an Alvarado score ≥5, and a MESH score ≥8 compared to an Alvarado score ≥7 showed better performance in diagnosing appendicitis. Conclusion MESH (migration, elevated WBC, shift to left, and heel drop test) is a simple clinical scoring system for assessing patients with suspected appendicitis and is more accurate than the Alvarado score. Further validation studies are needed. PMID:27723842

  7. Appendicitis/diverticulitis: diagnostics and conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Kruis, Wolfgang; Morgenstern, Julia; Schanz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Appendicitis and diverticulitis are very common entities that show some similarities in diagnosis and course of disease. Both are widely believed to be simple clinical diagnoses, which is in contrast to scientific evidence. An accurate diagnosis has to describe not only the initial detection, but particularly the severity of the disease. It is based mainly on cross-sectional imaging by ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT). Appendectomy is the standard treatment for acute appendicitis and is mandatory in complicated cases. Antibiotic therapy is similarly effective in uncomplicated appendicitis, but long-term results are not sufficiently known. Treatment of diverticulitis is related to the disease status. Complications such as perforation and bleeding require intervention. Uncomplicated diverticulitis as graded by US or CT are subject to conservative management, in the form of outpatient or hospital care. It is an unresolved debate as to whether antibiotic treatment offers benefits. Mesalazine seems at least to improve pain. The real challenge is treatment of recurrent diverticulitis. Lifestyle measures such as nutritional habits and physical activity are found to influence diverticular disease. Besides immunosuppression, obesity is a significant risk factor for complicated diverticulitis. Whether any medication such as chronic antibiotics, probiotics or mesalazine offers benefits is unclear. The indication for sigmoid resection has changed; it is no longer given by the number of attacks, but rather by structural changes as depicted by cross-sectional imaging.

  8. Omental Torsion after Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Mimicking Appendicitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Basilicata, Giacinto; Nocito, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP) is a common procedure in obesity surgery. The aim of an antecolic approach is to reduce the rate of internal herniation. Our aim is to make bariatric surgeons aware of another possible complication of antecolic LRYGBP. Methods and Results. We present a case report of omental torsion 24 months after antecolic LRYGBP presenting as an acute abdomen, suggesting appendicitis. During diagnostic laparoscopy, omental infarction due to torsion was observed. Resection of the avital omentum was performed. Discussion. Omental torsion after antecolic LRYGBP is a rare complication. When appearing in the early postoperative phase, it may mimic an anastomotic leakage. It may also occur as late complication, presenting with acute abdomen as an appendicitis. PMID:27019758

  9. Parasitic Appendicitis From Past to Present in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Engin, O; Calik, S; Calik, B; Yildirim, M; Coskun, G

    2010-01-01

    Background Understanding the etiology of appendicitis is important for developing effective treatments the relationship between parasitic appendicitis and various socio-cultural factors were examined, particularly with respect to the incidence of literacy. The aim of the article was to research the relations between parasitic appendicitis and literacy ratio in population. Methods Cases of parasitic appendicitis resulting in surgery performed at Buca Seyfi Demirsoy Large State Hospital Surgery Clinic between 2002 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and classified according to age, sex, type of parasite, morbidity, and mortality. Studies conducted in different regions of Turkey as well as in other countries were reviewed to determine if there was a relationship between parasitic appendicitis and literacy. Results Of the 1,969 appendectomy cases reviewed, nine were classified as parasitic appendicitis (0.45%). Enterobius vermicularis was observed in seven cases and Taenia spp. in two. The average age was 26.4 yr. No morbidity or mortality was found. Conclusion The data were compared with a retrospective review of studies conducted in the same regions and a decrease in the rate of parasitic appendicitis was observed during the period between the two reviews. It was determined that a low literacy rate was associated with an increase in the incidence of parasitic appendicitis. Observations made between different countries also produced similar results. In countries where the incidence of parasitic appendiciticis was greater than 1.5%, the literacy rate was less than 88%. To avoid appendectomy resulting from parasites, it is important to increase education and literacy. In some areas, individuals with appendicitis undergo surgery due to a lack of education or poor literacy. PMID:22347256

  10. Stump Appendicitis: A Surgeon's Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Starker, Lee F.; Duffy, Andrew J.; Bell, Robert L.; Bokhari, Jamal

    2011-01-01

    Background: Stump appendicitis is defined by the recurrent inflammation of the residual appendix after the appendix has been only partially removed during an appendectomy for appendicitis. Forty-eight cases of stump appendicitis were identified in the English literature. Database: The institutional CPT codes were evaluated for multiple hits of the appendectomy code, yielding a total of 3 patients. After appropriate approval from an internal review board, a retrospective chart review was completed and all available data extracted. All 3 patients were diagnosed with stump appendicitis, ranging from 2 months to 20 years after the initial procedure. Two patients underwent a laparoscopic and the one an open completion appendectomy. All patients did well and were discharged home in good condition. Conclusion: Surgeons need a heightened awareness of the possibility of stump appendicitis. Correct identification and removal of the appendiceal base without leaving an appendiceal stump minimizes the risk of stump appendicitis. If a CT scan has been obtained, it enables exquisite delineation of the surrounding anatomy, including the length of the appendiceal remnant. Thus, we propose that unless there are other mitigating circumstances, the completion appendectomy in cases of stump appendicitis should also be performed laparoscopically guided by the CT findings. PMID:21985727

  11. Ascending retrocecal appendicitis presenting with right upper abdominal pain: Utility of computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Eugene Mun Wai; Venkatesh, Sudhakar Kundapur

    2009-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common surgical condition that is usually managed with early surgery, and is associated with low morbidity and mortality. However, some patients may have atypical symptoms and physical findings that may lead to a delay in diagnosis and increased complications. Atypical presentation may be related to the position of the appendix. Ascending retrocecal appendicitis presenting with right upper abdominal pain may be clinically indistinguishable from acute pathology in the gallbladder, liver, biliary tree, right kidney and right urinary tract. We report a series of four patients with retrocecal appendicitis who presented with acute right upper abdominal pain. The clinical diagnoses at presentation were acute cholecystitis in two patients, pyelonephritis in one, and ureteric colic in one. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen at presentation showed subhepatic collections in two patients and normal findings in the other two. Computed tomography (CT) identified correctly retrocecal appendicitis and inflammation in the retroperitoneum in all cases. In addition, abscesses in the retrocecal space (n = 2) and subhepatic collections (n = 2) were also demonstrated. Emergency appendectomy was performed in two patients, interval appendectomy in one, and hemicolectomy in another. Surgical findings confirmed the presence of appendicitis and its retroperitoneal extensions. Our case series illustrates the usefulness of CT in diagnosing ascending retrocecal appendicitis and its extension, and excluding other inflammatory conditions that mimic appendicitis. PMID:19630119

  12. Stratified computed tomography findings improve diagnostic accuracy for appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geon; Lee, Sang Chul; Choi, Byung-Jo; Kim, Say-June

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To improve the diagnostic accuracy in patients with symptoms and signs of appendicitis, but without confirmative computed tomography (CT) findings. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the database of 224 patients who had been operated on for the suspicion of appendicitis, but whose CT findings were negative or equivocal for appendicitis. The patient population was divided into two groups: a pathologically proven appendicitis group (n = 177) and a non-appendicitis group (n = 47). The CT images of these patients were re-evaluated according to the characteristic CT features as described in the literature. The re-evaluations and baseline characteristics of the two groups were compared. RESULTS: The two groups showed significant differences with respect to appendiceal diameter, and the presence of periappendiceal fat stranding and intraluminal air in the appendix. A larger proportion of patients in the appendicitis group showed distended appendices larger than 6.0 mm (66.3% vs 37.0%; P < 0.001), periappendiceal fat stranding (34.1% vs 8.9%; P = 0.001), and the absence of intraluminal air (67.6% vs 48.9%; P = 0.024) compared to the non-appendicitis group. Furthermore, the presence of two or more of these factors increased the odds ratio to 6.8 times higher than baseline (95%CI: 3.013-15.454; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Appendiceal diameter and wall thickening, fat stranding, and absence of intraluminal air can be used to increased diagnostic accuracy for appendicitis with equivocal CT findings. PMID:25320531

  13. Determination of surgical priorities in appendicitis based on the probability of undetected appendiceal perforation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Chul; Park, Geon; Choi, Byung-Jo; Kim, Say-June

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To identify risk factors of actual appendiceal perforation when computed tomography (CT) scans suggest nonperforated appendicitis and accordingly determine surgical priority. METHODS: We collected database of 1362 patients who underwent an appendectomy for acute appendicitis between 2006 and 2013. A single radiologist selected 1236 patients whose CT scans were suggestive of nonperforated appendicitis. Patients were divided into 2 groups: actual nonperforation group and actual perforation group according to intraoperative and pathologic features. Comparison of the 2 groups were made using binary logistic regression. RESULTS: Of 1236 patients, 90 (7.3%) were found to have actual appendiceal perforation. Four risk factors related with actual appendiceal perforation were identified: body temperature ≥ 37.6  °C (HR = 1.912, 95%CI: 1.161-3.149; P = 0.011), out-of-hospital symptom duration ≥ 72 h (HR = 2.454, 95%CI: 1.292-4.662; P = 0.006), age ≥ 35 years (HR = 3.358, 95%CI: 1.968-5.728; P < 0.001), and appendiceal diameter on CT scan ≥ 8 mm (HR = 4.294, 95%CI: 1.034-17.832; P = 0.045). Actual appendiceal perforation group showed longer operation time, later initiation of diet, longer use of parenteral narcotics, longer hospital stay, and higher incidence of postoperative complications (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: We proposed here new criteria to select patients with adverse clinical outcomes after appendectomy among the patients with radiologically nonperforated appendicitis. Surgical appendectomy outcomes could be improved by determining the surgical priority according to our criteria. PMID:25717248

  14. Incidental finding of silent appendicitis on (18)F-FDG PET/CT in a patient with small cell lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Sophie; Van Den Berghe, Ivo; De Geeter, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We report the incidental diagnosis of acute asymptomatic appendicitis on a fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) performed for staging of a non small cell lung carcinoma. The patient was asymptomatic and laboratory tests were normal. The case illustrates: a) the possibility to diagnose appendicitis on (18)F-FDG PET/CT and b) the possibility of silent acute appendicitis, although this is a rare occurrence. PMID:27331212

  15. Incidental finding of silent appendicitis on (18)F-FDG PET/CT in a patient with small cell lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Sophie; Van Den Berghe, Ivo; De Geeter, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We report the incidental diagnosis of acute asymptomatic appendicitis on a fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) performed for staging of a non small cell lung carcinoma. The patient was asymptomatic and laboratory tests were normal. The case illustrates: a) the possibility to diagnose appendicitis on (18)F-FDG PET/CT and b) the possibility of silent acute appendicitis, although this is a rare occurrence.

  16. ACUTE APENDICITIS IN LIVER TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

    PubMed Central

    da FONSECA-NETO, Olival Cirilo Lucena; LIMA, Heloise Caroline de Souza; de MELO, Paulo Sérgio Vieira; LEMOS, Roberto; LEITÃO, Laércio; AMORIM, Américo Gusmão; LACERDA, Cláudio Moura

    2016-01-01

    Background : Appendicitis is a common cause of emergency surgery that in the population undergoing organ transplantation presents a rare incidence due to late diagnosis and treatment. Aim : To report the occurrence of acute appendicitis in a cohort of liver transplant recipients. Methods : Retrospective analysis in a period of 12 years among 925 liver transplants, in witch five cases of acute appendicitis were encountered. Results : Appendicitis occurred between three and 46 months after liver transplantation. The age ranged between 15 and 58 years. There were three men and two women. The clinical presentations varied, but not discordant from those found in non-transplanted patients. Pain was a symptom found in all patients, in two cases well located in the right iliac fossa (40%). Two patients had symptoms characteristic of peritoneal irritation (40%) and one patient had abdominal distention (20%). All patients were submitted to laparotomies. In 20% there were no complications. In 80% was performed appendectomy complicated by suppuration (40%) or perforation (40%). Superficial infection of the surgical site occurred in two patients, requiring clinical management. The hospital stay ranged from 48 h to 45 days. Conclusion : Acute appendicitis after liver transplantation is a rare event being associated with a high rate of drilling, due to delays in diagnosis and therapy, and an increase in hospital stay. PMID:27120736

  17. Missed appendicitis after self-induced abortion

    PubMed Central

    Punguyire, Damien; Iserson, Victor Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Female lower abdominal pain poses diagnostic difficulties for clinicians, especially when little more than the history and physical examination are available. A girl presented with constant lower abdominal pain after taking misoprostol for pregnancy termination. She was eventually referred to a rural District Hospital, where a laparotomy demonstrated acute appendicitis. After treating herself for a self-diagnosed pregnancy with illegally provided misoprostol, this patient presented with persistent lower abdominal pain. The differential diagnosis included ectopic pregnancy and all other causes of female abdominal pain. Yet diagnosing two diseases in the same anatomical area at the same time contradicts diagnostic parsimony. System problems in resource-poor areas can limit access to healthcare services and encourage dispensing potentially dangerous medications without clinicians’ authorization. It is dangerous to rely on patients’ self-diagnoses while neglecting other diagnoses. More than one diagnosis may be needed to explain temporally and anatomically related symptoms. PMID:22187620

  18. Perforated double appendicitis: Horseshoe type.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Serap Pamak; Cabıoğlu, Neslihan; Akıncı, Muzaffer

    2016-01-01

    Appendix vermiformis duplex is an infrequent malformation. However if it is missed out, there might be some complications and medicolegal troubles. A surgeon must be aware of any other appendix during appendectomy. Therefore, the possible locations and shapes described in the Cave-Wallbridge classification should be considered by the surgeon. In this case report, we present a patient with a horseshoe-type dupplication of appendix in a perforated appendicitis diagnosed during an emergency laparotomy. PMID:27436939

  19. Acute right lower abdominal pain in women of reproductive age: Clinical clues

    PubMed Central

    Hatipoglu, Sinan; Hatipoglu, Filiz; Abdullayev, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study possible gynecological organ pathologies in the differential diagnosis of acute right lower abdominal pain in patients of reproductive age. METHODS: Following Clinical Trials Ethical Committee approval, the retrospective data consisting of physical examination and laboratory findings in 290 patients with sudden onset right lower abdominal pain who used the emergency surgery service between April 2009 and September 2013, and underwent surgery and general anesthesia with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis were collated. RESULTS: Total data on 290 patients were obtained. Two hundred and twenty-four (77.2%) patients had acute appendicitis, whereas 29 (10%) had perforated appendicitis and 37 (12.8%) had gynecological organ pathologies. Of the latter, 21 (7.2%) had ovarian cyst rupture, 12 (4.2%) had corpus hemorrhagicum cyst rupture and 4 (1.4%) had adnexal torsion. Defense, Rovsing’s sign, increased body temperature and increased leukocyte count were found to be statistically significant in the differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis and gynecological organ pathologies. CONCLUSION: Gynecological pathologies in women of reproductive age are misleading in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. PMID:24744594

  20. Gangrenous Appendicitis in a Boy with Mobile Caecum.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Suat; Keskin, Zeynep; Gunduz, Metin; Sekmenli, Taner; Kivrak, Hatice Yazar

    2015-04-01

    A mobile caecum and ascending colon is an uncommon congenital disorder, and it is even rarer as the cause of an acute abdomen during childhood. This report presents the case of a 6-year-old boy with acute gangrenous appendicitis with a mobile caecum and ascending colon. Data from the surgical course, as well as laboratory and imaging studies, were acquired and carefully examined. Emergency ultrasound (US) was performed and revealed no signs of appendicitis in the right lower quadrant. Serial imaging study, including non-enhanced computed tomography (CT), was performed. An imaging study identified epigastric appendicitis with mobile caecum. Surgery was executed under general anesthesia with a median incision extending from the epigastrium to the suprapubic region. The caecum was mobile and placed in the right epigastric area, next to the left lobe of the liver and gallbladder. The gangrenous appendix was discovered posterior to the caecum and transverse colon, enlarging to the left upper quadrant. Appendectomy was executed, the gangrenous appendix was confirmed pathologically, and the patient was released 4 days later. In the US, if there are unusual clinical findings or no findings in patients with abdominal pain, CT is beneficial in determining the location of the caecum and appendix and preventing misdiagnosis in children. PMID:26060548

  1. Historical aspects of appendicitis in children.

    PubMed

    Hamill, James K; Liley, Andrew; Hill, Andrew G

    2014-05-01

    Evidence of appendicitis exists from ancient Egyptian mummies but the appendix was not discovered as an anatomical entity until the renaissance in Western European literature. Much confusion reigned over the cause of right iliac fossa inflammatory disease until the late 19th century, when the appendix was recognized as the cause of the great majority of cases. Coining the term 'appendicitis' and making the case for early surgery, Fitz in 1886 set the scene for recovery from appendicitis through operative intervention. PMID:24165165

  2. Malrotated Subhepatic Caecum with Subhepatic Appendicitis: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Chong, Hock Chin; Chai, Feng Yih; Balakrishnan, Dhayal; Asilah, Siti Mohd Desa; Adila, Irene Nur Ibrahim; Syibrah, Khuzaimah Zahid

    2016-01-01

    Subhepatically located caecum and appendix is a very rare entity. It occurs due to the anomaly in fetal gut rotation that results in an incomplete rotation and fixation of the intestine. Appendicitis, which is a common surgical emergency, in combination with the abnormal subhepatic location, presents a great challenge in its diagnosis and management. Here, we describe a 42-year-old male with chronic dyspepsia who presented with sepsis and severe pain at his right hypochondriac and epigastric region. The final diagnosis was acute appendicitis of the subhepatic appendix. Our discussion focuses on the diagnostic approach and clinical and surgical management. We hope that our report will increase the awareness among the clinicians and hasten the management of such rare condition to avoid complications. PMID:27648337

  3. Malrotated Subhepatic Caecum with Subhepatic Appendicitis: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hock Chin; Balakrishnan, Dhayal; Asilah, Siti Mohd Desa; Adila, Irene Nur Ibrahim; Syibrah, Khuzaimah Zahid

    2016-01-01

    Subhepatically located caecum and appendix is a very rare entity. It occurs due to the anomaly in fetal gut rotation that results in an incomplete rotation and fixation of the intestine. Appendicitis, which is a common surgical emergency, in combination with the abnormal subhepatic location, presents a great challenge in its diagnosis and management. Here, we describe a 42-year-old male with chronic dyspepsia who presented with sepsis and severe pain at his right hypochondriac and epigastric region. The final diagnosis was acute appendicitis of the subhepatic appendix. Our discussion focuses on the diagnostic approach and clinical and surgical management. We hope that our report will increase the awareness among the clinicians and hasten the management of such rare condition to avoid complications.

  4. Malrotated Subhepatic Caecum with Subhepatic Appendicitis: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hock Chin; Balakrishnan, Dhayal; Asilah, Siti Mohd Desa; Adila, Irene Nur Ibrahim; Syibrah, Khuzaimah Zahid

    2016-01-01

    Subhepatically located caecum and appendix is a very rare entity. It occurs due to the anomaly in fetal gut rotation that results in an incomplete rotation and fixation of the intestine. Appendicitis, which is a common surgical emergency, in combination with the abnormal subhepatic location, presents a great challenge in its diagnosis and management. Here, we describe a 42-year-old male with chronic dyspepsia who presented with sepsis and severe pain at his right hypochondriac and epigastric region. The final diagnosis was acute appendicitis of the subhepatic appendix. Our discussion focuses on the diagnostic approach and clinical and surgical management. We hope that our report will increase the awareness among the clinicians and hasten the management of such rare condition to avoid complications. PMID:27648337

  5. Single-Port Laparoscopic Interval Appendectomy for Perforated Appendicitis With a Periappendiceal Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung Uk; Jeong, Woon Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Nonoperative management followed by an interval appendectomy is a commonly used approach for treating patients with perforated appendicitis with abscess formation. As minimally-invasive surgery has developed, single-port laparoscopic surgery (SPLS) is increasingly being used to treat many conditions. We report our initial experience with this procedure using a multichannel single-port. Methods The study included 25 adults who underwent a single-port laparoscopic interval appendectomy for perforated appendicitis with periappendiceal abscess by using a single-port with or without needlescopic grasper between June 2014 and January 2016. Results Of the 25 patients, 9 (36%) required percutaneous drainage for a median of 7 days (5–14 days) after insertion, and 3 (12%) required conversion to reduced-port laparoscopic surgery with a 5-mm port insertion because of severe adhesions to adjacent organs. Of 22 patients undergoing SPLS, 13 underwent pure SPLS (52.0%) whereas 9 patients underwent SPLS with a 2-mm needle instrument (36.0%). Median operation time was 70 minutes (30–155 minutes), and a drainage tube was placed in 9 patients (36.0%). Median total length of incision was 2.5 cm (2.0–3.0 cm), and median time to soft diet initiation and length of stay in the hospital were 2 days (0–5 days) and 3 days (1–7 days), respectively. Two patients (8.0%) developed postoperative complications: 1 wound site bleeding and 1 surgical site infection. Conclusion Conservative management followed by a single-port laparoscopic interval appendectomy using a multichannel single-port appears feasible and safe for treating patients with acute perforated appendicitis with periappendiceal abscess. PMID:27437392

  6. Clinical significance of elevated serum and urine amylase levels in patients with appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Swensson, E E; Maull, K I

    1981-12-01

    During the 45 month period beginning January 1977, 251 patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of acute appendicitis underwent celiotomy at the Medical College of Virginia Hospital. A preoperative serum or urine amylase determination was recorded in 155 of the patients (62 percent). Of this group, 15 patients (10 percent) had elevation of serum amylase or 2 hour urine amylase. Hyperamylasemia or hyperamylasuria directly led to misdiagnosis or treatment delay in 5 of the 15 patients. Appendiceal rupture occurred in three patients, two of whom had prolonged (greater than 1 month) hospitalizations directly attributable to the misdiagnosis. As a result of this study, we conclude that (1) acute appendicitis and elevated amylase levels may occur concurrently, (2) hyperamylasemia or hyperamylasuria should not dissuade the surgeon from early operation if other clinical features suggest appendicitis, and (3) abdominal pain and elevation of amylase level define significant intraabdominal disease, not specifically pancreatic disease.

  7. An unusual presentation of perforated appendicitis in epigastric region☆

    PubMed Central

    Odabasi, Mehmet; Arslan, Cem; Abuoglu, Hasan; Gunay, Emre; Yildiz, Mehmet Kamil; Eris, Cengiz; Ozkan, Erkan; Aktekin, Ali; Muftuoglu, M.A. Tolga

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Atypical presentations of appendix have been reported including backache, left lower quadrant pain and groin pain from a strangulated femoral hernia containing the appendix. We report a case presenting an epigastric pain that was diagnosed after computed tomography as a perforated appendicitis on intestinal malrotation. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 27-year-old man was admitted with a three-day history of epigastric pain. Physical examination revealed tenderness and defense on palpation of epigastric region. There was a left subcostal incision with the history of diaphragmatic hernia repair when the patient was 3 days old. He had an intestinal malrotation with the cecum fixed at the epigastric region and the inflamed appendix extending beside the left lobe of liver. DISCUSSION While appendicitis is the most common abdominal disease requiring surgical intervention seen in the emergency room setting, intestinal malrotation is relatively uncommon. When patients with asymptomatic undiagnosed gastrointestinal malrotation clinically present with abdominal pain, accurate diagnosis and definitive therapy may be delayed, possibly increasing the risk of morbidity and mortality. CONCLUSION Atypical presentations of acute appendicitis should be kept in mind in patients with abdominal pain in emergency room especially in patients with previous childhood operation for diaphragmatic hernia. PMID:24441442

  8. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  9. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 913–906–6000 Email: contactcenter@ aafp. org Internet: www. aafp. org American College of Surgeons 633 ... Fax: 312–202–5001 Email: postmaster@ facs. org Internet: www. facs. org American Society of Colon and ...

  10. Extracting actionable findings of appendicitis from radiology reports using natural language processing.

    PubMed

    Rink, Bryan; Roberts, Kirk; Harabagiu, Sanda; Scheuermann, Richard H; Toomay, Seth; Browning, Travis; Bosler, Teresa; Peshock, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Radiology reports often contain findings about the condition of a patient which should be acted upon quickly. These actionable findings in a radiology report can be automatically detected to ensure that the referring physician is notified about such findings and to provide feedback to the radiologist that further action has been taken. In this paper we investigate a method for detecting actionable findings of appendicitis in radiology reports. The method identifies both individual assertions regarding the presence of appendicitis and other findings related to appendicitis using syntactic dependency patterns. All relevant individual statements from a report are collectively considered to determine whether the report is consistent with appendicitis. Evaluation on a corpus of 400 radiology reports annotated by two expert radiologists showed that our approach achieves a precision of 91%, a recall of 83%, and an F1-measure of 87%. PMID:24303268

  11. Diagnosing appendicitis: What works, what does not and where to go from here?

    PubMed

    Craig, Simon; Dalton, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    Although acute appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery in children, diagnosis is far from straightforward. Delays in diagnosis can result in significant complications, whereas over-diagnosis can result in costly inter-hospital transfers and unnecessary surgery. This article aims to describe current evidence-based assessment of children with possible appendicitis presenting to the emergency department. We provide an overview of the literature relating to the various available diagnostic approaches, including the application of history, examination, pathology tests, imaging, and clinical decision rules.

  12. Left-sided appendicitis in children with congenital gastrointestinal malrotation: a diagnostic pitfall in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Taslakian, Bedros; Issa, Ghada; Hourani, Roula; Akel, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common conditions requiring emergency surgery. However, acute appendicitis presenting with left lower quadrant abdominal pain is extremely rare. Imaging, particularly CT , plays an important role in establishing an accurate and prompt diagnosis, as delay in diagnosis may occur due to lack of uniformity in the clinical signs and symptoms. We report a rare case of a 10-year-old boy who presented with persistent left lower quadrant pain of several days duration, in which the CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was essential in establishing the correct diagnosis. The malpositioned inflamed appendix was clearly identified in the left side of the abdomen, with the characteristic CT findings of uncomplicated intestinal malrotation. Left-sided acute appendicitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of young patients presenting with left lower quadrant pain, in order to avoid delay in diagnosis and guide the surgical intervention. PMID:23761499

  13. Left-sided appendicitis in children with congenital gastrointestinal malrotation: a diagnostic pitfall in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Taslakian, Bedros; Issa, Ghada; Hourani, Roula; Akel, Samir

    2013-06-10

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common conditions requiring emergency surgery. However, acute appendicitis presenting with left lower quadrant abdominal pain is extremely rare. Imaging, particularly CT , plays an important role in establishing an accurate and prompt diagnosis, as delay in diagnosis may occur due to lack of uniformity in the clinical signs and symptoms. We report a rare case of a 10-year-old boy who presented with persistent left lower quadrant pain of several days duration, in which the CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was essential in establishing the correct diagnosis. The malpositioned inflamed appendix was clearly identified in the left side of the abdomen, with the characteristic CT findings of uncomplicated intestinal malrotation. Left-sided acute appendicitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of young patients presenting with left lower quadrant pain, in order to avoid delay in diagnosis and guide the surgical intervention.

  14. Alternative diagnoses at paediatric appendicitis MRI.

    PubMed

    Moore, M M; Kulaylat, A N; Brian, J M; Khaku, A; Hulse, M A; Engbrecht, B W; Methratta, S T; Boal, D K B

    2015-08-01

    As the utilization of MRI in the assessment for paediatric appendicitis increases in clinical practice, it is important to recognize alternative diagnoses as the cause of abdominal pain. The purpose of this review is to share our institution's experience using MRI in the evaluation of 510 paediatric patients presenting with suspected appendicitis over a 30 month interval (July 2011 to December 2013). An alternative diagnosis was documented in 98/510 (19.2%) patients; adnexal pathology (6.3%, n = 32), enteritis-colitis (6.3%, n = 32), and mesenteric adenitis (2.2%, n = 11) comprised the majority of cases. These common entities and other less frequent illustrative cases obtained during our overall institutional experience with MRI for suspected appendicitis are reviewed. PMID:26072983

  15. Alternative diagnoses at paediatric appendicitis MRI.

    PubMed

    Moore, M M; Kulaylat, A N; Brian, J M; Khaku, A; Hulse, M A; Engbrecht, B W; Methratta, S T; Boal, D K B

    2015-08-01

    As the utilization of MRI in the assessment for paediatric appendicitis increases in clinical practice, it is important to recognize alternative diagnoses as the cause of abdominal pain. The purpose of this review is to share our institution's experience using MRI in the evaluation of 510 paediatric patients presenting with suspected appendicitis over a 30 month interval (July 2011 to December 2013). An alternative diagnosis was documented in 98/510 (19.2%) patients; adnexal pathology (6.3%, n = 32), enteritis-colitis (6.3%, n = 32), and mesenteric adenitis (2.2%, n = 11) comprised the majority of cases. These common entities and other less frequent illustrative cases obtained during our overall institutional experience with MRI for suspected appendicitis are reviewed.

  16. Perforated Appendicitis: Assessment With Multidetector Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Iacobellis, Francesca; Iadevito, Isabella; Romano, Federica; Altiero, Michele; Bhattacharjee, Bikram; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-02-01

    Appendicitis is one of the most common abdominal surgical emergencies. In some cases, the correct diagnosis may be challenging, owing to different conditions that can mimic this pathology. In this context, abdominal computed tomography (CT) is the imaging modality of choice, leading to an accurate diagnosis and to a reduction in unnecessary laparotomies. The diagnosis of perforated appendix is crucial, but the detection of the perforation signs by CT may not be so simple in the early process. The aim of this article is to review the multiple detector CT signs of perforated appendicitis.

  17. Right adrenal abscess -- an unusual complication of acute apendicitis.

    PubMed

    Dimofte, Gabriel; Dubei, Liviu; Lozneanu, Lili-Gabriela; Ursulescu, Corina; Grigora Scedil, Mihai

    2004-09-01

    Acute appendicitis represents one of the most frequent abdominal emergencies encountered in everyday surgical practice. Local infectious complications are not unusual and retroperitoneal abscesses after acute retrocaecal appendicitis have been previously described. The authors present the case of a 22-years-young female patient, admitted for a right iliac fossa abscess, secondary to gangrenous appendicitis. A right adrenal mass 35/40 mm was revealed during preoperative ultrasound evaluation, which evolved in an adrenal abscess that spontaneously drained 10 days after appendectomy and retrocecal drainage. Adrenal abscesses are exceptionally rare, with only a few cases being reported in the literature, but none of these after acute appendicitis.

  18. To CT or not to CT? The influence of computed tomography on the diagnosis of appendicitis in obese pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Haven; Burbridge, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background Appendicitis is a common pediatric query. However, obesity often results in nondiagnostic ultrasounds and increased likelihood of abdominal computed tomography (CT). Concern regarding radiation exposure led the Canadian Association of Radiologists to recommend foregoing CT when ultrasounds are nondiagnostic and clinical suspicion is high. We evaluated this recommendation by quantifying the influence of CT on the diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis. Methods We performed a 2-year retrospective case series of children presenting with suspected appendicitis. We stratified patients by weight (obese v. nonobese) and pediatric appendicitis score (PAS) and examined how often they received abdominal CT, why they received it, and its influence on diagnosis. Results Of 223 patients (84 obese, 139 nonobese), 54 received CT. Obese patients received CTs more frequently than nonobese patients (29% v. 22%). The most common reason for CT was a nondiagnostic ultrasound (75% in obese, 80% in nonobese patients). Sixty-five percent of CTs obtained after nondiagnostic ultrasounds confirmed the initial diagnosis, but the rates were 80% and 50%, respectively, when only obese and only nonobese patients were considered. Obese patients were 4 times more likely to have a CT confirming their initial appendicitis diagnosis. Conclusion Because obese patients are more likely than nonobese patients to have a CT that confirms appendicitis, when treating an obese pediatric patient with suspected appendicitis and a nondiagnostic ultrasound, surgeons with a high clinical suspicion should strongly consider foregoing CT and proceeding with treatment. PMID:26011850

  19. A case of Fournier’s gangrene in a young immunocompetent male patient resulting from a delayed diagnosis of appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Wanis, Michael; Nafie, Shady; Mellon, John Kilian

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the case of a 28-year-old male patient presenting to our department with an atypical history of acute scrotal swelling on a background of abdominal pain. He was diagnosed with a perforated appendicitis and Fournier’s gangrene. PMID:27106611

  20. [Combination of appendicitis with gynecologic diseases].

    PubMed

    Makhovskií, V Z; Aksenenko, V A; Mazikina, L M; Madagov, L A

    1997-01-01

    782 patients with combined diseases of abdominal and retroperitoneal organs were operated on from 1970 to 1996. In 321 patients (41.0%) at the age from 15 to 80 years appendectomy in combination with gynaecologic operations were performed. The catarral appendicitis was detected in 202 patients, phlegmonous--in 113, gangrenous--in 6 patients. The rate of inflammatory genital disorders was variable: ovarian cyst rupture (183 patients), suppuration (7 patients), over-winding (15 patients), purulent salpingitis (76 patients), ulchanges cyst (6 patients). The extirpation and supravaginal amputation of the uterus were performed in 34 patients. The abdominal exudate was detected in 284 patients. The oblique incision in the ilias region was used in 177 patients. In was extended in 80 patients. The median laparotomy was performed in 64 patients. The combination of appendicitis and gynaecologic diseases are commonly seen in clinical practice.

  1. Bilateral giant abdominoscrotal hydroceles complicated by appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Yarram, Sai G; Dipietro, Michael A; Graziano, Kathleen; Mychaliska, George B; Strouse, Peter J

    2005-12-01

    Abdominoscrotal hydrocele is a rare entity, with fewer than 100 cases reported in children. Bilateral abdominoscrotal hydroceles are even less common, with 14 cases reported in children. Various complications of abdominoscrotal hydrocele have been reported in the literature. We present a 4-month-old boy with bilateral giant abdominoscrotal hydroceles who developed appendicitis apparently because of obstruction from the right hydrocele. We discuss the various imaging modalities used to establish the diagnosis and plan the operative approach.

  2. An Uncommon Case of Chronic Tubercular Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Maharjan, Sushna

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common disease that ranks as the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide, after the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, primary TB of the appendix is rare and may or may not be associated with specific clinical features. Thus, diagnosis is made only after histopathological examination. It suggests that all surgically removed appendices should be subjected to histopathological examination. This reported case is an uncommon case of chronic tubercular appendicitis. PMID:26649216

  3. Conventional single-port laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated appendicitis in children: Efficient and cost-effective

    PubMed Central

    Karakuş, Osman Zeki; Ulusoy, Oktay; Ateş, Oğuz; Hakgüder, Gülce; Olguner, Mustafa; Akgür, Feza Miraç

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) is gradually gaining popularity among paediatric surgeons for complicated appendicitis. A retrospective study was conducted to compare conventional single port LA, multiport LA and open appendectomy (OA) for complicated appendicitis in children. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 1995 from December 2014, 1,408 patients (604 girls, 804 boys) underwent surgery for uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis. The patient characteristics, operation times, duration of hospitalization, operative costs, and postoperative complications were recorded. A 10-mm 0° scope with a parallel eye piece and an integrated 6 mm working channel were inserted through an 11-mm “conventional umbilical port” for single port LA. RESULTS: A total of 314 patients with complicated appendicitis (128 girls, 186 boys) underwent appendectomy. Among these, 102 patients (32.4%) underwent single port LA, 17 patients (5.4%) underwent multiport LA and 195 patients (62.1%) underwent OA. The hospital stay of the single port LA group was significantly less (3.88 ± 1.1) compared with multiport LA (5.41 ± 1.2) and OA groups (6.14 ± 1.1) (P < 0.001). Drain usage, wound infection and adhesive intestinal obstruction rates were significantly high in the OA group. There was no significant difference between the groups in postoperative intraabdominal abscess formation. Single-port LA performed for complicated appendicitis was cheaper compared with the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: The present study has shown that single-port LA for complicated appendicitis can be conducted in a reasonable operative time; it shortens the hospitalization period, markedly reduces postoperative wound infection and adhesive intestinal obstruction rates and does not increase the operative cost. PMID:26917914

  4. Improving diagnosis of appendicitis. Early autologous leukocyte scanning

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaney, A.R.; Raviola, C.A.; Weber, P.N.; McDonald, P.T.; Navarro, D.A.; Jasko, I. )

    1989-10-01

    A prospective nonrandomized study investigating the accuracy and utility of autologous leukocyte scanning in the diagnosis of appendicitis was performed. One hundred patients in whom the clinical diagnosis of appendicitis was uncertain underwent indium 111 oxyquinoline labelling of autologous leukocytes and underwent scanning 2 hours following reinjection. Of 32 patients with proved appendicitis, three scans revealed normal results (false-negative rate, 0.09). Of 68 patients without appendicitis, three scans had positive results (false-positive rate, 0.03; sensitivity, 0.91; specificity, 0.97; predictive value of positive scan, 0.94; predictive value of negative scan, 0.96; and overall accuracy, 0.95). Scan results altered clinical decisions in 19 patients. In 13 cases, the scan produced images consistent with diagnoses other than appendicitis, expediting appropriate management. Early-imaging In 111 oxyquinoline autologous leukocyte scanning is a practical and highly accurate adjunct for diagnosing appendicitis.

  5. The importance of timely detection and management in neonatal appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Barrak Hani; Al Omran, Yasser; Hassan, Aziz; Al Hindi, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The clinical presentation of cute appendicitis is rarely encountered in neonatology. When it does occur, it is thought to be due to prematurity or develops secondary to coexisting diseases. We present a case of appendicitis in a 10-day-old Middle-Eastern girl, who was born at term and who had no underlying conditions that are typically associated with neonatal appendicitis. This case highlights that certain causes and clinical signs are unreliable when coming to a working diagnosis of neonatal appendicitis, and that regardless of the cause, timely detection and management are necessary in achieving surgical success. PMID:24855077

  6. The importance of timely detection and management in neonatal appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Barrak Hani; Al Omran, Yasser; Hassan, Aziz; Al Hindi, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The clinical presentation of cute appendicitis is rarely encountered in neonatology. When it does occur, it is thought to be due to prematurity or develops secondary to coexisting diseases. We present a case of appendicitis in a 10-day-old Middle-Eastern girl, who was born at term and who had no underlying conditions that are typically associated with neonatal appendicitis. This case highlights that certain causes and clinical signs are unreliable when coming to a working diagnosis of neonatal appendicitis, and that regardless of the cause, timely detection and management are necessary in achieving surgical success. PMID:24855077

  7. Case Report: Ischaemic appendicitis post mesenteric biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Zukiwskyj, Marianna; Tun, June; Desai, Shashank

    2016-01-01

    A common indication for laparoscopic mesenteric lymph node biopsy is to provide a tissue diagnosis in the absence of palpable peripheral nodes via a minimally invasive approach.  There are no reports to date of ischaemia to the appendix as a complication of this procedure.   We report the case of a 34-year-old lady who underwent a mesenteric biopsy for a lesion found incidentally on CT to investigate longstanding abdominal pain, and 2 days later required an appendicectomy for ischaemic appendicitis. PMID:26937277

  8. Improving diagnosis of appendicitis. Early autologous leukocyte scanning.

    PubMed

    DeLaney, A R; Raviola, C A; Weber, P N; McDonald, P T; Navarro, D A; Jasko, I

    1989-10-01

    A prospective nonrandomized study investigating the accuracy and utility of autologous leukocyte scanning in the diagnosis of apendicitis was performed. One hundred patients in whom the clinical diagnosis of appendicitis was uncertain underwent indium 111 oxyquinoline labelling of autologous leukocytes and underwent scanning 2 hours following reinjection. Of 32 patients with proved appendicitis, three scans revealed normal results (false-negative rate, 0.09). Of 68 patients without appendicitis, three scans had positive results (false-positive rate, 0.03; sensitivity, 0.91; specificity, 0.97; predictive value of positive scan, 0.94; predictive value of negative scan, 0.96; and overall accuracy, 0.95). Scan results altered clinical decisions in 19 patients. In 13 cases, the scan produced images consistent with diagnoses other than appendicitis, expediting appropriate management. Early-imaging111 In oxyquinoline autologous leukocyte scanning is a practical and highly accurate adjunct for diagnosing appendicitis.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric appendicitis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael M; Kulaylat, Afif N; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Engbrecht, Brett W; Dillman, Jonathan R; Methratta, Sosamma T

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of appendicitis in children has rapidly increased recently. This change has been primarily driven by the desire to avoid CT radiation dose. This meta-analysis reviews the diagnostic performance of MRI for pediatric appendicitis and discusses current knowledge of cost-effectiveness. We used a conservative Haldane correction statistical method and found pooled diagnostic parameters including a sensitivity of 96.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 94.3-97.8%), specificity of 96.1% (95% CI: 93.5-97.7%), positive predictive value of 92.0% (95% CI: 89.3-94.0%) and negative predictive value of 98.3% (95% CI: 97.3-99.0%), based on 11 studies. Assessment of patient outcomes associated with MRI use at two institutions indicates that time to antibiotics was 4.7 h and 8.2 h, time to appendectomy was 9.1 h and 13.9 h, and negative appendectomy rate was 3.1% and 1.4%, respectively. Alternative diagnoses were present in ~20% of cases, most commonly adnexal cysts and enteritis/colitis. Regarding technique, half-acquisition single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) pulse sequences are crucial. While gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted pulse sequences might be helpful, any benefit beyond non-contrast MRI has not been confirmed. Balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequences are generally noncontributory. Protocols do not need to exceed five sequences; four-sequence protocols are commonly utilized. Sedation generally is not indicated; patients younger than 5 years might be attempted based on the child's ability to cooperate. A comprehensive pediatric cost-effectiveness analysis that includes both direct and indirect costs is needed. PMID:27229509

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric appendicitis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael M; Kulaylat, Afif N; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Engbrecht, Brett W; Dillman, Jonathan R; Methratta, Sosamma T

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of appendicitis in children has rapidly increased recently. This change has been primarily driven by the desire to avoid CT radiation dose. This meta-analysis reviews the diagnostic performance of MRI for pediatric appendicitis and discusses current knowledge of cost-effectiveness. We used a conservative Haldane correction statistical method and found pooled diagnostic parameters including a sensitivity of 96.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 94.3-97.8%), specificity of 96.1% (95% CI: 93.5-97.7%), positive predictive value of 92.0% (95% CI: 89.3-94.0%) and negative predictive value of 98.3% (95% CI: 97.3-99.0%), based on 11 studies. Assessment of patient outcomes associated with MRI use at two institutions indicates that time to antibiotics was 4.7 h and 8.2 h, time to appendectomy was 9.1 h and 13.9 h, and negative appendectomy rate was 3.1% and 1.4%, respectively. Alternative diagnoses were present in ~20% of cases, most commonly adnexal cysts and enteritis/colitis. Regarding technique, half-acquisition single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) pulse sequences are crucial. While gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted pulse sequences might be helpful, any benefit beyond non-contrast MRI has not been confirmed. Balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequences are generally noncontributory. Protocols do not need to exceed five sequences; four-sequence protocols are commonly utilized. Sedation generally is not indicated; patients younger than 5 years might be attempted based on the child's ability to cooperate. A comprehensive pediatric cost-effectiveness analysis that includes both direct and indirect costs is needed.

  11. Polyarteritis nodosa presenting with necrotising appendicitis and hepatic aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Ozçay, Necdet; Arda, Kemal; Sugüneş, Tonguç; Ozdemirel, Deniz; Aydoğ, Gülden; Atalay, Fuat; Akoğlu, Musa

    2003-03-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a necrotizing vasculitis which affects small and medium-sized arteries. The clinical features of the disease vary according to the site and extent of involvement. Aneurysmal dilatation and thrombosis in the arteries of the liver and gastrointestinal tract have been reported in polyarteritis nodosa. However, rupture of the hepatic aneurysm and necrotizing appendicitis due to polyarteritis nodosa are uncommon; indeed a case in which these have occurred together has not been reported to date. In this case report, a patient with necrotizing appendicitis and hepatic aneurysm rupture due to underlying poliarteritis nodasa is presented. Extensive intraabdominal hematoma and appendicitis were treated surgically and complete recovery was achieved.

  12. Demographic characteristics and seasonal variations of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Bal, Ahmet; Ozkececi, Ziya Taner; Turkoglu, Ozgur; Ozsoy, Mustafa; Celep, Ruchan Bahadir; Yilmaz, Sezgin; Arikan, Yüksel

    2015-01-01

    L’appendicite è la patologia che più comunemente richiede un intervento chirurgico in emergenza, e l’appendicectomia è il procedimento chirurgico più commune in tutto il mondo, importante in quanto rappresenta un trattamento efficace. Il nostro scopo è stato quello di determinare le variazioni stagionali dell’appendicite nella nostra regione e di indentificare le differenze demografiche e regionali, e per questo abbiamo analizzato retrospettivamente I dati dei pazienti ricoverati nell’ospedale universitario Afyon Kocatepe e nell’ospedale statale Sivrihisar State tra il 2003 ed il 2012, cioè 839 pazienti. L’età media di tutti i pazienti era di 33 ± 14.7 anni, e la maggior frequenza dell’appendicite acuta è risultata in autunno e nella primavera (P > 0.05). Non si sono osservate differenze sigfnificative stagionali nell’ospedale universitario Afyon Kocatepe, mentre l’appendicite si è manifestata più frequentemente in autunno che non in inverno nell’ospedale statale Sivrihisar (P < 0.05). non c’è stata nessuna relazione con la temperatura media mensile, l’umidità, l’entità delle precipitazioni e la frequenza dell’appendicite (P > 0.05). In conclusion, sebbene l’appendicite presenta una variazione stagionale, altri fattori embientali e l’impatto delle abitudini alimentari non vanno ignorate. L’etiologia dell’appendicite è comunque.multifattoriale, e nei futuri studi multiparametrici nell’intero territorio nazionale potrebbero evidenziarsi delle etiologie territorio-specifiche di questa patologia.

  13. Diabetes insipidus uncovered during conservative management of complicated acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Mamtani, Anita; Odom, Stephen R; Butler, Kathryn L

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) arises from impaired function of antidiuretic hormone, characterized by hypovolemia, hypernatremia, polyuria, and polydipsia. This case is a reminder of the rare but challenging obstacle that undiagnosed DI poses in fasting surgical patients, requiring prompt recognition and vigilant management of marked homeostatic imbalances.

  14. New synthetic strategies for xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Milo; Darcsi, Andras; Balint, Mihaly; Benkovics, Gabor; Sohajda, Tamas; Beni, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Xanthene dyes can be appended to cyclodextrins via an ester or amide bridge in order to switch the fluorescence on or off. This is made possible through the formation of nonfluorescent lactones or lactams as the fluorophore can reversibly cyclize. In this context we report a green approach for the synthesis of switchable xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins based on the coupling agent 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMT-MM). By using 6-monoamino-β-cyclodextrin and commercially available inexpensive dyes, we prepared rhodamine- and fluorescein-appended cyclodextrins. The compounds were characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy and MS spectrometry, their UV-vis spectra were recorded at various pH, and their purity was determined by capillary electrophoresis. Two potential models for the supramolecular assembly of the xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins were developed based on the set of data collected by the extensive NMR characterization. PMID:27340446

  15. BODIPY atropisomer interconversion, face discrimination, and superstructure appending.

    PubMed

    Doulain, Pierre-Emmanuel; Goze, Christine; Bodio, Ewen; Richard, Philippe; Decréau, Richard A

    2016-03-25

    A strategy was developed to append sterically hindered apical pickets on both faces of the BODIPY platform to prevent stacking and aggregation. Ortho-substitution of both the meso-phenyl ring and the boron-bound catechol affords the right directionality to append pickets, achieve face discrimination, featuring two interconvertible atropisomers, and is reminiscent of the picket-fence strategy in porphyrins. PMID:26927530

  16. Diagnostic accuracy at several reduced radiation dose levels for CT imaging in the diagnosis of appendicitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Khatonabadi, Maryam; Kim, Hyun; Jude, Matilda; Zaragoza, Edward; Lee, Margaret; Patel, Maitraya; Poon, Cheryce; Douek, Michael; Andrews-Tang, Denise; Doepke, Laura; McNitt-Gray, Shawn; Cagnon, Chris; DeMarco, John; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: While several studies have investigated the tradeoffs between radiation dose and image quality (noise) in CT imaging, the purpose of this study was to take this analysis a step further by investigating the tradeoffs between patient radiation dose (including organ dose) and diagnostic accuracy in diagnosis of appendicitis using CT. Methods: This study was IRB approved and utilized data from 20 patients who underwent clinical CT exams for indications of appendicitis. Medical record review established true diagnosis of appendicitis, with 10 positives and 10 negatives. A validated software tool used raw projection data from each scan to create simulated images at lower dose levels (70%, 50%, 30%, 20% of original). An observer study was performed with 6 radiologists reviewing each case at each dose level in random order over several sessions. Readers assessed image quality and provided confidence in their diagnosis of appendicitis, each on a 5 point scale. Liver doses at each case and each dose level were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation based methods. Results: Overall diagnostic accuracy varies across dose levels: 92%, 93%, 91%, 90% and 90% across the 100%, 70%, 50%, 30% and 20% dose levels respectively. And it is 93%, 95%, 88%, 90% and 90% across the 13.5-22mGy, 9.6-13.5mGy, 6.4-9.6mGy, 4-6.4mGy, and 2-4mGy liver dose ranges respectively. Only 4 out of 600 observations were rated "unacceptable" for image quality. Conclusion: The results from this pilot study indicate that the diagnostic accuracy does not change dramatically even at significantly reduced radiation dose.

  17. Appendicitis caused by the metastasis of HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mori, Ryutaro; Futamura, Manabu; Morimitsu, Kasumi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro

    2016-12-01

    The appropriate therapy for metastatic breast cancer must be selected based on the immunohistochemical phenotype of the cancer. However, biopsy for metastatic lesions is difficult. We herein report a patient with incidental appendicitis caused by a metastatic breast cancer which was successfully treated with effective therapy chosen based on the pathological diagnosis obtained on resection. The patient was a 56-year-old female with right breast cancer and an immunohistochemical status of estrogen receptor (ER) (+), progesterone receptor (PgR) (+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) (3+), and Ki67 40 %. She received epirubicin and cyclophosphamide therapy followed by docetaxel and trastuzumab, and total mastectomy with axillary dissection was performed. Thereafter, she received postmastectomy radiation, adjuvant trastuzumab, and adjuvant hormone therapy with letrozole. One year and 8 months after the operation, she developed right hydronephrosis and swollen para-aortic lymph nodes and her hormone therapy was changed to fulvestrant therapy. However, she additionally developed left hydronephrosis and multiple bone metastases, and pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel therapy was started. After six cycles, her disease became well-controlled, and maintenance with pertuzumab and trastuzumab was introduced. However, after another 7 months, she developed new vertebral metastasis and acute appendicitis and laparoscopic appendectomy was performed. A pathological investigation of the resected appendix revealed some clusters of atypical cells in the subserosa and muscle layer, which showed an immunohistochemical status of ER (+), PgR (-), HER2 (3+), and E-cadherin (-). These findings led to the diagnosis as appendiceal metastasis of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) from the breast. Thereafter, she received trastuzumab-DM1 and her disease was well-controlled again. Appendicitis caused by breast cancer is very rare. However, ILC sometimes develops metastases in

  18. Non-fecalith-induced appendicitis: etiology, imaging, and pathology.

    PubMed

    Swischuk, Leonard E; Chung, Dai H; Hawkins, Hal K; Jadhav, Siddharth P; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to document the imaging and pathology findings in non-fecalith-induced appendicitis. We reviewed the imaging and pathologic findings in 40 patients with histologically proven purulent appendicitis seen over a 2-year period. Findings documented were (1) total appendiceal involvement, (2) predominant appendiceal tip involvement, (3) presence of a fecalith, and (4) presence of lymphoid hyperplasia. There were a total of 40 patients, 28 males and 12 females. The age range was 2-18 years with a mean of 11.5 years. Twenty-two (55 %) patients demonstrated classic purulent appendicitis of the whole appendix, 20 (91 %) of these appendices had a fecalith. Eighteen (45 %) patients demonstrated purulent appendicitis confined to or predominately involving the tip of the appendix, and all 18 (100 %) patients demonstrated marked lymphoid hyperplasia. Only two (11 %) of these appendices had a fecalith. Overall, a fecalith was found in only 55 % of our cases, while 45 % demonstrated no fecalith, but rather marked lymphoid hyperplasia. Lymphoid hyperplasia appeared to be the underlying predisposing cause of purulent appendicitis in these cases.

  19. Xanthogranulomatous Appendicitis Mimicking Residual Burkitt's Lymphoma After Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soomin; Choi, Sung-Eun; Kim, Yu Ri; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Sohn, Seung-Kook

    2016-01-01

    The case of a 23-year-old female treated with aggressive high-dose therapy for Burkitt's lymphoma is reported. A positron emission tomography and computed tomography scan after completion of chemotherapy revealed a residual hypermetabolic lesion in the right pelvic cavity. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan showed circumferential wall thickening at the tip of the appendix. A laparoscopic exploration and appendectomy were performed, and a pathologic examination of the resected appendix revealed xanthogranulomatous appendicitis. This is a rare case of a xanthogranulomatous appendicitis mimicking remnant Burkitt's lymphoma after completion of chemotherapy. PMID:27218100

  20. [Causes of late diagnosis of appendicitis in children].

    PubMed

    Zlámal, Z

    1996-07-01

    The author evaluates the case-history of 51 children with perforated appendicitis treated during 1984-1995 at the First Surgical Clinic of the Faculty Hospital Olomouc. The purpose was to find an answer to the problem why in these children the diagnosis was delayed and whose was the fault of the substantial deterioration of the health status. In the evaluation four groups of causal responsibility are differentiated: a very rapid development of appendicitis-parents, arriving late in the surgery-paediatricians-surgeons. The authors discuss circumstances associated with the diagnostic error and delay.

  1. Unusual presentation of a familiar pathology: chronic appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Sierakowski, Kyra; Pattichis, Andrew; Russell, Patrick; Wattchow, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a man who experienced night sweats, abdominal pain and fever for over 3 months, with incomplete response to broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Although CT imaging was insufficient to identify the cause for his chronic abdominal pain, the abnormality of a 'misty mesentery' was crucial in guiding further investigation. The final diagnosis of chronic appendicitis was made through laparoscopic and pathological examination. This case highlights the utility of a collaborative diagnostic effort between disciplines. Chronic appendicitis can cause lingering abdominal pain. Early recognition and appropriate referral can save patients months and even years of unnecessary suffering. PMID:26869622

  2. New synthetic strategies for xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins

    PubMed Central

    Darcsi, Andras; Balint, Mihaly; Benkovics, Gabor; Sohajda, Tamas; Beni, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Summary Xanthene dyes can be appended to cyclodextrins via an ester or amide bridge in order to switch the fluorescence on or off. This is made possible through the formation of nonfluorescent lactones or lactams as the fluorophore can reversibly cyclize. In this context we report a green approach for the synthesis of switchable xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins based on the coupling agent 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMT-MM). By using 6-monoamino-β-cyclodextrin and commercially available inexpensive dyes, we prepared rhodamine- and fluorescein-appended cyclodextrins. The compounds were characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy and MS spectrometry, their UV–vis spectra were recorded at various pH, and their purity was determined by capillary electrophoresis. Two potential models for the supramolecular assembly of the xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins were developed based on the set of data collected by the extensive NMR characterization. PMID:27340446

  3. Henoch-Schönlein purpura complicated by acalculous cholecystitis and intussusception, and following recurrence with appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Özkaya, Ahmet Kağan; Güler, Ekrem; Çetinkaya, Ahmet; Karakaya, Ali Erdal; Göksügür, Yalçın; Katı, Ömer; Güler, Ahmet Gökhan; Davutoğlu, Mehmet

    2016-05-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is the most common childhood systemic vasculitis. Gastro-intestinal involvement occurs in two-thirds of patients. The characteristic skin lesions generally precede abdominal symptoms or present concurrently. A 7-year-old boy presented with intussusception and acalculous cholecystitis and had a cholecystectomy. Two weeks later he was re-admitted with features typical of HSP which responded to corticosteroids. Eleven months later he presented with abdominal pain and recurrence of HSP and, at laparotomy, there was acute appendicitis. This is the first case of a child presenting with HSP complicated by acalculous cholecystitis. PMID:27077617

  4. Methods for Acute and Subacute Murine Hindlimb Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Michael E; McCord, Timothy J; McClung, Joseph M; Kontos, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a leading cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in developed countries, and animal models that reliably reproduce the human disease are necessary to develop new therapies for this disease. The mouse hindlimb ischemia model has been widely used for this purpose, but the standard practice of inducing acute limb ischemia by ligation of the femoral artery can result in substantial tissue necrosis, compromising investigators' ability to study the vascular and skeletal muscle tissue responses to ischemia. An alternative approach to femoral artery ligation is the induction of gradual femoral artery occlusion through the use of ameroid constrictors. When placed around the femoral artery in the same or different locations as the sites of femoral artery ligation, these devices occlude the artery over 1 - 3 days, resulting in more gradual, subacute ischemia. This results in less substantial skeletal muscle tissue necrosis, which may more closely mimic the responses seen in human PAD. Because genetic background influences outcomes in both the acute and subacute ischemia models, consideration of the mouse strain being studied is important in choosing the best model. This paper describes the proper procedure and anatomical placement of ligatures or ameroid constrictors on the mouse femoral artery to induce subacute or acute hindlimb ischemia in the mouse. PMID:27403963

  5. Methods for Acute and Subacute Murine Hindlimb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Padgett, Michael E.; McCord, Timothy J.; McClung, Joseph M.; Kontos, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a leading cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in developed countries, and animal models that reliably reproduce the human disease are necessary to develop new therapies for this disease. The mouse hindlimb ischemia model has been widely used for this purpose, but the standard practice of inducing acute limb ischemia by ligation of the femoral artery can result in substantial tissue necrosis, compromising investigators' ability to study the vascular and skeletal muscle tissue responses to ischemia. An alternative approach to femoral artery ligation is the induction of gradual femoral artery occlusion through the use of ameroid constrictors. When placed around the femoral artery in the same or different locations as the sites of femoral artery ligation, these devices occlude the artery over 1-3 days, resulting in more gradual, subacute ischemia. This results in less substantial skeletal muscle tissue necrosis, which may more closely mimic the responses seen in human PAD. Because genetic background influences outcomes in both the acute and subacute ischemia models, consideration of the mouse strain being studied is important in choosing the best model. This paper describes the proper procedure and anatomical placement of ligatures or ameroid constrictors on the mouse femoral artery to induce subacute or acute hindlimb ischemia in the mouse. PMID:27403963

  6. Thiophene and benzodioxole appended thiazolyl-pyrazoline compounds: Microwave assisted synthesis, antimicrobial and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Shahavar Sulthana, S; Arul Antony, S; Balachandran, C; Syed Shafi, S

    2015-07-15

    A novel series of thiophene and benzodioxole appended thiazolyl-pyrazoline derivatives have been designed, synthesized and evaluated against different bacteria and fungi. The antimicrobial activity of the synthesized compounds were screened using MIC method and were proved synthesized compounds 7o, 7r and 7t to show good antimicrobial activity against bacteria and fungi. In silico molecular docking studies revealed that all the synthesized molecules showed good binding energy toward the target receptor DNA topoisomerase IV, ranging from -10.42 to -11.66 kcal/mol. PMID:26028159

  7. Photoswitchable azobenzene-appended iridium(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Miqueo, J; Altube, A; García-Lecina, E; Tron, A; McClenaghan, N D; Freixa, Z

    2016-09-21

    Iridium(iii) cyclometalated complexes have been used as models to study the effect that extended conjugation and substitution pattern has on the photochromic behavior of azobenzene-appended 2-phenylpyridyl (ppy) ligands. For this purpose four azobenzene-containing ppy ligands were synthesized. With these ligands, nine iridium(iii) complexes containing up to three appended azobenzenes were synthesized. Analysis of their photochromic behaviour by means of UV-vis and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy permitted us to conclude that the light-induced trans-to-cis isomerization of the azobenzene was strongly inhibited upon coordination to the Ir(iii) cation when the electronic conjugation was extended along the whole ligand. The use of an aliphatic spacer unit (either -CH2- or -OCH2-) between the azobenzene and the ppy fragment of the ligand sufficed to disrupt the electronic communication, and obtain photochromic organometallic complexes. PMID:27460186

  8. A stump appendicitis in a child: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Stump appendicitis is a delayed complication of appendectomy. It is rare and few cases reported in the paediatric literature. The authors report on another case in a child and focus on the diagnostic peculiarities of this entity. Case A 9-year-old boy with previous history of open appendectomy was admitted for a right lower quadrant pain with bilious vomiting and fever. Physical examination demonstrated tenderness in the right lower quadrant and guarding over the appendectomy scar. The white blood cell count was 23.500 cells/mm3. Plain abdominal radiograph and ultrasonography revealed fecalith localized in the right iliac fossa. The diagnosis of stump appendicitis was advocated and confirmed at laparotomy. A gangrenous and perforated appendiceal stump was found and completely removed. The post-operative course was uneventful after 18 months follow-up period. Conclusion Stump appendicitis is rare and should be considered in any patient with right lower quadrant pain even if there is a history of appendectomy. Complete removal of the appendix is the only mean to prevent the occurrence of this complication. PMID:19919712

  9. EnD-Seq and AppEnD: sequencing 3′ ends to identify nontemplated tails and degradation intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Joshua D.; Slevin, Michael K.; Tatomer, Deirdre C.; Duronio, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Existing methods for detecting RNA intermediates resulting from exonuclease degradation are low-throughput and laborious. In addition, mapping the 3′ ends of RNA molecules to the genome after high-throughput sequencing is challenging, particularly if the 3′ ends contain post-transcriptional modifications. To address these problems, we developed EnD-Seq, a high-throughput sequencing protocol that preserves the 3′ end of RNA molecules, and AppEnD, a computational method for analyzing high-throughput sequencing data. Together these allow determination of the 3′ ends of RNA molecules, including nontemplated additions. Applying EnD-Seq and AppEnD to histone mRNAs revealed that a significant fraction of cytoplasmic histone mRNAs end in one or two uridines, which have replaced the 1–2 nt at the 3′ end of mature histone mRNA maintaining the length of the histone transcripts. Histone mRNAs in fly embryos and ovaries show the same pattern, but with different tail nucleotide compositions. We increase the sensitivity of EnD-Seq by using cDNA priming to specifically enrich low-abundance tails of known sequence composition allowing identification of degradation intermediates. In addition, we show the broad applicability of our computational approach by using AppEnD to gain insight into 3′ additions from diverse types of sequencing data, including data from small capped RNA sequencing and some alternative polyadenylation protocols. PMID:26015596

  10. Pictorial essay: CT scan of appendicitis and its mimics causing right lower quadrant pain

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Monika; Agrawal, Anjali

    2008-01-01

    CT scanning is widely used in the diagnostic workup of right lower quadrant pain. While appendicitis remains the most frequent cause, a majority of patients referred for suspected appendicitis turn out to have alternative diagnoses or a normal CT study. The purpose of our pictorial essay is to present an overview of the CT findings of appendicitis and its common mimics and to highlight the features that provide clues to alternative diagnoses.

  11. Once Daily Dosing of Ceftriaxone and Metronidazole in Children With Perforated Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Ally, Saudia; Kelly, Brian; Kays, David; Thames, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare hospital length of stay and rate of infectious complications in children with perforated appendicitis based on the postoperative antibiotic administered. METHODS: This study was a retrospective analysis of children with perforated appendicitis who underwent an appendectomy at a large academic medical center from 2008 to 2013. The primary outcome was hospital length of stay. The secondary outcomes were rates of abscess formation, wound infection, and 30-day readmissions. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-three patients were included. Sixty-six patients (53%) were administered ceftriaxone and metronidazole once daily; 57 (47%) were administered other antibiotic regimens, which consisted of single, double, or triple antibiotic therapy with a beta-lactam backbone. There was no difference between the groups in terms of postoperative length of stay (5.7 versus 5.8 days, p = 0.83), postoperative abscess rate (8% versus 4%, p = 0.57), postoperative wound infection rate (5% versus 2%, p = 0.73), and 30-day readmissions (3% versus 11%, p = 0.19). CONCLUSIONS: While there was no statistically significant difierence in the outcomes evaluated, the rate of infectious complications was twofold higher in those given ceftriaxone and metronidazole than in others. A larger prospective randomized controlled trial is warranted to better understand the risks of using these agents. PMID:27199621

  12. [Laparoscopic diagnosis of acute mesenteric lymphadenitis].

    PubMed

    Perminova, G I; Sirotinskiĭ, V V; Sokolov, A A

    1989-01-01

    In 14 patients with non-specific mesadenitis, the diagnosis was established at emergency laparoscopy, performed for suspected acute appendicitis. Laparoscopic semiotics of the disease is described. Conservative treatment with additional local administration of drugs was successful. The mean duration of the in-hospital treatment of the patients was 4.6 days.

  13. Perforated appendicitis: current experience in a Childrens Hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Marchildon, M B; Dudgeon, D L

    1977-01-01

    A review of 89 consecutive cases of perforated appendicitis recently treated surgically at Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles revealed no mortality and a complication rate of 17%. Significant factors in this low morbidity are: adequate preoperative resuscitation, routine administration of broad spectrum antibiotics pre and postoperatively, and attention to surgical detail. Anaerobic organisms were invariably present in cultures of the peritoneal fluid taken at operation. Anaerobes were also present in the blood in all 5 patients having positive blood cultures and were frequently pathogens whenever postoperative infectious complications occurred. The use of antibiotics effective against anaerobic organisms was common in this series and produced no morbidity. PMID:831639

  14. Capillary electrophoretic studies on quantum dots and histidine appended peptides self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhao; Li, Jingyan; Chen, Yao; Teng, Yiwan; Wang, Cheli; Li, Jinchen; Liu, Li; Dong, Bingyu; Qiu, Lin; Jiang, Pengju

    2015-10-01

    Herein, we designed four peptides appended with different numbers of histidine (Hisn -peptide). We launched a systematic investigation on quantum dots (QDs) and Hisn -peptide self-assembly in solution using fluorescence coupled CE (CE-FL). The results indicated that CE-FL was a powerful method to probe how ligands interaction on the surface of nanoparticles. The self-assembly of QDs and peptide was determined by the numbers of histidine. We also observed that longer polyhistidine tags (n ≤ 6) could improve the self-assembly efficiency. Furthermore, the formation and separation of QD-peptide assembly were also studied by CE-FL inside a capillary. The total time for the mixing, self-assembly, separation, and detection was less than 10 min. Our method greatly expands the application of CE-FL in QDs-based biolabeling and bioanalysis.

  15. Identifying reasons for delays in acute hospitals using the Day-of-Care Survey method.

    PubMed

    Reid, Erica; King, Andrew; Mathieson, Alex; Woodcock, Thomas; Watkin, Simon W

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a new tool called 'Day-of-Care Survey', developed to assess inpatient delays in acute hospitals. Using literature review, iterative testing and feedback from professional groups, a national multidisciplinary team developed the survey criteria and methodology. Review teams working in pairs visited wards and used case records and bedside charts to assess the patient's status against severity of illness and service intensity criteria. Patients who did not meet the survey criteria for acute care were identified and delays were categorised. From March 2012 to December 2013, nine acute hospitals across Scotland, Australia and England were surveyed. A total of 3,846 adult general inpatient beds (excluding intensive care and maternity) were reviewed. There were 145 empty beds at the time of surveys across the nine sites, with 270 definite discharges planned on the day of the survey. The total number of patients not meeting criteria for acute care was 798/3,431 (23%, range 18-28%). Six factors accounted for 61% (490/798) of the reasons why patients not meeting acute care criteria remained in hospital. This survey gives important insights into the challenges of managing inpatient flow using system level information as a method to target interventions designed to address delay. PMID:25824060

  16. Identifying reasons for delays in acute hospitals using the Day-of-Care Survey method.

    PubMed

    Reid, Erica; King, Andrew; Mathieson, Alex; Woodcock, Thomas; Watkin, Simon W

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a new tool called 'Day-of-Care Survey', developed to assess inpatient delays in acute hospitals. Using literature review, iterative testing and feedback from professional groups, a national multidisciplinary team developed the survey criteria and methodology. Review teams working in pairs visited wards and used case records and bedside charts to assess the patient's status against severity of illness and service intensity criteria. Patients who did not meet the survey criteria for acute care were identified and delays were categorised. From March 2012 to December 2013, nine acute hospitals across Scotland, Australia and England were surveyed. A total of 3,846 adult general inpatient beds (excluding intensive care and maternity) were reviewed. There were 145 empty beds at the time of surveys across the nine sites, with 270 definite discharges planned on the day of the survey. The total number of patients not meeting criteria for acute care was 798/3,431 (23%, range 18-28%). Six factors accounted for 61% (490/798) of the reasons why patients not meeting acute care criteria remained in hospital. This survey gives important insights into the challenges of managing inpatient flow using system level information as a method to target interventions designed to address delay.

  17. Appendicitis in pregnancy mimicking haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Pooja; Aggarwal, Neelam; Chopra, Seema; Suri, Vanita

    2011-01-01

    We report a patient with pregnancy at term in whom appendicitis mimicked haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets (HELLP) syndrome. A high index of suspicion of appendicitis should be kept in patients with abdominal pain and biochemical evidence of HELLP. PMID:27579095

  18. Perforated second trimester appendicitis with abdominal compartment syndrome managed with negative pressure wound therapy and open abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Turnock, Adam R.; Fleischer, Brian P.; Carney, Martin J.; Vanderlan, Wesley B.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is a known complication of laparotomy; however, the literature is lacking in regards to treatment of this entity in pregnant patients. We present a case of acute perforated appendicitis in a second trimester primagravida, complicated by gangrenous necrosis of the contiguous bowel with subsequent development of ACS and intra-abdominal sepsis. This was treated with a novel approach, using non-commercial negative pressure wound therapy and open abdomen technique. Gestational integrity was preserved and the patient went on to experience a normal spontaneous vaginal delivery. At 5 years post-delivery the patient has had no surgical complications and her baby has met all developmental milestones. PMID:27302498

  19. A drawing pin, drill bit, several staples and a magnet: definitely not a simple case of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Coles, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The sequalae of foreign body ingestion may present in a number of manners and are even more prone to difficulties when a history of foreign body ingestion is not apparent. An 8-year-old boy with a short history of abdominal pain and vomiting presented to the hospital after seeing his general practitioner. He had a history of developmental delay. Examination revealed lower abdominal peritonism and his blood tests revealed elevated inflammatory markers. The patient was initially diagnosed with acute appendicitis and proceeded to theatre. At operation, the patient had a normal appendix but two perforations of the small bowel were incidentally discovered. After theatre, the patient underwent an abdominal X-ray, which revealed a number of radiopaque objects in the rectum. He returned to theatre where a number of metallic objects and a magnet were manually retrieved from the patient's rectum. He made a full recovery and was discharged home a few days later. PMID:26220986

  20. Proposal for a recovery prediction method for patients affected by acute mediastinitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An attempt to find a prediction method of death risk in patients affected by acute mediastinitis. There is not such a tool described in available literature for that serious disease. Methods The study comprised 44 consecutive cases of acute mediastinitis. General anamnesis and biochemical data were included. Factor analysis was used to extract the risk characteristic for the patients. The most valuable results were obtained for 8 parameters which were selected for further statistical analysis (all collected during few hours after admission). Three factors reached Eigenvalue >1. Clinical explanations of these combined statistical factors are: Factor1 - proteinic status (serum total protein, albumin, and hemoglobin level), Factor2 - inflammatory status (white blood cells, CRP, procalcitonin), and Factor3 - general risk (age, number of coexisting diseases). Threshold values of prediction factors were estimated by means of statistical analysis (factor analysis, Statgraphics Centurion XVI). Results The final prediction result for the patients is constructed as simultaneous evaluation of all factor scores. High probability of death should be predicted if factor 1 value decreases with simultaneous increase of factors 2 and 3. The diagnostic power of the proposed method was revealed to be high [sensitivity =90%, specificity =64%], for Factor1 [SNC = 87%, SPC = 79%]; for Factor2 [SNC = 87%, SPC = 50%] and for Factor3 [SNC = 73%, SPC = 71%]. Conclusion The proposed prediction method seems a useful emergency signal during acute mediastinitis control in affected patients. PMID:22574625

  1. Comparison of Laparoscopic Appendectomy with open appendectomy in Treating Children with Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guoqing; Han, Aihua; Wang, Wenjuan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze feasibility and curative effect of laparoscopic appendectomy in the treatment of pediatric appendicitis and compare it with open appendectomy. Methods: Two hundred and sixty patients were selected for this study and randomly divided into open appendectomy group (130 cases) and laparoscopic appendectomy group (130 cases). Patients in open appendectomy group underwent traditional open appendectomy, while patients in laparoscopic appendectomy were treated with laparoscopic appendectomy. Incision length, blood loss during operation, duration of operation, time to leave bed, anus exhausting time, time to take food, catheter drainage time, urinary catheterization time, time of using antibiotics, use of pain killer and incidence of complications such as incision infection, residual abscess and intestinal obstruction were compared between two groups. Results: We found relevant indexes including length of incision, amount of bleeding and duration of operation in laparoscopic appendectomy group were better than open appendectomy group after surgery; and differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). Indexes such as time to out of bed, time to take food, exhaust time, drainage time, catheterization time and application time and use of antibiotics in laparoscopic appendectomy group were all superior to open appendectomy group, and differences had statistical significance (P<0.05). Incidence of complications in laparoscopic appendectomy group was much lower than open appendectomy group and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: Laparoscopic appendectomy has advantages of small trauma, sound curative effect, low incidence of complications and rapid recovery and can effectively relieve pain of children suffering from appendicitis. Hence it is worth promotion and should be preferred. PMID:27182227

  2. Missed appendicitis: did unexpected intraluminal densities play a role?

    PubMed

    Harper, Rachel; Friedman, Benjamin T; Strote, Jared

    2016-01-01

    A healthy 19-year-old boy presented to our emergency department with abdominal pain. His history, examination and laboratory evaluation raised concern for appendicitis. A CT study of the abdomen and pelvis was carried out by the radiologist and emergency physician and was notable only for a large amount of unexpected high-attenuation intraluminal material. With further history, this was thought to be most likely retained bismuth from over-the-counter medicine ingestion. The patient was discharged home without a diagnosis. Further review of the CT scan by a second radiologist revealed a concern for appendiceal enlargement and associated free fluid. The patient was called back for further evaluation and treatment and ultimately an appendectomy was performed. Physicians should be aware of the causes and impact of unexpected radiopaque intraluminal contents on radiological studies. Most commonly from ingested medicine, such findings can obscure mucosal details, mimic active bleeding or create a distraction from other abnormalities. PMID:27605197

  3. Left-Sided Appendicitis in an Elderly Patient with Midgut Malrotation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Pei Wen; Huang, Bo-Ming; Liu, Chung Hsien; Chen, Chien-Chin; Tsai, Ming-Jen

    2015-12-01

    Appendicitis is a common surgical abdominal disease with various presentations. Its diagnosis may be obscured by asymptomatic congenital anatomical anomalies like midgut malrotation. Midgut malrotation is a rare fetal anomaly resulting from incomplete or failure of midgut rotation and fixation. It is mostly presented with bowel obstruction or volvulus in early life. Presentation in adult is rare. Here, we report an elderly patient presented with left lower abdominal pain and urinary tract infection. Abdominal computed tomography revealed left-sided appendicitis with non-rotational-type midgut malrotation. Clinicians should bear in mind the possibility of underlying midgut malrotation, as appendicitis could be the first presentation of this rare congenital condition. PMID:27011586

  4. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-04-28

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide.

  5. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of “chyle” occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  6. Performance of CMR Methods for Differentiating Acute From Chronic Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Smulders, Martijn W.; Bekkers, Sebastiaan C.A.M.; Kim, Han W.; Van Assche, Lowie M.R.; Parker, Michele A.; Kim, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) methods for discriminating acute from chronic myocardial infarction (MI). Background Although T2-weighted-CMR is thought to be accurate in differentiating acute from chronic MI, few studies have reported on diagnostic accuracy, and these generally compared extremes in infarct age (e.g. <1-week-old versus >6-months-old) and did not evaluate other CMR methods that could be informative. Methods 221 CMR studies were performed at various time-points after STEMI in 117 consecutive patients without prior history of MI or revascularization enrolled prospectively at 2 centers. Imaging markers of acute MI (<1-month) were T2-hyperintensity on double inversion-recovery turbo-spin-echo (DIR-TSE) images, microvascular obstruction (MO) on delayed-enhancement-CMR, and focally increased end-diastolic wall thickness (EDWT) on cine-CMR. Results The prevalence of T2-DIR-TSE hyperintensity decreased with infarct age but remained substantial up to 6-months post-MI. In contrast, the prevalence of both MO and increased-EDWT dropped sharply after 1-month. T2-DIR-TSE sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for identifying acute MI were 88%, 66%, and 77% compared with 73%, 97%, and 85% for the combination of MO-or-increased-EDWT. On multivariable analysis, persistence of T2-hyperintensity in intermediate-aged infarcts (1–6 months-old) was predicted by larger infarct size, diabetes, and better T2-DIR-TSE image quality score. For infarct size ≥10% LV, a simple algorithm incorporating all CMR components allowed classification of infarct age into 3 categories (<1-month-old, 1–6 months-old, and ≥6-months-old) with 80% [95% CI: 73–87%] accuracy. Conclusions T2-DIR-TSE hyperintensity is specific for infarcts less than 6-months-old, whereas microvascular obstruction and increased end-diastolic wall-thickness are specific for infarcts less than 1-month-old. Incorporating multiple CMR markers of acute MI and their

  7. May Ingestion of Leachate from Decomposed Corpses Cause Appendicitis? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Domingues-Ferreira, Maurício; Saddi-Rosa, Pedro; dos Santos, André Luis

    2011-01-01

    The general consensus is that appendicitis is basically provoked by fecaliths or lymphoid hyperplasic obstruction. Several studies based on histological diagnosis have not confirmed this hypothesis. On the contrary, obstruction has been proved in only a minority of cases. Diverse infections by parasites, bacteria, fungus, and noninfective agents have been associated with appendicitis in the medical literature. We describe a firefighter, who ingested a small quantity of leachate from decomposing corpses while working and developed enteritis a few hours later, which lasted several days and evolved to appendicitis. This case raises the possibility that the high quantity of bacteria concentration present in the leachate could have provoked enteritis and the subsequent appendicitis due to a direct effect of the bacteria on the appendix. PMID:21541232

  8. OSO paradigm--A rapid behavioral screening method for acute psychosocial stress reactivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Brzózka, M M; Unterbarnscheidt, T; Schwab, M H; Rossner, M J

    2016-02-01

    Chronic psychosocial stress is an important environmental risk factor for the development of psychiatric diseases. However, studying the impact of chronic psychosocial stress in mice is time consuming and thus not optimally suited to 'screen' increasing numbers of genetically manipulated mouse models for psychiatric endophenotypes. Moreover, many studies focus on restraint stress, a strong physical stressor with limited relevance for psychiatric disorders. Here, we describe a simple and a rapid method based on the resident-intruder paradigm to examine acute effects of mild psychosocial stress in mice. The OSO paradigm (open field--social defeat--open field) compares behavioral consequences on locomotor activity, anxiety and curiosity before and after exposure to acute social defeat stress. We first evaluated OSO in male C57Bl/6 wildtype mice where a single episode of social defeat reduced locomotor activity, increased anxiety and diminished exploratory behavior. Subsequently, we applied the OSO paradigm to mouse models of two schizophrenia (SZ) risk genes. Transgenic mice with neuronal overexpression of Neuregulin-1 (Nrg1) type III showed increased risk-taking behavior after acute stress exposure suggesting that NRG1 dysfunction is associated with altered affective behavior. In contrast, Tcf4 transgenic mice displayed a normal stress response which is in line with the postulated predominant contribution of TCF4 to cognitive deficits of SZ. In conclusion, the OSO paradigm allows for rapid screening of selected psychosocial stress-induced behavioral endophenotypes in mouse models of psychiatric diseases.

  9. Inflammatory stricture of the right ureter following perforated appendicitis: The first Indian report.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, Janavikula Sankaran; Ganesh, Deepa; Rajkumar, Anirudh

    2016-01-01

    Perforated appendicitis leading to inflammatory stricture of the right ureter is a rarity. We present this fairly uncommon case of a patient who developed a stricture of the right ureter secondary to an ongoing inflammatory process in the peritoneum and retroperitoneum. A perforated appendicitis was operated upon, and on follow-up the mild hydronephrosis had worsened. Stenting of the right ureter completely solved the problem.

  10. Inflammatory stricture of the right ureter following perforated appendicitis: The first Indian report

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Janavikula Sankaran; Ganesh, Deepa; Rajkumar, Anirudh

    2016-01-01

    Perforated appendicitis leading to inflammatory stricture of the right ureter is a rarity. We present this fairly uncommon case of a patient who developed a stricture of the right ureter secondary to an ongoing inflammatory process in the peritoneum and retroperitoneum. A perforated appendicitis was operated upon, and on follow-up the mild hydronephrosis had worsened. Stenting of the right ureter completely solved the problem. PMID:27251819

  11. Appendicitis in Diabetics: Predictors of Complications and Their Incidence.

    PubMed

    Bach, Lindsay; Donovan, Andrew; Loggins, Whitney; Thompson, Stephanie; Richmond, Bryan

    2016-08-01

    Appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency encountered by the general surgeon. Literature has demonstrated that diabetics may manifest atypical signs of infection, often clouding the diagnostic picture. We conducted a 3-year retrospective analysis of adults with appendicitis to determine differences in presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes for diabetic versus nondiabetic patients. Demographics, symptoms, imaging, procedure(s), complications, and length of stay (LOS) were obtained via chart review. Factors were compared between patients with and without diabetes using chi-squared test, t test, or Mann-Whitney U test (significance at P ≤ 0.05). Multivariate regression analysis identified variables predicting longer LOS or perforation at diagnosis. Overall, 339 patients met inclusion criteria [303 were nondiabetic (ND), 36 were diabetic (D)]. On univariate analysis, diabetics were more likely to have other comorbid illnesses: obesity (P < 0.001), chronic kidney disease (P = 0.003), hypertension (P < 0.001), coronary artery disease (P < 0.001), peripheral vascular disease (PVD, P = 0.31), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P = 0.002). Diabetics presented with lower white blood cell counts (mean 14.2 ND, 11.9 D, P = 0.02), and were more likely to present with perforation (18.5% ND, 38.9% D, P = 0.008). LOS was longer in diabetics (1.0 day for ND, 3.0 day for D, P < 0.001). Complications were more frequent in diabetics (19.4% D vs 8.6% ND), which trended toward but failed to reach significance (P = 0.066). On multivariate analysis, however, old age was the only characteristic associated with perforation [odds ratio: 1.05 (1.02-1.06), P < 0.001], whereas diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and older age predicted longer LOS (P ≤ 0.001). Diabetics present a more complicated clinical picture having significantly more comorbidities and a trend toward postoperative complications necessitating a higher index of suspicion to detection

  12. Appendicitis in Diabetics: Predictors of Complications and Their Incidence.

    PubMed

    Bach, Lindsay; Donovan, Andrew; Loggins, Whitney; Thompson, Stephanie; Richmond, Bryan

    2016-08-01

    Appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency encountered by the general surgeon. Literature has demonstrated that diabetics may manifest atypical signs of infection, often clouding the diagnostic picture. We conducted a 3-year retrospective analysis of adults with appendicitis to determine differences in presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes for diabetic versus nondiabetic patients. Demographics, symptoms, imaging, procedure(s), complications, and length of stay (LOS) were obtained via chart review. Factors were compared between patients with and without diabetes using chi-squared test, t test, or Mann-Whitney U test (significance at P ≤ 0.05). Multivariate regression analysis identified variables predicting longer LOS or perforation at diagnosis. Overall, 339 patients met inclusion criteria [303 were nondiabetic (ND), 36 were diabetic (D)]. On univariate analysis, diabetics were more likely to have other comorbid illnesses: obesity (P < 0.001), chronic kidney disease (P = 0.003), hypertension (P < 0.001), coronary artery disease (P < 0.001), peripheral vascular disease (PVD, P = 0.31), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P = 0.002). Diabetics presented with lower white blood cell counts (mean 14.2 ND, 11.9 D, P = 0.02), and were more likely to present with perforation (18.5% ND, 38.9% D, P = 0.008). LOS was longer in diabetics (1.0 day for ND, 3.0 day for D, P < 0.001). Complications were more frequent in diabetics (19.4% D vs 8.6% ND), which trended toward but failed to reach significance (P = 0.066). On multivariate analysis, however, old age was the only characteristic associated with perforation [odds ratio: 1.05 (1.02-1.06), P < 0.001], whereas diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and older age predicted longer LOS (P ≤ 0.001). Diabetics present a more complicated clinical picture having significantly more comorbidities and a trend toward postoperative complications necessitating a higher index of suspicion to detection

  13. Computerized tomography in the workup of pediatric appendicitis: why are children scanned?

    PubMed

    Ladd, Mitchell R; Neff, Lucas P; Becher, Robert D; Gallaher, Jared R; Pranikoff, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Physicians increasingly use computerized tomography (CT) for the evaluation of suspected acute appendicitis (AA) in children despite increasing awareness of the potential dangers of CT-associated radiation exposure. Many studies demonstrate the value of CT in the diagnosis of AA, but none have determined what factors influence the decision to perform a CT. We investigated factors associated with the use of CT during initial workup of children who subsequently underwent appendectomy. This is a retrospective review of all patients aged 0 to 17 years who underwent appendectomy for AA by pediatric surgeons over 11 years. Both univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were created to predict use of CT. A total of 546 children underwent appendectomy for AA, of which 293 (53%) underwent CT. In univariate analysis, seven variables were significantly associated with the use of CT: female gender, Hispanic ethnicity, initial presentation to referring hospitals, lower Alvarado scores, delays from onset of symptoms to hospital presentation, migration, and rebound tenderness. In multivariable analysis, four variables significantly independently predicted the use of CT: initial presentation to a referring hospital [odds ratio (OR) 3.50), female gender (OR 1.49), increased latency from symptom onset to presentation (OR 1.34), and the presence of rebound tenderness (OR 0.23), which had a protective effect; the overall model was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). This model is the first to define variables that significantly predict CT utilization in the pediatric population. Continued investigation will be necessary to develop effective algorithms for judicious use of CT for suspected AA.

  14. A brief retrospective method for identifying longitudinal trajectories of adjustment following acute stress.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Anthony D; Bonanno, George A; Sinan, Beyza

    2015-06-01

    Research increasingly indicates that prototypical trajectories of resilience, recovery, delayed, and chronic distress characterize reactions to acute adversity. However, trajectory research has been limited by the practical and methodological difficulties of obtaining pre-event and longitudinal data. In two studies, we employed a novel method in which trained interviewers provided a graphical depiction of prototypical stress trajectories to participants and asked them to select the one that best described their experience. In Study 1, self-identified trajectories from 21 high-exposure survivors of the September 11th World Trade Center attacks distinguished variation in posttraumatic stress disorder and depression symptoms at 7 and 18 months, and were consistent with trajectories based on longitudinal outcomes and friend/relative ratings. In Study 2, we examined self-identified trajectories from 115 bereaved spouses at 1.5 to 3 years. Persons who identified a resilient trajectory, compared with recovery and chronic distress trajectories, had fewer interviewer-rated symptoms of grief, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder were rated as functioning more effectively by friends, reported higher life satisfaction, and had fewer somatic complaints. The present results provide initial evidence for the construct validity of a cross-sectional and less demanding method for identifying acute stress trajectories.

  15. A brief retrospective method for identifying longitudinal trajectories of adjustment following acute stress.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Anthony D; Bonanno, George A; Sinan, Beyza

    2015-06-01

    Research increasingly indicates that prototypical trajectories of resilience, recovery, delayed, and chronic distress characterize reactions to acute adversity. However, trajectory research has been limited by the practical and methodological difficulties of obtaining pre-event and longitudinal data. In two studies, we employed a novel method in which trained interviewers provided a graphical depiction of prototypical stress trajectories to participants and asked them to select the one that best described their experience. In Study 1, self-identified trajectories from 21 high-exposure survivors of the September 11th World Trade Center attacks distinguished variation in posttraumatic stress disorder and depression symptoms at 7 and 18 months, and were consistent with trajectories based on longitudinal outcomes and friend/relative ratings. In Study 2, we examined self-identified trajectories from 115 bereaved spouses at 1.5 to 3 years. Persons who identified a resilient trajectory, compared with recovery and chronic distress trajectories, had fewer interviewer-rated symptoms of grief, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder were rated as functioning more effectively by friends, reported higher life satisfaction, and had fewer somatic complaints. The present results provide initial evidence for the construct validity of a cross-sectional and less demanding method for identifying acute stress trajectories. PMID:25288824

  16. Predictors of appendicitis on computed tomography among cases with borderline appendix size.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Atalie C; Olcott, Eric W; Poullos, Peter D; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Thompson, Matthew O; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Shin, Lewis K

    2015-08-01

    Confident diagnosis of appendicitis when the appendix is borderline (6 to 7 mm) in size can be challenging. This retrospective study assessed computed tomography (CT) findings that are most predictive of appendicitis when the appendix is borderline in diameter. Three radiologists conducted separate, blind retrospective reviews of 105 contrast-enhanced CTs with borderline appendices. Presence or absence of appendicitis was confirmed by chart review of clinical or surgical outcomes. Logistic regression was used to determine the odds ratio (OR) and the receiver operating characteristic for CT features predictive of appendicitis. Absence of intraluminal air (OR = 5.11, p < 0.001), wall hyperemia (OR = 3.92, p = 0.002), wall thickening (OR = 29.7, p < 0.001), and fat stranding (OR = 3.85, p = 0.003) were significant findings in univariate logistic regression. Using a multivariate model, we found that the absence of intraluminal air (OR = 6.04, p = 0.002) and wall thickening (OR = 24.6, p < 0.001) remained statistically significant and were unaffected by adjustment for gender and pediatric age. The area under the curve was significantly greater for the multivariate model than the initial, clinical CT impressions (p = 0.024). The combination of wall thickening and absence of intraluminal air was 92.6 % (95 % CI 75.7-99.1) sensitive and 82.4 % (95 % CI 65.5-93.2) specific for appendicitis. Wall thickening and the absence of intraluminal air are prominent predictors of appendicitis and, if present together, these features may aid in identifying appendicitis on CT when the appendix is borderline in size.

  17. A rare cause of acute abdominal disease: two reports of caecal diverticulum perforation.

    PubMed

    Çiftci, Fatih; Abdurrahman, İbrahim; Eren, Abdülkadir

    2016-05-01

    Diverticulum of the caecum is a rare lesion. From a clinical point of view, the inflammation it causes can mimic symptoms of acute appendicitis, causing difficulties in diagnosis and thus prescription of appropriate treatment. It is almost impossible to differentiate this disease from acute appendicitis through physical examination alone, and radiological imaging may also prove insufficient. For this reason, it is common to perioperatively diagnose diverticula of the caecum. Two cases of patients who underwent surgery for perforated caecal diverticula are presently described. PMID:27598596

  18. Segmentation of White Blood Cell from Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Images Using Dual-Threshold Method.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhu, Rui; Mi, Lei; Cao, Yihui; Yao, Di

    2016-01-01

    We propose a dual-threshold method based on a strategic combination of RGB and HSV color space for white blood cell (WBC) segmentation. The proposed method consists of three main parts: preprocessing, threshold segmentation, and postprocessing. In the preprocessing part, we get two images for further processing: one contrast-stretched gray image and one H component image from transformed HSV color space. In the threshold segmentation part, a dual-threshold method is proposed for improving the conventional single-threshold approaches and a golden section search method is used for determining the optimal thresholds. For the postprocessing part, mathematical morphology and median filtering are utilized to denoise and remove incomplete WBCs. The proposed method was tested in segmenting the lymphoblasts on a public Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) image dataset. The results show that the performance of the proposed method is better than single-threshold approach independently performed in RGB and HSV color space and the overall single WBC segmentation accuracy reaches 97.85%, showing a good prospect in subsequent lymphoblast classification and ALL diagnosis. PMID:27313659

  19. [Efficacy of surgical treatment of patients for an acute lactational mastitis using radiofrequency scalpel and ozono-ultrasonic method].

    PubMed

    Ioffe, I V; Chernova, N V

    2013-01-01

    According to microbial investigation data, conducted preoperatively, intraoperatively, in 7 days postoperatively for an acute purulent lactational mastitis, there was noted significant reduction of the wound microbial soiling while application of radiofrequency scalpel and ozono-ultrasonic method in comparison with such while application of conventional methods of treatment.

  20. Cooperative insertion of CO2 in diamine-appended metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Thomas M.; Mason, Jarad A.; Kong, Xueqian; Bloch, Eric D.; Gygi, David; Dani, Alessandro; Crocellà, Valentina; Giordanino, Filippo; Odoh, Samuel O.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Dzubak, Allison L.; Poloni, Roberta; Schnell, Sondre K.; Planas, Nora; Lee, Kyuho; Pascal, Tod; Wan, Liwen F.; Prendergast, David; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Smit, Berend; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Gagliardi, Laura; Bordiga, Silvia; Reimer, Jeffrey A.; Long, Jeffrey R.

    2015-03-01

    The process of carbon capture and sequestration has been proposed as a method of mitigating the build-up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. If implemented, the cost of electricity generated by a fossil fuel-burning power plant would rise substantially, owing to the expense of removing CO2 from the effluent stream. There is therefore an urgent need for more efficient gas separation technologies, such as those potentially offered by advanced solid adsorbents. Here we show that diamine-appended metal-organic frameworks can behave as `phase-change' adsorbents, with unusual step-shaped CO2 adsorption isotherms that shift markedly with temperature. Results from spectroscopic, diffraction and computational studies show that the origin of the sharp adsorption step is an unprecedented cooperative process in which, above a metal-dependent threshold pressure, CO2 molecules insert into metal-amine bonds, inducing a reorganization of the amines into well-ordered chains of ammonium carbamate. As a consequence, large CO2 separation capacities can be achieved with small temperature swings, and regeneration energies appreciably lower than achievable with state-of-the-art aqueous amine solutions become feasible. The results provide a mechanistic framework for designing highly efficient adsorbents for removing CO2 from various gas mixtures, and yield insights into the conservation of Mg2+ within the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase family of enzymes.

  1. Low molecular weight PEI-appended polyesters as non-viral gene delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Xun, Miao-Miao; Liu, Yan-Hong; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Ji; Zhang, Qin-Fang; Wu, Wan-Xia; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2014-05-01

    Routine clinical implementation of human gene therapy requires safe and efficient gene delivery methods. Linear biodegradable polyesters with carbon-carbon double bonds are prepared from unsaturated diacids and diols. Subsequent appending of low molecular weight PEI by Michael addition gives target cationic polymers efficiently. Agarose gel retardation and fluorescence quenching assays show that these materials have good DNA binding ability and can completely retard plasmid DNA at weight ratio of 0.8. The formed polyplexes have appropriate sizes around 275 nm and zeta-potential values about +20-35 mV. The cytotoxicities of these polymers assayed by MTT are much lower than that of 25 kDa PEI. In vitro transfection toward 7402, HEK293 and U-2OS cells show that polymer P1 may give dramatically higher transfection efficiency (TE) than 25 kDa PEI, especially in U-2OS cells, suggesting that such polymer might be promising non-viral gene vectors.

  2. The value of selected in vitro and in silico methods to predict acute oral toxicity in a regulatory context: results from the European Project ACuteTox.

    PubMed

    Prieto, P; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, A; Stanzel, S; Albella, B; Artursson, P; Campillo, N; Cecchelli, R; Cerrato, L; Díaz, L; Di Consiglio, E; Guerra, A; Gombau, L; Herrera, G; Honegger, P; Landry, C; O'Connor, J E; Páez, J A; Quintas, G; Svensson, R; Turco, L; Zurich, M G; Zurbano, M J; Kopp-Schneider, A

    2013-06-01

    ACuteTox is a project within the 6th European Framework Programme which had as one of its goals to develop, optimise and prevalidate a non-animal testing strategy for predicting human acute oral toxicity. In its last 6 months, a challenging exercise was conducted to assess the predictive capacity of the developed testing strategies and final identification of the most promising ones. Thirty-two chemicals were tested blind in the battery of in vitro and in silico methods selected during the first phase of the project. This paper describes the classification approaches studied: single step procedures and two step tiered testing strategies. In summary, four in vitro testing strategies were proposed as best performing in terms of predictive capacity with respect to the European acute oral toxicity classification. In addition, a heuristic testing strategy is suggested that combines the prediction results gained from the neutral red uptake assay performed in 3T3 cells, with information on neurotoxicity alerts identified by the primary rat brain aggregates test method. Octanol-water partition coefficients and in silico prediction of intestinal absorption and blood-brain barrier passage are also considered. This approach allows to reduce the number of chemicals wrongly predicted as not classified (LD50>2000 mg/kg b.w.).

  3. Acute brain slice methods for adult and aging animals: application of targeted patch clampanalysis and optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Tanya L.; Chen, Qian; Feng, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    Summary The development of the living acute brain slice preparation for analyzing synaptic function roughly a half century ago was a pivotal achievement that greatly influenced the landscape of modern neuroscience. Indeed, many neuroscientists regard brain slices as the gold-standard model system for detailed cellular, molecular, and circuitry level analysis and perturbation of neuronal function. A critical limitation of this model system is the difficulty in preparing slices from adult and aging animals, and over the past several decades few substantial methodological improvements have emerged to facilitate patch clamp analysis in the mature adult stage. In this chapter we describe a robust and practical protocol for preparing brain slices from mature adult mice that are suitable for patch clamp analysis. This method reduces swelling and damage in superficial layers of the slices and improves the success rate for targeted patch clamp recordings, including recordings from fluorescently labeled populations in slices derived from transgenic mice. This adult brain slice method is suitable for diverse experimental applications, including both monitoring and manipulating neuronal activity with genetically encoded calcium indicators and optogenetic actuators, respectively. We describe the application of this adult brain slice platform and associated methods for screening kinetic properties of Channelrhodopsin (ChR) variants expressed in genetically-defined neuronal subtypes. PMID:25023312

  4. Acute appendicitis with a neuroendocrine tumor G1 (carcinoid): pitfalls of conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki A; Fujimoto, Taketoshi; Kato, Yo; Sasaki, Mayumi; Ikusue, Toshikazu

    2016-08-01

    A man in his early thirties presented to our clinic with right lower abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US) revealed a swollen appendix and an appendicolith. Abscess formation was not observed but ongoing appendiceal rupture was not ruled out. Three months after successful conservative therapy, the lumen of the apical portion was kept dilated and laparoscopic interval appendectomy was performed. No tumorous findings were observed macroscopically. However, histology revealed many tiny nests infiltrating the submucosa, muscular layer, and subserosa at the root of the appendix. An appendiceal neuroendocrine tumor G1 (NET G1; carcinoid) was diagnosed immunohistologically. Neither CT nor US visualized the tumor because of its non-tumor-forming but infiltrative growth. In conclusion, after successful conservative treatment, interval appendectomy should be considered to uncover a possible appendiceal NET G1 (carcinoid), particularly when dilatation of the distal lumen is kept under observation. PMID:27311320

  5. [Videolaparoscopic and morphological parallels in diagnosis of different forms of acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Ermolov, A S; Samsonov, V T; Gulyaev, A A; Abdulamitov, Kh K; Titova, G P; Tlibekova, M A; Radygina, M V

    2016-01-01

    Цель исследования - сравнить результаты макроскопической оценки и материалов гистологического исследования 1635 червеобразных отростков, удаленных с использованием видеолапароскопического доступа у больных острым аппендицитом, проходивших лечение в НИИ СП им. Н.В. Склифосовского с 2002 по 2014 г. Материал и методы. При выполнении диагностического этапа видеолапароскопии по ряду общепринятых признаков проводили макроскопическую оценку воспалительных изменений червеобразного отростка. Для гистологического исследования было направлено 77 (4,7%) отростков с изменениями, расцененными как катаральные, 1432 (87,5%) - как флегмонозные и 126 (7,7%) - как гангренозные. Результаты. В результате гистологического исследования у 86 (5,3%) больных отростки оказались с катаральными изменениями, у 1338 (81,8%) - с флегмонозными и у 115 (7,0%) - с гангренозными. В 65 (4,0%) наблюдениях изменения были расценены как хронические, у 31 (1,9%) больного воспалительных изменений не выявлено. Установленный при видеолапароскопии диагноз различных форм острого аппендицита подтвержден при гистологическом исследовании у 94,1% больных. Наибольшее совпадение (88,2%) видеолапароскопического и гистологического диагнозов отмечено при флегмонозной форме острого аппендицита. Только у 5,9% больных отсутствовали острые воспалительные изменения в червеобразном отростке, что можно объяснить гипердиагностикой и завышением показаний к аппендэктомии.

  6. Fluorophore(s) appended fullerene dyads and triads for probing photoinduced energy transfer: syntheses, electronic structure, and fluorescence studies.

    PubMed

    Deviprasad, Gollapalli R; Smith, Phillip M; Zandler, Melvin E; Rogers, Lisa M; D'Souza, Francis

    2006-01-01

    Fullerene, C(60) was functionalized to possess one or two fluorophore entities. The fluorophore-fullerene dyads thus synthesized contain either a naphthalene, pyrene, or fluorene entity while the triads contain either a pyrene or fluorene entity in addition to a naphthalene entity. The redox behavior of these dyads and triads were probed by cyclic voltammetric technique, while the geometry and electronic structures were deduced from ab initio B3LYP/3-21G(*) method. Steady-state emission studies revealed the occurrence of energy transfer from the singlet excited fluorophore to the fullerene entity in the case of the dyads while the occurrence of step-by-step sequential energy transfer is envisioned in the case of the triads. A better 'antenna-effect' owing to the extended range of excitation wavelength to induce energy transfer to the appended fullerene has been achieved in the case of the triads. PMID:16404521

  7. PREDICTION OF THE ACUTE TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS TO THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMALAS) USING A GROUP CONTRIBUTION METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    A group contribution method has been developed to correlate the acute toxicity (96 h LC50) to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) for 379 organic chemicals. Multilinear regression and computational neural networks (CNNs) were used for model building. The multilinear linear m...

  8. Utility of desmin and a Masson's trichrome method to detect early acute myocardial infarction in autopsy tissues.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Jie; Guzman, Miguel; Desoto-Lapaix, Fidelina; Pincus, Matthew R; Wieczorek, Rosemary

    2009-09-20

    Detection of early acute myocardial ischemia/infarction prior to neutrophilic infiltration in autopsy myocardium poses a diagnostic dilemma to the surgical pathologist. Morphological changes can be subtle or not identified at all on the hematoxylin and eosin stain. To evaluate the Masson's trichrome stain and immunohistochemical stains, desmin and myoglobin, in detecting acute myocardial ischemia/infarction in autopsy myocardium. We reviewed the autopsy files of the New York Harbor Healthcare System and retrieved 25 cases of early acute myocardial infarction. Three autopsy hearts of non-cardiac related deaths were used as controls. Sections from grossly suspected early acute myocardial infaction areas were stained by a Masson's trichrome stain technique and with desmin by a standard immnunohistochemical method. The ischemic zone surrounding myocardial infarction and the acute infarct itself in 23/25(92%) were detected by desmin depletion, and in all cases with Masson's trichrome color changes. No change in staining for desmin or Masson's trichrome were seen in the three controls. Desmin and Masson's trichrome together are valuable tools when faced with the problem of postmortem detection of early myocardial infarction/ischemia.

  9. Synthesis and cell phototoxicity of a triply bridged fused diporphyrin appended with six thioglucose units.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sunaina; Aggarwal, Amit; Bhupathiraju, N V S Dinesh K; Newton, Brandon; Nafees, Ahmad; Gao, Ruomei; Drain, Charles Michael

    2014-11-12

    A triply bridged fused diporphyrin appended with six thioglucose units is reported. This new, chemically and photochemically stable amphiphilic compound is taken up by breast cancer cells and causes cell death upon light exposure. Photophysical studies reveal absorption bands in the near IR region, and photosensitized formation of singlet oxygen in high quantum yields.

  10. Photo-triggered transformation from vesicles to branched nanotubes fabricated by a cholesterol-appended cyanostilbene.

    PubMed

    Xing, Pengyao; Chen, Hongzhong; Bai, Linyi; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-06-01

    Cholesterol-appended cyanostilbene was synthesized, which could self-assemble into vesicles accompanied by a aggregation-induced emission effect. Under UV light irradiation, the vesicles gradually merged together to form branched nanotubes. The self-assembly and disassembly processes could be utilized in the quantitative analysis of external stimulus, which were demonstrated by H2O2-selective sensing.

  11. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery.

  12. Appendicitis, mesenteric lymphadenitis, and subsequent risk of ulcerative colitis: cohort studies in Sweden and Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Bo V; Andersson, Roland E

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the repeatedly observed low risk of ulcerative colitis after appendicectomy is related to the appendicectomy itself or the underlying morbidity, notably appendicitis or mesenteric lymphadenitis. Design Nationwide cohort studies. Setting Sweden and Denmark. Participants 709 353 Swedish (1964-2004) and Danish (1977-2004) patients who had undergone appendicectomy were followed up for subsequent ulcerative colitis. The impact of appendicectomy on risk was also studied in 224 483 people whose parents or siblings had inflammatory bowel disease. Main outcome measures Standardised incidence ratios and rate ratios as measures of relative risk. Results During 11.1 million years of follow-up in the appendicectomy cohort, 1192 patients developed ulcerative colitis (10.8 per 100 000 person years). Appendicectomy without underlying inflammation was not associated with reduced risk (standardised incidence ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 1.15). Before the age of 20, however, appendicectomy for appendicitis (0.45, 0.39 to 0.53) or mesenteric lymphadenitis (0.65, 0.46 to 0.90) was associated with significant risk reduction. A similar pattern was seen in those with affected relatives, whose overall risk of ulcerative colitis was clearly higher than the background risk (1404 observed v 446 expected; standardised incidence ratio 3.15, 2.99 to 3.32). In this cohort, appendicectomy without underlying appendicitis did not modify risk (rate ratio 1.04, 0.66 to 1.55, v no appendicectomy), while risk after appendicectomy for appendicitis was halved (0.49, 0.31 to 0.74). Conclusions In individuals with or without a familial predisposition to inflammatory bowel disease, appendicitis and mesenteric lymphadenitis during childhood or adolescence are linked to a significantly reduced risk of ulcerative colitis in adulthood. Appendicectomy itself does not protect against ulcerative colitis. PMID:19273506

  13. A Summary of the October 2009 Forum on the Future of Nursing: Acute Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing, at the IOM, seeks to transform nursing as part of larger efforts to reform the health care system. The first of the Initiative's three forums was held on October 19, 2009, and focused on safety, technology, and interdisciplinary collaboration in acute care. Appended are: (1)…

  14. Fast Simulation of X-ray Projections of Spline-based Surfaces using an Append Buffer

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Andreas; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Schwemmer, Chris; Hornegger, Joachim; Keil, Andreas; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Many scientists in the field of x-ray imaging rely on the simulation of x-ray images. As the phantom models become more and more realistic, their projection requires high computational effort. Since x-ray images are based on transmission, many standard graphics acceleration algorithms cannot be applied to this task. However, if adapted properly, simulation speed can be increased dramatically using state-of-the-art graphics hardware. A custom graphics pipeline that simulates transmission projections for tomographic reconstruction was implemented based on moving spline surface models. All steps from tessellation of the splines, projection onto the detector, and drawing are implemented in OpenCL. We introduced a special append buffer for increased performance in order to store the intersections with the scene for every ray. Intersections are then sorted and resolved to materials. Lastly, an absorption model is evaluated to yield an absorption value for each projection pixel. Projection of a moving spline structure is fast and accurate. Projections of size 640×480 can be generated within 254 ms. Reconstructions using the projections show errors below 1 HU with a sharp reconstruction kernel. Traditional GPU-based acceleration schemes are not suitable for our reconstruction task. Even in the absence of noise, they result in errors up to 9 HU on average, although projection images appear to be correct under visual examination. Projections generated with our new method are suitable for the validation of novel CT reconstruction algorithms. For complex simulations, such as the evaluation of motion-compensated reconstruction algorithms, this kind of x-ray simulation will reduce the computation time dramatically. Source code is available at http://conrad.stanford.edu/ PMID:22975431

  15. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children.

    PubMed

    Reust, Carin E; Williams, Amy

    2016-05-15

    Acute abdominal pain accounts for approximately 9% of childhood primary care office visits. Symptoms and signs that increase the likelihood of a surgical cause for pain include fever, bilious vomiting, bloody diarrhea, absent bowel sounds, voluntary guarding, rigidity, and rebound tenderness. The age of the child can help focus the differential diagnosis. In infants and toddlers, clinicians should consider congenital anomalies and other causes, including malrotation, hernias, Meckel diverticulum, or intussusception. In school-aged children, constipation and infectious causes of pain, such as gastroenteritis, colitis, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections, are more common. In female adolescents, clinicians should consider pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts, or ovarian torsion. Initial laboratory tests include complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, urinalysis, and a pregnancy test. Abdominal radiography can be used to diagnose constipation or obstruction. Ultrasonography is the initial choice in children for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, pancreatitis, ovarian cyst, ovarian or testicular torsion, pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy-related pathology, and appendicitis. Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery, with a peak incidence during adolescence. When the appendix is not clearly visible on ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27175718

  16. Acute renal infarction: an unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Javaid, Muhammad M; Butt, Mohammed A; Syed, Yadullah; Carr, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Acute renal infarction is an uncommon and under-diagnosed disease. Its clinical presentation is nonspecific and often mimics other more common disease entities. The diagnosis is usually missed or delayed, which frequently results in irreversible renal parenchyma damage. High index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis, as timely intervention may prevent loss of kidney function. We report a case of acute renal infarction following coronary angiography in a patient with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation who initially presented with acute abdominal pain mimicking appendicitis.

  17. A bio-inspired design strategy: Organization of tryptophan-appended naphthalenediimide into well-defined architectures induced by molecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avinash, M. B.; Govindaraju, T.

    2011-06-01

    and sodium-interaction-induced H-type aggregation of tryptophan-appended NDIs have been illustrated. 1H NMR spectra further reveal sodium cation-π interactions in tryptophan-appended NDIs, while NMR and IR spectroscopic studies confirm the structural variations associated with the molecular assembly. In summary, the molecular organization has been successfully transformed from nanospheres to particles, nanobelts, fibers and fractals. Such drastic changes in the morphology are clear and striking evidence of the importance of non-trivial weak non-covalent forces. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental methods, synthesis, NMR, IR, FESEM, TEM and AFM. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00766h

  18. Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Associated with Gangrenous Appendicitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    SEMEENA, NK; ADLEKHA, Shashikant

    2014-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein Purpura (HSP) is a leucocytoclastic vasculitis of unclear aetiology characterised by symmetrical, non-traumatic, nonthrombocytopenic purpura mostly involving the lower limbs and buttocks, as well as arthritis, gastrointestinal manifestations, and occasional nephritis. A 35 years old male presented with purpuric rash on the lower extremities, abdominal pain, fever, arthralgia, and melaena. A diagnosis of HSP with appendicitis was made, which is an exceedingly rare phenomenon. PMID:24876811

  19. A comparison of spinal manipulation methods and usual medical care for acute and sub-acute low back pain: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Mitchell; Glick, Ronald; Stevans, Joel; Landsittel, Doug

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Randomized-controlled trial with follow-up to 6 months. Objective This was a comparative effectiveness trial of: manual-thrust manipulation (MTM) versus mechanical-assisted manipulation (MAM); and manipulation versus usual medical care (UMC). Summary of Background Data Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions seen in primary care and physical medicine practice. MTM is a common treatment for LBP. Claims that MAM is an effective alternative to MTM have yet to be substantiated. There is also question about the effectiveness of manipulation in acute and sub-acute LBP, as compared to UMC. Methods 107 adults with onset of LBP within the past 12 weeks were randomized to 1 of 3 treatment groups: MTM; MAM; or UMC. Outcome measures included the Oswestry LBP disability index (0 to 100 scale) and numeric pain rating (0 to 10 scale). Participants in the manipulation groups were treated twice weekly over 4 weeks; subjects in UMC were seen for 3 visits during this time. Outcome measures were captured at baseline, 4 weeks, 3 months and 6 months. Results Linear regression showed a statistically significant advantage of MTM at 4 weeks compared to MAM (disability = −8.1, p = .009; pain = −1.4, p = .002) and UMC (disability = −6.5, p = .032; pain = −1.7, p < .001). Responder analysis, defined as 30% and 50% reductions in Oswestry scores revealed a significantly greater proportion of responders at 4 weeks in MTM (76%; 50%) compared to MAM (50%; 16%) and UMC (48%; 39%).Similar between-group results were found for pain: MTM (94%; 76%); MAM (69%; 47%); and UMC (56%; 41%). No statistically significant group differences were found between MAM and UMC, and for any comparison at 3 or 6 months. Conclusions MTM provides greater short-term reductions in self-reported disability and pain scores compared to UMC or MAM. PMID:25423308

  20. Methods for measuring the acute toxicity of effluents and receiving waters to freshwater and marine organisms (fourth edition)

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.I.

    1991-09-01

    The manual describes methods for measuring the acute toxicity of effluents and receiving waters to freshwater, estuarine, and marine macroinvertebrates and fish. The methods include single and multiple concentration static nonrenewal, static-renewal, and flow-through toxicity tests for effluents and receiving waters. Also included are guidelines on laboratory safety; quality assurance; facilities and equipment; test species selection and handling; dilution water; effluent and receiving water sample collection, preservation, shipping, and holding; test conditions; toxicity test data analysis; report preparation; and organism culturing.

  1. A new pathological scoring method for adrenal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenhong; Hui, Yuanjian; Yu, Jia; Wang, Weixing; Xu, Sheng; Chen, Chen; Xiong, Xincheng

    2014-12-01

    These studies investigated the appearance and function of adrenal glands in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and established a new histopathological score to evaluate adrenal histopathological changes. Severe acute pancreatitis relied on retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. The damage of SAP was estimated by serum amylase, secretory phospholipase A2 and pancreatic histopathology. Light and electron microscopy of adrenal gland, and the levels of serum corticosterone were investigated. These results showed that the generally ascending trend of adrenal pathological score was inversely proportional to the generally descending trend of serum corticosterone levels, but parallel with the changes of pancreatic histopathology. Herein, the new adrenal histopathological score was effective in the evaluation of adrenal injury following SAP. It may indirectly reflect the variation of serum cortisol levels and the severity of pancreatitis to a certain extent.

  2. [Acute abdomen and diabetic patients--difficulties of diagnosis and therapeutical decision].

    PubMed

    Doran, H; Pătraşcu, T; Păcescu, E; Marin, I; Radu, C

    2001-01-01

    We present a retrospective study based on 50 diabetic patients with acute abdominal diseases. Usually, clinical features were not typical, without defining signs of acute abdomen, despite frequent severe anatomo-pathological forms (6 of 12 acute appendicitis were gangrenous, with generalised or localised peritonitis; 15 of 22 acute colecystitis were gangrenous). In diabetic patients, with metabolic disorders and cetoacidosis, positive diagnosis and the decision of laparotomy are difficult problems, often delated, with a negative influence on the evolutions and prognosis of these patients.

  3. Comparison of estimation methods for creating small area rates of acute myocardial infarction among Medicare beneficiaries in California.

    PubMed

    Yasaitis, Laura C; Arcaya, Mariana C; Subramanian, S V

    2015-09-01

    Creating local population health measures from administrative data would be useful for health policy and public health monitoring purposes. While a wide range of options--from simple spatial smoothers to model-based methods--for estimating such rates exists, there are relatively few side-by-side comparisons, especially not with real-world data. In this paper, we compare methods for creating local estimates of acute myocardial infarction rates from Medicare claims data. A Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain estimator that incorporated spatial and local random effects performed best, followed by a method-of-moments spatial Empirical Bayes estimator. As the former is more complicated and time-consuming, spatial linear Empirical Bayes methods may represent a good alternative for non-specialist investigators. PMID:26291680

  4. Comparison of Estimation Methods for Creating Small Area Rates of Acute Myocardial Infarction Among Medicare Beneficiaries in California

    PubMed Central

    Arcaya, Mariana C.; Subramanian, S.V.

    2016-01-01

    Creating local population health measures from administrative data would be useful for health policy and public health monitoring purposes. While a wide range of options – from simple spatial smoothers to model-based methods – for estimating such rates exists, there are relatively few side-by-side comparisons, especially not with real-world data. In this paper, we compare methods for creating local estimates of acute myocardial infarction rates from Medicare claims data. A Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain estimator that incorporated spatial and local random effects performed best, followed by a method-of-moments spatial Empirical Bayes estimator. As the former is more complicated and time-consuming, spatial linear Empirical Bayes methods may represent a good alternative for non-specialist investigators. PMID:26291680

  5. The Acute Asthma Severity Assessment Protocol (AASAP) study: objectives and methods of a study to develop an acute asthma clinical prediction rule.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Donald H; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Abramo, Thomas J; Sheller, James R; Resha, Donald J; Hartert, Tina V

    2012-06-01

    Acute asthma exacerbations are one of the most common reasons for paediatric emergency department visits and hospitalisations, and a relapse frequently necessitates repeat urgent care. While care plans exist, there are no acute asthma prediction rules (APRs) to assess severity and predict outcome. The primary objective of the Acute Asthma Severity Assessment Protocol study is to develop a multivariable APR for acute asthma exacerbations in paediatric patients. A prospective, convenience sample of paediatric patients aged 5-17 years with acute asthma exacerbations who present to an urban, academic, tertiary paediatric emergency department was enrolled. The study protocol and data analysis plan conform to accepted biostatistical and clinical standards for clinical prediction rule development. Modelling of the APR will be performed once the entire sample size of 1500 has accrued. It is anticipated that the APR will improve resource utilisation in the emergency department, aid in standardisation of disease assessment and allow physician and non-physician providers to participate in earlier objective decision making. The objective of this report is to describe the study objectives and detailed methodology of the Acute Asthma Severity Assessment Protocol study.

  6. Propulsion efficiency of bodies appended with multiple flapping fins: When more is less

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Leinhos, Henry A.

    2013-04-01

    Underwater animals propel themselves by flapping their pectoral and caudal fins in a narrow range of frequencies, given by Strouhal number St, to produce transitional vortex jets (St is generally expressed non-dimensionally as the product of flapping frequency and stroke (arc) length divided by forward speed). The organized nature of the selection of St and of the vortex jet is thought to maximize hydrodynamic efficiency, although the exact mechanism is not known. Our recent Stuart-Landau equation models, which have self-regulation properties, indicate that the fin and its jet vortices couple. Temporal maps of forces in single isolated fins show a bimodal behavior in certain ranges of the transitional Reynolds number; this behavior bears resemblance to neural bifurcation properties that owe their origin to the self-regulation mechanism. In view of our theoretical and biorobotic evidence of self-regulation in single flapping fins, we explore if this property is altered in a fin-appended body, the goal being to understand how the narrow selection of St, self-regulation, and maximization of hydrodynamic efficiency are related. Swimming vehicles of 1-m scale have been built where a rigid cylindrical body is appended with six flapping fins, three at each end. The fins are rigid, have a rounded leading edge and a laminar section (NACA 0012), and are hinged at one end. The planform is an abstracted version of the penguin wing; it has low aspect ratio and a chord Reynolds number that varies in the transitional range from 10 000 to 60 000. The fin geometry, Reynolds number range, and the nonflexible nature of the main body are in common with those in penguins, and the length and displacement volume are similar to those of sharks. The maximum hydrodynamic efficiency of the fin-appended body (0.40) is lower than that of the single fin (0.57), but is close to that of a fish using several fins. The propulsion density (kW/m3 of displacement volume) of the fin-appended cylinder

  7. Faecal retention: a common cause in functional bowel disorders, appendicitis and haemorrhoids--with medical and surgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Raahave, Dennis

    2015-03-01

    as defecation improved overall. The novel knowledge of faecal retention in the patients does not explain why faecal retention occurs. However, it may be inferred from the present results that a constipated or irritable bowel may belong to the same underlying disease dimension, where faecal retention is a common factor. Thus, measuring CTT and faecal load is suggested as a guide to a positive functional diagnosis of bowel disorders compared to the constellation of symptoms alone. Thirty-five patients underwent surgery after being refractory to the conservative treatment for constipation. They had a significantly prolonged CTT and heavy faecal loading, which was responsible for the aggravated abdominal and defaecatory symptoms. The operated patients presented with a redundant colon (dolichocolon) significantly more often. These patients also had an extremely high rate of previous appendectomy. Twenty-one patients underwent hemicolectomy, and 11 patients had a subtotal colectomy with an ileosigmoidal anastomosis; three patients received a stoma. However, some patients had to have the initial segmental colectomy converted to a final subtotal colectomy because of persisting symptoms. Six more subtotal colectomies have been performed and the leakage rate of all colectomies is then 4.9 % (one patient died). After a mean follow-up of 5 years, the vast majority of patients were without abdominal pain and bloating, having two to four defecations daily with control and their quality of life had increased considerably. A faecalith is often located in the appendix, the occlusion of which is responsible for many cases of acute appendicitis, which is infrequent in all except white populations. An effort to trace the origin of the faecalith to faecal retention in the colon was made in a case control study (56 patients and 44 random controls). The CTT was longer and faecal load greater in patients with appendicitis compared to controls, though the difference was not significant

  8. Faecal retention: a common cause in functional bowel disorders, appendicitis and haemorrhoids--with medical and surgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Raahave, Dennis

    2015-03-01

    as defecation improved overall. The novel knowledge of faecal retention in the patients does not explain why faecal retention occurs. However, it may be inferred from the present results that a constipated or irritable bowel may belong to the same underlying disease dimension, where faecal retention is a common factor. Thus, measuring CTT and faecal load is suggested as a guide to a positive functional diagnosis of bowel disorders compared to the constellation of symptoms alone. Thirty-five patients underwent surgery after being refractory to the conservative treatment for constipation. They had a significantly prolonged CTT and heavy faecal loading, which was responsible for the aggravated abdominal and defaecatory symptoms. The operated patients presented with a redundant colon (dolichocolon) significantly more often. These patients also had an extremely high rate of previous appendectomy. Twenty-one patients underwent hemicolectomy, and 11 patients had a subtotal colectomy with an ileosigmoidal anastomosis; three patients received a stoma. However, some patients had to have the initial segmental colectomy converted to a final subtotal colectomy because of persisting symptoms. Six more subtotal colectomies have been performed and the leakage rate of all colectomies is then 4.9 % (one patient died). After a mean follow-up of 5 years, the vast majority of patients were without abdominal pain and bloating, having two to four defecations daily with control and their quality of life had increased considerably. A faecalith is often located in the appendix, the occlusion of which is responsible for many cases of acute appendicitis, which is infrequent in all except white populations. An effort to trace the origin of the faecalith to faecal retention in the colon was made in a case control study (56 patients and 44 random controls). The CTT was longer and faecal load greater in patients with appendicitis compared to controls, though the difference was not significant

  9. Effect of olive mill wastewaters on the oxygen consumption by activated sludge microorganisms: an acute toxicity test method.

    PubMed

    Paixão, S M; Anselmo, A M

    2002-01-01

    The test for inhibition of oxygen consumption by activated sludge (ISO 8192-1986 (E)) was evaluated as a tool for assessing, the acute toxicity of olive mill wastewaters (OMW). According to the ISO test, information generated by this method may be helpful in estimating the effect of a test material on bacterial communities in the aquatic environment, especially in aerobic biological treatment systems. However, the lack of standardized bioassay methodology for effluents imposed that the test conditions were modified and adapted. The experiments were conducted in the presence or absence of an easily biodegradable carbon source (glucose) with different contact times (20 min and 24 h). The results obtained showed a remarkable stimulatory effect of this effluent to the activated sludge microorganisms. In fact, the oxygen uptake rate values increase with increasing effluent concentrations and contact times up to 0.98 microl O(2) h(-1) mg(-1) dry weight for a 100% OMW sample, 24 h contact time, with blanks exhibiting an oxygen uptake rate of ca. 1/10 of this value (0.07-0.10). It seems that the application of the ISO test as an acute toxicity test for effluents should be reconsidered, with convenient adaptation for its utilization as a method of estimating the effect on bacterial communities present in aerobic biological treatment systems. PMID:12015797

  10. Evaluation of the Methods and Management of Acute Coronary Events (EMMACE)-3: protocol for a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Alabas, O A; West, R M; Gillott, R G; Khatib, R; Hall, A S; Gale, C P

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients with cardiovascular disease are living longer and are more frequently accessing healthcare resources. The Evaluation of the Methods and Management of Acute Coronary Events (EMMACE)-3 national study is designed to improve understanding of the effect of quality of care on health-related outcomes for patients hospitalised with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods and analysis EMMACE-3 is a longitudinal study of 5556 patients hospitalised with an ACS in England. The study collects repeated measures of health-related quality of life, information about medications and patient adherence profiles, a survey of hospital facilities, and morbidity and mortality data from linkages to multiple electronic health records. Together with EMMACE-3X and EMMACE-4, EMMACE-3 will assimilate detailed information for about 13 000 patients across more than 60 hospitals in England. Ethics and dissemination EMMACE-3 was given a favourable ethical opinion by Leeds (West) Research Ethics committee (REC reference: 10/H131374). On successful application, study data will be shared with academic collaborators. The findings from EMMACE-3 will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, at scientific conferences, the media, and through patient and public involvement. Study registration number ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01808027. Information about the study is also available at EMMACE.org. PMID:26105029

  11. Matched case-control study of adjusted versus nonadjusted gentamicin dosing in perforated and gangrenous appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Gill, M A; Cheetham, T C; Chenella, F C; Heseltine, P N; Yellin, A E; Appleman, M D; Berne, T V

    1986-01-01

    A matched case-control study of the efficacy of gentamicin dosage adjustment through the use of pharmacokinetic analysis of serum drug concentrations in patients treated by appendectomy for perforated or gangrenous appendicitis was performed. Two groups of patients were compared. In one group gentamicin was initiated preoperatively at 1.5 mg/kg Intravenous Piggy Back (IVPB) every 8 h. Postoperatively, serum levels were obtained to maintain peak concentrations within a range of 6-8 micrograms/ml. The comparison group was given gentamicin without measurement of drug levels. Both groups received clindamycin 600 mg IVPB every six h. Matched cases and control subjects were compared, controlling for pathologic state of the appendicitis, age, and sex. The patients were predominantly young men with normal renal function. More patients in the nonadjusted group had infectious complications than in the dose-adjusted group. There were seven failures (11.3%) in the nonadjusted group compared with only one failure (1.6%) in the dose-adjusted group, a significant difference (p = 0.03). Among the nonadjusted group, the complications were four abdominal abscesses, two wound infections, and one persistent high fever. There was no evidence of nephrotoxicity in either group. Our recommendations are that patients who are to undergo appendectomy for perforated/gangrenous appendicitis should be treated with clindamycin and gentamicin at a dose of 1.5 mg/kg. With normal renal function, an interval of 8 h is appropriate. Serum gentamicin levels should be obtained and the dose adjusted to maintain peak concentrations of 6-8 micrograms/ml.

  12. Laparoscopy-Assisted Single-Port Appendectomy in Children: Safe Alternative also for Perforated Appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Sesia, Sergio B; Berger, Eliane; Holland-Cunz, Stefan; Mayr, Johannes; Häcker, Frank-Martin

    2015-12-01

    Because of its low complication rate, favorable safety, cost-effectiveness, and technical ease, mono-instrumental, laparoscopy-assisted single-port appendectomy (SPA) has been the standard therapy for appendicitis in our department since its introduction 10 years ago. We report our experience with this technique and compare its outcome to open appendectomy (OA). The records of all children who underwent appendectomy at our institution over a period of 8 years were analyzed retrospectively. Patient baseline data, markers of inflammation, operative time, length of hospital stay, complication rate according to the classification of Clavien-Dindo, and histologic grading were assessed to compare the 2 surgical techniques (SPA and OA). The chi square test, the Student's t test and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test were used to analyze the data and the comparisons of the mean values. A P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Overall, 975 patients were included in the study. A total of 555 children had undergone SPA and 420 had been treated by OA. Median operative time of SPA was longer than that of OA (60.8  min vs 57.4  min; P < 0.05). Length of hospital stay after SPA was shorter than after OA (4.4 days and 5.9 days, respectively; P < 0.001). The overall complication rate was lower for SPA than that for OA (4.0% vs 5.7%), but the difference of complications for SPA and OA was not statistically significant (P < 0.22). SPA was successfully performed in 85.9% of children. In 53.8% of patients with perforated appendicitis, no conversion was required. In the group of children with perforated appendicitis, the complication rate of ∼20% was independent of the surgical technique applied. With respect to operative time, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complication rate, SPA is not inferior to OA. SPA is safe and efficient, even in the management of perforated appendicitis.

  13. Applying quality improvement methods to address gaps in medicines reconciliation at transfers of care from an acute UK hospital

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Vanessa; Kuo, Shirley; Vaughan, Louella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Reliable reconciliation of medicines at admission and discharge from hospital is key to reducing unintentional prescribing discrepancies at transitions of healthcare. We introduced a team approach to the reconciliation process at an acute hospital with the aim of improving the provision of information and documentation of reliable medication lists to enable clear, timely communications on discharge. Setting An acute 400-bedded teaching hospital in London, UK. Participants The effects of change were measured in a simple random sample of 10 adult patients a week on the acute admissions unit over 18 months. Interventions Quality improvement methods were used throughout. Interventions included education and training of staff involved at ward level and in the pharmacy department, introduction of medication documentation templates for electronic prescribing and for communicating information on medicines in discharge summaries co-designed with patient representatives. Results Statistical process control analysis showed reliable documentation (complete, verified and intentional changes clarified) of current medication on 49.2% of patients' discharge summaries. This appears to have improved (to 85.2%) according to a poststudy audit the year after the project end. Pharmacist involvement in discharge reconciliation increased significantly, and improvements in the numbers of medicines prescribed in error, or omitted from the discharge prescription, are demonstrated. Variation in weekly measures is seen throughout but particularly at periods of changeover of new doctors and introduction of new systems. Conclusions New processes led to a sustained increase in reconciled medications and, thereby, an improvement in the number of patients discharged from hospital with unintentional discrepancies (errors or omissions) on their discharge prescription. The initiatives were pharmacist-led but involved close working and shared understanding about roles and responsibilities

  14. Comparative assessment of the acute skin irritation potential of detergent formulations using a novel human 4-h patch test method.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael K; Kruszewski, Francis H; Al-Atrash, Jenan; Blazka, Mark E; Gingell, Ralph; Heitfeld, Fred A; Mallon, David; Snyder, Neil K; Swanson, Judith E; Casterton, Phillip L

    2005-12-01

    Predictive skin irritation test methods, which do not require use of animals, are needed for the pre-market assessment of detergent formulations. The utility of a novel and ethical human acute skin irritation patch test method, originally developed for chemical skin irritation assessment, was evaluated. In this IRB-approved method, subjects were patched under occlusion for increasing periods of time up to 4h in duration. The total incidence of positive skin reactions for test products was compared to a positive control (20% aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS]). Acutely irritating formulas were defined as those showing a significantly increased or equal incidence of positive responders compared with that of SDS. The time of exposure required for 50% of subjects to show a positive skin reaction (TR50 value) was calculated for each product and enabled test product comparisons within and between studies. Using this approach, 24 detergent formulations of various types were tested in seven individual studies. The skin irritation profiles were generally consistent within product types, which could be categorized as follows (by decreasing irritancy): mold/mildew removers (average TR50 = 0.37 h) > disinfectants/sanitizers (0.64 h) > fabric softener concentrate (1.09 h) = aluminum wash (1.20 h) > 20% SDS (1.81 h) > liquid laundry detergents (3.48 h) > liquid dish detergents (4.16 h) = liquid fabric softeners (4.56 h) = liquid hand soaps (4.58 h) = shampoos (5.40 h) = hard surface cleaners (6.34 h) > powder automatic dish detergents (>16 h) = powder laundry detergents (>16 h). In addition to formulation effects, some seasonal effects were noted; particularly greater winter-time reactivity to 20% SDS and the hard surface cleaner and liquid laundry formulations. These results demonstrate the utility of this patch test method for the comparative skin irritation assessment of these different product types. PMID:16026914

  15. Acute Effects of Different Methods of Stretching and Specific Warm-ups on Muscle Architecture and Strength Performance.

    PubMed

    Sá, Marcos A; Matta, Thiago T; Carneiro, Simone P; Araujo, Carolina O; Novaes, Jefferson S; Oliveira, Liliam F

    2016-08-01

    Sá, MA, Matta, TT, Carneiro, SP, Araujo, CO, Novaes, JS, and Oliveira, LF. Acute effects of different methods of stretching and specific warm-ups on muscle architecture and strength performance. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2324-2329, 2016-The purpose of the study was to investigate the acute effects of 2 stretching interventions, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) and passive static stretching (PSS), and a specific warm-up (SW) on the strength and architecture of the vastus laterallis and biceps femoris muscles in a subsequent performance on a strength training session (STS). Musculoskeletal ultrasound images were acquired from 9 men before and immediately after stretchings or a SW, and 10 minutes after a STS. The STS consisted of the following exercises: leg extension, leg curl, leg press, and hack machine squat. The PNF resulted in lower performance for all situations. The PSS and SW improved performance for the leg press compared with the PNF and controls (CSs). For the hack machine squat, SWs resulted in higher performance than stretching conditions. The vastus lateralis muscle fascicle length (FL) increases after a STS for PNF. The biceps femoris muscle showed a higher pennation angle 10 minutes after the STS for PSS; the FL increases immediately after PSS and then decreases 10 minutes after the STS for PSS. As per our results, the SWs should be performed before STSs, whereas PNF stretching should not be prescribed because this condition impairs subsequent performance. These results may assist health professionals in prescribing resistance training.

  16. Acute Effects of Different Methods of Stretching and Specific Warm-ups on Muscle Architecture and Strength Performance.

    PubMed

    Sá, Marcos A; Matta, Thiago T; Carneiro, Simone P; Araujo, Carolina O; Novaes, Jefferson S; Oliveira, Liliam F

    2016-08-01

    Sá, MA, Matta, TT, Carneiro, SP, Araujo, CO, Novaes, JS, and Oliveira, LF. Acute effects of different methods of stretching and specific warm-ups on muscle architecture and strength performance. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2324-2329, 2016-The purpose of the study was to investigate the acute effects of 2 stretching interventions, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) and passive static stretching (PSS), and a specific warm-up (SW) on the strength and architecture of the vastus laterallis and biceps femoris muscles in a subsequent performance on a strength training session (STS). Musculoskeletal ultrasound images were acquired from 9 men before and immediately after stretchings or a SW, and 10 minutes after a STS. The STS consisted of the following exercises: leg extension, leg curl, leg press, and hack machine squat. The PNF resulted in lower performance for all situations. The PSS and SW improved performance for the leg press compared with the PNF and controls (CSs). For the hack machine squat, SWs resulted in higher performance than stretching conditions. The vastus lateralis muscle fascicle length (FL) increases after a STS for PNF. The biceps femoris muscle showed a higher pennation angle 10 minutes after the STS for PSS; the FL increases immediately after PSS and then decreases 10 minutes after the STS for PSS. As per our results, the SWs should be performed before STSs, whereas PNF stretching should not be prescribed because this condition impairs subsequent performance. These results may assist health professionals in prescribing resistance training. PMID:26705067

  17. Previous appendicitis may affect peritoneal overlap of the mesh in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, R; Di Martino, M; Lipari, G; Sambataro, L

    2002-02-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is now increasingly performed in bilateral and recurrent groin hernias. The avoidance of direct exposure of the commonly used meshes to the abdominal viscera is considered essential to reduce the risk of bowel adhesions. We report a case of bilateral inguinal hernia repair in a patients who had had an appendectomy performed 8 years earlier for a perforated appendicitis. Probably as a result of previous inflammation, any attempt to dissect the preperitoneal layer in the right side resulted in peritoneal lacerations. Since the peritoneum could not be used to cover the mesh, we decided to position an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) mesh to avoid postoperative adhesions. The mesh was fixed with tacks to the symphysis pubis, Cooper's ligament, the ilio-pubic tract, and the transversalis fascia 2 cm above the hernia defect. This case suggests that in patient with previous appendicitis, a difficult preperitoneal dissection can be expected. In such cases, especially in young patients for whom future surgical operations cannot be excluded, any attempt to reduce adhesions is justified. At the present time, the use of e-PTFE meshes, which induce no tissue reaction, is a good option in this situation. PMID:11967702

  18. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  19. The Design and Methods of Genetic Studies on Acute and Chronic Postoperative Pain in Patients after Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Belfer, Inna; Greco, Carol M.; Lokshin, Anna; Vulakovich, Katie; Landsittel, Douglas; Dai, Feng; Crossett, Lawrence; Chelly, Jacques E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Total knee replacement (TKR) is the treatment option of choice for the millions of individuals whose osteoarthritis pain can no longer be managed through non-invasive methods. Over 500,000 TKRs are performed annually in the United States. Although most patients report improvement in pain and functioning following TKR, up to 30% report persistent pain that interferes with daily function. However, the reasons for poor outcomes are not clear. To best determine which patients are at risk for pain post TKR, a detailed and comprehensive approach is needed. In this article, we present the methodology of a study designed to identify a set of genetic, proteomic, clinical, demographic, psychosocial, and psychophysical risk factors for severe acute and chronic pain post TKR. Design Prospective longitudinal observational study. Setting University Hospital System. Subjects Patients scheduled for unilateral TKR with a target number of 150. Methods Prior to surgery, we collect demographic, psychosocial, and pain data. Biological data, including blood samples for genetic analyses, and serum, urine, and joint fluid for cytokine assessment are collected intraoperatively. Pain assessments as well as medication use are collected during each of the three days postsurgery. Additionally, pain and psychosocial information is collected 6 and 12 months following surgery. Conclusions This study, for the first time, captures the information on both genetic and “environmental” risk factors for acute and chronic pain post-TKR and has the potential to lead to the next step—multicenter large-scale studies on predictors and biomarkers of poor TKR outcomes as well as on tailored interventions and personalized medicine approaches for those at risk. PMID:25040948

  20. [Extraperitoneal ligation herniorraphy by the acute infectious diseases of the abdominal cavity in children].

    PubMed

    Ignat'ev, R O; Bataev, S M

    2012-01-01

    Surgery on the reason of the "acute abdomen" in children often reveals the persisting vaginal peritoneal defects, which further lead to hernia formation. 23 children (aged 4-15 years) were operated on the acute uncomplicated appendicitis (n=10), acute mesadenitis (n=3), appendicular local and pelvioperitonitis (n=9) and ovary apoplexia (n=1). Inguinal hernia was revealed in all patients during laparoscopy. After videoendoscopic sanation of the abdomen and appendectomy (if it was necessary) the extraperitoneal ligation herniorraphy in author's modification was performed. The were no cases of abdominal complications as well as hernia recurrence among the treated patients.

  1. Diver with acute abdominal pain, right leg paresthesias and weakness: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Corson, K; Minky, K; Mader, J

    2002-01-01

    A 29-year-old man was brought to an emergency department by the United States Coast Guard with chief complaints of severe abdominal pain, right leg paresthesia and weakness following four deep air dives. Physical examination before recompression treatment was remarkable for diffuse abdominal tenderness and right leg weakness. The patient was diagnosed in the emergency room with type II decompression sickness (DCS) and underwent standard recompression therapy. He experienced complete resolution of weakness after hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy, but his abdominal pain was persistent. Further investigation led to the diagnosis of acute appendicitis with perforation. The patient underwent appendectomy and intravenous antibiotic therapy and was discharged to his home on hospital day five without complications. This case reinforces the importance of careful clinical assessment of divers and illustrates the potentially wide differential diagnosis of DCS. This is the first reported case of recompression treatment of a diver with acute appendicitis and type II DCS.

  2. Using the two-source capture-recapture method to estimate the incidence of acute flaccid paralysis in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Kathryn; Kelly, Heath

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the incidence and the completeness of ascertainment of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) in Victoria, Australia, in 1998-2000 and to determine its common causes among children aged under 15 years. METHODS:: The two-source capture-recapture method was used to estimate the incidence of cases of AFP and to evaluate case ascertainment in the routine surveillance system. The primary and secondary data sources were notifications from this system and inpatient hospital records, respectively. FINDINGS: The routine surveillance system indicated that there were 14 cases and the hospital record review identified 19 additional cases. According to the two-source capture-recapture method, there would have been 40 cases during this period (95% confidence interval (CI) = 29-51), representing an average annual incidence of 1.4 per 100000 children aged under 15 years (95% CI = 1.1- 1.7). Thus case ascertainment based on routine surveillance was estimated to be 35% complete. Guillain-Barré syndrome was the commonest single cause of AFP. CONCLUSIONS: Routine surveillance for AFP in Victoria was insensitive. A literature review indicated that the capture-recapture estimates obtained in this study were plausible. The present results help to define a target notification rate for surveillance in settings where poliomyelitis is not endemic. PMID:12481205

  3. A Self-Administered Method of Acute Pressure Block of Sciatic Nerves for Short-Term Relief of Dental Pain: A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolin; Zhao, Wanghong; Wang, Ye; Hu, Jiao; Chen, Qiu; Yu, Juncai; Wu, Bin; Huang, Rong; Gao, Jie; He, Jiman

    2014-01-01

    Objectives While stimulation of the peripheral nerves increases the pain threshold, chronic pressure stimulation of the sciatic nerve is associated with sciatica. We recently found that acute pressure block of the sciatic nerve inhibits pain. Therefore, we propose that, the pain pathology-causing pressure is chronic, not acute. Here, we report a novel self-administered method: acute pressure block of the sciatic nerves is applied by the patients themselves for short-term relief of pain from dental diseases. Design This was a randomized, single-blind study. Setting Hospital patients. Patients Patients aged 16–60 years with acute pulpitis, acute apical periodontitis, or pericoronitis of the third molar of the mandible experiencing pain ≥3 on the 11-point numerical pain rating scale. Interventions Three-minute pressure to sciatic nerves was applied by using the hands (hand pressure method) or by having the patients squat to force the thigh and shin as tightly as possible on the sandwiched sciatic nerve bundles (self-administered method). Outcomes The primary efficacy variable was the mean difference in pain scores from the baseline. Results One hundred seventy-two dental patients were randomized. The self-administered method produced significant relief from pain associated with dental diseases (P ≤ 0.001). The analgesic effect of the self-administered method was similar to that of the hand pressure method. Conclusions The self-administered method is easy to learn and can be applied at any time for pain relief. We believe that patients will benefit from this method. PMID:24400593

  4. Rapunzel Syndrome Causing Appendicitis in an 8-year-old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Shruti; Yadav, Yogesh Kumar; Sharma, Uma; Gupta, Kusum

    2012-01-01

    Rapunzel syndrome is a rare type of presentation of trichobezoar, an extension of hair fibers into the small bowel and rarely beyond the ileocecal valve. Its clinical presentation is deceptive ranging from abdominal mass to symptoms of obstruction. We report a 8-year-old girl admitted with a history of abdominal pain and vomiting off and on for a period of 1 year. Ultrasound findings were suggestive of subacute intestinal obstruction. On laparotomy, trichobezoar was found in the stomach extending into small bowel and was removed. Appendix was inflammed hence it was also resected. Microscopic evidence of a hair shaft was seen in the appendix indicating appendicitis was due to luminal obstruction by hair concretions. PMID:23766615

  5. Multifunctional 8-hydroxyquinoline-appended cyclodextrins as new inhibitors of metal-induced protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, Valentina; Attanasio, Francesco; Puglisi, Antonino; Spencer, John; Sgarlata, Carmelo; Vecchio, Graziella

    2014-07-14

    Mounting evidence suggests a pivotal role of metal imbalances in protein misfolding and amyloid diseases. As such, metal ions represent a promising therapeutic target. In this context, the synthesis of chelators that also contain complementary functionalities to combat the multifactorial nature of neurodegenerative diseases is a highly topical issue. We report two new 8-hydroxyquinoline-appended cyclodextrins and highlight their multifunctional properties, including their Cu(II) and Zn(II) binding abilities, and capacity to act as antioxidants and metal-induced antiaggregants. In particular, the latter property has been applied in the development of an effective assay that exploits the formation of amyloid fibrils when β-lactoglobulin A is heated in the presence of metal ions.

  6. [Chilaiditi's syndrome complicated by subdiaphragmatic perforated appendicitis: unusual manifestation of a rare condition].

    PubMed

    Lenz, M; Kindler, M; Schilling, M; Pollack, T; Schwab, W; Becker, M

    2011-09-01

    We report on a case of an 80-year-old female patient who presented to the emergency room of with right upper quadrant abdominal pain since the day before. During the initial diagnostic an abdominal x-ray study revealed an air-filled colonic section of the bowel under the right hemidiaphragm corresponding to Chilaiditi's sign. The clinical symptoms and laboratory results were mild at this time. After 12 h the patient developed right upper quadrant peritonitis due to a perforated, subdiaphragmatic appendicitis based on Chilaiditi's syndrome. During surgical treatment the cecum and parts of the ascending colon were found to be interposed between the liver and right hemidiaphragm. A right hemicolectomy was performed which led to complete recovery of the patient. In addition to presenting this interesting case this article highlights the regime of the diagnostics and therapy of a complication of the very rare condition of Chilaiditi's syndrome.

  7. A Scalable Method for Molecular Network Reconstruction Identifies Properties of Targets and Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Edison; Szedlak, Anthony; Kang, Yunyi; Smith, Peyton; Smith, Nicholas; McBride, Madison; Finlay, Darren; Vuori, Kristiina; Mason, James; Ball, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A key aim of systems biology is the reconstruction of molecular networks. We do not yet, however, have networks that integrate information from all datasets available for a particular clinical condition. This is in part due to the limited scalability, in terms of required computational time and power, of existing algorithms. Network reconstruction methods should also be scalable in the sense of allowing scientists from different backgrounds to efficiently integrate additional data. We present a network model of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current version (AML 2.1), we have used gene expression data (both microarray and RNA-seq) from 5 different studies comprising a total of 771 AML samples and a protein–protein interactions dataset. Our scalable network reconstruction method is in part based on the well-known property of gene expression correlation among interacting molecules. The difficulty of distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions is addressed by optimizing the coefficient of variation of gene expression, using a validated gold-standard dataset of direct interactions. Computational time is much reduced compared to other network reconstruction methods. A key feature is the study of the reproducibility of interactions found in independent clinical datasets. An analysis of the most significant clusters, and of the network properties (intraset efficiency, degree, betweenness centrality, and PageRank) of common AML mutations demonstrated the biological significance of the network. A statistical analysis of the response of blast cells from 11 AML patients to a library of kinase inhibitors provided an experimental validation of the network. A combination of network and experimental data identified CDK1, CDK2, CDK4, and CDK6 and other kinases as potential therapeutic targets in AML. PMID:25844667

  8. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when ...

  9. [Multidetector computed tomography in acute abdomen].

    PubMed

    Carreras Aja, M; Arrieta Artieda, I; Borruel Nacenta, S

    2011-10-01

    MDCT has become a fundamental tool for determining the causes of acute abdomen. CT is considered the imaging technique of choice in the diagnostic workup of both localized and diffuse acute abdomen, except in patients in whom acute cholecystitis or acute gynecological disease is suspected and in children, adolescents, and pregnant patients, in whom ultrasonography is the imaging technique of choice. Plain-film X-ray examination has been relegated to the initial management of renal colic, suspected foreign bodies, and intestinal obstruction. One of the drawbacks of MDCT is its use of ionizing radiation, which makes it necessary to filter and direct the examinations as well as to ensure that the most appropriate protocols are used. For this reason, low dose protocols have been developed so that diagnostic studies can be performed with doses of radiation between 2 and 3 mSv; these are normally used in the diagnosis of renal colic and can also be used in selected patients with suspected appendicitis and acute diverticulitis. PMID:21742357

  10. Single site multiport umbilical laparoscopic appendicectomy versus conventional multiport laparoscopic appendicectomy in acute settings

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, SP

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although conventional multiport laparoscopic appendicectomy (CMLA) is preferred for managing acute appendicitis, the recently developed transumbilical laparoscopic approach is rapidly gaining popularity. However, its wide dissemination seems restricted by technical/technological issues. In this regard, a newly developed method of single site multiport umbilical laparoscopic appendicectomy (SMULA) was compared prospectively with CMLA to assess the former’s efficacy and the technical advantages in acute scenarios. Methods Overall, 430 patients were studied: 212 in the SMULA group and 218 in the CMLA group. The same surgeon performed all the procedures using routine laparoscopic instruments. The SMULA technique entailed three ports inserted directly at the umbilical mound through three distinct strategically placed mini-incisions without raising the umbilical flap. The CMLA involved the traditional three-port technique. Results Both groups were comparable in terms of demographic criteria, indications for surgery, intraoperative blood loss, time to ambulation, length of hospital stay and umbilical morbidity. Although the mean operative time was marginally longer in the SMULA group (43.35 minutes, standard deviation [SD]: 21.16 minutes) than in the CMLA group (42.28 minutes, SD: 21.41 minutes), this did not reach statistical significance. Conversely, the mean pain scores on day 0 and the cosmetic outcomes differed significantly and favoured the SMULA technique. None of the patients developed port site hernias over the follow-up period (mean 2.9 years). Conclusions The favourable outcomes for the SMULA technique are likely to be due to the three small segregated incisions at one place and better trocar ergonomics. The SMULA technique is safe in an acute setting and may be considered of value among the options for transumbilical appendicectomy. PMID:25198978

  11. [Focused surgical bedside ultrasound: E-FAST (focused assessment with sonography in trauma) - abdominal aortic aneurysm - cholecystolithiasis - acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Studer, Maria; Studer, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasound is an easy to learn and highly efficient diagnostic tool to complete the clinical examination and improve bedside decision-making. In the trauma room, surgeons are often required to make a quick decision as to whether or not a patient needs an emergency intervention or whether further diagnostics are required. For this reason, education of surgeons in performing focused emergency ultrasound is pivotal. The goal of ICAN is to improve and expand the education of surgeons in Switzerland. This article provides a short review of the most frequent surgical pathologies encountered in the emergency room.

  12. Enhancing the population impact of collaborative care interventions: Mixed method development and implementation of stepped care targeting posttraumatic stress disorder and related comorbidities after acute trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zatzick, Douglas; Rivara, Frederick; Jurkovich, Gregory; Russo, Joan; Trusz, Sarah Geiss; Wang, Jin; Wagner, Amy; Stephens, Kari; Dunn, Chris; Uehara, Edwina; Petrie, Megan; Engel, Charles; Davydow, Dimitri; Katon, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop and implement a stepped collaborative care intervention targeting PTSD and related co-morbidities to enhance the population impact of early trauma-focused interventions. Method We describe the design and implementation of the Trauma Survivors Outcomes & Support Study (TSOS II). An interdisciplinary treatment development team was comprised of trauma surgical, clinical psychiatric and mental health services “change agents” who spanned the boundaries between front-line trauma center clinical care and acute care policy. Mixed method clinical epidemiologic and clinical ethnographic studies informed the development of PTSD screening and intervention procedures. Results Two-hundred and seven acutely injured trauma survivors with high early PTSD symptom levels were randomized into the study. The stepped collaborative care model integrated care management (i.e., posttraumatic concern elicitation and amelioration, motivational interviewing, and behavioral activation) with cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy targeting PTSD. The model was feasibly implemented by front-line acute care MSW and ARNP providers. Conclusions Stepped care protocols targeting PTSD may enhance the population impact of early interventions developed for survivors of individual and mass trauma by extending the reach of collaborative care interventions to acute care medical settings and other non-specialty posttraumatic contexts. PMID:21596205

  13. Use of household water treatment and safe storage methods in acute emergency response: case study results from Nepal, Indonesia, Kenya, and Haiti.

    PubMed

    Lantagne, Daniele S; Clasen, Thomas F

    2012-10-16

    Household water treatment (HWTS) methods, such as boiling or chlorination, have long been recommended in emergencies. While there is increasing evidence of HWTS efficacy in the development context, effectiveness in the acute emergency context has not been rigorously assessed. We investigated HWTS effectiveness in response to four acute emergencies by surveying 1521 targeted households and testing stored water for free chlorine residual and fecal indicators. We defined "effective use" as the percentage of the targeted population with contaminated household water who used the HWTS method to improve stored drinking water microbiological quality to internationally accepted levels. Chlorine-based methods were distributed in all four emergencies and filters in one emergency. Effective use ranged widely, from 0-67.5%, with only one pre-existing chlorine program in Haiti and unpromoted boiling use in Indonesia reaching >20%. More successful programs provided an effective HWTS method, with the necessary supplies and training provided, to households with contaminated water who were familiar with the method before the emergency. HWTS can be effective at reducing the risk of unsafe drinking water in the acute emergency context. Additionally, by focusing on whether interventions actually improve drinking water quality in vulnerable households, "effective use" provides an important program evaluation metric.

  14. Carbohydrate-appended tumor targeting iron(III) complexes showing photocytotoxicity in red light.

    PubMed

    Basu, Uttara; Khan, Imran; Hussain, Akhtar; Gole, Bappaditya; Kondaiah, Paturu; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2014-02-17

    Glucose-appended photocytotoxic iron(III) complexes of a tridentate Schiff base phenolate ligand [Fe(bpyag)(L)](NO3) (1-3), where bpyag is N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-2-aminoethyl-β-D-glucopyranoside and H2L is 3-(2-hydroxyphenylimino)-1-phenylbutan-1-one (H2phap) in 1, 3-(2-hydroxyphenylimino)-9-anthrylbutan-1-one (H2anap) in 2, and 3-(2-hydroxyphenylimino)-1-pyrenylbutan-1-one (H2pyap) in 3, were synthesized and characterized. The complex [Fe(dpma)(anap)](NO3) (4), having bis-(2-pyridylmethyl)benzylamine (dpma), in which the glucose moiety of bpyag is substituted by a phenyl group, was used as a control, and the complex [Fe(dpma)(anap)](PF6) (4a) was structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure shows a FeN4O2 core in a distorted octahedral geometry. The high-spin iron(III) complexes with magnetic moment value of ∼5.9 μB showed a low-energy phenolate-to-Fe(III) charge-transfer (CT) absorption band as a shoulder near 500 nm with a tail extending to 700 nm and an irreversible Fe(III)-Fe(II) redox couple near -0.6 V versus saturated calomel electrode. The complexes are avid binders to calf thymus DNA and showed photocleavage of supercoiled pUC19 DNA in red (647 nm) and green (532 nm) light. Complexes 2 and 3 displayed significant photocytotoxicity in red light, with an IC50 value of ∼20 μM in HeLa and HaCaT cells, and no significant toxicity in dark. The cell death is via an apoptotic pathway, by generation of reactive oxygen species. Preferential internalization of the carbohydrate-appended complexes 2 and 3 was evidenced in HeLa cells as compared to the control complex 4. A 5-fold increase in the cellular uptake was observed for the active complexes in HeLa cells. The photophysical properties of the complexes are rationalized from the density functional theory calculations.

  15. Modular Attachment of Appended Boron Lewis Acids to a Ruthenium Pincer Catalyst: Metal-Ligand Cooperativity Enables Selective Alkyne Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kuei-Nin T; Kampf, Jeff W; Szymczak, Nathaniel K

    2016-08-24

    A new series of bifunctional Ru complexes with pendent Lewis acidic boranes were prepared by late-stage modification of an active hydrogen-transfer catalyst. The appended boranes modulate the reactivity of a metal hydride as well as catalytic hydrogenations. After installing acidic auxiliary groups, the complexes become multifunctional and catalyze the cis-selective hydrogenation of alkynes with higher rates, conversions, and selectivities compared with the unmodified catalyst. PMID:27472301

  16. Hospital Admissions for Acute Myocardial Infarction, Angina, Stroke, and Asthma After Implementation of Arizona's Comprehensive Statewide Smoking Ban

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michele E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the impact of Arizona's May 2007 comprehensive statewide smoking ban on hospital admissions for diagnoses for which there is evidence of a causal relationship with secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure (acute myocardial infarction [AMI], angina, stroke, and asthma). Methods. We compared monthly hospital admissions from January 2004 through May 2008 for these primary diagnoses and 4 diagnoses not associated with SHS (appendicitis, kidney stones, acute cholecystitis, and ulcers) for Arizona counties with preexisting county or municipal smoking bans and counties with no previous bans. We attributed reductions in admissions to the statewide ban if they occurred only in diagnoses associated with SHS and if they were larger in counties with no previous bans. We analyzed the data with Poisson regressions, controlling for seasonality and admissions trends. We also estimated cost savings. Results. Statistically significant reductions in hospital admissions were seen for AMI, angina, stroke, and asthma in counties with no previous bans over what was seen in counties with previous bans. No ban variable coefficients were statistically significant for diagnoses not associated with SHS. Conclusions. Arizona's statewide smoking ban decreased hospital admissions for AMI, stroke, asthma, and angina. PMID:20466955

  17. [Comparison of culture and real-time PCR methods in the detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae in acute otitis media effusion specimens].

    PubMed

    Eser, Ozgen Köseoğlu; Alp, Sehnaz; Ergin, Alper; Ipçi, Kaan; Alp, Alpaslan; Gür, Deniz; Hasçelik, Gülşen

    2012-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae are the major etiologic agents of acute otitis media. This study was aimed to compare the detection rate of S.pneumoniae and H.influenzae by culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction (Rt-PCR) in the middle ear effusions of patients diagnosed as acute otitis media. A total of 60 middle ear effusion samples collected from children with acute otitis media were included in the study. The samples were inoculated and incubated in BACTEC Ped Plus blood culture bottles and BACTEC 9120 system (BD Diagnostic Systems, MD), respectively, and the isolates were identified by conventional methods. For the molecular diagnosis of H.influenzae and S.pneumoniae, ply pneumolysin gene and HIB capsule region, respectively were amplified by Rt-PCR (LightCycler, Roche Diagnostics, Germany). H.influenzae and S.pneumoniae were isolated from 5 (8.3%) and 3 (5%) of the patient samples with conventional culture methods, respectively. In addition in 11.6% of the samples other microorganisms (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus sanguinis, Moraxella catarrhalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans) were also isolated. On the other hand H.influenzae and S.pneumoniae were detected in 38 (63.3%) and 24 (40%) of the samples with Rt-PCR, respectively. There was about eight fold increase in the detection frequency of H.influenzae and S.pneumoniae with Rt-PCR compared to culture methods. When culture was accepted as the gold standard method, the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of Rt-PCR in the detection of H.influenzae and S.pneumoniae were estimated as 80%, 51% and 98.2%, respectively. As a result, Rt-PCR was shown to be a sensitive method and could be preferred for the rapid diagnosis of H.influenzae and S.pneumoniae in the etiological diagnosis of acute otitis media, especially in culture negative cases.

  18. Clinical profile of non-traumatic acute abdominal pain presenting to an adult emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Chanana, Lakshay; Jegaraj, Moses A. K.; Kalyaniwala, Kimmin; Yadav, Bijesh; Abilash, Kundavaram

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal pain is one of the most common reasons for presenting to the emergency depatment (ED) and the etiology is varied. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in a large ED of a tertiary care center in India. All patients older than 15 years and presenting with non-traumatic abdominal pain to the ED from May 2012 to October 2012 were recruited and the demographic characteristics, diagnosis and outcome were analyzed. Results: The study cohort included 264 patients over a 6 month period. More than half (55.6%) were aged between 15 and 40 years. There was a male predominance (56.8%). Majority of the patients (76.9%) presented with abdominal pain of less than 72 hour duration. The pain was sudden in onset in 54.9% of patients. Dull type was the most common character of pain (36%) followed by colicky type (22.3%). The most common site of pain was the lower abdomen (45.8%). Upper abdominal pain was seen in 26.9% and the pain was generalized in 27.3% of patients. The common causes were uretericcolic (16.3%), urinary tract infection (12.5%), acute pancreatitis (11%), acute appendicitis (10.6%) and acute gastritis (8%). More than half (51.9%) discharged from ED and 37% of cases were managed by the emergency physicians. Surgical intervention was required in 25.8% of patients. The mortality rate was 2.3%. Conclusions: Abdominal pain is a common ED symptom and clinicians must consider multiple diagnoses, especially those that require immediate intervention to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:26288785

  19. Appending High-Resolution Elevation Data to GPS Speed Traces for Vehicle Energy Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, E.; Burton, E.; Duran, A.; Gonder, J.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate and reliable global positioning system (GPS)-based vehicle use data are highly valuable for many transportation, analysis, and automotive considerations. Model-based design, real-world fuel economy analysis, and the growing field of autonomous and connected technologies (including predictive powertrain control and self-driving cars) all have a vested interest in high-fidelity estimation of powertrain loads and vehicle usage profiles. Unfortunately, road grade can be a difficult property to extract from GPS data with consistency. In this report, we present a methodology for appending high-resolution elevation data to GPS speed traces via a static digital elevation model. Anomalous data points in the digital elevation model are addressed during a filtration/smoothing routine, resulting in an elevation profile that can be used to calculate road grade. This process is evaluated against a large, commercially available height/slope dataset from the Navteq/Nokia/HERE Advanced Driver Assistance Systems product. Results will show good agreement with the Advanced Driver Assistance Systems data in the ability to estimate road grade between any two consecutive points in the contiguous United States.

  20. Flower-like supramolecular self-assembly of phosphonic acid appended naphthalene diimide and melamine

    PubMed Central

    Bhosale, Rajesh S; Al Kobaisi, Mohammad; Bhosale, Sidhanath V.; Bhargava, Suresh; Bhosale, Sheshanath V.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse supramolecular assemblies ranging from nanometres to micrometers of small aromatic π-conjugated functional molecules have attracted enormous research interest in light of their applications in optoelectronics, chemosensors, nanotechnology, biotechnology and biomedicines. Here we study the mechanism of the formation of a flower-shaped supramolecular structure of phosphonic acid appended naphthalene diimide with melamine. The flower-shaped assembly formation was visualised by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging, furthermore, XRD and DLS used to determined mode of aggregation. Characteristically, phosphonic acid-substituted at imide position of NDIs possess two important properties resulting in the formation of controlled flower-like nanostructures: (i) the aromatic core of the NDI which is designed to optimize the dispersive interactions (π-π stacking and van der Waals interactions) between the cores within a construct and (ii) phosphonic acid of NDI interact with malamine through molecular recognition i.e. strong hydrogen-bonding (H-bonding). We believe such arrangements prevent crystallization and favour the directional growth of flower-like nanostructure in 3D fashion. These works demonstrate that complex self-assembly can indeed be attained through hierarchical non-covalent interactions of two components. Furthermore, flower-like structures built from molecular recognition by these molecules indicate their potential in other fields if combined with other chemical entities. PMID:26416382

  1. Flower-like supramolecular self-assembly of phosphonic acid appended naphthalene diimide and melamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhosale, Rajesh S.; Al Kobaisi, Mohammad; Bhosale, Sidhanath V.; Bhargava, Suresh; Bhosale, Sheshanath V.

    2015-09-01

    Diverse supramolecular assemblies ranging from nanometres to micrometers of small aromatic π-conjugated functional molecules have attracted enormous research interest in light of their applications in optoelectronics, chemosensors, nanotechnology, biotechnology and biomedicines. Here we study the mechanism of the formation of a flower-shaped supramolecular structure of phosphonic acid appended naphthalene diimide with melamine. The flower-shaped assembly formation was visualised by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging, furthermore, XRD and DLS used to determined mode of aggregation. Characteristically, phosphonic acid-substituted at imide position of NDIs possess two important properties resulting in the formation of controlled flower-like nanostructures: (i) the aromatic core of the NDI which is designed to optimize the dispersive interactions (π-π stacking and van der Waals interactions) between the cores within a construct and (ii) phosphonic acid of NDI interact with malamine through molecular recognition i.e. strong hydrogen-bonding (H-bonding). We believe such arrangements prevent crystallization and favour the directional growth of flower-like nanostructure in 3D fashion. These works demonstrate that complex self-assembly can indeed be attained through hierarchical non-covalent interactions of two components. Furthermore, flower-like structures built from molecular recognition by these molecules indicate their potential in other fields if combined with other chemical entities.

  2. Self-assembled via axial coordination magnesium porphyrin-imidazole appended fullerene dyad: spectroscopic, electrochemical, computational, and photochemical studies.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Francis; El-Khouly, Mohamed E; Gadde, Suresh; McCarty, Amy L; Karr, Paul A; Zandler, Melvin E; Araki, Yasuyaki; Ito, Osamu

    2005-05-26

    Spectroscopic, redox, and electron transfer reactions of a self-assembled donor-acceptor dyad formed by axial coordination of magnesium meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (MgTPP) and fulleropyrrolidine appended with an imidazole coordinating ligand (C(60)Im) were investigated. Spectroscopic studies revealed the formation of a 1:1 C(60)Im:MgTPP supramolecular complex, and the anticipated 1:2 complex could not be observed because of the needed large amounts of the axial coordinating ligand. The formation constant, K(1), for the 1:1 complex was found to be (1.5 +/- 0.3) x 10(4) M(-1), suggesting fairly stable complex formation. The geometric and electronic structures of the dyads were probed by ab initio B3LYP/3-21G() methods. The majority of the highest occupied frontier molecular orbital (HOMO) was found to be located on the MgTPP entity, while the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) was on the fullerene entity, suggesting that the charge-separated state of the supramolecular complex is C(60)Im(*-):MgTPP(*+). Redox titrations involving MgTPP and C(60)Im allowed accurate determination of the oxidation and reduction potentials of the donor and acceptor entities in the supramolecular complex. These studies revealed more difficult oxidation, by about 100 mV, for MgTPP in the pentacoordinated C(60)Im:MgTPP compared to pristine MgTPP in o-dichlorobenzene. A total of six one-electron redox processes corresponding to the oxidation and reduction of the zinc porphyrin ring and the reduction of fullerene entities was observed within the accessible potential window of the solvent. The excited state events were monitored by both steady state and time-resolved emission as well as transient absorption techniques. In o-dichlorobenzene, upon coordination of C(60)Im to MgTPP, the main quenching pathway involved electron transfer from the singlet excited MgTPP to the C(60)Im moiety. The rate of forward electron transfer, k(CS), calculated from the picosecond time-resolved emission

  3. Can outer-to-outer diameter be used alone in diagnosing appendicitis on 128-slice MDCT?

    PubMed Central

    Yaqoob, Jamal; Idris, Muhammad; Alam, Muhammad Shahbaz; Kashif, Nazia

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the frequency of visualization, position and diameter of normal appendix on 128-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in adult population. METHODS: Retrospective cross sectional study conducted at Radiology Department, Dallah Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from March 2013 to October 2013. Non-enhanced computed tomography scans of abdomen and pelvis of 98 patients presenting with hematuria (not associated with abdominal pain, fever or colonic disease) were reviewed by two radiologists, blinded to patient history. The study group included 55 females and 43 males with overall mean age of 54.7 years (range 21 to 94 years). The coronal reformatted images were reviewed in addition to the axial images. The frequency of visualization of appendix was recorded with assessment of position, diameter and luminal contents. RESULTS: The appendix was recorded as definitely visualized in 99% of patients and mean outer-to-outer diameter of the appendix was 5.6 ± 1.3 mm (range 3.0-11.0 mm). CONCLUSION: MDCT with its multiplanar reformation display is extremely useful for visualization of normal appendix. The normal appendix is very variable in its position and diameter. In the absence of other signs, the diagnosis of acute appendix should not be made solely on outer-to-outer appendiceal diameter. PMID:25550996

  4. Fullerene- and pyromellitdiimide-appended tripodal ligands embedded in light-harvesting porphyrin macrorings.

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, Yusuke; Satake, Akiharu; Sandanayaka, Atula S D; Araki, Yasuyuki; Ito, Osamu; Kobuke, Yoshiaki

    2011-10-17

    Three new tripyridyl tripodal ligands appended with either fullerene or pyromellitdiimide moieties, named C(60)-s-Tripod, C(60)-l-Tripod, and PI-Tripod, were synthesized and introduced into a porphyrin macroring N-(1-Zn)(3) (where 1-Zn = trisporphyrinatozinc(II)). From UV-vis absorption and fluorescence titration data, the binding constants of C(60)-s-Tripod, C(60)-l-Tripod, and PI-Tripod with N-(1-Zn)(3) in benzonitrile were estimated to be 3 × 10(8), 1 × 10(7), and 2 × 10(7) M(-1), respectively. These large binding constants denote multiple interactions of the ligands to N-(1-Zn)(3). The binding constants of the longer ligand (C(60)-l-Tripod) and the pyromellitdiimide ligand (PI-Tripod) are almost the same as those without the fullerene or pyromellitdiimide groups, indicating that they interact via three pyridyl groups to the porphyrinatozinc(II) coordination. In contrast, the larger binding constants and the almost complete fluorescence quenching in the case of the shorter ligand (C(60)-s-Tripod) indicate that the interaction with N-(1-Zn)(3) is via two pyridyl groups to the porphyrinatozinc(II) coordination and a π-π interaction of the fullerene to the porphyrin(s). The fluorescence of N-(1-Zn)(3) was quenched by up to 80% by the interaction of C(60)-l-Tripod. The nanosecond transient absorption spectra showed only the excited triplet peak of the fullerene on selective excitation of the macrocyclic porphyrins, indicating that energy transfer from the excited N-(1-Zn)(3) group to the fullerenyl moiety occurs in the C(60)-l-Tripod/N-(1-Zn)(3) composite. In the case of PI-Tripod, the fluorescence of N-(1-Zn)(3) was quenched by 45%. It seems that the fluorescence quenching probably originates from electron transfer from the excited N-(1-Zn)(3) group to the pyromellitdiimide moiety.

  5. T helper type 17 pathway suppression by appendicitis and appendectomy protects against colitis.

    PubMed

    Cheluvappa, R; Luo, A S; Grimm, M C

    2014-02-01

    Appendicitis followed by appendectomy (AA) at a young age protects against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We wanted to characterize the role of the T helper type 17 (Th17) system involved in this protective effect. AA was performed on 5-week-old male BALB/c mice and distal-colon samples were harvested. Mice with two laparotomies each served as sham-sham (SS) controls. RNA was extracted from four individual colonic samples per group (AA and SS groups) and each sample microarray-analysed and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-validated. Gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed that the Th17 recruitment factor gene CCL20 was significantly suppressed at both 3 days post-AA and 28 days post-AA. Although Th17 cell development differentiation factor genes TGF-β2 and TGF-β3 were significantly up-regulated 3 days post-AA, GSEA 28 days post-AA showed that AA down-regulated 29 gene-sets associated with TGF-β1, TGF-β2 and TGF-β3 in contrast to none up-regulated with any of these genes. GSEA showed substantial down-regulation of gene-sets associated with Th17 lymphocyte recruitment, differentiation, activation and cytokine expression in the AA group 28 days post-AA. We conclude that Th17-system cytokines are kept under control by AA via down-regulation of proinflammatory CCL20, a rapid down-regulation of pro-Th17 cell differentiation genes TGF-β2 and TGF-β3, suppression of RORC-associated gene-sets, increased protective STAT1 expression and suppression of 81 'pro-Th17' system gene-sets. AA suppresses the Th17 pathway leading to colitis amelioration. Further characterization of Th17-associated genes and biological pathways will assist in the development of better therapeutic approaches in IBD management. PMID:24666024

  6. The effectiveness of the McKenzie method in addition to first-line care for acute low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a highly prevalent and disabling condition worldwide. Clinical guidelines for the management of patients with acute low back pain recommend first-line treatment consisting of advice, reassurance and simple analgesics. Exercise is also commonly prescribed to these patients. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term effect of adding the McKenzie method to the first-line care of patients with acute low back pain. Methods A multi-centre randomized controlled trial with a 3-month follow-up was conducted between September 2005 and June 2008. Patients seeking care for acute non-specific low back pain from primary care medical practices were screened. Eligible participants were assigned to receive a treatment programme based on the McKenzie method and first-line care (advice, reassurance and time-contingent acetaminophen) or first-line care alone, for 3 weeks. Primary outcome measures included pain (0-10 Numeric Rating Scale) over the first seven days, pain at 1 week, pain at 3 weeks and global perceived effect (-5 to 5 scale) at 3 weeks. Treatment effects were estimated using linear mixed models. Results One hundred and forty-eight participants were randomized into study groups, of whom 138 (93%) completed the last follow-up. The addition of the McKenzie method to first-line care produced statistically significant but small reductions in pain when compared to first-line care alone: mean of -0.4 points (95% confidence interval, -0.8 to -0.1) at 1 week, -0.7 points (95% confidence interval, -1.2 to -0.1) at 3 weeks, and -0.3 points (95% confidence interval, -0.5 to -0.0) over the first 7 days. Patients receiving the McKenzie method did not show additional effects on global perceived effect, disability, function or on the risk of persistent symptoms. These patients sought less additional health care than those receiving only first-line care (P = 0.002). Conclusions When added to the currently recommended first-line care of acute

  7. A tutorial for analysing the cost-effectiveness of alternative methods for assessing chemical toxicity: the case of acute oral toxicity prediction.

    PubMed

    Norlen, Hedvig; Worth, Andrew P; Gabbert, Silke

    2014-05-01

    Compared with traditional animal methods for toxicity testing, in vitro and in silico methods are widely considered to permit a more cost-effective assessment of chemicals. However, how to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative methods has remained unclear. This paper offers a user-oriented tutorial for applying cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) to alternative (non-animal) methods. The purpose is to illustrate how CEA facilitates the identification of the alternative method, or the combination of methods, that offers the highest information gain per unit of cost. We illustrate how information gains and costs of single methods and method combinations can be assessed. By using acute oral toxicity as an example, we apply CEA to a set of four in silico methods (ToxSuite, TOPKAT, TEST, ADMET Predictor), one in vitro method (the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity assay), and various combinations of these methods. Our results underline that in silico tools are more cost-effective than the in vitro test. Battery combinations of alternative methods, however, do not necessarily outperform single methods, because additional information gains from the battery are easily outweighed by additional costs. PMID:24901905

  8. A clinical comparison of cefepime and metronidazole versus gentamicin and clindamycin in the antibiotic management of surgically treated advanced appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Berne, T V; Yellin, A E; Appleman, M D; Heseltine, P N; Gill, M A

    1993-01-01

    Many antibiotics and antibiotic combinations are used for the treatment of peritonitis because of advanced (gangrenous or perforated) appendicitis. An aminoglycoside combined with an antianaerobe antibiotic is one standard treatment, but there is concern about the potential nephrotoxicity of the aminoglycoside and the necessity for monitoring aminoglycoside blood levels. Cefepime, a new broad-spectrum cephalosporin with a prolonged serum half-life, has excellent activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Its spectrum of activity is similar to the aminoglycosides, but it has less potential for inducing renal injury. A double-blind, randomized study compared cefepime, 2 grams every 12 hours IVPB plus metronidazole 0.5 grams every eight hours IVPB (C/M) with gentamicin 1.5 milligrams per kilograms of IVPB plus clindamycin 0.9 grams q eight hours IVPB (G/C), administered up to 14 days, in 96 surgically treated patients with gangrenous or perforated appendicitis. Fifty patients had advanced appendicitis (nine gangrenous and 41 perforated) in the C/M group and 46 patients (six gangrenous and 40 perforated) in the G/C group. The mean number of days of postoperative fever (C/M, 4.4 +/- 2.7 versus G/C, 5.0 +/- 2.2), postoperative hospitalization (C/M, 2.0 +/- 1.9 versus G/C, 2.0 +/- 2.1) and antibiotic therapy (C/M, 6.3 +/- 1.9 versus G/C, 6.9 +/- 1.9) was similar in the two treatment groups. There were 11 treatment failures (C/M, three; G/C, eight; p = 0.13), six of which were probably a result of enterococci. No deaths occurred. Our study results show that the efficacy of cefepime plus metronidazole is equivalent to that of clindamycin plus gentamicin.

  9. Solid inclusion complexes of oleanolic acid with amino-appended β-cyclodextrins (ACDs): Preparation, characterization, water solubility and anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yufeng; Liu, Ying; Yang, Zhikuan; Niu, Raomei; Gao, Kai; Yang, Bo; Liao, Xiali; Zhang, Jihong

    2016-12-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a pentacyclic triterpenoid acid of natural abundance in plants which possesses important biological activities. However, its medicinal applications were severely impeded by the poor water solubility and resultant low bioavailability and potency. In this work, studies on solid inclusion complexes of OA with a series of amino-appended β-cyclodextrins (ACDs) were conducted in order to address this issue. These complexes were prepared by suspension method and were well characterized by NMR, SEM, XRD, TG, DSC and Zeta potential measurement. The 2:1 inclusion mode of ACDs/OA complexes was elucidated by elaborate 2D NMR (ROESY). Besides, water solubility of OA was dramatically promoted by inclusion complexation with ACDs. Moreover, in vitro anticancer activities of OA against human cancer cell lines HepG2, HT29 and HCT116 were significantly enhanced after formation of inclusion complexes, while the apoptotic response results indicated their induction of apoptosis of cancer cells. This could provide a novel approach to development of novel pharmaceutical formulations of OA. PMID:27612690

  10. Fluorinated Boronic Acid-Appended Bipyridinium Salts for Diol Recognition and Discrimination via (19)F NMR Barcodes.

    PubMed

    Axthelm, Jörg; Görls, Helmar; Schubert, Ulrich S; Schiller, Alexander

    2015-12-16

    Fluorinated boronic acid-appended benzyl bipyridinium salts, derived from 4,4'-, 3,4'-, and 3,3'-bipyridines, were synthesized and used to detect and differentiate diol-containing analytes at physiological conditions via (19)F NMR spectroscopy. An array of three water-soluble boronic acid receptors in combination with (19)F NMR spectroscopy discriminates nine diol-containing bioanalytes--catechol, dopamine, fructose, glucose, glucose-1-phosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, galactose, lactose, and sucrose--at low mM concentrations. Characteristic (19)F NMR fingerprints are interpreted as two-dimensional barcodes without the need of multivariate analysis techniques.

  11. Model studies for evaluating the acute neurobehavioral effects of complex hydrocarbon solvents I. Validation of methods with ethanol.

    PubMed

    McKee, R H; Lammers, J H C M; Hoogendijk, E M G; Emmen, H H; Muijser, H; Barsotti, D A; Owen, D E; Kulig, B M

    2006-12-01

    As a preliminary step to evaluating the acute neurobehavioral effects of hydrocarbon solvents and to establish a working model for extrapolating animal test data to humans, joint neurobehavioral/toxicokinetic studies were conducted which involved administering ethanol to rats and volunteers. The specific objectives of the present studies were to evaluate the acute central nervous system (CNS) effects of ethanol in rats and humans and to assess relationships between internal levels of exposure and behavioral effects. A more general objective was to validate a battery of neurobehavioral tests that could be used to carry out comparative studies in both species. Accordingly, a range of tests including standardized observational measures, spontaneous motor activity assessments and learned visual discrimination performance was utilized in rat studies to evaluate acute CNS effects. Groups of rats were given ethanol at levels of approximately 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0g/kg, with blood level measurements to verify internal doses. In a volunteer study, 12 healthy male subjects were given 0.65g/kg ethanol, a level approximating the limit for motor vehicle operation in The Netherlands, and neurobehavioral effects were measured prior to and 1 and 3h after ethanol administration, with a computerized neurobehavioral test battery. Blood and air measurements were made to quantify internal doses. Results of the behavioral tests in rats provided evidence of ethanol-induced changes in neuromuscular, sensori-motor, and activity domains. There were also significant changes in visual discrimination, particularly in the areas of general measures of responding and psychomotor speed. In humans there were small but statistically significant effects on learning and memory, psychomotor skills and attention. However, the effects were subtle and not all parameters within given domains were affected. These studies demonstrated a qualitative similarity in response between rats and humans.

  12. Prediction of the acute toxicity (96-h LC50) of organic compounds to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) using a group contribution method.

    PubMed

    Martin, T M; Young, D M

    2001-10-01

    A group contribution method has been developed to correlate the acute toxicity (96-h LC50) to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) for 397 organic chemicals. Multilinear regression and computational neural networks (CNNs) were used for model building. The models were able to achieve a fairly good correlation of the data (r2 > 0.9). The linear model, which included four specific interaction terms, provided a rapid means of predicting the toxicity of a compound. The CNN model was able to yield virtually the same predictions with or without the four interaction terms that were included in the multilinear model.

  13. A potential method for non-invasive acute myocardial infarction detection based on saliva Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Gang; Chen, Maowen; Chen, Yuanxiang; Huang, Zufang; Lin, Jinyong; Lin, Jia; Xu, Zhihong; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Wei; Weng, Guoxing; Chen, Guannan

    2015-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) was employed for human saliva biochemical analysis with the aim to develop a rapidly non-invasive test for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) detection. High-quality Raman spectra were obtained from human saliva samples of 46 AMI patients and 43 healthy controls. Significant differences in Raman intensities of prominent bands were observed between AMI and normal saliva. The tentative assignment of the observed Raman bands indicated constituent and conformational differences between the two groups. Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was employed to analyze and classify the Raman spectra acquired from AMI and healthy saliva, yielding a diagnostic sensitivity of 80.4% and specificity of 81.4%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated the feasibility and potential for developing RS analysis of human saliva into a clinical tool for rapid AMI detection and screening.

  14. Treatment Outcomes of Corticosteroid Injection and Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy as Two Primary Therapeutic Methods for Acute Plantar Fasciitis: A Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Karimi Mobarakeh, Mahmoud; Hassanzadeh, Zabihallah; Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Asadi, Kamran; Ettehad, Hossein; Hashemi-Motlagh, Keyvan; Saheb-Ekhtiari, Khashayar; Fallah-Alipour, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of corticosteroid injection (CSI) and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) as primary treatment of acute plantar fasciitis has been debated. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare the therapeutic effects of CSI and ESWT in patients with acute (<6-week duration) symptomatic plantar fasciitis. Of the 116 eligible patients, 68 were randomized to 2 equal groups of 34 patients, each undergoing either ESWT or CSI. The ESWT method included 2000 impulses with energy of 0.15 mJ/mm(2) and a total energy flux density of 900 mJ/mm(2) for 3 consecutive sessions at 1-week intervals. In the CSI group, 40 mg of methyl prednisolone acetate plus 1 mL of lidocaine 2% was injected into the maximal tenderness point at the inframedial calcaneal tuberosity. The success and recurrence rates and pain intensity measured using the visual analog scale, were recorded and compared at the 3-month follow-up visit. The pain intensity had reduced significantly in all patients undergoing either technique. However, the value and trend of pain reduction in the CSI group was significantly greater than those in the ESWT group (p < .0001). In the ESWT and CSI groups, 19 (55.9%) and 5 (14.7%) patients experienced treatment failure, respectively. Age, gender, body mass index, and recurrence rate were similar between the 2 groups (p > .05). Both ESWT and CSI can be used as the primary and/or initial treatment option for treating patients with acute plantar fasciitis; however, the CSI technique had better therapeutic outcomes.

  15. Treatment Outcomes of Corticosteroid Injection and Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy as Two Primary Therapeutic Methods for Acute Plantar Fasciitis: A Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Karimi Mobarakeh, Mahmoud; Hassanzadeh, Zabihallah; Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Asadi, Kamran; Ettehad, Hossein; Hashemi-Motlagh, Keyvan; Saheb-Ekhtiari, Khashayar; Fallah-Alipour, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of corticosteroid injection (CSI) and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) as primary treatment of acute plantar fasciitis has been debated. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare the therapeutic effects of CSI and ESWT in patients with acute (<6-week duration) symptomatic plantar fasciitis. Of the 116 eligible patients, 68 were randomized to 2 equal groups of 34 patients, each undergoing either ESWT or CSI. The ESWT method included 2000 impulses with energy of 0.15 mJ/mm(2) and a total energy flux density of 900 mJ/mm(2) for 3 consecutive sessions at 1-week intervals. In the CSI group, 40 mg of methyl prednisolone acetate plus 1 mL of lidocaine 2% was injected into the maximal tenderness point at the inframedial calcaneal tuberosity. The success and recurrence rates and pain intensity measured using the visual analog scale, were recorded and compared at the 3-month follow-up visit. The pain intensity had reduced significantly in all patients undergoing either technique. However, the value and trend of pain reduction in the CSI group was significantly greater than those in the ESWT group (p < .0001). In the ESWT and CSI groups, 19 (55.9%) and 5 (14.7%) patients experienced treatment failure, respectively. Age, gender, body mass index, and recurrence rate were similar between the 2 groups (p > .05). Both ESWT and CSI can be used as the primary and/or initial treatment option for treating patients with acute plantar fasciitis; however, the CSI technique had better therapeutic outcomes. PMID:26215551

  16. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modelling using spatial dose metrics and machine learning methods for severe acute oral mucositis resulting from head and neck radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jamie A; Wong, Kee H; Welsh, Liam C; Jones, Ann-Britt; Schick, Ulrike; Newbold, Kate L; Bhide, Shreerang A; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M; Gulliford, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Severe acute mucositis commonly results from head and neck (chemo)radiotherapy. A predictive model of mucositis could guide clinical decision-making and inform treatment planning. We aimed to generate such a model using spatial dose metrics and machine learning. Material and Methods Predictive models of severe acute mucositis were generated using radiotherapy dose (dose-volume and spatial dose metrics) and clinical data. Penalised logistic regression, support vector classification and random forest classification (RFC) models were generated and compared. Internal validation was performed (with 100-iteration cross-validation), using multiple metrics, including area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and calibration slope, to assess performance. Associations between covariates and severe mucositis were explored using the models. Results The dose-volume-based models (standard) performed equally to those incorporating spatial information. Discrimination was similar between models, but the RFCstandard had the best calibration. The mean AUC and calibration slope for this model were 0.71 (s.d.=0.09) and 3.9 (s.d.=2.2), respectively. The volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses were associated with severe mucositis. Conclusions The RFCstandard model performance is modest-to-good, but should be improved, and requires external validation. Reducing the volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses may reduce mucositis incidence. PMID:27240717

  17. Design of a testing strategy using non-animal based test methods: lessons learnt from the ACuteTox project.

    PubMed

    Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Prieto, Pilar; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Stanzel, Sven

    2013-06-01

    In the framework of toxicology, a testing strategy can be viewed as a series of steps which are taken to come to a final prediction about a characteristic of a compound under study. The testing strategy is performed as a single-step procedure, usually called a test battery, using simultaneously all information collected on different endpoints, or as tiered approach in which a decision tree is followed. Design of a testing strategy involves statistical considerations, such as the development of a statistical prediction model. During the EU FP6 ACuteTox project, several prediction models were proposed on the basis of statistical classification algorithms which we illustrate here. The final choice of testing strategies was not based on statistical considerations alone. However, without thorough statistical evaluations a testing strategy cannot be identified. We present here a number of observations made from the statistical viewpoint which relate to the development of testing strategies. The points we make were derived from problems we had to deal with during the evaluation of this large research project. A central issue during the development of a prediction model is the danger of overfitting. Procedures are presented to deal with this challenge.

  18. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers, 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and closure methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers are discussed. Flow phenomena peculiar to calculation of these boundary layers were considered, along with calculations of three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers. Procedures for ascertaining nonsimilar two and three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers were appended, including finite difference, finite element, and mass-weighted residual methods.

  19. Statistical energy analysis response prediction methods for structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an effort to document methods for accomplishing response predictions for commonly encountered aerospace structural configurations is presented. Application of these methods to specified aerospace structure to provide sample analyses is included. An applications manual, with the structural analyses appended as example problems is given. Comparisons of the response predictions with measured data are provided for three of the example problems.

  20. Determining Chiral Configuration of Diamines via Contact Angle Measurements on Enantioselective Alanine-Appended Benzene-Tricarboxamide Gelators.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Ho; Kim, Ka Young; Ahn, Ahreum; Choi, Myong Yong; Jaworski, Justyn; Jung, Jong Hwa

    2016-06-01

    Spectroscopic techniques exist that may discern between enantiomers and assess chiral purity. A nonspectroscopic approach that may be directly observed could provide numerous benefits. Using chiral alanine-appended benzene-tricarboxamide gelators, we reveal a methanol gel system that is capable of providing visual discrimination between enantiomers of various diamines. Specifically, gelation is induced by supramolecular nanofiber assembly resulting from interaction between a chiral gelator and a diamine of opposing chirality (i.e., a heterochiral system). Upon further implementing the chiral gelator in electrospun fibers as solid state films, we revealed enantioselective surface wetting properties that allowed for determining chirality through contact angle measurements. While these two approaches of observable gelation and surface wetting offer nonspectroscopic approaches, we also find that the supramolecular nanofiber assembly was able to enhance the induced circular dichroism signal resulting from addition of chiral diamines, allowing precise quantification of their enantiomeric purity.

  1. Evaluation of New Dihydrophthalazine-Appended 2,4-Diaminopyrimidines against Bacillus anthracis: Improved Syntheses Using a New Pincer Complex

    PubMed Central

    Muddala, Nagendra Prasad; Nammalwar, Baskar; Selvaraju, Subhashini; Bourne, Christina R.; Henry, Mary; Bunce, Richard A.; Berlin, K. Darrell; Barrow, Esther W.; Barrow, William W.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis and evaluation of ten new dihydrophthalazine-appended 2,4-diaminopyrimidines as potential drugs to treat Bacillus anthracis is reported. An improved synthesis utilizing a new pincer catalyst, dichlorobis[1-(dicyclohexylphosphanyl)-piperidine]palladium(II), allows the final Heck coupling to be performed at 90 °C using triethylamine as the base. These milder conditions have been used to achieve improved yields for new and previously reported substrates with functional groups that degrade or react at the normal 140 °C reaction temperature. An analytical protocol for separating the S and R enantiomers of two of the most active compounds is also disclosed. Finally, the X-ray structure for the most active enantiomer of the lead compound, (S)-RAB1, is given. PMID:25905602

  2. Update on the management of non-obstetric acute abdomen in pregnant patients.

    PubMed

    Barber-Millet, Sebastián; Bueno Lledó, José; Granero Castro, Pablo; Gómez Gavara, Immaculada; Ballester Pla, Neus; García Domínguez, Rafael

    2016-05-01

    Acute abdomen is a rare entity in the pregnant patient, with an incidence of one in 500-635 patients. Its appearance requires a quick response and an early diagnosis to treat the underlying disease and prevent maternal and fetal morbidity. Imaging tests are essential, due to clinical and laboratory masking in this subgroup. Appendicitis and complicated biliary pathology are the most frequent causes of non-obstetric acute abdomen in the pregnant patient. The decision to operate, the timing, and the surgical approach are essential for a correct management of this pathology. The aim of this paper is to perform a review and update on the diagnosis and treatment of non-obstetric acute abdomen in pregnancy. PMID:26875476

  3. Update on the management of non-obstetric acute abdomen in pregnant patients.

    PubMed

    Barber-Millet, Sebastián; Bueno Lledó, José; Granero Castro, Pablo; Gómez Gavara, Immaculada; Ballester Pla, Neus; García Domínguez, Rafael

    2016-05-01

    Acute abdomen is a rare entity in the pregnant patient, with an incidence of one in 500-635 patients. Its appearance requires a quick response and an early diagnosis to treat the underlying disease and prevent maternal and fetal morbidity. Imaging tests are essential, due to clinical and laboratory masking in this subgroup. Appendicitis and complicated biliary pathology are the most frequent causes of non-obstetric acute abdomen in the pregnant patient. The decision to operate, the timing, and the surgical approach are essential for a correct management of this pathology. The aim of this paper is to perform a review and update on the diagnosis and treatment of non-obstetric acute abdomen in pregnancy.

  4. [Clinical case--voluminous diaphragmatic hernia--surgically acute abdomen: diagnostic and therapeutical challenges].

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, D; Savlovschi, C; Borcan, R; Pantu, H; Serban, D; Gradinaru, S; Smarandache, G; Trotea, T; Branescu, C; Musat, L; Comandasu, M; Priboi, M; Baldir, M; Sandolache, B; Oprescu, S

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a 58-year old male patient admitted in the surgery section of the University Emergency Hospital of Bucharest and diagnosed with acute abdomen. The minimal clinical-paraclinical investigation (i.e., thorax-pulmonary Xray, biological probes) raises questions as to the differentiated diagnosis and other associated diseases, also suggesting the existence of voluminous diaphragmatic hernia. The CT thorax-abdomen examination confirms the diaphragmatic hernia suspicion, with intra-thorax ascent of the colon up to the anterior C4 level, but does not explain the abdominal suffering; thus we suspected a biliary ileus or acute appendicitis. Medial laparotomy was imperative. Intrasurgically peritonitis was noticed located by gangrenous acute apendicitis, perforated, with coprolite, for which apendictomy and lavage-drainage pf the peritoneal cavity was performed. Post-surgical status: favourable to recovery.

  5. Acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Graves, Nancy S

    2013-09-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a common infectious disease syndrome, causing a combination of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. There are more than 350 million cases of acute gastroenteritis in the United States annually and 48 million of these cases are caused by foodborne bacteria. Traveler's diarrhea affects more than half of people traveling from developed countries to developing countries. In adult and pediatric patients, the prevalence of Clostridium difficile is increasing. Contact precautions, public health education, and prudent use of antibiotics are necessary goals in decreasing the prevalence of Clostridium difficle. Preventing dehydration or providing appropriate rehydration is the primary supportive treatment of acute gastroenteritis.

  6. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  7. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  8. [Estimation of efficiency of complex-method intestinal therapy using Nitella flexilis test-object for acute intestinal obstruction of various etiology].

    PubMed

    Berishvili, K L; Rummo, O O; Kirkovskiĭ, V V; Tret'iak, S I; Korotkov, S V

    2005-12-01

    The aim of our investigation was to define the presence of correlation between toxicity of intestinal contents and clinical and laboratory indices in the cases of ileus and peritonitis with the use of complex method of enteral therapy. Experiments have been carried out on internodal cells of Nitella Flexilis water plant. Efficiency of the given method (investigation of toxicity of the intestinal content with the use of test-object Nitella Flexilis) has been studied in 25 patients, who underwent correction of morpho-functional status of small intestine. Results of investigation have shown that changes in toxicity of intestinal content reliably reflect the nature and dynamics of the pathobiologic processes proceeding in GIS in treated patients suffering from acute intestinal impassability. Using the method of correction of morpho-functional status of small intestine decreases the role of "Intestinal factor" in formation of endogenous intoxication, which in turn results in early normalization of clinical and laboratory indices, favored process of early post-operational period, decreased rate of lethality and shortened rehabilitation period.

  9. Quantifying the internal deformation of the rodent spinal cord during acute spinal cord injury - the validation of a method.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Tim; Liu, Jie; Yung, Andrew; Cripton, Peter; Kozlowski, Piotr; Tetzlaff, Wolfram; Oxland, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and analysis of the rodent spinal cord subject to experimental spinal cord injury (SCI) has almost completely been limited to naked-eye observations, and a single measure of gross spinal cord motion due to injury. This study introduces a novel method which utilizes MRI to quantify the deformation of the rodent spinal cord due to imposed, clinically-relevant injuries - specifically, cervical contusion and dislocation mechanisms. The image registration methods were developed using the Advanced Normalization Tools package, which incorporate rigid, affine and deformable registration steps. The proposed method is validated against a fiducial-based, 'gold-standard' measure of spinal cord tissue motion. The validation analysis yielded accuracy (and precision) values of 62 μm (49 μm), 73 μm (79 μm) and 112 μm (110 μm), for the medio-lateral, dorso-ventral and cranio-caudal directions, respectively. The internal morphological change of the spinal cord has never before been quantified, experimentally. This study demonstrates the capability of this method and its potential for future application to in vivo rodent models of SCI.

  10. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage in evaluating acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Barbee, C L; Gilsdorf, R B

    1975-06-01

    A study was performed to determine the value of peritoneal lavage in the acute abdomen not related to trauma. Lavage was performed in 33 patients in the evaluation of abdominal pain of sufficient degree to warrant consideration for surgical intervention. Peritoneal lavage was truly positive or truly negative in 64% of the cases. It showed false negative results in 28% and false positive results in 8%. The lavage was most accurate in the evaluation of appendicitis, colonic disease, and intra abdominal bleeding. It was highly inaccurate in the evaluation of cholecystitis and peptic ulcer disease. It was concluded that the peritoneal lavage can be a useful adjunct in the evaluation of patients with abdominal pain and should be considered in difficult diagnostic problems but not routinely employed.

  11. Appendiceal spirochaetosis in children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute appendicitis is a surgical emergency in which the appendix is surgically removed to prevent peritonitis due to perforation of the appendix. Depending on age and gender, up to 17% of removed appendices do not show the histopathological changes pathognomonic for acute appendicitis and are called ‘pseudo-appendicitis’. Intestinal spirochaetes have been reported in up to 12.3% of these non-inflamed appendices obtained from adults. Although children carry the highest risk for acute appendicitis, not much is known on the prevalence of intestinal spirochaetes in children. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between pseudo-appendicitis and appendiceal spirochaetosis in children. Methods Archival appendix specimens from paediatric patients (less than 18 years old) were obtained from two Dutch hospitals (acute appendicitis, n = 63; pseudo-appendicitis, n = 55; control appendices, n = 33) and microscopically analysed by H&E staining and spirochaete-specific immunohistochemistry and Brachyspira species specific real-time PCR. Results Five out of 142 appendices were found to be positive, all in male patients: one in the acute appendicitis group, two in the pseudo-appendicitis group and two in the control group. Conclusion The results obtained do not provide evidence for a role of Brachyspira species infection in the aetiology of acute appendicitis in children. PMID:24330703

  12. The change in right ventricular systolic function according to the revascularisation method used, following acute ST -segment elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Ilker; Zungur, Mustafa; Islamli, Aysel; Aykan, Ahmet Cagri; Kalaycioğlu, Ezgi; Turan, Turhan; Gokdeniz, Tayyar; Alkan, Mustafa Beyazit; Sayin, Ahmet; Bilgin, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective The level of right ventricular (RV) systolic function has prognostic importance in right ventricular ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (RV-STEMI). This study aimed to evaluate the changes in RV systolic function in patients with RV-STEMI according to the revascularisation method used for their management. Methods The first group consisted of 132 patients who received primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). The 78 patients who had received thrombolytic therapy (TT) in external centres before referral to our centre for PCI within three to 12 hours of RV-STEMI were included in the second group. All patients were evaluated by conventional and two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography. Results There were 172 male patients and their mean age was 63.7 ± 11.8 years. There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to right ventricular systolic parameters at admission and at the one-month follow-up visit. The echocardiographic changes between admission and the one-month follow up were investigated for the patients included in the study groups. Mean values of each parameter observed at the one-month follow up were significantly increased compared to those at admission within each group. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that PCI within three to 12 hours following TT provided similar benefits on right ventricular systolic function compared to PPCI in patients with RV-STEMI. PMID:26956497

  13. The Acute Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Heiken, Jay P

    2015-11-01

    Acute disorders of the abdominal aorta are potentially lethal conditions that require prompt evaluation and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging method for evaluating these conditions because of its availability and speed. Volumetric CT acquisition with multiplanar reconstruction and three-dimensional analysis is now the standard technique for evaluating the aorta. MR imaging may be useful for select applications in stable patients in whom rupture has been excluded. Imaging is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment planning, because management has shifted toward endoluminal repair. Acute abdominal aortic conditions most commonly are complications of aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PMID:26526434

  14. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  15. Acute abdomen in pregnancy due to isolated Fallopian tube torsion: The laparoscopic treatment of a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Sidiropoulou, Zacharoula; Setúbal, António

    2014-01-01

    In the last years, operative laparoscopy became a standard approach in gynaecology and general surgery. Even in pregnancy its use is becoming more widely accepted. In fact, it offers advantages similar to those in no pregnant women, associated with good maternal and fetal outcomes. Around 0.2% of pregnant women require abdominal surgery. The most common indications of laparoscopy in pregnancy are cholelithiasis complications, appendicitis, persistent ovarian cyst and adnexal torsion. Authors describe a very rare case of acute abdomen due to isolated Fallopian tube torsion in a 24th weeks pregnant woman, managed by laparoscopic salpingectomy. PMID:25405198

  16. Medical image analysis methods in MR/CT-imaged acute-subacute ischemic stroke lesion: Segmentation, prediction and insights into dynamic evolution simulation models. A critical appraisal☆

    PubMed Central

    Rekik, Islem; Allassonnière, Stéphanie; Carpenter, Trevor K.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, basic thresholding techniques in combination with standard statistical correlation-based data analysis tools have been widely used to investigate different aspects of evolution of acute or subacute to late stage ischemic stroke in both human and animal data. Yet, a wave of biology-dependent and imaging-dependent issues is still untackled pointing towards the key question: “how does an ischemic stroke evolve?” Paving the way for potential answers to this question, both magnetic resonance (MRI) and CT (computed tomography) images have been used to visualize the lesion extent, either with or without spatial distinction between dead and salvageable tissue. Combining diffusion and perfusion imaging modalities may provide the possibility of predicting further tissue recovery or eventual necrosis. Going beyond these basic thresholding techniques, in this critical appraisal, we explore different semi-automatic or fully automatic 2D/3D medical image analysis methods and mathematical models applied to human, animal (rats/rodents) and/or synthetic ischemic stroke to tackle one of the following three problems: (1) segmentation of infarcted and/or salvageable (also called penumbral) tissue, (2) prediction of final ischemic tissue fate (death or recovery) and (3) dynamic simulation of the lesion core and/or penumbra evolution. To highlight the key features in the reviewed segmentation and prediction methods, we propose a common categorization pattern. We also emphasize some key aspects of the methods such as the imaging modalities required to build and test the presented approach, the number of patients/animals or synthetic samples, the use of external user interaction and the methods of assessment (clinical or imaging-based). Furthermore, we investigate how any key difficulties, posed by the evolution of stroke such as swelling or reperfusion, were detected (or not) by each method. In the absence of any imaging-based macroscopic dynamic model

  17. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical investigation on non-covalent interaction in chromophore appended fullerene complexes of calix[4]arene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Amal; Bhattacharya, Sumanta

    2012-12-01

    The present paper describes the spectroscopic and theoretical insights on non-covalent interaction of a calix[4]arene molecule, namely, 4-iso-propyl-calix[4]arene (1) with chromophore appended fullerenes, namely, tert-butyl-(1,2-methanofullerene)-61-carboxylate (2) and [6,6]-phenyl-C71- butyric acid methyl ester (3) in solvents having varying polarity, viz., toluene and benzonitrile. Absorption spectrophotometric studies reveal appreciable ground state interaction between fullerenes and 1. The most fascinating feature of the present study is that 1 binds very effectively with both 2 and 3 as obtained from binding constant (K) data of such complexes; i.e., K2-1 and K3-1 exhibit value of 4.53 × 105 dm3 mol-1 (7.95 × 105 dm3 mol-1) and 13.35 × 105 dm3 mol-1 (27.62 × 105 dm3 mol-1) in toluene (benzonitrile), respectively. The effect of solvent over the complexation between fullerenes and 1 is clearly observed from the trend in the K values. Estimation of solvent reorganization energy (RS) evokes that both 2-1 and 3-1 complexes are stabilized more in toluene compared to benzonitrile. Molecular mechanics force field (MMMF) calculations in vacuo evoke geometrical structures of the 2-1 and 3-1 complexes and reveal interesting feature regarding binding pattern of fullerenes toward 1 in terms of heat of formation value of the respective complexes.

  18. A conformationally stressed novel ball-type perylenediimide appended zinc(II)phthalocyanine hybrid: spectroelectrochemical, electrocolorimetric and photovoltaic properties.

    PubMed

    Pekdemir, Fatih; Kurnalı, Sertan; Şengül, Abdurrahman; Altındal, Ahmet; Rıza Özkaya, Ali; Salih, Bekir; Bekaroğlu, Özer

    2015-01-01

    A supramolecule, 6, based on an electron-donor zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and an electron-acceptor perylene diimide (PDI) has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV/Vis, IR, (1)H NMR and solid state (13)C CPMAS NMR and also MALDI-TOF and ICP mass spectrometry. The PDI appended ZnPc core brings about a geometrical constraint in the molecule with intriguing spectroscopic, electrochemical and photovoltaic properties. The first reduction process of 6 occurs on the PDI core while the first oxidation takes place on the Pc ring. These processes reflect a considerably small HOMO-LUMO gap of 1.50 eV, which has vital importance for optoelectronic applications. In addition, the PDI-based first and second reduction processes of 6 are accompanied by an electrochromic behaviour with colour changes from dark purple to blue and blue to turquoise, respectively. A photovoltaic cell involving 6 as the donor and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester as the acceptor has been fabricated. The measurements of the effect of annealing temperature on its performance indicated that the annealing process gives rise to a significant increase in the open circuit voltage, the fill factor and the photoconversion efficiency. PMID:25361438

  19. A conformationally stressed novel ball-type perylenediimide appended zinc(II)phthalocyanine hybrid: spectroelectrochemical, electrocolorimetric and photovoltaic properties.

    PubMed

    Pekdemir, Fatih; Kurnalı, Sertan; Şengül, Abdurrahman; Altındal, Ahmet; Rıza Özkaya, Ali; Salih, Bekir; Bekaroğlu, Özer

    2015-01-01

    A supramolecule, 6, based on an electron-donor zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and an electron-acceptor perylene diimide (PDI) has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV/Vis, IR, (1)H NMR and solid state (13)C CPMAS NMR and also MALDI-TOF and ICP mass spectrometry. The PDI appended ZnPc core brings about a geometrical constraint in the molecule with intriguing spectroscopic, electrochemical and photovoltaic properties. The first reduction process of 6 occurs on the PDI core while the first oxidation takes place on the Pc ring. These processes reflect a considerably small HOMO-LUMO gap of 1.50 eV, which has vital importance for optoelectronic applications. In addition, the PDI-based first and second reduction processes of 6 are accompanied by an electrochromic behaviour with colour changes from dark purple to blue and blue to turquoise, respectively. A photovoltaic cell involving 6 as the donor and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester as the acceptor has been fabricated. The measurements of the effect of annealing temperature on its performance indicated that the annealing process gives rise to a significant increase in the open circuit voltage, the fill factor and the photoconversion efficiency.

  20. Reliability of Zygapophysial Joint Space Measurements Made from MRI Scans of Acute Low Back Pain Subjects: Comparison of Two Statistical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Gregory D; Cantu, Joe A; Pocius, Judith D; Cambron, Jerrilyn A; McKinnis, Ray A

    2010-01-01

    Objective This purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of measurements made of the zygapophysial (Z) joint space from the MRI scans of subjects with acute low back pain (ALBP) using new equipment and 2 different methods of statistical analysis. If found reliable, the methods of Z joint measurement can be applied to scans taken before and after spinal manipulation in a larger study of ALBP subjects. Methods Three observers measured the central anterior-to-posterior distance of the left and right L4/L5 and L5/S1 Z joint space from 5 subject scans (20 digitizer measurements, rounded to 0.1mm) on two separate occasions separated by 4 weeks. Observers were blinded to each other and their previous work. Intra- and interobserver reliability was calculated by means of intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and also by mean differences using the methods of Bland and Altman (1986). A mean difference of <±0.4 mm was considered clinically acceptable. Results ICCs showed intraobserver reliabilities of 0.95 (95%CI 0.87-0.98), 0.83 (0.62-0.92), and 0.92 (0.83-0.96) for each of the 3 observers; and interobserver reliabilities of 0.90 (0.82-0.95), 0.79 (0.61-0.90), and 0.84 (0.75-0.90) for the first and second measurements and overall reliability, respectively. The mean difference between the first and second measurements was -0.04 mm (±1.96 SD= -0.37 – 0.29), 0.23 (-0.48 – 0.94), 0.25 (-0.24 – 0.75), and 0.15 (-0.44 – 0.74) for each of the 3 observers and the overall agreement, respectively. Conclusions Both statistical methods were found to be useful and complementary and showed the measurements to be highly reliable. PMID:20350676

  1. Expanded applications of CT. Helical scanning in five common acute conditions.

    PubMed

    Nipper, M L; Jacobson, L K

    2001-06-01

    Helical CT has become a valuable imaging tool for detection of pulmonary embolism, deep venous thrombosis, ureteral colic, acute small-bowel obstruction, and acute appendicitis. Generally, helical CT has good sensitivity and specificity values, and scans can be performed more quickly than previous gold standard diagnostic examinations for the conditions mentioned. In some cases, helical CT can also identify other findings that may be responsible for a patient's symptoms. One notable disadvantage of helical CT is the charge for the procedure, which in some circumstances can be considerably more costly than diagnostic examinations preferred previously. However, because helical CT can often obviate the need for other tests--and may consequently reduce hospital stays--this technology may have the ability to reduce overall expenditures. Cost of helical CT is therefore a multifaceted issue and requires further study before conclusions can be drawn.

  2. Acute asthma during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Stenius-Aarniala, B. S.; Hedman, J.; Teramo, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute asthma during pregnancy is potentially dangerous to the fetus. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an acute attack of asthma during pregnancy on the course of pregnancy or delivery, or the health of the newborn infant, and to identify undertreatment as a possible cause of the exacerbations. METHODS: Five hundred and four pregnant asthmatic subjects were prospectively followed and treated. The data on 47 patients with an attack of asthma during pregnancy were compared with those of 457 asthmatics with no recorded acute exacerbation and with 237 healthy parturients. RESULTS: Of 504 asthmatics, 177 patients were not initially treated with inhaled corticosteroids. Of these, 17% had an acute attack compared with only 4% of the 257 patients who had been on inhaled anti-inflammatory treatment from the start of pregnancy. There were no differences between the groups as to length of gestation, length of the third stage of labour, or amount of haemorrhage after delivery. No differences were observed between pregnancies with and without an exacerbation with regard to relative birth weight, incidence of malformations, hypoglycaemia, or need for phototherapy for jaundice during the neonatal period. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with inadequate inhaled anti-inflammatory treatment during pregnancy run a higher risk of suffering an acute attack of asthma than those treated with an anti-inflammatory agent. However, if the acute attack of asthma is relatively mild and promptly treated, it does not have a serious effect on the pregnancy, delivery, or the health of the newborn infant. PMID:8733495

  3. Acute Vestibulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon-Hee

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of acute vertigo may represent both a common benign disorder or a life threatening but rare one. Familiarity with the common peripheral vestibular disorders will allow the clinician to rapidly “rule-in” a benign disorder and recognize when further testing is required. Key features of vertigo required to make an accurate diagnosis are duration, chronicity, associated symptoms, and triggers. Bedside tests that are critical to the diagnosis of acute vertigo include the Dix-Hallpike maneuver and canalith repositioning manuever, occlusive ophthalmoscopy, and the head impulse test. The goal of this review is to provide the clinician with the clinical and pathophysiologic background of the most common disorders that present with vertigo to develop a logical differential diagnosis and management plan. PMID:23983835

  4. [Acute diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Burgmann, Konstantin; Schoepfer, Alain

    2014-09-01

    Diarrhea, defined as three or more loose or watery stools per day, represents a frequent problem in outpatients as well as inpatients. As most of the patients with acute diarrhea show a self-limiting disease course, the main challenge for the physician is to discriminate patients for whom symptomatic therapy is sufficient from those with severe disease course and threatening complications. This review aims to provide a practical guidance for such decisions.

  5. Father's occupational exposure to carcinogenic agents and childhood acute leukemia: a new method to assess exposure (a case-control study)

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Saldivar, Maria Luisa; Ortega-Alvarez, Manuel Carlos; Fajardo-Gutierrez, Arturo; Bernaldez-Rios, Roberto; del Campo-Martinez, Maria de los Angeles; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Palomo-Colli, Miguel Angel; Paredes-Aguilera, Rogelio; Martínez-Avalos, Armando; Borja-Aburto, Victor Hugo; Rodriguez-Rivera, Maria de Jesus; Vargas-Garcia, Victor Manuel; Zarco-Contreras, Jesus; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Mejia-Arangure, Juan Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Background Medical research has not been able to establish whether a father's occupational exposures are associated with the development of acute leukemia (AL) in their offspring. The studies conducted have weaknesses that have generated a misclassification of such exposure. Occupations and exposures to substances associated with childhood cancer are not very frequently encountered in the general population; thus, the reported risks are both inconsistent and inaccurate. In this study, to assess exposure we used a new method, an exposure index, which took into consideration the industrial branch, specific position, use of protective equipment, substances at work, degree of contact with such substances, and time of exposure. This index allowed us to obtain a grade, which permitted the identification of individuals according to their level of exposure to known or potentially carcinogenic agents that are not necessarily specifically identified as risk factors for leukemia. The aim of this study was to determine the association between a father's occupational exposure to carcinogenic agents and the presence of AL in their offspring. Methods From 1999 to 2000, a case-control study was performed with 193 children who reside in Mexico City and had been diagnosed with AL. The initial sample-size calculation was 150 children per group, assessed with an expected odds ratio (OR) of three and a minimum exposure frequency of 15.8%. These children were matched by age, sex, and institution with 193 pediatric surgical patients at secondary-care hospitals. A questionnaire was used to determine each child's background and the characteristics of the father's occupation(s). In order to determine the level of exposure to carcinogenic agents, a previously validated exposure index (occupational exposure index, OEI) was used. The consistency and validity of the index were assessed by a questionnaire comparison, the sensory recognition of the work area, and an expert's opinion. Results The

  6. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical investigation on non-covalent interaction in chromophore appended fullerene complexes of calix[4]arene.

    PubMed

    Halder, Amal; Bhattacharya, Sumanta

    2012-12-01

    The present paper describes the spectroscopic and theoretical insights on non-covalent interaction of a calix[4]arene molecule, namely, 4-iso-propyl-calix[4]arene (1) with chromophore appended fullerenes, namely, tert-butyl-(1,2-methanofullerene)-61-carboxylate (2) and [6,6]-phenyl-C(71)- butyric acid methyl ester (3) in solvents having varying polarity, viz., toluene and benzonitrile. Absorption spectrophotometric studies reveal appreciable ground state interaction between fullerenes and 1. The most fascinating feature of the present study is that 1 binds very effectively with both 2 and 3 as obtained from binding constant (K) data of such complexes; i.e., K(2-1) and K(3-1) exhibit value of 4.53 × 10(5) dm(3) mol(-1) (7.95 × 10(5) dm(3) mol(-1)) and 13.35 × 10(5) dm(3) mol(-1) (27.62 × 10(5) dm(3) mol(-1)) in toluene (benzonitrile), respectively. The effect of solvent over the complexation between fullerenes and 1 is clearly observed from the trend in the K values. Estimation of solvent reorganization energy (R(S)) evokes that both 2-1 and 3-1 complexes are stabilized more in toluene compared to benzonitrile. Molecular mechanics force field (MMMF) calculations in vacuo evoke geometrical structures of the 2-1 and 3-1 complexes and reveal interesting feature regarding binding pattern of fullerenes toward 1 in terms of heat of formation value of the respective complexes.

  7. Design, synthesis, physicochemical studies, solvation, and DNA damage of quinoline-appended chalcone derivative: comprehensive spectroscopic approach toward drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Himank; Chattopadhyay, Anjan; Prasath, R; Devaraji, Vinod; Joshi, Ritika; Bhavana, P; Saini, Praveen; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar

    2014-07-01

    The present study epitomizes the design, synthesis, photophysics, solvation, and interaction with calf-thymus DNA of a potential antitumor, anticancer quinoline-appended chalcone derivative, (E)-3-(anthracen-10-yl)-1-(6,8-dibromo-2-methylquinolin-3-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (ADMQ) using steady state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular modeling, molecular docking, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, and gel electrophoresis studies. ADMQ shows an unusual photophysical behavior in a variety of solvents of different polarity. The dual emission has been observed along with the formation of twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) excited state. The radiationless deactivation of the TICT state is found to be promoted strongly by hydrogen bonding. Quantum mechanical (DFT, TDDFT, and ZINDO-CI) calculations show that the ADMQ is sort of molecular rotor which undergoes intramolecular twist followed by a complete charge transfer in the optimized excited state. FTIR studies reveals that ADMQ undergoes important structural change from its native structure to a β-hydroxy keto form in water at physiological pH. The concentration-dependent DNA cleavage has been identified in agarose gel DNA electrophoresis experiment and has been further supported by MD simulation. ADMQ forms hydrogen bond with the deoxyribose sugar attached with the nucleobase adenine DA-17 (chain A) and result in significant structural changes which potentially cleave DNA double helix. The compound does not exhibit any deleterious effect or toxicity to the E. coli strain in cytotoxicity studies. The consolidated spectroscopic research described herein can provide enormous information to open up new avenues for designing and synthesizing chalcone derivatives with low systematic toxicity for medicinal chemistry research. PMID:24962605

  8. Prospective randomized study of two different doses of clindamycin admixed with gentamicin in the management of perforated appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Yellin, A E; Berne, T V; Heseltine, P N; Appleman, M D; Gill, M; Chin, A; Baker, F J

    1993-04-01

    Septic complications after surgery for enterogenous peritonitis are minimized by adjuvant antibiotics effective against aerobes and anaerobes. Historically, "gold standard" therapy included an aminoglycoside plus clindamycin, the latter given at 600 mg intravenous piggyback (IVPB), every 6 hours. Clindamycin pharmacokinetics suggests that it can be given q8h and admixed with gentamicin, thereby markedly reducing the cost of administration. Although this is now common practice, there is no prospective study comparing the efficacy of the two dose schedules in peritonitis. This study was designed to test the hypothesis regarding the clinical efficacy of the two regimens. One hundred twenty-six patients with gangrenous (n = 34) or perforated appendicitis (n = 91) were randomized (2:1) to receive gentamicin admixed with clindamycin 900 mg IVPB every 8 hours (Group I n = 80) or gentamicin IVPB q8h plus clindamycin 600 mg IVPB every 6 hours (Group II n = 46). Appendectomy was performed, and aerobic and anaerobic cultures were obtained. Twenty-one patients had simultaneous determinations of clindamycin levels in plasma, peritoneal fluid, and appendix. Outcome analysis revealed no significant differences in postoperative days of fever, days non per os, antibiotic therapy, or hospitalization. There were 6 failures (4 abscesses and 2 wound infections) in Group I and 4 failures (1 abscess and 3 wound infections) in Group II. Both antibiotic regimens provided clinically equivalent results in mixed infections due to aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The admixed clindamycin, administered every 8 hours, results in at least 20% reduction in costs. This is an important consideration.

  9. Cleavage of an RNA analog by Zn(II) macrocyclic catalysts appended with a methyl or an acridine group.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, Clifford S; Mathews, Ryan A; Morrow, Janet R

    2007-06-01

    Two macrocycles (1 and 2) are prepared that incorporate pendent groups in macrocycle 3 (3=1-oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclododecane) with the goal of studying the effect of these pendent groups on metal ion complexation, solution chemistry and catalysis. Zn(1) contains a macrocyclic ligand with a pendent acridine group and Zn(2) has an appended methyl group. Water ligand pK(a) values for Zn(1) (6.7) and Zn(2) (7.3) are lower than that of Zn(3) (7.7). Zn(II) complexes of 1 and 2 are studied as catalysts for the cleavage of 2-hydroxypropyl 4-nitrophenylphosphate (HpPNP), an RNA analog. Zn(2) has a lower catalytic activity over the pH range 7-10 for cleavage of HpPNP compared to the parent macrocyclic complex, Zn(3). In contrast, Zn(1) has a threefold larger rate constant at pH 7.0 compared to Zn(2), attributed to the presence of a catalytic species which has a protonated acridine amino group. The binding constant of 1.5mM at pH 8.0 for formation of the Zn(2)-uridine adduct is similar to that for Zn(3), suggesting that N-alkylation of the macrocyclic ligand does not interfere with binding of the Zn(II) complex to uridine groups. Binding of cytidine to Zn(2) was not detectable under similar conditions up to 25mM nucleoside. Binding experiments under similar conditions could not be carried out for adenosine or guanosine due to their low solubility.

  10. Efficient ultrasound-assisted synthesis, spectroscopic, crystallographic and biological investigations of pyrazole-appended quinolinyl chalcones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasath, R.; Bhavana, P.; Sarveswari, S.; Ng, Seik Weng; Tiekink, Edward R. T.

    2015-02-01

    Two series of new quinolinyl chalcones containing a pyrazole group, 3a-f and 4a-r, have been synthesized by Claisen-Schmidt condensation of the derivatives of 2-methyl-3-acetylquinoline with either substituted 1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazole-4-carbaldehyde or 5-chloro-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-4-carbaldehyde in 76-93% yield under ultrasonic method. The compounds were characterized using IR, 1H NMR and ESI-MS spectroscopic methods and, for representative compounds, by X-ray crystallography. An E-configuration about the Cdbnd C ethylene bond has been established via 1H NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. These compounds show promising anti-microbial properties, with 4a and 3e being the most potent against bacterial and fungal strains, respectively and the methoxy substituted compounds showed moderate anti-oxidant activity.

  11. [Efficacy of application of radiofrequency scalpel and ozono-ultrasound method in dynamics of planimetric indices of the wound course process in the patients, suffering an acute purulent lactation mastitis].

    PubMed

    Ioffe, I V; Chernova, N V

    2013-02-01

    The results of planimetric investigation, conducted in 82 patients, suffering an acute purulent lactation mastitis (APLM), were analyzed. Of them 42 patients (the main group) were operated on, using radiofrequency scalpel, for the postoperative wounds processing the low-frequency ultrasound and ozonated isotonic solution of sodium chloride were used. In 40 patients (group of comparison) the conventional methods of treatment of APLM were applied.

  12. Ni(II) and Pd(II) complexes with new N,O donor thiophene appended Schiff base ligand: Synthesis, electrochemistry, X-ray structure and DFT calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Subhankar; Pramanik, Ajoy Kumar; Mondal, Apurba Sau; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The thiophene appended Schiff's base ligand, 1-(2-(thiophen-2-yl)ethylimino)methyl)naphthalene-2-ol (HL) with N,O donor sites has been synthesized by the condensation between 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and thiophene-2-ethylamine. The square planar 1:2 complexes of HL having general formula [M(L)2] (M = Ni(1) and Pd(2)) with nickel(II) and palladium(II) have been synthesized and characterized by several spectroscopic techniques. The geometry has been confirmed by single crystal X-ray study for complex 1. The electronic structure and spectral properties of the complexes are interpreted by DFT and TDDFT studies.

  13. Etiology of non-traumatic acute abdomen in pediatric emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Chieh; Chen, Chun-Yu; Wu, Han-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common complaint in pediatric emergency departments. A complete evaluation is the key factor approaching the disease and should include the patient’s age, any trauma history, the onset and chronicity of the pain, the related symptoms and a detailed physical examination. The aim of this review article is to provide some information for physicians in pediatric emergency departments, with the age factors and several causes of non-traumatic acute abdominal pain. The leading causes of acute abdominal pain are divided into four age groups: infants younger than 2 years old, children 2 to 5, children 5 to 12, and children older than 12 years old. We review the information about acute appendicitis, intussusception, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, infection, Meckel’s diverticulum and mesenteric adenitis. In conclusion, the etiologies of acute abdomen in children admitted to the emergency department vary depending on age. A complete history and detailed physical examination, as well as abdominal imaging examinations, could provide useful information for physicians in the emergency department to narrow the differential diagnosis of abdominal emergencies and give a timely treatment. PMID:24364022

  14. Donor-Appended N,C-Chelate Organoboron Compounds: Influence of Donor Strength on Photochromic Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Mellerup, Soren K; Yuan, Kang; Nguyen, Carmen; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Wang, Suning

    2016-08-22

    Recently, four-coordinated N,C-chelate organoboron compounds have been found to show many interesting photochemical transformations depending on the nature of their chelating framework. As such, the effect of substitution on the chelate ligand has been well-established and understood, but the impact of the aryl groups attached to the boron atom remains less clear. To investigate the effect of enhanced charge-transfer character, a series of new N,C-chelate organoboron compounds with donor-functionalized aryl groups have been synthesized and characterized using NMR, UV/Vis, and electrochemical methods. These compounds were found to possess bright and tunable charge-transfer luminescence which is dependent on the donor strength of the amino substituent. In addition, some of these compounds undergo photochromic switching, producing dark isomers of various colors. This work establishes that donor-functionalization of the aryl groups in N,C-chelate boron compounds is an effective strategy for tuning both the photophysical and photochemical properties of such systems. The new findings also help elucidate the influence of electronic structure on the photoreactivity of N,C-chelate organoboron compounds which appears to be as important as steric crowding around the boron atom.

  15. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Laraki, M; Harti, A; Bouderka, M A; Barrou, H; Matar, N; Benaguida, M

    1993-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy is a serious condition and diagnosis is often difficult. The authors report the case of a 32-year-old woman in the 32nd week of her fifth pregnancy, in which the outcome was fatal for both mother and child. The cause of pancreatitis during pregnancy has been attributed to many factors, chiefly cholelithiasis. A number of recent studies have shown the relationship existing between the role played by pregnancy in predisposing to gallbladder disease with lithiasis. Many diagnosis errors are made in this condition. Thus modern treatment methods have improved the prognosis in acute pancreatitis but, when it occurs during pregnancy, diagnostic delays often lead to a gloomy outlook. PMID:8248696

  16. Omental infarction and its mimics: imaging features of acute abdominal conditions presenting with fat stranding greater than the degree of bowel wall thickening.

    PubMed

    Tonerini, Michele; Calcagni, Francesca; Lorenzi, Silvia; Scalise, Paola; Grigolini, Alessandro; Bemi, Pietro

    2015-08-01

    The segmental omental infarction is a rare self-limited disorder presenting with aspecific clinical symptoms that may mimic several acute abdominal conditions. Therefore, a correct noninvasive diagnosis is important because treatment approaches range from monitoring to surgery. As omental infarction results in an important fat stranding that is much greater than the degree of bowel wall thickening, it suggests a narrower differential diagnosis: appendicitis, diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, and mesenteric panniculitis. In this pictorial essay, we point out the importance of imaging in identifying this typical sign allowing alternate diagnoses such as segmental omental infarction that can be conservatively managed.

  17. Müllerian Remnant Cyst as a Cause of Acute Abdomen in a Female Patient with Müllerian Agenesis: Radiologic and Pathologic Findings

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 17-year-old female with Müllerian agenesis who presented with right sided abdominal pain clinically suspicious for acute appendicitis. Multimodality imaging workup revealed a heterogeneous cystic right upper quadrant mass with surrounding fluid and inflammatory changes. Surgical resection of this mass was performed and a histopathologic diagnosis of a hemorrhagic Müllerian remnant cyst was made, which to the best of our knowledge has never been described in a patient with Müllerian agenesis. PMID:27446624

  18. Acute sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Feldt, Brent; Dion, Gregory R; Weitzel, Erik K; McMains, Kevin C

    2013-10-01

    Sinusitis is a common patient complaint that carries with it a large economic burden. It is one of the most common reasons patients visit their primary care physician. Acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) can be distinguished from other forms of rhinosinusitis based on symptom duration of <4 weeks in a patient with purulent rhinorrhea associated with facial pain or pressure. Native upper aerodigestive tract bacteria are the most common etiologic agents. Treatment of ABRS is targeted primarily at symptom improvement. Amoxicillin can be used based on the clinical scenario and patient comorbidities. Computed tomographic scans are reserved for complicated presentations or when there is concern for intracranial extension or other complications. A systematic approach to ABRS will allow for improved patient quality of life and a decreased overall economic burden of this common entity.

  19. A method of teaching critical care skills to undergraduate student midwives using the Maternal-Acute Illness Management (M-AIM) training day.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Rose; Nuttall, Janet; Smith, Joyce; Hollins Martin, Caroline J

    2014-11-01

    The most recent Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Deaths (CMACE, 2011) identified human errors, specifically those of midwives and obstetricians/doctors as a fundamental component in contributing to maternal death in the U.K. This paper discusses these findings and outlines a project to provide training in Maternal-Acute Illness Management (M-AIM) to final year student midwives. Contents of the program are designed to educate and simulate AIM skills and increase confidence and clinical ability in early recognition, management and referral of the acutely ill woman. An outline of the Maternal-AIM program delivered at the University of Salford (Greater Manchester, UK) is presented to illustrate how this particular institution has responded to a perceived need voiced by local midwifery leaders. It is proposed that developing this area of expertise in the education system will better prepare student midwives for contemporary midwifery practice.

  20. Assessment of the predictive capacity of the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity test method to identify substances not classified for acute oral toxicity (LD50>2000 mg/kg): results of an ECVAM validation study.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Pilar; Cole, Thomas; Curren, Rodger; Gibson, Rosemary M; Liebsch, Manfred; Raabe, Hans; Tuomainen, Anita M; Whelan, Maurice; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka

    2013-04-01

    Assessing chemicals for acute oral toxicity is a standard information requirement of regulatory testing. However, animal testing is now prohibited in the cosmetics sector in Europe, and strongly discouraged for industrial chemicals. Building on the results of a previous international validation study, a follow up study was organised to assess if the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity assay could identify substances not requiring classification as acute oral toxicants under the EU regulations. Fifty-six coded industrial chemicals were tested in three laboratories, each using one of the following protocols: the previously validated protocol, an abbreviated version of the protocol and the protocol adapted for an automation platform. Predictions were very similar among the three laboratories. The assay exhibited high sensitivity (92-96%) but relatively low specificity (40-44%). Three chemicals were under predicted. Assuming that most industrial chemicals are not likely to be acutely toxic, this test method could prove a valuable component of an integrated testing strategy, a read-across argument, or weight-of-evidence approach to identify non toxic chemicals (LD50>2000 mg/kg). However, it is likely to under predict chemicals acting via specific mechanisms of action not captured by the 3T3 test system, or which first require biotransformation in vivo. PMID:23246604

  1. Assessment of the predictive capacity of the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity test method to identify substances not classified for acute oral toxicity (LD50>2000 mg/kg): results of an ECVAM validation study.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Pilar; Cole, Thomas; Curren, Rodger; Gibson, Rosemary M; Liebsch, Manfred; Raabe, Hans; Tuomainen, Anita M; Whelan, Maurice; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka

    2013-04-01

    Assessing chemicals for acute oral toxicity is a standard information requirement of regulatory testing. However, animal testing is now prohibited in the cosmetics sector in Europe, and strongly discouraged for industrial chemicals. Building on the results of a previous international validation study, a follow up study was organised to assess if the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity assay could identify substances not requiring classification as acute oral toxicants under the EU regulations. Fifty-six coded industrial chemicals were tested in three laboratories, each using one of the following protocols: the previously validated protocol, an abbreviated version of the protocol and the protocol adapted for an automation platform. Predictions were very similar among the three laboratories. The assay exhibited high sensitivity (92-96%) but relatively low specificity (40-44%). Three chemicals were under predicted. Assuming that most industrial chemicals are not likely to be acutely toxic, this test method could prove a valuable component of an integrated testing strategy, a read-across argument, or weight-of-evidence approach to identify non toxic chemicals (LD50>2000 mg/kg). However, it is likely to under predict chemicals acting via specific mechanisms of action not captured by the 3T3 test system, or which first require biotransformation in vivo.

  2. DNA Double-Strand Break Analysis by {gamma}-H2AX Foci: A Useful Method for Determining the Overreactors to Radiation-Induced Acute Reactions Among Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goutham, Hassan Venkatesh; Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram; Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath; Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Sharan, Krishna; Kanive Parashiva, Guruprasad; Kapaettu, Satyamoorthy; Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Interindividual variability in normal tissue toxicity during radiation therapy is a limiting factor for successful treatment. Predicting the risk of developing acute reactions before initiation of radiation therapy may have the benefit of opting for altered radiation therapy regimens to achieve minimal adverse effects with improved tumor cure. Methods and Materials: DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and its repair kinetics in lymphocytes of head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy was analyzed by counting {gamma}-H2AX foci, neutral comet assay, and a modified version of neutral filter elution assay. Acute normal tissue reactions were assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The correlation between residual DSBs and the severity of acute reactions demonstrated that residual {gamma}-H2AX foci in head-and-neck cancer patients increased with the severity of oral mucositis and skin reaction. Conclusions: Our results suggest that {gamma}-H2AX analysis may have predictive implications for identifying the overreactors to mucositis and skin reactions among head-and-neck cancer patients prior to initiation of radiation therapy.

  3. Appendicitis in Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  4. Unusual case of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Allen, Luke Nelson; Tsai, Alice Yi-Chien

    2016-01-01

    A teenage girl was admitted to the paediatric assessment unit with non-specific abdominal pain that gradually localised to the right iliac fossa (RIF). She remained systemically well; investigations including blood tests, urine sample and abdominal ultrasound were inconclusive. Surgical opinion was sought and the decision was made to perform a diagnostic laparoscopy due to the ongoing pain. Laparoscopy showed no evidence of any significant pathology, and appendicectomy was performed following the routine practice. Numerous pinworms came out while the appendix was resected. The RIF pain resolved and the patient made a full post-operative recovery. A stat dose of mebendazole and amoxicillin were given and the immediate family was also treated. Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm) causes significant morbidity worldwide and has a high prevalence among children in the UK. It can be easily treated and prompt recognition based on clinical symptoms can potentially prevent unnecessary surgery. PMID:27364910

  5. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4000 million cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 1996, resulting in 2.5 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries traveling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to January 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 71 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, and oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution). PMID:19450323

  6. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4.6 billion cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 2004, resulting in 2.2 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries travelling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 72 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution), vitamin A supplementation, and zinc supplementation. PMID:21718555

  7. Traumatic stress in acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodin, Gary; Yuen, Dora; Mischitelle, Ashley; Minden, Mark D; Brandwein, Joseph; Schimmer, Aaron; Marmar, Charles; Gagliese, Lucia; Lo, Christopher; Rydall, Anne; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acute leukemia is a condition with an acute onset that is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. However, the psychological impact of this life-threatening condition and its intensive treatment has not been systematically examined. In the present study, we investigate the prevalence and correlates of post-traumatic stress symptoms in this population. Methods Patients with acute myeloid, lymphocytic, and promyelocytic leukemia who were newly diagnosed, recently relapsed, or treatment failures were recruited at a comprehensive cancer center in Toronto, Canada. Participants completed the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire, Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, CARES Medical Interaction Subscale, and other psychosocial measures. A multivariate regression analysis was used to assess independent predictors of post-traumatic stress symptoms. Results Of the 205 participants, 58% were male, mean age was 50.1 ± 15.4 years, 86% were recently diagnosed, and 94% were receiving active treatment. The mean Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire score was 30.2 ± 22.5, with 27 of 200 (14%) patients meeting criteria for acute stress disorder and 36 (18%) for subsyndromal acute stress disorder. Post-traumatic stress symptoms were associated with more physical symptoms, physical symptom distress, attachment anxiety, and perceived difficulty communicating with health-care providers, and poorer spiritual well-being (all p <0.05). Conclusions The present study demonstrates that clinically significant symptoms of traumatic stress are common in acute leukemia and are linked to the degree of physical suffering, to satisfaction with relationships with health-care providers, and with individual psychological characteristics. Longitudinal study is needed to determine the natural history, but these findings suggest that intervention may be indicated to alleviate or prevent traumatic stress in this population. PMID:22081505

  8. [Treatment and prevention of acute radiation dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Benomar, S; Boutayeb, S; Lalya, I; Errihani, H; Hassam, B; El Gueddari, B K

    2010-06-01

    Acute radiation dermatitis is a common side-effect of radiotherapy which often necessitates interruption of the therapy. Currently, there is no general consensus about its prevention or about the treatment of choice. The goal of this work was to focus on optimal methods to prevent and manage acute skin reactions related to radiation therapy and to determine if there are specific topical or oral agents for the prevention of this acute skin reaction. The prevention and the early treatment are the two focus points of the management of the acute radiation dermatitis.

  9. Acute and Impaired Wound Healing: Pathophysiology and Current Methods for Drug Delivery, Part 1: Normal and Chronic Wounds: Biology, Causes, and Approaches to Care

    PubMed Central

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Herman, Ira M.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first installment of 2 articles that discuss the biology and pathophysiology of wound healing, review the role that growth factors play in this process, and describe current ways of growth factor delivery into the wound bed. Part 1 discusses the latest advances in clinicians’ understanding of the control points that regulate wound healing. Importantly, biological similarities and differences between acute and chronic wounds are considered, including the signaling pathways that initiate cellular and tissue responses after injury, which may be impeded during chronic wound healing. PMID:22713781

  10. Acute and impaired wound healing: pathophysiology and current methods for drug delivery, part 1: normal and chronic wounds: biology, causes, and approaches to care.

    PubMed

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N; Hamblin, Michael R; Herman, Ira M

    2012-07-01

    This is the first installment of 2 articles that discuss the biology and pathophysiology of wound healing, review the role that growth factors play in this process, and describe current ways of growth factor delivery into the wound bed. Part 1 discusses the latest advances in clinicians' understanding of the control points that regulate wound healing. Importantly, biological similarities and differences between acute and chronic wounds are considered, including the signaling pathways that initiate cellular and tissue responses after injury, which may be impeded during chronic wound healing.

  11. Dengue hemorrhagic fever patients with acute abdomen: clinical experience of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Khor, Boon-Siang; Liu, Jien-Wei; Lee, Ing-Kit; Yang, Kuender D

    2006-05-01

    Among 328 patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS), 14 (4 men and 10 women, median age 44 years) had acute abdomen. DHF/DSS was initially suspected in only 2 of these 14 patients. Presumptive diagnoses of acute cholecystitis (6 acalculus and 4 calculus cholecystitis) were made in 10 patients, non-specific peritonitis in three patients, and acute appendicitis in one patients. Cholecystectomy, percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage, and appendectomy were performed in three patients. Transfused blood in the three patients who underwent invasive procedures and the 11 patients who received supportive treatment included packed red blood cells (24 versus 0 units; P = 0.048), fresh frozen plasma (84 versus 0 units; P = 0.048), and platelets (192 versus 180 units; P = 0.003). Patients who underwent invasive procedures also had prolonged time in the hospital (median = 11 versus 7 days; P = 0.015). To avoid unnecessary invasive procedure-related morbidity and mortality, this report underscores the importance of a careful differential diagnosis in patients with acute abdomen in a dengue-endemic setting.

  12. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  13. New method of intracoronary adenosine injection to prevent microvascular reperfusion injury in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Grygier, Marek; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander; Lesiak, Maciej; Janus, Magdalena; Kowal, Jadwiga; Skorupski, Wlodzimierz; Pyda, Malgorzata; Mitkowski, Przemyslaw; Grajek, Stefan

    2011-04-15

    The aim of our study was to examine the role of a new, simple protocol of intracoronary adenosine administration performed during primary angioplasty on the immediate angiographic results and clinical course. A prospective, single-center, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of 70 consecutive patients (64 ± 14 years, 54 men) with acute myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was conducted. Patients were randomized to 2 groups. Group 1 (n = 35) received intracoronary adenosine (1 to 2 mg) with a hand injection through the guiding catheter 2 times: immediately after crossing the lesion of the infarct-related artery with guidewire and then after the first balloon inflation. Group 2 (n = 35) received placebo. The baseline clinical and angiographic characteristics of the 2 groups were similar. Percutaneous coronary intervention resulted in Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction grade 3 flow after PCI in 32 patients (91.4%) in the adenosine group and 27 patients (77.1%) in the placebo group (p = 0.059). Myocardial blush grade 3 was observed at the end of PCI in 23 patients (65.7%) in the adenosine group and 13 (37.1%) in the placebo group (p < 0.05). Resolution of ST-segment elevation (> 50%) was more frequently observed in the adenosine than in the placebo group: 27 (77%) versus 15 (43%), respectively (p < 0.01). In conclusion, intracoronary adenosine administration improved the angiographic and electrocardiographic results in patients with acute myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation undergoing PCI. Adenosine administration seemed to be associated with a more favorable clinical course. PMID:21310372

  14. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  15. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  16. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. Reduced blood flow through the renal artery ...

  17. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... virus. Viral infections that may cause this include chickenpox , Coxsackie disease, Epstein-Barr, and echovirus . Other causes ...

  18. Acute systemic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Botham, Philip A

    2002-01-01

    Use of the test that aimed to identify the single lethal dose of a substance that kills half the animals in a test group (the LD50 test) should finally be discontinued by the end of 2002, after many years of controversy and debate. In its stead are three recently developed alternative animal tests that significantly improve animal welfare: the fixed dose procedure, the acute toxic class method, and the up and down procedure. These tests have already undergone revision, both to improve their scientific performance and, importantly, to increase their regulatory acceptance. They can now be used within a strategy of acute toxicity testing for all types of test substances and for all regulatory and in-house purposes. In vitro cytotoxicity tests could be used (perhaps by mid-2002) as adjuncts to these alternative animal tests to improve dose level selection and reduce (at least modestly) the number of animals used. However, the total replacement of animal tests requires a considerable amount of further test development, followed by validation, which will require at least 10 yr.

  19. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. PMID:27432672

  20. Management of acute sunburn.

    PubMed

    Han, Amy; Maibach, Howard I

    2004-01-01

    Current literature documents the use of many pharmacologic agents in the management of acute sunburn. While numerous studies have been undertaken, there is no consensus on an algorithm for such treatment. We review the literature for an evidence-based approach to the management of sunburn. A MEDLINE search was conducted whereby all published articles related to sunburn or ultraviolet (UV)-induced erythema from 1966-2001 were evaluated. Studies and reviews were excluded if they were not conducted in human beings. The results of these studies are varying and often conflicting in terms of clinical effectiveness or feasibility. A total of 40 studies were reviewed. Fourteen out of the 40 studies addressed the actual treatment of sunburn (i.e. the application of a substance after the development of signs or symptoms). The majority concluded that either corticosteroids, NSAIDs, antioxidants, antihistamines or emollients were ineffective at decreasing recovery time. The remaining studies showed mild improvement with such treatments, but study designs or methods were flawed. Furthermore, regardless of the treatment modality, the damage to epidermal cells is the same. Given the lack of convincing data and consensus of opinion regarding sunburn management, the most effective and practical approach to acute sunburn is symptomatic treatment of UV light-induced symptoms, including erythema, pain and pruritus.

  1. Neurological emergencies: acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, R.; Dennis, M.

    2000-01-01

    Stroke causes a vast amount of death and disability throughout the world, yet for many healthcare professionals it remains an area of therapeutic nihilism, and thus uninteresting. This negative perception is shared by the general public, who often have a poor understanding of the early symptoms and significance of a stroke. Yet within the past few years there have been many important developments in the approach to caring for stroke patients, for both the acute management and secondary prevention. After the completion of numerous clinical trials, there is now robust evidence to either support or discredit various interventions. Even more exciting is the prospect of yet more data becoming available in the near future, testing a whole array of treatments, as clinical interest in stroke expands exponentially. In this review an evidence based approach to the management of acute stroke within the first few days is presented, including ischaemic and haemorrhagic events, but not subarachnoid haemorrhage. It is explained why stroke is regarded as a medical emergency, and the importance of a rational, methodic approach to the initial assessment, which is the key to accurate diagnosis and subsequent management, is emphasised. The potential early problems associated with stroke are identified and specific interventions for different stroke types are discussed. The review ends with a brief discussion of the implications that the evolving treatments have for the organisation of modern stroke services.

 PMID:10675208

  2. Acute Bacterial Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial cholangitis for the most part owing to common bile duct stones is common in gastroenterology practice and represents a potentially life-threatening condition often characterized by fever, abdominal pain, and jaundice (Charcot's triad) as well as confusion and septic shock (Reynolds' pentad). Methods This review is based on a systematic literature review in PubMed with the search items ‘cholangitis’, ‘choledocholithiasis’, ‘gallstone disease’, ‘biliary infection’, and ‘biliary sepsis’. Results Although most patients respond to empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment, timely endoscopic biliary drainage depending on the severity of the disease is required to eliminate the underlying obstruction. Specific recommendations have been derived from the Tokyo guideline working group consensus 2006 and its update in 2013, albeit poorly evidence-based, providing a comprehensive overview of diagnosis, classification, risk stratification, and treatment algorithms in acute bacterial cholangitis. Conclusion Prompt clinical recognition and accurate diagnostic workup including adequate laboratory assessment and (aetiology-oriented) imaging are critical steps in the management of cholangitis. Treatment is directed at the two major interrelated pathophysiologic components, i.e. bacterial infection (immediate antimicrobial therapy) and bile duct obstruction (biliary drainage). As for the latter, transpapillary endoscopic drainage by stent or nasobiliary drain and/or same-session bile duct clearance, depending on individual disease severity, represent first-line treatment approaches. PMID:26468310

  3. A microfluidic method to synthesize transferrin-lipid nanoparticles loaded with siRNA LOR-1284 for therapy of acute myeloid leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaogang; Yu, Bo; Zhu, Jing; Huang, Xiaomeng; Xie, Jing; Xu, Songlin; Yang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xinmei; Yung, Bryant C.; Lee, L. James; Lee, Robert J.; Teng, Lesheng

    2014-07-01

    The siRNA LOR-1284 targets the R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RRM2) and has shown promise in cancer therapy. In this study, transferrin (Tf) conjugated lipid nanoparticles (Tf-NP-LOR-1284) were synthesized by microfluidic hydrodynamic focusing (MHF) and evaluated for the targeted delivery of LOR-1284 siRNA into acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The in vitro study showed that Tf-NP-LOR-1284 can protect LOR-1284 from serum nuclease degradation. Selective uptake of Tf-NP-LOR-1284 was observed in MV4-11 cells. In addition, qRT-PCR and Western blot results revealed that Tf-NP-LOR-1284 was more effective than the free LOR-1284 in reducing the R2 mRNA and protein levels. The Tf-NP-LOR-1284 showed prolonged circulation time and increased AUC after i.v. administration relative to the free LOR-1284. Furthermore, Tf-NP-LOR-1284 facilitated increased accumulation at the tumor site along with the decreased R2 mRNA and protein expression in a murine xenograft model. These results suggest that Tf-conjugated NPs prepared by MHF provide a suitable platform for efficient and specific therapeutic delivery of LOR-1284 into AML cells.

  4. Analysis of gene rearrangements using a fluorescence in situ hybridization method in Mexican patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: experience at a single institution.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Salas, Consuelo; Montero-Ruiz, Oreth; Frías, Sara; Dehesa, Gloria; Jarquín, Berenice; Rivera-Luna, Roberto

    2008-07-15

    We evaluated the prevalence of BCR/ABL, MLL, and ETV6/RUNX1 rearrangements as well as CDKN2A (alias p16) deletion in a group of Mexican children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) to determine whether the changes coexist, and to compare the incidences found with other reports in the literature. To increase the detection of these abnormalities, we combined conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Bone marrow samples were obtained from 59 consecutive children with ALL. FISH detected a total of 63 abnormalities with the selected probes, 34 of which were related to the conventional cytogenetic results. The most common abnormality was the p16 deletion (22.8%), followed by MLL and ETV6/RUNX1 rearrangements (8.7%), and the BCR/ABL fusion was the least frequent (2.7%). The coexistence of two recurrent abnormalities with specific prognostic significance in the same patient was not found. A lesser proportion of the p16 deletion in T-ALL patients was observed, probably related to the low prevalence of this subtype in our population. In addition, we confirmed the low frequency of the ETV6/RUNX1 fusion observed in Hispanics. Due to the different prevalence of these abnormalities in the Mexican population, similar studies should be conducted analyzing new rearrangements, to improve the adequate classification of the abnormalities and the stratification in prognostic groups.

  5. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist.

  6. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable. PMID:25400985

  7. Evaluation of the acceptability of improved supplementary foods for the treatment of moderate acute malnutrition in Burkina Faso using a mixed method approach.

    PubMed

    Iuel-Brockdorf, Ann-Sophie; Draebel, Tania Aase; Ritz, Christian; Fabiansen, Christian; Cichon, Bernardette; Brix Christensen, Vibeke; Yameogo, Charles; Oummani, Rouafi; Briend, André; Michaelsen, Kim F; Ashorn, Per; Filteau, Suzanne; Friis, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate, within the context of a randomized controlled trial of product effectiveness, the acceptability of new formulations of six corn-soy blended flours (CSB) and six lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) with different quantities of milk and qualities of soy for the treatment of children with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). Our study included 1546 children aged 6-23 months and involved questionnaires after one month of supplementation home visits and interviews with a sub-sample of 20 trial participants and their caretakers, and nine focus group discussion. All 12 products were well accepted in terms of organoleptic qualities and received good ratings. However, LNS were more appreciated by caretakers and children. Additionally, an effect of soy isolate was detected on child appreciation where products with high milk content also received better ratings. CSB were not consumed as readily; 33.9% (n = 257) of children receiving CSB were reported to have leftovers compared to 17.3% (n = 134) of children receiving LNS (p=<0.001). Both CSB and LNS were referred to as foods with medicinal properties and perceived as beneficial to child health. They were both reported to have high priority in the daily feeding of the child. In conclusion, there were minimal differences in acceptability of the various CSB and LNS formulations, although CSB were less readily consumed and required smaller meal volumes. Since all products were well-accepted, decisions regarding whether the more expensive products should be used for the treatment of MAM will need to be based on their effect on child nutrition, growth and health. Future supplementary feeding programs in similar contexts could furthermore consider introducing supplementary foods as a medical treatment, as this may increase adherence and decrease sharing.

  8. Infarct density distribution by MRI in the porcine model of acute and chronic myocardial infarction as a potential method transferable to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Varga-Szemes, Akos; Simor, Tamas; Lenkey, Zsofia; van der Geest, Rob J; Kirschner, Robert; Toth, Levente; Brott, Brigitta C; Elgavish, Ada; Elgavish, Gabriel A

    2014-06-01

    To study the feasibility of a myocardial infarct (MI) quantification method [signal intensity-based percent infarct mapping (SI-PIM)] that is able to evaluate not only the size, but also the density distribution of the MI. In 14 male swine, MI was generated by 90 min of closed-chest balloon occlusion followed by reperfusion. Seven (n = 7) or 56 (n = 7) days after reperfusion, Gd-DTPA-bolus and continuous-infusion enhanced late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) MRI, and R1-mapping were carried out and post mortem triphenyl-tetrazolium-chloride (TTC) staining was performed. MI was quantified using binary [2 or 5 standard deviation (SD)], SI-PIM and R1-PIM methods. Infarct fraction (IF), and infarct-involved voxel fraction (IIVF) were determined by each MRI method. Bias of each method was compared to the TTC technique. The accuracy of MI quantification did not depend on the method of contrast administration or the age of the MI. IFs obtained by either of the two PIM methods were statistically not different from the IFs derived from the TTC measurements at either MI age. IFs obtained from the binary 2SD method overestimated IF obtained from TTC. IIVF among the three different PIM methods did not vary, but with the binary methods the IIVF gradually decreased with increasing the threshold limit. The advantage of SI-PIM over the conventional binary method is the ability to represent not only IF but also the density distribution of the MI. Since the SI-PIM methods are based on a single LGE acquisition, the bolus-data-based SI-PIM method can effortlessly be incorporated into the clinical image post-processing procedure.

  9. New flow cytometric method for detection of minimally expressed multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein on normal and acute leukemia cells using biotinylated MRK16 and streptavidin-RED670 conjugate.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, A; Shinjo, K; Ohnishi, K; Ohno, R

    1995-06-01

    To evaluate the expression of multidrug resistance (MDR) on normal and leukemia cells, we examined P-glycoprotein (P-gp) by a newly devised flow cytometric method, utilizing a biotinylated monoclonal antibody (mAb) against P-gp (MRK16), a streptavidin-RED670 conjugate (SA-RED670) and appropriate emission filters. The combination of biotinylated MRK16 (b-MRK16) and SA-RED670 resulted in higher sensitivity as compared with standard methods such as the use of streptavidin-phycoerythrin (SA-PE) conjugate. The sensitivity was examined in K562, K562/ADR, NOMO-1, NOMO-1/ADR and HL60 cells, and compared with the data obtained from reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of mdr-1 gene. P-gp positivity on flow cytometry was 10.4%, 99.9%, 1.4%, 90.4% and 0%, respectively. Mdr-1 mRNA was well expressed in K562/ADR and NOMO-1/ADR cells, but not in NOMO-1 and HL60 cells. In K562 cells, mdr-1 was found after 40 cycles of PCR, but not 25 cycles. These data are well correlated with those from the flow cytometry. We then studied the P-gp expression on normal peripheral blood cells and acute leukemia cells. P-gp was little expressed on peripheral lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. It was also little expressed on blast cells from 5 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (AML) and 5 acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) expressed P-gp at diagnosis, ranging from 8.5% to 34.5% (16.9 +/- 11.8%) and from 2.3% to 45.6% (24.0 +/- 17.8%), respectively. All 9 relapsed or refractory cases expressed P-gp, ranging from 21.1% to 99.8% (52.2 +/- 29.9%). Significant differences were found in APL, CD34-positive and relapse and refractory cases (P = 0.0006, 0.0007 and 0.0088, respectively). These results indicate that this flow cytometric analysis is useful for the evaluation of clinical MDR status and can identify a group of patients with resistant leukemia. PMID:7622426

  10. Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Wald, Ellen R

    2011-05-01

    Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis are 2 of the most common indications for antimicrobial agents in children. Together, they are responsible for billions of dollars of health care expenditures. The pathogenesis of the 2 conditions is identical. In the majority of children with each condition, a preceding viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of the acute bacterial complication. It has been shown that viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of acute otitis media in 37% of cases. Currently, precise microbiologic diagnosis of acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis requires performance of tympanocentesis in the former and sinus aspiration in the latter. The identification of a virus from the nasopharynx in either case does not obviate the need for antimicrobial therapy. Furthermore, nasal and nasopharyngeal swabs are not useful in predicting the results of culture of the middle ear or paranasal sinus. However, it is possible that a combination of information regarding nasopharyngeal colonization with bacteria and infection with specific viruses may inform treatment decisions in the future.

  11. Acute mastoiditis--revisited.

    PubMed

    Luntz, M; Keren, G; Nusem, S; Kronenberg, J

    1994-09-01

    The clinical course and causative organisms were studied in 18 patients with acute mastoiditis, 13 of whom (72%) had no previous history of middle ear disease. Their age ranged from 5 months to 21 years, and duration of middle ear symptoms immediately prior to admission ranged from 1 to 45 days (average 9.7 days). None had undergone a myringotomy prior to admission, while 13 (72%) had been receiving antibiotic treatment for acute otitis media. Three were admitted with intracranial complications. Bacteria were isolated in 10 of the 16 patients in whom samples were available for bacterial culture, and included Streptococcus pneumonia (2), Streptococcus pyogenes (2), Staphylococcus aureus (2), Staphlococcus coagulase negative (2), Klebsiella pneumonia (1), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1). Of the 17 patients treated by us, 11 received surgery. Acute otitis media, secretory otitis media, acute mastoiditis, subacute mastoiditis and masked mastoiditis create a continuum. Antibiotic treatment for acute otitis media cannot be considered as an absolute safeguard against acute mastoiditis. When antibiotics are prescribed for acute mastoiditis before culture result is available, an anti-staphylococcal agent should be included. At least some patients with acute mastoiditis develop a primary infection of the bony framework of the middle ear cleft. The prevalence of the intracranial complications in acute mastoiditis is still high and may appear soon after or concomitant with the first sign of acute mastioditis.

  12. Cadmium(II) and zinc(II) complexes of pyrrole-appended oxacarbaporphyrin: a side-on coordination mode of O-confused carbaporphyrin.

    PubMed

    Pawlicki, Miłosz; Latos-Grazyński, Lechosław; Szterenberg, Ludmiła

    2005-12-26

    A pyrrole adduct of 5,20-diphenyl-10,15-di(p-tolyl)-2-oxa-21-carbaporphyrin [(H,pyr)OCPH]H(2) reacted with sodium ethanolate to yield 5,20-diphenyl-10,15-di(p-tolyl)-3-ethoxy-3-(2'-pyrrol)-2-oxa-21-carbaporphyrin [(EtO,pyr)OCPH]H(2). Subsequently, "true" O-confused oxaporphyrin with a pendant pyrrole ring [(pyr)OCPH]H was formed by the addition of acid to [(EtO,pyr)OCPH]H(2), which triggered an ethanol elimination. In the course of this process, the tetrahedral-trigonal rearrangements originated at the C(3) atom. Insertion of zinc(II), cadmium(II), and nickel(II) into [(pyr)OCPH]H yielded [(pyr)OCPH]Zn(II)Cl, [(pyr)OCPH]Cd(II)Cl, and [(pyr)OCP]Ni(II). The formation of [(pyr)OCP]Ni(II) was accompanied by the C(21)H dehydrogenation step. The nickel(II) ion of [(pyr)OCP]Ni(II), coordinated to a dianionic macrocyclic ligand, is bound by three pyrrolic nitrogens and a trigonally hybridized C(21) atom of the inverted furan. The pyrrole-appended O-confused carbaporphyrin acts as a monoanionic ligand toward zinc(II) and cadmium(II) cations. Three nitrogen atoms and the C(21)H fragment of the inverted furan occupy equatorial positions. In (1)H NMR spectra, the unique inner C(21)H resonances of the inverted furan ring are located at 0.15 ppm for [(pyr)OCPH]Zn(II)Cl, and at 0.21 ppm for [(pyr)OCPH]Cd(II)Cl. The proximity of the furan fragment to the metal ion induces direct scalar couplings between the spin-active nucleus of the metal ((111/113)Cd) and the adjacent (1)H nucleus. The interaction of the metal ion and C(21)H was also reflected by significant changes in carbon chemical shifts ([(pyr)OCPH]Zn(II)Cl, 78.3 ppm; [(pyr)OCPH]Cd(II)Cl, 81.4 ppm; the free base, 101.3 ppm). The density functional theory (DFT) has been applied to model the molecular structures of zinc(II) and cadmium(II) complexes of O-confused oxaporphyrin with an appended pyrrole ring. The Cd...C(21) distance in the optimized structure exceeds the typical Cd-C bond lengths, but is much shorter than the

  13. [Pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Masashi

    2011-03-01

    Many aspects of the pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy have been clarified in this decade, although many unknown mechanisms remain to be elucidated. According to progress of MRI and neuroimmunological analysis and the observation of clinical findings, many new syndromes were found, which enhanced our understanding of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy. The pathogenesis of encephalitis is divided into infection and immune mediated mechanisms. The antibodies to neuronal surface antigens(NSA) such as NMDA receptors, leucin-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) and aquaporin 4 were demonstrated in specific encephalitis, limbic encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica. Anti-NSA antibody encephalitis should be treated by immunotherapy such as corticosteroid and plasmapheresis. Acute encephalitis with refractory repetitive partial seizures (AERRPS) is a devastating postinfectious disease in children and adults, although the pathogenesis of AERRPS is poorly understood. Influenza associated encephalopathy(IAE) is characterized by it's high incidence in Japanese children between 1 year and 5 years of age, its onset in the first or the second day of illness and its high mortality (15-30%) and morbidity (25-40%). We proposed the classification of IAE with poor prognosis from the neuroradiological findings. Four types of encephalopathy seem to be differentiated from each other, acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) type, hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome (HSES) type, acute brain swelling (ABS) type, febrile convulsive status epilepticus (FCSE) type. The notable radiological features are thalamic lesions in ANE, diffuse cerebral cortical cytotoxic edema in HSES, reversible cerebral swelling in ABS which sometimes reaches lethal brain herniation, and in FCSE type, dendritic high signal in subcortical white matter by DWI ("bright tree appearance") appears simultaneously with the later onset of repetitive focal seizure. These four types are

  14. Acute Vision Loss.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Nika; Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Acute vision loss can be transient (lasting <24 hours) or persistent (lasting >24 hours). When patients present with acute vision loss, it is important to ascertain the duration of vision loss and whether it is a unilateral process affecting one eye or a bilateral process affecting both eyes. This article focuses on causes of acute vision loss in the nontraumatic setting and provides management pearls to help health care providers better triage these patients.

  15. Acute Vision Loss.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Nika; Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Acute vision loss can be transient (lasting <24 hours) or persistent (lasting >24 hours). When patients present with acute vision loss, it is important to ascertain the duration of vision loss and whether it is a unilateral process affecting one eye or a bilateral process affecting both eyes. This article focuses on causes of acute vision loss in the nontraumatic setting and provides management pearls to help health care providers better triage these patients. PMID:26319342

  16. [Acute mastoiditis in children].

    PubMed

    Kajosaari, Lauri; Sinkkonen, Saku T; Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Jero, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Acute mastoiditis in children develops when acute otitis media (AOM) spreads into the mastoid air cells inside the temporal bone. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings of AOM with simultaneous signs of infection in the mastoid area. The most common pathogen causing acute mastoiditis in children is Streptococcus pneumoniae. Intravenous antimicrobial medication, tympanostomy and microbial sample are the cornerstones of the treatment. If a complication of mastoiditis is suspected, imaging studies are needed, preferably with magnetic resonance imaging. The most common complication of acute mastoiditis is a subperiosteal abscess. PMID:24660384

  17. Pesticide residues in cashew apple, guava, kaki and peach: GC-μECD, GC-FPD and LC-MS/MS multiresidue method validation, analysis and cumulative acute risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Jardim, Andréia Nunes Oliveira; Mello, Denise Carvalho; Goes, Fernanda Caroline Silva; Frota Junior, Elcio Ferreira; Caldas, Eloisa Dutra

    2014-12-01

    A multiresidue method for the determination of 46 pesticides in fruits was validated. Samples were extracted with acidified ethyl acetate, MgSO4 and CH3COONa and cleaned up by dispersive SPE with PSA. The compounds were analysed by GC-FPD, GC-μECD or LC-MS/MS, with LOQs from 1 to 8 μg/kg. The method was used to analyse 238 kaki, cashew apple, guava, and peach fruit and pulp samples, which were also analysed for dithiocarbamates (DTCs) using a spectrophotometric method. Over 70% of the samples were positive, with DTC present in 46.5%, λ-cyhalothrin in 37.1%, and omethoate in 21.8% of the positive samples. GC-MS/MS confirmed the identities of the compounds detected by GC. None of the pesticides found in kaki, cashew apple and guava was authorised for these crops in Brazil. The risk assessment has shown that the cumulative acute intake of organophosphorus or pyrethroid compounds from the consumption of these fruits is unlikely to pose a health risk to consumers. PMID:24996324

  18. Pesticide residues in cashew apple, guava, kaki and peach: GC-μECD, GC-FPD and LC-MS/MS multiresidue method validation, analysis and cumulative acute risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Jardim, Andréia Nunes Oliveira; Mello, Denise Carvalho; Goes, Fernanda Caroline Silva; Frota Junior, Elcio Ferreira; Caldas, Eloisa Dutra

    2014-12-01

    A multiresidue method for the determination of 46 pesticides in fruits was validated. Samples were extracted with acidified ethyl acetate, MgSO4 and CH3COONa and cleaned up by dispersive SPE with PSA. The compounds were analysed by GC-FPD, GC-μECD or LC-MS/MS, with LOQs from 1 to 8 μg/kg. The method was used to analyse 238 kaki, cashew apple, guava, and peach fruit and pulp samples, which were also analysed for dithiocarbamates (DTCs) using a spectrophotometric method. Over 70% of the samples were positive, with DTC present in 46.5%, λ-cyhalothrin in 37.1%, and omethoate in 21.8% of the positive samples. GC-MS/MS confirmed the identities of the compounds detected by GC. None of the pesticides found in kaki, cashew apple and guava was authorised for these crops in Brazil. The risk assessment has shown that the cumulative acute intake of organophosphorus or pyrethroid compounds from the consumption of these fruits is unlikely to pose a health risk to consumers.

  19. Asthma in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 10% of adults have suffered an attack of asthma, and up to 5% of these have severe disease that responds poorly to treatment. Patients with severe disease have an increased risk of death, but patients with mild to moderate disease are also at risk of exacerbations. Most guidelines about the management of asthma follow stepwise protocols. This review does not endorse or follow any particular protocol, but presents the evidence about specific interventions. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for acute asthma? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 100 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: beta2 agonists (plus ipratropium bromide, pressured metered-dose inhalers, short-acting continuous nebulised, short-acting intermittent nebulised, short-acting iv, and inhaled formoterol); corticosteroids (inhaled); corticosteroids (single oral, combined inhaled, and short courses); education about acute asthma; generalist care; helium–oxygen mixture (heliox); magnesium sulphate (iv and adding isotonic nebulised magnesium to inhaled beta2 agonists); mechanical ventilation; oxygen supplementation (controlled 28% oxygen and controlled 100% oxygen); and specialist care. PMID:21463536

  20. Towards Prevention of Acute Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A.; Thongprayoon, C.; Pickering, B.W.; Akhoundi, A.; Wilson, G.; Pieczkiewicz, D.; Herasevich, V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Identifying patients at risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) before their admission to intensive care is crucial to prevention and treatment. The objective of this study is to determine the performance of an automated algorithm for identifying selected ARDS predisposing conditions at the time of hospital admission. Methods This secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study included 3,005 patients admitted to hospital between January 1 and December 31, 2010. The automated algorithm for five ARDS predisposing conditions (sepsis, pneumonia, aspiration, acute pancreatitis, and shock) was developed through a series of queries applied to institutional electronic medical record databases. The automated algorithm was derived and refined in a derivation cohort of 1,562 patients and subsequently validated in an independent cohort of 1,443 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of an automated algorithm to identify ARDS risk factors were compared with another two independent data extraction strategies, including manual data extraction and ICD-9 code search. The reference standard was defined as the agreement between the ICD-9 code, automated and manual data extraction. Results Compared to the reference standard, the automated algorithm had higher sensitivity than manual data extraction for identifying a case of sepsis (95% vs. 56%), aspiration (63% vs. 42%), acute pancreatitis (100% vs. 70%), pneumonia (93% vs. 62%) and shock (77% vs. 41%) with similar specificity except for sepsis and pneumonia (90% vs. 98% for sepsis and 95% vs. 99% for pneumonia). The PPV for identifying these five acute conditions using the automated algorithm ranged from 65% for pneumonia to 91 % for acute pancreatitis, whereas the NPV for the automated algorithm ranged from 99% to 100%. Conclusion A rule-based electronic data extraction can reliably and accurately identify patients at risk of ARDS at the time of hospital

  1. Preserving GABAergic interneurons in acute brain slices of mice using the N-methyl-D-glucamine-based artificial cerebrospinal fluid method.

    PubMed

    Pan, Geng; Li, Yue; Geng, Hong-Yan; Yang, Jian-Ming; Li, Ke-Xin; Li, Xiao-Ming

    2015-04-01

    Defects in the function and development of GABAergic interneurons have been linked to psychiatric disorders, so preservation of these interneurons in brain slices is important for successful electrophysiological recording in various ex vivo methods. However, it is difficult to maintain the activity and morphology of neurons in slices from mice of >30 days old. Here we evaluated the N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG)-based artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) method for the preservation of interneurons in slices from mice of up to ∼6 months old and discussed the steps that may affect their quality during slicing. We found that the NMDG-aCSF method rescued more cells than sucrose-aCSF and successfully preserved different types of interneurons including parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive interneurons. In addition, both the chemical and electrical synaptic signaling of interneurons were maintained. These results demonstrate that the NMDG-aCSF method is suitable for the preservation of interneurons, especially in studies of gap junctions. PMID:25648546

  2. Interaction of ferrocene appended Ru(II), Rh(III) and Ir(III) dipyrrinato complexes with DNA/protein, molecular docking and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Paitandi, Rajendra Prasad; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Roop Shikha; Sharma, Gunjan; Koch, Biplob; Pandey, Daya Shankar

    2014-09-12

    Efficacy of the ferrocene appended piano-stool dipyrrinato complexes [(η(6)-C6H6)RuCl(fcdpm)] (1), [(η(6)-C10H14)RuCl(fcdpm)] (2), [(η(6)-C12H18)RuCl(fcdpm)] (3) [(η(5)-C5Me5)RhCl(fcdpm)] (4) and [(η(5)-C5Me5)IrCl(fcdpm)] (5) [fcdpm = 5-ferrocenyldipyrromethene] toward anticancer activity have been described. Binding of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and BSA (bovine serum albumin) have been thoroughly investigated by UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. Binding constants for 1-5 (range, 10(4)-10(5) M(-1)) validated their efficient binding with CT-DNA. Molecular docking studies revealed interaction through minor groove of the DNA, on the other hand these also interact through hydrophobic residues of the protein, particularly cavity in the subdomain IIA. In vitro anticancer activity have been scrutinized by MTT assay, acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EtBr) fluorescence staining, and DNA ladder (fragmentation) assay against Dalton's Lymphoma (DL) cells. Present study revealed that rhodium complex (4) is more effective relative to ruthenium (1-3) and iridium (5) complexes.

  3. Evolution of acute orthopaedic care.

    PubMed

    Mamczak, Christiaan N; Born, Christopher T; Obremskey, William T; Dromsky, David M

    2012-01-01

    Current combat battlefield injuries are among the most complex and challenging orthopaedic cases. These injuries carry high risks for exsanguination and global contamination of extensive soft-tissue and complicated bony injuries. Military orthopaedic surgeons must employ the latest advances in acute combat casualty care to achieve favorable outcomes. Adaptive changes over the past 10 years of war have given today's surgeons the armamentarium to optimize patient care. Innovative methods of damage control resuscitation and surgery have led to increased survival. However, the fundamentals of surgical hemostasis and decontamination remain critical to successful management. The acute treatment of combat casualties involves a continuum of care from the point of injury through transport out of theater. Future research and education are paramount to better prepare military orthopaedic surgeons to further increase survivability and enhance the outcomes of service members with complex wounds.

  4. Acute otitis media guidelines: review and update.

    PubMed

    Lieberthal, Allan S

    2006-07-01

    In 2004, the Subcommittee on Management of Acute Otitis Media of the American Academy of Pediatrics and American Academy of Family Physicians published evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the "Diagnosis and Management of Acute Otitis Media." The guidelines included a definition of acute otitis media (AOM) that included three components: 1) a history of acute onset of signs and symptoms; 2) the presence of middle-ear effusion; and 3) signs and symptoms of middle-ear inflammation. An option to observe selected children with AOM for 48 to 72 hours without initial antibiotic therapy was proposed. This option was based on age, severity of illness, and certainty of diagnosis. Despite the changing prevalence of bacterial pathogens and increasing resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae, amoxicillin remains the first-line antibiotic for initial antibacterial treatment of AOM. The guideline also addresses the management of otalgia, choice of antibiotics after initial treatment failure, and methods for preventing AOM.

  5. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  6. Acute and late obstruction of a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt: a two-center experience in different catheter-based methods of treatment.

    PubMed

    Moszura, Tomasz; Zubrzycka, Maria; Michalak, Krzysztof W; Rewers, Bozena; Dryzek, Pawel; Moll, Jacek J; Sysa, Andrzej; Burczynski, Piotr

    2010-05-01

    Modified Blalock-Taussig (B-T) shunt occlusion results in a sudden reduction of pulmonary vascular perfusion, causing dramatic saturation drop and cyanosis which pose a direct hazard to a child's life. The results of percutaneous local r-tpa infusion, balloon angioplasty and additionally stent implantation in obstructed modified B-T shunts were studied to assess their role as an alternative to a re-do surgery. We outline two pediatric centers' experience (period 2004-2008) regarding the effectiveness of various emergency treatment methods for occlusion or critical stenosis of systemic-to-pulmonary arterial shunts in 23 children. Local r-tpa infusion via catheter was performed in 12/23 patients, balloon angioplasty in 22/23 and additionally stent implantation in 3/23 children. Procedures were successful in 22/23 patients (96%), with an increase in arterial saturation [average: 30%; standard deviation (S.D.) 15%; Shapiro-Wilk test; dependent t-test-P<0.01]. Unrestricted contrast flow was achieved in 18 patients, reduced central flow in three and minimal flow in one child. Neither local nor systemic complications occurred. Our experience demonstrates the possibility of successful early shunt recanalization with the use of local thrombolytic therapy combined with the balloon angioplasty. The presence of old fixed thrombus with neointimal hypertrophy in the shunt constitutes an indication for endovascular stent implantation. PMID:20139195

  7. Uncomplicated acute bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, R; Sande, M A

    2000-12-19

    Acute bronchitis is an acute cough illness in otherwise healthy adults that usually lasts 1 to 3 weeks. This review describes the pathophysiology of the condition and provides a practical approach to the evaluation and treatment of adults with uncomplicated acute bronchitis. Practical points to be made are:1. Respiratory viruses appear to cause the large majority of cases of uncomplicated acute bronchitis.2. Pertussis infection is present in up to 10% to 20% of adults with cough illness of more than 2 to 3 weeks' duration. No clinical features distinguish pertussis from nonpertussis infection in adults who were immunized against pertussis as children.3. Transient bronchial hyperresponsiveness appears to be the predominant mechanism of the bothersome cough of acute bronchitis.4. Ruling out pneumonia is the primary objective in evaluating adults with acute cough illness in whom comorbid conditions and occult asthma are absent or unlikely. In the absence of abnormalities in vital signs (heart rate > 100 beats/min, respiratory rate > 24 breaths/min, and oral body temperature > 38 degrees C), the likelihood of pneumonia is very low.5. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials do not support routine antibiotic treatment of uncomplicated acute bronchitis.6. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials have shown that inhaled albuterol decreases the duration of cough in adults with uncomplicated acute bronchitis.7. Intervention studies suggest that antibiotic treatment of acute bronchitis can be reduced by using a combination of patient and physician education. Decreased rates of antibiotic treatment are not associated with increased utilization, return visits, or dissatisfaction with care.

  8. Acute mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Sise, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia is uncommon and always occurs in the setting of preexisting comorbidities. Mortality rates remain high. The 4 major types of acute mesenteric ischemia are acute superior mesenteric artery thromboembolic occlusion, mesenteric arterial thrombosis, mesenteric venous thrombosis, and nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia, including ischemic colitis. Delays in diagnosis are common and associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Prompt diagnosis requires attention to history and physical examination, a high index of suspicion, and early contract CT scanning. Selective use of nonoperative therapy has an important role in nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia of the small bowel and colon.

  9. Cholesterol lowering effects of mono-lactose-appended β-cyclodextrin in Niemann–Pick type C disease-like HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Motoyama, Keiichi; Hirai, Yumi; Nishiyama, Rena; Maeda, Yuki; Higashi, Taishi; Ishitsuka, Yoichi; Kondo, Yuki; Irie, Tetsumi; Era, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Niemann–Pick type C disease (NPC) is one of inherited lysosomal storage disorders, emerges the accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in endolysosomes. Currently, 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CyD) has been applied for the treatment of NPC. HP-β-CyD improved hepatosplenomegaly in NPC patients, however, a high dose of HP-β-CyD was necessary. Therefore, the decrease in dose by actively targeted-β-CyD to hepatocytes is expected. In the present study, to deliver β-CyD selectively to hepatocytes, we newly fabricated mono-lactose-appended β-CyD (Lac-β-CyD) and evaluated its cholesterol lowering effects in NPC-like HepG2 cells, cholesterol accumulated HepG2 cells induced by treatment with U18666A. Lac-β-CyD (degree of substitution of lactose (DSL) 1) significantly decreased the intracellular cholesterol content in a concentration-dependent manner. TRITC-Lac-β-CyD was associated with NPC-like HepG2 cells higher than TRITC-β-CyD. In addition, TRITC-Lac-β-CyD was partially localized with endolysosomes after endocytosis. Thus, Lac-β-CyD entered NPC-like HepG2 cells via asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR)-mediated endocytosis and decreased the accumulation of intracellular cholesterol in NPC-like HepG2 cells. These results suggest that Lac-β-CyD may have the potential as a drug for the treatment of hepatosplenomegaly in NPC disease. PMID:26664628

  10. Incidentally discovered goblet cell carcinoid clinically presenting as acute intestinal obstruction: a case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Afroz, Nishat; Shamim, Nida; Sofi, Lateef Ahmed; Rizvi, Syed Amjad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) is a rare variant of carcinoid tumor that exclusively involves the appendix. It usually occurs in 5th-6th decade with the most common clinical presentation being acute appendicitis. The natural history of this tumor is intermediate between carcinoids and adenocarcinomas. We here report a case of GCC diagnosed incidentally in a patient presenting with acute intestinal obstruction. Ultrasonographic examination supported the clinical diagnosis of acute intestinal obstruction, following which the patient underwent laparotomy and resection of ileum along with appendix was done. On gross pathological examination, a nodular growth was present on the tip and body of appendix that was yellow in color with a semi-solid to mucoid consistency on cut section. On microscopy, lakes of mucin with few acinar structures floating in them were seen. The submucosa as well as serosa were infiltrated by clusters of goblet cells and well-formed acini, with little atypia. Glands and nests were positive for periodic acid Schiff and immunohistochemistry showed focal chromogranin positivity in glandular structures, thereby confirming the diagnosis of GCC. Although the prognosis of GCC is better than adenocarcinomas, it is one of the carcinoids having a poorer outcome when compared with other variants of carcinoid tumor. Therefore, it is important to rule out other differential diagnoses of goblet cell carcinoid, the most important being mucinous adenocarcinomas. PMID:24739849

  11. New method of preoxygenation for orotracheal intubation in patients with hypoxaemic acute respiratory failure in the intensive care unit, non-invasive ventilation combined with apnoeic oxygenation by high flow nasal oxygen: the randomised OPTINIV study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Samir; Molinari, Nicolas; De Jong, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tracheal intubation in the intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with severe life-threatening complications including severe hypoxaemia. Preoxygenation before intubation has been recommended in order to decrease such complications. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV)-assisted preoxygenation allows increased oxygen saturation during the intubation procedure, by applying a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to prevent alveolar derecruitment. However, the NIV mask has to be taken off after preoxygenation to allow the passage of the tube through the mouth. The patient with hypoxaemia does not receive oxygen during this period, at risk of major hypoxaemia. High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) has a potential for apnoeic oxygenation during the apnoea period following the preoxygenation with NIV. Whether application of HFNC combined with NIV is more effective at reducing oxygen desaturation during the intubation procedure compared with NIV alone for preoxygenation in patients with hypoxaemia in the ICU with acute respiratory failure remains to be established. Methods and analysis The HFNC combined to NIV for decreasing oxygen desaturation during the intubation procedure in patients with hypoxaemia in the ICU (OPTINIV) trial is an investigator-initiated monocentre randomised controlled two-arm trial with assessor-blinded outcome assessment. The OPTINIV trial randomises 50 patients with hypoxaemia requiring orotracheal intubation for acute respiratory failure to receive NIV (pressure support=10, PEEP=5, fractional inspired oxygen (FiO2)=100%) combined with HFNC (flow=60 L/min, FiO2=100%, interventional group) or NIV alone (reference group) for preoxygenation. The primary outcome is lowest oxygen saturation during the intubation procedure. Secondary outcomes are intubation-related complications, quality of preoxygenation and ICU mortality. Ethics and dissemination The study project has been approved by the appropriate ethics committee (CPP Sud

  12. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  13. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  14. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk factors for acute ear infections include: Attending day care (especially centers with more than 6 children) Changes ... hands and toys often. If possible, choose a day care that has 6 or fewer children. This can ...

  15. Treatment of acute gout.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Naomi

    2014-05-01

    This article presents an overview of the treatment of acute gout. Nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments, monotherapy versus combination therapy, suggested recommendations, guidelines for treatment, and drugs under development are discussed.

  16. Acute interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bouros, D; Nicholson, A C; Polychronopoulos, V; du Bois, R M

    2000-02-01

    The term "acute interstitial pneumonia" (AIP) describes an idiopathic clinicopathological condition, characterized clinically by an interstitial lung disease causing rapid onset of respiratory failure, which is distinguishable from the other more chronic forms of interstitial pneumonia. It is synonymous with Hamman-Rich syndrome, occurring in patients without pre-existing lung disease. The histopathological findings are those of diffuse alveolar damage. AIP radiologically and physiologically resembles acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is considered to represent the small subset of patients with idiopathic ARDS. It is frequently confused with other clinical entities characterized by rapidly progressive interstitial pneumonia, especially secondary acute interstitial pneumonia, acute exacerbations and accelerated forms of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis . Furthermore, many authors use the above terms, both erroneously and interchangeably. It has a grave prognosis with >70% mortality in 3 months, despite mechanical ventilation. This review aims to clarify the relative clinical and pathological issues and terminology.

  17. Acute mountain sickness

    MedlinePlus

    High altitude cerebral edema; Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... Acute mountain sickness is caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes. The faster you ...

  18. Acute genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-28

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers.

  19. Weight Loss & Acute Porphyria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sale You are here Home Diet and Nutrition Weight loss & acute Porphyria Being overweight is a particular problem ... one of these diseases before they enter a weight-loss program. Also, they should not participate in a ...

  20. Acute Radiation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary Radiation Emergencies & Your Health Possible Health Effects Contamination and Exposure Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) Cutaneous Radiation ... Decision Making in Radiation Emergencies Protective Actions Internal Contamination Clinical Reference (ICCR) Application Psychological First Aid in ...

  1. A data-driven acute inflammation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acute inflammation is a severe medical condition defined as an inflammatory response of the body to an infection. Its rapid progression requires quick and accurate decisions from clinicians. Inadequate and delayed decisions makes acute inflammation the 10th leading cause of death overall in United States with the estimated cost of treatment about $17 billion annually. However, despite the need, there are limited number of methods that could assist clinicians to determine optimal therapies for acute inflammation. We developed a data-driven method for suggesting optimal therapy by using machine learning model that is learned on historical patients' behaviors. To reduce both the risk of failure and the expense for clinical trials, our method is evaluated on a virtual patients generated by a mathematical model that emulates inflammatory response. In conducted experiments, acute inflammation was handled with two complimentary pro- and anti-inflammatory medications which adequate timing and doses are crucial for the successful outcome. Our experiments show that the dosage regimen assigned with our data-driven method significantly improves the percentage of healthy patients when compared to results by other methods used in clinical practice and found in literature. Our method saved 88% of patients that would otherwise die within a week, while the best method found in literature saved only 73% of patients. At the same time, our method used lower doses of medications than alternatives. In addition, our method achieved better results than alternatives when only incomplete or noisy measurements were available over time as well as it was less affected by therapy delay. The presented results provide strong evidence that models from the artificial intelligence community have a potential for development of personalized treatment strategies for acute inflammation. PMID:24565439

  2. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children. PMID:27613655

  3. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children.

  4. Biocatalytic self-assembly of supramolecular charge-transfer nanostructures based on n-type semiconductor-appended peptides.

    PubMed

    Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Berdugo, Cristina; Javid, Nadeem; Frederix, Pim W J M; Ulijn, Rein V

    2014-06-01

    The reversible in situ formation of a self-assembly building block (naphthalenediimide (NDI)-dipeptide conjugate) by enzymatic condensation of NDI-functionalized tyrosine (NDI-Y) and phenylalanine-amide (F-NH2) to form NDI-YF-NH2 is described. This coupled biocatalytic condensation/assembly approach is thermodynamically driven and gives rise to nanostructures with optimized supramolecular interactions as evidenced by substantial aggregation induced emission upon assembly. Furthermore, in the presence of di-hydroxy/alkoxy naphthalene donors, efficient charge-transfer complexes are produced. The dynamic formation of NDI-YF-NH2 and electronic and H-bonding interactions are analyzed and characterized by different methods. Microscopy (TEM and AFM) and rheology are used to characterize the formed nanostructures. Dynamic nanostructures, whose formation and function are driven by free-energy minimization, are inherently self-healing and provide opportunities for the development of aqueous adaptive nanotechnology. PMID:24788665

  5. Multicomponent reactions of phosphines, diynedioates, and aryl aldehydes generated furans appending reactive phosphorus ylides through cumulated trienoates as key intermediates: a phosphine α-addition-δ-evolvement of an anion pathway.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jie-Cheng; Chuang, Shih-Ching

    2014-11-01

    Multicomponent reactions of phosphines, diynedioates, and aryl aldehydes have been demonstrated, providing trisubstituted furans appending reactive phosphorus ylides, through cumulated trienoates as key intermediates. The proposed trienoate intermediates, 1,5-dipolar species formed via nucleophilic α-attack of phosphines toward diynedioates (α-addition-δ-evolvement of an anion, abbreviated αAδE), undergo addition to aryl aldehydes followed by 5-endo-dig cyclization, proton transfer, and resonance to give trisubstituted furans. Furthermore, the phosphorus ylides are oxidized to α-keto ester furans and utilized as Wittig reagents.

  6. Acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yewen; Yin, Xing; Wijaya, Cori; Huang, Ming-He; McConnell, Bradley K

    2011-01-01

    With heart failure leading the cause of death in the USA (Hunt), biomedical research is fundamental to advance medical treatments for cardiovascular diseases. Animal models that mimic human cardiac disease, such as myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia-reperfusion (IR) that induces heart failure as well as pressure-overload (transverse aortic constriction) that induces cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure (Goldman and Tarnavski), are useful models to study cardiovascular disease. In particular, myocardial ischemia (MI) is a leading cause for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality despite controlling certain risk factors such as arteriosclerosis and treatments via surgical intervention (Thygesen). Furthermore, an acute loss of the myocardium following myocardial ischemia (MI) results in increased loading conditions that induces ventricular remodeling of the infarcted border zone and the remote non-infarcted myocardium. Myocyte apoptosis, necrosis and the resultant increased hemodynamic load activate multiple biochemical intracellular signaling that initiates LV dilatation, hypertrophy, ventricular shape distortion, and collagen scar formation. This pathological remodeling and failure to normalize the increased wall stresses results in progressive dilatation, recruitment of the border zone myocardium into the scar, and eventually deterioration in myocardial contractile function (i.e. heart failure). The progression of LV dysfunction and heart failure in rats is similar to that observed in patients who sustain a large myocardial infarction, survive and subsequently develops heart failure (Goldman). The acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model in rats has been used to mimic human cardiovascular disease; specifically used to study cardiac signaling mechanisms associated with heart failure as well as to assess the contribution of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of heart failure. The method described in this report is the rat model of acute myocardial

  7. Postmortem diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute respiratory failure - demographics, etiologic and pulmonary histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Capelozzi, Vera L; Serrano, Carlos V

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acute respiratory failure is present in 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and is responsible for 20% to 30% of the fatal post-acute myocardial infarction. The role of inflammation associated with pulmonary edema as a cause of acute respiratory failure post-acute myocardial infarction remains to be determined. We aimed to describe the demographics, etiologic data and histological pulmonary findings obtained through autopsies of patients who died during the period from 1990 to 2008 due to acute respiratory failure with no diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction during life. METHODS: This study considers 4,223 autopsies of patients who died of acute respiratory failure that was not preceded by any particular diagnosis while they were alive. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was given in 218 (4.63%) patients. The age, sex and major associated diseases were recorded for each patient. Pulmonary histopathology was categorized as follows: diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of acute myocardial infarction associated with specific histopathology was determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: In total, 147 men were included in the study. The mean age at the time of death was 64 years. Pulmonary histopathology revealed pulmonary edema as well as the presence of diffuse alveolar damage in 72.9% of patients. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 11.9% of patients, systemic arterial hypertension in 10.1% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 6.9%. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between acute myocardial infarction with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that in autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure as the cause of death, 5% were diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Pulmonary histology revealed a significant inflammatory response, which has

  8. An easy 'Filter-and-Separate' method for enantioselective separation and chiral sensing of substrates using a biomimetic homochiral polymer.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, T; Asha, S K

    2015-05-28

    We present a polyfluorene appended with protected l-glutamic acid that exhibited a reversible α-helix/β-sheet-like conformation and helical porous fibrous morphology mimicking the super-structure of proteins. The new homochiral polymer probe enabled efficient heterogeneous enantioselective separation and chiral sensing of a wide variety of substrates from their aqueous racemic mixture using an easy 'Filter-and-Separate' method.

  9. Methods and formulas for calculating the strength of plate and shell constructions as used in airplane design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heck, O S; Ebner, H

    1936-01-01

    This report is a compilation of previously published articles on formulas and methods of calculation for the determination of the strength and stability of plate and shell construction as employed in airplane design. In particular, it treats the problem of isotropic, orthotopic, and stiffened rectangular plates, thin curved panels, and circular cylinders under various loading conditions. The purpose of appending the pertinent literature references following the subjects discussed was to facilitate a comprehensive study of the treated problems.

  10. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Acute bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sudhanshu; Jindal, Atul; Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit C

    2011-11-01

    Acute asthma is the third commonest cause of pediatric emergency visits at PGIMER. Typically, it presents with acute onset respiratory distress and wheeze in a patient with past or family history of similar episodes. The severity of the acute episode of asthma is judged clinically and categorized as mild, moderate and severe. The initial therapy consists of oxygen, inhaled beta-2 agonists (salbutamol or terbutaline), inhaled budesonide (three doses over 1 h, at 20 min interval) in all and ipratropium bromide and systemic steroids (hydrocortisone or methylprednisolone) in acute severe asthma. Other causes of acute onset wheeze and breathing difficulty such as pneumonia, foreign body, cardiac failure etc. should be ruled out with help of chest radiography and appropriate laboratory investigations in first time wheezers and those not responding to 1 h of inhaled therapy. In case of inadequate response or worsening, intravenous infusion of magnesium sulphate, terbutaline or aminophylline may be used. Magnesium sulphate is the safest and most effective alternative among these. Severe cases may need ICU care and rarely, ventilatory support. PMID:21769523

  12. Thrombosis and acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Solís, Erick

    2012-04-01

    Thrombosis is a common complication in patients with acute leukemia. While the presence of central venous lines, concomitant steroids, the use of Escherichia coli asparaginase and hereditary thrombophilic abnormalities are known risk factors for thrombosis in children, information on the pathogenesis, risk factors, and clinical outcome of thrombosis in adult patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still scarce. Expert consensus and guidelines regarding leukemia-specific risk factors, thrombosis prevention, and treatment strategies, as well as optimal type of central venous catheter in acute leukemia patients are required. It is likely that each subtype of acute leukemia represents a different setting for the development of thrombosis and the risk of bleeding. This is perhaps due to a combination of different disease-specific pathogenic mechanisms of thrombosis, including the type of chemotherapy protocol chosen, the underlying patients health, associated risk factors, as well as the biology of the disease itself. The risk of thrombosis may also vary according to ethnicity and prevalence of hereditary risk factors for thrombosis; thus, it is advisable for Latin American, Asian, and African countries to report on their specific patient population. PMID:22507812

  13. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment.

  14. EXPERIMENTAL ACUTE GLOMERULITIS

    PubMed Central

    Lukens, Francis D. W.; Longcope, Warfield T.

    1931-01-01

    1. Both focal and diffuse glomerulitis has been produced in rabbits by the injection directly into the left renal artery of suspensions of heat killed hemolytic streptococci. 2. Similar lesions in the glomeruli could not be obtained by the injection of suspensions of bismuth oxychloride into the left renal artery of normal rabbits. 3. The acute glomerulitis occurred in only about one-half of the rabbits employed for the experiments. 4. Glomerulitis was observed much more frequently in rabbits in which an acute localized streptococcus infection had been produced by the intracutaneous injection of living hemolytic streptococci, than in normal rabbits. The occurrence of acute glomerulitis was usually associated with a well marked skin reaction to the filtrates of hemolytic streptococci. PMID:19869861

  15. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Susan M.; Cedars, Ari M.; Ewald, Gregory A.; Geltman, Edward M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    Hospitalizations for acute decompensated heart failure are increasing in the United States. Moreover, the prevalence of heart failure is increasing consequent to an increased number of older individuals, as well as to improvement in therapies for coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac death that have enabled patients to live longer with cardiovascular disease. The main treatment goals in the hospitalized patient with heart failure are to restore euvolemia and to minimize adverse events. Common in-hospital treatments include intravenous diuretics, vasodilators, and inotropic agents. Novel pharmaceutical agents have shown promise in the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure and may simplify the treatment and reduce the morbidity associated with the disease. This review summarizes the contemporary management of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:20069075

  16. [Diagnostic difficulty for an acute hydrocephalus].

    PubMed

    Vico, S; Franck, L; Bensalah, M; Gil, C; De Rudnicki, S

    2013-09-01

    Tuberculosis disease, in its extra pulmonary form, remains a difficult diagnosis because of its atypical symptoms and evolution. We have observed a case of acute tuberculosis neuromeningitis, without being able to make a definite diagnosis prior to the patient's death because of the negativity of the initial bacteriological samples. We started the most probable appropriate treatment but in vain. This case allows us to challenge diagnostic methods and resulting treatments in emergency cases where tuberculosis is suspected. Moreover, it seems essential to do everything possible to find the bacterium when confronted with a patient with risk factors and clinical and radiological symptoms compatible with tubercular disease, before the disease becomes acute. PMID:23948022

  17. Synthesis, structural characterization and antimicrobial activities of diorganotin(IV) complexes with azo-imino carboxylic acid ligand: Crystal structure and topological study of a doubly phenoxide-bridged dimeric dimethyltin(IV) complex appended with free carboxylic acid groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Manojit; Roy, Subhadip; Devi, N. Manglembi; Singh, Ch. Brajakishor; Singh, Keisham Surjit

    2016-09-01

    Diorganotin(IV) complexes appended with free carboxylic acids were synthesized by reacting diorganotin(IV) dichlorides [R2SnCl2; R = Me (1), Bu (2) and Ph (3)] with an azo-imino carboxylic acid ligand i.e. 2-{4-hydroxy-3-[(2-hydroxyphenylimino)methyl]phenylazo}benzoic acid in presence of triethylamine. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR and multinuclear NMR (1H, 13C and 119Sn) spectroscopy. The structure of 1 in solid state has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Crystal structure of 1 reveals that the compound crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/c and is a dimeric dimethyltin(IV) complex appended with free carboxylic acid groups. In the structure of 1, the Sn(IV) atoms are hexacoordinated and have a distorted octahedral coordination geometry in which two phenoxy oxygen atoms and the azomethine nitrogen atom of the ligand coordinate to each tin atom. One of the phenoxy oxygen atom bridges the two tin centers resulting in a planar Sn2O2 core. Topological analysis is used for the description of molecular packing in 1. Tin NMR spectroscopy study indicates that the complexes have five coordinate geometry around tin atom in solution state. Since the complexes have free carboxylic acids, these compounds could be further used as potential metallo-ligands for the synthesis of other complexes. The synthesized diorganotin(IV) complexes were also screened for their antimicrobial activities and compound 2 showed effective antimicrobial activities.

  18. Preparation and characterization of 4-isopropylcalix[4]arene-capped (3-(2-O-β-cyclodextrin)-2-hydroxypropoxy)-propylsilyl-appended silica particles as chiral stationary phase for high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chelvi, S K Thamarai; Zhao, Jia; Chen, Lijuan; Yan, Shi; Yin, Xiaoxing; Sun, Jiaquan; Yong, E L; Wei, Qunli; Gong, Yinhan

    2014-01-10

    A new type of 4-isopropylcalix[4]arene-capped (3-(2-O-β-cyclodextrin)-2-hydroxypropoxy)propylsilyl-appended silica particles (IPC4CD-HPS) has been prepared by treatment of bromoacetate-substituted (3-(2-O-β-cyclodextrin)-2-hydroxypropoxy)propylsilyl-appended silica particles (BACD-HPS) with 4-isopropylcalix[4]arene oxyanions in anhydrous N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone. The bonded silica IPC4CD-HPS has been successfully used as chiral stationary phase (CSP) in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for the first time. The synthetic stationary phase was characterized by means of elemental analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. This new CSP has a chiral selector with two anchored functional moieties: 4-isopropylcalix[4]arene and β-cyclodextrin. The chromatographic performance of IPC4CD-HPS was investigated by separation of positional isomers of several disubstituted benzenes and enantiomers of some chiral drug compounds under reversed-phase conditions. The results showed that IPC4CD-HPS had excellent selectivity for the separation of aromatic positional isomers and enantiomers of chiral compounds due to the cooperative functioning of the anchored 4-isopropylcalix[4]arenes and β-cyclodextrins.

  19. Acute Intraoperative Pulmonary Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Nason, Katie S.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Acute intraoperative aspiration is a potentially fatal complication with significant associated morbidity. Patients undergoing thoracic surgery are at increased risk for anesthesia-related aspiration, largely due to the predisposing conditions associated with this complication. Awareness of the risk factors, predisposing conditions, maneuvers to decrease risk and immediate management options by both the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesia team is imperative to reducing risk and optimizing patient outcomes associated with acute intraoperative pulmonary aspiration. Based on the root-cause analyses that many of the aspiration events can be traced back to provider factors, having an experienced anesthesiologist present for high-risk cases is also critical. PMID:26210926

  20. Acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    Cumming, Gordon R.

    1974-01-01

    While rheumatic fever is relatively uncommon except where there are poor and crowded living conditions, sporadic acute attacks continue to occur in a family or pediatric medical practice. The physician's role in management of the sore throat in the diagnosis of suspected cases of rheumatic fever and in follow-up for continued prophylaxis is discussed. The frequency of admissions and presenting features of 159 patients with acute rheumatic fever is reviewed. Continued surveillance is required if we are to achieve a further reduction in attack rate and complications. PMID:4419123

  1. Acute sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2013-04-01

    Acute rhinosinusitis is a common illness in children. Viral upper respiratory tract infection is the most common presentation of rhinosinusitis. Most children resolve the infection spontaneously and only a small proportion develops a secondary bacterial infection. The proper choice of antibiotic therapy depends on the likely infecting pathogens, bacterial antibiotic resistance, and pharmacologic profiles of antibiotics. Amoxicillin-clavulanate is currently recommended as the empiric treatment in those requiring antimicrobial therapy. Isolation of the causative agents should be considered in those who failed the initial treatment. In addition to antibiotics, adjuvant therapies and surgery may be used in the management of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis.

  2. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  3. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about acute myeloid leukemia? What is acute myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  4. Appendicitis in an obturator hernia.

    PubMed

    Camerlinck, Michael; Vanhoenacker, Filip; De Vuyst, Dimitri; Quanten, Inge

    2011-04-01

    We present a case of a 79-year-old female with a history of pain at the right groin for 9 days. Computer tomography of the pelvis showed herniation of the appendix through the obturator canal with a huge abscess surrounding the right hip joint. Laparotomy was performed and histopathology confirmed a perforated necrotic tip of the herniated appendix. An obturator hernia is a rare hernia of the pelvic floor. It is most common in old, emaciated, multiparous women and can cause groin pain with extension to the medial aspect of the thigh. In case of incarceration of bowel, patients also present with obstruction. Isolated incarceration of the appendix, however, does not cause obstruction. The diagnosis of an obturator hernia is often delayed, due to a non-specific clinical presentation. CT scan may offer the clue to the correct diagnosis and should be performed in case of a possible obturator hernia.

  5. Emergency pulpotomy in relieving acute dental pain among Tanzanian patients

    PubMed Central

    Nyerere, Joachim W; Matee, Mecky I; Simon, Elison NM

    2006-01-01

    Background In Tanzania, oral health services are mostly in the form of dental extractions aimed at alleviating acute dental pain. Conservative methods of alleviating acute dental pain are virtually non-existent. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to determine treatment success of emergency pulpotomy in relieving acute dental pain. Methods Setting: School of Dentistry, Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Study design: Longitudinal study. Participants: 180 patients who presented with dental pain due to acute irreversible pulpitis during the study period between July and August 2001. Treatment and evaluation: Patients were treated by emergency pulpotomy on permanent posterior teeth and were evaluated for pain after one, three and six week's post-treatment. Pain, if present, was categorised as either mild or acute. Results Of the patients with treated premolars, 25 (13.9%) patients did not experience pain at all while 19 (10.6%) experienced mild pain. None of the patients with treated premolars experienced acute pain. Among 136 patients with treated molars 56 (31%) did not experience any pain, 76 (42.2%) experienced mild pain and the other 4 (2.2%) suffered acute pain. Conclusion The short term treatment success of emergency pulpotomy was high being 100% for premolars and 97.1% for molars, suggesting that it can be recommended as a measure to alleviate acute dental pain while other conservative treatment options are being considered. PMID:16426455

  6. THE PANC 3 SCORE PREDICTING SEVERITY OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    BEDUSCHI, Murilo Gamba; MELLO, André Luiz Parizi; VON-MÜHLEN, Bruno; FRANZON, Orli

    2016-01-01

    Background : About 20% of cases of acute pancreatitis progress to a severe form, leading to high mortality rates. Several studies suggested methods to identify patients that will progress more severely. However, most studies present problems when used on daily practice. Objective : To assess the efficacy of the PANC 3 score to predict acute pancreatitis severity and its relation to clinical outcome. Methods : Acute pancreatitis patients were assessed as to sex, age, body mass index (BMI), etiology of pancreatitis, intensive care need, length of stay, length of stay in intensive care unit and mortality. The PANC 3 score was determined within the first 24 hours after diagnosis and compared to acute pancreatitis grade of the Revised Atlanta classification. Results : Out of 64 patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, 58 met the inclusion criteria. The PANC 3 score was positive in five cases (8.6%), pancreatitis progressed to a severe form in 10 cases (17.2%) and five patients (8.6%) died. Patients with a positive score and severe pancreatitis required intensive care more often, and stayed for a longer period in intensive care units. The PANC 3 score showed sensitivity of 50%, specificity of 100%, accuracy of 91.4%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 90.6% in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis. Conclusion : The PANC 3 score is useful to assess acute pancreatitis because it is easy and quick to use, has high specificity, high accuracy and high predictive value in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:27120730

  7. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  8. [Acute arsenic poisoning].

    PubMed

    Montelescaut, Etienne; Vermeersch, Véronique; Commandeur, Diane; Huynh, Sophie; Danguy des Deserts, Marc; Sapin, Jeanne; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Acute arsenic poisoning is a rare cause of suicide attempt. It causes a multiple organs failure caused by cardiogenic shock. We report the case of a patient admitted twelve hours after an ingestion of trioxide arsenic having survived thanks to a premature treatment.

  9. [Acute arsenic poisoning].

    PubMed

    Montelescaut, Etienne; Vermeersch, Véronique; Commandeur, Diane; Huynh, Sophie; Danguy des Deserts, Marc; Sapin, Jeanne; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Acute arsenic poisoning is a rare cause of suicide attempt. It causes a multiple organs failure caused by cardiogenic shock. We report the case of a patient admitted twelve hours after an ingestion of trioxide arsenic having survived thanks to a premature treatment. PMID:25486670

  10. Acute radiation risk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Olga

    Biologically motivated mathematical models, which describe the dynamics of the major hematopoietic lineages (the thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems) in acutely/chronically irradiated humans are developed. These models are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations, which variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning. It is shown that the developed models are capable of reproducing clinical data on the dynamics of these systems in humans exposed to acute radiation in the result of incidents and accidents, as well as in humans exposed to low-level chronic radiation. Moreover, the averaged value of the "lethal" dose rates of chronic irradiation evaluated within models of these four major hematopoietic lineages coincides with the real minimal dose rate of lethal chronic irradiation. The demonstrated ability of the models of the human thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems to predict the dynamical response of these systems to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates implies that these mathematical models form an universal tool for the investigation and prediction of the dynamics of the major human hematopoietic lineages for a vast pattern of irradiation scenarios. In particular, these models could be applied for the radiation risk assessment for health of astronauts exposed to space radiation during long-term space missions, such as voyages to Mars or Lunar colonies, as well as for health of people exposed to acute/chronic irradiation due to environmental radiological events.

  11. Acute coronary care 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the titles are: The measurement of acute myocardial infarct size by CT; Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of myocardial ischemia and infarction; Poistron imaging in the evaluation of ischemia and myocardial infarction; and New inotropic agents.

  12. Acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Vlodov, J; Tenner, S M

    2001-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis has multiple causes, an unpredictable course, and myriad complications. The diagnosis relies on a combination of history, physical examination, serologic markers, and radiologic findings. The mainstay of therapy includes aggressive hydration, maintenance of NPO, and adequate analgesia with narcotics. Antibiotic and nutritional support with total parenteral nutrition should be used when appropriate.

  13. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back strain - new ... lower back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see ...

  14. [Management of acute tendinitis].

    PubMed

    Rapp, H J; Heisse, K; Becker, M; Stechele, M

    1992-12-01

    Ultrasonography must be used in combination with physical examination for the appropriate diagnosis of acute tendon injuries. Therapy should be designed to return the tendon to its normal function and appearance. Local and systemic anti-inflammatory agents, cold hydrotherapy and massage minimize excessive scar formation and progressively increasing tensile forces directs scar tissue to replace the tendon function.

  15. Acute streptococcal necrotising fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Frankish, P D; Mason, G H; Allen, P R; Milsom, F P; Christmas, T I

    1988-10-12

    Two cases of acute streptococcal necrotising fasciitis are reported. Both patients were taking nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs when they developed this infection. Urgent surgical debridement was undertaken and resulted in a successful outcome in both patients. The clinical and histopathological features of this condition are reviewed.

  16. Haemodilution for acute ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Timothy S; Jensen, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    Background Ischaemic stroke interrupts the flow of blood to part of the brain. Haemodilution is thought to improve the flow of blood to the affected areas of the brain and thus reduce infarct size. Objectives To assess the effects of haemodilution in acute ischaemic stroke. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (February 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 1, 2014), MEDLINE (January 2008 to October 2013) and EMBASE (January 2008 to October 2013). We also searched trials registers, scanned reference lists and contacted authors. For the previous version of the review, the authors contacted manufacturers and investigators in the field. Selection criteria Randomised trials of haemodilution treatment in people with acute ischaemic stroke. We included only trials in which treatment was started within 72 hours of stroke onset. Data collection and analysis Two review authors assessed trial quality and one review author extracted the data. Main results We included 21 trials involving 4174 participants. Nine trials used a combination of venesection and plasma volume expander. Twelve trials used plasma volume expander alone. The plasma volume expander was plasma alone in one trial, dextran 40 in 12 trials, hydroxyethyl starch (HES) in five trials and albumin in three trials. Two trials tested haemodilution in combination with another therapy. Evaluation was blinded in 14 trials. Five trials probably included some participants with intracerebral haemorrhage. Haemodilution did not significantly reduce deaths within the first four weeks (risk ratio (RR) 1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90 to 1.34). Similarly, haemodilution did not influence deaths within three to six months (RR 1.05; 95% CI 0.93 to 1.20), or death and dependency or institutionalisation (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.85 to 1.07). The results were similar in confounded and unconfounded trials, and in trials of isovolaemic and hypervolaemic haemodilution. No

  17. Method for compression of binary data

    DOEpatents

    Berlin, G.J.

    1996-03-26

    The disclosed method for compression of a series of data bytes, based on LZSS-based compression methods, provides faster decompression of the stored data. The method involves the creation of a flag bit buffer in a random access memory device for temporary storage of flag bits generated during normal LZSS-based compression. The flag bit buffer stores the flag bits separately from their corresponding pointers and uncompressed data bytes until all input data has been read. Then, the flag bits are appended to the compressed output stream of data. Decompression can be performed much faster because bit manipulation is only required when reading the flag bits and not when reading uncompressed data bytes and pointers. Uncompressed data is read using byte length instructions and pointers are read using word instructions, thus reducing the time required for decompression. 5 figs.

  18. Method for compression of binary data

    DOEpatents

    Berlin, Gary J.

    1996-01-01

    The disclosed method for compression of a series of data bytes, based on LZSS-based compression methods, provides faster decompression of the stored data. The method involves the creation of a flag bit buffer in a random access memory device for temporary storage of flag bits generated during normal LZSS-based compression. The flag bit buffer stores the flag bits separately from their corresponding pointers and uncompressed data bytes until all input data has been read. Then, the flag bits are appended to the compressed output stream of data. Decompression can be performed much faster because bit manipulation is only required when reading the flag bits and not when reading uncompressed data bytes and pointers. Uncompressed data is read using byte length instructions and pointers are read using word instructions, thus reducing the time required for decompression.

  19. The management of acute pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Wells, T A; Curzen, N P

    2005-01-01

    Acute pericarditis is usually a benign self-limiting condition, often of unexplained or viral aetiology, involving inflammation of the pericardial layers. It is often part of the differential diagnosis in patients admitted with acute chest pain and can be confused with acute myocardial infarction, acute pulmonary embolism and pleurisy. Occasionally it can result in cardiac tamponade and, if associated with myocarditis, in heart failure. This article sets out how to diagnose acute pericarditis, the common underlying causes, the possible treatment options and outcomes. PMID:21655516

  20. Acute gangrenous cholecystitis: radionuclide diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Brachman, M.B.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Ramanna, L.; Waxman, A.D.

    1984-04-01

    Radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging with Tc-99m IDA is a useful procedure for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. Visualization of the gallbladder essentially rules out acute cholecystitis. Nonvisualization suggest acute cholecystitis but may also be associated with chronic gallbladder disease or other conditions. The authors recently observed five patients in whom a rim of increased parenchymal liver activity was seen adjacent to the gallbladder fossa. All five patients had acute gangrenous cholecystitis. The rim of increased activity appears to be a useful secondary sign of acute cholecystitis.

  1. SCORING IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS: WHEN IMAGING IS APPROPRIATE?.

    PubMed

    Cucuteanu, B; Prelipcean, Cristina Cijevschi; Mihai, Cătălina; Dranga, Mihaela; Negru, D

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a frequent presentation to the emergency departments with a rising incidence and a great variability in clinical severity and outcome. The aim of this review is to offer a succinct presentation on acute pancreatitis scoring systems and the use of different imaging methods in severity prediction: Ranson criteria, Glasgow criteria, Hong Kong Score, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), computed tomography scoring systems, Bedside Index of Severity in Acute Pancreatitis (BISAP) score, Panc 3, Japanese Severity Score (JSS), Harmless Acute Pancreatitis Score (HAPS), Pancreatitis Outcome Prediction (POP), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA). This article also describes the Revised Atlanta Classification of AP (2012) and the correlation with computed tomography.

  2. Clinical value of severity markers in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lempinen, M; Puolakkainen, P; Kemppainen, E

    2005-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common digestive disease of which the severity may vary from mild, edematous to severe, necrotizing disease. An improved outcome in the severe form of the disease is based on early identification of disease severity and subsequent focused management of these high-risk patients. However, the ability of clinicians to predict, upon presentation, which patient will have mild or severe acute pancreatitis is not accurate. Prospective systems using clinical criteria have been used to determine severity in patients with acute pancreatitis, such as the Ranson's prognostic signs, Glasgow score, and the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (APACHE II). Their application in clinical practise has been limited by the time delay of at least 48 h to judge all parameters in the former two and by being cumbersome and time-consuming in the latter. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is presently the most accurate non-invasive single method to evaluate the severity of acute pancreatitis. It cannot, however, be performed to all patients with acute pancreatitis. Therefore, considerable interest has grown in the development of reliable biochemical markers that reflect the severity of acute pancreatitis. In this article we critically appraise current and new severity markers of acute pancreatitis in their ability to distinguish between mild and severe disease and their clinical utility.

  3. Acute pain management.

    PubMed

    Hansen, B

    2000-07-01

    We encounter patients with acute pain many times each day, and few aspects of veterinary practice offer such an opportunity to help so many in such a profoundly rewarding way. As emphasized here and elsewhere, we now have excellent tools with which to help these animals, and the biggest impediment to optimal treatment of their pain is often our own difficulty in recognizing its presence. Perhaps the single most important aspect of treating acute pain is to cultivate an ability to see past our personal biases and expectations which may limit treatment and to rediscover the common sense we had about pain before we entered the profession. By rededicating ourselves to seeking out, preventing, and relieving pain, we not only perform a vital service for our patients but also elevate our profession even as we reap financial and spiritual rewards for our efforts. What could be better? PMID:10932832

  4. Acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  5. Acute organophosphorus poisoning.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, Sheemona; Bhattacharyya, Rajasri; Banerjee, Dibyajyoti

    2014-04-20

    Acute organophosphorus poisoning continues to be a detrimental problem and a potential cause of mortality especially in developing countries. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase enzyme is the main mechanism of toxicity of such pesticides and measurement of acetylcholinesterase activity is the commonly used laboratory diagnosis approved for the purpose. It is now proved beyond any doubt that early intervention is beneficial for cases of acute organophosphorus poisoning and, therefore, considerable current interest has been generated for development of point of care testing tool for screening of the same. However, to the best of our knowledge so far the matter is not reviewed from the view of point of care testing tool development. In this paper, this subject is reviewed highlighting the methodological aspects and point of care testing tool development in the context of organophosphorus poisoning.

  6. Acute aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corvera, Joel S

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  7. Cytokines and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Brady, M; Christmas, S; Sutton, R; Neoptolemos, J; Slavin, J

    1999-07-01

    Cytokines have been shown to play a pivotal role in multiple organ dysfunction, a major cause of death in severe acute pancreatitis. Moreover, the two-hit hypothesis of the cytokine-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome explains the variable individual response to severe acute pancreatitis and the impact of secondary events such as sepsis or therapeutic intervention. Many experimental anti-cytokine therapies have been administered following induction of experimental pancreatitis, and have proved to be therapeutic. Patients with severe pancreatitis present early because of pain. Clearly then a window for therapeutic intervention is available between onset of symptoms and peak pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. It is this fundamental observation that convinces many in the field that the treatment of AP will be one of the first clinical successes for novel drugs or therapy that seek to modulate the inflammatory response.

  8. Acute arsenic intoxication.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J P; Alvarez, J A

    1989-12-01

    The diagnosis of acute arsenic poisoning should be considered in any patient presenting with severe gastrointestinal complaints. Signs and symptoms include nausea, vomiting, colicky abdominal pain and profuse, watery diarrhea. Hypotension, fluid and electrolyte disturbances, mental status changes, electrocardiographic abnormalities, respiratory failure and death can result. Quantitative measurement of 24-hour urinary arsenic excretion is the only reliable laboratory test to confirm arsenic poisoning. Treatment includes gastric emesis or lavage, chelation therapy, electrolyte and fluid replacement, and cardiorespiratory support.

  9. [Acute Chest Pain].

    PubMed

    Gmür, Christian

    2016-02-17

    Acute chest pain is a frequent consultation reason in general practice as well as in emergency departments. With the help of history, physical examination, ECG, laboratory and newly developed risk scores, potentially life-threatening diseases and high-risk patients may be detected and treated early, quickly and cost-effectively. New biomarkers and their combination with risk scores can increase the negative predictive value to exclude certain diseases. PMID:26886697

  10. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  11. Neuropsychology of acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Sinanović, Osman

    2010-06-01

    Neuropsychology includes both the psychiatric manifestations of neurological illness (primary brain-based disorders) and neurobiology of "idiopathic" psychiatric disorders. Neurological primary brain disorders provoke broad spectrum of brain pathophysiology that cause deficit sin human behaviour, and the magnitude of neurobehavioral-related problems is a world wide health concern. Speech disorders of aphasic type, unilateral neglect, anosognosia (deficit disorders), delirium and mood disorders (productive disorders) in urgent neurology, first of all in acute phase of stroke are more frequent disorders then it verified in routine exam, not only in the developed and large neurological departments. Aphasia is common consequence of left hemispheric lesion and most common neuropsychological consequence of stroke, with prevalence of one third of all stroke patients in acute phase although exist reports on greater frequency. Unilateral neglect is a disorder that mostly effects the patient after the lesion of the right hemisphere, mostly caused by a cerebrovascular insult (infarct or haemorrhage affecting a large area - up to two thirds of the right hemisphere), and in general the left-side neglect is the most widespread neuropsychological deficit after the lesion of the right cerebral hemisphere. Reports on the incidence of visual neglect vary and they range from 13 to 85%. Anosognosia is on the second place as neuropsychological syndrome of stroke in right hemisphere, characterized by the denial of the motor, visual or cognitive deficit. This syndrome, defined as denial of hemiparesis or hemianopsia, is a common disorder verified in 17-28% of all patents with acute brain stoke. There are different reports on frequency of delirium in acute stroke, from 24 to 48%, and it is more frequent in hemorrhagic then ischemic stoke. Post stroke depression (PSD) is one of the more frequent consequences on the stroke, and the prevalence of PSD has ranged from 5 to 63% of patients in

  12. [Acute coronary syndromes: epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Alev Arat

    2013-04-01

    Coronary heart disease is the main cause of death in the world as well as in Turkey. It's not only a health issue but also a social problem with a high economic burden and negative impact on quality of life. The majority of deaths are attributable to acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and their complications.This review summarizes some important facts regarding ACS epidemiology in the world and in Turkey. PMID:27323430

  13. Acupuncture for acute hordeolum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke; Wang, Xue; Guo, Menghu; Wieland, L. Susan; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The objective of this review is to determine the effects and, when possible, the safety of acupuncture for the treatment of acute hordeola, in comparison to no specific treatment (e.g., observation), sham acupuncture, or other active treatments. Acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment also will be compared to that treatment alone. PMID:25214814

  14. Diagnosis of acute rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Marchisio, Paola; Tenconi, Rossana; Tagliaferri, Laura; Albertario, Giada; Patria, Maria Francesca; Principi, Nicola

    2012-08-01

    Rhinosinusitis is almost always a complication of a viral infection involving the upper respiratory tract. A common cold is the first symptom of rhinosinusitis, but infectious processes involving the nose inevitably affect the paranasal sinuses because of their anatomical contiguity. The symptoms remain those of a common cold as long as nasal phlogosis is moderate and the ostia between the nose and sinuses are patent. If the inflammation is intense, edema may obliterate the ostia and isolate the sinuses, thus stopping the removal of the exudates. The duration of symptoms makes it possible to distinguish acute (10-30 days) from subacute (30-90 days) and chronic rhinosinusitis (>90 days). The diagnosis of rhinosinusitis should only be based on anamnestic and clinical criteria in children with serious or persistent symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection, or which appear within a short time of an apparent recovery. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance images of the paranasal sinuses should be reserved for children reasonably considered to be candidates for surgery. Antibiotics are recommended in cases of mild acute bacterial rhinosinusitis as a means of accelerating the resolution of symptoms. The use of antibiotics is mandatory in severe acute bacterial rhinosinusitis to cure the disease and avoid the possible onset of severe complications.

  15. Acute lung injury review.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Kenji; King, Landon S; Aggarwal, Neil R; De Gorordo, Antonio; D'Alessio, Franco R; Kubo, Keishi

    2009-01-01

    The first report of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was published in 1967, and even now acute lung injury (ALI) and ARDS are severe forms of diffuse lung disease that impose a substantial health burden all over the world. Recent estimates indicate approximately 190,000 cases per year of ALI in the United States each year, with an associated 74,500 deaths per year. Common causes of ALI/ARDS are sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, aspiration pneumonia, pancreatitis, and so on. Several pathologic stages of ALI/ARDS have been described: acute inflammation with neutrophil infiltration, fibroproliferative phase with hyaline membranes, with varying degrees of interstitial fibrosis, and resolution phase. There has been intense investigation into the pathophysiologic events relevant to each stage of ALI/ARDS, and much has been learned in the alveolar epithelial, endobronchial homeostasis, and alveolar cell immune responses, especially neutrophils and alveolar macrophages in an animal model. However, these effective results in the animal models are not equally adoptive to those in randomized, controlled trials. The clinical course of ALI/ARDS is variable with the likely pathophysiologic complexity of human ALI/ARDS. In 1994, the definition was recommended by the American-European Consensus Conference Committee, which facilitated easy nomination of patients with ALI/ARDS for a randomized, clinical trial. Here, we review the recent randomized, clinical trials of ALI/ARDS.

  16. Parent-Child Agreement Regarding Children's Acute Stress: The Role of Parent Acute Stress Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Garcia-Espana, J. Felipe; Miller, Victoria A.; Winston, Flaura

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We examined parent--child agreement regarding child acute stress disorder (ASD) and the relationship between parent ASD symptoms and parent ratings of child ASD. Method: Parent-child dyads (N = 219; child age 8-17 years) were assessed within 1 month of child injury. Parent--child agreement was examined regarding child ASD presence,…

  17. Structural, Electronic, and Computational Studies of Heteroleptic Cu(I) Complexes of 6,6'-Dimesityl-2,2'-bipyridine with Ferrocene-Appended Ethynyl-2,2'-bipyridine Ligands.

    PubMed

    Barnsley, Jonathan E; Scottwell, Synøve Ø; Elliott, Anastasia B S; Gordon, Keith C; Crowley, James D

    2016-08-15

    Optical characterization and computational modeling of three ferrocene-appended ethynyl-2,2'-bipyridine ligands and the associated heteroleptic copper(I) complexes of 6,6'-dimesityl-2,2'-bipyridine are reported. These dyes have been studied using electrochemical analysis, electronic absorption, and Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopies, coupled with density functional theoretical approaches. For the complexes, optical spectra are dominated by a low energy copper(I) centered metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transition; this is modulated by the presence of pendant ferrocene units and the extent of conjugation of the ferrocenyl bipyridine backbone. Electronic tuning due to ferrocene is shown to result in a redshift of the MCLT transition of up to ∼0.2 eV, while an elongation of conjugation appears to result in an increased MLCT intensity of around 50%. PMID:27459334

  18. Acute poisoning: understanding 90% of cases in a nutshell

    PubMed Central

    Greene, S; Dargan, P; Jones, A

    2005-01-01

    The acutely poisoned patient remains a common problem facing doctors working in acute medicine in the United Kingdom and worldwide. This review examines the initial management of the acutely poisoned patient. Aspects of general management are reviewed including immediate interventions, investigations, gastrointestinal decontamination techniques, use of antidotes, methods to increase poison elimination, and psychological assessment. More common and serious poisonings caused by paracetamol, salicylates, opioids, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, benzodiazepines, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and cocaine are discussed in detail. Specific aspects of common paediatric poisonings are reviewed. PMID:15811881

  19. Medical treatment of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Julia; Simon, Peter; Lerch, Markus M

    2004-12-01

    Eighty percent of all cases of acute pancreatitis are linked etiologically to gallstone disease or caused by immoderate alcohol consumption. No specific causal treatment for acute pancreatitis exists. Early prognostic factors that indicate severe disease are three or more signs on organ failure scores according to Ranson, Imrie, or Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) 11, extrapancreatic complications of the disease, or the detection of pancreatic necrosis on CT scans. Elevated CRP levels above 130 mg/L can also predict a severe course of acute pancreatitis. The essential medical treatment for acute pancreatitis is the correction of hypovolemia. Moreover, relief of often severe visceral pain is a high priority. Prophylactic antibiotics should be restricted to patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, infected necrosis, or other infectious complications. Enteral nutrition has no adverse effect compared with parenteral nutrition during the course of acute pancreatitis, and is probably beneficial in regard to outcome.

  20. Serum Metabolomics in Rats after Acute Paraquat Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyi; Ma, Jianshe; Zhang, Meiling; Wen, Congcong; Huang, Xueli; Sun, Fa; Wang, Shuanghu; Hu, Lufeng; Lin, Guanyang; Wang, Xianqin

    2015-01-01

    Paraquat is one of the most widely used herbicides in the world and is highly toxic to humans and animals. In this study, we developed a serum metabolomic method based on GC/MS to evaluate the effects of acute paraquat poisoning on rats. Pattern recognition analysis, including both principal component analysis and partial least squares-discriminate analysis revealed that acute paraquat poisoning induced metabolic perturbations. Compared with the control group, the level of octadecanoic acid, L-serine, L-threonine, L-valine, and glycerol in the acute paraquat poisoning group (36 mg/kg) increased, while the levels of hexadecanoic acid, D-galactose, and decanoic acid decreased. These findings provide an overview of systematic responses to paraquat exposure and metabolomic insight into the toxicological mechanism of paraquat. Our results indicate that metabolomic methods based on GC/MS may be useful to elucidate the mechanism of acute paraquat poisoning through the exploration of biomarkers. PMID:26133715

  1. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. [Computer tomography in acute pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Triller, J; Scheidegger, J; Terrier, F

    1983-07-01

    Computer tomography of the kidneys was performed on 30 patients with acute renal infections (acute suppurative pyelonephritis, acute renal abscess, infected cyst, pyelonephrosis, calculus perforation, retroperitoneal abscess). Computer tomography provided more accurate information concerning the extent of the renal and extra-renal inflammatory process than did the urogram or sonogram. This may significantly affect the choice of treatment, particularly concerning the use of drugs or of surgery. Angiography and retrograde pyelography may be used in selected cases, especially where there is a suspicion of acute bacterial nephritis, renal vein thrombosis or ureteric obstruction.

  3. Signs and symptoms in diagnosing acute myocardial infarction and acute coronary syndrome: a diagnostic meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bruyninckx, Rudi; Aertgeerts, Bert; Bruyninckx, Pieter; Buntinx, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Background Prompt diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction or acute coronary syndrome is very important. Aim A systematic review was conducted to determine the accuracy of 10 important signs and symptoms in selected and non-selected patients. Design of study Diagnostic meta-analysis. Method Using MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, tracing references, and by contacting experts, studies were sought out that described one of the 10 signs and symptoms on one or both conditions. Studies were excluded if they were not based on original data. Validity was assessed using QUADAS and all data were pooled using a random effects model. Results Sixteen of the 28 included studies were about patients who were non-selected. In this group, absence of chest-wall tenderness on palpation had a pooled sensitivity of 92% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 86 to 96) for acute myocardial infarction and 94% (95% CI = 91 to 96) for acute coronary syndrome. Oppressive pain followed with a pooled sensitivity of 60% (95% CI = 55 to 66) for acute myocardial infarction. Sweating had the highest pooled positive likelihood ratio (LR+), namely 2.92 (95% CI = 1.97 to 4.23) for acute myocardial infarction. The other pooled LR+ fluctuated between 1.05 and 1.49. Negative LRs (LR−) varied between 0.98 and 0.23. Absence of chest-wall tenderness on palpation had a LR− of 0.23 (95% CI = 0.18 to 0.29). Conclusions Based on this meta-analysis it was not possible to define an important role for signs and symptoms in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction or acute coronary syndrome. Only chest-wall tenderness on palpation largely ruled out acute myocardial infarction or acute coronary syndrome in low-prevalence settings. PMID:18307844

  4. Analysis of the discontinuous Galerkin method applied to the European option pricing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hozman, J.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we deal with a numerical solution of a one-dimensional Black-Scholes partial differential equation, an important scalar nonstationary linear convection-diffusion-reaction equation describing the pricing of European vanilla options. We present a derivation of the numerical scheme based on the space semidiscretization of the model problem by the discontinuous Galerkin method with nonsymmetric stabilization of diffusion terms and with the interior and boundary penalty. The main attention is paid to the investigation of a priori error estimates for the proposed scheme. The appended numerical experiments illustrate the theoretical results and the potency of the method, consequently.

  5. Acute exacerbation of COPD.

    PubMed

    Ko, Fanny W; Chan, Ka Pang; Hui, David S; Goddard, John R; Shaw, Janet G; Reid, David W; Yang, Ian A

    2016-10-01

    The literature of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is fast expanding. This review focuses on several aspects of acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) including epidemiology, diagnosis and management. COPD poses a major health and economic burden in the Asia-Pacific region, as it does worldwide. Triggering factors of AECOPD include infectious (bacteria and viruses) and environmental (air pollution and meteorological effect) factors. Disruption in the dynamic balance between the 'pathogens' (viral and bacterial) and the normal bacterial communities that constitute the lung microbiome likely contributes to the risk of exacerbations. The diagnostic approach to AECOPD varies based on the clinical setting and severity of the exacerbation. After history and examination, a number of investigations may be useful, including oximetry, sputum culture, chest X-ray and blood tests for inflammatory markers. Arterial blood gases should be considered in severe exacerbations, to characterize respiratory failure. Depending on the severity, the acute management of AECOPD involves use of bronchodilators, steroids, antibiotics, oxygen and noninvasive ventilation. Hospitalization may be required, for severe exacerbations. Nonpharmacological interventions including disease-specific self-management, pulmonary rehabilitation, early medical follow-up, home visits by respiratory health workers, integrated programmes and telehealth-assisted hospital at home have been studied during hospitalization and shortly after discharge in patients who have had a recent AECOPD. Pharmacological approaches to reducing risk of future exacerbations include long-acting bronchodilators, inhaled steroids, mucolytics, vaccinations and long-term macrolides. Further studies are needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of these interventions in preventing COPD exacerbations.

  6. Acute panmyelosis with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Juergen; Kvasnicka, Hans M; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette

    2004-04-01

    Acute panmyelosis with myelofibrosis (APMF) is an ill-defined disorder that may either evolve as a clonal hematopoietic condition or as a sequel of toxic exposure to the bone marrow (BM). Therefore, controversy and discussion continues as to whether APMF may be considered as a hyperfibrotic (de novo) myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or as a severe toxic myelopathy with accompanying myelofibrosis. In this context scant knowledge exists about BM findings, but especially evolution of this disorder according to sequential examinations. Clinically patients present with pancytopenia, a very few blasts in the peripheral blood and no or little splenomegaly. Initially BM histopathology is characterized by different degrees of reticulin-collagen fibrosis and wide ranges of cellularity with a prominent left-shifted and often macrocytic erythropoiesis associated with a reduction and maturation defects of the neutrophil series. Most conspicuous are abnormalities of the megakaryocytes including loose clustering, dislocation towards the endosteal border and appearance of atypical microforms with compact nuclei. Moreover, besides myelofibrosis in a number of patients the interstitial compartment displays a remarkable inflammatory reaction with lymphoid nodules, abundant iron-laden macrophages, perivascular plasmacytosis and increase in microvessels. Repeatedly performed BM biopsies reveal an accumulation of dispersed or clustered CD34+ and lysozyme-expressing blasts in keeping with the insidious transformation into acute leukemia. Prognosis is unfavorable with a median survival of less than 1 year. In conclusion, APMF has to be regarded as a condition that shows considerable overlappings with primary hyperfibrotic MDS, AML and toxic myelopathy (secondary MDS) with accompanying myelofibrosis and therefore can not be considered as a definite clinical entity.

  7. Acute brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Martin, G T

    2016-01-01

    In the 20th century, the complications of head injuries were controlled but not eliminated. The wars of the 21st century turned attention to blast, the instant of impact and the primary injury of concussion. Computer calculations have established that in the first 5 milliseconds after the impact, four independent injuries on the brain are inflicted: 1) impact and its shockwave, 2) deceleration, 3) rotation and 4) skull deformity with vibration (or resonance). The recovery, pathology and symptoms after acute brain trauma have always been something of a puzzle. The variability of these four modes of injury, along with a variable reserve of neurones, explains some of this problem.

  8. [Infant acute leukemia].

    PubMed

    Brethon, Benoît; Cavé, Hélène; Fahd, Mony; Baruchel, André

    2016-03-01

    If acute leukemia is the most frequent cancer in childhood (33%), it remains a very rare diagnosis in infants less than one year old, e.g. less than 5% of cases. At this age, the frequency of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (almost all of B-lineage) is quite similar to the one of myeloblastic forms (AML). Infant leukemia frequently presents with high hyperleucocytosis, major tumoral burden and numerous extra-hematological features, especially in central nervous system and skin. Whatever the lineage, the leukemic cell is often very immature cytologically and immunologically. Rearrangements of the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene, located on band 11q23, are the hallmark of these immature leukemias and confer a particular resistance to conventional approaches, corticosteroids and chemotherapy. The immaturity of infants less than 1-year-old is associated to a decrease of the tolerable dose-intensity of some drugs (anthracyclines, alkylating agents) or asks questions about some procedures like radiotherapy or high dose conditioning regimen, responsible of inacceptable acute and late toxicities. The high level of severe infectious diseases and other high-grade side effects limits also the capacity to cure these infants. The survival of infants less than 1-year-old with AML is only 50% but similar to older children. On the other hand, survival of those with ALL is the same, then quite limited comparing the 80% survival in children over one year. Allogeneic stem cell transplantations are indicated in high-risk subgroups of infant ALL (age below 6 months, high hyperleucocytosis >300.10(9)/L, MLL-rearrangement, initial poor prednisone response). However, morbidity and mortality remain very important and these approaches cannot be extended to all cases. During the neonatal period, the dismal prognosis linked to the high number of primary failures or very early relapses and uncertainties about the late toxicities question physicians about ethics. It is an emergency to

  9. Feedlot Acute Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Woolums, Amelia R

    2015-11-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) of feedlot cattle is a sporadically occurring respiratory condition that is often fatal. Affected cattle have a sudden onset of labored breathing. There is no confirmed effective treatment of feedlot AIP; however, administration of antibiotics effective against common bacterial respiratory pathogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially aspirin, has been recommended. Protective strategies are not well defined, but efforts to limit dust exposure and heat stress; to ensure consistent formulation, mixing, and delivery of feed; and to identify and treat infectious respiratory disease in a timely manner may decrease rates of feedlot AIP.

  10. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Gretchen

    2014-03-01

    One in 4 children will have at least 1 episode of acute otitis media (AOM) by age 10 years. AOM results from infection of fluid that has become trapped in the middle ear. The bacteria that most often cause AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Differentiating AOM from otitis media with effusion (OME) is a critical skill for physicians, as accurate diagnosis will guide appropriate treatment of these conditions. Although fluid is present in the middle ear in both conditions, the fluid is not infected in OME as is seen in AOM patients. PMID:24439877

  11. [Acute necrotizing enteritis].

    PubMed

    Marincaş, M; Bratucu, E; Straja, D; Daha, C; Boru, C

    2003-01-01

    The authors present a retrospective clinical study done on a 13-pacients basis diagnosed during surgery with acute necrotizing enteritis. This study follows the complexity of pathogenic factors and the difficulties one confronts with when establishing a diagnosis since the clinical manifestations are non-specifical and shows the contribution of laboratory data to an earliest possible diagnosis. Both medical and surgical treatment are analyzed depending on the results achieved with an attempt to determine a therapeutic approach as beneficial as possible, aiming at making clear either enterectomy or a conservatory surgical decision should be made. Mortality rate under such therapeutical approach was 38%.

  12. Acute lead arsenate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Tallis, G A

    1989-12-01

    Three cases of acute lead arsenate poisoning which occurred in South Australia during a 12 month interval are described. The case reports demonstrate a number of features of the characteristic clinical syndrome which may follow ingestion of lead arsenate. The recommended management is immediate gastric lavage and subsequent chelation therapy with calcium EDTA and dimercaprol. Early gastric lavage may prevent significant lead absorption. However, arsenic acid (produced in the stomach when lead arsenate reacts with hydrochloric acid) is relatively water soluble and prompt gastric lavage is unlikely to prevent extensive arsenic absorption. It remains controversial as to whether chelation with dimercaprol prevents arsenical neuropathy.

  13. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Gretchen

    2014-03-01

    One in 4 children will have at least 1 episode of acute otitis media (AOM) by age 10 years. AOM results from infection of fluid that has become trapped in the middle ear. The bacteria that most often cause AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Differentiating AOM from otitis media with effusion (OME) is a critical skill for physicians, as accurate diagnosis will guide appropriate treatment of these conditions. Although fluid is present in the middle ear in both conditions, the fluid is not infected in OME as is seen in AOM patients.

  14. Acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Barie, Philip S; Eachempati, Soumitra R

    2010-06-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (ACC) can develop with or without gallstones after surgery and in critically ill or injured patients. Diabetes mellitus, malignant disease, abdominal vasculitis, congestive heart failure, cholesterol embolization, shock, and cardiac arrest also have been associated with AAC. The pathogenesis of AAC is complex and multifactorial. Ultrasound of the gallbladder is most accurate for the diagnosis of AAC in the critically ill patient. CT is probably of comparable accuracy, but carries both advantages and disadvantages. Rapid improvement may be expected when AAC is diagnosed correctly and cholecystostomy is performed timely. PMID:20478490

  15. Acute medial elbow ruptures.

    PubMed

    Norwood, L A; Shook, J A; Andrews, J R

    1981-01-01

    Disruption of the ulnar collateral ligament, flexor muscles, and anterior elbow capsule may result from valgus vector forces and subsequently cause difficulty in throwing, pulling, pushing and catching. Complete medial elbow tears were diagnosed acutely in four elbows by abduction stress tests at 15 degrees of flexion. Three elbows had associated ulnar nerve compression. We repaired torn medial structures by direct suture without ligamentous reconstruction. We also decompressed ulnar nerves and performed one anterior transposition. Full range of motion, strength, and return to previous functional level was attained without infection, neurovascular compression, or myositis ossificans.

  16. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  17. Acute extremity compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tumbarello, C

    2000-01-01

    Acute Extremity Compartment Syndrome is a disorder, which can cause loss of limb if left untreated. Compartment syndrome develops when pressures within the fascial compartments become elevated, resulting in decreased perfusion to muscles and nerves. Left untreated, tissue death occurs. Rapid identification of clinical signs can decrease severity of symptoms. Diligent nursing assessment and monitoring of clinical signs, with communication to the physician, will facilitate rapid treatment by the physician. The primary treatment option is early identification and intervention through performance of a fasciotomy.

  18. Astronomical Methods in Aerial Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beij, K Hilding

    1925-01-01

    The astronomical method of determining position is universally used in marine navigation and may also be of service in aerial navigation. The practical application of the method, however, must be modified and adapted to conform to the requirements of aviation. Much of this work of adaptation has already been accomplished, but being scattered through various technical journals in a number of languages, is not readily available. This report is for the purpose of collecting under one cover such previous work as appears to be of value to the aerial navigator, comparing instruments and methods, indicating the best practice, and suggesting future developments. The various methods of determining position and their application and value are outlined, and a brief resume of the theory of the astronomical method is given. Observation instruments are described in detail. A complete discussion of the reduction of observations follows, including a rapid method of finding position from the altitudes of two stars. Maps and map cases are briefly considered. A bibliography of the subject is appended.

  19. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Edwin C.; Durie, Brian G. M.; Garewal, Harinder S.

    1987-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia frequently associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Data on 11 patients with APL treated at our institution were analyzed and compared with those of 147 published cases. Most had a bleeding diathesis at presentation and evidence of DIC eventually developed in all. Seven patients (64%) showed the t(15;17)(q22;q21) karyotype or a similar translocation. Using a chemotherapy induction regimen containing an anthracycline, complete remission, requiring a total of 14 courses of treatment, was achieved in six patients (55%). The median duration of response and median survival for complete responders were 10 and 15 months, respectively. Three patients (27%) died of bleeding complications during induction therapy. The tritiated-thymidine labeling index of leukemia cells predicted which patients would achieve a complete remission. Review of six studies of 147 patients with APL from the past 12 years supports the use of a chemotherapy induction regimen containing anthracycline or amsacrine and heparin for the treatment of DIC. PMID:3472414

  20. Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

  1. Acute traumatic patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B

    2015-02-01

    Inaugural traumatic patellar dislocation is most often due to trauma sustained during physical or sports activity. Two-thirds of acute patellar dislocations occur in young active patients (less than 20 years old). Non-contact knee sprain in flexion and valgus is the leading mechanism in patellar dislocation, accounting for as many as 93% of all cases. The strong displacement of the patella tears the medial stabilizing structures, and notably the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), which is almost always injured in acute patellar dislocation, most frequently at its femoral attachment. Lateral patellar glide can be assessed with the knee in extension or 20° flexion. Displacement by more than 50% of the patellar width is considered abnormal and may induce apprehension. Plain X-ray and CT are mandatory to diagnose bony risk factors for patellar dislocation, such as trochlear dysplasia or increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG), and plan correction. MRI gives information on cartilage and capsulo-ligamentous status for treatment planning: free bodies or osteochondral fracture have to be treated surgically. If patellar dislocation occurs in an anatomically normal knee and osteochondral fracture is ruled out on MRI, non-operative treatment is usually recommended.

  2. The use of acute phase proteins for monitoring animal health and welfare in the pig production chain: the validation of an immunochromatographic method for the detection of elevated levels of pig-MAP.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro, Matilde; Morales, Joaquín; Vizcaíno, Elena; Murillo, José Alberto; Klauke, Thorsten; Petersen, Brigitte; Piñeiro, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    The serum concentration of acute phase proteins (APPs) increases in the presence of disease or stress, which makes APPs notable parameters for the global assessment of animal health and welfare. A rapid, immunochromatographic test (ICT) for the detection of elevated levels of pig Major Acute-phase Protein (pig-MAP), one of the main APPs in pigs, was evaluated in more than 1400 pig serum samples obtained from commercial farms. The ICT showed a good performance with a relative sensitivity (Sn) and specificity (Sp) of 94 and 97%, respectively, for a threshold of 1.5mg/mL (comparison with ELISA). Differences in the pig-MAP levels and the number of positive samples with the ICT were observed within the season of sampling, farms, and age groups at one farm, according to the presence of disease or lesions. The ICT was also evaluated in blood samples obtained at slaughter in association with the carcase inspection. The results from this study indicate that the ICT may be used for the evaluation of groups of pigs, after analysing one sub-sample of these pigs, and might be a useful tool in routine health and welfare monitoring programmes aimed to improve the quality of pig production.

  3. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... leukemias). The rest of this document focuses on acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults. For information on ALL in ...

  4. Acute diabetic abdomen in childhood.

    PubMed

    Valerio, D

    1976-01-10

    Three children presented as acute surgical emergencies due to undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Where diabetic ketoacidosis mimicks the acute abdomen three clinical features are important in reaching the right diagnosis-namely, a history of polydipsia, polyuria, and anorexia preceding the abdominal pain, the deep sighing and rapid respirations, and severe dehydration.

  5. Acute arsenic poisoning diagnosed late.

    PubMed

    Shumy, Farzana; Anam, Ahmad Mursel; Kamruzzaman, A K M; Amin, Md Robed; Chowdhury, M A Jalil

    2016-04-01

    Acute arsenicosis, although having a 'historical' background, is not common in our times. This report describes a case of acute arsenic poisoning, missed initially due to its gastroenteritis-like presentation, but suspected and confirmed much later, when the patient sought medical help for delayed complications after about 2 months.

  6. Acute arsenic poisoning diagnosed late.

    PubMed

    Shumy, Farzana; Anam, Ahmad Mursel; Kamruzzaman, A K M; Amin, Md Robed; Chowdhury, M A Jalil

    2016-04-01

    Acute arsenicosis, although having a 'historical' background, is not common in our times. This report describes a case of acute arsenic poisoning, missed initially due to its gastroenteritis-like presentation, but suspected and confirmed much later, when the patient sought medical help for delayed complications after about 2 months. PMID:26508422

  7. The Role of Eugenol in the Prevention of Acute Pancreatitis-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Markakis, Charalampos; Tsaroucha, Alexandra; Papalois, Apostolos E.; Lambropoulou, Maria; Spartalis, Eleftherios; Tsigalou, Christina; Romanidis, Konstantinos; Simopoulos, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory intra-abdominal disease, which takes a severe form in 15–20% of patients and can result in high mortality especially when complicated by acute renal failure. The aim of this study is to assess the possible reduction in the extent of acute kidney injury after administration of eugenol in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Materials and Methods. 106 male Wistar rats weighing 220–350 g were divided into 3 groups: (1) Sham, with sham surgery; (2) Control, with induction of acute pancreatitis, through ligation of the biliopancreatic duct; and (3) Eugenol, with induction of acute pancreatitis and eugenol administration at a dose of 15 mg/kg. Serum urea and creatinine, histopathological changes, TNF-α, IL-6, and MPO activity in the kidneys were evaluated at predetermined time intervals. Results. The group that was administered eugenol showed milder histopathological changes than the Control group, TNF-α activity was milder in the Eugenol group, and there was no difference in activity for MPO and IL-6. Serum urea and creatinine levels were lower in the Eugenol group than in the Control group. Conclusions. Eugenol administration was protective for the kidneys in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis in rats. PMID:26884642

  8. Screening for acute HIV infection in South Africa: finding acute and chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Ingrid V.; Chetty, Senica; Giddy, Janet; Reddy, Shabashini; Bishop, Karen; Lu, Zhigang; Losina, Elena; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2010-01-01

    Background The yield of screening for acute HIV infection among general medical patients in resource-scarce settings remains unclear. Our objective was to evaluate a strategy of pooled HIV plasma RNA to diagnose acute HIV infection in patients with negative or discordant rapid HIV antibody tests in Durban, South Africa. Methods We prospectively enrolled patients with negative or discordant rapid HIV antibody tests from a routine HIV screening program in an outpatient department in Durban with an HIV prevalence of 48%. Study participants underwent venipuncture for pooled qualitative HIV RNA, and if positive, quantitative RNA, enzyme immunoassay and Western Blot (WB). Patients with negative or indeterminate WB and positive quantitative HIV RNA were considered acutely infected. Those with chronic infection (positive RNA and WB) despite negative or discordant rapid HIV tests were considered false negative rapid antibody tests. Results Nine hundred ninety-four participants were enrolled with either negative (N=976) or discordant (N=18) rapid test results. Eleven (1.1%, 95% CI: 0.6–2.0%) had acute HIV infection. Of the 994 patients, an additional 20 (2.0%, 95% CI: 1.3–.3.1%) had chronic HIV infection (false negative rapid test). Conclusions One percent of outpatients with negative or discordant rapid HIV tests in Durban, South Africa had acute HIV infection readily detectable through pooled serum HIV RNA screening. Pooled RNA testing also identified an additional 2% of patients with chronic HIV infection. HIV RNA screening has the potential to identify both acute and chronic HIV infections that are otherwise missed by standard HIV testing algorithms. PMID:20553336

  9. Acute pain medicine in anesthesiology

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Anastacia P.; Tighe, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    The American Academy of Pain Medicine and the American Society for Regional Anesthesia have recently focused on the evolving practice of acute pain medicine. There is increasing recognition that the scope and practice of acute pain therapies must extend beyond the subacute pain phase to include pre-pain and pre-intervention risk stratification, resident and fellow education in regional anesthesia and multimodal analgesia, as well as a deeper understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms that are integral to the variability observed among individual responses to nociception. Acute pain medicine is also being established as a vital component of successful systems-level acute pain management programs, inpatient cost containment, and patient satisfaction scores. In this review, we discuss the evolution and practice of acute pain medicine and we aim to facilitate further discussion on the evolution and advancement of this field as a subspecialty of anesthesiology. PMID:24381730

  10. Nuclear renal imaging in acute pyelonephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Handmaker, H.

    1982-07-01

    Patients with acute pyelonephritis may present with a spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms. There are few noninvasive diagnostic studies, however, to confirm or exclude this diagnosis. A small number of patients, generally those with severe disease, will demonstrate radiographic changes on excretory urography, but the lack of sensitivity of the IVP in early, acute pyelonephritis is well documented. Several radionuclide techniques have been proposed to assist in the earlier detection of this clinical problem including imaging with Mercury-197 chlormerodrin, Gallium-67 citrate, Technetium-99m glucoheptonate. Technetium-99m DMSA, and, more recently, Indium-111 labeled white blood cells. The success of the renal cortical imaging agents as well as those which localize in infection are described in this report. There appears to be a complimentary role or the cortical imaging agents and the radiopharmaceuticals which localize in bacterial infection. Cortical agents offer the advantage of specific assessment of functioning renal tissue and a convenient, rapid method for following the response to treatment in a noninvasive manner. A pattern is described which may be diagnostic; correlation with Gallium-67 citrate of Indium-111 WBCs may increase the probability of infection as the cause for the cortical abnormality. The measurement of differential renal function using cortical agents provides additional information to assist the clinician in predicting the late effects of infection. Improved sensitivity and specificity, and a reproducible method for following the response to therapy in patients with acute pyelonephritis are the advantages of the techniques described.

  11. Hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia in adults: analysis of the clinical outcome of 123 patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kali, Aref; Konoplev, Sergej; Lin, Erpei; Kadia, Tapan; Faderl, Stefan; Ravandi, Farhad; Ayoubi, Mohamad; Brandt, Mark; Cortes, Jorge E.; Kantarjian, Hagop; Borthakur, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypocellular variant of acute myeloid leukemia accounts for less than 10% of all cases of adult acute myeloid leukemia. It is defined by having less than 20 percent of cellular bone marrow in a biopsy at presentation. It is unclear in the literature whether the outcome of hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia differs from that of non-hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia. Design and Methods We retrospectively analyzed all the cases reported to be hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia between 2000 and 2009. A second pathology review was conducted and the diagnosis was confirmed in all cases. Results One hundred twenty-three (9%) patients were identified: patients with hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia were older than those with non-hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia (P=0.009) and more frequently presented with cytopenias (P<0.001). Forty-one patients with hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia had an antecedent hematologic disorder and 11 patients had received prior chemo-radiotherapy for non-hematopoietic neoplasms. On multivariate analysis, overall survival, remission duration and event-free survival were comparable to those of other patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Conclusions The outcome of hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia does not differ from that of non-hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:22058194

  12. Acute Paraplegia due to Thoracic Hematomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Bahattin; Canbek, Ihsan; Karavelioğlu, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intraspinal intramedullary hemorrhage is a rare entity with the acute onset of neurologic symptoms. The etiology of idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia (ISH) is unknown, and there are few published case reports. Hematomyelia is mostly associated with trauma, but the other nontraumatic etiologies are vascular malformations, tumors, bleeding disorders, syphilis, syrinx, and myelitis. MRI is a good choice for early diagnosis. Hematomyelia usually causes acute spinal cord syndrome due to the compression and destruction of the spinal cord. A high-dose steroid treatment and surgical decompression and evacuation of hematoma are the urgent solution methods. We present idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia of a previously healthy 80-year-old male with a sudden onset of back pain and paraplegia. PMID:27478663

  13. Acute Paraplegia due to Thoracic Hematomyelia.

    PubMed

    Akpınar, Aykut; Celik, Bahattin; Canbek, Ihsan; Karavelioğlu, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intraspinal intramedullary hemorrhage is a rare entity with the acute onset of neurologic symptoms. The etiology of idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia (ISH) is unknown, and there are few published case reports. Hematomyelia is mostly associated with trauma, but the other nontraumatic etiologies are vascular malformations, tumors, bleeding disorders, syphilis, syrinx, and myelitis. MRI is a good choice for early diagnosis. Hematomyelia usually causes acute spinal cord syndrome due to the compression and destruction of the spinal cord. A high-dose steroid treatment and surgical decompression and evacuation of hematoma are the urgent solution methods. We present idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia of a previously healthy 80-year-old male with a sudden onset of back pain and paraplegia. PMID:27478663

  14. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Imaging-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Kentrup, Dominik; Pawelski, Helga; Reuter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best available treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Despite the introduction of effective immunosuppressant drugs, episodes of acute allograft rejection still endanger graft survival. Since efficient treatment of acute rejection is available, rapid diagnosis of this reversible graft injury is essential. For diagnosis of rejection, invasive core needle biopsy of the graft is the “gold-standard”. However, biopsy carries the risk of significant graft injury and is not immediately feasible in patients taking anticoagulants. Therefore, a non-invasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review current imaging-based state of the art approaches for non-invasive diagnostics of acute renal transplant rejection. We especially focus on new positron emission tomography-based as well as targeted ultrasound-based methods. PMID:27011915

  16. SURGICAL EMBOLECTOMY FOR FOVEA-THREATENING ACUTE RETINAL ARTERY OCCLUSION

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, David R.P.; Mammo, Zaid; Chin, Eric K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a technique of surgical intraocular embolectomy in patients with acute fovea-threatening branch retinal artery occlusion. Methods: Pars plana vitrectomy with embolectomy involving embolus isolation, dissection, and removal in patients with an acute fovea-threatening arterial occlusion without a patent cilioretinal artery. Results: The surgical technique involves a core vitrectomy. The blocked artery is incised using a microvitreoretinal blade, and microsurgical forceps are used to retrieve the embolus. No significant complications were noted. The study technique offers an excellent safety profile and minimizes the risk of vitreous hemorrhage by carefully dissecting the vascular adventitial sheath and isolating the embolus. Conclusion: Surgical embolectomy is a viable technique for patients with acute fovea-threatening arterial occlusions without patent cilioretinal artery. Careful dissection and retrieval of the embolus minimizes the risk of vitreous hemorrhage, which is an important improvement in previous techniques for management of acute retinal arterial occlusions. PMID:26674278

  17. Prevalence of Acute Symptoms among Workers in Printing Factories

    PubMed Central

    Decharat, Somsiri

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To identify socioeconomic situation factors and behavioral factors associated with the prevalence of acute symptoms among 150 printing workers in 16 printing factories in Southern Thailand. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted by interviewing 150 printing workers in 16 printing factories in Southern Thailand. Results. Acute symptoms comprised dizziness, drowsiness, eye irritation, light-headedness, rhinitis, shortness of breath, cough, chest tightness, nausea/vomiting, exacerbation of asthma, allergic skin reaction, and visual disorder. The prevalence of symptoms was consistently higher among workers in the printing process than among other workers. Smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol were not associated with an increased prevalence of acute symptoms among these printing-factory workers. Conclusion. The significant associations were found between personal protective equipment and personal hygiene and prevalence of acute symptoms in printing workers. PMID:25386365

  18. Anxiety and depression on an acute respiratory ward

    PubMed Central

    Thew, Graham R; MacCallam, Jackie; Salkovskis, Paul M; Suntharalingam, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Psychological difficulties are a common complication among patients with respiratory disease, and are associated with poorer health outcomes and increased use of healthcare. As prevalence studies typically sample patients from community settings, this study aimed to explore the extent and nature of psychological difficulties during acute hospital admission. Methods: A case example of an acute respiratory ward is presented. In total, 41 acute respiratory inpatients completed standardised measures of depression, anxiety, and health anxiety. Results: Rates of clinically significant depression, anxiety, and health anxiety were 71%, 40%, and 21%, respectively, with 76% of participants showing clinically significant scores on at least one measure. Comparison to existing literature suggests depression rates may be elevated in the acute inpatient context. The difficulties experienced encompassed both contextual factors related to being in hospital and broader health concerns. Conclusion: We suggest that psychological distress may be particularly prevalent in inpatient settings and that larger-scale studies are warranted. PMID:27508081

  19. Severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis associated with lipoprotein lipase deficiency in childhood.

    PubMed

    van Walraven, L A; de Klerk, J B C; Postema, R R

    2003-09-01

    An 11-year-old girl with lipoprotein lipase deficiency experienced recurring episodes of abdominal pain. She initially underwent appendectomy for suspected appendicitis; however, the appendix was normal. Pancreatitis was subsequently identified as the cause of her pain.

  20. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115