Science.gov

Sample records for acute asthma attacks

  1. Are doctors still failing to assess and treat asthma attacks? An audit of the management of acute attacks in a health district.

    PubMed

    Pinnock, H; Johnson, A; Young, P; Martin, N

    1999-06-01

    This audit aimed to observe the management of acute asthma by primary and secondary care within a Health District. Asthma attacks occurring during the first 6 weeks of 1996 to patients between the ages of 3 and 74 years in Canterbury and Thanet District were notified by general practitioners, out-of-hours co-operatives and hospitals. Data were obtained retrospectively from the patient records. A total of 378 episodes was registered: 342 (90%) to primary care. Of these 234 (76% of patients aged 6 years or over) had a peak flow recorded; 114 (30%) were given emergency bronchodilation: oxygen was not used in primary care; 204 (54%) were given systemic steroids; and 43 (11%) were referred for hospital care of whom 36 were admitted. Of the attacks, 212 (69% of the patients aged 6 years or over) could be classified by percentage predicted peak flow and management compared to the Guidelines published by the British Thoracic Society. Twenty-eight patients presented with 'life-threatening' asthma: 20 (71%) were given emergency bronchodilation; oxygen was used in only two; 24 (86%) were given systemic steroids; and six (21%) were referred for admission. In their confidential enquiry into the asthma deaths the British Thoracic Society identified a failure to appreciate the severity of the attack, resulting in inadequate emergency treatment and delay in referring to hospital. These data suggest that, 15 years later, these problems may still exist.

  2. Acute asthma during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Stenius-Aarniala, B. S.; Hedman, J.; Teramo, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute asthma during pregnancy is potentially dangerous to the fetus. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an acute attack of asthma during pregnancy on the course of pregnancy or delivery, or the health of the newborn infant, and to identify undertreatment as a possible cause of the exacerbations. METHODS: Five hundred and four pregnant asthmatic subjects were prospectively followed and treated. The data on 47 patients with an attack of asthma during pregnancy were compared with those of 457 asthmatics with no recorded acute exacerbation and with 237 healthy parturients. RESULTS: Of 504 asthmatics, 177 patients were not initially treated with inhaled corticosteroids. Of these, 17% had an acute attack compared with only 4% of the 257 patients who had been on inhaled anti-inflammatory treatment from the start of pregnancy. There were no differences between the groups as to length of gestation, length of the third stage of labour, or amount of haemorrhage after delivery. No differences were observed between pregnancies with and without an exacerbation with regard to relative birth weight, incidence of malformations, hypoglycaemia, or need for phototherapy for jaundice during the neonatal period. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with inadequate inhaled anti-inflammatory treatment during pregnancy run a higher risk of suffering an acute attack of asthma than those treated with an anti-inflammatory agent. However, if the acute attack of asthma is relatively mild and promptly treated, it does not have a serious effect on the pregnancy, delivery, or the health of the newborn infant. PMID:8733495

  3. Asthma in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 10% of adults have suffered an attack of asthma, and up to 5% of these have severe disease that responds poorly to treatment. Patients with severe disease have an increased risk of death, but patients with mild to moderate disease are also at risk of exacerbations. Most guidelines about the management of asthma follow stepwise protocols. This review does not endorse or follow any particular protocol, but presents the evidence about specific interventions. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for acute asthma? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 100 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: beta2 agonists (plus ipratropium bromide, pressured metered-dose inhalers, short-acting continuous nebulised, short-acting intermittent nebulised, short-acting iv, and inhaled formoterol); corticosteroids (inhaled); corticosteroids (single oral, combined inhaled, and short courses); education about acute asthma; generalist care; helium–oxygen mixture (heliox); magnesium sulphate (iv and adding isotonic nebulised magnesium to inhaled beta2 agonists); mechanical ventilation; oxygen supplementation (controlled 28% oxygen and controlled 100% oxygen); and specialist care. PMID:21463536

  4. Acute bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sudhanshu; Jindal, Atul; Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit C

    2011-11-01

    Acute asthma is the third commonest cause of pediatric emergency visits at PGIMER. Typically, it presents with acute onset respiratory distress and wheeze in a patient with past or family history of similar episodes. The severity of the acute episode of asthma is judged clinically and categorized as mild, moderate and severe. The initial therapy consists of oxygen, inhaled beta-2 agonists (salbutamol or terbutaline), inhaled budesonide (three doses over 1 h, at 20 min interval) in all and ipratropium bromide and systemic steroids (hydrocortisone or methylprednisolone) in acute severe asthma. Other causes of acute onset wheeze and breathing difficulty such as pneumonia, foreign body, cardiac failure etc. should be ruled out with help of chest radiography and appropriate laboratory investigations in first time wheezers and those not responding to 1 h of inhaled therapy. In case of inadequate response or worsening, intravenous infusion of magnesium sulphate, terbutaline or aminophylline may be used. Magnesium sulphate is the safest and most effective alternative among these. Severe cases may need ICU care and rarely, ventilatory support. PMID:21769523

  5. Paraplegia due to Spinal Epidermoid Cyst Rupture at Asthma Attack

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kweon Young; Kang, Jung Hun; Choi, Dae Woo; Lee, Min Hong

    2013-01-01

    Spinal epidermoid cyst is less than 1% of the entire spinal cord tumor and a rare tumor. It is a slowly proliferating benign tumor and can be a result of either congenital or acquired factors. In particular, reports of acute paraplegia due to spinal epidermoid cyst rupture are very rare. Since authors experienced paraplegia resulting from congenital spinal epidermoid cyst rupture during an asthma attack, it is reported with a review of literature. PMID:23705125

  6. Intravenous magnesium for acute asthma?

    PubMed

    2003-10-01

    Each year in the UK, around 1,500 people die from asthma. Standard treatment has been based on bronchodilators (e.g. beta 2-stimulants) and anti-inflammatory drugs (corticosteroids). The recently revised British Guideline on the Management of Asthma suggests also using a single dose of i.v. magnesium sulphate in patients with acute severe asthma, an unlicensed indication. Here we discuss the rationale for giving i.v. magnesium and whether it offers any advantage for patients with acute severe asthma.

  7. The management of acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Cross, S

    1997-04-01

    Health professionals likely to come into contact with people experiencing an acute episode of asthma, such as school nurses, ambulance personnel and A&E staff, need clear guidelines on management. The British Thoracic Society guidelines, revised this year, advise on the categorisation of asthma, assessment and treatment.

  8. Relation of the Timing of Onset of Rhinitis and Cough to Asthma Attack in Children.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, Tetsu; Ozaki, Yukiko; Tananari, Yoshifumi; Yamakawa, Rumi; Hirata, Rumiko

    2016-01-01

    If the risk of progression to asthma could be predicted in patients with rhinitis, prevention of asthma might become possible. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between the duration of rhinitis symptoms and acute asthma attacks in children with a history of asthma who were not on treatment for asthma. In 94 children with a history of asthma who were asymptomatic after completing asthma treatment, we investigated the onset and duration of nasal discharge and cough related to allergic rhinitis. Then the children were followed up for 2 weeks and were classified into either an asthma attack group (Group A) or non-asthma group(Group B). A total of 78 subjects were evaluated after 16 were excluded. The duration of nasal discharge was significantly shorter in Group A than in Group B (5.5±1.9 days vs. 10.4±3.1 days, P<0.0001). The interval between the onset of cough and nasal discharge was -1.0±3.1 days in Group A and -5.7±4.1 days in Group B (P<0.0001). The risk of progression to asthma attack may be higher when the onset of cough precedes nasal discharge or when nasal discharge has a short duration and cough shows an early onset. These results may provide assistance when selecting patients for early anti-allergy therapy from among those presenting with upper respiratory tract symptoms. PMID:27237939

  9. Taking vitamin D could halve the risk of asthma attacks.

    PubMed

    2016-09-21

    Cochrane library research has found that giving a daily oral vitamin D supplement to people with mild to moderate asthma reduced the risk of severe attacks requiring hospital admission or emergency department attendance from 6% to about 3%. PMID:27654533

  10. Alexithymia and posttraumatic stress disorder following asthma attack.

    PubMed

    Chung, Man Cheung; Wall, Natalie

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the levels of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following asthma attack (post-asthma attack PTSD) and psychiatric co-morbidity among college students. It also investigated the association between these variables and alexithymia. One hundred and six college students participated in the study and completed an on-line survey comprising the Asthma Symptom Checklist, PTSD Checklist, General Health Questionnaire-28 and Toronto Alexithymia Scale. Ninety-one students without asthma and major illness formed the control group. 2 % met the diagnostic criteria for full-PTSD, while 42 and 56 % met the partial and no-PTSD criteria respectively. Compared with the control, the asthma group reported significantly more somatic problems, social dysfunction and depression and was five times more likely to have an elevated risk of developing a general psychiatric disorder. After adjusting age, marital status, asthma experience and symptoms, alexithymia did not predict PTSD, while difficulty identifying feelings predicted psychiatric co-morbidity. Mediational analyses showed that asthma symptoms partially mediated the link between difficulty identifying feelings and psychiatric co-morbidity. People can develop PTSD symptoms and other psychological difficulties following asthma attack. Alexithymia influenced general psychological difficulties independently of PTSD symptoms.

  11. Severe angina pectoris in asthma attack: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nabavizadeh, Seyed Hesamedin; Farahbakhsh, Nazanin; Fazel, Ali; Mosavat, Fereshteh; Anushiravani, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways related to the obstruction of reversible airflow. Asthma presents as recurrent attacks of cough and dyspnea. Poor control causes recurrent admissions to the ICU, and mortality is related to poor drug compliance and follow-up. Angina pectoris is a syndrome of recurrent chest discomfort related to myocardial ischemia. The presence of these two disorders rarely has been reported. We reported a 12-year-old boy who was referred with exacerbation of asthma and developed angina pectoris during hospitalization. He had labored breathing and diffuse wheezing. During treatment of the asthma, the patient developed severe chest pain due to shunt formation and coronary hypoxia, caused by the sole administration of ventolin, since oxygen had been disconnected. After receiving appropriate therapy, both his asthma and angina recovered, and, to date, he has not experienced angina pectoris again. PMID:27504177

  12. Severe angina pectoris in asthma attack: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Seyed Hesamedin; Farahbakhsh, Nazanin; Fazel, Ali; Mosavat, Fereshteh; Anushiravani, Amir

    2016-06-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways related to the obstruction of reversible airflow. Asthma presents as recurrent attacks of cough and dyspnea. Poor control causes recurrent admissions to the ICU, and mortality is related to poor drug compliance and follow-up. Angina pectoris is a syndrome of recurrent chest discomfort related to myocardial ischemia. The presence of these two disorders rarely has been reported. We reported a 12-year-old boy who was referred with exacerbation of asthma and developed angina pectoris during hospitalization. He had labored breathing and diffuse wheezing. During treatment of the asthma, the patient developed severe chest pain due to shunt formation and coronary hypoxia, caused by the sole administration of ventolin, since oxygen had been disconnected. After receiving appropriate therapy, both his asthma and angina recovered, and, to date, he has not experienced angina pectoris again. PMID:27504177

  13. Severe angina pectoris in asthma attack: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Seyed Hesamedin; Farahbakhsh, Nazanin; Fazel, Ali; Mosavat, Fereshteh; Anushiravani, Amir

    2016-06-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways related to the obstruction of reversible airflow. Asthma presents as recurrent attacks of cough and dyspnea. Poor control causes recurrent admissions to the ICU, and mortality is related to poor drug compliance and follow-up. Angina pectoris is a syndrome of recurrent chest discomfort related to myocardial ischemia. The presence of these two disorders rarely has been reported. We reported a 12-year-old boy who was referred with exacerbation of asthma and developed angina pectoris during hospitalization. He had labored breathing and diffuse wheezing. During treatment of the asthma, the patient developed severe chest pain due to shunt formation and coronary hypoxia, caused by the sole administration of ventolin, since oxygen had been disconnected. After receiving appropriate therapy, both his asthma and angina recovered, and, to date, he has not experienced angina pectoris again.

  14. National asthma attack audit 1991-2. General Practitioners in Asthma Group.

    PubMed Central

    Neville, R G; Clark, R C; Hoskins, G; Smith, B

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To describe the frequency and characteristics of asthma attacks in the United Kingdom and to compare actual management with recommended guidelines for the management of attacks. DESIGN--Correspondence survey. SETTING--218 general practices in the United Kingdom. SUBJECTS--1775 patients of all ages who had a total of 1805 asthma attacks over three months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patient characteristics, place of management of attacks, comparison of actual management with recommended guidelines. RESULTS--Of the 1805 attacks, 300 occurred in boys aged 0-9, 144 in girls aged 0-9, and 118 in women aged 20-29. The estimated frequency of attacks in the community was 14.3 per 1000 patients per year. 1546 (86%) patients with attacks were managed within general practice, 225 (12%) were admitted to hospital, and 34 (2%) were discharged from an accident and emergency department. Two patients died. On initial presentation, 248 (14%) patients were "not breathless," 900 (50%) were "moderately breathless," 535 (30%) were "breathless and distressed," 68 (4%) were "too breathless to talk," and 2 were "moribund." Recording of clinical data was variable. Underuse of nebulised bronchodilators and systemic steroid was apparent in all grades of clinical severity. Contrary to current guidelines for asthma management, "step up" in maintenance therapy after an attack was often not practised. CONCLUSION--Reported management was at variance with recommended guidelines. This has major implications for the design and distribution of future guidelines. PMID:8461773

  15. Acute severe asthma. A prospective study of the precipitating factors in 40 children.

    PubMed

    Potter, P C; Weinberg, E; Shore, S C

    1984-09-15

    A prospective study was undertaken to determine the factors precipitating acute severe asthma in children attending the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town. A comparison in terms of recent exposure to possible precipitating factors was made between 40 known asthmatics presenting with acute severe asthma and 40 known asthmatics who were clinically well. Exposure to known allergens had occurred in 7 cases. The time of onset of symptoms bore no relationship to meteorological changes in temperature, humidity or average pressure. Drug compliance in both groups was of the order of 50%. The majority of severe asthma attacks were associated with infection of the respiratory tract. The importance of infection as a precipitating factor in a severe asthma attack is discussed with reference to the cholinergic, adrenergic and immunological mechanisms.

  16. Attack context: an important mediator of the relationship between psychological status and asthma outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, C; Eiser, C; Seamark, D; Halpin, D

    2002-01-01

    Background: The importance of psychosocial variables in asthma is increasingly recognised, although attempts to relate these to asthma outcomes often produce only weak relationships. This study aimed to identify whether such relationships might be obscured by the effects of recent asthma experience on psychological status. Methods: An adult community sample of 37 patients who had suffered a recent attack of asthma and 37 with stable asthma were given measures of panic fear and control confidence. The relationship with subsequent emergency service use was examined using two way ANOVA and correlational analyses. Covariate influences (psychiatric morbidity, age, sex, treatment level, asthma duration, social status) were considered. Results: Control confidence predicted emergency service use in different ways for recent attack and stable asthma patients. This interaction was highly significant (F(1,69) = 10.32, p<0.005) with high confidence relating to an increased risk of an attack in the recent attack group and low confidence relating to increased risk for the stable asthma group. There was also an interaction between panic fear and attack context (F(1,69) = 11.05, p<0.005) with low panic fear resulting in more attacks for recent attack cases. Conclusions: Attack context (having a recent attack) is an important mediator of psychological status. Strong cognitive/affective responses to attacks may motivate improved self-care and this represents a window of opportunity for self-care interventions. Weak cognitive/affective responses to attacks may reflect denial and require different intervention approaches. For those with recently stable asthma the relationships are qualitatively and quantitatively different, and the implications for intervention are also discussed. PMID:11867824

  17. Children's perception of breathlessness in acute asthma

    PubMed Central

    Male, I; Richter, H; Seddon, P

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To determine whether asthmatic children who present to hospital with hypoxia perceive breathlessness less well than non-hypoxic presenters.
METHODS—A total of 27 children aged 5-16 years (mean age 10) admitted with acute asthma had recordings of oxygen saturation (SaO2), clinical score, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and breathlessness score (HMP) at admission and at 5, 10, 24,48, and 72 hours after admission. Those defined as hypoxic (SaO2 <92%) at admission were compared with a non-hypoxic group.
RESULTS—Twelve children were hypoxic at admission. Compared with the non-hypoxic group they were younger (8.6 (SD 2.8) v 11.2 (2.8) y, p = 0.02), and had greater airway obstruction (FEV1 32.5 (10)% v 54.3 (26)%, p = 0.0073, 95% confidence interval (CI) −36.9 to −6.6) yet had a trend towards less breathlessness (median HMP 4 v 3, p = 0.062, CI −0.001 to 2.00) at admission. The hypoxic group had a smaller change in breathlessness from admission to discharge, despite a similar improvement in FEV1, reflected in a lower ratio of change in HMP to change in FEV1 (ΔHMP/ΔFEV1) (median ΔHMP/ΔFEV1 0.021%−1v 0.073%−1, p = 0.0081, CI −0.075 to −0.016). Linear regression analysis showed a strong relation between ΔHMP/ΔFEV1 and initial SaO2 (p = 0.004, r = 0.54).
CONCLUSIONS—Asthmatic children who present to hospital hypoxic tend to perceive themselves as less breathless than non-hypoxic children. This may predispose to a future life threatening attack.

 PMID:10999869

  18. Chapter 14: Acute severe asthma (status asthmaticus).

    PubMed

    Shah, Rachna; Saltoun, Carol A

    2012-01-01

    Acute severe asthma, formerly known as status asthmaticus, is defined as severe asthma unresponsive to repeated courses of beta-agonist therapy such as inhaled albuterol, levalbuterol, or subcutaneous epinephrine. It is a medical emergency that requires immediate recognition and treatment. Oral or parenteral corticosteroids should be administered to all patients with acute severe asthma as early as possible because clinical benefits may not occur for a minimum of 6-12 hours. Approximately 50% of episodes are attributable to upper respiratory infections, and other causes include medical nonadherence, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory exposure in aspirin-allergic patients, allergen exposure (especially pets) in severely atopic individuals, irritant inhalation (smoke, paint, etc.), exercise, and insufficient use of inhaled or oral corticosteroids. The patient history should be focused on acute severe asthma including current use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids, number of hospitalizations, emergency room visits, intensive-care unit admissions and intubations, the frequency of albuterol use, the presence of nighttime symptoms, exercise intolerance, current medications or illicit drug use, exposure to allergens, and other significant medical conditions. Severe airflow obstruction may be predicted by accessory muscle use, pulsus paradoxus, refusal to recline below 30°, a pulse >120 beats/min, and decreased breath sounds. Physicians' subjective assessments of airway obstruction are often inaccurate. More objective measures of airway obstruction via peak flow (or forced expiratory volume in 1 second) and pulse oximetry before oxygen administration usually are helpful. Pulse oximetry values >90% are less commonly associated with problems although CO(2) retention and a low Pao(2) may be missed. PMID:22794687

  19. Medical emergencies: pulmonary embolism and acute severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, K; Ball, J

    2013-01-01

    In this, the second of two articles covering specific medical emergencies, we discuss the definitions, epidemiology, pathophysiology, acute and chronic management of pulmonary embolus and acute severe asthma. PMID:23210560

  20. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy in acute severe asthma. A randomized, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Engel, T; Dirksen, A; Frølund, L; Heinig, J H; Svendsen, U G; Pedersen, B K; Weeke, B

    1990-04-01

    Methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT) has been shown to possess a long-lasting effect in other immune-inflammatory diseases without the well-known side effects caused by long-term treatment with glucocorticosteroids. In an attempt to reduce the long-term use of oral steroids in asthmatics, we conducted this double-blind, double-dummy study to compare the use of MPPT (1 g of methylprednisolone intravenously) (8 patients) with a short course of oral prednisolone (10 patients) in asthmatics presenting with acute severe asthma. Both treatments were effective in relieving the acute attack of asthma. The MPPT-treated patients did not show a faster resolution than did the orally treated group. No patients needed assisted ventilation, and no deaths occurred. One week after the treatment FEV1 tended to decrease in the methylprednisolone group compared with the oral prednisolone group (P = 0.06). The patients initially receiving MPPT needed supplementary prednisolone earlier and in higher doses than did the patients receiving oral prednisolone as initial treatment. At the end of the 12 weeks' study period, the groups reached identical FEV1. In conclusion, we did not find intravenous methylprednisolone superior to oral prednisolone in the treatment of acute attacks of severe asthma, but methylprednisolone pulse therapy had a shorter duration as regards protection against future asthma attacks. PMID:2183645

  1. Acute asthma in emergency room.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Krishan

    2003-03-01

    Acute asthmatic exacerbation is one of the commonest emergencies seen in the pediatric age group. Viral infections are the most important triggers which set up the inflammatory reaction in the bronchial mucosa. GINA 2002 guidelines for assessing the severity and management are very useful for day to day practice. There is evidence to support the view that metered dose inhaler alongwith spaceor with or without mask is as effective as the standard doses of beta-2 agonists given by nebulizer. Ipratrpium bromide adds to the benefits of short acting beta-2 agonists. Systemic steroids should be started early. Early introduction of l/v beta-2 agonists and trial of l/v magnesium sulfate in non-responders have been recently recommended. Intravenous aminophylline can be tried in addition to full dose beta-2 agonists in those who reach the PICU. A close watch on the patient by monitoring clinical parameters, pulse oximeter, arterial blood gases and peak flow rate help in deciding whether there is need to further step up the therapy. Non-conventional measures like ketamine should be tried only under constant monitoring.

  2. Association of PTSD symptoms with asthma attacks among hurricane Katrina survivors.

    PubMed

    Arcaya, Mariana C; Lowe, Sarah R; Rhodes, Jean E; Waters, Mary C; Subramanian, S V

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and asthma in the wake of natural disasters is poorly understood. Using pre- and postdisaster data (N = 405) from the Resilience in Survivors of Katrina (RISK) project, we examined associations between PTSD symptoms, measured by the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), and self-reported postdisaster asthma attacks. A 1-point increase in the IES-R avoidance score, which corresponded to one standard deviation change in this sample, was associated with double the odds of reporting an asthma attack or episode since the hurricane, 95% CI Revise spacing among characters: [1.22, 4.16]. Association with hyperarousal and intrusion symptoms was null. Further research using objective measures of asthma morbidity is needed; nevertheless, these findings may help inform postdisaster health services delivery and predisaster mitigation planning.

  3. Association of PTSD symptoms with asthma attacks among hurricane Katrina survivors.

    PubMed

    Arcaya, Mariana C; Lowe, Sarah R; Rhodes, Jean E; Waters, Mary C; Subramanian, S V

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and asthma in the wake of natural disasters is poorly understood. Using pre- and postdisaster data (N = 405) from the Resilience in Survivors of Katrina (RISK) project, we examined associations between PTSD symptoms, measured by the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), and self-reported postdisaster asthma attacks. A 1-point increase in the IES-R avoidance score, which corresponded to one standard deviation change in this sample, was associated with double the odds of reporting an asthma attack or episode since the hurricane, 95% CI Revise spacing among characters: [1.22, 4.16]. Association with hyperarousal and intrusion symptoms was null. Further research using objective measures of asthma morbidity is needed; nevertheless, these findings may help inform postdisaster health services delivery and predisaster mitigation planning. PMID:25470787

  4. The influence of sensitisation to pollens and moulds on seasonal variations in asthma attacks

    PubMed Central

    Canova, Cristina; Heinrich, Joachim; Anto, Josep Maria; Leynaert, Benedicte; Smith, Matthew; Kuenzli, Nino; Zock, Jan-Paul; Janson, Christer; Cerveri, Isa; de Marco, Roberto; Toren, Kjell; Gislason, Thorarinn; Nowak, Dennis; Pin, Isabelle; Wjst, Matthias; Manfreda, Jure; Svanes, Cecilie; Crane, Julian; Abramson, Michael; Burr, Michael; Burney, Peter; Jarvis, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    No large study has described the seasonal variation in asthma attacks in population-based asthmatics in whom sensitisation to allergen has been measured. 2637 young adults with asthma living in 15 countries reported the months in which they usually had attacks of asthma and had skin-prick tests performed. Differences in seasonal patterns by sensitisation status were assessed using generalised estimating equations. Most young adults with asthma reported periods of the year when their asthma attacks were more common (range: 47% in Sweden to 86% in Spain). Seasonal variation in asthma was not modified by sensitisation to house dust mite or cat allergens. Asthmatics sensitised to grass, birch and Alternaria allergens had different seasonal patterns to those not sensitised to each allergen, with some geographical variation. In southern Europe, those sensitised to grass allergens were more likely to report attacks occurred in spring or summer than in winter (OR March/April 2.60, 95% CI 1.70–3.97; OR May/June 4.43, 95% CI 2.34–8.39) and smaller later peaks were observed in northern Europe (OR May/June 1.25, 95% CI 0.60–2.64; OR July/August 1.66, 95% CI 0.89–3.10). Asthmatics reporting hay fever but who were not sensitised to grass showed no seasonal variations. Seasonal variations in asthma attacks in young adults are common and are different depending on sensitisation to outdoor, but not indoor, allergens. PMID:23471350

  5. [The weather chart pattern inducing asthma attack: the advocacy of "fine mist" as a provocative factor].

    PubMed

    Kanaya, K

    2001-05-01

    Outbreaks of asthma attack on 345 patients were studied in relation to the atmospheric phenomena. About 76% of days in which multiple attacks took place were fit with either of the following atmospheric conditions, 1) the trough of atmospheric pressure, 2) the approach of Typhoon, 3) the cold advection, in Japan. The common feature of these different atmospheric conditions are the tendency to turn excess vapor into fine water particles (fine mist). The fine mist could stimulate irritable airway to asthma attacks ("fine mist" hypothesis). To verity this hypothesis each asthmatic attack was further studied. It fitted in 70.7% of the attacks (fitting group) and not in 29.3% of the attacks (non-fitting group). Frequency of asthmatic attacks varied in every month on fitting group, but was nearly constant on non-fitting group. The average of the daily change of vapor density was calculated monthly. And it appeared that its graphic pattern was similar to the graphic pattern of asthmatic attack frequency. Thus it is supposed that there are at least two factors that could induce asthmatic attacks, one would be fine mist, others are unknown.

  6. [Investigation of the presence of human metapneumovirus in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma and its relationship with the attacks].

    PubMed

    Ilvan, Ahmet; Aslan, Gönül; Serin, Mehmet Sami; Calıkoğlu, Mukadder; Yılmaz, Fatma Mehtap; Tezcan, Seda; Taş, Dilaver; Ayrık, Cüneyt; Uygungül, Evren; Sezer, Ogün; Emekdaş, Gürol

    2013-10-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV), an enveloped RNA virus classified in Paramyxoviridae family, was first characterized in 2001 from children with acute respiratory tract infection. Recent studies have suggested hMPV to play a role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma attacks. The aims of this study were to investigate the frequency of hMPV in patients with COPD and asthma, its effects on the severity of the attacks and the relationship between demographical and clinical factors. A total of 123 patients, including 66 with COPD (45 were in attack and 21 were stable) and 57 with asthma (33 were in attack and 24 were under control) diagnosed according to the criteria of Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease and the Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention, respectively, were included in the study. Nasopharyngeal lavage samples collected from all of the patients have been evaluated for the presence of hMPV-RNA by using a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) targeting F gene region of the virus. hMPV-RNA positivity rates in patients with COPD and asthma were observed as 30.3% (20/66) and 31.6% (18/57), respectively, and the difference between the groups were not statistically significant (p= 1.00). When patients were compared according to their disease status, hMPV was detected in 31.1% (14/45) of patients with COPD attack and 28.6% of stable patients (p> 0.05). These rates were found as 36.4% (12/33) and 25% (6/24) in patients with asthma attack and controlled asthma, respectively (p> 0.05). Although the virus detection rates in patients with COPD and asthma attacks (26/78; 33.3%) were higher than the patients with stable/controlled disease (12/45; 26.7%), the difference was not found as statistically significant (p= 0.57). The detection rate of hMPV-RNA was 26.1% in patients who can be treated at home and hospital without any need of intensive care and mechanical ventilation, while this rate was 36

  7. Is ketamine a lifesaving agent in childhood acute severe asthma?

    PubMed Central

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jomha, Fatima A; Alhammadi, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    Children with acute severe asthma exacerbation are at risk of developing respiratory failure. Moreover, conventional aggressive management might be futile in acute severe asthma requiring intubation and invasive ventilation. The aim of this review is to detail evidence on the use of ketamine in childhood asthma exacerbations. A search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases was performed, using different combinations of the following terms: ketamine, asthma, use, exacerbation, and childhood. In addition, we searched the references of the identified articles for additional articles. We then reviewed titles and included studies that were relevant to the topic of interest. Finally, the search was limited to studies published in English and Spanish from 1918 to June 2015. Due to the scarcity in the literature, we included all published articles. The literature reports conflicting results of ketamine use for acute severe asthma in children. Taking into consideration the relatively good safety profile of the drug, ketamine might be a reasonable option in the management of acute severe asthma in children who fail to respond to standard therapy. Furthermore, pediatricians and pediatric emergency clinicians administering ketamine should be knowledgeable about the unique actions of this drug and its potential side effects. PMID:26955277

  8. Recurrent accident and emergency department attendance for acute asthma in children.

    PubMed Central

    O'Halloran, S M; Heaf, D P

    1989-01-01

    Asthmatic children aged over 5 years making repeated visits to the accident and emergency department of a children's hospital were compared prospectively, on the basis of a clinical questionnaire and pulmonary function tests, with a control group of outpatients with asthma to find the reasons for their repeated attendance. Recurrent attenders (n = 145) had more severe asthma than control subjects (n = 118), with greater airway obstruction at rest (FEV1 79% v 85% predicted) and bronchial lability (47% v 38%). Significantly more of the "emergency" group used pressurised aerosols and fewer dry powder inhalers to administer bronchodilators. There were no differences in prophylactic treatment. Seventy one per cent of parents in the emergency group had feared that their child would die during an attack, compared with 56% of control subjects. Eighty one per cent of children were self referred to the accident and emergency department. Most parents had found hospital to be the quickest means of obtaining treatment in an emergency. There were no differences between the two groups in parents' knowledge about asthma, home conditions, or social disadvantage. Although children who repeatedly attend hospital accident and emergency departments for treatment of acute attacks have more severe asthma than controls and show some deficiencies in treatment, the major determinant of attendance appeared to be the parents' conviction that appropriate treatment could not be obtained elsewhere. PMID:2799741

  9. Effective argon-FRC with a rebreathing technique in children with acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Yiallouros, P K; Milner, A D

    1995-01-01

    In children with asthma the measurement of functional residual capacity (FRC) with standard dilution techniques requires long rebreathing times of the inert gas, i.e., helium, to reach alveolar units with long time constants. A modification of the argon-freon-22 rebreathing technique enables argon to dilute in the readily accessible lung volume and potentially can give a measurement of FRC. However, the rebreathing tests cannot be prolonged for more than 1 min thus allowing argon to reach only the rapidly accessible lung units which are grossly useful in gas exchange (effective FRC, EFRC). The aim of this study was to measure the EFRC and standard lung function in children with acute severe asthma, assess their response to nebulized salbutamol, and evaluate the relations of the EFRC response to baseline spirometric measurements. Twenty-four asthmatic children who were admitted to the hospital with an acute asthma attack had spirometry and triplicate EFRC measurements before and after treatment with nebulized salbutamol. Eighteen patients had repeated the respiratory tests 50 days later when they had fully recovered. A significant proportion (28.9%) of the argon traces obtained at baseline before treatment did not equilibrate. However, in the great majority of these tests the oscillation of the argon traces over the last 3 breaths of the test was < 5% of the simultaneous argon concentration. The EFRC values derived from the argon traces with minimal oscillation (< 5%) were reduced during the acute asthma attack when compared with the paired values obtained after recovery (P = 0.03). The administration of salbutamol caused a fall from the baseline EFRC (P = 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Continuing decline in acute asthma episodes in the community

    PubMed Central

    Sunderland, R; Fleming, D

    2004-01-01

    Aims and Methods: To report on trends in the incidence of asthma episodes in children reported to the WRS over the period 1980–2002. Results: Data confirm the steady upward trend from 1980 to 1993. The downward trend since 1993 was consistent in both male and female preschool and school age children, in all regions of the country simultaneously, and during all seasons until 1999 since when it has stabilised. No causative factor has been identified and no temporal association found between factors previously postulated as causing the increase in acute asthma. The decline in acute asthma episodes in children is consistent with observed declines in all other respiratory infections in this community. PMID:14977715

  11. Imaging Recommendations for Acute Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wintermark, Max; Sanelli, Pina C.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bello, Jacqueline A.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Hetts, Steven W.; Johnson, Michele H.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Rowley, Howard A.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Sunshine, Jeffrey L.; Zaharchuk, Greg; Meltzer, Carolyn C.

    2014-01-01

    In the article entitled “Imaging Recommendations for Acute Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Patients: A Joint Statement by the American Society of Neuroradiology, the American College of Radiology and the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery”, we are proposing a simple, pragmatic approach that will allow the reader to develop an optimal imaging algorithm for stroke patients at their institution. PMID:23948676

  12. Treatment of bronchial asthma with low-level laser in attack-free period at children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ailioaie, C.; Ailioaie, Laura

    2000-06-01

    Bronchial asthma is a common disease in both the pediatric and adult populations, characterized by wide variations over short periods of time in resistance to airflow in intrapulmonary airways. A primary goal in the use of low- level laser therapy (LLLT) was the safe, effective and rapid palliation of symptoms owing to tracheal or bronchial obstruction. We have investigated the effects of LLLT comparatively with other modality trials in children's asthma. In the study were included 98 patients aged 10-18 years diagnosed with moderate or severe asthma, in attack- free period. The patients were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 received only laser therapy using extra meridian acupuncture points and scanning technique. Group 2 was treated only with inhaled Serevent 2 X 25 micrometers , two times daily, 3 months. Group 3 was tread with Theophylline retard in dosage of 15-mg/kg/12 h, 3 months. At the end of treatment we remarked a noticeable improvement of the clinical, functional and immunological characteristics at 83 percent of patients in group 1, comparatively with only 70 percent (group 2) and 53 percent (group 3). The LLLT had a very good action on bronchial patency , displayed an immunocorrecting action and is recommended in attack-free periods at children.

  13. [Effect of inhaled terbutaline sulphate (dry powder, Turbuhaler and nebulizer solution) in children with acute asthma].

    PubMed

    Solé, D; Rizzo, M C; Pimentel, A F; Sano, F; Barreto, B A; Wandalsen, N F; Naspitz, C K

    1995-01-01

    Forty seven children (6-14 years), with an acute mild or moderate attack of asthma (clinical score 3 or FEV1 > 50% of the predicted), were treated with terbutaline sulphate, by inhalation route with a dry powder inhaler (Turbuhaler - 0,5 mg - group T; N=27, or by a nebulizer 1% solution-in saline-compressed air (6 l/min.) group S; N=20. The children were evaluated at 5, 15, 25 and 30 minutes after the initial treatment. In both groups a significant fall of the clinical score (starting at 15 minutes) (p < 0.05) and a significant improvement of the FEV(1), VC and FEF25-75% (starting at 5 minutes), were observed (p < 0.05). There were no significant changes in heart rates, respiratory rates and blood pressure (p > 0.05). At the end of the first treatment, the number of patients with a FEV(1) < 80% was similar in both groups (T = 13/27 and S = 10/20). The same treatment was repeated, and all the children showed a marked improvement, except for one boy of the group T was hospitalized. In conclusion, children with mild or moderate acute attacks of asthma can be treated up to a week with an inhalation of dry powder, resulting in adequate bronchodilatation without important side effects. PMID:14689023

  14. Acute kidney injury after massive attack of Africanised bees

    PubMed Central

    Bridi, Ramaiane A; Balbi, Andre Luis; Neves, Precil M; Ponce, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a well-documented complication of massive attack by Africanised bees and can be observed 48–72 h after the accident. We report a case of Africanised bees attack followed by severe and lethal AKI. A 56-year-old man was admitted to emergency department after a massive attack of Africanised bees (>1000 bee stings). He was unconscious, presenting with hypotension and tachycardia. Mechanical ventilation, volume expansion and care for anaphylaxis were instituted. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) and after 48 h he developed rhabdomyolysis, oliguria, increased creatinine levels, hyperkalaemia and refractory acidosis. A diagnosis of AKI secondary to rhabdomyolysis and shock was made. The patient was treated with a prolonged course of haemodialysis. However, he progressed to refractory shock and died 5 days after admission. PMID:24618864

  15. Asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Calverley, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is now recognised to be a major cause of morbidity and even mortality in people of all ages. Two important ideas have changed our approach to asthma management. The first is understanding that asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder which needs regular treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs such as inhaled corticosteroids to prevent further attacks. The second development is the availability of prescribable peak flow meters, which allows both confident diagnosis and early prediction of relapse. Asthma management guidelines provide a logical treatment framework for most patients, but a few difficult cases still consume large amounts of medical time. The commonest problem is one of compliance with treatment which may respond to patient education, although this is not universally so. Other problems include misdiagnosis, acid reflux and, rarely, true corticosteroid-resistant asthma. Several potentially important new treatments have been developed. These include longer acting anticholinergic drugs, drugs with bronchodilator and some anti-inflammatory properties which antagonise or inhibit the production of leukotrienes, sub-types of phosphodiesterase inhibitor with anti-inflammatory properties and immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporin. Ultimately these new treatments must be rigorously tested and integrated into a care plan that remains centred on patient education. PMID:8746278

  16. Asthma attack periodicity: A study of hospital emergency visits in Vancouver

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, D.V.; Baker-Anderson, M.; Sizto, R. )

    1990-02-01

    Attendances at the emergency departments of the nine acute care hospitals serving the Vancouver region, with a population of just under a million people, were recorded from July 1, 1984 to October 31, 1986. Of about 25,500 visits a month, 2.7% were for respiratory conditions; and of these, 41.3% were for asthma. Data from 11 air monitoring stations were also tabulated on a daily basis, giving mean maximal hourly values for SO2, NO2, and O3; daily aerosol sulfate measurements from one station were also analyzed, together with daily temperature data and measurements of the coefficient of haze. In 3 consecutive years, a peak in asthma attendances was noted, starting in the last week of September, and continuing for 3 weeks. In these periods, weekly visits for asthma reached 130 patients; during the rest of the year, the weekly visits for asthma varied between 30 and 90. This peak affected children and adults between the ages of 15 and 60, but no increase was seen in those over 60 years. Although pollution levels increased sharply in the fall, a day-by-day analysis showed that the rise in asthma attendances preceded the increase in NO chi and SO2 levels for the region, expressed as the mean of the hourly maxima across all stations. It seems unlikely that a specific pollen is responsible for this, or that house mite replication is the cause. Soya beans are not shipped out of Vancouver. The cause of the peak has not been identified. Variations in emergency visits by day of the week have been recorded; in children and in those aged 15-60, more visits occur on Sundays than on other days, but this does not occur in those over 60. Intercorrelations between environmental variables and emergency visits have been calculated separately for the periods May 1 to October 31, and November 1 to April 30.

  17. [Hereditary angioedema. Treatment of acute attacks in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Malbrán, Alejandro; Malbrán, Eloisa; Menéndez, Alejandra; Fernández Romero, Diego S

    2014-01-01

    In the world, hereditary angioedema (HAE) affects 1 every 50000 persons. It is characterized by highly disabling and recurrent episodes of cutaneous, abdominal and laryngeal episodes of angioedema. Asphyxia related mortality ranges from 15 to 50%. In Argentina a plasma derived C1 inhibitor concentrate (pdC1INH) has been available for the treatment of acute attacks for many decades, however, only15 (26%) out of 58 patients had received pdC1INH at least once until 2008, and only2 (3.4%) had used it regularly. After worldwide approval of the new drugs for the treatment of acute HAE attacks, adding icatibant to pdC1INH in Argentina, and after publication of the therapeutic guide for the country, 42 (82%) out of 51 patients from the original group has pdC1INH available to treat their next attack. However, 16 (18%) patients continue without access to medication and other 15 (35.7%) obtain their therapy spuriously through some other affected relative in their environment. Only 12 (28.6%) patients of the group self-treated at home. Access to treatment has greatly improved, but needs to be extended to all patients and self-treatment at home should be encouraged.

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of cathepsin S and the risks of asthma attack induced by acaroid mites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaopin; Chen, Qi; Jiang, Yuxin; Liu, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    To investigate association between the three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs146456111, rs143154304 and rs147260142) in cathepsin S (Cat S) and the risks of allergic asthma attack induced by the acaroid mites in the Chinese population. A case-control study was performed in 412 cases and 454 volunteers/controls to evaluate the effects of three SNPs in Cat S on the risks of asthma attack. The genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cleaved amplification polymorphism sequence-tagged sites (PCR-RFLP). The frequencies of genotypes and alleles in these SNPs in the asthmatic group were also analyzed between the two groups. The locus of rs146456111 in Cat S gene, the allele frequency of A and C in asthmatic group were significantly different from the control group (χ2 = 184.425, P = 0.000), and the difference was significant regarding the distribution of the genotypes (AA, AC, and CC) between asthmatic subjects and normal controls (χ2 = 177.915, P = 0.000). Logistic regression analysis revealed that the AC, CC, and AC + CC genotypes were significantly increased with the risk of asthma (AC vs. AA, OR = 4.013, 95% CI = 2.989-4.751, P = 0.000; CC vs. AA, OR = 3.167, 95% CI = 2.483-3.785, P = 0.000; AC + CC vs. AA, OR = 3.418, 95% CI = 2.381-4.214, P = 0.000, respectively), compared with AA genotype. Moreover, by comparison with allele A, allele C (OR = 2.187, 95% CI = 1.743-2.281, P < 0.001) tended to increase the risk of asthma; For the locus of rs143154304, compared with the allele frequency G with A in control group, there was no difference (χ2 = 1.434, P = 0.231) in that of asthmatic group, as well as the distributions of the genotypes (AA, AG, and GG) between asthmatic subjects and normal controls (χ2 = 1.997, P = 0.369); Logistic regression analysis showed that the AG, GG, and AG + GG genotypes were no risk to asthma (AG vs. AA, OR = 0.991, 95% CI = 0.625-1.507, P = 0.968; GG vs. AA, OR = 0.812, 95% CI = 0.525-1.258, P = 0

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of cathepsin S and the risks of asthma attack induced by acaroid mites.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaopin; Chen, Qi; Jiang, Yuxin; Liu, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    To investigate association between the three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs146456111, rs143154304 and rs147260142) in cathepsin S (Cat S) and the risks of allergic asthma attack induced by the acaroid mites in the Chinese population. A case-control study was performed in 412 cases and 454 volunteers/controls to evaluate the effects of three SNPs in Cat S on the risks of asthma attack. The genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cleaved amplification polymorphism sequence-tagged sites (PCR-RFLP). The frequencies of genotypes and alleles in these SNPs in the asthmatic group were also analyzed between the two groups. The locus of rs146456111 in Cat S gene, the allele frequency of A and C in asthmatic group were significantly different from the control group (χ(2) = 184.425, P = 0.000), and the difference was significant regarding the distribution of the genotypes (AA, AC, and CC) between asthmatic subjects and normal controls (χ(2) = 177.915, P = 0.000). Logistic regression analysis revealed that the AC, CC, and AC + CC genotypes were significantly increased with the risk of asthma (AC vs. AA, OR = 4.013, 95% CI = 2.989-4.751, P = 0.000; CC vs. AA, OR = 3.167, 95% CI = 2.483-3.785, P = 0.000; AC + CC vs. AA, OR = 3.418, 95% CI = 2.381-4.214, P = 0.000, respectively), compared with AA genotype. Moreover, by comparison with allele A, allele C (OR = 2.187, 95% CI = 1.743-2.281, P < 0.001) tended to increase the risk of asthma; For the locus of rs143154304, compared with the allele frequency G with A in control group, there was no difference (χ(2) = 1.434, P = 0.231) in that of asthmatic group, as well as the distributions of the genotypes (AA, AG, and GG) between asthmatic subjects and normal controls (χ(2) = 1.997, P = 0.369); Logistic regression analysis showed that the AG, GG, and AG + GG genotypes were no risk to asthma (AG vs. AA, OR = 0.991, 95% CI = 0.625-1.507, P = 0.968; GG vs. AA, OR = 0.812, 95% CI = 0.525-1.258, P

  20. The triggers or precipitants of the acute migraine attack.

    PubMed

    Kelman, L

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and define the triggers of the acute migraine attack. Patients rated triggers on a 0-3 scale for the average headache. Demographics, prodrome, aura, headache characteristics, postdrome, medication responsiveness, acute and chronic disability, sleep characteristics and social and personal characteristics were also recorded. One thousand two hundred and seven International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 (1.1-1.2, and 1.5.1) patients were evaluated, of whom 75.9% reported triggers (40.4% infrequently, 26.7% frequently and 8.8% very frequently). The trigger frequencies were stress (79.7%), hormones in women (65.1%), not eating (57.3%), weather (53.2%), sleep disturbance (49.8%), perfume or odour (43.7%), neck pain (38.4%), light(s) (38.1%), alcohol (37.8%), smoke (35.7%), sleeping late (32.0%), heat (30.3%), food (26.9%), exercise (22.1%) and sexual activity (5.2%). Triggers were more likely to be associated with a more florid acute migraine attack. Differences were seen between women and men, aura and no aura, episodic and chronic migraine, and between migraine and probable migraine.

  1. The efficacy of nebulized magnesium sulfate alone and in combination with salbutamol in acute asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sarhan, Hatem A; EL-Garhy, Omar H; Ali, Mohamed A; Youssef, Nouran A

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of the efficacy of nebulized magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) alone and in combination with salbutamol in acute asthma. Methods A double-blind randomized controlled study was conducted in Chest and Emergency Departments. Thirty patients of acute attack of bronchial asthma were randomized into three groups: MgSO4 nebulization (group A), salbutamol nebulization (group B), and their combination (group C). All patients were monitored before and after nebulization (each 20 minutes) for peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), blood pressure, pulsus paradoxus, oxygen saturation, clinical examination, and Fischl index. Results A highly significant improvement in PEFR, PEFR percentage, and Fischl index and significant decrease in RR and HR was observed in all groups. A similar improvement in PEFR was observed in group A and group B (P=0.389). The difference in peak expiratory flow (PEF) improvement was insignificant between group B and group C (P=0.101), while there was a significant difference between group A and group C (P=0.014) in favor of group C. Conclusion Nebulized MgSO4 alone or combined with salbutamol has a clinically significant bronchodilator effect in acute asthma and leads to clinical improvement, increase in PEFR, reduction in HR, and reduction in RR. The response to nebulized MgSO4 alone (PEFR improvement 54±35.6 L/min, P=0.001) is comparable (P=0.389) to that of nebulized salbutamol (PEFR improvement 67.0±41.9 L/min, P=0.001) and is significantly less than (P=0.014) that of nebulized combination (PEFR improvement 92.0±26.9 L/min, P=0.000). PMID:27354766

  2. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy in severe acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, B K; Laursen, L C; Lervang, H H; Stjernebjerg, T; Weeke, B

    1987-02-01

    In a group comparative double blind pilot study six asthmatic patients with an acute exacerbation of their disease were randomly treated with either methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT) (1000 mg daily for 3 days) (n = 2) followed by placebo tablets, or standard doses of methylprednisolone (MP) (50 mg daily gradually decreased to zero over 3 weeks) (n = 4). The results showed that the effect of MPPT did not differ from that of standard doses of MP. MPPT has, however, the potential of being preferable to standard treatment with MP, because of easy administration and optimal patient compliance. PMID:3296841

  3. Generation of plasmin during acute attacks of hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Cugno, M; Hack, C E; de Boer, J P; Eerenberg, A J; Agostoni, A; Cicardi, M

    1993-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is caused by a genetic deficiency of C1-inhibitor, a serine protease inhibitor that regulates activation of complement, contact, and fibrinolytic systems. Symptoms (bouts of subcutaneous and mucous swelling) depend on the release of a vasoactive mediator, probably through activation of these three systems. We studied the interrelationship among complement, contact, and fibrinolytic activation in 23 patients with hereditary angiodema, 18 during remission and five during an attack, by measuring plasma levels of C1-C1 inhibitor, factor XIIa-C1 inhibitor, kallikrein-C1 inhibitor, and plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complexes, tissue plasminogen activator, and urokinase plasminogen activator. In addition, cleavage of high-molecular weight kininogen was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and quantified by densitometry. During remission, plasma levels of C1-C1 inhibitor complexes were elevated (p = 0.0002), whereas the other parameters were within the normal range. During acute attacks, not only plasma levels of C1-C1 inhibitor complexes but also those of plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complexes (P = 0.0009) and cleaved high-molecular weight kininogen were elevated. A positive correlation between plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complexes and cleaved high-molecular weight kininogen was observed (r = 0.75, p < 0.001). This article presents the first in vivo evidence that supports the concept that release of vasoactive mediators in hereditary angiodema attacks is associated with the activation of the fibrinolytic system.

  4. The Acute Asthma Severity Assessment Protocol (AASAP) study: objectives and methods of a study to develop an acute asthma clinical prediction rule.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Donald H; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Abramo, Thomas J; Sheller, James R; Resha, Donald J; Hartert, Tina V

    2012-06-01

    Acute asthma exacerbations are one of the most common reasons for paediatric emergency department visits and hospitalisations, and a relapse frequently necessitates repeat urgent care. While care plans exist, there are no acute asthma prediction rules (APRs) to assess severity and predict outcome. The primary objective of the Acute Asthma Severity Assessment Protocol study is to develop a multivariable APR for acute asthma exacerbations in paediatric patients. A prospective, convenience sample of paediatric patients aged 5-17 years with acute asthma exacerbations who present to an urban, academic, tertiary paediatric emergency department was enrolled. The study protocol and data analysis plan conform to accepted biostatistical and clinical standards for clinical prediction rule development. Modelling of the APR will be performed once the entire sample size of 1500 has accrued. It is anticipated that the APR will improve resource utilisation in the emergency department, aid in standardisation of disease assessment and allow physician and non-physician providers to participate in earlier objective decision making. The objective of this report is to describe the study objectives and detailed methodology of the Acute Asthma Severity Assessment Protocol study.

  5. Assessing the risk of attack in the management of asthma: a review and proposal for revision of the current control-centred paradigm.

    PubMed

    Blakey, John D; Woolnough, Kerry; Fellows, Jodie; Walker, Samantha; Thomas, Mike; Pavord, Ian D

    2013-09-01

    Asthma guidelines focus on day-to-day control of symptoms. However, asthma attacks remain common. They continue to cause mortality and considerable morbidity, and are a major financial burden to the UK National Health Service (NHS) and the wider community. Asthma attacks have chronic consequences, being associated with loss of lung function and significant psychological morbidity. In this article we argue that addressing daily symptom control is only one aspect of asthma treatment, and that there should be a more explicit focus on reducing the risk of asthma attacks. Management of future risk by general practitioners is already central to other conditions such as ischaemic heart disease and chronic renal impairment. We therefore propose a revised approach that separately considers the related domains of daily control and future risk of asthma attack. We believe this approach will have advantages over the current 'stepwise' approach to asthma management. It should encourage individualised treatment, including non-pharmacological measures, and thus may lead to more efficacious and less harmful management strategies. We speculate that this type of approach has the potential to reduce morbidity and healthcare costs related to asthma attacks.

  6. Dyspnea in acute bronchial asthma in an emergency room.

    PubMed

    Kunitoh, H; Watanabe, K; Sajima, Y

    1994-03-01

    Pulmonary function, arterial blood gases, and pulse rate were prospectively compared with dyspnea perceived by patients before and after emergency room treatment for acute asthma in 83 episodes. Subjective degree of dyspnea was rated on a modified Borg scale. Before treatment, all spirometry (FVC, FEV1, and peak expiratory flow rate) and arterial blood gas (PaO2, PaCO2, and bicarbonate) data as well as pulse rate were significantly correlated with modified Borg scale, but only PaCO2 showed significant correlation (P < .001) in a multivariate analysis. After treatment, only PaO2 was significantly correlated with modified Borg scale (P = .008) in a multivariate analysis, and pulse rate showed correlation of borderline significance (P = .06). In another 37 episodes of relapsed acute asthma, the correlations between laboratory data and modified Borg scale were very weak, especially after treatment. We conclude that dyspnea expressed by asthmatic patients in an emergency room might be reflecting different mechanisms as treatment is performed. Although it should be one useful guide in emergency evaluation, it must be recognized that dyspnea in the same patient could mean different abnormalities.

  7. Asthma and other recurrent wheezing disorders in children (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Acute childhood asthma is a common clinical emergency presenting across a range of ages and with a range of severities. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for acute asthma in children? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 35 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: beta2 agonists (high-dose nebulised, metered-dose inhaler plus spacer device versus nebuliser, intravenous), corticosteroids (systemic, high-dose inhaled), ipratropium bromide (single- or multiple-dose inhaled), magnesium sulphate, oxygen, and theophylline or aminophylline. PMID:24807832

  8. The intersection between asthma and acute chest syndrome in children with sickle-cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    DeBaun, Michael R; Strunk, Robert C

    2016-06-18

    Acute chest syndrome is a frequent cause of acute lung disease in children with sickle-cell disease. Asthma is common in children with sickle-cell disease and is associated with increased incidence of vaso-occlusive pain events, acute chest syndrome episodes, and earlier death. Risk factors for asthma exacerbation and an acute chest syndrome episode are similar, and both can present with shortness of breath, chest pain, cough, and wheezing. Despite overlapping risk factors and symptoms, an acute exacerbation of asthma or an episode of acute chest syndrome are two distinct entities that need disease-specific management strategies. Although understanding has increased about asthma as a comorbidity in sickle-cell disease and its effects on morbidity, substantial gaps remain in knowledge about best management. PMID:27353685

  9. The intersection between asthma and acute chest syndrome in children with sickle-cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    DeBaun, Michael R; Strunk, Robert C

    2016-06-18

    Acute chest syndrome is a frequent cause of acute lung disease in children with sickle-cell disease. Asthma is common in children with sickle-cell disease and is associated with increased incidence of vaso-occlusive pain events, acute chest syndrome episodes, and earlier death. Risk factors for asthma exacerbation and an acute chest syndrome episode are similar, and both can present with shortness of breath, chest pain, cough, and wheezing. Despite overlapping risk factors and symptoms, an acute exacerbation of asthma or an episode of acute chest syndrome are two distinct entities that need disease-specific management strategies. Although understanding has increased about asthma as a comorbidity in sickle-cell disease and its effects on morbidity, substantial gaps remain in knowledge about best management.

  10. Diffusion Weighted Imaging in Acute Attacks of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Yasmin; Foroughipour, Mohsen; Torabi, Reza; Layegh, Parvaneh; Matin, Nassim; Shoeibi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common autoimmune disorders of the central nervous system. In spite of various imaging modalities, the definitive diagnosis of MS remains challenging. Objectives This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of acute MS attack and to compare its results with contrast enhanced MRI (CE-MRI). Patients and Methods In this cross sectional study, seventy patients with definite diagnosis of relapsing-remitting MS were included. CE-MRI using 0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium as well as DWI sequences were performed for all patients. The percentage of patients with positive DWI was compared with the results of CE-MRI and the consistency between the two imaging modalities was evaluated. Moreover, the relationship between the time of onset of patient’s symptoms and test results for both methods were investigated. Results CE-MRI yielded positive results for 61 (87%) patients and DWI yielded positive for 53 (76%) patients. In fifty patients (71.42%), both tests were positive and in six cases (8.57%), both were negative. The test results of three patients turned out to be positive in DWI, while they tested negative in CE-MRI. There was no significant relationship between the results of CE-MRI as well as DWI and the time of imaging from the onset of symptoms. Conclusion These data indicate that while CE-MRI will depict more positive results, there are cases in which DWI will show a positive result while CE-MRI is negative. We suggest that the combination of these two imaging modalities might yield more positive results in diagnosing acute MS attack giving rise to a more accurate diagnosis.

  11. Acrolein and Asthma Attack Prevalence in a Representative Sample of the United States Adult Population 2000 – 2009

    PubMed Central

    deCastro, B. Rey

    2014-01-01

    Background Acrolein is an air toxic and highly potent respiratory irritant. There is little epidemiology available, but US EPA estimates that outdoor acrolein is responsible for about 75 percent of non-cancer respiratory health effects attributable to air toxics in the United States, based on the Agency's 2005 NATA (National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment) and acrolein's comparatively potent inhalation reference concentration of 0.02 µg/m3. Objectives Assess the association between estimated outdoor acrolein exposure and asthma attack reported by a representative cross-sectional sample of the adult United States population. Methods NATA 2005 chronic outdoor acrolein exposure estimates at the census tract were linked with residences oif adults (≥18 years old) in the NHIS (National Health Interview Survey) 2000 – 2009 (n = 271,348 subjects). A sample-weighted logistic regression model characterized the association between the prevalence of reporting at least one asthma attack in the 12 months prior to survey interview and quintiles of exposure to outdoor acrolein, controlling for potential confounders. Results In the highest quintile of outdoor acrolein exposure (0.05 – 0.46 µg/m3), there was a marginally significant increase in the asthma attack pOR (prevalence-odds ratio [95% CI]  = 1.08 [0.98∶1.19]) relative to the lowest quintile. The highest quintile was also associated with a marginally significant increase in prevalence-odds (1.13 [0.98∶1.29]) in a model limited to never smokers (n = 153,820). Conclusions Chronic exposure to outdoor acrolein of 0.05 – 0.46 µg/m3 appears to increase the prevalence-odds of having at least one asthma attack in the previous year by 8 percent in a representative cross-sectional sample of the adult United States population. PMID:24816802

  12. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... that you have asthma. Your doctor will diagnose asthma based on lung function tests, your medical history, and a physical exam. You may also have allergy tests. When your asthma symptoms become worse than usual, it's called an ...

  13. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > Asthma Print A A A ... it can take several days. continue Who Gets Asthma? No one really knows why one person's airways ...

  14. A review of asthma and scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Kay; Muth, Claus M; Waldhauser, Lisa K

    2002-10-01

    An increasing number of asthmatics participate in recreational scuba diving. This activity presents unique physical and physiological challenges to the respiratory system. This review addresses the susceptibility of divers with asthma to diving accidents, acute asthmatic attacks, and long-term exacerbation of their disease. Recommendations on fitness to dive with asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness are provided.

  15. Management of Acute Exacerbation of Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Suau, Salvador J; DeBlieux, Peter M C

    2016-02-01

    Acute asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are the most common respiratory diseases requiring emergent medical evaluation and treatment. Asthma and COPD are chronic, debilitating disease processes that have been differentiated traditionally by the presence or absence of reversible airflow obstruction. Asthma and COPD exacerbations impose an enormous economic burden on the US health care budget. In daily clinical practice, it is difficult to differentiate these 2 obstructive processes based on their symptoms, and on their nearly identical acute treatment strategies; major differences are important when discussing anatomic sites involved, long-term prognosis, and the nature of inflammatory markers. PMID:26614239

  16. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Month with a Google+ Hangout on Air for parents and caregivers to learn how to help control a child's asthma so that they can breathe ... parents build up their asthma team. Jose, his parents, a doctor and a nurse, ... forces to help Jose control his asthma. The video is recorded in Spanish ...

  17. [Lactic acidosis in a child with acute severe asthma].

    PubMed

    Perrin, C; Savy, N; Lang, M; Caron, N; Labbé, A

    2014-10-01

    Lactic acidosis is a recognized event in adult patients with acute severe asthma (ASA). Only a few cases have been reported in children. Hereinafter is reported the case of a 2-year-old girl hospitalized in the pediatric intensive care unit for ASA, which was treated with high-flow oxygen therapy and intravenous methylprednisolone and salbutamol. During hospitalization, she had metabolic acidosis with a 7.29 pH, a 26mmHg hypocapnia, and a decrease in bicarbonates to 12 mmol/L. The anion gap was increased to 20 mmol/L and lactates to 8 mmol/L. The work-up for a congenital metabolic disease was normal. Progression was propitious with spontaneous improvement of lactic acidosis, and the child was discharged from the intensive care unit after 72 h. The origin of lactic acidosis during ASA seems to be multifactorial. Although its recovery can be spontaneous, it is important to know how to identify it because it can worsen respiratory symptoms and can lead to incongruous therapeutic escalation.

  18. Self-management of acute asthma among low-income urban adults.

    PubMed

    George, Maureen; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Rand, Cynthia

    2009-08-01

    One approach to address asthma disparities has been to create evidence-based guidelines to standardize asthma care and education. However, the adoption of these recommendations has been suboptimal among many providers. As a result, low-income minority patients may not be receiving adequate instruction in asthma self-management. In addition, these patients may fail to follow guideline-based recommendations. We conducted 25 interviews to identify the extent to which urban low-income adults have received training in, and implement, self-management protocols for acute asthma. Twenty-five adults (92% female; 76% African American; mean age 39) were enrolled. Only one subject had received asthma self-management training and only 10 (40%) used short-acting beta-(2) agonist-based (SABA) self-management protocols for the early treatment of acute asthma. No subject used a peak flow meter or an asthma action plan. Most (52%) chose to initially treat acute asthma with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) despite the availability of SABAs. Importantly, 21 (84%) preferred an integrated approach using both conventional and CAM treatments. Four themes associated with acute asthma self-management emerged from the qualitative analysis. The first theme safety reflected subjects' perception that CAM was safer than SABA. Severity addressed the calculation that subjects made in determining if SABA or CAM was indicated based on the degree of symptoms they were experiencing. The third theme speed and strength of the combination described subjects' belief in the superiority of integrating CAM and SABA for acute asthma self-management. The final themesense of identity spoke to the ability of CAM to provide a customized self-management strategy that subjects desired. It is unclear if subjects' greater use of CAM or delays in using SABA-based self-management protocols were functions of inadequate instruction or personal preference. Regardless, delays in, or under use of, conventional

  19. Self-Management of Acute Asthma among Low-Income Urban Adults

    PubMed Central

    George, Maureen; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Rand, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    One approach to address asthma disparities has been to create evidence-based guidelines to standardize asthma care and education. However, the adoption of these recommendations has been suboptimal among many providers. As a result, low-income minority patients may not be receiving adequate instruction in asthma self-management. In addition, these patients may fail to follow guideline-based recommendations. We conducted 25 interviews to identify the extent to which urban low-income adults have received training in, and implement, self-management protocols for acute asthma. Twenty-five adults (92% female; 76% African American; mean age 39) were enrolled. Only one subject had received asthma self-management training and only 10 (40%) used short-acting beta-2 agonist-based (SABA) self-management protocols for the early treatment of acute asthma. No subject used a peak flow meter or an asthma action plan. Most (52%) chose to initially treat acute asthma with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) despite the availability of SABAs. Importantly, 21 (84%) preferred an integrated approach using both conventional and CAM treatments. Four themes associated with acute asthma self-management emerged from the qualitative analysis. The first theme safety reflected subjects’ perception that CAM was safer than SABA. Severity addressed the calculation that subjects made in determining if SABA or CAM was indicated based on the degree of symptoms they were experiencing. The third theme speed and strength of the combination described subjects’ belief in the superiority of integrating CAM and SABA for acute asthma self-management. The final themesense of identity spoke to the ability of CAM to provide a customized self-management strategy that subjects desired. It is unclear if subjects’ greater use of CAM or delays in using SABA-based self-management protocols were functions of inadequate instruction or personal preference. Regardless, delays in, or under use of

  20. Steroid-induced acute psychosis in a child with asthma: report of one case.

    PubMed

    Lee, K M; Lin, Y Z; Huang, F Y

    2001-01-01

    A 5-year-old girl was admitted due to severe asthmatic attack. She was treated with methylprednisolone (40 mg i.v. q6h), aminophylline (loading with 5 mg/kg and maintained with 0.6 mg/kg/hr i.v. drip), nebulized terbutaline sulphate (5 mg q6h), oral procaterol 12.5 micrograms bid, along with oxygen therapy. Acute psychotic reaction with visual hallucination, delusion, panic reaction and myoclonic movement of hands developed on day 3 of admission. The patient had no previous history of psychiatric problems. The theophylline level was 9.89 micrograms/ml at the moment of psychotic reaction. After the dose of methylprednisolone was reduced from 40 mg to 20 mg i.v. q6h and shifted to other anti-asthma treatment by procaterol metered dose inhaler via spacer, the psychotic reaction disappeared a few hours later. The psychotic reaction was thought to be due to steroid therapy since no other causes could explain the psychotic reaction. PMID:11431864

  1. Ketamine versus aminophylline for acute asthma in children: A randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Abhimanyu; Guglani, Vishal; Jat, Kana Ram

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a lack of consensus regarding second-line therapy in children with acute asthma who fail to the standard therapy. Ketamine had bronchodilator property and may be useful in the treatment of acute asthma. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ketamine as compared to aminophylline in children with acute asthma who respond poorly to the standard therapy. METHODS: This randomized controlled trial included patients with acute asthma having Pediatric Respiratory Assessment Measure (PRAM) score ≥5 at 2 h of standard therapy. The enrolled patients received either intravenous (IV) ketamine or IV aminophylline. Primary outcome measure was change in PRAM score at the end of intervention. Secondary outcome measures included adverse effects, change in PO2and PCO2, need for mechanical ventilation, and duration of hospital stay. RESULTS: The trial included 24 patients each in ketamine and aminophylline groups. The baseline parameters were similar between the groups. The primary outcome was similar in both the groups with a change in PRAM score of 4.00 ± 1.25 and 4.17 ± 1.68 (P = 0.699) in ketamine and aminophylline groups, respectively. The secondary outcomes were not different between the groups. CONCLUSION: Ketamine and aminophylline were equally effective for children with acute asthma who responded poorly to the standard therapy. PMID:27803755

  2. Successful use of extracorporeal life support after double traumatic tracheobronchial injury in a patient with severe acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Valette, Xavier; Desjouis, Aurélie; Massetti, Massimo; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Icard, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of an asthmatic patient with blunt trachea and left main bronchus injuries who developed acute severe asthma after surgical repair. Despite medical treatment and ventilatory support, asthma persisted with high airway pressures and severe respiratory acidosis. We proposed venovenous extracorporeal life support for CO(2) removal which allowed arterial blood gas normalization and airway pressures decrease. Extracorporeal life support was removed on day five after medical treatment of acute severe asthma. So we report the successful use of extracorporeal life support for operated double blunt tracheobronchial injury with acute severe asthma. PMID:22135742

  3. Acute Oral Ethanol Exposure Triggers Asthma In Cockroach Allergen–Sensitized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Jacqueline C.; Kim, Jiyoun; Beal, Dominic R.; Vaickus, Louis J.; Craciun, Florin L.; Remick, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma may be triggered by multiple mediators, including allergen-IgE cross-linking and non-IgE mechanisms. Several clinical studies have shown acute ethanol consumption exacerbates asthma, yet no animal model exists to study this process. We developed a model of ethanol-triggered asthma in allergen-sensitized mice to evaluate the mechanisms of ethanol inducing asthma-like responses. Outbred mice were exposed to cockroach allergens on Days 0 and 14; and on Day 21, mice received ethanol by oral gavage. Tracer studies confirmed alcohol aspiration did not occur. Within 30 minutes, alcohol induced degranulation of over 74% of mast cells, and multiple parameters of asthma-like pulmonary inflammation were triggered. Ethanol-gavaged mice had a fivefold increased production of eotaxin-2 (534 pg/mL) and a sevenfold increase in bronchoalveolar eosinophils (70,080 cells). Ethanol induced a 10-fold increase in IL-13, from 84 pg/mL in sensitized mice to 845 pg/mL in ethanol-gavaged sensitized mice. In cockroach allergen–sensitized mice, ethanol triggered asthma-like changes in respiratory physiology and a significant fivefold increase in airway mucin production. Importantly, none of these asthmatic exacerbations were observed in normal mice gavaged with ethanol. Cromolyn sodium effectively stabilized mast cells, yet increased mucin production and bronchoalveolar eosinophil recruitment. Together, these data show a single oral alcohol exposure will trigger asthma-like pulmonary inflammation in allergen-sensitized mice, providing a novel asthma model. PMID:22796441

  4. Effects of oral montelukast on airway function in acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Cýllý, A; Kara, A; Ozdemir, T; Oğüş, C; Gülkesen, K H

    2003-05-01

    Montelukast, a specific cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, has been shown to improve pulmonary function within 1 h of ingestion. This study was undertaken to compare the effects on peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) of oral montelukast added to intravenous steroid, intravenous steroid alone and placebo during the 24 h period following administration. Seventy asthmatic patients (FEV1 40-80% predicted and > or = 15% improvement after inhaled beta agonist) were enrolled in a single blind study to receive oral montelukast (10 mg) plus intravenous prednisolone (1 mg/kg), intravenous prednisolone (1 mg/kg) or placebo in a randomised fashion. The patients received one ofthe above three groups of medication before any other treatments. This was immediately followed by the aerosol treatments of 100 mcg of terbutaline sulphate divided into three doses during 1 h as described in the consensus statement. Thereafter, patients were observed for 24 h to document the effects on PEFR, Borg dyspnoea score and need for rescue medication. The primary end point was percentage change at different time points. Secondary end points were Borg dyspnoea score and use of rescue medication. Compared with placebo, montelukast added to the prednisolone group and the prednisolone alone group had significant percentage change from baseline in PEFR in the entire 24 h period (P<0.05). The difference in PEFR between montelukast plus prednisolone group and prednisolone group favoured the montelukast plus prednisolone group but did not reach statistical significance. Furthermore, montelukast plus prednisolone group required less inhaled short-acting beta agonistthan other two groups. The results of this study indicate that adding montelukast to steroid in acute asthma may have some additive improvement in lung functions. PMID:12735671

  5. [Severe acute asthma in the emergency room: amelioration of decreased peak flow rate is interpreted with difficulty].

    PubMed

    Bouvard, E; Bellocq, A; Bernier, C; Meyniel, D

    1999-09-01

    We report a severe acute asthma case whose course was marked by persistent hypoxemia whereas proximal flows were normalized. This discordance reveals a ventilation/perfusion mismatch. This data suggests that care must be taken in interpreting the peak flow improvement during acute severe asthma management.

  6. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hodder, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1) an airway disease – acute potentially fatal asthma, and (2) a pulmonary parenchymal disease – acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician. PMID:27147862

  7. Asthma.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Karl-Christian

    2014-01-01

    'Asthma' is derived from the Greek root ασθμαινω, meaning 'gasp for breath'. The term originally did not define a disease, but was employed to describe respiratory symptoms of a variety of pulmonary conditions. Over the centuries, several models have been proposed to understand the pathophysiologic abnormalities of asthma. By the beginning of the 20th century, asthma was seen to be a unique illness characterized by 'spasmodic afflictions of the bronchial tubes'. Consistent with the nature of asthma as a complex disease, the models for asthma pathogenesis have become increasingly complex. Research has moved from antiquated ideas to a descriptive functional approach to one that relies on pathophysiology in cellular and molecular biology, immunology, microbiology and genetics/genomics. As more advanced technologies for measuring lung function were developed, the features of asthma were steadily unraveled and its pathophysiology clarified. Asthma was shown to be associated with transient increases in airway resistance, reductions in forced expiratory volumes and flows, hyperinflation of the lungs and increased work of breathing, as well as abnormalities in the distribution of ventilation, perfusion and arterial blood gases. Today, asthma is seen as a chronic inflammatory disease which is not yet fully understood in its pathophysiology; therefore, therapy is still on the path to becoming optimal. PMID:24925386

  8. Asthma.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Karl-Christian

    2014-01-01

    'Asthma' is derived from the Greek root ασθμαινω, meaning 'gasp for breath'. The term originally did not define a disease, but was employed to describe respiratory symptoms of a variety of pulmonary conditions. Over the centuries, several models have been proposed to understand the pathophysiologic abnormalities of asthma. By the beginning of the 20th century, asthma was seen to be a unique illness characterized by 'spasmodic afflictions of the bronchial tubes'. Consistent with the nature of asthma as a complex disease, the models for asthma pathogenesis have become increasingly complex. Research has moved from antiquated ideas to a descriptive functional approach to one that relies on pathophysiology in cellular and molecular biology, immunology, microbiology and genetics/genomics. As more advanced technologies for measuring lung function were developed, the features of asthma were steadily unraveled and its pathophysiology clarified. Asthma was shown to be associated with transient increases in airway resistance, reductions in forced expiratory volumes and flows, hyperinflation of the lungs and increased work of breathing, as well as abnormalities in the distribution of ventilation, perfusion and arterial blood gases. Today, asthma is seen as a chronic inflammatory disease which is not yet fully understood in its pathophysiology; therefore, therapy is still on the path to becoming optimal.

  9. Acute stress disorder in hospitalised victims of 26/11-terror attack on Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Balasinorwala, Vanshree Patil; Shah, Nilesh

    2010-11-01

    The 26/11 terror attacks on Mumbai have been internationally denounced. Acute stress disorder is common in victims of terror. To find out the prevalence and to correlate acute stress disorder, 70 hospitalised victims of terror were assessed for presence of the same using DSM-IV TR criteria. Demographic data and clinical variables were also collected. Acute stress disorder was found in 30% patients. On demographic profile and severity of injury, there were some interesting observations and differences between the victims who developed acute stress disorder and those who did not; though none of the differences reached the level of statistical significance. This study documents the occurrence of acute stress disorder in the victims of 26/11 terror attack.

  10. The effect of sand storms on acute asthma in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alangari, Abdullah A.; Riaz, Muhammad; Mahjoub, Mohamed Osman; Malhis, Nidal; Al-Tamimi, Saleh; Al-Modaihsh, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Major sand storms are frequent in the Middle East. This study aims to investigate the role of air particulate matter (PM) level in acute asthma in children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. METHODS: An aerosol spectrometer was used to evaluate PM < 10μm in diameter (PM10) and PM < 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) concentrations in the air every 30 minutes throughout February and March 2012 in Riyadh. Data on children 2-12 years of age presenting to the emergency department of a major children's hospital with acute asthma during the same period were collected including their acute asthma severity score. RESULTS: The median with interquartile range (IQR) levels of PM10 and PM2.5 were 454 μg/m3 (309,864) and 108 μg/m3 (72,192) respectively. There was no correlation between the average daily PM10 levels and the average number of children presenting with acute asthma per day (r = -0.14, P = 0.45), their daily asthma score (r = 0.014, P = 0.94), or admission rate ( r= -0.08, P = 0.65). This was also true for average daily PM2.5 levels. In addition, there was no difference in these variables between days with PM10 >1000 μg/m3, representing major sand storms, plus the following 5 days and other days with PM10< 1000 μg/m3. CONCLUSION: Sand storms, even major ones, had no significant impact on acute asthma exacerbations in children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The very high levels of PM, however, deserve further studying especially of their long-term effects. PMID:25593604

  11. Stable admission rate for acute asthma in Danish children since 1977.

    PubMed

    Sevelsted, Astrid; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Bisgaard, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Childhood asthma is consistently reported to have increased in recent decades in most westernized countries, but it is unknown if this increase is similar across severities. We aimed to study the time-trend of acute hospital admission and readmission for asthma of school-aged children in the recent 35 years in Denmark. We analyzed time-trends in the national incidence rate of hospitalization for acute severe asthma in children aged 5-15 in Denmark during the 35-year period 1977-2012 in the Danish national registry. Only in-patient admissions with a principal diagnosis of asthma (ICD-8: 493** or ICD-10: J45** or J46**) were included. Among children with asthma hospitalizations, we investigated the risk of readmission beyond 1 month of first admission. Admissions were summarized as rates per thousand person years at risk. The overall time-trend is stable with a rate of one admission per year per thousand children at risk and a per-year incidence rate ratio 0.999 [95 % CI 0.997-1.001]. The rate of any readmission decreased from approximately 20 per thousand children in the eighties to less than 10 in the early nineties before stabilizing at around 10 per thousand children from mid-nineties and onwards. During 35 years of nation-wide follow-up, we find a highly stable incidence rate of first hospital admission for acute severe asthma in children. Moreover, rates of readmission halved during the seventies and stabilized in the last twenty years. In conclusion, our data suggest that the reported increase in childhood asthma is mainly due to less severe cases.

  12. Short-term starvation with a near-fatal asthma attack induced ketoacidosis in a nondiabetic pregnant woman

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kuang-Yu; Chang, Shan-Yueh; Wang, Sheng-Huei; Su, Her-Young; Tsai, Chen-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Life-threatening refractory metabolic acidosis due to starvation ketoacidosis is rarely reported, even among nondiabetic pregnant women, and may be overlooked. Furthermore, stressful situations may increase the acidosis severity. In the present case, a nondiabetic multiparous woman was admitted for a near-fatal asthma attack and vomiting during the third trimester of pregnancy. She was intubated and rapidly developed high anion gap metabolic acidosis. We diagnosed the patient with starvation ketoacidosis based on vomiting with concomitant periods of stress during pregnancy and the absence of other causes of high anion gap metabolic acidosis. She responded poorly to standard treatment, although the ketoacidosis and asthma promptly resolved after an emergency caesarean section. The patient and her baby were safely discharged. Short-term starvation, if it occurs during periods of stress and medication, can result in life-threatening ketoacidosis, even among nondiabetic women during the third trimester of pregnancy. Awareness of this condition may facilitate prompt recognition and proactive treatment for dietary and stress control, and emergent interventions may also improve outcomes. PMID:27368034

  13. Development and internal validation of a pediatric acute asthma prediction rule for hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Donald H; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Moons, Karel GM; Harrell, Frank E; Hartert, Tina V

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinicians have difficulty predicting need for hospitalization in children with acute asthma exacerbations. Objective To develop and internally validate a multivariable Asthma Prediction Rule (APR) to inform hospitalization decision-making in children ages 5-17 years with acute asthma exacerbations. Methods Between April, 2008 and February, 2013 we enrolled a prospective cohort of patients ages 5-17 years with asthma who presented to our pediatric emergency department with acute exacerbations. Predictors for APR modeling included 15 demographic characteristics, asthma chronic control measures, and pulmonary examination findings in participants at the time of triage and before treatment. The primary outcome variable for APR modeling was need for hospitalization (length-of-stay > 24 hr for those admitted to hospital or relapse for those discharged). A secondary outcome was the hospitalization decision of the clinical team. We used penalized maximum likelihood multiple logistic regression modeling to examine the adjusted association of each predictor variable with the outcome. Backward step-down variable selection techniques were used to yield reduced-form models. Results Data from 928 of 933 participants was used for prediction rule modeling, with median [IQR] age 8.8 [6.9, 11.2] years, 61% male, and 59% African-American race. Both full (penalized) and reduced-form models for each outcome calibrated well, with bootstrap-corrected c-indices of 1.74 and 0.73 for need for hospitalization and 0.81 in each case for hospitalization decision. Conclusion The APR predicts the need for hospitalization of children with acute asthma exacerbations using predictor variables available at the time of presentation to an emergency department. PMID:25609324

  14. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... exercise. It's a great way to keep the body and mind healthy, so if you get exercise-induced asthma ...

  15. Precipitating factors of asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee, T H

    1992-01-01

    Asthma is characterised by bronchial hyperresponsiveness. This feature of the asthmatic diathesis predisposes patients to wheezing in response to a number of different factors. These precipitating factors include specific allergen acting via sensitised mediator cells through an IgE-dependent mechanism. There are irritants which may work through a non-specific manner, or stimuli such as exercise and hyperventilation, which probably also act through mediator release via a non-IgE-dependent manner. The mechanism whereby physical stimuli such as exercise induce bronchoconstriction is of interest, because it increases the context in which the mast cell may participate in acute asthmatic bronchoconstriction. Respiratory infections also commonly provoke asthma, especially in infants and may, indeed, precipitate the asthmatic state itself. Finally, drugs can often trigger asthma attacks and the mechanisms of asthma precipitated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin have been the subject of recent research.

  16. A case of severe acute exacerbation of Yokkaichi asthma treated with a vibrating mesh nebulizer.

    PubMed

    Yano, Takeshi; Yonaha, Tetsu; Hidaka, Koutaro; Nagahama, Masumi; Koshida, Tomohiro; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Tsuneyoshi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Yokkaichi asthma was one of the most common environmental pollution diseases in Japan in the 1960s and 1970s. The problem of air pollution in Yokkaichi was solved in the 1970s. However, mortality and life expectancy were still affected by the late effects of air pollution in patients with Yokkaichi asthma even in the 2000s. In this case report, we described the experience of successful treatment of a patient with severe asthmatic status due to Yokkaichi asthma. A 40s-year-old man, who was officially certified as a patient with Yokkaichi asthma from his infancy, was admitted to hospital due to acute exacerbation of asthma. Mechanical ventilation, intravenous administration of aminophylline and dexamethasone, enteral administration of montelukast, and a transdermal patch of tulobuterol were started. However, because of the lack of improvement in clinical status, inhalation of procaterol using vibrating mesh nebulizer systems was started. Inhalation of procaterol was used three times a day. After using the vibrating mesh nebulizer, respiratory system compliance and hypercapnia rapidly improved. Bilateral expiratory wheezing was diminished. Weaning from mechanical ventilation was initiated, and on the eighth day of mechanical ventilation, the patient was extubated. Although intractable respiratory failure with decreased respiratory system compliance resulting from the late effects of air pollution and a long-time asthmatic inflammatory condition was observed, the use of a vibrating mesh nebulizer for the inhaled administration of procaterol was useful to relieve severe bronchospasm due to Yokkaichi asthma. PMID:27547723

  17. Prevention of comorbidity and acute attack of gout by uric acid lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kowoon; Kwon, Seong-Ryul; Lim, Mie-Jin; Jung, Kyong-Hee; Joo, Hoyeon; Park, Won

    2014-05-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate the effect of uric acid lowering therapy in reducing the new development of comorbidities and the frequency of acute attacks in gout patients. We retrospectively reviewed patients who were diagnosed to have gout with at least 3 yr of follow up. They were divided into 2 groups; 53 patients with mean serum uric acid level (sUA)<6 mg/dL and 147 patients with mean sUA≥6 mg/dL. Comorbidities of gout such as hypertension (HTN), type II diabetes mellitus (DM), chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and urolithiasis were compared in each group at baseline and at last follow-up visit. Frequency of acute gout attacks were also compared between the groups. During the mean follow up period of 7.6 yr, the yearly rate of acute attack and the new development of HTN, DM, CVD and urolithiasis was lower in the adequately treated group compared to the inadequately treated group. Tight control of uric acid decreases the incidence of acute gout attacks and comorbidities of gout such as HTN, DM, CVD and urolithiasis.

  18. [A case of broncho-pulmonary aspergillosis complicated by bronchial asthma attack].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Nobuyuki; Fujimura, Masaki; Kasahara, Kazuo; Yasui, Masahide; Kita, Toshiyuki; Abo, Miki; Yoshimi, Yuzou; Nishitsuji, Masaru; Nomura, Satoshi; Nakao, Shinji

    2003-04-01

    A 55-year-old man was hospitalized for the treatment of severe asthma. However, his condition improved with steroid chemotherapy under artificial ventilation, but high fever and multiple patchy shadows of the lung that were not responsive to antibiotics appeared. We detected aspergillus hyphae, probably inhaled with a quantity of dust in the attic of his workplace, in the sputum. We diagnosed invasive broncho-pulmonary aspergillosis complicated with allergic broncho-pulmonary aspergillosis. His condition improved with anti-fungal drug treatment. We consider that the causes of invasive broncho-pulmonary aspergillosis in this case were massive inhalation of aspergillus conidia, artifical ventilation and steroid chemotherapy.

  19. Early use of inhaled nedocromil sodium in children following an acute episode of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A; Lyons, J; Weinberg, E; Weinberg, F; Gillies, J; Reid, G; Robertson, C; Robinson, P; Dalton, M; Van Asperen, P; Wilson, C; Mullineux, J; Mullineux, A; Sly, P; Cox, M; Isles, A

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Current guidelines on the treatment of childhood asthma recommend the introduction of an anti-inflammatory drug in children who have persistent symptoms and require regular treatment with a bronchodilator. The efficacy and safety of inhaled nedocromil sodium (Tilade Mint aerosol) administered using a Fisonair spacer at a dose of 4 mg three times daily was compared with placebo in the treatment of asthmatic children aged 6-12 years who are symptomatic and recovering from an acute exacerbation of asthma.
METHODS—A group comparative, double blind, placebo controlled trial was performed in children who were recovering from an acute episode of asthma following treatment in the emergency department of the hospital or in children referred from their general practitioner following a wheezing episode and documented evidence of at least two previous episodes of wheezing. A two week baseline period on existing bronchodilator treatment was followed by a 12 week treatment period on either nedocromil sodium (2 mg/puff) or placebo. Both treatments were administered using a Fisonair spacer at a dose of two puffs three times daily. Changes from baseline values in daytime asthma and night time asthma symptom scores, usage of rescue bronchodilators, mean peak expiratory flow (PEF) recorded twice daily on diary cards, patients' opinion of treatment, and withdrawals due to treatment failure were measured during the primary treatment period (last six weeks of treatment).
RESULTS—One hundred and forty two children aged 6-12 years entered the baseline period. Sixty three were withdrawn due to failure to meet the entry criteria (18) or the criteria for asthma symptom severity (15) or reversibility (9), because they developed uncontrolled asthma (2), because they took disallowed treatment (2), or for other non-trial related reasons (17). Seventy nine patients (46boys) of mean age 8.8 years entered the treatment period. There were significant differences in the changes

  20. Gestational age-specific associations between infantile acute bronchiolitis and asthma after age five

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Matthew J.; Marsh, Caitlin A.; Darrow, Lyndsey A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Infantile acute bronchiolitis is a risk factor for the development of pediatric asthma. The associations might differ according to gestational age. Methods Datasets of emergency department (ED) visits (Jan 2002 to June 2010) and live birth records (Jan 2002 to Dec 2004) from the state of Georgia were linked for all children who survived one year. Exposure was an ED visit for acute bronchiolitis during infancy (AB), and the outcome was an ED visit for asthma after age five years. The risk of asthma among children with AB (n = 11,564) was compared with the risk of asthma among children who did not have an ED visit for AB but who utilized the ED for another reason during infancy (n = 131,694). Associations were estimated using log-binomial regression models that controlled for several plausible confounders. Effect measure modification of the risk ratio by gestational age was investigated. Results Crude asthma risks (per 100 children) through June 2010 were 4.5 for children with AB and 2.3 for children without AB. The adjusted risk ratio for the overall association was 1.89 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.73, 2.108). We did not observe effect modification of the risk ratio by gestational age. Conclusion A positive association was observed between ED visits for AB and subsequent asthma ED visits after age five; associations did not vary meaningfully by gestational age. Sensitivity analyses did not suggest large biases due to differences in ED utilization across socio-demographic groups or loss to follow-up from residential migration. PMID:25256755

  1. RNAi-mediated silencing of hepatic Alas1 effectively prevents and treats the induced acute attacks in acute intermittent porphyria mice.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Makiko; Gan, Lin; Chen, Brenden; Kadirvel, Senkottuvelan; Yu, Chunli; Phillips, John D; New, Maria I; Liebow, Abigail; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Querbes, William; Desnick, Robert J

    2014-05-27

    The acute hepatic porphyrias are inherited disorders of heme biosynthesis characterized by life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks. Factors that induce the expression of hepatic 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 (ALAS1) result in the accumulation of the neurotoxic porphyrin precursors 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG), which recent studies indicate are primarily responsible for the acute attacks. Current treatment of these attacks involves i.v. administration of hemin, but a faster-acting, more effective, and safer therapy is needed. Here, we describe preclinical studies of liver-directed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting Alas1 (Alas1-siRNAs) in a mouse model of acute intermittent porphyria, the most common acute hepatic porphyria. A single i.v. dose of Alas1-siRNA prevented the phenobarbital-induced biochemical acute attacks for approximately 2 wk. Injection of Alas1-siRNA during an induced acute attack significantly decreased plasma ALA and PBG levels within 8 h, more rapidly and effectively than a single hemin infusion. Alas1-siRNA was well tolerated and a therapeutic dose did not cause hepatic heme deficiency. These studies provide proof-of-concept for the clinical development of RNA interference therapy for the prevention and treatment of the acute attacks of the acute hepatic porphyrias.

  2. Original Research: Acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease: Effect of genotype and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Pahl, Kristy

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a severe hemoglobinopathy caused by mutations in the beta globin genes. The disorder has protean manifestations and leads to severe morbidity and early mortality. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a common complication and in the USA is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease. Care of patients with sickle cell disease is complex and typically involves both primary care physicians and hematology subspecialists. The purpose of this study was first to attempt to validate in a pediatric sickle cell patient cohort associations between ACS and sickle cell disease genotype and between ACS and asthma as a comorbidity. The second purpose of the study was to study in a typical community the frequency with which asthma associated with ACS was addressed in terms of electronic medical record integration, pulmonary subspecialty consultation for management of asthma, and completion of pulmonary function testing (PFTs). A retrospective study of the electronic medical record of a children’s hospital that provides most of the medical care for children in a portion of western New York state was performed. We found that ACS was more common in the sickle cell disease genotypes SS and S/beta-thalassemia-null, and that ACS was more frequent in patients treated for asthma. We also found that despite the use of a comprehensive electronic medical record, there was poor documentation of ACS and asthma episodes in the problem lists of patients with sickle cell disease, and that most patients with sickle cell disease with ACS or asthma failed to receive formal consultation services from pediatric pulmonary subspecialists. PMID:26936083

  3. Original Research: Acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease: Effect of genotype and asthma.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Kristy; Mullen, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is a severe hemoglobinopathy caused by mutations in the beta globin genes. The disorder has protean manifestations and leads to severe morbidity and early mortality. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a common complication and in the USA is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease. Care of patients with sickle cell disease is complex and typically involves both primary care physicians and hematology subspecialists. The purpose of this study was first to attempt to validate in a pediatric sickle cell patient cohort associations between ACS and sickle cell disease genotype and between ACS and asthma as a comorbidity. The second purpose of the study was to study in a typical community the frequency with which asthma associated with ACS was addressed in terms of electronic medical record integration, pulmonary subspecialty consultation for management of asthma, and completion of pulmonary function testing (PFTs). A retrospective study of the electronic medical record of a children's hospital that provides most of the medical care for children in a portion of western New York state was performed. We found that ACS was more common in the sickle cell disease genotypes SS and S/beta-thalassemia-null, and that ACS was more frequent in patients treated for asthma. We also found that despite the use of a comprehensive electronic medical record, there was poor documentation of ACS and asthma episodes in the problem lists of patients with sickle cell disease, and that most patients with sickle cell disease with ACS or asthma failed to receive formal consultation services from pediatric pulmonary subspecialists.

  4. Audit of acute asthma management at the Paediatric Emergency Department at Wad Madani Children’s Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Haroun, Huda M.; Ali, Hassan M.; Tag Eldeen, Imad Eldeen M.

    2012-01-01

    This audit of hospital care of acute wheeze and asthma aimed to assess the degree of adherence of the acute care of the asthma patients to the published international guidelines. Information was collected in six key areas: patient demographics; initial asthma severity assessment; in-hospital treatment; asthma prophylaxis; asthma education and emergency planning; and follow-up arrangements. The area of initial asthma severity assessment showed defciencies in the clinical measures currently used to verify case severity. In- hospital treatment on the other hand was consistent with recommendations in the use of the inhaled β-2 agonist salbutamol as bronchodilator, the discrete use of aminophylline and the small number of patients ordered chest X-ray. However, the treatment was incoherent with recommendations in the delivery method used for inhaled bronchodilator in relation to the age group of treated patients, absence of ipratropium bromide as a bronchodilator in the management and the large use of antibiotics. Assessment of the areas of asthma prophylaxis, asthma education and emergency- planning and follow-up arrangements illustrated that little efforts were made to assure safe discharge, although these measures have been shown to reduce morbidity after the exacerbation and reduce relapse rates and signifcantly reduce hospitalizations, unscheduled acute visits, missed work days, as well as improving quality of life. This audit emphasizes the need for the adoption of a management protocol for acute asthma care in the emergency department based on published international guidelines and the assurance of its implementation, monitoring and evaluation using the right tools to improve patient care. PMID:27493337

  5. Cortisol response to acute stress in asthma: Moderation by depressive mood.

    PubMed

    Trueba, Ana F; Simon, Erica; Auchus, Richard J; Ritz, Thomas

    2016-05-15

    Both individuals with asthma and depression show signs of a dysregulated hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. However, little is known about the cortisol response to stress in the context of co-occurring asthma and depressive mood. Thirty-nine individuals with asthma and 41 healthy controls underwent a combined speech and mental arithmetic stressor. During the course of the laboratory session, salivary cortisol was collected 5 times, with 1 sample at 0min before the stressor and 4 samples at 0, 15, 30 and 45min after the stressor. Depressive mood in the past week was assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at the beginning of the session. Depressive symptoms moderated cortisol response to the acute stressor, but only among asthmatic patients. Higher depressive mood was associated with a significant increase in cortisol, whereas low depressive mood was associated with no cortisol response. In healthy participants, depressive mood had no substantial effect on cortisol response to the stressor. These findings suggest that depressive mood and chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma can interact to augment cortisol response to stress.

  6. Efficacy of parecoxib, sumatriptan, and rizatriptan in the treatment of acute migraine attacks.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; Lohse, Lutz

    2011-01-01

    Triptans and analgetic nonsteroidal inflammatory drugs reduce acute pain syndromes in migraine. A further treatment option for an acute headache attack in patients with migraine may be the application of cyclooxygenase-2-specific inhibitors, as they have anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of an oral fast-dissolving tablet of 10 mg of rizatriptan, an intravenous infusion of 40 mg of parecoxib, and a subcutaneous pen injection of sumatriptan (6 mg/0.5 mL) on pain relief in 3 cohorts of patients with episodic migraine. They were treated owing to the acute onset of a pain attack as a case of emergency. They were randomized to treatment with sumatriptan, rizatriptan, or parecoxib. The participants completed a visual analog scale for pain intensity at baseline before the drug administration and then after intervals of 20, 30, 60, and 120 minutes. Rizatriptan, parecoxib, and sumatriptan reduced pain symptoms. Twenty and 30 minutes after drug intake, rizatriptan was more efficacious than parecoxib and sumatriptan, and parecoxib was more effective than sumatriptan. Only a significant difference between rizatriptan and sumatriptan was found after 60 and 120 minutes. This trial demonstrates the effectiveness of a parecoxib infusion in the treatment of acute migraine and that the circumvention of the first pass effect of the liver by rizatriptan may be beneficial for fast pain relief. PMID:21996647

  7. [Exercise-induced asthma].

    PubMed

    Dinh Xuan, A T; Marsac, J; Lockhart, A

    1988-12-10

    Exercise-induced asthma only differs from common asthma in its causative factor. It is a typical asthmatic attack which follows a strenuous and continuous physical exercise lasting 5 to 10 minutes, most often in cold and dry weather. The prevalence of exercise-induced asthma has not yet been firmly established; its pathophysiological mechanisms are still debated, and the respective roles of heat and water losses by the airways are not clearly defined. However, the influence of the type of exercise as a precipitating factor of exercise-induced asthma is now well-known. All things being equal, swimming generates less asthma than running and cycling. This enables the subjects to be directed towards the most suitable sports and encouraged to improve their physical fitness. Drug treatment of exercise-induced asthma must preferentially be preventive; it relies on cromoglycate and beta-2 adrenergic agonists, the latter being also capable of treating acute exercise-induced bronchial obstruction. Education of the patients and their family is also important.

  8. Cervical lung herniation complicating a case of acute asphyxial asthma in a child.

    PubMed

    Martchek, Melissa A; Padilla, Benjamin E; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Friedlaender, Eron Y

    2015-04-01

    The abrupt onset of respiratory failure secondary to asthma, known as acute asphyxial asthma (AAA) in adults, is uncommonly reported in children. Here, we report a case of a child with the acute onset of respiratory failure consistent with AAA complicated by the finding of a neck mass during resuscitation. This 11-year-old boy with a history of asthma initially presented in respiratory failure with altered mental status after the complaint of difficulty in breathing minutes before collapsing at home. Initially, his respiratory failure was thought to be secondary to status asthmaticus, and treatment was initiated accordingly. However, a neck mass noted during the resuscitation was cause for concern, and other etiologies for his respiratory failure were considered, including an airway obstructing neck mass. After pediatric surgery and anesthesia consultation for intubation and possible tracheostomy placement, general anesthesia was induced in the operating room with an inhaled anesthetic, with prompt resolution of the bronchspasm and decompression of the neck mass. Review of the imaging and clinical course ultimately yielded a diagnosis of cervical lung herniation as the etiology of his neck mass. We report this case of AAA and cervical lung herniation and a review of the literature of these 2 uncommon phenomena in children. PMID:25831031

  9. A Puzzle of Vestibular Physiology in a Meniere's Disease Acute Attack

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lopez, Marta; Manrique-Huarte, Raquel; Perez-Fernandez, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present for the first time the functional evaluation of each of the vestibular receptors in the six semicircular canals in a patient diagnosed with Meniere's disease during an acute attack. A 54-year-old lady was diagnosed with left Meniere's disease who during her regular clinic review suffers an acute attack of vertigo, with fullness and an increase of tinnitus in her left ear. Spontaneous nystagmus and the results in the video head-impulse test (vHIT) are shown before, during, and after the attack. Nystagmus was initially left beating and a few minutes later an upbeat component was added. No skew deviation was observed. A decrease in the gain of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) and the presence of overt saccades were observed when the stimuli were in the plane of the left superior semicircular canal. At the end of the crisis nystagmus decreased and vestibuloocular reflex returned to almost normal. A review of the different possibilities to explain these findings points to a hypothetical utricular damage. PMID:26167320

  10. Acute asthma management by a pediatric after-hours call center.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kyle A; Freiner, Donna; Garbutt, Jane; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Bruns, Julie; Sterkel, Randal; Smith, Sharon R; Strunk, Robert C

    2009-01-01

    To describe an asthma management protocol used in a nurse-staffed pediatric After-Hours Call Center (AHCC) that incorporates severity-based home treatment recommendations and follow-up call assessments. Call records for asthma advice from January 1, 2004 to June 30, 2004 were identified retrospectively and reviewed. Descriptive statistics were used to report patient demographics, frequencies of symptom severity zones (Red, Yellow, or Green) at initial calls, frequencies of call dispositions designating care advice provided (including home treatment recommendations and seeking emergency department [ED] care), and changes in severity zones between initial calls and follow-up calls when nurses reassessed patients after recommended home treatment. During the study period, 3,632 asthma calls (2,439 initial; 1,193 follow-up) were managed by AHCC nurses. Initial calls were classified mostly as Red (28%) or Yellow (42%) severity zones; 27% were Green zone and 3% could not be categorized. Fifty-two percent of initial calls with Red or Yellow severity zones involved home treatment recommendations; 50% of those Red zone and 63% of those Yellow zone calls had improved severity zones at follow-up call assessments. Twenty-eight percent of patients with home treatment recommendations were referred to the ED at the time of follow-up call nurse reassessment. This telephone-based nurse-staffed pediatric acute asthma management protocol includes provision of severity-based home treatment recommendations and follow-up assessments, and improved symptoms for many children with acute exacerbations. This protocol may also be successful in other locations and may improve outcomes, such as reduction in ED visits.

  11. Interstitial collagen turnover during airway remodeling in acute and chronic experimental asthma

    PubMed Central

    González-Avila, Georgina; Bazan-Perkins, Blanca; Sandoval, Cuauhtémoc; Sommer, Bettina; Vadillo-Gonzalez, Sebastian; Ramos, Carlos; Aquino-Galvez, Arnoldo

    2016-01-01

    Asthma airway remodeling is characterized by the thickening of the basement membrane (BM) due to an increase in extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, which contributes to the irreversibility of airflow obstruction. Interstitial collagens are the primary ECM components to be increased during the fibrotic process. The aim of the present study was to examine the interstitial collagen turnover during the course of acute and chronic asthma, and 1 month after the last exposure to the allergen. Guinea pigs sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) and exposed to 3 further OVA challenges (acute model) or 12 OVA challenges (chronic model) were used as asthma experimental models. A group of animals from either model was sacrificed 1 h or 1 month after the last OVA challenge. Collagen distribution, collagen content, interstitial collagenase activity and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-13 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 protein expression levels were measured in the lung tissue samples from both experimental models. The results revealed that collagen deposit in bronchiole BM, adventitial and airway smooth muscle layers was increased in both experimental models as well as lung tissue collagen concentration. These structural changes persisted 1 month after the last OVA challenge. In the acute model, a decrease in collagenase activity and in MMP-1 concentration was observed. Collagenase activity returned to basal levels, and an increase in MMP-1 and MMP-13 expression levels along with a decrease in TIMP-1 expression levels were observed in animals sacrificed 1 month after the last OVA challenge. In the chronic model, there were no changes in collagenase activity or in MMP-13 concentration, although MMP-1 expression levels increased. One month later, an increase in collagenase activity was observed, although MMP-1 and TIMP-1 levels were not altered. The results of the present study suggest that even when the allergen challenges were discontinued, and collagenase

  12. Early prediction of poor outcome in patients with acute asthma in the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Mallmann, F; Fernandes, A K; Avila, E M; Nogueira, F L; Steinhorst, A M P; Saucedo, D Z; Machado, F J; Raymundi, M G; Dalcin, P T R; Menna Barreto, S S

    2002-01-01

    Early identification of patients who need hospitalization or patients who should be discharged would be helpful for the management of acute asthma in the emergency room. The objective of the present study was to examine the clinical and pulmonary functional measures used during the first hour of assessment of acute asthma in the emergency room in order to predict the outcome. We evaluated 88 patients. The inclusion criteria were age between 12 and 55 years, forced expiratory volume in the first second below 50% of predicted value, and no history of chronic disease or pregnancy. After baseline evaluation, all patients were treated with 2.5 mg albuterol delivered by nebulization every 20 min in the first hour and 60 mg of intravenous methylprednisolone. Patients were reevaluated after 60 min of treatment. Sixty-five patients (73.9%) were successfully treated and discharged from the emergency room (good responders), and 23 (26.1%) were hospitalized or were treated and discharged with relapse within 10 days (poor responders). A predictive index was developed: peak expiratory flow rates after 1 h < or =0% of predicted values and accessory muscle use after 1 h. The index ranged from 0 to 2. An index of 1 or higher presented a sensitivity of 74.0, a specificity of 69.0, a positive predictive value of 46.0, and a negative predictive value of 88.0. It was possible to predict outcome in the first hour of management of acute asthma in the emergency room when the index score was 0 or 2.

  13. Interstitial collagen turnover during airway remodeling in acute and chronic experimental asthma

    PubMed Central

    González-Avila, Georgina; Bazan-Perkins, Blanca; Sandoval, Cuauhtémoc; Sommer, Bettina; Vadillo-Gonzalez, Sebastian; Ramos, Carlos; Aquino-Galvez, Arnoldo

    2016-01-01

    Asthma airway remodeling is characterized by the thickening of the basement membrane (BM) due to an increase in extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, which contributes to the irreversibility of airflow obstruction. Interstitial collagens are the primary ECM components to be increased during the fibrotic process. The aim of the present study was to examine the interstitial collagen turnover during the course of acute and chronic asthma, and 1 month after the last exposure to the allergen. Guinea pigs sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) and exposed to 3 further OVA challenges (acute model) or 12 OVA challenges (chronic model) were used as asthma experimental models. A group of animals from either model was sacrificed 1 h or 1 month after the last OVA challenge. Collagen distribution, collagen content, interstitial collagenase activity and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-13 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 protein expression levels were measured in the lung tissue samples from both experimental models. The results revealed that collagen deposit in bronchiole BM, adventitial and airway smooth muscle layers was increased in both experimental models as well as lung tissue collagen concentration. These structural changes persisted 1 month after the last OVA challenge. In the acute model, a decrease in collagenase activity and in MMP-1 concentration was observed. Collagenase activity returned to basal levels, and an increase in MMP-1 and MMP-13 expression levels along with a decrease in TIMP-1 expression levels were observed in animals sacrificed 1 month after the last OVA challenge. In the chronic model, there were no changes in collagenase activity or in MMP-13 concentration, although MMP-1 expression levels increased. One month later, an increase in collagenase activity was observed, although MMP-1 and TIMP-1 levels were not altered. The results of the present study suggest that even when the allergen challenges were discontinued, and collagenase

  14. Transient ischemic attack as an unusual initial manifestation of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lifeng; Yuan, Xiaoling

    2016-07-01

    Patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) are prone to both bleeding and thrombosis. Both of these have a significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of patients with this disease. Here we report a case of a 41-year-old male, who presented with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and early neurological deterioration (END) as initial manifestations prior to an ultimate diagnosis of APL. This patient had no cerebrovascular risk factors or familial cerebrovascular disease. The patient experienced an acute ischemic stroke, verified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in less than 24 h after his second hospital admission. Some APL patients suffer from cerebral ischemia as an initial manifestation or during induction therapy, and patients presenting this condition may continue to deteriorate until their death during hospitalization. Thus, APL should be considered as a possible underlying disease in patients with TIA without cerebrovascular risk factors. Delayed diagnosis and treatment of APL can be fatal.

  15. Severe Acute Asthma Exacerbation in Children: A Stepwise Approach for Escalating Therapy in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Nievas, I. Federico Fernandez; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES An increasing prevalence of pediatric asthma has led to increasing burdens of critical illness in children with severe acute asthma exacerbations, often leading to respiratory distress, progressive hypoxia, and respiratory failure. We review the definitions, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestations of severe acute asthma, with a view to developing an evidence-based, stepwise approach for escalating therapy in these patients. METHODS Subject headings related to asthma, status asthmaticus, critical asthma, and drug therapy were used in a MEDLINE search (1980–2012), supplemented by a manual search of personal files, references cited in the reviewed articles, and treatment algorithms developed within Le Bonheur Children's Hospital. RESULTS Patients with asthma require continuous monitoring of their cardiorespiratory status via noninvasive or invasive devices, with serial clinical examinations, objective scoring of asthma severity (using an objective pediatric asthma score), and appropriate diagnostic tests. All patients are treated with β-agonists, ipratropium, and steroids (intravenous preferable over oral preparations). Patients with worsening clinical status should be progressively treated with continuous β-agonists, intravenous magnesium, helium-oxygen mixtures, intravenous terbutaline and/or aminophylline, coupled with high-flow oxygen and non-invasive ventilation to limit the work of breathing, hypoxemia, and possibly hypercarbia. Sedation with low-dose ketamine (with or without benzodiazepines) infusions may allow better toleration of non-invasive ventilation and may also prepare the patient for tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation, if indicated by a worsening clinical status. CONCLUSIONS Severe asthma can be a devastating illness in children, but most patients can be managed by using serial objective assessments and the stepwise clinical approach outlined herein. Following multidisciplinary education and training, this

  16. Importance of patient/parents education in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Gupta, R

    2001-09-01

    Asthma is fairly common in pediatric age group and the suffering due to asthma continues to increase despite excellent treatments available. One of the four major components of asthma management is patient education and is critical to the success of asthma management. Reasons for continued suffering include that our management strategies are not easily understood by the patient/parents without a simple and careful approach towards this step. Eliciting common concerns and fears is the single and foremost strategy to develop a relationship of trust with the patients/parents. Making them understand about the chronic nature of asthma, need for a long-term care approach, what happens during acute attacks and where medications act are some of the important areas you should be educating about in the beginning. Then comes the skill transfer, i.e. giving them skills to monitor asthma including use of peakflowmeter and use of inhalation devices effectively. Joint development of written plans for medications is essential. Development of plans to control of asthma; jointly with them; including learning about warning signs and a plan to manage acute attack at home is also very important and patient/parents should be having an active participation. Finally, educating them how to identify asthma triggers helps as a long-term strategy to keep control over asthma with or without medications. Reminding patient/parents when to come for follow-up and what would be discussed next time are some important tricks of the trade. PMID:11980470

  17. Management of acute asthma in Canada: an assessment of emergency physician behaviour.

    PubMed

    Grunfeld, A; Beveridge, R C; Berkowitz, J; FitzGerald, J M

    1997-01-01

    The study objective was to assess Canadian emergency physicians for their management preferences and their compliance with recently developed guidelines for treatment of acute asthma in adults. The design was a cross-sectional survey sent to members of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) and to the emergency department (ED) directors of all Canadian hospitals with more than 25 beds in November 1992. ED directors who had not responded were sent a second survey in January 1993. The response rates for the survey were 60.1% (362/602) for ED directors and 53.4% (302/586) for CAEP members. Respondents were more likely to be from larger hospitals and to have completed some training beyond general practice level (CCFP, CCFP-EM, ABEM, FRCPC). There were wide variations among respondents in the use of objective measurements of asthma severity (forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1] and peak expiratory flow rates [PEFR]), dosing of bronchodilators, and utilization of systemic corticosteroids. Forty-six percent of respondents used the FEV1 "occasionally" (22.3%) or "never" (23.8%), and 26.7% used PEFR "occasionally" (15.8%) or "never" (10.9%) in asthma management. Ninety-seven percent used nebulized beta agonist "always" (71.3%) or "often" (25.6%), but only 48.5% used the metered dose inhaler (MDI) "always" (11%) or "often" (37.5%). More than a quarter of respondents (27.2%) used doses of beta agonists that were less than those recommended (> every 30-60 min). Oral corticosteroids were prescribed at discharge only "occasionally" (51.1%), "seldom" (18.9%), or "never" (6.5%) in 76.6% of physicians. Physicians with more training were more likely to assess and treat patients according to current asthma treatment guidelines. The survey shows that many Canadian emergency physicians did not follow published recommendations for the care of patients with acute asthma. This finding was especially so with regard to objective evaluation of airflow, aggressive use of

  18. INTERCONNECTION BETWEEN NITRIC OXIDE FORMATION AND HYPERSENSITIVITY PARAMETERS UNDER GUINEA PIG MODEL OF ACUTE ASTHMA WITH MULTIPLE CHALLENGES.

    PubMed

    Parilova, O O; Shandrenko, S G

    2015-01-01

    An immunoregulatory role of nitric oxide (NO) in the development of adaptive immune responses associated with allergic diseases is very important. The present study extended these observations by the examination of the reciprocal changes in characteristic immunologic parameters of the disease and NO level of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells under guinea pig model of acute asthma with multiple challenges. Development of guinea pig Th2 mediated asthma was accompanied by increasing the level of allergic markers: ovalbumin (OVA) specific IgG and IL-4. We demonstrated that the infiltrate of airway cells contributes to NO synthesis in the respiratory tract during allergic inflammation. The level of intracellular NO formation significantly correlated with plasma allergen specific IgG value in OVA-induced asthma. The presented data evidence that the elevated intracellular NO level in BAL fluid may reflect a nitrosative stress in respiratory tract in general, when allergic asthma exacerbation is present.

  19. Primary Position Upbeat Nystagmus during an Acute Attack of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jee-Ae; Jeong, In-Hye; Lim, Young-Min

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ocular manifestation is one of the frequent signs of an acute attack in multiple sclerosis (MS), although primary position upbeat nystagmus (PPUN) is rare. The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence of PPUN in MS and to determine the lesions that are responsible for this sign. Methods The medical records of 120 MS patients with acute brain lesions were reviewed over a consecutive period of 9 years; of these, 6 patients were found to have PPUN. Other ocular motor abnormalities were analyzed in combination with upbeat nystagmus, video-oculographic findings, and lesions detected on brain MRI. Results Lesions in the pontine tegmentum involving the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) and ventral tegmental tract (VTT) were the most common, being observed in three of the six patients with PPUN. One patient exhibited caudal medullary lesions bilaterally affecting the paramedian portion of the posterior tegmentum, and two patients exhibited multiple lesions involving the pons with the cerebral peduncle or medulla. In five patients, other ocular motor dysfunctions, such as gaze-evoked nystagmus (n=3) and internuclear ophthalmoplegia (n=1), were found in combination with upbeat nystagmus. Conclusions PPUN is an infrequent, ocular manifestation noted during an acute attack of MS, and was observed in 5% of the present cases. Brainstem lesions in these cases primarily involved the pontine tegmentum and the caudal medulla. These findings support the theory that upbeat nystagmus is attributable to damage to the upward vestibulo-ocular reflex pathway related to the vestibular nucleus, VTT, and interconnecting pathways. PMID:24465261

  20. Do accident and emergency senior house officers know the British guidelines on the management of acute asthma?

    PubMed

    Ulahannan, T; Hardern, R D; Hamer, D W

    1996-03-01

    Avoidable deaths from asthma continue, even in hospital. Since the management of acute severe asthma is often initiated in the Accident and Emergency department, it is crucial that staff there have adequate knowledge. An anonymous questionnaire, containing items based on chart 6 of the UK guidelines, was completed by 66 Accident and Emergency Senior House Officers from the Yorkshire region. The study aim was to establish these doctors' levels of knowledge about the recommended management of acute asthma in Accident and Emergency. The median score was 10 (out of a possible 24) and the interquartile range 8-13. Further efforts are required to implement these guidelines so that the best patient outcomes can be achieved.

  1. National Heart Attack Alert Program position paper: chest pain centers and programs for the evaluation of acute cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zalenski, R J; Selker, H P; Cannon, C P; Farin, H M; Gibler, W B; Goldberg, R J; Lambrew, C T; Ornato, J P; Rydman, R J; Steele, P

    2000-05-01

    The National Heart Attack Alert Program (NHAAP), which is coordinated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), promotes the early detection and optimal treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction and other acute coronary ischemic syndromes. The NHAAP, having observed the development and growth of chest pain centers in emergency departments with special interest, created a task force to evaluate such centers and make recommendations pertaining to the management of patients with acute cardiac ischemia. This position paper offers recommendations to assist emergency physicians in EDs, including those with chest pain centers, in providing comprehensive care for patients with acute cardiac ischemia. PMID:10783408

  2. The national review of asthma deaths: what did we learn and what needs to change?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Key points The 2014 UK National Review of Asthma Deaths identified potentially preventable factors in two-thirds of the medical records of cases scrutinised 45% of people who died from asthma did not call for or receive medical assistance in their final fatal attack Overall asthma management, acute and chronic, in primary and secondary care was judged to be good in less than one-fifth of those who died There was a failure by doctors and nurses to identify and act on risk factors for asthma attacks and asthma death The rationale for diagnosing asthma was not evident in a considerable number of cases, and there were inaccuracies related to the completion of medical certificates of the cause of death in over half of the cases considered for the UK National Review of Asthma Deaths Educational aims To increase awareness of some of the findings of the recent UK National Review of Asthma Deaths and previous similar studies To emphasise the need for accurate diagnosis of asthma, and of the requirements for completion of medical certificates of the cause of death To consider areas for improving asthma care and prevention of attacks and avoidable deaths Summary Despite the development and publication of evidence-based asthma guidelines nearly three decades ago, potentially preventable factors are repeatedly identified in studies of the care provided for patients who die from asthma. The UK National Review of Asthma Deaths (NRAD), a confidential enquiry, was no exception: major preventable factors were identified in two-thirds of asthma deaths. Most of these factors, such as inappropriate prescription and failure to provide patients with personal asthma action plans (PAAPs), could possibly have been prevented had asthma guidelines been implemented. NRAD involved in-depth scrutiny by clinicians of the asthma care for 276 people who were classified with asthma as the underlying cause of death in real-life. A striking finding was that a third of these patients did not actually

  3. Sumatriptan (subcutaneous route of administration) for acute migraine attacks in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Christopher J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a highly disabling condition for the individual and also has wide-reaching implications for society, healthcare services, and the economy. Sumatriptan is an abortive medication for migraine attacks, belonging to the triptan family. Subcutaneous administration may be preferable to oral for individuals experiencing nausea and/or vomiting Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of subcutaneous sumatriptan compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine attacks in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, online databases, and reference lists for studies through 13 October 2011. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- and/or active-controlled studies using subcutaneous sumatriptan to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used numbers of participants achieving each outcome to calculate relative risk (or ‘risk ratio’) and numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or a different active treatment. Main results Thirty-five studies (9365 participants) compared subcutaneous sumatriptan with placebo or an active comparator. Most of the data were for the 6 mg dose. Sumatriptan surpassed placebo for all efficacy outcomes. For sumatriptan 6 mg versus placebo the NNTs were 2.9, 2.3, 2.2, and 2.1 for pain-free at one and two hours, and headache relief at one and two hours, respectively, and 6.1 for sustained pain-free at 24 hours. Results for the 4 mg and 8 mg doses were similar to the 6 mg dose, with 6 mg significantly better than 4 mg only for pain-free at one hour, and 8 mg significantly better than 6 mg only for headache relief at one hour. There was no evidence of increased migraine relief if a second dose of sumatriptan 6

  4. Comparative efficacy of terbutaline administered by Nebuhaler and by nebulizer in young children with acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Pendergast, J; Hopkins, J; Timms, B; Van Asperen, P P

    1989-10-01

    We compared the use of terbutaline sulphate that was delivered by a nebulizer with its delivery by a Nebuhaler at two dose levels in 27 children (nine children per group) of between three and six years of age with acute asthma. No significant difference was found in the mean baseline clinical score among the three groups, and a significant decline occurred in the mean clinical scores in all groups by 15 minutes which was maintained to 60 minutes after the dose was administered. The decline that was achieved with delivery of the drug by way of a Nebuhaler (at either dose level) was not significantly different from that with a nebulizer, although cooperation with Nebuhaler usage was not universal in the age-group. PMID:2677624

  5. Short-term starvation with a near-fatal asthma attack induced ketoacidosis in a nondiabetic pregnant woman: A case report.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kuang-Yu; Chang, Shan-Yueh; Wang, Sheng-Huei; Su, Her-Young; Tsai, Chen-Liang

    2016-06-01

    Life-threatening refractory metabolic acidosis due to starvation ketoacidosis is rarely reported, even among nondiabetic pregnant women, and may be overlooked. Furthermore, stressful situations may increase the acidosis severity.In the present case, a nondiabetic multiparous woman was admitted for a near-fatal asthma attack and vomiting during the third trimester of pregnancy. She was intubated and rapidly developed high anion gap metabolic acidosis. We diagnosed the patient with starvation ketoacidosis based on vomiting with concomitant periods of stress during pregnancy and the absence of other causes of high anion gap metabolic acidosis. She responded poorly to standard treatment, although the ketoacidosis and asthma promptly resolved after an emergency caesarean section. The patient and her baby were safely discharged.Short-term starvation, if it occurs during periods of stress and medication, can result in life-threatening ketoacidosis, even among nondiabetic women during the third trimester of pregnancy. Awareness of this condition may facilitate prompt recognition and proactive treatment for dietary and stress control, and emergent interventions may also improve outcomes.

  6. Short-term starvation with a near-fatal asthma attack induced ketoacidosis in a nondiabetic pregnant woman: A case report.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kuang-Yu; Chang, Shan-Yueh; Wang, Sheng-Huei; Su, Her-Young; Tsai, Chen-Liang

    2016-06-01

    Life-threatening refractory metabolic acidosis due to starvation ketoacidosis is rarely reported, even among nondiabetic pregnant women, and may be overlooked. Furthermore, stressful situations may increase the acidosis severity.In the present case, a nondiabetic multiparous woman was admitted for a near-fatal asthma attack and vomiting during the third trimester of pregnancy. She was intubated and rapidly developed high anion gap metabolic acidosis. We diagnosed the patient with starvation ketoacidosis based on vomiting with concomitant periods of stress during pregnancy and the absence of other causes of high anion gap metabolic acidosis. She responded poorly to standard treatment, although the ketoacidosis and asthma promptly resolved after an emergency caesarean section. The patient and her baby were safely discharged.Short-term starvation, if it occurs during periods of stress and medication, can result in life-threatening ketoacidosis, even among nondiabetic women during the third trimester of pregnancy. Awareness of this condition may facilitate prompt recognition and proactive treatment for dietary and stress control, and emergent interventions may also improve outcomes. PMID:27368034

  7. Clinical review: Severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Papiris, Spyros; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Malagari, Katerina; Roussos, Charis

    2002-01-01

    Severe asthma, although difficult to define, includes all cases of difficult/therapy-resistant disease of all age groups and bears the largest part of morbidity and mortality from asthma. Acute, severe asthma, status asthmaticus, is the more or less rapid but severe asthmatic exacerbation that may not respond to the usual medical treatment. The narrowing of airways causes ventilation perfusion imbalance, lung hyperinflation, and increased work of breathing that may lead to ventilatory muscle fatigue and life-threatening respiratory failure. Treatment for acute, severe asthma includes the administration of oxygen, β2-agonists (by continuous or repetitive nebulisation), and systemic corticosteroids. Subcutaneous administration of epinephrine or terbutaline should be considered in patients not responding adequately to continuous nebulisation, in those unable to cooperate, and in intubated patients not responding to inhaled therapy. The exact time to intubate a patient in status asthmaticus is based mainly on clinical judgment, but intubation should not be delayed once it is deemed necessary. Mechanical ventilation in status asthmaticus supports gas-exchange and unloads ventilatory muscles until aggressive medical treatment improves the functional status of the patient. Patients intubated and mechanically ventilated should be appropriately sedated, but paralytic agents should be avoided. Permissive hypercapnia, increase in expiratory time, and promotion of patient-ventilator synchronism are the mainstay in mechanical ventilation of status asthmaticus. Close monitoring of the patient's condition is necessary to obviate complications and to identify the appropriate time for weaning. Finally, after successful treatment and prior to discharge, a careful strategy for prevention of subsequent asthma attacks is imperative. PMID:11940264

  8. Pulmonary function abnormalities and asthma are prevalent in children with sickle cell disease and are associated with acute chest syndrome.

    PubMed

    Intzes, Stefanos; Kalpatthi, Ram V; Short, Robert; Imran, Hamayun

    2013-11-01

    Pulmonary diseases form major sources of morbidity and mortality in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of lung function abnormalities and asthma and their association with acute chest syndrome (ACS) in children with SCD. This was a cross-sectional retrospective study of 127 children with SCD; we collected information regarding ACS and asthma and pulmonary function test (PFT) data. Based on PFT results, the patients were assigned to one pattern of lung function [normal, obstructive lung disease (OLD), restrictive lung disease (RLD)]. Statistical analyses included Pearson correlation, prevalence odds ratio (POR), cross-tabulation, and multiple binary logistic regression. OLD was noted in 35% and RLD in 23% of the patients, with the remainder exhibiting a normal PFT pattern. Forty-six percent of patients had asthma, 64% of whom had a history of ACS. OLD (r = .244, P = .008, POR = 2.8) and asthma (r = .395, P < .001, POR = 5.4) were significantly associated with a history of ACS. There was a negative correlation between having normal PFT data and a history of ACS (r = -.289, P = .002, POR = .3). Asthma and pulmonary function abnormalities are prevalent in children with SCD, with OLD being more common than RLD. There is an association between asthma, OLD, and ACS, however causality cannot be proven due to the study design. We stress the importance of actively investigating for a clinical diagnosis of asthma in all patients with SCD and suggest that PFT data may help detect patients at lower risk for ACS.

  9. MicroRNAs Profiling in Murine Models of Acute and Chronic Asthma: A Relationship with mRNAs Targets

    PubMed Central

    Huynh-Thu, Vân Anh; Geurts, Pierre; Irrthum, Alexandre; Crahay, Céline; Arnould, Thierry; Deroanne, Christophe; Piette, Jacques; Cataldo, Didier; Colige, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Background miRNAs are now recognized as key regulator elements in gene expression. Although they have been associated with a number of human diseases, their implication in acute and chronic asthma and their association with lung remodelling have never been thoroughly investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to establish a miRNAs expression profile in lung tissue, mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin mimicking acute, intermediate and chronic human asthma. Levels of lung miRNAs were profiled by microarray and in silico analyses were performed to identify potential mRNA targets and to point out signalling pathways and biological processes regulated by miRNA-dependent mechanisms. Fifty-eight, 66 and 75 miRNAs were found to be significantly modulated at short-, intermediate- and long-term challenge, respectively. Inverse correlation with the expression of potential mRNA targets identified mmu-miR-146b, -223, -29b, -29c, -483, -574-5p, -672 and -690 as the best candidates for an active implication in asthma pathogenesis. A functional validation assay was performed by cotransfecting in human lung fibroblasts (WI26) synthetic miRNAs and engineered expression constructs containing the coding sequence of luciferase upstream of the 3′UTR of various potential mRNA targets. The bioinformatics analysis identified miRNA-linked regulation of several signalling pathways, as matrix metalloproteinases, inflammatory response and TGF-β signalling, and biological processes, including apoptosis and inflammation. Conclusions/Significance This study highlights that specific miRNAs are likely to be involved in asthma disease and could represent a valuable resource both for biological makers identification and for unveiling mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:21305051

  10. Protective effect of curcumin on acute airway inflammation of allergic asthma in mice through Notch1-GATA3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chong, Lei; Zhang, Weixi; Nie, Ying; Yu, Gang; Liu, Liu; Lin, Li; Wen, Shunhang; Zhu, Lili; Li, Changchong

    2014-10-01

    Curcumin, a natural product derived from the plant Curcuma longa, has been found to have anti-inflammatory, antineoplastic and antifibrosis effects. It has been reported that curcumin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice through inhibiting NF-κB and its downstream transcription factor GATA3. It also has been proved the antineoplastic effect of curcumin through down-regulating Notch1 receptor and its downstream nuclear transcription factor NF-κB levels. In this study, we aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin on acute allergic asthma and its underlying mechanisms. 36 male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups (normal, asthma, asthma+budesonide and asthma+curcumin groups). BALF (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) and lung tissues were analyzed for airway inflammation and the expression of Notch1, Notch2, Notch3, Notch4 and the downstream transcription factor GATA3. Our findings showed that the levels of Notch1 and Notch2 receptors were up-regulated in asthma group, accompanied by the increased expression of GATA3. But the expression of Notch2 receptor was lower than Notch1 receptor. Curcumin pretreatment improved the airway inflammatory cells infiltration and reversed the increasing levels of Notch1/2 receptors and GATA3. Notch3 receptor was not expressed in all of the four groups. Notch4 receptor protein and mRNA expression level in the four groups had no significant differences. The results of the present study suggested that Notch1 and Notch2 receptor, major Notch1 receptor, played an important role in the development of allergic airway inflammation and the inhibition of Notch1-GATA3 signaling pathway by curcumin can prevent the development and deterioration of the allergic airway inflammation. This may be a possible therapeutic option of allergic asthma.

  11. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M

    1995-01-01

    Many toxic compounds found in air emissions may induce bronchoconstriction. In the workplace, workers are exposed to these compounds, often in much higher concentrations. Some of these compounds act as sensitizers. Of these, some compounds induce asthma by producing specific IgE antibodies to the compound or its protein conjugate, while others induce asthma through yet unidentified immunologic mechanisms. Some compounds, when inhaled in high concentrations, act as irritants and produce bronchoconstriction probably by inducing acute airway inflammation. The latter condition is called Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS) or irritant-induced asthma. Occupational asthma is an excellent model to study the pathogenesis and the natural history of adult onset asthma because the responsible agent can be identified, complete avoidance is possible, and exposure can be measured or estimated. PMID:8549481

  12. Asthma in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ellis, E F

    1983-11-01

    Asthma is defined as an obstructive disease of the pulmonary airways resulting from spasm of airway muscle, increased mucus secretion, and inflammation. The airways of asthmatic individuals are hyperresponsive to a variety of stimuli including cold air, atmospheric irritants, pharmacologically active chemicals, various drugs, and hyperventilation. The fundamental abnormality underlying the hyperresponsiveness appears to be genetically determined; two theories explaining the abnormality have received the most attention. One theory suggests that asthma is due to abnormal beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase function with decreased adrenergic responsiveness. An alternate theory proposes that increased cholinergic activity in the airway is the fundamental defect in the disease. The true prevalence of asthma has been difficult to determine owing to uncertainties regarding the definition of the disease. Prevalence in various populations of children ranged from 1.37% to 11.4% or higher. Most studies report a preponderance of asthma in boys over girls, with ratios varying from 1.3:1 to 3.3:1. Risk factors for the disease include a history of atopy, acute lower respiratory tract disease, parental cigarette smoking, and bronchiolitis or croup. The spectrum of asthma is that of an illness beginning early in life and persisting, in some cases, through adulthood. Signs of the disease may be apparent in the first 2 yr of life and are often associated with viral respiratory infections. Disproportionate narrowing of peripheral airways and decreased static elastic recoil properties of the lung predispose infants and young children to asthma. During midchildhood there is a tendency toward improvement, with continued improvement during adolescence. The goal of management of the child with asthma is to reduce symptoms sufficiently so that the child can regularly attend school, engage in play activities, and sleep through the night uninterrupted, while avoiding unacceptable

  13. Risk of severe life threatening asthma and beta agonist type: an example of confounding by severity.

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, J E; Lanes, S F; Kolbe, J; Rea, H H

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that a particular inhaled beta agonist, fenoterol, increases the incidence of severe life threatening asthma. METHODS: A retrospective cohort was assembled comprising 655 patients with asthma aged 15-55 years who attended a single Auckland hospital for acute asthma between 1 January 1986 and 31 December 1987 (the "index event"). Patients were followed for the occurrence of death from asthma or admission to the intensive care unit for asthma, until death or 31 May 1989. Data on asthma medications and asthma severity were obtained from forms used specifically for managing patients with acute asthma in the emergency department and maintained as part of the hospital record and/or from the hospital record (when patients were admitted). RESULTS: Following the index event 90 admissions to the intensive care unit (ICU) and 15 asthma deaths were identified. Before adjusting for asthma severity, patients using inhaled fenoterol had a greater incidence of severe life threatening asthma than patients using inhaled salbutamol (RR = 2.1, 95% CI 1.4 to 3.1). After controlling for two markers of severe asthma used in previous studies-a hospital admission in the previous year and prescribed oral corticosteroids-the relative risk estimate declined to 1.5 (95% CI 1.0 to 2.3). After controlling further for the number of hospital admissions during the study period, continuous oral corticosteroid use rather than short courses of treatment, severity of the previous attack requiring a hospital visit, and race, fenoterol was not associated with severe life threatening asthma at the time of attendance for a previous hospital visit (RR = 1.0, 95% CI 0.6 to 1.7). CONCLUSION: Fenoterol is used more often by patients with severe asthma and, after adjusting for differences in baseline risk, it does not increase the risk of severe life threatening asthma. PMID:8958891

  14. Hospital Admissions for Acute Myocardial Infarction, Angina, Stroke, and Asthma After Implementation of Arizona's Comprehensive Statewide Smoking Ban

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michele E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the impact of Arizona's May 2007 comprehensive statewide smoking ban on hospital admissions for diagnoses for which there is evidence of a causal relationship with secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure (acute myocardial infarction [AMI], angina, stroke, and asthma). Methods. We compared monthly hospital admissions from January 2004 through May 2008 for these primary diagnoses and 4 diagnoses not associated with SHS (appendicitis, kidney stones, acute cholecystitis, and ulcers) for Arizona counties with preexisting county or municipal smoking bans and counties with no previous bans. We attributed reductions in admissions to the statewide ban if they occurred only in diagnoses associated with SHS and if they were larger in counties with no previous bans. We analyzed the data with Poisson regressions, controlling for seasonality and admissions trends. We also estimated cost savings. Results. Statistically significant reductions in hospital admissions were seen for AMI, angina, stroke, and asthma in counties with no previous bans over what was seen in counties with previous bans. No ban variable coefficients were statistically significant for diagnoses not associated with SHS. Conclusions. Arizona's statewide smoking ban decreased hospital admissions for AMI, stroke, asthma, and angina. PMID:20466955

  15. Relevance of serology for Mycoplasma pneumoniae diagnosis compared with PCR and culture in acute exacerbation of bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    El Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Raafat, Doaa; El Metaal, Amal Abd

    2009-01-01

    We studied Mycoplasma pneumoniae as the etiologic pathogen in acute exacerbations of asthma and the value of polymerase chain reaction (PCR), culture, and serologic tests for its accurate diagnosis. For the study, 59 nonsmoking patients with asthma (37 females, 22 males; age, 15-50 years) underwent clinical, radiologic, and laboratory examinations. Bacteria isolated from sputum were Streptococcus pneumoniae (32 [54%]), Staphylococcus aureus (23 [39%]), and M pneumoniae (5 [15%]). All M pneumoniae were associated with S pneumoniae (8/32 [25%]) and S aureus (1/23 [4%]). No M pneumoniae were isolated as single pathogens. Serologic testing for M pneumoniae revealed that all samples were positive for specific IgG; 40 (68%) had a high titer, and 19 (32%) had a moderate titer. Of 59 samples, 29 (49%) were positive by Serodia Myco II gelatin particle testing (Fujirebio, Tokyo, Japan). PCR was positive in 25 samples, all of which had a high IgG titer; all culture-positive cases were PCR+. M pneumoniae is a common bacterial pathogen associated with acute exacerbations of asthma in people 15 years or older. Prompt laboratory diagnosis of M pneumoniae requires direct detection by PCR and culture. A high serologic titer can be a clue for the presence of M pneumoniae.

  16. Serum Procalcitonin as a Useful Serologic Marker for Differential Diagnosis between Acute Gouty Attack and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with gout are similar to those with bacterial infection in terms of the nature of inflammation. Herein we compared the differences in procalcitonin (PCT) levels between these two inflammatory conditions and evaluated the ability of serum PCT to function as a clinical marker for differential diagnosis between acute gouty attack and bacterial infection. Materials and Methods Serum samples were obtained from 67 patients with acute gouty arthritis and 90 age-matched patients with bacterial infection. Serum PCT levels were measured with an enzyme-linked fluorescent assay. Results Serum PCT levels in patients with acute gouty arthritis were significantly lower than those in patients with bacterial infection (0.096±0.105 ng/mL vs. 4.94±13.763 ng/mL, p=0.001). However, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels showed no significant differences between the two groups. To assess the ability of PCT to discriminate between acute gouty arthritis and bacterial infection, the areas under the curves (AUCs) of serum PCT, uric acid, and CRP were 0.857 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.798–0.917, p<0.001], 0.808 (95% CI, 0.738–0.878, p<0.001), and 0.638 (95% CI, 0.544–0.731, p=0.005), respectively. There were no significant differences in ESR and white blood cell counts between these two conditions. With a cut-off value of 0.095 ng/mL, the sums of sensitivity and specificity of PCT were the highest (81.0% and 80.6%, respectively). Conclusion Serum PCT levels were significantly lower in patients with acute gouty attack than in patients with bacterial infection. Thus, serum PCT can be used as a useful serologic marker to differentiate between acute gouty arthritis and bacterial infections. PMID:27401644

  17. Importance of Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Evaluation of the Treatment Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with Acute Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Tuna; Bozgeyik, Zülküf; Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Citil, Serdal; Erbay, Mehmet Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background We planned to investigate contribution of DWMR to the treatment efficacy with ADC values which were measured in acute and chronic plaque before and after MS treatment. ADC changes in normal appearing white matter (NAWM) in patients with MS and healthy volunteers were also evaluated in this study. Material/Methods 25 patients with MS and 30 healthy subjects with normal brain MR findings were included to our study. Contrast enhancement in plaque was evaluated as an acute, and non-contrast enhancement in plaque was evaluated as a chronic. Also, ADC measurements were performed using the same parameters in NAWM in plaque neighborhood and volunteers. Results were compared with appropriate statistical methods. Results ADC values in acute and chronic plaques were decreased after the treatment, and these reductions were statistically significant for acute plaqus in b500 and for chronic plaques in b500 and b1000. The mean ADC values were measured as 1.53±0.49×10−3 and 1.43±0.58×10−3 in acute plaques and 1.40±0.35×10−3 and 1.34±0.36×10−3 mm2/sec in chronic plaques before and after the treatment. Conclusions We think that DWMR have important role due to quantitative measurement ability in the evaluation of the treatment efficacy of the MS patients with acute attack in addition to contrast-enhanced MR sequence. PMID:26740826

  18. Comparison of oral montelukast with oral zileuton in acute asthma: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Magazine, Rahul; Shahul, Hameed Aboobackar; Chogtu, Bharti; Kamath, Asha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leukotriene modifiers have an established role in the management of chronic asthma but their role in acute asthma is still under evaluation. Objective: To study and compare the effects of oral montelukast with oral zileuton in acute asthma. Materials and Methods: This study included 120 asthmatics and was conducted from September 2012 to March 2014. Patients were randomized into three different groups to receive montelukast or zileuton or placebo in addition to standard treatment for asthma exacerbation. Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) values, details of rescue medication and vital signs were recorded at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h of drug or placebo administration and at discharge. Additional recording was done in the morning (8–10 am) following admission. The primary endpoint was the mean PEFR of each group at these time points; the secondary end point being the need for rescue medications. Results: The mean PEFR recordings of the three study groups – placebo, montelukast, and zileuton – respectively, at various time points were as follows: at 6 h (223.25 ± 90.40, 199.00 ± 82.52, 233.75 ± 84.05; P = 0.240); at 12 h (271.00 ± 109.38, 251.50 ± 101.44, 309.50 ± 129.63; P = 0.048); at 24 h (288.25 ± 114.26, 269.00 ± 107.51, 324.50 ± 127.88; P = 0.080); and at 48 h (295.00 ± 114.80, 293.50 ± 113.24, 344.75 ± 119.91; P = 0.015); discharge (305.00 ± 118.56, 305.25 ± 119.51, 361.25 ± 119.70; P = 0.010). The mean PEFR for the three study groups at 8–10 am on the morning following admission was 268.75 ± 111.43, 252.50 ± 99.99, 306.75 ± 114.44; P = 0.047. Total rescue doses needed were 10, 1, and 0, respectively (P = 0.049). Conclusion: Zileuton is better than montelukast as an additional drug in acute asthma and results in significant improvement in lung function, and reduction in the need for rescue medications. PMID:27185992

  19. [Anesthetic management in bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Kozian, Alf; Schilling, Thomas; Hachenberg, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    In daily practice, acute and chronic pulmonary diseases are common issues presenting to the anesthetist. Respiratory physiology in general is affected by both general and regional anesthesia, which results in an increased number of perioperative complications in pulmonary risk patients. Therefore, anesthetic management of patients with bronchial asthma needs to address different clinical topics: the physical appearance of pulmonary disease, type and extent of surgical intervention as well as effects of therapeutic drugs, anesthetics and mechanical ventilation on respiratory function. The present work describes important precautions in preoperative scheduling of the asthmatic patient. In the operative course, airway manipulation and a number of anesthetics are able to trigger intraoperative bronchial spasm with possibly fatal outcome. It is essential to avoid these substances to prevent asthma attack. If asthmatic status occurs, appropriate procedures according to therapeutic standards have to be applied to the patient. Postoperatively, sufficient pain therapy avoids pulmonary complications and improves outcome. PMID:27359239

  20. Common Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... your bedding on the hottest water setting. Outdoor Air Pollution Outdoor air pollution can trigger an asthma attack. This pollution can ... your newspaper to plan your activities for when air pollution levels will be low. Cockroach Allergen Cockroaches and ...

  1. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  2. Emergency room assessment and adrenaline treatment of patients with acute asthma of different severity.

    PubMed

    Limthongkul, S

    1989-06-01

    The adequacy of emergency room assessment and treatment of patients with acute severe asthmatic attacks was evaluated by analyzing the course of 451 visits of 348 patients to Chulalongkorn hospital's Emergency Room. Eighty-five per cent of the patients had an initial index score of greater than or equal to 4 and an average peak expiratory flow rate of 92.16 +/- 46.3 L/min. The discharge index score was 85 per cent with a score of less than or equal to 3 and an average peak expiratory flow rate of 192 +/- 40.3 L/min. Our study indicated that the predictive index proposed by Fischl et al correlated with the severity of airway obstruction; however, the initial index did not help with emergency room decision-making in predicting which patients might be hospitalized, have a relapse or be discharged. In fact, in our emergency room department, the index score to determine airway obstruction and the pattern of response to treatment were better predictors of the outcome, which was classified into three categories: non-responsive or minimally responsive, responsive, and partially responsive. By using conventional clinical criteria (i.e. recumbent position with elimination of laboured breathing, disappearance of dyspnea and reduction of wheezing), there was a 93 per cent accurate determination in the episodes of patients who responded sufficiently to the emergency room treatment to allow their discharge. The remaining 7 per cent of those seeking emergency treatment were hospitalized, which is a lower incidence than that of others series.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Selected CC and CXC chemokines in children with atopic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Machura, Edyta; Mazur, Bogdan; Chrobak, Ewelina; Ziora, Katarzyna; Ziora, Dariusz; Kasperska-Zajac, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are only limited data on CC and CXC chemokines regulation in children with asthma. Aim We compared the serum profile of selected CC and CXC chemokines in patients with atopic asthma and healthy children. Material and methods Serum concentration of CC chemokines RANTES, MCP-1, and CXC chemokines IP-10, MIG, IL-8, RANTES was measured using cytometric bead array in 44 children with atopic asthma and 17 healthy subjects. Results The concentration of RANTES was significantly higher and the MIG level was lower in all children with asthma as compared to their control counterparts. We observed increased RANTES and decreased MIG levels also in patients with stable asthma when compared with children in the control group. The IP-10 concentration was similar between the whole asthma group and healthy controls, while significantly increased levels of this chemokine in acute asthma have been observed when compared to stable asthma. For MCP-1 and IL-8, the serum concentration was similar in all compared groups. The MIG concentration correlated positively with IP-10, IL-8, and CRP levels and negatively with the eosinophil count. A negative correlation between the IP-10 and eosinophil count and a negative correlation between FEV1 and IP-10 were found. Conclusions An increased serum RANTES level in children with asthma may result in enhancement of Th2 lymphocyte recruitment into the airway. A decreased expression of Th1 chemokine MIG in children with stable asthma may contribute to a diminished antagonizing effect on Th2 cytokine production and hence intensify Th2 predominance. An increased IP-10 level in children during an asthma attack suggest that this chemokine is a serological marker of disease exacerbation. PMID:27279817

  4. The immune profile associated with acute allergic asthma accelerates clearance of influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Samarasinghe, Amali E; Woolard, Stacie N; Boyd, Kelli L; Hoselton, Scott A; Schuh, Jane M; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    Asthma was the most common comorbidity in hospitalized patients during the 2009 influenza pandemic. For unknown reasons, hospitalized asthmatics had less severe outcomes and were less likely to die from pandemic influenza. Our data with primary human bronchial cells indicate that changes intrinsic to epithelial cells in asthma may protect against cytopathology induced by influenza virus. To further study influenza virus pathogenesis in allergic hosts, we aimed to develop and characterize murine models of asthma and influenza comorbidity to determine structural, physiological and immunological changes induced by influenza in the context of asthma. Aspergillus fumigatus-sensitized and -challenged C57BL/6 mice were infected with pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, either during peak allergic inflammation or during airway remodeling to gain insight into disease pathogenesis. Mice infected with the influenza virus during peak allergic inflammation did not lose body weight and cleared the virus rapidly. These mice exhibited high eosinophilia, preserved airway epithelial cell integrity, increased mucus, reduced interferon response and increased insulin-like growth factor-1. In contrast, weight loss and viral replication kinetics in the mice that were infected during the late airway remodeling phase were equivalent to flu-only controls. These mice had neutrophils in the airways, damaged airway epithelial cells, less mucus production, increased interferons and decreased insulin-like growth factor-1. The state of the allergic airways at the time of influenza virus infection alters host responses against the virus. These murine models of asthma and influenza comorbidity may improve our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of viral infections in humans with asthma. PMID:24469764

  5. ASSESSMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY PM 2.5 SAMPLES FROM TWO CITIES IN GERMANY WITH DIFFERING INCIDENCE OF ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    ASSESSMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY PM 2.5 SAMPLES FROM TWO CITIES IN GERMANY WITH DIFFERING INCIDENCE OF ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA.

    LR Bishop, J Heinrich*, MK Selgrade & MI Gilmour.
    Experimental Toxicology Division, ORD/ NHEERL, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC. *GSF, Neuherberg,...

  6. Effects of the tulobuterol patch on the treatment of acute asthma exacerbations in young children.

    PubMed

    Katsunuma, Toshio; Ohya, Yukihiro; Fujisawa, Takao; Akashi, Kenichi; Imamura, Naoto; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Daikoku, Kazunari; Kondo, Naomi; Terada, Akihiko; Doi, Satoru; Nishimuta, Toshiyuki; Noma, Takeshi; Hamasaki, Yuhei; Kurihara, Kazuyuki; Masuda, Kei; Yamada, Takashi; Yamada, Masanori; Yoshihara, Shigemi; Watanabe, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Tohru; Kitabayashi, Taeru; Morikawa, Akihiro; Nishima, Sankei

    2012-01-01

    The tulobuterol patch (TP) is a beta(2)-adrenergic agonist with a favorable pharmacokinetic profile used for asthma management in Japan. Because it contains tulobuterol in a molecular, crystallized form that is gradually absorbed percutaneously, TP exerts a prolonged bronchodilator effect exceeding 24 hours. Although it is a well-established treatment for asthma and wheezing, few studies have investigated whether it can reduce or prevent the symptoms associated with upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) in young children. This study evaluated the effect of TP on the long-term management of asthma in young children. In this 1-year, randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, children aged 0.5-3 years old with mild-to-moderate persistent asthma were treated with either TP or placebo patch. The parents/guardians applied the TP or placebo patch to their children after URTI symptoms appeared. Respiratory symptoms were recorded daily during the 1-year observation period. Overall, 86 patients were enrolled and 80 were treated and analyzed in this study. All patients had been treated with anti-inflammatory drugs before enrollment. The time to symptom resolution was significantly shorter (p = 0.001) and the total respiratory symptom score (p = 0.0457) was significantly lower in the TP group than in the placebo group. In young children with mild-to-moderate asthma who had been treated with anti-inflammatory drugs, using the TP soon after the appearance of URTI symptoms led to quicker resolution of respiratory symptoms and lower respiratory symptom scores.

  7. Geospatial relationships of air pollution and acute asthma events across the Detroit-Windsor international border: study design and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Lawrence D; Lamerato, Lois E; Xu, Xiaohong; Booza, Jason C; Reiners, John J; Raymond Iii, Delbert M; Villeneuve, Paul J; Lavigne, Eric; Larkin, Dana; Krouse, Helene J

    2014-07-01

    The Geospatial Determinants of Health Outcomes Consortium (GeoDHOC) study investigated ambient air quality across the international border between Detroit, Michigan, USA and Windsor, Ontario, Canada and its association with acute asthma events in 5- to 89-year-old residents of these cities. NO2, SO2, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured at 100 sites, and particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at 50 sites during two 2-week sampling periods in 2008 and 2009. Acute asthma event rates across neighborhoods in each city were calculated using emergency room visits and hospitalizations and standardized to the overall age and gender distribution of the population in the two cities combined. Results demonstrate that intra-urban air quality variations are related to adverse respiratory events in both cities. Annual 2008 asthma rates exhibited statistically significant positive correlations with total VOCs and total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) at 5-digit zip code scale spatial resolution in Detroit. In Windsor, NO2, VOCs, and PM10 concentrations correlated positively with 2008 asthma rates at a similar 3-digit postal forward sortation area scale. The study is limited by its coarse temporal resolution (comparing relatively short term air quality measurements to annual asthma health data) and interpretation of findings is complicated by contrasts in population demographics and health-care delivery systems in Detroit and Windsor.

  8. Geospatial relationships of air pollution and acute asthma events across the Detroit–Windsor international border: Study design and preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Lawrence D; Lamerato, Lois E; Xu, Xiaohong; Booza, Jason C; Reiners, John J; Raymond III, Delbert M; Villeneuve, Paul J; Lavigne, Eric; Larkin, Dana; Krouse, Helene J

    2014-01-01

    The Geospatial Determinants of Health Outcomes Consortium (GeoDHOC) study investigated ambient air quality across the international border between Detroit, Michigan, USA and Windsor, Ontario, Canada and its association with acute asthma events in 5- to 89-year-old residents of these cities. NO2, SO2, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured at 100 sites, and particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at 50 sites during two 2-week sampling periods in 2008 and 2009. Acute asthma event rates across neighborhoods in each city were calculated using emergency room visits and hospitalizations and standardized to the overall age and gender distribution of the population in the two cities combined. Results demonstrate that intra-urban air quality variations are related to adverse respiratory events in both cities. Annual 2008 asthma rates exhibited statistically significant positive correlations with total VOCs and total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) at 5-digit zip code scale spatial resolution in Detroit. In Windsor, NO2, VOCs, and PM10 concentrations correlated positively with 2008 asthma rates at a similar 3-digit postal forward sortation area scale. The study is limited by its coarse temporal resolution (comparing relatively short term air quality measurements to annual asthma health data) and interpretation of findings is complicated by contrasts in population demographics and health-care delivery systems in Detroit and Windsor. PMID:24220215

  9. Acute Effects of Asian Dust Events on Respiratory Symptoms and Peak Expiratory Flow in Children with Mild Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Young; Choung, Ji Tae; Yu, Jinho; Kim, Do Kyun

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible adverse effects of Asian dust events on respiratory health in asthmatic children. Fifty-two children with mild asthma were studied for eight consecutive weeks in the spring of 2004 (March 8 to May 2). During the study period, five Asian dust days were identified; we included a lag period of two days following each of the events. Subjects recorded their respiratory symptom diaries and peak expiratory flow (PEF) twice daily during the study period; and they underwent methacholine bronchial challenge tests. The subjects reported a significantly higher frequency of respiratory symptoms during the Asian dust days than during the control days. They showed significantly more reduced morning and evening PEF values, and more increased PEF variability (10.1%±3.5% vs. 5.5%±2.2%) during the Asian dust days than during the control days. Methacholine PC20 was not significantly different between before and after the study period (geometric mean: 2.82 mg/mL vs. 3.16 mg/mL). These results suggest that the short-term Asian dust events might be associated with increased acute respiratory symptoms and changes in PEF outcomes. However, there might be little long-term influence on airway hyperresponsiveness in children with mild asthma. PMID:18303201

  10. Acute effects of urban ambient air pollution on respiratory symptoms, asthma medication use, and doctor visits for asthma in a cohort of Australian children.

    PubMed

    Jalaludin, Bin B; O'Toole, Brian I; Leeder, Stephen R

    2004-05-01

    We enrolled a cohort of primary school children with a history of wheeze (n=148) in an 11-month longitudinal study to examine the relationship between ambient air pollution and respiratory morbidity. We obtained daily air pollution (ozone, particulate matter less than 10 microm, and nitrogen dioxide), meteorological, and pollen data. One hundred twenty-five children remained in the final analysis. We used logistic regression models to determine associations between air pollution and respiratory symptoms, asthma medication use, and doctor visits for asthma. There were no associations between ambient ozone concentrations and respiratory symptoms, asthma medication use, and doctor visits for asthma. There was, however, an association between PM(10) concentrations and doctor visits for asthma (RR=1.11, 95% CI=1.04-1.19) and between NO(2) concentration and wet cough (RR=1.05, 95% CI=1.003-1.10) in single-pollutant models. The associations remained significant in multipollutant models. There was no consistent evidence that children with wheeze, positive histamine challenge, and doctor diagnosis of asthma reacted differently to air pollution from children with wheeze and doctor diagnosis of asthma and children with wheeze only. There were significant associations between PM(10) levels and doctor visits for asthma and an association between NO(2) levels and the prevalence of wet cough. We were, however, unable to demonstrate that current levels of ambient air pollution in western Sydney have a coherent range of adverse health effects on children with a history of wheezing.

  11. The influence of education on morbidity and mortality in asthma (including the use of open access hospital admission for severe attacks).

    PubMed

    Clark, C J

    1994-04-01

    Despite the availability of effective drugs, asthma morbidity and mortality are increasing. Undertreatment is a significant contributory factor providing the rationale for improved concentration on education of asthmatics. A review of asthma education programmes reveals improvements in a variety of outcome measures. However, the types of patients studied in these programmes are very variable and it remains an unproven assumption that previously non-compliant and undertreated patients are amenable to improving asthma through education. The problems of compliance are common both in childhood and adult asthma. Further concentration on strategies to improve the management of this particular sub-group require development. In general, education programmes appear more effective when they consist of specific self-management instructions rather than general education regarding the disease process. PMID:8049704

  12. HMS-Related Hemolysis after Acute Attacks of Plasmodium vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Mitjà, Oriol; Hays, Russell; Malken, James; Ipai, Anthony; Kangapu, Samson; Robson, Jenny; Bassat, Quique

    2011-01-01

    Among a cohort of 1,213 cases treated for Plasmodium vivax malaria from an isolated Papua New Guinean population, seven adults with severe and sustained hemolytic anemia after clearance of the peripheral parasitemia were prospectively investigated. All the patients fulfilled the criteria for hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly and in 2 of 7 cases an IgG warm antibody was identified. Hereditary hemolytic anemia was excluded in 5 of 5 patients. All treated cases improved after an initial high dose of prednisone and antimalarial chemoprophylaxis. The persistence of marked anemia in a patient with splenomegaly after a P. vivax attack should raise the suspicion of hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly. PMID:21976560

  13. Treatment of acute severe asthma with inhaled albuterol delivered via jet nebulizer, metered dose inhaler with spacer, or dry powder.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, A C; Schottlender, J; Lombardi, D; Molfino, N A

    1997-07-01

    Despite the increasing use of dry powder formulations in the ambulatory setting, there is a paucity of information on the efficacy of this therapeutic modality to treat acute severe asthma. In addition, studies that compared wet nebulization vs metered dose inhalers formulated with chlorofluorocarbon (CFCMDI) attached to holding chambers have yielded discrepant results. Thus, it is unclear which of the three delivery systems would elicit a superior bronchodilator response, particularly in patients with life-threatening asthma. In a prospective, randomized open design, we studied the response to inhaled albuterol (salbutamol) in 27 adult asthmatics presenting to the emergency department (ED) with an FEV1 <30% predicted. Subjects were treated with one of the following regimens (nine subjects in each group): group A, mean (SD) baseline FEV1 of 0.7 (0.2) L, received albuterol solution, 5 mg, via a nebulizer (Puritan-Bennett Raindrop; Lawrenceville, Ga) impelled with oxygen (O2) at 8 L/min; group B, baseline FEV1 of 0.6 (0.15) L, received albuterol, 400 microg, via a CFCMDI attached to a 145-mL valved aerosol holding chamber (Aerochamber; Trudell Medical; London, ON); and group C, baseline FEV1 of 0.6 (0.17) L, received albuterol powder, 400 microg, by another means (Rotahaler; Glaxo; Research Triangle Park, NC). All groups received the respective treatments on arrival in the ED, every 30 min during the first 2 h, and then hourly until the sixth hour. Clinical parameters and FEV1 were recorded on ED admission and 15 min after each dose of albuterol. At the time of ED admission, all patients also received continuous O2 and one dose of I.V. steroids (dexamethasone, 8 mg). The total dose of inhaled albuterol administered during the 6-h treatment was 45 mg of nebulized solution in group A and 3,600 microg of albuterol aerosol and dry powder in groups B and C, respectively. No significant differences were found in the population demographics, baseline FEV1, and arterial

  14. Inpatient deaths from acute myocardial infarction, 1982-92: analysis of data in the Nottingham heart attack register.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, N.; Young, T.; Gray, D.; Skene, A. M.; Hampton, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess longitudinal trends in admissions, management, and inpatient mortality from acute myocardial infarction over 10 years. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis based on the Nottingham heart attack register. SETTING: Two district general hospitals serving a defined urban and rural population. SUBJECTS: All patients admitted with a confirmed acute myocardial infarction during 1982-4 and 1989-92 (excluding 1991, when data were not collected). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Numbers of patients, background characteristics, time from onset of symptoms to admission, ward of admission, treatment, and inpatient mortality. RESULTS: Admissions with acute myocardial infarction increased from 719 cases in 1982 to 960 in 1992. The mean age increased from 62.1 years to 66.6 years (P < 0.001), the duration of stay fell from 8.7 days to 7.2 days (P < 0.001), and the proportion of patients aged 75 years and over admitted to a coronary care unit increased significantly from 29.1% to 61.2%. A higher proportion of patients were admitted to hospital within 6 hours of onset of their symptoms in 1989-92 than in 1982-4, but 15% were still admitted after the time window for thrombolysis. Use of beta blockers increased threefold between 1982 and 1992, aspirin was used in over 70% of patients after 1989, and thrombolytic use increased 1.3-fold between 1989 and 1992. Age and sex adjusted odds ratios for inpatient mortality remained unchanged over the study period. CONCLUSIONS: Despite an increasing uptake of the "proved" treatments, inpatient mortality from myocardial infarction did not change between 1982 and 1992. PMID:9251546

  15. Valuing the Economic Costs of Allergic Rhinitis, Acute Bronchitis, and Asthma from Exposure to Indoor Dampness and Mold in the US

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Two foundational methods for estimating the total economic burden of disease are cost of illness (COI) and willingness to pay (WTP). WTP measures the full cost to society, but WTP estimates are difficult to compute and rarely available. COI methods are more often used but less likely to reflect full costs. This paper attempts to estimate the full economic cost (2014$) of illnesses resulting from exposure to dampness and mold using COI methods and WTP where the data is available. A limited sensitivity analysis of alternative methods and assumptions demonstrates a wide potential range of estimates. In the final estimates, the total annual cost to society attributable to dampness and mold is estimated to be $3.7 (2.3–4.7) billion for allergic rhinitis, $1.9 (1.1–2.3) billion for acute bronchitis, $15.1 (9.4–20.6) billion for asthma morbidity, and $1.7 (0.4–4.5) billion for asthma mortality. The corresponding costs from all causes, not limited to dampness and mold, using the same approach would be $24.8 billion for allergic rhinitis, $13.5 billion for acute bronchitis, $94.5 billion for asthma morbidity, and $10.8 billion for asthma mortality. PMID:27313630

  16. Prediction of relapse within eight weeks after an acute asthma exacerbation in adults.

    PubMed

    McCarren, M; McDermott, M F; Zalenski, R J; Jovanovic, B; Marder, D; Murphy, D G; Kampe, L M; Misiewicz, V M; Rydman, R J

    1998-02-01

    Associations between historical, presenting, and treatment-related characteristics and relapse within 8 weeks after a moderate to severe asthma exacerbation were studied in a cohort of 284 adult asthmatics. Data were collected prospectively, and a multivariate model was developed and internally validated. Within 10 days, only 8% had relapsed, increasing to 45% by 8 weeks. Three variables that could be identified at the time of discharge were independently associated with relapse. These included: having made three or more visits to an emergency department in the prior 6 months (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.6-3.4); difficulty performing work or activities as a result of physical health in the 4 weeks prior (HR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.6-4.3); discontinuing hospital-based treatment for the exacerbation within 24 hours without having achieved a peak expiratory flow rate of at least 50% of predicted (HR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.6-4.1). These risk factors may help to identify patients with poorly controlled asthma in need of more intensive and comprehensive management. PMID:9474071

  17. Attack rate and household secondary attack rate of acute conjunctivitis during an outbreak in South India: A community-based survey

    PubMed Central

    Thekkur, Pruthu; Reddy, Mahendra M; Naik, Bijaya Nanda; Subitha, L; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Knowledge on epidemiology of the disease in the contemporary world will help to develop appropriate strategies to curtail the transmission during an outbreak. This study was carried out during an outbreak of conjunctivitis in selected areas of Puducherry, South India, to assess the attack rate of conjunctivitis, identify factors associated with developing conjunctivitis and calculate household secondary attack rate (HSAR) of conjunctivitis and its correlates. Methodology: During December 2014, a community-based survey was conducted in a selected urban and rural area in Puducherry, South India. Simple random sampling was used to select primary sampling units and systematic sampling to select households. All individuals in the selected households were studied. A questionnaire was used to obtain data on sociodemographic characteristics, conjunctivitis during September-November, 2014, and number of household contacts who developed conjunctivitis within 7 days of index case. The attack rate and HSAR of conjunctivitis was expressed as percentage. Multivariate logistic regression was used to find factors independently associated with developing conjunctivitis and also 100% HSAR. Results: Of 3193 study participants from 772 households, 509 (15.9%, 95% confidence interval 14.7-17.2%) had an attack of conjunctivitis during the reference period. Of the 772 households, 218 (28.2%) had at least one case of conjunctivitis. Of 218 households, 33 (15.1%) households had 100% HSAR. Lower age, not being unemployed, low socioeconomic status, and residing in rural area were independently associated with developing conjunctivitis. Index case being male and living in a household with ≥5 members were independently associated with 100% HSAR. Conclusion: In the outbreak under study, more than one-fourth of households had at least one case of conjunctivitis and about one in every six individuals had an attack of conjunctivitis. PMID:27221677

  18. The role of ozone exposure in the epidemiology of asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Balmes, J.R.

    1993-12-01

    Asthma is a clinical condition characterized by intermittent respiratory symptoms, nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness, and reversible airway obstruction. Although the pathogenesis of asthma is incompletely understood, it is clear that airway inflammation is a paramount feature of the condition. Because inhalation of ozone by normal, healthy subjects causes increased airway responsiveness and inflammation, it is somewhat surprising that most controlled human exposure studies that have involved asthmatic subjects have not shown them to be especially sensitive to ozone. The acute decrement in lung function that is the end point traditionally used to define sensitivity to ozone in these studies may be due more to neuromuscular mechanisms limiting deep inspiration than to bronchoconstriction. The frequency of asthma attacks following ozone exposures may be a more relevant end point. Epidemiologic studies, rather than controlled human exposure studies, are required to determine whether ozone pollution increases the risk of asthma exacerbations. Asthma affects approximately 10 million people in the United States and, thus, the answer to this question is of considerable public health importance. Both the prevalence and severity of asthma appear to be increasing in many countries. Although increased asthma morbidity and mortality are probably of multifactorial etiology, a contributory role of urban air pollution is plausible. The epidemiologic database to support an association between asthma and ozone exposure is limited, but the results of several studies suggest such an association. Some potential approaches to further investigation of the relationship between asthma and ozone, including those that would link controlled human exposures to population-based studies, are considered. 57 refs.

  19. Exercising and asthma at school

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma attack, modify PE activities. For example, a running program might be set up this way: Walk ... whole distance Run part of the distance Alternate running and walking Some exercises may be less likely ...

  20. Acute adult asthma--assessment of severity and management and comparison with British Thoracic Society Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hart, S R; Davidson, A C

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the accuracy of clinical severity assessment of asthmatics and to compare emergency and subsequent ward management with British Thoracic Society (BTS) Guidelines, the records of all patients admitted for severe asthma (46) over a 5-month period to a District General Hospital were inspected. Variations from recommended management were revealed. Appropriate oxygen administration was often not provided in casually and patients frequently left hospital before their discharge criteria were attained: recommended diurnal variations in peak flow were exceeded in 26%. Eleven per cent of discharges were against medical advice, making provision of adequate management logistically difficult. Adherence to BTS guidelines on the need for arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis would have led to a failure to detect significant hypoxaemia in 25% of cases. This study identified substantial variations from BTS management guidelines. It is suggested that oximetry is necessary on arrival to guide selection for arterial blood gas analysis.

  1. Comparison of the process of care of acute severe asthma in adults admitted to hospital before and 1 yr after the publication of national guidelines.

    PubMed

    Pearson, M G; Ryland, I; Harrison, B D

    1996-10-01

    This study set out to assess the effect of publication of the British Guidelines on Asthma Management on the processes and outcomes of the inpatient care of acute severe asthma in the U.K. A criterion-based audit of all acute asthma admissions during August and September 1990 (immediately before) and in 1991 (1 yr after publication of the Guidelines) using eight criteria of process and outcome was performed. Thirty-six teaching and district general hospitals in England, Scotland and Wales took part. In total, 766 patients admitted in 1990, and 900 patients admitted in 1991, were studied. The 1990 and 1991 cohorts were very similar demographically and had asthma of comparable severity. Respiratory physicians achieved similar high performance rates of between 75 and 91% for seven of the eight criteria for both years. Respiratory physicians were significantly more likely to provide patients with a written management plan in 1991. General physicians' performance was significantly lower in both years, but overall there was a very small, but just significant, improvement in their performance in 1991. Some hospitals performed consistently well in both years. It is concluded that respiratory physicians consistently provide better asthma care than general physicians. Though statistically significant, the small degree of improvement was disappointing. Possible reasons include: insufficient time for the Guidelines to be incorporated into practice; inaccessibility of the Guidelines to general physicians; failure to accept responsibility for implementing the good practice reflected in the Guidelines; and an explicit need for strategies to implement the Guidelines beyond publication in a widely-read general medical journal.

  2. Chlamydia pneumoniae and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cook, P; Davies, P; Tunnicliffe, W; Ayres, J; Honeybourne, D; Wise, R

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—This study was designed to test the association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with asthma in a multiracial population, after adjustments for several potential confounding variables.
METHODS—Antibodies to C pneumoniae were measured by microimmunofluorescence in 123 patients with acute asthma, 1518 control subjects admitted to the same hospital with various non-cardiovascular, non-pulmonary disorders, and 46 patients with severe chronic asthma, including some with "brittle" asthma. Acute infection or reinfection was defined by titres of IgG of ⩾512 or IgM ⩾8 or a fourfold rise in IgG, and previous infection by IgG 64-256 or IgA ⩾8. Logistic regression was used to control for likely confounders, including ethnic origin, age, sex, smoking habit, steroid medication, diabetes mellitus and social deprivation, on antibody levels.
RESULTS—Antibody titres consistent with acute C pneumoniae infection were found in 5.7% of patients with acute asthma and 5.7% of control patients, while 14.6% of patients with acute asthma and 12.7% of control patients had titres suggesting previous infection. These two groups did not differ significantly. However, titres suggesting previous infection were found in 34.8% of patients with severe chronic asthma: the difference between this group and the control group was statistically significant with an adjusted odds ratio of 3.99 (95% confidence interval 1.60 to 9.97).
CONCLUSIONS—These data raise important questions about the previously demonstrated association of C pneumoniae infection with asthma, and suggest that future studies of this association should give particular attention to the presence or absence of a history of severe chronic asthma.

 PMID:9741366

  3. Presenting symptoms and onset-to-arrival time in patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack.

    PubMed

    Gargano, Julia Warner; Wehner, Susan; Reeves, Mathew J

    2011-11-01

    Delayed arrival to the emergency department (ED) precludes most stroke patients from receiving thrombolytic treatment. Our objective in this study was to examine the association between presenting symptoms and onset-to-arrival time (ie, time between onset of symptoms to arrival at the ED) in a statewide stroke registry. Demographics, clinical data, and presenting symptoms were collected for patients with acute stroke or symptomatic transient ischemic attack (TIA) admitted to 15 Michigan hospitals (n = 1922). Polytomous logistic regression models were developed to test the association between presenting symptoms and onset-to-arrival time (classified as <2 hours, 2-6 hours, or >6 hours/unknown). Onset-to-arrival time was <2 hours in 19% of the patients, 2-6 hours in 22%, and >6 hours/unknown in 59%. Unilateral symptoms (reported by 40%) and speech difficulties (reported by 22%) were associated with increased likelihood of arriving within 2 hours (unilateral: adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.9; speech: aOR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2-2.2). Difficulty with walking, balance, or dizziness (12%), confusion (9%), loss of consciousness (6.7%) and falls (3.4%) were associated with lower likelihood of arriving within 2 hours (walking: aOR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.4-1.0; confusion: aOR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.8; consciousness: aOR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9; falls: aOR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9). Presenting symptoms were strongly associated with time of arrival; patients with unilateral symptoms and speech difficulties were more likely to seek care early. Future studies should consider including more specific patient-level data to identify psychosocial and behavioral aspects of recognition and action to stroke symptoms. PMID:20719538

  4. Repeat treatment of acute hereditary angioedema attacks with open-label icatibant in the FAST-1 trial

    PubMed Central

    Malbrán, A; Riedl, M; Ritchie, B; Smith, W B; Yang, W; Banerji, A; Hébert, J; Gleich, G J; Hurewitz, D; Jacobson, K W; Bernstein, J A; Khan, D A; Kirkpatrick, C H; Resnick, D; Li, H; Fernández Romero, D S; Lumry, W

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is characterized by potentially life-threatening recurrent episodes of oedema. The open-label extension (OLE) phase of the For Angioedema Subcutaneous Treatment (FAST)-1 trial (NCT00097695) evaluated the efficacy and safety of repeated icatibant exposure in adults with multiple HAE attacks. Following completion of the randomized, controlled phase, patients could receive open-label icatibant (30 mg subcutaneously) for subsequent attacks. The primary end-point was time to onset of primary symptom relief, as assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS). Descriptive statistics were reported for cutaneous/abdominal attacks 1–10 treated in the OLE phase and individual laryngeal attacks. Post-hoc analyses were conducted in patients with ≥ 5 attacks across the controlled and OLE phases. Safety was evaluated throughout. During the OLE phase, 72 patients received icatibant for 340 attacks. For cutaneous/abdominal attacks 1–10, the median time to onset of primary symptom relief was 1·0–2·0 h. For laryngeal attacks 1–12, patient-assessed median time to initial symptom improvement was 0·3–1·2 h. Post-hoc analyses showed the time to onset of symptom relief based on composite VAS was consistent across repeated treatments with icatibant. One injection of icatibant was sufficient to treat 88·2% of attacks; rescue medication was required in 5·3% of attacks. No icatibant-related serious adverse events were reported. Icatibant provided consistent efficacy and was well tolerated for repeated treatment of HAE attacks. PMID:24749847

  5. Combination of lung ultrasound (a comet-tail sign) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in differentiating acute heart failure from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma as cause of acute dyspnea in prehospital emergency setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We studied the diagnostic accuracy of bedside lung ultrasound (the presence of a comet-tail sign), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and clinical assessment (according to the modified Boston criteria) in differentiating heart failure (HF)-related acute dyspnea from pulmonary (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/asthma)-related acute dyspnea in the prehospital setting. Methods Our prospective study was performed at the Center for Emergency Medicine, Maribor, Slovenia, between July 2007 and April 2010. Two groups of patients were compared: a HF-related acute dyspnea group (n = 129) and a pulmonary (asthma/COPD)-related acute dyspnea group (n = 89). All patients underwent lung ultrasound examinations, along with basic laboratory testing, rapid NT-proBNP testing and chest X-rays. Results The ultrasound comet-tail sign has 100% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 100% negative predictive value (NPV) and 96% positive predictive value (PPV) for the diagnosis of HF. NT-proBNP (cutoff point 1,000 pg/mL) has 92% sensitivity, 89% specificity, 86% NPV and 90% PPV. The Boston modified criteria have 85% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 80% NPV and 90% PPV. In comparing the three methods, we found significant differences between ultrasound sign and (1) NT-proBNP (P < 0.05) and (2) Boston modified criteria (P < 0.05). The combination of ultrasound sign and NT-proBNP has 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% NPV and 100% PPV. With the use of ultrasound, we can exclude HF in patients with pulmonary-related dyspnea who have positive NT-proBNP (> 1,000 pg/mL) and a history of HF. Conclusions An ultrasound comet-tail sign alone or in combination with NT-proBNP has high diagnostic accuracy in differentiating acute HF-related from COPD/asthma-related causes of acute dyspnea in the prehospital emergency setting. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01235182. PMID:21492424

  6. Impact of Age and Sex on Outcomes and Hospital Cost of Acute Asthma in the United States, 2011-2012

    PubMed Central

    Teague, W. Gerald; Koroukian, Siran M.; Schlitz, Nicholas K.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Busse, William B.; Calhoun, William J.; Castro, Mario; Comhair, Suzy A.; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Israel, Elliot; Wenzel, Sally E.; Holguin, Fernando; Gaston, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Worldwide, asthma is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality and economic burden, with significant gender and racial disparities. However, little attention has been given to the independent role of age on lifetime asthma severity and hospitalization. We aimed to assess the effect of age, gender, race and ethnicity on indicators of asthma severity including asthma related hospitalization, mortality, hospital cost, and the rate of respiratory failure. Methods We analyzed the 2011 and 2012 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project- National Inpatient Sample (NIS). We validated and extended those results using the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP; 2002–2011) database. Severe asthma was prospectively defined using the stringent American Thoracic Society (ATS) definition. Results Hospitalization for asthma was reported in 372,685 encounters in 2012 and 368,528 in 2011. The yearly aggregate cost exceeded $2 billion. There were distinct bimodal distributions for hospitalization age, with an initial peak at 5 years and a second at 50 years. Likewise, this bimodal age distribution of patients with severe asthma was identified using SARP. Males comprised the majority of individuals in the first peak, but women in the second. Aggregate hospital cost mirrored the bimodal peak distribution. The probability of respiratory failure increased with age until the age of 60, after which it continued to increase in men, but not in women. Conclusions Severe asthma is primarily a disease of young boys and middle age women. Greater understanding of the biology of lung aging and influence of sex hormones will allow us to plan for targeted interventions during these times in order to reduce the personal and societal burdens of asthma. PMID:27294365

  7. The Evidence for Intravenous Theophylline Levels between 10-20mg/L in Children Suffering an Acute Exacerbation of Asthma: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Intravenous theophyllines are a second line treatment for children suffering an acute exacerbation of asthma. Various guidelines and formularies recommend aiming for serum theophylline levels between 10-20mg/l. This review aims to assess the evidence underpinning this recommendation. Methods A systematic review comparing outcomes of children who achieved serum theophylline concentrations between 10-20mg/l with those who did not. Primary outcomes were time until resolution of symptoms, mortality and need for mechanical ventilation. Secondary outcomes were date until discharge criteria are met, actual discharge, adverse effects and FEV1. Data sources MEDLINE, CINAHL, CENTRAL and Web of Science. Search performed in October 2015. Eligibility criteria Interventional or observational studies utilizing intravenous theophyllines for an acute exacerbation of asthma in children where serum theophylline levels and clinical outcomes were measured. Findings 10 RCTs and 2 observational studies were included. Children with serum levels between 10-20mg/l did not have a reduction in duration of symptoms, length of hospital stay or need for mechanical ventilation or better spirometric results compared with levels <10mg/l. Levels above 20mg/l are not associated with higher rates of adverse effects. This study is limited due to heterogeneity in the way theophylline levels were reported and poor surveillance of adverse effects across studies. Conclusion Dosing strategies aiming for levels between 10-20mg/l are not associated with better outcomes. Clinicians should rely on clinical outcomes and not serum levels when using intravenous theophyllines in children suffering an acute exacerbation of asthma. PMID:27096742

  8. Asthma Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asthma is a chronic disease that requires ongoing management. Personalized plans for treatment may include medications, an asthma action plan, and environmental control measures to avoid your child's asthma triggers. ...

  9. Asthma Bronchiale and Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Harshani; Kopsaftis, Zoe; Carson, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Exercising regularly has a wide range of beneficial health effects; in particular, it has been well documented to help in the management of chronic illnesses including asthma. However, in some individuals, exertion can also trigger an exacerbation of asthmatic episodes and subsequent acute attacks of breathlessness, coughing, tightness of the chest and wheezing. This physiological process is called exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) whereby post-exercise forced expiratory volume in 1 s is reduced by 10-15% from baseline. While EIB is highly prevalent in asthmatics and presents with similar respiratory symptoms, asthma and EIB are not mutually exclusive. The aim of this review is to present a broad overview of both conditions in order to enhance the understanding of the similarities and differences distinguishing them as two separate entities. The pathophysiology and mechanisms underlying asthma are well described with research now focussing on defining phenotypes for targeted management strategies. Conversely, the mechanistic understanding of EIB remains largely under-described. Diagnostic pathways for both are established and similar, as are pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments and management approaches, which have enhanced success with early detection. Given the potential for exacerbation of asthma, exercise avoidance is common but counterproductive as current evidence indicates that it is well tolerated and improves quality of life. Literature supporting the benefit of exercise for EIB sufferers is at present favourable, yet extremely limited; therefore, future research should be directed in this area as well as towards further developing the understanding of the pathophysiology and mechanisms underpinning both EIB and asthma.

  10. Recent developments in the treatment of acute abdominal and facial attacks of hereditary angioedema: focus on human C1 esterase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Lourdes Pastó; Bellfill, Ramon Lleonart; Caus, Joaquim Marcoval

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a potentially fatal genetic disorder typified by a deficiency (type I) or dysfunction (type II) of the C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) and characterized by swelling of the extremities, face, trunk, abdominal viscera, and upper airway. Type III is normal estrogen-sensitive C1-INH HAE. Bradykinin, the main mediator of HAE, binds to endothelial B2 receptors, increasing vascular permeability and resulting in edema. HAE management includes short- and long-term prophylaxis. For treating acute episodes, C1-INH concentrate is recommended with regression of symptoms achieved in 30–90 min. Infusions of 500–1000 U have been used in Europe for years. Two plasma-derived C1-INH concentrates have been licensed recently in the United States: Berinert® for treating acute attacks and Cinryze® for prophylaxis in adolescent/adult patients. A recombinant C1-INH that is being considered for approval (conestat alfa) exhibited significant superiority versus placebo. Ecallantide (Kalbitor®) is a selective kallikrein inhibitor recently licensed in the United States for treating acute attacks in patients aged >16 years. It is administered in three 10-mg subcutaneous injections with the risk of anaphylactic reactions. Icatibant (Firazyr®) is a bradykinin B2 receptor competitor. It is administered subcutaneously as a 30-mg injection and approved in Europe but not in the United States. PMID:23776358

  11. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction; Non-ST - elevation myocardial infarction; NSTEMI; CAD - heart attack; Coronary artery disease - heart attack ... made up of cholesterol and other cells. A heart attack may occur when: A tear in the ...

  12. Asthma in childhood.

    PubMed

    de Benedictis, Fernando Maria; Attanasi, Marina

    2016-03-01

    Several topics on childhood asthma were addressed in the Paediatric Clinical Year in Review session at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress. With regard to the relationship between lower respiratory tract infections and asthma, it emerges that is the number of respiratory episodes in the first years of life, but not the particular viral trigger, to be associated with later asthma development. Understanding which characteristics of individual patients are associated with an increased risk for asthma exacerbation is a critical step to implement strategies preventing these seasonal events. Recent data suggest the possibility that exhaled volatile organic compounds may qualify as biomarkers in detecting early signs of asthma. Adding information of exhaled volatile organic compounds and expression of inflammation genes to a clinical tool significantly improves asthma prediction in preschool wheezy children. Personal communication with children and adolescents is likely more important than the tools actually used for monitoring asthma. Systemic corticosteroids do not affect the long-term prognosis in children with first viral-induced wheezing episode and should be used cautiously during acute episodes. Finally, stress and a polymorphism upstream of a specific gene are both associated with reduced bronchodilator response in children with asthma.

  13. Asthma - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - inhaled corticosteroids; Asthma - long-acting beta-agonists; Asthma - leukotriene modifiers; Asthma - cromolyn; Bronchial asthma-control drugs; Wheezing - control drugs; Reactive airway disease - control drugs

  14. Definition of critical asthma syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Nicholas; Zeki, Amir A; Albertson, Timothy E; Louie, Samuel

    2015-02-01

    Urgent visits to the clinic and emergency department for acute severe asthma exacerbations are all too frequent. Existing national guidelines do not present consistent or specific recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of individual asthma patients in respiratory distress. In this vein, we propose the term "critical asthma syndrome" (CAS) to describe any child or adult who is at high risk for fatal asthma. Acute severe asthma, refractory asthma, status asthmaticus, and near-fatal asthma all describe CAS where physical exhaustion from the overwhelming work of breathing leads to respiratory arrest and death from hypoxia or related complications. The authors of this supplement seek to emphasize the importance of early recognition, prompt and coordinated evaluation, and treatment of CAS in the emergency department, hospital, and intensive care units by experienced healthcare provider teams. CAS is not severe persistent asthma where control of symptoms and prevention of exacerbations are targets of chronic disease management in the outpatient setting. The authors address the distinctions between the two entities throughout the supplement, and elaborate on the considerations important in the care of a critically ill patient, including the common errors to avoid. In addition, gaps in knowledge and clinical experience in regards to critical asthma are highlighted. Knowledge gaps include a lack of understanding of how to recognize CAS, how to coordinate and integrate hospital and outpatient resources, when to further phenotype patients with critical asthma in order to facilitate effective treatment, and how to prevent future acute exacerbations. Lastly, CAS is complicated by the fact that asthma care in diverse healthcare settings is haphazard. We recommend that primary care physicians refer patients promptly to an asthma specialist for consultation to reduce the frequency of acute exacerbations and prevent the development of CAS.

  15. What do medical students know about childhood asthma?

    PubMed

    Fitzclarence, C A; Henry, R L

    1991-02-01

    A questionnaire designed to measure knowledge about childhood asthma was completed by 216 of the 311 (69%) undergraduate medical students at the University of Newcastle. First year students had a mean score of 16.2 (maximum possible score was 31) which was similar to the background community score of 13.0 obtained in a group of parents with no close contact with asthma. Knowledge about asthma increased over each of the 5 years of the medical course. Final-year students had a mean score of 28.7 (range: 25-31) which was similar to a group of parents thought by their paediatricians to have a high level of knowledge about asthma (mean: 25.3, range: 18-31). The progression of knowledge over the 5 years of the course provided interesting information about the learning process. Although second year students completed the questionnaire after a term devoted to coursework in respiratory medicine, only 26% were able to name two preventive agents and 21% named three agents useful during acute attacks of asthma. Third year students gave correct responses in 39 and 45% of cases, respectively, and the correct response rates rose to 78 and 97% in the fifth year. This was probably because the theoretical knowledge needed to be acquired and tested against a clinical scenario before it could be used. The study demonstrated an increase in knowledge about asthma throughout the problem-based medical course. In addition to providing information about the educational process, it provided information about the questionnaire which was able to measure a range of knowledge and not just extremes of asthma knowledge. PMID:2043392

  16. An international observational prospective study to determine the cost of asthma exacerbations (COAX).

    PubMed

    Lane, Stephen; Molina, Jesus; Plusa, Tadeusz

    2006-03-01

    Asthma is a common chronic condition that places substantial burden on patients and healthcare services. Despite the standards of asthma control that international guidelines recommend should be achieved, many patients continue to suffer sub-optimal control of symptoms and experience exacerbations (acute asthma attacks). In addition to being associated with reduced quality of life, asthma exacerbations are a key cost driver in asthma management. Routine clinical practice for the management of asthma exacerbations varies in different healthcare systems, so healthcare providers require local costs to be able to assess the value of therapies that reduce the frequency and severity of exacerbations. This prospective study, conducted in a total of 15 countries, assessed the local cost of asthma exacerbations managed in either primary or secondary care. Healthcare resources used were costed using actual values appropriate to each country in local currency and in Euros. Results are presented for exacerbations managed in primary care in Brazil, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain and Ukraine, and in secondary care in Croatia, Denmark, Ireland, Latvia, Norway, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain. Multiple regression analysis of the 2052 exacerbations included in the economic analysis showed that the cost of exacerbations was significantly affected by country (P<0.0001). Mean costs were significantly higher in secondary care (euro 1349) than primary care (euro 445, P=0.0003). Age was a significant variable (P=0.0002), though the effect showed an interaction with care type (P<0.0001). As severity of exacerbation increased, so did secondary care costs, though primary care costs remained essentially constant. In conclusion, the study showed that asthma exacerbations are costly to manage, suggesting that therapies able to increase asthma control and reduce the frequency or severity of exacerbations may bring economic

  17. Implementation of a 12-week disease management program improved clinical outcomes and quality of life in adults with asthma in a rural district hospital: pre- and post-intervention study.

    PubMed

    Chamnan, Parinya; Boonlert, Kittipa; Pasi, Wanit; Yodsiri, Songkran; Pong-on, Sirinya; Khansa, Bhoonsab; Yongkulwanitchanan, Pichapat

    2010-03-01

    Despite the availability of effective medical treatment and disease management guidelines, asthma remains a poorly controlled disease in developing countries. There is little evidence of the effectiveness of disease management guidelines in rural clinical practice. The effect of disease management guidelines on clinical outcomes and quality of life in asthmatic patients in a rural community hospital was examined. Fifty-seven patients aged > or = 16 years with physician-diagnosed asthma from a hospital outpatient clinic in Ubon-ratchathani, Thailand, were recruited. Asthma diagnosis was confirmed by reviewing clinical records. We implemented a 12-week disease management program, including the use of written asthma treatment plan and asthma action plan tailored to individual patients. Using one-group pre- and post-intervention design, we compared the average number of emergency visits and hospitalizations from acute asthmatic attacks before and after the implementation of interventions using the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test. We also compared patient's asthma quality of life (AQL) scores, measured using the 7-point scaled Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire. It was found that among the 57 patients, 38 (67%) were women, and the mean age (SD) of the patients was 47.6 (17.0) years. Sixteen patients (28%) had a family history of asthma. Emergency visits decreased from 0.48 (SD = 0.83) per patient before implementation of interventions to 0.11 (0.37) per patient after implementation of interventions (p = 0.003). Hospitalizations with acute asthma attacks reduced from 0.14 (0.35) per patient to 0.04 (0.27) per patient (p = 0.034). Overall AQL scores increased significantly from 3.7 to 5.4 (p < 0.001), with most improvement observed in symptoms and emotions. It was concluded that implementation of a 12-week asthma disease management program could reduce emergency visits and hospitalizations, and improve patients' quality of life in a rural practice setting.

  18. The disease management approach to controlling asthma.

    PubMed

    Haahtela, T

    2002-02-01

    Asthma has become an important public health issue worldwide and certain groups, such as children, are at particular risk of the disease. Often asthma remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. Despite these worrying trends, the disease management approach to asthma control can help most asthma patients achieve a 'normal' way of life. The increased prevalence and greater diagnostic awareness of asthma have placed increased demands on healthcare resources, but effective asthma control can minimize the personal, social and economic burdens of asthma. Early diagnosis and immediate anti-inflammatory treatment is the first step in gaining control of symptoms. A stepwise approach is then used to classify asthma severity and treatment, with the number and frequency of medications increasing (step up) as asthma severity increases and decreasing (step down) when asthma is under control. This stepwise approach to asthma management necessitates regular review of treatment once asthma is under control. However, effective asthma management is dependent on successful patient education, adherence to prescribed medication and good doctor patient partnerships. Current treatment guidelines recommend the use of a written asthma management plan that should be agreed between the doctor and patient. These plans should cover all aspects of asthma treatment, including prevention steps for long-term control and action steps to stop attacks once a worsening in asthma has been recognized. This comprehensive approach to asthma management increases the likelihood of achieving asthma control, which in turn reduces the need for emergency visits to the hospital or clinic and reduces the limitations on physical activity previously imposed by the condition.

  19. Farm Work-Related Asthma Among US Primary Farm Operators

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, Jacek M.; White, Gretchen E.; Rodman, Chad; Schleiff, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of current asthma and the proportion of current asthma that is related to work on the farm among primary farm operators. The 2011 Farm and Ranch Safety Survey data were used to produce estimates and prevalence odds ratios. An estimated 5.1% of farm operators had asthma. Of these, 15.4% had farm work-related asthma. Among operators with farm work-related asthma, 54.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 41.8%–68.2%) had an asthma attack in the prior 12 months and 33.3% (95% CI: 21.2%–45.4%) had an asthma attack that occurred while doing farm work. Of those who had an asthma attack that occurred while doing farm work, 65.0% associated their asthma attack with plant/tree materials. This study provides updated information on asthma and the proportion of current asthma that is related to work on the farm and identifies certain groups of farm operators that might benefit from workplace asthma prevention intervention. PMID:25635741

  20. Environmental factors associated with asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Bailus; Stokes, Lynette D.; Warren, Rueben

    2003-01-01

    Asthma, a disease of attacks and remission, continues to account for substantial morbidity and direct economic costs. Numerous studies--epidemiologic, toxicologic and clinical--present evidence for a broad spectrum of environmental risk factors associated with asthma. This review summarizes current thinking on a subset of these factors. Knowledge of potential environmental determinants of asthma is important to both the patient and healthcare professional in the application of multiple modalities of medical and environmental intervention for management of the development, and exacerbation of this chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways. PMID:12760611

  1. Asthma. A summary of first-choice treatments.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    First identify and avoid factors that trigger or aggravate asthma attacks First-line treatment for asthma is inhaled salbutamol: used on demand to relieve respiratory discomfort or to prevent attacks due to a known trigger; or on a daily basis if necessary, in combination with an inhaled corticosteroid such as beclometasone, for patients with persistent asthma. Treatment of severe persistent asthma is based on daily use of a high-dose inhaled corticosteroid, or possibly an oral corticosteroid, for as short a period as possible. To limit adverse effects and drug interactions, the dose should be reduced, or the treatment gradually withdrawn, once asthma is under control.

  2. Prevalence, causes and risk factors of hospital readmissions after acute stroke and transient ischemic attack: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weibin; Geng, Na; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Zhenguang; Cao, Lili

    2016-08-01

    Acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a great burden not only during hospitalization but also after hospital discharge. The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the hospital readmissions, causes and risk factors after survival of acute stroke and TIA. Pubmed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, OVID and EMBASE databases were searched to identify studies reporting hospital readmissions after acute stroke and TIA. The primary outcomes were hospital readmission rates during 30 days and 1 year after discharge. The primary causes and risk factors of hospital readmissions were also identified. Ten studies with 253,680 patients were eligible for inclusion. The pooled 30-day and 1-year hospital readmission rates were 17.4 % (95 % CI, 12.7-23.5 %) and 42.5 % (95 % CI, 34.1-51.3 %), respectively. The three major causes of 30-day hospital readmissions were infection (19.9 %), coronary artery disease (CAD) (17.8 %) and recurrent stroke (16.0 %) successively, while the three major causes were recurrent stroke (19.4 %), infection (19.3 %) and CAD (16.3 %) during 1 year's follow-up. There were more patients with CAD in readmits group than that in control group (p = 0.030). The length of index admission, defined as any eligible admission to an acute care hospital assessed in the measure for the outcome, was longer (p = 0.000) and admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) was higher (p = 0.002) in readmits group than these in control group. In conclusion, there is high risk of early and long-term hospital readmissions after survival of acute stroke and TIA. These patients with coronary artery disease, longer length of index admission and higher NIHSS deserve deep attention after hospital discharge.

  3. Prevalence, causes and risk factors of hospital readmissions after acute stroke and transient ischemic attack: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weibin; Geng, Na; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Zhenguang; Cao, Lili

    2016-08-01

    Acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a great burden not only during hospitalization but also after hospital discharge. The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the hospital readmissions, causes and risk factors after survival of acute stroke and TIA. Pubmed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, OVID and EMBASE databases were searched to identify studies reporting hospital readmissions after acute stroke and TIA. The primary outcomes were hospital readmission rates during 30 days and 1 year after discharge. The primary causes and risk factors of hospital readmissions were also identified. Ten studies with 253,680 patients were eligible for inclusion. The pooled 30-day and 1-year hospital readmission rates were 17.4 % (95 % CI, 12.7-23.5 %) and 42.5 % (95 % CI, 34.1-51.3 %), respectively. The three major causes of 30-day hospital readmissions were infection (19.9 %), coronary artery disease (CAD) (17.8 %) and recurrent stroke (16.0 %) successively, while the three major causes were recurrent stroke (19.4 %), infection (19.3 %) and CAD (16.3 %) during 1 year's follow-up. There were more patients with CAD in readmits group than that in control group (p = 0.030). The length of index admission, defined as any eligible admission to an acute care hospital assessed in the measure for the outcome, was longer (p = 0.000) and admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) was higher (p = 0.002) in readmits group than these in control group. In conclusion, there is high risk of early and long-term hospital readmissions after survival of acute stroke and TIA. These patients with coronary artery disease, longer length of index admission and higher NIHSS deserve deep attention after hospital discharge. PMID:27129874

  4. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack treatment works best when it's given right after symptoms occur. Prompt treatment of a heart attack can help prevent or limit damage to the heart and prevent sudden death. Call 9-1-1 Right Away A heart ...

  5. Korean Asthma Guideline 2014: Summary of Major Updates to the Korean Asthma Guideline 2014.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deog Kyeom; Park, Yong Bum; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Jung, Ki-Suck; Yoo, Ji Hong; Yoo, Kwang-Ha; Kim, Kwan Hyung

    2016-07-01

    Asthma is a prevalent and serious health problem in Korea. Recently, the Korean Asthma Guideline has been updated by The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases (KATRD) in an effort to improve the clinical management of asthma. This guideline focuses on adult patients with asthma and aims to deliver up to date scientific evidence and recommendations to general physicians for the management of asthma. For this purpose, this guideline was updated following systematic review and meta-analysis of recent studies and adapting some points of international guidelines (Global Initiative for Asthma [GINA] report 2014, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program [NAEPP] 2007, British Thoracic Society [BTS/SIGN] asthma guideline 2012, and Canadian asthma guideline 2012). Updated issues include recommendations derived using the population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) model, which produced 20 clinical questions on the management of asthma. It also covers a new definition of asthma, the importance of confirming various airflow limitations with spirometry, the epidemiology and the diagnostic flow of asthma in Korea, the importance and evidence for inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and ICS/formoterol as a single maintenance and acute therapy in the stepwise management of asthma, assessment of severity of asthma and management of exacerbation, and an action plan to cope with exacerbation. This guideline includes clinical assessments, and treatment of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome, management of asthma in specific conditions including severe asthma, elderly asthma, cough variant asthma, exercise-induced bronchial contraction, etc. The revised Korean Asthma Guideline is expected to be a useful resource in the management of asthma.

  6. Korean Asthma Guideline 2014: Summary of Major Updates to the Korean Asthma Guideline 2014.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deog Kyeom; Park, Yong Bum; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Jung, Ki-Suck; Yoo, Ji Hong; Yoo, Kwang-Ha; Kim, Kwan Hyung

    2016-07-01

    Asthma is a prevalent and serious health problem in Korea. Recently, the Korean Asthma Guideline has been updated by The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases (KATRD) in an effort to improve the clinical management of asthma. This guideline focuses on adult patients with asthma and aims to deliver up to date scientific evidence and recommendations to general physicians for the management of asthma. For this purpose, this guideline was updated following systematic review and meta-analysis of recent studies and adapting some points of international guidelines (Global Initiative for Asthma [GINA] report 2014, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program [NAEPP] 2007, British Thoracic Society [BTS/SIGN] asthma guideline 2012, and Canadian asthma guideline 2012). Updated issues include recommendations derived using the population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) model, which produced 20 clinical questions on the management of asthma. It also covers a new definition of asthma, the importance of confirming various airflow limitations with spirometry, the epidemiology and the diagnostic flow of asthma in Korea, the importance and evidence for inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and ICS/formoterol as a single maintenance and acute therapy in the stepwise management of asthma, assessment of severity of asthma and management of exacerbation, and an action plan to cope with exacerbation. This guideline includes clinical assessments, and treatment of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome, management of asthma in specific conditions including severe asthma, elderly asthma, cough variant asthma, exercise-induced bronchial contraction, etc. The revised Korean Asthma Guideline is expected to be a useful resource in the management of asthma. PMID:27433170

  7. Inherent illnesses and attacks: an ethnographic study of interpretations of childhood Acute Respiratory Infections (ARIs) in Manhiça, southern Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is a leading cause of childhood hospitalisation and child mortality in Africa. This study explores local interpretations of Acute Respiratory Infections (ARIs), focusing on caretakers of children under five in the context of hospital care seeking. Methods The study took place in Manhiça, southern Mozambique and used Focused Ethnographic Study tools (FES) including field exercises and interviews. Results Understandings of terms used to describe ARIs differed between caretakers and hospital staff. Children's sicknesses that hospital staff diagnosed as ARIs were interpreted by caretakers as intermittent "attacks" of xifuva, a permanent, inherent and incurable chest illness. Caretakers thought that it was possible to manage and treat the attacks, which were caused by immediate natural factors such as food or the weather, but not the underlying illness, which was seen as having more indirect and social causes. Explanations of illness could not be neatly separated into pluralistic categories, but were characterised by syncretism, with "lay" and "biomedical" terms and concepts intermingling in practical care-seeking interactions between caretakers and health staff. Conclusions Health promotion should take into account the syncretism involved in explanations of ARIs in the context of practical care seeking for children. In doing so, it should draw upon lay interpretations and terminologies in order to stress the importance of seeking hospital care for all xifuva-type illnesses as well as seeking care for any subsequent attacks of an already diagnosed xifuva. However, this should be undertaken with awareness that the meanings of the terms used in practical care-seeking interactions may change over time. Health communication about ARIs should therefore be ongoing and evidence-based, even if ARIs appear to be well understood. PMID:21752260

  8. Childhood Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share your child's asthma management plan with the school nurse and any coaches who oversee your child. With the approval of physicians and parents, school-age children with asthma should be allowed to ...

  9. Personal Exposures to Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Acute Respiratory Health among Bronx Schoolchildren with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Spira-Cohen, Ariel; Chen, Lung Chi; Kendall, Michaela; Lall, Ramona; Thurston, George D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported relationships between adverse respiratory health outcomes and residential proximity to traffic pollution, but have not shown this at a personal exposure level. Objective We compared, among inner-city children with asthma, the associations of adverse asthma outcome incidences with increased personal exposure to particulate matter mass ≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) air pollution versus the diesel-related carbonaceous fraction of PM2.5. Methods Daily 24-hr personal samples of PM2.5, including the elemental carbon (EC) fraction, were collected for 40 fifth-grade children with asthma at four South Bronx schools (10 children per school) during approximately 1 month each. Spirometry and symptom scores were recorded several times daily during weekdays. Results We found elevated same-day relative risks of wheeze [1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03–2.04)], shortness of breath (1.41; 95% CI, 1.01–1.99), and total symptoms (1.30; 95% CI, 1.04–1.62) with an increase in personal EC, but not with personal PM2.5 mass. We found increased risk of cough, wheeze, and total symptoms with increased 1-day lag and 2-day average personal and school-site EC. We found no significant associations with school-site PM2.5 mass or sulfur. The EC effect estimate was robust to addition of gaseous pollutants. Conclusion Adverse health associations were strongest with personal measures of EC exposure, suggesting that the diesel “soot” fraction of PM2.5 is most responsible for pollution-related asthma exacerbations among children living near roadways. Studies that rely on exposure to PM mass may underestimate PM health impacts. PMID:21216722

  10. Asthma Medications: Basic Pharmacology and Use in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Houglum, Joel E.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Asthma is a chronic disease that affects athletes at all levels of sport. Several categories of drugs, including relatively new agents, are available to treat the asthmatic patient. By understanding the appropriate uses and effects of these drugs, the athletic trainer can assist the asthmatic athlete in improving therapeutic outcomes from the asthma therapy. The appropriate use of these medications includes not only the use of the appropriate drug(s), but also appropriate technique for administration, compliance with the prescribed dosing intervals, and sufficient care to avoid side effects. Data Sources: I searched MEDLINE and CINAHL from 1982 to 1999 and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts from 1990 to 1999. Terms searched were “asthma,” “athlete,”“athletic,” “exercise-induced,” “exercise,” “performance,” “therapy,” and “treatment.” Data Synthesis: Bronchodilators include β2 agonists, anticholinergics, and methylxanthines. Of these, the β2 agonists used by inhalation are the drugs of choice to treat an acute asthma attack or to prevent an anticipated attack (such as before exercise). Anti-inflammatory agents include corticosteroids mast cell-stabilizing agents, and antileukotrienes. Corticosteroids by inhalation are the drugs of choice for long-term treatment to curb the inflammatory process in the lung. Each of these drug categories has a unique mechanism of action. The athletic trainer who understands the appropriate use of these medications can help the athlete to obtain optimal results from drug therapy. Encouraging the athlete to comply with appropriate therapy, monitoring the effectiveness of the therapy, and recognizing the stimuli that initiate asthmatic attacks can improve the patient's therapeutic outcomes. Conclusions/Recommendations: The athletic trainer has an opportunity to play a key role in ensuring that the asthmatic athlete achieves the desired outcomes from treatment. The athletic trainer can help

  11. Asthma in inner cities.

    PubMed Central

    LeNoir, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    While the management of asthma has improved over the past two decades, the incidence of asthma in the inner city has not. The inner city, comprising a disproportionate number of people who live close to or below the poverty line, shows increased rates of morbidity and mortality from asthma. African Americans and Hispanic Americans are two to six times more likely to die from asthma than their white counterparts. When federally funded programs have targeted reducing morbidity and mortality in children from these populations, they have succeeded, but in a national study only 18 states had initiatives targeting asthma in low-income populations. This is tantamount to a public health crisis. Patients are not always properly diagnosed and are often without a regular source of health care, and symptoms are seen only in an acute context. Living conditions for the inner-city child have significant allergen triggers associated with house dust, cockroaches, cigarette smoke, chemical pollutants, and particulate matter. Viral infections, such as those caused by respiratory syncytial virus, are worse in crowded living conditions. The desirability of an increased public awareness of the seriousness of the disease and the need for chronic health care are issues that should be raised, through culturally relevant public means and in the knowledge that visual information is most effective. Physicians must understand the proper use of rescue and controller drugs, and asthma education must expand beyond doctors and nurses in their offices. The National Medical Association is committed to doing this aggressively, and community organizations, alliances, and coalitions must also aggressively follow. Public agencies must be lobbied to set high standards for proper asthma care and resources. With organizations acting in concert, the mortality and morbidity from asthma can be substantially prevented in the inner city. PMID:12653387

  12. Korean Asthma Guideline 2014: Summary of Major Updates to the Korean Asthma Guideline 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog Kyeom; Park, Yong Bum; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Jung, Ki-Suck; Yoo, Ji Hong

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a prevalent and serious health problem in Korea. Recently, the Korean Asthma Guideline has been updated by The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases (KATRD) in an effort to improve the clinical management of asthma. This guideline focuses on adult patients with asthma and aims to deliver up to date scientific evidence and recommendations to general physicians for the management of asthma. For this purpose, this guideline was updated following systematic review and meta-analysis of recent studies and adapting some points of international guidelines (Global Initiative for Asthma [GINA] report 2014, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program [NAEPP] 2007, British Thoracic Society [BTS/SIGN] asthma guideline 2012, and Canadian asthma guideline 2012). Updated issues include recommendations derived using the population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) model, which produced 20 clinical questions on the management of asthma. It also covers a new definition of asthma, the importance of confirming various airflow limitations with spirometry, the epidemiology and the diagnostic flow of asthma in Korea, the importance and evidence for inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and ICS/formoterol as a single maintenance and acute therapy in the stepwise management of asthma, assessment of severity of asthma and management of exacerbation, and an action plan to cope with exacerbation. This guideline includes clinical assessments, and treatment of asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome, management of asthma in specific conditions including severe asthma, elderly asthma, cough variant asthma, exercise-induced bronchial contraction, etc. The revised Korean Asthma Guideline is expected to be a useful resource in the management of asthma. PMID:27433170

  13. Imaging recommendations for acute stroke and transient ischemic attack patients: a joint statement by the American Society of Neuroradiology, the American College of Radiology and the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, Max; Sanelli, Pina C; Albers, Gregory W; Bello, Jacqueline A; Derdeyn, Colin P; Hetts, Steven W; Johnson, Michele H; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Lev, Michael H; Liebeskind, David S; Rowley, Howard A; Schaefer, Pamela W; Sunshine, Jeffrey L; Zaharchuk, Greg; Meltzer, Carolyn C

    2013-11-01

    In the article entitled "Imaging Recommendations for Acute Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Patients: A Joint Statement by the American Society of Neuroradiology, the American College of Radiology and the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery", we are proposing a simple, pragmatic approach that will allow the reader to develop an optimal imaging algorithm for stroke patients at their institution. PMID:23948676

  14. Screening for cognitive impairment with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment in Chinese patients with acute mild stroke and transient ischaemic attack: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lijun; Dong, Yanhong; Zhu, Rongyan; Jin, Zhao; Li, Zixiao; Wang, Yilong; Zhao, Xingquan; Sachdev, Perminder; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to establish the cut-off point of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA-Beijing) in screening for cognitive impairment (CI) within 2 weeks of mild stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Methods A total of 80 acute mild ischaemic stroke patients and 22 TIA patients were recruited. They received the MoCA-Beijing and a formal neuropsychological test battery. CI was defined by 1.5 SD below the established norms on a formal neuropsychological test battery. Results Most stroke and TIA patients were in their 50s (53.95±11.43 years old), with greater than primary school level of education. The optimal cut-off point for MoCA-Beijing in discriminating patients with CI from those with no cognitive impairment (NCI) was 22/23 (sensitivity 85%, specificity 88%, positive predictive value=91%, negative predictive value=80%, classification accuracy=86%). The predominant cognitive deficits were characteristic of frontal-subcortical impairment, such as visuomotor speed (46.08%), attention/executive function (42.16%) and visuospatial ability (40.20%). Conclusions A MoCA-Beijing cut-off score of 22/23 is optimally sensitive and specific for detecting CI after mild stroke, and TIA in the acute stroke phase, and is recommended for routine clinical practice. PMID:27406642

  15. Occupational Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Dean

    1982-01-01

    Bronchospasm is a common cause of morbidity in the workplace. More than 100 agents are now recognized as occupational causes of asthma and numerous agents can cause exacerbations of preexisting asthma. Because of the large number of potential causative agents and the complexity of modern industrial processes, knowledge of the characteristic clinical features of occupational asthma is the key to recognizing this disease. Early diagnosis of occupational asthma is important in preventing long-term morbidity. Present evidence that prolonged exposure to some work-encountered agents can cause asthma that persists for years after the end of exposure suggests that avoidance is the only acceptable countermeasure against this disease. PMID:7164429

  16. Rescue treatment and prevention of asthma using magnesium throat lozenges: Hypothesis for a mouth-lung biologically closed electric circuit.

    PubMed

    Eby, George A

    2006-01-01

    In the rescue treatment of acute asthma, injected and inhalant magnesium are relatively weak having demonstrated value only in severe illness, although theoretical and laboratory considerations suggest that magnesium should be strongly effective as an asthma rescue agent. It was hypothesized that a mouth-lung biologically closed electric circuit (BCEC) exists capable of nearly instantly transporting positively charged magnesium ions from the mouth and throat into the lungs. One hundred milligram magnesium (magnesium chloride) 4-g throat lozenges producing 100+ mM magnesium ion concentration in saliva were tested to determine if they had beneficial effects in asthma rescue and prevention. Subjects were selected based solely on need for asthma rescue, and lozenges were used as needed. Case histories are presented showing the nearly immediate effect of magnesium chloride throat lozenges in terminating and preventing asthma attacks. Throat lozenges containing magnesium chloride produced much more rapid and stronger benefits than has been reported for inhaled and injected magnesium. An added benefit from magnesium chloride lozenge treatment of asthma was relaxation. In this first report of its kind, magnesium chloride throat lozenges appeared to provide rescue benefits in the treatment of asthma equivalent to pharmaceutical asthma drugs. Countering these benefits, strong ionic magnesium solutions greatly increase rhinovirus, herpesvirus and Candida albicans in vitro, and appear to worsen these infections in humans. Magnesium lozenges releasing concentrated magnesium ions appear contraindicated during common colds, oral herpes infections, chronic rhinosinusitis, oral and respiratory infections in general, and their use must immediately be terminated if respiratory or oral symptoms worsen. Double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trials in people without respiratory or oral infections are needed to determine magnesium lozenge safety, and the extent by which drug

  17. [The therapy of bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Fabbri, L M; Papi, A; Corbetta, L; Ciaccia, A

    1999-05-01

    Asthma (Greek word that means "breathlessness" or "open-mouth breath") is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, with extensive infiltration of the airway lumen and wall with eosinophils, mast cells, activated T-lymphocytes. Airway inflammation is associated with airway hyperresponsiveness, recurrent episodes of reversible airflow limitation and respiratory symptoms such as wheezing, chest tightness, breathlessness and cough with mucus production. Curiously, asthma worsens particularly at night and in the early hours of the morning. The current consensus on asthma therapy suggests that pharmacological control of asthma can be achieved with antiinflammatory "controller" medications such as inhaled glucocorticoids and cromones. Short-acting bronchodilators act as "reliever" medications and rapidly reverse acute manifestations of asthma. Asthmatic exacerbations require the repetitive administration of inhaled short-acting beta-2-agonist and the early introduction of oral glucocorticoids. Rarely the severity of exacerbation requires the administration of oxygen (that, if available, is not contraindicated), intravenous bronchodilators, glucocorticoids and epinephryne and mechanical ventilation.

  18. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  19. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks.

    PubMed

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  20. Pathophysiology of the cysteinyl leukotrienes and effects of leukotriene receptor antagonists in asthma.

    PubMed

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes, synthesized de novo from cell membrane phospholipids, are proinflammatory mediators that play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma. These mediators are among the most potent of bronchoconstrictors and cause vasodilation, increased microvascular permeability, exudation of macromolecules and edema. The cysteinyl leukotrienes also have potent chemoattractant properties for eosinophils, causing an influx of eosinophils into the airway mucosa, which further fuels the inflammatory process. In addition, the cysteinyl leukotrienes are potent secretagogues and reduce ciliary motility, which may hinder mucociliary clearance. Asthmatic patients demonstrate increased production of cysteinyl leukotrienes during naturally occurring asthma and acute asthma attacks as well as after allergen and exercise challenge. The leukotriene receptor antagonists montelukast, zafirlukast and pranlukast inhibit bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients undergoing allergen, exercise, cold air or aspirin challenge. They attenuate the hallmarks of asthmatic inflammation, including eosinophilia in the airway mucosa and peripheral blood. Moreover, exhaled nitric oxide concentrations, another correlate of airway inflammation, are decreased during montelukast treatment in children. Cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis is not blocked by corticosteroid therapy. This important observation suggests that the leukotriene receptor antagonists represent a novel therapeutic approach, one that may provide benefits that are additive with corticosteroid therapy. This supposition is supported by clinical observations that treatment with leukotriene receptor antagonists significantly improve asthma control when added to inhaled corticosteroid therapy. Moreover, the bronchodilator properties of the leukotriene receptor antagonists are additive with those of beta agonists. These data provide strong support for the use of leukotriene receptor antagonists for treating asthma. PMID

  1. Wastewater-based epidemiological evaluation of the effect of air pollution on short-acting beta-agonist consumption for acute asthma treatment.

    PubMed

    Fattore, Elena; Davoli, Enrico; Castiglioni, Sara; Bosetti, Cristina; Re Depaolini, Andrea; Marzona, Irene; Zuccato, Ettore; Fanelli, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Asthma, one of the most common chronic diseases in the world and a leading cause of hospitalization among children, has been associated with outdoor air pollution. We applied the wastewater-based epidemiology (WBE) approach to study the association between the use of salbutamol, a short-acting beta-agonist used to treat acute bronchospasm, and air pollution in the population of Milan, Italy. Composite 24-h samples of untreated wastewater were collected daily and analyzed for human metabolic residues of salbutamol by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Corresponding daily outdoor concentrations of particular matter up to 10µm (PM10) and 2.5µm (PM2.5) in aerodynamic diameter, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, and benzene were collected from the public air monitoring network. Associations at different lag times (0-10 days) were assessed by a log-linear Poisson regression model. We found significant direct associations between defined daily doses (DDD) of salbutamol and mean daily concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 up to nine days of lag time. The highest rate ratio, and 95% confidence interval (CI), of DDD of salbutamol was 1.06 (95% CI: 1.02-1.10) and 1.07 (95% CI: 1.02-1.12) at seven days of lag time and for an increase of 10 μg/m(3) of PM10 and PM2.5, respectively. Reducing the mean daily PM10 concentration in Milan from 50 to 30μg/m(3) means that 852 (95% CI: 483-1504) daily doses of salbutamol per day would not be used. These results confirm the association between asthma and outdoor PM10 and PM2.5 and prove the potential of the WBE approach to quantitatively estimate the relation between environmental exposures and diseases. PMID:27281687

  2. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... a million people in the U.S. have a heart attack. About half of them die. Many people have permanent heart damage or die because they don't get ... It's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if someone ...

  3. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asthma: Associated Conditions Asthma and Pregnancy Asthma Medications Asthma Medications Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... make sure you are using it correctly. Other Asthma Related Medication Treatment Annual influenza vaccine (flu shot) ...

  4. Progress in the management of childhood asthma

    PubMed Central

    Pensrichon, Rattana; Kurasirikul, Suruthai

    2012-01-01

    Asthma has become the most common chronic disease in childhood. Significant advances in epidemiological research as well as in therapy of pediatric asthma have been made over the past 2 decades. In this review, we look at certain aspects therapy of childhood asthma, both in the past and present. Literature review on allergen avoidance (including mites, cockroach and cat), intensive therapy with β2-agonists in acute asthma (administering via continuous nebulization and intravenous routes), a revisit of theophylline use and its action, the use of inhaled corticosteroids in various phases of childhood asthma and sublingual immunotherapy in asthma are examined. Recent facts and dilemmas of these treatments are identified along with expression of our opinions, particularly on points of childhood asthma in the Asia-Pacific, are made in this review. PMID:22348203

  5. Piperazine-induced occupational asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmar, L.; Bellander, T.; Bergoeoe, B.; Simonsson, B.G.

    1982-03-01

    Asthmatic reactions were studied among some 130 factory workers who handled amines and other chemicals. Among present employees, we found 15 cases of asthma associated with occupational exposure to chemicals; among former employees there were at least 18. The inducing agent was judged to be piperazine in 29 persons and ethylenediamine (EDA) in three. The asthma was of the late or dual type; immediate reactions alone were to seen. No one had attacks of asthma before employment, and atopic subjects were not preferentially affected. Routine spirometry revealed airway obstruction in fewer than half of the recent cases. Tests of nonspecific bronchial reactivity with methacholine in six subjects with recent asthma showed hyperactivity in five, while tow subjects with earlier asthma did not have hyperactivity. Bronchial provocation tests with piperazine in one subject were positive both in the factory and in the laboratory. The level of piperazine was 1.2 mg/m3 time-weighted average (TWA) in a work place associated with induction of the asthmatic state, and 0.3 mg/m3 in a place connected with attacks in ''sensitized'' subjects.

  6. Deaths from asthma in New Zealand.

    PubMed Central

    Sears, M R; Rea, H H; Fenwick, J; Beaglehole, R; Gillies, A J; Holst, P E; O'Donnell, T V; Rothwell, R P; Sutherland, D C

    1986-01-01

    We report the first complete population based study of childhood deaths due to asthma. All deaths ascribed to asthma in New Zealand children aged 0-14 were investigated as part of a two year national study of mortality from asthma. The 16 children who died from asthma all developed asthma by the age of 4; 15 had a family history of asthma, and 12 had associated atopic disorders. Disturbed pyschosocial relationships were evident in eight families. Seven children died in less than three hours from the onset of their final attack. All children died outside hospital. Mortality from asthma in Maori children (3.14 per 100 000) was five times that of European children. With hindsight, factors which if avoided could have led to a different outcome were identified in eleven cases. The circumstances surrounding these deaths were similar to those described for adults with asthma; this study, however, underlines the importance of parental care and knowledge in the management of children with asthma. Inadequate long term medical care, underassessment of severity by family and doctors, failure of the family to call for help when required, and inadequate responses of medical services contributed to the fatalities. Excess beta2 sympathomimetic dosage or overreliance on home nebulisers were uncommon. Most childhood deaths from asthma should be prevented by increased family awareness, better assessment of severity, improved long term treatment, and rapid access to emergency medical care. PMID:3954419

  7. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... lower “bad” cholesterol (also called LDL, or low-density lipoprotein) levels and may help increase “good” cholesterol (also called HDL, or high-density lipoprotein). If you have had a heart attack, ...

  8. Airway smooth muscle in the pathophysiology and treatment of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Solway, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays an integral part in the pathophysiology of asthma. It is responsible for acute bronchoconstriction, which is potentiated by constrictor hyperresponsiveness, impaired relaxation and length adaptation. ASM also contributes to airway remodeling and inflammation in asthma. In light of this, ASM is an important target in the treatment of asthma. PMID:23305987

  9. Epidemiology of asthma in western Europe.

    PubMed

    Charpin, D; Vervloet, D; Charpin, J

    1988-10-01

    Asthma deaths are uncommon, but have recently increased in some countries due to problems in the management of the disease. Morbidity rates show large variations, which can be attributed to differences in defining the disease, but also to genuine variations, with a trend towards less asthma in northern Europe. It has been suggested that allergic diseases as a whole, and asthma in particular, may exhibit an upward secular trend. Risk factors include a genetic background and environmental triggering factors. The importance of genetic factors is illustrated by family studies and by extreme prevalence rates observed in some communities. Environmental factors include rapid air pollution variations which act as a trigger for asthma attacks. However, at levels currently prevailing in western Europe, air pollutants do not induce a higher incidence of asthma. Altitude generates a gradual decrease in Dermatophagoides, thus explaining both the clinical improvement in asthmatics living in altitude and a lower prevalence of asthma in populations born and living there. Among the other aero-allergens, grass pollens plays a major role in spring, elicitating asthma attacks. Some natural allergens transformed by man (castor bean, soja) can be responsible for asthma epidemics.

  10. Thunderstorm-asthma and pollen allergy.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Liccardi, G; Frenguelli, G

    2007-01-01

    Thunderstorms have been linked to asthma epidemics, especially during the pollen seasons, and there are descriptions of asthma outbreaks associated with thunderstorms, which occurred in several cities, prevalently in Europe (Birmingham and London in the UK and Napoli in Italy) and Australia (Melbourne and Wagga Wagga). Pollen grains can be carried by thunderstorm at ground level, where pollen rupture would be increased with release of allergenic biological aerosols of paucimicronic size, derived from the cytoplasm and which can penetrate deep into lower airways. In other words, there is evidence that under wet conditions or during thunderstorms, pollen grains may, after rupture by osmotic shock, release into the atmosphere part of their content, including respirable, allergen-carrying cytoplasmic starch granules (0.5-2.5 microm) or other paucimicronic components that can reach lower airways inducing asthma reactions in pollinosis patients. The thunderstorm-asthma outbreaks are characterized, at the beginning of thunderstorms by a rapid increase of visits for asthma in general practitioner or hospital emergency departments. Subjects without asthma symptoms, but affected by seasonal rhinitis can experience an asthma attack. No unusual levels of air pollution were noted at the time of the epidemics, but there was a strong association with high atmospheric concentrations of pollen grains such as grasses or other allergenic plant species. However, subjects affected by pollen allergy should be informed about a possible risk of asthma attack at the beginning of a thunderstorm during pollen season. PMID:17156336

  11. Thunderstorm-asthma and pollen allergy.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Liccardi, G; Frenguelli, G

    2007-01-01

    Thunderstorms have been linked to asthma epidemics, especially during the pollen seasons, and there are descriptions of asthma outbreaks associated with thunderstorms, which occurred in several cities, prevalently in Europe (Birmingham and London in the UK and Napoli in Italy) and Australia (Melbourne and Wagga Wagga). Pollen grains can be carried by thunderstorm at ground level, where pollen rupture would be increased with release of allergenic biological aerosols of paucimicronic size, derived from the cytoplasm and which can penetrate deep into lower airways. In other words, there is evidence that under wet conditions or during thunderstorms, pollen grains may, after rupture by osmotic shock, release into the atmosphere part of their content, including respirable, allergen-carrying cytoplasmic starch granules (0.5-2.5 microm) or other paucimicronic components that can reach lower airways inducing asthma reactions in pollinosis patients. The thunderstorm-asthma outbreaks are characterized, at the beginning of thunderstorms by a rapid increase of visits for asthma in general practitioner or hospital emergency departments. Subjects without asthma symptoms, but affected by seasonal rhinitis can experience an asthma attack. No unusual levels of air pollution were noted at the time of the epidemics, but there was a strong association with high atmospheric concentrations of pollen grains such as grasses or other allergenic plant species. However, subjects affected by pollen allergy should be informed about a possible risk of asthma attack at the beginning of a thunderstorm during pollen season.

  12. Asthma epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Salam, Muhammad T

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, and a growing body of evidence indicates that epigenetic variations may mediate the effects of environmental exposures on the development and natural history of asthma. Epigenetics is the study of mitotically or meiotically heritable changes in gene expression that occur without directly altering the DNA sequence. DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs are major epigenetic variations in humans that are currently being investigated for asthma etiology and natural history. DNA methylation results from addition of a methyl group to the 5 position of a cytosine ring and occurs almost exclusively on a cytosine in a CpG dinucleotide. Histone modifications involve posttranslational modifications such as acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination on the tails of core histones. MicroRNAs are short ~22 nucleotide long, non-coding, single-stranded RNAs that binds to complementary sequences in the target mRNAs, usually resulting in gene silencing. While many studies have documented relationships of environmental exposures that have been implicated in asthma etiology with epigenetic alterations, to date, few studies have directly linked epigenetic variations with asthma development. There are several methodological challenges in studying the epigenetics of asthma. In this chapter, the influence of epigenetic variations on asthma pathophysiology, methodological concerns in conducting epigenetic research and future direction of asthma epigenetics research are discussed.

  13. [Childhood asthma].

    PubMed

    Liñán Cortés, Santos; Cobos Barroso, Nicolás

    2004-11-01

    Very frequently we have to deal with children who follow specific treatment to combat their repetitive episodes of breathing difficulty and wheezing. In many cases, they suffer from asthma. Hippocrates defined asthma as "the condition which causes an excessive narrowing of the bronchi after a reaction with a provocative stimulus which usually does not produce any effect". PMID:15648894

  14. Asthma-related emergency department use: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laurie H; Chambers, Patricia; Dexheimer, Judith W

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic pediatric diseases. Patients with asthma often present to the emergency department for treatment for acute exacerbations. These patients may not have a primary care physician or primary care home, and thus are seeking care in the emergency department. Asthma care in the emergency department is multifaceted to treat asthma patients appropriately and provide quality care. National and international guidelines exist to help drive clinical care. Electronic and paper-based tools exist for both physicians and patients to help improve emergency, home, and preventive care. Treatment of patients with asthma should include the acute exacerbation, long-term management of controller medications, and controlling triggers in the home environment. We will address the current state of asthma research in emergency medicine in the US, and discuss some of the resources being used to help provide a medical home and improve care for patients who suffer from acute asthma exacerbations. PMID:27471415

  15. Asthma-related emergency department use: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Laurie H; Chambers, Patricia; Dexheimer, Judith W

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic pediatric diseases. Patients with asthma often present to the emergency department for treatment for acute exacerbations. These patients may not have a primary care physician or primary care home, and thus are seeking care in the emergency department. Asthma care in the emergency department is multifaceted to treat asthma patients appropriately and provide quality care. National and international guidelines exist to help drive clinical care. Electronic and paper-based tools exist for both physicians and patients to help improve emergency, home, and preventive care. Treatment of patients with asthma should include the acute exacerbation, long-term management of controller medications, and controlling triggers in the home environment. We will address the current state of asthma research in emergency medicine in the US, and discuss some of the resources being used to help provide a medical home and improve care for patients who suffer from acute asthma exacerbations. PMID:27471415

  16. A 500-ml plastic bottle: an effective spacer for children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Zar, Heather J; Asmus, Michael J; Weinberg, Eugene G

    2002-06-01

    Inhaled therapy using a metered-dose inhaler (MDI) with attached spacer has been increasingly recognized as the optimal method for delivering asthma medication for acute attacks and chronic prophylaxis. However, in developing countries the cost and availability of commercially produced spacers limit the use of MDI-spacer delivery systems. A 500-ml plastic bottle has been recently adapted to function as a spacer. This article reviews the current data on the efficacy of this bottle-spacer and discusses its advantages and limitations. It is concluded that a modified 500-ml plastic bottle is an effective spacer; modification and use of this device should be incorporated into international guidelines for the management of children with asthma.

  17. Turning Discovery Into Health – Asthma | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Asthma Turning Discovery Into Health – Asthma Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents (Top ... show a cross-section of an airway during asthma symptoms and attack. CLICK IMAGE TO ENLARGE R ...

  18. Blockade of dopamine D1-like receptor signalling protects mice against OVA-induced acute asthma by inhibiting B-cell activating transcription factor signalling and Th17 function.

    PubMed

    Gong, Subo; Li, Jinxiu; Ma, Libing; Li, Keng; Zhang, Li; Wang, Guyi; Liu, Yi; Ji, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiaokun; Chen, Ping; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Zhang, Shu; Zhou, Zhiguang; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xiang, Xudong; Yang, Yu

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have consistently demonstrated that dopamine D1-like receptor (D1-like-R) signalling is implicated in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and type I diabetes. Given that allergic asthma shares certain disease aetiology similarities with autoimmune diseases, we conducted studies in OVA-induced mice aiming to address the impact of D1-like-R signalling on the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. It was noted that blockade of D1-like-R signalling provided protection for mice against OVA-induced acute asthma. Particularly, treatment of OVA-induced mice with SCH23390, a D1-like-R antagonist, significantly attenuated inflammatory infiltration in the airways along with repressed goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus production, as well as airway resistance. By contrast, administration of SKF83959, a D1-like-R agonist, displayed the opposite effect. Blockade of D1-like-R signalling impaired Th17 function, as manifested by a significant reduction of Th17 cells in the spleen and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Mechanistic studies revealed that D1-like-R signalling enhances B-cell activating transcription factor activity, which then transcribes the expression of RORγt, a Th17 transcription factor; accordingly, D1-like-R signalling regulates Th17 differentiation to promote the development of allergic asthma. Taken together, the data obtained in the present suggest that blockade of D1-like-R signalling could be an effective therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of allergic asthma in clinical practice.

  19. Yoga for bronchial asthma: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Nagarathna, R; Nagendra, H R

    1985-10-19

    Fifty three patients with asthma underwent training for two weeks in an integrated set of yoga exercises, including breathing exercises, suryanamaskar, yogasana (physical postures), pranayama (breath slowing techniques), dhyana (meditation), and a devotional session, and were told to practise these exercises for 65 minutes daily. They were then compared with a control group of 53 patients with asthma matched for age, sex, and type and severity of asthma, who continued to take their usual drugs. There was a significantly greater improvement in the group who practised yoga in the weekly number of attacks of asthma, scores for drug treatment, and peak flow rate. This study shows the efficacy of yoga in the long term management of bronchial asthma, but the physiological basis for this beneficial effect needs to be examined in more detail.

  20. Air pollution and asthma: search for a relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, I.F.; Dulberg, E.M.

    1981-04-01

    Data on visits to New York City hospital emergency rooms for asthmatic attacks were analyzed to identify asthma events. There were days when the number of such visits was unusually high. In the fall season, asthma events tended to occur simultaneously in all hospitals included in the study, and thus can be associated with some atmospheric agent acting throughout the city. However, asthma events were not related to atmospheric concentrations of sulfur dioxide and particulates.

  1. What Is Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section What Is Asthma? Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... major trigger for asthma. Photo: iStock Who Gets Asthma? People get asthma because of an interaction between ...

  2. Exercise and Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Exercise and Asthma Page Content Article Body Almost every ... children more likely to develop asthma. How does exercise cause asthma symptoms? The symptoms of asthma are ...

  3. Asthma and allergy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - asthma and allergy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on asthma and allergies : Allergy and Asthma Network Mothers of Asthmatics -- www.aanma.org American Academy of Allergy, Asthma ...

  4. Asthma and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Asthma Asthma and Hispanic Americans In 2014, 2.1 million Hispanics reported that they currently have asthma. Puerto Rican Americans have almost twice the asthma ...

  5. IAQ Tools for Schools: Managing Asthma in the School Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation and Indoor Air.

    This manual provides tips on improving indoor air quality within the school environment by removing the elements that trigger asthma attacks in children, and presents a list of organizations where asthma resource information can be obtained. Air quality management tips cover removing of animal and cockroach allergens, cleaning up mold and…

  6. Shark attack.

    PubMed

    Guidera, K J; Ogden, J A; Highhouse, K; Pugh, L; Beatty, E

    1991-01-01

    Shark attacks are rare but devastating. This case had major injuries that included an open femoral fracture, massive hemorrhage, sciatic nerve laceration, and significant skin and muscle damage. The patient required 15 operative procedures, extensive physical therapy, and orthotic assistance. A review of the literature pertaining to shark bites is included.

  7. Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke More Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack Updated:May 24,2016 Sometimes a heart attack ... Disease Go Red For Women Types of aneurysms Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) • ...

  8. Diagnosing Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & ...

  9. Asthma Inhalers

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce the release of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) into the atmosphere when taking certain asthma medications. Until recently, most ... hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) inhalers, that do not rob the atmosphere of ozone. “The FDA [Food and Drug Administration] ...

  10. Asthma - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... children. It is a leading cause of missed school days and hospital visits for children. An allergic reaction ... how to let your child take medicine during school hours. (You may ... every day to prevent asthma symptoms. Your child should take ...

  11. Asthma Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... of asthma. The doctor may take a spirometer reading, give the child an inhaled medication that opens ...

  12. An overview of thunderstorm-associated asthma outbreak in southwest of Iran.

    PubMed

    Forouzan, Arash; Masoumi, Kambiz; Haddadzadeh Shoushtari, Maryam; Idani, Esmaeil; Tirandaz, Fatemeh; Feli, Maryam; Assarehzadegan, Mohammad Ali; Asgari Darian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report the characteristics and treatment strategies of all patients with acute bronchospasm who were presented to the emergency departments of Ahvaz, Iran, following the occurrence of a thunderstorm on November 2, 2013. A total of 2000 patients presenting with asthma attacks triggered by thunderstorm were interviewed and an initial questionnaire was completed for each individual. After twenty days, patients were asked to complete a supplementary questionnaire, but only 800 of them accepted to do so. The majority of subjects was aged 20-40 years (60.5%) and had no history of asthma in most cases (60.0%). The symptoms had started outdoors for 60.0% of the participants. In most patients, the onset of the condition was on November 2. Short-acting β 2-agonist (salbutamol) and aminophylline were the most commonly prescribed medications in the emergency department. Upon the second interview, 85.3% of the patients were still symptomatic. Overall, 63.6% did not have a follow-up visit after hospital discharge, although all of them were referred to the specialist. The findings of the present study suggest that thunderstorm-associated asthma could affect young adults with no gender priority, with or without asthma history, which put a strain on emergency medical services. PMID:25093023

  13. An overview of thunderstorm-associated asthma outbreak in southwest of Iran.

    PubMed

    Forouzan, Arash; Masoumi, Kambiz; Haddadzadeh Shoushtari, Maryam; Idani, Esmaeil; Tirandaz, Fatemeh; Feli, Maryam; Assarehzadegan, Mohammad Ali; Asgari Darian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report the characteristics and treatment strategies of all patients with acute bronchospasm who were presented to the emergency departments of Ahvaz, Iran, following the occurrence of a thunderstorm on November 2, 2013. A total of 2000 patients presenting with asthma attacks triggered by thunderstorm were interviewed and an initial questionnaire was completed for each individual. After twenty days, patients were asked to complete a supplementary questionnaire, but only 800 of them accepted to do so. The majority of subjects was aged 20-40 years (60.5%) and had no history of asthma in most cases (60.0%). The symptoms had started outdoors for 60.0% of the participants. In most patients, the onset of the condition was on November 2. Short-acting β 2-agonist (salbutamol) and aminophylline were the most commonly prescribed medications in the emergency department. Upon the second interview, 85.3% of the patients were still symptomatic. Overall, 63.6% did not have a follow-up visit after hospital discharge, although all of them were referred to the specialist. The findings of the present study suggest that thunderstorm-associated asthma could affect young adults with no gender priority, with or without asthma history, which put a strain on emergency medical services.

  14. Recognizing asthma mimics and asthma complications.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Dennis; Seda, Gilbert; Daheshia, Massoud

    2011-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways characterized by airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperreactivity, and underlying inflammation. Two common reasons asthmatics fail standard therapy are incorrect diagnosis and failure to recognize underlying contributing factors. A correct diagnosis of asthma is of great importance to military practitioners since misdiagnosis or uncontrolled asthma affects an individual's operational readiness or determines whether one can receive a medical waiver to enlist in military service. This article presents four cases of patients with dyspnea that have conditions which mimic asthma or complicate asthma management: vocal cord dysfunction misdiagnosed as asthma, respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease mistaken as asthma, difficult-to-control asthma because of bronchiectasis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and difficult and fatal asthma. Asthma is contrasted to other respiratory disorders, and an outlined approach to asthma diagnosis and management is presented using the Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines.

  15. [Occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Cambray-Gutiérrez, Julio César; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha

    2015-01-01

    The occupational asthma is the most common form of lung disease caused by factors that are attributed to a specific working environment in industrialized countries. It causes variable limitation of airflow and/or hyper-responsiveness of the airway due to contact with specific agents present in an atmosphere of work and not to stimuli found out of this place. It is recognized more and more frequently, and many agents are capable of causing occupational asthma by different pathophysiological mechanisms. More than 400 agents causing occupational asthma are known and every year new triggers are detected. Numerous factors contribute to the pathogenesis of occupational asthma induced chemically, including immunological, non-immunological mechanisms of epithelial damage, airway remodeling, oxidative stress, neurogenic inflammation as well as genetic factors. The most important risk factors for occupational asthma include: atopy, smoking and genetic factors. The diagnosis is based on the clinical history, skin tests, immunological tests and functional studies. The fundamental treatment is removing the worker from exposure as soon as possible. The advance in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of occupational asthma will importantly influence in the prevention and the management of this disease.

  16. Nasal disease and asthma.

    PubMed

    Marseglia, G L; Merli, P; Caimmi, D; Licari, A; Labó, E; Marseglia, A; Ciprandi, G; La Rosa, M

    2011-10-01

    The nose plays a primary role within the airways, working as a filter and air-conditioner, together with other important functions. Thus, it is not surprising that nasal diseases are associated with several other comorbidities, including both upper and lower airways, such as bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and asthma. Several studies have investigated the relationship existing between the upper and the lower airways and new insights are rising. Nevertheless, some uncertainties still remain, mainly because nasal disorders are quite heterogeneous, overlapping (i.e. rhinitis-rhinosinusitis-sinusitis, acute or chronic, allergic or non-allergic) and difficult to diagnose, so that, frequently, many studies don’t differentiate between the various conditions. For this reason, the purpose of this review is to systematically analyze present epidemiological, pathophysiological and clinical data on the relationship between nasal diseases and asthma, splitting up three main conditions: allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. PMID:22032779

  17. Step 4: stick or twist? A review of asthma therapy

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Mariel G; Pavord, Ian D; Shaw, Dominick E

    2016-01-01

    Many people with asthma do not achieve disease control, despite bronchodilators and inhaled corticosteroid therapy. People with uncontrolled asthma are at higher risk of an asthma attack and death, with mortality rates estimated at 1000 deaths/year in England and Wales. The recent National Review of Asthma Deaths (NRAD) report, ‘Why asthma still kills’, recommended that patients at step 4 or 5 of the British Thoracic Society/Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (BTS/SIGN) guidance must be referred to a specialist asthma service. This article reviews the 2014 evidence base for therapy of asthma patients at BTS/SIGN step 4 of the treatment cascade, in response to key findings of the NRAD report and lack of preferred treatment option at this step.

  18. Step 4: stick or twist? A review of asthma therapy

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Mariel G; Pavord, Ian D; Shaw, Dominick E

    2016-01-01

    Many people with asthma do not achieve disease control, despite bronchodilators and inhaled corticosteroid therapy. People with uncontrolled asthma are at higher risk of an asthma attack and death, with mortality rates estimated at 1000 deaths/year in England and Wales. The recent National Review of Asthma Deaths (NRAD) report, ‘Why asthma still kills’, recommended that patients at step 4 or 5 of the British Thoracic Society/Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (BTS/SIGN) guidance must be referred to a specialist asthma service. This article reviews the 2014 evidence base for therapy of asthma patients at BTS/SIGN step 4 of the treatment cascade, in response to key findings of the NRAD report and lack of preferred treatment option at this step. PMID:27651907

  19. Step 4: stick or twist? A review of asthma therapy.

    PubMed

    Slater, Mariel G; Pavord, Ian D; Shaw, Dominick E

    2016-01-01

    Many people with asthma do not achieve disease control, despite bronchodilators and inhaled corticosteroid therapy. People with uncontrolled asthma are at higher risk of an asthma attack and death, with mortality rates estimated at 1000 deaths/year in England and Wales. The recent National Review of Asthma Deaths (NRAD) report, 'Why asthma still kills', recommended that patients at step 4 or 5 of the British Thoracic Society/Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (BTS/SIGN) guidance must be referred to a specialist asthma service. This article reviews the 2014 evidence base for therapy of asthma patients at BTS/SIGN step 4 of the treatment cascade, in response to key findings of the NRAD report and lack of preferred treatment option at this step. PMID:27651907

  20. Thunderstorm-associated bronchial asthma: a forgotten but very present epidemic.

    PubMed

    Al-Rubaish, Abdullah M

    2007-05-01

    Acute episodes of bronchial asthma are associated with specific etiological factors such as air pollutants and meteorological conditions including thunderstorms. Evidence suggests that thunderstorm-associated asthma (TAA) may be a distinct subset of asthmatics, and, epidemics have been reported, but none from Saudi Arabia.The trigger for this review was the TAA epidemic in November 2002, Eastern Saudi Arabia. The bulk of patients were seen in the King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar. The steady influx of acute cases were managed effectively and involved all neighboring hospitals, without evoking any "Major Incident Plan".THREE GROUPS OF FACTORS ARE IMPLICATED AS CAUSES OF TAA: pollutants (aerobiologic or chemical) and meteorological conditions. Aerobiological pollutants include air-borne allergens: pollen and spores of molds. Their asthma-inducing effect is augmented during thunderstorms.Chemical pollutants include greenhouse gases, heavy metals, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, fumes from engines and particulate matter. Their relation to rain-associated asthma is mediated by sulfuric and nitric acid.Outbreaks of non-epidemic asthma are associated with high rainfall, drop in maximum air temperature and pressure, lightning strikes and increased humidity. Thunderstorm can cause all of these and it seems to be related to the onset of asthma epidemic.Patients in epidemics of TAA are usually young atopic adults not on prophylaxis steroid inhalers. The epidemic is usually their first known attack. These features are consistent with the hypothesis that TAA is related to both aero-allergens and weather effects. Subjects allergic to pollen who are in the path of thunderstorm can inhale air loaded with pollen allergen and so have acute asthmatic response. TAA runs a benign courseDoctors should be aware of this phenomenon and the potential outbreak of asthma during heavy rains. A & E departments and ICU should be alert for possible rush of asthmatic

  1. Thunderstorm-associated bronchial asthma: a forgotten but very present epidemic.

    PubMed

    Al-Rubaish, Abdullah M

    2007-05-01

    Acute episodes of bronchial asthma are associated with specific etiological factors such as air pollutants and meteorological conditions including thunderstorms. Evidence suggests that thunderstorm-associated asthma (TAA) may be a distinct subset of asthmatics, and, epidemics have been reported, but none from Saudi Arabia.The trigger for this review was the TAA epidemic in November 2002, Eastern Saudi Arabia. The bulk of patients were seen in the King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar. The steady influx of acute cases were managed effectively and involved all neighboring hospitals, without evoking any "Major Incident Plan".THREE GROUPS OF FACTORS ARE IMPLICATED AS CAUSES OF TAA: pollutants (aerobiologic or chemical) and meteorological conditions. Aerobiological pollutants include air-borne allergens: pollen and spores of molds. Their asthma-inducing effect is augmented during thunderstorms.Chemical pollutants include greenhouse gases, heavy metals, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, fumes from engines and particulate matter. Their relation to rain-associated asthma is mediated by sulfuric and nitric acid.Outbreaks of non-epidemic asthma are associated with high rainfall, drop in maximum air temperature and pressure, lightning strikes and increased humidity. Thunderstorm can cause all of these and it seems to be related to the onset of asthma epidemic.Patients in epidemics of TAA are usually young atopic adults not on prophylaxis steroid inhalers. The epidemic is usually their first known attack. These features are consistent with the hypothesis that TAA is related to both aero-allergens and weather effects. Subjects allergic to pollen who are in the path of thunderstorm can inhale air loaded with pollen allergen and so have acute asthmatic response. TAA runs a benign courseDoctors should be aware of this phenomenon and the potential outbreak of asthma during heavy rains. A & E departments and ICU should be alert for possible rush of asthmatic

  2. Mechanical ventilation for severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Leatherman, James

    2015-06-01

    Acute exacerbations of asthma can lead to respiratory failure requiring ventilatory assistance. Noninvasive ventilation may prevent the need for endotracheal intubation in selected patients. For patients who are intubated and undergo mechanical ventilation, a strategy that prioritizes avoidance of ventilator-related complications over correction of hypercapnia was first proposed 30 years ago and has become the preferred approach. Excessive pulmonary hyperinflation is a major cause of hypotension and barotrauma. An appreciation of the key determinants of hyperinflation is essential to rational ventilator management. Standard therapy for patients with asthma undergoing mechanical ventilation consists of inhaled bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and drugs used to facilitate controlled hypoventilation. Nonconventional interventions such as heliox, general anesthesia, bronchoscopy, and extracorporeal life support have also been advocated for patients with fulminant asthma but are rarely necessary. Immediate mortality for patients who are mechanically ventilated for acute severe asthma is very low and is often associated with out-of-hospital cardiorespiratory arrest before intubation. However, patients who have been intubated for severe asthma are at increased risk for death from subsequent exacerbations and must be managed accordingly in the outpatient setting. PMID:26033128

  3. Low level atmospheric sulfur dioxide pollution and childhood asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, R.Y.; Li, C.K. )

    1990-11-01

    Quarterly analysis (1983-1987) of childhood asthma in Hong Kong from 13,620 hospitalization episodes in relation to levels of pollutants (SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, NO, O{sub 3}, TSP, and RSP) revealed a seasonal pattern of attack rates that correlates inversely with exposure to sulfur dioxide (r = -.52, P less than .05). The same cannot be found with other pollutants. Many factors may contribute to the seasonal variation of asthma attacks. We speculate that prolonged exposure (in terms of months) to low level SO{sub 2} is one factor that might induce airway inflammation and bronchial hyperreactivity and predispose to episodes of asthma.

  4. [Occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Pauli, G; Bessot, J C; Gourdon, C

    1992-12-01

    The diagnosis of occupational asthma requires the integration of a multiplicity of data; the history, cutaneous skin tests, biological tests, respiratory function tests and non-specific tests of bronchial hyperreactivity and specific bronchial provocation test. The history search for the presence of an atopic state, the occurrence of similar disorders in members of the same firm and also the timing of symptoms in relation to the occupational activities. Cutaneous tests are particularly helpful in IgE-mediated asthma in relation to the inhalation of animal or vegetable materials of glycoprotein origin. For haptens, the need for their prior coupling to a protein carrier causes problems which have not been entirely resolved. Laboratory tests run into the same snags. Respiratory function and non-specific bronchial provocation tests, confirm the diagnosis of asthma and enable the medium and long term prognostic to be assessed. Specific bronchial provocation tests are the most appropriate tests to establish an aetiological diagnosis in occupational asthma. Different technical methods are possible: quantitative administration of allergen aerosols, realistic tests, and tests using exposure chambers to achieve true test doses. The products responsible for occupational asthma are multiple. The different substances are characterised in a simplified manner: first animal matter (mammalian and arthropod allergens), secondly substances of vegetable origin (roots, leaves, flowers, grain and flour, wood and its derivates) and finally chemical products. The chemical products are primarily from the pharmaceutical and metal industries and above all from the plastics industry. PMID:1296320

  5. [Occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Padilla Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    The work-related asthma is a disease that is frequently reported in other countries, but little recognized in our own despite the large number of workers at risk. The lack of knowledge about its etiology at work involves a mishandling and poor outcome of the patient, because its treatment requires the removal of worker of exposure at work or at least this fall. The definitive diagnosis involves specialized medical procedures that are difficult to access and workplace studies that establish at first line the diagnosis of asthma and the work as cause of the disease or its aggravation. Health workers surveillance and compliance with work regulations are strategies that should be promoted prevention of asthma at work. PMID:20873063

  6. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M.; Grzybowski, S.

    1976-01-01

    Occupational asthma is probably much more common than is generally realized. Though many causes have been described, undoubtedly many more are yet to be recognized. One of the diagnostic difficulties lies in the fact that in most forms of this disease a late asthmatic reaction occurs in the evening rather than at work. The pathogenetic mechanisms differ in various forms of occupational asthma. In some, an immunologic mechanism is likely; in others, a "pharmacologic" action of the offending agent is implicated. Asthma due to inhalation of dusts of western red cedar, isocyanates, detergent enzymes and textiles is considered in detail. Periodic examination of workers at risk is of value for early diagnosis and prevention of irrversible airway obstruction. PMID:766943

  7. [Asthma Update 2015--What Cell Biology in Basic Pulmonary Research Can Offer to the Pneumologist].

    PubMed

    Wegmann, M; Fehrenbach, H; Krauss-Etschmann, S

    2016-02-01

    Bronchial asthma is one of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases world-wide causing an enormous socio-economic burden especially in industrialized countries. Currently, asthma is increasingly considered to be a poly-symptomatic disease comprising a variety of different asthma phenotypes and endotypes. This heterogeneity of asthma explains why the standard treatment with corticosteroids and β-agonists cannot achieve full symptom control in all cases, especially not during acute exacerbations. Therefore, current asthma research focuses on primary prevention of asthma as well as on novel approaches towards a phenotype- and endotype-specific asthma therapy.

  8. Thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    AN ASSOCIATION between asthma and thunderstorms based on retrospective data has been noted in several papers. This study, however, draws on almost-real-time, anonymised attendance data from 35 emergency departments (EDs) in the UK, and lightning-strike plots from the Met Office. PMID:25270814

  9. Thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    AN ASSOCIATION between asthma and thunderstorms based on retrospective data has been noted in several papers. This study, however, draws on almost-real-time, anonymised attendance data from 35 emergency departments (EDs) in the UK, and lightning-strike plots from the Met Office.

  10. Genetic factors in the presence, severity, and triggers of asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Sarafino, E P; Goldfedder, J

    1995-01-01

    The role of heredity in the presence of asthma, severity of the condition, and impact of 12 specific triggers of attacks was investigated. Health surveys containing questions about children's asthma characteristics were completed by 325 families with twin children across the United States. Data for 39 monozygotic twin pairs and 55 same sex dizygotic twin pairs who were between 2 and 20 years of age and had asthma present in at least one member of each pair were received and analysed. Results revealed higher concordance for the presence of asthma among monozygotic (58.97%; n = 23) than dizygotic twins (23.64%; n = 13). Further analyses were restricted to data from the concordant monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs. Asthma severity (the product of attack frequency and intensity ratings) was significantly correlated for monozygotic pairs but not for dizygotic pairs, and this difference in monozygotic and dizygotic severity correlations was significant. Also, monozygotic twins showed significantly higher correlations than dizygotic twins for the impacts of two asthma triggers: respiratory infection and physical activity. These results indicate a role of heredity in the presence of asthma and suggest that genetic factors may also affect the severity of children's asthma condition and the impact of respiratory infection and physical exertion as asthma triggers. PMID:7574852

  11. Parent misperception of control in childhood/adolescent asthma: the Room to Breathe survey.

    PubMed

    Carroll, W D; Wildhaber, J; Brand, P L P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine how often asthma control is achieved in children and adolescents, and how asthma affects parents' and children's daily lives. Interviews, including the childhood asthma control test (C-ACT), were conducted with 1,284 parents of asthmatic children (aged 4-15 yrs), as well as with the children themselves (aged 8-15 yrs; n=943), in Canada, Greece, Hungary, the Netherlands, South Africa and the UK. Parents reported mild asthma attacks at least weekly in 11% of children, and serious attacks (requiring oral corticosteroids or hospitalisation) at least annually in 35%. Although 73% of parents described their child's asthma as mild or intermittent, 40% of children/adolescents had C-ACT scores ≤ 19, indicating inadequate control, and only 14.7% achieved complete Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA)-defined control and just 9.2% achieved Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN)/British Thoracic Society (BTS)-defined control. Guideline-defined asthma control was significantly less common than well-controlled asthma using the C-ACT (p<0.001). Asthma restricted the child's activities in 39% of families and caused lifestyle changes in 70%. Complete asthma control is uncommon in children worldwide. Guideline-defined control measures appear to be more stringent than those defined by C-ACT or families. Overall, parents underestimate their child's asthma severity and overestimate asthma control. This is a major potential barrier to successful asthma treatment in children.

  12. Exercise-induced asthma: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cummiskey, J

    2001-10-01

    Asthmatic attack in exercise-induced asthma is brought about by hyperventilation (not necessarily to exercise), cold air, and low humidity of the air breathed. The effects are an increase in airway resistance, damage to bronchial mucosa, and an increase in bronchovascular permeability. The mechanism of these changes is the release of mediators such as histamine, leukotrienes, nitric oxide, sensory neuropeptides, the inhibition of neuronal activity, and bronchovascular permeability. The cause of asthma and exercise-induced asthma is unknown. It is probably an abnormality of vascular control in the peribronchium and/or an alteration in local adrenergic function. The importance of exercise-induced asthma definition and the use of stimulants in sport and antidoping in sport are discussed. PMID:11678516

  13. [Severe asthma].

    PubMed

    González, Claudio D

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to investigate the frequency of severe asthma (SA) according to WHO definition and to compare SA patients' characteristics with those of non-severe asthma (NSA); secondly, to investigate the level of control reached throughout a period of regular treatment. Between 1-1-2005 and 12-31-2014, 471 medical records from patients with bronchial asthma assisted in Buenos Aires City were analyzed. SA frequency was 40.1% (189/471), being significantly higher among patients from the public health system (47.7%, 108/226 vs. 33%, 81/245, p = 0.001). SA patients were older than NSA ones (51.3 ± 17.4 vs. 42.6 ± 17.1 years, p = 0.000), presented longer time since onset of the disease (median 30 vs. 20 years, p = 0.000), lower educational levels (secondary level or higher 41.7% vs. 58.1%, p = 0.000), lower frequency of rhinitis (47% vs. 60.6%, p = 0.004), more severe levels of airway obstruction (FEV% 50.2 ± 13.7 vs. 77.7 ± 12.4, p = 0.000), more frequent antecedents of Near Fatal Asthma (11.1% vs. 2.8%, p = 0.000), higher levels of serum IgE (median of 410 vs. 279 UI/l, p = 0.01) and higher demand of systemic steroids requirements and hospitalizations (68.7% vs. 50.7%, p = 0.000 and 37.5% vs. 15.9%, p = 0.000, respectively). A 30.6% of SA patients (58/189) reached a follow-up period of 12 months, 13 (22.5%) of whom reached the controlled asthma level. The frequency of SA found seems to be considerable. Multicenter studies to investigate the levels of control reached by SA patients with access to proper treatment are recommended.

  14. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  15. Asthma: Basic Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Learn How to Control Asthma Language: ... common triggers are tobacco smoke, dust mites, outdoor air pollution, cockroach allergen, pets, mold, and smoke from burning ...

  16. Asthma and school

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma action plan - school; Wheezing - school; Reactive airway disease - school; Bronchial asthma - school ... Your child's school asthma action plan should include: Phone ... nurse, parents, and guardians A brief history of your child's ...

  17. Asthma in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... have asthma. Nearly 9 million of them are children. Children have smaller airways than adults, which makes asthma especially serious for them. Children with asthma may experience wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, ...

  18. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive airway - mold; Bronchial asthma - mold; Triggers - mold; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Mold is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to mold, you are ...

  19. Out-Patient Management of Bronchial Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    Asthma, seen primarily as an inflammatory disease with secondary airway hyper-responsiveness, causes symptoms through contraction of the airway's smooth muscles. The management of chronic asthma relies on bronchodilators for symptomatic relief of bronchospasm, while primary therapy is used to either prevent or reverse the inflammatory component of the disease. Anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies include environmental control (where relevant), sodium cromoglycate (where appropriate), and both inhaled and oral glucocorticosteroids. Management of acute severe asthma is similar; bronchodilators are used to ”buy time” while systemic corticosteroids control the inflammatory process. PMID:21248908

  20. Frequency and Correlates of Overweight Status in Adolescent Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Natalie Walders; Wamboldt, Frederick S.; Mansell, Anthony L.; Carter, Rick; Federico, Monica J.; Wamboldt, Marianne Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background Debate exists within the literature concerning whether asthma and obesity are linked as comorbid conditions. Further study is required to understand the relationship between asthma and overweight status, and developmental considerations are an important priority area. Objective The present study addressed gaps in the existing literature by comparing rates of overweight status among a matched sample of adolescents with and without asthma and by examining correlates of overweight status among youth with asthma. Methods Rates and correlates of overweight status were compared among a matched cohort of 103 adolescents with asthma, 75 adolescents with asthma characterized by history of a severe acute event, and 92 normal controls. Results Significantly higher rates of overweight status were found among the asthma groups compared to the control group and to population estimates. Significant correlates for overweight status included younger age and earlier age at asthma diagnosis, suggesting that receiving an asthma diagnoses in early childhood may increase the propensity for weight gain. Conclusion Asthma and obesity are problematic comorbid conditions, and specialized obesity prevention programs may be particularly necessary at the onset of a new asthma diagnosis. Clinical Implications Identifying and addressing the factors that may contribute to the potential for obesity among youth with asthma are key research and clinical practice priorities. PMID:18350405

  1. Near fatal asthma: treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Vitale, C; Lanza, M; Sanduzzi, A; Molino, A; Mormile, M; Vatrella, A; Bilò, M B; Antonicelli, L; Bresciani, M; Micheletto, C; Vaghi, A; D'Amato, M

    2016-07-01

    Near-fatal asthma (NFA) is described as acute asthma associated with a respiratory arrest or arterial carbon dioxide tension greater than 50 mmHg, with or without altered consciousness, requiring mechanical ventilation. Risk factors for near fatal asthma have not been fully elucidated. In 80-85% of all fatal events, a phenotype, characterized by eosinophilic inflammation associated with gradual deterioration occurring in patients with severe and poorly controlled asthma, has been identified. Regarding to the management, acute severe asthma remains a significant clinical problem, which needs to be identified to facilitate early and appropriate therapeutic interventions. The assessment relies on clinical signs, but additional information might be obtained from chest radiography or blood gas analysis. No investigation should delay the initiation of appropriate therapy. The goals of therapy are the maintenance of oxygenation, relief of airflow obstruction, reduction of airways edema and mucus plugging (with Increased use of medications such as beta-agonists via metered dose inhalers and nebulizers, oral and/or intravenous (other than by inhalation) corticosteroids and oral or intravenous theophylline) whereas supporting ventilation as clinically indicated. Of course, the emergency physician needs to consider the wide range of potential complications, as attention to these problems when managing severe acute asthma might significantly improve outcome. An understanding of the available agents and potential pitfalls in the management of NFA is mandatory for the emergency physician. PMID:27425166

  2. The role of tiotropium in the management of asthma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by reversible airway obstruction that is secondary to an allergic inflammation and excessive smooth muscle contraction. Cholinergic signals were known to contribute significantly to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the use of anti-cholinergic agents in asthma has been justified only in acute asthma exacerbations, until tiotropium bromide, a long-acting anti-cholinergic agent was introduced. Recent reports showing a promising role of tiotropium in the treatment of asthma have aroused interest of the use of anti-cholinergic agent for the management of asthma. This report describes pharmacological characteristics, potential effects on inflammatory cells, and the current status of tiotropium in the treatment of asthma. PMID:22701860

  3. Occupational asthma: a case of Baker's asthma.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Thomas R; Sheffer, Albert L

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most prominent respiratory diseases worldwide. It is defined by airflow limitation and/or airway hyperresponsiveness and can be exacerbated by a number of environmental allergens. When allergic asthma exacerbations are attributed to stimuli in a particular work environment, then occupational asthma must be considered. Incidence estimates vary, but in 1999 the Surveillance of Work-Related and Occupational Respiratory Disease in the United Kingdom estimated 4293 incident cases of occupational respiratory disease, an increase of 1427 cases over the previous year. Occupational asthma represented 26% of these cases. Baker's asthma is one of the most frequently reported types of occupational asthma in several countries. Diagniostic steps include thorough history, careful exam, and demonstration of functional reversible airflow obstruction. Treatment modalities used for occupational asthma are similar to those used in the management of other forms of asthma, with particular attention to reducing the level of exposure to the inciting allergen.

  4. Asthma outbreak during a thunderstorm.

    PubMed

    Packe, G E; Ayres, J G

    1985-07-27

    An outbreak of acute asthma occurred in Birmingham and the surrounding area on July 6 and 7, 1983. In most patients symptoms began at the time of sudden climatic changes associated with a thunderstorm. Air pollution was not a factor. The large and sudden increase in numbers of airborne fungal spores, especially Didymella exitialis and Sporobolomyces, around the time of the outbreak suggests that they may have been partly contributory, although a direct causal effect has not yet been established.

  5. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Heart Attack Recovery FAQs Updated:Aug 24,2016 Most people ... recovery. View an animation of a heart attack . Heart Attack Recovery Questions and Answers What treatments will I ...

  6. Development of a Novel Tool for Engaging Children and Parents in Asthma Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Nkoy, Flory L.; Stone, Bryan L.; Fassl, Bernhard A.; Koopmeiners, Karmella; Halbern, Sarah; Kim, Eun H.; Poll, Justin; Hales, Joseph W.; Lee, Dillon; Maloney, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of an innovative application designed to engage children and their parents in weekly asthma self-monitoring and self-management to prompt an early response to deteriorations in chronic asthma control, and to provide their physicians with longitudinal data to assess the effectiveness of asthma therapy and prompt adjustments. The evaluation included 2 iterative usability testing cycles with 6 children with asthma and 2 parents of children with asthma to assess user performance and satisfaction with the application. Several usability problems were identified and changes were made to ensure acceptability of the application and relevance of the content. This novel application is unique compared to existing asthma tools and may shift asthma care from the current reactive, acute care model to a preventive, proactive patient-centered approach where treatment decisions are tailored to patients’ individual patterns of chronic asthma control to prevent acute exacerbations. PMID:23304339

  7. Occupational Medicine Model and Asthma Military Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Stuart M

    2015-11-01

    Medical evidence hints that asymptomatic recruits with a history of childhood asthma, quiescent since their 13th birthday, are still at risk for adverse changes in their clinical status following unfavorable environmental exposures during military deployment or combat. Asthmatic persons, claiming none or few symptoms, may still manifest airflow obstruction and display biomarkers of airway inflammation even when they are relatively asymptomatic and experience few if any respiratory complaints. The occupational medicine model offers a credible foundation for acknowledging the importance of personal susceptibility in the pathogenesis of military-associated asthma. It is appropriate to re-explore the current military standard for recruits with asymptomatic childhood asthma (≥12 months) not prescribed antiasthma medications. Raising the acceptance age for these recruits may be a consideration. Unfortunately, there is no effectual screening test that recognizes such susceptible soldiers at risk for future asthma attacks. Nevertheless, there is general support for evidence-based, scientifically valid medical screening that judges fitness for military service. Screening tests comprising asthma biomarkers and genetic indices may better verify vulnerable soldiers destined to suffer future asthma reactivation.

  8. Holy Saturday asthma.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Terence M; Cusack, Ruth; Landers, Sarah; Bredin, Charles Patrick

    2014-01-01

    A 61-year-old man complained of cough and dyspnoea after exposure to colophony-containing solder fumes at work. A histamine challenge test confirmed airway hyper-responsiveness, and colophony-challenge demonstrated a 16.7% drop in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), supporting a diagnosis of colophony-induced occupational asthma. At review, the patient presented with cough, dyspnoea and wheeze that occurred acutely when exposed to the fumes from burning incense during Easter Saturday services, necessitating his departure from the church. Inhalation challenge tests using two blends of incense used at his church (Greek and Vatican) led to identical symptoms and a significant reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 s 15 min after exposure and PEFRs up to 48 h after exposure, indicating an early and late phase asthmatic reaction. This is the first report of coexistent colophony and incense-induced asthma. The similarities in chemical structures between abietic acid in colophony and boswellic acid in incense suggest a common mechanism. PMID:24626388

  9. Association of airborne Aspergillus with asthma exacerbation in Southern Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Zubairi, Ali Bin Sarwar; Azam, Iqbal; Awan, Safia; Zafar, Afia

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure to airborne fungi has been related with exacerbation of asthma in adults and children leading to increased outpatient, emergency room visits, and hospitalizations. Hypersensitivity to these airborne fungi may be an important initial predisposing factor in the development and exacerbation of asthma. Objective This study was conducted to determine an association between fungal types and spore concentrations with the risk of asthma exacerbation in adults. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted from May 2008 to August 2009 at the Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi, Pakistan. All adult (age≥16 years) patients presenting to the hospital with acute asthma exacerbation were enrolled after informed consent. A home survey was conducted for each patient to assess their environmental characteristics. Indoor air samples were also obtained from the patient's home to determine the type and spore concentration of fungi within the week of their enrollment in the study. Results Three hundred and ninety-one patients with an acute asthma exacerbation were enrolled during the study period. The mean age of participants was 46 years (standard deviation, ±18 years) and 247 (63.2%) were females. A trend of higher asthma enrollment associated with higher Aspergillus concentrations was found in two consecutive summers. A total of nineteen types of fungi were found in air samples. Aspergillus spp. was the most frequently isolated fungus with acute asthma exacerbation. Conclusion An association of higher concentration of indoor Aspergillus spp. with asthma exacerbation in adults was observed in this study. PMID:24809014

  10. Wheezing and Asthma in Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Wheezing and Asthma in Infants KidsHealth > For Parents > Wheezing and Asthma ... of asthma.) My Baby Is Wheezing. Is It Asthma? If your baby has a cold and is ...

  11. [Phototherapy and sleep deprivation as additional methods of treating bronchial asthma patients].

    PubMed

    Maevskiĭ, A A

    1991-05-01

    Correction of internal desynchronosis in bronchial asthma by means of phototherapy and partial sleep deprivation was instituted in 4 hormone-dependent patients with bronchial asthma for 13 months. The results were positive: the frequency and severity of night attacks reduced, the condition of the patients improved.

  12. School holidays and admissions with asthma.

    PubMed

    Storr, J; Lenney, W

    1989-01-01

    The admission rate for asthma at a children's hospital was studied over an 11 year period. Admissions varied unpredictably over periods of a few days, but there was a repeated yearly pattern of peaks and troughs with an interval of several weeks. The short term variation could be attributed to chance effects alone, excluding any important role for short term influences--for example, weather changes--in precipitating asthma admissions. There was a definite association between the longer term variation and school holidays. The admission rate fell during holidays and there were two or more peaks during terms. The pattern is consistent with a largely viral aetiology for asthmatic attacks throughout the year. We postulate that school holidays disrupt the spread of viral infections in a community, with synchronisation of subsequent attacks. Travel during holidays may facilitate acquisition of new viral strains by the community.

  13. School holidays and admissions with asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Storr, J; Lenney, W

    1989-01-01

    The admission rate for asthma at a children's hospital was studied over an 11 year period. Admissions varied unpredictably over periods of a few days, but there was a repeated yearly pattern of peaks and troughs with an interval of several weeks. The short term variation could be attributed to chance effects alone, excluding any important role for short term influences--for example, weather changes--in precipitating asthma admissions. There was a definite association between the longer term variation and school holidays. The admission rate fell during holidays and there were two or more peaks during terms. The pattern is consistent with a largely viral aetiology for asthmatic attacks throughout the year. We postulate that school holidays disrupt the spread of viral infections in a community, with synchronisation of subsequent attacks. Travel during holidays may facilitate acquisition of new viral strains by the community. PMID:2923458

  14. Psychological Factors in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Asthma has long been considered a condition in which psychological factors have a role. As in many illnesses, psychological variables may affect outcome in asthma via their effects on treatment adherence and symptom reporting. Emerging evidence suggests that the relation between asthma and psychological factors may be more complex than that, however. Central cognitive processes may influence not only the interpretation of asthma symptoms but also the manifestation of measurable changes in immune and physiologic markers of asthma. Furthermore, asthma and major depressive disorder share several risk factors and have similar patterns of dysregulation in key biologic systems, including the neuroendocrine stress response, cytokines, and neuropeptides. Despite the evidence that depression is common in people with asthma and exerts a negative impact on outcome, few treatment studies have examined whether improving symptoms of depression do, in fact, result in better control of asthma symptoms or improved quality of life in patients with asthma. PMID:20525122

  15. Tropical island asthma in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Fournier-Massey, G; Massey, D G; Price, S; McLaughlin, D G; Gordon, B L

    1985-09-01

    To better understand the increased morbidity and mortality of asthma in Hawaii, a profile was established from questionnaires completed by 76 asthmatics in a residential area and by 204 asthmatics attending emergency rooms. The general profile differed from profiles on other islands and mainland USA in that allergens were more important and exercise less. Variations occurred in the profile in association with ethnicity, time in Hawaii, and prescribing habits. The Chinese did not recognize infection as a trigger; the Filipinos had little familial asthma, less pollen sensitivity, and used few steroids; and the Japanese were sensitive to Kona weather but not to pollen. The newcomers (military) who were sensitive to pollen and less to emotion and exercise, rated their attacks more severe and used more nebulizers and steroids. Certain other relationships emerged such as house dust as a trigger and the increased use of steroids. Asthmatics of two civilian ERs used fewer nebulizers and steroids. In conclusion, Hawaii's increased morbidity and mortality of asthma should be examined further in terms of ethnicity, infection, house dust, and prescribing habits.

  16. PSYCHOLOGICAL MANAGEMENT OF CHILDHOOD ASTHMA

    PubMed Central

    Selesnick, Sheldon T.; Friedman, David Belais; Augenbraun, Bernice

    1964-01-01

    Over-emphasis on physical factors in asthma probably has come about because psychological factors have seemed elusive, difficult to define and often misleading. Several concepts of classic causes of emotional disturbances that abet asthmatic attacks in children may be helpful in management of the patient and his environs. The first concept has to do with feelings of inadequacy in the mother which lead her to place the burden of decision-making upon the child. She is thus able to give the child very little support and communicates to him her anxiety. Often encouragement to the mother, through the physician's pointing out her very real capacities and achievements can be helpful to the child. The second concept has to do with the asthmatic child's character structure and his assumption of a pseudo-mature position. Among the things the physician can do is to advise the parents as to what is age-appropriate behavior for the child and instruct them in ways to make the child recognize his position of dependence. The third concept concerns threat of separation as a precipitant to the asthma attack. To deal with such a situation the physician may make a number of recommendations of methods for alleviating such a threat. In some families, the degree of disturbance is so great that the parents cannot respond to the physician's advice and may need psychiatric referral. Clues for recognizing such a situation are given along with recommendations on how to make a successful referral. PMID:14154286

  17. Thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip E; Jonsson, Haflidi

    2004-09-01

    Thunderstorms have often been linked to epidemics of asthma, especially during the grass flowering season; however, the precise mechanisms explaining this phenomenon are unknown. Evidence of high respirable allergen loadings in the air associated with specific meteorologic events combined with an analysis of pollen physiology suggests that rupture of airborne pollen can occur. Strong downdrafts and dry, cold outflows distinguish thunderstorm rain from frontal rain. The weather system of a mature thunderstorm likely entrains grass pollen into the cloud base, where pollen rupture would be enhanced, then transports the respirable-sized fragments of pollen debris to ground level where outflows distribute them ahead of the rain. The conditions occurring at the onset of a thunderstorm might expose susceptible people to a rapid increase in concentrations of pollen allergens in the air that can readily deposit in the lower airways and initiate asthmatic reactions. PMID:15283882

  18. Thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip E; Jonsson, Haflidi

    2004-09-01

    Thunderstorms have often been linked to epidemics of asthma, especially during the grass flowering season; however, the precise mechanisms explaining this phenomenon are unknown. Evidence of high respirable allergen loadings in the air associated with specific meteorologic events combined with an analysis of pollen physiology suggests that rupture of airborne pollen can occur. Strong downdrafts and dry, cold outflows distinguish thunderstorm rain from frontal rain. The weather system of a mature thunderstorm likely entrains grass pollen into the cloud base, where pollen rupture would be enhanced, then transports the respirable-sized fragments of pollen debris to ground level where outflows distribute them ahead of the rain. The conditions occurring at the onset of a thunderstorm might expose susceptible people to a rapid increase in concentrations of pollen allergens in the air that can readily deposit in the lower airways and initiate asthmatic reactions.

  19. Sleeping position and reported night-time asthma symptoms and medication.

    PubMed

    Kalolella, Admirabilis Beno

    2016-01-01

    A 49 years old man, known case of bronchial asthma for 43 years, with history of frequent asthmatic attacks, usually responding to double dose of intravenous Aminophylline and double dose of Hydrocortisone was received at medical emergency care unit at midnight with night-time asthma attack. The attack did not settle with Aminophylline single Intravenous injection. He was then admitted and put in supine sleep position for re-evaluation while his asthma symptoms were monitored while waiting for the medical officer's evaluation of his asthma status. After 3 hours of observation, asthma symptoms were relieved, and patient was discharged home and advised to sleep in supine position throughout every night to prevent asthma symptoms. The patient was followed up through nighttime sleep diary for one month. After one month period of monitoring, the patient had significance reduction in asthma symptoms and reduced night time medication, reduced episodes of night awakening due to asthma symptoms, and improved capability for normal works. This case report describes a novel approach of management and prophylaxis of asthmatic episodes through sleeping position that reduces and control asthma symptoms resulting in reduced drug consumption. PMID:27642400

  20. Fractal Geometry Enables Classification of Different Lung Morphologies in a Model of Experimental Asthma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obert, Martin; Hagner, Stefanie; Krombach, Gabriele A.; Inan, Selcuk; Renz, Harald

    2015-06-01

    Animal models represent the basis of our current understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma and are of central importance in the preclinical development of drug therapies. The characterization of irregular lung shapes is a major issue in radiological imaging of mice in these models. The aim of this study was to find out whether differences in lung morphology can be described by fractal geometry. Healthy and asthmatic mouse groups, before and after an acute asthma attack induced by methacholine, were studied. In vivo flat-panel-based high-resolution Computed Tomography (CT) was used for mice's thorax imaging. The digital image data of the mice's lungs were segmented from the surrounding tissue. After that, the lungs were divided by image gray-level thresholds into two additional subsets. One subset contained basically the air transporting bronchial system. The other subset corresponds mainly to the blood vessel system. We estimated the fractal dimension of all sets of the different mouse groups using the mass radius relation (mrr). We found that the air transporting subset of the bronchial lung tissue enables a complete and significant differentiation between all four mouse groups (mean D of control mice before methacholine treatment: 2.64 ± 0.06; after treatment: 2.76 ± 0.03; asthma mice before methacholine treatment: 2.37 ± 0.16; after treatment: 2.71 ± 0.03; p < 0.05). We conclude that the concept of fractal geometry allows a well-defined, quantitative numerical and objective differentiation of lung shapes — applicable most likely also in human asthma diagnostics.

  1. Lupine inhalation induced asthma in a child.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ancillo, Alvaro; Gil-Adrados, Ana C; Domínguez-Noche, Carmen; Cosmes, Pedro M

    2005-09-01

    The ingestion of lupine seed flour has been reported as a cause of allergic reactions. There is some evidence of its allergenic potential after inhalation. An 8-year-old asthmatic child, who was allergic to peanut, was studied in our clinic with the suspicion of an adverse drug reaction due to salbutamol. He suffered an asthma attack while playing with his brother, who had been eating lupine seed as snack; surprisingly, the asthma attack worsened with salbutamol. The skin tests showed a positive result with Lupinus albus extract, peanut, garbanzo bean, navy bean, pea, green bean, lentil, soy, Olea europea pollen, grass pollen and Plantago lanceolata pollen. The prick-by-prick tests both from dried seeds and those preserved in salt and water were strongly positive. Serum specific IgE antibodies were positive to Lupine albus (1.43 kU/l), peanut (4.32 kU/l), soy (2.15 kU/l), lentil (3.12 kU/l) and garbanzo (0.7 kU/l). After informed consent salbutamol was well tolerated but the patient had asthma in 5 min of manipulation of the lupine seeds. In our case, reactivity with other legumes was also demonstrated, but only peanut allergy was relevant because boiled legumes were tolerated. It is also notorious that anamnesis is so important to assess the true etiological agents of asthma.

  2. Asthma triggers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes. ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes.

  3. Asthma - child - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric asthma - discharge; Wheezing - discharge; Reactive airway disease - discharge ... Your child has asthma , which causes the airways of the lungs to swell and narrow. In the hospital, the doctors and nurses helped ...

  4. Allergies, asthma, and pollen

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive airway - pollen; Bronchial asthma - pollen; Triggers - pollen; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. It is important to know your triggers because avoiding them is your first step toward feeling better. ...

  5. Test Your Asthma Knowledge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Test Your Asthma Knowledge Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents ... page please turn Javascript on. True or False? Asthma is caused by an inflammation of the inner ...

  6. Paediatric asthma and obesity.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Sean R; Platts-Mills, Thomas A E

    2006-12-01

    None of the explanations proposed for the increase in paediatric asthma have been adequate. It is becoming apparent that the cause of the increase in asthma must be multi-factorial. Increasing attention has been focused on the role of lifestyle in the development of asthma. Lifestyle changes that have occurred in children are those in diet and decreased physical activity, with obesity being the product of these changes. The increase in asthma, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle have occurred together. However, a temporal relationship between asthma, obesity and decreased physical activity has not been determined in the paediatric literature. Limited data suggest that decreased physical activity could be playing a role in the aetiology of asthma independent of obesity. Furthermore, there has been substantial research on the benefits of exercise programmes for paediatric patients with asthma. Longitudinal trials monitoring physical activity, obesity and the development of asthma are needed. PMID:17098637

  7. Viruses and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Dulek, Daniel E.; Peebles, R. Stokes

    2011-01-01

    Background Viral respiratory infection has long been known to influence the occurrence of asthma exacerbations. Over the last twenty years much effort has been put into clarifying the role that viral respiratory infections play in the eventual development of asthma. Scope of Review In this review we give a general background of the role of viruses in the processes of asthma exacerbation and asthma induction. We review recent additions to the literature in the last three years with particular focus on clinical and epidemiologic investigations of influenza, rhinovirus, bocavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and metapneumovirus. Major Conclusions The development of asthma emerges from a complex interaction of genetic predisposition and environmental factors with viral infection likely playing a significant role in the effect of environment on asthma inception. General Significance Further understanding of the role that viruses play in asthma exacerbation and inception will contribute to decreased asthma morbidity in the future. PMID:21291960

  8. Asthma and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Asthma and Pregnancy Saturday, 01 August 2015 In every ... her background risk. This sheet talks about whether asthma may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  9. Using a Narrative Approach to Enhance Clinical Care for Patients With Asthma.

    PubMed

    Owton, Helen; Allen-Collinson, Jacquelyn; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2015-07-01

    There are currently > 230 million people in the world with asthma, and asthma attacks result in the hospitalization of someone every 7 min. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute outlines four components of clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma, which tend to take a biomedical focus: (1) measures of assessment and monitoring, obtained by objective tests, physical examination, patient history, and patient report, to diagnose and assess the characteristics and severity of asthma and to monitor whether asthma control is achieved and maintained; (2) education for a partnership in asthma care; (3) control of environmental factors and comorbid conditions that affect asthma; and (4) pharmacologic therapy. Many national guidelines include providing patients with asthma with (1) written action plans, (2) inhaler technique training, and (3) structured annual reviews. Although current guidelines help improve clinical processes of care for asthma, there is also a need to improve self-care of asthma by empowering individuals to take more control of their condition. There is a growing appreciation that a narrative approach with patients with asthma, which focuses on the illness experience and aims to enhance patient-clinician understanding, might improve self-care. We explore how a framework for clinicians to listen to patients' stories, developed from research on individuals with asthma, might enhance communication, improve patient-clinician relationship, and foster better patient self-care. The article closes with the implications of this approach for clinical practice and future research.

  10. Summary of the 2008 BTS/SIGN British Guideline on the management of asthma.

    PubMed

    Levy, Mark L; Thomas, Mike; Small, Iain; Pearce, Linda; Pinnock, Hilary; Stephenson, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 BTS/SIGN British Guideline on the management of asthma provides comprehensive updated evidence-based guidance on asthma management for healthcare professionals. This primary care-focussed summary has been produced to aid dissemination and implementation of the key guideline messages into primary care. The section on diagnosis emphasises the new integrated symptom-based approach with clinicians using their deductive skills to determine the probability that the patient has asthma. The various tools used for monitoring asthma are discussed. There are sections on both non-pharmacological and pharmacological management of chronic asthma in adults and children. Treatment options for children are subdivided into the under-5s and children aged 5-12 years. Poor asthma control is manifested by exacerbations and acute asthma. Personalised asthma action plans for guided self management should be provided and used when levels of asthma control change. There are sections on difficult asthma and the treatment of exacerbations and acute severe asthma. Various outcome measures for auditing the quality of asthma care are discussed.

  11. Identifying asthma triggers.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Justin C; Ferguson, Berrylin J

    2014-02-01

    Asthma has many triggers including rhinosinusitis; allergy; irritants; medications (aspirin in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease); and obesity. Paradoxic vocal fold dysfunction mimics asthma and may be present along with asthma. This article reviews each of these triggers, outlining methods of recognizing the trigger and then its management. In many patients more than one trigger may be present. Full appreciation of the complexity of these relationships and targeted therapy to the trigger is needed to best care for the patient with asthma.

  12. Mouse Models of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Debeuf, Nincy; Haspeslagh, Eline; van Helden, Mary; Hammad, Hamida; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2016-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the conducting airways characterized by the presence of allergen-specific IgE, Th2 cytokine production, eosinophilic airway inflammation, bronchial hyperreactivity, mucus overproduction, and structural changes in the airways. Investigators have tried to mimic these features of human allergic asthma in murine models. Whereas the surrogate allergen ovalbumin has been extremely valuable for unravelling underlying mechanisms of the disease, murine asthma models depend nowadays on naturally occurring allergens, such as house dust mite (HDM), cockroach, and Alternaria alternata. Here we describe a physiologically relevant model of acute allergic asthma based on sensitization and challenge with HDM extracts, and compare it with the ovalbumin/alum-induced asthma model. Moreover, we propose a detailed readout of the asthma phenotype, determining the degree of eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids by flow cytometry, visualizing goblet cell metaplasia, and measuring Th cytokine production by lung-draining mediastinal lymph node cells restimulated with HDM. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27248433

  13. Revisiting early intervention in adult asthma

    PubMed Central

    Selroos, Olof; O'Byrne, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The term “early intervention” with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in asthma is used in different ways, thereby causing confusion and misinterpretation of data. We propose that the term should be reserved for start of ICS therapy in patients with a diagnosis of asthma but within a short period of time after the first symptoms, not from the date of diagnosis. Prospective clinical studies suggest a time frame of 2 years for the term “early” from the onset of symptoms to starting anti-inflammatory treatment with ICS. The current literature supports early intervention with ICS for all patients with asthma including patients with mild disease, who often have normal or near-normal lung function. This approach reduces symptoms rapidly and allows patients to achieve early asthma control. Later introduction of ICS therapy may not reduce effectiveness in terms of lung function but delays asthma control and exposes patients to unnecessary morbidity. Results of nationwide intervention programmes support the early use of ICS, as it significantly minimises the disease burden. Acute asthma exacerbations are usually preceded by progressing symptoms and lung function decline over a period of 1–2 weeks. Treatment with an increased dose of ICS together with a rapid- and long-acting inhaled β2-agonist during this phase has reduced the risk of severe exacerbations. PMID:27730140

  14. About Heart Attacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... survive. A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced or ... survive. A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced or ...

  15. How Is Asthma Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Month with a Google+ Hangout on Air for parents and caregivers to learn how to help control a child's asthma so that they can breathe ... parents build up their asthma team. Jose, his parents, a doctor and a nurse, ... forces to help Jose control his asthma. The video is recorded in Spanish ...

  16. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print A A A Text Size en español ¿Las alergias provocan asma? Do allergies cause asthma? The answer to that question is: yes and ...

  17. High Frequency Migraine Is Associated with Lower Acute Pain Sensitivity and Abnormal Insula Activity Related to Migraine Pain Intensity, Attack Frequency, and Pain Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Vani A.; Moayedi, Massieh; Keaser, Michael L.; Khan, Shariq A.; Hubbard, Catherine S.; Goyal, Madhav; Seminowicz, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a pain disorder associated with abnormal brain structure and function, yet the effect of migraine on acute pain processing remains unclear. It also remains unclear whether altered pain-related brain responses and related structural changes are associated with clinical migraine characteristics. Using fMRI and three levels of thermal stimuli (non-painful, mildly painful, and moderately painful), we compared whole-brain activity between 14 migraine patients and 14 matched controls. Although, there were no significant differences in pain thresholds nor in pre-scan pain ratings to mildly painful thermal stimuli, patients did have aberrant suprathreshold nociceptive processing. Brain imaging showed that, compared to controls, patients had reduced activity in pain modulatory regions including left dorsolateral prefrontal, posterior parietal, and middle temporal cortices and, at a lower-threshold, greater activation in the right mid-insula to moderate pain vs. mild pain. We also found that pain-related activity in the insula was associated with clinical variables in patients, including associations between: bilateral anterior insula and pain catastrophizing (PCS); bilateral anterior insula and contralateral posterior insula and migraine pain intensity; and bilateral posterior insula and migraine frequency at a lower-threshold. PCS and migraine pain intensity were also negatively associated with activity in midline regions including posterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortices. Diffusion tensor imaging revealed a negative correlation between fractional anisotropy (a measure of white matter integrity; FA) and migraine duration in the right mid-insula and a positive correlation between left mid-insula FA and PCS. In sum, while patients showed lower sensitivity to acute noxious stimuli, the neuroimaging findings suggest enhanced nociceptive processing and significantly disrupted modulatory networks, particularly involving the insula, associated with indices

  18. Molecular epidemiology of respiratory viruses in virus-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ishioka, Taisei; Noda, Masahiro; Kozawa, Kunihisa; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory illness (ARI) due to various viruses is not only the most common cause of upper respiratory infection in humans but is also a major cause of morbidity and mortality, leading to diseases such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human rhinovirus (HRV), human metapneumovirus (HMPV), human parainfluenza virus (HPIV), and human enterovirus infections may be associated with virus-induced asthma. For example, it has been suggested that HRV infection is detected in the acute exacerbation of asthma and infection is prolonged. Thus it is believed that the main etiological cause of asthma is ARI viruses. Furthermore, the number of asthma patients in most industrial countries has greatly increased, resulting in a morbidity rate of around 10-15% of the population. However, the relationships between viral infections, host immune response, and host factors in the pathophysiology of asthma remain unclear. To gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of virus-induced asthma, it is important to assess both the characteristics of the viruses and the host defense mechanisms. Molecular epidemiology enables us to understand the pathogenesis of microorganisms by identifying specific pathways, molecules, and genes that influence the risk of developing a disease. However, the epidemiology of various respiratory viruses associated with virus-induced asthma is not fully understood. Therefore, in this article, we review molecular epidemiological studies of RSV, HRV, HPIV, and HMPV infection associated with virus-induced asthma. PMID:24062735

  19. Time for a new language for asthma control: results from REALISE Asia

    PubMed Central

    Price, David; David-Wang, Aileen; Cho, Sang-Heon; Ho, James Chung-Man; Jeong, Jae-Won; Liam, Chong-Kin; Lin, Jiangtao; Muttalif, Abdul Razak; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Tan, Tze-Lee; Yunus, Faisal; Neira, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Asthma is a global health problem, and asthma prevalence in Asia is increasing. The REcognise Asthma and LInk to Symptoms and Experience Asia study assessed patients’ perception of asthma control and attitudes toward treatment in an accessible, real-life adult Asian population. Patients and methods An online survey of 2,467 patients with asthma from eight Asian countries/regions, aged 18–50 years, showed greater than or equal to two prescriptions in previous 2 years and access to social media. Patients were asked about their asthma symptoms, exacerbations and treatment type, views and perceptions of asthma control, attitudes toward asthma management, and sources of asthma information. Results Patients had a mean age of 34.2 (±7.4) years and were diagnosed with asthma for 12.5 (±9.7) years. Half had the Global Initiative for Asthma-defined uncontrolled asthma. During the previous year, 38% of patients visited the emergency department, 33% were hospitalized, and 73% had greater than or equal to one course of oral corticosteroids. About 90% of patients felt that their asthma was under control, 82% considered their condition as not serious, and 59% were concerned about their condition. In all, 66% of patients viewed asthma control as managing attacks and 24% saw it as an absence of or minimal symptoms. About 14% of patients who correctly identified their controller inhalers had controlled asthma compared to 6% who could not. Conclusion Patients consistently overestimated their level of asthma control contrary to what their symptoms suggest. They perceived control as management of exacerbations, reflective of a crisis-oriented mind-set. Interventions can leverage on patients’ trust in health care providers and desire for self-management via a new language to generate a paradigm shift toward symptom control and preventive care. PMID:26445555

  20. Major reduction in asthma morbidity and continued reduction in asthma mortality in New Zealand: what lessons have been learned?

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, J.; Kolbe, J.; Richards, G.; Whitlock, T.; Rea, H.

    1995-01-01

    Increasing financial barriers to primary health care against a background of social and economic decline are likely to have contributed to asthma morbidity and mortality in New Zealand. Although there would not have been a sufficient increase in asthma prevalence to have accounted for the threefold increase in mortality rates, whether or not there was an increase in asthma severity in the late 1970s remains open to debate. Misuse or poor use of newly available and potent bronchodilator medications by those with the most severe asthma may simply have contributed to further delays in obtaining appropriate care and therefore to an increase in frequency of severe attacks in the community. Despite substantial increases in the use of bronchodilator therapy in New Zealand, there was no immediate improvement in indices of either asthma morbidity or mortality. The initial reduction in mortality rates in the 1980s happened at a time when first admissions for asthma were still increasing and seems to be best explained by an improvement in utilisation of hospital services (which were free until 1992) rather than a reduction in asthma severity. However, the recent reductions in all measures of asthma morbidity and further reduction in asthma mortality since 1989 does now suggest a reduction in asthma severity and would be best explained by the substantial increase in medium and high dose inhaled corticosteroid use, and to the endorsement of the current management strategies for asthma which are being promoted internationally and which were given considerable publicity in New Zealand in 1989 and 1990. Whilst sales of inhaled beta agonists were higher in 1991 than 1989, this may not reflect their pattern of use by individual patients since the need for an increase in inhaled beta agonist treatment has been accepted as indicating a lack of control and the need for either starting or increasing the dose of inhaled steroid treatment. Images PMID:7660347

  1. Asthma in Sickle Cell Disease: Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Kathryn; Lima, John

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To review issues related to asthma in sickle cell disease and management strategies. Data Source. A systematic review of pertinent original research publications, reviews, and editorials was undertaken using MEDLlNE, the Cochrane Library databases, and CINAHL from 1947 to November 2010. Search terms were [asthma] and [sickle cell disease]. Additional publications considered relevant to the sickle cell disease population of patients were identified; search terms included [sickle cell disease] combined with [acetaminophen], [pain medications], [vitamin D], [beta agonists], [exhaled nitric oxide], and [corticosteroids]. Results. The reported prevalence of asthma in children with sickle cell disease varies from 2% to approximately 50%. Having asthma increases the risk for developing acute chest syndrome , death, or painful episodes compared to having sickle cell disease without asthma. Asthma and sickle cell may be linked by impaired nitric oxide regulation, excessive production of leukotrienes, insufficient levels of Vitamin D, and exposure to acetaminophen in early life. Treatment of sickle cell patients includes using commonly prescribed asthma medications; specific considerations are suggested to ensure safety in the sickle cell population. Conclusion. Prospective controlled trials of drug treatment for asthma in patients who have both sickle cell disease and asthma are urgently needed. PMID:21490765

  2. Anesthesia in children with asthma and rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, F; De Benedictis, F M; Peroni, D G; Marseglia, G L; Caffarelli, C; Crisafulli, G; Indinnimeo, L

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of asthma is increasing worldwide, but morbidity and mortality are decreasing, because of improvements in medical care. Although the incidence of severe perioperative bronchospasm is relatively low in asthmatics undergoing anaesthesia, when it does occur it may be life-threatening. Preoperative assessment of asthma should include a specialized medical hystory and physical examination as well as pulmonary function testing. Potential trigger agents should be identified and avoided. In many asthmatic patients treatment with systemic corticosteroids and bronchodilators is indicated to prevent the inflammation and bronchocostriction associated with endotracheal intubation. Nonetheless, acute bronchospasm can still occur, especially at induction and emergence, and should be promptly and methodically managed. PMID:22014930

  3. Evaluation of CHESS: New York asthma data 1971 to 1972. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, H.D.; Viren, J.R.; Pechan, E.H.; Ripps, A.E.

    1981-08-01

    A statistical reanalysis of the CHESS New York asthma data that were collected from 1971-72 is presented. An initial analysis of these data by the EPA suggested that asthma attacks increase with elevated levels of suspended nitrates in the ambient air environment. This analysis suffered from several shortcomings which raise serious questions about the study conclusions. For example, the original analysis failed to take into account factors such as day of study, a critical variable since daily attack rates declined appreciably as study periods grew longer. Other critical factors that were not considered in the EPA analysis were seasonal, psychological, and allergic effects as well as the lack of independence among asthma attacks. In addition, both the medical and the aerometry data in the study were of poor quality. The reanalysis attempted to compensate as much as possible for the various shortcomings. The results show no evidence of a link between suspended nitrates and asthma.

  4. Epigenetic Mechanisms in Asthma.

    PubMed

    DeVries, Avery; Vercelli, Donata

    2016-03-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases are among the most prevalent chronic noncommunicable diseases of childhood, but the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms are poorly understood. Because epigenetic mechanisms link gene regulation to environmental cues and developmental trajectories, their contribution to asthma and allergy pathogenesis is under active investigation. DNA methylation signatures associated with concurrent disease and with the development of asthma during childhood asthma have been identified, but their significance is not easily interpretable. On the other hand, the characterization of early epigenetic predictors of asthma points to a potential role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating the inception of, and the susceptibility to, this disease. PMID:27027952

  5. Prevalence of Asthma in Children of Chemical Warfare Victims

    PubMed Central

    Mirsadraee, Majid; Mozaffari, Abolfazl; Attaran, Davood

    2011-01-01

    Objective Exposure of DNA to sulfur mustard gas may increase the inheritance of asthma in chemical warfare victims' (CWV) offspring. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of asthma in children of CWV and compare it to asthmatic children in the general population. Methods Four hundred and nine children from 130 CWV fathers and 440 children from 145 asthmatic parents from two cities in Iran participated in this study. The prevalence of asthma was determined by standard questionnaire released for epidemiological survey of asthma in children and compared between two groups. Findings The prevalence of asthma in the CWV group was 15%; this was not significantly different from the control group (12.5%). The children of the CWV group reported a significantly greater incidence of wheezing (1.2±3.1 attacks) per year, but the control group reported more severe attacks leading to speech difficulties (3%) and coughing (7%). Regression analysis showed that with increasing family size in the control group, the number of subjects suffering from asthmatic symptoms decreases significantly (r=0.86, P=0.001). Conclusion Chemical agents may increase the prevalence of asthma in the offspring of CWV. PMID:23056804

  6. The Validation Study of Neurofilament Heavy Chain and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine as Plasma Biomarkers of Clinical/Paraclinical Activity in First and Relapsing-Remitting Demyelination Acute Attacks.

    PubMed

    Ljubisavljevic, S; Stojanovic, I; Basic, J; Pavlovic, D A

    2016-10-01

    Although current evidence mainly suggests immunopathogenesis of demyelination and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS), there are results which document the importance of other factors, such as oxidative stress and its mediated injuries. The oxidative stress intensity in axonal damage during acute demyelination is little known. We performed this study as a cross-sectional biomarker validation study in order to evaluate the parameters of axonal damage (phosphorylated neurofilaments heavy chain (pNF-H)) and oxidative stress (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)) in plasma of patients with initial and relapsing-remitting demyelination attacks, defined as clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS); and the correlations between these parameters and biological (index of blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability), clinical (index of disease progression), and radiological (T1-Gd-enhancing lesion volume) activities of disease. Both parameters were increased in CIS and RRMS compared to control subjects (p < 0.05). The positive correlations were observed between 8-OHdG values and index of BBB permeability, clinical severity of disease, and demyelinated brain lesion volume, in CIS group (r > 0.50; p < 0.05). Similar correlations were obtained between pNF-H values and the above parameters, as well as the index of disease progression, in RRMS group (r > 0.30; p < 0.05). There was a significant correlation between values of 8-OHdG and pNF-H only in CIS group, r = 0.52, p < 0.05. While the plasma values of 8-OHdG reflect the degree of acute demyelination in CIS, pNF-H values reflect that in RRMS. The obtained results must be reevaluated in similar prospective studies related to their prognostic values. PMID:27295058

  7. Seven Deadliest Network Attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Prowell, Stacy J; Borkin, Michael; Kraus, Robert

    2010-05-01

    Do you need to keep up with the latest hacks, attacks, and exploits effecting networks? Then you need "Seven Deadliest Network Attacks". This book pinpoints the most dangerous hacks and exploits specific to networks, laying out the anatomy of these attacks including how to make your system more secure. You will discover the best ways to defend against these vicious hacks with step-by-step instruction and learn techniques to make your computer and network impenetrable. Attacks detailed in this book include: Denial of Service; War Dialing; Penetration 'Testing'; Protocol Tunneling; Spanning Tree Attacks; Man-in-the-Middle; and, Password Replay. Knowledge is power, find out about the most dominant attacks currently waging war on computers and networks globally. Discover the best ways to defend against these vicious attacks; step-by-step instruction shows you how. Institute countermeasures, don't be caught defenseless again, learn techniques to make your computer and network impenetrable.

  8. Asthma and coagulation.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J Daan; Majoor, Christof J; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Bel, Elisabeth H D; van der Poll, Tom

    2012-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disease characterized by paroxysmal airflow obstruction evoked by irritative stimuli on a background of allergic lung inflammation. Currently, there is no cure for asthma, only symptomatic treatment. In recent years, our understanding of the involvement of coagulation and anticoagulant pathways, the fibrinolytic system, and platelets in the pathophysiology of asthma has increased considerably. Asthma is associated with a procoagulant state in the bronchoalveolar space, further aggravated by impaired local activities of the anticoagulant protein C system and fibrinolysis. Protease-activated receptors have been implicated as the molecular link between coagulation and allergic inflammation in asthma. This review summarizes current knowledge of the impact of the disturbed hemostatic balance in the lungs on asthma severity and manifestations and identifies new possible targets for asthma treatment.

  9. What is severe asthma?

    PubMed

    Blakey, J D; Wardlaw, A J

    2012-05-01

    Asthma is common, and some individuals are severely affected by it. Learned institutions have sought to provide a definition of 'severe asthma' to facilitate research and clinical care. This is a challenging undertaking given the difficulty in defining asthma and the lack of supportive evidence for a distinct severe asthma phenotype. In this review, we discuss the rationale for a definition of severe asthma and the relative merits of the sequential attempts that have been made to produce such a definition. The difficulty in disentangling control and severity is highlighted, as is the heterogeneity of phenotype in severe asthma, and potential for misclassification. We conclude that the search for a singular definition of severe asthma is problematic, though likely to continue. We suggest the alternative strategy of using classifiers with a specific aim related to symptoms, pathophysiology or service provision.

  10. Asthma and coagulation.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J Daan; Majoor, Christof J; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Bel, Elisabeth H D; van der Poll, Tom

    2012-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disease characterized by paroxysmal airflow obstruction evoked by irritative stimuli on a background of allergic lung inflammation. Currently, there is no cure for asthma, only symptomatic treatment. In recent years, our understanding of the involvement of coagulation and anticoagulant pathways, the fibrinolytic system, and platelets in the pathophysiology of asthma has increased considerably. Asthma is associated with a procoagulant state in the bronchoalveolar space, further aggravated by impaired local activities of the anticoagulant protein C system and fibrinolysis. Protease-activated receptors have been implicated as the molecular link between coagulation and allergic inflammation in asthma. This review summarizes current knowledge of the impact of the disturbed hemostatic balance in the lungs on asthma severity and manifestations and identifies new possible targets for asthma treatment. PMID:22262775

  11. The Saudi initiative for asthma – 2012 update: Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma in adults and children

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moamary, Mohamed S.; Alhaider, Sami A.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.; Al-Ghobain, Mohammed O.; Idrees, Majdy M.; Zeitouni, Mohammed O.; Al-Harbi, Adel S.; Al Dabbagh, Maha M.; Al-Matar, Hussain; Alorainy, Hassan S.

    2012-01-01

    This an updated guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma, developed by the Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA) group, a subsidiary of the Saudi Thoracic Society. The main objective of SINA is to have updated guidelines, which are simple to understand and easy to use by non-asthma specialists, including primary care and general practice physicians. This new version includes updates of acute and chronic asthma management, with more emphasis on the use of Asthma Control Test in the management of asthma, and a new section on “difficult-to-treat asthma.” Further, the section on asthma in children was re-written to cover different aspects in this age group. The SINA panel is a group of Saudi experts with well-respected academic backgrounds and experience in the field of asthma. The guidelines are formatted based on the available evidence, local literature, and the current situation in Saudi Arabia. There was an emphasis on patient–doctor partnership in the management that also includes a self-management plan. The approach adopted by the SINA group is mainly based on disease control as it is the ultimate goal of treatment. PMID:23189095

  12. Childhood asthma: a guide for pediatric emergency medicine providers.

    PubMed

    Kline-Krammes, Sarah; Patel, Nirali H; Robinson, Shawn

    2013-08-01

    Pediatric asthma is a disease that is managed across outpatient physicians, hospitalists, critical care physicians, and emergency department (ED) physicians. Scoring systems may facilitate a rapid assessment of the child with asthma in the ED. Short-acting beta agonists are still the mainstay of therapy for acute exacerbations along with corticosteroids and ipratropium bromide. ED providers must also know the indications for noninvasive ventilation and intubation. Most patients can be treated and discharged from the ED after acute exacerbation, and should be given a plan for going home that provides educational material and emergency scenarios to help prevent future acute incidents.

  13. Pediatric Asthma and Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, M Luz; Calvo Rey, Cristina; Del Rosal Rabes, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory viral infections, particularly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus, are the most importance risk factors for the onset of wheezing in infants and small children. Bronchiolitis is the most common acute respiratory infection in children under 1year of age, and the most common cause of hospitalization in this age group. RSV accounts for approximately 70% of all these cases, followed by rhinovirus, adenovirus, metapneumovirus and bocavirus. The association between bronchiolitis caused by RSV and the development of recurrent wheezing and/or asthma was first described more than 40years ago, but it is still unclear whether bronchiolitis causes chronic respiratory symptoms, or if it is a marker for children with a genetic predisposition for developing asthma in the medium or long term. In any case, sufficient evidence is available to corroborate the existence of this association, which is particularly strong when the causative agent of bronchiolitis is rhinovirus. The pathogenic role of respiratory viruses as triggers for exacerbations in asthmatic patients has not been fully characterized. However, it is clear that respiratory viruses, and in particular rhinovirus, are the most common causes of exacerbation in children, and some type of respiratory virus has been identified in over 90% of children hospitalized for an episode of wheezing. Changes in the immune response to viral infections in genetically predisposed individuals are very likely to be the main factors involved in the association between viral infection and asthma. PMID:26766408

  14. Pediatric Asthma and Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, M Luz; Calvo Rey, Cristina; Del Rosal Rabes, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory viral infections, particularly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus, are the most importance risk factors for the onset of wheezing in infants and small children. Bronchiolitis is the most common acute respiratory infection in children under 1year of age, and the most common cause of hospitalization in this age group. RSV accounts for approximately 70% of all these cases, followed by rhinovirus, adenovirus, metapneumovirus and bocavirus. The association between bronchiolitis caused by RSV and the development of recurrent wheezing and/or asthma was first described more than 40years ago, but it is still unclear whether bronchiolitis causes chronic respiratory symptoms, or if it is a marker for children with a genetic predisposition for developing asthma in the medium or long term. In any case, sufficient evidence is available to corroborate the existence of this association, which is particularly strong when the causative agent of bronchiolitis is rhinovirus. The pathogenic role of respiratory viruses as triggers for exacerbations in asthmatic patients has not been fully characterized. However, it is clear that respiratory viruses, and in particular rhinovirus, are the most common causes of exacerbation in children, and some type of respiratory virus has been identified in over 90% of children hospitalized for an episode of wheezing. Changes in the immune response to viral infections in genetically predisposed individuals are very likely to be the main factors involved in the association between viral infection and asthma.

  15. Preventive Asthma Care Delivery in the Primary Care Office: Missed Opportunities for Children with Persistent Asthma Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Alison B.; Fagnano, Maria; Halterman, Jill S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe which NHLBI preventive actions are taken for children with persistent asthma symptoms at the time of a primary care visit and determine how care delivery varies by asthma symptom severity. Methods We approached children (2-12yo) with asthma from Rochester, NY, in the waiting room at their doctor's office. Eligibility required current persistent symptoms. Caregivers were interviewed via telephone within 2 weeks after the visit regarding specific preventive care actions delivered. Bivariate and regression analyses assessed the relationship between asthma symptom severity and actions taken during the visit. Results We identified 171 children with persistent asthma symptoms (34% black, 64% Medicaid) from October 2009-January 2011 at 6 pediatric offices. Overall delivery of guideline-based preventive actions during visits was low. Children with mild persistent symptoms were least likely to receive preventive care. Regression analyses controlling for demographics and visit type (acute or follow-up asthma visit vs. non-asthma visit) confirmed that children with mild persistent asthma symptoms were less likely than those with more severe asthma symptoms to receive preventive medication action (OR .34 [95%CI .14-.84]), trigger reduction discussion (.39[.19-.82]), recommendation of follow-up (.40[.19-.87]), and receipt of action plan (.37[.16-.86]). Conclusions Many children with persistent asthma symptoms do not receive recommended preventive actions during office visits, and children with mild persistent symptoms are the least likely to receive care. Efforts to improve guideline-based asthma care are needed, and children with mild persistent asthma symptoms warrant further consideration. PMID:23294977

  16. Serum Magnesium and Vitamin D Levels as Indicators of Asthma Severity

    PubMed Central

    Malapati, Brahma Reddy; Gokani, Ruchi; Patel, Bhavita; Chatriwala, Mitul

    2016-01-01

    Background. Serum magnesium levels affect the concentration of circulating vitamin D in blood and subsequently it affects the immunity; thus it plays significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Asthma, in adults, is less studied and hypomagnesemia along with vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency is common in asthmatic individuals, which causes frequent asthma attacks, respiratory infections, severe exacerbations, and poor response to bronchodilators. Objective. To detect the magnitude of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency and serum magnesium levels among asthmatic patients and to correlate them with the severity of asthma. Materials and Methods. This is a cross-sectional case-control study which includes 60 patients of chronic stable asthma and 60 healthy controls. After taking clinical history and systemic examination, pulmonary function test was done. Serum levels of magnesium, 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D], and calcium were measured in all the subjects. Results. Significant correlation was found between vitamin D deficiency, hypomagnesemia, and asthma severity. Serum calcium levels were unaffected by that. Conclusion. Vitamin D and serum magnesium deficiency are highly prevalent in patients with asthma. Increased asthma severity, frequency of attacks, and exacerbation are associated with lower levels of one or both. Serum 25(OH)D and magnesium levels may serve as important markers of asthma severity.

  17. Cough reflex sensitivity in various phenotypes of childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Jesenak, M; Babusikova, E; Petrikova, M; Turcan, T; Rennerova, Z; Michnova, Z; Havlicekova, Z; Villa, M P; Banovcin, P

    2009-11-01

    Cough is a major symptom in some children with asthma, but the relationship between cough and the severity of asthma is defined insufficiently. As cough represents common problem of pediatrics, several objective methods for its assessment were developed. Cough reflex sensitivity (CRS) test with capsaicin is one of the most important tools for studying cough. In the present study, we aimed to study the CRS in various phenotypes of childhood asthma. We found that, in general, CRS was increased in asthmatic children compared with controls. The most evident increase of CRS was observed during acute asthma exacerbation, in children suffering from asthma with concomitant allergic rhinitis, and in atopic asthmatics. Interestingly, we noted a significant decline in lung function after capsaicin CRS. Various laboratory and clinical characteristics of asthmatic children influence cough sensitivity to a different extent. Cough reflex sensitivity measurement can add valuable information beside the commonly used spirometric and inflammometric methods in the management of asthmatic children.

  18. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I ...

  19. Effects of physical conditioning on children and adolescents with asthma.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Liam; Kemp, Justin G; Roberts, Richard G D

    2005-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, the effects of exertional dyspnoea and the associated fear of an asthma attack usually lead to an avoidance of physical activity amongst asthmatic children. This issue still exists today, particularly in children with severe asthma. This article presents a comprehensive review of published information concerning the effects of training programmes on children and adolescents with asthma. The primary focus of these investigations was to examine the effects of physical conditioning on aerobic fitness, the severity and incidence of exercise-induced asthma (EIA) and asthma symptoms. The large majority of training studies of asthmatic children and adolescents demonstrate significant increases in aerobic fitness post-training or the achievement of normal levels of aerobic fitness. While there are a few reports of a reduced severity in EIA symptoms post-training, the majority of studies demonstrate no change in the occurrence or degree of EIA. However, a number of these studies have reported some reductions in hospitalisations, wheeze frequency, school absenteeism, doctor consultations and medication usage. It is, therefore, recommended that children and adolescents with asthma should participate in regular physical activity. This may improve asthma management and associated general health benefits, whilst minimising inactivity-related health risks. PMID:15707377

  20. Compliance amongst asthma patients registered for an asthma disease risk-management programme in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Opedun, Ntombombuso; Ehlers, Valerie J; Roos, Janetta H

    2011-09-27

    The study attempted to identify the factors that influence compliance amongst 1039 members and their dependants of a particular medical aid scheme in South Africa who were registered for an asthma disease risk-management (DRM) programme. The sample consisted of 200 systematically selected individuals or their dependants. A quantitative, exploratory, and descriptive study was undertaken. Questionnaires for completion were posted to the individuals or their dependants. The Statistica 7.1 computer program was used to analyse the data.Most asthma patients did not comply with the DRM programme because they lacked knowledge of the programme. Asthma patients' compliance with the DRM programme can be enhanced by the sustained, positive attitudes of their health providers and case managers; better promotion of the programme; and by involving the patients to a greater extent in the long-term management of their disease.Asthma patients require education about healthy lifestyles that would empower them to successfully manage their condition, which would prevent or at least reduce asthma attacks and/or hospital admissions.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: allergic asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions allergic asthma allergic asthma Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Asthma is a breathing disorder characterized by inflammation of ...

  2. Predicting Asthma in Preschool Children with Asthma-Like Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  3. Asthma and air pollution in the Los Angeles area

    SciTech Connect

    Whittemore, A.S.; Korn, E.L.

    1980-07-01

    Daily asthma attack diaries of 16 panels of asthmatics residing in the Los Angeles area were collected by the Environmental Protection Agency for 34-week periods during the years 1972 to 1975. These data are examined here for the relationship between daily attack occurrence and daily levels of photochemical oxidant, total suspended particulates, minimum temperature, relative humidity, and average wind speed. A separate multiple logistic regression is used for each panelist's attack data. Variables representing the presence or absence of attack on the preceding day, as well as day of week and time since the start of the study, are included in the regressions. The most significant predictor of attacks was the presence of an attack on the preceding day. On the average, the panelists tended to have increased attacks on days with high oxidant and particulate pollution, on cool days, and during the first two months of the study. Panelists' attack propensity also differed by day of week; in particular they had more attacks on Saturdays (the last day of the weekly reporting period) than on Sundays. Each panelist's regression coefficients are classified according to age, sex, hay fever status, and self-assessed attack precursors; this classification is used to examine subgroups among the panelists with high coefficients corresponding to the above factors.

  4. Wild boar attacks.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Abdulkadir; Turedi, Suleyman; Nuhoglu, Irfan; Kalkan, Asim; Turkmen, Suha

    2007-01-01

    Attacks on humans by wild boar (Sus scrofa) are occasionally reported in rural areas of Turkey. While fatalities are rare, individuals may sustain significant soft tissue trauma. Lower extremity lacerations of up to 10 cm in length and 4 cm deep were seen in the 3 cases reviewed. Injuries to the upper abdomen and chest occurred in one case. Attacks frequently occur in forested areas covered by dense brushwood, and their incidence is increased during the rutting season. In contrast to other large, feral animal attacks, injuries sustained from wild boar typically are limited to the lower extremities. This case series examines 3 attacks by wild boar in rural Turkey.

  5. Asthma in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Forno, Erick; Gogna, Mudita; Cepeda, Alfonso; Yañez, Anahi; Solé, Dirceu; Cooper, Philip; Avila, Lydiana; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A.; Celedón, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Consistent with the diversity of Latin America, there is profound variability in asthma burden among and within countries in this region. Regional variation in asthma prevalence is likely multifactorial and due to genetics, perinatal exposures, diet, obesity, tobacco use, indoor and outdoor pollutants, psychosocial stress, and microbial or parasitic infections. Similarly, nonuniform progress in asthma management leads to regional variability in disease morbidity. Future studies of distinct asthma phenotypes should follow up well-characterized Latin American subgroups and examine risk factors that are unique or common in Latin America (e.g. stress and violence, parasitic infections and use of biomass fuels for cooking). Because most Latin American countries share the same barriers to asthma management, concerted and multifaceted public health and research efforts are needed, including approaches to curtail tobacco use, campaigns to improve asthma treatment, broadening access to care and clinical trials of non-pharmacologic interventions (e.g. replacing biomass fuels with gas or electric stoves). PMID:26103996

  6. Asthma in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Forno, Erick; Gogna, Mudita; Cepeda, Alfonso; Yañez, Anahi; Solé, Dirceu; Cooper, Philip; Avila, Lydiana; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A; Celedón, Juan C

    2015-09-01

    Consistent with the diversity of Latin America, there is profound variability in asthma burden among and within countries in this region. Regional variation in asthma prevalence is likely multifactorial and due to genetics, perinatal exposures, diet, obesity, tobacco use, indoor and outdoor pollutants, psychosocial stress and microbial or parasitic infections. Similarly, non-uniform progress in asthma management leads to regional variability in disease morbidity. Future studies of distinct asthma phenotypes should follow-up well-characterised Latin American subgroups and examine risk factors that are unique or common in Latin America (eg, stress and violence, parasitic infections and use of biomass fuels for cooking). Because most Latin American countries share the same barriers to asthma management, concerted and multifaceted public health and research efforts are needed, including approaches to curtail tobacco use, campaigns to improve asthma treatment, broadening access to care and clinical trials of non-pharmacological interventions (eg, replacing biomass fuels with gas or electric stoves).

  7. [Asthma and diving].

    PubMed

    Wurzinger, G

    1999-01-01

    Until recently asthma was considered a contraindication for scuba diving due to possible "air trapping" and subsequent barotrauma. However, in view of the wide prevalence and heterogeneity of the illness this is no longer justified. There are, nevertheless, certain prerequisites for diving with asthma: a complete anamnesis and an analysis of the pulmonary function, an exact diagnosis of the trigger factors as well as of the bronchial hyperreactivity in order to correctly ascertain the asthma level. When scuba diving, asthmatics need to observe certain rules. Still, some types of asthma remain incompatible with diving. Among these are the pseudo-allergic, exercise-induced, and psychogenic-induced asthma as well as allergic bronchopulmonal aspergillosis. Asthma due to bronchial infections and GERD are considered relative contraindications.

  8. Cybersupport: empowering asthma caregivers.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Claire E

    2008-01-01

    In the United States, an estimated 6.5 million children have asthma (Akinbami, 2005). Due to the chronic and unpredictable nature of asthma, the condition places excessive demands on the primary caregiver. The complexity of asthma management has required parents to take increased responsibility for the assessment and treatment of their child's asthma (Dickinson & Dignam, 2002). Many families are turning to the Internet for information and support. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the "lived" experiences of an online asthma caregivers support group. Archived messages posted to an online discussion list were analyzed using phenomenological thematic analysis. Five themes emerged providing insight into the meaning of caregiving and the provision of social support. Online support narratives provide a unique way to gain insight and understanding of the experiences of mother's enacting the caregiver role. Understanding the everyday lives of asthma caregivers can help nurses and other health care providers better meet caregiver needs.

  9. [Exacerbations of asthma--precipitating factors: drugs].

    PubMed

    Sanfiorenzo, C; Pipet, A

    2011-10-01

    Asthmatic exacerbations are sometimes triggered by medications, primarily the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDS) and beta-blockers. Asthma attacks induced by NSAIDS occur rapidly and can be severe. Widal syndrome is a specific disease entity whose physiopathology remains incompletely explained. Asthma is characteristically severe and steroid dependent; desensitisation with aspirin has been proposed, but this remains controversial. Beta-blockers are contra-indicated in asthma; the β1 "cardioselectivity" of some agents is not absolute, disappearing at high doses and the "partial agonists" are not better tolerated. However, certain authors have called into question the harmful effect of beta-blockade in moderate and stable asthma. More studies are needed, but the current data suggest that in some cases beta-blockers may be safe but their use requires close supervision. Other molecules can pose problems in asthmatics (dipyridamole, synthetic sex hormones and certain excipients). On the whole, there has been little innovation concerning the hazard that drugs can pose for some asthmatics. The task for the future will be to specify the physiopathology of Widal syndrome, and to clarify the categories of patients in whom beta-blockers can be safely employed as the public health consequences of cardiovascular pathologies make this an important issue for lung specialists.

  10. Viral diversity in asthma

    PubMed Central

    McErlean, Peter; Greiman, Alyssa; Favoreto, Silvio; Avila, Pedro C.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Asthma exacerbations are precipitated primarily by respiratory virus infection and frequently require immediate medical intervention. Studies of childhood and adult asthma have implicated a wide variety of respiratory viruses in exacerbations. By focusing on both RNA and DNA respiratory viruses and some newly identified viruses, this review illustrates the diversity and highlights some of the uncertainties that exist in our understanding of virus-related asthma exacerbations. PMID:21029933

  11. Delivering asthma education to special high risk groups.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, J M; Turner, M O

    1997-12-01

    Patients at high risk from their asthma and therefore worthy of more focused asthma education are those at risk of fatal and near fatal asthma(NFA). In recent years the characteristics of these patients have been better defined. The most important risk factor appears to be a prior history of NFA. Other important features include prior emergency room visits or hospitalization for asthma. Excess use of beta-agonists, especially in the absence of inhaled corticosteroids, also confers increased risk. High risk groups also share similar psychosocial barriers as well as economic deprivation. The benefits of asthma education in these groups have been assessed in a number of studies. In general, asthma education has been shown to have an impact on these patients. Greater effects have been achieved where there has been consistent follow-up by the same physician. Patients require frequent reinforcement of their asthma management, especially regarding their response to acute exacerbations. A sub-group of patients with more severe asthma appear to have a problem perceiving dyspnoea and may therefore benefit from peak flow monitoring but the problem of compliance with this intervention is significant. Behaviour modification plays an important role as does ensuring the patient has adequate resources to purchase medications especially the more expensive anti-inflammatory therapy. Future studies should focus on optimizing the potential benefits of educating high risk patients as they are not only those at greatest risk of death but also consume a disproportionate amount of health care resources.

  12. Teaching Your Child about Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  13. AVP-825 Breath-Powered Intranasal Delivery System Containing 22 mg Sumatriptan Powder vs 100 mg Oral Sumatriptan in the Acute Treatment of Migraines (The COMPASS Study): A Comparative Randomized Clinical Trial Across Multiple Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Stewart J; Cady, Roger K; Silberstein, Stephen; Messina, John; Mahmoud, Ramy A; Djupesland, Per G; Shin, Paul; Siffert, Joao

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of AVP-825, an investigational bi-directional breath-powered intranasal delivery system containing low-dose (22 mg) sumatriptan powder, vs 100 mg oral sumatriptan for acute treatment of migraine in a double-dummy, randomized comparative efficacy clinical trial allowing treatment across multiple migraine attacks. Background In phases 2 and 3, randomized, placebo-controlled trials, AVP-825 provided early and sustained relief of moderate or severe migraine headache in adults, with a low incidence of triptan-related adverse effects. Methods This was a randomized, active-comparator, double-dummy, cross-over, multi-attack study (COMPASS; NCT01667679) with two ≤12-week double-blind periods. Subjects experiencing 2-8 migraines/month in the past year were randomized 1:1 using computer-generated sequences to AVP-825 plus oral placebo tablet or an identical placebo delivery system plus 100 mg oral sumatriptan tablet for the first period; patients switched treatment for the second period in this controlled comparative design. Subjects treated ≤5 qualifying migraines per period within 1 hour of onset, even if pain was mild. The primary end-point was the mean value of the summed pain intensity differences through 30 minutes post-dose (SPID-30) using Headache Severity scores. Secondary outcomes included pain relief, pain freedom, pain reduction, consistency of response across multiple migraines, migraine-associated symptoms, and atypical sensations. Safety was also assessed. Results A total of 275 adults were randomized, 174 (63.3%) completed the study (ie, completed the second treatment period), and 185 (67.3%) treated at least one migraine in both periods (1531 migraines assessed). There was significantly greater reduction in migraine pain intensity with AVP-825 vs oral sumatriptan in the first 30 minutes post-dose (least squares mean SPID-30 = 10.80 vs 7.41, adjusted mean

  14. Asthma and the diver.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J; Fisher, Laura H; Chegini, Soheil; Craig, Timothy J

    2005-10-01

    Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) diving has grown in popularity, with nearly 9 million sport divers in the United States alone. Approximately 7% of the population has been diagnosed with asthma, which is similar to the percentage of divers admitting they have asthma. Numerous concerns exist regarding subjects with asthma who choose to participate in recreational diving. Among these concerns are pulmonary barotrauma, pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, arterial gas embolism, ear barotrauma, sinus barotrauma, and dental barotrauma. Despite these concerns, a paucity of information exists linking asthma to increased risk of diving complications. However, it has long been the norm to discourage individuals with asthma from participating in recreational scuba diving. This article examines the currently available literature to allow for a more informed decision regarding the possible risks associated with diving and asthma. It examines the underlying physiological principles associated with diving, including Henry's law and Boyle's law, to provide a more intimate understanding on physiological changes occurring in the respiratory system under compressive stress. Finally, this article offers a framework for guiding the patient with asthma who is interested in scuba diving. Under the right circumstances, the patient with asthma can safely participate in recreational diving without apparent increased risk of an asthma-related event. PMID:16251767

  15. Biomarkers in Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiao Chloe; Woodruff, Prescott G

    2016-08-01

    Biomarkers have been critical for studies of disease pathogenesis and the development of new therapies in severe asthma. In particular, biomarkers of type 2 inflammation have proven valuable for endotyping and targeting new biological agents. Because of these successes in understanding and marking type 2 inflammation, lack of knowledge regarding non-type 2 inflammatory mechanisms in asthma will soon be the major obstacle to the development of new treatments and management strategies in severe asthma. Biomarkers can play a role in these investigations as well by providing insight into the underlying biology in human studies of patients with severe asthma. PMID:27401625

  16. Asthma and the diver.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J; Fisher, Laura H; Chegini, Soheil; Craig, Timothy J

    2005-10-01

    Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) diving has grown in popularity, with nearly 9 million sport divers in the United States alone. Approximately 7% of the population has been diagnosed with asthma, which is similar to the percentage of divers admitting they have asthma. Numerous concerns exist regarding subjects with asthma who choose to participate in recreational diving. Among these concerns are pulmonary barotrauma, pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, arterial gas embolism, ear barotrauma, sinus barotrauma, and dental barotrauma. Despite these concerns, a paucity of information exists linking asthma to increased risk of diving complications. However, it has long been the norm to discourage individuals with asthma from participating in recreational scuba diving. This article examines the currently available literature to allow for a more informed decision regarding the possible risks associated with diving and asthma. It examines the underlying physiological principles associated with diving, including Henry's law and Boyle's law, to provide a more intimate understanding on physiological changes occurring in the respiratory system under compressive stress. Finally, this article offers a framework for guiding the patient with asthma who is interested in scuba diving. Under the right circumstances, the patient with asthma can safely participate in recreational diving without apparent increased risk of an asthma-related event.

  17. Safety and efficacy of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant treatment compared with warfarin in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation who develop acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack: a multicenter prospective cohort study (daVinci study).

    PubMed

    Saji, Naoki; Kimura, Kazumi; Tateishi, Yohei; Fujimoto, Shigeru; Kaneko, Nobuyuki; Urabe, Takao; Tsujino, Akira; Iguchi, Yasuyuki

    2016-11-01

    The safety and efficacy of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant (NOAC) compared with warfarin in treating patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) who developed acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (AIS/TIA), particularly those receiving tissue-plasminogen activator (tPA) therapy, remains unclear. Between April 2012 and December 2014, we conducted a multicenter prospective cohort study to assess the current clinical practice for treating such patients. We divided the patients into two groups according to the administration of oral anticoagulants (warfarin or NOACs) and tPA therapy. The risk of any hemorrhagic or ischemic event was compared within 1 month after the onset of stroke. We analyzed 235 patients with AIS/TIA including 73 who received tPA therapy. Oral anticoagulants were initiated within 2-4 inpatient days. NOACs were administered to 49.8 % of patients, who were predominantly male, younger, had small infarcts, lower NIHSS scores, and had a lower all-cause mortality rate (0 vs. 4.2 %, P = 0.06) and a lower risk of any ischemic events (6.0 vs. 7.6 %, P = 0.797) compared with warfarin users. The prevalence of all hemorrhagic events was equivalent between the two groups. Early initiation of NOACs after tPA therapy appeared to lower the risk of hemorrhagic events, although there was no significant difference (0 vs. 5.6 %, P = 0.240). Although more clinicians are apt to prescribe NOACs in minor ischemic stroke, NOAC treatment may provide a potential benefit in such cases. Early initiation of NOACs after tPA therapy may reduce the risk of hemorrhagic events compared with warfarin.

  18. Transient Ischemic Attack

    MedlinePlus

    Transient Ischemic Attack TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery for a short time. The only ... TIA is that with TIA the blockage is transient (temporary). TIA symptoms occur rapidly and last a ...

  19. Non-anthropogenic dust exposure and asthma medication purchase in children.

    PubMed

    Yitshak-Sade, Maayan; Novack, Victor; Katra, Itzhak; Gorodischer, Rafael; Tal, Asher; Novack, Lena

    2015-03-01

    Air pollution has been shown to increase frequency of asthma attacks, as usually measured by hospitalisation rates. We hypothesise that purchase of asthma reliever medications will reflect a broader association between the environmental exposure and asthma exacerbations. In a time series analysis, we estimated the association of dust storms with mild asthma manifestations, as indicated by medication purchases, during 2005-2011. We compared our results with the estimation of the association of dust storms with hospitalisations due to asthma and asthma-like symptoms. We detected 289 dust storms characterised by high levels of particulate matter <10 μm in diameter. We identified 42,920 children with asthma, wheezing or asthma-like symptoms, of whom 2418 were hospitalised. We observed a higher risk of asthma medication purchase on the day of a mild dust storm (relative risk 1.05, 95% CI 1.00-1.10). The next peak in drug purchases was 3 days later and was more pronounced among Bedouin-Arab children. Stratified analyses showed higher risks for hospitalisation among Bedouin-Arab children; especially among children living in temporary houses (relative risk 1.33, 95% CI 1.04-1.71). We observed an increased risk of asthma medication purchase associated with mild dust storms. The risk observed for hospitalisation was more pronounced among the rural Bedouin-Arab population. PMID:25323244

  20. The Revised Asthma Problem Behavior Checklist: adaptation for use in Spanish asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Belloch, A; Perpiñá, M; Pascual, L M; de Diego, A; Creer, T L

    1997-01-01

    Behavioral problems associated with asthma management were examined in a group of 100 adult Spanish outpatients with asthma (57 women, 43 men; 17-69 years of age). All of them completed a Spanish version of the Revised Asthma Problem Behavior Checklist (RAPBC). Data about duration, severity, and self-management of asthma (self-efficacy expectancies and health care utilization), as well as dyspnea and FEV1, were also recorded. The highest-reliability Cronbach alpha indices were for the criteria related to emotions and behaviors that could precipitate asthma attacks. Concurrent criterion validity was examined first by Pearson correlations between the RAPBC scores and clinical data about asthma (duration, FEV1, and dyspnea), and second, by examining the differences in RAPBC scores (ANOVAs) among three severity groups of patients. Severe patients reported more behavioral problems associated with poor life-styles and self-management of their asthma and showed more psychological and physical negative consequences related to asthma. In conclusion, while the RAPBC could be considered a valid instrument to assess the behavioral problems associated with asthma in Spanish patients, and shows a good concurrent criterion validity, its reliability (internal consistency) with respect to life-style and self-management behaviors related to asthma should be improved, to ensure its utility as a screening instrument for behavior-related problems in asthmatic Spanish patients.

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea and asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Cristina; Terse-Ramos, Regina; Souza-Machado, Adelmir; Cruz, Álvaro A

    2013-01-01

    Symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing, especially obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), are common in asthma patients and have been associated with asthma severity. It is known that asthma symptoms tend to be more severe at night and that asthma-related deaths are most likely to occur during the night or early morning. Nocturnal symptoms occur in 60-74% of asthma patients and are markers of inadequate control of the disease. Various pathophysiological mechanisms are related to the worsening of asthma symptoms, OSAS being one of the most important factors. In patients with asthma, OSAS should be investigated whenever there is inadequate control of symptoms of nocturnal asthma despite the treatment recommended by guidelines having been administered. There is evidence in the literature that the use of continuous positive airway pressure contributes to asthma control in asthma patients with obstructive sleep apnea and uncontrolled asthma. PMID:24310634

  2. Weather elements, chemical air pollutants and airborne pollen influencing asthma emergency room visits in Szeged, Hungary: performance of two objective weather classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makra, László; Puskás, János; Matyasovszky, István; Csépe, Zoltán; Lelovics, Enikő; Bálint, Beatrix; Tusnády, Gábor

    2015-09-01

    Weather classification approaches may be useful tools in modelling the occurrence of respiratory diseases. The aim of the study is to compare the performance of an objectively defined weather classification and the Spatial Synoptic Classification (SSC) in classifying emergency department (ED) visits for acute asthma depending from weather, air pollutants, and airborne pollen variables for Szeged, Hungary, for the 9-year period 1999-2007. The research is performed for three different pollen-related periods of the year and the annual data set. According to age and gender, nine patient categories, eight meteorological variables, seven chemical air pollutants, and two pollen categories were used. In general, partly dry and cold air and partly warm and humid air aggravate substantially the symptoms of asthmatics. Our major findings are consistent with this establishment. Namely, for the objectively defined weather types favourable conditions for asthma ER visits occur when an anticyclonic ridge weather situation happens with near extreme temperature and humidity parameters. Accordingly, the SSC weather types facilitate aggravating asthmatic conditions if warm or cool weather occur with high humidity in both cases. Favourable conditions for asthma attacks are confirmed in the extreme seasons when atmospheric stability contributes to enrichment of air pollutants. The total efficiency of the two classification approaches is similar in spite of the fact that the methodology for derivation of the individual types within the two classification approaches is completely different.

  3. Asthma Exacerbation: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Angus, Karen; Parsons, Michael; Cheeseman, Neil

    2015-01-01

    In the practice of emergency medicine, simulation is a valuable tool that allows medical students and postgraduate residents to develop skills in a safe environment at no risk to patients. In this report, we present a case simulation of an acute asthma exacerbation utilizing a human patient simulator. The case is designed such that it can be easily modified to accommodate the trainee’s level of expertise, allowing instructors to challenge both the novice and advanced learner alike. PMID:26180682

  4. Can Vitamin D Supplementation in Addition to Asthma Controllers Improve Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Asthma?

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian; Liu, Dan; Liu, Chun-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Effects of vitamin D on acute exacerbation, lung function, and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in patients with asthma are controversial. We aim to further evaluate the roles of vitamin D supplementation in addition to asthma controllers in asthmatics. From 1946 to July 2015, we searched the PubMed, Embase, Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ISI Web of Science using “Vitamin D,” “Vit D,” or “VitD” and “asthma,” and manually reviewed the references listed in the identified articles. Randomized controlled trials which reported rate of asthma exacerbations and adverse events, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1, % of predicted value), FeNO, asthma control test (ACT), and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were eligible. We conducted the heterogeneities test and sensitivity analysis of the enrolled studies, and random-effects or fixed-effects model was applied to calculate risk ratio (RR) and mean difference for dichotomous and continuous data, respectively. Cochrane systematic review software Review Manager (RevMan) was used to test the hypothesis by Mann–Whitney U test, which were displayed in Forest plots. Seven trials with a total of 903 patients with asthma were pooled in our final studies. Except for asthma exacerbations (I2 = 81%, χ2 = 10.28, P = 0.006), we did not find statistical heterogeneity in outcome measures. The pooled RR of asthma exacerbation was 0.66 (95% confidence interval: 0.32–1.37), but without significant difference (z = 1.12, P = 0.26), neither was in FEV1 (z = 0.30, P = 0.77), FeNO (z = 0.28, P = 0.78), or ACT (z = 0.92, P = 0.36), although serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was significantly increased (z = 6.16, P < 0.001). Vitamin D supplementation in addition to asthma controllers cannot decrease asthma exacerbation and FeNO, nor improve lung function and asthma symptoms, although it can be safely applied to increase serum 25

  5. Do self-management plans reduce morbidity in patients with asthma?

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, G; Neville, R G; Smith, B; Clark, R A

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Self-management plans may help patients with asthma intervene when symptoms deteriorate, thus preventing asthma attacks. AIM: A study set out to test whether a self-management plan tailored to the circumstances of the individual reduces morbidity from asthma. METHOD: General practitioners who had participated in a national audit of asthma attacks were randomized into intervention and control groups. Six months after the intervention group had issued self-management plans to patients with asthma, both groups of practitioners completed morbidity questionnaires on patients. Morbidity outcomes were compared for the 6-month periods before and after the issue of the plans. RESULTS: In the 6 months before the study, the 376 patients enrolled by the intervention group experienced higher levels of morbidity than the 530 patients for whom details were recorded by the control group. In the 6 months after the issue of the plans, control group patients showed little change in levels of morbidity, but intervention group patients showed significant reductions in hospital admissions, consultations for asthma symptoms, asthma review consultations, courses of oral steroids and use of emergency nebulized bronchodilators. CONCLUSION: General practitioners appeared to operate enthusiast bias' and issued more self-management plans to patients with uncontrolled asthma. The reduction in morbidity in this group is probably a result of the use of the plans, but the verdict on whether plans reduce morbidity must be deemed 'not proven'. PMID:8731624

  6. The potential role of vitamin D in the link between obesity and asthma severity/control in children.

    PubMed

    Vo, Phuong; Bair-Merritt, Megan; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-06-01

    Childhood obesity and asthma are major public health problems. Obesity is not only associated with increased risk of incident asthma, but it may worsen asthma severity/control. Although the mechanisms linking obesity with asthma expression have not been completely elucidated, evidence suggests that increased frequency of acute respiratory infection (ARI) and decreased corticosteroid responsiveness may help to explain how obesity worsens asthma expression. In addition, obese individuals have low vitamin D status, and emerging evidence suggests vitamin D affects risk of ARI and corticosteroid responsiveness in individuals with asthma. In this review, we summarize the association between obesity and asthma severity/control in children and discuss ARI and corticosteroid responsiveness as potential mediators in the obesity-asthma pathway. We also discuss the potential role of vitamin D, including a brief summary of recent randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation.

  7. Aptopic asthmatic subjects but not aptopic subjects without asthma have enhanced inflammatory response to ozone**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background Asthma is a known risk factor for acute ozone-associated respiratory disease. Ozone (03) causes an immediate decrease in lung function and increased airway inflammation. The role of atopy and asthma in modulation of 03-induced inflammation has not been determined. Ob...

  8. Atopic asthmatic subjects but not atopic subjects without asthma have enhanced inflammatory response to ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Asthma is a known risk factor for acute ozone-associated respiratory disease. Ozone causes an immediate decrease in lung function and increased airway inflammation. The role of atopy and asthma in modulation of ozone-induced inflammation has not been determined. OB...

  9. Kerosene-induced asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez de la Vega, A.; Casaco, A.; Garcia, M.; Noa, M.; Carvajal, D.; Arruzazabala, L.; Gonzalez, R. )

    1990-04-01

    Clinical evaluation of 286 asthmatic women showed 15.5% of those who improved clinically had contact with kerosene, while 43.9% of those who failed to improve used kerosene as fuel for cooking. In 16 women the onset of asthma occurred soon after they began to use kerosene. Kerosene can cause and aggravate asthma.

  10. Occupational asthma: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, L J; Balmes, J R

    2000-01-01

    Occupational asthma is the most common form of occupational lung disease in the developed world at the present time. In this review, the epidemiology, pathogenesis/mechanisms, clinical presentations, management, and prevention of occupational asthma are discussed. The population attributable risk of asthma due to occupational exposures is considerable. Current understanding of the mechanisms by which many agents cause occupational asthma is limited, especially for low-molecular-weight sensitizers and irritants. The diagnosis of occupational asthma is generally established on the basis of a suggestive history of a temporal association between exposure and the onset of symptoms and objective evidence that these symptoms are related to airflow limitation. Early diagnosis, elimination of exposure to the responsible agent, and early use of inhaled steroids may play important roles in the prevention of long-term persistence of asthma. Persistent occupational asthma is often associated with substantial disability and consequent impacts on income and quality of life. Prevention of new cases is the best approach to reducing the burden of asthma attributable to occupational exposures. Future research needs are identified. PMID:10931788

  11. Thunderstorm-associated asthma: the effect on GP consultations.

    PubMed

    Hajat, S; Goubet, S A; Haines, A

    1997-10-01

    Evidence shows that asthma attacks can be brought on by adverse weather conditions such as those experienced during a thunderstorm; a prime example of such an occasion being a thunderstorm episode on 24 June 1994, which resulted in a well-documented increase in medical attendances made by those suffering with asthma and respiratory disorders. However, most of these studies have concerned admissions to accident and emergency departments. The aim of this paper was to ascertain whether a similar increase in consultations was observed in the primary care setting. PMID:9474828

  12. Thunderstorm-associated asthma: the effect on GP consultations.

    PubMed Central

    Hajat, S; Goubet, S A; Haines, A

    1997-01-01

    Evidence shows that asthma attacks can be brought on by adverse weather conditions such as those experienced during a thunderstorm; a prime example of such an occasion being a thunderstorm episode on 24 June 1994, which resulted in a well-documented increase in medical attendances made by those suffering with asthma and respiratory disorders. However, most of these studies have concerned admissions to accident and emergency departments. The aim of this paper was to ascertain whether a similar increase in consultations was observed in the primary care setting. PMID:9474828

  13. Thunderstorm-associated asthma: the effect on GP consultations.

    PubMed

    Hajat, S; Goubet, S A; Haines, A

    1997-10-01

    Evidence shows that asthma attacks can be brought on by adverse weather conditions such as those experienced during a thunderstorm; a prime example of such an occasion being a thunderstorm episode on 24 June 1994, which resulted in a well-documented increase in medical attendances made by those suffering with asthma and respiratory disorders. However, most of these studies have concerned admissions to accident and emergency departments. The aim of this paper was to ascertain whether a similar increase in consultations was observed in the primary care setting.

  14. [Occupational asthma in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Endre, László

    2015-05-10

    Occupational asthma belongs to communicable diseases, which should be reported in Hungary. During a 24-year period between January 1990 and December 2013, 180 occupational asthma cases were reported in Hungary (52 cases between 1990 and 1995, 83 cases between 1996 and 2000, 40 cases between 2001 and 2006, and 5 cases between 2007 and 2013). These data are unusual, because according to the official report of the National Korányi Pulmonology Institute in Budapest, at least 14,000 new adult asthma cases were reported in every year between 2000 and 2012 in Hungary. Also, international data indicate that at least 2% of adult patients with asthma have occupational asthma and at least 50 out of 1 million employees develop occupational asthma in each year. In 2003, 631 new occupational asthma patients were reported in the United Kingdom, but only 7 cases in Hungary. Because it is unlikely that the occupational environment in Hungary is much better than anywhere else in the world, it seems that not all new occupational asthma cases are reported in Hungary. Of the 180 reported cases in Hungary, 55 were bakers or other workers in flour mills. There were 11 metal-workers, 10 health care assistants, 9 workers dealing with textiles (tailors, dressmakers, workers in textile industry) and 9 employees worked upon leather and animal fur. According to international data, the most unsafe profession is the animal keeper in scientific laboratories, but only 4 of them were reported as having occupational asthma during the studied 24 years in Hungary. Interestingly, 3 museologists with newly-diagnosed occupational asthma were reported in 2003, but not such cases occurred before or after that year. In this paper the Hungarian literature of occupational asthma is summarized, followed by a review on the classification, pathomechanism, clinical presentation, predisposing factors, diagnostics and therapeutic aspects of the disease. Epidemiological data of adult asthma in Hungary and data from

  15. Nutrition and asthma.

    PubMed

    Varraso, Raphaëlle

    2012-06-01

    Over the past four decades, the prevalence of asthma has markedly increased in Westernized countries and countries transitioning to this lifestyle. It has been hypothesized that these increases are a consequence of changing environmental and/or behavioral factors. The modification of dietary habits (ie, decreased intake of fruits/vegetables and increased intake of "Westernized" processed foods) and a decrease in sun exposure have led to decreased intake of antioxidant vitamins and fatty acids and to decreased circulating levels of vitamin D, and have been proposed to explain the rise in asthma prevalence. This article summarizes the main findings on foods and nutrients connected to asthma based on several exhaustive recent reviews on the topic, and examines the evidence for an effect of dietary patterns on asthma. Overall, findings underscore the importance of conducting prospective studies and clinical trials to better understand the role of diet in the etiology of asthma.

  16. [Distinguishing asthma from COPD].

    PubMed

    Ohara, Kouhei; Samukawa, Takuya; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2016-05-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major public health burdens. Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, airway narrowing with reversibility, and hyperresponsiveness of airways. COPD has been associated with smoking and exposure to environmental fumes, which typically characterized by persistent airflow limitation and chronic inflammation of the airways. These differences are most apparent when young non-smoker with asthma and older smokers with COPD are compared. However, it would be difficult to differentiate asthma from COPD, especially in elderly who currently smoke or have a significant history of smoking. Furthermore, some patients exhibit characteristics of both diseases, this may represent a phenotype known as asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). Therefore, the precise understanding of these diseases is important.

  17. The costs of asthma.

    PubMed

    Barnes, P J; Jonsson, B; Klim, J B

    1996-04-01

    At present, asthma represents a substantial burden on health care resources in all countries so far studied. The costs of asthma are largely due to uncontrolled disease, and are likely to rise as its prevalence and severity increase. Costs could be significantly reduced if disease control is improved. A large proportion of the total cost of illness is derived from treating the consequences of poor asthma control-direct costs, such as emergency room use and hospitalizations. Indirect costs, which include time off work or school and early retirement, are incurred when the disease is not fully controlled and becomes severe enough to have an effect on daily life. In addition, quality of life assessments show that asthma has a significant socioeconomic impact, not only on the patients themselves, but on the whole family. Underuse of prescribed therapy, which includes poor compliance, significantly contributes towards the poor control of asthma. The consequences of poor compliance in asthma include increased morbidity and sometimes mortality, and increased health care expenditure. To improve asthma management, international guidelines have been introduced which recommend an increase in the use of prophylactic therapy. The resulting improvements in the control of asthma will reduce the number of hospitalizations associated with asthma, and may ultimately produce a shift within direct costs, with subsequent reductions in indirect costs. In addition, costs may be reduced by improving therapeutic interventions and through effective patient education programmes. This paper reviews current literature on the costs of asthma to assess how effectively money is spent and, by estimating the proportion of the cost attributable to uncontrolled disease, will identify where financial savings might be made. PMID:8726924

  18. Signs of a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack Heart Health and Stroke Signs of a heart attack Related information Make the Call. Don't Miss ... to top More information on Signs of a heart attack Read more from womenshealth.gov Make the Call, ...

  19. [Preoperative Management of Patients with Bronchial Asthma or Chronic Bronchitis].

    PubMed

    Hagihira, Satoshi

    2015-09-01

    Bronchial asthma is characterized by chronic airway inflammation. The primary goal of treatment of asthma is to maintain the state of control. According to the Japanese guidelines (JGL2012), long-term management consists of 4 therapeutic steps, and use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) is recommended at all 4 steps. Besides ICS, inhalation of long-acting β2-agonist (LABA) is also effective. Recently, omalizumab (a humanized antihuman IgE antibody) can be available for patients with severe allergic asthma. Although there is no specific strategy for preoperative treatment of patients with asthma, preoperative systemic steroid administration seemed to be effective to prevent asthma attack during anesthesia. The most common cause of chronic bronchitis is smoking. Even the respiratory function is within normal limits, perioperative management of patients with chronic bronchitis is often troublesome. The most common problem is their sputum. To minimize perioperative pulmonary complication in these patients, smoking cessation and pulmonary rehabilitation are essential. It is known that more than 1 month of smoking cessation is required to reduce perioperative respiratory complication. However, even one or two weeks of smoking cessation can decrease sputum secretion. In summary, preoperative optimization is most important to prevent respiratory complication in patients with bronchial asthma or chronic bronchitis. PMID:26466493

  20. A fatal leopard attack.

    PubMed

    Hejna, Petr

    2010-05-01

    A rare case of a big cat fatal attack is presented. A male leopard that had escaped from its unlocked cage attacked a 26-year-old male zoo worker. The man sustained penetrating injuries to the neck with consequent external bleeding. The man died while being transported to the hospital as a result of the injuries sustained. The wounds discovered on the victim's body corresponded with the known methods of leopard attacks and with findings on the carcasses of animals killed by leopards in the wild. The conclusion of the medicolegal investigation was that the underlying cause of death was a bite wound to the neck which lacerated the left internal jugular vein, the two main branches of the left external carotid artery, and the cervical spine. The cause of death was massive external bleeding. Special attention is paid to the general pattern of injuries sustained from big cat attacks.

  1. Heart attack first aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... of patients with unstable angina/non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (updating the 2007 guideline and replacing the 2011 ...

  2. Cooperating attackers in neural cryptography.

    PubMed

    Shacham, Lanir N; Klein, Einat; Mislovaty, Rachel; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2004-06-01

    A successful attack strategy in neural cryptography is presented. The neural cryptosystem, based on synchronization of neural networks by mutual learning, has been recently shown to be secure under different attack strategies. The success of the advanced attacker presented here, called the "majority-flipping attacker," does not decay with the parameters of the model. This attacker's outstanding success is due to its using a group of attackers which cooperate throughout the synchronization process, unlike any other attack strategy known. An analytical description of this attack is also presented, and fits the results of simulations.

  3. Role of infections in the induction and development of asthma: genetic and inflammatory drivers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qun; Chu, Hong Wei

    2009-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors interact to initiate and even maintain the course of asthma. As one of the highly risky environmental factors, infections in predisposed individuals can promote asthma development and exacerbations and/or prolong symptoms. This review will describe our current understanding of the genetic markers of innate immunity in the induction and development of asthma, the diverse roles of infections in modulating allergic inflammation, host susceptibility to infections and subsequent acute exacerbations in an allergic setting, and the therapeutic or preventive implications of existing knowledge. Current challenges and future directions in basic and clinical research of asthma are also discussed. PMID:19885377

  4. Predicting asthma outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sears, Malcolm R

    2015-10-01

    This review addresses predictors of remission or persistence of wheezing and asthma from early childhood through adulthood. Early childhood wheezing is common, but predicting who will remit or have persistent childhood asthma remains difficult. By adding parental history of asthma and selected infant biomarkers to the history of recurrent wheezing, the Asthma Predictive Index and its subsequent modifications provide better predictions of persistence than simply the observation of recurrent wheeze. Sensitization, especially to multiple allergens, increases the likelihood of development of classic childhood asthma. Remission is more likely in male subjects and those with milder disease (less frequent and less severe symptoms), less atopic sensitization, a lesser degree of airway hyperresponsiveness, and no concomitant allergic disease. Conversely, persistence is linked strongly to allergic sensitization, greater frequency and severity of symptoms, abnormal lung function, and a greater degree of airway hyperresponsiveness. A genetic risk score might predict persistence more accurately than family history. Remission of established adult asthma is substantially less common than remission during childhood and adolescence. Loss of lung function can begin early in life and tracks through childhood and adolescence. Despite therapy which controls symptoms and exacerbations, the outcomes of asthma appear largely resistant to pharmacologic therapy.

  5. Asthma in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Hem, Erlend; Stensrud, Trine

    2011-12-01

    Athletes active in endurance sports are at an increased risk of acquiring asthma through their sports activities, especially so for cross-country skiers, biathlon skiers, swimmers and athletes of other endurance sports. Asthma may be present from early childhood or develop while in active sports. This article focuses on the physical activity and sports activities in children and adolescents. Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is found in 8-10% of a normal child population of school age and in about 35% of children with current asthma. EIA is caused by the markedly increased ventilation during exercise, with increased heat and water loss through respiration, leading to bronchial constriction. The risk of developing asthma in the young athlete is related to the repeated daily training activity with increased epithelial damage of the airways, delayed repair due to the daily repetition of the training and increased airway mucosal inflammation. The increased environmental exposure through the sports activity to environmental agents, such as cold, dry air in skiers and chlorine compounds in swimmers, increases symptoms and signs of asthma and bronchial hyper-responsiveness, either worsening an existing asthma or leading to a novel disease in a previously healthy athlete. Several specific aspects of daily training life, environmental exposure, diagnostic procedures and aspects of treatment related to the regulations of medication use in sports need particular attention when addressing the adolescent athlete with respiratory symptoms.

  6. [Asthma and scuba diving Absolute contraindication? in all asthma patients?].

    PubMed

    Coëtmeur, D; Briens, E; Dassonville, J; Vergne, M

    2001-09-01

    Physical and psychological fitness are required for scuba diving, leading to medical contraindications in certain subjects. Asthma, a condition exhibiting increasing prevalence in the general population is currently considered an absolute contraindication for scuba diving by the French Federation for Submarine Sports and Education (FFESSM). There is however no documented evidence demonstrating a higher risk in asthmatic divers. Our English-speaking colleagues have suggested that certain asthmatic subjects could participate in scuba diving sports under certain conditions without any higher risk compared with non-asthmatic divers. We recall here the impact of diving on respiratory function and potential consequences in asthmatic subjects, proposing that the formal contraindication against scuba diving should be maintained for asthmatic patients who experience frequent symptoms (step 2 or more of the International Consensus Report on Diagnosis and Treatment of Asthma) and/or have a baseline obstructive syndrome. It would appear reasonable to discuss the contraindication concerning patients with rare acute episodes and who have a perfectly normal respiratory function. The question of bronchodilator inhalation prior to diving may be a question to debate. However, such a proposal cannot be considered to be valid unless well-conducted studies of the clinical manifestations are available (frequency and severity of the acute episodes, triggering factors) for the diver candidate. Because of the highly restrictive nature of the contraindication notification and the absence of arguments backing up the decision, the question should be put to competent authorities (sports federations, learned societies) in order to ascertain the pathophysiological mechanisms involved and collect reliable epidemiological data before proposing a consensus discussion. This process may lead to the delivery of scuba diving authorizations for selected asthmatic subjects without a higher risk than non

  7. Health Service Utilization and Poor Health Reporting in Asthma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Joshua G.; Diaz, Rafael; Akpinar-Elci, Muge

    2016-01-01

    The management and treatment of adult asthma has been associated with utilization of health services. Objectives: First, to investigate the likelihood of health service utilization, including primary care, emergency department, and hospital stays, among persons diagnosed with an asthma condition relative to those that do not have an asthma condition. Second, to examine the likelihood of poor physical health among asthma respondents relative to those that do not have an asthma condition. Third, to demonstrate that these relationships vary with frequency of utilization. Fourth, to discuss the magnitude of differences in frequent utilization between asthma and non-asthma respondents. Data Source: Data is derived from a random, stratified sampling of Hampton Roads adults, 18 years and older (n = 1678). Study Design: Study participants are interviewed to identify asthma diagnosis, access to primary care, frequency of emergency department utilization, hospital admissions, and days of poor physical health. Odds-ratios establish relationships with the covariates on the outcome variable. Findings: Those with asthma are found more likely (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.05–2.15) to report poor physical health relative to non-asthma study participants. Further, asthma respondents are found more likely (OR 4.23, 95% CI 1.56–11.69) to frequently utilize primary care that may be associated with the management of the condition and are also more likely to utilize treatment services, such as the emergency department (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.32–2.65) and hospitalization (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.39–3.50), associated with acute and episodic care. Further, it is a novel finding that these likelihoods increase with frequency of utilization for emergency department visits and hospital stays. Conclusion: Continuity in care and better management of the diseases may result in less demand for emergency department services and hospitalization. Health care systems need to recognize that asthma patients are

  8. The future of asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, I. P.

    1997-01-01

    Reports in the media describing the discovery of "the asthma gene" or "a new vaccine for asthma" may be inaccurate and often raise patients' hopes unjustifiably. This article is a personal view of key areas in current asthma research, and it examines how they may impinge on the care of asthmatic patients in the next decade. I have tried to explain the thinking behind some of the approaches under study. I discuss the potential contributions of genetic studies, immunological approaches, and new therapeutic approaches. PMID:9001482

  9. Eosinophilic Endotype of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Fernando; Lim, Hui Fang; Nair, Parameswaran

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into different clinical endotypes, depending on the type of airway inflammation, clinical severity, and response to treatment. This article focuses on the eosinophilic endotype of asthma, which is defined by the central role that eosinophils play in the pathophysiology of the condition. It is characterized by elevated sputum and/or blood eosinophils on at least 2 occasions and by a significant response to treatments that suppress eosinophilia. Histopathologic demonstration of eosinophils in the airways provides the most direct diagnosis of eosinophilic asthma; but it is invasive, thus, impractical in clinical practice. PMID:27401626

  10. A relapse of near-fatal thunderstorm-asthma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Corrado, A; Cecchi, L; Liccardi, G; Stanziola, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; D'Amato, M

    2013-05-01

    Thunderstorm-related asthma is a dramatic example of the allergenic potential of pollen antigens. Pollen allergic patients who encounter the allergenic cloud of pollen during a thunderstorm are at higher risk of having an asthma attack. Relapse is also possible and we describe here the first case of relapse of near fatal thunderstorm-asthma occurred in a 36 years old, 20 weeks pregnant woman affected by seasonal asthma and sensitized to allergens released by Parietariapollen. Patients suffering from pollen allergy should be alerted of the danger of being outdoors during a thunderstorm in the pollen season and if they experienced an episode of severe thunderstorm-related asthma could be at risk of a relapse during a heavy precipitation event. PMID:23862404

  11. A relapse of near-fatal thunderstorm-asthma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Corrado, A; Cecchi, L; Liccardi, G; Stanziola, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; D'Amato, M

    2013-05-01

    Thunderstorm-related asthma is a dramatic example of the allergenic potential of pollen antigens. Pollen allergic patients who encounter the allergenic cloud of pollen during a thunderstorm are at higher risk of having an asthma attack. Relapse is also possible and we describe here the first case of relapse of near fatal thunderstorm-asthma occurred in a 36 years old, 20 weeks pregnant woman affected by seasonal asthma and sensitized to allergens released by Parietariapollen. Patients suffering from pollen allergy should be alerted of the danger of being outdoors during a thunderstorm in the pollen season and if they experienced an episode of severe thunderstorm-related asthma could be at risk of a relapse during a heavy precipitation event.

  12. A multidisciplinary team case management approach reduces the burden of frequent asthma admissions

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Hannah; Davis, Jenny; Evans, Sian; Flower, Laura; Tan, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Up to 10% of asthmatics have “difficult asthma”; however, they account for 80% of asthma-related expenditure and run the highest risk of acute severe exacerbations. An estimated 75% of admissions for asthma are avoidable. Guidelines advise that these patients be managed by an experienced specialist multidisciplinary team (MDT). We aimed to assess the impact of a case management strategy delivered via specialist MDTs on acute healthcare utilisation of patients with frequent asthma admissions. An MDT (consultant, specialist nurse, physiotherapist and psychologist) case management strategy was introduced in 2010 at University Hospital Southampton Foundation Trust (Southampton, UK) to support patients with frequent asthma admissions during admission and then in clinic. To assess efficacy, we systematically searched the hospital database for patients acutely admitted for asthma on two or more occasions in 2010, 2011 and 2012. Data were collected retrospectively covering patient demographics, admission details, asthma severity and comorbidity. From 2010 to 2012, 84 patients were admitted on two or more occasions per year (80% female, mean body mass index 31 kg·m−2 and 55% psychological comorbidity). After introducing an MDT approach repeat asthma admissions fell by 33% from 127 in 2010 to 84 in 2012 (p=0.0004). In addition, bed days fell by 52% from 895 in 2010 to 430 in 2010 (p=0.015). An MDT case management approach significantly reduces hospitalisation in difficult asthma patients with prior frequent admission. PMID:27730207

  13. Work-related asthma: diagnosis and prognosis of immunological occupational asthma and work-exacerbated asthma.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, X; Cruz, M J; Bustamante, V; Lopez-Campos, J L; Barreiro, E

    2014-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of asthma are increasing. One reason for this trend is the rise in adult-onset asthma, especially occupational asthma, which is 1 of the 2 forms of work-related asthma. Occupational asthma is defined as asthma caused by agents that are present exclusively in the workplace. The presence of pre-existing asthma does not rule out the possibility of developing occupational asthma. A distinction has traditionally been made between immunological occupational asthma (whether IgE-mediated or not) and nonimmunological occupational asthma caused by irritants, the most characteristic example of which is reactive airway dysfunction syndrome. The other form of work-related asthma is known as work-exacerbated asthma, which affects persons with pre-existing or concurrent asthma that is worsened by work-related factors. It is important to differentiate between the 2 entities because their treatment, prognosis, and medical and social repercussions can differ widely. In this review, we discuss diagnostic methods, treatment, and avoidance/nonavoidance of the antigen in immunological occupational asthma and work-exacerbated asthma. Key words: Specific inhalation challenge. Peak expiratory flow. Workplace. Irritants.

  14. New concepts in treatment of chronic persistent asthma. Using a stepwise protocol to control inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rumbak, M J

    1991-09-01

    Asthma continues to cause unacceptably high rates of disability and death, largely because the severity of disease is underestimated and patients are inadequately educated about their disease. When patients understand what happens during an asthma attack and its aftermath, they are more likely to notice important symptoms and to start or increase self-treatment appropriately. Physicians are responsible for teaching patients how to avoid precipitating factors and for discussing and writing down a self-treatment plan to follow in specific circumstances. The British Thoracic Society has suggested a stepwise protocol for drug treatment of asthma. Each patient must be evaluated individually and started at the appropriate step.

  15. National Asthma Control Program State Profiles

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health State Data Profiles (2011) Recommend on ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I ...

  16. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy What's an Asthma Flare-Up? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma ... of a straw that's being pinched. Causes of Asthma Flare-Ups People with asthma have airways that ...

  17. Thunderstorm asthma: an overview of the evidence base and implications for public health advice.

    PubMed

    Dabrera, G; Murray, V; Emberlin, J; Ayres, J G; Collier, C; Clewlow, Y; Sachon, P

    2013-03-01

    Thunderstorm asthma is a term used to describe an observed increase in acute bronchospasm cases following the occurrence of thunderstorms in the local vicinity. The roles of accompanying meteorological features and aeroallergens, such as pollen grains and fungal spores, have been studied in an effort to explain why thunderstorm asthma does not accompany all thunderstorms. Despite published evidence being limited and highly variable in quality due to thunderstorm asthma being a rare event, this article reviews this evidence in relation to the role of aeroallergens, meteorological features and the impact of thunderstorm asthma on health services. This review has found that several thunderstorm asthma events have had significant impacts on individuals' health and health services with a range of different aeroallergens identified. This review also makes recommendations for future public health advice relating to thunderstorm asthma on the basis of this identified evidence. PMID:23275386

  18. Thunderstorm asthma: an overview of the evidence base and implications for public health advice.

    PubMed

    Dabrera, G; Murray, V; Emberlin, J; Ayres, J G; Collier, C; Clewlow, Y; Sachon, P

    2013-03-01

    Thunderstorm asthma is a term used to describe an observed increase in acute bronchospasm cases following the occurrence of thunderstorms in the local vicinity. The roles of accompanying meteorological features and aeroallergens, such as pollen grains and fungal spores, have been studied in an effort to explain why thunderstorm asthma does not accompany all thunderstorms. Despite published evidence being limited and highly variable in quality due to thunderstorm asthma being a rare event, this article reviews this evidence in relation to the role of aeroallergens, meteorological features and the impact of thunderstorm asthma on health services. This review has found that several thunderstorm asthma events have had significant impacts on individuals' health and health services with a range of different aeroallergens identified. This review also makes recommendations for future public health advice relating to thunderstorm asthma on the basis of this identified evidence.

  19. Collaborative Attack vs. Collaborative Defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shouhuai

    We have witnessed many attacks in the cyberspace. However, most attacks are launched by individual attackers even though an attack may involve many compromised computers. In this paper, we envision what we believe to be the next generation cyber attacks — collaborative attacks. Collaborative attacks can be launched by multiple attackers (i.e., human attackers or criminal organizations), each of which may have some specialized expertise. This is possible because cyber attacks can become very sophisticated and specialization of attack expertise naturally becomes relevant. To counter collaborative attacks, we might need collaborative defense because each “chain” in a collaborative attack may be only adequately dealt with by a different defender. In order to understand collaborative attack and collaborative defense, we present a high-level abstracted framework for evaluating the effectiveness of collaborative defense against collaborative attacks. As a first step towards realizing and instantiating the framework, we explore a characterization of collaborative attacks and collaborative defense from the relevant perspectives.

  20. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  1. Asthma and Food Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  2. Asthma Action Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cold or warm water used with detergent and bleach can also be effective. • Wash the sheets and ... hot water or cooler water with detergent and bleach. Ë Cockroaches Many people with asthma are allergic ...

  3. Asthma, Allergies and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just for Kids Library School Tools Videos Virtual Allergist Education & Training Careers in A/I Continuing Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation ...

  4. Transcendental meditation and asthma.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A F; Honsberger, R; Chiu, J T; Novey, H S

    1975-01-01

    A 6-month study with crossover at 3 months was designed to evaluate the possible beneficial effects of transcendental meditation upon bronchial asthma. 21 patients kept daily diaries of symptoms and medications and answered questionnaires at the end of the study and 6 months later. Other measurements included physician evaluation, pulmonary function testing, and galvanic skin resistance. The results indicated that transcendental meditation is a useful adjunct in treating asthma.

  5. Relvar Ellipta for asthma.

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    ▼Relvar Ellipta (GSK) is a dry powder inhaler that contains a corticosteroid (fluticasone furoate) and a long-acting beta2 agonist (vilanterol trifenatate). It is licensed for once-daily use as maintenance therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. In a previous article we considered its use in the management of COPD.1 Here we review the evidence for Relvar Ellipta in the treatment of patients with asthma.

  6. Vaccination for asthma exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Bardin, P G

    2004-06-01

    Most asthma exacerbations are caused by common cold virus infections, predominantly rhinovirus infections. Full protection against repeat infections with the same rhinovirus serotype is given by serum neutralizing antibody, but cross-reactive antibody developed against other serotypes could yield partial protection and result in attenuated cold and airway symptoms. It is proposed that vaccine-mediated induction of cross-reactive antibody might not prevent rhinovirus infections but might reduce severe asthma symptoms and exacerbations.

  7. Evolving Concepts of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Marc; Ray, Anuradha; Wenzel, Sally E

    2015-09-15

    Our understanding of asthma has evolved over time from a singular disease to a complex of various phenotypes, with varied natural histories, physiologies, and responses to treatment. Early therapies treated most patients with asthma similarly, with bronchodilators and corticosteroids, but these therapies had varying degrees of success. Similarly, despite initial studies that identified an underlying type 2 inflammation in the airways of patients with asthma, biologic therapies targeted toward these type 2 pathways were unsuccessful in all patients. These observations led to increased interest in phenotyping asthma. Clinical approaches, both biased and later unbiased/statistical approaches to large asthma patient cohorts, identified a variety of patient characteristics, but they also consistently identified the importance of age of onset of disease and the presence of eosinophils in determining clinically relevant phenotypes. These paralleled molecular approaches to phenotyping that developed an understanding that not all patients share a type 2 inflammatory pattern. Using biomarkers to select patients with type 2 inflammation, repeated trials of biologics directed toward type 2 cytokine pathways saw newfound success, confirming the importance of phenotyping in asthma. Further research is needed to clarify additional clinical and molecular phenotypes, validate predictive biomarkers, and identify new areas for possible interventions.

  8. Asthma is Different in Women

    PubMed Central

    Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in asthma incidence, prevalence and severity have been reported worldwide. After puberty, asthma becomes more prevalent and severe in women, and is highest in women with early menarche or with multiple gestations, suggesting a role for sex hormones in asthma genesis. However, the impact of sex hormones on the pathophysiology of asthma is confounded by and difficult to differentiate from age, obesity, atopy, and other gender associated environmental exposures. There are also gender discrepancies in the perception of asthma symptoms. Understanding gender differences in asthma is important to provide effective education and personalized management plans for asthmatics across the lifecourse. PMID:26141573

  9. Occupational asthma after exposure to azodicarbonamide: report of four cases.

    PubMed Central

    Normand, J C; Grange, F; Hernandez, C; Ganay, A; Davezies, P; Bergeret, A; Prost, G

    1989-01-01

    Azodicarbonamide (Chemical Abstract Service Registry No 123.77.3) is an organic low molecular weight agent used for blowing and foaming plastics. Finely ground azodicarbonamide can be a pulmonary and sometimes a cutaneous acute sensitiser. Four cases of work related asthma are reported. PMID:2920144

  10. Shark attack in Natal.

    PubMed

    White, J A

    1975-02-01

    The injuries in 5 cases of shark attack in Natal during 1973-74 are reviewed. Experience in shark attacks in South Africa during this period is discussed (1965-73), and the value of protecting heavily utilized beaches in Natal with nets is assessed. The surgical applications of elasmobranch research at the Oceanographic Research Institute (Durban) and at the Headquarters of the Natal Anti-Shark Measures Board (Umhlanga Rocks) are described. Modern trends in the training of surf life-guards, the provision of basic equipment for primary resuscitation of casualties on the beaches, and the policy of general and local care of these patients in Natal are discussed.

  11. Particulate air pollution: possible relevance in asthma.

    PubMed

    Glovsky, M M; Miguel, A G; Cass, G R

    1997-01-01

    The relative importance of air pollution in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma has been of interest for several decades. Numerous studies on the role of gaseous air pollution containing ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide have been published. Very little attention has been focused on the role of respirable particles in the causation of asthma. In this article we summarize some of our ongoing investigations into the sources and composition of airborne particles in the Los Angeles and Pasadena atmosphere, including the search for biologically active particles that may induce asthma attacks. If is found that the urban atmosphere contains not only combustion-derived particles from diesel engine exhaust and gasoline-powered motor vehicle exhaust, but also particles formed from biological starting materials including plant debris, cigarette smoke, wood smoke, and meat smoke as well as tire debris containing some natural rubber and paved road dust. Paved road dust is a very complex mixture of particles including garden soil, tire dust, plant fragments, redeposited atmospheric particles of all types, and pollen fragments presumably ground up by passing traffic. We have shown previously that latex allergen can be extracted from tire dust, from roadside dust, and from respirable air samples taken at Los Angeles and Long Beach. At present, work is underway to identify the larger range of allergens that may be contributed by the entrainment of paved road dust into the atmosphere. The possible importance of pollen fragments present in paved road dust in very small particle sizes is discussed as well as their potential relevance in asthma.

  12. Environmental risk factors and allergic bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Liccardi, G; D'Amato, M; Holgate, S

    2005-09-01

    potential. In addition, by inducing airway inflammation, which increases airway permeability, pollutants overcome the mucosal barrier and could be able to "prime" allergen-induced responses. There are also observations that a thunderstorm occurring during pollen season can induce severe asthma attacks in pollinosis patients. After rupture by thunderstorm, pollen grains may release part of their cytoplasmic content, including inhalable, allergen-carrying paucimicronic particles. PMID:16164436

  13. Environmental risk factors and allergic bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Liccardi, G; D'Amato, M; Holgate, S

    2005-09-01

    potential. In addition, by inducing airway inflammation, which increases airway permeability, pollutants overcome the mucosal barrier and could be able to "prime" allergen-induced responses. There are also observations that a thunderstorm occurring during pollen season can induce severe asthma attacks in pollinosis patients. After rupture by thunderstorm, pollen grains may release part of their cytoplasmic content, including inhalable, allergen-carrying paucimicronic particles.

  14. Fatal crocodile attack.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Shee, Biplab; Sukul, Biswajit

    2013-11-01

    Attacks on human beings by various animals leading to varied types of injuries and even death in some cases are not uncommon. Crocodile attacks on humans have been reported from a number of countries across the globe. Deaths in such attacks are mostly due to mechanical injuries or drowning. Bites by the crocodiles often cause the limbs to be separated from the body. The present case refers to an incident of a fatal attack by a crocodile on a 35 years old female where only the mutilated head of the female was recovered. Multiple lacerated wounds over the face and scalp along with fracture of the cranial bones was detected on autopsy. Two distinct bite marks in the form of punched in holes were noted over the parietal and frontal bones. Injuries on the head with its traumatic amputation from the body were sufficient to cause death. However, the presence of other fatal injuries on the unrecovered body parts could not be ruled out.

  15. Word Attack Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follettie, Joseph F.

    A limited analysis of alternative approaches to phonemic-level word attack instruction is provided in this document. The instruction segment begins with training in letter-sound correspondences for which mastery of certain skills is assumed. Instruction ends with the decoding of novel items having a consonant-vowel-consonant construction. Contents…

  16. [Asthma and exercise].

    PubMed

    Lecomte, J

    2002-09-01

    Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is defined as the clinical occurrence of shortness of breath, cough or wheeze that occurs typically 5-15 minutes after the cessation of the exercise. In most patients with EIA, bronchoconstriction is followed by a refractory period, during which repeated exertion causes less bronchoconstriction. The occurrence of this type of asthma is influenced by the intensity and the duration of exercise. It is now generally believed that EIA affects all patients with asthma if challenged with exercise of sufficient intensity. The estimate prevalence varies from 7 to 15% in the general population. EIA appears also to affect 3-14% of athletes. It is now clear that hyperventilation and hypertonicity of airway-lining fluid provide the stimulus for EIA with release of constrictor mediators. Recently, incidence of new diagnoses of asthma is associated with heavy exercise in communities with high concentrations of ozone, thus, air pollution and outdoor exercise could contribute to the development of asthma in children. Beta-agonists and/or disodium cromoglycate remain the preferred first-line therapy for EIA but now antileukotrienes provide an attractive therapeutic alternative. General recommendations can help reduce its severity: warm-up; breath through mask when exercising in cold, dry conditions; in recent years some reports have suggested that training and conditioning may help athletes and non-athletes with asthma have fewer symptoms after exercise, increase the threshold of exercise necessary to induce airway obstruction and finally improve their well-being. Scuba diving stays an absolute contra-indication if asthma.

  17. Intra-airway administration of small interfering RNA targeting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 attenuates allergic asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shintaro; Hattori, Noboru; Senoo, Tadashi; Onari, Yojiro; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Kanehara, Masashi; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Fujitaka, Kazunori; Haruta, Yoshinori; Murai, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Akihito; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a major inhibitor of the fibrinolytic system, may promote the development of asthma. To further investigate the significance of PAI-1 in the pathogenesis of asthma and determine the possibility that PAI-1 could be a therapeutic target for asthma, this study was conducted. First, PAI-1 levels in induced sputum (IS) from asthmatic subjects and healthy controls were measured. In asthmatic subjects, IS PAI-1 levels were elevated, compared with that of healthy controls, and were significantly higher in patients with long-duration asthma compared with short-duration asthma. PAI-1 levels were also found to correlate with IS transforming growth factor-β levels. Then, acute and chronic asthma models induced by ovalbumin were established in PAI-1-deficient mice and wild-type mice that received intra-airway administrations of small interfering RNA against PAI-1 (PAI-1-siRNA). We could demonstrate that eosinophilic airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness were reduced in an acute asthma model, and airway remodeling was suppressed in a chronic asthma model in both PAI-1-deficient mice and wild-type mice that received intra-airway administration of PAI-1-siRNA. These results indicate that PAI-1 is strongly involved in the pathogenesis of asthma, and intra-airway administration of PAI-1-siRNA may be able to become a new therapeutic approach for asthma.

  18. Vitamin C and common cold-induced asthma: a systematic review and statistical analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Asthma exacerbations are often induced by the common cold, which, in turn, can be alleviated by vitamin C. Objective To investigate whether vitamin C administration influences common cold-induced asthma. Methods Systematic review and statistical analysis of the identified trials. Medline, Scopus and Cochrane Central were searched for studies that give information on the effects of vitamin C on common cold-induced asthma. All clinically relevant outcomes related to asthma were included in this review. The estimates of vitamin C effect and their confidence intervals [CI] were calculated for the included studies. Results Three studies that were relevant for examining the role of vitamin C on common cold-induced asthma were identified. The three studies had a total of 79 participants. Two studies were randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trials. A study in Nigeria on asthmatics whose asthma attacks were precipitated by respiratory infections found that 1 g/day vitamin C decreased the occurrence of asthma attacks by 78% (95% CI: 19% to 94%). A cross-over study in former East-Germany on patients who had infection-related asthma found that 5 g/day vitamin C decreased the proportion of participants who had bronchial hypersensitivity to histamine by 52 percentage points (95% CI: 25 to 71). The third study did not use a placebo. Administration of a single dose of 1 gram of vitamin C to Italian non-asthmatic common cold patients increased the provocative concentration of histamine (PC20) 3.2-fold (95% CI: 2.0 to 5.1), but the vitamin C effect was significantly less when the same participants did not suffer from the common cold. Conclusions The three reviewed studies differed substantially in their methods, settings and outcomes. Each of them found benefits from the administration of vitamin C; either against asthma attacks or against bronchial hypersensitivity, the latter of which is a characteristic of asthma. Given the evidence suggesting that vitamin C

  19. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  20. [Epigenetics, environment and asthma].

    PubMed

    Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha; Silva-García, Raúl; Oliva-Rico, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the respiratory tract with a complex genetic background influenced by the exposition to a series of environmental factors. Genetic studies can only elucidate part of the heritability and susceptibility of asthma and even though several diseases have an evident genetic etiology, only a fraction of the genes involved in their pathogenicity have been identified. The epigenetic regulation of the latter is a fact one should bear in mind in order to explain the major triggers of diseases whose understanding is complicated, such as allergies and asthma. External stimulus such as nourishment, stress, physical activity, atmospheric pollution, tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking can induce either gene silencing or gene expression. In this regard, epigenetics can explain how these environmental factors influence our genetic inheritance. There is growing evidence that backs-up the fact that DNA methylation, histone post-translational modification and microRNA expression are influenced by the environment. This helps explaining how several of the risk factors mentioned contribute to the development and inheritance of asthma. In this review, different environmental factors and their relation with the main epigenetic regulatory mechanisms will be analyzed, as well as their possible role in the development of asthma.

  1. The Microbiome in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yvonne J.; Boushey, Homer A.

    2014-01-01

    The application of recently developed sensitive, specific, culture-independent tools for identification of microbes is transforming concepts of microbial ecology, including concepts of the relationships between the vast, complex populations of microbes associated with ourselves and with states of health and disease. While most work initially focused on the community of microbes (microbiome) in the gastrointestinal tract and its relationships to gastrointestinal disease, interest has expanded to include study of the relationships of the microbiome of the airways to asthma and its phenotypes, and to the relationships between the gastrointestinal microbiome, development of immune function, and predisposition to development of allergic sensitization and asthma. We here provide our perspective on the findings of studies of differences in the airway microbiome in patients with asthma vs. healthy subjects, and of studies of relationships between environmental microbiota, gut microbiota, immune function, and the development of asthma, and additionally provide our perspective on how these findings suggest in broad outline a rationale for approaches involving directed manipulation of the gut and airway microbiome for treatment and prevention of allergic asthma. PMID:25567040

  2. [Epigenetics, environment and asthma].

    PubMed

    Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha; Silva-García, Raúl; Oliva-Rico, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the respiratory tract with a complex genetic background influenced by the exposition to a series of environmental factors. Genetic studies can only elucidate part of the heritability and susceptibility of asthma and even though several diseases have an evident genetic etiology, only a fraction of the genes involved in their pathogenicity have been identified. The epigenetic regulation of the latter is a fact one should bear in mind in order to explain the major triggers of diseases whose understanding is complicated, such as allergies and asthma. External stimulus such as nourishment, stress, physical activity, atmospheric pollution, tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking can induce either gene silencing or gene expression. In this regard, epigenetics can explain how these environmental factors influence our genetic inheritance. There is growing evidence that backs-up the fact that DNA methylation, histone post-translational modification and microRNA expression are influenced by the environment. This helps explaining how several of the risk factors mentioned contribute to the development and inheritance of asthma. In this review, different environmental factors and their relation with the main epigenetic regulatory mechanisms will be analyzed, as well as their possible role in the development of asthma. PMID:24915622

  3. Managing Asthma in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Ellen M.

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting nearly 5 million children under the age of 18. Children with asthma account for 3 million hospital visits and 200,000 hospitalizations yearly. This adds up to an estimated $2 billion annually in health care costs (American Academy of Pediatrics, 1999). A child with asthma has three…

  4. Smoking and Asthma (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth > For Teens > Smoking and Asthma Print A A A Text Size What's in ... the health problems it causes. If you have asthma, smoking is especially risky because of the damage ...

  5. Smoking and Asthma (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Smoking and Asthma Print A A A Text Size What's in ... unhealthy for everyone, but especially for someone with asthma. The lungs of a smoker, with or without ...

  6. Asthma Early Warning System in New York City (aewsnyc) Using Remote Sensing Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassebo, Yasser; Rahman, Zahidur

    2011-06-01

    Asthma is estimated to affect approximately 17.3 million Americans, including 5 million children less than 18 years of age. Of these 5 million children, 1.3 million are less than 5 years of age. Asthma is a major public health problem in NYC particularly in Bronx. 12.5% of new Yorkers have been diagnosed with asthma. 300,000 children in NYC have been diagnosed with asthma up to year of 2000. NYC children were almost twice as likely to be hospitalized due to asthma attacks as the average of US child in 2000. Queens county's diesel pollution risk ranks as the 10th unhealthiest in the US compared to over than 3000 counties. Asthma symptoms are consistent with exposure to a high level of a respiratory irritant gas, smoke fume, vapor, aerosol, particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5), and dust. Some types these environmental gaseous such as sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) can exacerbate preexisting respiratory symptoms in the short-term. Control of air pollution related diseases such as asthma, cancer, and bronchitis is difficult and inefficient due to the uncertainty in the air pollution transportation. Asthma control relies on air pollution detection and reduction. Asthma control can be improved by applying spatial tools such as Remote Sensing (RS), Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The project long-term goal is to develop a model to predict an Asthma Early Warning System for NYC (AEWSNYC), using two approaches: (1) satellite data error correction collaboratively with (2) Ground-based multiwavelength lidar measurements and NASA back trajectory tools. The proposed method can be used to create an efficient asthma control model globally.

  7. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  8. The Saudi Initiative for Asthma - 2016 update: Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma in adults and children

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moamary, Mohamed S.; Alhaider, Sami A.; Idrees, Majdy M.; Al Ghobain, Mohammed O.; Zeitouni, Mohammed O.; Al-Harbi, Adel S.; Yousef, Abdullah A.; Al-Matar, Hussain; Alorainy, Hassan S.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.

    2016-01-01

    This is an updated guideline for the diagnosis and management of asthma, developed by the Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA) group, a subsidiary of the Saudi Thoracic Society. The main objective of SINA is to have guidelines that are up to date, simple to understand and easy to use by nonasthma specialists, including primary care and general practice physicians. SINA approach is mainly based on symptom control and assessment of risk as it is the ultimate goal of treatment. The new SINA guidelines include updates of acute and chronic asthma management, with more emphasis on the use of asthma control in the management of asthma in adults and children, inclusion of a new medication appendix, and keeping consistency on the management at different age groups. The section on asthma in children is rewritten and expanded where the approach is stratified based on the age. The guidelines are constructed based on the available evidence, local literature, and the current situation in Saudi Arabia. There is also an emphasis on patient–doctor partnership in the management that also includes a self-management plan. PMID:26933455

  9. [Inhaled therapy in asthma].

    PubMed

    Plaza Moral, Vicente; Giner Donaire, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Because of its advantages, inhaled administration of aerosolized drugs is the administration route of choice for the treatment of asthma and COPD. Numerous technological advances in the devices used in inhaled therapy in recent decades have boosted the appearance of multiple inhalers and aerosolized drugs. However, this variety also requires that the prescribing physician is aware of their characteristics. The main objective of the present review is to summarize the current state of knowledge on inhalers and inhaled drugs commonly used in the treatment of asthma. The review ranges from theoretical aspects (fundamentals and available devices and drugs) to practical and relevant aspects for asthma care in the clinical setting (therapeutic strategies, education, and adherence to inhalers). PMID:26683076

  10. Asthma Pharmacogenomics: 2015 Update.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joshua S; Weiss, Scott T; Tantisira, Kelan G

    2015-07-01

    There is evidence that genetic factors are implicated in the observed differences in therapeutic responses to the common classes of asthma therapy such as β2-agonists, corticosteroids, and leukotriene modifiers. Pharmacogenomics explores the roles of genetic variation in drug response and continues to be a field of great interest in asthma therapy. Prior studies have focused on candidate genes and recently emphasized genome-wide association analyses. Newer integrative omics and system-level approaches have recently revealed novel understanding of drug response pathways. However, the current known genetic loci only account for a fraction of variability in drug response and ongoing research is needed. While the field of asthma pharmacogenomics is not yet fully translatable to clinical practice, ongoing research should hopefully achieve this goal in the near future buttressed by the recent precision medicine efforts in the USA and worldwide.

  11. [Asthma and scuba diving].

    PubMed

    Héritier, Francis; Leuenberger, Philippe

    2003-02-01

    In scuba diving, the density of the gases supplied increases with depth. During ascent, overinflation of the lungs is avoided by exhalation. In case of airway obstruction, the theoretical risk of pulmonary barotrauma and drowning increases. For this reason, asthma has been considered as a contraindication to scuba diving. This recommendation is often ignored and many people with asthma dive, apparently without problems. Certifying that an asthmatic patient is fit to dive remains a controversial and difficult matter. In case of mild intermittent asthma, scuba diving seems possible when the pulmonary function test is normal and the patient is asymptomatic, including during exercise and exposure to cold air. The asthmatic diver should be fully informed of the risks incurred and should notify his or her informed-consent to the physician.

  12. Lung VITAL: Rationale, design, and baseline characteristics of an ancillary study evaluating the effects of vitamin D and/or marine omega-3 fatty acid supplements on acute exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease, asthma control, pneumonia and lung function in adults.

    PubMed

    Gold, Diane R; Litonjua, Augusto A; Carey, Vincent J; Manson, JoAnn E; Buring, Julie E; Lee, I-Min; Gordon, David; Walter, Joseph; Friedenberg, Georgina; Hankinson, John L; Copeland, Trisha; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory and observational research studies suggest that vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids may reduce risk for pneumonia, acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases including chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) or asthma, and decline of lung function, but prevention trials with adequate dosing, adequate power, and adequate time to follow-up are lacking. The ongoing Lung VITAL study is taking advantage of a large clinical trial-the VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL)--to conduct the first major evaluation of the influences of vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on pneumonia risk, respiratory exacerbation episodes, asthma control and lung function in adults. VITAL is a 5-year U.S.-wide randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial trial of supplementation with vitamin D3 ([cholecalciferol], 2000 IU/day) and marine omega-3 FA (Omacor® fish oil, eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA]+docosahexaenoic acid [DHA], 1g/day) for primary prevention of CVD and cancer among men and women, at baseline aged ≥50 and ≥55, respectively, with 5107 African Americans. In a subset of 1973 participants from 11 urban U.S. centers, lung function is measured before and two years after randomization. Yearly follow-up questionnaires assess incident pneumonia in the entire randomized population, and exacerbations of respiratory disease, asthma control and dyspnea in a subpopulation of 4314 randomized participants enriched, as shown in presentation of baseline characteristics, for respiratory disease, respiratory symptoms, and history of cigarette smoking. Self-reported pneumonia hospitalization will be confirmed by medical record review, and exacerbations will be confirmed by Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services data review.

  13. Evaluation of CHESS: New York asthma data 1971 to 1972. Volume 1. Findings and supporting tables. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, H.D.; Viren, J.R.; Pechan, E.H.; Ripps, A.E.

    1981-08-01

    A statistical reanalysis of the CHESS New York asthma data that were collected from 1971-72 is presented. An initial analysis of these data suggested that asthma attacks increase with elevated levels of suspended nitrates in the ambient air environment. This analysis suffered from several shortcomings which raise serious questions about the study conclusions. For example, the original analysis failed to take into account factors such as day of study. Other critical factors that were not considered in the EPA analysis were seasonal, psychological, and allergic effects as well as the lack of independence among asthma attacks. In addition, both the medical and the aerometry data in the study were of poor quality. The reanalysis attempted to compensate as much as possible for the various shortcomings. The results show no evidence of a link between suspended nitrates and asthma.

  14. Asthma Outcomes: Pulmonary Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Robert S.; Wise, Robert S.; Covar, Ronina; Irvin, Charles G.; Kercsmar, Carolyn M.; Kraft, Monica; Liu, Mark C.; O’Connor, George T.; Peters, Stephen P.; Sorkness, Ronald; Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    Background Outcomes of pulmonary physiology have a central place in asthma clinical research. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to provide recommendations on the use of pulmonary function measures as asthma outcomes that should be assessed in a standardized fashion in future asthma clinical trials and studies to allow for cross-study comparisons. Methods Our subcommittee conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed to identify studies that focused on the validation of various airway response tests used in asthma clinical research. The subcommittee classified the instruments as core (to be required in future studies), supplemental (to be used according to study aims and in a standardized fashion), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results A list of pulmonary physiology outcomes that applies to both adults and children older than 6 years was created. These outcomes were then categorized into core, supplemental, and emerging. Spirometric outcomes (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and FEV1/FVC) are proposed as core outcomes for study population characterization, for observational studies, and for prospective clinical trials. Bronchodilator reversibility and pre- and post-bronchodilator FEV1 also are core outcomes for study population characterization and observational studies. Conclusions The subcommittee considers pulmonary physiology outcomes of central importance in asthma and proposes spirometric outcomes as core outcomes for all future NIH-initiated asthma clinical research. PMID:22386510

  15. Asthma in Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Hunninghake, Gary M.; Weiss, Scott T.; Celedón, Juan C.

    2006-01-01

    Hispanic individuals trace their ancestry to countries that were previously under Spanish rule, including Mexico, large parts of Central and South America, and some Caribbean islands. Most—but not all—Hispanics have variable proportions of European, Amerindian, and African ancestry. Hispanics are diverse with regard to many factors, including racial ancestry, country of origin, area of residence, socioeconomic status, education, and access to health care. Recent findings suggest that there is marked variation in the prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of asthma in Hispanics in the United States and in Hispanic America. The reasons for differences in asthma and asthma morbidity among and within Hispanic subgroups are poorly understood but are likely due to the interaction between yet-unidentified genetic variants and other factors, including environmental tobacco smoke exposure, obesity, allergen exposure, and availability of health care. Barriers to optimal management of asthma in Hispanics in the United States and in Hispanic America include inadequate access to health care, suboptimal use of antiinflammatory medications, and lack of reference values for spirometric measures of lung function in many subgroups (e.g., Puerto Ricans). Future studies of asthma in Hispanics should include large samples of subgroups that are well characterized with regard to self-reported ethnicity, country of origin, place of birth, area of residence, and indicators of socioeconomic status. Because Hispanics are disproportionately represented among the poor in the United States, implementation of adequate access to health care and social reforms (e.g., improving housing conditions) would likely have a major impact on reducing asthma morbidity in this population. PMID:16210666

  16. Pathology of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Makoto; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Aoki, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a serious health and socioeconomic issue all over the world, affecting more than 300 million individuals. The disease is considered as an inflammatory disease in the airway, leading to airway hyperresponsiveness, obstruction, mucus hyper-production and airway wall remodeling. The presence of airway inflammation in asthmatic patients has been found in the nineteenth century. As the information in patients with asthma increase, paradigm change in immunology and molecular biology have resulted in an extensive evaluation of inflammatory cells and mediators involved in the pathophysiology of asthma. Moreover, it is recognized that airway remodeling into detail, characterized by thickening of the airway wall, can be profound consequences on the mechanics of airway narrowing and contribute to the chronic progression of the disease. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition plays an important role in airway remodeling. These epithelial and mesenchymal cells cause persistence of the inflammatory infiltration and induce histological changes in the airway wall, increasing thickness of the basement membrane, collagen deposition and smooth muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Resulting of airway inflammation, airway remodeling leads to the airway wall thickening and induces increased airway smooth muscle mass, which generate asthmatic symptoms. Asthma is classically recognized as the typical Th2 disease, with increased IgE levels and eosinophilic inflammation in the airway. Emerging Th2 cytokines modulates the airway inflammation, which induces airway remodeling. Biological agents, which have specific molecular targets for these Th2 cytokines, are available and clinical trials for asthma are ongoing. However, the relatively simple paradigm has been doubted because of the realization that strategies designed to suppress Th2 function are not effective enough for all patients in the clinical trials. In the future, it is required to understand more details for phenotypes of

  17. Immunotherapy in asthma.

    PubMed

    Warrington, Richard

    2010-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways in which many cells and cellular elements play a role. Chronic inflammation is associated with airway hyper-responsiveness that leads to recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness and coughing, as well as variable airflow obstruction within the lung. With time, such airflow obstruction may become permanent due to remodeling. It has been treated for more than 100 years by subcutaneous immunotherapy with allergen extracts but in recent years, other forms and types of immunotherapy have been introduced. Perhaps the most successful of these to date, is sublingual immunotherapy, which has attained significant usage in European countries but has yet to make inroads into clinical practice in North America. Other mechanisms to modify the inflammatory responses of asthma have included immunotherapy with recombinant allergens, the use of allergen peptides targeting antigen-specific T cells and the administration of Toll-like receptor agonists coupled to allergen proteins. As the inflammatory responses in asthma frequently involve IgE, a modified monoclonal antibody to IgE and interfering with its binding to the IgE receptor have gained acceptance for treating severe allergic asthma. Other monoclonal antibodies or recombinant receptor antagonists are being assessed for their ability to block other contributors to the inflammatory response. Finally, attempts have been made to generate autoantibody responses to cytokines implicated in asthma. Most of these therapies aim to modify or inhibit the so-called Th 2 immune response, which is implicated in many forms of asthma, or to inhibit cytokines involved in these responses. However, an added benefit of classical immunotherapy seems to be the ability to prevent the allergic progression to new sensitivities and new forms of allergic disease.

  18. Facial dog attack injuries.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Patil, Pavan Manohar

    2015-02-01

    The exposed position of the face makes it vulnerable to dog bite injuries. This fact combined with the short stature of children makes them a high-risk group for such attacks. In contrast to wounds inflicted by assaults and accidents, dog bite wounds are deep puncture type wounds compounded by the presence of pathologic bacteria from the saliva of the attacking dog. This, combined with the presence of crushed, devitalized tissue makes these wounds highly susceptible to infection. Key to successful management of such wounds are meticulous cleansing of the wound, careful debridement, primary repair, appropriate antibiotic therapy, and rabies and tetanus immunization where indicated. This review presents an overview of the epidemiology, presentation, management of such emergencies, and the recent advances in the care of such patients. PMID:25829713

  19. [Macro-and microelements imbalance in etiology and progression of bronchial asthma in children].

    PubMed

    Lytvynets', L Ia

    2013-06-01

    The aim of our work was the study of macro-and microelemensts characteristics of the state of the blood serum of children with asthma, depending on the severity. A total of 107 children aged 10 to 18 years with asthma in the acute stage. The results of the proposed asthma control test (GINA, 2011) to the level of asthma control the children were distributed as follows: 34 (31.8%)--with controlled, 47 (43.9%)--partly controlled and 26--with uncontrolled bronchial asthma. Investigation of serum trace elements were determined by atomic absobtsionnoy spectrophotometry. Found that with varying degrees of control of asthma changes were reduction of magnesium, zinc, when excessive amounts of copper and calcium. We show some dizelements in patients with nontrol bronhial asthma. The most pronounced manifestation dyzelements documented in patients with uncontrolled asthma. It is with same with uncontrolled asthma, there are marked hypoxic change, energy shortage, bronchial hyperreactivity, as a result of increasing stress level of response to an antigen, reduce antioxidant enzyme systems, immune system dysfunction. This changes in the macro-and microelement composition of the blood significantly reduce the reserves of the immune system, chronic inflammatory processes in the bronches, which exacerbates the severity of the disease, which in practice requires a differential diagnosis, comprehensive treatment based on identified dyzelements states.

  20. A national census of those attending UK accident and emergency departments with asthma. The UK National Asthma Task Force.

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, M R; Latouche, D; Trako, E; Thurston, J G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To obtain a representative national picture of the type of people with asthma attending accident and emergency (A&E) departments in the UK, the reasons why they attend, and to determine the proportion admitted to hospital. DESIGN: A national census involving questionnaires. SETTING: 100 A&E departments throughout the UK. SUBJECTS: All those with asthma attending because of asthma during a one week period in September 1994. RESULTS: Details were obtained about 1292 attendances. About half of all attendances were by adults and half by children, and 87.8% were previously diagnosed asthmatics; 18.8% of adult attenders were unemployed. Perceived severity of asthma was the reason for attendance in 65.5%, but 11.5% reported non-availability, or perceived non-availability, of the general practitioner (GP) as the reason for attending. One fifth of adults had been kept awake by their asthma for over three nights before attendance. 425 of the 1292 attenders (32.9%) had been admitted to hospital in the previous 12 months and 316 (24.5%) had attended the A&E department in the previous three months. Only 24.6% of attenders had had contact with their general practitioner in the previous 24 h. 61.6% of under-5 attenders (n = 341) were admitted to hospital; the figures for those aged 5-15 and 15+ years and above were 265 (41.4%) and 665 (38.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Many people with asthma attend A&E departments without first having seen their GP. In many adult cases the asthma, while severe, is not acute, but a high proportion of both adults and children are admitted to hospital. Many of these attendances and admissions are repeat attendances. To enhance the quality of care provided to those with asthma may require easier access to primary care, enhanced patient education, or enhanced health professional education. Further study is needed of a variety of potential interventions. PMID:9023616

  1. Inner City Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inner city has long been recognized as an area of high asthma morbidity and mortality. A wide range of factors interact to create this environment. These factors include well-recognized asthma risk factors that are not specific to the inner city, the structure and delivery of health care, the location and function of the urban environment, and social inequities. This article will review these facets and discuss successful and unsuccessful interventions in order to understand what is needed to solve this problem. PMID:25459579

  2. A new focus on assessing and treating asthma control in the African-American community: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Michael; McGill, Cheryl Lynn Walker; Graham, Leroy M; Foggs, Michael; Robinson, Sandra; Crim, Courtney; Stempel, David A

    2008-09-01

    Asthma continues to be a highly prevalent disease characterized by significant morbidity, unnecessary mortality, and substantial cost to the health care system. After decades of increasing prevalence, the number of current asthmatics in recent years has plateaued at approximately 22 million people in the United States. An additional 10 million Americans have a past history of asthma that is not active. The burden of asthma is higher among African Americans than in any other racial or ethnic group in America. The African-American community continues to experience a disproportional increase in asthma prevalence, morbidity, and mortality. The educational initiatives stemming from the newly revised National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) guidelines provide the opportunity to address the increased burden of asthma in the African American community. These new guidelines, released in August 2007, focus on asthma control as the primary goal of therapy, routine monitoring of asthma control, and use of asthma control assessments to direct treatment. The present review discusses the following: I. The impact of health disparities on outcomes of African Americans with asthma, II. The barriers that prevent asthmatic patients from achieving optimal control, III. The unique factors that challenge practitioners and patients in achieving optimal asthma control in the African American Community, IV. The impact of good asthma control and the need for patients and clinicians to assess asthma control in with a standardized assessment tool, and V. Strategic initiatives and the role of the End The Attacks NOW program in improving outcomes for African American patients with asthma. PMID:18924317

  3. Evolution of asthma through childhood.

    PubMed

    Sears, M R

    1998-11-01

    The greatest incidence of childhood asthma is among males under 5 years, with decreasing numbers of new cases with age. Many young children wheeze, but remission is common especially in non-atopic children without a family history of allergy or asthma, whose wheezing relates more to infections and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. The prognosis of childhood asthma is best established from population studies, in which some two-thirds of wheezy children become symptom-free as adults, whereas follow-up studies of wheezing children seen in office or specialty clinic practice, who generally have more severe asthma, show a much greater likelihood (60-80%) of persistence of asthma into adulthood. Factors predisposing to persistence of childhood asthma include a positive family history, development of atopy, environmental exposures to allergens and cigarette smoke, markers of severity of childhood asthma, and female gender.

  4. Food Intolerance and childhood asthma: what is the link?

    PubMed

    Beausoleil, Janet L; Fiedler, Joel; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2007-01-01

    Food allergies and asthma are increasing worldwide. It is estimated that approximately 8% of children aged <3 years have food allergies. Foods can induce a variety of IgE-mediated, cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and respiratory reactions. The most common foods responsible for allergic reactions in children are egg, milk, peanut, soy, fish, shellfish, and tree nuts. Asthma alone as a manifestation of a food allergy is rare and atypical. Less than 5% of patients experience wheezing without cutaneous or gastrointestinal symptoms during a food challenge. In addition to acute respiratory symptoms, a food allergy may also induce airway hyper-responsiveness beyond the initial reaction. This process can occur in patients who do not demonstrate a decrease in lung function during the reaction. Inhalation of aerosolized food particles can cause respiratory symptoms in selected food-allergic individuals, particularly with fish and shellfish during cooking and aerosolization. However, this has not been demonstrated with the smelling of, or casual contact with, peanut butter. Rarely, food additives such as sulfating agents can cause respiratory reactions. This reaction occurs primarily in patients with underlying asthma, particularly in patients with more severe asthma. In contrast, there is no convincing evidence that tartrazine or monosodium glutamate can induce asthma responses. Although food-induced asthma is rare, it is common for patients and clinicians to perceive that food can trigger asthma. Avoidance of specific foods or additives has not been shown to improve asthma, even in patients who may perceive that a particular food worsens their asthma.However, patients with underlying asthma are more likely to experience a fatal or near-fatal food reaction. Food reactions tend to be more severe or life threatening when they involve the respiratory tract. The presence of a food allergy is a risk factor for the future development of asthma, particularly for children with

  5. Immunoglobulin isotypes in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Najam, F I; Giasuddin, A S; Shembesh, A H

    1999-01-01

    Immunoglobulin isotypes (IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD, IgE) in serum were investigated in 64 Libyan children with mild to moderately severe asthma (age: 1-12 years; sex: 39 males, 25 females) (Group A) and in 57 healthy Libyan children (age: 1-12 years; sex: 30 males, 27 females (Group B). The patients were classified according to age into three groups (A1: 1-3 years; A2: > 3-5 years; A3: > 5-12 years); according to disease activity into two groups (AA: active disease; NA: inactive disease); and according to age plus disease activity into six groups (AA1, NA1; AA2, NA2; AA3, NA3). The healthy children were also divided according to age into three groups (B1: 1-3 years; B2: > 3-5 years; B3: > 5-12 years). IgG, IgA, IgM and IgD were measured by radial immunodiffusion method and IgE was estimated by enzyme immunoassay technique utilizing immunokits from bioMerieux, France. Serum levels of IgG, IgD and IgE were elevated significantly in patients compared to controls (A vs B: p < 0.05) while IgA and IgM levels were normal (p > 0.05). IgG and IgD levels were raised in A3 (p < 0.05), while IgD levels were raised in both A2 and A3 (p < 0.05) and IgE was elevated in all age groups (p < 0.05). However, IgG was elevated significantly in AA only, while IgD and IgE levels were high in both AA and NA (p < 0.05) and IgE was even considerably higher in AA compared to NA (p < 0.02). Further elevated levels were observed for IgG in AA3 only (p < 0.05), for IgD in NA2 (p < 0.01), AA3 (p < 0.01) and NA3 (p < 0.05) and IgE was much higher in patients with active disease than with inactive disease in all age groups (p < 0.05). The fact that asthmatic attack in majority of our patients can be explained as mediated through IgE and the possibilities that IgG and IgD may play roles as aetiopathogenetic or protective regulatory factors in childhood asthma are discussed.

  6. Managing Asthma at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Julie A.

    2000-01-01

    School personnel must know which students have asthma, typical warning signs, and appropriate actions in an emergency. Administering appropriate medication and reducing environmental triggers are not enough. Policymaking in schools and workplaces and legislation to increase health care access and eliminate substandard housing and air pollution are…

  7. Medications for Chronic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Falk, Nathan P; Hughes, Scott W; Rodgers, Blake C

    2016-09-15

    Chronic asthma is a major health concern for children and adults worldwide. The goal of treatment is to prevent symptoms by reducing airway inflammation and hyperreactivity. Step-up therapy for symptom control involves initiation with low-dose treatment and increasing intensity at subsequent visits if control is not achieved. Step-down therapy starts with a high-dose regimen, reducing intensity as control is achieved. Multiple randomized controlled trials have shown that inhaled corticosteroids are the most effective monotherapy. Other agents may be added to inhaled corticosteroids if optimal symptom control is not initially attained. Long-acting beta2 agonists are the most effective addition, but they are not recommended as monotherapy because of questions regarding their safety. Leukotriene receptor antagonists can be used in addition to inhaled corticosteroids, but they are not as effective as adding a long-acting beta2 agonist. Patients with mild persistent asthma who prefer not to use inhaled corticosteroids may use leukotriene receptor antagonists as monotherapy, but they are less effective. Because of their high cost and a risk of anaphylaxis, monoclonal antibodies should be reserved for patients with severe symptoms not controlled by other agents. Immunotherapy should be considered in persons with asthma triggered by confirmed allergies if they are experiencing adverse effects with medication or have other comorbid allergic conditions. Many patients with asthma use complementary and alternative agents, most of which lack data regarding their safety or effectiveness. PMID:27637121

  8. Respiratory Conditions Update: Asthma.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Timothy A

    2016-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by chronic airway inflammation and variable expiratory airflow limitation. Related clinical features include wheezing, dyspnea, chest tightness, and cough that worsens at night or in the early morning, and that varies over time and in intensity. A finding of variable expiratory airflow limitation on spirometry confirms the diagnosis. A forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity ratio less than the level predicted for the patient's age is suggestive of airflow limitation. Variability also must be confirmed. Updated guidelines recommend control-based management administered in a stepwise manner, with goals of achieving symptom control and minimizing the risks of exacerbations, future fixed airway limitation, and adverse effects of therapy. There is good evidence for the effectiveness of asthma education and self-management plans. Short-acting bronchodilators should be used as needed for symptom relief, with the addition of an inhaled corticosteroid early as maintenance therapy if symptoms are not well controlled. If asthma remains uncontrolled despite therapy, patients should be referred for more specialized treatment. Biomarkers, biologic drugs, and endoscopic treatments are being studied in the management of severe asthma, and ongoing research may determine which patients might benefit most from these emerging therapies. PMID:27576231

  9. Exercise training in asthma.

    PubMed

    Satta, A

    2000-12-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease that is often limiting the exercise capacity. Rehabilitation programs are recommended and widely applied in asthmatic patients, and exercise prescription is a keystone of these programs. The impairment of exercise performance in asthmatics, the role of exercise training in such patients, the mechanisms of its beneficial effects and the suggested programs are discussed in a review, accordingly to the current evidence and available data in scientific literature. Exercise performance is impaired in most asthmatics. There is no conclusive evidence that asthma may involve a ventilatory limitation to exercise. The lesser fitness in asthmatics seems mainly due to inactivity and sedentary lifestyle. Exercise induced asthma (EIA) is a significant problem, and the best approach to minimise its effects on exercise capacity is prevention. Exercise training has been proved to have health-related benefits and to improve the quality of life. There is substantial evidence that exercise training increases exercise performance and fitness in asthmatics. It is still unclear whether physical training improves pulmonary function and bronchial responsiveness. Since asthma ranges widely, exercise prescription varies for each patient. The proper selection of the patients and the choice of exercise programs are the steps required. Accordingly with the severity of the disease, exercise strategies may range from sports activities to, when the disease is severe, inpatient hospital programs that overlap with COPD rehabilitation. Further research to clarify some aspects (effects on pulmonary function and EIA, outcomes, cost-benefit relationship) is necessary. PMID:11296996

  10. The microbiome in asthma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yvonne J; Boushey, Homer A

    2015-01-01

    The application of recently developed sensitive, specific, culture-independent tools for identification of microbes is transforming concepts of microbial ecology, including concepts of the relationships between the vast complex populations of microbes associated with ourselves and with states of health and disease. Although most work initially focused on the community of microbes (microbiome) in the gastrointestinal tract and its relationship to gastrointestinal disease, interest has expanded to include study of the relationships of the airway microbiome to asthma and its phenotypes and to the relationships between the gastrointestinal microbiome, development of immune function, and predisposition to allergic sensitization and asthma. Here we provide our perspective on the findings of studies of differences in the airway microbiome between asthmatic patients and healthy subjects and of studies of relationships between environmental microbiota, gut microbiota, immune function, and asthma development. In addition, we provide our perspective on how these findings suggest the broad outline of a rationale for approaches involving directed manipulation of the gut and airway microbiome for the treatment and prevention of allergic asthma.

  11. Prospective tracking of a pediatric emergency department e-kiosk to deliver asthma education.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ashish; Weng, Wenjing; Lichenstein, Richard; Arora, Mohit; Sears, Andrew

    2009-12-01

    The study objective was to describe the prospective use of an interactive Patient Education and Motivation Tool (PEMT) placed within a pediatric emergency department (ED). A touch screen computer was utilized to deliver asthma education to children and their parents/guardians during their acute asthma visit between November 2006 and April 2007. Ninety-nine participants were enrolled in this prospective non-randomized pre-post study. PEMT comprised three key components: screening, learning and evaluation. The tool tracked the date the system was used, user characteristics, asthma knowledge, amount of time spent on each screen, and navigational patterns of individuals using the program. The results showed that baseline asthma knowledge had positive association with age and negative association with time spent in the learning module. There was negative association between age and time spent in the learning module. Thus PEMT was effective in improving the asthma knowledge of young patients and those having lower baseline knowledge.

  12. Environmental Air Pollutants as Risk Factors for Asthma Among Children Seen in Pediatric Clinics in UKMMC, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Idris, Idayu Badilla; Ghazi, Hasanain Faisal; Zhie, Khor Hui; Khairuman, Khairul Aliff; Yahya, Siti Kasuma; Abd Zaim, Farah Azureen; Nam, Chok Wai; Abdul Rasid, Hazwan Zuhairi; Isa, Zaleha Md

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma is increasing, especially among children in Malaysia, with environmental factors as one of the main preventable contributors. The aim of this study was to determine the association between environmental air pollutants and the occurrence of asthma among children seen in pediatric clinics in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center (UKMMC), Kuala Lumpur. An unmatched case control study among children who attended the pediatric clinic was carried out from May to August 2015. A total of 223 children who were diagnosed with asthma (105 cases) and who did not have asthma (118 controls) were included in this study. Their parents or caregivers were interviewed using questionnaires modified from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Data obtained were analyzed using SPSS software version 20. There was a higher risk of asthma in those who had carpet at home (OR = 2.15 CI [1.25-3.68]), those who lived within 200 m of heavy traffic (OR = 1.72 CI [1.01-2.93]), and those who were exposed to lorry fumes (OR = 2.61. CI [1.38-4.93]). Environmental air pollutants increased the risk of asthma among children in Malaysia. Exposure to congested roads, lorry fumes, and indoor carpet were associated with asthma among children in this study. Parents or caretakers of children with asthma should be given adequate education on the prevention of asthmatic attack among these children. PMID:27325078

  13. Environmental Air Pollutants as Risk Factors for Asthma Among Children Seen in Pediatric Clinics in UKMMC, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Idris, Idayu Badilla; Ghazi, Hasanain Faisal; Zhie, Khor Hui; Khairuman, Khairul Aliff; Yahya, Siti Kasuma; Abd Zaim, Farah Azureen; Nam, Chok Wai; Abdul Rasid, Hazwan Zuhairi; Isa, Zaleha Md

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma is increasing, especially among children in Malaysia, with environmental factors as one of the main preventable contributors. The aim of this study was to determine the association between environmental air pollutants and the occurrence of asthma among children seen in pediatric clinics in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center (UKMMC), Kuala Lumpur. An unmatched case control study among children who attended the pediatric clinic was carried out from May to August 2015. A total of 223 children who were diagnosed with asthma (105 cases) and who did not have asthma (118 controls) were included in this study. Their parents or caregivers were interviewed using questionnaires modified from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Data obtained were analyzed using SPSS software version 20. There was a higher risk of asthma in those who had carpet at home (OR = 2.15 CI [1.25-3.68]), those who lived within 200 m of heavy traffic (OR = 1.72 CI [1.01-2.93]), and those who were exposed to lorry fumes (OR = 2.61. CI [1.38-4.93]). Environmental air pollutants increased the risk of asthma among children in Malaysia. Exposure to congested roads, lorry fumes, and indoor carpet were associated with asthma among children in this study. Parents or caretakers of children with asthma should be given adequate education on the prevention of asthmatic attack among these children.

  14. Improving Attack Graph Visualization through Data Reduction and Attack Grouping

    SciTech Connect

    John Homer; Ashok Varikuti; Xinming Ou; Miles A. McQueen

    2008-09-01

    Various tools exist to analyze enterprise network systems and to produce attack graphs detailing how attackers might penetrate into the system. These attack graphs, however, are often complex and difficult to comprehend fully, and a human user may find it problematic to reach appropriate configuration decisions. This paper presents methodologies that can 1) automatically identify portions of an attack graph that do not help a user to understand the core security problems and so can be trimmed, and 2) automatically group similar attack steps as virtual nodes in a model of the network topology, to immediately increase the understandability of the data. We believe both methods are important steps toward improving visualization of attack graphs to make them more useful in configuration management for large enterprise networks. We implemented our methods using one of the existing attack-graph toolkits. Initial experimentation shows that the proposed approaches can 1) significantly reduce the complexity of attack graphs by trimming a large portion of the graph that is not needed for a user to understand the security problem, and 2) significantly increase the accessibility and understandability of the data presented in the attack graph by clearly showing, within a generated visualization of the network topology, the number and type of potential attacks to which each host is exposed.

  15. Association between obesity and asthma in 4-11 year old children in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Munoz, J; Chinn, S; Rona, R

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—There is evidence of a positive association between asthma and obesity in adults and in children. We investigated, in a large sample of English and Scottish primary school children, whether there is a consistent association between fatness and asthma symptoms in Britain.
METHODS—A cross sectional analysis was made of 18 218 children aged 4-11 years who participated in the 1993 or 1994 surveys of the National Study of Health and Growth (NSHG). Children belonged either to English or Scottish representative samples, or an English inner city sample. Asthma attacks in the previous year, occasional wheeze, or persistent wheeze were the symptoms used in the analysis. Body mass index (BMI) and the sum of triceps and subscapular skinfolds converted to standard deviation scores (SDS) were used to assess levels of fatness.
RESULTS—A total of 14 908 children (81.8%) were included in the analysis. In the multiple logistic analysis BMI and asthma (asthma attacks or wheeze) were associated in the representative sample (OR for the comparison of the 10th and 90th centiles of BMI 1.28,95% CI 1.11 to 1.48), but sum of skinfolds was unrelated to asthma symptoms in most analyses. The association between asthma and BMI was stronger in girls than in boys in the inner city sample, but less convincingly in the representative sample.
CONCLUSIONS—Levels of obesity are associated with asthma symptoms regardless of ethnicity. The association is more consistent for BMI than for sum of skinfolds, partly because obese children are more advanced in their maturation than other children. There is some evidence that, as in adults, the association is stronger in girls than in boys, but only in the multiethnic inner city sample.

 PMID:11209102

  16. [Cerebral infarction and transient ischemic attack].

    PubMed

    Sahara, Noriyuki; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Okada, Yasushi

    2016-04-01

    Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke 2015 was published. Here, we describe several points revised from the 2009 edition about "Cerebral infarction and transient ischemic attack (TIA)". The revision points are as follows; 1. Extension of possible time window of intravenous recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator treatment (from within 3 hours to within 4.5 hours); 2. Antiplatelet therapy in acute stage (dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) for non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA); 3. Endovascular recanalization therapy in acute stage; 4. Antiplatelet therapy in chronic stage (Cilostazol is recommended similar to aspirin or clopidogrel); 5. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) stroke or TIA patients; 6. Management of TIA. We explain the revised points of the guideline in the text.

  17. [Cerebral infarction and transient ischemic attack].

    PubMed

    Sahara, Noriyuki; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Okada, Yasushi

    2016-04-01

    Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke 2015 was published. Here, we describe several points revised from the 2009 edition about "Cerebral infarction and transient ischemic attack (TIA)". The revision points are as follows; 1. Extension of possible time window of intravenous recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator treatment (from within 3 hours to within 4.5 hours); 2. Antiplatelet therapy in acute stage (dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) for non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA); 3. Endovascular recanalization therapy in acute stage; 4. Antiplatelet therapy in chronic stage (Cilostazol is recommended similar to aspirin or clopidogrel); 5. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) stroke or TIA patients; 6. Management of TIA. We explain the revised points of the guideline in the text. PMID:27333757

  18. The use of remotely sensed environmental data in the study of asthma disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres-Sampaio, D.; Teodoro, A. C.; Freitas, A.; Sillero, N.

    2012-09-01

    Despite the growing use of Remote Sensing (RS) data in epidemiological studies, several diseases, including asthma, have not been studied yet using RS potentialities. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airway that affects people of all ages throughout the world. The expression of this disease can be influenced by some environmental factors such as allergens, air pollution or climate conditions. In this study, we modeled the distribution of asthma in each season, using Maximum entropy (Maxent) model and presence data obtained from a national database with asthma public hospitals admissions in Mainland Portugal, with discharges between years 2003 and 2008. We considered data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to retrieve estimates of near-surface air temperature and relative humidity. Land-use regression (LUR) models were developed to produce estimates of three pollutants: PM10, NO2, and CO. Moreover, MODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was also used in the construction of Maxent models. All Maxent models predicted similar suitable areas and obtained acceptable area under the curve (AUC) values (~0.75) of the ROC plot. Our results show a strong relationship between asthma presence and NO2, suggesting that asthmatic people living in urban areas with high traffic volume have an increased risk of suffering asthma attacks. Furthermore, there is evidence of the effect of PM10, CO, and RH (during the Summer) in asthma expression. RS data have a great potential but also presents limitations that should be addressed to allow studying more complex diseases.

  19. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives In 2014, 218, ... Native American adults reported that they currently have asthma. American Indian/Alaska Native children are 30% more ...

  20. Asthma and air pollution in the Los Angeles area. Technical report No. 35

    SciTech Connect

    Whittemore, A S; Korn, E L

    1980-03-01

    Daily asthma attack diaries of sixteen panels of asthmatics residing in the Los Angeles area were collected by the Environmental Protection Agency for 34 week periods during the years 1972 to 1975. These data are examined here for the relationship between daily attack occurrence and daily levels of photochemical oxidant, total suspended particulates, minimum temperature, relative humidity, and average wind speed. A separate multiple logistic regression is used for each panelist's attack data. Variables representing the presence or absence of attack on the preceding day, as well as day of week and time since the start of the study, are included in the regressions. The most significant predictor of attacks was the presence of an attack on the preceding day. On the average, the panelists tended to have increased attacks on days with high oxidant and particulate pollution, on cool days, and during the first two months of the study. Panelists' attack propensity also differed by day of week; in particular they had more attacks on Saturdays (the last day of the weekly reporting period) than on Sundays. Each panelist's regression coefficients are classified according to his age, sex, hay fever status and self-assessed attack precursors; this classification is used to examine subgroups among the panelists with high coefficients corresponding to the above factors.

  1. Eosinophil cationic protein mRNA expression in children with bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Yu, H Y; Li, X Y; Cai, Z F; Li, L; Shi, X Z; Song, H X; Liu, X J

    2015-11-13

    Studies have shown that eosinophils are closely related to pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Eosinophils release eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), which plays an important role in infection and allergic reactions. Serum ECP mRNA expression in children with bronchial asthma has not been adequately investigated. We analyzed serum ECP mRNA expression in 63 children with bronchial asthma and 21 healthy children by using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to understand the role of ECP in children with bronchial asthma. The children with bronchial asthma were segregated into acute-phase and stable-phase groups, based on the severity of the illness. Serum ECP mRNA expression in children with bronchial asthma (0.375 ± 0.04) was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (0.20 ± 0.02; P < 0.05). Additionally, children in the acute-phase group showed higher ECP mRNA expression level (0.44 ± 0.06) than those in the stable-phase (0.31 ± 0.03) and healthy control groups (0.20 ± 0.02; P < 0.05), while the level in the stable-phase (0.31 ± 0.03) was markedly higher than that in the healthy control group (0.20 ± 0.02; P < 0.05). Detection of serum ECP mRNA expression level has possible applications in the diagnosis and treatment of children with bronchial asthma.

  2. Summertime haze air pollution and children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Thurston, G D; Lippmann, M; Scott, M B; Fine, J M

    1997-02-01

    In order to investigate associations between summertime haze air pollution and asthma at an individual level, 52, 58, and 56 children (ages 7 to 13) attending a summer "asthma camp" were followed during the last week of June in 1991, 1992, and 1993, respectively. Most of the subjects had moderate to severe asthma. Daily records were kept of the environmental conditions, as well as of subject medication use, lung function, and medical symptoms. Air pollution was found to be significantly and consistently correlated with acute asthma exacerbations, chest symptoms, and lung function decrements. The pollutant most consistently associated with adverse health consequences was ozone (O3), although associations with sulfates and hydrogen ion suggest a possible role by fine particles as well. Effects were found to be roughly monotonic as a function of O3 concentration. Regression of morning (8:00 A.M.) to afternoon (5:00 P.M.) peak flow change on O3 indicated pulmonary function reductions similar to those previously reported for more active children without asthma. Moreover, analyses also indicated an increased risk of an asthma exacerbation and of experiencing chest symptoms of approximately 40% on the highest pollution day, relative to the mean. Based on these relative risk estimates, a rise in the 1-h daily maximal O3 from 84 ppb to 160 ppb was associated in this group with an increase from 20 to 28 (+/- 2) in the expected number of unscheduled medications administered/day, and from 29 to 41 (+/- 3) in the expected total number of chest symptoms/day. Thus, air pollution can be a major contributor to the respiratory problems experienced by children with asthma during the summer months.

  3. Feedback on heart attack.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-04-13

    The Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust in London is the largest heart and lung centre in the UK. This article explores a project carried out by nurses at the trust looking at the experiences of having an acute myocardial infarction, and how patients felt about taking part in a research study. PMID:27532071

  4. Feedback on heart attack.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-04-13

    The Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust in London is the largest heart and lung centre in the UK. This article explores a project carried out by nurses at the trust looking at the experiences of having an acute myocardial infarction, and how patients felt about taking part in a research study.

  5. Beta-blockers: friend or foe in asthma?

    PubMed Central

    Arboe, Bente; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim Recently, β-blockers have been suggested as a potential maintenance treatment option for asthma. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge of the potential benefits and risks of β-blocker therapy for asthma. Method Systematic literature review. Results No significant increase in the number of patients requiring rescue oral corticosteroid for an exacerbation of asthma has been observed after initiation of β-blocker treatment. Patients with mild to moderate reactive airway disease, probably both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, may have a limited fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) following single-dose administration of β-blocker, whereas no change in FEV1 has been reported following long-term administration. In a murine model of asthma, long-term administration of β-blockers resulted in a decrease in airway hyperresponsiveness, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect. In keeping with this, long-term administration of a nonselective β-blocker to steroid-naïve asthma patients has shown a dose-dependent improvement in airway hyperresponsiveness, and either an asymptomatic fall in FEV1 or no significant change in FEV1. Furthermore, available studies show that bronchoconstriction induced by inhaled methacholine is reversed by salbutamol in patients on regular therapy with a β-blocker. On the other hand, a recent placebo-controlled trial of propranolol and tiotropium bromide added to inhaled corticosteroids revealed no effect on airway hyperresponsiveness and a small, not statistically significant, fall in FEV1 in patients classified as having mild to moderate asthma. Conclusion The available, although limited, evidence suggests that a dose-escalating model of β-blocker therapy to patients with asthma is well tolerated, does not induce acute bronchoconstriction, and, not least, may have beneficial effects on airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in some patients with

  6. Asthma and Allergic Diseases in Pregnancy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Asthma and allergic disorders can affect the course and outcome of pregnancy. Pregnancy itself may also affect the course of asthma and related diseases. Optimal management of these disorders during pregnancy is vital to ensure the welfare of the mother and the baby. Specific pharmacological agents for treatment of asthma or allergic diseases must be cautiously selected and are discussed here with respect to safety considerations in pregnancy. Although most drugs do not harm the fetus, this knowledge is incomplete. Any drug may carry a small risk that must be balanced against the benefits of keeping the mother and baby healthy. The goals and principles of management for acute and chronic asthma, rhinitis, and dermatologic disorders are the same during pregnancy as those for asthma in the general population. Diagnosis of allergy during pregnancy should mainly consist of the patient's history and in vitro testing. The assured and well-evaluated risk factors revealed for sensitization in mother and child are very limited, to date, and include alcohol consumption, exposure to tobacco smoke, maternal diet and diet of the newborn, drug usage, and insufficient exposure to environmental bacteria. Consequently, the recommendations for primary and secondary preventive measures are also very limited in number and verification. PMID:21151812

  7. Acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    Cumming, Gordon R.

    1974-01-01

    While rheumatic fever is relatively uncommon except where there are poor and crowded living conditions, sporadic acute attacks continue to occur in a family or pediatric medical practice. The physician's role in management of the sore throat in the diagnosis of suspected cases of rheumatic fever and in follow-up for continued prophylaxis is discussed. The frequency of admissions and presenting features of 159 patients with acute rheumatic fever is reviewed. Continued surveillance is required if we are to achieve a further reduction in attack rate and complications. PMID:4419123

  8. Thunderstorm-related asthma: what happens and why.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Vitale, C; D'Amato, M; Cecchi, L; Liccardi, G; Molino, A; Vatrella, A; Sanduzzi, A; Maesano, C; Annesi-Maesano, I

    2016-03-01

    The fifth report issued by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change forecasts that greenhouse gases will increase the global temperature as well as the frequency of extreme weather phenomena. An increasing body of evidence shows the occurrence of severe asthma epidemics during thunderstorms in the pollen season, in various geographical zones. The main hypotheses explaining association between thunderstorms and asthma claim that thunderstorms can concentrate pollen grains at ground level which may then release allergenic particles of respirable size in the atmosphere after their rupture by osmotic shock. During the first 20-30 min of a thunderstorm, patients suffering from pollen allergies may inhale a high concentration of the allergenic material that is dispersed into the atmosphere, which in turn can induce asthmatic reactions, often severe. Subjects without asthma symptoms, but affected by seasonal rhinitis can also experience an asthma attack. All subjects affected by pollen allergy should be alerted to the danger of being outdoors during a thunderstorm in the pollen season, as such events may be an important cause of severe exacerbations. In light of these observations, it is useful to predict thunderstorms and thus minimize thunderstorm-related events. PMID:26765082

  9. Prevalence of asthma among teenagers attending school in Tahiti.

    PubMed Central

    Liard, R; Chansin, R; Neukirch, F; Levallois, M; Leproux, P

    1988-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma was studied in 6731 adolescents (average age 13.5 years, 48.6% boys) attending school in three towns of the isle of Tahiti, according to the ethnic origin of both parents. The pupils completed a self-administered questionnaire in class; 14.3% gave an affirmative answer to the question "Have you ever had attacks of asthma?" (cumulative prevalence). That prevalence was 11.4% in the Europeans, 13.7% in the Chinese, 13.8% in the Polynesians, 15.3% in those whose parents were "halves" (half-bred from Polynesians and Europeans), and 16.0% in the miscellaneous group (= other origins) (P less than 0.02). Asthma was significantly more frequent in boys only among the Europeans and those with one European parent. The results of this study confirm the high prevalence of asthma in French Polynesia found in a previous study. They give no evidence of a racial difference in prevalence but suggest an influence of environment. PMID:3221164

  10. Thunderstorm-related asthma: what happens and why.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Vitale, C; D'Amato, M; Cecchi, L; Liccardi, G; Molino, A; Vatrella, A; Sanduzzi, A; Maesano, C; Annesi-Maesano, I

    2016-03-01

    The fifth report issued by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change forecasts that greenhouse gases will increase the global temperature as well as the frequency of extreme weather phenomena. An increasing body of evidence shows the occurrence of severe asthma epidemics during thunderstorms in the pollen season, in various geographical zones. The main hypotheses explaining association between thunderstorms and asthma claim that thunderstorms can concentrate pollen grains at ground level which may then release allergenic particles of respirable size in the atmosphere after their rupture by osmotic shock. During the first 20-30 min of a thunderstorm, patients suffering from pollen allergies may inhale a high concentration of the allergenic material that is dispersed into the atmosphere, which in turn can induce asthmatic reactions, often severe. Subjects without asthma symptoms, but affected by seasonal rhinitis can also experience an asthma attack. All subjects affected by pollen allergy should be alerted to the danger of being outdoors during a thunderstorm in the pollen season, as such events may be an important cause of severe exacerbations. In light of these observations, it is useful to predict thunderstorms and thus minimize thunderstorm-related events.

  11. Is respiratory viral infection really an important trigger of asthma exacerbations in children?

    PubMed

    Lee, So-lun; Chiu, Shui-seng Susan; Malik, Peiris Joseph S; Chan, Kwok-hung; Wong, Hing-sang Wilfred; Lau, Yu-lung

    2011-10-01

    We performed a prospective cohort study from September 2003 to December 2004 to delineate attributing the effect of different respiratory viral infections including newly discovered ones to asthma exacerbations in children in Hong Kong. One hundred and fourteen children aged 6-14 years with chronic stable asthma and on regular inhaled steroid were monitored for respiratory symptoms over a full calendar year from recruitment. They would attend the study clinic if peak expiratory flow rate decreased to below 80% of their baselines, if they met a predefined symptom score, or if parents subjectively felt them developing a cold. Virological diagnosis using virus culture, antigen detection, and polymerase chain reaction methods on nasal swab specimens would be attempted for all these visits irrespective of triggers. Physician diagnosed outcome of each episode was documented. Three hundred and five episodes of respiratory illnesses were captured in the cohort. Nasal specimens were available in 166 episodes, 92 of which were diagnosed as asthma exacerbations, and 74 non-asthma related episodes. Respiratory viruses were detected in 61 of 166 episodes (36.7%). There was no significant difference in virus detection rate between asthma exacerbations (32 out of 97 episodes, 34.8%) and non-asthma respiratory illnesses (29 out of 79 episodes, 39.2%). Although newly discovered respiratory viruses were identified in these episodes, rhinovirus was the commonest organism associated with both asthma exacerbations and non-asthma related episodes. Plausible explanations for much lower virus detection rate than previously reported include improved personal hygiene and precautionary measures taken during respiratory tract infections in the immediate post-severe acute respiratory syndrome period together with a significant contribution of other adverse factors like environmental air pollution. We conclude that not all viral infections in children with asthma lead to an asthma exacerbation

  12. Mitral Stenosis Presenting as Asthma.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenjing; Jbeli, Aiham; Stys, Maria; Stys, Adam

    2016-02-01

    Although wheezing is one of the most common symptoms and physical findings in asthma, other causes of wheezing should be kept in mind: vocal cord dysfunction, postnasal drip syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, and non-pulmonary diseases, like heart failure and pulmonary edema. Here, we present a case of severe mitral stenosis with pulmonary edema treated for resistant asthma. If asthma is difficult to control, other etiologies of wheezing, including cardiac disease, should be taken into consideration during diagnosis. PMID:26999914

  13. Role of leukotriene receptor antagonists in the management of pediatric asthma: an update.

    PubMed

    Dumitru, Catalina; Chan, Susan M H; Turcanu, Victor

    2012-10-01

    At present, the main indications for leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRA) in pediatric asthma are as add-on therapy to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and as initial controller therapy in children with mild asthma, especially those who cannot or will not use ICS. LTRA are also useful for patients who have concomitant rhinitis, and patients with viral-induced wheeze and exercise-induced asthma. It should be noted that the benefits of LTRA therapy have been demonstrated in children as young as 6 months of age and recent clinical trials have further proven the benefits of LTRA in acute asthma exacerbations. However, considering the important pro-inflammatory effects that leukotrienes (LT) have in experimental models of asthma, it may seem surprising that LTRA treatment outcomes are not better and that in some clinical trials only a minority of patients could be classified as full responders. This could be explained by potential additional LT receptors that are not affected by LTRA. Such receptors could represent new therapeutic targets in asthma. Furthermore, progress in differentiating between asthma phenotypes that result from different pathogenic mechanisms, some of which may involve LT to a lesser degree, should lead to an improved, personalized use of LTRA for treating asthma. PMID:22897162

  14. Pediatric obesity and asthma quality of life.

    PubMed

    Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara; Militello, Lisa K; Kouba, Joanne; Harrison, Patrick R; Manion, Amy; Doumit, Rita

    2013-06-01

    Widely researched as separate entities, our understanding of the comorbid effects of childhood obesity and asthma on quality of life is limited. This article discusses the effects of childhood obesity and asthma on self-reported quality of life in low-income African American teens with asthma. When controlling for the influence of symptom frequency, asthma classification, asthma self-efficacy, and asthma self-care levels, body mass index remains a most important factor in determining self-reported quality of life among teens with asthma. Although overweight and obesity did not change the effectiveness of the asthma intervention program, obesity did affect participants quality of life scores.

  15. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) (and Asthma)

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  16. Personalizing the Approach to Childhood Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  17. Getting control of uncontrolled asthma.

    PubMed

    Wechsler, Michael E

    2014-11-01

    Despite various treatment modalities, a large proportion of patients have asthma that remains uncontrolled. These patients remain at an increased risk of developing severe exacerbations, have a poor quality of life, and pose a high economic healthcare burden, with an estimated mean annual cost more than double that of patients with good symptom control. It is therefore important to accurately diagnose asthma and continually assess asthma control. Several validated tools are available to do this, including questionnaires, biomarker analysis, and bronchoscopy. Current guidelines advise physicians to establish a self-management program for the patient to assess and monitor asthma control. A further recommendation is the establishment of an educational action plan to increase treatment adherence and to improve asthma control. National and international guidelines provide long-term management strategies for these patients and recommend a stepwise approach for achieving and maintaining asthma control. Despite availability of a wide range of controller and reliever therapies, uncontrolled asthma remains a challenge and reflects the need for new therapeutic options. This review discusses current global guidelines for the assessment and management of asthma control and summarizes the broad spectrum of novel therapeutic agents currently under development for the treatment of asthma, including anticholinergics, chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecules expressed on T-helper 2 lymphocyte antagonists, and anti-interleukin (IL)-5, anti-IL-13, and anti-IL-4 agents. PMID:24844737

  18. Effects of smoking on asthma.

    PubMed

    Jindal, S K

    2014-03-01

    Tobacco smoking has several adverse associations with asthma.The odds ratios for prevalence of asthma are high for both active smoking and ETS exposures. In-utero exposure of foetus from maternal smoking, as well as its tertiary exposure from maternal passive-smoking are also known to be responsible for development of asthma in childhood. Smoking adversely affects the health and treatment-outcomes of asthma. There are increased requirements of drugs for smoker and ETS exposed asthmatics. Smoking is also an important factor in the development of airway remodelling, fixed airway obstruction and an exaggerated lung function decline. PMID:25327058

  19. Asthma in pregnancy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Warwick; Murphy, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common medical conditions in women of childbearing age. There are now data to show that asthma is not a benign condition with respect to maternal and fetal health. Despite this there are several problems encountered in the management of such women. There is a tendency to cease or reduce optimal asthma treatments because pregnant women and/or their clinicians may believe they pose a risk to the fetus. There is also a lack of clinician awareness of the complications of asthma in pregnancy. PMID:27757158

  20. Management of paediatric asthma

    PubMed Central

    Grigg, J

    2004-01-01

    Paediatric asthma best practice not only includes prescribing the correct therapeutic mix based on consensus guidelines, but also reducing therapy once control has been achieved. Clinicians should also be aware that asthma in young children is a heterogeneous entity, and a beneficial response to bronchodilators and/or inhaled steroids is not inevitable. In general, preschool children and infants should not be prescribed inhaled corticosteroids above 200 µg beclometasone dipropionate equivalent twice a day, or regular oral steroids, or long acting ß2-adrenoceptor agonists. New therapies such as anti-IgE antibodies are on the horizon, but these are unlikely to replace the established drug combinations. More likely is that the delivery of established drugs will become more convenient (for example, once a day inhaled corticosteroids, or season dependent prophylactic therapy). PMID:15356355

  1. Prevention of asthma.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, H S; Frick, O L

    1981-11-01

    Infants born of allergic mothers but normal fathers, who had eczema and who were fed cows' milk, had a significantly greater incidence of asthma (P less than 0.001) than infants with a similar history but who were breast-fed. An analysis of all breast-fed infants in the study showed that they were less likely to develop asthma than those who were bottle-fed (P less than 0.06). There was a lower incidence of allergy in infants born of families with allergic mothers and normal fathers, than in families in which both parents were allergic (P less than 0.02). In skin tests of both breast or bottle-fed babies, the two most common allergens eliciting reactions were egg and cat dander. PMID:7333001

  2. Asthma induced by enkephalin.

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, R D; Bellamy, D; Pyke, D A

    1980-01-01

    A total of 291 diabetics were studied to see whether an asthmatic reaction was associated with facial flushing induced by chlorpropamide and alcohol. Of these patients, 191 reported facial flushing, of whom 12 reported breathlessness as well. Of these 12, five also described wheezing, and respiratory function tests showed them to have asthma. Three of these five patients underwent further tests, which showed that the asthmatic reaction could be prevented by giving disodium cromoglycate and the specific opiate antagonist naloxone. One patient developed wheezing when given an enkephalin analogue with opiate-like activity. Asthma induced by chlorpropamide and alcohol was concluded to be mediated by endogenous peptides with opiate-like activity such as enkephalin. PMID:7357255

  3. Prevention of occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Tarlo, Susan M; Liss, Gary M

    2010-07-01

    Prevention of occupational asthma related to a work-sensitizing agent ideally would be achieved by avoidance of exposures that cause immunologic sensitization and subsequent asthma. There are a few examples in which a sensitizing agent has been removed from a work process and others in which exposure has been significantly changed or reduced with associated reduced rates of sensitization and disease. Additional measures include containment, use of robots, ventilation measures, exposure monitoring, and use of respiratory protective devices. Secondary prevention includes medical surveillance, which may involve periodic respiratory questionnaires, spirometry, and immunologic tests aiming to detect sensitization or disease early to allow intervention and improve outcomes. Education measures for workers to understand the meaning of work-related respiratory symptoms and appropriate workplace safety measures have not been formally evaluated but may also be expected to enhance protective measures and lead to earlier diagnosis. Tertiary prevention includes medical management and workers' compensation.

  4. Steroid resistant asthma.

    PubMed

    Luhadia, S K

    2014-03-01

    Inspite of very safe and effective treatment, Bronchial asthmatics do not respond well in 5-10% of cases which are labelled as Refractory Asthma. Besides compliance, presence of psychogenic and trigger factors and comorbid illness, steroid insensitiveness or resistance may play a significant role in the poorly controlled/responding asthmatics. Type I Steroid resistance is due to lack of binding affinity of steroids to glucocorticoid receptors and may respond to higher doses of steroids while type II steroid resistance is because of reduced number of cells with glucocorticoid receptors, which is very rare and do not respond to even higher doses of systemic steroids and these cases require alternative/novel therapies. Future treatment of steroid resistant and severe refractory asthma is likely to be targeted towards cytokines and Bronchial Thermoplasty.

  5. Allergens and thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Shuaib M; Pulimood, Thomas B

    2009-09-01

    Thunderstorm-related asthma is increasingly recognized in many parts of the world. This review focuses on important advances in the understanding of the mechanism of the role of allergens, in particular fungal spores such as Alternaria, in asthma epidemics associated with thunderstorms. From our observations, we have proposed that the prerequisites for this phenomenon are as follows: 1) a sensitized, atopic, asthmatic individual; 2) prior airway hyperresponsiveness before a sudden, large allergen exposure; 3) a large-scale thunderstorm with cold outflow occurring at a time and location during an allergen season in which large numbers of asthmatics are outdoors; and 4) sudden release of large amounts of respirable allergenic fragments, particularly fungal spores such as Alternaria. PMID:19671382

  6. Allergens and thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Shuaib M; Pulimood, Thomas B

    2009-09-01

    Thunderstorm-related asthma is increasingly recognized in many parts of the world. This review focuses on important advances in the understanding of the mechanism of the role of allergens, in particular fungal spores such as Alternaria, in asthma epidemics associated with thunderstorms. From our observations, we have proposed that the prerequisites for this phenomenon are as follows: 1) a sensitized, atopic, asthmatic individual; 2) prior airway hyperresponsiveness before a sudden, large allergen exposure; 3) a large-scale thunderstorm with cold outflow occurring at a time and location during an allergen season in which large numbers of asthmatics are outdoors; and 4) sudden release of large amounts of respirable allergenic fragments, particularly fungal spores such as Alternaria.

  7. Sulfate attack expansion mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Müllauer, Wolfram Beddoe, Robin E.; Heinz, Detlef

    2013-10-15

    A specially constructed stress cell was used to measure the stress generated in thin-walled Portland cement mortar cylinders caused by external sulfate attack. The effects of sulfate concentration of the storage solution and C{sub 3}A content of the cement were studied. Changes in mineralogical composition and pore size distribution were investigated by X-ray diffraction and mercury intrusion porosimetry, respectively. Damage is due to the formation of ettringite in small pores (10–50 nm) which generates stresses up to 8 MPa exceeding the tensile strength of the binder matrix. Higher sulfate concentrations and C{sub 3}A contents result in higher stresses. The results can be understood in terms of the effect of crystal surface energy and size on supersaturation and crystal growth pressure.

  8. The Microbiome and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yvonne J.

    2014-01-01

    That the subglottic airways are not sterile, as was once believed, but are populated by a distinct “bronchial microbiome,” is now accepted. Also accepted is the concept that asthma is associated with differences in the composition of this microbiome. What is not clear is whether the differences in microbial community composition themselves mediate pathologic changes in the airways or whether they reflect differences in systemic immune function driven by differences in the development of the gastrointestinal microbiome in early life, when the immune system is most malleable. Recognition of the probable existence of a “common mucosal immune system” allowed synthesis of these apparently opposing ideas into a single conceptual model. Gastrointestinal microbiome–driven differences in systemic immune function predispose to sensitization to allergens deposited on mucosal surfaces, whereas possibly similar, but not identical, differences in immune function predispose to less effective responses to microbial infection of the airways, resulting in persistence of the inflammation underlying the structural and functional abnormalities of asthma. In this model, allergic sensitization and asthma are thus seen as commonly overlapping but not necessarily coincident consequences of abnormalities in microbial colonization, development of immune function, and encounter with agents infecting the respiratory tract. PMID:24437406

  9. Relationship between particulate matter and childhood asthma - basis of a future warning system for central Phoenix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, R.; Lurponglukana, N.; Fernando, H. J. S.; Runger, G. C.; Hyde, P.; Hedquist, B. C.; Anderson, J.; Bannister, W.; Johnson, W.

    2012-03-01

    Statistically significant correlations between increase of asthma attacks in children and elevated concentrations of particulate matter of diameter 10 microns and less (PM10) were determined for metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona. Interpolated concentrations from a five-site network provided spatial distribution of PM10 that was mapped onto census tracts with population health records. The case-crossover statistical method was applied to determine the relationship between PM10 concentration and asthma attacks. For children ages 5-17, a significant relationship was discovered between the two, while children ages 0-4 exhibited virtually no relationship. The risk of adverse health effects was expressed as a function of the change from the 25th to 75th percentiles of mean level PM10 (36 μg m-3). This increase in concentration was associated with a 12.6% (95% CI: 5.8%, 19.4%) increase in the log odds of asthma attacks among children ages 5-17. Neither gender nor other demographic variables were significant. The results are being used to develop an asthma early warning system for the study area.

  10. Relationship between particulate matter and childhood asthma - basis of a future warning system for Central Phoenix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, R.; Lurponglukana, N.; Fernando, H. J. S.; Runger, G. C.; Hyde, P.; Hedquist, B. C.; Anderson, J.; Bannister, W.; Johnson, W.

    2011-10-01

    Statistically significant correlations between increase of asthma attacks in children and elevated concentrations of particulate matter of diameter 10 microns and less (PM10) were determined for metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona. Interpolated concentrations from a five-site network provided spatial distribution of PM10 that was mapped onto census tracts with population health records. The case-crossover statistical method was applied to determine the relationship between PM10 concentration and asthma attacks. For children ages 5-17, a significant relationship was discovered between the two, while children ages 0-4 exhibited virtually no relationship. The risk of adverse health effects was expressed as a function of the change from the 25th to 75th percentiles of mean level PM10 (36 μg m-3). This increase in concentration was associated with a 12.6% (95% CI: 5.8%, 19.4%) increase in the log odds of asthma attacks among children ages 5-17. Neither gender nor other demographic variables were significant. The results are being used to develop an asthma early warning system for the study area.

  11. Smoking in Asthma Is Associated with Elevated Levels of Corticosteroid Resistant Sputum Cytokines—An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Spears, Mark; McSharry, Charles; Chaudhuri, Rekha; Weir, Christopher J.; de Wet, Carl; Thomson, Neil C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Current cigarette smoking is associated with reduced acute responses to corticosteroids and worse clinical outcomes in stable chronic asthma. The mechanism by which current smoking promotes this altered behavior is currently unclear. Whilst cytokines can induce corticosteroid insensitivity in-vitro, how current and former smoking affects airway cytokine concentrations and their responses to oral corticosteroids in stable chronic asthma is unclear. Objectives To examine blood and sputum cytokine concentrations in never, ex and current smokers with asthma before and after oral corticosteroids. Methods Exploratory study utilizing two weeks of oral dexamethasone (equivalent to 40 mg/day prednisolone) in 22 current, 21 never and 10 ex-smokers with asthma. Induced sputum supernatant and plasma was obtained before and after oral dexamethasone. 25 cytokines were measured by multiplex microbead system (Invitrogen, UK) on a Luminex platform. Results Smokers with asthma had elevated sputum cytokine interleukin (IL) -6, -7, and -12 concentrations compared to never smokers with asthma. Few sputum cytokine concentrations changed in response to dexamethasone IL-17 and IFNα increased in smokers, CCL4 increased in never smokers and CCL5 and CXCL10 reduced in ex-smokers with asthma. Ex-smokers with asthma appeared to have evidence of an ongoing corticosteroid resistant elevation of cytokines despite smoking cessation. Several plasma cytokines were lower in smokers with asthma compared to never smokers with asthma. Conclusion Cigarette smoking in asthma is associated with a corticosteroid insensitive increase in multiple airway cytokines. Distinct airway cytokine profiles are present in current smokers and never smokers with asthma and could provide an explanatory mechanism for the altered clinical behavior observed in smokers with asthma. PMID:23951170

  12. Respiratory symptoms, asthma, exercise test spirometry, and atopy in schoolchildren from a Lima shanty town

    PubMed Central

    Penny, M; Murad, S; Madrid, S; Herrera, T; Pineiro, A; Caceres, D; Lanata, C

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Little is known about the associations between symptoms of asthma, pulmonary function tests, and atopy in developing countries. While asthma in children is often associated with atopy, some studies of wheezing illness have found little or no association, leading to suggestions that there are subgroups of wheezing illness. The ISAAC study recently reported that the prevalence of reported asthma symptoms in Lima, Peru was among the highest in the world, but did not report on the atopic status of the subjects.
METHODS—A cross sectional survey was conducted of children aged 8-10 years who had previously participated in a cohort study of respiratory and diarrhoeal illnesses in infancy. Questionnaires were administered asking about respiratory symptoms and asthma diagnoses, pulmonary function tests were performed before and after exercise on a treadmill, and atopy was determined from skin prick tests and specific serum IgE levels.
RESULTS—A total of 793 children participated in the survey. The prevalence of asthma related symptoms in the last 12 months was 23.2%, but only 3.8% of children reported a recent asthma attack. The mean differences in pretest percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were 8.1% (95% CI 2.4 to 13.8) between children who did and did not report an asthma attack in the last 12 months, and 5.3% (95% CI 2.8 to 7.9) in children who did and did not report respiratory symptoms. The corresponding differences in mean percentage fall in FEV1 after exercise were 3.1% (95% CI -1 to 7.1) and 5.1% (95% CI 3.4 to 6.8). Recent asthma or respiratory symptoms were not associated with atopy in this population (odds ratios 1.29 (95% CI 0.56 to 2.97) and 0.91 (95% CI 0.61 to 1.37), respectively).
CONCLUSIONS—Most asthma in these children was unrecognised and mild. Asthma and asthma symptoms in this population do not seem to be related to atopy.

 PMID:11462062

  13. Active play exercise intervention in children with asthma: a PILOT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Westergren, Thomas; Fegran, Liv; Nilsen, Tonje; Haraldstad, Kristin; Kittang, Ole Bjørn; Berntsen, Sveinung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increased physical activity (PA) may be beneficial for children with asthma. Knowledge about how to intervene and encourage children with asthma to be physically active is required. In the present study, we aimed to pilot a 6-week exercise intervention designed as active play and examine attendance rate, exercise intensity and children's perceptions of participating. Methods 6 children with asthma (4 boys, 2 girls) aged 10–12 years, participated in 60 min of active play exercise twice weekly. A mixed-methods design was applied. The data analysed included attendance rate, exercise intensity assessed by heart rate (HR) monitoring during exercise sessions, registration and description of the active play exercise programme, 3 semistructured focus groups, field observations of 5 exercise sessions, and preintervention and postintervention testing. Findings The average attendance rate was 90%. Intensity ≥80% of maximal HR (HRmax) was recorded for a median (IQR) time of 22 (8) out of 60 min per session. Median (IQR) HR during the sessions was 146 (9; 74% of HRmax) bpm. Children reported increased health-related quality of life (HRQoL) post-test compared with baseline. Children enjoyed participating and reported no limitations by asthma or serious asthma attacks. Instead, they perceived that their asthma and fitness had improved after the programme. The instructors created an inclusive atmosphere that was characterised by easy-to-master games, fair competition, humour and mutual participation. Conclusions The exercise intervention pilot focusing on active play had a high attendance rate, relatively high exercise intensity, and satisfaction; the children perceived that their fitness and asthma had improved, and reported increased HRQoL. A randomised controlled trial of active play exercise including children with asthma should be conducted to evaluate effect on PA level, physical fitness, asthma control and HRQoL. PMID:26733570

  14. Indoor Pollutant Exposures Modify the Effect of Airborne Endotoxin on Asthma in Urban Children

    PubMed Central

    Hansel, Nadia N.; Aloe, Charles; Schiltz, Allison M.; Peng, Roger D.; Rabinovitch, Nathan; Ong, Mary Jane; Williams, D’Ann L.; Breysse, Patrick N.; Diette, Gregory B.; Liu, Andrew H.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: The effect of endotoxin on asthma morbidity in urban populations is unclear. Objectives: To determine if indoor pollutant exposure modifies the relationships between indoor airborne endotoxin and asthma health and morbidity. Methods: One hundred forty-six children and adolescents with persistent asthma underwent repeated clinical assessments at 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Home visits were conducted at the same time points for assessment of airborne nicotine, endotoxin, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations. The effect of concomitant pollutant exposure on relationships between endotoxin and asthma outcomes were examined in stratified analyses and statistical models with interaction terms. Measurements and Main Results: Both air nicotine and NO2 concentrations modified the relationships between airborne endotoxin and asthma outcomes. Among children living in homes with no detectable air nicotine, higher endotoxin was inversely associated with acute visits and oral corticosteroid bursts, whereas among those in homes with detectable air nicotine, endotoxin was positively associated with these outcomes (interaction P value = 0.004 and 0.07, respectively). Among children living in homes with lower NO2 concentrations (<20 ppb), higher endotoxin was positively associated with acute visits, whereas among those living in homes with higher NO2 concentrations, endotoxin was negatively associated with acute visit (interaction P value = 0.05). NO2 also modified the effect of endotoxin on asthma symptom outcomes in a similar manner. Conclusions: The effects of household airborne endotoxin exposure on asthma are modified by coexposure to air nicotine and NO2, and these pollutants have opposite effects on the relationships between endotoxin and asthma-related outcomes. PMID:24066676

  15. The Saudi Initiative for Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moamary, Mohamed S.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.; Idrees, Majdy M.; Zeitouni, Mohamed O.; Alanezi, Mohammed O.; Al-Jahdal, Hamdan H.; Al Dabbagh, Maha

    2009-01-01

    The Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA) provides up-to-date guidelines for healthcare workers managing patients with asthma. SINA was developed by a panel of Saudi experts with respectable academic backgrounds and long-standing experience in the field. SINA is founded on the latest available evidence, local literature, and knowledge of the current setting in Saudi Arabia. Emphasis is placed on understanding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, medications, and clinical presentation. SINA elaborates on the development of patient-doctor partnership, self-management, and control of precipitating factors. Approaches to asthma treatment in SINA are based on disease control by the utilization of Asthma Control Test for the initiation and adjustment of asthma treatment. This guideline is established for the treatment of asthma in both children and adults, with special attention to children 5 years and younger. It is expected that the implementation of these guidelines for treating asthma will lead to better asthma control and decrease patient utilization of the health care system. PMID:19881170

  16. Prenatal Stress, Prematurity, and Asthma.

    PubMed

    Medsker, Brock; Forno, Erick; Simhan, Hyagriv; Celedón, Juan C

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting millions of children in the United States and worldwide. Prematurity is a risk factor for asthma, and certain ethnic or racial minorities such as Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic blacks are disproportionately affected by both prematurity and asthma. In this review, we examine current evidence to support maternal psychosocial stress as a putative link between prematurity and asthma, while also focusing on disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and immune responses as potential underlying mechanisms for stress-induced "premature asthma." Prenatal stress may cause not only abnormalities in the HPA axis but also epigenetic changes in the fetal glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1), leading to impaired glucocorticoid metabolism. Moreover, maternal stress can alter fetal cytokine balance, favoring TH2 (allergic) immune responses characteristic of atopic asthma: interleukin 6 (IL-6), which has been associated with premature labor, can promote TH2 responses by stimulating production of IL-4 and IL-13. Given a link among stress, prematurity, and asthma, future research should include birth cohorts aimed at confirming and better characterizing "premature asthma." If confirmed, clinical trials of prenatal maternal stress reduction would be warranted to reduce the burden of these common comorbidities. While awaiting the results of such studies, sound policies to prevent domestic and community violence (eg, from firearms) are justified, not only by public safety but also by growing evidence of detrimental effects of violence-induced stress on psychiatric and somatic health. PMID:26676148

  17. Environment and asthma in adults.

    PubMed

    Le Moual, Nicole; Jacquemin, Bénédicte; Varraso, Raphaëlle; Dumas, Orianne; Kauffmann, Francine; Nadif, Rachel

    2013-09-01

    The present review addresses recent advances and especially challenging aspects regarding the role of environmental risk factors in adult-onset asthma, for which the causes are poorly established. In the first part of the review, we discuss aspects regarding some environmental risk factors for adult-onset asthma: air pollution, occupational exposures with a focus on an emerging risk represented by exposure to cleaning agents (both at home and in the workplace), and lifestyle and nutrition. The second part is focused on perspectives and challenges, regarding relevant topics on which research is needed to improve the understanding of the role of environmental factors in asthma. Aspects of exposure assessment, the complexity of multiple exposures, the interrelationships of the environment with behavioral characteristics and the importance of studying biological markers and gene-environment interactions to identify the role of the environment in asthma are discussed. We conclude that environmental and lifestyle exposures play an important role in asthma or related phenotypes. The changes in lifestyle and the environment in recent decades have modified the specific risk factors in asthma even for well-recognized risks such as occupational exposures. To better understand the role of the environment in asthma, the use of objective (quantitative measurement of exposures) or modern tools (bar code, GPS) and the development of multidisciplinary collaboration would be very promising. A better understanding of the complex interrelationships between socio-economic, nutritional, lifestyle and environmental conditions might help to study their joint and independent roles in asthma.

  18. Understanding Asthma in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohay, Heather; Holzheimer, Leisa

    1997-01-01

    Asthma is an incurable respiratory disease characterized by increased responsiveness of the tracheobronchial tree to a variety of stimuli. Associated symptoms include shortness of breath, chest tightness, and a cough or wheeze. This resource booklet for child caregivers presents comprehensive information on the nature of asthma and caring for a…

  19. Prenatal Stress, Prematurity, and Asthma.

    PubMed

    Medsker, Brock; Forno, Erick; Simhan, Hyagriv; Celedón, Juan C

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting millions of children in the United States and worldwide. Prematurity is a risk factor for asthma, and certain ethnic or racial minorities such as Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic blacks are disproportionately affected by both prematurity and asthma. In this review, we examine current evidence to support maternal psychosocial stress as a putative link between prematurity and asthma, while also focusing on disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and immune responses as potential underlying mechanisms for stress-induced "premature asthma." Prenatal stress may cause not only abnormalities in the HPA axis but also epigenetic changes in the fetal glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1), leading to impaired glucocorticoid metabolism. Moreover, maternal stress can alter fetal cytokine balance, favoring TH2 (allergic) immune responses characteristic of atopic asthma: interleukin 6 (IL-6), which has been associated with premature labor, can promote TH2 responses by stimulating production of IL-4 and IL-13. Given a link among stress, prematurity, and asthma, future research should include birth cohorts aimed at confirming and better characterizing "premature asthma." If confirmed, clinical trials of prenatal maternal stress reduction would be warranted to reduce the burden of these common comorbidities. While awaiting the results of such studies, sound policies to prevent domestic and community violence (eg, from firearms) are justified, not only by public safety but also by growing evidence of detrimental effects of violence-induced stress on psychiatric and somatic health.

  20. Pilot Testing "Okay with Asthma"[TM]: An Online Asthma Intervention for School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Tami H.; Hauenstein, Emily J.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is the leading cause of missed school days despite advancements in asthma treatment. This may be, in part, due to a lack of understanding about asthma. "Okay With Asthma"[TM], an online story with psychosocial management strategies for school-age children, was pilot tested to measure its effect on asthma knowledge and attitude. The online…

  1. "Kickin' Asthma": School-Based Asthma Education in an Urban Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Patel, Bina; Davis, Adam; Edelstein, Joan; Tager, Ira B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In urban communities with high prevalence of childhood asthma, school-based educational programs may be the most appropriate approach to deliver interventions to improve asthma morbidity and asthma-related outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implementation of "Kickin' Asthma", a school-based asthma curriculum…

  2. Evidence for the efficacy and safety of anti-interleukin-5 treatment in the management of refractory eosinophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    Hilvering, Bart; Xue, Luzheng; Pavord, Ian D

    2015-08-01

    Two recent phase III trials in patients with severe eosinophilic asthma have shown that anti-interleukin 5 (IL-5) therapy with mepolizumab reduces the frequency of asthma attacks, improves symptoms and allows patients to reduce oral glucocorticoid use without loss of control of asthma. An earlier large 616 patient Dose Ranging Efficacy And safety with Mepolizumab in severe asthma (DREAM) study had shown that the only variables associated with treatment efficacy were a prior history of asthma attacks and the peripheral blood eosinophil count. The link between blood eosinophil counts and treatment efficacy is biologically obvious given that IL-5 has a pivotal role in eosinophil production, proliferation and chemotaxis. It is also clinically relevant as the blood eosinophil count is routinely measured and thus readily available in patients with asthma. Recognition of the link between airway or blood eosinophilia and treatment response was also important in the clinical testing of the alternative IL-5 blocker, such as reslizumab, which is currently being evaluated in a phase III randomized controlled trial (RCT) after having shown to improve lung function, improve symptom score and reduce sputum eosinophilia in a smaller phase IIb study. In addition, benralizumab, an IL-5α receptor blocker, has shown good effects in a phase IIb RCT with patients with severe asthma that had sputum eosinophilia and more recently in a phase IIa trial with patients with eosinophilic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Therefore anti-IL-5 treatment seems generally effective in eosinophilic asthma, either assessed by blood or airway eosinophilia. This factor together with the impressive clinical efficacy and good safety profile make anti-IL-5 (mepolizumab, reslizumab) and benralizumab (anti-IL-5 receptor α) very promising drugs for the treatment of patients with severe eosinophilic asthma, a subgroup that is in desperate need of better treatments.

  3. Developing Asthma-Friendly Childcare Centers with Online Training and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowski, Alexandra Catherine Hayes; Carretta, Henry Joseph; Pineda, Nicole; Dudley, Julie Kurlfink; Forrest, Jamie R.

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, the Florida Asthma Coalition (FAC) began offering its Asthma-Friendly Childcare Center (AFCC) training online. This course teaches childcare center employees the fundamentals of effective asthma management. It covers basic asthma physiology, ways to recognize asthma attacks, techniques to help children experiencing attacks, and strategies to create healthy environments for asthmatics. A team of health services researchers evaluated both years of the online training. Evaluators used a quasi-experimental design with pretest, posttest, and follow-up assessment. Questions measured knowledge gain and retention, user satisfaction, and implementation of management strategies. Over 650 people from nearly all 67 Florida counties took AFCC training online between 2011 and 2013. Test scores improved by a minimum of 11% points in all program years evaluated. Gains in both knowledge and confidence were substantial and highly significant across years. While individual trainees did forget some content on follow-up, they seemed to retain the specific messages most relevant for their own workplaces. Most trainees also planned to implement multiple management strategies recommended by the training. A large majority of participants rated the training as excellent on all quality metrics, including relevance of content and time efficiency of the online format. Nearly all respondents perceived the training as useful for both providing improved care and fulfilling licensure or certification requirements. Many participants also indicated that their centers would pursue formal certification as AFCCs via the program offered by FAC. The online AFCC course performed strongly in its first years, yielding both high participant satisfaction and substantial improvement in workplace asthma management activity. This training holds promise for introducing and improving multidimensional asthma management strategies at childcare facilities nationwide. PMID:27014676

  4. Developing Asthma-Friendly Childcare Centers with Online Training and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, Alexandra Catherine Hayes; Carretta, Henry Joseph; Pineda, Nicole; Dudley, Julie Kurlfink; Forrest, Jamie R

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, the Florida Asthma Coalition (FAC) began offering its Asthma-Friendly Childcare Center (AFCC) training online. This course teaches childcare center employees the fundamentals of effective asthma management. It covers basic asthma physiology, ways to recognize asthma attacks, techniques to help children experiencing attacks, and strategies to create healthy environments for asthmatics. A team of health services researchers evaluated both years of the online training. Evaluators used a quasi-experimental design with pretest, posttest, and follow-up assessment. Questions measured knowledge gain and retention, user satisfaction, and implementation of management strategies. Over 650 people from nearly all 67 Florida counties took AFCC training online between 2011 and 2013. Test scores improved by a minimum of 11% points in all program years evaluated. Gains in both knowledge and confidence were substantial and highly significant across years. While individual trainees did forget some content on follow-up, they seemed to retain the specific messages most relevant for their own workplaces. Most trainees also planned to implement multiple management strategies recommended by the training. A large majority of participants rated the training as excellent on all quality metrics, including relevance of content and time efficiency of the online format. Nearly all respondents perceived the training as useful for both providing improved care and fulfilling licensure or certification requirements. Many participants also indicated that their centers would pursue formal certification as AFCCs via the program offered by FAC. The online AFCC course performed strongly in its first years, yielding both high participant satisfaction and substantial improvement in workplace asthma management activity. This training holds promise for introducing and improving multidimensional asthma management strategies at childcare facilities nationwide. PMID:27014676

  5. Is asthma prevalence still increasing?

    PubMed

    Lundbäck, Bo; Backman, Helena; Lötvall, Jan; Rönmark, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Increased awareness of asthma in society and altered diagnostic practices makes evaluation of data on prevalence change difficult. In most parts of the world the asthma prevalence seems to still be increasing. The increase is associated with urbanization and has been documented particularly among children and teenagers in urban areas of middle- and low-level income countries. Use of validated questionnaires has enabled comparisons of studies. Among adults there are few studies based on representative samples of the general population which allow evaluation of time trends of prevalence. This review focuses mainly on studies of asthma prevalence and symptoms among adults. Parallel with increased urbanization, we can assume that the increase in asthma prevalence in most areas of the world will continue. However, in Australia and North-West Europe studies performed, particularly among children and adolescents, indicate that the increase in asthma prevalence may now be leveling off. PMID:26610152

  6. Current characteristics associated with hereditary angioedema attacks and treatment: the home infusion based patient experience.

    PubMed

    Tachdjian, Raffi; Banerji, Aleena; Guyer, Autumn; Morphew, Tricia

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a current perspective on the characteristics of hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks and treatment as captured by a home infusion service. Retrospective data on 158 HAE patients who were enrolled in this acute treatment program were analyzed for factors surrounding an attack. The majority of patients had a high level of disease severity at baseline (88%), with a higher than expected likelihood of having a positive family history (87.8%). The most likely times for patients to call for home treatment were just before and during working hours (6:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M.). Eighty-three percent had more than one alternate mode of medication. Factors associated with a severe attack included an overall severe rating of HAE attacks in the previous year, an abdominal attack alone or a combination of peripheral and abdominal attacks versus a peripheral attack alone, and the use of two doses rather than one for treatment of the current attack. Average time to relief onset was 43.5 minutes. One dose of ecallantide was sufficient to treat the majority of attacks, and a second dose was needed in 23.6% of patients experiencing a severe attack. However, patients who reported both a severe attack rating during the previous year and experiencing only a peripheral current attack were more likely to experience a severe current attack. Acute treatment paradigms for HAE remain diverse. Understanding factors driving these decisions could help alleviate the overall burden of this disease and help overcome some of the challenges faced by the patients and their caretakers and improve their quality of life. Enhanced capture and analysis of prodromal factors in future studies should help us further alleviate the burden of this disease.

  7. Acute Migraine Treatment in Adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Werner J

    2015-06-01

    There are many options for acute migraine attack treatment, but none is ideal for all patients. This study aims to review current medical office-based acute migraine therapy in adults and provides readers with an organized approach to this important facet of migraine treatment. A general literature review includes a review of several recent published guidelines. Acetaminophen, 4 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (ibuprofen, acetylsalicylic acid [ASA], naproxen sodium, and diclofenac potassium), and 7 triptans (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan, and zolmitriptan) have good evidence for efficacy and form the core of acute migraine treatment. NSAID-triptan combinations, dihydroergotamine, non-opioid combination analgesics (acetaminophen, ASA, and caffeine), and several anti-emetics (metoclopramide, domperidone, and prochlorperazine) are additional evidence-based options. Opioid containing combination analgesics may be helpful in specific patients, but should not be used routinely. Clinical features to be considered when choosing an acute migraine medication include usual headache intensity, usual rapidity of pain intensity increase, nausea, vomiting, degree of disability, patient response to previously used medications, history of headache recurrence with previous attacks, and the presence of contraindications to specific acute medications. Available acute medications can be organized into 4 treatment strategies, including a strategy for attacks of mild to moderate severity (strategy one: acetaminophen and/or NSAIDs), a triptan strategy for patients with severe attacks and for attacks not responding to strategy one, a refractory attack strategy, and a strategy for patients with contraindications to vasoconstricting drugs. Acute treatment of migraine attacks during pregnancy, lactation, and for patients with chronic migraine is also discussed. In chronic migraine, it is particularly important that medication

  8. [COPD and Asthma: same same but different].

    PubMed

    Rothe, T

    2012-02-15

    In clinical practice, differentiation of COPD and asthma is difficult. A case report of an asthma patient with a drifter type of asthma imitating COPD is presented. In this context differences and similarities of both diseases are high-lighted. The definitions of asthma and COPD in international guidelines leave some space to misdiagnosing.

  9. Sources of Stress in Children with Asthma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Michelle; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy M.

    1992-01-01

    Children with asthma were studied to determine their perceptions of the frequency and severity of stressors they experienced other than asthma. Results indicated children with asthma were similar to peers regarding perceptions of stressors. Perceptions of most stressors related more strongly to gender role development than to asthma. (SM)

  10. Managing Asthma: A Guide for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This guide was developed to provide school personnel with practical ways to help students with asthma participate fully in all school activities. It begins by noting the prevalence of asthma and stating that asthma is a leading cause of absenteeism among students. This is followed by a brief description of asthma as a chronic lung disease…

  11. Availability of Asthma Quick Relief Medication in Five Alabama School Systems

    PubMed Central

    Stroupe, Nancy; McClure, Leslie A.; Wheeler, Lani; Gerald, Lynn B.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This paper documents individual asthma action plan presence and quick relief medication (albuterol) availability for elementary students enrolled in five Alabama school systems. Patients and Methods Data were obtained during baseline data collection (fall 2005) of a school-based supervised asthma medication trial. All students attended 1 of 36 participating elementary schools across five school systems in Jefferson County, Alabama. In addition, they had to have physician-diagnosed asthma requiring daily controller medication. Each school system had its own superintendent and elected school board. Asthma action plan presence and albuterol availability was confirmed by study personnel. Asthma action plans had to contain daily and acute asthma management instructions. Predictors of asthma action plan presence and albuterol availability were also investigated. Associations between albuterol availability and self-reported characteristics including health care utilization prior to study enrollment and outcomes during the study baseline period were also investigated. Results Enrolled students had a mean (SD) age of 11.0 (2.1) years, 91% were African American, and 79% had moderate persistent asthma. No student had a complete asthma action plan on file and only 14% had albuterol physically available at school. Albuterol availability was not predicted by gender, race, insurance status, second-hand smoke exposure, need for pre-exercise albuterol, asthma severity, or self-reported health care utilization prior to study enrollment. Albuterol availability did not predict school absences, red/yellow peak flow recordings, or medication adherence during the study's baseline period. Conclusion Despite policies permitting students to possess albuterol, few elementary students across five independent school systems in Alabama actually had it readily available at school. PMID:22454787

  12. Availability of Asthma Quick Relief Medication in Five Alabama School Systems.

    PubMed

    Gerald, Joe K; Stroupe, Nancy; McClure, Leslie A; Wheeler, Lani; Gerald, Lynn B

    2012-03-01

    OBJECTIVES: This paper documents individual asthma action plan presence and quick relief medication (albuterol) availability for elementary students enrolled in five Alabama school systems. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data were obtained during baseline data collection (fall 2005) of a school-based supervised asthma medication trial. All students attended 1 of 36 participating elementary schools across five school systems in Jefferson County, Alabama. In addition, they had to have physician-diagnosed asthma requiring daily controller medication. Each school system had its own superintendent and elected school board. Asthma action plan presence and albuterol availability was confirmed by study personnel. Asthma action plans had to contain daily and acute asthma management instructions. Predictors of asthma action plan presence and albuterol availability were also investigated. Associations between albuterol availability and self-reported characteristics including health care utilization prior to study enrollment and outcomes during the study baseline period were also investigated. RESULTS: Enrolled students had a mean (SD) age of 11.0 (2.1) years, 91% were African American, and 79% had moderate persistent asthma. No student had a complete asthma action plan on file and only 14% had albuterol physically available at school. Albuterol availability was not predicted by gender, race, insurance status, second-hand smoke exposure, need for pre-exercise albuterol, asthma severity, or self-reported health care utilization prior to study enrollment. Albuterol availability did not predict school absences, red/yellow peak flow recordings, or medication adherence during the study's baseline period. CONCLUSION: Despite policies permitting students to possess albuterol, few elementary students across five independent school systems in Alabama actually had it readily available at school.

  13. Hazardous air pollutants and asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Leikauf, George D

    2002-01-01

    Asthma has a high prevalence in the United States, and persons with asthma may be at added risk from the adverse effects of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). Complex mixtures (fine particulate matter and tobacco smoke) have been associated with respiratory symptoms and hospital admissions for asthma. The toxic ingredients of these mixtures are HAPs, but whether ambient HAP exposures can induce asthma remains unclear. Certain HAPs are occupational asthmagens, whereas others may act as adjuncts during sensitization. HAPs may exacerbate asthma because, once sensitized, individuals can respond to remarkably low concentrations, and irritants lower the bronchoconstrictive threshold to respiratory antigens. Adverse responses after ambient exposures to complex mixtures often occur at concentrations below those producing effects in controlled human exposures to a single compound. In addition, certain HAPs that have been associated with asthma in occupational settings may interact with criteria pollutants in ambient air to exacerbate asthma. Based on these observations and past experience with 188 HAPs, a list of 19 compounds that could have the highest impact on the induction or exacerbation of asthma was developed. Nine additional compounds were identified that might exacerbate asthma based on their irritancy, respirability, or ability to react with biological macromolecules. Although the ambient levels of these 28 compounds are largely unknown, estimated exposures from emissions inventories and limited air monitoring suggest that aldehydes (especially acrolein and formaldehyde) and metals (especially nickel and chromium compounds) may have possible health risk indices sufficient for additional attention. Recommendations for research are presented regarding exposure monitoring and evaluation of biologic mechanisms controlling how these substances induce and exacerbate asthma. PMID:12194881

  14. Early life respiratory infections and asthma development: role in disease pathogenesis and potential targets for disease prevention

    PubMed Central

    Beigelman, Avraham; Bacharier, Leonard B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To present recent findings and perspectives on the relationship between early life respiratory infections and asthma inception and to discuss emerging concepts on strategies that target these infectious agents for asthma prevention. Recent findings Cumulative evidence supports the role of early life viral infections, especially respiratory syncytial virus and human rhinovirus, as major antecedents of childhood asthma. These viruses may have different mechanistic roles in the pathogenesis of asthma. The airway microbiome and virus-bacteria interactions in early life have emerged as additional determinants of childhood asthma. Innovative strategies for the prevention of these early life infections, or for attenuation of acute infection severity, are being investigated and may identify effective strategies for the primary and secondary prevention of childhood asthma. Summary Early life infections are major determinants of asthma development. The pathway from early life infections to asthma is the result of complex interactions between the specific type of the virus, genetic and environmental factors. Novel intervention strategies that target these infectious agents have been investigated in proof-of-concepts trials, and further study is necessary to determine their capacity for asthma prevention. PMID:26854761

  15. Childhood asthma management pre- and post-incident asthma hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Marina; Clavenna, Antonio; Sequi, Marco; Bortolotti, Angela; Fortino, Ida; Merlino, Luca; Bonati, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Many hospitalizations for asthma could potentially be avoided with appropriate management. The aim of this study was to analyze data on disease management of a paediatric population with a hospitalization for asthma. The study population comprised 6-17 year old subjects belonging to three local health units of the Lombardy Region, northern Italy. Regional administrative databases were used to collect data on: the number of children with an incident hospitalization for asthma during the 2004-2006 period, anti-asthma therapy, specialist visit referrals, and claims for spirometry, released in the 12 months before and after hospitalization. Each patient's asthma management profile was compared with GINA guideline recommendations. Among the 183 hospitalized subjects, 101 (55%) received therapy before hospitalization and 82 (45%) did not. 10% did not receive any therapy either before or after hospital admission and in 13% the therapy was discontinued afterward. Based on GINA guidelines, asthma management adhered to recommendations only for 55% of subjects. Results may suggest that for half of hospitalized subjects, inaccurate diagnosis, under-treatment/scarce compliance with asthma guidelines by physicians, and/or scarce compliance to therapy by patients/their parents occurred. In all these cases, hospitalization would be a proxy indicator of preventable poor control of disease, rather than a proxy indicator of severity.

  16. [Persulfate asthma in hairdressers].

    PubMed

    Pankow, W; Hein, H; Bittner, K; Wichert, P

    1989-03-01

    At the a two-year apprenticeship, a young female hairdresser developed rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma, induced by a hair bleach containing the substance persulphate. On each occasion, her symptoms occurred in the form of an immediate reaction. The causative role of the bleach was demonstrated with the aid of an inhalation challenge test. In addition, the prick test produced a positive reaction vis-a-vis persulphate. The long latency period and the positive prick test might militate in favour of an allergic pathomechanism.

  17. Strategies in managing asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, A F

    1989-01-01

    The management of adult asthma involves a concerted effort to identify and remove or mollify inciting or triggering stimuli such as respiratory tract infections, gastric reflux, aspirin, beta-antagonists, and environmental agents; educate patients, using written treatment plans and pulmonary function monitoring; and properly use the antiasthmatic medications including beta-agonists, theophylline, anticholinergics, and corticosteroids, with an emphasis on aerosol delivery and the use of corticosteroids during exacerbations. This strategy is summarized with suggestions on therapy in emergency departments, during the transition from hospital to ambulatory care, before exercise, and during pregnancy. PMID:2660411

  18. [Persulfate asthma in hairdressers].

    PubMed

    Pankow, W; Hein, H; Bittner, K; Wichert, P

    1989-03-01

    At the a two-year apprenticeship, a young female hairdresser developed rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma, induced by a hair bleach containing the substance persulphate. On each occasion, her symptoms occurred in the form of an immediate reaction. The causative role of the bleach was demonstrated with the aid of an inhalation challenge test. In addition, the prick test produced a positive reaction vis-a-vis persulphate. The long latency period and the positive prick test might militate in favour of an allergic pathomechanism. PMID:2710769

  19. A Case of Occupational Asthma in a Plastic Injection Process Worker

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We report a case of death due to asthma attack in a plastic injection process worker with a history of asthma. Methods To assess task relevance, personal history including occupational history and medical records were reviewed. Samples of the substances utilized in the injection process were collected by visiting the patient’s workplace. The work environment with the actual process was reproduced in the laboratory, and the released substances were evaluated. Results The medical records confirmed that the patient’s conventional asthma was in remission. The analysis of the resins discharged from the injection process simulation revealed styrene, which causes occupational asthma, and benzenepropanoic acid, 3,5-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-hydroxy-, and octadecyl ester. Even though it was not the case in the present study, various harmful substances capable of inducing asthma such as formaldehyde, acrolein, and acetic acid are released during resin processing. Conclusion A worker was likely to occur occupational asthma as a result of the exposure to the harmful substances generated during the plastic injection process. PMID:24472161

  20. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Enhance Early Inflammatory Response in Sendai Virus-Induced Asthma Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Akk, Antonina; Springer, Luke E; Pham, Christine T N

    2016-01-01

    Paramyxoviral infection in childhood has been linked to a significant increased rate of asthma development. In mice, paramyxoviral infection with the mouse parainfluenza virus type I, Sendai virus (Sev), causes a limited bronchiolitis followed by persistent asthma traits. We have previously shown that the absence of cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) dampened the acute lung inflammatory response and the subsequent asthma phenotype induced by Sev. Adoptive transfer of wild-type neutrophils into DPPI-deficient mice restored leukocyte influx, the acute cytokine response, and the subsequent mucous cell metaplasia that accompanied Sev-induced asthma phenotype. However, the exact mechanism by which DPPI-sufficient neutrophils promote asthma development following Sev infection is still unknown. We hypothesize that neutrophils recruited to the alveolar space following Sev infection elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that propagate the inflammatory cascade, culminating in the eventual asthma phenotype. Indeed, we found that Sev infection was associated with NET formation in the lung and release of cell-free DNA complexed to myeloperoxidase in the alveolar space and plasma that peaked on day 2 post infection. Absence of DPPI significantly attenuated Sev-induced NET formation in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, concomitant administration of DNase 1, which dismantled NETs, or inhibition of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4), an essential mediator of NET formation, suppressed the early inflammatory responses to Sev infection. Lastly, NETs primed bone marrow-derived cells to release cytokines that can amplify the inflammatory cascade. PMID:27617014

  1. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Enhance Early Inflammatory Response in Sendai Virus-Induced Asthma Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Akk, Antonina; Springer, Luke E.; Pham, Christine T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Paramyxoviral infection in childhood has been linked to a significant increased rate of asthma development. In mice, paramyxoviral infection with the mouse parainfluenza virus type I, Sendai virus (Sev), causes a limited bronchiolitis followed by persistent asthma traits. We have previously shown that the absence of cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) dampened the acute lung inflammatory response and the subsequent asthma phenotype induced by Sev. Adoptive transfer of wild-type neutrophils into DPPI-deficient mice restored leukocyte influx, the acute cytokine response, and the subsequent mucous cell metaplasia that accompanied Sev-induced asthma phenotype. However, the exact mechanism by which DPPI-sufficient neutrophils promote asthma development following Sev infection is still unknown. We hypothesize that neutrophils recruited to the alveolar space following Sev infection elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that propagate the inflammatory cascade, culminating in the eventual asthma phenotype. Indeed, we found that Sev infection was associated with NET formation in the lung and release of cell-free DNA complexed to myeloperoxidase in the alveolar space and plasma that peaked on day 2 post infection. Absence of DPPI significantly attenuated Sev-induced NET formation in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, concomitant administration of DNase 1, which dismantled NETs, or inhibition of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4), an essential mediator of NET formation, suppressed the early inflammatory responses to Sev infection. Lastly, NETs primed bone marrow-derived cells to release cytokines that can amplify the inflammatory cascade.

  2. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Enhance Early Inflammatory Response in Sendai Virus-Induced Asthma Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Akk, Antonina; Springer, Luke E.; Pham, Christine T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Paramyxoviral infection in childhood has been linked to a significant increased rate of asthma development. In mice, paramyxoviral infection with the mouse parainfluenza virus type I, Sendai virus (Sev), causes a limited bronchiolitis followed by persistent asthma traits. We have previously shown that the absence of cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) dampened the acute lung inflammatory response and the subsequent asthma phenotype induced by Sev. Adoptive transfer of wild-type neutrophils into DPPI-deficient mice restored leukocyte influx, the acute cytokine response, and the subsequent mucous cell metaplasia that accompanied Sev-induced asthma phenotype. However, the exact mechanism by which DPPI-sufficient neutrophils promote asthma development following Sev infection is still unknown. We hypothesize that neutrophils recruited to the alveolar space following Sev infection elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that propagate the inflammatory cascade, culminating in the eventual asthma phenotype. Indeed, we found that Sev infection was associated with NET formation in the lung and release of cell-free DNA complexed to myeloperoxidase in the alveolar space and plasma that peaked on day 2 post infection. Absence of DPPI significantly attenuated Sev-induced NET formation in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, concomitant administration of DNase 1, which dismantled NETs, or inhibition of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4), an essential mediator of NET formation, suppressed the early inflammatory responses to Sev infection. Lastly, NETs primed bone marrow-derived cells to release cytokines that can amplify the inflammatory cascade. PMID:27617014

  3. WILD PIG ATTACKS ON HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J.

    2013-04-12

    Attacks on humans by wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have been documented since ancient times. However, studies characterizing these incidents are lacking. In an effort to better understand this phenomenon, information was collected from 412 wild pig attacks on humans. Similar to studies of large predator attacks on humans, data came from a variety of sources. The various attacks compiled occurred in seven zoogeographic realms. Most attacks occurred within the species native range, and specifically in rural areas. The occurrence was highest during the winter months and daylight hours. Most happened under non-hunting circumstances and appeared to be unprovoked. Wounded animals were the chief cause of these attacks in hunting situations. The animals involved were typically solitary, male and large in size. The fate of the wild pigs involved in these attacks varied depending upon the circumstances, however, most escaped uninjured. Most human victims were adult males traveling on foot and alone. The most frequent outcome for these victims was physical contact/mauling. The severity of resulting injuries ranged from minor to fatal. Most of the mauled victims had injuries to only one part of their bodies, with legs/feet being the most frequent body part injured. Injuries were primarily in the form of lacerations and punctures. Fatalities were typically due to blood loss. In some cases, serious infections or toxemia resulted from the injuries. Other species (i.e., pets and livestock) were also accompanying some of the humans during these attacks. The fates of these animals varied from escaping uninjured to being killed. Frequency data on both non-hunting and hunting incidents of wild pig attacks on humans at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, showed quantitatively that such incidents are rare.

  4. No Direct Association Between Asthma and the Microbiome Based on Currently Available Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yayan, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Current uses of culture-independent tools in previous studies have shown a significant relationship between microbiota and asthma. Although these studies are relatively new, there is also evidence of the possibility of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment or prevention of asthma. This article retrospectively examines the possible association between microorganisms and asthma. Data on all patients with different types of asthma were collected from hospital charts from the Department of Internal Medicine, Saarland University Medical Center, Germany, within the study period of 2011 to 2012. The tracheal secretions of asthmatics obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage, bronchial aspirates through flexible bronchoscopy, and directly in sputum were examined microbiologically for microorganisms. Thirty-one (10.47%, 95% CI, 6.98–13.96) of a total of 296 patients were found to have asthma microorganisms in their airways. We could not establish a causal relationship between microorganisms and asthma based on the results of our study (P = 0.893). Additionally, acute respiratory infections did not affect the microbiological colonization in asthmatics’ airways (P = 0.472). We were unable to find a direct association between asthma and the microbiome based on existing diagnostic techniques. PMID:25501073

  5. Important issues in occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Banks, D E; Tarlo, S M

    2000-01-01

    Although there has been a dramatic increase in awareness about the contributions of the work environment to asthma, many aspects of this illness remain to be explored in further detail. This article focuses on issues that need to be better understood. Data are reported that describe newly recognized agents in the workplace that have been shown in a sophisticated manner to induce asthma. In addition, data that further describe the mechanisms of occupational asthma and information regarding the management of occupational asthma are given. Important problems yet to be resolved include whether those who develop occupational asthma from different agents are likely to have different outcomes, whether screening is likely to have a significant effect on the outcome (and, if so, what is the best approach to screening), and identification of a clear definition of the role of immunologic-mediated parameters as they relate to the initiation of asthma attributable to low molecular weight agents and patient outcome. There is little information about "safe" levels of exposure that protect all workers. Data (such as underlying specific immunologic or genetic markers) are lacking that might aid in predicting which workers are likely to be sensitized by low molecular weight agents. This abbreviated list of unresolved issues makes the study of occupational asthma a fertile field for research.

  6. Guidelines for severe uncontrolled asthma.

    PubMed

    Cisneros Serrano, Carolina; Melero Moreno, Carlos; Almonacid Sánchez, Carlos; Perpiñá Tordera, Miguel; Picado Valles, César; Martínez Moragón, Eva; Pérez de Llano, Luis; Soto Campos, José Gregorio; Urrutia Landa, Isabel; García Hernández, Gloria

    2015-05-01

    Since the publication, 9 years ago, of the latest SEPAR (Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery) Guidelines on Difficult-to-Control Asthma (DCA), much progress has been made in the understanding of asthmatic disease. These new data need to be reviewed, analyzed and incorporated into the guidelines according to their level of evidence and recommendation. Recently, consensus documents and clinical practice guidelines (CPG) addressing this issue have been published. In these guidelines, specific mention will be made of what the previous DCA guidelines defined as "true difficult-to-control asthma". This is asthma that remains uncontrolled after diagnosis and a systematic evaluation to rule out factors unrelated to the disease itself that lead to poor control ("false difficult-to-control asthma"), and despite an appropriate treatment strategy (Spanish Guidelines for the Management of Asthma [GEMA] steps 5 and 6): severe uncontrolled asthma. In this respect, the guidelines propose a revised definition, an attempt to classify the various manifestations of this type of asthma, a proposal for a stepwise diagnostic procedure, and phenotype-targeted treatment. A specific section has also been included on DCA in childhood, aimed at assisting healthcare professionals to improve the care of these patients. PMID:25677358

  7. Infection, eosinophilia and childhood asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Keun; Fujisawa, Takao

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing list of viruses and bacteria associated with wheezing illness and asthma. It is well known that a few of these pathogens are strongly associated with wheezing illness and asthma exacerbations. What is not known is if early childhood infections with these pathogens cause asthma, and, if so, exactly what are the pathophysiologic mechanisms behind its development. The current consensus is respiratory infection works together with allergy to produce the immune and physiologic conditions necessary for asthma diasthesis. One link between respiratory infection and asthma may be the eosinophil, a cell that plays prominently in asthma and allergy, but can also be found in the body in response to infection. In turn, the eosinophil and its associated products may be novel therapeutic targets, or at the very least used to elucidate the complex pathophysiologic pathways of asthma and other respiratory illnesses. Together or separately, they can also be used for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring. The optimal care of a patient must take into consideration not only symptoms, but also the underlying disease mechanisms. PMID:22348202

  8. Guidelines for severe uncontrolled asthma.

    PubMed

    Cisneros Serrano, Carolina; Melero Moreno, Carlos; Almonacid Sánchez, Carlos; Perpiñá Tordera, Miguel; Picado Valles, César; Martínez Moragón, Eva; Pérez de Llano, Luis; Soto Campos, José Gregorio; Urrutia Landa, Isabel; García Hernández, Gloria

    2015-05-01

    Since the publication, 9 years ago, of the latest SEPAR (Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery) Guidelines on Difficult-to-Control Asthma (DCA), much progress has been made in the understanding of asthmatic disease. These new data need to be reviewed, analyzed and incorporated into the guidelines according to their level of evidence and recommendation. Recently, consensus documents and clinical practice guidelines (CPG) addressing this issue have been published. In these guidelines, specific mention will be made of what the previous DCA guidelines defined as "true difficult-to-control asthma". This is asthma that remains uncontrolled after diagnosis and a systematic evaluation to rule out factors unrelated to the disease itself that lead to poor control ("false difficult-to-control asthma"), and despite an appropriate treatment strategy (Spanish Guidelines for the Management of Asthma [GEMA] steps 5 and 6): severe uncontrolled asthma. In this respect, the guidelines propose a revised definition, an attempt to classify the various manifestations of this type of asthma, a proposal for a stepwise diagnostic procedure, and phenotype-targeted treatment. A specific section has also been included on DCA in childhood, aimed at assisting healthcare professionals to improve the care of these patients.

  9. No link between OC use and heart attack.

    PubMed

    1999-10-01

    A retrospective study conducted in England, Scotland, and Wales concluded that there is no significant increase in the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI/heart attack) in women who use modern low-estrogen dose oral contraceptives (OCs). The study matched 448 women aged 16-44 years who had suffered a heart attack with 1728 women in the control group. The leader of the study stated that women should be warned of the classical risk factors for AMI, particularly smoking, and not the OC that they are taking. Furthermore, researchers in the UK study revealed that of the women under age 45 years who suffered a heart attack, 87% were not taking an OC. Moreover, majority of these women had at least one or more known cardiovascular risk factors. In addition, the older studies clarified that the increase in risk for thrombotic diseases, including AMI, is applicable primarily to older high-dose OCs.

  10. Genetic attack on neural cryptography.

    PubMed

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Naeh, Rivka; Kanter, Ido

    2006-03-01

    Different scaling properties for the complexity of bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning are essential for the security of neural cryptography. Incrementing the synaptic depth of the networks increases the synchronization time only polynomially, but the success of the geometric attack is reduced exponentially and it clearly fails in the limit of infinite synaptic depth. This method is improved by adding a genetic algorithm, which selects the fittest neural networks. The probability of a successful genetic attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that scaling laws observed in the case of other attacks hold for the improved algorithm, too. The number of networks needed for an effective attack grows exponentially with increasing synaptic depth. In addition, finite-size effects caused by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian learning are analyzed. These learning rules converge to the random walk rule if the synaptic depth is small compared to the square root of the system size.

  11. Genetic attack on neural cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Naeh, Rivka; Kanter, Ido

    2006-03-15

    Different scaling properties for the complexity of bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning are essential for the security of neural cryptography. Incrementing the synaptic depth of the networks increases the synchronization time only polynomially, but the success of the geometric attack is reduced exponentially and it clearly fails in the limit of infinite synaptic depth. This method is improved by adding a genetic algorithm, which selects the fittest neural networks. The probability of a successful genetic attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that scaling laws observed in the case of other attacks hold for the improved algorithm, too. The number of networks needed for an effective attack grows exponentially with increasing synaptic depth. In addition, finite-size effects caused by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian learning are analyzed. These learning rules converge to the random walk rule if the synaptic depth is small compared to the square root of the system size.

  12. Attack vulnerability of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Kim, Beom Jun; Yoon, Chang No; Han, Seung Kee

    2002-05-01

    We study the response of complex networks subject to attacks on vertices and edges. Several existing complex network models as well as real-world networks of scientific collaborations and Internet traffic are numerically investigated, and the network performance is quantitatively measured by the average inverse geodesic length and the size of the largest connected subgraph. For each case of attacks on vertices and edges, four different attacking strategies are used: removals by the descending order of the degree and the betweenness centrality, calculated for either the initial network or the current network during the removal procedure. It is found that the removals by the recalculated degrees and betweenness centralities are often more harmful than the attack strategies based on the initial network, suggesting that the network structure changes as important vertices or edges are removed. Furthermore, the correlation between the betweenness centrality and the degree in complex networks is studied.

  13. T lymphocytes and their products in atopic allergy and asthma.

    PubMed

    Kay, A B

    1991-01-01

    Various cells are associated with inflammatory events characteristic of atopic allergy and asthma. As well as T cells and eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, mononuclear phagocytes and platelets have all to be considered particularly as their mediators have potential for contributing directly to the features of bronchial asthma. Nevertheless, mast cell/T lymphocyte/eosinophil interactions may be of particular significance. For instance, the acute symptoms of allergy and asthma such as sneezing, bronchospasm and hives are believed to be largely the result of mediator release from mast cells whereas chronic symptoms (the result of allergic inflammation) can be explained on the basis of eosinophil-mediated tissue damage. Allergen is recognized directly by T cells. Specialized T cell subsets, possibly the Th2 equivalent, predominate in allergy and elaborate IL-4 (an essential co-factor for IgE production) and IL-5 which brings about terminal differentiation and activation of the eosinophil. Basic proteins derived from the crystalloid granule together with PAF and leukotrienes produce chronic wheeze, bronchial irritability, and might also be involved in permanent nasal blockage in chronic rhinitis. This general hypothesis is continually being tested. It is clearly important to identify precise molecular targets in allergy and asthma in order to construct therapeutic strategies. PMID:1937873

  14. Aminophylline Dosage In Asthma Exacerbations in Children: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Adequate asthma treatment of childhood exacerbations with IV aminophylline depends on appropriate dosage. Recommendations to aim for a target therapeutic range may be inappropriate as serum concentrations correlate poorly with clinical improvement. This review aims to evaluate the evidence for the optimum dosage strategy of intravenous aminophylline in children suffering an exacerbation of asthma. Methods A systematic review comparing dosage regimens of intravenous aminophylline in children suffering an exacerbation of asthma. Primary outcomes were time until resolution of symptoms, mortality and need for mechanical ventilation. Secondary outcomes were date until discharge criteria are met, actual discharge and adverse effects. Data sources CENTRAL, CINAHL, MEDLINE and Web of Science. Search performed in March 2016 Eligibility criteria Studies using intravenous aminophylline in children with an acute exacerbation of asthma which reported the dosage and clinical outcomes. Findings 14 RCTs were included. There is a poor relationship between the dosage administered to children and symptom resolution, length of stay or need for mechanical ventilation. This study is limited due to its use of indirect evidence. Conclusion The currently recommended dosage regimens may not represent the optimum safety and efficacy of intravenous aminophylline. There is a need to develop the evidence base correlating dosage with patient centered clinical outcomes, to improve prescribing practices. PMID:27483163

  15. Prevalence of asthma-like symptoms, asthma and its treatment in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Lund, T; Pedersen, L; Larsson, B; Backer, V

    2009-04-01

    The objective was to determine the prevalence of asthma-like symptoms and asthma and the use of asthma medication in Danish elite athletes. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of Danish elite athletes was conducted in 2006. All elite athletes (N=418) financially supported by the national organization of elite athletes comprised the study group; 329 (79%) completed the questionnaire concerning their sport, asthma-like symptoms, asthma and use of asthma medication. Asthma-like symptoms at rest were reported by 41% of respondents; 55% reported asthma-like symptoms at rest or at exercise. Physician-diagnosed asthma was present in 16% and 14% had current asthma. Asthma medication was taken by 7% of the athletes, of whom 79% used inhaled corticosteroids and 21% used inhaled beta(2)-agonists only. Athletes participating in endurance sports had higher prevalences of current asthma (24%) and use of asthma medication (15%) than all other athletes (P<0.01). Athletes participating in endurance sports have a higher prevalence of asthma and use of asthma medication. The frequency of asthma medication is lower than the prevalence of current asthma indicating that there is no overuse of asthma medication among Danish elite athletes.

  16. Effectiveness of asthma education with and without a self-management plan in hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Palma, Tatiana; Zamorano, Alejandra; Arancibia, Francisca; Bustos, María-Francisca; Silva, Maria José; Cardenas, Consuelo; De La Barra, Pedro; Puente, Victoria; Cerda, Jaime; Castro-Rodriguez, José A; Prado, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    Background. Formal education in primary care can reduce asthma exacerbations. However, there are few studies in hospitalized children, with none originating in Latin America. Methods. A prospective randomized study was designed to evaluate whether a full education with self-management plan (ESM) was more effective than an education without self-management plan (E) in reducing asthma hospitalization. Children (5 to 15 years of age) who were hospitalized for an asthma attack were divided in two groups. Children in the E group received general instructions based on a booklet. Those in the ESM group received the same booklet plus a self-management guide and a puzzle game that reinforces the lessons learned in the booklet. Patients were interviewed every 3 months, by telephone, for one year. Interviewers recording the number of hospitalizations, exacerbations, and emergency visits for asthma and oral steroid burst uses. Results. From 88 children who met the inclusion criteria, 77 (86%) completed one year of follow-up (41 from E and 36 from ESM group). Overall, after one year, the hospitalization decreased by 66% and the inhaled corticosteroids therapy increased from 36% to 79%. At the end of the study, there was no difference in exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, or hospitalizations between the two groups. Conclusions. Asthma education with or without a self-management plan during asthma hospitalization were effective in reducing exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, and future rehospitalizations. This evidence supports the importance of providing a complete asthma education plan in any patient who is admitted for asthma exacerbation. PMID:19905916

  17. Effectiveness of asthma education with and without a self-management plan in hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Palma, Tatiana; Zamorano, Alejandra; Arancibia, Francisca; Bustos, María-Francisca; Silva, Maria José; Cardenas, Consuelo; De La Barra, Pedro; Puente, Victoria; Cerda, Jaime; Castro-Rodriguez, José A; Prado, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    Background. Formal education in primary care can reduce asthma exacerbations. However, there are few studies in hospitalized children, with none originating in Latin America. Methods. A prospective randomized study was designed to evaluate whether a full education with self-management plan (ESM) was more effective than an education without self-management plan (E) in reducing asthma hospitalization. Children (5 to 15 years of age) who were hospitalized for an asthma attack were divided in two groups. Children in the E group received general instructions based on a booklet. Those in the ESM group received the same booklet plus a self-management guide and a puzzle game that reinforces the lessons learned in the booklet. Patients were interviewed every 3 months, by telephone, for one year. Interviewers recording the number of hospitalizations, exacerbations, and emergency visits for asthma and oral steroid burst uses. Results. From 88 children who met the inclusion criteria, 77 (86%) completed one year of follow-up (41 from E and 36 from ESM group). Overall, after one year, the hospitalization decreased by 66% and the inhaled corticosteroids therapy increased from 36% to 79%. At the end of the study, there was no difference in exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, or hospitalizations between the two groups. Conclusions. Asthma education with or without a self-management plan during asthma hospitalization were effective in reducing exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, and future rehospitalizations. This evidence supports the importance of providing a complete asthma education plan in any patient who is admitted for asthma exacerbation.

  18. Vaccination coverage among persons with asthma -- United States, 2010-2011 influenza season.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    Asthma was the most common underlying condition among persons hospitalized with pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in 2009. Although persons with asthma are not more likely than others to get influenza, influenza can make asthma symptoms worse, trigger asthma attacks, and lead to pneumonia or other complications that result in hospitalization and even death. During 1964-2010, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended that all adults and children aged ≥6 months with asthma receive an influenza vaccination annually. Beginning with the 2010-11 influenza season, ACIP expanded its annual vaccination recommendation to include all persons aged ≥6 months, while emphasizing that protection of persons at higher risk for influenza-related complications continue as a focus of vaccination efforts. To provide the first update of national vaccination coverage among persons aged ≥2 years with asthma since the new ACIP recommendation, CDC analyzed data from the 2010 and 2011 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that influenza vaccination during the 2010-11 season among persons with asthma was 50%, up from 36% 5 years earlier. However, vaccination coverage across all age groups, including among those with health insurance, a usual place for health care, and one or more health-care visits in the past 12 months, remained well below Healthy People 2020 targets of 80% for children aged 6 months-17 years and 90% for adults aged ≥18 years who are at high risk. These findings highlight the need to educate health-care providers and persons with asthma about the importance of annual influenza vaccination.

  19. Resource distribution in multiple attacks with imperfect detection of the attack outcome.

    PubMed

    Levitin, Gregory; Hausken, Kjell

    2012-02-01

    This article extends the previous research of consecutive attacks strategy by assuming that an attacker observes the outcome of each attack imperfectly. With given probabilities it may wrongly identify a destroyed target as undestroyed, and wrongly identify an undestroyed target as destroyed. The outcome of each attack is determined by a contest success function that depends on the amount of resources allocated by the defender and the attacker to each attack. The article suggests a probabilistic model of the multiple attacks and analyzes how the target destruction probability and the attacker's relative resource expenditure are impacted by the two probabilities of incorrect observation, the attacker's and defender's resource ratio, the contest intensity, the number of attacks, and the resource distribution across attacks. We analyze how the attacker chooses the number of attacks, the attack stopping rule, and the optimal resource distribution across attacks to maximize its utility.

  20. Additive attacks on speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokh Baroughi, Alireza; Craver, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Speaker recognition is used to identify a speaker's voice from among a group of known speakers. A common method of speaker recognition is a classification based on cepstral coefficients of the speaker's voice, using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to model each speaker. In this paper we try to fool a speaker recognition system using additive noise such that an intruder is recognized as a target user. Our attack uses a mixture selected from a target user's GMM model, inverting the cepstral transformation to produce noise samples. In our 5 speaker data base, we achieve an attack success rate of 50% with a noise signal at 10dB SNR, and 95% by increasing noise power to 0dB SNR. The importance of this attack is its simplicity and flexibility: it can be employed in real time with no processing of an attacker's voice, and little computation is needed at the moment of detection, allowing the attack to be performed by a small portable device. For any target user, knowing that user's model or voice sample is sufficient to compute the attack signal, and it is enough that the intruder plays it while he/she is uttering to be classiffed as the victim.