Science.gov

Sample records for acute asthma management

  1. Practical management of acute asthma in adults.

    PubMed

    Hallstrand, Teal S; Fahy, John V

    2002-02-01

    All asthma patients are at risk for acute asthma exacerbations. Moderate to severe exacerbations account for many emergency department visits and subsequent hospitalizations each year. Recent studies have advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of acute asthma. The purpose of this review is to provide practical guidance in the assessment and treatment of adults with acute asthma in the hospital setting. Managing patients with acute asthma involves assessing the severity of the exacerbation, implementing measures to rapidly reverse airflow limitation, and instituting therapies that limit the progression of airway inflammation. Some patients may benefit from other supportive measures such as heliox and noninvasive ventilation. If the patient continues to deteriorate and requires mechanical ventilation, then ventilator settings that minimize the risk of hyperinflation should be chosen. After an episode of acute asthma, long-term preventive medications, especially inhaled corticosteroids, should be prescribed and education should be provided to prevent future episodes.

  2. Emergency management of acute adult asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Grunfeld, A. F.; Ho, K.

    1995-01-01

    Despite advances in understanding the pathophysiology of acute asthma and the development of new, effective therapies, patients still die. While physicians agree that most asthma deaths could be prevented if patients were treated adequately, evidence suggests that both patients and physicians continue to underestimate the severity of asthma attacks and delay adequate treatment. PMID:8563508

  3. [Management of an acute exacerbation of asthma and COPD].

    PubMed

    Leuppi, Jörg D; Ott, Sebastian R

    2014-05-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive airways disease are chronic pulmonary diseases which have a high prevalence world-wide. Both conditions can deteriorate acutely and potentially put patients into life-threatening situations. Management of an acute exacerbation starts in the emergency consultation-setting and ends only once the longterm management has been thoroughly assessed and optimised in order to prevent future exacerbations. Exacerbation frequency is strongly associated with long-term morbidity and mortality in both diseases. Recent data have shown that short-course systemic steroids (5 days) for the treatment of an acute exacerbation of COPD are as successful as long-course treatments (14 days) in preventing exacerbations during the subsequent 6 months. Similarly the targeted use of antibiotics is discussed in this review.

  4. Improving Childcare Staff Management of Acute Asthma Exacerbation - An Australian Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Soo, Yien Yien; FitzGerald, Kate Helen; Saini, Bandana; Kritikos, Vicky; Brannan, John D; Moles, Rebekah Jane

    2016-11-11

    OBJECTIVE This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of an asthma first-aid training tool for childcare staff in Australia. The effects of training on both asthma knowledge and skills were assessed. METHODS A pre/post study design was utilised to assess changes in asthma knowledge and asthma first-aid skills in childcare staff before and after an educational intervention. Asthma first-aid skills were assessed from the participant's response to two scenarios in which a child was having a severe exacerbation of asthma. Asthma knowledge and asthma skills scores were collected at base-line and three weeks post the education session which involved feedback on each individual's skills and a brief lecture on asthma delivered via PowerPoint presentation. RESULTS There was a significant improvement after intervention in asthma knowledge (Z = -3.638, p<0.001) and asthma first-aid skills for both scenario 1 (Z = -6.012, p<0.001) and scenario 2 (Z = -6.018, p<0.001). In scenario 1 and 2, first-aid skills improved by 65% (p<0.001) and 57% (p<0.001) respectively. Asthma knowledge was high at baseline (79%) and increased by 7% (p<0.001) after the educational intervention. These asthma knowledge results were not significant when adjusted for prior knowledge. Results suggest that knowledge assessment alone may not predict the practical skills needed for asthma first-aid. CONCLUSIONS Skills assessment is a useful adjunct to knowledge assessment when gauging the ability of childcare staff to manage acute asthma exacerbation. Skills assessment could be considered for incorporation into future educational interventions to improve management of acute asthma exacerbation.

  5. Acute asthma: under attack.

    PubMed

    Kissoon, Niranjan

    2002-06-01

    The burden of asthma (death, disability, and an increasing prevalence) makes it a major public health problem worldwide. In an effort to decrease this burden, investigators are studying many aspects of this disease. The role of race, ethnicity, infections, and pollutants as triggers, as well as the risk factors are now being defined. Research into methods to decrease acute exacerbations and improve emergency and in-hospital management, using standardized protocols and incentives for follow-up care, has yielded valuable information but has met with limited success. Adherence to the national guidelines has been poor and to some extent can be attributed to the lack of a practical method of measuring the degree of lung inflammation and cumbersome treatment protocols. Exhaled nitric oxide is a noninvasive marker of inflammation and may provide a rational method to titrate corticosteroid and leukotriene receptor antagonist therapy. The best route and dosing regimen for corticosteroid administration (oral vs intramuscular vs nebulized) are the subject of several studies, with no clear-cut winner. The burden of asthma in developing countries with limited financial resources has also triggered a search for simpler, cheaper, and practical methods for beta-agonist delivery using indigenous spacers. Recent research in asthma has unveiled our incomplete knowledge of the disease but has also provided a sense of where efforts should be expended. Research into the genetics and pharmacogenetics of asthma and into the societal factors limiting the delivery of optimal care is likely to yield useful and practical information.

  6. Treatment for acute asthma in the Emergency Department: practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Urso, D L

    2010-03-01

    This article describes the management of acute asthma exacerbation in the Emergency Department (ED). An asthma exacerbation can be defined as clinical worsening of disease or an asymptomatic decrease in peak flows. Acute exacerbations of asthma may represent reactions to airway irritants or failures of chronic treatment. Hospitalizations and ED visits account for a large proportion of the health-care cost burden of asthma. The assessment of an asthma exacerbation constitutes a process with two different dimensions: to determine the severity of attack, and to evaluate the response to treatment. The principal goals of managing an asthma acute exacerbation may be summarized as maintenance of adequate arterial oxygen saturation with supplemental oxygen, relief of airflow obstruction with repetitive administration of short acting beta-2 agonists (SABA), and treatment of airway inflammation with systemic corticosteroids (CS) to prevent future relapses. SABA, oxygen, and CS form the basis of management of acute asthma exacerbation but a role is emerging for anthicolinergics.

  7. State of the art: therapeutic controversies in severe acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, M A; Camargo, C A; Rowe, B H; Silverman, R A

    2000-07-01

    This is a transcript of the 1999 SAEM State-of-the-Art session on "Therapeutic Controversies in Severe Acute Asthma," presented at the 1999 SAEM annual meeting in Boston. The aim of this session was to address some of the current controversies in the management of acute asthma exacerbations, a major issue in emergency medicine. Despite many recent advances in asthma management, morbidity and mortality remain high. While many of us have strong feelings on how asthma patients should be treated, many of our assertions are not based on good science, and there are numerous areas of controversy. This discussion focuses on the controversy over beta agonist treatment for acute asthma, the physiology of corticosteroids in asthma, and the emergency use of leukotriene-modifying agents.

  8. Out-Patient Management of Bronchial Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    Asthma, seen primarily as an inflammatory disease with secondary airway hyper-responsiveness, causes symptoms through contraction of the airway's smooth muscles. The management of chronic asthma relies on bronchodilators for symptomatic relief of bronchospasm, while primary therapy is used to either prevent or reverse the inflammatory component of the disease. Anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies include environmental control (where relevant), sodium cromoglycate (where appropriate), and both inhaled and oral glucocorticosteroids. Management of acute severe asthma is similar; bronchodilators are used to ”buy time” while systemic corticosteroids control the inflammatory process. PMID:21248908

  9. Asthma disease management and the respiratory therapist.

    PubMed

    Kallstrom, Thomas J; Myers, Timothy R

    2008-06-01

    The role of the respiratory therapist (RT) is expanding with the growing acceptance and use of the disease-management paradigm for managing chronic diseases. RTs are key members of the asthma disease-management team, in acute-care settings, patients' homes, out-patient clinics, emergency departments, and in the community. Utilizing RTs as disease managers allows patients to be treated faster and more appropriately, discharged to home sooner, and decreases hospital admissions. RT are leaders in the emerging field of asthma disease management.

  10. Case-control study of severe life threatening asthma (SLTA) in adults: demographics, health care, and management of the acute attack

    PubMed Central

    Kolbe, J; Fergusson, W; Vamos, M; Garrett, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Severe life threatening asthma (SLTA) is important in its own right and as a proxy for asthma death. In order to target hospital based intervention strategies to those most likely to benefit, risk factors for SLTA among those admitted to hospital need to be identified. A case-control study was undertaken to determine whether, in comparison with patients admitted to hospital with acute asthma, those with SLTA have different sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, evidence of inadequate ongoing medical care, barriers to health care, or deficiencies in management of the acute attack.
METHODS—Seventy seven patients with SLTA were admitted to an intensive care unit (pH 7.17 (0.15), PaCO2 10.7 (5.0) kPa) and 239 matched controls (by date of index attack) with acute asthma were admitted to general medical wards. A questionnaire was administered 24-48 hours after admission.
RESULTS—The risk of SLTA in comparison with other patients admitted with acute asthma increased with age (odds ratio (OR) 1.04/year, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.07) and was less for women (OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.20to 0.68). These variables were controlled for in all subsequent analyses. There were no differences in other sociodemographic features. Cases were more likely to have experienced a previous SLTA (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.20 to 3.45) and to have had a hospital admission in the last year (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.09 to 3.18). There were no differences between cases and controls in terms of indicators of quality of ongoing asthma specific medical care, nor was there evidence of disproportionate barriers to health care. During the index attack cases had more severe asthma at the time of presentation, were less likely to have presented to general practitioners, and were more likely to have called an ambulance or presented to an emergency department. In terms of pharmacological management, those with SLTA were more likely to have been using oral theophylline (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.35 to 3.68) and less

  11. Difficult childhood asthma: management and future.

    PubMed

    Tillie-Leblond, Isabelle; Deschildre, Antoine; Gosset, Philippe; de Blic, Jacques

    2012-09-01

    Diagnosis and management of severe asthma implies the definition of different entities, that is, difficult asthma and refractory severe asthma, but also the different phenotypes included in the term refractory severe asthma. A complete evaluation by a physician expert in asthma is necessary, adapted for each child. Identification of mechanisms involved in different phenotypes in refractory severe asthma may improve the therapeutic approach. The quality of care and monitoring of children with severe asthma is as important as the prescription drug, and is also crucial for differentiating between severe asthma and difficult asthma, whereby expertise is required.

  12. Do the residents in the emergency department appropriately manage patients with acute asthma attack? A study of self-criticism.

    PubMed

    Akoglu, Sebahat; Topacoglu, Hakan; Karcioglu, Ozgur; Cimrin, Arif Hikmet

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the management of patients with asthma attack admitted to the emergency department (ED) in terms of compliance with international guidelines. The records of patients with asthma who were admitted to a university-based ED between December 2001 and December 2002 were evaluated. A total of 72 cases with available data were evaluated retrospectively. Twenty-six patients (36.1%) were admitted more than once during the study period. The number of multiple admissions ranged from 2 (15 patients, 20.0%) to 11 (2 patients, 2.8%). Peak expiratory flow (PEF) measurements were recorded in 17 patients (23.6%) on presentation. Pulse and respiratory rates were recorded in 70 (97.0%) and 67 patients (93.0%), respectively. Thirty-four patients (47.2%) underwent chest x-ray; results were normal in most patients. Salbutamol was the most commonly used drug as first-line therapy. Ipratropium bromide (inhaled) and systemic corticosteroids were added to the salbutamol in 47 (65.2%), 42 (58.4%), and 32 patients (44%), respectively. Pulmonologists were consulted in only 7 cases (9.7%). Thirty patients (43.4%) were prescribed corticosteroids on discharge. The role of functional parameters in determining asthma severity and monitoring treatment effects should be emphasized in clinical practice. Finally, more prevalent use of management guidelines will help determine their usefulness.

  13. [Treatment of patients with acute asthma exacerbation].

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Jelena; Mose, Jakov

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. The global prevalence of asthma ranges from 1% to 18% of the population, so it remains a common problem with enormous medical and economic impacts. In majority of patients, asthma can be well controlled with simple regimens of inhaled anti-inflammatory and bronchodilating medications. However, some patients tend to suffer from poorly controlled disease in terms of chronic symptoms with episodic severe exacerbations. Major factors that may be related to the emergency department visits and hospitalisation include prior severe attacks, nonadherence to therapeutic regimens, inadequate use of inhaled corticosteroids, poor self-management skills, frequent use of inhaled short-acting beta-agonists, cigarette smoking, poor socioeconomic status and age over 40 years. Severe exacerbations of asthma are life-threatening medical emergencies and require careful brief assesment, treatment according to current GINA (Global Initiative for Asthma) guidelines with periodic reassesment of patient's response to therapy usually in an emergency department.

  14. Asthma disease management: a provider's perspective.

    PubMed

    Abisheganaden, J

    2002-07-01

    Asthma is a highly prevalent problem in Singapore, with an increasing societal and economic burden. However, asthma is also an eminently treatable condition, with evidence that integrated education-treatment efforts directed at important patient sub-groups can be cost-effective. What is important is a comprehensive and integrated asthma management programme, aimed at reducing the burden of asthma at all levels of the healthcare system, with the long-term goal of improving asthma care cost-effectively. This refers to asthma disease management. Asthma disease management should focus on identifying deficiencies in asthma management across the population diagnosed with the condition and establish a partnership between the patient, provider and the healthcare system to improve the overall quality of asthma care. The framework for implementing such a programme bridges key concepts and programmes that are already in place in the various institutions. These include patient and physician education, the use of clinical practice guidelines, clinical pathways, outcomes management, quality improvement processes, information technology, case management and existing asthma shared-care programmes and resources. In order to significantly reduce asthma morbidity, an integrated approach is required, involving individuals providing asthma care at various levels of care delivery. There is also a need to co-ordinate the efforts of such individuals and institutions involved so that there is good horizontal and vertical integration of care. The disease management approach described is intended to raise the overall standard of asthma care across a spectrum of patients with asthma.

  15. The intersection between asthma and acute chest syndrome in children with sickle-cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    DeBaun, Michael R; Strunk, Robert C

    2016-06-18

    Acute chest syndrome is a frequent cause of acute lung disease in children with sickle-cell disease. Asthma is common in children with sickle-cell disease and is associated with increased incidence of vaso-occlusive pain events, acute chest syndrome episodes, and earlier death. Risk factors for asthma exacerbation and an acute chest syndrome episode are similar, and both can present with shortness of breath, chest pain, cough, and wheezing. Despite overlapping risk factors and symptoms, an acute exacerbation of asthma or an episode of acute chest syndrome are two distinct entities that need disease-specific management strategies. Although understanding has increased about asthma as a comorbidity in sickle-cell disease and its effects on morbidity, substantial gaps remain in knowledge about best management.

  16. The intersection between asthma and acute chest syndrome in children with sickle-cell anaemia

    PubMed Central

    DeBaun, Michael R; Strunk, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Acute chest syndrome is a frequent cause of acute lung disease in children with sickle-cell disease. Asthma is common in children with sickle-cell disease and is associated with increased incidence of vaso-occlusive pain events, acute chest syndrome episodes, and earlier death. Risk factors for asthma exacerbation and an acute chest syndrome episode are similar, and both can present with shortness of breath, chest pain, cough, and wheezing. Despite overlapping risk factors and symptoms, an acute exacerbation of asthma or an episode of acute chest syndrome are two distinct entities that need disease-specific management strategies. Although understanding has increased about asthma as a comorbidity in sickle-cell disease and its effects on morbidity, substantial gaps remain in knowledge about best management. PMID:27353685

  17. Environmental issues in managing asthma.

    PubMed

    Diette, Gregory B; McCormack, Meredith C; Hansel, Nadia N; Breysse, Patrick N; Matsui, Elizabeth C

    2008-05-01

    Management of asthma requires attention to environmental exposures both indoors and outdoors. Americans spend most of their time indoors, where they have a greater ability to modify their environment. The indoor environment contains both pollutants (eg, particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, secondhand smoke, and ozone) and allergens from furred pets, dust mites, cockroaches, rodents, and molds. Indoor particulate matter consists of particles generated from indoor sources such as cooking and cleaning activities, and particles that penetrate from the outdoors. Nitrogen dioxide sources include gas stoves, furnaces, and fireplaces. Indoor particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide are linked to asthma morbidity. The indoor ozone concentration is mainly influenced by the outdoor ozone concentration. The health effects of indoor ozone exposure have not been well studied. In contrast, there is substantial evidence of detrimental health effects from secondhand smoke. Guideline recommendations are not specific for optimizing indoor air quality. The 2007 National Asthma Education and Prevention Program asthma guidelines recommend eliminating indoor smoking and improving the ventilation. Though the guidelines state that there is insufficient evidence to recommend air cleaners, air cleaners and reducing activities that generate indoor pollutants may be sound practical approaches for improving the health of individuals with asthma. The guidelines are more specific about allergen avoidance; they recommend identifying allergens to which the individual is immunoglobin E sensitized and employing a multifaceted, comprehensive strategy to reduce exposure. Outdoor air pollutants that impact asthma include particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide, and guidelines recommend that individuals with asthma avoid exertion outdoors when these pollutants are elevated. Outdoor allergens include tree, grass, and weed pollens, which vary in concentration by season

  18. Environmental Issues in Managing Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Diette, Gregory B; McCormack, Meredith C; Hansel, Nadia N; Breysse, Patrick N; Matsui, Elizabeth C

    2008-01-01

    Management of asthma requires attention to environmental exposures both indoors and outdoors. Americans spend most of their time indoors, where they have a greater ability to modify their environment. The indoor environment contains both pollutants (eg, particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, secondhand smoke, and ozone) and allergens from furred pets, dust mites, cockroaches, rodents, and molds. Indoor particulate matter consists of particles generated from indoor sources such as cooking and cleaning activities, and particles that penetrate from the outdoors. Nitrogen dioxide sources include gas stoves, furnaces, and fireplaces. Indoor particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide are linked to asthma morbidity. The indoor ozone concentration is mainly influenced by the outdoor ozone concentration. The health effects of indoor ozone exposure have not been well studied. In contrast, there is substantial evidence of detrimental health effects from secondhand smoke. Guideline recommendations are not specific for optimizing indoor air quality. The 2007 National Asthma Education and Prevention Program asthma guidelines recommend eliminating indoor smoking and improving the ventilation. Though the guidelines state that there is insufficient evidence to recommend air cleaners, air cleaners and reducing activities that generate indoor pollutants may be sound practical approaches for improving the health of individuals with asthma. The guidelines are more specific about allergen avoidance; they recommend identifying allergens to which the individual is immunoglobin E sensitized and employing a multifaceted, comprehensive strategy to reduce exposure. Outdoor air pollutants that impact asthma include particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide, and guidelines recommend that individuals with asthma avoid exertion outdoors when these pollutants are elevated. Outdoor allergens include tree, grass, and weed pollens, which vary in concentration by season

  19. Difficult asthma: assessment and management, Part 1.

    PubMed

    Long, Aidan A; Fanta, Christopher H

    2012-01-01

    A minority of asthma patients have disease that proves difficult to control with usual medications and experience ongoing symptoms, poor quality of life, and limitations in activity and/or frequent asthma exacerbations. This group of patients accounts for much of the expense associated with asthma care and is the focus of national and international collaborative study groups. Distinguishing between "difficult-to-manage asthma" and truly "therapy-resistant asthma" is helpful and promotes a systematic consideration of contributory factors. Critical evaluation of factors contributing to difficult-to-manage asthma including adverse environment, comorbidities, nonadherence, and incorrect diagnosis is recommended in a systematic fashion in Part 1 of this contribution.

  20. Supporting Self-management of Asthma Care.

    PubMed

    Keep, Suzanne M; Reiffer, Alice; Bahl, Thomas E

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a major public health concern, with an estimated 18.8 million adults in the United States having the disease. Asthma can be controlled with a variety of effective treatment options; however, only half the people with asthma report their asthma is well controlled. Uncontrolled asthma leads to high direct and indirect costs as well as decreased quality of life. The pathophysiology of asthma, current asthma practice guidelines, and common barriers to self-management will be discussed. Through use of motivational interviewing techniques and knowledge of available self-management tools, the home care clinician is poised to help increase self-management of asthma, decrease hospitalizations, and improve quality of life.

  1. Recent advances in understanding and managing asthma

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Su-Ling; Wark, Peter A.B.

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the important articles published in the area of asthma research from January 2015 to July 2016. In basic science, significant advances have been made in understanding the link between the innate immune response and type II acquired immune responses in asthma and the role of the airway epithelium. Novel information continues to emerge with regard to the pathogenesis and heterogeneity of severe asthma. There have been important translational clinical trials in the areas of childhood asthma, treatment of allergy to improve asthma outcomes, and improving drug delivery to optimize the management of asthma. In addition, there are increasing data concerning the application of biological agents to the management of severe asthma. This body of work discusses the most notable advances in the understanding and management of asthma. PMID:27610226

  2. Factors Affecting Recovery Time of Pulmonary Function in Hospitalized Patients With Acute Asthma Exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Jung; Lee, Jaemoon; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Park, So-Young; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Hee-Bom

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prolonged recovery time of pulmonary function after an asthma exacerbation is a significant burden on asthmatics, and management of these patients needs to be improved. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors associated with a longer recovery time of pulmonary function among asthmatic patients hospitalized due to a severe asthma exacerbation. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 89 patients who were admitted for the management of acute asthma exacerbations. The recovery time of pulmonary function was defined as the time from the date each patient initially received treatment for asthma exacerbations to the date the patient reached his or her previous best FEV1% value. We investigated the influence of various clinical and laboratory factors on the recovery time. Results The median recovery time of the patients was 1.7 weeks. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that using regular inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) before an acute exacerbation of asthma and concurrent with viral infection at admission were associated with the prolonged recovery time of pulmonary function. Conclusions The prolonged recovery time of pulmonary function after a severe asthma exacerbation was not shown to be directly associated with poor adherence to ICS. Therefore the results indicate that an unknown subtype of asthma may be associated with the prolonged recovery of pulmonary function time after an acute exacerbation of asthma despite regular ICS use. Further prospective studies to investigate factors affecting the recovery time of pulmonary function after an asthma exacerbation are warranted. PMID:27582400

  3. Management of severe asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Bush, Andrew; Saglani, Sejal

    2010-09-04

    Children who are referred to specialist care with asthma that does not respond to treatment (problematic severe asthma) are a heterogeneous group, with substantial morbidity. The evidence base for management is sparse, and is mostly based on data from studies in children with mild and moderate asthma and on extrapolation of data from studies in adults with severe asthma. In many children with severe asthma, the diagnosis is wrong or adherence to treatment is poor. The first step is a detailed diagnostic assessment to exclude an alternative diagnosis ("not asthma at all"), followed by a multidisciplinary approach to exclude comorbidities ("asthma plus") and to assess whether the child has difficult asthma (improves when the basic management needs, such as adherence and inhaler technique, are corrected) or true, therapy-resistant asthma (still symptomatic even when the basic management needs are resolved). In particular, environmental causes of secondary steroid resistance should be identified. An individualised treatment plan should be devised depending on the clinical and pathophysiological characterisation. Licensed therapeutic approaches include high-dose inhaled steroids, the Symbicort maintenance and reliever (SMART) regimen (with budesonide and formoterol fumarate), and anti-IgE therapy. Unlicensed treatments include methotrexate, azathioprine, ciclosporin, and subcutaneous terbutaline infusions. Paediatric data are needed on cytokine-specific monoclonal antibody therapies and bronchial thermoplasty. However, despite the interest in innovative approaches, getting the basics right in children with apparently severe asthma will remain the foundation of management for the foreseeable future.

  4. Managed care opportunities for improving asthma care.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jonathan D

    2011-04-01

    Uncontrolled asthma is an enormous burden in terms of the propensity to reach asthma control in the future, direct and indirect costs, and health-related quality of life. The complex pathophysiology, treatment, and triggers of asthma warrant a unified, yet targeted, approach to care. No single factor is fully responsible for poor control. Complicating the problem of asthma control is adherence to long-term controller medications. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) established several key points for asthma control, and developed classifications for asthma control and recommended actions for treatment. All parties involved in the management of asthma, including physicians, pharmacists, nurses, patients, family members, and insurance companies, need to be aware of the NAEPP guidelines. To determine if the goals of asthma therapy are being met, assessment of asthma outcomes is necessary. Unfortunately, some measures may get overlooked, and patient-reported outcomes (as assessed by the validated control instruments) are not often collected during routine examinations. The Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set measure for asthma may be used to quantify asthma care, but there is evidence that it does not fully capture the goals of asthma management. Most well-designed, education-based interventions are considered good value for money, but it can be difficult to put into practice such policy interventions. An optimal managed care plan will adhere to known evidence-based guidelines, can measure outcomes, is targeted to the patient's risk and impairment, and can adapt to changes in our understanding of asthma and its treatment.

  5. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some top athletes manage their asthma while still competing at professional and Olympic levels. Reviewed by: Rupal ... What's an Asthma Flare-Up? Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend Permissions Guidelines About KidsHealth ...

  6. Adolescent Asthma Self-Management: A Concept Analysis and Operational Definition.

    PubMed

    Mammen, Jennifer; Rhee, Hyekyun

    2012-12-01

    BACKGROUND: Adolescents with asthma have a higher risk of morbidity and mortality than other age groups. Asthma self-management has been shown to improve outcomes; however, the concept of asthma self-management is not explicitly defined. METHODS: We use the Norris method of concept clarification to delineate what constitutes the concept of asthma self-management in adolescents. Five databases were searched to identify components of the concept of adolescent asthma self-management, and lists of relevant subconcepts were compiled and categorized. RESULTS: Analysis revealed 4 specific domains of self-management behaviors: (1) symptom prevention; (2) symptom monitoring; (3) acute symptom management; and (4) communication with important others. These domains of self-management were mediated by intrapersonal/cognitive and interpersonal/contextual factors. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the analysis, we offer a research-based operational definition for adolescent asthma self-management and a preliminary model that can serve as a conceptual base for further research.

  7. Managing Asthma in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Ellen M.

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting nearly 5 million children under the age of 18. Children with asthma account for 3 million hospital visits and 200,000 hospitalizations yearly. This adds up to an estimated $2 billion annually in health care costs (American Academy of Pediatrics, 1999). A child with asthma has three…

  8. PSYCHOLOGICAL MANAGEMENT OF CHILDHOOD ASTHMA

    PubMed Central

    Selesnick, Sheldon T.; Friedman, David Belais; Augenbraun, Bernice

    1964-01-01

    Over-emphasis on physical factors in asthma probably has come about because psychological factors have seemed elusive, difficult to define and often misleading. Several concepts of classic causes of emotional disturbances that abet asthmatic attacks in children may be helpful in management of the patient and his environs. The first concept has to do with feelings of inadequacy in the mother which lead her to place the burden of decision-making upon the child. She is thus able to give the child very little support and communicates to him her anxiety. Often encouragement to the mother, through the physician's pointing out her very real capacities and achievements can be helpful to the child. The second concept has to do with the asthmatic child's character structure and his assumption of a pseudo-mature position. Among the things the physician can do is to advise the parents as to what is age-appropriate behavior for the child and instruct them in ways to make the child recognize his position of dependence. The third concept concerns threat of separation as a precipitant to the asthma attack. To deal with such a situation the physician may make a number of recommendations of methods for alleviating such a threat. In some families, the degree of disturbance is so great that the parents cannot respond to the physician's advice and may need psychiatric referral. Clues for recognizing such a situation are given along with recommendations on how to make a successful referral. PMID:14154286

  9. Difficult asthma: assessment and management, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Fanta, Christopher H; Long, Aidan A

    2012-01-01

    Patients with severe asthma have considerable morbidity related to their asthma and are at risk for serious, life-threatening exacerbations. Their management requires an intensive and comprehensive approach, including attention to reducing exposure to environmental inciters of airway inflammation and triggers of symptoms, patient education (including an asthma action plan), and opportunity for close patient-provider communication. Approved medical options include the lipoxygenase inhibitor, zileuton; the anti-immunoglobulin E monoclonal antibody, omalizumab; and bronchial thermoplasty. Nonapproved interventions of potential benefit are ultrahigh-dose inhaled corticosteroids, anticholinergic bronchodilators (tiotropium), macrolide antibiotics, and vitamin D supplementation for the vitamin D-deficient patient. Potentially toxic, "steroid-sparing" therapies such as methotrexate, cyclosporine, and etanercept are best reserved for patients participating in clinical trials. Recognition of specific subtypes of patients with therapy-resistant asthma permits more targeted treatment approaches, such as for aspirin-sensitive asthma, persistent eosinophilic asthma, asthma complicated by allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, asthma with persistent airflow obstruction, and asthma with life-threatening (near fatal) asthmatic attacks. Novel therapies based on an improved understanding of the pathobiology of therapy-resistant asthma are greatly needed.

  10. Talking with Teens about Asthma Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara; Vlasses, Fran; Moberley, Jorie; Coover, Lenore

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic illness that affects approximately 7 million children and adolescents in the United States. Teens seem to be at higher risk for poor asthma health outcomes because of the tumultuous changes associated with adolescence. The purpose of this study was to explore experiences and behaviors related to the self-management of teens…

  11. Occupational asthma: natural history, evaluation and management

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, S.; Chan-Yeung, M.

    1987-04-01

    A variety of occupational circumstances are capable of inducing asthma by specific exposure to airborne dusts, gases, vapors and fumes. The authors review the clinical history of the disease, including detection of exposures and diagnostic tests. The natural history of occupational asthma, its management and finally its prevention are then discussed.

  12. MDI versus Nebulizers for Acute Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Raissy, Hengameh H.; Kelly, H. William

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate studies comparing metered dose inhalers with holding chambers to nebulizers in the emergency department for the treatment of asthma exacerbation. DATA SOURCE: Primary articles and systematic review provided by the Cochrane Airways Review Group of the Cochrane Library identified by MEDLINE search (1966–February 2004) and through secondary sources. DATA SYNTHESIS: The Cochrane review included 21 randomized clinical trials conducted in hospital emergency departments comparing clinical outcomes following β2 agonist administration via a nebulizer or a metered dose inhaler with holding chamber. Although the relative risk ratio of hospital admission with metered dose inhaler and holding chamber did not differ in children or in adults compared to the nebulizer delivery, none of the individual studies reviewed were powered to detect a difference in the rate of hospital admission. Specific factors in the treatment of acute asthma such as assessment of severity, appropriate outcome selection, appropriate dose selection, and appropriate delivery systems need to be considered to critically evaluate the literature. CONCLUSION: Although available randomized clinical trials suggest equivalency of metered dose inhaler plus holding chambers and nebulized delivery of inhaled β2 agonists, these trials are biased to show no difference in response. There is no data to support the advantage of one method over the other in mild to moderate asthmatic patients either clinically or economically. PMID:23118701

  13. Tips to Help Parents Manage Their Child's Asthma Every Day

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Help Parents Manage Their Child's Asthma Every Day Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of Contents Asthma ... persistent asthma (for example, symptoms more than 2 days a week). Your health provider will help you ...

  14. Management of asthma: a consensus statement.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, J O; Götz, M; Landau, L I; Levison, H; Milner, A D; Pedersen, S; Silverman, M

    1989-01-01

    In developing these international guidelines there were several unifying themes in the diagnosis and simple management of childhood asthma. For the purposes of the meeting, asthma was operationally defined as 'episodic wheeze and/or cough in a clinical setting where asthma is likely and other rarer conditions have been excluded'. In making a diagnosis of asthma, a full history is a prerequisite. Additional tests are only used to support clinical impression and to provide objective evidence for therapeutic recommendations. General features of a multidisciplinary approach include an appreciation of the importance of psychosocial factors, counselling, and education. Drugs should be prescribed in a rational sequence: beta 2-stimulants for mild episodic wheeze; sodium cromoglycate for mild to moderate asthma; inhaled steroids for moderate to severe asthma; with xanthines, ipratropium bromide, and oral steroids having their place in more persistent and severe cases. Children and their parents should be reassured that if asthma is properly controlled there is no reason why the child should not lead a normal and physically active life. The management of asthma is rewarding and return to 'normal' lifestyle is nearly always possible with active participation in sporting activities. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 PMID:2698121

  15. A multidisciplinary team case management approach reduces the burden of frequent asthma admissions.

    PubMed

    Burke, Hannah; Davis, Jenny; Evans, Sian; Flower, Laura; Tan, Andrew; Kurukulaaratchy, Ramesh J

    2016-07-01

    Up to 10% of asthmatics have "difficult asthma"; however, they account for 80% of asthma-related expenditure and run the highest risk of acute severe exacerbations. An estimated 75% of admissions for asthma are avoidable. Guidelines advise that these patients be managed by an experienced specialist multidisciplinary team (MDT). We aimed to assess the impact of a case management strategy delivered via specialist MDTs on acute healthcare utilisation of patients with frequent asthma admissions. An MDT (consultant, specialist nurse, physiotherapist and psychologist) case management strategy was introduced in 2010 at University Hospital Southampton Foundation Trust (Southampton, UK) to support patients with frequent asthma admissions during admission and then in clinic. To assess efficacy, we systematically searched the hospital database for patients acutely admitted for asthma on two or more occasions in 2010, 2011 and 2012. Data were collected retrospectively covering patient demographics, admission details, asthma severity and comorbidity. From 2010 to 2012, 84 patients were admitted on two or more occasions per year (80% female, mean body mass index 31 kg·m(-2) and 55% psychological comorbidity). After introducing an MDT approach repeat asthma admissions fell by 33% from 127 in 2010 to 84 in 2012 (p=0.0004). In addition, bed days fell by 52% from 895 in 2010 to 430 in 2010 (p=0.015). An MDT case management approach significantly reduces hospitalisation in difficult asthma patients with prior frequent admission.

  16. Barriers to Asthma Management as Identified by School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quaranta, Judith E.; Spencer, Gale A.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma rates are increasing in children. School nurses have opportunities to care for children with asthma but need to overcome barriers impacting their ability to manage asthma in the school setting. This study (a) assessed barriers present in the school setting, (b) determined the impact of barriers on performance of asthma management behaviors,…

  17. Barriers to Asthma Management for School Nurses: An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanley Nadeau, Ellen; Toronto, Coleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood asthma is a growing health concern. Asthma is the most common chronic illness of childhood and a leading cause of emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and school absenteeism. School nurses play a valuable role in asthma management. The purpose of this integrative review is to examine barriers to asthma management for school nurses in…

  18. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hodder, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1) an airway disease – acute potentially fatal asthma, and (2) a pulmonary parenchymal disease – acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician. PMID:27147862

  19. A multidisciplinary team case management approach reduces the burden of frequent asthma admissions

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Hannah; Davis, Jenny; Evans, Sian; Flower, Laura; Tan, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Up to 10% of asthmatics have “difficult asthma”; however, they account for 80% of asthma-related expenditure and run the highest risk of acute severe exacerbations. An estimated 75% of admissions for asthma are avoidable. Guidelines advise that these patients be managed by an experienced specialist multidisciplinary team (MDT). We aimed to assess the impact of a case management strategy delivered via specialist MDTs on acute healthcare utilisation of patients with frequent asthma admissions. An MDT (consultant, specialist nurse, physiotherapist and psychologist) case management strategy was introduced in 2010 at University Hospital Southampton Foundation Trust (Southampton, UK) to support patients with frequent asthma admissions during admission and then in clinic. To assess efficacy, we systematically searched the hospital database for patients acutely admitted for asthma on two or more occasions in 2010, 2011 and 2012. Data were collected retrospectively covering patient demographics, admission details, asthma severity and comorbidity. From 2010 to 2012, 84 patients were admitted on two or more occasions per year (80% female, mean body mass index 31 kg·m−2 and 55% psychological comorbidity). After introducing an MDT approach repeat asthma admissions fell by 33% from 127 in 2010 to 84 in 2012 (p=0.0004). In addition, bed days fell by 52% from 895 in 2010 to 430 in 2010 (p=0.015). An MDT case management approach significantly reduces hospitalisation in difficult asthma patients with prior frequent admission. PMID:27730207

  20. The Yes We Can Urban Asthma Partnership: a medical/social model for childhood asthma management.

    PubMed

    Thyne, Shannon M; Rising, Joshua P; Legion, Vicki; Love, Mary Beth

    2006-11-01

    Pediatric asthma programs have struggled to integrate children's medical and social needs. We developed and piloted an integrated team model for asthma care for low-income children through the Yes We Can Urban Asthma Partnership. Program evaluation demonstrated increases in prescribing controller medications (p <0.05), use of action plans (p<0.001), and the use of mattress covers (p<0.001); and decrease in asthma symptoms (p<0.01). Additional changes occurred within the local system of asthma care to support ongoing efforts to improve asthma management. We conclude that pediatric asthma programs can effectively target the social and medical needs of children in a sustainable manner.

  1. The Saudi Initiative for Asthma - 2016 update: Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma in adults and children

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moamary, Mohamed S.; Alhaider, Sami A.; Idrees, Majdy M.; Al Ghobain, Mohammed O.; Zeitouni, Mohammed O.; Al-Harbi, Adel S.; Yousef, Abdullah A.; Al-Matar, Hussain; Alorainy, Hassan S.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.

    2016-01-01

    This is an updated guideline for the diagnosis and management of asthma, developed by the Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA) group, a subsidiary of the Saudi Thoracic Society. The main objective of SINA is to have guidelines that are up to date, simple to understand and easy to use by nonasthma specialists, including primary care and general practice physicians. SINA approach is mainly based on symptom control and assessment of risk as it is the ultimate goal of treatment. The new SINA guidelines include updates of acute and chronic asthma management, with more emphasis on the use of asthma control in the management of asthma in adults and children, inclusion of a new medication appendix, and keeping consistency on the management at different age groups. The section on asthma in children is rewritten and expanded where the approach is stratified based on the age. The guidelines are constructed based on the available evidence, local literature, and the current situation in Saudi Arabia. There is also an emphasis on patient–doctor partnership in the management that also includes a self-management plan. PMID:26933455

  2. Patient and physician asthma deterioration terminology: results from the 2009 Asthma Insight and Management survey.

    PubMed

    Blaiss, Michael S; Nathan, Robert A; Stoloff, Stuart W; Meltzer, Eli O; Murphy, Kevin R; Doherty, Dennis E

    2012-01-01

    Long-term achievement of asthma control is dependent in part on the use of mutually understandable asthma terminology in all verbal and written patient-physician communications. Using data from the Asthma Insight and Management (AIM) survey, the objective of this analysis is to provide a contemporary depiction of asthma deterioration terminology as used by current asthma patients and physicians in the United States. As part of the 2009 AIM survey, current asthma patients (≥12 years of age; weighted n = 2499) and physicians (n = 309) were queried about their recognition, understanding, and/or use of the terms "asthma attack," "asthma flare-up," and "asthma exacerbation" in telephone interviews. Nearly all patients had heard the term "asthma attack" (97%), but relatively few had heard the term "asthma exacerbation" (24%); 71% had heard "asthma flare-up." In contrast, physicians reported using the term "asthma attack" least (65%) and the term "asthma exacerbation" most (77%) when discussing asthma with their patients; 70% reported using "asthma flare-up." Among patients familiar with "asthma flare-up" and "asthma exacerbation" (n = 502), only 38% said that the terms mean the same thing; nearly all physicians (94%) said that the terms mean the same thing. Collectively, data from the AIM survey suggest that patients and physicians use different asthma deterioration terminology and, more importantly, that they do not necessarily understand each other's terms. Standardizing asthma deterioration terminology may help optimize asthma patient-physician communication to improve patient understanding of written asthma action plans and therefore, enhance patient outcomes.

  3. Challenges of Asthma Management for School Nurses in Districts with High Asthma Hospitalization Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberatos, Penny; Leone, Jennifer; Craig, Ann Marie; Frei, Elizabeth Mary; Fuentes, Natalie; Harris, India Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background: School nurses play a central role in assisting elementary school children in managing their asthma, especially those in higher-risk school districts that are at increased risk of uncontrolled asthma. Study purposes are to (1) identify barriers to asthma management by school nurses in higher-risk school districts; and (2) assess the…

  4. New approaches to managing asthma: a US perspective

    PubMed Central

    Berger, William E

    2008-01-01

    Despite remarkable advances in diagnosis and long-term management, asthma remains a serious public health concern. Newly updated expert guidelines emphasize the intra- and inter-individual variability of asthma and highlight the importance of periodic assessment of asthma control. These guidelines update recommendations for step-wise asthma treatment, address the burgeoning field of asthma diagnostics, and stress the importance of a patient and health care professional partnership, including written action plans and self monitoring. The field of asthma therapeutics is expanding rapidly, with promising new treatment options available or in development that may address some of the existing barriers to successful asthma management. These approaches simplify treatment, use combinations of agents in one delivery device that have complementary actions, or target specific pathways involved in asthma patho-physiology. Considerable activity is taking place in asthma pharmacogenetics. This review provides an overview of these new approaches to managing asthma, including their present status and future potential. PMID:18728834

  5. Impact of School Nurse Case Management on Students with Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taras, Howard; Wright, Sandra; Brennan, Jesse; Campana, Jack; Lofgren, RoseMarie

    2004-01-01

    This project determined asthma prevalence in a large school district, absentee rates, and potential effects of school nurse case management for student asthma over three years. Data were derived from an asthma tracking tool used by nurses in one school district for every student reported as having asthma by their parent. School nurses began…

  6. Biomarkers in the Management of Difficult Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Schleich, Florence; Sophie, Demarche; Renaud, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Difficult asthma is a heterogeneous disease of the airways including various types of bronchial inflammation and various degrees of airway remodeling. Therapeutic response of severe asthmatics can be predicted by the use of biomarkers of Type2-high or Type2-low inflammation. Based on sputum cell analysis, four inflammatory phenotypes have been described. As induced sputum is time-consuming and expensive technique, surrogate biomarkers are useful in clinical practice. Eosinophilic phenotype is likely to reflect ongoing adaptive immunity in response to allergen. Several biomarkers of eosinophilic asthma are easily available in clinical practice (blood eosinophils, serum IgE, exhaled nitric oxyde, serum periostin). Neutrophilic asthma is thought to reflect innate immune system activation in response to pollutants or infectious agents while paucigranulocytic asthma is thought to be not inflammatory and characterized by smooth muscle dysfunction. We currently lack of user-friendly biomarkers of neutrophilic asthma and airway remodeling. In this review, we summarize the biomarkers available for the management of difficult asthma. PMID:26467509

  7. Biomarkers in the Management of Difficult Asthma.

    PubMed

    Schleich, Florence; Demarche, Sophie; Louis, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Difficult asthma is a heterogeneous disease of the airways including various types of bronchial inflammation and various degrees of airway remodeling. Therapeutic response of severe asthmatics can be predicted by the use of biomarkers of Type2-high or Type2-low inflammation. Based on sputum cell analysis, four inflammatory phenotypes have been described. As induced sputum is timeconsuming and expensive technique, surrogate biomarkers are useful in clinical practice. Eosinophilic phenotype is likely to reflect ongoing adaptive immunity in response to allergen. Several biomarkers of eosinophilic asthma are easily available in clinical practice (blood eosinophils, serum IgE, exhaled nitric oxyde, serum periostin). Neutrophilic asthma is thought to reflect innate immune system activation in response to pollutants or infectious agents while paucigranulocytic asthma is thought to be not inflammatory and characterized by smooth muscle dysfunction. We currently lack of user-friendly biomarkers of neutrophilic asthma and airway remodeling. In this review, we summarize the biomarkers available for the management of difficult asthma.

  8. [Diagnosis and treatment in the emergency room of acute asthma in childhood].

    PubMed

    Aldana Vergara, Ruth Saraí; Olivar Lòpez, Victor; Sienra Monge, Juan José Luis; Lezana Fernández, José Luis; Zepeda Ortega, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Acute asthma is characterized by acute air way obstruction episodes presented as short breath, increased coughing, wheezing and difficult breathing, reversible with bronchodilator. It constitutes one of the most frequent causes of pediatric ER visits whose diagnosis and treatment is not always adequate. It is necessary to carry out a complete medical history searching for the number of previous attacks, risk factors, associated illnesses, triggers, prior hospitalizations, preventive and maintenance treatment used, along with a complete physical examination. During the management of moderate-severe attacks frequent systematic assessments are required to ensure treatment response. In children above 5 years old, monitoring of expiratory peak flow (EPF) during mild-moderate attacks is recommended. In general, a national consensus to classify and treat acute asthma in emergency services does not exist for which the need to develop a clinical practice guide of diagnosis and management arises.

  9. Asthma Risk Profiles of Children Participating in an Asthma Education and Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Candice; Rapp, Kristi Isaac; Jack, Leonard, Jr.; Hayes, Sandra; Post, Robert; Malveaux, Floyd

    2015-01-01

    Background: Focused risk assessment is essential in the effective management of asthma. Purpose: This study identified and examined correlations among areas of pediatric asthma risk and determined associations between these risks and demographic characteristics. Methods: This exploratory study identified risk factors that affect asthma management…

  10. Asthma Management Disparities: A Photovoice Investigation with African American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans-Agnew, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Disparities in asthma management are a burden on African American youth. The objective of this study is to describe and compare the discourses of asthma management disparities (AMDs) in African American adolescents in Seattle to existing youth-related asthma policies in Washington State. Adolescents participated in a three-session photovoice…

  11. Mouse models of acute exacerbations of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh K; Herbert, Cristan; Foster, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    Most of the healthcare costs associated with asthma relate to emergency department visits and hospitalizations because of acute exacerbations of underlying chronic disease. Development of appropriate animal models of acute exacerbations of asthma is a necessary prerequisite for understanding pathophysiological mechanisms and assessing potential novel therapeutic approaches. Most such models have been developed using mice. Relatively few mouse models attempt to simulate the acute-on-chronic disease that characterizes human asthma exacerbations. Instead, many reported models involve relatively short-term challenge with an antigen to which animals are sensitized, followed closely by an unrelated triggering agent, so are better described as models of potentiation of acute allergic inflammation. Triggers for experimental models of asthma exacerbations include (i) challenge with high levels of the sensitizing allergen (ii) infection by viruses or fungi, or challenge with components of these microorganisms (iii) exposure to environmental pollutants. In this review, we examine the strengths and weaknesses of published mouse models, their application for investigation of novel treatments and potential future developments.

  12. Indoor Environmental Control Practices and Asthma Management.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Elizabeth C; Abramson, Stuart L; Sandel, Megan T

    2016-11-01

    Indoor environmental exposures, particularly allergens and pollutants, are major contributors to asthma morbidity in children; environmental control practices aimed at reducing these exposures are an integral component of asthma management. Some individually tailored environmental control practices that have been shown to reduce asthma symptoms and exacerbations are similar in efficacy and cost to controller medications. As a part of developing tailored strategies regarding environmental control measures, an environmental history can be obtained to evaluate the key indoor environmental exposures that are known to trigger asthma symptoms and exacerbations, including both indoor pollutants and allergens. An environmental history includes questions regarding the presence of pets or pests or evidence of pests in the home, as well as knowledge regarding whether the climatic characteristics in the community favor dust mites. In addition, the history focuses on sources of indoor air pollution, including the presence of smokers who live in the home or care for children and the use of gas stoves and appliances in the home. Serum allergen-specific immunoglobulin E antibody tests can be performed or the patient can be referred for allergy skin testing to identify indoor allergens that are most likely to be clinically relevant. Environmental control strategies are tailored to each potentially relevant indoor exposure and are based on knowledge of the sources and underlying characteristics of the exposure. Strategies include source removal, source control, and mitigation strategies, such as high-efficiency particulate air purifiers and allergen-proof mattress and pillow encasements, as well as education, which can be delivered by primary care pediatricians, allergists, pediatric pulmonologists, other health care workers, or community health workers trained in asthma environmental control and asthma education.

  13. Barriers to Asthma Management for School Nurses: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Hanley Nadeau, Ellen; Toronto, Coleen E

    2016-04-01

    Childhood asthma is a growing health concern. Asthma is the most common chronic illness of childhood and a leading cause of emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and school absenteeism. School nurses play a valuable role in asthma management. The purpose of this integrative review is to examine barriers to asthma management for school nurses in the school setting. Findings revealed multiple barriers school nurses encounter in managing asthma. Six themes emerged that included lack of resources and support, insufficient time, communication challenges, limited knowledge, and lack of awareness of school nurses' expertise. Students, parents, primary care physicians, school administration, staff, and school nurses themselves all play a role in constructing barriers to asthma management. There is a need for school nurses and school nurse leaders to focus efforts to develop strategies to overcome barriers to ensure evidence-based, best practice management of asthma in the school setting.

  14. Management of asthma in adults: current therapy and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Green, R; Brightling, C; Pavord, I; Wardlaw, A

    2003-01-01

    Asthma is increasing in prevalence worldwide and results in significant use of healthcare resources. Although most patients with asthma can be adequately treated with inhaled corticosteroids, an important number of patients require additional therapy and an increasing number of options are available. A further minority of patients develop severe persistent asthma which remains difficult to manage despite current pharmacological therapies. This review discusses the various treatment options currently available for each stage of asthma severity, highlights some of the limitations of current management, and outlines directions which may improve the management of asthma in the future. PMID:12782771

  15. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  16. School Asthma Screening and Case Management: Attendance and Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moricca, Michelle L.; Grasska, Merry A.; BMarthaler, Marcia; Morphew, Tricia; Weismuller, Penny C.; Galant, Stanley P.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is related to school absenteeism and underperformance in elementary students. This pilot study assessed whether school nurse case management (CM) in children identified with asthma impacts academic performance and school absenteeism in one school. A validated questionnaire was used to identify children at risk for asthma and CM was provided…

  17. Do the British Guidelines for Asthma Management facilitate concordance?

    PubMed Central

    Steven, Karen; Marsden, Wendy; Neville, Ronald G; Hoskins, Gaylor; Sullivan, Frank M; Drummond, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background  Asthma is an example of a common, chronic illness in which clinicians are encouraged to promote concordance and adhere to guidelines. Some existing research suggests that these aims may be incompatible. Objectives  To describe patient goals for life and for asthma management in order to inform concordance with people with asthma. Design  A cross‐sectional, qualitative survey. Setting and participants  A purposive sample of 47 adults with asthma from Dundee, UK. The subjects were identified from general practice asthma registers and had a range of ages and asthma severity but no significant comorbidity. Methods  Tape‐recorded semi‐structured interviews. The topic guide was based on the literature and had been piloted in a previous study. Results  The participants focussed on improving their lives, only aiming to improve their asthma as a means of improving their lives. Three aspects of asthma were reported to help or hinder improving life: the use of asthma medication, trigger avoidance and exercise. People integrated these three aspects of asthma in order to maximize life. Conclusions  The study supports the more individualized goals of the recently revised British Guidelines for Asthma Management but highlights the need to develop this further in future revisions. It also provides an explanation for patients’ acceptance of less than ‘perfect’ asthma control and it suggests that shared goals may be achieved in practice by considering the advantages and disadvantages of medication and allergen avoidance on everyday life rather than on asthma. PMID:14982501

  18. Managing Asthma: A Guide for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This guide was developed to provide school personnel with practical ways to help students with asthma participate fully in all school activities. It begins by noting the prevalence of asthma and stating that asthma is a leading cause of absenteeism among students. This is followed by a brief description of asthma as a chronic lung disease…

  19. Partners in School Asthma Management: Evaluation of a Self-Management Program for Children with Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, L. Kay; Sockrider, Marianna M.; Abramson, Stuart L.; Swank, Paul R.; Czyzewski, Danita I.; Tortolero, Susan R.; Markham, Christine M.; Fernandez, Maria E.; Shegog, Ross; Tyrrell, Shellie

    2006-01-01

    The "Partners in School Asthma Management" program for inner-city elementary school children comprises (1) case finding; (2) linkage of school nurses, parents, and clinicians; (3) a computer-based tailored educational program; and (4) school environmental assessment and intervention. Case finding identified 1730 children in 60 elementary schools…

  20. Managing asthma in the community: a guide for nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Bostock-Cox, Beverley

    2013-03-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory condition which affects all age groups and causes significant and unecessary morbidity and mortality. Appropriate management will depend on making the correct diagnosis and offering suitable medication through a device that the patient can use. Where indicated, self management through the use of asthma action plans should be encouraged.

  1. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... NEXT >> Featured Video Hard to Breathe: NHLBI Researchers Seek Treatments for Severe Asthma 05/29/2014 The ... Topics Asthma article Hard to Breathe: NHLBI Researchers Seek Treatments for Severe Asthma 05/29/2014 Asthma ...

  2. Apps for asthma self-management: a systematic assessment of content and tools

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Apps have been enthusiastically adopted by the general public. They are increasingly recognized by policy-makers as a potential medium for supporting self-management of long-term conditions. We assessed the degree to which current smartphone and tablet apps for people with asthma offer content and tools of appropriate quality to support asthma self-management. Methods We adapted systematic review methodology to the assessment of apps. We identified English-language asthma apps for all ages through a systematic search of official app stores. We systematically assessed app content using criteria derived from international guidelines and systematic review of strategies for asthma self-management. We covered three domains: comprehensiveness of asthma information, consistency of advice with evidence and compliance with health information best practice principles. Results We identified 103 apps for asthma in English, of which 56 were sources of information about the condition and 47 provided tools for the management of asthma. No apps offered both types of functionality. Only three information apps approached our definition of comprehensiveness of information about asthma. No apps provided advice on lay management of acute asthma that included details of appropriate reliever medication use. In 32 of 72 instances, apps made unequivocal recommendations about strategies for asthma control or prophylaxis that were unsupported by current evidence. Although 90% of apps stated a clear purpose, compliance with other best practice principles for health information was variable. Contact details were located for 55%, funding source for 18% and confidentiality policy for 17%. Conclusions No apps for people with asthma combined reliable, comprehensive information about the condition with supportive tools for self-management. Healthcare professionals considering recommending apps to patients as part of asthma self-management should exercise caution, recognizing that some

  3. Asthma Management Disparities: A Photovoice Investigation with African American Youth.

    PubMed

    Evans-Agnew, Robin

    2016-04-01

    Disparities in asthma management are a burden on African American youth. The objective of this study is to describe and compare the discourses of asthma management disparities (AMDs) in African American adolescents in Seattle to existing youth-related asthma policies in Washington State. Adolescents participated in a three-session photovoice project and presented their phototexts to the Washington State asthma planning committee. Critical discourse analysis methodology was used to analyze adolescent phototexts and the State asthma plan. We found that the State plan did not address AMD in African American adolescents. Adolescents discussed more topics on AMD than the State plan presented, and they introduced new topics concerning residential mobility, poor nutrition, inadequate athletic opportunities, and schools with stairs. Current health policy may be constraining effective responses to asthma disparities in youth. School nursing leadership can use photovoice to advance youth voice in transforming structural inequities in urban school environments.

  4. Occupational asthma. Practical points for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Kuschner, W G; Chitkara, R K; Sarinas, P S

    1998-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic illness characterized by episodes of reversible airflow obstruction. A cornerstone of asthma management is identifying and avoiding agents that cause bronchospasm. The workplace is an important potential source of respirable exposures that can cause or trigger asthma. Identification of an occupational factor in asthma is important: early diagnosis and removal of the worker from the exposure is associated with improved prognosis; the diagnosis of occupational asthma may lead to compensation for work-related impairment and disability; and the diagnosis of occupational asthma is a Sentinel Health Event with implications for public health and prevention. In this article, we review specific causes of occupational asthma and general settings in which an occupational factor should be suspected and explored as part of the management of the worker with asthma. We also review specific and simple elements of history and pulmonary function testing that can be easily assessed by most health care practitioners and may be sufficient to establish a diagnosis of occupational asthma. Finally, we review the medical-legal implications of occupational asthma.

  5. Challenges in the Management of Asthma in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Song, Woo-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Recent literature has emphasized the clinical and socio-epidemiological significance of asthma in the elderly. However, why the disease burden remains high in this group is unclear. Elderly subjects usually have multiple chronic illnesses, and the role played by comorbidities in the context of asthma has been underappreciated. This review aims to summarize the literature associations between comorbidities and asthma in elderly patients. In addition, we discuss patient management issues. PMID:26122503

  6. Difficult asthma in adults: recognition and approaches to management.

    PubMed

    Harrison, B D W

    2005-09-01

    Difficult asthma must be distinguished from severe asthma. It is then important in patients with suspected difficult asthma to ensure that the diagnosis is correct, and that if the patient has asthma that the attributed symptoms are indeed all genuinely due to the asthma and not to coexisting physical or psychogenic respiratory conditions. It is also important to be alert when there is discordance between symptoms and objective lung function in order to recognize both poor perceivers and over-reactors. Difficult asthma can occur in patients with objectively mild, moderate or severe disease, but the consequences are most dramatic in patients with severe asthma. Asthma may be difficult for the patient, for the clinician or both because of disease factors, doctor or nurse therapist factors, and/or patient factors. Investigation requires access to the full range of respiratory, imaging and allergy tests. It also requires a multidisciplinary approach involving ear, nose and throat specialists and speech therapists, and access to psychiatric and psychological assessment and therapies. Poor compliance is associated with significantly poorer asthma and asthma-related health outcomes. Poor compliance can be recognized in two-thirds of such patients by their not attending scheduled appointments. Poor compliance is significantly associated with anxiety, social deprivation and adverse family circumstances, and these characteristics and adversities probably contribute to the poorly compliant behaviour. In difficult asthma it is important to identify and manage the condition causing the symptoms rather than prescribing more and more asthma therapy. Recognizing psychosocial adversity is essential. A structured approach is essential. There remains a small number of patients with genuine steroid-resistant asthma, some with predominately neutrophilic rather than eosinophilic airway inflammation, and others for whom the secondary gain of continuing symptoms is overwhelming. There is

  7. National Environmental Leadership Award in Asthma Management

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Asthma Awards recognizes health plans, healthcare providers and communities in action that demonstrate an environmental component to address asthma triggers, collaborate with others and save healthcare dollars with their programming.

  8. Original Research: Acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease: Effect of genotype and asthma.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Kristy; Mullen, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is a severe hemoglobinopathy caused by mutations in the beta globin genes. The disorder has protean manifestations and leads to severe morbidity and early mortality. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a common complication and in the USA is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease. Care of patients with sickle cell disease is complex and typically involves both primary care physicians and hematology subspecialists. The purpose of this study was first to attempt to validate in a pediatric sickle cell patient cohort associations between ACS and sickle cell disease genotype and between ACS and asthma as a comorbidity. The second purpose of the study was to study in a typical community the frequency with which asthma associated with ACS was addressed in terms of electronic medical record integration, pulmonary subspecialty consultation for management of asthma, and completion of pulmonary function testing (PFTs). A retrospective study of the electronic medical record of a children's hospital that provides most of the medical care for children in a portion of western New York state was performed. We found that ACS was more common in the sickle cell disease genotypes SS and S/beta-thalassemia-null, and that ACS was more frequent in patients treated for asthma. We also found that despite the use of a comprehensive electronic medical record, there was poor documentation of ACS and asthma episodes in the problem lists of patients with sickle cell disease, and that most patients with sickle cell disease with ACS or asthma failed to receive formal consultation services from pediatric pulmonary subspecialists.

  9. An Online Simulation in Pediatric Asthma Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Keith B.

    2004-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that nearly 20 million Americans suffer from asthma, 6.3 million of which are children (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2004). It is not merely an annoyance disease, as is commonly believed. Asthma kills. It takes more than 5,000 American lives each year (Asthma Statistics in America,…

  10. Managing Asthma in the Early Childhood Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graville, Iris

    2011-01-01

    Asthma, one of the most common chronic disorders in childhood, affects more than seven million children in the United States, and is the third leading cause of hospitalization for children. Statistics like these make planning and preparing for asthma in the early childhood setting a high priority. With the high rates of asthma in the U.S. today,…

  11. Successful implementation of spacer treatment guideline for acute asthma

    PubMed Central

    Powell, C; Maskell, G; Marks, M; South, M; Robertson, C; LENNEY, W.

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To develop and implement an evidence based guideline for the treatment of acute asthma using a metered dose inhaler and spacer combination.
METHODS—Defined strategies were used for the development and implementation of a guideline, assessed by a prospective, descriptive, study using notes review, and patient, nursing, and medical staff telephone contact. The setting was a tertiary referral hospital in Victoria, Australia with 25 000 yearly admissions, and asthma accounting for about 7% of total. The first 200 children and families to use the guideline after its introduction were evaluated.
RESULTS—A total of 191 (95.5%) children were treated according to the guideline. Six (3.0%) children were given nebulisers appropriately based on severity; five (2.5%) were given nebulisers at parental or child choice; and four (2.0 %) who did not have severe asthma, received nebulised treatment inappropriately.
CONCLUSIONS—Successful implementation of a new evidence based guideline can be achieved using specific strategies for promoting the application of research findings in the clinical arena.

 PMID:11159290

  12. Reasons for delay in seeking treatment for acute asthma: the patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Janson, S; Becker, G

    1998-01-01

    Increased morbidity and mortality due to asthma suggested the need to investigate whether persons with asthma report delay in seeking medical care during acute asthma exacerbations and the reasons they gave for delay. We interviewed 95 asthmatic adults, 36 men and 59 women, using a critical incident technique to discover how patients responded to acute asthma symptom episodes. Subjects were interviewed once per month for a total of three interviews. All subjects had physician-diagnosed asthma for a mean of 16.8+/-14.5 years. Eighty-six percent of the sample (n=82) reported delay in seeking medical care for severe asthma symptoms. Seven reasons for delay were identified: uncertainty, disruption, minimization, fear of systemic corticosteroid, previous bad experiences in emergency departments, the need to "tough it out" alone, and economic reasons. Seventy-one subjects (86.5%) reported three or more reasons for delay. Thirteen subjects (16%) identified pivotal episodes in which they realized they could die from asthma and as a result, no longer delayed. People with asthma often delay seeking urgent care for acute episodes for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are modifiable. Clear directions from health professionals to guide patients in responding to acute asthma episodes are needed. Asthma action plans written by the primary physician may be a positive agent of change for those who delay.

  13. Examining Household Asthma Management Behavior through a Microeconomic Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Brandt, Sylvia J.; Tager, Ira B.

    2014-01-01

    National guidelines on the effective management of pediatric asthma have been promoted for over 20 years, yet asthma-related morbidity among low-income children remains disproportionately high. To date, household and clinical interventions designed to remediate these differences have been informed largely by a health behavior framework. However,…

  14. IAQ Tools for Schools: Managing Asthma in the School Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation and Indoor Air.

    This manual provides tips on improving indoor air quality within the school environment by removing the elements that trigger asthma attacks in children, and presents a list of organizations where asthma resource information can be obtained. Air quality management tips cover removing of animal and cockroach allergens, cleaning up mold and…

  15. The home environment and family asthma management among ethnically diverse urban youth with asthma.

    PubMed

    Sato, Amy F; Kopel, Sheryl J; McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Seifer, Ronald; Esteban, Cynthia; Coutinho, Maria Teresa; Klein, Robert; Fritz, Gregory K; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne

    2013-06-01

    Although the pediatric psychology literature underscores the importance of illness-related aspects of the home environment for optimal family asthma management, little is known about the contribution of more global aspects of the home environment (e.g., family routines/schedule, quality of stimulation provided to child) to asthma management in ethnic minority and urban families. The goals of this study were to (a) explore ethnic/racial group differences in global and specific dimensions of home environment quality among Latino, non-Latino White (NLW), and African American urban children with asthma; and (b) examine associations between the quality and quantity of support and stimulation within the home environment, as measured by the HOME Inventory, and family asthma management. Urban, low-income children (N = 131) between the ages of 6 and 13 with asthma and a primary caregiver participated in a multimodal assessment, including an in-home observation and semistructured interviews to assess aspects of home environment quality and family asthma management practices. While controlling for poverty, no ethnic group differences were found in the global home environment; however, there were significant differences in specific dimensions (e.g., Family Participation in Developmentally Stimulating Experiences, and Aspects of the Physical Environment) of home environment quality. Across the whole sample, home environment quality predicted family asthma management. When examining this association for specific ethnic groups, this finding did not hold for the Latino subsample. The results highlight the need to consider ethnic group differences in non-illness-specific aspects of the home environment when addressing families' asthma management strategies.

  16. Asthma in intellectual disability: are we managing our patients appropriately?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    People with intellectual disability are a vulnerable group of people with asthma that has, to date, largely been ignored in the medical literature. Although guidelines for medication management for people with intellectual disability suggest asthma is treated as for other populations, there are special considerations that should be taken into account when managing asthma in this group. Due to their cognitive impairment as well as comorbidities, they are likely to require support with asthma self-management, including inhaler use. Their varying degrees of autonomy mean that there is often a need to provide education and information to both the person and their caregivers. Educational aims To understand general principles of health of people with intellectual disability and how this affects the healthcare professional’s approach to asthma management. To understand how intellectual disability affects cognition, autonomy and communication, and therefore the ability of a person to self-manage asthma. To recognise ways of mitigating respiratory disease risk in people with intellectual disability. To describe ways for healthcare professionals to support people with intellectual disability and their caregivers in asthma management. PMID:28210318

  17. Using the Health Belief Model to Understand School Nurse Asthma Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quaranta, Judith E.; Spencer, Gale A.

    2015-01-01

    Ten million children in the United States have asthma. Since children are in school about 6 hr a day, school nurses are positioned to intervene and influence asthma outcomes. A descriptive correlational study was designed to investigate performance of school nurses' asthma management behaviors in relationship to asthma knowledge, asthma attitude,…

  18. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > Asthma A A A What's ... although it can take several days. Who Gets Asthma? No one really knows why one person's airways ...

  19. Asthma Prevalence, Management, and Education in New York State Elementary Schools: A Survey of School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kielb, Christine; Lin, Shao; Hwang, Syni-an

    2007-01-01

    A survey of school nurses was conducted in New York State elementary schools to assess asthma and asthma management in students. The survey contained questions about asthma morbidity, management and education, obstacles to management, and school indoor air quality. The reported prevalence of asthma among students was 8.5%. Of the students with…

  20. Asthma Management: Part I: An Overview of the Problem and Current Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Valerie O'Toole; Friedman, Janet; Schmitt, Rita

    2002-01-01

    Describes the pathophysiology of asthma and the types, risk factors, and current trends in management of the disease. The role of the school nurse in asthma management is outlined, including identifying children with asthma, evaluating the child's response to the asthma management plan, and controlling environmental factors that precipitate asthma…

  1. Anaphylaxis: acute treatment and management.

    PubMed

    Ring, Johannes; Grosber, Martine; Möhrenschlager, Matthias; Brockow, Knut

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is the maximal variant of an acute life-threatening immediate-type allergy. Due to its often dramatic onset and clinical course, practical knowledge in the management of these reactions is mandatory both for physicians and patients. It has to be distinguished between acute treatment modalities and general recommendations for management of patients who have suffered from an anaphylactic reaction. Acute treatment comprises general procedures like positioning, applying an intravenous catheter, call for help, comfort of the patient as well as the application of medication. The acute treatment modalities are selected depending upon the intensity of the clinical symptomatology as they are categorized in 'severity grades'. First of all it is important to diagnose anaphylaxis early and consider several differential diagnoses. This diagnosis is purely clinical and laboratory tests are of no help in the acute situation. Epinephrine is the essential antianaphylactic drug in the pharmacologic treatment. It should be first applied intramuscularly, only in very severe cases or under conditions of surgical interventions intravenous application can be tried. Furthermore, glucocorticosteroids are given in order to prevent protracted or biphasic courses of anaphylaxis; they are of little help in the acute treatment. Epinephrine autoinjectors can be used by the patient him/herself. Histamine H(1)-antagonists are valuable in mild anaphylactic reactions; they should be given intravenously if possible. The replacement of volume is crucial in antianaphylactic treatment. Crystalloids can be used in the beginning, in severe shock colloid volume substitutes have to be applied. Patients suffering from an anaphylactic episode should be observed over a period of 4-10 h according to the severity of the symptomatology. It is crucial to be aware or recognize risk patients as for example patients with severe uncontrolled asthma, or under beta-adrenergic blockade. When bronchial

  2. National audit of acute severe asthma in adults admitted to hospital. Standards of Care Committee, British Thoracic Society.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, M G; Ryland, I; Harrison, B D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To ascertain the standard of care for hospital management of acute severe asthma in adults. DESIGN--Questionnaire based retrospective multicentre survey of case records. SETTING--36 hospitals (12 teaching and 24 district general hospitals) across England, Wales, and Scotland. PATIENTS--All patients admitted with acute severe asthma between 1 August and 30 September 1990 immediately before publication of national guidelines for asthma management. MAIN MEASURES--Main recommendations of guidelines for hospital management of acute severe asthma as performed by respiratory and non-respiratory physicians. RESULTS--766 patients (median age 41 (range 16-94) years) were studied; 465 (63%) were female and 448 (61%) had had previous admissions for asthma. Deficiencies were evident for each aspect of care studied, and respiratory physicians performed better than non-respiratory physicians. 429 (56%) patients had had their treatment increased in the two weeks preceding the admission but only 237 (31%) were prescribed oral steroids. Initially 661/766 (86%) patients had peak expiratory flow measured and recorded but only 534 (70%) ever had arterial blood gas tensions assessed. 65 (8%) patients received no steroid treatment in the first 24 hours after admission. Variability of peak expiratory flow was measured before discharge in 597/759 (78%) patients, of whom 334 (56%) achieved good control (variability < 25%). 47 (6%) patients were discharged without oral or inhaled steroids; 182/743 (24%) had no planned outpatient follow up and 114 failed to attend, leaving 447 (60%) seen in clinic within two months. Only 57/629 (8%) patients were recorded as having a written management plan. CONCLUSIONS--The hospital management of a significant minority of patients deviates from recommended national standards and some deviations are potentially serious. Overall, respiratory physicians provide significantly better care than non-respiratory physicians. PMID:10142032

  3. Optimising the management of patients with difficult asthma.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Evelyn; Higgins, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Asthma affects 5.4 million people in the UK, around 1 in 12 of the population. Between 5 and 10% of asthma (depending on the definition used) is categorised as difficult asthma, a term which generally refers to patients who continue to experience symptoms and frequent exacerbations despite the prescription of high-dose asthma therapy. Difficult asthma is an indication for specialist review by an appropriate respiratory physician, but close liaison between primary, secondary and tertiary care is critical and it is therefore important that primary care health professionals should be aware of the principles of management. One of the most important questions to ask is whether the individual with difficult asthma is taking their treatment Identifying this, however, is not easy. GPs could assess prescription uptake, looking for low use of preventers and excess use of short-acting bronchodilators. Newer means of assessing adherence have been developed. Inhaler devices that can monitor completion and timing of actuations have been produced. Meters that measure FeNO are available. A recent UK study found that 12 out of 100 patients referred for difficult asthma did not have reversible airflow obstruction or a history suggestive of asthma. Diagnoses included COPD, cystic fibrosis, cardiomyopathy, respiratory muscle dysfunction and severe anxiety with vocal cord dysfunction.

  4. Perceived involvement in condition management among inner-city youth with asthma and their primary caregivers.

    PubMed

    Greenley, Rachel Neff; Josie, Katherine Leigh; Drotar, Dennis

    2006-11-01

    This study examined patterns of agreement versus disagreement in family perceptions of caregiver and youth involvement in asthma management tasks and associations of these patterns with youth asthma outcomes. Fifty-six caregiver-child dyads completed questionnaires of family involvement in asthma management and asthma health outcomes (i.e., symptom days, health care utilization, and medication adherence). Discrepancies were documented for perceptions of both caregiver and youth involvement. Caregiver overestimation of youth involvement in asthma management was associated with greater asthma severity and more asthma symptoms. Discrepancies in family perceptions of involvement pose salient challenges for effective clinical management and require clinical attention.

  5. The Healthy Learner Model for Student Chronic Condition Management--Part II: The Asthma Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Cecelia DuPlessis; Splett, Patricia L.; Mullett, Sara Stoltzfus; Jensen, Charlotte; Belseth, Stephanie Bisson

    2006-01-01

    The Healthy Learner Asthma Initiative (HLAI) was designed as a comprehensive, school-community initiative to improve asthma management and produce healthy learners. National asthma guidelines were translated into components of asthma management in the school setting that defined performance expectations and lead to greater quality and consistency…

  6. [Management of asthma in primary care medicine].

    PubMed

    Pasche, Olivier; Cornuz, Jacques; Lazor, Romain

    2010-12-01

    The international recommendations issued by GINA (Global Initiative for Asthma) have undergone considerable adaptations over the last years. This article proposes the local adaptation of those guidelines bearing on the practical aspects of the treatment for the general practitioner's use. One of the fundamental changes in these new guidelines on good practice relates to the permanent adaptation of the treatment on the basis of symptom control rather than on the severity of the asthma. Another change from the old recommendations concerns the manner in which the asthma is categorised into different phases.

  7. Managing patients with chronic severe asthma: rise to the challenge.

    PubMed

    Polosa, Riccardo; Benfatto, Giuseppe Trifoglio

    2009-03-01

    Most asthmatic patients with moderate to severe disease can be satisfactorily managed with a combination of inhaled corticosteroids and beta(2)-agonists. However, there are perhaps 10% of the asthmatic population with persistent symptoms, impaired quality of life and excessive health-care utilization, despite this management regime. These patients often require frequent and even occasionally regular oral corticosteroid use. Chronic, severe asthma is a heterogeneous disease with distinct sub-phenotypes. A systematic diagnostic work-up may help to identify these distinct sub-phenotypes and this may help guide treatment and may even provide information about prognosis. Optimal treatment of chronic severe asthma should achieve the best possible asthma control and quality of life with the least dose of systemic corticosteroids. The choice and formulation of therapeutic agent is dictated by the severity of disease and includes conventional, immunosuppressive/immunomodulating and biologic therapies. Unfortunately, current asthma management guidelines offer little contribution to the care of the challenging patient with chronic severe asthma. This review article aims at summarizing the evidence regarding various therapeutic modalities for chronic severe asthma and also aims to provide a practical approach to diagnosis and management for the benefit of those who have a specific interest in this problematic condition.

  8. Managing Asthma in the School Environment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guide offers valuable information for all school staff, especially school nurses, teachers and maintenance staff, on how to identify and control common environmental factors in schools that trigger asthma episodes. [EPA 402-K-10-004].

  9. Typhoid fever as a triggering factor in acute and intractable bronchial asthma attack.

    PubMed

    Wardhana; Surachmanto, Eko E; Datau, E A

    2013-10-01

    Typhoid fever is an enteric infection caused by Salmonella typhi. In Indonesia, typhoid fever is endemic with high incidence of the disease. In daily practice we frequently have patients with bronchial asthma, and it is becoming worse when these patients get typhoid fever. After oral ingestion, Salmonella typhi invades the the intestine mucosa after conducted by microbial binding to epithelial cells, destroying the microfold cells (M cell) then passed through the lamina propria and detected by dendritic cells (DC) which express a variety of pathogen recognition receptors on the surfaces, including Toll-Like Receptor (TLR). expressed on macrophages and on intestinal epithelial cells inducing degradation of IB, and translocation of NF-B (Nuclear Factor-Kappa Beta). This process initiates the induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression profile adhesion molecules, chemokines, adhesion molecules, and other proteins that induce and perpetuate the inflammation in host cells then will induce acute ant intractable attack of bronchial asthma. The role of typhoid fever in bronchial asthma, especially in persons with acute attack of bronchial asthma, is not well understood. In this article, we will discuss the role of typhoid fever in the bronchial asthma patients which may cause bronchial asthma significantly become more severe even triggering the acute and intractable attack of bronchial asthma. This fact makes an important point, to treat completely the typhoid fever in patients with bronchial asthma.

  10. Asthma and ageing: an end user's perspective--the perception and problems with the management of asthma in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Jones, S C; Iverson, D; Burns, P; Evers, U; Caputi, P; Morgan, S

    2011-04-01

    Despite the high prevalence of asthma in the elderly, its development, diagnosis, and treatment are under-researched. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the current state of knowledge in relation to management of asthma in the elderly - focusing on barriers to diagnosis and treatment and the central role of self-management. Asthma prevalence increases with age, as does the risk of dying from asthma, and with the ageing of the population and increasing life expectancy, the prevalence of (diagnosed and undiagnosed) asthma in older adults is expected to increase drastically, placing an increasing burden on sufferers, the community and health budgets. Asthma sufferers are more likely to be psychologically distressed and at a higher risk of anxiety and depression, more likely to experience a sense of lack of control over their health and to have lower self-reported quality of life. Asthma is under-diagnosed, and under-treated, in the elderly, further exacerbating these negative consequences. The review concludes, among other things, that there is a need to better understand the development and impact of asthma in the elderly, to increase community awareness of asthma in the elderly, to improve both 'medical management' and 'self-management' in this population and to develop more effective tools for diagnosis and treatment of asthma in the elderly. The paper concludes with key recommendations for future research and practice in this area.

  11. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... stay healthier overall. Doctors can help people find treatments that allow them to them participate in their sports — in fact, a number of professional athletes have asthma. Taking Medicine Most asthma medicines are breathed directly into the ...

  12. The usefulness of biomarkers of airway inflammation in managing asthma.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sarita U; Long, Aidan A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of managing asthma is to maintain disease control. Current approaches to assessment of control do not include measurement of airway inflammation. This study was designed to assess the usefulness of biomarkers of airway inflammation in guiding asthma management decisions. A literature review was performed. Bronchial biopsy is a direct measure of airway inflammation but not practical for routine use. Enumeration of sputum eosinophils is very useful in guiding changes in controller medication to decrease asthma exacerbations, whereas measurement of exhaled nitric oxide has not proven to be useful in this regard. Serial measurement of airway hyperreactivity as a guide to asthma management yields inconclusive results. Use of indirect stimuli for bronchial challenge offers both practical and theoretical advantages in the assessment of airway hyperreactivity. Data on the analysis of exhaled breath condensate have not yet been studied adequately in guiding management decisions. Enumeration of sputum cell counts appears to be the most useful biomarker of airway inflammation in guiding asthma management decisions. Combined approaches using simple methods of measuring airway hyperreactivity and obtaining sputum samples hold promise for the future, particularly if rapid analysis of cellular products in sputum can be developed.

  13. Serum Vitamin D Levels and Severe Asthma Exacerbations in the Childhood Asthma Management Program Study

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, John M.; Schuemann, Brooke; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L.; Hollis, Bruce W.; Strunk, Robert C.; Zeiger, Robert S.; Weiss, Scott T.; Litonjua, Augusto A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Asthma exacerbations, most often due to respiratory tract infections, are the leading causes of asthma morbidity and comprise a significant proportion of asthma-related costs. Vitamin D status may play a role in preventing asthma exacerbations. Objectives To assess the relationship between serum vitamin D levels and subsequent severe asthma exacerbations. Methods We measured 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in serum collected from 1,024 mild to moderate persistent asthmatic children at the time of enrollment in a multi-center clinical trial of children randomized to receiving budesonide, nedocromil, or placebo (as-needed beta-agonists), the Childhood Asthma Management Program. Using multivariable modeling we examined the relationship between baseline vitamin D level and the odds of any hospitalization or emergency department (ED) visit over the 4 years of the trial. Results 35% of all subjects were vitamin D insufficient, as defined by a level ≤ 30 ng/ml 25(OH)D. Mean vitamin D levels were lowest in African-American subjects, and highest in whites. After adjusting for age, sex, BMI, income, and treatment group, insufficient vitamin D status was associated with a higher odds of any hospitalization or ED visit (odds ratio [OR] 1.5 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1 – 1.9] P =0.01). Conclusion Vitamin D insufficiency is common in this population of North American children with mild to moderate persistent asthma, and is associated with higher odds of severe exacerbation over a four year period. PMID:20538327

  14. Clinical evaluation, management, and prevention of work-related asthma.

    PubMed

    Friedman-Jiménez, G; Beckett, W S; Szeinuk, J; Petsonk, E L

    2000-01-01

    Work-related asthma (WRA) is asthma that is attributable to, or is made worse by, environmental exposures in the workplace. WRA has become the most prevalent occupational lung disease in developed countries, is more common than is generally recognized, and can be severe and disabling. Identification of workplace exposures causing and/or aggravating the asthma, and appropriate control or cessation of these exposures can often lead to reduction or even complete elimination of symptoms and disability. This depends on timely recognition and diagnosis of WRA. In this review, the diagnostic evaluation has been organized in a stepwise fashion to make it more practical for primary care physicians as well as physicians specializing in occupational diseases and asthma. WRA merits more widespread attention among clinicians, labor and management health and safety specialists, researchers, health care organizations, public health policy makers, industrial hygienists, and others interested in disease prevention.

  15. Managing Asthma in Elementary and Middle Schools: Adherence to Federal Laws and National Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Ethan J.; Neuharth-Pritchett, Stacey; Getch, Yvette Q.; Lease, A. Michele

    2017-01-01

    The current study examined teacher-reported asthma management practices in school and adherence to federal guidelines for students with asthma. 593 kindergarten-eighth grade teachers completed surveys regarding compliance with federal laws and policies, information-seeking behavior, asthma-related professional development, and asthma management…

  16. Asthma Management Practices and Education Needs of Head Start Directors and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huss, Karen; Winkelstein, Marilyn; Calabrese, Barbara; Butz, Arlene; Reshef, Shoshana; Rand, Cynthia; Gilpin, Adele

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed Baltimore Head Start directors and staff participating in an asthma education intervention at 15 Head Start programs to determine their asthma management practices and education needs. Results revealed discrepancies between staff and directors regarding location of asthma medications and presence of asthma action plans in programs. Both…

  17. Community Care of North Carolina's approach to asthma management.

    PubMed

    Tilson, Elizabeth Cuervo

    2013-01-01

    Community Care of North Carolina (CCNC) takes a comprehensive approach to asthma management. Support from CCNC helps providers follow evidence-based practice guidelines; data guide continuous quality improvement initiatives and inform the care of individual patients and populations; and care managers work with high-risk patients.

  18. Canadian Thoracic Society 2012 guideline update: Diagnosis and management of asthma in preschoolers, children and adults

    PubMed Central

    Lougheed, M Diane; Lemiere, Catherine; Ducharme, Francine M; Licskai, Chris; Dell, Sharon D; Rowe, Brian H; FitzGerald, Mark; Leigh, Richard; Watson, Wade; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2010, the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) published a Consensus Summary for the diagnosis and management of asthma in children six years of age and older, and adults, including an updated Asthma Management Continuum. The CTS Asthma Clinical Assembly subsequently began a formal clinical practice guideline update process, focusing, in this first iteration, on topics of controversy and/or gaps in the previous guidelines. METHODS: Four clinical questions were identified as a focus for the updated guideline: the role of noninvasive measurements of airway inflammation for the adjustment of anti-inflammatory therapy; the initiation of adjunct therapy to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) for uncontrolled asthma; the role of a single inhaler of an ICS/long-acting beta2-agonist combination as a reliever, and as a reliever and a controller; and the escalation of controller medication for acute loss of asthma control as part of a self-management action plan. The expert panel followed an adaptation process to identify and appraise existing guidelines on the specified topics. In addition, literature searches were performed to identify relevant systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials. The panel formally assessed and graded the evidence, and made 34 recommendations. RESULTS: The updated guideline recommendations outline a role for inclusion of assessment of sputum eosinophils, in addition to standard measures of asthma control, to guide adjustment of controller therapy in adults with moderate to severe asthma. Appraisal of the evidence regarding which adjunct controller therapy to add to ICS and at what ICS dose to begin adjunct therapy in children and adults with poor asthma control supported the 2010 CTS Consensus Summary recommendations. New recommendations for the adjustment of controller medication within written action plans are provided. Finally, priority areas for future research were identified. CONCLUSIONS: The present clinical practice guideline

  19. Building the case for asthma as a disease management program.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Steven S

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is a common disease that affects between 5.5% and 7.0% of the population. It is an example of a disease where good guidelines and an accepted model of treatment exist, but have not been fully implemented. In the latter part of 2000, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota (BCBSM) had existing and successful disease management (DM) programs for diabetes and heart disease and was looking to expand the concept to other diseases. Asthma was one of the conditions under consideration. This study, done in conjunction with PharMetrics, Inc. of Watertown, MA was done to establish the opportunity present to help Blue Cross members with the disease, and to help decide whether developing such a program made sense for the health plan. In addition, if the answer to the second question were yes, the study would lay the groundwork for that program. Using 2 years of BCBSM claims data, the study identified, stratified, and analyzed the cohort of BCBSM members with a diagnosis of asthma according to severity of illness, individual drug or drug combination treatment, emergency room usage, hospitalization, and total episode costs for asthma. Health plan results were bench-marked against the experience of others across the country represented in the (then) 20+ million managed care lives in PharMetrics' Integrated Outcomes Database. The results showed that in some of the recommended guidelines for asthma care BCBSM members led the nation in compliance, but that there was ample opportunity for improvement thus justifying moving forward in developing a disease management program. The results also seemed to validate many of the recommendations for asthma care expressed in the Expert Panel Report 2 on the diagnosis and treatment of asthma from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

  20. Personalised medicine and asthma diagnostics/management.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, Samuel J; Sandford, Andrew J

    2013-02-01

    Human beings come in all shapes and sizes. Heterogeneity makes life interesting, but leads to inter-individual variation in disease susceptibility and response to therapy. One major health challenge is to develop "personalised medicine"; therapeutic interventions tailored to an individual to ensure optimal treatment of disease. Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with several different phenotypes triggered by multiple gene-environment interactions. Inhaled corticosteroids and β2-agonists have been the mainstay asthma therapies for 30 years, but they are not effective in all patients, while high costs and side-effects also drive the need for better targeted treatment of asthma. Pharmacogenetics is the study of variations in the genetic code for proteins in signaling pathways targeted by pharmacological therapies. Biomarkers are biological markers obtained from patients that can aid in asthma diagnosis, prediction of treatment response, and monitoring of disease control. This review presents a broad discussion of the use of genetic profiling and biomarkers to better diagnose, monitor, and tailor the treatment of asthmatics. We also discuss possible future developments in personalised medicine, including the construction of artificially engineered airway tissues containing a patient's own cells for use as personalised drug-testing tools.

  1. Diagnosis and management of asthma in preschoolers: A Canadian Thoracic Society and Canadian Paediatric Society position paper

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Francine M; Dell, Sharon D; Radhakrishnan, Dhenuka; Grad, Roland M; Watson, Wade TA; Yang, Connie L; Zelman, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Asthma often starts before six years of age. However, there remains uncertainty as to when and how a preschool-age child with symptoms suggestive of asthma can be diagnosed with this condition. This delays treatment and contributes to both short- and long-term morbidity. Members of the Canadian Thoracic Society Asthma Clinical Assembly partnered with the Canadian Paediatric Society to develop a joint working group with the mandate to develop a position paper on the diagnosis and management of asthma in preschoolers. In the absence of lung function tests, the diagnosis of asthma should be considered in children one to five years of age with frequent (≥8 days/month) asthma-like symptoms or recurrent (≥2) exacerbations (episodes with asthma-like signs). The diagnosis requires the objective document of signs or convincing parent-reported symptoms of airflow obstruction (improvement in these signs or symptoms with asthma therapy), and no clinical suspicion of an alternative diagnosis. The characteristic feature of airflow obstruction is wheezing, commonly accompanied by difficulty breathing and cough. Reversibility with asthma medications is defined as direct observation of improvement with short-acting ß2-agonists (SABA) (with or without oral corticosteroids) by a trained health care practitioner during an acute exacerbation (preferred method). However, in children with no wheezing (or other signs of airflow obstruction) on presentation, reversibility may be determined by convincing parental report of a symptomatic response to a three-month therapeutic trial of a medium dose of inhaled corticosteroids with as-needed SABA (alternative method), or as-needed SABA alone (weaker alternative method). The authors provide key messages regarding in whom to consider the diagnosis, terms to be abandoned, when to refer to an asthma specialist and the initial management strategy. Finally, dissemination plans and priority areas for research are identified. PMID:26526095

  2. Diagnosis and management of asthma in preschoolers: A Canadian Thoracic Society and Canadian Paediatric Society position paper

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Francine M; Dell, Sharon D; Radhakrishnan, Dhenuka; Grad, Roland M; Watson, Wade TA; Yang, Connie L; Zelman, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Asthma often starts before six years of age. However, there remains uncertainty as to when and how a preschool-age child with symptoms suggestive of asthma can be diagnosed with this condition. This delays treatment and contributes to both short- and long-term morbidity. Members of the Canadian Thoracic Society Asthma Clinical Assembly partnered with the Canadian Paediatric Society to develop a joint working group with the mandate to develop a position paper on the diagnosis and management of asthma in preschoolers. In the absence of lung function tests, the diagnosis of asthma should be considered in children one to five years of age with frequent (≥8 days/month) asthma-like symptoms or recurrent (≥2) exacerbations (episodes with asthma-like signs). The diagnosis requires the objective document of signs or convincing parent-reported symptoms of airflow obstruction (improvement in these signs or symptoms with asthma therapy), and no clinical suspicion of an alternative diagnosis. The characteristic feature of airflow obstruction is wheezing, commonly accompanied by difficulty breathing and cough. Reversibility with asthma medications is defined as direct observation of improvement with short-acting ß2-agonists (SABA) (with or without oral corticosteroids) by a trained health care practitioner during an acute exacerbation (preferred method). However, in children with no wheezing (or other signs of airflow obstruction) on presentation, reversibility may be determined by convincing parental report of a symptomatic response to a three-month therapeutic trial of a medium dose of inhaled corticosteroids with as-needed SABA (alternative method), or as-needed SABA alone (weaker alternative method). The authors provide key messages regarding in whom to consider the diagnosis, terms to be abandoned, when to refer to an asthma specialist and the initial management strategy. Finally, dissemination plans and priority areas for research are identified. PMID:25893310

  3. Development of a patient passport in asthma management.

    PubMed

    Newell, Karen; Basi, Tajindar; Hume, Shenagh

    2014-10-21

    This article outlines the development, testing and evaluation of an asthma patient passport (APP). The APP was designed specifically for patients with severe and difficult-to-manage asthma. This patient group tends not to access emergency services when needed, potentially putting life at risk. These individuals prefer to self-manage rather than expose themselves to feelings of vulnerability in the emergency department (ED). The aims of the project were to save lives by ensuring these patients attend the ED, to improve patient experience in the ED and to assist healthcare professionals in their clinical decision making, enabling them to deliver appropriate and individualised emergency treatment.

  4. Development and Validation of a Risk-Adjustment Tool in Acute Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chu-Lin; Clark, Sunday; Sullivan, Ashley F; Camargo, Carlos A

    2009-01-01

    Objective To develop and prospectively validate a risk-adjustment tool in acute asthma. Data Sources Data were obtained from two large studies on acute asthma, the Multicenter Airway Research Collaboration (MARC) and the National Emergency Department Safety Study (NEDSS) cohorts. Both studies involved >60 emergency departments (EDs) and were performed during 1996–2001 and 2003–2006, respectively. Both included patients aged 18–54 years presenting to the ED with acute asthma. Study Design Retrospective cohort studies. Data Collection Clinical information was obtained from medical record review. The risk index was derived in the MARC cohort and then was prospectively validated in the NEDSS cohort. Principle Findings There were 3,515 patients in the derivation cohort and 3,986 in the validation cohort. The risk index included nine variables (age, sex, current smoker, ever admitted for asthma, ever intubated for asthma, duration of symptoms, respiratory rate, peak expiratory flow, and number of beta-agonist treatments) and showed satisfactory discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.75) and calibration (p=.30 for Hosmer–Lemeshow test) when applied to the validation cohort. Conclusions We developed and validated a novel risk-adjustment tool in acute asthma. This tool can be used for health care provider profiling to identify outliers for quality improvement purposes. PMID:19619246

  5. Predictive value of serum uric acid in hospitalized adolescents and adults with acute asthma

    PubMed Central

    Abdulnaby, Nasser Keshar; Sayed, Ashraf Othman; Shalaby, Nehad Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Background High serum uric acid (sUA) is an indicator of oxidative stress and is linked to tissue hypoxia in asthma. The objective of this case series was to investigate the prognostic role of sUA in patients with acute asthma exacerbations and the link between sUA and spirometric lung tests. Patients and methods This cross-sectional observational study included 120 patients with acute asthma exacerbations and 120 controls, categorized according to peak expiratory flow rate into moderate, and severe and life-threatening asthma. On admission, a detailed history was obtained and investigations were carried out regarding oxygen saturation (SaO2), arterial blood gas, spirometry, sUA, number of asthma exacerbations, smoking status, history of previous hospitalization, intensive care unit admission, and mechanical ventilation. Results The current study revealed higher sUA in asthmatic patients compared with healthy subjects and in severe asthma patients compared with moderate asthma patients (P<0.001). A positive correlation of sUA with asthma severity, number of asthma exacerbations and smoking index (r=0.6, 0.42 and 0.29, respectively, P<0.001) and a negative correlation of sUA with SaO2, partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2), percent predicted forced vital capacity, percent predicted forced expiratory volume (FEV%) and peak expiratory flow rate percent of predicted (PEFR%; r=−0.48, −0.29, −0.44, −0.44 and −0.66, respectively, P<0.001) were observed. Degree of asthma severity, number of asthma exacerbations, and smoking index were significant predictors of high sUA (R2=0.43, P<0.001) in multiple linear regression model 1. SaO2 and PEFR% were significant predictors of high uric acid (R2=0.50, P<0.001) in model 2. The sensitivity and specificity of sUA in predicting severity of asthma at the cutoff point of 6.3 mg/dL were 80% and 90%, respectively. The odds ratios of sUA, number of asthma exacerbations, and asthma duration were 5.4, 1.95 and 1

  6. Challenges in the management of severe allergic asthma in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Ayse Bilge; Iliaz, Sinem

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the features of asthma and allergy in the elderly. A significant number of elderly patients with asthma have uncontrolled and severe asthma. This review aims to provide an analysis of the literature on the assessment and phenotype of severe allergic asthma in the elderly. Gaps and pitfalls in diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, as well as management of severe allergic asthma in the elderly, are also discussed. PMID:27051308

  7. Ketamine versus aminophylline for acute asthma in children: A randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Abhimanyu; Guglani, Vishal; Jat, Kana Ram

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a lack of consensus regarding second-line therapy in children with acute asthma who fail to the standard therapy. Ketamine had bronchodilator property and may be useful in the treatment of acute asthma. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ketamine as compared to aminophylline in children with acute asthma who respond poorly to the standard therapy. METHODS: This randomized controlled trial included patients with acute asthma having Pediatric Respiratory Assessment Measure (PRAM) score ≥5 at 2 h of standard therapy. The enrolled patients received either intravenous (IV) ketamine or IV aminophylline. Primary outcome measure was change in PRAM score at the end of intervention. Secondary outcome measures included adverse effects, change in PO2and PCO2, need for mechanical ventilation, and duration of hospital stay. RESULTS: The trial included 24 patients each in ketamine and aminophylline groups. The baseline parameters were similar between the groups. The primary outcome was similar in both the groups with a change in PRAM score of 4.00 ± 1.25 and 4.17 ± 1.68 (P = 0.699) in ketamine and aminophylline groups, respectively. The secondary outcomes were not different between the groups. CONCLUSION: Ketamine and aminophylline were equally effective for children with acute asthma who responded poorly to the standard therapy. PMID:27803755

  8. The value of FeNO measurement in asthma management: the motion against FeNO to help manage childhood asthma--reality bites.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Peter J; Stick, Stephen M

    2008-06-01

    Since exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) was first demonstrated to be raised in asthmatic patients in the early 1990s, there has been a strong interest in its potential role in the diagnosis and management of asthma. This culminated in 2003 when the US Food and Drug Administration cleared the NIOX nitric oxide analyser for clinical application in patients with asthma. The interest in FeNO is based on the assumptions that FeNO is a marker of asthma and asthma control, and that it reflects eosinophilic airway inflammation. However, the literature remains unconvincing and inconclusive. Furthermore, studies which have management algorithms that include FeNO as a guide to asthma treatment have failed to observe any improvement in asthma control compared with the use of standard asthma guidelines. At present, the cost of including FeNO in management guidelines far outweighs any potential benefits.

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Grain-Induced Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Perales, Araceli

    2013-01-01

    Grain-induced asthma is a frequent occupational allergic disease mainly caused by inhalation of cereal flour or powder. The main professions affected are bakers, confectioners, pastry factory workers, millers, farmers, and cereal handlers. This disorder is usually due to an IgE-mediated allergic response to inhalation of cereal flour proteins. The major causative allergens of grain-related asthma are proteins derived from wheat, rye and barley flour, although baking additives, such as fungal α-amylase are also important. This review deals with the current diagnosis and treatment of grain-induced asthma, emphasizing the role of cereal allergens as molecular tools to enhance diagnosis and management of this disorder. Asthma-like symptoms caused by endotoxin exposure among grain workers are beyond the scope of this review. Progress is being made in the characterization of grain and bakery allergens, particularly cereal-derived allergens, as well as in the standardization of allergy tests. Salt-soluble proteins (albumins plus globulins), particularly members of the α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor family, thioredoxins, peroxidase, lipid transfer protein and other soluble enzymes show the strongest IgE reactivities in wheat flour. In addition, prolamins (not extractable by salt solutions) have also been claimed as potential allergens. However, the large variability of IgE-binding patterns of cereal proteins among patients with grain-induced asthma, together with the great differences in the concentrations of potential allergens observed in commercial cereal extracts used for diagnosis, highlight the necessity to standardize and improve the diagnostic tools. Removal from exposure to the offending agents is the cornerstone of the management of grain-induced asthma. The availability of purified allergens should be very helpful for a more refined diagnosis, and new immunomodulatory treatments, including allergen immunotherapy and biological drugs, should aid in the management

  10. Outcomes for a Comprehensive School-Based Asthma Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerald, Lynn B.; Redden, David; Wittich, Angelina R.; Hains, Coralie; Turner-Henson, Anne; Hemstreet, Mary P.; Feinstein, Ronald; Erwin, Sue; Bailey, William C.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the evaluation of a comprehensive school-based asthma management program in an inner-city, largely African-American school system. All 54 elementary schools (combined enrollment 13,247 students) from a single urban school system participated in this study. Schools were randomly divided between immediate and delayed…

  11. Asthma Self-Management Model: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivera, Carolina M. X.; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira; Bonizio, Roni C.; de Menezes, Marcelo B.; Ferraz, Erica; Cetlin, Andrea A.; Valdevite, Laura M.; Almeida, Gustavo A.; Araujo, Ana S.; Simoneti, Christian S.; de Freitas, Amanda; Lizzi, Elisangela A.; Borges, Marcos C.; de Freitas, Osvaldo

    2016-01-01

    Information for patients provided by the pharmacist is reflected in adhesion to treatment, clinical results and patient quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess an asthma self-management model for rational medicine use. This was a randomized controlled trial with 60 asthmatic patients assigned to attend five modules presented by…

  12. Acute Oral Ethanol Exposure Triggers Asthma In Cockroach Allergen–Sensitized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Jacqueline C.; Kim, Jiyoun; Beal, Dominic R.; Vaickus, Louis J.; Craciun, Florin L.; Remick, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma may be triggered by multiple mediators, including allergen-IgE cross-linking and non-IgE mechanisms. Several clinical studies have shown acute ethanol consumption exacerbates asthma, yet no animal model exists to study this process. We developed a model of ethanol-triggered asthma in allergen-sensitized mice to evaluate the mechanisms of ethanol inducing asthma-like responses. Outbred mice were exposed to cockroach allergens on Days 0 and 14; and on Day 21, mice received ethanol by oral gavage. Tracer studies confirmed alcohol aspiration did not occur. Within 30 minutes, alcohol induced degranulation of over 74% of mast cells, and multiple parameters of asthma-like pulmonary inflammation were triggered. Ethanol-gavaged mice had a fivefold increased production of eotaxin-2 (534 pg/mL) and a sevenfold increase in bronchoalveolar eosinophils (70,080 cells). Ethanol induced a 10-fold increase in IL-13, from 84 pg/mL in sensitized mice to 845 pg/mL in ethanol-gavaged sensitized mice. In cockroach allergen–sensitized mice, ethanol triggered asthma-like changes in respiratory physiology and a significant fivefold increase in airway mucin production. Importantly, none of these asthmatic exacerbations were observed in normal mice gavaged with ethanol. Cromolyn sodium effectively stabilized mast cells, yet increased mucin production and bronchoalveolar eosinophil recruitment. Together, these data show a single oral alcohol exposure will trigger asthma-like pulmonary inflammation in allergen-sensitized mice, providing a novel asthma model. PMID:22796441

  13. The Efficacy of Asthma Case Management in an Urban School District in Reducing School Absences and Hospitalizations for Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Marian; Heffner, Brenda; Stewart, Tara; Beeman, Gail

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric asthma rates are reaching epidemic proportions, adversely affecting children's quality of life, educational potential, and health care costs, especially those in the inner city. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a school-based asthma case management (CM) approach with medically undeserved inner-city children attending Memphis…

  14. Preparation and standardization of a herbal agent for the therapeutic management of asthma.

    PubMed

    Emeje, Martins; Izuka, Amaka; Isimi, Christiana; Ofoefule, Sabinus; Kunle, Olobayo

    2011-04-01

    This study aims to develop a suitable single tablet dosage form containing a mixture of hot water stem back extracts of Anogeissus leiocarpus and Prosopis africana (AA1), suitable for use in the therapeutic management of asthma. The compaction characteristics of the oven-dried hot water extract (HWE) were studied using the Heckel equation. The mechanical properties as well as disintegration and dissolution profile of the compacts were also assessed. The results showed that AA1 exhibited high densification due to dye filling while the subsequent rearrangement of the granules did not contribute, significantly, to their densification. The granules had enhanced plasticity as shown by the low yield point, Py. The tablets produced from the extract had good mechanical properties, with hardness increasing with compression pressure while the friability decreased. Of the four disintegrants tested, tablets containing Explotab had the shortest disintegration time of 11 min while tablets containing Prosolv had the longest disintegration time of 40 min. The order of disintegrant property is Explotab > Cellactose > Emcocel > Maize starch > Prosolv. Dissolution results (t(90%)) show that tablets containing Explotab released 100% of the drug in 20 min proving to be the most suitable in acute asthma attack. The order of dissolution is Explotab > Cellactose > Maize starch > Prosolv > Emcocel. It is concluded that incorporation of Explotab (10%w/w) as a disintegrant in AA1 preparation produced tablets of suitable compressional properties and ensured adequate drug release for the management of acute asthma.

  15. Schools' Capacity to Help Low-Income, Minority Children to Manage Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Elizabeth W.; Valerio, Melissa; Liu, Manlan; Benet, Dana Jones; Joseph, Christine; Brown, Randall; Clark, Noreen M.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the challenges and strengths of asthma management in 14 low-income, predominantly African American urban elementary schools serving more than 5,000 students. Asthma prevalence was 24.5%. Teachers, school principals, parents, and children described how asthma was managed at school. Data from classmates of students with asthma…

  16. Subcutaneous Emphysema in Acute Asthma: A Cause for Concern?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Patrick D; King, Thomas J; O'Shea, Donal B

    2015-08-01

    Pneumomediastinum has been described in patients with asthma. In this case report, we describe a young patient who presented to our medical assessment unit with an asthma exacerbation and progressive dyspnea. The patient developed pneumomediastinum, a rare complication of an asthma exacerbation. Pneumomediastinum is usually characterized by chest pain, dyspnea, and neck swelling caused by subcutaneous emphysema. Although the condition is usually benign and treatment is primarily supportive, surgical intervention may be needed if the patient develops hemodynamic compromise or respiratory failure through mechanisms similar to those seen in a tension pneumothorax.

  17. Monitoring asthma in childhood: management-related issues.

    PubMed

    Rottier, Bart L; Eber, Ernst; Hedlin, Gunilla; Turner, Steve; Wooler, Edwina; Mantzourani, Eva; Kulkarni, Neeta

    2015-06-01

    Management-related issues are an important aspect of monitoring asthma in children in clinical practice. This review summarises the literature on practical aspects of monitoring including adherence to treatment, inhalation technique, ongoing exposure to allergens and irritants, comorbid conditions and side-effects of treatment, as agreed by the European Respiratory Society Task Force on Monitoring Asthma in Childhood. The evidence indicates that it is important to discuss adherence to treatment in a non-confrontational way at every clinic visit, and take into account a patient's illness and medication beliefs. All task force members teach inhalation techniques at least twice when introducing a new inhalation device and then at least annually. Exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke, combustion-derived air pollutants, house dust mites, fungal spores, pollens and pet dander deserve regular attention during follow-up according to most task force members. In addition, allergic rhinitis should be considered as a cause for poor asthma control. Task force members do not screen for gastro-oesophageal reflux and food allergy. Height and weight are generally measured at least annually to identify individuals who are susceptible to adrenal suppression and to calculate body mass index, even though causality between obesity and asthma has not been established. In cases of poor asthma control, before stepping up treatment the above aspects of monitoring deserve closer attention.

  18. Achieving asthma control with ICS/LABA: A review of strategies for asthma management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Aalbers, René; Vogelmeier, Claus; Kuna, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    Maintenance treatment with an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and a long-acting β2-agonist (LABA) is recommended for patients whose asthma is not controlled with a low-to-moderate dose of ICS alone; a separate reliever medication is used on an as-needed basis. The Gaining Optimal Asthma ControL (GOAL) study demonstrated that salmeterol/fluticasone maintenance treatment can improve asthma control and reduce future risk compared with fluticasone alone, although the dose escalation design of this study meant that most patients treated with salmeterol/fluticasone were receiving the highest dose of ICS at the end of the study. Similarly, budesonide/formoterol maintenance therapy improved asthma control and reduced future risk compared with budesonide alone in the Formoterol and Corticosteroids Establishing Therapy (FACET) study. An alternative approach to asthma management is to use an ICS/LABA for both maintenance and reliever therapy. A large body of clinical evidence has shown that the use of budesonide/formoterol in this way improves both current control and reduces future risk compared with ICS/LABA plus as-needed short-acting β2-agonist (SABA), even when patients receive lower maintenance doses of ICS as part of the maintenance and reliever therapy regimen. In addition, one study has shown that beclometasone/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy reduces exacerbations more effectively than beclometasone/formoterol plus as-needed SABA. The use of ICS/LABA as both maintenance and reliever therapy ensures that an increase in reliever use in response to worsening symptoms is automatically matched by an increase in ICS.

  19. Economic evaluation of enhanced asthma management: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Yee V.; Shafie, Asrul A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate and compare full economic evaluation studies on the cost-effectiveness of enhanced asthma management (either as an adjunct to usual care or alone) vs. usual care alone. Methods: Online databases were searched for published journal articles in English language from year 1990 to 2012, using the search terms ‘“asthma” AND (“intervene” OR “manage”) AND (“pharmacoeconomics” OR “economic evaluation” OR “cost effectiveness” OR “cost benefit” OR “cost utility”)’. Hand search was done for local publishing. Only studies with full economic evaluation on enhanced management were included (cost consequences (CC), cost effectiveness (CE), cost benefit (CB), or cost utility (CU) analysis). Data were extracted and assessed for the quality of its economic evaluation design and evidence sources. Results: A total of 49 studies were included. There were 3 types of intervention for enhanced asthma management: education, environmental control, and self-management. The most cost-effective enhanced management was a mixture of education and self-management by an integrated team of healthcare and allied healthcare professionals. In general, the studies had a fair quality of economic evaluation with a mean QHES score of 73.7 (SD=9.7), and had good quality of evidence sources. Conclusion: Despite the overall fair quality of economic evaluations but good quality of evidence sources for all data components, this review showed that the delivered enhanced asthma managements, whether as single or mixed modes, were overall effective and cost-reducing. Whilst the availability and accessibility are an equally important factor to consider, the sustainability of the cost-effective management has to be further investigated using a longer time horizon especially for chronic diseases such as asthma. PMID:25580173

  20. Exhaled nitric oxide as a tool in managing and monitoring difficult-to-treat asthma.

    PubMed

    Bukstein, Don; Luskin, Allan T; Brooks, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    Most patients diagnosed with asthma maintain control reasonably well and do not experience asthma exacerbations; however, on average, 30% of patients achieve suboptimal control, have severe or difficult-to-treat asthma, and are relatively nonresponsive to the same medications that achieve and maintain asthma control for most patients. This small patient population of difficult-to-treat or severe asthma accounts for 80% of asthma medical costs. This study was designed to determine the potential U.S. payer cost savings resulting from an asthma specialist incorporating fractionated exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)) as an asthma management or monitoring tool to guide treatment of difficult-to-treat asthma patients. We present an annual medical resource use scenario typical of a difficult-to-treat asthma patient as well as five hypothetical scenarios of annual medical resource use for a difficult-to-treat asthma patient being managed with regular FE(NO) measurements in addition to current standard asthma management guidelines. We used the most conservative estimate of the potential asthma cost savings when FE(NO) measurement is used for difficult-to-treat asthma. The most likely clinical scenario assumes a 5% reduction in hospitalization and emergency department costs only. The inclusion of FE(NO) measurements to the asthma management strategy would essentially reach parity with the current standard of care, despite the additional cost of FE(NO) MEASUREMENTS: Additional scenarios were examined, all showed cost and use reduction across all medical resource usage categories. Use of exhaled NO measurement to guide asthma management, maintenance, and control in difficult-to-treat asthma would almost certainly result in cost savings to the payer.

  1. A systematic review of explanatory factors of barriers and facilitators to improving asthma management in South Asian children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background South Asian children with asthma are less likely to receive prescriptions and more likely to suffer uncontrolled symptoms and acute asthma admissions compared with White British children. Understanding barriers are therefore vital in addressing health inequalities. We undertook a systematic review identifying explanatory factors for barriers and facilitators to asthma management in South Asian children. South Asians were defined as individuals of Indian, Pakistani or Bangladeshi descent. Methods Data Sources - Medline, HMIC, EMBASE, ASSIA, Web of Science, BNI, CINAHL, PsycINFO, OpenSIGLE, CRD, Scopus, NHS Evidence, Cochrane Library, Campbell Collaboration, RCPCH, ATS, ERS, Asthma UK, Google Scholar & Asthma Guidelines (BTS, GINA, ATS, Monash, NAEPP, Singapore & New Zealand) to August 2013. Inclusion Criteria – Qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods research with primary focus on identifying explanations for barriers and/or facilitators to asthma management in South Asian children aged 0–18 years with diagnosed/suspected asthma and/or carers and/or healthcare professionals. Data Extraction – Three authors independently reviewed, selected & extracted eligible articles with disagreements resolved by research team discussion. Results 15 studies encompassing 25,755 children, 18,483 parents/carers and 239 healthcare professionals were included. Barriers and explanatory factors identified were: 1. Lack of asthma knowledge in families and healthcare professionals. 2. Under-use of preventer medications. 3. Non-acceptance/denial of asthma. 4. Over-reliance on Emergency Department management. 5. Communication problems. 6. Non-adherence to medication. 7. Use of complementary therapies. Little facilitators regarding asthma management were identified. Conclusions Several key issues were identified as likely to be ethnic-specific to South Asian families, rather than a reflection of minority status: impact of parental and professional knowledge and beliefs

  2. The effect of sand storms on acute asthma in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alangari, Abdullah A.; Riaz, Muhammad; Mahjoub, Mohamed Osman; Malhis, Nidal; Al-Tamimi, Saleh; Al-Modaihsh, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Major sand storms are frequent in the Middle East. This study aims to investigate the role of air particulate matter (PM) level in acute asthma in children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. METHODS: An aerosol spectrometer was used to evaluate PM < 10μm in diameter (PM10) and PM < 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) concentrations in the air every 30 minutes throughout February and March 2012 in Riyadh. Data on children 2-12 years of age presenting to the emergency department of a major children's hospital with acute asthma during the same period were collected including their acute asthma severity score. RESULTS: The median with interquartile range (IQR) levels of PM10 and PM2.5 were 454 μg/m3 (309,864) and 108 μg/m3 (72,192) respectively. There was no correlation between the average daily PM10 levels and the average number of children presenting with acute asthma per day (r = -0.14, P = 0.45), their daily asthma score (r = 0.014, P = 0.94), or admission rate ( r= -0.08, P = 0.65). This was also true for average daily PM2.5 levels. In addition, there was no difference in these variables between days with PM10 >1000 μg/m3, representing major sand storms, plus the following 5 days and other days with PM10< 1000 μg/m3. CONCLUSION: Sand storms, even major ones, had no significant impact on acute asthma exacerbations in children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The very high levels of PM, however, deserve further studying especially of their long-term effects. PMID:25593604

  3. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... exercise. It's a great way to keep the body and mind healthy, so if you get exercise-induced asthma ...

  4. ISU201 enhances the resolution of airway inflammation in a mouse model of an acute exacerbation of asthma.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yuka; Garthwaite, Linda; Hsu, Kenneth; Yoo, Hyouna; Park, Sang-Ho; Geczy, Carolyn L; Kumar, Rakesh K; Herbert, Cristan

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are commonly used for treating asthma and its exacerbations but have well-recognised adverse effects and are not always effective. Few alternative treatments exist. Using a murine model of an acute exacerbation of asthma, we assessed the ability of ISU201, a novel protein drug, to suppress the inflammatory response when administered after induction of an exacerbation. Sensitised mice were chronically challenged with a low mass concentration of aerosolised ovalbumin, and then received a single moderate-level challenge to simulate an allergen-induced exacerbation. ISU201 was administered to mice 2 and 8 hours later, while pulmonary inflammation and expression of mRNA for chemokines and proinflammatory cytokines were assessed after 4, 12, and 24 hours. Relative to vehicle-treated controls, ISU201 suppressed accumulation of pulmonary neutrophils and eosinophils, while accelerating the decline in CXCL1, TNF-α, and IL-6 in lavage fluid and lung tissue. ISU201 significantly reduced peak expression of mRNA for the chemokines Cxcl9 and Cxcl10, the adhesion molecules Icam1 and Vcam1, and the proinflammatory cytokines Il1b, Il12p40, and Csf1. The ability of ISU201 to promote resolution of inflammation suggests that it may have potential as an alternative to glucocorticoids in the management of asthma, including when administered after the onset of an acute exacerbation.

  5. Stable admission rate for acute asthma in Danish children since 1977.

    PubMed

    Sevelsted, Astrid; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Bisgaard, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Childhood asthma is consistently reported to have increased in recent decades in most westernized countries, but it is unknown if this increase is similar across severities. We aimed to study the time-trend of acute hospital admission and readmission for asthma of school-aged children in the recent 35 years in Denmark. We analyzed time-trends in the national incidence rate of hospitalization for acute severe asthma in children aged 5-15 in Denmark during the 35-year period 1977-2012 in the Danish national registry. Only in-patient admissions with a principal diagnosis of asthma (ICD-8: 493** or ICD-10: J45** or J46**) were included. Among children with asthma hospitalizations, we investigated the risk of readmission beyond 1 month of first admission. Admissions were summarized as rates per thousand person years at risk. The overall time-trend is stable with a rate of one admission per year per thousand children at risk and a per-year incidence rate ratio 0.999 [95 % CI 0.997-1.001]. The rate of any readmission decreased from approximately 20 per thousand children in the eighties to less than 10 in the early nineties before stabilizing at around 10 per thousand children from mid-nineties and onwards. During 35 years of nation-wide follow-up, we find a highly stable incidence rate of first hospital admission for acute severe asthma in children. Moreover, rates of readmission halved during the seventies and stabilized in the last twenty years. In conclusion, our data suggest that the reported increase in childhood asthma is mainly due to less severe cases.

  6. Impact of Goal Setting and Goal Attainment Methods on Asthma Outcomes: Findings From an Asthma Self-Management Intervention for African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaron, Micah; Nelson, Belinda W.; Kaltsas, Elena; Brown, Randall W.; Thomas, Lara J.; Patel, Minal R.

    2017-01-01

    Optimal use of goal-setting strategies in self-management efforts with high-risk individuals with asthma is not well understood. This study aimed to describe factors associated with goal attainment in an asthma self-management intervention for African American women with asthma and determine whether goal attainment methods proved beneficial to…

  7. Interleukin-8 secretion and neutrophil recruitment accompanies induced sputum eosinophil activation in children with acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Norzila, M Z; Fakes, K; Henry, R L; Simpson, J; Gibson, P G

    2000-03-01

    Although airway inflammation is recognized as a key feature of asthma, the characteristics of airway inflammation in children with acute severe asthma are not well defined. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of airway inflammation in children with an acute exacerbation of asthma using sputum cell counts and fluid-phase measurements and to examine the changes in these parameters upon resolution of the exacerbation. Children (n = 38) presenting to the Emergency Department with acute asthma underwent successful sputum induction using ultrasonically nebulized normal saline (n = 22), or expectorated sputum spontaneously (n = 16). Sputum induction was repeated at least 2 wk later when the children had recovered (n = 28). Sputum portions were selected, dispersed and total and differential cell counts performed. Neutrophil elastase and EG2-positive eosinophils were assessed and fluid-phase eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), myeloperoxidase (MPO), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and IL-5 were measured. During the acute exacerbation the median (range) total cell count was 8.4 x 10(6)/ml (0.5 to 190.3), and fell significantly at resolution to 1.3 x 10(6)/ml (p < 0.01). The inflammatory cell infiltrate was mixed and included eosinophils (0.8 x 10(6)/ml), neutrophils (3.3 x 10(6)/ml), and mast cells. EG2(+) cells were high and correlated with the degree of airflow obstruction (r = -0.5, p = 0.02). They decreased significantly at resolution as did supernatant ECP (1,078 versus 272 ng/ml), suggesting that eosinophils were activated during the exacerbation. MPO was 220 ng/ ml at exacerbation and fell significantly to 1 ng/ml at resolution. Levels of IL-8 and IL-5 were elevated during the acute exacerbation and IL-8 concentrations decreased at resolution. In conclusion, airway inflammation can be studied in children with acute asthma by sputum induction. Airway inflammation is present during an acute exacerbation of asthma, and is characterized by infiltration and

  8. Korean Asthma Guideline 2014: Summary of Major Updates to the Korean Asthma Guideline 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog Kyeom; Park, Yong Bum; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Jung, Ki-Suck; Yoo, Ji Hong

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a prevalent and serious health problem in Korea. Recently, the Korean Asthma Guideline has been updated by The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases (KATRD) in an effort to improve the clinical management of asthma. This guideline focuses on adult patients with asthma and aims to deliver up to date scientific evidence and recommendations to general physicians for the management of asthma. For this purpose, this guideline was updated following systematic review and meta-analysis of recent studies and adapting some points of international guidelines (Global Initiative for Asthma [GINA] report 2014, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program [NAEPP] 2007, British Thoracic Society [BTS/SIGN] asthma guideline 2012, and Canadian asthma guideline 2012). Updated issues include recommendations derived using the population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) model, which produced 20 clinical questions on the management of asthma. It also covers a new definition of asthma, the importance of confirming various airflow limitations with spirometry, the epidemiology and the diagnostic flow of asthma in Korea, the importance and evidence for inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and ICS/formoterol as a single maintenance and acute therapy in the stepwise management of asthma, assessment of severity of asthma and management of exacerbation, and an action plan to cope with exacerbation. This guideline includes clinical assessments, and treatment of asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome, management of asthma in specific conditions including severe asthma, elderly asthma, cough variant asthma, exercise-induced bronchial contraction, etc. The revised Korean Asthma Guideline is expected to be a useful resource in the management of asthma. PMID:27433170

  9. The School Nurse Role in Asthma Management: Can the Action Plan Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgmeyer, Anne; Jamerson, Patricia; Gyr, Patricia; Westhus, Nina; Glynn, Emily

    2005-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disorder in American schoolchildren, and school nurses play a valuable role in its management. A study was conducted in which school nurses were asked to describe their role in caring for students with asthma and their use of Asthma Action Plans (AAPs). The nurses indicated that they frequently provided direct…

  10. A Comparison of an Individually Tailored and a Standardized Asthma Self-Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shackelford, Judy; Bachman, Jean H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in the United States and can be life-threatening. There are a rising number of adults with asthma that cannot be prevented or cured but may be controlled. Self-management education is essential for long-term asthma control; however, the most effective type of education is unknown.…

  11. Didgeridoo Playing and Singing to Support Asthma Management in Aboriginal Australians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eley, Robert; Gorman, Don

    2010-01-01

    Context: Asthma affects over 15% of Australian Aboriginal people. Compliance in asthma management is poor. Interventions that will increase compliance are required. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine whether Aboriginal children, adolescents and adults would engage in music lessons to increase their knowledge of asthma and support…

  12. Pattern of airway inflammation and its determinants in children with acute severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Gibson, P G; Norzila, M Z; Fakes, K; Simpson, J; Henry, R L

    1999-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between sputum cell counts and clinical variables in children with an acute exacerbation of asthma. Sputum was successfully obtained from 37 of 42 children presenting to the Emergency Department with acute asthma, using ultrasonically nebulized normal saline (n = 19) or spontaneous expectoration (n = 18). Sputum portions were selected and dispersed, and total and differential cell counts were performed. Sputum supernatant was assessed for eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), interleukin (IL)-5, and IL-8. The exacerbations were of 3 inflammatory cell patterns: eosinophilic (n = 16 or 43% of total), combined eosinophilic/neutrophilic (E/N; n = 13.3 or 35% of total), or noneosinophilic (n = 8 or 22% of total). IL-5 was highest in eosinophilic exacerbations. Combined E/N exacerbations had increased mast cells (77%) and higher sputum ECP levels than eosinophilic exacerbations: 2,146 ng/mL vs. 666 ng/mL (P = 0.04). The speed of onset of the exacerbation was not related to the inflammatory cell profile. Logistic regression identified maintenance asthma treatment (odds ratio (OR), 5.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.3-26.8) and lung function during the acute episode (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.7-93) as significantly associated with the intensity of sputum eosinophilia. Eosinophils were lowest in children who received maintenance treatment with oral corticosteroids compared to those with no background asthma preventer therapy (P = 0.001). In conclusion, we identified three distinct patterns of airway inflammation in children with acute asthma; they included increased eosinophils, combined eosinophilic-neutrophilic infiltration, and a noneosinophilic pattern. Eosinophil degranulation was greatest with the combined eosinophilic/neutrophilic pattern of airway inflammation. Sputum eosinophils were associated with clinical severity, and background asthma therapy, but not with outcome, nor with speed of onset of exacerbations. These

  13. Ionisers in the management of bronchial asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Nogrady, S G; Furnass, S B

    1983-01-01

    Because of recent interest in the possible benefits to asthmatic patients of negative ion generators and the largely uncontrolled and inconclusive nature of earlier studies a double blind crossover study of this treatment was carried out in 20 subjects with stable asthma over six months. After an initial two week period without an ioniser, active or placebo ionisers were installed in subjects' bedrooms for two eight week periods separated by a four week "washout" period when no ioniser was present. The study was completed by a final four week period when no ioniser was present. Subjects were randomly allocated to receive an active or a placebo ioniser first. Subjects recorded their peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) twice daily, completed a daily symptom score questionnaire, and noted any treatment they took on a diary card. Recordings were completed throughout the trial. Ion counts and dust concentrations were measured in subjects' bedrooms during the study. Mean ion counts rose considerably when ionisers were activated (p less than 0.001). There were no significant differences in PEFR, symptom score, or consumption of medication between the periods that active ionisers and either no ionisers or placebo ionisers were in operation. This study has failed to show a statistically significant benefit in asthmatic subjects from the use of negative ion generators. PMID:6364442

  14. Helpful Hints: Caregiver-Generated Asthma Management Strategies and Their Relation to Pediatric Asthma Symptoms and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Kimberly P.; Winter, Marcia A.; Knestel, Andrea; Everhart, Robin S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This mixed-methods study examined the relation between caregiver-generated asthma management strategies and asthma severity in a sample of 200 children with persistent asthma (ages 5–12 years). Methods Caregivers were interviewed about asthma management strategies they found helpful in controlling their child's symptoms. A qualitative content analysis was used to identify household strategies. Indicators of asthma severity included lung functioning (FEV1) and functional severity (FSS). Child quality of life was also assessed (PQLQ). Results Six primary household strategies were identified: Reactive, Planning Ahead, Social, Emotional, Avoiding Triggers, and Cleaning. In general, strategies offered by caregivers did not differ by socioeconomic status. Caregivers who endorsed Avoiding Triggers as effective strategies had children with better lung functioning. Caregivers who endorsed Planning Ahead or Emotional strategies had children with better asthma-related quality of life. Conclusion These household strategies hold promise for reducing pediatric asthma symptoms and improving child quality of life. PMID:22408054

  15. Acute anti-inflammatory effects of inhaled budesonide in asthma: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gibson, P G; Saltos, N; Fakes, K

    2001-01-01

    Corticosteroids can have acute effects on airway function and methacholine airway responsiveness in asthma as early as 6 h after dosing, suggesting there may be an acute anti-inflammatory effect of inhaled corticosteroid in asthma. This study aimed to determine the effects of a single dose of inhaled budesonide on sputum eosinophils and mast cells in adults with asthma, and to examine whether the mechanism of clearance of eosinophils was by apoptosis. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was conducted. At the screening visit, adults with stable asthma (n = 41) ceased inhaled corticosteroid therapy for 4 d and those with significant sputum eosinophilia (> or = 7%) were randomized (n = 26) to a single dose of budesonide 2,400 microg or placebo via Turbuhaler, on two separate study days. Symptoms and lung function were followed for 6 h, then sputum was induced and airway responsiveness to hypertonic saline determined. Sputum eosinophils (mean, SE) were significantly lower 6 h after budesonide (25%, 4.5), compared with placebo (37%, 6.2, p < 0.05). There was a 2.2-fold (95% CI 1.45 to 3.33) improvement in airway responsiveness with budesonide. No significant difference was seen on mast cells, apoptotic eosinophils, symptoms, or lung function. In conclusion, a single dose of inhaled corticosteroids has beneficial effects on airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness as early as 6 h after dosing. This may be clinically useful as therapy during mild exacerbations of asthma.

  16. Comparison of oral montelukast with oral zileuton in acute asthma: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Magazine, Rahul; Shahul, Hameed Aboobackar; Chogtu, Bharti; Kamath, Asha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leukotriene modifiers have an established role in the management of chronic asthma but their role in acute asthma is still under evaluation. Objective: To study and compare the effects of oral montelukast with oral zileuton in acute asthma. Materials and Methods: This study included 120 asthmatics and was conducted from September 2012 to March 2014. Patients were randomized into three different groups to receive montelukast or zileuton or placebo in addition to standard treatment for asthma exacerbation. Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) values, details of rescue medication and vital signs were recorded at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h of drug or placebo administration and at discharge. Additional recording was done in the morning (8–10 am) following admission. The primary endpoint was the mean PEFR of each group at these time points; the secondary end point being the need for rescue medications. Results: The mean PEFR recordings of the three study groups – placebo, montelukast, and zileuton – respectively, at various time points were as follows: at 6 h (223.25 ± 90.40, 199.00 ± 82.52, 233.75 ± 84.05; P = 0.240); at 12 h (271.00 ± 109.38, 251.50 ± 101.44, 309.50 ± 129.63; P = 0.048); at 24 h (288.25 ± 114.26, 269.00 ± 107.51, 324.50 ± 127.88; P = 0.080); and at 48 h (295.00 ± 114.80, 293.50 ± 113.24, 344.75 ± 119.91; P = 0.015); discharge (305.00 ± 118.56, 305.25 ± 119.51, 361.25 ± 119.70; P = 0.010). The mean PEFR for the three study groups at 8–10 am on the morning following admission was 268.75 ± 111.43, 252.50 ± 99.99, 306.75 ± 114.44; P = 0.047. Total rescue doses needed were 10, 1, and 0, respectively (P = 0.049). Conclusion: Zileuton is better than montelukast as an additional drug in acute asthma and results in significant improvement in lung function, and reduction in the need for rescue medications. PMID:27185992

  17. Real-world asthma management with inhaler devices in Switzerland—results of the asthma survey

    PubMed Central

    Nicod, Laurent P.; Kohler, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the Asthma Survey was to generate insights about the daily practice of physicians with regard to inhaler devices used for treating asthma under real-world conditions in Switzerland. Methods A questionnaire was administered to 605 participating hospital- and practice-based Swiss physicians. Areas of interest were practical aspects of patient education, typical difficulties encountered when prescribing pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDI) and dry-powder inhalers (DPI), and reasons for physician preferences. Differences between the German-speaking part of Switzerland (D-CH) and French- and Italian-speaking parts of Switzerland (W-CH) linguistic regions were explored. Results Datasets from 529 physicians (291 D-CH and 238 W-CH) were suitable for analysis, 342 internists/general practitioners, 177 pulmonologists/allergologists, and 10 other. Approximately 90% of all participants declared being personally involved in providing inhaler device education to their patients. Practice assistants (33.0% vs. 9.2%, P<0.001) and pharmacists (6.9% vs. 19.7%, P<0.001) were more frequently involved in D-CH compared to W-CH. Patient skills with regard to inhalation technique were generally not monitored on a regular basis with only 34.0% of participants ensuring such checks at the scheduled visits. DPIs were overwhelmingly preferred over pMDI. Although the prevalence of typical handling errors was similar with both inhalers in the two regions, pMDIs were used more frequently in W-CH (P<0.001). Conclusions Real-world asthma management and inhaler preferences differ between D-CH and W-CH. While the importance of patient education is widely acknowledged, inhalation skills monitoring remains suboptimal. The reasons for higher pMDI preference in W-CH compared to D-CH deserve further research. PMID:28066588

  18. The efficacy of asthma case management in an urban school district in reducing school absences and hospitalizations for asthma.

    PubMed

    Levy, Marian; Heffner, Brenda; Stewart, Tara; Beeman, Gail

    2006-08-01

    Pediatric asthma rates are reaching epidemic proportions, adversely affecting children's quality of life, educational potential, and health care costs, especially those in the inner city. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a school-based asthma case management (CM) approach with medically underserved inner-city children attending Memphis City schools. Fourteen elementary schools with high rates of asthma-related hospital utilization were grouped according to school size, percentage of children with asthma enrolled, and percentage of children eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. Schools were randomized to either a nurse CM intervention or a usual care (UC) condition. The CM group included 115 students; 128 students were in the UC group. A longitudinal design was used to follow students' progress. Students were primarily African-American children diagnosed with asthma. In CM schools, nurse case managers conducted weekly group sessions incorporating the Open Airways curriculum, followed up on students' school absences, and coordinated students' asthma care with families, school personnel, and medical providers. In UC schools, students received routine school nursing services. CM students had fewer school absences than their counterparts in UC schools (mean 4.38 vs 8.18 days, respectively) and experienced significantly fewer emergency department visits (p < .0001) and fewer hospital days (p < .05) than UC students. No such differences existed before program initiation. Replication and follow-up in year 2 showed continued significant improvements. School-based nurse CM can achieve significant improvements in school attendance and medical utilization.

  19. A review of omalizumab for the management of severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Cheng, Shih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Despite the expansion of the understanding in asthma pathophysiology and the continual advances in disease management, a small subgroup of patients remain partially controlled or refractory to standard treatments. Upon the identification of immunoglobulin E and other inflammatory mediators, investigations and developments of targeted agents have thrived. Omalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that specifically targets the circulating immunoglobulin E, which in turn impedes and reduces subsequent releases of the proinflammatory mediators. In the past decade, omalizumab has been proven to be efficacious and well-tolerated in the treatment of moderate-to-severe asthma in both trials and real-life studies, most notably in reducing exacerbation rates and corticosteroid use. While growing evidence has demonstrated that omalizumab may be potentially beneficial in treating other allergic diseases, its indication remains confined to treating severe allergic asthma and chronic idiopathic urticaria. Future efforts may be focused on determining the optimal length of omalizumab treatment, seeking biomarkers that could better predict treatment response, as well as extending its indications. PMID:27528798

  20. Update on perioperative management of the child with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Dones, Francesco; Foresta, Grazia; Russotto, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Asthma represents the leading cause of morbidity from a chronic disease among children. Dealing with this disease during the perioperative period of pediatric surgical procedures is, therefore, quite common for the anesthesiologist and other professionalities involved. Preoperative assessment has a key role in detecting children at increased risk of perioperative respiratory complications. For children without an optimal control of symptoms or with a recent respiratory tract infection elective surgery should be postponed, if possible, after the optimization of therapy. According to clinical setting, loco-regional anesthesia represents the desirable option since it allows to avoid airway instrumentation. Airway management goals are preventing the increase of airflow resistance during general anesthesia along with avoiding triggers of bronchospasm. When their use is possible, face mask ventilation and laringeal mask are considered more reliable than tracheal intubation for children with asthma. Sevoflurane is the most commonly used anesthetic for induction and manteinance. Salbutamol seems to be useful in preventing airflow resistance rise after endotracheal intubation. Mechanical ventilation should be tailored according to pathophysiology of asthma: an adequate expiratory time should be setted in order to avoid a positive end-expiratory pressure due to expiratory airflow obstruction. Pain should be prevented and promptly controlled with a loco-regional anesthesia technique when it is possible. Potential allergic reactions to drugs or latex should always be considered during the whole perioperative period. Creating a serene atmosphere should be adopted as an important component of interventions in order to guarantee the best care to the asthmatic child. PMID:22802997

  1. Effect of aging on airway remodeling and muscarinic receptors in a murine acute asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji Young; Lee, Sook Young; Rhee, Chin Kook; Kim, Seung Joon; Kwon, Soon Seog; Kim, Young Kyoon

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives The influence of aging on the development of asthma has not been studied thoroughly. The aim of this study was to investigate age-related airway responses involving lung histology and expression of muscarinic receptors in a murine model of acute asthma. Methods Female BALB/c mice at the ages of 6 weeks and 6, 9, and 12 months were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) for 1 month (n = 8–12 per group). We analyzed inflammatory cells and T-helper (Th)2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and parameters of airway remodeling and expression of muscarinic receptors in lung tissue. Results Among the OVA groups, total cell and eosinophil numbers in BAL fluid were significantly higher in the older (6-, 9-, and 12-month-old) mice than in the young (6-week-old) mice. Interleukin (IL) 4 (IL-4) concentration increased, but IL-5 and IL-13 concentrations showed a decreased tendency, with age. IL-17 concentration tended to increase with age, which did not reach statistical significance. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining area, peribronchial collagen deposition, and area of α-smooth muscle staining were significantly higher in the 6-month older OVA group than in the young OVA group. The expression of the M3 and M2 muscarinic receptors tended to increase and decrease, respectively, with age. Conclusion The aged mice showed an active and unique pattern not only on airway inflammation, but also on airway remodeling and expression of the muscarinic receptors during the development of acute asthma compared with the young mice. These findings suggest that the aging process affects the pathogenesis of acute asthma and age-specific approach might be more appropriate for better asthma control in a clinical practice. PMID:24204129

  2. The Effectiveness of Web-Based Asthma Self-Management System, My Asthma Portal (MAP): A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Pierre; Bartlett, Susan J; Valois, Marie-France; Zaihra, Tasneem; Paré, Guy; Grad, Roland; Eilayyan, Owis; Perreault, Robert; Tamblyn, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether Web-based technologies can improve disease self-management is uncertain. My Asthma Portal (MAP) is a Web-based self-management support system that couples evidence-based behavioral change components (self-monitoring of symptoms, physical activity, and medication adherence) with real-time monitoring, feedback, and support from a nurse case manager. Objective The aim of this study was to compare the impact of access to a Web-based asthma self-management patient portal linked to a case-management system (MAP) over 6 months compared with usual care on asthma control and quality of life. Methods A multicenter, parallel, 2-arm, pilot, randomized controlled trial was conducted with 100 adults with confirmed diagnosis of asthma from 2 specialty clinics. Asthma control was measured using an algorithm based on overuse of fast-acting bronchodilators and emergency department visits, and asthma-related quality of life was assessed using the Mini-Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (MAQLQ). Secondary mediating outcomes included asthma symptoms, depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, and beliefs about medication. Process evaluations were also included. Results A total of 49 individuals were randomized to MAP and 51 to usual care. Compared with usual care, participants in the intervention group reported significantly higher asthma quality of life (mean change 0.61, 95% CI 0.03 to 1.19), and the change in asthma quality of life for the intervention group between baseline and 3 months (mean change 0.66, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.98) was not seen in the control group. No significant differences in asthma quality of life were found between the intervention and control groups at 6 (mean change 0.46, 95% CI –0.12 to 1.05) and 9 months (mean change 0.39, 95% CI –0.2 to 0.98). For poor control status, there was no significant effect of group, time, or group by time. For all self-reported measures, the intervention group had a significantly higher proportion of individuals

  3. [Is self-management practical in bronchial asthma?].

    PubMed

    Gonon, M; Solèr, M; Langewitz, W; Perruchoud, A P

    1999-04-03

    The threat and uncertainty involved in an asthma attack reduce the quality of life for the patient. Life quality can be improved if the patient learns self-management principles. This is easy to learn and involves a simple procedure requiring the patient to refer to written instructions in the event of an asthma exacerbation. As a basis for treatment the patient needs to measure maximum peak flow, which can be done with an easy-to-use peak flow meter. A value above 80% of the personal best indicates that the treatment has been successful. By means of printed instructions in credit card format, the appropriate treatment for particular peak flow values and/or symptoms can be looked up and administered. So far there have been no self-management studies providing a definite answer on what interventions are effective and cost-effective. One clear result is that inhaled steroid therapy must be initiated early. Learning self-management patently leads to improvement in the patient's life quality and safety. In the long run this concept appears to be cost-saving with regard to days lost through sickness and hospitalization.

  4. Schools' capacity to help low-income, minority children to manage asthma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Elizabeth W; Valerio, Melissa; Liu, Manlan; Benet, Dana Jones; Joseph, Christine; Brown, Randall; Clark, Noreen M

    2005-08-01

    This article describes the challenges and strengths of asthma management in 14 low-income, predominantly African American urban elementary schools serving more than 5,000 students. Asthma prevalence was 24.5%. Teachers, school principals, parents, and children described how asthma was managed at school. Data from classmates of students with asthma showed that they had moderate to high levels of information about the disease. Data from teachers indicated the great need for practical instruction on how they might effectively support a child with asthma in the classroom and on the playground. Principals raised concerns about expectations for the functioning of school staff and implementation of school policies especially related to asthma emergencies. Parents reported a range of problems their children face at school. Data from children with asthma showed that 75% believed asthma affected their school work. Findings from this study should be useful to school personnel, health providers, and others who assist children and their families to manage asthma at school. Data suggest that making school nursing services available is warranted, given the impact of asthma on the school community.

  5. Proposed Design of a Clinical Information System for the Management of Bronchial Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Huq, S; Karras, BT; Wright, J; Lober, WB; Lozano, P; Zimmerman, FJ

    2002-01-01

    This poster categorizes the various applications to aid the management of Pediatric Bronchial Asthma. An attempt is made at classifying the various informatics approaches in this domain. Later, the approach of the proposed Asthma CAMS (Computer Aided Management System) project, being developed by the Child Health Institute and Clinical Informatics Research Group www.cirg.washington.edu at the University of Washington, is discussed.

  6. Factors associated with relapse in adult patients discharged from the emergency department following acute asthma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jesse; Arrotta, Nicholas; Villa-Roel, Cristina; Dennett, Liz; Rowe, Brian H

    2017-01-01

    A significant proportion of patients discharged from the emergency department (ED) with asthma exacerbations will relapse within 4 weeks. This systematic review summarises the evidence regarding relapses and factors associated with relapse in adult patients discharged from EDs after being treated for acute asthma. Following a registered protocol, comprehensive literature searches were conducted. Studies tracking outcomes for adults after ED management and discharge were included if they involved adjusted analyses. Methodological quality was assessed using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale (NOS) and the Risk of Bias (RoB) Tool. Results were summarised using medians and IQRs or mean and SD, as appropriate. 178 articles underwent full-text review and 10 studies, of various methodologies, involving 32 923 patients were included. The majority of the studies were of high quality according to NOS and RoB Tool. Relapse proportions were 8±3%, 12±4% and 14±6% at 1, 2 and 4 weeks, respectively. Female sex was the most commonly reported and statistically significant factor associated with an increased risk of relapse within 4 weeks of ED discharge for acute asthma. Other factors significantly associated with relapse were past healthcare usage and previous inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) usage. A median of 17% of patients who are discharged from the ED will relapse within the first 4 weeks. Factors such as female sex, past healthcare usage and ICS use at presentation were commonly and significantly associated with relapse occurrence. Identifying patients with these features could provide clinicians with guidance during their ED discharge decision-making. PMID:28176972

  7. Digital Asthma Self-Management Interventions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Deborah; Wyke, Sally; Agur, Karolina; Cameron, Euan J; Docking, Robert I; MacKenzie, Alison M; McConnachie, Alex; Raghuvir, Vandana; Thomson, Neil C

    2014-01-01

    Background Many people with asthma tolerate symptoms and lifestyle limitations unnecessarily by not utilizing proven therapies. Better support for self-management is known to improve asthma control, and increasingly the Internet and other digital media are being used to deliver that support. Objective Our goal was to summarize current knowledge, evidenced through existing systematic reviews, of the effectiveness and implementation of digital self-management support for adults and children with asthma and to examine what features help or hinder the use of these programs. Methods A comprehensive search strategy combined 3 facets of search terms: (1) online technology, (2) asthma, and (3) self-management/behavior change/patient experience. We undertook searches of 14 databases, and reference and citation searching. We included qualitative and quantitative systematic reviews about online or computerized interventions facilitating self-management. Title, abstract, full paper screening, and quality appraisal were performed by two researchers independently. Data extraction was undertaken using standardized forms. Results A total of 3810 unique papers were identified. Twenty-nine systematic reviews met inclusion criteria: the majority were from the United States (n=12), the rest from United Kingdom (n=6), Canada (n=3), Portugal (n=2), and Australia, France, Spain, Norway, Taiwan, and Greece (1 each). Only 10 systematic reviews fulfilled pre-determined quality standards, describing 19 clinical trials. Interventions were heterogeneous: duration of interventions ranging from single use, to 24-hour access for 12 months, and incorporating varying degrees of health professional involvement. Dropout rates ranged from 5-23%. Four RCTs were aimed at adults (overall range 3-65 years). Participants were inadequately described: socioeconomic status 0/19, ethnicity 6/19, and gender 15/19. No qualitative systematic reviews were included. Meta-analysis was not attempted due to

  8. Global strategy for the diagnosis and management of asthma in children 5 years and younger.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Soren Erik; Hurd, Suzanne S; Lemanske, Robert F; Becker, Allan; Zar, Heather J; Sly, Peter D; Soto-Quiroz, Manuel; Wong, Gary; Bateman, Eric D

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood and the leading cause of childhood morbidity from chronic disease as measured by school absences, emergency department visits, and hospitalisation. During the past two decades, many scientific advances have improved our understanding of asthma and our ability to manage and control it effectively. However, in children 5 years and younger, the clinical symptoms of asthma are variable and non-specific. Furthermore, neither airflow limitation nor airway inflammation, the main pathologic hallmarks of the condition, can be assessed routinely in this age group. For this reason, to aid in the diagnosis of asthma in young children, a symptoms-only descriptive approach that includes the definition of various wheezing phenotypes has been recommended. In 1993, the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) was implemented to develop a network of individuals, organizations, and public health officials to disseminate information about the care of patients with asthma while at the same time assuring a mechanism to incorporate the results of scientific investigations into asthma care. Since then, GINA has developed and regularly revised a Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention. Publications based on the Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention have been translated into many different languages to promote international collaboration and dissemination of information. In this report, Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention in Children 5 Years and Younger, an effort has been made to present the special challenges that must be taken into account in managing asthma in children during the first 5 years of life, including difficulties with diagnosis, the efficacy and safety of drugs and drug delivery systems, and the lack of data on new therapies. Approaches to these issues will vary among populations in the world based on socioeconomic conditions, genetic diversity, cultural beliefs, and differences in

  9. Perception of acute airway function changes by patients with mild asthma.

    PubMed

    Malakauskas, Kestutis; Ragaisiene, Sandra; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Sakalauskas, Rainundas

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the perception of dyspnea during acute bronchoconstriction and bronchodilation in patients with mild asthma with normal lung function who never experienced severe asthma exacerbations in the past. We studied 83 mild, stable asthmatic patients aged 18-58 years. All patients underwent the methacholine challenge followed by the bronchodilation test with salbutamol. The perceptual sensitivity of changes in airway function was analyzed by linear regression coefficients, slope alpha(constr), and slope alpha(dilat). Additionally, the perception score was determined at a 20% decrease in FEV(1) (PS(20)) during the methacholine challenge. The finding was that perceptual sensitivity for bronchoconstriction and bronchodilation, expressed as slope alpha(constr) and slope alpha(dilat), was similar in the study subjects (mean +/- SD, 0.09 +/- 0.05 and 0.10 +/- 0.05, respectively). The two subgroups under assessment were named poor perceivers when PS(20) < 1 (n = 19) and good perceivers when PS(20) > or = 1 (n = 64). While assessing them, the values of slope alpha(constr) did not differ from the values of slope alpha(dilat) in either of the subgroups of poor perceivers or good perceivers. However, the poor perceivers sensed changes in airway function significantly less than the good perceivers did, although overlapping values of slope alpha were observed. In conclusion, this study indicates that perceptual sensitivity during acute bronchoconstriction and bronchodilation is comparably the same in mild, stable asthmatic patients. However, some of these asthmatic patients may display a diminished perception of dyspnea, which can lead to the deterioration of their asthma without their noticing the corresponding symptoms. Thus, they may delay treatment for acute asthma.

  10. Comparison of salbutamol and ipratropium bromide versus salbutamol alone in the treatment of acute severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Hossain, A S; Barua, U K; Roy, G C; Sutradhar, S R; Rahman, I; Rahman, G

    2013-04-01

    The use of nebulized Ipratropium bromide, quaternary anticholinergic bronchodilators in combination with beta-agonist for the treatment of acute asthma in adults is controversial. In a view of different recommendation the present study is undertaken in Bangladeshi patients. Combination of inhaled Ipratropium bromide and Salbutamol provides greater bronchodilatation than mono therapy with Salbutamol alone in acute severe asthma. Patients of severe asthma (PEFR <50% of predicted) were enrolled into control group (Salbutamol only) and case (Salbutamol + Ipratropium bromide) group. After measurement of peak expiratory flow, patient received 3 doses of 2.5 mg Salbutamol (n=40) only or 3 doses of both 2.5mg Salbutamol and 500mcg Ipratropium bromide at an interval of 20 minutes (n=40) through a jet nebulizer. Peak flow was reassessed 30 & 60 minutes after treatment. Peak flow at baseline was similar in two groups. Then at 30 minutes after nebulization, the mean±SD percentage increase in peak flow was greater in combination group (60.01±35.01%) than Salbutamol group (44.47±25.03%) with difference of 16% (p=0.025). At 60 minutes the percentage increase in peak flow was about 32% greater in combination group than Salbutamol group (94.44±33.70% vs. 62.57±29.26%, p=0.000) and combination group reached percentage predicted peak flow more than 60% while Sabutamol group did not. Ipratropium Bromide and Salbutamol nebulized combinedly have better bronchodilating effect than Salbultamol alone in acute severe asthma.

  11. Do United States' teachers know and adhere to the national guidelines on asthma management in the classroom? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Yudilyn; Reznik, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Proper asthma management in schools is important in achieving optimum asthma control in children with asthma. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) has developed guidelines on classroom asthma management. We conducted a systematic review to examine teacher knowledge of the NHLBI guidelines on asthma management in the classroom. We searched PubMed and EMBASE using search terms "asthma management," "teacher(s)," "school teacher," and "public school." The inclusion criteria were articles published in English from 1994 to May 2014 that focus on schools in the United States (US). From 535 titles and abstracts, 9 studies met inclusion criteria. All studies reported that school teachers did not know the policies and procedures of asthma management. Teachers relied on school nurses to handle medical emergencies. Some studies identified that lack of full-time school nurses was a barrier to asthma management. Only one study showed directly that classroom teachers were not following the NHLBI guidelines on asthma management. Our literature review revealed that US teachers do not know the NHLBI guidelines on asthma management in the classroom. Future research should focus on interventions targeted toward training classroom teachers on asthma management as per NHLBI guidelines to ultimately improve asthma management in schools.

  12. Cortisol response to acute stress in asthma: Moderation by depressive mood.

    PubMed

    Trueba, Ana F; Simon, Erica; Auchus, Richard J; Ritz, Thomas

    2016-05-15

    Both individuals with asthma and depression show signs of a dysregulated hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. However, little is known about the cortisol response to stress in the context of co-occurring asthma and depressive mood. Thirty-nine individuals with asthma and 41 healthy controls underwent a combined speech and mental arithmetic stressor. During the course of the laboratory session, salivary cortisol was collected 5 times, with 1 sample at 0min before the stressor and 4 samples at 0, 15, 30 and 45min after the stressor. Depressive mood in the past week was assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at the beginning of the session. Depressive symptoms moderated cortisol response to the acute stressor, but only among asthmatic patients. Higher depressive mood was associated with a significant increase in cortisol, whereas low depressive mood was associated with no cortisol response. In healthy participants, depressive mood had no substantial effect on cortisol response to the stressor. These findings suggest that depressive mood and chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma can interact to augment cortisol response to stress.

  13. Quality of acute asthma care in two tertiary hospitals in a state in South Western Nigeria: A report of clinical audit

    PubMed Central

    Desalu, Olufemi Olumuyiwa; Adeoti, Adekunle Olatayo; Ogunmola, Olarinde Jeffrey; Fadare, Joseph Olusesan; Kolawole, Tolutope Fasanmi

    2016-01-01

    Background: To audit the quality of acute asthma care in two tertiary hospitals in a state in the southwestern region of Nigeria and to compare the clinical practice against the recommendations of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guideline. Patients and Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of 101 patients who presented with acute exacerbation of asthma to the hospital between November 2010 and October 2015. Results: Majority of the cases were females (66.3%), <45 years of age (60.4%), and admitted in the wet season (64.4%). The median duration of hospital stay was 2 days (interquartile range; 1–3 days) and the mortality was 1.0%. At admission, 73 (72.3%) patients had their triggering factors documented and 33 (32.7%) had their severity assessed. Smoking status, medication adherence, serial oxygen saturation, and peak expiratory flow rate measurement were documented in less than half of the cases, respectively. Seventy-six (75.2%) patients had nebulized salbutamol, 89 (88.1%) had systemic corticosteroid, and 78 (77.2%) had within 1 h. On discharge, 68 (67.3%) patients were given follow-up appointment and 32 (31.7%) were reviewed within 30 days after discharge. Less than half were prescribed an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), a self-management plan, or had their inhaler technique reviewed or controller medications adjusted. Overall, adherence to the GINA guideline was not satisfactory and was very poor among the medical officers. Conclusion: The quality of acute asthma care in our setting is not satisfactory, and there is a low level of compliance with most recommendations of asthma guidelines. This audit has implicated the need to address the non-performing areas and organizational issues to improve the quality of care. PMID:27942102

  14. Challenges in the management of bronchial asthma among adults in Nigeria: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Onyedum, Cc; Ukwaja, Kn; Desalu, Oo; Ezeudo, C

    2013-07-01

    Inadequate attention given to the management of asthma and ways of improving bronchial asthma control could be an important factor for the rising morbidity and mortality from asthma despite major advances in our understanding of the disease process. There is a paucity of data concerning the challenges faced in the management of asthma in Africa. This review was aimed at highlighting the challenges facing asthma management and to discuss various strategies in improving asthma control in Nigeria. Data were sourced from PubMed, Medline, African Journals Online, Google Scholar, SCOPUS, and by reviewing the references of relevant literature. Additional articles were obtained via communications with colleagues and reviewing the Abstract Books of Nigeria Thoracic Society Annual Scientific Conference from 2005 to 2012. The data search was up-to-date as of December 31, 2012. Challenges in asthma management were found during diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. There are wide variations in diagnostic criteria for bronchial asthma and lack of standard diagnostic equipment leading to under or misdiagnosis. Treatment challenges include poor communication gap between the health-care providers and the patients, a high-cost and unavailability of essential asthma medications. Poor technique uses for medication devices, especially the inhalational drugs and Lack of National/hospital protocol or guidelines for treating asthma. Several challenges affect asthma management in developing countries, which borders on poverty, inadequate resources, weak health systems, and poor infrastructure. Efforts should be made to address these challenges by the Nigerian government, Nigerian Thoracic Society, pharmaceutical industries, and the health-care workers in general.

  15. Prevalence, severity and medical management of asthma in European school children in 1985 and 1991.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, E A; Asher, M I

    1994-10-01

    This present study, conducted in 1991, examined trends in the prevalence, severity and medical management of asthma in European school children by repeating the protocol of a study performed in 1985, using the same schools and questionnaire. One thousand, nine hundred and one children in 1991 were compared with 1084 children in 1985. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms increased significantly by approximately one-third, although the increase in the diagnostic label 'asthma' did not increase significantly. Asthma severity indices (> 12 asthma attacks in the last 12 months and symptoms in the last month) were not significantly increased, except for night cough in the last month (1985 7.0%, 1991 9.9%, P = 0.008). In 1991, children with wheeze in the last 12 months were more likely to be diagnosed as having asthma and treated with bronchodilators and prophylactic drugs than in 1985. We conclude that the prevalence of asthma symptoms has increased from 1985 to 1991, but the two indices of severity of asthma are mostly unchanged. Diagnosis of asthma in children with symptoms has improved but asthma still appears underrecognized. Drug treatment of asthma has increased.

  16. Acute effects of air pollution on asthma hospitalization in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zhao, Ang; Zhao, Jinzhuo; Chen, Renjie; Wang, Weibing; Ha, Sandie; Xu, Xiaohui; Kan, Haidong

    2014-08-01

    Air pollution has been accepted as an important contributor to asthma development and exacerbation. However, the evidence is limited in China. In this study, we investigated the acute effect of air pollution on asthma hospitalization in Shanghai, China. We applied over-dispersed generalized additive model adjusted for weather conditions, day of the week, long-term and seasonal trends. An interquartile range increase in the moving average concentrations of PM10, SO2, NO2 and BC on the concurrent day and previous day corresponded to 1.82%, 6.41%, 8.26% and 6.62% increase of asthmatic hospitalization, respectively. The effects of SO2 and NO2 were robust after adjustment for PM10. The associations appeared to be more evident in the cool season than in the warm season. Our results contribute to the limited data in the scientific literature on acute effects of air pollution on asthma in high exposure settings, which are typical in developing countries.

  17. Two for one: A self-management plan coupled with a prescription sheet for children with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Francine M; Noya, Francisco; McGillivray, David; Resendes, Sandy; Ducharme-Bénard, Stéphanie; Zemek, Roger; Bhogal, Sanjit Kaur; Rouleau, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite strong recommendations in the asthma guidelines, the use of written self-management plans remains low among asthmatic patients. OBJECTIVES: To develop a written self-management plan, based on scientific evidence and expert opinions, in a format intended to facilitate its dispensing by health care professionals, and to test the perception of its relevance and clarity by asthmatic children, adolescents and adults. METHODS: Inspired by previously tested self-management plans, surveys of asthma educators, expert opinions and the 2004 Canadian Asthma Guidelines, the authors simultaneously developed French and English versions of a written self-management plan that coupled with a prescription. The self-management plan was tested in parents and their asthmatic children (aged one to 17 years), and it was revised until 85% clarity and perceived relevance was achieved. RESULTS: Ninety-seven children and their parents were interviewed. Twenty per cent had a self-management plan. On the final revision, nearly all items were clear and perceived relevant by 85% or more of the interviewees. Two self-management plans were designed for clinics and acute care settings, respectively. The plans are divided into three control zones identified by symptoms with optional peak flow values and symbolized by traffic light colours. They are designed in triplicate format with a prescription slip, a medical chart copy and a patient copy. CONCLUSION: The written self-management plans, based on available scientific evidence and expert opinions, are clear and perceived to be relevant by children, adolescents and their parents. By incorporating the prescription and chart copies, they were designed to facilitate dispensing by physicians in both clinics and acute care settings. PMID:18949103

  18. President Calvin Coolidge's asthma and modern management of asthma patients in the dental setting.

    PubMed

    Maloney, William James; Maloney, Maura P

    2012-03-01

    Asthma affects millions of individuals worldwide. President Calvin Coolidge was one of these individuals. Coolidge suffered from asthma since childhood. It affected his outlook toward aggressive physical activity and was a strong factor in shaping his personality and, eventually, his politics. He was devoted to the status quo in American business enterprises and was known for his reserved personality and conservative political beliefs. One can speculate as to what role his passive personality, developed as a direct and conscious result of his desire for physical self-preservation in light of his asthma, played in leading the United States to the brink of the Great Depression. Dentists encounter individuals with asthma in their private practices daily. It is imperative that all dentists be aware of the symptoms of asthma, its many orofacial manifestations and possible modifications to dental treatment.

  19. Limitations of asthma control questionnaires in the management and follow up of childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Will

    2013-12-01

    It is important to achieve asthma control whenever possible in clinical practice. Asthma control questionnaires undoubtedly provide a useful measure of asthma control in research studies but their place in routine clinical practice has yet to be secured. There is considerable variation in the results yielded from different validated asthma control tools. It remains to be seen whether they improve the reliability of reporting of symptoms to health care professionals when compared to verbal reporting. In the presence of sensible care from compassionate and well informed doctors and nurses asthma control questionnaires will not improve outcomes for children. A patient-focused clinical encounter supplemented with lung function measurements and occasional eNO testing has more to offer families and children than control questionnaires and their routine use in the clinic cannot be recommended on the basis of current evidence.

  20. Home visiting for intervention delivery to improve rural family asthma management.

    PubMed

    Horner, Sharon D

    2006-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the use of home visits in an asthma self-management intervention study with rural families who have a school-aged child with asthma. The study design involved randomization of the sample by elementary schools, then baseline (pretest) and postintervention data collection.(1) The purpose of this article is to describe challenges with, and pose solutions for, implementing home visits for asthma self-management in rural areas. Home visiting is a strategy for program delivery that takes advantage of the home context for tailoring services to address the family's individual needs. The advantages of intervening in the home include being able to (a) use actual home conditions for individualizing the asthma education to meet families' needs; (b) match home visitors with family in terms of ethnicity and language; (c) retain a high percentage of families over the year-long duration of the study; and (d) not add to family burden of managing asthma.

  1. Creation and implementation of SAMPRO™: A school-based asthma management program

    PubMed Central

    Lemanske, Robert F.; Kakumanu, Sujani; Shanovich, Kathleen; Antos, Nicholas; Cloutier, Michelle M.; Mazyck, Donna; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Schantz, Shirley; Szefler, Stanley; Vandlik, Renee; Williams, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians who care for children with asthma have an obligation to coordinate asthma care with the schools. Aside from routine clinical care of asthmatic children, providers must educate the family and child about the need for an asthma treatment plan in school and support the school nurse meeting the needs of the student requiring school-based asthma care. The following article was developed by multiple stakeholders to address this need. It describes the 4 components of the School-based Asthma Management Program (SAMPRO™). SAMPRO™ details elements necessary for the education of children, families, clinicians, and school-based personnel based on a “circle of support” that would enhance multidirectional communication and promote better care for children with asthma within the school setting. PMID:27596707

  2. Creation and implementation of SAMPRO™: A school-based asthma management program.

    PubMed

    Lemanske, Robert F; Kakumanu, Sujani; Shanovich, Kathleen; Antos, Nicholas; Cloutier, Michelle M; Mazyck, Donna; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Schantz, Shirley; Szefler, Stanley; Vandlik, Renee; Williams, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Clinicians who care for children with asthma have an obligation to coordinate asthma care with the schools. Aside from routine clinical care of asthmatic children, providers must educate the family and child about the need for an asthma treatment plan in school and support the school nurse meeting the needs of the student requiring school-based asthma care. The following article was developed by multiple stakeholders to address this need. It describes the 4 components of the School-based Asthma Management Program (SAMPRO™). SAMPRO™ details elements necessary for the education of children, families, clinicians, and school-based personnel based on a "circle of support" that would enhance multidirectional communication and promote better care for children with asthma within the school setting.

  3. Adolescent Asthma Self-Management: Patient and Parent-Caregiver Perspectives on Using Social Media to Improve Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panzera, Anthony D.; Schneider, Tali K.; Martinasek, Mary P.; Lindenberger, James H.; Couluris, Marisa; Bryant, Carol A.; McDermott, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-management of asthma can now leverage new media technologies. To optimize implementation they must employ a consumer-oriented developmental approach. This study explored benefits of and barriers to improved asthma self-management and identified key elements for the development of a digital media tool to enhance asthma control.…

  4. Improvement of Rural Children's Asthma Self-Management by Lay Health Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Sharon D.; Fouladi, Rachel T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the present analysis is to examine changes in rural children's asthma self-management after they received lay health educator (LHE)-delivered classes. Methods: Elementary schools were randomly assigned to the treatment or attention-control condition and their participating students received either asthma education or…

  5. Difficult‐to‐control asthma management through the use of a specific protocol

    PubMed Central

    Giavina‐Bianchi, Pedro; Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Bisaccioni, Carla; Agondi, Rosana; Kalil, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The present study is a critical review of difficult‐to‐control asthma, highlighting the characteristics and severity of the disease. It also presents a protocol for the management of patients with this asthma phenotype. The protocol, which was based on relevant studies in the literature, is described and analyzed. PMID:21049219

  6. Asthma Management among Low-Income Latino and African American Families of Infants and Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Karel; Chesla, Catherine A.

    2004-01-01

    To discover the underlying understandings that organize how low-income Latino and African American parents of infants and toddlers with severe persistent asthma manage symptoms in their children, 11 families with children 12-48 months old and recently hospitalized with asthma were interviewed over 3-6 months. Interpretive phenomenology was used to…

  7. Process and Outcomes of School Nurse Case Management for Students with Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelke, Martha Keehner; Swanson, Melvin; Guttu, Martha

    2014-01-01

    There have been many studies that have examined the impact of school-based asthma programs on students with asthma. However, most studies do not provide adequate elaboration on the components of the program. Therefore, replication of these programs is difficult. This study examines the process of school nurse case management, which includes the…

  8. The Breathmobile Program: structure, implementation, and evolution of a large-scale, urban, pediatric asthma disease management program.

    PubMed

    Jones, Craig A; Clement, Loran T; Hanley-Lopez, Jean; Morphew, Tricia; Kwong, Kenny Yat Choi; Lifson, Francene; Opas, Lawrence; Guterman, Jeffrey J

    2005-08-01

    Despite more than a decade of education and research-oriented intervention programs, inner city children with asthma continue to engage in episodic "rescue" patterns of healthcare and experience a disproportionate level of morbidity. The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a sustainable community-wide pediatric asthma disease management program designed to shift inner city children in Los Angeles from acute episodic care to regular preventive care in accordance with national standards. In 1995 the Southern California Chapter of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA), the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LAC DHS), and the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) established an agreement to initiate and sustain the Breathmobile Program. This program includes automated case identification, mobile school-based clinics, and highly structured clinical encounters supported by an advanced information technology solution. Interdisciplinary teams of asthma care specialists provide regular and ongoing care to children at school and county clinic sites over a wide geographic area of urban Los Angeles. Each team operates in a specially equipped mobile clinic (Breathmobile), efficiently moving a structured healthcare process to school and county clinic sites with large numbers of children. Demographic, clinical, and participation data is tracked carefully in an electronic medical record system. Program operations, clinical oversight, and patient tracking are centralized at a care coordination center. Clinical operations and methods have been replicated in fixed specialty clinic sites at the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center. Clinical and process measures are regularly evaluated to assure quality, plan iterative improvement, and support evidence-based care. Four Breathmobiles deliver ongoing care at more than 90 school sites. The program has engaged over five thousand patients and their families in a

  9. Randomised pragmatic comparison of UK and US treatment of acute asthma presenting to hospital

    PubMed Central

    Innes, N; Stocking, J; Daynes, T; Harrison, B

    2002-01-01

    Background: Systemic corticosteroids and inhaled ß2 agonists are accepted first line treatments for acute severe asthma, but there is no consensus on their optimum dosage and frequency of administration. American regimens include higher initial dosages of ß2 agonists and corticosteroids than UK regimens. Methods: In a prospective, pragmatic, randomised, parallel group study, 170 patients of mean (SD) age 37 (12) years with acute asthma (peak expiratory flow (PEF) 212 (80) l/min) presenting to hospital received treatment with either high dose prednisolone and continuous nebulised salbutamol as recommended in the US or lower dose prednisolone and bolus nebulised salbutamol as recommended in the UK by the BTS. Results: Outcome measures were: ΔPEF at 1 hour (BTS 89 l/min, US 106 l/min, p=0.2, CI –8 to 41) and at 2 hours (BTS 49 l/min, US 101 l/min, p<0.0001, CI 28 to 77); time to discharge if admitted (BTS 4 days, US 4 days); rates of achieving discharge PEF (>60%) at 2 hours (BTS 64%, US 78%, p=0.04); time to regain control of asthma as measured by PEF ≥80% best with ≤20% variability (BTS 3 days, US 4 days, p=0.6); PEF at 24 hours in patients admitted (BTS 293 l/min, US 288 l/min, p=0.8); and control of asthma in the subsequent month (no significant differences). Conclusions: Treatment with higher doses of continuous nebulised salbutamol leads to a greater immediate improvement in PEF but the degree of recovery at 24 hours and speed of recovery thereafter is achieved as effectively with lower corticosteroid doses as recommended in the British guidelines. PMID:12454298

  10. Electronic Nose Breathprints Are Independent of Acute Changes in Airway Caliber in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Zsofia; Fens, Niki; van der Maten, Jan; van der Schee, Marc P.; Wagener, Ariane H.; de Nijs, Selma B.; Dijkers, Erica; Sterk, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular profiling of exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOC) by electronic nose technology provides breathprints that discriminate between patients with different inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma and COPD. However, it is unknown whether this is determined by differences in airway caliber. We hypothesized that breathprints obtained by electronic nose are independent of acute changes in airway caliber in asthma. Ten patients with stable asthma underwent methacholine provocation (Visit 1) and sham challenge with isotonic saline (Visit 2). At Visit 1, exhaled air was repetitively collected pre-challenge, after reaching the provocative concentration (PC20) causing 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and after subsequent salbutamol inhalation. At Visit 2, breath was collected pre-challenge, post-saline and post-salbutamol. At each occasion, an expiratory vital capacity was collected after 5 min of tidal breathing through an inspiratory VOC-filter in a Tedlar bag and sampled by electronic nose (Cyranose 320). Breathprints were analyzed with principal component analysis and individual factors were compared with mixed model analysis followed by pairwise comparisons. Inhalation of methacholine led to a 30.8 ± 3.3% fall in FEV1 and was followed by a significant change in breathprint (p = 0.04). Saline inhalation did not induce a significant change in FEV1, but altered the breathprint (p = 0.01). However, the breathprint obtained after the methacholine provocation was not significantly different from that after saline challenge (p = 0.27). The molecular profile of exhaled air in patients with asthma is altered by nebulized aerosols, but is not affected by acute changes in airway caliber. Our data demonstrate that breathprints by electronic nose are not confounded by the level of airway obstruction. PMID:22163399

  11. Managing acute care.

    PubMed

    Russell, J S

    1993-02-01

    In the last few years, much medical-facility construction has been driven by what insurers want. Hospitals have built facilities for well-reimbursed procedures and closed money-losing ones. Health-maintenance organizations increasingly expect to hold down costs by making prepayment arrangements with doctors and their hospitals. President Clinton has pledged early action on health-care reform, which will likely change planners' priorities. Whether the nation goes to Clintonian "managed competition" or a Canadian-style nationwide single-payer system (the two most likely options), the projects on these pages reflect two large-scale trends that are likely to continue: the movement of more procedures from inpatient to outpatient facilities and the separation of treatment functions from ordinary office and administrative tasks so that the latter are not performed in the same high-cost buildings as technology-intensive procedures. Various schemes that make care more "patient-centered" have been tried and been shown to speed healing, even for outpatients, but such hard-to-quantify issues get short shrift in an era of knee-jerk cost containment. The challenge in tomorrow's healthcare universe--whatever it becomes--will be to keep these issues on the table.

  12. Caregiver perception of asthma management of children in the context of poverty

    PubMed Central

    Bellin, Melissa H.; Land, Cassie; Newsome, Angelica; Kub, Joan; Mudd, Shawna S.; Bollinger, Mary Elizabeth; Butz, Arlene M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Low-income caregivers of young children with high-risk asthma experience social stressors and illness-related demands that may impede effective home asthma management. Knowledge of the caregiving experience in the context of poverty is limited. Methods Convenience sampling methods were used to recruit low-income caregivers of children aged 7–12 years, who are frequently in the Emergency Room (ED) for uncontrolled asthma. Thirteen caregivers participated in focus groups that were designed to elicit reflections on asthma home and community management from the caregiver perspective. A grounded theory approach was used in the open coding of transcript data from three focus groups, as well as to revise and reorganize emerging themes and sub-themes. Results Participants (Mean age = 33.9 years) were predominantly the biological mother (92.3%), single (84.6%), and impoverished (69.2% reported annual household income ≤ $30,000). Their children (Mean age = 7.8 years) were African-American (100%), enrolled in Medicaid (92.3%), averaged 1.38 (SD = 0.7) ED visits over the prior 3 months, resided in homes with at least one smoker (61.5%), and nearly all (84.6%) experienced activity limitations due to asthma. Five themes emerged in the analysis: intensive caregiving role, complex and shared asthma management responsibility, parental beliefs and structural barriers to guideline-based care, lack of control over environmental triggers, and parent advocacy to improve child asthma care and outcomes. Conclusions Caregivers managing a child with high-risk asthma in the context of poverty indicate the need for ongoing asthma education, increased sensitivity to the complexity of home asthma management, and family-centered interventions that enhance communication and collaboration between caregivers and providers. PMID:27304455

  13. Nasal polyps in patients with asthma: prevalence, impact, and management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Cristobal; Mullol, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) often have coexisting asthma under the concept of “United Airway Disease”, being the combination of both diseases, which is one of the most challenging phenotypes to treat. Although clinicians have recognized this difficult-to-treat phenotype for many years, it remained poorly characterized. There is increasing epidemiological evidence linking chronic rhinosinusitis and asthma, but a good understanding of the pathophysiology and the combined management is still lacking. Bronchial asthma is more prevalent in patients who suffer chronic rhinosinusitis, while asthmatic patients have a greater prevalence of CRSwNP than patients without asthma. The effect of CRSwNP treatment, whether medical or surgical, in asthma is today less controversial after some studies have shown improvement of asthma after medical and/or surgical treatment of CRSwNP. However, direct comparisons between surgical and medical treatments are limited. Further randomized clinical trials are, however, still needed to better understand the management when both asthma and CRSwNP occur together. This review aims at summarizing the prevalence, impact, and management challenges regarding both asthma and CRSwNP. PMID:27042129

  14. Economic Evidence for US Asthma Self-Management Education and Home-Based Interventions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Joy; Wilhelm, Natalie; Lewis, Lillianne; Herman, Elizabeth

    The health and economic burden of asthma in the United States is substantial. Asthma self-management education (AS-ME) and home-based interventions for asthma can improve asthma control and prevent asthma exacerbations, and interest in health care-public health collaboration regarding asthma is increasing. However, outpatient AS-ME and home-based asthma intervention programs are not widely available; economic sustainability is a common concern. Thus, we conducted a narrative review of existing literature regarding economic outcomes of outpatient AS-ME and home-based intervention programs for asthma in the United States. We identified 9 outpatient AS-ME programs and 17 home-based intervention programs with return on investment (ROI) data. Most programs were associated with a positive ROI; a few programs observed positive ROIs only among selected populations (eg, higher health care utilization). Interpretation of existing data is limited by heterogeneous ROI calculations. Nevertheless, the literature suggests promise for sustainable opportunities to expand access to outpatient AS-ME and home-based asthma intervention programs in the United States. More definitive knowledge about how to maximize program benefit and sustainability could be gained through more controlled studies of specific populations and increased uniformity in economic assessments.

  15. Interstitial collagen turnover during airway remodeling in acute and chronic experimental asthma

    PubMed Central

    González-Avila, Georgina; Bazan-Perkins, Blanca; Sandoval, Cuauhtémoc; Sommer, Bettina; Vadillo-Gonzalez, Sebastian; Ramos, Carlos; Aquino-Galvez, Arnoldo

    2016-01-01

    Asthma airway remodeling is characterized by the thickening of the basement membrane (BM) due to an increase in extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, which contributes to the irreversibility of airflow obstruction. Interstitial collagens are the primary ECM components to be increased during the fibrotic process. The aim of the present study was to examine the interstitial collagen turnover during the course of acute and chronic asthma, and 1 month after the last exposure to the allergen. Guinea pigs sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) and exposed to 3 further OVA challenges (acute model) or 12 OVA challenges (chronic model) were used as asthma experimental models. A group of animals from either model was sacrificed 1 h or 1 month after the last OVA challenge. Collagen distribution, collagen content, interstitial collagenase activity and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-13 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 protein expression levels were measured in the lung tissue samples from both experimental models. The results revealed that collagen deposit in bronchiole BM, adventitial and airway smooth muscle layers was increased in both experimental models as well as lung tissue collagen concentration. These structural changes persisted 1 month after the last OVA challenge. In the acute model, a decrease in collagenase activity and in MMP-1 concentration was observed. Collagenase activity returned to basal levels, and an increase in MMP-1 and MMP-13 expression levels along with a decrease in TIMP-1 expression levels were observed in animals sacrificed 1 month after the last OVA challenge. In the chronic model, there were no changes in collagenase activity or in MMP-13 concentration, although MMP-1 expression levels increased. One month later, an increase in collagenase activity was observed, although MMP-1 and TIMP-1 levels were not altered. The results of the present study suggest that even when the allergen challenges were discontinued, and collagenase

  16. Asthma-related emergency department use: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Laurie H; Chambers, Patricia; Dexheimer, Judith W

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic pediatric diseases. Patients with asthma often present to the emergency department for treatment for acute exacerbations. These patients may not have a primary care physician or primary care home, and thus are seeking care in the emergency department. Asthma care in the emergency department is multifaceted to treat asthma patients appropriately and provide quality care. National and international guidelines exist to help drive clinical care. Electronic and paper-based tools exist for both physicians and patients to help improve emergency, home, and preventive care. Treatment of patients with asthma should include the acute exacerbation, long-term management of controller medications, and controlling triggers in the home environment. We will address the current state of asthma research in emergency medicine in the US, and discuss some of the resources being used to help provide a medical home and improve care for patients who suffer from acute asthma exacerbations. PMID:27471415

  17. Guidelines for the emergency management of asthma in adults. CAEP/CTS Asthma Advisory Committee. Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians and the Canadian Thoracic Society.

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, R C; Grunfeld, A F; Hodder, R V; Verbeek, P R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a set of comprehensive, standardized evidence-based guidelines for the assessment and treatment of acute asthma in adults in the emergency setting. OPTIONS: The use of medications was evaluated by class, dose, route, onset of action and optimal mode of delivery. The use of objective measurements and clinical features to assess response to therapy were evaluated in relation to the decision to admit or discharge the patient or arrange for follow-up care. OUTCOMES: Control of symptoms and disease reflected in hospital admission rates, frequency of treatment failures following discharge, resolution of symptoms and improvement of spirometric test results. EVIDENCE: Previous guidelines, articles retrieved through a search of MEDLINE, emergency medical abstracts and information from members of the expert panel were reviewed by members of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) and the Canadian Thoracic Society. Where evidence was not available, consensus was reached by the expert panel. The resulting guidelines were reviewed by members of the parent organizations. VALUES: The evidence-based methods and values of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination were used. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: As many as 80% of the approximate 400 deaths from asthma each year in Canada are felt to be preventable. The use of guidelines, aggressive emergency management and consistent use of available options at discharge are expected to decrease the rates of unnecessary hospital admissions and return visits to emergency departments because of treatment failures. Substantial decreases in costs are expected from the use of less expensive drugs, or drug delivery systems, fewer hospital admissions and earlier return to full activity after discharge. RECOMMENDATIONS: Beta2-agonists are the first-line therapy for the management of acute asthma in the emergency department (grade A recommendation). Bronchodilators should be administered by the

  18. A Self-Regulation Theory–Based Asthma Management Mobile App for Adolescents: A Usability Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Self-regulation theory suggests people learn to influence their own behavior through self-monitoring, goal-setting, feedback, self-reward, and self-instruction, all of which smartphones are now capable of facilitating. Several mobile apps exist to manage asthma; however, little evidence exists about whether these apps employ user-centered design processes that adhere to government usability guidelines for mobile apps. Objective Building upon a previous study that documented adolescent preferences for an asthma self-management app, we employed a user-centered approach to assess the usability of a high-fidelity wireframe for an asthma self-management app intended for use by adolescents with persistent asthma. Methods Individual interviews were conducted with adolescents (ages 11-18 years) with persistent asthma who owned a smartphone (N=8). Adolescents were asked to evaluate a PDF app wireframe consisting of 76 screen shots displaying app features, including log in and home screen, profile setup, settings and info, self-management features, and graphical displays for charting asthma control and medication. Preferences, comments, and suggestions for each set of screen shots were assessed using the audio-recorded interviews. Two coders reached consensus on adolescent evaluations of the following aspects of app features: (1) usability, (2) behavioral intentions to use, (3) confusing aspects, and (4) suggestions for improvement. Results The app wireframe was generally well received, and several suggestions for improvement were recorded. Suggestions included increased customization of charts and notifications, reminders, and alerts. Participants preferred longitudinal data about asthma control and medication use to be displayed using line graphs. All participants reported that they would find an asthma management app like the one depicted in the wireframe useful for managing their asthma. Conclusions Early stage usability tests guided by government usability

  19. Implementing asthma self-management education in medical care settings--issues and strategies.

    PubMed

    Mullen, P D; Mullen, L R

    1983-11-01

    Asthma self-management education has the potential to improve the health and quality of life for children and to reduce use of acute care services. The preparation of parents and children to prevent asthma attacks and to ameliorate acute episodes when they do occur can best be accomplished with the support of medical care providers. This analysis addresses policy issues relevant to that acceptance: the degree of integration into medical practice that is desirable; the most hospitable clinical settings; and the incentives for providers, consumers, and payers that would result in appropriate supply and use of ASME:. The analysis commences with a discussion of the costs and benefits of making ASME a part of medical care. It then turns to a description of the trends that led to the current array of institutions, services, and incentives within the health care sector. Future changes in family context, financing, and other determinants of the use of medical services by children and youth are forecast. The framework for the analysis of incentives is diffusion of innovation. ASME is analyzed according to the attributes that generally facilitate the acceptance of a new procedure. In its current form and with current incentives, ASME is fairly complex and difficult to communicate, has little relative advantage, and is not necessarily compatible with the usual provider goals. The motivating factors for three interrelated groups-providers, consumers, and third-party payers-and leverage points for the application of incentives are identified. The latter include reimbursement, standards of practice, information generation and flow, insurance regulation, institutional development, and research funding. Important information to potential adopters includes the definition of the service, its optimal intensity and mix of providers, and its effects on net costs and quality of life.

  20. Environmental triggers and avoidance in the management of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Clarisse; Charpin, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Identifying asthma triggers forms the basis of environmental secondary prevention. These triggers may be allergenic or nonallergenic. Allergenic triggers include indoor allergens, such as house dust mites (HDMs), molds, pets, cockroaches, and rodents, and outdoor allergens, such as pollens and molds. Clinical observations provide support for the role of HDM exposure as a trigger, although avoidance studies provide conflicting results. Molds and their metabolic products are now considered to be triggers of asthma attacks. Pets, dogs, and especially cats can undoubtedly trigger asthmatic symptoms in sensitized subjects. Avoidance is difficult and rarely adhered to by families. Cockroach allergens contribute to asthma morbidity, and avoidance strategies can lead to clinical benefit. Mouse allergens are mostly found in inner-city dwellings, but their implication in asthma morbidity is debated. In the outdoors, pollens can induce seasonal asthma in sensitized individuals. Avoidance relies on preventing pollens from getting into the house and on minimizing seasonal outdoor exposure. Outdoor molds may lead to severe asthma exacerbations. Nonallergenic triggers include viral infections, active and passive smoking, meteorological changes, occupational exposures, and other triggers that are less commonly involved. Viral infection is the main asthma trigger in children. Active smoking is associated with higher asthma morbidity, and smoking cessation interventions should be personalized. Passive smoking is also a risk factor for asthma exacerbation. The implementation of public smoking bans has led to a reduction in the hospitalization of asthmatic children. Air pollution levels have been linked with asthmatic symptoms, a decrease in lung function, and increased emergency room visits and hospitalizations. Since avoidance is not easy to achieve, clean air policies remain the most effective strategy. Indoor air is also affected by air pollutants, such as cigarette smoke and

  1. [Cardiogenic pulmonary edema following β2 agonist infusion for acute, severe asthma].

    PubMed

    Bahloul, M; Chaari, A; Dammak, H; Medhioub, F; Abid, L; Chtourou, K; Rekik, N; Chelly, H; Kallel, H; Bouaziz, M

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a severe acute pulmonary edema secondary to the administration of salbutamol to a patient admitted for severe asthma. The diagnosis of acute pulmonary edema was suspected on the clinical examination, chest radiography, biological (plasmatic Pro-BNP rate) and echocardiographic findings. Rapid improvement under dobutamine and mechanical ventilation argue in favour of cardiogenic pulmonary edema. The young age of our patient, the absence of history of cardiovascular disease and the chronology of this complication onset regarded to salbutamol infusion could suggest β2 agonist involvement in this event. The improvement of cardiac function on echocardiography and the normal results obtained with myocardial perfusion scintigraphy performed 35 days later show the left ventricular reversible dysfunction.

  2. Adolescence and asthma management: the perspective of adolescents receiving primary health care☆

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Alisson; Rocha, Regina Lunardi; Alvim, Cristina Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of adolescence characteristics on asthma management. Methods: This was a qualitative study conducted in the city of Divinópolis, Minas Gerais, Southeast Brazil. Data were collected through semistructured interviews guided by a questionnaire with seven asthmatic adolescents followed-up in the primary public health care service of the city. Results: Using content analysis, three thematic categories were observed in the adolescents' responses: 1) family relationships in the treatment of asthma in adolescence; 2) the asthmatic adolescents and their peers; and 3) the role of the school for the asthmatic adolescents. Conclusions: The results demonstrated that peers, family, and school should be more valued by health professionals and by health care services when treating asthmatic adolescents, as these social relationships are closely associated with the adolescent and have an important role in asthma management. Attempts to meet the demands of adolescents contribute to improve asthma management. PMID:25479845

  3. Factors Associated With Nonresponse to a Computer-Tailored Asthma Management Program for Urban Adolescents With Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, C. L. M.; Havstad, S. L.; Johnson, D.; Saltzgaber, J.; Peterson, E. L.; Resnicow, K.; Ownby, D. R.; Baptist, A. P.; Johnson, C. C.; Strecher, V. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The ability to identify potentially resistant participants early in the course of an intervention could inform development of strategies for behavior change and improve program effectiveness. Objective The objective of this analysis was to identify factors related to nonresponse (i.e., lack of behavior change) to an asthma management intervention for urban teenagers. The intervention targeted several behaviors, including medication adherence, having a rescue inhaler nearby, and smoking. Methods A discriminate analysis was conducted using data from a randomized trial of the intervention. Included in this analysis are participants who reported a physician diagnosis of asthma, completed a baseline questionnaire, were randomized to the treatment group, completed ≥2 of 4 educational sessions, and completed ≥2 of 3 follow-up questionnaires. Ninety students met criteria for inclusion in this subgroup analysis. Results In logistic regression models for medication adherence, nonresponse was related to low baseline asthma self-regulation, odds ratio = 3.6 (95% confidence interval = 1.3–9.5). In models for having an inhaler nearby, nonresponse was related to low baseline self-regulation and to rebelliousness, OR = 4.7 (1.6–13.2) and 5.6 (1.7–18.0), respectively. Nonresponse to smoking messages was related to rebelliousness, low emotional support, and low religiosity, ORs = 7.6 (1.8–32.3), 9.5 (1.4–63.5), and 6.6 (1.5–29.8) respectively. Conclusions Certain variables had the ability to discriminate the likelihood of response from that of nonresponse to an asthma program for urban, African American adolescents with asthma. These variables can be used to identify resistant subgroups early in the intervention, allowing the application of specialized strategies through tailoring. These types of analyses can inform behavioral interventions. PMID:20642376

  4. Acute pain management in children

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Susan T; Hannallah, Raafat S

    2010-01-01

    The greatest advance in pediatric pain medicine is the recognition that untreated pain is a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality after surgical trauma. Accurate assessment of pain in different age groups and the effective treatment of postoperative pain is constantly being refined; with newer drugs being used alone or in combination with other drugs continues to be explored. Several advances in developmental neurobiology and pharmacology, knowledge of new analgesics and newer applications of old analgesics in the last two decades have helped the pediatric anesthesiologist in managing pain in children more efficiently. The latter include administering opioids via the skin and nasal mucosa and their addition into the neuraxial local anesthetics. Systemic opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and regional analgesics alone or combined with additives are currently used to provide effective postoperative analgesia. These modalities are best utilized when combined as a multimodal approach to treat acute pain in the perioperative setting. The development of receptor specific drugs that can produce pain relief without the untoward side effects of respiratory depression will hasten the recovery and discharge of children after surgery. This review focuses on the overview of acute pain management in children, with an emphasis on pharmacological and regional anesthesia in achieving this goal. PMID:21197314

  5. Acute pain management in children.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Susan T; Hannallah, Raafat S

    2010-07-15

    The greatest advance in pediatric pain medicine is the recognition that untreated pain is a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality after surgical trauma. Accurate assessment of pain in different age groups and the effective treatment of postoperative pain is constantly being refined; with newer drugs being used alone or in combination with other drugs continues to be explored. Several advances in developmental neurobiology and pharmacology, knowledge of new analgesics and newer applications of old analgesics in the last two decades have helped the pediatric anesthesiologist in managing pain in children more efficiently. The latter include administering opioids via the skin and nasal mucosa and their addition into the neuraxial local anesthetics. Systemic opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and regional analgesics alone or combined with additives are currently used to provide effective postoperative analgesia. These modalities are best utilized when combined as a multimodal approach to treat acute pain in the perioperative setting. The development of receptor specific drugs that can produce pain relief without the untoward side effects of respiratory depression will hasten the recovery and discharge of children after surgery. This review focuses on the overview of acute pain management in children, with an emphasis on pharmacological and regional anesthesia in achieving this goal.

  6. Recognizing asthma mimics and asthma complications.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Dennis; Seda, Gilbert; Daheshia, Massoud

    2011-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways characterized by airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperreactivity, and underlying inflammation. Two common reasons asthmatics fail standard therapy are incorrect diagnosis and failure to recognize underlying contributing factors. A correct diagnosis of asthma is of great importance to military practitioners since misdiagnosis or uncontrolled asthma affects an individual's operational readiness or determines whether one can receive a medical waiver to enlist in military service. This article presents four cases of patients with dyspnea that have conditions which mimic asthma or complicate asthma management: vocal cord dysfunction misdiagnosed as asthma, respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease mistaken as asthma, difficult-to-control asthma because of bronchiectasis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and difficult and fatal asthma. Asthma is contrasted to other respiratory disorders, and an outlined approach to asthma diagnosis and management is presented using the Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines.

  7. Japanese guidelines for childhood asthma 2017.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hirokazu; Hamasaki, Yuhei; Kohno, Yoichi; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Kondo, Naomi; Nishima, Sankei; Nishimuta, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Akihiro

    2017-04-01

    The Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Diseases 2017 (JAGL 2017) includes a minor revision of the Japanese Pediatric Guideline for the Treatment and Management of Asthma 2012 (JPGL 2012) by the Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology. The section on child asthma in JAGL 2017 provides information on how to diagnose asthma between infancy and adolescence (0-15 years of age). It makes recommendations for best practices in the management of childhood asthma, including management of acute exacerbations and non-pharmacological and pharmacological management. This guideline will be of interest to non-specialist physicians involved in the care of children with asthma. JAGL differs from the Global Initiative for Asthma Guideline in that JAGL emphasizes diagnosis and early intervention of children with asthma at <2 years or 2-5 years of age. The first choice of treatment depends on the severity and frequency of symptoms. Pharmacological management, including step-up or step-down of drugs used for long-term management based on the status of asthma control levels, is easy to understand; thus, this guideline is suitable for the routine medical care of children with asthma. JAGL also recommends using a control test in children, so that the physician aims for complete control by avoiding exacerbating factors and appropriately using anti-inflammatory drugs (for example, inhaled corticosteroids and leukotriene receptor antagonists).

  8. Publications about Asthma

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA provides the general public, partners, media outlets and health care professionals with a wide variety of asthma resources at no-cost. EPA develops resources to share information about asthma, its triggers, and comprehensive asthma management.

  9. Effectiveness of asthma education with and without a self-management plan in hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Palma, Tatiana; Zamorano, Alejandra; Arancibia, Francisca; Bustos, María-Francisca; Silva, Maria José; Cardenas, Consuelo; De La Barra, Pedro; Puente, Victoria; Cerda, Jaime; Castro-Rodriguez, José A; Prado, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    Background. Formal education in primary care can reduce asthma exacerbations. However, there are few studies in hospitalized children, with none originating in Latin America. Methods. A prospective randomized study was designed to evaluate whether a full education with self-management plan (ESM) was more effective than an education without self-management plan (E) in reducing asthma hospitalization. Children (5 to 15 years of age) who were hospitalized for an asthma attack were divided in two groups. Children in the E group received general instructions based on a booklet. Those in the ESM group received the same booklet plus a self-management guide and a puzzle game that reinforces the lessons learned in the booklet. Patients were interviewed every 3 months, by telephone, for one year. Interviewers recording the number of hospitalizations, exacerbations, and emergency visits for asthma and oral steroid burst uses. Results. From 88 children who met the inclusion criteria, 77 (86%) completed one year of follow-up (41 from E and 36 from ESM group). Overall, after one year, the hospitalization decreased by 66% and the inhaled corticosteroids therapy increased from 36% to 79%. At the end of the study, there was no difference in exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, or hospitalizations between the two groups. Conclusions. Asthma education with or without a self-management plan during asthma hospitalization were effective in reducing exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, and future rehospitalizations. This evidence supports the importance of providing a complete asthma education plan in any patient who is admitted for asthma exacerbation.

  10. Pediatric asthma case management: a review of evidence and an experimental study design.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Amanda; Musolf, Jeanne; Meurer, John R; Cohn, Jennifer H; Kelly, Kevin J

    2004-08-01

    Asthma is a complex disease that involves physiological, environmental, and psychosocial factors. This paper reviews childhood asthma case management by social service professionals, lay health workers, and nurses, and it presents a new randomized controlled study using nurse case management in a local community coalition. Evidence suggests the common factor for success involves case managers spending time contacting and patiently and persistently working with the family, thus building a trusting relationship. Although case management time is an expense for a health care payer, provider, and the child and family, the positive outcomes achieved can demonstrate the benefit of these interventions to all parties involved. The described experimental study assesses the cost and effectiveness of home-based nurse case management by a community coalition for children visiting an emergency department for asthma care.

  11. New program set to intervene to prevent readmissions, repeat ED visits due to acute exacerbations of asthma.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    Faculty at Indiana University School of Medicine are set to launch a community paramedicine program aimed at preventing repeat hospital and ED visits for acute exacerbations of asthma in children. Under the program, all children who are treated in the hospital or ED for asthma will receive home visits by specially trained paramedics within a few days of discharge. Paramedics will conduct a comprehensive assessment and make referrals as necessary for followup care. Nearly 30% of children who have been hospitalized for asthma require readmission to the hospital not long after discharge, and as many as 25% of children who have been treated in the ED for asthma will return to the ED within 30 days for another asthma-related visit. The one-time home visits will be comprehensive, enabling EMS providers to initiate stop-gap measures so that if a child is starting to get sick, paramedics can make sure the appropriate medicines are started and that acute care needs are met. Developers will monitor 30-day, 90-day, and one-year readmission metrics among patients who have received home visits.They hope that resulting cost-savings will sustain the program beyond the initial period, which is being funded through a grant from the Department of Health and Human Services.

  12. A workshop on asthma management programs and centers in Brazil: reviewing and explaining concepts*

    PubMed Central

    Stelmach, Rafael; Neto, Alcindo Cerci; Fonseca, Ana Cristina de Carvalho Fernandez; Ponte, Eduardo Vieira; Alves, Gerardo; Araujo-Costa, Ildely Niedia; Lasmar, Laura Maria de Lima Belizário Facury; de Castro, Luci Keiko Kuromoto; Lenz, Maria Lucia Medeiros; Silva, Paulo; Cukier, Alberto; Alves, Alexssandra Maia; Lima-Matos, Aline Silva; Cardoso, Amanda da Rocha Oliveira; Fernandes, Ana Luisa Godoy; de São-José, Bruno Piassi; Riedi, Carlos Antônio; Schor, Deborah; Peixoto, Décio Medeiros; Brandenburg, Diego Djones; Camillo, Elineide Gomes dos Santos; Serpa, Faradiba Sarquis; Brandão, Heli Vieira; Lima, João Antonio Bonfadini; Pio, Jorge Eduardo; Fiterman, Jussara; Anderson, Maria de Fátima; Cardoso, Maria do Socorro de Lucena; Rodrigues, Marcelo Tadday; Pereira, Marilyn Nilda Esther Urrutia; Antila, Marti; Martins, Sonia Maria; Guimarães, Vanessa Gonzaga Tavares; Mello, Yara Arruda Marques; de Andrade, Wenderson Clay Correia; Salibe-Filho, William; Caldeira, Zelina Maria da Rocha; da Cruz-Filho, Álvaro Augusto Souza; Camargos, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report the results of a workshop regarding asthma management programs and centers (AMPCs) in Brazil, so that they can be used as a tool for the improvement and advancement of current and future AMPCs. Methods: The workshop consisted of five presentations and the corresponding group discussions. The working groups discussed the following themes: implementation of asthma management strategies; human resources needed for AMPCs; financial resources needed for AMPCs; and operational maintenance of AMPCs. Results: The workshop involved 39 participants, from all regions of the country, representing associations of asthma patients (n = 3), universities (n = 7), and AMPCs (n = 29). We found a direct relationship between a lack of planning and the failure of AMPCs. Based on the experiences reported during the workshop, the common assumptions about AMPCs in Brazil were the importance of raising awareness of managers; greater community participation; interdependence between primary care and specialized care; awareness of regionalization; and use of medications available in the public health system. Conclusions: Brazil already has a core of experience in the area of asthma management programs. The implementation of strategies for the management of chronic respiratory disease and their incorporation into health care system protocols would seem to be a natural progression. However, there is minimal experience in this area. Joint efforts by individuals with expertise in AMPCs could promote the implementation of asthma management strategies, thus speeding the creation of treatment networks, which might have a multiplier effect, precluding the need for isolated centers to start from zero. PMID:25750669

  13. Development of a Tool to Evaluate Asthma Preparedness and Management in Child-Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Young, Chelsea A.; Chan, Curtis; Stookey, Jodi; Patel, Anisha I.; Evans, Jane; Cohn, Karen; Agana, Luz; Yen, Irene H.; Fernandez, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Asthma is a common condition affecting many children in child-care centers. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program offers recommendations about creating an asthma-friendly child-care setting. However, no studies have investigated the extent to which child-care centers adhere to these recommendations. This study describes the development of a novel instrument to determine the ability of child-care centers to meet national recommendations for asthma. Methods: The Preparing for Asthma in Child Care (PACC) Instrument was developed using information from existing recommendations and standards, the peer-reviewed literature, site visits, and expert interviews. The survey questions were pilot-tested at 36 child-care centers throughout San Francisco. Results: The instrument is composed of 43 items across seven domains: smoking exposure, presence of a medical consultant and policies, management of ventilation and triggers, access to medication, presence of asthma action plans, staff training, and encouragement of physical activity. Discussion: The PACC Instrument is an evidence-based and comprehensive tool designed to identify areas to target to improve asthma care for children in child-care centers. PMID:26155370

  14. Ipratropium bromide for acute asthma exacerbations in the emergency setting: a literature review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Dotson, Kurtis; Dallman, Michael; Bowman, C Michael; Titus, M Olivia

    2009-10-01

    Since the 1970s, when inhaled anticholinergic agents were first introduced as adjunct therapies for the immediate treatment of pediatric asthma exacerbations, several trials have shown varying degrees of benefit from their use as bronchodilators in combination with inhaled short-acting beta-adrenergic agonists and systemic corticosteroids. Although other anticholinergics exist, ipratropium bromide (IB) specifically has emerged as the overwhelming choice of pulmonologists and emergency physicians because of its limited systemic absorption from the lungs when given as an inhaled preparation. However, although the varying trials, predominantly in the emergency department setting, have typically shown a trend toward improved outcomes, none has set forth clear dosing protocol recommendations for use by practicing physicians. It is our goal in this review of the available literature on the use of IB, as an adjunct to inhaled short-acting beta-adrenergic agonists, to summarize practical, evidence-based recommendations for use in the pediatric emergency department setting for acute asthma exacerbations. We also hope to better delineate the most effective dosing regimen in those patients who might benefit most from the addition of IB and to explore proposed additional benefits it may have as a modulator of cholinergic-induced effects from high-dose beta-agonist therapy and viral triggers.

  15. Value of Inhaled Corticosteroid Therapy In Long-Term Asthma Management

    PubMed Central

    Beam, Donald S.

    2010-01-01

    Asthma, which affects more than 22 million people in the U.S. every year, poses a significant clinical and economic burden to our health care system. Patients, health care practitioners, and payers require a variety of resources to ensure optimal disease management and positive clinical outcomes while also managing costs. In addition, decision makers in health care must determine the most appropriate and cost-efficient therapy or class of agents to achieve asthma control. As such, payers rely on evidence-based medicine, including guidelines to determine the right therapy for the right patient. Inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy plays a critical role in the management of mild-to-moderate persistent asthma. Despite national treatment guidelines that cite ICS therapy as the most effective and safest long-term treatment option for persistent asthma, ICS monotherapy continues to be underused. One retrospective claims study found that 55.2% of children with mild-to-moderate asthma received prescriptions for combination therapy (ICS and long-acting beta-agonists) as initial controller treatment. This practice is contrary to national treatment guidelines, which recommend a step-therapy approach. These prescribing patterns result in higher pharmacy costs, do not always ensure control of symptoms, and sometimes expose patients to potential safety risks. This article addresses the importance of ICS therapy in the treatment of mild-to-moderate asthma, as advocated by the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) Expert Panel Report 3 guidelines; the role of small airway disease in asthma pathophysiology; and the clinical and economic benefits of ICS therapy. PMID:20689625

  16. Evidence based guidelines for the prevention, identification, and management of occupational asthma

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, P; Cullinan, P; Newman, T; Burge, P; Boyle, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Occupational asthma is the most frequently reported work related respiratory disease in many countries. This work was commissioned by the British Occupational Health Research Foundation to assist the Health and Safety Executive in achieving its target of reducing the incidence of occupational asthma in Great Britain by 30% by 2010. Aim: The guidelines aim to improve the prevention, identification, and management of occupational asthma by providing evidence based recommendations on which future practice can be based. Methods: The literature was searched systematically using Medline and Embase for articles published in all languages up to the end of June 2004. Evidence based statements and recommendations were graded according to the Royal College of General Practitioner's star system and the revised Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network grading system. Results: A total of 474 original studies were selected for appraisal from over 2500 abstracts. The systematic review produced 52 graded evidence statements and 22 recommendations based on 223 studies. Discussion: Evidence based guidelines have become benchmarks for practice in healthcare and the process used to prepare them is well established. This evidence review and its recommendations focus on interventions and outcomes to provide a robust approach to the prevention, identification, and management of occupational asthma, based on and using the best available medical evidence. The most important action to prevent cases of occupational asthma is to reduce exposure at source. Thereafter surveillance should be performed for the early identification of symptoms, including occupational rhinitis, with additional functional and immunological tests where appropriate. Effective management of workers suspected to have occupational asthma involves the identification and investigation of symptoms suggestive of asthma immediately they occur. Those workers who are confirmed to have occupational asthma should be

  17. Inhaled short-acting bronchodilators for managing emergency childhood asthma: an overview of reviews.

    PubMed

    Pollock, M; Sinha, I P; Hartling, L; Rowe, B H; Schreiber, S; Fernandes, R M

    2017-02-01

    International guidelines provide conflicting recommendations on how to use bronchodilators to manage childhood acute wheezing conditions in the emergency department (ED), and there is variation within and among countries in how these conditions are managed. This may be reflective of uncertainty about the evidence. This overview of systematic reviews (SRs) aimed to synthesize, appraise, and present all SR evidence on the efficacy and safety of inhaled short-acting bronchodilators to treat asthma and wheeze exacerbations in children 0-18 years presenting to the ED. Searching, review selection, data extraction and analysis, and quality assessments were conducted using methods recommended by The Cochrane Collaboration. Thirteen SRs containing 56 relevant trials and 5526 patients were included. Results demonstrate the efficacy of short-acting beta-agonist (SABA) delivered by metered-dose inhaler as first-line therapy for younger and older children (hospital admission decreased by 44% in younger children, and ED length of stay decreased by 33 min in older children). Short-acting anticholinergic (SAAC) should be added to SABA for older children in severe cases (hospital admission decreased by 27% and 74% when compared to SABA and SAAC alone, respectively). Continuous nebulization, addition of magnesium sulfate to SABA, and levosalbutamol compared to salbutamol cannot be recommended in routine practice.

  18. Adaptation of a difficult-to-manage asthma programme for implementation in the Dutch context: a modified e-Delphi.

    PubMed

    Honkoop, Persijn J; Pinnock, Hilary; Kievits-Smeets, Regien M M; Sterk, Peter J; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; In 't Veen, Johannes C C M

    2017-02-09

    Patients with difficult-to-manage asthma represent a heterogeneous subgroup of asthma patients who require extensive assessment and tailored management. The International Primary Care Respiratory Group approach emphasises the importance of differentiating patients with asthma that is difficult to manage from those with severe disease. Local adaptation of this approach, however, is required to ensure an appropriate strategy for implementation in the Dutch context. We used a modified three-round e-Delphi approach to assess the opinion of all relevant stakeholders (general practitioners, pulmonologists, practice nurses, pulmonary nurses and people with asthma). In the first round, the participants were asked to provide potentially relevant items for a difficult-to-manage asthma programme, which resulted in 67 items. In the second round, we asked participants to rate the relevance of specific items on a seven-point Likert scale, and 46 items were selected as relevant. In the third round, the selected items were categorised and items were ranked within the categories according to relevance. Finally, we created the alphabet acronym for the categories 'the A-I of difficult-to-manage asthma' to resonate with an established Dutch 'A-E acronym for determining asthma control'. This should facilitate implementation of this programme within the existing structure of educational material on asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in primary care, with potential for improving management of difficult-to-manage asthma. Other countries could use a similar approach to create a locally adapted version of such a programme.

  19. Preventive effect of N-acetylcysteine in a mouse model of steroid resistant acute exacerbation of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhari, Parivash; Hajizadeh, Sohrab; Raoufy, Mohammad Reza; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Yang, Ming; Hansbro, Nicole; Li, Jing Jing; Foster, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress appears to have an important role in glucocorticoid insensitivity, as a crucial problem in asthma therapy. We studied the preventive effect of antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on the airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the airways in an animal model of steroid resistant acute exacerbation of asthma. Systemically sensitized Balb/C mice were exposed to Ovalbumin aerosol on days 13, 14, 15 and 16, followed by intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce acute exacerbation. NAC (intraperitoneal, 320 mg/kg 30 min before and 12 hours after each challenge) reduced hyper-responsiveness with/out dexamethasone. LPS application caused neutrophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and eosinophil count was higher than respective control in BALF as well as neutrophils after dexamethasone treatment. NAC significantly decreased neutrophil and eosinophil count in BALF as well as inflammatory cytokines (IL-13 and IL-5).We concluded that addition of NAC to asthma therapy has beneficial preventive effects in an animal model of steroid resistant acute exacerbation of asthma. PMID:26417226

  20. Dexamethasone for Acute Asthma Exacerbations in Children: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Matthew P.; Morrison, Andrea K.; Levas, Michael N.; Kessler, Elizabeth A.; Hill, Garick D.; Gorelick, Marc H.; Jackson, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Dexamethasone has been proposed as an equivalent therapy to prednisone/prednisolone for acute asthma exacerbations in pediatric patients. Although multiple small trials exist, clear consensus data are lacking. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine whether intramuscular or oral dexamethasone is equivalent or superior to a 5-day course of oral prednisone or prednisolone. The primary outcome of interest was return visits or hospital readmissions. METHODS: A search of PubMed (Medline) through October 19, 2013, by using the keywords dexamethasone or decadron and asthma or status asthmaticus identified potential studies. Six randomized controlled trials in the emergency department of children ≤18 years of age comparing dexamethasone with prednisone/prednisolone for the treatment of acute asthma exacerbations were included. Data were abstracted by 4 authors and verified by a second author. Two reviewers evaluated study quality independently and interrater agreement was assessed. RESULTS: There was no difference in relative risk (RR) of relapse between the 2 groups at any time point (5 days RR 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.46–1.78, Q = 1.86, df = 3, I2 = 0.0%, 10–14 days RR 1.14, 95% CI 0.77–1.67, Q = 0.84, df = 2, I2 = 0.0%, or 30 days RR 1.20, 95% CI 0.03–56.93). Patients who received dexamethasone were less likely to experience vomiting in either the emergency department (RR 0.29, 95% CI 0.12–0.69, Q = 3.78, df = 3, I2 = 20.7%) or at home (RR 0.32, 95% CI 0.14–0.74, Q = 2.09, df = 2, I2 = 4.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Practitioners should consider single or 2-dose regimens of dexamethasone as a viable alternative to a 5-day course of prednisone/prednisolone. PMID:24515516

  1. Asthma Management at Evans Army Community Hospital: Using Clinical Practice Guidelines to Improve Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-26

    publish MTF best practices, guidelines, metrics, algorithms, provider materials , pharmacy materials , patient education materials , and tool kits for...management system that accumulates and reports expenses, manpower, and workload performed by the DoD fixed military medical and dental treatment facilities...described the results of using consistent comprehensive patient education materials , provider education, and other asthma management interventions to

  2. [A concept analysis of self-management of asthma in children].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu-Chen

    2008-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease commonly seen in children. It is absolutely essential for a child who suffers from the disease, and his/her family members, to learn how to perform self-management to minimize the rate of asthmatic deterioration, attack episodes, and the risk of mortality. Literature review indicates that there is no consistency of definition and terminology as far as the concept of "self-management" is concerned. This study, therefore, adopts the concept analysis proposed by Walker & Avant, by searching seven health-related databases via systematic review methodology. From the results of the concept analysis it can be concluded that there are three definitive features of self-management among asthmatic children: 1) the learning and performance process factors determined reciprocally by cognition, physiology, behavior, and environment, 2) the prevention and management of sudden asthma attacks, 3) the normalization of the patient's life with proper control of the asthmatic condition and a reduction of asthma attacks. On the basis of this concept analysis, the authors expect to develop a theoretical framework and related research to build up an asthma knowledge base for future care of children with asthma.

  3. The private struggle of mothers with asthma: a gender perspective on illness management.

    PubMed

    van Mens-Verhulst, Janneke; Radtke, H Lorraine; Spence, Cheryl D

    2004-07-01

    Little attention has been paid to the specific problems of mothers with chronic illness. In this study of mothers with asthma, we asked the question: "how do they manage their illness"? We interviewed a purposive sample of four Dutch and four Canadian mothers living with asthma and varying in age and socio-economic class. Our analysis explored challenges the mothers face, three main strategies of non-medical illness management (prevention, normalization and mobilizing support), and the influence of age and class differences. Unhealthy cycles of living with asthma are identified and suggestions for mother-specific interventions are offered. By drawing attention to the gendered nature of chronic illness management and to patients' own experiences, a more useful frame of reference is created for professionals who do not have first hand knowledge of living with a chronic illness.

  4. Findings from a pilot Randomised trial of an Asthma Internet Self-management Intervention (RAISIN)

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, D; Wyke, S; Saunderson, K; McConnachie, A; Agur, K; Chaudhuri, R; Thomas, M; Thomson, N C; Yardley, L; Mair, F S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of a phase 3 randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a website (Living Well with Asthma) to support self-management. Design and setting Phase 2, parallel group, RCT, participants recruited from 20 general practices across Glasgow, UK. Randomisation through automated voice response, after baseline data collection, to website access for minimum 12 weeks or usual care. Participants Adults (age≥16 years) with physician diagnosed, symptomatic asthma (Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) score ≥1). People with unstable asthma or other lung disease were excluded. Intervention ‘Living Well with Asthma’ is a desktop/laptop compatible interactive website designed with input from asthma/ behaviour change specialists, and adults with asthma. It aims to support optimal medication management, promote use of action plans, encourage attendance at asthma reviews and increase physical activity. Outcome measures Primary outcomes were recruitment/retention, website use, ACQ and mini-Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ). Secondary outcomes included patient activation, prescribing, adherence, spirometry, lung inflammation and health service contacts after 12 weeks. Blinding postrandomisation was not possible. Results Recruitment target met. 51 participants randomised (25 intervention group). Age range 16–78 years; 75% female; 28% from most deprived quintile. 45/51 (88%; 20 intervention group) followed up. 19 (76% of the intervention group) used the website, for a mean of 18 min (range 0–49). 17 went beyond the 2 ‘core’ modules. Median number of logins was 1 (IQR 1–2, range 0–7). No significant difference in the prespecified primary efficacy measures of ACQ scores (−0.36; 95% CI −0.96 to 0.23; p=0.225), and mini-AQLQ scores (0.38; −0.13 to 0.89; p=0.136). No adverse events. Conclusions Recruitment and retention confirmed feasibility; trends to improved outcomes suggest use of Living Well with Asthma may improve

  5. The Global Asthma Network rationale and methods for Phase I global surveillance: prevalence, severity, management and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Ellwood, Philippa; Asher, M Innes; Billo, Nils E; Bissell, Karen; Chiang, Chen-Yuan; Ellwood, Eamon M; El-Sony, Asma; García-Marcos, Luis; Mallol, Javier; Marks, Guy B; Pearce, Neil E; Strachan, David P

    2017-01-01

    The Global Asthma Network (GAN), established in 2012, followed the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC). ISAAC Phase One involved over 700 000 adolescents and children from 156 centres in 56 countries; it found marked worldwide variation in symptom prevalence of asthma, rhinitis and eczema that was not explained by the current understanding of these diseases; ISAAC Phase Three involved over 1 187 496 adolescents and children (237 centres in 98 countries). It found that asthma symptom prevalence was increasing in many locations especially in low- and middle-income countries where severity was also high, and identified several environmental factors that required further investigation.GAN Phase I, described in this article, builds on the ISAAC findings by collecting further information on asthma, rhinitis and eczema prevalence, severity, diagnoses, asthma emergency room visits, hospital admissions, management and use of asthma essential medicines. The subjects will be the same age groups as ISAAC, and their parents. In this first global monitoring of asthma in children and adults since 2003, further evidence will be obtained to understand asthma, management practices and risk factors, leading to further recognition that asthma is an important non-communicable disease and to reduce its global burden.

  6. mHealth intervention to support asthma self-management in adolescents: the ADAPT study

    PubMed Central

    Kosse, Richelle C; Bouvy, Marcel L; de Vries, Tjalling W; Kaptein, Ad A; Geers, Harm CJ; van Dijk, Liset; Koster, Ellen S

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Poor medication adherence in adolescents with asthma results in poorly controlled disease and increased morbidity. The aim of the ADolescent Adherence Patient Tool (ADAPT) study is to develop an mHealth intervention to support self-management and to evaluate the effectiveness in improving medication adherence and asthma control. Intervention The ADAPT intervention consists of an interactive smartphone application (app) connected to a desktop application for health care providers, in this study, the community pharmacist. The app contains several functions to improve adherence as follows: 1) a questionnaire function to rate asthma symptoms and monitor these over time; 2) short movie clips with medication and disease information; 3) a medication reminder; 4) a chat function with peers; and 5) a chat function with the pharmacist. The pharmacist receives data from the patient’s app through the desktop application, which enables the pharmacist to send information and feedback to the patient. Study design The ADAPT intervention is tested in a community pharmacy-based cluster randomized controlled trial in the Netherlands, aiming to include 352 adolescents with asthma. The main outcome is adherence, measured by patient’s self-report and refill adherence calculated from pharmacy dispensing records. In addition, asthma control, illness perceptions, medication beliefs, and asthma-related quality of life are measured. Conclusion This study will provide in-depth knowledge on the effectiveness of an mHealth intervention to support asthma self-management in adolescents. These insights will also be useful for adolescents with other chronic diseases. PMID:28356720

  7. Immunological abnormalities in the syndrome of poliomyelitis-like illness associated with acute bronchial asthma (Hopkin's syndrome).

    PubMed Central

    Manson, J I; Thong, Y H

    1980-01-01

    In recent years an unusual syndrome of poliomyelitis-like illness, associated with acute bronchial asthma, has been reported from different parts of the world. A further 3 cases are described in this paper. Although the condition resembles poliomyelitis in most respects, particularly with regard to the severe permanent residual weakness usually observed, consistent evidence of a viral aetiology has not been forthcoming. Tests of immune function suggested the presence of varying degrees of nonspecific immune deficiency in our 3 patients, but evidence of viral invasion was inconclusive. It is suggested that a combination of immune deficiency with the stress of the acute asthma attack rendered the patients susceptible to invasion of the anterior horn cells by a viral agent, which may have been of external origin, or may have existed in a latent form within the host. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7377814

  8. Pathogenesis and management of virus infection-induced exacerbation of senile bronchial asthma and chronic pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Metstuo

    2002-06-01

    The number of senile patients with therapy resistant bronchial asthma, chronic pulmonary emphysema increases due to the habit of smoking and increased number of older people, and these inflammatory pulmonary diseases are the leading causes of death worldwide. Rhinoviruses cause the majority of common colds, and provoke exacerbations of bronchial asthma and chronic pulmonary emphysema. Here, I review the pathogenesis and management of rhinovirus infection-induced exacerbation of senile bronchial asthma and chronic pulmonary emphysema.

  9. Acute Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections in community-acquired pneumonia and exacerbations of COPD or asthma: therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Meloni, F; Paschetto, E; Mangiarotti, P; Crepaldi, M; Morosini, M; Bulgheroni, A; Fietta, A

    2004-02-01

    Rates of acute Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections were determined in 115 adults hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), purulent exacerbations of COPD and acute exacerbations of bronchial asthma, by means of serology and molecular methods. Results were compared with those obtained in a matched control group. Common respiratory pathogens were isolated by cultures in 22.5% and 22.2% of CAP and exacerbated COPD patients, respectively. Cultures from exacerbated asthma patients were always negative. Serological and molecular evidence of current C. pneumoniae infection was obtained in 10.0%, 8.9% and 3.3% of CAP, COPD and asthma cases. The corresponding rates of acute M. pneumoniae infection were 17.5%, 6.7% and 3.3%, respectively. Finally, no difference was found between typical and atypical pathogen rates. These findings highlight the importance of taking into account C. pneumoniae and M. pneumoniae infections in guiding the choice of empirical antibacterial treatment for CAP and purulent exacerbations of COPD.

  10. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M

    1995-01-01

    Many toxic compounds found in air emissions may induce bronchoconstriction. In the workplace, workers are exposed to these compounds, often in much higher concentrations. Some of these compounds act as sensitizers. Of these, some compounds induce asthma by producing specific IgE antibodies to the compound or its protein conjugate, while others induce asthma through yet unidentified immunologic mechanisms. Some compounds, when inhaled in high concentrations, act as irritants and produce bronchoconstriction probably by inducing acute airway inflammation. The latter condition is called Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS) or irritant-induced asthma. Occupational asthma is an excellent model to study the pathogenesis and the natural history of adult onset asthma because the responsible agent can be identified, complete avoidance is possible, and exposure can be measured or estimated. PMID:8549481

  11. Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Bronchial Asthma: Joint Recommendations of National College of Chest Physicians (India) and Indian Chest Society.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ritesh; Dhooria, Sahajal; Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Maturu, Venkata N; Sehgal, Inderpaul S; Muthu, Valliappan; Prasad, K T; Yenge, Lakshmikant B; Singh, Navneet; Behera, Digambar; Jindal, Surinder K; Gupta, Dheeraj; Balamugesh, Thanagakunam; Bhalla, Ashish; Chaudhry, Dhruva; Chhabra, S K; Chokhani, Ramesh; Chopra, Vishal; Dadhwal, Devendra S; D'Souza, George; Garg, Mandeep; Gaur, S N; Gopal, Bharat; Ghoshal, Aloke G; Guleria, Randeep; Gupta, K B; Haldar, Indranil; Jain, Sanjay; Jain, Nirmal K; Jain, V K; Janmeja, A K; Kant, Surya; Kashyap, Surender; Khilnani, G C; Kishan, Jai; Kumar, Raj; Koul, Parvaiz; Mahashur, Ashok; Mandal, Amit K; Malhotra, Samir; Mohammed, Sabir; Mohapatra, Prasanta R; Patel, Dharmesh; Prasad, Rajendra; Samaria, J K; Sarat, P; Sawhney, Honey; Shafiq, Nusrat; Sidhu, U P S; Singla, Rupak; Suri, J C; Talwar, Deepak; Varma, Subhash

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is an important public health problem in India with significant morbidity. Several international guidelines for diagnosis and management of asthma are available, however there is a need for country-specific guidelines due to vast differences in availability and affordability of health-care facilities across the globe. The Indian Chest Society (ICS) and the National College of Chest Physicians (NCCP) of India have collaborated to develop evidence-based guidelines with an aim to assist physicians at all levels of health-care in diagnosis and management of asthma in a scientific manner. Besides a systematic review of the literature, Indian studies were specifically analysed to arrive at simple and practical recommendations. The evidence is presented under these five headings: (1) definitions, epidemiology and impact, (2) diagnosis, (3) pharmacologic management of stable disease, (4) management of acute exacerbations, and (5) non-pharmacologic management and special situations. The modified grade system was used for classifying the quality of evidence as 1, 2, 3, or usual practice point (UPP). The strength of recommendation was graded as A or B depending upon the level of evidence.

  12. Helping African American Children Self-Manage Asthma: The Importance of Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaul, Teri

    2011-01-01

    Background: Asthma is the leading cause of chronic illness among children in the United States, with a disproportionately higher incidence among minority children. In an attempt to increase understanding of the factors that may influence self-management of chronic disease, the study examined the relationship between self-efficacy belief and asthma…

  13. Protective effect of curcumin on acute airway inflammation of allergic asthma in mice through Notch1-GATA3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chong, Lei; Zhang, Weixi; Nie, Ying; Yu, Gang; Liu, Liu; Lin, Li; Wen, Shunhang; Zhu, Lili; Li, Changchong

    2014-10-01

    Curcumin, a natural product derived from the plant Curcuma longa, has been found to have anti-inflammatory, antineoplastic and antifibrosis effects. It has been reported that curcumin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice through inhibiting NF-κB and its downstream transcription factor GATA3. It also has been proved the antineoplastic effect of curcumin through down-regulating Notch1 receptor and its downstream nuclear transcription factor NF-κB levels. In this study, we aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin on acute allergic asthma and its underlying mechanisms. 36 male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups (normal, asthma, asthma+budesonide and asthma+curcumin groups). BALF (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) and lung tissues were analyzed for airway inflammation and the expression of Notch1, Notch2, Notch3, Notch4 and the downstream transcription factor GATA3. Our findings showed that the levels of Notch1 and Notch2 receptors were up-regulated in asthma group, accompanied by the increased expression of GATA3. But the expression of Notch2 receptor was lower than Notch1 receptor. Curcumin pretreatment improved the airway inflammatory cells infiltration and reversed the increasing levels of Notch1/2 receptors and GATA3. Notch3 receptor was not expressed in all of the four groups. Notch4 receptor protein and mRNA expression level in the four groups had no significant differences. The results of the present study suggested that Notch1 and Notch2 receptor, major Notch1 receptor, played an important role in the development of allergic airway inflammation and the inhibition of Notch1-GATA3 signaling pathway by curcumin can prevent the development and deterioration of the allergic airway inflammation. This may be a possible therapeutic option of allergic asthma.

  14. Overcoming gaps in the management of asthma in older patients: new insights.

    PubMed

    Barua, Pranoy; O'Mahony, M Sinead

    2005-01-01

    Asthma is under-recognised and undertreated in older populations. This is not surprising, given that one-third of older people experience significant breathlessness. The differential diagnosis commonly includes asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart failure, malignancy, aspiration and infections. Because symptoms and signs of several cardiorespiratory diseases are nonspecific in older people and diseases commonly co-exist, investigations are important. A simple strategy for the investigation of breathlessness in older people should include a full blood count, chest radiograph, ECG, peak flow diary and/or spirometry with reversibility as a minimum. If there are major abnormalities on the ECG, an echocardiogram should also be performed. Diurnal variability in peak flow readings >or=20% or >or=15% reversibility in forced expiratory volume in 1 second, spontaneously or with treatment, support a diagnosis of asthma. Distinguishing asthma from COPD is important to allow appropriate management of disease based on aetiology, accurate prediction of treatment response, correct prognosis and appropriate management of the chest condition and co-morbidities. The two conditions are usually readily differentiated by clinical features, particularly age at onset, variability of symptoms and nocturnal symptoms in asthma, supported by the results of reversibility testing. Full lung function tests may not necessarily help in differentiating the two entities, although gas transfer factor is characteristically reduced in COPD and usually normal or high in asthma. Methacholine challenge tests previously mainly used in research are now also used widely and safely to confirm asthma in clinical settings. Interest in exhaled nitric oxide as a biomarker of airways inflammation is increasing as a noninvasive tool in the diagnosis and monitoring of asthma. Regular inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the mainstay of treatment of asthma. Even in mild disease in older adults

  15. Asthma Self-Management: A Study in an Emergency Room of a Chest Hospital in Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Kotwani, Anita; Shendge, Sushil

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Poorly controlled asthma imposes a considerable burden and is a serious public health problem in the developing world. A key challenge for healthcare professionals is to help patients to engage in self-management behaviours with optimal adherence to appropriate treatment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the pattern of self-management in asthmatic patients enrolled as out-patients in a tertiary care referral public chest hospital, in Delhi, India. Methods: The study population was adult asthma patients (n=200) visiting the emergency room (December 2008-December 2009) of a chest hospital for asthma exacerbation. The data was collected through a questionnaire regarding the self-management of asthma. Results: Enrolled patients (64.0% female) were registered as asthma out-patients in the study hospital for a mean of 5.4±4.4 years. Patients visiting the emergency room (ER) and having an unscheduled visit to doctor at least twice in the previous 12 months were 86.5% and 91.0%. Patients were classified according to the disease severity as having intermittent (17.0%) or persistent (83.0%) asthma. Not all patients had metered dose inhalers at home. Only 2.0% of patients were prescribed peak flow meters and were keeping a diary of their readings. With one exception, patients did not have written action plans for treatment provided by doctor or health facility. No statistical difference was found in the pattern of self-management of patients having persistent or intermittent asthma. Conclusions: Findings revealed poor self-management of asthma and poor communication from doctors regarding self-management to the patients. Suitable actions and interventions are needed by health professionals to implement patient self-management asthma programme for optimum asthma control. PMID:23532570

  16. The role of inhaled long-acting beta-2 agonists in the management of asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, H. William; Harkins, Michelle S.; Boushey, Homer

    2006-01-01

    The role of inhaled beta-2 agonists in the management of asthma has changed significantly over the last several years. This review outlines the most recent understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma and the studies that define the roles that both short- and long-acting beta-2 agonists play in therapy for this disease. A concentration on the clinical pharmacology and genetic implications for clinical use of this class of drugs in accordance with the national and international guidelines are described. PMID:16532973

  17. A systematic review of complementary and alternative medicine for asthma self-management.

    PubMed

    George, Maureen; Topaz, Maxim

    2013-03-01

    This article is a systematic review of complementary and alternative medicine use for pediatric and adult asthma self-management. The aim of the review was to summarize the existing body of research regarding the types and patterns of, adverse events and risky behaviors associated with, and patient-provider communication about complementary therapies in asthma. This evidence serves as the basis for a series of recommendations in support of patient-centered care, which addresses both patient preferences for integrated treatment and patient safety.

  18. The Effects of Self-Management Education for School-Age Children on Asthma Morbidity: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Emily; Grimes, Deanna E.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of asthma self-management education for school-age children on number of school days missed, emergency department visits and hospital admissions were evaluated through a systematic review of the published research. A total of 9 studies on asthma education programs that were conducted in schools by school nurses and health educators and…

  19. Diagnosis and management of rhinitis: complete guidelines of the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters in Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology.

    PubMed

    Dykewicz, M S; Fineman, S; Skoner, D P; Nicklas, R; Lee, R; Blessing-Moore, J; Li, J T; Bernstein, I L; Berger, W; Spector, S; Schuller, D

    1998-11-01

    This document contains complete guidelines for diagnosis and management of rhinitis developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters in Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the Joint Council on Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The guidelines are comprehensive and begin with statements on clinical characteristics and diagnosis of different forms of rhinitis (allergic, non-allergic, occupational rhinitis, hormonal rhinitis [pregnancy and hypothyroidism], drug-induced rhinitis, rhinitis from food ingestion), and other conditions that may be confused with rhinitis. Recommendations on patient evaluation discuss appropriate use of history, physical examination, and diagnostic testing, as well as unproven or inappropriate techniques that should not be used. Parameters on management include use of environmental control measures, pharmacologic therapy including recently introduced therapies and allergen immunotherapy. Because of the risks to patients and society from sedation and performance impairment caused by first generation antihistamines, second generation antihistamines that reduce or eliminate these side effects should usually be considered before first generation antihistamines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. The document emphasizes the importance of rhinitis management for comorbid conditions (asthma, sinusitis, otitis media). Guidelines are also presented on special considerations in patients subsets (children, the elderly, pregnancy, athletes and patients with rhinitis medicamentosa); and when consultation with an allergist-immunologist should be considered.

  20. Association of epithelial damage and signs of neutrophil mobilization in the airways during acute exacerbations of paediatric asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, S; Yamada, Y; Abe, T; Lindén, A; Arisaka, O

    2006-01-01

    We examined whether epithelial damage is associated with mobilization of neutrophils or eosinophils in the airway lumen during acute exacerbations of paediatric asthma. Aspirated sputum samples were harvested from 65 paediatric patients (mean age 3·4 ± 0·4 years) during acute exacerbations of asthma. Patients with signs of infection were excluded. The presence of conglomerates of epithelial cells (i.e. ‘Creola bodies) in the aspirated sputum was utilized as a marker of epithelial damage. Among the paediatric asthma patients, 60% displayed Creola bodies (CrB+: n = 39) in their sputum samples whereas the remaining patients did not (CrB–: n = 26). CrB+ patients displayed more than a 20-fold increase in the concentration of the neutrophil-mobilizing cytokine interleukin (IL)-8 (pg/ml) and of the neutrophil product neutrophil elastase (NE, g/l), respectively, compared with CrB– patients (IL-8: 7468·2 ± 1953·6 versus 347·9 ± 72·6, P < 0·01; NE: 2072·4 ± 419·0 versus 438·5 ± 125·7, P < 0·01). Even though not statistically significant, a corresponding trend was observed for the relative number of sputum neutrophils. In contrast, the concentration of the eosinophil-mobilizing cytokine IL-5 and the esoinophil product ECP tended to be lower in CrB+ than in CrB– patients (P > 0·05). In conclusion, as indicated by the analysis of aspirated sputum, epithelial damage is associated with a locally enhanced chemotactic signal for and activity of neutrophils, but not eosinophils, during acute exacerbations of paediatric asthma. It remains to be determined whether these indirect signs of neutrophil mobilization in the airway lumen mirror an increased number of neutrophils in the surrounding airway tissue. PMID:16634793

  1. Nocturnal Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... night. Exercise-Induced Asthma (EIA) Clinical Trials Asthma: Types Allergic Asthma Exercise-Induced Asthma (EIA) FAQ Cold Weather Activities Symptoms & Diagnosis Treatment & Monitoring Nocturnal Asthma No ...

  2. Continuous Inhalation of Ipratropium Bromide for Acute Asthma Refractory to β2-agonist Treatment.

    PubMed

    Koumbourlis, Anastassios C; Mastropietro, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    To present the case of a patient with persistent bronchospasm, refractory to treatment with β2-agonists, that resolved promptly with continuous inhalation of large dose (1000 mcg/hr) ipratropium bromide, and to discuss the possibility of tolerance to β2-agonists as the cause for his failure to respond to adrenergic medications. The patient had received multiple doses of albuterol, as well as subcutaneous terbutaline (0.3 mg), intravenous magnesium sulfate (1 g) and intravenous dexamethasone (10 mg) prior to his admission to the intensive care unit. He remained symptomatic despite systemic intravenous steroids, continuous intravenous terbutaline (up to 0.6 mcg/kg/min), and continuous nebulized albuterol (up to 20 mg/hr for 57 hr) followed by 49 hours of continuous levalbuterol (7 mg/hr). Due to the lack of response, all β2-agonists were discontinued at 106 hours post-admission, and he was started on large dose ipratropium bromide (1000 mcg/hr) by continuous nebulization. Clinical improvement was evident within 1 hour and complete resolution of his symptoms within 4 hours. Continuous inhalation of large dose ipratropium bromide may be an effective regimen for the treatment of patients hospitalized with acute asthma who are deemed to be nonresponsive and/or tolerant to β2-agonist therapy.

  3. Japanese guidelines for adult asthma 2017.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Masakazu; Sugiura, Hisatoshi; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Masao; Inoue, Hiromasa; Sagara, Hironori; Tamaoki, Jun; Tohda, Yuji; Munakata, Mitsuru; Yamauchi, Kohei; Ohta, Ken

    2017-04-01

    Adult bronchial asthma is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, and presents clinically with variable airway narrowing (wheezes and dyspnea) and cough. Long-standing asthma induces airway remodeling, leading to intractable asthma. The number of patients with asthma has increased; however, the number of patients who die of asthma has decreased (1.2 per 100,000 patients in 2015). The goal of asthma treatment is to enable patients with asthma to attain normal pulmonary function and lead a normal life, without any symptoms. A good relationship between physicians and patients is indispensable for appropriate treatment. Long-term management by therapeutic agents and elimination of the causes and risk factors of asthma are fundamental to its treatment. Four steps in pharmacotherapy differentiate between mild and intensive treatments; each step includes an appropriate daily dose of an inhaled corticosteroid, varying from low to high levels. Long-acting β2-agonists, leukotriene receptor antagonists, sustained-release theophylline, and long-acting muscarinic antagonist are recommended as add-on drugs, while anti-immunoglobulin E antibody and oral steroids are considered for the most severe and persistent asthma related to allergic reactions. Bronchial thermoplasty has recently been developed for severe, persistent asthma, but its long-term efficacy is not known. Inhaled β2-agonists, aminophylline, corticosteroids, adrenaline, oxygen therapy, and other approaches are used as needed during acute exacerbations, by choosing treatment steps for asthma in accordance with the severity of exacerbations. Allergic rhinitis, eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis, eosinophilic otitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, aspirin-induced asthma, and pregnancy are also important issues that need to be considered in asthma therapy.

  4. Management of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Harik, Nada S; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2010-01-01

    In children, osteomyelitis is primarily hematogenous in origin and acute in nature. The principal cause of osteomyelitis in children is Staphylococcus aureus, and both the epidemiology and pathogenesis of S. aureus infections, including osteomyelitis, have changed in recent years owing to the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus. This review focuses on advances in the diagnosis and overall management of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children with these changes in mind. PMID:20109047

  5. Setting up an acute pain management service.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Eric S; Baratta, Jaime L; Gandhi, Kishor; Viscusi, Eugene R

    2014-12-01

    Successful implementation of an acute pain management service involves a team approach in which team members have clearly defined roles. Clinical protocols are designed to help address common problems and prevent errors. As the complexity of surgery and patients' diseases continues to increase, current knowledge of new analgesic medications, acute pain literature, and skills in regional anesthesia techniques is imperative. Emphasizing a multimodal approach can improve analgesia and decrease opioid-related side effects.

  6. Interleukin-33 drives activation of alveolar macrophages and airway inflammation in a mouse model of acute exacerbation of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Bunting, Melissa M; Shadie, Alexander M; Flesher, Rylie P; Nikiforova, Valentina; Garthwaite, Linda; Tedla, Nicodemus; Herbert, Cristan; Kumar, Rakesh K

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of interleukin-33 (IL-33) in airway inflammation in an experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, which reproduces many of the features of the human disease. Systemically sensitized female BALB/c mice were challenged with a low mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks to induce chronic asthmatic inflammation and then received a single moderate-level challenge to trigger acute airway inflammation simulating an asthmatic exacerbation. The inflammatory response and expression of cytokines and activation markers by alveolar macrophages (AM) were assessed, as was the effect of pretreatment with a neutralizing antibody to IL-33. Compared to chronically challenged mice, AM from an acute exacerbation exhibited significantly enhanced expression of markers of alternative activation, together with enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and of cell surface proteins associated with antigen presentation. In parallel, there was markedly increased expression of both mRNA and immunoreactivity for IL-33 in the airways. Neutralization of IL-33 significantly decreased both airway inflammation and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines by AM. Collectively, these data indicate that in this model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, IL-33 drives activation of AM and has an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation.

  7. A community-based strategy for improving asthma management and outcomes for preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Findley, Sally E; Thomas, Gloria; Madera-Reese, Rosa; McLeod, Natasha; Kintala, Sreelata; Andres Martinez, Raquel; Ortiz, Benjamin; Herman, Elizabeth

    2011-02-01

    Although almost one in ten (8.6%) preschool children has been diagnosed with asthma, few asthma management programs are designed for parents of preschool children. The Asthma Basics for Children program addressed this need in 2003-2008 by implementing a multi-layered approach that offered educational activities to center staff, parents, and children and PACE training to physicians in 31 Northern Manhattan daycare centers. Following program participation, 85% of parents reported reducing their child's triggers, 89% said it was easier to talk to their child's physician, and 80% were confident in their ability to manage their child's asthma. Children's any daytime symptoms dropped from 78% to 42%, any nighttime symptoms from 81% to 49%, any daycare absences from 56% to 38%, any asthma-related emergency department (ED) visits from 74% to 47%, and any asthma-related hospitalizations from 24% to 11% (p < .001 for all differences). Outcomes varied by level of exposure. In the Center-Only group (no parent participation), the only reduction was from 19% to 10% (McNemar = 3.77, p = .052) in hospitalizations. Children whose parents participated in the program had significant reductions in daycare absences (62% to 38%, McNemar = 11.1, p < .001), ED visits (72% to 43%, McNemar = 19.2, p < .001), and hospitalizations (24% to 11%, McNemar = 5.54, p = .018). Children whose parents and healthcare provider participated had the greatest improvements with asthma-related daycare absences dropping from 62% to 32% (McNemar = 9.8, p = .001), ED visits from 72% to 37% (McNemar = 14.4, p < .001), and hospitalizations from 35% to 15% (McNemar = 8.33, p = .003). This study demonstrates that a multi-layered approach can improve asthma outcomes among preschoolers with a combination of parent and provider education having the greatest impact.

  8. Key clinical activities for quality asthma care. Recommendations of the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Williams, Seymour G; Schmidt, Diana K; Redd, Stephen C; Storms, William

    2003-03-28

    other health-care planners make decisions regarding delivery of health care for persons with asthma. Although this report is based on information directed to clinicians; it is not intended to substitute for recommended clinical practices for caring for persons with asthma, nor is it intended to replace the clinical decision-making required to meet individual patient needs. Readers are referred to the EPR-2 for the full asthma guidelines regarding diagnosis and management of asthma or to the abstracted Practical Guide (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. Practical guide for the diagnosis and management of asthma. Bethesda MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, 1997; publication no. 97-4053. Available at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/prof/lung/asthma/practgde.htm) and to the EPR-Update 2002. The 1997 EPR-2 guidelines and EPR-Update 2002 were derived from a consensus of leading asthma researchers from academic, clinical, federal and voluntary institutions and based on scientific evidence supported by the literature. The 10 key activities highlighted here correspond to the four recommended-as-essential components of asthma management: assessment and monitoring, control of factors contributing to asthma severity, pharmacotherapy and education for a partnership in care. The key clinical activities are not intended for acute or hospital management of patients with asthma but rather for the preventive aspects of managing asthma long term. This report was developed as a collaborative activity between CDC and the NAEPP.

  9. What is left unsaid: an interpretive description of the information needs of parents of children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Mandy M; Caine, Vera; Ali, Samina; Hartling, Lisa; Scott, Shannon D

    2015-02-01

    Parents of children with asthma provide the vast majority of day-to-day asthma care. Understanding their information needs is an essential step to provide meaningful and effective family-centered asthma education. To gain insight into the information needs and information deficits of parents of children with asthma, we conducted an interpretive descriptive study to capture the perspectives of 21 parents from diverse backgrounds whose 23 children with asthma had a range of illness trajectories and management scenarios. Parents were purposively sampled from two asthma clinics and one pediatric emergency department in a large urban center in North America. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2011-2012. In data analysis, parents' self-identified information needs were distinguished from analysts' interpretations of information deficits. Participants' knowledge did not always reflect time since diagnosis, and information needs and deficits persisted for years. Parents often reported receiving little or no little or no education about asthma and its management. An asthma management information hierarchy was identified, starting with the most foundational, recognizing severity; followed by acute management; prevention versus crisis orientation; and knowing "about" asthma. In the absence of adequate and accurate education, parents' beliefs about the nature of asthma as an acute rather than chronic condition shaped their asthma management decisions and information-seeking behaviors. Information deficits were affected by interactions with health care providers. These parents' pervasive unmet information needs and deficits highlight the need for comprehensive, problem-oriented asthma education.

  10. A Web-based, Tailored Asthma Management Program for Urban African-American High School Students

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Christine L. M.; Peterson, Edward; Havstad, Suzanne; Johnson, Christine C.; Hoerauf, Sarah; Stringer, Sonja; Gibson-Scipio, Wanda; Ownby, Dennis R.; Elston-Lafata, Jennifer; Pallonen, Unto; Strecher, Victor

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Urban African-American youth, aged 15–19 years, have asthma fatality rates that are higher than in whites and younger children, yet few programs target this population. Traditionally, urban youth are believed to be difficult to engage in health-related programs, both in terms of connecting and convincing. Objectives: Develop and evaluate a multimedia, web-based asthma management program to specifically target urban high school students. The program uses “tailoring,” in conjunction with theory-based models, to alter behavior through individualized health messages based on the user's beliefs, attitudes, and personal barriers to change. Methods: High school students reporting asthma symptoms were randomized to receive the tailored program (treatment) or to access generic asthma websites (control). The program was made available on school computers. Measurements and Main Results: Functional status and medical care use were measured at study initiation and 12 months postbaseline, as were selected management behaviors. The intervention period was 180 days (calculated from baseline). A total of 314 students were randomized (98% African American, 49% Medicaid enrollees; mean age, 15.2 yr). At 12 months, treatment students reported fewer symptom-days, symptom-nights, school days missed, restricted-activity days, and hospitalizations for asthma when compared with control students; adjusted relative risk and 95% confidence intervals were as follows: 0.5 (0.4–0.8), p = 0.003; 0.4 (0.2–0.8), p = 0.009; 0.3 (0.1–0.7), p = 0.006; 0.5 (0.3–0.8), p = 0.02; and 0.2 (0.2–0.9), p = 0.01, respectively. Positive behaviors were more frequently noted among treatment students compared with control students. Cost estimates for program delivery were $6.66 per participating treatment group student. Conclusions: A web-based, tailored approach to changing negative asthma management behaviors is economical, feasible, and effective in improving asthma outcomes in a

  11. Managing acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Skipworth, James R A; Shankar, Arjun; Pereira, Stephen P

    2010-10-01

    Pancreatitis may be acute or chronic. Although both can be caused by similar aetiologies, they tend to follow distinct natural histories. Around 80% of acute pancreatitis (AP) diagnoses occur secondary to gallstone disease and alcohol misuse. AP is commonly associated with sudden onset of upper abdominal pain radiating to the back that is usually severe enough to warrant the patient seeking urgent medical attention. Onset of pain may be related to a recent alcohol binge or rich, fatty meal. The patient may appear unwell, be tachycardic and have exquisite tenderness in the upper abdomen. Overall, 10-25% of AP episodes are classified as severe, leading to an associated mortality rate of 7.5%. Disease severity is best predicted from a number of clinical scoring systems which can be applied at diagnosis in association with repeated clinical assessment, measurement of acute inflammatory markers, and CT. All patients with suspected AP should be referred urgently. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) follows continued, repetitive or sustained injury to the pancreas and 70% of diagnoses occur secondary to alcohol abuse. The characteristic presenting feature of CP is insidious progression of chronic, severe, upper abdominal pain, radiating to the back, caused by a combination of progressive pancreatic destruction, inflammation and duct obstruction. Signs and symptoms include weight loss and steatorrhoea and later on diabetes. CP patients may also present with recurrent episodes mimicking AP, both symptomatically and metabolically. Diagnosis of CP should be based on symptom profile, imaging and assessment of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function. CT should be the first-line imaging investigation.

  12. Acute and chronic pancreatitis: surgical management.

    PubMed

    Dzakovic, Alexander; Superina, Riccardo

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis is becoming increasingly prevalent in children, posing new challenges to pediatric health care providers. Although some general adult treatment paradigms are applicable in the pediatric population, diagnostic workup and surgical management of acute and chronic pancreatitis have to be tailored to anatomic and pathophysiological entities peculiar to children. Nonbiliary causes of acute pancreatitis in children are generally managed nonoperatively with hydration, close biochemical and clinical observation, and early initiation of enteral feeds. Surgical intervention including cholecystectomy or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is often required in acute biliary pancreatitis, whereas infected pancreatic necrosis remains a rare absolute indication for pancreatic debridement and drainage via open, laparoscopic, or interventional radiologic procedure. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by painful irreversible changes of the parenchyma and ducts, which may result in or be caused by inadequate ductal drainage. A variety of surgical procedures providing drainage, denervation, resection, or a combination thereof are well established to relieve pain and preserve pancreatic function.

  13. Managing acute upper GI bleeding, preventing recurrences.

    PubMed

    Albeldawi, Mazen; Qadeer, Mohammed A; Vargo, John J

    2010-02-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is common and potentially life-threatening and needs a prompt assessment and aggressive medical management. All patients need to undergo endoscopy to diagnose, assess, and possibly treat any underlying lesion. In addition, patients found to have bleeding ulcers should receive a proton pump inhibitor, the dosage and duration of treatment depending on the endoscopic findings and clinical factors.

  14. Determinants Of Oral corticosteroid Responsiveness in Wheezing Asthmatic Youth (DOORWAY): protocol for a prospective multicentre cohort study of children with acute moderate-to-severe asthma exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, F M; Zemek, R; Gravel, J; Chalut, D; Poonai, N; Laberge, S; Quach, C; Krajinovic, M; Guimont, C; Lemière, C; Guertin, M C

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Oral corticosteroids are the cornerstone of acute asthma management in the emergency department. Recent evidence has raised doubts about the efficacy of this treatment in preschool-aged children with viral-induced wheezing and in smoking adults. The aims of the study were to: (1) document the magnitude of response to oral corticosteroids in children presenting to the emergency department with moderate or severe asthma; (2) quantify potential determinants of response to corticosteroids and (3) explore the role of gene polymorphisms associated with the responsiveness to corticosteroids. Methods and analysis The design is a prospective cohort study of 1008 children aged 1–17 years meeting a strict definition of asthma and presenting with a clinical score of ≥4 on the validated Pediatric Respiratory Assessment Measure. All children will receive standardised severity-specific treatment with prednisone/prednisolone and cointerventions (salbutamol with/without ipratropium bromide). Determinants, namely viral aetiology, environmental tobacco smoke and single nucleotide polymorphism, will be objectively documented. The primary efficacy endpoint is the failure of emergency department (ED) management within 72 h of the ED visit. Secondary endpoints include other measures of asthma severity and time to recovery within 7 days of the index visit. The study has 80% power for detecting a risk difference of 7.5% associated with each determinant from a baseline risk of 21%, at an α of 0.05. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from all participating institutions. An impaired response to systemic steroids in certain subgroups will challenge the current standard of practice and call for the immediate search for better approaches. A potential host–environment interaction will broaden our understanding of corticosteroid responsiveness in children. Documentation of similar effectiveness of corticosteroids across determinants will provide

  15. Adaptation of a difficult-to-manage asthma programme for implementation in the Dutch context: a modified e-Delphi

    PubMed Central

    Honkoop, Persijn J; Pinnock, Hilary; Kievits-Smeets, Regien M M; Sterk, Peter J; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; in ’t Veen, Johannes C C M

    2017-01-01

    Patients with difficult-to-manage asthma represent a heterogeneous subgroup of asthma patients who require extensive assessment and tailored management. The International Primary Care Respiratory Group approach emphasises the importance of differentiating patients with asthma that is difficult to manage from those with severe disease. Local adaptation of this approach, however, is required to ensure an appropriate strategy for implementation in the Dutch context. We used a modified three-round e-Delphi approach to assess the opinion of all relevant stakeholders (general practitioners, pulmonologists, practice nurses, pulmonary nurses and people with asthma). In the first round, the participants were asked to provide potentially relevant items for a difficult-to-manage asthma programme, which resulted in 67 items. In the second round, we asked participants to rate the relevance of specific items on a seven-point Likert scale, and 46 items were selected as relevant. In the third round, the selected items were categorised and items were ranked within the categories according to relevance. Finally, we created the alphabet acronym for the categories ‘the A–I of difficult-to-manage asthma’ to resonate with an established Dutch ‘A–E acronym for determining asthma control’. This should facilitate implementation of this programme within the existing structure of educational material on asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in primary care, with potential for improving management of difficult-to-manage asthma. Other countries could use a similar approach to create a locally adapted version of such a programme. PMID:28184039

  16. Asthma Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... to all games and activities. Quick-relief medicines work immediately to relieve asthma symptoms. Tell the school ... an Asthma Flare-Up How Do Asthma Medicines Work? School and Asthma Asthma Asthma Center School and ...

  17. Clinical management and outcome of refractory asthma in the UK from the British Thoracic Society Difficult Asthma Registry.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Joan; Brightling, Chris E; Menzies-Gow, Andrew; Niven, Robert; Patterson, Chris C; Heaney, Liam G

    2012-08-01

    Refractory asthma represents a significant unmet clinical need. Data from a national online registry audited clinical outcome in 349 adults with refractory asthma from four UK specialist centres in the British Thoracic Society Difficult Asthma Network. At follow-up, lung function improved, with a reduction in important healthcare outcomes, specifically hospital admission, unscheduled healthcare visits and rescue courses of oral steroids. The most frequent therapeutic intervention was maintenance oral corticosteroids and most steroid sparing agents (apart from omalizumab) demonstrated minimal steroid sparing benefit. A significant unmet clinical need remains in this group, specifically a requirement for therapies which reduce systemic steroid exposure.

  18. Management of acute respiratory diseases in the pediatric population: the role of oral corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Cutrera, Renato; Baraldi, Eugenio; Indinnimeo, Luciana; Miraglia Del Giudice, Michele; Piacentini, Giorgio; Scaglione, Francesco; Ullmann, Nicola; Moschino, Laura; Galdo, Francesca; Duse, Marzia

    2017-03-23

    Respiratory diseases account for about 25% of all pediatric consultations, and 10% of these are for asthma. The other main pediatric respiratory diseases, in terms of incidence, are bronchiolitis, acute bronchitis and respiratory infections. Oral corticosteroids, in particular prednisolone, are often used to treat acute respiratory diseases given their anti-inflammatory effects. However, the efficacy of treatment with oral corticosteroids differs among the various types of pediatric respiratory diseases. Notably, also the adverse effects of corticosteroid treatment can differ depending on dosage, duration of treatment and type of corticosteroid administered - a case in point being growth retardation in long-course treatment. A large body of data has accumulated on this topic. In this article, we have reviewed the data and guidelines related to the role of oral corticosteroids in the treatment and management of pediatric bronchiolitis, wheezing, asthma and croup in the attempt to provide guidance for physicians. Also included is a section on the management of acute respiratory failure in children.

  19. Anticholinergics in the treatment of children and adults with acute asthma: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, G; Castro-Rodriguez, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Current guidelines recommend the use of a combination of inhaled ß2 agonists and anticholinergics, particularly for patients with acute severe or life threatening asthma in the emergency setting. However, this statement is based on a relatively small number of randomised controlled trials and related systematic reviews. A review was undertaken to incorporate the more recent evidence available about the effectiveness of treatment with a combination of ß2 agonists and anticholinergics compared with ß2 agonists alone in the treatment of acute asthma. Methods: A search was conducted of all randomised controlled trials published before April 2005. Results: Data from 32 randomised controlled trials (n = 3611 subjects) showed significant reductions in hospital admissions in both children (RR = 0.73; 95% CI 0.63 to 0.85, p = 0.0001) and adults (RR = 0.68; 95% CI 0.53 to 0.86, p = 0.002) treated with inhaled anticholinergic agents. Combined treatment also produced a significant increase in spirometric parameters 60–120 minutes after the last treatment in both children (SMD = –0.54; 95% CI –0.28 to –0.81, p = 0.0001) and adults (SMD = –0.36; 95% CI –0.23 to –0.49, p = 0.00001). Conclusions: This review strongly suggests that the addition of multiple doses of inhaled ipratropium bromide to ß2 agonists is indicated as the standard treatment in children, adolescents, and adults with moderate to severe exacerbations of asthma in the emergency setting. PMID:16055613

  20. Comparison of salbutamol with normal saline and salbutamol with magnesium sulphate in the treatment of severe acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S; Sutradhar, S R; Miah, A H; Bari, M A; Hasan, M J; Alam, M K; Tariquzzaman, M; Sarker, C N

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy and safety of nebulized magnesium sulphate with salbutamol to normal saline with salbutamol as the initial treatment of severe acute asthma patients. The present study was designed as a randomized open controlled clinical trial. The study was conducted Mymensingh Medical College Hospital over a period of 11 months from December 2009 to October 2010. Patients admitted with severe acute asthma having inclusion criteria were the study population. Among 120 study population 60 were in salbutamol with magnesium sulphate group and 60 were in salbutamol with normal saline group. The study finding showed that peak flow at baseline was similar in two groups. At 10 minutes after nebulization, the mean±SD percentage increase in peak flow was greater in magnesium sulphate group (20±4%) than in the normal saline salbutamol group (13±3%). At 20 minutes the percentage increase in peak flow was greater in magnesium sulphate group (35±7%) than in the normal saline salbutamol group (24±6%) p value <0.001. Magnesium sulphate plus salbutamol group reached PEF near to 60% which is not in saline salbutamol group. There was no significant changed in respiratory rate, pulse rate, systolic, diastolic blood pressure and clinical evidence of unwanted adverse effect.

  1. Pharmacotherapy in the management of asthma in the elderly: a review of clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Yeong; Song, Woo-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Asthma in the elderly is a disease with emerging concern. Despite some recent advances in our understanding of epidemiology and pathophysiology, there is a considerable lack of clinical evidence specific to elderly patients. Currently available high quality clinical evidence has been mostly obtained from younger adults, but rarely from elderly patients. Under-representation of elderly patients in previous randomized trials may have been due to being, old age, or having comorbidities. Thus, a question may be raised whether current clinical evidence could be well generalized into elderly patients. Further clinical trials should address clinical issues raised in elderly population. In this review, we aimed to overview the efficacy and safety of pharmacological management, and also to summarize the literature relevant to elderly asthma. PMID:26844215

  2. Web-based distributed data management in the childhood asthma research and education (CARE) network.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, James R; Vignati, Aimee J; Pogash, Rosanne M; Simmons, Vanessa A; Evans, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    A well-designed distributed data management application provides an efficient, effective process to collect quality data in multicenter clinical trials. This paper describes the web-based clinical center data management application that was developed by the Data Coordinating Center of the Childhood Asthma Research and Education (CARE) Network. A series of modules was designed to allow the clinical staff at the remote clinical centers to enter clinical trial data, correct entry errors, respond to queries from the Data Coordinating Center, and submit data corrections for previously entered data to ultimately provide a clean and accurate dataset for analysis.

  3. Clinical practice guideline: management of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Joshua A.; Hsu, Jonathan; Bawazeer, Mohammad; Marshall, John; Friedrich, Jan O.; Nathens, Avery; Coburn, Natalie; May, Gary R.; Pearsall, Emily; McLeod, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in the incidence of acute pancreatitis reported worldwide. Despite improvements in access to care, imaging and interventional techniques, acute pancreatitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis, recent studies auditing the clinical management of the condition have shown important areas of noncompliance with evidence-based recommendations. This underscores the importance of creating understandable and implementable recommendations for the diagnosis and management of acute pancreatitis. The purpose of the present guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for the management of both mild and severe acute pancreatitis as well as the management of complications of acute pancreatitis and of gall stone–induced pancreatitis. Une hausse de l’incidence de pancréatite aiguë a été constatée à l’échelle mondiale. Malgré l’amélioration de l’accès aux soins et aux techniques d’imagerie et d’intervention, la pancréatite aiguë est toujours associée à une morbidité et une mortalité importantes. Bien qu’il existe des guides de pratique clinique pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, des études récentes sur la vérification de la prise en charge clinique de cette affection révèlent des lacunes importantes dans la conformité aux recommandations fondées sur des données probantes. Ces résultats mettent en relief l’importance de formuler des recommandations compréhensibles et applicables pour le diagnostic et la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë. La présente ligne directrice vise à fournir des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, qu’elle soit bénigne ou grave, ainsi que de ses complications et de celles de la pancréatite causée par un calcul biliaire. PMID:27007094

  4. The acute swollen knee: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Chinmay; St Mart, Jean-Pierre

    2013-07-01

    The acutely swollen knee is a common presentation of knee pathology in both primary care and the emergency department. The key to diagnosis and management is a thorough history and examination to determine the primary pathology, which includes inflammation, infection or a structural abnormality in the knee. The location of pain and tenderness can aid to localization of structural pathology even before radiological tests are requested, and indeed inform the investigations that should be carried out. Aspiration of an acutely swollen knee can aid diagnosis and help relieve pain. The management of the swollen knee depends on underlying pathology and can range from anti-inflammatory medication for inflammation to operative intervention for a structural abnormality.

  5. The acute swollen knee: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Chinmay; St Mart, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The acutely swollen knee is a common presentation of knee pathology in both primary care and the emergency department. The key to diagnosis and management is a thorough history and examination to determine the primary pathology, which includes inflammation, infection or a structural abnormality in the knee. The location of pain and tenderness can aid to localization of structural pathology even before radiological tests are requested, and indeed inform the investigations that should be carried out. Aspiration of an acutely swollen knee can aid diagnosis and help relieve pain. The management of the swollen knee depends on underlying pathology and can range from anti-inflammatory medication for inflammation to operative intervention for a structural abnormality. PMID:23821708

  6. [Difficult asthma].

    PubMed

    Chanez, Pascal; Vachier, Isabelle; Bourdin, Arnaud; Halimi, Laurence; Godard, Philippe

    2006-10-01

    Difficult asthma is a major issue in pulmonary medicine today because of its cost for patients and society. Difficult asthma is asthma that remains uncontrolled despite optimal specialist management. The validity of the diagnosis must be reconsidered in these cases: associated or differential diagnoses may be involved in the lack of control, and it is always necessary to assess the patient's treatment adhesion. Sufficient time--at least a year--must be taken to get to know the patient and to meet the objectives set. The standard asthma therapies should be tested objectively. Severe asthma is the reality of difficult asthma that endures despite a reaffirmed diagnosis, optimal compliance and controlled comorbidities. Better knowledge is needed of the pathophysiology of these patients' asthma. Improved knowledge of these phenotypes will make it possible to develop innovative treatments. They will need to be validated in clinical research for subsequent use that is wider but more rational because targeted at phenotypes likely to benefit from them.

  7. Childhood asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, N M; Brown, R W; Parker, E; Robins, T G; Remick, D G; Philbert, M A; Keeler, G J; Israel, B A

    1999-01-01

    Asthma prevalence in children has increased 58% since 1980. Mortality has increased by 78%. The burden of the disease is most acute in urban areas and racial/ethnic minority populations. Hospitalization and morbidity rates for nonwhites are more than twice those for whites. Asthma is characterized by recurrent wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing. Research in the past decade has revealed the importance of inflammation of the airways in asthma and clinical treatment to reduce chronic inflammation. Asthma is associated with production of IgE to common environmental allergens including house dust mite, animal dander, cockroach, fungal spores, and pollens. Some interventions to reduce symptoms through control of dust mite and animal dander have had positive results. Control of symptoms through interventions to reduce exposures to cockroach antigen has not been reported. Studies illustrating causal effects between outdoor air pollution and asthma prevalence are scant. Increases in asthma prevalence have occurred at the same time as general improvements in air quality. However, air quality appears to exacerbate symptoms in the child who already has the disease. Decreased pulmonary function has been associated with exposure to particulates and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to smoke, SO(2) and NO(2). Symptoms have been correlated with increased levels of respirable particulates, ozone, and SO(2). Interventions that reduce the negative outcomes in asthma associated with outdoor environmental factors have not been reported. Control of asthma in children will entail the collaborative efforts of patients, family, clinical professionals, and school personnel, as well as community-wide environmental control measures and conducive national and local policies based on sound research. Images Figure 1 PMID:10423388

  8. Pain Management: Part 1: Managing Acute and Postoperative Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Safe and effective management of acute dental pain can be accomplished with nonopioid and opioid analgesics. To formulate regimens properly, it is essential to appreciate basic pharmacological principles and appropriate dosage strategies for each of the available analgesic classes. This article will review the basic pharmacology of analgesic drug classes, including their relative efficacy for dental pain, and will suggest appropriate regimens based on pain intensity. Management of chronic pain will be addressed in the second part of this series. PMID:20553137

  9. Living with asthma and chronic obstructive airways disease: Using technology to support self-management - An overview.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Deborah; Mair, Frances S; Yardley, Lucy; Kirby, Sarah; Thomas, Mike

    2016-08-10

    Long-term respiratory conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are common, and cause high levels of morbidity and mortality. Supporting self-management is advocated for both asthma and increasingly so for COPD, and there is growing interest in the potential role of a range of new technologies, such as smartphone apps, the web or telehealth to facilitate and promote self-management in these conditions. Treatment goals for both asthma and COPD include aiming to control symptoms, maintain activities, achieve the best possible quality of life and minimize risks of exacerbation. To do this, health professionals should be (a) helping patients to recognize deteriorating symptoms and act appropriately; (b) promoting adherence to maintenance therapy; (c) promoting a regular review where triggers can be established, and strategies for managing such triggers discussed; and (d) promoting healthy lifestyles and positive self-management of symptoms. In particular, low uptake of asthma action plans is a modifiable contributor to morbidity and possibly also to mortality in those with asthma and should be addressed as a priority. Using technology to support self-management is an evolving strategy that shows promise. This review provides an overview of self-management support and discusses how newer technologies may help patients and health professionals to meet key treatment goals.

  10. The immune profile associated with acute allergic asthma accelerates clearance of influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Amali E; Woolard, Stacie N; Boyd, Kelli L; Hoselton, Scott A; Schuh, Jane M; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    Asthma was the most common comorbidity in hospitalized patients during the 2009 influenza pandemic. For unknown reasons, hospitalized asthmatics had less severe outcomes and were less likely to die from pandemic influenza. Our data with primary human bronchial cells indicate that changes intrinsic to epithelial cells in asthma may protect against cytopathology induced by influenza virus. To further study influenza virus pathogenesis in allergic hosts, we aimed to develop and characterize murine models of asthma and influenza comorbidity to determine structural, physiological and immunological changes induced by influenza in the context of asthma. Aspergillus fumigatus-sensitized and -challenged C57BL/6 mice were infected with pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, either during peak allergic inflammation or during airway remodeling to gain insight into disease pathogenesis. Mice infected with the influenza virus during peak allergic inflammation did not lose body weight and cleared the virus rapidly. These mice exhibited high eosinophilia, preserved airway epithelial cell integrity, increased mucus, reduced interferon response and increased insulin-like growth factor-1. In contrast, weight loss and viral replication kinetics in the mice that were infected during the late airway remodeling phase were equivalent to flu-only controls. These mice had neutrophils in the airways, damaged airway epithelial cells, less mucus production, increased interferons and decreased insulin-like growth factor-1. The state of the allergic airways at the time of influenza virus infection alters host responses against the virus. These murine models of asthma and influenza comorbidity may improve our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of viral infections in humans with asthma.

  11. Assessment and management of patients with acute red eye.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, Sue

    2013-06-01

    This article provides an overview of the role of the nurse in the assessment and management of five ocular conditions that give rise to an acute red eye in older people. The conditions discussed are acute closed angle glaucoma, acute iritis, acute conjunctivitis, herpes zoster ophthalmicus and bacterial corneal ulcer.

  12. Fluid management in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Stuart L

    2014-01-01

    Fluid management in critical illness has undergone extensive reevaluation in the past decade. Since a significant percentage of critically ill patients develop acute kidney injury (AKI), optimal fluid management is even more paramount to prevent the ill effects of either underhydration or overhydration. The concepts of early goal-directed fluid therapy (EGDT) and conservative late fluid management permeate current clinical research, and the independent association between fluid accumulation and mortality has been repeatedly demonstrated. A number of prospective randomized trials are planned to provide an adequately powered assessment of the effect of EGDT or earlier renal replacement therapy initiation in patients with, or at risk for AKI. The aim of this analytical review is to use existing clinical and physiological studies to support a 3-phase model of fluid management in the critically ill patient with AKI.

  13. Clinical Predictors and Outcomes of Consistent Bronchodilator Response in the Childhood Asthma Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunita; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Tantisira, Kelan G.; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Strunk, Robert C.; Zeiger, Robert S.; Murphy, Amy J.; Weiss, Scott T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Among asthmatics, bronchodilator response (BDR) to inhaled ß2- adrenergic agonists is variable, and the significance of a consistent response over time is unknown. Objective We assessed baseline clinical variables and determined the clinical outcomes associated with a consistently positive BDR over 4 years in children with mild-moderate persistent asthma. Methods In the 1,041 participants in the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP), subjects with a change in FEV1 of 12% or greater (and 200mLs) after inhaled ß2 agonist at each of their yearly follow-up visits (consistent BDR) were compared with those who did not have a consistent BDR. Results We identified 52 children with consistent BDR over the 4-year trial. Multivariable logistic regression modeling demonstrated that baseline pre-bronchodilator FEV1 (OR=0.71, p<0.0001), log 10 IgE level (OR=1.97, p=0.002), and lack of treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (OR=0.31, p=0.009) were associated with a consistent BDR. Individuals who had a consistent BDR had more hospital visits (p=0.007), required more prednisone bursts (p=0.0007), had increased nocturnal awakenings due to asthma (p<0.0001), and missed more days of school (p=0.03) than non-responders during the 4-year follow-up. Conclusions We have identified predictors of consistent BDR and determined that this phenotype is associated with poor clinical outcomes. PMID:18848350

  14. Systematic review of the effectiveness of breathing retraining in asthma management.

    PubMed

    Burgess, John; Ekanayake, Buddhini; Lowe, Adrian; Dunt, David; Thien, Francis; Dharmage, Shyamali C

    2011-12-01

    In asthma management, complementary and alternative medicine is enjoying a growing popularity worldwide. This review synthesizes the literature on complementary and alternative medicine techniques that utilize breathing retraining as their primary component and compares evidence from controlled trials with before-and-after trials. Medline, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and the Cochrane Library electronic databases were searched. Reference lists of all publications were manually checked to identify studies not found through electronic searching. The selection criteria were met by 41 articles. Most randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of the Buteyko breathing technique demonstrated a significant decrease in β(2)-agonist use while several found improvement in quality of life or decrease in inhaled corticosteroid use. Although few in number, RCTs of respiratory muscle training found a significant reduction in bronchodilator medication use. Where meta-analyses could be done, they provided evidence of benefit from yoga, Buteyko breathing technique and physiotherapist-led breathing training in improving asthma-related quality of life. However, considerable heterogeneity was noted in some RCTs of yoga. It is reasonable for clinicians to offer qualified support to patients with asthma undertaking these breathing retraining techniques.

  15. ASSESSMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY PM 2.5 SAMPLES FROM TWO CITIES IN GERMANY WITH DIFFERING INCIDENCE OF ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    ASSESSMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY PM 2.5 SAMPLES FROM TWO CITIES IN GERMANY WITH DIFFERING INCIDENCE OF ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA.

    LR Bishop, J Heinrich*, MK Selgrade & MI Gilmour.
    Experimental Toxicology Division, ORD/ NHEERL, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC. *GSF, Neuherberg,...

  16. Double blind randomised controlled trial of two different breathing techniques in the management of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Slader, C A; Reddel, H K; Spencer, L M; Belousova, E G; Armour, C L; Bosnic‐Anticevich, S Z; Thien, F C K; Jenkins, C R

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that breathing techniques reduce short acting β2 agonist use and improve quality of life (QoL) in asthma. The primary aim of this double blind study was to compare the effects of breathing exercises focusing on shallow nasal breathing with those of non‐specific upper body exercises on asthma symptoms, QoL, other measures of disease control, and inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) dose. This study also assessed the effect of peak flow monitoring on outcomes in patients using breathing techniques. Methods After a 2 week run in period, 57 subjects were randomised to one of two breathing techniques learned from instructional videos. During the following 30 weeks subjects practised their exercises twice daily and as needed for relief of symptoms. After week 16, two successive ICS downtitration steps were attempted. The primary outcome variables were QoL score and daily symptom score at week 12. Results Overall there were no clinically important differences between the groups in primary or secondary outcomes at weeks 12 or 28. The QoL score remained unchanged (0.7 at baseline v 0.5 at week 28, p = 0.11 both groups combined), as did lung function and airway responsiveness. However, across both groups, reliever use decreased by 86% (p<0.0001) and ICS dose was reduced by 50% (p<0.0001; p>0.10 between groups). Peak flow monitoring did not have a detrimental effect on asthma outcomes. Conclusion Breathing techniques may be useful in the management of patients with mild asthma symptoms who use a reliever frequently, but there is no evidence to favour shallow nasal breathing over non‐specific upper body exercises. PMID:16517572

  17. Parent and Clinician Preferences for an Asthma App to Promote Adolescent Self-Management: A Formative Study

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Courtney A; Sage, Adam J; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Sleath, Betsy L; Carpenter, Delesha M

    2016-01-01

    Background Most youth asthma apps are not designed with parent and clinician use in mind, and rarely is the app development process informed by parent or clinician input. Objective This study was conducted to generate formative data on the use, attitudes, and preferences for asthma mHealth app features among parents and clinicians, the important stakeholders who support adolescents with asthma and promote adolescent self-management skills. Methods We conducted a mixed-methods study from 2013 to 2014 employing a user-centered design philosophy to acquire feedback from a convenience sample of 20 parents and 6 clinicians. Participants were given an iPod Touch and asked to evaluate 10 features on 2 existing asthma apps. Participant experiences using the apps were collected from questionnaires and a thematic analysis of audio-recorded and transcribed (verbatim) interviews using MAXQDA. Descriptive statistics were calculated to characterize the study sample and app feature feedback. Independent samples t tests were performed to compare parent and clinician ratings of app feature usefulness (ratings: 1=not at all useful to 5=very useful). Results All parents were female (n=20), 45% were black, 20% had an income ≥US $50,000, and 45% had a bachelor’s degree or higher education. The clinician sample included 2 nurses and 4 physicians with a mean practice time of 13 years. Three main themes provided an understanding of how participants perceived their roles and use of asthma app features to support adolescent asthma self-management: monitoring and supervision, education, and communication/information sharing. Parents rated the doctor report feature highest, and clinicians rated the doctor appointment reminder highest of all evaluated app features on usefulness. The peak flow monitoring feature was the lowest ranked feature by both parents and clinicians. Parents reported higher usefulness for the doctor report (t(10)=2.7, P<.02), diary (t(10)=2.7, P<.03), and self

  18. Parent-reported physician diagnosis is an important factor in asthma management: an elementary school survey.

    PubMed

    Homnick, Douglas N; DeJong, Sandra R

    2007-06-01

    Parent surveys seem to provide sufficient information for asthma case selection. In this study, elementary school children were identified for an asthma education program through a screening questionnaire, followed by a comprehensive family survey. The data were analyzed by groups according to those with parent-reported physician diagnosis or no physician diagnosis. Those with an asthma diagnosis had less nighttime symptoms, less family stress, and more asthma follow-up visits, and were prescribed appropriate medications and peak flow meters more often than those students without a physician diagnosis of asthma. A physician commitment to or recognition of an asthma diagnosis is an important factor in subsequent asthma care.

  19. Examining causes of the urban (inner city) asthma epidemic: Implementing new management strategies.

    PubMed

    Szefler, Stanley J

    2016-01-01

    Asthma in the inner city contributes to high morbidity and mortality, and, in school children, reduced school attendance and alteration in academic performance. There is a need to improve asthma care in the inner city by reducing asthma exacerbations. Methods are currently available to predict and prevent seasonal exacerbations of asthma. In addition, new medications are being developed that will be effective in improving pulmonary function and reducing asthma exacerbations. School-centered asthma programs can also be helpful to assist children and clinicians in applying asthma treatment plans and assuring optimal adherence to these plans.

  20. Evidence-based diagnosis and management of acute bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Ann Marie

    2014-09-18

    Acute bronchitis is a common respiratory infection seen in primary care settings. This article examines the current evidence for diagnosis and management of acute bronchitis in adults and provides recommendations for primary care clinical practice.

  1. Geospatial relationships of air pollution and acute asthma events across the Detroit–Windsor international border: Study design and preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Lawrence D; Lamerato, Lois E; Xu, Xiaohong; Booza, Jason C; Reiners, John J; Raymond III, Delbert M; Villeneuve, Paul J; Lavigne, Eric; Larkin, Dana; Krouse, Helene J

    2014-01-01

    The Geospatial Determinants of Health Outcomes Consortium (GeoDHOC) study investigated ambient air quality across the international border between Detroit, Michigan, USA and Windsor, Ontario, Canada and its association with acute asthma events in 5- to 89-year-old residents of these cities. NO2, SO2, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured at 100 sites, and particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at 50 sites during two 2-week sampling periods in 2008 and 2009. Acute asthma event rates across neighborhoods in each city were calculated using emergency room visits and hospitalizations and standardized to the overall age and gender distribution of the population in the two cities combined. Results demonstrate that intra-urban air quality variations are related to adverse respiratory events in both cities. Annual 2008 asthma rates exhibited statistically significant positive correlations with total VOCs and total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) at 5-digit zip code scale spatial resolution in Detroit. In Windsor, NO2, VOCs, and PM10 concentrations correlated positively with 2008 asthma rates at a similar 3-digit postal forward sortation area scale. The study is limited by its coarse temporal resolution (comparing relatively short term air quality measurements to annual asthma health data) and interpretation of findings is complicated by contrasts in population demographics and health-care delivery systems in Detroit and Windsor. PMID:24220215

  2. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide for the management of asthma in adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Harnan, Sue; Gomersall, Tim; Tappenden, Paul; Wong, Ruth; Pavord, Ian; Lawson, Rod; Everard, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measured in a clinical setting for the management of asthma in adults. 13 electronic databases were searched and studies were selected against predefined inclusion criteria. Quality assessment was conducted using QUADAS-2. Class effect meta-analyses were performed. Six studies were included. Despite high levels of heterogeneity in multiple study characteristics, exploratory class effect meta-analyses were conducted. Four studies reported a wider definition of exacerbation rates (major or severe exacerbation) with a pooled rate ratio of 0.80 (95% CI 0.63–1.02). Two studies reported rates of severe exacerbations (requiring oral corticosteroid use) with a pooled rate ratio of 0.89 (95% CI 0.43–1.72). Inhaled corticosteroid use was reported by four studies, with a pooled standardised mean difference of −0.24 (95% CI −0.56–0.07). No statistically significant differences for health-related quality of life or asthma control were found. FeNO guided management showed no statistically significant benefit in terms of severe exacerbations or inhaled corticosteroid use, but showed a statistically significant reduction in exacerbations of any severity. However, further research is warranted to clearly define which management protocols (including cut-off points) offer best efficacy and which patient groups would benefit the most. PMID:26846832

  3. Safety of Nonoperative Management After Acute Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Amoza Pais, Sonia; Batlle Marin, Xavi; Oronoz Martinez, Begoña; Balen Ribera, Enrique; Yarnoz Irazabal, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The role of surgery in the management of diverticular disease after an episode of acute diverticulitis (AD) managed in a conservative form is evolving. Age, number of episodes of AD, type of episode, and symptoms after the episodes are factors related to the need for elective surgery. The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety of conservative management and the risk factors for emergency surgery after a first episode of AD managed without surgery. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 405 patients diagnosed as having had a first episode of AD. Sixty-nine patients underwent emergency surgery on the first admission, and 69 patients had an elective operation in the follow-up (group A). The remaining 267 patients were managed initially without surgery (group B). Thirteen of these 267 patients needed a further urgent surgical procedure. Factors involved in the decision of elective surgery and the probability of emergency surgery after the first episode of AD managed without surgery were evaluated in relation to demographic factors, risk factors, presence of recurrences, and type of the first episode. Results Patients, mean age was 62.7 years, 71 were aged less than 51, and 151 were males. The mean follow-up for patients with nonoperative management was 91.2 months. An elective operation was performed in 69 patients. Compared to patients in group B, those in group A more frequently had a first episode of complicated acute diverticulitis (CAD) (37.1% vs. 16.4%; P = 0.000) and were more likely to be smokers (46.3% vs. 19.3%; P = 0.000) and to suffer more than one episode of AD (42% vs. 26.9%; P = 0.027). Nonoperative management was chosen for 267 patients, but 13 patients needed an emergency operation later. In the multivariate analysis, we found a significant relation between the presence of CAD in the first episode and the need for emergency surgery. There were no differences in surgical mortality between the patients in the two groups, but patients treated

  4. Hearing half the message? A re-audit of the care of patients with acute asthma by emergency ambulance crews in London

    PubMed Central

    Snooks, H; Halter, M; Palmer, Y; Booth, H; Moore, F

    2005-01-01

    

Problem: An initial audit of the care provided to emergency asthma patients by the ambulance service was carried out in 1996. Some under-recognition and under-treatment of severe asthma was found as well as a lack of documentation of patient condition on scene. A re-audit was undertaken in 1999. Design: A multidisciplinary advisory group was reconvened. The same method was adopted as for the first audit. Patients included were those administered nebulised salbutamol by crews in the catchment areas of four hospitals and those diagnosed with asthma at the Accident & Emergency (A&E) departments of those hospitals between January and March 1999. Setting: London Ambulance Service. Key measures for improvement: (1) Accuracy of diagnosis and appropriateness of treatment, and (2) adherence to protocol. Strategies for change: Following the first audit, treatment protocols were widened and brought into line with the British Thoracic Society guidelines for care of acute asthma patients. The results were widely disseminated within the service and training was initiated for all operational staff. Effects of change: The number of patients included in the re-audit more than doubled (audit 1: n = 252, audit 2: n = 532). The increase occurred exclusively in those administered nebulised salbutamol by ambulance crews but diagnosed with conditions other than asthma in A&E (audit 1: n = 15, audit 2: n = 161). The proportion of patients diagnosed with asthma in A&E who were administered nebulised salbutamol by their attending crew rose from 58% to 75%. However, 43 asthma patients were not treated; several of these were not recognised as suffering from asthma and others fell within the changed protocols for treatment. Adherence to protocol for administration of salbutamol remained high. Pre-hospital documentation of key observations did not improve. Lessons learnt: Messages from the first audit seem to have been acted upon selectively. Implementing change is complex, and re

  5. [Occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Cambray-Gutiérrez, Julio César; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha

    2015-01-01

    The occupational asthma is the most common form of lung disease caused by factors that are attributed to a specific working environment in industrialized countries. It causes variable limitation of airflow and/or hyper-responsiveness of the airway due to contact with specific agents present in an atmosphere of work and not to stimuli found out of this place. It is recognized more and more frequently, and many agents are capable of causing occupational asthma by different pathophysiological mechanisms. More than 400 agents causing occupational asthma are known and every year new triggers are detected. Numerous factors contribute to the pathogenesis of occupational asthma induced chemically, including immunological, non-immunological mechanisms of epithelial damage, airway remodeling, oxidative stress, neurogenic inflammation as well as genetic factors. The most important risk factors for occupational asthma include: atopy, smoking and genetic factors. The diagnosis is based on the clinical history, skin tests, immunological tests and functional studies. The fundamental treatment is removing the worker from exposure as soon as possible. The advance in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of occupational asthma will importantly influence in the prevention and the management of this disease.

  6. Feasibility of Adapting Multisystemic Therapy to Improve Illness Management Behaviors and Reduce Asthma Morbidity in High Risk African American Youth: A Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naar-King, Sylvie; Ellis, Deborah; Kolmodin, Karen; Cunningham, Phillippe; Secord, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    African-American adolescents have the highest rates of asthma morbidity and mortality, yet there are few successful behavioral interventions to improve illness management for this group. Mental health providers have an opportunity to expand their services and impact by targeting adolescents with poor asthma management. We describe the adaptation…

  7. Sahaja yoga in the management of moderate to severe asthma: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Manocha, R; Marks, G; Kenchington, P; Peters, D; Salome, C

    2002-01-01

    Background: Sahaja Yoga is a traditional system of meditation based on yogic principles which may be used for therapeutic purposes. A study was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of this therapy as an adjunctive tool in the management of asthma in adult patients who remained symptomatic on moderate to high doses of inhaled steroids. Methods: A parallel group, double blind, randomised controlled trial was conducted. Subjects were randomly allocated to Sahaja yoga and control intervention groups. Both the yoga and the control interventions required the subjects to attend a 2 hour session once a week for 4 months. Asthma related quality of life (AQLQ, range 0–4), Profile of Mood States (POMS), level of airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine (AHR), and a diary card based combined asthma score (CAS, range 0–12) reflecting symptoms, bronchodilator usage, and peak expiratory flow rates were measured at the end of the treatment period and again 2 months later. Results: Twenty one of 30 subjects randomised to the yoga intervention and 26 of 29 subjects randomised to the control group were available for assessment at the end of treatment. The improvement in AHR at the end of treatment was 1.5 doubling doses (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.0 to 2.9, p=0.047) greater in the yoga intervention group than in the control group. Differences in AQLQ score (0.41, 95% CI –0.04 to 0.86) and CAS (0.9, 95% CI –0.9 to 2.7) were not significant (p>0.05). The AQLQ mood subscale did improve more in the yoga group than in the control group (difference 0.63, 95% CI 0.06 to 1.20), as did the summary POMS score (difference 18.4, 95% CI 0.2 to 36.5, p=0.05). There were no significant differences between the two groups at the 2 month follow up assessment. Conclusions: This randomised controlled trial has shown that the practice of Sahaja yoga does have limited beneficial effects on some objective and subjective measures of the impact of asthma. Further work is required to

  8. Acute radiation syndrome: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Elizabeth H; Nemhauser, Jeffrey B; Smith, James M; Kazzi, Ziad N; Farfán, Eduardo B; Chang, Arthur S; Naeem, Syed F

    2010-06-01

    Primary care physicians may be unprepared to diagnose and treat rare, yet potentially fatal, illnesses such as acute radiation syndrome (ARS). ARS, also known as radiation sickness, is caused by exposure to a high dose of penetrating, ionizing radiation over a short period of time. The time to onset of ARS is dependent on the dose received, but even at the lowest doses capable of causing illness, this will occur within a matter of hours to days. This article describes the clinical manifestations of ARS, provides guidelines for assessing its severity, and makes recommendations for managing ARS victims.

  9. Treating asthma by the guidelines: developing a medication management information system for use in primary care.

    PubMed

    Twiggs, Joan E; Fifield, J; Jackson, E; Cushman, R; Apter, A

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, implement, and assess an automated asthma medication management information system (MMIS) that provides patient-specific evaluative guidance based on 1997 NAEPP clinical consensus guidelines. MMIS was developed and implemented in primary care settings within a pediatric asthma disease management program. MMIS infrastructure featured a centralized database with Internet access. MMIS collects detailed patient asthma medication data, evaluates pharmacotherapy relative to practitioner-reported disease severity, symptom control and model of guideline-recommended severity-appropriate medications and produces a patient-specific "curbside consult" feedback report. A system algorithm translates actual detailed medication data into actual severity-specific medication-class combinations. A table-driven computer program compares actual medication-class combinations to a guideline-based medication-class combinations model. Methodology determines whether the patient was prescribed a "severity-appropriate" amount or an amount "more" or "less" medication than indicated for patient's reported severity. Feedback messages comment on comparison. Missing data, unrecognized amounts of controller medication or unrecognized medication combinations create error cases. Post hoc review analyzed error cases to determine prevalence of non-guideline medicating practices among these practitioners. Proportion of valid and error cases across two clinical visits before and after post hoc clinical review were measured, as well as proportion of severity-appropriate, out-of-severity and non-guideline medications. MMIS produced a valid feedback report for 83% of patient visits. Missing data accounted for 60% of error cases. Practitioners used severity-appropriate medications for 60% of cases. When non-severity-appropriate medications were used they tended to be "too much" rather than "too little" (22%, 5%), suggesting appropriate use of guideline-recommended "step

  10. Management of blood pressure in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, John A; Dawson, Jesse; Quinn, Terence J

    2013-08-01

    The importance of elevated or low arterial blood pressure (BP) early after stroke, and the need for pharmacological intervention to control BP, remains controversial. Debate surrounds if, when and how to intervene. This debate is informed by conflicting results from observational data and underpowered clinical trials and substantive outcome data are lacking. Accordingly, management decisions have largely been left up to the individual treating physician and guidelines are based on 'good practice' and theory rather than level 1, grade A evidence. Substantial progress has been made in recent years, particularly in the field of hemorrhagic stroke, where recently presented and soon to completed large-scale trials may finally give us a firm evidence base. For ischemic stroke, many important studies have informed our understanding of the basic pathophysiology, epidemiology, treatment and outcomes of BP management in acute stroke and, although not yet constituting a solid 'evidence base', are helping us from the 'cognitive quick-sand' of small studies and personal experiences.

  11. Time Management in Acute Vertebrobasilar Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kamper, Lars; Mansour, Michael; Winkler, Sven B.; Kempkes, Udo; Haage, Patrick

    2009-03-15

    Acute vertebrobasilar occlusion (VBO) is associated with a high risk of stroke and death. Although local thrombolysis may achieve recanalization and improve outcome, mortality is still between 35% and 75%. However, without recanalization the chance of a good outcome is extremely poor, with mortality rates of 80-90%. Early treatment is a fundamental factor, but detailed studies of the exact time management of the diagnostic and interventional workflow are still lacking. Data on 18 patients were retrospectively evaluated. Time periods between symptom onset, admission to hospital, time of diagnosis, and beginning of intervention were correlated with postinterventional neurological status. The Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) were used to examine patients before and after local thrombolysis. Additionally, multivariate statistics were applied to reveal similarities between patients with neurological improvement. Primary recanalization was achieved in 77% of patients. The overall mortality was 55%. Major complications were intracranial hemorrhage and peripheral embolism. The time period from symptom onset to intervention showed a strong correlation with the postinterventional NIHSS as well as the patient's age, with the best results in a 4-h interval. Multivariate statistics revealed similarities among the patients. Evaluation of time management in acute VBO by multivariate statistics is a helpful tool for definition of similarities in this patient group. Similarly to the door-to-balloon time for acute coronary interventions, the chances for a good outcome depend on a short time interval between symptom onset and intervention. While the only manipulable time period starts with hospital admission, our results emphasize the necessity of efficient intrahospital workflow.

  12. Cervical and mediastinal emphysema associated with an asthma exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Waseem Asrar; Abbas, Shoneen; Bright, John

    2013-02-18

    Surgical emphysema associated with an acute asthma exacerbation is very rare. This report presents the case of a 19- year-old male patient with a background of asthma who presented with palpable cervical surgical emphysema and CT evidence of mediastinal emphysema. There are only a limited number of case reports associated with surgical emphysema in the absence of pneumothorax in patients with an asthma exacerbation. Evidence with regard to the management of such cases is limited and is largely consensus based. Below we discuss the case in a greater detail.

  13. Valuing the Economic Costs of Allergic Rhinitis, Acute Bronchitis, and Asthma from Exposure to Indoor Dampness and Mold in the US.

    PubMed

    Mudarri, David H

    2016-01-01

    Two foundational methods for estimating the total economic burden of disease are cost of illness (COI) and willingness to pay (WTP). WTP measures the full cost to society, but WTP estimates are difficult to compute and rarely available. COI methods are more often used but less likely to reflect full costs. This paper attempts to estimate the full economic cost (2014$) of illnesses resulting from exposure to dampness and mold using COI methods and WTP where the data is available. A limited sensitivity analysis of alternative methods and assumptions demonstrates a wide potential range of estimates. In the final estimates, the total annual cost to society attributable to dampness and mold is estimated to be $3.7 (2.3-4.7) billion for allergic rhinitis, $1.9 (1.1-2.3) billion for acute bronchitis, $15.1 (9.4-20.6) billion for asthma morbidity, and $1.7 (0.4-4.5) billion for asthma mortality. The corresponding costs from all causes, not limited to dampness and mold, using the same approach would be $24.8 billion for allergic rhinitis, $13.5 billion for acute bronchitis, $94.5 billion for asthma morbidity, and $10.8 billion for asthma mortality.

  14. Valuing the Economic Costs of Allergic Rhinitis, Acute Bronchitis, and Asthma from Exposure to Indoor Dampness and Mold in the US

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Two foundational methods for estimating the total economic burden of disease are cost of illness (COI) and willingness to pay (WTP). WTP measures the full cost to society, but WTP estimates are difficult to compute and rarely available. COI methods are more often used but less likely to reflect full costs. This paper attempts to estimate the full economic cost (2014$) of illnesses resulting from exposure to dampness and mold using COI methods and WTP where the data is available. A limited sensitivity analysis of alternative methods and assumptions demonstrates a wide potential range of estimates. In the final estimates, the total annual cost to society attributable to dampness and mold is estimated to be $3.7 (2.3–4.7) billion for allergic rhinitis, $1.9 (1.1–2.3) billion for acute bronchitis, $15.1 (9.4–20.6) billion for asthma morbidity, and $1.7 (0.4–4.5) billion for asthma mortality. The corresponding costs from all causes, not limited to dampness and mold, using the same approach would be $24.8 billion for allergic rhinitis, $13.5 billion for acute bronchitis, $94.5 billion for asthma morbidity, and $10.8 billion for asthma mortality. PMID:27313630

  15. School-based Management of Chronic Asthma Among Inner-city African-American Schoolchildren in Dallas, Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Melanie; Johnson, Pauline; Neatherlin, Jacque; Millard, Mark W.; Lawrence, Gretchen

    1998-01-01

    Examined the efficacy of a school-based asthma management program to prevent exacerbation of symptoms in inner-city, African-American students. Students visited the school clinic twice daily for treatment with inhaled anti-inflammatory medication and measurement of respiratory peak flow rates. Regular use of inhaled anti-inflammatory medication…

  16. Management of acute traumatic spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Shank, C D; Walters, B C; Hadley, M N

    2017-01-01

    Acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating disease process affecting tens of thousands of people across the USA each year. Despite the increase in primary prevention measures, such as educational programs, motor vehicle speed limits, automobile running lights, and safety technology that includes automobile passive restraint systems and airbags, SCIs continue to carry substantial permanent morbidity and mortality. Medical measures implemented following the initial injury are designed to limit secondary insult to the spinal cord and to stabilize the spinal column in an attempt to decrease devastating sequelae. This chapter is an overview of the contemporary management of an acute traumatic SCI patient from the time of injury through the stay in the intensive care unit. We discuss initial triage, immobilization, and transportation of the patient by emergency medical services personnel to a definitive treatment facility. Upon arrival at the emergency department, we review initial trauma protocols and the evidence-based recommendations for radiographic evaluation of the patient's vertebral column. Finally, we outline closed cervical spine reduction and various aggressive medical therapies aimed at improving neurologic outcome.

  17. Severe asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Guilbert, Theresa W; Bacharier, Leonard B; Fitzpatrick, Anne M

    2014-01-01

    Severe asthma in children is characterized by sustained symptoms despite treatment with high doses of inhaled corticosteroids or oral corticosteroids. Children with severe asthma may fall into 2 categories, difficult-to-treat asthma or severe therapy-resistant asthma. Difficult-to-treat asthma is defined as poor control due to an incorrect diagnosis or comorbidities, or poor adherence due to adverse psychological or environmental factors. In contrast, treatment resistant is defined as difficult asthma despite management of these factors. It is increasingly recognized that severe asthma is a highly heterogeneous disorder associated with a number of clinical and inflammatory phenotypes that have been described in children with severe asthma. Guideline-based drug therapy of severe childhood asthma is based primarily on extrapolated data from adult studies. The recommendation is that children with severe asthma be treated with higher-dose inhaled or oral corticosteroids combined with long-acting β-agonists and other add-on therapies, such as antileukotrienes and methylxanthines. It is important to identify and address the influences that make asthma difficult to control, including reviewing the diagnosis and removing causal or aggravating factors. Better definition of the phenotypes and better targeting of therapy based upon individual patient phenotypes is likely to improve asthma treatment in the future.

  18. Severe asthma in children

    PubMed Central

    Guilbert, TW; Bacharier, LB; Fitzpatrick, AM

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma in children is characterized by sustained symptoms despite treatment with high doses of ICS or oral corticosteroids. Children with severe asthma may fall into two categories, difficult-to-treat asthma or severe therapy-resistant asthma. Difficult-to-treat asthma is defined as poor control due to an incorrect diagnosis or comorbidities, poor adherence due to adverse psychological or environmental factors. In contrast, treatment-resistant is defined as difficult asthma despite management of these factors. It is increasingly recognized that severe asthma is a highly heterogeneous disorder associated with a number of clinical and inflammatory phenotypes that have been described in children with severe asthma. Guideline based drug therapy of severe childhood asthma is based primarily on extrapolated data from adult studies. The recommendation is that children with severe asthma be treated with higher-dose inhaled or oral corticosteroids combined with long-acting beta-agonists and other add on therapies such as antileukotrienes and methylxanthines. It is important to identify and address the influences that make asthma difficult to control including reviewing the diagnosis and the removal of causal or aggravating factors. Better definition of the phenotypes and better targeting of therapy based upon individual patient phenotypes is likely to improve asthma treatment in the future. PMID:25213041

  19. Practical approaches to treating acute bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Cline, Douglas C

    2005-12-01

    Both the National Asthma Education Prevention Program (NAEPP) guidelines for asthma and the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) stress the importance of treating acute bronchospasm. Important steps for each disease are making a differential diagnosis, assessing the possibility of future exacerbations, applying disease management principles to prevent and/or treat bronchospasm exacerbations, identifying acutely ill patients, and determining when hospitalization or specialist referrals are appropriate.

  20. Childhood Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Library ▸ Asthma Library ▸ Childhood asthma TTR Share | Childhood Asthma Children with recurrent cough, wheezing, chest tightness or ... breath may have one or more forms of asthma. Left untreated, asthmatic children often have less stamina ...

  1. [Management of acute exacerbations of COPD].

    PubMed

    Rabbat, A; Guetta, A; Lorut, C; Lefebvre, A; Roche, N; Huchon, G

    2010-10-01

    Exacerbations of COPD are common and cause a considerable burden to the patient and the healthcare system. To optimize the hospital care of patients with exacerbations of COPD, clinicians should be aware of some key points: management of exacerbations is broadly based on clinical features and severity. Initial clinical evaluation is crucial to define those patients requiring hospital admission and those who could be managed as outpatients. In hospitalized patients, the appropriate level of care should be determined by the initial severity and response to initial medical treatment. Medical treatment should follow recent recommendations, including rest, titrated oxygen therapy, inhaled or nebulized short-acting bronchodilators (Beta2-agonists and anticholinergic agents), DVT prevention with LMWH, steroids in most severely ill patients, unless there are contraindications and antibiotics in the case of a clear bacterial infectious aetiology. Severe exacerbations may lead to acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Unless contraindicated, non-invasive ventilation (NIV) should be the first line ventilatory support for these patients. NIV should be commenced early, before severe acidosis ensues, to avoid the need for endotracheal intubation and to reduce mortality and treatment failures. Several randomised controlled clinical trials support the use of NIV in the management of acute exacerbations of COPD, demonstrating a decreased need for mechanical ventilation and an improved survival. In most severe cases, NIV should be provided in ICU. Although it has been shown that for less severe patients (with pH values>7.30), NIV can be administered safely and effectively on general medical wards, a lead respiratory consultant and trained nurses are mandatory. Mechanical ventilation through an endotracheal tube should be considered when patients have contraindications to the use of NIV or fail to improve on NIV. The duration of mechanical ventilation should be shortened as much as

  2. A pilot study assessing the impact of a learner-centered adult asthma self-management program on psychological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tousman, Stuart; Zeitz, Howard; Taylor, Linda D

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of the research was to determine if an adult asthma self-management program could significantly improve psychological outcomes for participants. Small groups of adults met for 2 hours for 7 consecutive weeks. Intervention techniques included interactive discussions, problem solving, social support, and a behavior modification procedure. The behavior modification procedure consisted of homework assignments in which participants were asked to self-monitor and record asthma-specific behaviors (peak expiratory flow monitoring, avoidance/removal of asthma triggers, and controller medication adherence) and general lifestyle behaviors (drinking water, washing hands, and exercising). Paired sample t tests indicated statistically significant improvements for the outcomes of quality of life, depression, and self-efficacy. Significant increases were found in knowledge and behaviors, such as peak-flow monitoring and frequency of daily exercise. These results provide initial evidence that our program was effective, although the small sample size and lack of control group indicate the need for further research.

  3. Approaches to chronic disease management for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: strategies through the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Hart, Mary K; Millard, Mark W

    2010-07-01

    Investigator-initiated research in both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease conducted at the Baylor Martha Foster Lung Care Center has sought to improve management throughout the continuum of respiratory care using a multidisciplinary approach. Respiratory care therapists employed in the primary care setting were shown to improve the quality of asthma care: rescue inhaler use decreased by 75% and respiratory symptom score decreased by 49% in patients who were seen by this midlevel specialty provider. In addition to similar results in a geriatric population, patients' diagnosis was changed in 48% of cases and treatment was changed in 76% of cases after the intervention. For pulmonary rehabilitation, an activity of daily living assessment form was created, and rehabilitation-whether traditional or water-based-was shown to improve patients' ability to perform activities of daily living and improve quality of life scores. The Rules of Two((R)), developed by Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas to simplify understanding of good asthma control, continues to be taught, and patient education has also been offered through asthma summer camps for children. Finally, a multidisciplinary team worked to develop a protocol for treatment of asthma patients in the emergency department and, through this effort, was able to reduce length of stay from an average of 278 minutes to an average of 168 minutes. These efforts aim to overcome the gap between recommended care and actual practice, so that patients benefit from evidence-based medicine and continuing refinements to diagnosis and treatment.

  4. γ-Secretase Inhibitor Alleviates Acute Airway Inflammation of Allergic Asthma in Mice by Downregulating Th17 Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weixi; Zhang, Xueya; Sheng, Anqun; Weng, Cuiye; Zhu, Tingting; Zhao, Wei; Li, Changchong

    2015-01-01

    T helper 17 (Th17) cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. Th17 cell differentiation requires Notch signaling. γ-Secretase inhibitor (GSI) blocks Notch signaling; thus, it may be considered as a potential treatment for allergic asthma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of GSI on Th17 cell differentiation in a mouse model of allergic asthma. OVA was used to induce mouse asthma model in the presence and absence of GSI. GSI ameliorated the development of OVA-induced asthma, including suppressing airway inflammation responses and reducing the severity of clinical signs. GSI also significantly suppressed Th17-cell responses in spleen and reduced IL-17 levels in serum. These findings suggest that GSI directly regulates Th17 responses through a Notch signaling-dependent pathway in mouse model of allergic asthma, supporting the notion that GSI is a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:26339131

  5. Acute management--how should we intervene?

    PubMed

    Kontny, F

    2000-01-01

    A crucial question in the acute management of the patient with unstable coronary artery disease (UCAD) is whether to carry out early intervention, performing angiography soon after presentation and following this with revascularization where appropriate, or whether to follow a noninvasive medical strategy as far as possible unless symptoms necessitate intervention. The body of literature addressing this question is sparse, but the recent Fast Revascularization during InStability in Coronary artery disease (FRISC II) study has provided new insights into the problem. Using a factorial design to randomize patients to invasive or noninvasive management strategies, and to short- or long-term treatment with the low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) dalteparin sodium (Fragmin), it was shown in FRISC II that early invasive treatment (within 7 days), when combined with optimal medical pretreatment with dalteparin sodium, aspirin, and appropriate antianginal medication, is associated with improved clinical outcomes, relative to a "watchful waiting" approach based on noninvasive therapy. Thus, an early invasive approach following aggressive medical pretreatment should be the preferred strategy for patients with UCAD who present with signs of ischemia on the electrocardiogram or raised biochemical markers of myocardial damage at admission.

  6. Guidelines for management of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amal Kumar; Kumar, Soumitra

    2011-12-01

    These Guidelines summarize and evaluate all currently available evidence on Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) with the aim of assisting physicians in selecting the best management strategies for a typical patient, suffering from AMI, taking into account the impact on outcome, as well as the risk/benefit ratio of particular diagnostic or therapeutic means. Rapid diagnosis and early risk stratification of patients presenting with AMI are important to identify patients in whom early interventions can improve outcome. AMI can be defined from a number of different perspectives related to clinical, electrocardiographic (ECG), biochemical, and pathological characteristics. Quantitative assessment of risk is useful for clinical decision making. For patients with the clinical presentation of AMI within 12 h after symptom onset, early mechanical (PCI) or pharmacological reperfusion should be performed. Platelet activation and subsequent aggregation play a dominant role in the propagation of arterial thrombosis and consequently are the key therapeutic targets in the management of AMI. Adjunctive therapy with antiplatelets and antithrombotics is essential. A recommendation for routine urgent PCI (within 24 h) following successful fibrinolysis seems to be most practical option. In India, pharmacoinvasive therapy is the best option.

  7. Randomised feasibility study of a novel experience-based internet intervention to support self-management in chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Angela; Jawad, Sena; Davoudianfar, Mina; Locock, Louise; Ziebland, Sue; Powell, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) assessing the effects of an experience-based website as a resource for the self-management of chronic asthma. Design and setting Feasibility, single-blind RCT in 2 regions of England. Randomisation used computer-generated random number sequence in a 1:1 ratio, after baseline data collection, to website access for 2 weeks. Participants Adults (age ≥18 years), with clinically diagnosed asthma as coded in their primary care electronic record, prescribed inhaled corticosteroids for at least 3 months in the previous year, were recruited from 9 general practices. Intervention The EXPERT asthma intervention is an interactive PC/laptop/tablet/smartphone compatible website designed with extensive input from adults with asthma. It provides experience-based information and aims to support subjective perception of self-efficacy, self-management and improve health status. Outcome measures Primary outcomes were consent/recruitment, website usage and completion of outcome measures. Secondary outcomes included Partners in Health (PIH) questionnaire, the Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scale, the SF36 and the E-Health Impact Questionnaire. Participant blinding postrandomisation was not possible. The analysis was blind to allocation. Results Recruitment target exceeded. 148 participants randomised (73 intervention group). Age range 19–84 years; 59% female. 121 of 148 (84%; 62 intervention group) followed up. The median number of logins was 2 (IQR 2–3, range 1–48). Minimal differences of change from baseline between groups; both showed improvement in health state or management of their condition with no significant differences between arms. No adverse events. Conclusions Recruitment and retention confirmed feasibility. The trends towards improved outcomes suggest that further research on digital interventions based on exposure to others’ personal experiences may be of value in the self-management

  8. Childhood asthma on the northern Mexico border.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Norah Anita

    2004-06-01

    Children with asthma living on the northern Mexico border suffer not only from the physical aspects of this condition, but also from the lack of a clear biomedical definition and treatment plan for the illness. An ethnographic study involving participant observation and focused interviews in Tijuana, Mexico, sought to understand the intersection of diagnostic uncertainties surrounding childhood asthma on the part of parents, particularly mothers, living in acute poverty. Environmental factors such as dust and insects in impoverished homes probably acted as asthma triggers among many of the children in the study. Furthermore, management of children's asthma took place not only in biomedical clinics, but also in homes, traditional medical settings, and pharmacies, where mothers often sought remedies for their children's asthma attacks on an emergency basis. In all treatment settings, including biomedical ones, they often faced significant barriers to effective care, including the misuse of antibiotics. Thus, the role of pharmaceutical sales clerks, as well as pediatric asthma specialists, is explored in this article.

  9. Macrolides for Acute Wheezing Episodes in Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program's Expert Panel Report 3, Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma does not recommend antibiotics for the management of acute episodes of asthma exacerbation. Macrolides seem to have some potential effect beyond or in addition to their antibacterial effect. It has been reported that macrolides may potentially benefit patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases due to their antibacterial, antiviral, and/or anti-inflammatory effects. This review presents recent data on use of azithromycin in prevention and management of acute exacerbation of respiratory symptoms in infants and young children. PMID:27458539

  10. Assessing and Managing Acute Pain: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Jungquist, Carla R; Vallerand, April Hazard; Sicoutris, Corinna; Kwon, Kyung N; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2017-03-01

    : Acute pain, which is usually sudden in onset and time limited, serves a biological protective function, warning the body of impending danger. However, while acute pain often resolves over time with normal healing, unrelieved acute pain can disrupt activities of daily living and transition to chronic pain. This article describes the effects of unrelieved acute pain on patients and clinical outcomes. The authors call on nurses to assess and manage acute pain in accordance with evidence-based guidelines, expert consensus reports, and position statements from professional nursing organizations in order to minimize the likelihood of its becoming chronic.

  11. Adoption of a Portal for the Primary Care Management of Pediatric Asthma: A Mixed-Methods Implementation Study

    PubMed Central

    DuRivage, Nathalie; Mayne, Stephanie L; Finch, Stacia; Ross, Michelle E; Giacomini, Kelli; Suh, Andrew; McCarn, Banita; Brandt, Elias; Karavite, Dean; Staton, Elizabeth W; Shone, Laura P; McGoldrick, Valerie; Noonan, Kathleen; Miller, Dorothy; Lehmann, Christoph U; Pace, Wilson D; Grundmeier, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient portals may improve communication between families of children with asthma and their primary care providers and improve outcomes. However, the feasibility of using portals to collect patient-reported outcomes from families and the barriers and facilitators of portal implementation across diverse pediatric primary care settings have not been established. Objective We evaluated the feasibility of using a patient portal for pediatric asthma in primary care, its impact on management, and barriers and facilitators of implementation success. Methods We conducted a mixed-methods implementation study in 20 practices (11 states). Using the portal, parents of children with asthma aged 6-12 years completed monthly surveys to communicate treatment concerns, treatment goals, symptom control, medication use, and side effects. We used logistic regression to evaluate the association of portal use with child characteristics and changes to asthma management. Ten clinician focus groups and 22 semistructured parent interviews explored barriers and facilitators of use in the context of an evidence-based implementation framework. Results We invited 9133 families to enroll and 237 (2.59%) used the portal (range by practice, 0.6%-13.6%). Children of parents or guardians who used the portal were significantly more likely than nonusers to be aged 6-9 years (vs 10-12, P=.02), have mild or moderate/severe persistent asthma (P=.009 and P=.04), have a prescription of a controller medication (P<.001), and have private insurance (P=.002). Portal users with uncontrolled asthma had significantly more medication changes and primary care asthma visits after using the portal relative to the year earlier (increases of 14% and 16%, respectively). Qualitative results revealed the importance of practice organization (coordinated workflows) as well as family (asthma severity) and innovation (facilitated communication and ease of use) characteristics for implementation success

  12. Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell: Parental Nondisclosure of Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Over-the-Counter Medication Use in Children’s Asthma Management

    PubMed Central

    Sidora-Arcoleo, Kimberly; Yoos, H. Lorrie; Kitzman, Harriet; McMullen, Ann; Anson, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Background Parent-healthcare provider (HCP) communication is an important component of pediatric asthma management. Given the high prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and over-the-counter (OTC) medication use among this population, it is important to examine parental nondisclosure of these asthma management strategies. Method One-time interview and one-year retrospective medical record review with 228 parents of 5–12 year old children with asthma enrolled from 6 pediatric primary care practices examining parental nondisclosure of CAM and OTC medication use, reasons for nondisclosure, medical record documentation of CAM usage, and association between parent-HCP relationship and nondisclosure. Results Seventy-one percent of parents reported using CAM and/or OTC medication for children’s asthma management and 54% of those parents did not disclose usage. Seventy-five percent “did not think” to discuss it. Better parent-HCP relationship led to decreased nondisclosure. Discussion HCPs can play an important role in creating an environment where parents feel comfortable sharing information about their children’s asthma management strategies in order to arrive at a shared asthma management plan for the child leading to improved asthma health outcomes. PMID:18590866

  13. Pilot Testing "Okay with Asthma"[TM]: An Online Asthma Intervention for School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Tami H.; Hauenstein, Emily J.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is the leading cause of missed school days despite advancements in asthma treatment. This may be, in part, due to a lack of understanding about asthma. "Okay With Asthma"[TM], an online story with psychosocial management strategies for school-age children, was pilot tested to measure its effect on asthma knowledge and attitude. The online…

  14. [The National Disease Management Guideline for Asthma--what's new from the point of view of general practice].

    PubMed

    Schneider, Antonius; Niebling, Wilhelm

    2006-01-01

    The National Disease Management Guideline for Asthma was developed through a consensus process that involved different medical societies, thus constituting a novelty in the improvement of the care for asthma patients in Germany. The German Association of General Practitioners (DEGAM) also participated in the development of the asthma guideline. The implementability of this new guideline in general practice will be discussed on the basis of the chapters that are most important to primary care physicians. The guideline offers many relevant aspects for the management of asthma in general practice. In future editions, the levels of evidence underlying the statements about diagnosis and therapy should be more elaborate, thus providing more concise decision aids for physicians in daily practice. In particular, the implementation aids on the guideline's website could be used to translate the content of the guidelines into practice. Continuous quality improvement and the further development of the implementation process would be most important in overcoming the cross-sectoral barriers of the German healthcare system and thus optimizing the quality of care.

  15. New insights into asthma pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Szefler, Stanley J; Dakhama, Azzeddine

    2011-12-01

    Although national asthma guidelines help organize standards for asthma care, current asthma management is still primarily symptom based. Recent reports provide insights on how to improve asthma management through steps to better understand the natural history of asthma, individualize asthma care, reduce asthma exacerbations, manage inner city asthma, and some potential new ways to use available medications to improve asthma control. Despite many significant gains in managing asthma, we must now find improved strategies to prevent asthma exacerbations, alter the natural history of the disease, and to reduce health disparities in asthma care. Perhaps new directions in personalized medicine including a systems biology approach, along with improved health care access and communication will lead to better methods to alleviate the burden of asthma. This review will discuss the benefits and limitations of the current approach to asthma management, new studies that could impact new directions in asthma management, and new insights related to mechanisms of asthma and allergic airways inflammation that could eventually lead to improved asthma control.

  16. Feasibility of a novel mHealth management system to capture and improve medication adherence among adolescents with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cushing, Anna; Manice, Melissa P; Ting, Andrew; Parides, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Currently, 7.1 million children in the United States have asthma. Nonadherence to daily controller asthma medication is common, leading to more severe symptoms, overuse of rescue medication, and increased hospitalizations. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a novel mHealth management system composed of a sensored device, which is connected to mobile phone app that is designed to monitor and improve asthma medication adherence. Patients and methods The asthma management system was designed using well-established behavioral theory. Seven adolescents aged 11–18 years were enrolled and given an adherence sensor, and four of those also received a mobile phone app with game features and reminders. Five patients completed the study, and one was lost to follow-up in each group. Mobile app users and their parents participated in focus groups to assess patient preferences. Feasibility was assessed by the ability of sensors to capture real-time medication data. Acceptability was assessed by patient questionnaire and focus group analysis. Results Successful upload of real-time data from six of seven inhaler sensors to the HIPAA-compliant server demonstrates the feasibility of at-home patient monitoring using the sensor device. All three mobile app users who completed the study reported interest in continued use of the management system and would recommend the app to friends. Unstructured interviews and focus groups revealed that patients felt that the intervention helped their sense of asthma control. Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility of using the sensor device to remotely monitor real-time medication usage, and user feedback demonstrates the acceptability of the intervention for patient use. The findings provide guidance for the improvement of study design and technology development. Further research is needed to assess the efficacy of the intervention. PMID:27853357

  17. Asthma Prevention and Management for Aboriginal People: Lessons From Mi’kmaq Communities, Unama’ki, Canada, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Robert; Bennett, Ella; Masuda, Jeffrey; King, Malcolm; Stewart, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Background Asthma affects at least 10% of Aboriginal children (aged 11 or younger) in Canada, making it the second most common chronic disease suffered by this demographic group; yet asthma support strategies specific to Aboriginal peoples have only begun to be identified. Community Context This research builds on earlier phases of a recent study focused on identifying the support needs and intervention preferences of Aboriginal children with asthma and their parents or caregivers. Here, we seek to identify the implications of our initial findings for asthma programs, policies, and practices in an Aboriginal context and to determine strategies for implementing prevention programs in Aboriginal communities. Methods Five focus groups were conducted with 22 recruited community health care professionals and school personnel in 5 Mi’kmaq communities in Unama’ki (Cape Breton), Nova Scotia, Canada, through a community-based participatory research design. Each focus group was first introduced to findings from a local “social support for asthma” intervention, and then the groups explored issues associated with implementing social support from their respective professional positions. Outcome Thematic analysis revealed 3 key areas of opportunity and challenges for implementing asthma prevention and management initiatives in Mi’kmaq communities in terms of 1) professional awareness, 2) local school issues, and 3) community health centers. Interpretation Culturally relevant support initiatives are feasible and effective community-driven ways of improving asthma support in Mi’kmaq communities; however, ongoing assistance from the local leadership (ie, chief and council), community health directors, and school administrators, in addition to partnerships with respiratory health service organizations, is needed. PMID:26766847

  18. Effects of a Classroom-Based Asthma Education Curriculum on Asthma Knowledge, Attitudes, Self-Efficacy, Quality of Life, and Self-Management Behaviors among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Sally Fontamillas; Marshak, Helen Hopp; Dyjack, David T.; Neish, Christine M.

    2005-01-01

    Asthma education interventions primarily target young children and adults, and a few target adolescents. Several constructs of the social cognitive theory were used to design a classroom-based high school asthma education curriculum and to determine if the curriculum would improve asthma knowledge and attitudes among 10th grade students, as well…

  19. Asthma in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Forno, Erick; Gogna, Mudita; Cepeda, Alfonso; Yañez, Anahi; Solé, Dirceu; Cooper, Philip; Avila, Lydiana; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A.; Celedón, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Consistent with the diversity of Latin America, there is profound variability in asthma burden among and within countries in this region. Regional variation in asthma prevalence is likely multifactorial and due to genetics, perinatal exposures, diet, obesity, tobacco use, indoor and outdoor pollutants, psychosocial stress, and microbial or parasitic infections. Similarly, nonuniform progress in asthma management leads to regional variability in disease morbidity. Future studies of distinct asthma phenotypes should follow up well-characterized Latin American subgroups and examine risk factors that are unique or common in Latin America (e.g. stress and violence, parasitic infections and use of biomass fuels for cooking). Because most Latin American countries share the same barriers to asthma management, concerted and multifaceted public health and research efforts are needed, including approaches to curtail tobacco use, campaigns to improve asthma treatment, broadening access to care and clinical trials of non-pharmacologic interventions (e.g. replacing biomass fuels with gas or electric stoves). PMID:26103996

  20. Roger S. Mitchell lecture. Uses of expression microarrays in studies of pulmonary fibrosis, asthma, acute lung injury, and emphysema.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Dean

    2002-03-01

    Expression microarrays are a powerful tool that could provide new information about the molecular pathways regulating common lung diseases. To exemplify how this tool can be useful, selected examples of informative experiments are reviewed. In studies relevant to asthma, the cytokine interleukin-13 has been shown to produce many of the phenotypic features of this disease, but the cellular targets in the airways and the molecular pathways activated are largely unknown. We have used microarrays to begin to dissect the different transcriptional responses of primary lung cells to this cytokine. In experiments designed to identify global transcriptional programs responsible for regulating lung inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis, we performed microarray experiments on lung tissue from wild-type mice and mice lacking a member of the integrin family know to be involved in activation of latent transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. In addition to identifying distinct cluster of genes involved in each of these processes, these studies led to the identification of novel pathways by which TGF-beta can regulate acute lung injury and emphysema. Together, these examples demonstrate how careful application and thorough analysis of expression microarrays can facilitate the discovery of novel molecular targets for intervening in common lung diseases.

  1. Childhood asthma: considerations for primary care practice and chronic disease management in the village of care.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Michael P

    2012-06-01

    Childhood asthma is at historically high levels, with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite more than two decades of improved understanding of childhood asthma care and the evolution of beneficial medications, widespread control remains poor, leading to suboptimal patient outcomes and quality of life. This lack of control results in excessive emergency department use, hospitalizations, and inappropriate and/or unnecessary costs to the health care system. Advanced practice models that incorporate community-based approaches and services for childhood asthma are needed. Innovative, community-included methods of care to address the burden of childhood asthma may provide examples for care of other chronic diseases.

  2. Endovascular Management of Acute Bleeding Arterioenteric Fistulas

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, Henrik Mellander, Stefan; Snygg, Johan; Loenn, Lars

    2008-05-15

    The objective of this study was to review the outcome of endovascular transcatheter repair of emergent arterioenteric fistulas. Cases of abdominal arterioenteric fistulas (defined as a fistula between a major artery and the small intestine or colon, thus not the esophagus or stomach), diagnosed over the 3-year period between December 2002 and December 2005 at our institution, were retrospectively reviewed. Five patients with severe enteric bleeding underwent angiography and endovascular repair. Four presented primary arterioenteric fistulas, and one presented a secondary aortoenteric fistula. All had massive persistent bleeding with hypotension despite volume substitution and transfusion by the time of endovascular management. Outcome after treatment of these patients was investigated for major procedure-related complications, recurrence, reintervention, morbidity, and mortality. Mean follow-up time was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). All massive bleeding was controlled by occlusive balloon catheters. Four fistulas were successfully sealed with stent-grafts, resulting in a technical success rate of 80%. One patient was circulatory stabilized by endovascular management but needed immediate further open surgery. There were no procedure-related major complications. Mean hospital stay after the initial endovascular intervention was 19 days. Rebleeding occurred in four patients (80%) after a free interval of 2 weeks or longer. During the follow-up period three patients needed reintervention. The in-hospital mortality was 20% and the 30-day mortality was 40%. The midterm outcome was poor, due to comorbidities or rebleeding, with a mortality of 80% within 6 months. In conclusion, endovascular repair is an efficient and safe method to stabilize patients with life-threatening bleeding arterioenteric fistulas in the emergent episode. However, in this group of patients with severe comorbidities, the risk of rebleeding is high and further intervention must be considered

  3. Current concepts in acute pain management.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Mai-Phuong; Yagiela, John A

    2003-05-01

    Analgesics most commonly prescribed in dentistry for acute pain relief include the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, acetaminophen, and various opioid-containing analgesic combinations. The NSAIDs and presumably acetaminophen act by inhibiting cyclooxgenase enzymes responsible for the formation of prostaglandins that promote pain and inflammation. Opioids such as codeine, hydrocodone, and oxycodone stimulate endogenous opioid receptors to bring about analgesic and other effects. Numerous clinical studies have confirmed that moderate to severe pain of dental origin is best managed through the use of ibuprofen or another NSAID whose maximum analgesic effect is at least equal to that of standard doses of acetaminophen-opioid combinations. If an NSAID cannot be prescribed because of patient intolerance, analgesic preparations that combine effective doses of an orally active opioid with 600 to 1,000 mg of acetaminophen are preferred in the healthy adult. On occasion, prescribing both an NSAID and an acetaminophen-opioid combination may be helpful in patients not responding to a single product. In all cases, however, the primary analgesic should be taken on a fixed schedule, not on a "prn" (or as needed) basis, which only guarantees the patient will experience pain.

  4. Hospital Management of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Ashraf S

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the leading causes of hospitalizations for elderly adults in the United States. One in 5 Americans will be >65 years of age by 2050. Because of the high prevalence of HF in this group, the number of Americans requiring hospitalization for this disorder is expected to rise significantly. We reviewed the most recent and ongoing studies and recommendations for the management of patients hospitalized due to decompensated HF. The Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry, together with the 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association heart failure guidelines, earlier retrospective and prospective studies including the Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation (DOSE), the Trial of Intensified vs Standard Medical Therapy in the Elderly Patients With Congestive Heart Failure (TIME-CHF), the Organized Program to Initiate Lifesaving Treatment in Hospitalized Patients with Heart Failure (OPTIMIZE-HF), the Rapid Emergency Department Heart Failure Outpatient Trial (REDHOT) and the Comparison of Medical, Pacing and Defibrillation Therapies in Heart Failure (COMPANION) trial were reviewed for current practices pertaining to these patients. Gaps in our knowledge of optimal use of patient-specific information (biomarkers and comorbid conditions) still exist.

  5. Management of acute variceal bleeding: emphasis on endoscopic therapy.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Andrés

    2010-05-01

    Acute variceal bleeding is one of the most serious and feared complications of patients with portal hypertension. The most common cause of portal hypertension is advanced liver disease. Patients with esophageal and gastric varices may bleed because of a progressive increase in portal pressure that causes them to grow and finally rupture. This article will review the current management strategies for acute variceal bleeding with emphasis on endoscopic therapy for the acute episode.

  6. Update: Acute Heart Failure (VII): Nonpharmacological Management of Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Plácido, Rui; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2015-09-01

    Acute heart failure is a major and growing public health problem worldwide with high morbidity, mortality, and cost. Despite recent advances in pharmacological management, the prognosis of patients with acute decompensated heart failure remains poor. Consequently, nonpharmacological approaches are being developed and increasingly used. Such techniques may include several modalities of ventilation, ultrafiltration, mechanical circulatory support, myocardial revascularization, and surgical treatment, among others. This document reviews the nonpharmacological approach in acute heart failure, indications, and prognostic implications.

  7. Evaluation of efficiency practical issues in the management of childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Niksić, Dragana; Saracević, Ediba; Cemerlić-Kulić, Aida; Kurspahić-Mujcić, Amira; Bajraktarević, Selena; Niksić, Haris

    2005-11-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic illness in children and adolescents. The pediatric "Asthma School" has been established to improve the health and quality of life of children with asthma through education and support. The purpose of work is evaluation of efficiency education adolescents, children and parents in prevention, adequate use medications and control of asthma. It was operational investigation. The study was enrolled 70 participants from 7 cities in FBiH, which were attended "Asthma School". Evaluations of efficiency of education program have been done through questionnaires using 5-point scale. Observing variables were: attitude about quality of education and level of knowledge about asthma at the end of the educational round. "Asthma School" attended 62 parents and 8 adolescents. The age of children was 6-14 years. The most of participants were with middle school education (64.3%). Successfulness of seminar was score with highest point of scale by 79%. Access to health information was important for patients in adequate treating illness (80.6%) and in prevention of asthma (15%). There was a significant improvement for 38,4% in the basic knowledge of asthma among participants, from 2.7 before to 3.8 after education. Among 20 children that have learned proper technique breathing there was not register worsening symptoms of asthma by 83.4%. There was a significant improvement in the condition of patient, following by greater value PEF (72.3% participants). The results implicate necessity of continuity such action in order to make life of young asthma patient.

  8. Hospital admissions for asthma and acute bronchitis in El Paso, Texas: Do age, sex, and insurance status modify the effects of dust and low wind events?

    PubMed Central

    Staniswalis, Joan G.; Bulathsinhala, Priyangi; Peng, Yanlei; Gill, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Background El Paso County (Texas) is prone to still air inversions and is one of the dust “hot spots” in North America. In this context, we examined the sub-lethal effects of airborne dust and low wind events on human respiratory health (i.e., asthma and acute bronchitis) between 2000 and 2003, when 110 dust and 157 low wind events occurred. Because environmental conditions may not affect everyone the same, we explored the effects of dust and low wind within three age groups (children, adults, and the elderly), testing for effect modifications by sex and insurance status, while controlling for weather and air pollutants. Methods We used a case-crossover design using events matched with referent days on the same day-of-the-week, month, and year with conditional logistic regression to estimate the probability of hospital admission, while controlling for apparent temperature (lag 1), nitrogen dioxide, and particulate matter of 2.5 micrometers or less. Results Children (aged 1–17) were 1.19 (95% confidence interval: 1.00–1.41) times more likely to be hospitalized for asthma three days after a low wind event, and 1.33 (95% CI: 1.01–1.75) times more likely to be hospitalized for acute bronchitis one day after a dust event than on a clear day. Girls were more sensitive to acute bronchitis hospitalizations after dust events (1.83, 95% CI: 1.09–3.08) than boys, but less sensitive than boys to acute bronchitis hospitalizations after low wind events (0.68, 95% CI: 0.46–1.00). We found general trends with regard to dust and low wind events being associated with increased odds of hospitalization for asthma and bronchitis amongst all ages and adults (aged 18–64). Adults covered by Medicaid and adults without health insurance had higher risks of hospitalization for asthma and acute bronchitis after both low wind and dust event Conclusions Results suggest that there were respiratory health effects associated with dust and low wind events in El Paso, with stronger

  9. Asthma is Different in Women

    PubMed Central

    Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in asthma incidence, prevalence and severity have been reported worldwide. After puberty, asthma becomes more prevalent and severe in women, and is highest in women with early menarche or with multiple gestations, suggesting a role for sex hormones in asthma genesis. However, the impact of sex hormones on the pathophysiology of asthma is confounded by and difficult to differentiate from age, obesity, atopy, and other gender associated environmental exposures. There are also gender discrepancies in the perception of asthma symptoms. Understanding gender differences in asthma is important to provide effective education and personalized management plans for asthmatics across the lifecourse. PMID:26141573

  10. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium.

  11. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    López, Mario; Martín, Margarita

    2011-07-13

    The acute radiation syndrome (ARS) occurs after whole-body or significant partial-body irradiation (typically at a dose of >1 Gy). ARS can involve the hematopoietic, cutaneous, gastrointestinal and the neurovascular organ systems either individually or in combination. There is a correlation between the severity of clinical signs and symptoms of ARS and radiation dose. Radiation induced multi-organ failure (MOF) describes the progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems over time. Radiation combined injury (RCI) is defined as radiation injury combined with blunt or penetrating trauma, burns, blast, or infection. The classic syndromes are: hematopoietic (doses >2-3 Gy), gastrointestinal (doses 5-12 Gy) and cerebrovascular syndrome (doses 10-20 Gy). There is no possibility to survive after doses >10-12 Gy. The Phases of ARS are-prodromal: 0-2 days from exposure, latent: 2-20 days, and manifest illness: 21-60 days from exposure. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a dose of 5 μg/kg body weight per day subcutaneously has been recommended as treatment of neutropenia, and antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents for prevention or treatment of infections. If taken within the first hours of contamination, stable iodine in the form of nonradioactive potassium iodide (KI) saturates iodine binding sites within the thyroid and inhibits incorporation of radioiodines into the gland. Finally, if severe aplasia persists under cytokines for more than 14 days, the possibility of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation should be evaluated. This review will focus on the clinical aspects of the ARS, using the European triage system (METREPOL) to evaluate the severity of radiation injury, and scoring groups of patients for the general and specific management of the syndrome.

  12. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    López, Mario; Martín, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome (ARS) occurs after whole-body or significant partial-body irradiation (typically at a dose of >1 Gy). ARS can involve the hematopoietic, cutaneous, gastrointestinal and the neurovascular organ systems either individually or in combination. There is a correlation between the severity of clinical signs and symptoms of ARS and radiation dose. Radiation induced multi-organ failure (MOF) describes the progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems over time. Radiation combined injury (RCI) is defined as radiation injury combined with blunt or penetrating trauma, burns, blast, or infection. The classic syndromes are: hematopoietic (doses >2–3 Gy), gastrointestinal (doses 5–12 Gy) and cerebrovascular syndrome (doses 10–20 Gy). There is no possibility to survive after doses >10–12 Gy. The Phases of ARS are—prodromal: 0–2 days from exposure, latent: 2–20 days, and manifest illness: 21–60 days from exposure. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a dose of 5 μg/kg body weight per day subcutaneously has been recommended as treatment of neutropenia, and antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents for prevention or treatment of infections. If taken within the first hours of contamination, stable iodine in the form of nonradioactive potassium iodide (KI) saturates iodine binding sites within the thyroid and inhibits incorporation of radioiodines into the gland. Finally, if severe aplasia persists under cytokines for more than 14 days, the possibility of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation should be evaluated. This review will focus on the clinical aspects of the ARS, using the European triage system (METREPOL) to evaluate the severity of radiation injury, and scoring groups of patients for the general and specific management of the syndrome. PMID:24376971

  13. Management of the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Steven A; Bidani, Akhil

    2002-05-01

    Significant advances have occurred in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of ARDS. It is now recognized that ARDS is a manifestation of a diffuse process that results from a complicated cascade of events following an initial insult or injury. Mechanical ventilation and PEEP are still important components of supportive therapy. To avoid ventilator-associated lung injury there is emphasis on targeting ventilator management based on measurement of pulmonary mechanics. For those with resistant hypoxia and severe pulmonary hypertension adjunctive modalities, such as prone positioning and low-dose iNO, may provide important benefit. Alternative modes of supporting gas exchange, such as with partial liquid ventilation and extracorporeal gas-exchange, may serve as rescue therapies. Advances in cell and molecular biology have contributed to a better understanding of the role of inflammatory cells and mediators that contribute to the acute lung injury and the pathophysiology of the syndrome that manifests as ARDS. Based on this new understanding, the potential targets for intervention to ameliorate the systemic inflammatory response have proliferated. Examples include the cytokine network and its receptors, antioxidants, and endothelins. Apart from the challenge of testing these agents in experimental models, it seems likely that determination of the optimum combination of agents will become an equally important endeavor. A particular challenge is to develop better methods of predicting which of the many at-risk patients will go on to full-blown ARDS and MODS, thereby targeting subgroups of patients most likely to benefit from anti-inflammatory therapies. Similarly, the adverse effects of immunosuppressive therapy may be diminished by improved, perhaps molecular, techniques to detect microbial pathogens and permit differentiation between Systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis.

  14. Advances in asthma and COPD management: delivering CFC-free inhaled therapy using Modulite technology.

    PubMed

    Acerbi, D; Brambilla, G; Kottakis, I

    2007-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and long-acting beta-agonists (LABA) are currently used in the management of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Localized targeted delivery of these drugs into the lungs is achieved by means of two types of inhalation devices; pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs) and dry powder-inhalers (DPIs). For environmental reasons, the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) propellants used in pMDIs are now being replaced by ozone friendly hydrofluoroalkanes (HFAs). These new generation HFA-based pMDIs, developed to provide effective lung deposition of the active moiety, have a favorable safety and tolerability profile. However, HFA-based re-formulation of LABAs and ICS for pMDIs presents particular technical difficulties, especially in terms of ensuring dose content uniformity. This review focuses on the technology and clinical efficacy of the HFA solution pMDIs using Modulite platform technology (Chiesi Farmaceutici S.p.A). Modulite technology allows the development of HFA solution formulations that can mimic the established CFC-based drug formulations on a microgram to microgram basis and provides formulations with novel particle size distributions that improve on existing delivery systems; by manipulation of aerosol clouds and particle size, the delivery of HFA-formulated drugs can be optimized to either achieve fine particle fractions and deposition patterns similar to established CFC-based drug formulations, thus facilitating the transition to new environment-friendly pMDIs in the clinical setting, or achieve finer drug particles able to penetrate deeper into the bronchi for targeted drug delivery as medical need may dictate. Long-term, multiple-dose clinical studies of Modulite formulations of beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP), budesonide and formoterol have been demonstrated to be therapeutically equivalent to their respective previously established CFC or DPI formulations. As a result, a number of Modulite pMDIs have either

  15. Psychological aspects of asthma.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, Paul; Feldman, Jonathan; Giardino, Nicholas; Song, Hye-Sue; Schmaling, Karen

    2002-06-01

    Asthma can be affected by stress, anxiety, sadness, and suggestion, as well as by environmental irritants or allergens, exercise, and infection. It also is associated with an elevated prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders. Asthma and these psychological states and traits may mutually potentiate each other through direct psychophysiological mediation, nonadherence to medical regimen, exposure to asthma triggers, and inaccuracy of asthma symptom perception. Defensiveness is associated with inaccurate perception of airway resistance and stress-related bronchoconstriction. Asthma education programs that teach about the nature of the disease, medications, and trigger avoidance tend to reduce asthma morbidity. Other promising psychological interventions as adjuncts to medical treatment include training in symptom perception, stress management, hypnosis, yoga, and several biofeedback procedures.

  16. Management of Vertebral Stenosis Complicated by Presence of Acute Thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Canyigit, Murat; Arat, Anil Cil, Barbaros E.; Sahin, Gurdal; Turkbey, Baris; Elibol, Bulent

    2007-04-15

    A 44-year-old male presented with multiple punctate acute infarcts of the vertebrobasilar circulation and a computed tomographic angiogram showing stenosis of the right vertebral origin. A digital subtraction angiogram demonstrated a new intraluminal filling defect at the origin of the stenotic vertebral artery where antegrade flow was maintained. This filling defect was accepted to be an acute thrombus of the vertebral origin, most likely due to rupture of a vulnerable plaque. The patient was treated with intravenous heparin. A control angiogram revealed dissolution of the acute thrombus under anticoagulation and the patient was treated with stenting with distal protection. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated no additional acute ischemic lesions. We were unable to find a similar report in the English literature documenting successful management of an acute vertebral ostial thrombus with anticoagulation. Anticoagulation might be considered prior to endovascular treatment of symptomatic vertebral stenoses complicated by the presence of acute thrombus.

  17. Asthma in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Andrew; Douglass, Jo A

    2012-04-01

    As the population increases in age, the diseases of older age will have increasing prevalence and place a greater burden on the health system. Despite asthma being usually considered a disease of younger people, asthma mortality is currently greatest in the over 55 age-group. Symptoms and emergency presentations for health care due to asthma place a great burden on the quality of life of those over age 55 with asthma. Asthma in older people is under-diagnosed due to patient and physiological factors. Medication strategies for asthma have been dominantly derived from younger cohorts so that effective medication strategies have usually not been explored in older people. Older people with asthma are very concerned regarding side effects of medication so that adherence to therapeutic regimes is often poor. In addition physical disability can lead to difficulty in accessing treatment and using inhaler devices. Practical strategies to improve asthma outcomes in older people have been studied infrequently and the goals of self-management suitable for younger age-groups may not be applicable in this group. Consequently, asthma in older people is deserving of further attention both to basic mechanisms of disease, precision in diagnosis and effective therapeutic strategies, including those that involve self-management and device use.

  18. Occupational Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... working with laboratory animals or with powdered natural rubber latex gloves have developed occupational asthma. Occupational asthma ... spray painting, insulation installation and in manufacturing plastics, rubber and foam. These chemicals can cause occupational asthma ...

  19. Pediatrician qualifications and asthma management behaviors and their association with patient race/ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    Okelo, Sande O.; Riekert, Kristin A.; Eakin, Michelle N.; Bilderback, Andrew L.; Diette, Gregory B.; Rand, Cynthia S.; Yenokyan, Gayane

    2016-01-01

    Objective We sought to understand if pediatrician characteristics and asthma assessment and treatment varied in association with the proportion of African-American and Latino children in the pediatrician’s practice. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 500 American Academy of Pediatrics members between November 2005 and May 2006. Standardized vignettes were used to test how different indicators of a patient’s asthma status affect pediatrician asthma assessments and recommendations. Linear and logistic regression models were used to examine the association of pediatrician assessments and treatment recommendations for these vignettes, respectively, with the proportion of reported African-American and Latino children seen in their practice. Results There were 270 respondents (response rate = 54%). Based on pediatrician-reported percentage of minority patients, there were no differences in board certification status, recognition of poorly controlled asthma nor in the likelihood of appropriately increasing long-term controller medications to treat poorly controlled asthma (p > 0.05 for all analyses). Conclusions Caring primarily for minority children by AAP pediatricians appears unrelated to training qualifications or in their reported knowledge of how to appropriately assess and treat asthma. Therefore, studies of asthma care disparities should focus on understanding the knowledge-base of non-AAP pediatric providers who care for minority populations and exploring other potential contributory provider-level factors (e.g. communication skills). PMID:24256071

  20. Manifesto on small airway involvement and management in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an Interasma (Global Asthma Association - GAA) and World Allergy Organization (WAO) document endorsed by Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) and Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA(2)LEN).

    PubMed

    Braido, F; Scichilone, N; Lavorini, F; Usmani, O S; Dubuske, L; Boulet, L P; Mosges, R; Nunes, C; Sanchez-Borges, M; Ansotegui, I J; Ebisawa, M; Levi-Schaffer, F; Rosenwasser, L J; Bousquet, J; Zuberbier, T; Canonica, G Walter; Cruz, A; Yanez, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Deleanu, D; Rodrigo, G; Berstein, J; Ohta, K; Vichyanond, P; Pawankar, R; Gonzalez-Diaz, S N; Nakajima, S; Slavyanskaya, T; Fink-Wagner, A; Loyola, C Baez; Ryan, D; Passalacqua, G; Celedon, J; Ivancevich, J C; Dobashi, K; Zernotti, M; Akdis, M; Benjaponpitak, S; Bonini, S; Burks, W; Caraballo, L; El-Sayed, Z Awad; Fineman, S; Greenberger, P; Hossny, E; Ortega-Martell, J A; Saito, H; Tang, M; Zhang, L

    2016-01-01

    Evidence that enables us to identify, assess, and access the small airways in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has led INTERASMA (Global Asthma Association) and WAO to take a position on the role of the small airways in these diseases. Starting from an extensive literature review, both organizations developed, discussed, and approved the manifesto, which was subsequently approved and endorsed by the chairs of ARIA and GA(2)LEN. The manifesto describes the evidence gathered to date and defines and proposes issues on small airway involvement and management in asthma and COPD with the aim of challenging assumptions, fostering commitment, and bringing about change. The small airways (defined as those with an internal diameter <2 mm) are involved in the pathogenesis of asthma and COPD and are the major determinant of airflow obstruction in these diseases. Various tests are available for the assessment of the small airways, and their results must be integrated to confirm a diagnosis of small airway dysfunction. In asthma and COPD, the small airways play a key role in attempts to achieve disease control and better outcomes. Small-particle inhaled formulations (defined as those that, owing to their size [usually <2 μm], ensure more extensive deposition in the lung periphery than large molecules) have proved beneficial in patients with asthma and COPD, especially those in whom small airway involvement is predominant. Functional and biological tools capable of accurately assessing the lung periphery and more intensive use of currently available tools are necessary. In patients with suspected COPD or asthma, small airway involvement must be assessed using currently available tools. In patients with subotpimal disease control and/or functional or biological signs of disease activity, the role of small airway involvement should be assessed and treatment tailored. Therefore, the choice between large- and small-particle inhaled formulations must reflect

  1. Development of oral dispersible tablets containing prednisolone nanoparticles for the management of pediatric asthma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Dan; Liang, Zhong-Yuan; Cen, Yan-Yan; Zhang, He; Han, Mei-Gui; Tian, Yun-Qiao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Shu-Jun; Yang, Da-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop oral dispersible tablets containing prednisolone (PDS)-loaded chitosan nanoparticles using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC 101), lactose, and croscarmellose sodium (CCS). The PDS-loaded chitosan nanoparticles were formulated by ionotropic external gelation technique in order to enhance the solubility of PDS in salivary pH. Prepared nanoparticles were used for the development of oral fast disintegrating tablets by direct compression method. The prepared tablets were evaluated for disintegration time (DT), in vitro drug release (DR), thickness, weight variation, drug content uniformity, friability, and hardness. The effect of concentrations of the dependent variables (MCC, lactose, CCS) on DT and in vitro DR was studied. Fast disintegrating tablets of PDS can be prepared by using MCC, CCS, and lactose with enhanced solubility of PDS. The minimum DT was found to be 15 seconds, and the maximum DR within 30 minutes was 98.50%. All independent variables selected for the study were statistically significant. Oral fast disintegrating tablets containing PDS nanoparticles could be the better choice for the pediatric patients that would result in better patient compliance. From this study, it can be concluded that fast disintegrating tablets could be a potential drug delivery technology for the management of asthma in pediatrics.

  2. Development of oral dispersible tablets containing prednisolone nanoparticles for the management of pediatric asthma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Dan; Liang, Zhong-Yuan; Cen, Yan-Yan; Zhang, He; Han, Mei-Gui; Tian, Yun-Qiao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Shu-Jun; Yang, Da-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop oral dispersible tablets containing prednisolone (PDS)-loaded chitosan nanoparticles using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC 101), lactose, and croscarmellose sodium (CCS). The PDS-loaded chitosan nanoparticles were formulated by ionotropic external gelation technique in order to enhance the solubility of PDS in salivary pH. Prepared nanoparticles were used for the development of oral fast disintegrating tablets by direct compression method. The prepared tablets were evaluated for disintegration time (DT), in vitro drug release (DR), thickness, weight variation, drug content uniformity, friability, and hardness. The effect of concentrations of the dependent variables (MCC, lactose, CCS) on DT and in vitro DR was studied. Fast disintegrating tablets of PDS can be prepared by using MCC, CCS, and lactose with enhanced solubility of PDS. The minimum DT was found to be 15 seconds, and the maximum DR within 30 minutes was 98.50%. All independent variables selected for the study were statistically significant. Oral fast disintegrating tablets containing PDS nanoparticles could be the better choice for the pediatric patients that would result in better patient compliance. From this study, it can be concluded that fast disintegrating tablets could be a potential drug delivery technology for the management of asthma in pediatrics. PMID:26640367

  3. The Danish National Database for Asthma: establishing clinical quality indicators

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Susanne; Hoffmann-Petersen, Benjamin; Sverrild, Asger; Bräuner, Elvira V.; Lykkegaard, Jesper; Bodtger, Uffe; Agertoft, Lone; Korshøj, Lene; Backer, Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide affecting more than 300 million people. Symptoms are often non-specific and include coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. Asthma may be highly variable within the same individual over time. Although asthma results in death only in extreme cases, the disease is associated with significant morbidity, reduced quality of life, increased absenteeism, and large costs for society. Asthma can be diagnosed based on report of characteristic symptoms and/or the use of several different diagnostic tests. However, there is currently no gold standard for making a diagnosis, and some degree of misclassification and inter-observer variation can be expected. This may lead to local and regional differences in the treatment, monitoring, and follow-up of the patients. The Danish National Database for Asthma (DNDA) is slated to be established with the overall aim of collecting data on all patients treated for asthma in Denmark and systematically monitoring the treatment quality and disease management in both primary and secondary care facilities across the country. The DNDA links information from population-based disease registers in Denmark, including the National Patient Register, the National Prescription Registry, and the National Health Insurance Services register, and potentially includes all asthma patients in Denmark. The following quality indicators have been selected to monitor trends: first, conduction of annual asthma control visits, appropriate pharmacological treatment, measurement of lung function, and asthma challenge testing; second, tools used for diagnosis in new cases; and third, annual assessment of smoking status, height, and weight measurements, and the proportion of patients with acute hospital treatment. The DNDA will be launched in 2016 and will initially include patients treated in secondary care facilities in Denmark. In the nearby future, the database aims to include asthma

  4. Occupational asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Asthma - occupational exposure; Irritant-induced reactive airways disease Images Spirometry Respiratory system References Lemiere C, Vandenplas O. Occupational allergy and asthma. In: Adkinson NF Jr., Bochner ...

  5. Post hoc evaluation of a common-sense intervention for asthma management in community pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Seubert, Liza; Schneider, Carl R; Clifford, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to evaluate a common-sense, behavioural change intervention to implement clinical guidelines for asthma management in the community pharmacy setting. Design The components of the common-sense intervention were described in terms of categories and dimensions using the Intervention Taxonomy (ITAX) and Behaviour Change Techniques (BCTs) using the Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW), Capability, Opportunity and Motivation-Behaviour (COM-B) System and Behaviour Change Techniques Taxonomy (BCTTv1). The retrospective application of these existing tools facilitated evaluation of the mechanism, fidelity, logistics and rationale of the common-sense intervention. Intervention The initial intervention study was conducted in 336 community pharmacies in the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia. Small-group workshops were conducted in 25 pharmacies; 162 received academic detailing and 149 acted as controls. The intervention was designed to improve pharmacy compliance with guidelines for a non-prescription supply of asthma reliever medications. Results Retrospective application of ITAX identified mechanisms for the short-acting β agonists intervention including improving knowledge, behavioural skills, problem-solving skills, motivation and self-efficacy. All the logistical elements were considered in the intervention design but the duration and intensity of the intervention was minimal. The intervention was delivered as intended (as a workshop) to 13.4% of participants indicating compromised fidelity and significant adaptation. Retrospective application of the BCW, COM-B system and BCTTv1 identified 9 different behaviour change techniques as the rationale for promoting guideline-based practice change. Conclusions There was a sound rationale and clear mechanism for all the components of the intervention but issues related to logistics, adaptability and fidelity might have affected outcomes. Small group workshops could be a useful implementation strategy in

  6. Management of acute upside-down stomach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Upside-down stomach (UDS) is characterized by herniation of the entire stomach or most gastric portions into the posterior mediastinum. Symptoms may vary heavily as they are related to reflux and mechanically impaired gastric emptying. UDS is associated with a risk of incarceration and volvulus development which both might be complicated by acute gastric outlet obstruction, advanced ischemia, gastric bleeding and perforation. Case presentation A 32-year-old male presented with acute intolerant epigastralgia and anterior chest pain associated with acute onset of nausea and vomiting. He reported on a previous surgical intervention due to a hiatal hernia. Chest radiography and computer tomography showed an incarcerated UDS. After immediate esophago-gastroscopy, urgent laparoscopic reduction, repair with a 360° floppy Nissen fundoplication and insertion of a gradually absorbable GORE® BIO-A®-mesh was performed. Conclusion Given the high risk of life-threatening complications of an incarcerated UDS as ischemia, gastric perforation or severe bleeding, emergent surgery is indicated. In stable patients with acute presentation of large paraesophageal hernia or UDS exhibiting acute mechanical gastric outlet obstruction, after esophago-gastroscopy laparoscopic reduction and hernia repair followed by an anti-reflux procedure is suggested. However, in cases of unstable patients open repair is the surgical method of choice. Here, we present an exceptionally challenging case of a young patient with a giant recurrent hiatal hernia becoming clinically manifest in an incarcerated UDS. PMID:24228771

  7. Caerulomycin A inhibits Th2 cell activity: a possible role in the management of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kujur, Weshely; Gurram, Rama Krishna; Haleem, Nazia; Maurya, Sudeep K.; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2015-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Caerulomycin A induces regulatory T cells differentiation by suppressing Th1 cells activity. The role of regulatory T cells is well established in suppressing the function of Th2 cells. Th2 cells are known to inflict the induction of the activation of asthma. Consequently, in the present study, we monitored the influence of Caerulomycin A in inhibiting the activity of Th2 cells and its impact in recuperating asthma symptoms. Interestingly, we observed that Caerulomycin A significantly suppressed the differentiation of Th2 cells, as evidenced by downregulation in the GATA-3 expression. Further, decline in the levels of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 cytokines and IgE was noted in the animals suffering from asthma. Furthermore, we noticed substantial suppression in the inflammatory response and number of eosinophils in the lungs. In essence, this study signifies an important therapeutic role of Caerulomycin A in asthma. PMID:26481184

  8. Cultural perspectives of interventions for managing diabetes and asthma in children and adolescents from ethnic minority groups.

    PubMed

    Mc Manus, V; Savage, E

    2010-09-01

    Both diabetes and asthma are increasingly being recognized as health problems for ethnic groups. Because of cultural differences, ethnicity is reported to be a risk factor for poorer quality in health care, disease management and disease control. Ethnic groups are at risk for poorer quality of life and increased disease complications when compared with non-ethnic counterparts living in the same country. There is little known about how culture is addressed in interventions developed for ethnic groups. The aim of this paper is to systematically review the cultural perspectives of interventions for managing diabetes and asthma in children, adolescents and/or their families from ethnic minority groups. A total of 92 records were identified that were potentially relevant to this review following which, 61 papers were excluded. The full texts of remaining papers (n= 31) were then read independently by both authors, and agreement was reached to exclude a further 27 papers that did not meet inclusion criteria. A total of four papers were eligible for inclusion in this review. Findings indicate that despite growing concerns about health disparities between ethnic and non-ethnic groups in relation to both asthma and diabetes in childhood, there has been little effort to develop cultural specific interventions for ethnic groups. By systematically reviewing asthma and diabetes interventions we have highlighted that few interventions have been developed from a cultural perspective. There are a limited number of interventions published that add knowledge on the specific elements of intervention that is needed to effectively and sensitively educate other cultures. More work is required into identifying which strategies or components of cultural interventions are most effective in achieving positive health outcomes for children, adolescents and/or their families from ethnic groups.

  9. Rationale and design of a comparative effectiveness trial of home- and clinic-based self-management support coaching for older adults with asthma.

    PubMed

    Federman, Alex D; Martynenko, Melissa; O'Conor, Rachel; Kannry, Joseph; Karp, Adam; Lurio, Joseph; Hoy-Rosas, Jamillah; Lopez, Ray; Obiapi, Rosemary; Young, Edwin; Wolf, Michael S; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2015-07-31

    Older adults with asthma face numerous barriers to effective self-management and asthma control, and experience worse outcomes than younger asthmatics. Yet, there have been no controlled trials of interventions specifically designed to improve their care and outcomes. Through a multi-stakeholder collaboration (patients, academia, community-based organizations, a state department of health, and an advocacy organization) we developed a multi-component asthma self-management support intervention to address the myriad psychosocial, functional, health status, and cognitive barriers to effective asthma self-management in adults ages 60 and older. We are recruiting 425 New Yorkers in Manhattan and the Bronx for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial with 3 arms: the intervention delivered in primary care settings or in their home, or usual care. In the intervention, care coaches use a novel screening tool to identify the specific barriers to asthma control and self-management they experience. Once identified, the coach and patient choose from a menu of actions to address it. The intervention emphasizes efficiency, flexibility, shared decision making and goal setting, communication strategies appropriate for individuals with limited cognition and literacy skills, and ongoing reinforcement and support. Additionally, we introduced asthma-specific enhancements to the electronic health records of all participating clinical practices, including an asthma severity assessment, clinical decision support, and a patient-tailored asthma action plan. Patients will be followed for 12months and interviewed at baseline, 3, 6, and 12months and data on emergency department visits and hospitalizations will be obtained through the New York State Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System.

  10. Endovascular management of acute limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Peeters, P; Verbist, J; Keirse, K; Deloose, K; Bosiers, M

    2010-06-01

    Acute limb ischemia (ALI) refers to a rapid worsening of limb perfusion resulting in rest pain, ischemic ulcers or gangrene. With an estimated incidence of 140 million/year, ALI is serious limb-threatening and life-threatening medical emergency demanding prompt action. Three prospective, randomized clinical trials provide data on trombolytic therapy versus surgical intervention in patients with acute lower extremity ischemia. Although they did not give us the final answer, satisfactory results are reported for percutaneous thrombolysis compared with surgery. Moreover, they suggest an important advantage of thrombolysis in acute bypass graft occlusions. Therefore, we believe thrombolytic therapy should be a part of the vascular surgeon's armamentarium to safely and successfully treat ALI patients.

  11. Qualitative study of young people's and parents' beliefs about childhood asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Callery, Peter; Milnes, Linda; Verduyn, Chrissie; Couriel, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asthma continues to be a common childhood chronic illness managed principally in primary care. Self-management requires co-ordinated efforts of young people, carers and health professionals. Non-compliance occurs even when parents are supervising care, suggesting that decisions are made on the basis of beliefs that contrast with professional advice. Health professionals therefore need to understand the views of parents (or other carers) and patients to promote good self-management. Little attention has been given to carers' and young people's perspectives on asthma. AIM: To gain insights into the beliefs of a group of 25 young people aged nine to 16 years old and their carers about asthma and its management. DESIGN OF STUDY: Qualitative study using conversational-style interviews. SETTING: Generally deprived urban areas of Greater Manchester. METHOD: Interviews were conducted with 25 young people with asthma and separately with their carers. The interviews were analysed using the principles and procedures of grounded theory. RESULTS: Carers reported assessing asthma symptoms through observed effects on the child and other family members, including emotions and behaviours that disrupted family life. Young people emphasised the effect of asthma on their everyday lives and in particular the extent to which they appeared different to their peers. Some young people reported continuing symptoms and restrictions of activity that differed widely from the reports of their carers. CONCLUSION: Differences between young people's and carers' criteria for assessment suggest explanations for some 'non-compliant' behaviour. Carers' assessment of asthma severity through the absence of acute attacks is consistent with managing asthma as intermittent acute episodes. Professionals should take account of differences between young people's, carers' and professionals' perceptions of asthma. PMID:14694693

  12. [The management of acute pancreatitis according to the modern guidelines].

    PubMed

    Botoi, G; Andercou, O; Andercou, A; Marian, D; Tamasan, A; Span, M

    2011-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is a critical illness as the organism that produces a significant mortality despite diagnostic and therapeutic acquisitions. While new mechanisms have been identified for production and were crystallized management principles, a number of controversies remain awaiting resolution in the near future. Aim is to establish, based on their experience and literature data, place the current means of diagnosis and treatment in close correlation with the pathophysiological events of acute pancreatitis.

  13. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  14. Managing Acute Complications Of Sickle Cell Disease In Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sathyaseelan; Chao, Jennifer H

    2016-11-01

    Sickle cell disease is a chronic hematologic disease with a variety of acute, and often recurring, complications. Vaso-occlusive crisis, a unique but common presentation in sickle cell disease, can be challenging to manage. Acute chest syndrome is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease, occurring in more than half of patients who are hospitalized with a vaso-occlusive crisis. Uncommon diagnoses in children, such as stroke, priapism, and transient red cell aplasia, occur more frequently in patients with sickle cell disease and necessitate a degree of familiarity with the disease process and its management. Patients with sickle cell trait generally have a benign course, but are also subject to serious complications. This issue provides a current review of evidence-based management of the most common acute complications of sickle cell disease seen in pediatric patients in the emergency department.

  15. Risk Assessment and Community Participation Model for Environmental Asthma Management in an Elementary Public School: A Case Study in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Seguinot-Medina, Samarys; Rivera-Rentas, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Asthma is a rapidly growing chronic disease in the general population of the world, mostly in children. Puerto Ricans have the highest prevalence of children with asthma among the Hispanic community in the US and its territories. Asthma and air quality are becoming a significant and potentially costly public health issue in Puerto Rico. The CDC has reported that in Puerto Rico, 320,350 adults have asthma and this number represents 11.5% of the island adult population. The north east municipality of Carolina, Puerto Rico, has the highest asthma prevalence in the 0 to 17 year old range (2001 data). In this study, we address the potential relationship between anthropogenic and naturally occurring environmental factors, and asthma prevalence in an urban elementary public school in Carolina in an effort to empower and engage communities to work on their environmental health issues. We integrated geographic information systems (GIS) data of anthropogenic activities near the school as well as the natural resources and geomorphology of the region. We found that as Carolina is close by to Caribbean National Forest (El Yunque), this together with the temperature and precipitation cycles in the zone creates the ideal environmental conditions for increased humidity and pollen, mold and fungi development through out the year. We also collected health and socio economic data to generate an asthma profile of the students, employees and parents from the school community, and through a survey we identified perceptions on environmental asthma triggers, and indoor air quality in the school and homes of the students and employees. Finally, we implemented a workshop on indoor air quality designed to engage the school community in managing asthma triggers and the school environment. Our results showed that nearly 30 % of its student’s population has asthma, and from this group 58% are males and 42% are female students. Of all asthmatic children, only 43% receive treatment for the

  16. School-based asthma programs.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, Jean-Marie; Evans, David; Kattan, Meyer

    2009-08-01

    Asthma is prevalent in school-age children and contributes to school absenteeism and limitation of activity. There is a sizable literature on school-based interventions for asthma that attempt to identify children with asthma and improve outcomes. The purpose of this review is to describe and discuss limitations of screening tools and school-based asthma interventions. Identification of children with asthma may be appropriate in schools located in districts with a high prevalence of children experiencing significant morbidity and a high prevalence of undiagnosed asthma, provided there is access to high-quality asthma care. We review strategies for improving access to care, for teaching self-management skills in schools, and for improving school personnel management skills. Although studies indicate that school-based programs have the potential to improve outcomes, competing priorities in the educational system present challenges to their implementation and emphasize the need for practical, targeted, and cost-effective strategies.

  17. Central Role of IL-23 and IL-17 Producing Eosinophils as Immunomodulatory Effector Cells in Acute Pulmonary Aspergillosis and Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Evelyn Santos; Lee, Chrono K.; Specht, Charles A.; Yadav, Bhawna; Huang, Haibin; Akalin, Ali; Huh, Jun R.; Mueller, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus causes invasive pulmonary disease in immunocompromised hosts and allergic asthma in atopic individuals. We studied the contribution of lung eosinophils to these fungal diseases. By in vivo intracellular cytokine staining and confocal microscopy, we observed that eosinophils act as local sources of IL-23 and IL-17. Remarkably, mice lacking eosinophils had a >95% reduction in the percentage of lung IL-23p19+ cells as well as markedly reduced IL-23 heterodimer in lung lavage fluid. Eosinophils killed A. fumigatus conidia in vivo. Eosinopenic mice had higher mortality rates, decreased recruitment of inflammatory monocytes, and decreased expansion of lung macrophages after challenge with conidia. All of these functions underscore a potential protective role for eosinophils in acute aspergillosis. Given the postulated role for IL-17 in asthma pathogenesis, we assessed whether eosinophils could act as sources of IL-23 and IL-17 in models where mice were sensitized to either A. fumigatus antigens or ovalbumin (OVA). We found IL-23p19+ IL-17AF+ eosinophils in both allergic models. Moreover, close to 95% of IL-23p19+ cells and >90% of IL-17AF+ cells were identified as eosinophils. These data establish a new paradigm in acute and allergic aspergillosis whereby eosinophils act not only as effector cells but also as immunomodulatory cells driving the IL-23/IL-17 axis and contributing to inflammatory cell recruitment. PMID:28095479

  18. Evaluation of an Educational Program for Adolescents with Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Jill; Tichacek, Mary J.; Theodorakis, Renee

    2004-01-01

    In addition to challenges of adolescence itself, teens with asthma face demands of asthma management and risks of asthma sequelae, including fatalities. Few asthma educational programs specifically address their needs. In response to school nurse concern, this pilot study evaluated an adolescent asthma education program, the "Power Breathing[TM]…

  19. Can Vitamin D Supplementation in Addition to Asthma Controllers Improve Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Asthma?

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian; Liu, Dan; Liu, Chun-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Effects of vitamin D on acute exacerbation, lung function, and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in patients with asthma are controversial. We aim to further evaluate the roles of vitamin D supplementation in addition to asthma controllers in asthmatics. From 1946 to July 2015, we searched the PubMed, Embase, Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ISI Web of Science using “Vitamin D,” “Vit D,” or “VitD” and “asthma,” and manually reviewed the references listed in the identified articles. Randomized controlled trials which reported rate of asthma exacerbations and adverse events, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1, % of predicted value), FeNO, asthma control test (ACT), and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were eligible. We conducted the heterogeneities test and sensitivity analysis of the enrolled studies, and random-effects or fixed-effects model was applied to calculate risk ratio (RR) and mean difference for dichotomous and continuous data, respectively. Cochrane systematic review software Review Manager (RevMan) was used to test the hypothesis by Mann–Whitney U test, which were displayed in Forest plots. Seven trials with a total of 903 patients with asthma were pooled in our final studies. Except for asthma exacerbations (I2 = 81%, χ2 = 10.28, P = 0.006), we did not find statistical heterogeneity in outcome measures. The pooled RR of asthma exacerbation was 0.66 (95% confidence interval: 0.32–1.37), but without significant difference (z = 1.12, P = 0.26), neither was in FEV1 (z = 0.30, P = 0.77), FeNO (z = 0.28, P = 0.78), or ACT (z = 0.92, P = 0.36), although serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was significantly increased (z = 6.16, P < 0.001). Vitamin D supplementation in addition to asthma controllers cannot decrease asthma exacerbation and FeNO, nor improve lung function and asthma symptoms, although it can be safely applied to increase serum 25

  20. Managing Asthma in the School Environment: Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools. EPA 402-K-10-004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Asthma has reached epidemic proportions in the United States, affecting millions of people of all ages and races. An average of one out of every 10 school-age children now has asthma, and the percentage of children with asthma is rising more rapidly in preschool-age children than in any other age group. Asthma is a leading cause of school…

  1. Validation of the Asthma Illness Representation Scale (AIRS©)

    PubMed Central

    Sidora-Arcoleo, Kimberly; Feldman, Jonathan; Serebrisky, Denise; Spray, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Background Research has suggested a link between parents' illness representations (IRs), use of complementary and alternative medicine, inhaled/oral corticosteroids and leukotriene antagonists, and children's health outcomes. The Asthma Illness Representation Scale (AIRS©) provides a structured assessment of the key components of asthma IRs allowing the healthcare provider (HCP) to quickly identify areas of discordance with the professional model of asthma management. Methods These analyses extend the initial validation of the AIRS© and compares data from the original study conducted among a primarily white and African American sample in Rochester, NY (N = 228) with data obtained from a predominantly inner-city, ethnic minority sample (Puerto Rican, African American, and Afro-Caribbean) from the Bronx, New York (N = 109). Results A larger proportion of the Rochester sample was white and non-poor and had graduated high school. Bronx parents were more likely to perceive their child's asthma to be moderate or severe than the Rochester parents. Bronx children were older and had longer duration of asthma and reported more acute health care visits (past year). Bronx parents reported total AIRS© scores more closely aligned with the lay model than Rochester parents. The AIRS© instrument demonstrated acceptable internal reliability among the Bronx sample (total score α = 0.82) and the AIRS© subscale Cronbach's alpha coefficients were remarkably similar to those obtained from the original validation study (range = 0.54–0.83). Poor parents and those with less than a high school education had lower total AIRS© scores than their counterparts. White parents had AIRS© scores more closely aligned with the professional model compared to each of the ethnic subgroups. A perception of less severe asthma, fewer reports of asthma and somatization symptoms, and a positive HCP relationship were associated with IRs congruent with the professional model. IRs aligned with the

  2. The impact of spirometry on pediatric asthma diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Holt, E W; Tan, J; Hosgood, H D

    2006-09-01

    Research has shown that spirometry is underutilized in the clinical setting. This study profiles the use of spirometry in an asthma management program at an inner-city community health clinic. Eligible subjects included 56 children who presented with an acute asthma exacerbation. Physicians recorded patient diagnosis before and after viewing spirometry. Bivariate and multivariate analysis was used to determine associations between symptoms and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). Physicians changed 30.4% of patients' treatment plans after viewing spirometry results. Wheezing was significantly associated with FEV1 in bivariate analysis; however, multivariate modeling failed to identify significant relationships. The use of spirometry influenced patient diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Anesthetic management of patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Flexman, Alana M; Donovan, Anne L; Gelb, Adrian W

    2012-06-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. Anesthesiologists are likely to encounter patients with stroke and must be aware of the anesthetic considerations for these patients. Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombolysis are effective treatments for acuteischemic stroke as well as evolving endovascular techniques such as mechanical clot retrieval. Recent retrospective studies have found an association between general anesthesia and poor clinical outcome. The results of these studies have several limitations, and current evidence is inadequate to guide the choice of anesthesia in patients with acute stroke. The choice of anesthesia must be based on individual patient factors until further research is completed.

  4. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

  5. Occupational asthma: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, L J; Balmes, J R

    2000-01-01

    Occupational asthma is the most common form of occupational lung disease in the developed world at the present time. In this review, the epidemiology, pathogenesis/mechanisms, clinical presentations, management, and prevention of occupational asthma are discussed. The population attributable risk of asthma due to occupational exposures is considerable. Current understanding of the mechanisms by which many agents cause occupational asthma is limited, especially for low-molecular-weight sensitizers and irritants. The diagnosis of occupational asthma is generally established on the basis of a suggestive history of a temporal association between exposure and the onset of symptoms and objective evidence that these symptoms are related to airflow limitation. Early diagnosis, elimination of exposure to the responsible agent, and early use of inhaled steroids may play important roles in the prevention of long-term persistence of asthma. Persistent occupational asthma is often associated with substantial disability and consequent impacts on income and quality of life. Prevention of new cases is the best approach to reducing the burden of asthma attributable to occupational exposures. Future research needs are identified. PMID:10931788

  6. An update of clinical management of acute intermittent porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Pischik, Elena; Kauppinen, Raili

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is due to a deficiency of the third enzyme, the hydroxymethylbilane synthase, in heme biosynthesis. It manifests with occasional neuropsychiatric crises associated with overproduction of porphyrin precursors, aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The clinical criteria of an acute attack include the paroxysmal nature and various combinations of symptoms, such as abdominal pain, autonomic dysfunction, hyponatremia, muscle weakness, or mental symptoms, in the absence of other obvious causes. Intensive abdominal pain without peritoneal signs, acute peripheral neuropathy, and encephalopathy usually with seizures or psychosis are the key symptoms indicating possible acute porphyria. More than fivefold elevation of urinary porphobilinogen excretion together with typical symptoms of an acute attack is sufficient to start a treatment. Currently, the prognosis of the patients with AIP is good, but physicians should be aware of a potentially fatal outcome of the disease. Mutation screening and identification of type of acute porphyria can be done at the quiescent phase of the disease. The management of patients with AIP include following strategies: A, during an acute attack: 1) treatment with heme preparations, if an acute attack is severe or moderate; 2) symptomatic treatment of autonomic dysfunctions, polyneuropathy and encephalopathy; 3) exclusion of precipitating factors; and 4) adequate nutrition and fluid therapy. B, during remission: 1) exclusion of precipitating factors (education of patients and family doctors), 2) information about on-line drug lists, and 3) mutation screening for family members and education about precipitating factors in mutation-positive family members. C, management of patients with recurrent attacks: 1) evaluation of the lifestyle, 2) evaluation of hormonal therapy in women, 3) prophylactic heme therapy, and 4) liver transplantation in patients with severe recurrent attacks. D, follow-up of the AIP

  7. An update of clinical management of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Pischik, Elena; Kauppinen, Raili

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is due to a deficiency of the third enzyme, the hydroxymethylbilane synthase, in heme biosynthesis. It manifests with occasional neuropsychiatric crises associated with overproduction of porphyrin precursors, aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The clinical criteria of an acute attack include the paroxysmal nature and various combinations of symptoms, such as abdominal pain, autonomic dysfunction, hyponatremia, muscle weakness, or mental symptoms, in the absence of other obvious causes. Intensive abdominal pain without peritoneal signs, acute peripheral neuropathy, and encephalopathy usually with seizures or psychosis are the key symptoms indicating possible acute porphyria. More than fivefold elevation of urinary porphobilinogen excretion together with typical symptoms of an acute attack is sufficient to start a treatment. Currently, the prognosis of the patients with AIP is good, but physicians should be aware of a potentially fatal outcome of the disease. Mutation screening and identification of type of acute porphyria can be done at the quiescent phase of the disease. The management of patients with AIP include following strategies: A, during an acute attack: 1) treatment with heme preparations, if an acute attack is severe or moderate; 2) symptomatic treatment of autonomic dysfunctions, polyneuropathy and encephalopathy; 3) exclusion of precipitating factors; and 4) adequate nutrition and fluid therapy. B, during remission: 1) exclusion of precipitating factors (education of patients and family doctors), 2) information about on-line drug lists, and 3) mutation screening for family members and education about precipitating factors in mutation-positive family members. C, management of patients with recurrent attacks: 1) evaluation of the lifestyle, 2) evaluation of hormonal therapy in women, 3) prophylactic heme therapy, and 4) liver transplantation in patients with severe recurrent attacks. D, follow-up of the AIP

  8. Acute aortic syndromes: pathophysiology and management.

    PubMed

    Alli, Oluseun; Jacobs, Larry; Amanullah, Aman M

    2008-01-01

    The acute aortic syndromes carry significant morbidity and mortality, especially when detected late. Symptoms may mimic myocardial ischemia, and physical findings may be absent or, if present, can be suggestive of a diverse range of other conditions. Maintaining a high clinical index of suspicion is crucial in establishing the diagnosis. All patients with suspected aortic disease and evidence of acute ischemia on electrocardiogram should undergo diagnostic imaging studies before thrombolytics are administered. The demonstration of an intimal flap separating 2 lumina is the basis for diagnosis. Tear detection and localization are very important because any therapeutic intervention aims to occlude the entry tear. The goals of medical therapy are to reduce the force of left ventricular contractions, decrease the steepness of the rise of the aortic pulse wave, and reduce the systemic arterial pressure to as low a level as possible without compromising perfusion of vital organs. Surgical therapy still remains the gold standard of care for type A aortic dissection, whereas in type B dissection, percutaneous aortic stenting and fenestration techniques have been developed and are sometimes used in conjunction with medical therapy in certain situations.

  9. The Acute Pediatric Scrotum: Presentation, Differential Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Vasdev, Nikhil; Chadwick, David; Thomas, David

    2012-01-01

    Both pediatric and adult urologists frequently evaluate pediatric patients with an acute scrotum. We present a detailed review on the acute pediatric scrotum highlighting the clinical presentation, differential diagnosis and management of this common clinical condition. It is important to highlight that a testicular torsion is the most important differential diagnosis and the main priority in each case is to diagnosis and treat a potential testicular torsion is of the essence. The aim of our extensive review is to update/review the appropriate evaluation and management of the acute scrotum and to guide the clinician in distinguishing testicular torsion from the other conditions that commonly mimic this surgical emergency. This review is useful for trainees in UK and Europe who plan to take the FRCS (Urol) examination. PMID:24917714

  10. Management of patients after recovering from acute severe biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dedemadi, Georgia; Nikolopoulos, Manolis; Kalaitzopoulos, Ioannis; Sgourakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, accounting 35%-60% of cases. Around 15%-20% of patients suffer a severe attack with high morbidity and mortality rates. As far as treatment is concerned, the optimum method of late management of patients with severe acute biliary pancreatitis is still contentious and the main question is over the correct timing of every intervention. Patients after recovering from an acute episode of severe biliary pancreatitis can be offered alternative options in their management, including cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy, or no definitive treatment. Delaying cholecystectomy until after resolution of the inflammatory process, usually not earlier than 6 wk after onset of acute pancreatitis, seems to be a safe policy. ERCP and sphincterotomy on index admission prevent recurrent episodes of pancreatitis until cholecystectomy is performed, but if used for definitive treatment, they can be a valuable tool for patients unfit for surgery. Some patients who survive severe biliary pancreatitis may develop pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Management of pseudocysts with minimally invasive techniques, if not therapeutic, can be used as a bridge to definitive operative treatment, which includes delayed cholecystectomy and concurrent pseudocyst drainage in some patients. A management algorithm has been developed for patients surviving severe biliary pancreatitis according to the currently published data in the literature. PMID:27678352

  11. Augmentation of Conventional Medical Management of Moderately Severe or Severe Asthma with Acupuncture and Guided Imagery/Meditation

    PubMed Central

    Mehl-Madrona, Lewis

    2008-01-01

    Objective: I sought to determine if a combination of acupuncture and guided imagery could augment the conventional medical management of moderately severe or severe asthma. Design: This was an early-phase study with a convenience sample of self-selecting patients compared with self—year before, during treatment, and one year after treatment. Setting: Patients were recruited from an outpatient practice. Patients: All participants were adults with moderately severe or severe asthma (class 3 or 4). Interventions: The study employed acupuncture and guided imagery/meditation for a 24-week period. Main Outcome Measures: The main outcome measures were number of days of hospitalization, number of Emergency Department (ED) visits, number of physician visits, days per year taking steroids, puffs per week of inhaled β-agonists, FVC (forced vital capacity), FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in the first second), and FEF25-75 (forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of the FVC). Results: With the addition of acupuncture and guided imagery to conventional medical management, members of the study group experienced improvement. The number of hospitalized days and the number of ED visits not leading to hospitalizations decreased, as did number of medical visits and total days taking oral corticosteroids. Parameters of respiratory function improved despite reduced use of inhaled β-agonists. Conclusion: With acupuncture and guided imagery and meditation together, a self-selecting group of patients with moderately severe or severe asthma experienced improvement in respiratory function, taking less medication than before and having fewer emergencies and hospitalizations at a lower cost of care. PMID:21339915

  12. Managing and Preventing Acute Urinary Retention

    PubMed Central

    Lepor, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    Acute urinary retention (AUR), an uncomfortable and potentially dangerous condition, often occurs in men who have benign prostatic hyperplasia. Although the reported incidence of AUR varies in the literature, there are a number of events that are known to precipitate episodes of AUR, including ingestion of certain agents, infection, general anesthesia, and performance of various diagnostic genitourinary procedures. Because it is preferable to avoid the need for catheterization (and the associated risks) in men at high risk for AUR, certain measures have been studied as means to prevent AUR episodes. Specifically, α-blockers and 5-α-reductase inhibitors have been shown to reduce the incidence of initial and subsequent AUR episodes in certain at-risk men. PMID:16985887

  13. Management of the acute migraine headache.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, Glen; Knutson, Doug; Miser, William F

    2002-12-01

    As many as 30 million Americans have migraine headaches. The impact on patients and their families can be tremendous, and treatment of migraines can present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for family physicians. Abortive treatment options include nonspecific and migraine-specific therapy. Nonspecific therapies include analgesics (aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and opiates), adjunctive therapies (antiemetics and sedatives), and other nonspecific medications (intranasal lidocaine or steroids). Migraine-specific abortive therapies include ergotamine and its derivatives, and triptans. Complementary and alternative therapies can also be used to abort the headache or enhance the efficacy of another therapeutic modality. Treatment choices for acute migraine should be based on headache severity, migraine frequency, associated symptoms, and comorbidities.

  14. Rhinoviruses, Allergic Inflammation, and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gavala, Monica; Bertics, Paul J.; Gern, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Viral infections affect wheezing and asthma in children and adults of all ages. In infancy, wheezing illnesses are usually viral in origin, and children with more severe wheezing episodes are more likely to develop recurrent episodes of asthma and to develop asthma later in childhood. Children who develop allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (allergic sensitization), and those who wheeze with rhinoviruses (HRV) are at especially high risk for asthma. In older children and adults, HRV infections generally cause relatively mild respiratory illnesses and yet contribute to acute and potentially severe exacerbations in patients with asthma. These findings underline the importance of understanding the synergistic nature of allergic sensitization and infections with HRV in infants relative to the onset of asthma and in children and adults with respect to exacerbations of asthma. This review discusses clinical and experimental evidence of virus/allergen interactions and evaluates theories which relate immunologic responses to respiratory viruses and allergens to the pathogenesis and disease activity of asthma. Greater understanding of the relationship between viral respiratory infections, allergic inflammation, and asthma is likely to suggest new strategies for the prevention and treatment of asthma. PMID:21682739

  15. Identification of asthma clusters in two independent Korean adult asthma cohorts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Bum; Jang, An-Soo; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Park, Jong-Sook; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Cho, Sang-Heon; Choi, Byoung Whui; Park, Jung-Won; Nam, Dong-Ho; Yoon, Ho-Joo; Cho, Young-Joo; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook; Park, Choon-Sik

    2013-06-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous airway disease with various clinical phenotypes. It is crucial to clearly identify clinical phenotypes to achieve better asthma management. We used cluster analysis to classify the clinical groups of 724 asthmatic patients from the Cohort for Reality and Evolution of Adult Asthma in Korea (COREA), and in 1843 subjects from another independent Korean asthma cohort of Soonchunhyang University Asthma Genome Research Centre (SCH) (Bucheon, Republic of Korea). Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed by Ward's method, followed by κ-means cluster analysis. Cluster analysis of the COREA cohort indicated four asthma subtypes: 1) smoking asthma; 2) severe obstructive asthma; 3) early-onset atopic asthma; and 4) late-onset mild asthma. An independent cluster analysis of the SCH cohort also indicated four clusters that were similar to the COREA clusters. Our results indicate that adult Korean asthma patients can be classified into four distinct clusters.

  16. Managing patients with acute urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Shanggar; Gillatt, David

    2011-04-01

    Acute urinary retention (AUR) is more than ten times more common in men than women. In men it tends to occur in the elderly; the risk of AUR is higher in men > 70 years. The causes in men can be divided into precipitated or occurring spontaneously. These can be further divided according to the mechanism i.e. obstructive, neurological and myogenic. Spontaneous AUR, caused by progression of BPH leading to a mechanical obstruction of the bladder outlet, is the most common cause of AUR. The typical presentation of AUR is a patient complaining of a sudden inability to urinate associated with progressive abdominal distension which is usually painful. The pain increases in intensity with increasing distension of the bladder. An abdominal examination should reveal a distended bladder which can be confirmed by a dull percussion note. A digital rectal examination is vital to gain information on prostatic enlargement (benign or malignant), faecal load in rectum, anal tone and presence of other masses. Urinalysis and culture should be carried out on a sample obtained after catheterisation to rule out infection. Renal function should be assessed to see if there has been damage to the upper tracts. It is better not to perform a PSA test in this situation as it will invariably be raised due to distension of the bladder and catheter insertion. If catheter insertion fails then a urological consultation is required for insertion of a suprapubic catheter. Admission is essential if the patient is: unwell with urosepsis; has abnormal renal function needing investigation and fluid monitoring; has acute neurological problems; or cannot take care of the catheter. Trial without catheter needs to be planned and the ideal time to do this is within 2-3 days so that the patient can pass urine naturally.

  17. Asthma Education Programme in Russia: Educating Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslennikova, G. Ya.; Morosova, M. E.; Salman, N. V.; Kulikov, S. M.; Oganov, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    U.S. recommendations for asthma management were adapted for use in educating Moscow families with children with asthma (N=252). Use of anti-inflammatory drugs, doctor visits, peak flow rates, and daily peak flow were also measured. One-year follow up showed significant improvement in asthma self-management skills among the education group.…

  18. Acute Chest Pain: Emergency Evaluation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Walker, David M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Since cardiovascular and pulmonary disorders have significant morbidity and mortality, triage of patients who complain of chest pain is paramount. The less sophisticated the triage system, the more important the protocol should be to have these patients evaluated immediately. History and physical are still the most important diagnostic tools; information should be gathered from all available sources. Advanced cardiac life support training is most useful. Eight diagnostic classifications are described, together with the distinctions of onset, duration, location, radiation, precipitating and relieving factors, character and associated symptoms. The protocol for initial management is outlined, emphasizing coincident management wherever possible. Imagesp2005-a PMID:21286539

  19. The role of inspiratory muscle training in the management of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Shei, Ren-Jay; Paris, Hunter L R; Wilhite, Daniel P; Chapman, Robert F; Mickleborough, Timothy D

    2016-11-01

    Asthma is a pathological condition comprising of a variety of symptoms which affect the ability to function in daily life. Due to the high prevalence of asthma and associated healthcare costs, it is important to identify low-cost alternatives to traditional pharmacotherapy. One of these low cost alternatives is the use of inspiratory muscle training (IMT), which is a technique aimed at increasing the strength and endurance of the diaphragm and accessory muscles of respiration. IMT typically consists of taking voluntary inspirations against a resistive load across the entire range of vital capacity while at rest. In healthy individuals, the most notable benefits of IMT are an increase in diaphragm thickness and strength, a decrease in exertional dyspnea, and a decrease in the oxygen cost of breathing. Due to the presence of expiratory flow limitation in asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, dynamic lung hyperinflation is common. As a result of varying operational lung volumes, due in part to hyperinflation, the respiratory muscles may operate far from the optimal portion of the length-tension curve, and thus may be forced to operate against a low pulmonary compliance. Therefore, the ability of these muscles to generate tension is reduced, and for any given level of ventilation, the work of breathing is increased as compared to non-asthmatics. Evidence that IMT is an effective treatment for asthma is inconclusive, due to limited data and a wide variation in study methodologies. However, IMT has been shown to decrease dyspnea, increase inspiratory muscle strength, and improve exercise capacity in asthmatic individuals. In order to develop more concrete recommendations regarding IMT as an effective low-cost adjunct in addition to traditional asthma treatments, we recommend that a standard treatment protocol be developed and tested in a placebo-controlled clinical trial with a large representative sample.

  20. Remote Monitoring of Inhaled Bronchodilator Use and Weekly Feedback about Asthma Management: An Open-Group, Short-Term Pilot Study of the Impact on Asthma Control

    PubMed Central

    Van Sickle, David; Magzamen, Sheryl; Truelove, Shaun; Morrison, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Objective Adequate symptom control is a problem for many people with asthma. We asked whether weekly email reports on monitored use of inhaled, short-acting bronchodilators might improve scores on composite asthma-control measures. Methods Through an investigational electronic medication sensor attached to each participant's inhaler, we monitored 4 months' use of inhaled, short-acting bronchodilators. Participants completed surveys, including the Asthma Control TestTM (ACT), to assess asthma control at entry and monthly thereafter. After the first month, participants received weekly email reports for 3 months. The reports summarized inhaled bronchodilator use during the preceding week and provided suggestions derived from National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) guidelines. Paired t-tests and random-effects mixed models were implemented to assess changes in primary asthma endpoints. Results Thirty individuals participated in the 4-month study; 29 provided complete asthma control information. Mean age was 36.8 years (range: 19–74 years); 52% of respondents were female. Mean ACT scores were 17.6 (Standard Deviation [SD]  = 3.35) at entry and 18.4 (SD = 3.60) at completion of the first month. No significant difference appeared between ACT values at entry and completion of the first month (p = 0.66); however, after participants began receiving email reports and online information about their inhaler use, mean ACT scores increased 1.40 points (95% CI: 0.61, 2.18) for each subsequent study month. Significant decreases occurred in 2-week histories of daytime symptoms (β = −1.35, 95% CI: −2.65, −0.04) and nighttime symptoms (β = −0.84, 95% CI: −1.25, −0.44); no significant change in activity limitation (β = −0.21, 95% CI: −0.69, 0.26) was observed. Participants reported increased awareness and understanding of asthma patterns, level of control, bronchodilator use (timing, location) and triggers, and improved

  1. Conservative management of acute scrotal edema.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Karen D

    2014-01-01

    Scrotal edema is a prevalent issue. It is difficult to treat and has a myriad of causes. Historical treatments for scrotal edema have lacked efficacy. If treated before fibrosis occurs, surgery can be avoided. A method for conservative management is outlined.

  2. Acute pain management in symptomatic cholelithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Masudi, Tahir; Capitelli-McMahon, Helen; Anwar, Suhail

    2016-01-01

    AIM To review the evidence for the use of different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the treatment of biliary colic. METHODS The strategies employed included an extensive literature review for articles and studies related to biliary colic from electronic databases including PubMed, Science Direct, Wiley Inter Science, Medline and Cochrane from last 15 years. Keywords: “Biliary colic”, “management of biliary colic”, “non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs”, “cholelithiasis” and “biliary colic management”. Six randomized control trials, 1 non-randomized trial and 1 meta-analysis were included in this review. The outcomes of these studies and their significance have been reviewed in this paper. RESULTS Current evidence suggests there are no set protocols for biliary colic pain management. NSAIDs are potent in the management of biliary colic, not only in terms of symptom control but in disease progression as well. Apart from the studies on diclofenac and ketorolac, there are studies which have shown that intravenous tenoxicam and injectable flurbiprofen are equally effective in managing biliary colic. The efficacy of NSAIDs is superior in terms of lower number of doses and longer duration of action in comparison to other analgesic agents. CONCLUSION This literature review has found that NSAIDs are safe and effective for pain control in biliary colic, and reduce the likelihood of further complications. PMID:27830044

  3. Acute kidney injury and ESRD management in austere environments.

    PubMed

    Raman, Gaurav; Perkins, Robert M; Jaar, Bernard G

    2012-05-01

    Current knowledge about managing acute kidney injury in disaster situations stems mostly from lessons learned while taking care of crush syndrome patients during major earthquakes. More recently, there has been a greater focus on emergency preparedness for ESRD management. Natural or man-made disasters create an "austere environment," wherein resources to administer standard of care are limited. Advance planning and timely coordinated intervention during disasters are paramount to administer effective therapies and save lives. This article reviews the presentation and management of disaster victims with acute kidney injury and those requiring renal replacement therapies. Major contributions of some key national and international organizations in the field of disaster nephrology are highlighted. The article intends to increase awareness about nephrology care of disaster victims, among nephrology and non-nephrology providers alike.

  4. [Multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma].

    PubMed

    Ltaief, Z; Ben-Hamouda, N; Suys, T; Daniel, R T; Rossetti, A O; Oddo, M

    2014-12-10

    Management of neurocritical care patients is focused on the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury, i.e. the number of pathophysiological intracerebral (edema, ischemia, energy dysfunction, seizures) and systemic (hyperthermia, disorders of glucose homeostasis) events that occur following the initial insult (stroke, hemorrhage, head trauma, brain anoxia) that may aggravate patient outcome. The current therapeutic paradigm is based on multimodal neuromonitoring, including invasive (intracranial pressure, brain oxygen, cerebral microdialysis) and non-invasive (transcranial doppler, near-infrared spectroscopy, EEG) tools that allows targeted individualized management of acute coma in the early phase. The aim of this review is to describe the utility of multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma.

  5. Asthma Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... swimming, biking, etc.). Some develop symptoms only after physical activity, while others have additional asthma triggers. With the proper medicines, most kids with EIA can play sports like other kids. In fact, asthma affects more ...

  6. Asthma Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is working to explore the role of common air pollutants in the development and exacerbation of asthma at different life stages as well as other environmental and genetic factors that might make a person more sensitive to developing asthma.

  7. Analysing the medicine-management interface in acute trusts.

    PubMed

    Ong, B N; Boaden, M; Cropper, S

    1997-01-01

    The impact of the NHS reforms, and the resulting purchaser-provider split, has refocused attention on the relationship between management and medicine in acute hospitals. It is timely to assess the explanatory power of various theoretical models regarding the management-medicine interface. Argues that this interface is currently rather fluid and that a dynamic and adaptive model is best suited to understanding the way in which doctors and managers develop their relationship within the changing policy context. Two examples illustrate these shifting boundaries.

  8. Management of Adult Acute Myelogenous Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, D.; Powles, R. L.; Bateman, C. J. T.; Beard, M. E. J.; Gauci, C. L.; Wrigley, P. F. M.; Malpas, J. S.; Fairley, G. Hamilton; Scott, Ronald Bodley

    1973-01-01

    Consecutive adult patients admitted to St. Bartholomew's Hospital with acute myelogenous leukaemia have been treated with a remission induction drug schedule consisting of daunorubicin and cytosine arabinoside. Intermittent five-day courses were used in 72 patients, and a complete remission was obtained in 39 patients (54%). An alternative drug schedule in 22 patients resulted in fewer remissions but this may have been due to age differences in the two groups. Age and initial platelet count were found to be important factors in determining the success of remission induction therapy; the older patients and those with low platelet counts responded less well. A series of 23 patients who achieved remissions was divided into two groups; one received intermittent combination chemotherapy as the only form of maintenance, and the other was given weekly immunotherapy in addition to the chemotherapy. The immunotherapy consisted of irradiated allogeneic leukaemic cells and B.C.G. Eight of the 10 patients on chemotherapy alone have already relapsed compared with five out of 13 patients in the immunotherapy group. It is hoped that these promising initial results with this form of maintenance will be confirmed as more patients enter the maintenance trials. PMID:4513355

  9. Acute Management for the Injured Hand

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Geoffrey J.

    1985-01-01

    If not optimally treated, a hand injury can lead to disability which often has considerable economic and social implications. The role of the primary care physician is to diagnose the injury correctly and initiate management which will keep this disability to a minimum. This is best achieved by making a composite diagnosis to include all the injured components of the hand. The emphasis must be on early mobilization of the injured area and the maintenance of mobility in all joints of the upper limb. Early referral to physiotherapy and occupational therapy departments is highly desirable. The major pitfall in managing hand injuries is over zealous treatment of the fracture at the expense of the soft tissue injury, resulting in iatrogenic stiffness. PMID:21274226

  10. Internet-based self-management support for adults with asthma: a qualitative study among patients, general practitioners and practice nurses on barriers to implementation

    PubMed Central

    van Gaalen, Johanna L; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti; Bakker, Moira J; Snoeck-Stroband, Jiska B; Sont, Jacob K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to explore barriers among patients, general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses to implement internet-based self-management support as provided by PatientCoach for asthma in primary care. Setting Primary care within South Holland, the Netherlands. Participants Twenty-two patients (12 women, mean age 38 years), 21 GPs (6 women, mean age 52 years) and 13 practice nurses (all women, mean age 41 years). Design A qualitative study using focus groups and interviews. Outcomes Barriers as perceived by patients, GPs and practice nurses to implementation of PatientCoach. Methods 10 focus groups and 12 interviews were held to collect data: 4 patient focus groups, 4 GP focus groups, 2 practice nurse focus group, 2 patient interviews, 5 GP interviews and 5 practice nurse interviews. A prototype of PatientCoach that included modules for coaching, personalised information, asthma self-monitoring, medication treatment plan, feedback, e-consultations and a forum was demonstrated. A semistructured topic guide was used. Directed content analysis was used to analyse data. Reported barriers were classified according to a framework by Grol and Wensing. Results A variety of barriers emerged among all participant groups. Barriers identified among patients include a lack of a patient–professional partnership in using PatientCoach and a lack of perceived benefit in improving asthma symptoms. Barriers identified among GPs include a low sense of urgency towards asthma care and current work routines. Practice nurses identified a low level of structured asthma care and a lack of support by colleagues as barriers. Among all participant groups, insufficient ease of use of PatientCoach, lack of financial arrangements and patient characteristics such as a lack of asthma symptoms were reported as barriers. Conclusions We identified a variety of barriers to implementation of PatientCoach. An effective implementation strategy for internet-based self-management

  11. Relvar Ellipta for asthma.

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    ▼Relvar Ellipta (GSK) is a dry powder inhaler that contains a corticosteroid (fluticasone furoate) and a long-acting beta2 agonist (vilanterol trifenatate). It is licensed for once-daily use as maintenance therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. In a previous article we considered its use in the management of COPD.1 Here we review the evidence for Relvar Ellipta in the treatment of patients with asthma.

  12. Limit Asthma Attacks Caused by Colds or Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma attack. References Bailey W, et al. Trigger control to enhance asthma management. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 19, ... Flu and people with asthma. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ... and Management of Asthma. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. ...

  13. Outpatient treatment of adult asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Kleerup, E C; Tashkin, D P

    1995-01-01

    As a chronic disease with intermittent exacerbations, asthma is treated primarily in the outpatient setting by primary care physicians. Asthma is the result of complex and only partially understood interactions of respiratory, inflammatory, and neural cells and their mediators. The goals of asthma therapy are to prevent and relieve symptoms, allow normal activities of daily living, restore and maintain normal pulmonary function, avoid adverse effects from interventions, and minimize inconvenience and cost. These goals can be achieved through educating patients, assessing and monitoring asthma severity, avoiding or controlling asthma triggers, establishing an intervention plan for routine self-management and the management of exacerbations, and providing regular follow-up care. We present a stepped approach to asthma pharmacotherapy, emphasizing anti-inflammatory therapy--inhaled corticosteroids, cromolyn sodium, or nedocromil sodium--as a summary of recent national and international recommendations. PMID:7667983

  14. Inhaled mometasone furoate for the management of refractory oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We report a case study of a 55-year-old white male with severe persistent refractory corticosteroid-dependent asthma receiving inhaled combination therapy with fluticasone propionate 500 μg and salmeterol 50 μg twice-daily in addition to 6-week cycles of oral corticosteroid treatment for the previous 7 months. The patient was switched to high-dose mometasone furoate delivered via a dry powder inhaler (660 μg twice-daily) for 6 weeks. Considerable improvement from baseline in peak expiratory flow, use of rescue medication, and asthma symptoms of coughing and wheezing was observed. The patient discontinued the oral corticosteroid after 1 week of high-dose mometasone furoate treatment. Plasma cortisol value at 8 a.m. was 8.4 μg/dL (normal range, 4.3-22.6 μg/dL) at week 6. PMID:20181197

  15. Management of Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Durand, Francois; Nadim, Mitra K

    2016-05-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is defined by the occurrence of organ failure(s) other than the liver in patients with cirrhosis. Even though mortality rates are high, there should no longer be reluctance to admit patients with ACLF in the intensive care unit. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria is high and broad spectrum antibiotics should be initiated as soon as infection is suspected. In patients with circulatory failure, the assessment of circulatory status is challenging due to the hyperkinetic state and an imbalance between the splanchnic and systemic blood volume. Acute kidney injury is common in patients with ACLF. Acute tubular necrosis should be differentiated from hepatorenal syndrome, which justifies vasoconstrictive agents. Renal replacement therapy and mechanical ventilation should be decided on clinical grounds. Recent trials on extracorporeal liver support failed to demonstrate a survival benefit. Aggressive management may serve as a bridge to transplantation provided patients are likely to survive after transplantation.

  16. Management of acute stroke in patients taking novel oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Hankey, Graeme J; Norrving, Bo; Hacke, Werner; Steiner, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Each year, 1·0–2·0% of individuals with atrial fibrillation and 0·1–0·2% of those with venous thromboembolism who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban) can be expected to experience an acute ischemic stroke. Additionally, 0·2–0·5% of individuals with atrial fibrillation who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants can be expected to experience an intracranial hemorrhage. This opinion piece addresses the current literature and offers practical approaches to the management of patients receiving novel oral anticoagulants who present with an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Specifically, we discuss the role of thrombolysis in anticoagulated patients with acute ischemic stroke and factors to consider concerning restarting anticoagulation after acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:24891030

  17. Inpatient management of acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Perry, Elizabeth C

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol withdrawal is a common condition encountered in the hospital setting after abrupt discontinuation of alcohol in an alcohol-dependent individual. Patients may present with mild symptoms of tremulousness and agitation or more severe symptoms including withdrawal seizures and delirium tremens. Management revolves around early identification of at-risk individuals and symptom assessment using a validated tool such as the revised Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol score. Benzodiazepines remain the mainstay of treatment and can be administered using a front-loading, fixed-dose, or symptom-triggered approach. Long-acting benzodiazepines such as chlordiazepoxide or diazepam are commonly used and may provide a smoother withdrawal than shorter-acting benzodiazepines, but there are no data to support superiority of one benzodiazepine over another. Elderly patients or those with significant liver disease may have increased accumulation and decreased clearance of the long-acting benzodiazepines, and lorazepam or oxazepam may be preferred in these patients. Patients with symptoms refractory to high doses of benzodiazepines may require addition of a rescue medication such as phenobarbital, propofol or dexmedetomidine. Anticonvulsants (carbamazepine, valproate, gabapentin) may have a role in the management of mild to moderate withdrawal. Other medications such as β-antagonists or neuroleptics may offer additional benefit in select patients but should not be used a monotherapy.

  18. The Effects of Combining Web-Based eHealth With Telephone Nurse Case Management for Pediatric Asthma Control: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Meg; Bhattacharya, Abhik; Pulvermacher, Alice; Shanovich, Kathleen; Phillips, Brenda; Lehman, Erik; Chinchilli, Vernon; Hawkins, Robert; Kim, Jee-Seon

    2012-01-01

    Background Asthma is the most common pediatric illness in the United States, burdening low-income and minority families disproportionately and contributing to high health care costs. Clinic-based asthma education and telephone case management have had mixed results on asthma control, as have eHealth programs and online games. Objectives To test the effects of (1) CHESS+CM, a system for parents and children ages 4–12 years with poorly controlled asthma, on asthma control and medication adherence, and (2) competence, self-efficacy, and social support as mediators. CHESS+CM included a fully automated eHealth component (Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System [CHESS]) plus monthly nurse case management (CM) via phone. CHESS, based on self-determination theory, was designed to improve competence, social support, and intrinsic motivation of parents and children. Methods We identified eligible parent–child dyads from files of managed care organizations in Madison and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, sent them recruitment letters, and randomly assigned them (unblinded) to a control group of treatment as usual plus asthma information or to CHESS+CM. Asthma control was measured by the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) and self-reported symptom-free days. Medication adherence was a composite of pharmacy refill data and medication taking. Social support, information competence, and self-efficacy were self-assessed in questionnaires. All data were collected at 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Asthma diaries kept during a 3-week run-in period before randomization provided baseline data. Results Of 305 parent–child dyads enrolled, 301 were randomly assigned, 153 to the control group and 148 to CHESS+CM. Most parents were female (283/301, 94%), African American (150/301, 49.8%), and had a low income as indicated by child’s Medicaid status (154/301, 51.2%); 146 (48.5%) were single and 96 of 301 (31.9%) had a high school education or less. Completion rates were 127 of 153

  19. Asthma Outcomes: Asthma Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jerry A.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Canino, Glorisa J.; Elward, Kurtis S.; Kattan, Meyer; Matsui, Elizabeth C.; Mitchell, Herman; Sutherland, E. Rand; Minnicozzi, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory symptoms are commonly used to assess the impact of patient-centered interventions. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to propose which measurements of asthma symptoms should be used as a standardized measure in future clinical research studies. Methods Asthma symptom instruments were classified as daily diaries (prospectively recording symptoms between research visits) or retrospective questionnaires (completed at research visits). We conducted a systematic search in PubMed and a search for articles that cited key studies describing development of instruments. We classified outcome instruments as either core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to study aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results Four instruments (3 daily diaries, 1 for adults and 2 for children; and 1 retrospective questionnaire for adults) were identified. Minimal clinically important differences have not been established for these instruments, and validation studies were only conducted in a limited number of patient populations. Validity of existing instruments may not be generalizable across racial-ethnic or other subgroups. Conclusions An evaluation of symptoms should be a core asthma outcome measure in clinical research. However, available instruments have limitations that preclude selection of a core instrument. The working group participants propose validation studies in diverse populations, comparisons of diaries versus retrospective questionnaires, and evaluations of symptom assessment alone versus composite scores of asthma control. PMID:22386505

  20. Evolution of nutritional management of acute malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Golden, Michael H

    2010-08-01

    Wasting, kwashiorkor and stunting are not usually due to either protein or energy deficiency. Treatment based upon this concept results in high mortality rates, and failure of treated children to return physiologically to normal. They become relatively obese with insufficient lean tissue. Preventive strategies have also failed. Wasting and stunting are primarily due to deficiency of type II nutrients and kwashiorkor probably due to deficiency of several type I nutrients that confer resistance to oxidative stress. Modern dietary treatments are based upon the F75 formula whilst the child is sick without an appetite, followed by F100 for rapid gain of weight. Derivative, ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF) allow treatment of large numbers of children at home, are preferred by mothers and dramatically improve coverage. Children are indentified by screening in the community and treated before complications arise, using simple protocols. Successful treatment of the sick children with severe malnutrition not only depends upon these products, but appropriate management of complications. The physiology of the malnourished child is completely different from the normal child and many drugs and treatments that are safe in children with normal physiology are fatal for the malnourished child. In particular, the diagnosis and management of diarrhea and dehydration is different in the malnourished child. Giving standard treatment frequently leads to circulatory overload and death from heart failure. The challenge now is to find successful local ways to prevent malnutrition and achieve nutritional security. Until prevention works, we have to rely on fortified foods for treatment and convalescence from illness.

  1. Asthma in the female: hormonal effect and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Beck, S A

    2001-01-01

    Data support an increase in adverse outcomes in the pregnant woman with asthma, particularly those who are poorly controlled. Additionally, pregnancy is recognized to influence the course of asthma. Hormonal and physiologic changes are felt to direct the eventual course and outcome, but their roles are incompletely understood. Because of the potential for life-threatening consequences to mother and fetus, aggressive asthma management, as in the nongravid female, is recommended. Therapy may include controller agents such as cromolyn, beclomethasone, and the newer inhaled steroids. The newer antileukotriene agents may have a role in some patients. Reliever therapy with short-acting B2 agonists and, if needed, oral corticosteroids are indicated for acute exacerbations. Because of the potential for maternal and fetal harm, close monitoring of mother and child is essential.

  2. Development and pretesting of an electronic learning module to train health care professionals on the use of the Pediatric Respiratory Assessment Measure to assess acute asthma severity

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, Anab R; McKinney, Martha L; Gouin, Serge; Blais, Jean-Guy; Pusic, MV; Ducharme, Francine M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severity-specific guidelines based on the Pediatric Respiratory Assessment Measure (PRAM), a validated clinical score, reduce pediatric asthma hospitalization rates. OBJECTIVE: To develop, pretest the educational value of and revise an electronic learning module to train health care professionals on the use of the PRAM. METHODS: The respiratory efforts of 32 children with acute asthma were videotaped and pulmonary auscultation was recorded. A pilot module, composed of a tutorial and 18 clinical cases, was developed in French and English. Health care professionals completed the module and provided feedback. The performance of participants, case quality and difficulty, and learning curve were assessed using the Rasch test; quantitative and qualitative feedback served to revise the module. RESULTS: Seventy-two participants (19 physicians, 22 nurses, four respiratory therapists and 27 health care trainees) with a balanced distribution across self-declared expertise (26% beginner, 35% competent and 39% expert) were included. The accuracy of experts was superior to beginners (OR 1.79, 1.15 and 2.79, respectively). Overall performance significantly improved between the first and latter half of cases (P<0.001). Participants assessed the module to be clear (96%), relevant (98%), realistic (94%) and useful (99%) to learn the PRAM. The qualitative/quantitative analysis led to the deletion of three cases, modification of remaining cases to further enhance quality and reordering within three levels of difficulty. DISCUSSION: Using rigorous educational methods, an electronic module was developed to teach health care professionals on use of the PRAM score. Using the back-translation technique, both French and English versions were developed and validated simultaneously. The pilot module comprised a tutorial and three case-scenario sections, and was tested on a target audience of physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists and medical trainees. CONCLUSION: The final

  3. Endovascular vs medical management of acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M.; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Crowley, R. Webster; Liu, Kenneth C.; Southerland, Andrew M.; Worrall, Bradford B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the outcomes between endovascular and medical management of acute ischemic stroke in recent randomized controlled trials (RCT). Methods: A systematic literature review was performed, and multicenter, prospective RCTs published from January 1, 2013, to May 1, 2015, directly comparing endovascular therapy to medical management for patients with acute ischemic stroke were included. Meta-analyses of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and mortality at 90 days and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) for endovascular therapy and medical management were performed. Results: Eight multicenter, prospective RCTs (Interventional Management of Stroke [IMS] III, Local Versus Systemic Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke [SYNTHESIS] Expansion, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy [MR RESCUE], Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands [MR CLEAN], Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness [ESCAPE], Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits–Intra-Arterial [EXTEND-IA], Solitaire With the Intention For Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment [SWIFT PRIME], and Endovascular Revascularization With Solitaire Device Versus Best Medical Therapy in Anterior Circulation Stroke Within 8 Hours [REVASCAT]) comprising 2,423 patients were included. Meta-analysis of pooled data demonstrated functional independence (mRS 0–2) at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 1.71; p = 0.005). Subgroup analysis of the 6 trials with large vessel occlusion (LVO) criteria also demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (OR = 2.23; p < 0.00001). Subgroup analysis of the 5 trials that primarily utilized stent retriever devices (≥70%) in the intervention arm demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy

  4. Educating professionals to support self-management in people with asthma or diabetes: protocol for a systematic review and scoping exercise

    PubMed Central

    McCleary, Nicola; Andrews, Amanda; Morrow, Susan; Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon; Fletcher, Monica; Steed, Liz; Taylor, Stephanie J C; Pinnock, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Supported self-management for asthma helps people adjust their treatment in response to symptom changes. This improves day-to-day control and reduces the risk of asthma attacks and the need for emergency healthcare. However, implementation remains poor in routine clinical practice. This systematic review is part of a programme of work developing an intervention to help primary care practice teams embed self-management support into routine asthma care. The aim of the review is to synthesise the evidence regarding the effectiveness of educational interventions for professionals supporting self-management in people with asthma or diabetes (type 1 and type 2). These two conditions have the most robust evidence base for the effectiveness of implementing supported self-management. Methods and analysis Electronic searches will be conducted in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycINFO, AMED, Global Health, WHO Global Health Library, ERIC, BNI, RDRB/CME and Google Scholar. Eligible studies are randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials published between 1990 and 2016 which evaluated professional education interventions facilitating asthma or diabetes supported self-management. Further relevant work will be identified from trial registries, citation searching and through contact with authors of included studies. This will be supplemented by scoping potentially relevant educational packages described in English language policy literature or health service websites. Screening, data extraction and risk of bias assessment (using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool) will be completed by two independent reviewers, with a third reviewer arbitrating where necessary. We plan a theoretically informed narrative synthesis of the aggregated data as heterogeneity is likely to preclude meta-analysis. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required for this systematic review. The results will be described in a paper submitted for peer

  5. Management of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with combination inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β-agonists: a review of comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Mapel, Douglas W; Roberts, Melissa H

    2014-05-01

    The value of combination therapy with inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β-agonists (ICS/LABA) is well recognized in the management of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Despite differences in the pharmacological properties between two well-established ICS/LABA products (budesonide/formoterol and fluticasone/salmeterol), data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses suggest that these two products perform similarly under RCT conditions. In contrast, a few recently reported real-world comparative effectiveness studies have suggested that there are substantial differences between ICS/LABA combination treatments in terms of clinical and healthcare outcomes in patients with asthma or COPD. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief review of the benefits, as well as the limitations, of comparative effectiveness research (CER) in the therapeutic area of asthma and COPD. We conducted a structured literature review of the current CER studies on ICS/LABA combinations in asthma and COPD. These articles were then used to illustrate the unique challenges of CER studies, providing a summary of study results and limitations. We focus particularly on difficult biases and confounding factors that may be introduced before, during, and after the initiation of therapy. Beyond being a review of these two ICS/LABA combination treatments, this article is intended to help those who wish to assess the quality of CER published projects in asthma and COPD, or guide investigators who wish to design new CER studies for chronic respiratory disease treatments.

  6. Topical analgesics in the management of acute and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Argoff, Charles E

    2013-02-01

    Oral analgesics are commonly prescribed for the treatment of acute and chronic pain, but these agents often produce adverse systemic effects, which sometimes are severe. Topical analgesics offer the potential to provide the same analgesic relief provided by oral analgesics but with minimal adverse systemic effects. This article describes the results of a systematic review of the efficacy of topical analgesics in the management of acute and chronic pain conditions. A literature search of MEDLINE/PubMed was conducted using the keywords topical analgesic AND chronic pain OR acute pain OR neuropathic pain and focused only on individual clinical trials published in English-language journals. The search identified 92 articles, of which 65 were eligible for inclusion in the review. The most commonly studied topical analgesics were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (n=27), followed by lidocaine (n=9), capsaicin (n=6), amitriptyline (n=5), glyceryl trinitrate (n=3), opioids (n=2), menthol (n=2), pimecrolimus (n=2), and phenytoin (n=2). The most common indications were acute soft tissue injuries (n=18), followed by neuropathic pain (n=17), experimental pain (n=6), osteoarthritis and other chronic joint-related conditions (n=5), skin or leg ulcers (n=5), and chronic knee pain (n=2). Strong evidence was identified for the use of topical diclofenac and topical ibuprofen in the treatment of acute soft tissue injuries or chronic joint-related conditions, such as osteoarthritis. Evidence also supports the use of topical lidocaine in the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia and diabetic neuropathy. Currently, limited evidence is available to support the use of other topical analgesics in acute and chronic pain.

  7. Clinical Pathway Improves Pediatrics Asthma Management in the Emergency Department and Reduces Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Bekmezian, Arpi; Fee, Christopher; Weber, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Poor adherence to NIH Asthma Guidelines may result in unnecessary admissions for children presenting to the emergency department (ED) with exacerbations. We determine the effect of implementing an evidence-based ED clinical pathway on corticosteroid and bronchodilator administration and imaging utilization, and the subsequent effect on hospital admissions in a US ED. Methods Prospective, interventional study of pediatric (≤21 years) visits to an academic ED between 2011 and 2013 with moderate-severe asthma exacerbations. A multidisciplinary team designed a one-page clinical pathway based on NIH guidelines. Nurses, respiratory therapists, and physicians attended educational sessions prior to pathway implementation. Adjusting for demographics, acuity, and ED volume, we compared timing and appropriateness of corticosteroid and bronchodilator administration, and chest radiograph (CXR) utilization with historical controls from 2006–2011. Subsequent hospital admission rates were also compared. Results 379 post-intervention visits were compared with 870 controls. Corticosteroids were more likely to be administered during post-intervention visits (96% vs. 78%, adjusted OR 6.35; 95%CI 3.17–12.73). Post-intervention, median time to corticosteroid administration was 45 minutes faster (RR 0.74; 95%CI 0.67–0.81) and more patients received corticosteroids within 1 hour of arrival (45% vs 18%, OR 3.5; 95%CI 2.50–4.90). More patients received >1 bronchodilator dose within 1 hour (36% vs 24%, OR 1.65; 95%CI 1.23–2.21) and fewer received CXRs (27% vs 42%, OR 0.7; 95%CI 0.52–0.94). There were fewer admissions post-intervention (13% vs. 21%, OR 0.53; 95%CI 0.37–0.76). Conclusion A clinical pathway is associated with improved adherence to NIH guidelines and, subsequently, fewer hospital admissions for pediatric ED patients with asthma exacerbations. PMID:25985707

  8. Obesity-related asthma in adults.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Nikunj A; Lazarus, Angeline

    2016-08-01

    Obesity as a risk factor for asthma has been identified in previous studies. Additionally, a disproportionate number of patients with severe or difficult-to-control asthma are obese. Patients with obesity-related asthma tend to have worse asthma control and quality of life disproportionate to their pulmonary function tests, are less responsive to corticosteroid therapy, and are more likely to have obesity-related comorbidities such as obstructive sleep apnea and gastroesophageal disease that complicate asthma treatment. With the increasing prevalence of obesity, the prevalence of asthma is anticipated to grow proportionally. Addressing weight loss and encouraging activity is essential in the management of obesity-related asthma. This article briefly overviews the epidemiology, unique distinguishing features, potential mechanisms, and approach to management of patients with obesity-related asthma in adults.

  9. Improving timeliness for acute asthma care for paediatric ED patients using a nurse driven intervention: an interrupted time series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kathleen; Iqbal, Sabah; Sun, Su-Lin; Fritzeen, Jennifer; Chamberlain, James; C. Mullan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic paediatric disease treated in the emergency department (ED). Rapid corticosteroid administration is associated with improved outcomes, but our busy ED setting has made it challenging to achieve this goal. Our primary aim was to decrease the time to corticosteroid administration in a large, academic paediatric ED. We conducted an interrupted time series analysis for moderate to severe asthma exacerbations of one to 18 year old patients. A multidisciplinary team designed the intervention of a bedside nurse initiated administration of oral dexamethasone, to replace the prior system of a physician initiated order for oral prednisone. Our baseline and intervention periods were 12 month intervals. Our primary process measure was the time to corticosteroid administration. Other process measures included ED length of stay, admission rate, and rate of emesis. The balance measures included rate of return visits to the ED or clinic within five days, as well as the proportion of discharged patients who were admitted within five days. No special cause variation occurred in the baseline period. The mean time to corticosteroid administration decreased significantly, from 98 minutes in the baseline period to 59 minutes in the intervention period (p < 0.01), and showed special cause variation improvement within two months after the intervention using statistical process control methodology. We sustained the improvement and demonstrated a stable process. The intervention period had a significantly lower admission rate (p<0.01) and emesis rate (p<0.01), with no unforeseen harm to patients found with any of our balance measures. In summary, the introduction of a nurse initiated, standardized protocol for corticosteroid therapy for asthma exacerbations in a paediatric ED was associated with decreased time to corticosteroid administration, admission rates, and post-corticosteroid emesis. PMID:28090325

  10. Acute and chronic pain management in fibromyalgia: updates on pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Eric S

    2011-11-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a mysterious pain syndrome with progressive and widespread pain, explicit areas of tender points, stiffness, sleep disturbance, fatigue, and psychological distress without any obvious disease. FM is commonly perceived as a condition of central pain and sensory augmentation. There are documented functional abnormalities in pain and sensory processing in FM. Central sensitization and lack of descending analgesic activity are the 2 leading mechanisms that have been demonstrated by advance in both basic and clinical research. The pathogenesis of FM may also be attributed to the genetic polymorphisms involving serotoninergic, dopaminergic, and catecholaminergic systems. Any psychiatric disorders and psychosocial influences in FM may also affect the severity of pain. The various external stimuli or trigger such as infection, trauma, and stress may all contribute to proceed to presentation of FM. The recent launches of 3 US Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapy for FM namely pregabalin, duloxetine, and milnacipran have certainly raised the profile of optimal chronic pain management. However, appropriate evaluation and efficacious management of acute pain has not been as well publicized as chronic pain in FM. Acute pain or flare up caused by any trauma or surgery certainly may present a real challenge for patients with FM and their health care providers. Pre-emptive analgesia and pro-active treatment may offer the momentum for acute pain control based on model of central sensitization and pain in FM. This review article on FM appraises the modern practice of multimodal therapy focus on both acute and chronic pain management. Meanwhile, the evolving nonpharmacological approach is summarized and stressed as an essential component of integrated care in FM.

  11. The use of telemedicine in the management of acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Mark N; Demaerschalk, Bart M

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease, including acute ischemic stroke, remains a major public health problem in the US and throughout the world. There has been a concerted effort to apply evidence-based practices to stroke care to improve primary and secondary prevention as well as poststroke outcomes. Geography and workforce shortages contribute to a disparity in stroke care, however, among the substantial proportion of the US population that lives outside the reach of an acute stroke-ready hospital or a primary or comprehensive stroke center. In an attempt to combat the rural-to-urban disparity and expand the availability of best stroke practices, Levine and Gorman proposed the development of telemedical outreach for acute stroke evaluation and management, which they called "telestroke." Since then, the practice of telestroke has been found to have a high interrater agreement with a bedside assessment of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, to enhance correct thrombolysis decision making as compared with telephone-only consultation, and to be cost-effective. In light of these findings and the perception of benefit by acute stroke providers and patients, there has been growing interest in and a rapid expansion of telestroke networks in the US and internationally. There are legal and financial barriers to more widespread use of telemedicine in general, including telestroke. Further research is needed to understand the potential merits of telestroke infrastructure for the many phases of stroke care including poststroke hospitalization, prevention of complications, enhancing secondary prevention, and education of patients and providers.

  12. Managing acute cough in children: evidence-based guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Laura K; Allen, Patricia Jackson

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of acute cough in children. Cough is a common symptom in children and a frequent reason for consultation in primary care. Generally, an acute cough is a self-limiting condition resulting from expected childhood viral illnesses. However, a child should be thoroughly evaluated to rule out a serious underlying condition or disease responsible for the cough. Parents are often concerned and anxious about their child's cough. The use of over-the-counter cough and cold medications is widespread and parents commonly request primary care providers to provide prescriptions to alleviate cough symptoms. The American College of Chest Physicians has recommended clinical practice guidelines based on the conclusion of systematic reviews. These reviews indicate that cough medications offer no symptomatic relief for acute cough in children, and the use of cough and cold medications is inappropriate in young children and also places young children at risk for potential side effects and adverse reactions. The management of acute cough in children is based on a "wait, watch, review" approach. Clinicians should educate parents on expected illness duration, the risks of using over-the-counter medications, and discuss safe, supportive care measures to alleviate the child's discomfort.

  13. Patient preferences for managing asthma: results from a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    King, Madeleine T; Hall, Jane; Lancsar, Emily; Fiebig, Denzil; Hossain, Ishrat; Louviere, Jordan; Reddel, Helen K; Jenkins, Christine R

    2007-07-01

    Effective control of asthma requires regular preventive medication. Poor medication adherence suggests that patient preferences for medications may differ from the concerns of the prescribing clinicians. This study investigated patient preferences for preventive medications across symptom control, daily activities, medication side-effects, convenience and costs, using a discrete choice experiment embedded in a randomized clinical trial involving patients with mild-moderate persistent asthma. The present data were collected after patients had received 6 weeks' treatment with one of two drugs. Three choice options were presented, to continue with the current drug, to change to an alternative, hypothetical drug, or to take no preventive medication. Analysis used random parameter multinomial logit. Most respondents chose to continue with their current drug in most choice situations but this tendency differed depending on which medication they had been allocated. Respondents valued their ability to participate in usual daily activities and sport, preferred minimal symptoms, and were less likely to choose drugs with side-effects. Cost was also significant, but other convenience attributes were not. Demographic characteristics did not improve the model fit. This study illustrates how discrete choice experiments may be embedded in a clinical trial to provide insights into patient preferences.

  14. The team approach to pediatric asthma education.

    PubMed

    Capen, C L; Dedlow, E R; Robillard, R H; Fuller, B M; Fuller, C P

    1994-01-01

    An interdisciplinary pediatric pulmonary team of nurses, pharmacists, and social workers developed an asthma education program for presentation to children with asthma, ages 7-11, in a camp setting. Sound educational principles provide the foundation for this program, which includes a variety of teaching methods including puppet shows, games, crafts, and song. Informal evaluation methods of observation and feedback indicated that children's knowledge of asthma and asthma management increased.

  15. Surgical and interventional management of complications caused by acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Karakayali, Feza Y

    2014-10-07

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. It requires acute hospitalization, with a reported annual incidence of 13 to 45 cases per 100,000 persons. In severe cases there is persistent organ failure and a mortality rate of 15% to 30%, whereas mortality of mild pancreatitis is only 0% to 1%. Treatment principles of necrotizing pancreatitis and the role of surgery are still controversial. Despite surgery being effective for infected pancreatic necrosis, it carries the risk of long-term endocrine and exocrine deficiency and a morbidity and mortality rate of between 10% to 40%. Considering high morbidity and mortality rates of operative necrosectomy, minimally invasive strategies are being explored by gastrointestinal surgeons, radiologists, and gastroenterologists. Since 1999, several other minimally invasive surgical, endoscopic, and radiologic approaches to drain and debride pancreatic necrosis have been described. In patients who do not improve after technically adequate drainage, necrosectomy should be performed. When minimal invasive management is unsuccessful or necrosis has spread to locations not accessible by endoscopy, open abdominal surgery is recommended. Additionally, surgery is recognized as a major determinant of outcomes for acute pancreatitis, and there is general agreement that patients should undergo surgery in the late phase of the disease. It is important to consider multidisciplinary management, considering the clinical situation and the comorbidity of the patient, as well as the surgeons experience.

  16. Gouty Arthritis: A Review of Acute Management and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Liza; Saseen, Joseph J

    2016-08-01

    Gouty arthritis is one of the most common rheumatic diseases. The clinical burden of gouty arthritis has historically been well recognized; however, gout is often misdiagnosed and mismanaged. The prevalence of gout is rising and is likely attributed to several factors including increased incidence of comorbidities, lifestyle factors, and increased use of causative medications. With the increasing prevalence, there have been several innovations and evidence-based updates related to the diagnosis and management of gout. Acute gouty arthritis should be treated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), colchicine, or corticosteroids, or a combination of two agents. Xanthine oxidase inhibitor therapy remains the consensus first-line treatment option for the prevention of recurrent gout. Add-on therapies that reduce serum urate concentration include traditional uricosuric agents and a novel uric acid reabsorption inhibitor. Prophylaxis of acute gout with NSAIDs, colchicine, or corticosteroids is universally recommended when initiating any urate-lowering therapy in order to prevent acute gouty arthritis for a period of at least 6 months. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and risk factors for gouty arthritis and evaluate diagnostic strategies and therapeutic regimens for the management of gout, including a new drug approval.

  17. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Newman Taylor, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    Occupational asthma is important both as a potentially curable and preventable cause of asthma and as a model of adult onset asthma. It is induced by sensitization to a specific agent inhaled at work; for many of its causes, including inhaled proteins and the low molecular weight chemicals acid anhydrides and reactive dyes, it is probably IgE dependent. The risk of developing specific IgE and associated asthma is markedly increased in cigarette smokers, probably as a consequence of non-specific damage to the respiratory mucosa. Asthma caused by several agents, which include some of its most frequent causes, isocyanates, colophony and plicatic acid (Western Red Cedar) persists in some 50% of cases for years, and possibly indefinitely, after avoidance of exposure. The development of chronic symptomatic asthma seems particularly to occur in those with longer duration of symptomatic exposure. PMID:3074282

  18. Occupational asthma due to azodicarbonamide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheol-Woo; Cho, Jae-Hwa; Leem, Jong-Han; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Lee, Hong-Lyeol; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2004-04-30

    Azodicarbonamide is a low molecular weight foaming agent for plastics and rubbers. Azodicarbonamide can elicit acute and chronic health related problems due to its potential for pulmonary and cutaneous sensitization. Some cases of occupational asthma associated with exposure to azodicarbonamide have been reported, of which only a few cases were confirmed by specific inhalation challenges. Here, the first case of occupational asthma due to azodicarbonamide in Korea, in which the diagnosis was confirmed by specific inhalation challenge, is reported.

  19. Current prevention and management of acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed Central

    Bia, F. J.

    1992-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness was known to the Chinese in ancient times, as they traversed mountain passes between the Great Headache and Little Headache mountains into present-day Afghanistan. The Jesuit priest, Father Joseph Acosta, lived in Peru during the sixteenth century; he described both this syndrome and deaths which occurred in the high Andes. The incidence of high-altitude illness will rise as previously remote sites become more accessible to trekkers and skiers. Prevention and treatment are important concerns for those physicians who wish to advise their more adventuresome patients properly. This article incorporates a selected review of pertinent investigations, in the English-language literature over the past five years, into material previously presented at travel symposia for clinicians managing the prophylaxis and treatment of acute mountain sickness. PMID:1290275

  20. Management of acute pancreatitis (AP) – Polish Pancreatic Club recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Rosołowski, Mariusz; Lipiński, Michał; Dobosz, Marek; Durlik, Marek; Głuszek, Stanisław; Kuśnierz, Katarzyna; Lampe, Paweł; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Nowakowska-Duława, Ewa; Nowak-Niezgoda, Magdalena; Radomańska, Barbara; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Wereszczyńska-Siemiątkowska, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    The presented recommendations concern the current management of acute pancreatitis. The recommendations relate to the diagnostics and treatment of early and late phases of acute pancreatitis and complications of the disease taking into consideration surgical and endoscopic methods. All the recommendations were subjected to voting by the members of the Working Group of the Polish Pancreatic Club, who evaluated them every single time on a five-point scale, where A means full acceptance, B means acceptance with a certain reservation, C means acceptance with a serious reservation, D means rejection with a certain reservation and E means full rejection. The results of the vote, together with commentary, are provided for each recommendation. PMID:27350832

  1. Evolving Guidance on Ureteric Calculi Management in the Acute Setting.

    PubMed

    Makanjuola, Jonathan K; Rintoul-Hoad, Sophie; Bultitude, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Ureteric colic is a common presentation to acute emergency services. The gold standard test for the diagnosis of acute ureteric colic is a non-contrast computer tomography of the kidneys ureters and bladder (CT KUB). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should be used as first-line analgesia, with studies showing that there is no role for steroid or phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. There is emerging evidence that a high body mass index (BMI) is a risk factor. The drugs used to facilitate stone passage are known as medical expulsive therapy (MET). The most evaluated being alpha-blockers. The Spontaneous Urinary Stone Passage Enabled by Drugs (SUSPEND) trial was designed to evaluate the use of MET (tamsulosin and nifedipine). This trial showed that there was no difference with MET and placebo for the spontaneous passage of ureteric stones. There is an emerging role for the use of primary ureteroscopy in the management of non-infective ureteric stones.

  2. Challenges in the management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lau, James Y W; Barkun, Alan; Fan, Dai-ming; Kuipers, Ernst J; Yang, Yun-sheng; Chan, Francis K L

    2013-06-08

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency worldwide, a major cause of which are bleeding peptic ulcers. Endoscopic treatment and acid suppression with proton-pump inhibitors are cornerstones in the management of the disease, and both treatments have been shown to reduce mortality. The role of emergency surgery continues to diminish. In specialised centres, radiological intervention is increasingly used in patients with severe and recurrent bleeding who do not respond to endoscopic treatment. Despite these advances, mortality from the disorder has remained at around 10%. The disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities who use antiplatelet agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and anticoagulants. The management of such patients, especially those at high cardiothrombotic risk who are on anticoagulants, is a challenge for clinicians. We summarise the published scientific literature about the management of patients with bleeding peptic ulcers, identify directions for future clinical research, and suggest how mortality can be reduced.

  3. An update on the management of acute esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Lourdes; Tandon, Puneeta; Abraldes, Juan G

    2017-01-01

    The mortality rate in acute variceal haemorrhage remains high (around 15%). Treatment is based on the combined use of vasoactive drugs, endoscopic band ligation, and prophylactic antibiotics. Effective resuscitation (haemostasis, volume management) is essential to prevent complications. Treatment failure is best managed by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Balloon tamponade or specifically designed covered oesophageal stents can be used as a bridge to definitive therapy in unstable patients. Early, pre-emptive TIPS should be the first choice in patients at high risk of treatment failure (Child-Pugh B with active bleeding or Child-Pugh C<14). This article reviews the most recent advances in the management of variceal bleeding and discusses the recent recommendations of the Baveno VI consensus conference.

  4. Efficacy of the I Can Control Asthma and Nutrition Now (ICAN) Pilot Program on Health Outcomes in High School Students with Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouba, Joanne; Velsor-Friedrich, Barbarba; Militello, Lisa; Harrison, Patrick R.; Becklenberg, Amy; White, Barb; Surya, Shruti; Ahmed, Avais

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is the most prevalent chronic illness in childhood affecting 7 million youth. Many youth with asthma face another risk factor in obesity. Obesity, in turn, increases disorders such as asthma. Studies have recommended that asthma programs also address weight management in youth. Taking this into consideration, the I Can Control Asthma and…

  5. Role of cholescintigraphy in management of acute acalculous cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Shefali M; Lokare, SD; Nemade, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Aim: This study is aimed to evaluate the role of cholescintigraphy in management of acute acalculous cholecystitis. Materials and Methods: A total of thirty two patients who had presented to the surgical out-patient department or referred from in-patient department or intensive care unit between February 2008 and February 2010 were studied. All patients with Ultrasonography abdomen findings of acalculous cholecystitis were included in the study and they underwent cholescintigraphy. Gall bladder ejection fraction (GBEF) was calculated 30 min after fatty meal. Patients who either had non-visualization of gall bladder or GBEF less than 40% were considered to have acalculous cholecystitis on cholescintigraphy. The patients were followed-up for a period of 3 months after the commencement of treatment. Results: Eleven patients had either non-visualization of gall bladder or GBEF < 40%. Of these, six patients underwent cholecystectomy and the rest were medically managed, as patients deferred surgery. 83.33% of post-cholecystectomy patients as against 40% of medically treated patients were symptom free. Twenty one patients had GBEF > 40%, 90.74% of these patients were symptom free at the end of 3 months, with medical management. Conclusion: Cholescintigraphy is an important adjunct in management of patients with acalculous cholecystitis by guiding the course of therapy-surgical management versus medical management. PMID:24019652

  6. Contemporary concepts in management of acute otitis media in children.

    PubMed

    Rettig, Eleni; Tunkel, David E

    2014-10-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common disease of childhood. AOM is most appropriately diagnosed by careful otoscopy with an understanding of clinical signs and symptoms. The distinction between AOM and chronic otitis media with effusion should be emphasized. Treatment should include pain management, and initial antibiotic treatment should be given to those most likely to benefit, including young children, children with severe symptoms, and those with otorrhea and/or bilateral AOM. Tympanostomy tube placement may be helpful for those who experience frequent episodes of AOM or fail medical therapy. Recent practice guidelines may assist the clinician with such decisions.

  7. Acute Compartment Syndrome in Orthopedics: Causes, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Hasnain; Mahapatra, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Almost all orthopaedic surgeons come across acute compartment syndrome (ACS) in their clinical practice. Diagnosis of ACS mostly relies on clinical findings. If the diagnosis is missed and left untreated, it can lead to serious consequences which can endanger limb and life of the patient and also risk the clinician to face lawsuits. This review article highlights the characteristic features of ACS which will help an orthopaedic surgeon to understand the pathophysiology, natural history, high risk patients, diagnosis, and surgical management of the condition. PMID:25688303

  8. The Acute Management of Sport Concussion in Pediatric Athletes.

    PubMed

    Resch, Jacob E; Kutcher, Jeffrey S

    2015-10-01

    During the past two decades the focus on sport concussion has increased significantly. Young athletes represent the most vulnerable population to sustain a sport concussion yet receive the least amount of attention. Specifically, young athletes who sustain a sport concussion can go unrecognized and continue to participate in sport putting them at an increased risk for a more significant injury. The purpose of this review is to provide a clinical framework for the evaluation and management of sport concussion. In addition, this review provides considerations for health care professionals in regard to clinical measures and follow-up strategies during the acute phase following concussion in young concussed athletes following injury.

  9. Severe Raynaud's phenomenon-A streamlined approach to acute management.

    PubMed

    Lee, Regent; Lomas, Oliver; Handa, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is an exaggerated vasospastic response to cold or emotional stress which not only may cause the patient severe pain but also critical ischaemia and necrosis of the digits. We report the case of a 69-year-old woman who presented with rest pain, impending ulceration and necrosis of finger tips due to an episode of left-sided Raynaud's phenomenon. Intravenous prostacyclin was administered successfully as a bridge to endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy. Vascular surgery units are ideally positioned for the acute management of severe Raynaud's phenomenon to provide continuity of care to patients with profound digital ischaemia and impending tissue loss.

  10. Planned ventral hernia. Staged management for acute abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, T C; Croce, M A; Pritchard, F E; Minard, G; Hickerson, W L; Howell, R L; Schurr, M J; Kudsk, K A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Analysis of a staged management scheme for initial and definitive management of acute abdominal wall defects is provided. METHODS: A four-staged scheme for managing acute abdominal wall defects consists of the following stages: stage I--prosthetic insertion; stage II--2 to 3 weeks after prosthetic insertion and wound granulation, the prosthesis is removed; stage III--2 to 3 days later, planned ventral hernia (split thickness skin graft [STSG] or full-thickness skin and subcutaneous fat); stage IV--6 to 12 months later, definitive reconstruction. Cases were evaluated retrospectively for benefits and risks of the techniques employed. RESULTS: Eighty-eight cases (39 visceral edema, 27 abdominal sepsis, 22 abdominal wall resection) were managed during 8.5 years. Prostheses included polypropylene mesh in 45 cases, polyglactin 910 mesh in 27, polytetrafluorethylene in 10, and plastic in 6. Twenty-four patients died from their initial disease. The fistula rates associated with prosthetic management was 9%; no wound-related mortality occurred. Most wounds had split thickness skin graft applied after prosthetic removal. Definitive reconstruction was undertaken in 21 patients in the authors' institution (prosthetic mesh in 12 and modified components separation in 9). Recurrent hernias developed in 33% of mesh reconstructions and 11% of the components separation technique. CONCLUSIONS: The authors concluded that 1) this staged approach was associated with low morbidity and no technique-related mortality; 2) prostheses placed for edema were removed with fascial approximation accomplished in half of those cases; 3) absorbable mesh provided the advantages of reasonable durability, ease of removal, and relatively low cost--it has become the prosthesis of choice; and 4) the modified components separation technique of reconstruction provided good results in patients with moderate sized defects. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:8203973

  11. The 21st century environment and air quality influences on asthma.

    PubMed

    Linn, W S; Gong, H

    1999-01-01

    "Criteria" air pollutants are federally regulated pollutants that occur widely outdoors and have diverse sources, most often related to combustion. They include ozone (O3), particulate matter, sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and lead. All except lead may interfere with oxygen delivery, and so may be of special concern to asthmatics. In controlled experiments, SO2 causes acute asthma symptoms and bronchoconstriction, preventable by beta-agonist medications. Ozone causes acute irritant symptoms, restrictive lung dysfunction, increased bronchial reactivity, and lower-airway inflammation in healthy people and asthmatics. Exposures to O3, and possibly to other pollutants, appear to exacerbate bronchoconstrictive or inflammatory responses to inhaled aeroallergens (bioaerosols); this may represent an important health risk to asthmatics. Exposure levels known to evoke acute responses to O3 or SO2 are uncommon in community air pollution; however, some asthmatics might be susceptible to lesser, more common exposures. Evidence concerning NO2 is equivocal, but it may have O3-like effects in some asthmatics. Epidemiology has often associated particulate pollution with asthma exacerbations and other cardiorespiratory illnesses, even in cities with relatively mild air pollution. Current laboratory research cannot fully explain this association. Advances in emission controls should further reduce ambient pollution levels, but probably will not reduce asthma morbidity. Better asthma management, with improved anti-inflammatory medications, more careful monitoring by patients and health care providers, and reasonable efforts to reduce pollutant and aeroallergen exposures, offers the best hope to reduce asthma morbidity in the new century.

  12. [Seasonality in asthma: Impact and treatments].

    PubMed

    Guilleminault, L; Just, J; Humbert, M; Leroyer, C; Epaud, R

    2016-11-01

    The role of seasons should be taken into account in the management of asthma. The environment varies between seasons and it is well documented that asthma is modulated by environment. Viruses cause asthma exacerbations peak, in winter, in adults while the peak is present in September in children. Allergens are probably a less powerful source of asthma exacerbation than viruses but pollen involvement in spring and summer and dust mites in autumn are indisputable. Air pollutants, present in summer during the hottest periods, are also highly involved in asthma exacerbations. Indoor air pollution, in winter, is also implicated in asthma disease. All these environmental factors are synergistic and increase the risk of asthma exacerbation. Therapies should be adapted to each season depending on environmental factors potentially involved in the asthma disease.

  13. Management of Patients Admitted with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Krim, Selim R.; Campbell, Patrick T.; Desai, Sapna; Mandras, Stacy; Patel, Hamang; Eiswirth, Clement; Ventura, Hector O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital admission for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure is an unfortunate certainty in the vast majority of patients with heart failure. Regardless of the etiology, inpatient treatment for acute decompensated heart failure portends a worsening prognosis. Methods This review identifies patients with heart failure who need inpatient therapy and provides an overview of recommended therapies and management of these patients in the hospital setting. Results Inpatient therapy for patients with acute decompensated heart failure should be directed at decongestion and symptom improvement. Clinicians should also treat possible precipitating events, identify comorbid conditions that may exacerbate heart failure, evaluate and update current guideline-directed medical therapy, and perform risk stratification for all patients. Finally, efforts should be made to educate patients about the importance of restricting salt and fluid, monitoring daily weights, and adhering to a graded exercise program. Conclusion Early discharge follow-up and continued optimization of guideline-directed medical therapy are key to preventing future heart failure readmissions. PMID:26413005

  14. [Childhood asthma].

    PubMed

    Liñán Cortés, Santos; Cobos Barroso, Nicolás

    2004-11-01

    Very frequently we have to deal with children who follow specific treatment to combat their repetitive episodes of breathing difficulty and wheezing. In many cases, they suffer from asthma. Hippocrates defined asthma as "the condition which causes an excessive narrowing of the bronchi after a reaction with a provocative stimulus which usually does not produce any effect".

  15. Improving efficiency and reducing costs: Design of an adaptive, seamless, and enriched pragmatic efficacy trial of an online asthma management program.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mei; Ownby, Dennis R; Zoratti, Edward; Roblin, Douglas; Johnson, Dayna; Johnson, Christine Cole; Joseph, Christine L M

    2014-05-01

    Clinical trials are critical for medical decision-making, however, under the current paradigm, clinical trials are fraught with problems including low enrollment and high cost. Promising alternatives to increase trial efficiency and reduce costs include the use of (1) electronic initiatives that permit electronic remote data capture (EDC) for direct data collection at a site (2), electronic medical records (EMR) for patient identification and data collection, and (3) adaptive, enrichment designs with pragmatic approaches. We describe the design of a seamless, multi-site randomized Phase II/III trial to evaluate an asthma management intervention in urban adolescents with asthma. Patients are randomized, asked to access four online sessions of the intervention or control asthma management program, and are then followed for one year. The primary efficacy endpoint is self-reported asthma control as measured by the Asthma Control Test (ACT). Comparative effectiveness parametric approaches are utilized to conduct the trial in a real world setting with reduced costs. Escalated electronic initiatives are implemented for patient identification, assent, enrollment and tracking. Patient enrollment takes place during primary care visits. A centralized database with EDC is used for CRF data collection with integration of EMR data. This Phase II/III trial plans to have a total sample size of 500 patients with an interim look at the completion of Phase II (n=250), The interim analyses include an assessment of the intervention effect, marker(s) identification and the feasibility study of EMR data as the trial CRF data collection. Patient enrollment has begun and is ongoing.

  16. Management of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremy M

    2009-01-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE) is a pathology frequently seen in patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs) and can usually be attributed to preexisting cardiovascular disease. Heart failure alone accounts for more than 1 million hospital admissions annually and has one of the highest ED morbidity and mortality to date (). Historically, CPE has been managed by the treating clinician in a manner that is based largely on anecdotal evidence. Furosemide (Lasix), morphine, and nitroglycerin have historically been the baseline standard for drug therapy in CPE management. A lack of drastic improvement in the patient's condition over the course of the ED visit may reflect a management style that results in higher morbidity and mortality for CPE patients. Several recent articles provide evidence-based outcomes that suggest changing standard therapy along with the adjunctive use of other medications. These articles also describe treatment modalities that result in a marked improvement in the management of patients with CPE along with decreases in adverse outcomes and hospital length of stay. The goal of this article is to present a summary of the evidence regarding the management of CPE and discuss the implications for current practice.

  17. Feasibility of a smartphone application based action plan and monitoring in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Yeong; Lee, Suh-Young; Jo, Eun-Jung; Lee, Seung-Eun; Kang, Min-Gyu; Song, Woo-Jung; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Ahn, Ki-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background Asthma patients may experience acute episodic exacerbation. The guidelines recommend that written action plan should be given to asthma patients. However, no one can predict when and where acute exacerbation will happen. As people carry smart phone almost anytime and anywhere, smartphone application could be a useful tool in asthma care. We evaluated the feasibility of the ubiquitous healthcare system of asthma care using a smartphone application (snuCare) based on the self-management guideline or action plan. Methods Forty-four patients including fragile asthmatics were enrolled from Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between December 2011 and February 2012. They were randomly assigned into application user (n = 22) or application nonuser group (n = 22). We evaluated user-satisfaction, and clinical parameters such as asthma control, Quality of Life Questionnaire for Adult Korean Asthmatics, and the adherence of patients. Results The characteristics were similar at baseline between the 2 groups except those who treated with short-term systemic steroid or increased dose of systemic steroid during previous 8 weeks (user vs. nonuser: 31.8% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.020). Total of 2,226 signals was generated during 8 weeks including 5 risky states. After eight weeks, the users answered that it was very easy to use the application, which was shown in highest scores in terms of satisfaction (mean ± standard deviation, 4.3 ± 0.56). Seventy-three percent of patients answered that the application was very useful for asthma care. User group showed improved the adherence scores (p = 0.017). One patient in application user group could avoid Emergency Department visit owing to the application while a patient in nonuser group visited Emergency Department. Conclusion The ubiquitous healthcare system using a smartphone application (snuCare) based on the self-management guideline or action plan could be helpful in the monitoring and the management of asthma. PMID

  18. Early phase of acute pancreatitis: Assessment and management

    PubMed Central

    Phillip, Veit; Steiner, Jörg M; Algül, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a potentially life-threatening disease with a wide spectrum of severity. The overall mortality of AP is approximately 5%. According to the revised Atlanta classification system, AP can be classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Severe AP often takes a clinical course with two phases, an early and a late phase, which should both be considered separately. In this review article, we first discuss general aspects of AP, including incidence, pathophysiology, etiology, and grading of severity, then focus on the assessment of patients with suspected AP, including diagnosis and risk stratification, followed by the management of AP during the early phase, with special emphasis on fluid therapy, pain management, nutrition, and antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:25133018

  19. Role of Ultrasound with Color Doppler in Acute Scrotum Management

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Alka M.; Tripathi, Prem Siddharth; Shankhwar, Amit; Naveen, C.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: An acute scrotum is defined as acute pain with or without scrotal swelling, may be accompanied by local signs or general symptoms. Acute scrotal pain is a medical emergency. Depending on cause, the management is entirely different. Torsion of testis and strangulated hernia are surgical emergency; whereas, epididymo-orchitis is treated by medicines. Testicular trauma and obstructed hernia can be differentiated by taking history from patient. Physical examination adds only a little information. Color Doppler ultrasound (US) is the modality of choice to differentiate testicular torsion from inflammatory conditions and can thus help in avoiding unnecessary surgical explorations. Subjects and Methods: A study on 50 patients was conducted who were referred with history of acute scrotal pain to our department between January 2013 and January 2014. Trauma and scrotal mass were excluded from the study. The clinical presentation, outcome, and US results were analyzed. Results: Color Doppler sonography yielded a positive and negative predictive value (PPV and NPV) of 100% each for torsion, whereas, 93.9 and 70.6% for epididymo-orchitis, respectively; a sensitivity and specificity of 100% for torsion, whereas, for epididymo-orchitis it was found to be 86.1 and 85.7%, respectively. In cases of incomplete or early torsion, some residual perfusion may be detected leading to false-negative results. Conclusion: We therefore conclude that color Doppler sonography can reliably rule out testicular torsion and can thus help in avoiding unnecessary surgical explorations. Hence, it can significantly improve outcome and decrease morbidity of patient. It is an accurate, rapid, nonexpensive, nonionizing, important adjunct to clinical assessment of scrotum. PMID:25657954

  20. Signs of an asthma attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... call 911 if your child has any of these symptoms. This includes teachers, babysitters, and others who take care of your ... Durrani SR, Busse WW. Management of asthma in adolescents and adults. In: Adkinson ...

  1. [Recommendations for management of acute pharyngitis in adults].

    PubMed

    Cots, Josep M; Alós, Juan-Ignacio; Bárcena, Mario; Boleda, Xavier; Cañada, José L; Gómez, Niceto; Mendoza, Ana; Vilaseca, Isabel; Llor, Carles

    2016-11-01

    Acute pharyngitis in adults is one of the most common infectious diseases seen in general practitioners' consultations. Viral aetiology is the most common. Among bacterial causes, the main agent is Streptococcus pyogenes or group A β-haemolytic streptococcus (GABHS), which causes 5%-30% of the episodes. In the diagnostic process, clinical assessment scales can help clinicians to better predict suspected bacterial aetiology by selecting patients who should undergo a rapid antigen detection test. If these techniques are not performed, an overdiagnosis of streptococcal pharyngitis often occurs, resulting in unnecessary prescriptions of antibiotics, most of which are broad spectrum. Consequently, management algorithms that include the use of predictive clinical rules and rapid tests have been set up. The aim of the treatment is speeding up symptom resolution, reducing the contagious time span and preventing local suppurative and non-suppurative complications. Penicillin and amoxicillin are the antibiotics of choice for the treatment of pharyngitis. The association of amoxicillin and clavulanate is not indicated as the initial treatment of acute infection. Neither are macrolides indicated as first-line therapy; they should be reserved for patients allergic to penicillin. The appropriate diagnosis of bacterial pharyngitis and proper use of antibiotics based on the scientific evidence available are crucial. Using management algorithms can be helpful in identifying and screening the cases that do not require antibiotic therapy.

  2. Recommendations for management of acute pharyngitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Cots, Josep M; Alós, Juan-Ignacio; Bárcena, Mario; Boleda, Xavier; Cañada, José L; Gómez, Niceto; Mendoza, Ana; Vilaseca, Isabel; Llor, Carles

    2015-01-01

    Acute pharyngitis in adults is one of the most common infectious diseases seen in general practitioners' consultations. Viral aetiology is the most common. Among bacterial causes, the main agent is Streptococcus pyogenes or group A β-haemolytic streptococcus (GABHS), which causes 5%-30% of the episodes. In the diagnostic process, clinical assessment scales can help clinicians to better predict suspected bacterial aetiology by selecting patients who should undergo a rapid antigen detection test. If these techniques are not performed, an overdiagnosis of streptococcal pharyngitis often occurs, resulting in unnecessary prescriptions of antibiotics, most of which are broad spectrum. Consequently, management algorithms that include the use of predictive clinical rules and rapid tests have been set up. The aim of the treatment is speeding up symptom resolution, reducing the contagious time span and preventing local suppurative and non-suppurative complications. Penicillin and amoxicillin are the antibiotics of choice for the treatment of pharyngitis. The association of amoxicillin and clavulanate is not indicated as the initial treatment of acute infection. Neither are macrolides indicated as first-line therapy; they should be reserved for patients allergic to penicillin. The appropriate diagnosis of bacterial pharyngitis and proper use of antibiotics based on the scientific evidence available are crucial. Using management algorithms can be helpful in identifying and screening the cases that do not require antibiotic therapy.

  3. [Recommendations for management of acute pharyngitis in adults].

    PubMed

    Cots, Josep M; Alós, Juan-Ignacio; Bárcena, Mario; Boleda, Xavier; Cañada, José L; Gómez, Niceto; Mendoza, Ana; Vilaseca, Isabel; Llor, Carles

    2015-10-01

    Acute pharyngitis in adults is one of the most common infectious diseases seen in general practitioners' consultations. Viral aetiology is the most common. Among bacterial causes, the main agent is Streptococcus pyogenes or group A β-haemolytic streptococcus (GABHS), which causes 5%-30% of the episodes. In the diagnostic process, clinical assessment scales can help clinicians to better predict suspected bacterial aetiology by selecting patients who should undergo a rapid antigen detection test. If these techniques are not performed, an overdiagnosis of streptococcal pharyngitis often occurs, resulting in unnecessary prescriptions of antibiotics, most of which are broad spectrum. Consequently, management algorithms that include the use of predictive clinical rules and rapid tests have been set up. The aim of the treatment is speeding up symptom resolution, reducing the contagious time span and preventing local suppurative and non-suppurative complications. Penicillin and amoxicillin are the antibiotics of choice for the treatment of pharyngitis. The association of amoxicillin and clavulanate is not indicated as the initial treatment of acute infection. Neither are macrolides indicated as first-line therapy; they should be reserved for patients allergic to penicillin. The appropriate diagnosis of bacterial pharyngitis and proper use of antibiotics based on the scientific evidence available are crucial. Using management algorithms can be helpful in identifying and screening the cases that do not require antibiotic therapy.

  4. Management of anticoagulation in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, Franco; Dentali, Francesco; Repici, Alessandro; Amato, Arnaldo; Paggi, Silvia; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Dumonceau, Jean Marc

    2015-08-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding represents the most common adverse event associated with the use of oral anticoagulant therapy. Due to increasing prescription of anticoagulants worldwide, gastroenterologists are more and more called to deal with bleeding patients taking these medications. Their management is challenging because several issues have to be taken into account, such as the severity of bleeding, the intensity of anticoagulation, the patient's thrombotic risk and endoscopy findings. The recent introduction into the marketplace of new direct oral anticoagulants, for whom specific reversal agents are still lacking, further contributes to make the decision-making process even more demanding. Available evidence on this topic is limited and practice guidelines by gastroenterology societies only marginally address key issues for clinicians, including when and how to reverse coagulopathy, the optimal timing of endoscopy and when and how to resume anticoagulation thereafter. The present paper reviews the evidence in the literature and provides practical algorithms to support clinicians in the management of patients on anticoagulants who present with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  5. A consensus statement on lipid management after acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schiele, François; Farnier, Michel; Krempf, Michel; Bruckert, Eric; Ferrières, Jean

    2016-11-17

    In patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome (ACS), the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology give a Class I, Level A recommendation for the prescription of high-intensity statins to be initiated as early as possible, regardless of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level. Although statins are widely prescribed after ACS, the intensity of therapy and the proportion of patients achieving target LDL-C values are often not in line with recommendations due to a lack of compliance with guidelines by the physicians, a lack of compliance with treatment or poor tolerance by patients, and poor dose adaptation. In this context, a group of French physicians came together to define strategies to facilitate and improve the management of lipid-lowering therapy after ACS. This paper outlines the scientific rationale for the use of statins at the acute phase of ACS, the utility of ezetimibe, the measurement of LDL-C during the course of ACS, the opportunities for detecting familial hypercholesterolaemia and the results of the consensus for the management of lipid-lowering therapy, illustrated in two decision-making algorithms.

  6. The World Anti-Doping Code: can you have asthma and still be an elite athlete?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Key points The World Anti-Doping Code (the Code) does place some restrictions on prescribing inhaled β2-agonists, but these can be overcome without jeopardising the treatment of elite athletes with asthma. While the Code permits the use of inhaled glucocorticoids without restriction, oral and intravenous glucocorticoids are prohibited, although a mechanism exists that allows them to be administered for acute severe asthma. Although asthmatic athletes achieved outstanding sporting success during the 1950s and 1960s before any anti-doping rules existed, since introduction of the Code’s policies on some drugs to manage asthma results at the Olympic Games have revealed that athletes with confirmed asthma/airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) have outperformed their non-asthmatic rivals. It appears that years of intensive endurance training can provoke airway injury, AHR and asthma in athletes without any past history of asthma. Although further research is needed, it appears that these consequences of airway injury may abate in some athletes after they have ceased intensive training. The World Anti-Doping Code (the Code) has not prevented asthmatic individuals from becoming elite athletes. This review examines those sections of the Code that are relevant to respiratory physicians who manage elite and sub-elite athletes with asthma. The restrictions that the Code places or may place on the prescription of drugs to prevent and treat asthma in athletes are discussed. In addition, the means by which respiratory physicians are able to treat their elite asthmatic athlete patients with drugs that are prohibited in sport are outlined, along with some of the pitfalls in such management and how best to prevent or minimise them. PMID:27408633

  7. Current concepts in the management of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Gautham; Venkatakrishnan, L.; Sambandam, Swaminathan; Singh, Gursharan; Kaur, Maninder; Janarthan, Krishnaveni; John, B. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis (AP) are based on the Western experience, which may be difficult to extrapolate in India due to socioeconomic constraints. Hence, modifications based on the available resources and referral patterns should be introduced so as to ensure appropriate care. We reviewed the current literature on the management of AP available in English on Medline and proposed guidelines locally applicable. Patients of AP presenting with systemic inflammatory response syndrome are at risk of moderate-severe pancreatitis and hence, should be referred to a tertiary center early. The vast majority of patients with AP have mild disease and can be managed at smaller centers. Early aggressive fluid resuscitation with controlled fluid expansion, early enteral nutrition, and culture-directed antibiotics improve outcomes in AP. Infected pancreatic necrosis should be managed in a tertiary care hospital within a multidisciplinary setup. The “step up” approach involving antibiotics, percutaneous drainage, and minimally invasive necrosectomy instituted sequentially based on clinical response has improved the outcomes in this subgroup of patients. PMID:28348985

  8. Asthma Medicines: Long-Term Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size Email Print Share Asthma Medicines: Long-term Control Page Content Article Body Corticosteroids Synthetic versions of ... form, they are used exclusively for long-term control; they are not very effective for acute symptoms. ...

  9. TLC-Asthma: An Integrated Information System for Patient-centered Monitoring, Case Management, and Point-of-Care Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Adams, William G.; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L.; Miller, Charles W.; Panek, Celeste G.; Gi, Yangsoon; Loane, Kathleen C.; Madden, Nancy E.; Plunkett, Anne M.; Friedman, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    A great deal of successful work has been done in the area of EMR development, implementation, and evaluation. Less work has been done in the area of automated systems for patients. Efforts to link data at multiple levels – the patient, the case manager, and the clinician have been rudimentary to-date. In this paper we present a model information system that integrates patient health information across multiple domains to support the monitoring and care of children with persistent asthma. The system has been developed for use in a multi-specialty group practice and includes three primary components: 1) a patient-centered telephone-linked communication system; 2) a web-based alert reporting and nurse case-management system; and 3) EMR-based provider communication to support clinical decision making at the point-of-care. The system offers a model for a new level of connectivity for health information that supports customized monitoring, IT-enabled nurse case-managers, and the delivery of longitudinal data to clinicians to support the care of children with persistent asthma. Systems like the one described are well -suited, perhaps essential, technologies for the care of children and adults with chronic conditions such as asthma. PMID:14728122

  10. Occupational asthma often goes unrecognised.

    PubMed

    Cullinan, Paul; Cannon, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Occupational asthma is induced de novo by an airborne agent encountered in the workplace. The risk of occupational asthma is greater in those with a prior atopic history. Work-exacerbated asthma is the provocation of pre-existing, or coincidental, disease by one or more irritant exposures at work. Distinguishing occupational from work-exacerbated asthma can be difficult but it is important since the two have very different clinical, occupational and legal implications. Occupational asthma is underrecognised, the disease often develops in young people who are otherwise fit. They may not recognise their symptoms as anything out of the ordinary, or may confuse them with hay fever or a cold. It is sensible to consider occupational and work-exacerbated asthma in every working adult who has asthma or who presents with suggestive symptoms such as rhinitis. Occupational asthma almost always arises from an immediate-type hypersensitivity reaction to a respiratory sensitising agent in the workplace. The disease has a short latency with symptoms developing 6 to 36 months after employment in a new job. Rhinitis is common and in those working in an environment with airborne proteins the absence of rhinitis effectively rules out occupational asthma. In occupational asthma, symptoms (including nasal symptoms) improve away from work. Once the disease is established symptoms are provoked by even very small exposures at work and begin to be provoked by a wide variety of irritant exposures both at, and away from, work. It is good practice to enquire into the employment of every working-age adult with asthma, or rhinitis, and particularly in those presenting with new symptoms or symptoms that have become more difficult to manage. Patients should routinely be asked whether their symptoms improve when they are not at work.

  11. How Is Asthma Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NEXT >> Featured Video Hard to Breathe: NHLBI Researchers Seek Treatments for Severe Asthma 05/29/2014 The ... Topics Asthma article Hard to Breathe: NHLBI Researchers Seek Treatments for Severe Asthma 05/29/2014 Asthma ...

  12. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Conditions Asthma and Pregnancy Asthma Medications Asthma Medications Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... for both mother and child. Making Decisions about Medication During Pregnancy It is important that your asthma ...

  13. What Is Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section What Is Asthma? Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... major trigger for asthma. Photo: iStock Who Gets Asthma? People get asthma because of an interaction between ...

  14. Asthma and allergy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - asthma and allergy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on asthma and allergies : Allergy and Asthma Network -- www.allergyasthmanetwork.org American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology -- www. ...

  15. Asthma Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... least likely to trigger asthma? Strenuous exercise A common cold Reading the newspaper Cat dander Tobacco smoke Reading ... individuals. Viral and bacterial infections, such as the common cold and sinusitis, and continuous exercise are also common ...

  16. Management of acute traumatic stress in nuclear and radiological emergencies.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Marina; Jordan, Osvaldo; Kuper, Enrique; Hernandez, Daniel; Galmarini, Martin; Ferraro, Augusto

    2010-06-01

    In order to effectively respond to and minimize the psychological impact following disasters, such as radio-nuclear ones, it is essential to understand the mechanisms involved in such conditions and how to prevent and treat the psychological impacts, including those related to acute traumatic stress and its consequences across life span. Radio-nuclear emergencies may cause psychological traumatic stress, with its potentially significant consequences in mental health, with both short and long-term effects, which extend beyond the individuals directly affected. Ionizing radiation cannot be perceived by human senses and most people are unaware of the magnitude of its effects, which could result in feelings of helplessness and vulnerability. Those situations with a high degree of uncertainty, regarding potential future health effects, are more psychologically traumatic than others. The present century has witnessed a steady increase in the number of publications concerning the mental health impact of traumatic events, showing the need of increasing the study of traumatic stress and its impact on mental health. A prompt, planned and effective response to manage disaster-induced acute traumatic stress may prevent the evolutionary reactions of traumatic stress into disorders or even chronic stress diseases that can appear after a nuclear or radiological emergency.

  17. Update on management of cardiac arrhythmias in acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Willich, T; Goette, A

    2015-04-01

    This review summarizes different types of arrhythmias in patients with acute coronary syndromes and provides an overview of the available therapeutic options for acute care and management of critical arrhythmias. The different therapeutic options are depending on the origin and type of arrhythmia. The main common dominant mechanisms are intramural re-entry in ischemia and triggered activity in reperfusion. The different forms of arrhythmia were explained in detail. Atrial arrhythmias are mainly atrial fibrillation; other forms are rare and usually self-limited. As therapeutic options antiarrhythmic drug therapy with beta-blockers or amiodarone and direct current cardioversion are suitable. Ventricular arrhythmias can be divided in premature ventricular complexes, accelerated idioventricular rhythm, non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT), ventricular fibrillation (VF) and electrical storm. As therapeutic options antiarrhythmic drug therapy, implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy (ICD), radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) and stellate ganglion blockade are available. The treatment with antiarrhythmic drug is rather cautious recommended, with the exception of beta-blockers. An additional drug therapy with ranolazine may be considered. The advantage of ICD therapy for long-term primary or secondary prophylactic therapy has been well documented. ICD therapy is associated with significant reduction in mortality compared with antiarrhythmic drug therapy (mainly amiodarone), with the exception of beta-blockers. RFA and stellate ganglion blockade are rather intended as therapeutically options for incessant VT/VF or electrical storm.

  18. Management of acute cardiac tamponade by subxiphoid pericardiotomy.

    PubMed

    Alcan, K E; Zabetakis, P M; Marino, N D; Franzone, A J; Michelis, M F; Bruno, M S

    1982-02-26

    Eighteen patients with cardiac tamponade were treated by subxiphoid pericardiotomy performed with the patients under local anesthesia. This group included 9 cases of uremic pericarditis (50%), 5 cases of metastatic cancer (28%), 2 cases of trauma (11%), 1 case of tuberculosis (5.5%), and 1 case of unknown cause. Immediate relief from acute cardiac tamponade was obtained in all 18 cases with only minor and self-limiting postoperative complications, including transient supraventricular arrhythmias (five cases) and fever (five cases). There were no deaths related to either the operative procedure or reaccumulation of the pericardial effusion. The drainage period averaged 9.6 days (range, three to 28 days). Pericardial biopsy was performed in 15 of 18 cases. We conclude that subxiphoid pericardiotomy is a safe and effective method for the management of pericardial effusion of diverse causes. The ability to perform this technique safely using local anesthesia and the capacity to obtain a biopsy specimen under direct visualization make this technique superior to both needle pericardiocentesis and pericardiectomy in the acutely ill patient.

  19. Management of acute heart failure in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Antonio; Arrigo, Mattia; Tolppanen, Heli; Gayat, Etienne; Laribi, Said; Metra, Marco; Seronde, Marie France; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is the most common cause of unplanned hospital admissions, and is associated with high mortality rates. Over the next few decades, the combination of improved cardiovascular disease survival and progressive ageing of the population will further increase the prevalence of AHF in developed countries. New recommendations on the management of AHF have been published recently, but as elderly patients are under-represented in clinical trials, and scientific evidence is often lacking, the diagnosis and management of AHF in this population is challenging. The clinical presentation of AHF, especially in patients aged>85years, differs substantially from that in younger patients, with unspecific symptoms, such as fatigue and confusion, often overriding dyspnoea. Older patients also have a different risk profile compared with younger patients: often heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and infection as the most frequent precipitating factor of AHF. Moreover, co-morbidities, disability and frailty are common, and increase morbidity, recovery time, readmission rates and mortality; their presence should be detected during a geriatric assessment. Diagnostics and treatment for AHF should be tailored according to cardiopulmonary and geriatric status, giving special attention to the patient's preferences for care. Whereas many elderly AHF patients may be managed similarly to younger patients, different strategies should be applied in the presence of relevant co-morbidities, disability and frailty. The option of palliative care should be considered at an early stage, to avoid unnecessary and harmful diagnostics and treatments.

  20. Acute wound management: revisiting the approach to assessment, irrigation, and closure considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ayello, Elizabeth A.; Woo, Kevin; Nitzki-George, Diane; Sibbald, R. Gary

    2010-01-01

    Background As millions of emergency department (ED) visits each year include wound care, emergency care providers must remain experts in acute wound management. The variety of acute wounds presenting to the ED challenge the physician to select the most appropriate management to facilitate healing. A complete wound history along with anatomic and specific medical considerations for each patient provides the basis of decision making for wound management. It is essential to apply an evidence‐based approach and consider each wound individually in order to create the optimal conditions for wound healing. Aims A comprehensive evidence‐based approach to acute wound management is an essential skill set for any emergency physician or acute care practitioner. This review provides an overview of current evidence and addresses frequent pitfalls. Methods A systematic review of the literature for acute wound management was performed. Results A structured MEDLINE search was performed regarding acute wound management including established wound care guidelines. The data obtained provided the framework for evidence‐based recommendations and current best practices for wound care. Conclusion Acute wound management varies based on the wound location and characteristics. No single approach can be applied to all wounds; however, a systematic approach to acute wound care integrated with current best practices provides the framework for exceptional wound management. PMID:21373312

  1. Antiviral selection in the management of acute retinal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Patrick MK; Hooper, Claire Y; Lightman, Susan

    2010-01-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal antiviral regimen in the management of acute retinal necrosis, a disease caused by herpetic viruses with devastating consequences for the eye. The current gold standard is based on retrospective case series. Because the incidence of disease is low, few well-designed, randomized trials have evaluated treatment dosage and duration. Newer oral antiviral agents are emerging as alternatives to high-dose intravenous acyclovir, avoiding the need for inpatient intravenous treatment. Drug resistance is uncommon but may also be difficult to identify. Antiviral drugs have few side effects, but special attention needs to be paid to patients who have underlying renal disease, are pregnant or are immunocompromised. PMID:20169044

  2. Dyspnoea management in acute coronary syndrome patients treated with ticagrelor

    PubMed Central

    Parodi, Guido; Storey, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of dyspnoea in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients has always been considered a challenging diagnostic and therapeutic clinical scenario. P2Y12 platelet receptor inhibitors (i.e., clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor) are currently the cornerstone of treatment of ACS patients. Thus, in the last few years, the potential association between ACS and dyspnoea has also become more challenging with the increasing use of ticagrelor in these patients due to its beneficial effects on ischaemic event prevention and mortality, since ticagrelor can induce dyspnoea as a side effect. The present article is intended to review the current literature regarding dyspnoea occurrence in ACS patients, especially those treated with ticagrelor, and to propose ticagrelor-associated dyspnoea management recommendations based on current knowledge. PMID:25267878

  3. The pathophysiology, diagnosis and current management of acute compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, James; Haddad, Behrooz; Khan, Wasim S

    2014-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is a surgical emergency warranting prompt evaluation and treatment. It can occur with any elevation in interstitial pressure in a closed osseo-fascial compartment. Resultant ischaemic damage may be irreversible within six hours and can result in long-term morbidity and even death. The diagnosis is largely clinical with the classical description of 'pain out of proportion to the injury'. Compartment pressure monitors can be a helpful adjunct where the diagnosis is in doubt. Initial treatment is with the removal of any constricting dressings or casts, avoiding hypotension and optimizing tissue perfusion by keeping the limb at heart level. If symptoms persist, definitive treatment is necessary with timely surgical decompression of all the involved compartments. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnosis and current management of ACS.

  4. How to manage asparaginase hypersensitivity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Outcomes for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have improved significantly in recent decades, primarily due to dose-intensified, multi-agent chemotherapy regimens, of which asparaginase has played a prominent role. Despite this success, hypersensitivity remains a significant problem, often requiring the termination of asparaginase. Failure to complete the entire asparaginase therapy course due to clinical hypersensitivity, subclinical hypersensitivity (i.e., silent inactivation), or other treatment-related toxicity is associated with poor ALL outcomes. Thus, it is critical to rapidly identify patients who develop clinical/subclinical hypersensitivity and switch these patients to an alternate asparaginase formulation. This article provides an overview of asparaginase hypersensitivity, identification and management of hypersensitivity and subclinical hypersensitivity, and issues related to switching patients to asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi following hypersensitivity reaction.

  5. Performance of Turbuhaler((R)) in Patients with Acute Airway Obstruction and COPD, and in Children with Asthma : Understanding the Clinical Importance of Adequate Peak Inspiratory Flow, High Lung Deposition, and Low In Vivo Dose Variability.

    PubMed

    Selroos, Olof; Borgström, Lars; Ingelf, Jarl

    2006-01-01

    The dry-powder inhaler (DPI) Turbuhaler((R)) has been on the market for nearly two decades. Products containing terbutaline, formoterol, budesonide, and the combination budesonide/formoterol are widely used by patients with asthma and COPD. Most patients and physicians find Turbuhaler((R)) easy to use, and local side effects are rare. This is thought to arise from the lack of additives or only small amounts in the formulation, in addition to minimal deposition of the drug in the oropharynx and on the vocal cords during inspiration.The function of Turbuhaler((R)) has frequently been questioned. This article aims to review and clarify some key issues that have been challenged in the literature (e.g. the effectiveness of Turbuhaler((R)) in patients with more restricting conditions), to discuss the importance of lung deposition, and to explain the low in vivo variability associated with Turbuhaler((R)) and the lack of correlation with the higher in vitro variability.Turbuhaler((R)), like other DPIs, is flow dependent to some degree. However, a peak inspiratory flow (PIF) through Turbuhaler((R)) of 30 L/min gives a good clinical effect. These PIF values can be obtained by patients with conditions thought to be difficult to manage with inhalational agents, such as asthmatic children and adult patients with acute severe airway obstruction and COPD. Excellent clinical results with Turbuhaler((R)) in large controlled studies in patients with COPD and acute severe airway obstruction provide indirect evidence that medication delivered via Turbuhaler((R)) reaches the target organ.Due to the large amount of small particles and the moderate inbuilt resistance in Turbuhaler((R)), which opens up the vocal cords during inhalation, Turbuhaler((R)) is associated with a high lung deposition (25-40% of the delivered dose) compared with pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs) and other DPIs. A good correlation has been found between lung deposition and clinical efficacy. A high lung

  6. [Asthma and cyclic neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Salazar Cabrera, A N; Berrón Pérez, R; Ortega Martell, J A; Onuma Takane, E

    1996-01-01

    We report a male with history of recurrent infections (recurrent oral aphtous disease [ROAD], middle ear infections and pharyngo amigdalitis) every 3 weeks since he was 7 months old. At the age of 3 years cyclic neutropenia was diagnosed with cyclic fall in the total neutrophil count in blood smear every 21 days and prophylactic antimicrobial therapy was indicated. Episodic events every 3 weeks of acute asthma and allergic rhinitis were detected at the age of 6 years old and specific immunotherapy to Bermuda grass was given during 3 years with markedly improvement in his allergic condition but not in the ROAD. He came back until the age of 16 with episodic acute asthma and ROAD. The total neutrophil count failed to 0 every 21 days and surprisingly the total eosinophil count increased up to 2,000 at the same time, with elevation of serum IgE (412 Ul/mL). Specific immunotherapy to D.pt. and Aller.a. and therapy with timomodulin was indicated. After 3 months we observed clinical improvement in the asthmatic condition and the ROAD disappeared, but the total neutrophil count did not improve. We present this case as a rare association between 2 diseases with probably no etiological relationship but may be physiopatological that could help to understand more the pathogenesis of asthma.

  7. Personalising care of adults with asthma from Asia: a modified e-Dephi consensus study to inform management tailored to attitude and control profiles.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Alison; Price, David B; Pinnock, Hilary; Lee, Tan Tze; Roa, Camilo; Cho, Sang-Heon; David-Wang, Aileen; Wong, Gary; van der Molen, Thys; Ryan, Dermot; Castillo-Carandang, Nina; Yong, Yee Vern

    2017-01-05

    REALISE Asia-an online questionnaire-based study of Asian asthma patients-identified five patient clusters defined in terms of their control status and attitude towards their asthma (categorised as: 'Well-adjusted and at least partly controlled'; 'In denial about symptoms'; 'Tolerating with poor control'; 'Adrift and poorly controlled'; 'Worried with multiple symptoms'). We developed consensus recommendations for tailoring management of these attitudinal-control clusters. An expert panel undertook a three-round electronic Delphi (e-Delphi): Round 1: panellists received descriptions of the attitudinal-control clusters and provided free text recommendations for their assessment and management. Round 2: panellists prioritised Round 1 recommendations and met (or joined a teleconference) to consolidate the recommendations. Round 3: panellists voted and prioritised the remaining recommendations. Consensus was defined as Round 3 recommendations endorsed by >50% of panellists. Highest priority recommendations were those receiving the highest score. The multidisciplinary panellists (9 clinicians, 1 pharmacist and 1 health social scientist; 7 from Asia) identified consensus recommendations for all clusters. Recommended pharmacological (e.g., step-up/down; self-management; simplified regimen) and non-pharmacological approaches (e.g., trigger management, education, social support; inhaler technique) varied substantially according to each cluster's attitude to asthma and associated psychosocial drivers of behaviour. The attitudinal-control clusters defined by REALISE Asia resonated with the international panel. Consensus was reached on appropriate tailored management approaches for all clusters. Summarised and incorporated into a structured management pathway, these recommendations could facilitate personalised care. Generalisability of these patient clusters should be assessed in other socio-economic, cultural and literacy groups and nationalities in Asia.

  8. Personalising care of adults with asthma from Asia: a modified e-Dephi consensus study to inform management tailored to attitude and control profiles

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, Alison; Price, David B; Pinnock, Hilary; Lee, Tan Tze; Roa, Camilo; Cho, Sang-Heon; David-Wang, Aileen; Wong, Gary; van der Molen, Thys; Ryan, Dermot; Castillo-Carandang, Nina; Yong, Yee Vern

    2017-01-01

    REALISE Asia—an online questionnaire-based study of Asian asthma patients—identified five patient clusters defined in terms of their control status and attitude towards their asthma (categorised as: ‘Well-adjusted and at least partly controlled’; ‘In denial about symptoms’; ‘Tolerating with poor control’; ‘Adrift and poorly controlled’; ‘Worried with multiple symptoms’). We developed consensus recommendations for tailoring management of these attitudinal–control clusters. An expert panel undertook a three-round electronic Delphi (e-Delphi): Round 1: panellists received descriptions of the attitudinal–control clusters and provided free text recommendations for their assessment and management. Round 2: panellists prioritised Round 1 recommendations and met (or joined a teleconference) to consolidate the recommendations. Round 3: panellists voted and prioritised the remaining recommendations. Consensus was defined as Round 3 recommendations endorsed by >50% of panellists. Highest priority recommendations were those receiving the highest score. The multidisciplinary panellists (9 clinicians, 1 pharmacist and 1 health social scientist; 7 from Asia) identified consensus recommendations for all clusters. Recommended pharmacological (e.g., step-up/down; self-management; simplified regimen) and non-pharmacological approaches (e.g., trigger management, education, social support; inhaler technique) varied substantially according to each cluster’s attitude to asthma and associated psychosocial drivers of behaviour. The attitudinal–control clusters defined by REALISE Asia resonated with the international panel. Consensus was reached on appropriate tailored management approaches for all clusters. Summarised and incorporated into a structured management pathway, these recommendations could facilitate personalised care. Generalisability of these patient clusters should be assessed in other socio-economic, cultural and literacy groups and

  9. Critical asthma syndrome in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Schivo, Michael; Phan, Chinh; Louie, Samuel; Harper, Richart W

    2015-02-01

    Critical asthma syndrome represents the most severe subset of asthma exacerbations, and the critical asthma syndrome is an umbrella term for life-threatening asthma, status asthmaticus, and near-fatal asthma. According to the 2007 National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines, a life-threatening asthma exacerbation is marked by an inability to speak, a reduced peak expiratory flow rate of <25 % of a patient's personal best, and a failed response to frequent bronchodilator administration and intravenous steroids. Almost all critical asthma syndrome cases require emergency care, and most cases require hospitalization, often in an intensive care unit. Among asthmatics, those with the critical asthma syndrome are difficult to manage and there is little room for error. Patients with the critical asthma syndrome are prone to complications, they utilize immense resources, and they incite anxiety in many care providers. Managing this syndrome is anything but routine, and it requires attention, alacrity, and accuracy. The specific management strategies of adults with the critical asthma syndrome in the hospital with a focus on intensive care are discussed. Topics include the initial assessment for critical illness, initial ventilation management, hemodynamic issues, novel diagnostic tools and interventions, and common pitfalls. We highlight the use of critical care ultrasound, and we provide practical guidelines on how to manage deteriorating patients such as those with pneumothoraces. When standard asthma management fails, we provide experience-driven recommendations coupled with available evidence to guide the care team through advanced treatment. Though we do not discuss medications in detail, we highlight recent advances.

  10. Aligning patient care and asthma treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Eric

    2005-11-01

    This article describes how the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma can be used in the clinical setting to improve a patient's everyday function and quality of life. Major recommendations are detailed and case studies provide a practical approach for patient management.

  11. Environmental factors associated with asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Bailus; Stokes, Lynette D.; Warren, Rueben

    2003-01-01

    Asthma, a disease of attacks and remission, continues to account for substantial morbidity and direct economic costs. Numerous studies--epidemiologic, toxicologic and clinical--present evidence for a broad spectrum of environmental risk factors associated with asthma. This review summarizes current thinking on a subset of these factors. Knowledge of potential environmental determinants of asthma is important to both the patient and healthcare professional in the application of multiple modalities of medical and environmental intervention for management of the development, and exacerbation of this chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways. PMID:12760611

  12. Single-inhaler combination therapy for maintenance and relief of asthma: a new strategy in disease management.

    PubMed

    Peters, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    When an adequate standard of asthma control is not achieved with maintenance treatment of inhaled corticosteroids, the addition of a long-acting beta(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist (LABA) bronchodilator is recommended. Using a combination product, salmeterol/fluticasone propionate (Seretide or Advair) or budesonide/formoterol (Symbicort) is preferred for convenience and avoids any risk that LABA might be used as monotherapy. As formoterol has a rapid onset of bronchodilator effect, the budesonide/formoterol combination can be used for both the maintenance and reliever components of asthma treatment (Symbicort SMART) and this is endorsed as an effective treatment by the Global Initiative for Asthma. The efficacy of this approach has been evaluated in a series of well conducted, controlled studies. Current control of asthma symptoms is improved or achieved with reduced total dose administration with Symbicort SMART compared with any reasonable alternate option. In every study, the risk of severe exacerbations was lower with Symbicort SMART than comparator treatment. Patients who benefit to the greatest extent are those with evidence of more severe asthma and greater exacerbation risk. When initiated in suitable patients in conjunction with appropriate education, Symbicort SMART is dominant in pharmacoeconomic terms. Symbicort SMART delivers improved asthma outcomes with lower treatment and social costs than any alternative.

  13. Banishing Asthma-Inducing Mice Allergens on The Cheap

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163963.html Banishing Asthma-Inducing Mice Allergens on the Cheap Do-it- ... pest management may not be needed to control asthma in kids with a mouse allergy, researchers say. ...

  14. The efficacy of a comprehensive lifestyle modification programme based on yoga in the management of bronchial asthma: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Vempati, Ramaprabhu; Bijlani, Ramesh Lal; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Background There is a substantial body of evidence on the efficacy of yoga in the management of bronchial asthma. Many studies have reported, as the effects of yoga on bronchial asthma, significant improvements in pulmonary functions, quality of life and reduction in airway hyper-reactivity, frequency of attacks and medication use. In addition, a few studies have attempted to understand the effects of yoga on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) or exercise tolerance capacity. However, none of these studies has investigated any immunological mechanisms by which yoga improves these variables in bronchial asthma. Methods The present randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted on 57 adult subjects with mild or moderate bronchial asthma who were allocated randomly to either the yoga (intervention) group (n = 29) or the wait-listed control group (n = 28). The control group received only conventional care and the yoga group received an intervention based on yoga, in addition to the conventional care. The intervention consisted of 2-wk supervised training in lifestyle modification and stress management based on yoga followed by closely monitored continuation of the practices at home for 6-wk. The outcome measures were assessed in both the groups at 0 wk (baseline), 2, 4 and 8 wk by using Generalized Linear Model (GLM) repeated measures followed by post-hoc analysis. Results In the yoga group, there was a steady and progressive improvement in pulmonary function, the change being statistically significant in case of the first second of forced expiratory volume (FEV1) at 8 wk, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) at 2, 4 and 8 wk as compared to the corresponding baseline values. There was a significant reduction in EIB in the yoga group. However, there was no corresponding reduction in the urinary prostaglandin D2 metabolite (11β prostaglandin F2α) levels in response to the exercise challenge. There was also no significant change in serum eosinophilic cationic

  15. Asthma in Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Hunninghake, Gary M.; Weiss, Scott T.; Celedón, Juan C.

    2006-01-01

    Hispanic individuals trace their ancestry to countries that were previously under Spanish rule, including Mexico, large parts of Central and South America, and some Caribbean islands. Most—but not all—Hispanics have variable proportions of European, Amerindian, and African ancestry. Hispanics are diverse with regard to many factors, including racial ancestry, country of origin, area of residence, socioeconomic status, education, and access to health care. Recent findings suggest that there is marked variation in the prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of asthma in Hispanics in the United States and in Hispanic America. The reasons for differences in asthma and asthma morbidity among and within Hispanic subgroups are poorly understood but are likely due to the interaction between yet-unidentified genetic variants and other factors, including environmental tobacco smoke exposure, obesity, allergen exposure, and availability of health care. Barriers to optimal management of asthma in Hispanics in the United States and in Hispanic America include inadequate access to health care, suboptimal use of antiinflammatory medications, and lack of reference values for spirometric measures of lung function in many subgroups (e.g., Puerto Ricans). Future studies of asthma in Hispanics should include large samples of subgroups that are well characterized with regard to self-reported ethnicity, country of origin, place of birth, area of residence, and indicators of socioeconomic status. Because Hispanics are disproportionately represented among the poor in the United States, implementation of adequate access to health care and social reforms (e.g., improving housing conditions) would likely have a major impact on reducing asthma morbidity in this population. PMID:16210666

  16. Advances in the management of acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Da-Wei; Yin, Yi-Mei; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is an uncommon but dramatic clinical syndrome characterized by hepatic encephalopathy and a bleeding tendency due to abrupt loss of liver function caused by massive or submassive liver necrosis in a patient with a previously healthy liver. The causes of ALF encompass a wide variety of toxic, viral, metabolic, vascular and autoimmune insults to the liver, and identifying the correct cause can be difficult or even impossible. Many patients with ALF develop a cascade of serious complications involving almost every organ system, and death is mostly due to multi-organ failure, hemorrhage, infection, and intracranial hypertension. Fortunately, the outcome of ALF has been improved in the last 3 decades through the specific treatment for the disease of certain etiology, and the advanced intensive care management. For most severely affected patients who fail to recover after treatment, rapid evaluation for transfer to a transplantation center and consideration for liver transplantation is mandatory so that transplantation can be applied before contraindications develop. This review focuses on the recent advances in the understanding of various contributing etiologies, the administration of etiology-specific treatment to alleviate the liver injury, and the management of complications (e.g., encephalopathy, coagulopathy, cardiovascular instability, respiratory failure, renal failure, sepsis and metabolic disturbance) in patients with ALF. Assessment of the need for liver transplantation is also presented. PMID:24222950

  17. Management of Patients with Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Strate, Lisa L.; Gralnek, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the management of patients with acute overt lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Hemodynamic status should be initially assessed with intravascular volume resuscitation started as needed. Risk stratification based upon clinical parameters should be performed to help distinguish patients at high and low-risk of adverse outcomes. Hematochezia associated with hemodynamic instability may be indicative of an upper GI bleeding source and thus warrants an upper endoscopy. In the majority of patients, colonoscopy should be the initial diagnostic procedure and should be performed within 24 hours of patient presentation after adequate colon preparation. Endoscopic hemostasis therapy should be provided to patients with high risk endoscopic stigmata of bleeding including active bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel, or adherent clot. The endoscopic hemostasis modality used (mechanical, thermal, injection or combination) is most often guided by the etiology of bleeding, access to the bleeding site, and endoscopist experience with the various hemostasis modalities. Repeat colonoscopy, with endoscopic hemostasis performed if indicated, should be considered for patients with evidence of recurrent bleeding. Radiographic interventions (tagged red blood cell scintigraphy, CT angiography, angiography) should be considered in high-risk patients with ongoing bleeding who do not respond adequately to resuscitation, and who are unlikely to tolerate bowel preparation and colonoscopy. Strategies to prevent recurrent bleeding should be considered. NSAID use should be avoided in patients with a history of acute lower GI bleeding particularly if secondary to diverticulosis or angioectasia. In patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin (secondary prophylaxis), aspirin should not be discontinued. The exact timing depends on the severity of bleeding, perceived adequacy of hemostasis and the risk of a thromboembolic event. Surgery

  18. Effect of maternal asthma and gestational asthma therapy on fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Bakhireva, Ludmila N; Schatz, Michael; Chambers, Christina D

    2007-03-01

    Asthma is a common chronic condition that might seriously complicate pregnancy and fetal development. This article provides a comprehensive review of the existing literature regarding the effect on fetal growth of maternal asthma and common asthma medications used during pregnancy, including short-and long-acting beta (2)-agonists, inhaled and oral corticosteroids, chromones, leukotriene receptor agonists, and theophylline. Evaluated outcomes of fetal growth include low birth weight, mean birth weight, small for gestational age, birth length and head circumference, and measures of asymmetrical growth retardation. Methodological and practical considerations related to safety of asthma medications in pregnancy and management of gestational asthma are discussed.

  19. Tiotropium – what role in asthma?

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    Tiotropium solution for inhalation (Spiriva Respimat - Boehringer Ingelheim) is the first long-acting muscarinic antagonist to be marketed in the UK for the management of asthma. It is licensed as add-on maintenance bronchodilator treatment in adults with asthma who are using an inhaled corticosteroid (≥800μg budesonide/day or equivalent) and a long-acting beta2 agonist, and who have had one or more severe exacerbations in the previous year. This corresponds to use at step 4 of both the British asthma guideline and the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) strategy for the treatment of asthma in adults. Here we consider the evidence for tiotropium in the management of asthma and whether it offers any advantages over existing therapeutic options at step 4.

  20. Asthma in Hispanics. An 8-Year Update

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, Franziska J.; Forno, Erick; Cooper, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    This review provides an update on asthma in Hispanics, a diverse group tracing their ancestry to countries previously under Spanish rule. A marked variability in the prevalence and morbidity from asthma remains among Hispanic subgroups in the United States and Hispanic America. In the United States, Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans have high and low burdens of asthma, respectively (the “Hispanic Paradox”). This wide divergence in asthma morbidity among Hispanic subgroups is multifactorial, likely reflecting the effects of known (secondhand tobacco smoke, air pollution, psychosocial stress, obesity, inadequate treatment) and potential (genetic variants, urbanization, vitamin D insufficiency, and eradication of parasitic infections) risk factors. Barriers to adequate asthma management in Hispanics include economic and educational disadvantages, lack of health insurance, and no access to or poor adherence with controller medications such as inhaled corticosteroids. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of asthma in Hispanic subgroups, many questions remain. Studies of asthma in Hispanic America should focus on environmental or lifestyle factors that are more relevant to asthma in this region (e.g., urbanization, air pollution, parasitism, and stress). In the United States, research studies should focus on risk factors that are known to or may diverge among Hispanic subgroups, including but not limited to epigenetic variation, prematurity, vitamin D level, diet, and stress. Clinical trials of culturally appropriate interventions that address multiple aspects of asthma management in Hispanic subgroups should be prioritized for funding. Ensuring high-quality healthcare for all remains a pillar of eliminating asthma disparities. PMID:24881937

  1. Improving asthma outcomes in large populations.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Michael; Zeiger, Robert S

    2011-08-01

    This article summarizes our experience using administrative, survey, and telephone information to define asthma severity, impairment, risk, and quality of care in our large Kaiser Permanente population. Our data suggest that the 2-year Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set definition of persistent asthma is a good surrogate for survey-defined persistent asthma, and thus it would be reasonable to direct asthma population management and quality-of-care assessments at patients with Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set-defined persistent asthma for 2 years in a row. For population management, the numbers of short-acting β-agonist (SABA) canisters dispensed and validated tools on mail or telephone surveys have been used to assess asthma impairment. Algorithms based on pharmacy data (SABA canister and oral corticosteroid dispensings and prior emergency hospital care) have been used to assess the risk domain of asthma control. The asthma medication ratio (controllers divided by controllers plus SABAs) has been shown to be related to improved outcomes and is recommended as an asthma quality-of-care marker. It is hoped that outreach to patients and providers based on these indicators will improve asthma outcomes in patients cared for in individual practices, as well as in large health plans.

  2. Asthma in Hispanics. An 8-year update.

    PubMed

    Rosser, Franziska J; Forno, Erick; Cooper, Philip J; Celedón, Juan C

    2014-06-01

    This review provides an update on asthma in Hispanics, a diverse group tracing their ancestry to countries previously under Spanish rule. A marked variability in the prevalence and morbidity from asthma remains among Hispanic subgroups in the United States and Hispanic America. In the United States, Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans have high and low burdens of asthma, respectively (the "Hispanic Paradox"). This wide divergence in asthma morbidity among Hispanic subgroups is multifactorial, likely reflecting the effects of known (secondhand tobacco smoke, air pollution, psychosocial stress, obesity, inadequate treatment) and potential (genetic variants, urbanization, vitamin D insufficiency, and eradication of parasitic infections) risk factors. Barriers to adequate asthma management in Hispanics include economic and educational disadvantages, lack of health insurance, and no access to or poor adherence with controller medications such as inhaled corticosteroids. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of asthma in Hispanic subgroups, many questions remain. Studies of asthma in Hispanic America should focus on environmental or lifestyle factors that are more relevant to asthma in this region (e.g., urbanization, air pollution, parasitism, and stress). In the United States, research studies should focus on risk factors that are known to or may diverge among Hispanic subgroups, including but not limited to epigenetic variation, prematurity, vitamin D level, diet, and stress. Clinical trials of culturally appropriate interventions that address multiple aspects of asthma management in Hispanic subgroups should be prioritized for funding. Ensuring high-quality healthcare for all remains a pillar of eliminating asthma disparities.

  3. Asthma in middle schools: what students have to say about their asthma.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Guadalupe X; Miller, Delesha; Zagami, Edwina; Riddle, Connie; Willis, Stephanie; King, Donna

    2006-08-01

    Preadolescence involves cognitive, social, and physiological changes along with changes in the child's environment. During this developmental stage, young adolescents are transitioning into middle school, forming a larger social network, and managing parental expectations for assuming more responsibility for self-care. The impact of these developmental changes on asthma management is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to better understand asthma and asthma management from the perspective of middle school students. A partnership was formed between the university researcher, several school nurses, and a representative of the health department, through the Orange County Asthma Coalition. Funds were secured from the American Lung Association. School nurses helped to identify and recruit 50 middle school students with asthma to participate in focus groups. The focus-group discussions centered on asthma management with implications for intervention development. Analyses sought to identify developmental issues that affect management. Results indicated that the transition to middle school represents a challenge to managing asthma. As compared with the elementary school environment, support structures are broader and more diffuse, physical education is more demanding, and peer pressure is greater. Nevertheless, the desire for greater autonomy and independence in self-care was strong, particularly among eighth graders. Most interventions are designed for either children or adults, without recognizing the important developmental changes that are occurring in preadolescents with implications for asthma management. A school-based intervention in middle school may help students with asthma transition to greater autonomy of care, while easing transition in other domains of life.

  4. Implementation of ‘matrix support’ (collaborative care) to reduce asthma and COPD referrals and improve primary care management in Brazil: a pilot observational study

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Sonia Maria; Salibe-Filho, William; Tonioli, Luís Paulo; Pfingesten, Luís Eduardo; Braz, Patrícia Dias; McDonnell, Juliet; Williams, Siân; do Carmo, Débora; de Sousa, Jaime Correia; Pinnock, Hilary; Stelmach, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are leading causes of hospitalisation and death in the city of Sao Bernardo do Campo. The municipality had difficulties in sustaining a pulmonology specialist team. Local policy has strengthened the knowledge of the primary care teams to improve the management of these diseases. Our aim is to pilot the implementation of an educational intervention based on collaborative care focused on reducing respiratory-related referrals. We implemented ‘matrix support’: a Brazilian collaborative educational intervention promoting specialist training and support for primary care physicians in three health territories with the highest number of referrals. Clinicians and nurses from primary care attended an 8-h workshop. The backlog of respiratory referrals was prioritised, where Asthma and COPD represented 70% of referral reasons. Initially, pulmonologists held joint consultations with physicians and nurses; as confidence grew, these were replaced by round-table note-based case discussions. The primary outcome was the number of asthma and COPD referrals. Almost all primary healthcare professionals in the three areas (132 of 157–87%) were trained; 360 patients were discussed, including 220 joint consultations. The number of respiratory referrals dropped from 290 (the year before matrix support) to 134 (the year after) (P<0.05). Referrals for asthma/COPD decreased from 13.4 to 5.4 cases per month (P=0.09) and for other lung diseases from 10.8 to 5.3 cases per month (P<0.05). Knowledge scores showed a significant improvement (P<0.001). Matrix-support collaborative care was well-accepted by primary care professionals associated with improved knowledge and reduced respiratory referrals. The initiative attracted specialists to the region overcoming historical recruitment problems. PMID:27536853

  5. The Effect of Long-term Corticosteroid Use on Bone Mineral Density in Children: A Prospective Longitudinal Assessment in the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) Study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, H. William; Van Natta, Mark L.; Covar, Ronina A.; Tonascia, James; Green, Rebecca P.; Strunk, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Systemic corticosteroids are known to induce osteoporosis and increase the risk of fractures in adults and children. Inhaled corticosteroids have been shown to increase the risk of osteoporosis and fractures in adults at risk. However, long-term prospective studies in children to assess risks of multiple short courses of oral corticosteroids and chronic inhaled corticosteroids have not been done. Thus, we assessed the effects of multiple short courses of oral corticosteroids and long-term inhaled corticosteroids on bone mineral accretion over a period of years. Patients and Methods This was a cohort followup study for a median of 7 years of children with mild to moderate asthma initially randomized into the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) trial. Serial dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans of the lumbar spine for bone mineral density (BMD) were performed in all patients. Annual bone mineral accretion was calculated in 531 boys and 346 girls with asthma aged 5–12 years at baseline (84% of the initial cohort). Results Oral corticosteroid bursts produced a dose-dependent reduction in bone mineral accretion (0.052, 0.049, and 0.046 gm/cm2/year, p=0.0002) and an increase in risk of osteopenia (10%, 14% and 21%, p=0.02) for 0, 1–4, and 5+ courses, respectively, in males but not females. Cumulative inhaled corticosteroid use was associated with a small decrease in bone mineral accretion in males (p=0.05) but not females, but no increased risk of osteopenia. Conclusion Multiple oral corticosteroid bursts over a period of years can produce a dose-dependent reduction in bone mineral accretion and increased risk of osteopenia in children with asthma. Inhaled corticosteroid use has the potential for reducing bone mineral accretion in male children progressing through puberty but this risk is likely to be outweighed by the ability to reduce the amount of oral corticosteroids used in these children. PMID:18595975

  6. Guidelines for severe uncontrolled asthma.

    PubMed

    Cisneros Serrano, Carolina; Melero Moreno, Carlos; Almonacid Sánchez, Carlos; Perpiñá Tordera, Miguel; Picado Valles, César; Martínez Moragón, Eva; Pérez de Llano, Luis; Soto Campos, José Gregorio; Urrutia Landa, Isabel; García Hernández, Gloria

    2015-05-01

    Since the publication, 9 years ago, of the latest SEPAR (Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery) Guidelines on Difficult-to-Control Asthma (DCA), much progress has been made in the understanding of asthmatic disease. These new data need to be reviewed, analyzed and incorporated into the guidelines according to their level of evidence and recommendation. Recently, consensus documents and clinical practice guidelines (CPG) addressing this issue have been published. In these guidelines, specific mention will be made of what the previous DCA guidelines defined as "true difficult-to-control asthma". This is asthma that remains uncontrolled after diagnosis and a systematic evaluation to rule out factors unrelated to the disease itself that lead to poor control ("false difficult-to-control asthma"), and despite an appropriate treatment strategy (Spanish Guidelines for the Management of Asthma [GEMA] steps 5 and 6): severe uncontrolled asthma. In this respect, the guidelines propose a revised definition, an attempt to classify the various manifestations of this type of asthma, a proposal for a stepwise diagnostic procedure, and phenotype-targeted treatment. A specific section has also been included on DCA in childhood, aimed at assisting healthcare professionals to improve the care of these patients.

  7. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M.; Grzybowski, S.

    1976-01-01

    Occupational asthma is probably much more common than is generally realized. Though many causes have been described, undoubtedly many more are yet to be recognized. One of the diagnostic difficulties lies in the fact that in most forms of this disease a late asthmatic reaction occurs in the evening rather than at work. The pathogenetic mechanisms differ in various forms of occupational asthma. In some, an immunologic mechanism is likely; in others, a "pharmacologic" action of the offending agent is implicated. Asthma due to inhalation of dusts of western red cedar, isocyanates, detergent enzymes and textiles is considered in detail. Periodic examination of workers at risk is of value for early diagnosis and prevention of irrversible airway obstruction. PMID:766943

  8. Evaluation and sustainability of the healthy learners asthma initiative.

    PubMed

    Splett, Patricia L; Erickson, Cecelia D; Belseth, Stephanie B; Jensen, Charlotte

    2006-08-01

    The Healthy Learners Asthma Initiative (HLAI) involved collaboration between Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS), local health care providers/payors, parents, and other partners. The intervention included development of enhanced asthma care in school health offices and clinic performance improvement projects to foster adoption of National Institutes of Health asthma guidelines. Goals were to improve asthma management among school children and reduce asthma-related school absences, hospitalizations, and emergency department visits. The effectiveness evaluation utilized a randomized community trial design with 16 elementary and middle schools matched and randomly assigned to either an intervention or a control group. Outcomes investigated were (a) school health office impacts and (b) school attendance. Data sources included school health office records, district attendance, enrollment, and demographics files. Following implementation of the HLAI, asthma visits to health offices were significantly lower in intervention schools compared to control schools (91 vs 121 visits per 100 students with asthma per month), and intervention schools had greater availability of medication and asthma action plans and more peakflow measurements, asthma education, and parent communication. Clinics initiated significantly more asthma action plans and sent them to MPS. Attendance differences between groups were limited to students who received asthma care through the school health office. Monitoring of asthma management activities provided through school health offices from 2002 to 2005 indicates sustained implementation of enhanced asthma care in schools and increased asthma communication between school, parents, and health care providers.

  9. Management of Acute Osteomyelitis: A Ten-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Caitlin; Huschart, Emily; Kaul, Rajat; Bhumbra, Samina; Blackwood, R. Alexander; Mukundan, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone; proper management requires prolonged antibiotic treatment. Controversy exists as to when a patient should transition from intravenous to oral antibiotics. However, due to the high bioavailability of some oral antibiotics, optimal time to transition from high to low bioavailability antibiotics is a more valid consideration. Additionally, there are questions surrounding the efficacy of certain antibiotics, specifically trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), in treating osteomyelitis. After obtaining Institutional Review Board approval from both universities, a retrospective chart review was conducted, utilizing an author-created severity scale, on all patients seen by Pediatric Infectious Diseases at the Universities of Michigan and Toledo with an acute osteomyelitis diagnosis from 2002-2012. There were 133 patients, 106 treated successfully. Success was defined in this study specifically as treatment of <14 weeks without recurrence within 30 days of stopping antibiotics or permanent site disability. Seventeen patients were treated with TMP-SMX at comparable cure rates. Patients with pre-existing bone defects (noted in radiological reports), initial erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)≥70, hematogenous osteomyelitis with soft tissue extension, and skull osteomyelitis were associated with increased failure rate. Switch to low bioavailability antibiotics occurred, on average, at 3.5 weeks; however, switching before then was not associated with decreased cure rate. As prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), especially clindamycin-resistant MRSA, increases, TMP-SMX appears to be an acceptable antibiotic. There does not appear to be a minimum length of high bioavailability treatment required for cure. Prior bone defect, extensive infection, ESR≥70, or skull osteomyelitis may be indications for more aggressive management.

  10. [Management of coronary artery disease at the acute phase].

    PubMed

    Chatot, Marion; Schiele, François

    2015-03-01

    In patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), early management is of prime importance. However, the median time taken by the patient to call the emergency services is often very long, up to 2 hours. The presence of a physician as first responder ensures good quality resuscitation in case of cardiac arrest, and allows recording of a first ECG, which can be very informative, especially in ACS without ST segment elevation. Treatment at this stage is limited to sublingual nitroglycerin and aspirin. If the first ECG shows ST segment elevation, the patient should be immediately oriented for reperfusion, usually by percutaneous coronary intervention. in the absence of ST segment elevation, the diagnosis of ACS remains unconfirmed. This does not imply that the risk is lesser, but rather that the risk cannot be evaluated accurately in the pre-hospital setting. The use of risk scores can guide the choice of management towards an invasive strategy, including coronary angiography (immediately, or within 24-72 hours). Low-risk patients are candidates for an invasive strategy, provided non-invasive tests demonstrate the presence of ischemia. During the hospital phase, antiplatelet treatment should be initiated and must be adapted to the patient bleeding and thrombotic risk. Clopidogrel is recommended only in patients who are not amenable to prasugrel or ticagrelor. Statin therapy should be initiated from day one, regardless of the initial cholesterol level, preferably with 80 mg atorvastatin. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers should also be prescribed to complete the medical prescription both in-hospital and in the long term.

  11. Health Beliefs, Treatment Preferences and Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Asthma, Smoking and Lung Cancer Self-Management in Diverse Black Communities

    PubMed Central

    George, Maureen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this literature review is to characterize unconventional health beliefs and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for asthma, smoking and lung cancer as those that are likely safe and those that likely increase risk in diverse Black communities. These findings should provide the impetus for enhanced patient-provider communication that elicits patients’ beliefs and self-management preferences so that they may be accommodated, or when necessary, reconciled through discussion and partnership. Methods Original research articles relevant to this topic were obtained by conducting a literature search of the PubMed Plus, PsychINFO and SCOPUS databases using combinations of the following search terms: asthma, lung cancer, emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), smoking, beliefs, complementary medicine, alternative medicine, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), explanatory models, African American, and Black. Results Using predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria, 51 original research papers were retained. Taken together, they provide evidence that patients hold unconventional beliefs about the origins of asthma and lung cancer and the health risks of smoking, have negative opinions of standard medical and surgical treatments, and have favorable attitudes about using CAM. All but a small number of CAM and health behaviors were considered safe. Conclusions When patients’ unconventional beliefs and preferences are not identified and discussed, there is an increased risk that standard approaches to self-management of lung disease will be sub-optimal, that potentially dangerous CAM practices might be used and that timely medical interventions may be delayed. Practice implications Providers need effective communication skills as the medical dialogue forms the basis of patients’ understanding of disease and self-management options. The preferred endpoint of such discussions should be agreement around an

  12. [Asthma Update 2015--What Cell Biology in Basic Pulmonary Research Can Offer to the Pneumologist].

    PubMed

    Wegmann, M; Fehrenbach, H; Krauss-Etschmann, S

    2016-02-01

    Bronchial asthma is one of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases world-wide causing an enormous socio-economic burden especially in industrialized countries. Currently, asthma is increasingly considered to be a poly-symptomatic disease comprising a variety of different asthma phenotypes and endotypes. This heterogeneity of asthma explains why the standard treatment with corticosteroids and β-agonists cannot achieve full symptom control in all cases, especially not during acute exacerbations. Therefore, current asthma research focuses on primary prevention of asthma as well as on novel approaches towards a phenotype- and endotype-specific asthma therapy.

  13. The public health implications of asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Jean; Bousquet, Philippe J.; Godard, Philippe; Daures, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Asthma is a very common chronic disease that occurs in all age groups and is the focus of various clinical and public health interventions. Both morbidity and mortality from asthma are significant. The number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost due to asthma worldwide is similar to that for diabetes, liver cirrhosis and schizophrenia. Asthma management plans have, however, reduced mortality and severity in countries where they have been applied. Several barriers reduce the availability, affordability, dissemination and efficacy of optimal asthma management plans in both developed and developing countries. The workplace environment contributes significantly to the general burden of asthma. Patients with occupational asthma have higher rates of hospitalization and mortality than healthy workers. The surveillance of asthma as part of a global WHO programme is essential. The economic cost of asthma is considerable both in terms of direct medical costs (such as hospital admissions and the cost of pharmaceuticals) and indirect medical costs (such as time lost from work and premature death). Direct costs are significant in most countries. In order to reduce costs and improve quality of care, employers and health plans are exploring more precisely targeted ways of controlling rapidly rising health costs. Poor control of asthma symptoms is a major issue that can result in adverse clinical and economic outcomes. A model of asthma costs is needed to aid attempts to reduce them while permitting optimal management of the disease. This paper presents a discussion of the burden of asthma and its socioeconomic implications and proposes a model to predict the costs incurred by the disease. PMID:16175830

  14. Acute Diagnosis and Management of Stroke Presenting Dizziness or Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2015-08-01

    Stroke involving the brainstem and cerebellum frequently presents acute vestibular syndrome. Although vascular vertigo is known to usually accompany other neurologic symptoms and signs, isolated vertigo from small infarcts involving the cerebellum or brainstem has been increasingly recognized. Bedside neuro-otologic examination can reliably differentiate acute vestibular syndrome due to stroke from more benign inner ear disease. Sometimes acute isolated audiovestibular loss may herald impending infarction in the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Accurate identification of isolated vascular vertigo is very important because misdiagnosis of acute stroke may result in significant morbidity and mortality.

  15. Thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    AN ASSOCIATION between asthma and thunderstorms based on retrospective data has been noted in several papers. This study, however, draws on almost-real-time, anonymised attendance data from 35 emergency departments (EDs) in the UK, and lightning-strike plots from the Met Office.

  16. Pneumatosis Intestinalis Complicated by Pneumoperitoneum in a Patient with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon Young; Cho, Sung Bae; Kim, Hyun Ho; Lee, In Hee; Lee, Hea Yon; Kang, Hye Seon; Lee, Hwa Young

    2014-01-01

    Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is a very rare condition that is defined as the presence of gas within the subserosal or submucosal layer of the bowel. PI has been described in association with a variety of conditions including gastrointestinal tract disorders, pulmonary diseases, connective tissue disorders, organ transplantation, leukemia, and various immunodeficiency states. We report a rare case of a 74-year-old woman who complained of dyspnea during the management of acute asthma exacerbation and developed PI; but, it improved without any treatment. PMID:25473410

  17. Psychiatric factors in asthma: implications for diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Rietveld, Simon; Creer, Thomas L

    2003-01-01

    Emotional factors are an obstacle in the diagnosis and management of asthma. This review discusses three problem patterns: negative emotions in relatively normal patients with asthma; patients presenting possible functional symptoms and; patients presenting asthma in conjunction with psychiatric deviations. Negative emotions influence the symptoms and management of asthma, even in relatively normal patients. Psychogenic symptoms appear normal, but culminate in functional symptoms in a minority of patients. Diagnosing and treating asthma in patients with comorbid asthma and psychiatric symptoms is very difficult. On the one hand, treating asthma may often be just treating the emotions. On the other hand, negative emotions make the treatment of asthma guesswork. Physicians should estimate emotional influences in their patients' symptoms for an optimal evaluation of medication efficacy. Assessment and analysis of emotional factors surrounding exacerbations seems essential, e.g. emotional precipitants of asthma and asthma-evoked negative emotions. Moreover, patients should be informed about stress-induced breathlessness and the consequences of overuse of bronchodilators. When patients present with atypical symptoms, or do not properly respond to asthma medication, functional symptoms should be suspected. Psychiatric analysis may often lead to the conclusion that symptoms have a functional basis. In patients with comorbid asthma and anxiety disorders, asthma should be the focus for treatment since difficult-to-control asthma often causes anxiety problems in the first place. Moreover, panic-like symptoms in asthma are often related to sudden onset asthma exacerbations. However, in patients with comorbid asthma and depression, depression should become the focus of treatment. The reason is that optimal treatment of depressive asthmatics is probably impossible. Special issues include specific problems with children, compliance problems, and physicians' dilemmas regarding

  18. [Severe asthma].

    PubMed

    González, Claudio D

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to investigate the frequency of severe asthma (SA) according to WHO definition and to compare SA patients' characteristics with those of non-severe asthma (NSA); secondly, to investigate the level of control reached throughout a period of regular treatment. Between 1-1-2005 and 12-31-2014, 471 medical records from patients with bronchial asthma assisted in Buenos Aires City were analyzed. SA frequency was 40.1% (189/471), being significantly higher among patients from the public health system (47.7%, 108/226 vs. 33%, 81/245, p = 0.001). SA patients were older than NSA ones (51.3 ± 17.4 vs. 42.6 ± 17.1 years, p = 0.000), presented longer time since onset of the disease (median 30 vs. 20 years, p = 0.000), lower educational levels (secondary level or higher 41.7% vs. 58.1%, p = 0.000), lower frequency of rhinitis (47% vs. 60.6%, p = 0.004), more severe levels of airway obstruction (FEV% 50.2 ± 13.7 vs. 77.7 ± 12.4, p = 0.000), more frequent antecedents of Near Fatal Asthma (11.1% vs. 2.8%, p = 0.000), higher levels of serum IgE (median of 410 vs. 279 UI/l, p = 0.01) and higher demand of systemic steroids requirements and hospitalizations (68.7% vs. 50.7%, p = 0.000 and 37.5% vs. 15.9%, p = 0.000, respectively). A 30.6% of SA patients (58/189) reached a follow-up period of 12 months, 13 (22.5%) of whom reached the controlled asthma level. The frequency of SA found seems to be considerable. Multicenter studies to investigate the levels of control reached by SA patients with access to proper treatment are recommended.

  19. Understanding gut-immune interactions in management of acute infectious diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Calder, P; Hall, V

    2012-11-01

    This article discusses the role that immunity plays in the risk of diarrhoea and the potential role for probiotics in the management of acute infectious diarrhoea in older people, including antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea.

  20. Acetaminophen use and asthma in children

    PubMed Central

    Sakulchit, Teeranai; Goldman, Ran D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Question A child with a history of asthma came to my clinic with acute fever. I have heard that acetaminophen might be associated with exacerbation of asthma. Is it safe if I recommend acetaminophen for this child? Answer Most studies suggest an association between acetaminophen use in children and development of asthma later in childhood. However, several confounding factors in study design might contribute to this positive correlation, and without a prospective controlled trial, confirming this finding is challenging. If children have a known history of asthma, it is likely safe to administer a single dose of acetaminophen without concern of precipitating adverse respiratory symptoms. Regular use of acetaminophen to relieve fever or pain does not seem to exacerbate asthma in children more than ibuprofen does. PMID:28292797

  1. Acetaminophen use and asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Sakulchit, Teeranai; Goldman, Ran D

    2017-03-01

    Question A child with a history of asthma came to my clinic with acute fever. I have heard that acetaminophen might be associated with exacerbation of asthma. Is it safe if I recommend acetaminophen for this child? Answer Most studies suggest an association between acetaminophen use in children and development of asthma later in childhood. However, several confounding factors in study design might contribute to this positive correlation, and without a prospective controlled trial, confirming this finding is challenging. If children have a known history of asthma, it is likely safe to administer a single dose of acetaminophen without concern of precipitating adverse respiratory symptoms. Regular use of acetaminophen to relieve fever or pain does not seem to exacerbate asthma in children more than ibuprofen does.

  2. Asthma Care in Resource-Poor Settings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Asthma prevalence in low-to middle-income countries is at least the same or higher than in rich countries, but with increased severity. Lack of control in these settings is due to various factors such as low accessibility to effective medications, multiple and uncoordinated weak infrastructures of medical services for the management of chronic diseases such as asthma, poor compliance with prescribed therapy, lack of asthma education, and social and cultural factors. There is an urgent requirement for the implementation of better ways to treat asthma in underserved populations, enhancing the access to preventive medications and educational approaches with modern technological methods. PMID:23282401

  3. Asthma, surgery, and general anesthesia: a review.

    P