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Sample records for acute bacterial infection

  1. 75 FR 52755 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for... the development of antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin...

  2. Bacterial translocation: a potential source for infection in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, L; Munda, R; Alexander, J W; Tchervenkov, J I; Babcock, G F

    1993-09-01

    Infections from enteric bacteria are a major cause of morbidity and mortality during acute pancreatitis (AP), but the pathways by which these organisms reach distant organs remains speculative. Experiments were conducted to determine if bacterial translocation could be a mechanism for infection during this disease. AP was induced in Lewis rats by i.v. infusion of caerulein (experiment I) or ligation of the head of the pancreas (experiment II). In a third experiment, rats were gavaged with 1 x 10(8) 14C-radiolabeled Escherichia coli and pancreatitis was induced with caerulein. Results in all three experiments showed that AP increased the number of viable bacteria recovered in peritoneal fluid, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, lungs, and pancreas. Radionuclide counting indicated that AP enhanced the gut permeability to 14C E. coli. To estimate the impact of AP on the magnitude of translocation and on the ability of the host to clear bacteria, the nuclide and colony-forming units (CFU) ratios were calculated between animals with and without AP. Blood, peritoneal fluid, and MLN had the highest nuclide ratio. During AP, these tissues may be the principal routes for bacterial spreading from the gut lumen. Peritoneal fluid, pancreas, and lung were the tissues with the highest CFU ratio. Bacterial killing ability of these tissues is likely impaired during AP.

  3. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for... drugs to treat acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). This guidance finalizes...

  4. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing with electrokinetics enhanced biosensors for diagnosis of acute bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Lu, Yi; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-11-01

    Rapid pathogen detection and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) are required in diagnosis of acute bacterial infections to determine the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Molecular approaches for AST are often based on the detection of known antibiotic resistance genes. Phenotypic culture analysis requires several days from sample collection to result reporting. Toward rapid diagnosis of bacterial infection in non-traditional healthcare settings, we have developed a rapid AST approach that combines phenotypic culture of bacterial pathogens in physiological samples and electrochemical sensing of bacterial 16S rRNA. The assay determines the susceptibility of pathogens by detecting bacterial growth under various antibiotic conditions. AC electrokinetic fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation are optimized to enhance the sensor signal and minimize the matrix effect, which improve the overall sensitivity of the assay. The electrokinetics enhanced biosensor directly detects the bacterial pathogens in blood culture without prior purification. Rapid determination of the antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli clinical isolates is demonstrated.

  5. Similar pattern of chemokines after acute viral and bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Ashish Kumar

    2017-01-27

    Read with great interest the article by Cavalcanti et al (1). Which describes the levels of chemokine such as MCP-1, RANETS, MIG and IP-10 in children with sepsis community acquired pneumonia and skin abscess. Author has found increased levels of RANETS in all infections mentioned above. Interestingly IP-10 was significantly increased in sepsis groups with low levels of MCP1. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed.

  7. [Autochthonous acute viral and bacterial infections of the central nervous system (meningitis and encephalitis)].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruiz, Mercedes; Vicente, Diego; Navarro-Marí, José María

    2008-07-01

    Rapid diagnosis of acute viral and bacterial infections of the central nervous system (meningitis and encephalitis) is highly important for the clinical management of the patient and helps to establish early therapy that may solve life-threatening situations, to avoid unnecessary empirical treatments, to reduce hospital stay, and to facilitate appropriate interventions in the context of public health. Molecular techniques, especially real-time polymerase chain reaction, have become the fastest and most sensitive diagnostic procedures for autochthonous viral meningitis and encephalitis, and their role is becoming increasingly important for the diagnosis and control of most frequent acute bacterial meningitides. Automatic and closed systems may encourage the widespread and systematic use of molecular techniques for the diagnosis of these neurological syndromes in most laboratories.

  8. Microorganisms Causing Community-Acquired Acute Bronchitis: The Role of Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Young; Park, Sunghoon; Lee, Sun Hwa; Lee, Myung Goo; Park, Yong Bum; Oh, Kil Chan; Lee, Jae-Myung; Kim, Do Il; Seo, Ki-Hyun; Shin, Kyeong-Cheol; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Ko, Yongchun; Jang, Seung Hun; Jung, Ki-Suck; Hwang, Yong Il

    2016-01-01

    Background Although acute bronchitis is quite common, there is relatively limited information regarding the microorganisms that are involved in this illness. Methods We performed a prospective study of acute bronchitis at 31 hospitals and clinics in Korea from July 2011 to June 2012. Sputum specimens were collected for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture of microorganisms. Results Of the 811 enrolled patients, 291 had acceptable sputum specimens that were included for analysis of the etiologic distribution. With multiplex PCR testing, viruses were identified in 36.1% (105/291), most commonly rhinovirus (25.8%) and coronavirus (3.8%). Typical bacteria were isolated in 126/291 (43.3%) patients. Among these patients Haemophilus influenzae (n = 39) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 30) were isolated most commonly; atypical bacteria were identified in 44 (15.1%) patients. Bacteria-only, virus-only, and mixed infections (bacteria plus virus) accounted for 36.7% (98/291), 17.2% (50/291), and 18.9% (55/291) of infections, respectively. In particular, 52.4% of patients with viral infection had a concurrent bacterial infection, and rhinovirus was the most common virus in mixed infections (40/55). Additionally, infections with typical bacteria were more common in patients with chronic lung disease (p = 0.029), and typical bacterial infections showed a trend towards a higher prevalence with older age (p = 0.001). Conclusions Bacteria were associated with almost half of community-acquired acute bronchitis cases. Additional studies are required to further illuminate the role of bacteria and to identify patient groups most likely to benefit from antibiotic treatment. PMID:27788254

  9. Profile of oritavancin and its potential in the treatment of acute bacterial skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subhashis; Saeed, Usman; Havlichek, Daniel H; Stein, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    Oritavancin, a semisynthetic derivative of the glycopeptide antibiotic chloroeremomycin, received the US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria in adults in August 2014. This novel second-generation semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide antibiotic has activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Oritavancin inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis and is rapidly bactericidal against many Gram-positive pathogens. The long half-life of this drug enables a single-dose administration. Oritavancin is not metabolized in the body, and the unchanged drug is slowly excreted by the kidneys. In two large Phase III randomized, double-blind, clinical trials, oritavancin was found to be non-inferior to vancomycin in achieving the primary composite end point in the treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections. Adverse effects noted were mostly mild with nausea, headache, and vomiting being the most common reported side effects. Oritavancin has emerged as another useful antimicrobial agent for treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections, including those caused by MRSA and VISA. PMID:26185459

  10. Bacterial lysate in the prevention of acute exacerbation of COPD and in respiratory recurrent infections

    PubMed Central

    Braido, F; Tarantini, F; Ghiglione, V; Melioli, G; Canonica, G W

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) represent a serious problem because they are one of the most common cause of human death by infection. The search for the treatment of those diseases has therefore a great importance. In this study we provide an overview of the currently available treatments for RTIs with particular attention to chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases exacerbations and recurrent respiratory infections therapy and a description of bacterial lysate action, in particular making reference to the medical literature dealing with its clinical efficacy. Those studies are based on a very large number of clinical trials aimed to evaluate the effects of this drug in maintaining the immune system in a state of alert, and in increasing the defences against microbial infections. From this analysis it comes out that bacterial lysates have a protective effect, which induce a significant reduction of the symptoms related to respiratory infections. Those results could be very interesting also from an economic point of view, because they envisage a reduction in the number of acute exacerbations and a shorter duration of hospitalization. The use of bacterial lysate could therefore represent an important means to achieve an extension of life duration in patients affected by respiratory diseases. PMID:18229572

  11. Serum Procalcitonin as a Useful Serologic Marker for Differential Diagnosis between Acute Gouty Attack and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with gout are similar to those with bacterial infection in terms of the nature of inflammation. Herein we compared the differences in procalcitonin (PCT) levels between these two inflammatory conditions and evaluated the ability of serum PCT to function as a clinical marker for differential diagnosis between acute gouty attack and bacterial infection. Materials and Methods Serum samples were obtained from 67 patients with acute gouty arthritis and 90 age-matched patients with bacterial infection. Serum PCT levels were measured with an enzyme-linked fluorescent assay. Results Serum PCT levels in patients with acute gouty arthritis were significantly lower than those in patients with bacterial infection (0.096±0.105 ng/mL vs. 4.94±13.763 ng/mL, p=0.001). However, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels showed no significant differences between the two groups. To assess the ability of PCT to discriminate between acute gouty arthritis and bacterial infection, the areas under the curves (AUCs) of serum PCT, uric acid, and CRP were 0.857 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.798–0.917, p<0.001], 0.808 (95% CI, 0.738–0.878, p<0.001), and 0.638 (95% CI, 0.544–0.731, p=0.005), respectively. There were no significant differences in ESR and white blood cell counts between these two conditions. With a cut-off value of 0.095 ng/mL, the sums of sensitivity and specificity of PCT were the highest (81.0% and 80.6%, respectively). Conclusion Serum PCT levels were significantly lower in patients with acute gouty attack than in patients with bacterial infection. Thus, serum PCT can be used as a useful serologic marker to differentiate between acute gouty arthritis and bacterial infections. PMID:27401644

  12. Clinical efficacy of dalbavancin for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI)

    PubMed Central

    Leuthner, Kimberly D; Buechler, Kristin A; Kogan, David; Saguros, Agafe; Lee, H Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) are a common disease causing patients to seek treatment through the health care system. With the continued increase of drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, these infections are becoming more difficult to successfully cure. Lipoglycopeptides have unique properties that allow the drug to remain active toward both common and challenging pathogens at the infected site for lengthy periods of time. Dalbavancin, a new lipoglycopeptide, provides two unique dosing regimens for the treatment of ABSSSI. The original regimen of 1,000 mg intravenous infusion followed by a 500 mg intravenous infusion after a week has been shown as safe and effective in multiple, randomized noninferiority trials. These studies also demonstrated that dalbavancin was similar to standard regimens in terms of both safety and tolerability. Recently a single 1,500 mg dose was demonstrated to be equivalent to the dalbavancin two-dose regimen for treating ABSSSI. With the introduction of dalbavancin, clinicians have the option to provide an intravenous antimicrobial agent shown to be as effective as traditional therapies, without requiring admission into the hospitals or prescribing a medication which may not be utilized optimally. Further understanding of dalbavancin and its unusual properties can provide unique treatment situations with potential benefits for both the patient and the overall health care system, which should be further explored. PMID:27354809

  13. Current and future trends in antibiotic therapy of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Concia, E; Cristini, F; De Rosa, F G; Esposito, S; Menichetti, F; Petrosillo, N; Tumbarello, M; Venditti, M; Viale, P; Viscoli, C; Bassetti, M

    2016-04-01

    In 2013 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued recommendations and guidance on developing drugs for treatment of skin infection using a new definition of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infection (ABSSSI). The new classification includes cellulitis, erysipelas, major skin abscesses and wound infection with a considerable extension of skin involvement, clearly referring to a severe subset of skin infections. The main goal of the FDA was to better identify specific infections where the advantages of a new antibiotic could be precisely estimated through quantifiable parameters, such as improvement of the lesion size and of systemic signs of infection. Before the spread and diffusion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in skin infections, antibiotic therapy was relatively straightforward. Using an empiric approach, a β-lactam was the preferred therapy and cultures from patients were rarely obtained. With the emergence of MRSA in the community setting, initial ABSSSI management has been changed and readdressed. Dalbavancin, oritavancin and tedizolid are new drugs, approved or in development for ABSSSI treatment, that also proved to be efficient against MRSA. Dalbavancin and oritavancin have a long half-life and can be dosed less frequently. This in turn makes it possible to treat patients with ABSSSI in an outpatient setting, avoiding hospitalization or potentially allowing earlier discharge, without compromising efficacy. In conclusion, characteristics of long-acting antibiotics could represent an opportunity for the management of ABSSSI and could profoundly modify the management of these infections by reducing or in some cases eliminating both costs and risks of hospitalization.

  14. Population pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Van Wart, Scott A; Forrest, Alan; Khariton, Tatiana; Rubino, Christopher M; Bhavnani, Sujata M; Reynolds, Daniel K; Riccobene, Todd; Ambrose, Paul G

    2013-11-01

    Ceftaroline, the active form of ceftaroline fosamil, is a broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic. A population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model for ceftaroline was developed in NONMEM® using data from 185 healthy subjects and 92 patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI). Data from 128 patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) were used for external model validation. Healthy subjects received 50-2,000 mg ceftaroline fosamil via intravenous (IV) infusion over 1 hour or intramuscular (IM) injection q12h or q24h. ABSSSI and CABP patients received 600 mg of ceftaroline fosamil IV over 1 hour q12h. A three-compartment model with zero-order IV or parallel first-order IM input and first-order elimination described ceftaroline fosamil PK. A two-compartment model with first-order conversion of prodrug to ceftaroline and parallel linear and saturable elimination described ceftaroline PK. Creatinine clearance was the primary determinant of ceftaroline exposure. Good agreement between the observed data and both population (r(2)  = 0.93) and individual post-hoc (r(2)  = 0.98) predictions suggests the PPK model can adequately approximate ceftaroline PK using covariate information. Such a PPK model can evaluate dose adjustments for patients with renal impairment and generate ceftaroline exposures for use in pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic assessments of efficacy in patients with ABSSSI or CABP.

  15. Spectrum, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence factors of bacterial infections complicating severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Israil, A M; Palade, R; Chifiriuc, M C; Vasile, D; Grigoriu, M; Voiculescu, D; Popa, D

    2011-01-01

    Secondary infection of pancreatic necrotic tissue and peripancreatic fluid is a serious complication of acute pancreatitis resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to find out the spectrum of bacterial infections, their antibiotic susceptibility patterns and virulence features in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). A total of 19 patients with acute pancreatitis were consecutively selected from 153 clinical cases of septic abdominal surgical emergencies (age 29-80, 12 males, 7 females) admitted during 2009-2011, in the First Surgical Clinic of the University Emergency Hospital of Bucharest. All 19 SAP cases were submitted to pre-operatory antibiotic empiric treatment. Ten cases were culture negative, in spite of the positive microscopy registered in eight of them. The rest of nine cases were culture positive, 17 different bacterial strains being isolated and identified as belonging to eight aerobic and four anaerobic species. Polymicrobial infection was seen in six patients and the etiology was dominated by Gram-negative bacilli, followed by gut anaerobic bacteria, attesting their colonic origin. The susceptibility testing of the isolated strains confirmed in vitro in all cases the efficiency of the antibiotics that had been used in the empiric pre-operatory treatment. Out of 19 cases submitted to pre-operatory empiric treatment, 14 proved a favorable evolution and five a lethal outcome. The host depending factors (sepsis and other co-morbidities), as well as the aggressivity of the isolated microbial strains (mediated by the presence of different factors implicated in adherence, toxicity and invasion) were found to contribute to the unfavorable, even lethal clinical outcome of SAP cases. In spite of all theoretical controversies, the antibiotic therapy remains at present a very important therapeutic mean for the SAP treatment; although it cannot solve the septic necrotizing pancreatitis in 100% of cases, however

  16. Critical role of tedizolid in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Ferrández, Olivia; Urbina, Olatz; Grau, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    Tedizolid phosphate has high activity against the Gram-positive microorganisms mainly involved in acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections, such as strains of Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus strains), Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, the Streptococcus anginosus group, and Enterococcus faecalis, including those with some mechanism of resistance limiting the use of linezolid. The area under the curve for time 0–24 hours/minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) pharmacodynamic ratio has shown the best correlation with the efficacy of tedizolid, versus the time above MIC ratio and the maximum drug concentration/minimum inhibitory concentration ratio. Administration of this antibiotic for 6 days has shown its noninferiority versus administration of linezolid for 10 days in patients with skin and skin structure infections enrolled in two Phase III studies (ESTABLISH-1 and ESTABLISH-2). Tedizolid’s more favorable safety profile and dosage regimen, which allow once-daily administration, versus linezolid, position it as a good therapeutic alternative. However, whether or not the greater economic cost associated with this antibiotic is offset by its shorter treatment duration and possibility of oral administration in routine clinical practice has yet to be clarified. PMID:28053508

  17. Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Wald, Ellen R

    2011-05-01

    Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis are 2 of the most common indications for antimicrobial agents in children. Together, they are responsible for billions of dollars of health care expenditures. The pathogenesis of the 2 conditions is identical. In the majority of children with each condition, a preceding viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of the acute bacterial complication. It has been shown that viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of acute otitis media in 37% of cases. Currently, precise microbiologic diagnosis of acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis requires performance of tympanocentesis in the former and sinus aspiration in the latter. The identification of a virus from the nasopharynx in either case does not obviate the need for antimicrobial therapy. Furthermore, nasal and nasopharyngeal swabs are not useful in predicting the results of culture of the middle ear or paranasal sinus. However, it is possible that a combination of information regarding nasopharyngeal colonization with bacteria and infection with specific viruses may inform treatment decisions in the future.

  18. Dalbavancin for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Ramdeen, Sheena; Boucher, Helen W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) have increased in incidence and severity. The involvement of resistant organisms, particularly methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, presents additional challenges. The lipoglycopeptide dalbavancin has a prolonged half-life, high protein binding, and excellent tissue levels which led to its development as a once-weekly treatment for ABSSSI. In the pivotal DISCOVER 1 and DISCOVER 2 trials, dalbavancin proved non-inferior to vancomycin followed by linezolid when used sequentially for ABSSSI, forming the basis for its recent approval in the US and Europe for ABSSSI. Areas covered A literature search of published pharmacologic and clinical data was conducted to review the chemistry, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of dalbavancin. We also discuss its development process, highlighting efficacy and safety data from pertinent clinical trials and the role it could play in the current clinical landscape. Expert opinion DISCOVER 1 and DISCOVER 2 demonstrated dalbavancin’s non-inferiority to vancomycin followed by linezolid for ABSSSI and confirmed its safety and tolerability. They were among the first trials to use new, early primary efficacy endpoints, and dalbavancin was among the first agents designated a Qualified Infectious Disease Product for expedited review. Dalbavancin may prove to be a valuable option for ABSSSI patients in whom conventional therapy is limited. PMID:26239321

  19. Bacterial Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  20. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  1. Allergic airway inflammation decreases lung bacterial burden following acute Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in a neutrophil- and CCL8-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Dulek, Daniel E; Newcomb, Dawn C; Goleniewska, Kasia; Cephus, Jaqueline; Zhou, Weisong; Reiss, Sara; Toki, Shinji; Ye, Fei; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Sherrill, Taylor P; Blackwell, Timothy S; Moore, Martin L; Boyd, Kelli L; Kolls, Jay K; Peebles, R Stokes

    2014-09-01

    The Th17 cytokines interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-17F, and IL-22 are critical for the lung immune response to a variety of bacterial pathogens, including Klebsiella pneumoniae. Th2 cytokine expression in the airways is a characteristic feature of asthma and allergic airway inflammation. The Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 diminish ex vivo and in vivo IL-17A protein expression by Th17 cells. To determine the effect of IL-4 and IL-13 on IL-17-dependent lung immune responses to acute bacterial infection, we developed a combined model in which allergic airway inflammation and lung IL-4 and IL-13 expression were induced by ovalbumin sensitization and challenge prior to acute lung infection with K. pneumoniae. We hypothesized that preexisting allergic airway inflammation decreases lung IL-17A expression and airway neutrophil recruitment in response to acute K. pneumoniae infection and thereby increases the lung K. pneumoniae burden. As hypothesized, we found that allergic airway inflammation decreased the number of K. pneumoniae-induced airway neutrophils and lung IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 expression. Despite the marked reduction in postinfection airway neutrophilia and lung expression of Th17 cytokines, allergic airway inflammation significantly decreased the lung K. pneumoniae burden and postinfection mortality. We showed that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden was independent of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-17A and partially dependent on IL-13 and STAT6. Additionally, we demonstrated that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden associated with allergic airway inflammation was both neutrophil and CCL8 dependent. These findings suggest a novel role for CCL8 in lung antibacterial immunity against K. pneumoniae and suggest new mechanisms of orchestrating lung antibacterial immunity.

  2. Simplifying the treatment of acute bacterial bone and joint infections in children.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, Markus; Peltola, Heikki

    2011-12-01

    The treatment of acute hematogenous bone and joint infections of children - osteomyelitis (OM), septic arthritis (SA) and OM-SA combination (OM+SA) - has simplified over the past years. The old approach included months-long antibiotic treatment, started intravenously for at least a week, followed by oral completion of the course. Recent prospective randomized trials show that most cases heal with a total course of 3 weeks (OM, OM+SA) or 2 weeks (SA) of an appropriate antibiotic, provided the clinical response is good and C-reactive protein level has normalized. If the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Kingella kingae is low, clindamycin and a first-generation cephalosporin are safe, inexpensive and effective alternatives. They should be administered in large doses and four times a day. Clindamycin, vancomycin and expensive linezolid are options against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Extensive surgery beyond a diagnostic sample by aspiration is rarely needed in uncomplicated cases.

  3. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Travis M; Johnson, Steven W; DiMondi, V Paul; Wilson, Dustin T

    2016-01-01

    JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. PMID:27354817

  4. Bacterial Superantigens Promote Acute Nasopharyngeal Infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a Human MHC Class II-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Katherine J.; Zeppa, Joseph J.; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T.; Xu, Stacey X.; Mazzuca, Delfina M.; Welch, Ian; Baroja, Miren L.; Kotb, Malak; Cairns, Ewa; Cleary, P. Patrick; Haeryfar, S. M. Mansour; McCormick, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Establishing the genetic determinants of niche adaptation by microbial pathogens to specific hosts is important for the management and control of infectious disease. Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific bacterial pathogen that secretes superantigens (SAgs) as ‘trademark’ virulence factors. SAgs function to force the activation of T lymphocytes through direct binding to lateral surfaces of T cell receptors and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules. S. pyogenes invariably encodes multiple SAgs, often within putative mobile genetic elements, and although SAgs are documented virulence factors for diseases such as scarlet fever and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), how these exotoxins contribute to the fitness and evolution of S. pyogenes is unknown. Here we show that acute infection in the nasopharynx is dependent upon both bacterial SAgs and host MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes was rapidly cleared from the nasal cavity of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice, whereas infection was enhanced up to ∼10,000-fold in B6 mice that express human MHC-II. This phenotype required the SpeA superantigen, and vaccination with an MHC –II binding mutant toxoid of SpeA dramatically inhibited infection. Our findings indicate that streptococcal SAgs are critical for the establishment of nasopharyngeal infection, thus providing an explanation as to why S. pyogenes produces these potent toxins. This work also highlights that SAg redundancy exists to avoid host anti-SAg humoral immune responses and to potentially overcome host MHC-II polymorphisms. PMID:24875883

  5. Septins and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Torraca, Vincenzo; Mostowy, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Septins, a unique cytoskeletal component associated with cellular membranes, are increasingly recognized as having important roles in host defense against bacterial infection. A role for septins during invasion of Listeria monocytogenes into host cells was first proposed in 2002. Since then, work has shown that septins assemble in response to a wide variety of invasive bacterial pathogens, and septin assemblies can have different roles during the bacterial infection process. Here we review the interplay between septins and bacterial pathogens, highlighting septins as a structural determinant of host defense. We also discuss how investigation of septin assembly in response to bacterial infection can yield insight into basic cellular processes including phagocytosis, autophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:27891501

  6. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tim N.; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  7. Bacterial and viral pathogen spectra of acute respiratory infections in under-5 children in hospital settings in Dhaka city

    PubMed Central

    Bhuyan, Golam Sarower; Hossain, Mohammad Amir; Sarker, Suprovath Kumar; Rahat, Asifuzzaman; Islam, Md Tarikul; Haque, Tanjina Noor; Begum, Noorjahan; Qadri, Syeda Kashfi; Muraduzzaman, A. K. M.; Islam, Nafisa Nawal; Islam, Mohammad Sazzadul; Sultana, Nusrat; Jony, Manjur Hossain Khan; Khanam, Farhana; Mowla, Golam; Matin, Abdul; Begum, Firoza; Shirin, Tahmina; Ahmed, Dilruba; Saha, Narayan; Qadri, Firdausi

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to examine for the first time the spectra of viral and bacterial pathogens along with the antibiotic susceptibility of the isolated bacteria in under-5 children with acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in hospital settings of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Nasal swabs were collected from 200 under-five children hospitalized with clinical signs of ARIs. Nasal swabs from 30 asymptomatic children were also collected. Screening of viral pathogens targeted ten respiratory viruses using RT-qPCR. Bacterial pathogens were identified by bacteriological culture methods and antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates was determined following CLSI guidelines. About 82.5% (n = 165) of specimens were positive for pathogens. Of 165 infected cases, 3% (n = 6) had only single bacterial pathogens, whereas 43.5% (n = 87) cases had only single viral pathogens. The remaining 36% (n = 72) cases had coinfections. In symptomatic cases, human rhinovirus was detected as the predominant virus (31.5%), followed by RSV (31%), HMPV (13%), HBoV (11%), HPIV-3 (10.5%), and adenovirus (7%). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequently isolated bacterial pathogen (9%), whereas Klebsiella pneumaniae, Streptococcus spp., Enterobacter agglomerans, and Haemophilus influenzae were 5.5%, 5%, 2%, and 1.5%, respectively. Of 15 multidrug-resistant bacteria, a Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate and an Enterobacter agglomerans isolate exhibited resistance against more than 10 different antibiotics. Both ARI incidence and predominant pathogen detection rates were higher during post-monsoon and winter, peaking in September. Pathogen detection rates and coinfection incidence in less than 1-year group were significantly higher (P = 0.0034 and 0.049, respectively) than in 1–5 years age group. Pathogen detection rate (43%) in asymptomatic cases was significantly lower compared to symptomatic group (P<0.0001). Human rhinovirus, HPIV-3, adenovirus, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Klebsiella pneumaniae had

  8. Anatomical considerations in the diagnosis and management of acute maxillofacial bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman, A; Wiesenfeld, D; Newland, S

    1996-08-01

    General dentists are frequently called upon to manage maxillofacial infections. Such infections are usually well localized in their initial stages but can spread to become severe and potentially life-threatening. This paper discusses the anatomical basis of the spread of these infections and techniques relevant to the rational management of these serious conditions.

  9. [Bacterial bone and joint infections in childhood--a review. 1. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Handrick, W; Tischer, W; Braun, W; Hörmann, D; Spencker, F B; Springer, W; Schneider, G

    1991-01-01

    This is an overview of modern aspects concerning diagnostics and therapy in children with acute hematogenous osteomyelitis. A close cooperation of pediatricians, pediatric surgeons, microbiologists and radiologists in this field is essential.

  10. Acute bacterial parotitis following acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, V K; Kimbrough, D J; Jarquin-Valdivia, A A

    2009-06-01

    Acute bacterial parotitis (ABP) is a relatively uncommon condition that tends to occur in debilitated older patients. We report a case of an older woman that presented with an acute intracerebral hemorrhage who developed ABP. This morbidity led to endotracheal intubation, mechanical ventilation, tracheostomy and gastrostomy, all of which were not initially needed. We discuss the proposed physiopathology and etiopathogenesis of ABP in adults.

  11. Profile of tedizolid phosphate and its potential in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Ronald G; Michaels, Heidi N

    2015-01-01

    Tedizolid phosphate is the first once-daily oxazolidinone approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). It is more potent in vitro than linezolid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other gram-positive pathogens causing ABSSSI, even retaining activity against some linezolid-resistant strains. Tedizolid is approximately 90% protein bound, leading to lower free-drug concentrations than linezolid. The impact of the effect of food, renal or hepatic insufficiency, or hemodialysis on tedizolid’s pharmacokinetic have been evaluated, and no dosage adjustment is needed in these populations. In animal and clinical studies, tedizolid’s effect on bacterial killing is optimized by the free-drug area under the curve to minimum inhibitory concentration ratio (fAUC/MIC). The 200 mg once-daily dose is able to achieve the target fAUC/MIC ratio in 98% of simulated patients. Two Phase III clinical trials have demonstrated the noninferiority of tedizolid 200 mg once daily for 6 days to linezolid 600 mg twice daily for 10 days. In vitro, animal, and clinical studies have failed to demonstrate that tedizolid inhibits monoamine oxidase to a clinically relevant extent. Tedizolid has several key advantages over linezolid including once daily dosing, decreased treatment duration, minimal interaction with serotonergic agents, possibly associated with less adverse events associated with the impairment of mitochondrial protein synthesis (eg, myelosuppression, lactic acidosis, and peripheral/optic neuropathies), and retains in vitro activity against linezolid-resistant gram-positive bacteria. Economic analyses with tedizolid are needed to describe the cost-effectiveness of this agent compared with other options used for ABSSSI, particularly treatment options active against MRSA. PMID:25960671

  12. Early Clinical Response as a Predictor of Late Treatment Success in Patients With Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Retrospective Analysis of 2 Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Nathwani, Dilip; Corey, Ralph; Das, Anita F; Sandison, Taylor; De Anda, Carisa; Prokocimer, Philippe

    2017-01-15

    In the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections, pooled data from 2 clinical trials (N = 1333 patients) showed that programmatic and investigator-assessed early treatment success both had a high positive predictive value (94.3%-100.0%) for late clinical cure, including among hospitalized patients. The negative predictive value of programmatic early success was <20%. These exploratory findings require prospective real-world evaluation.

  13. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2004-06-01

    Hospitalized patients with cirrhosis are at increased risk of developing bacterial infections, the most common being spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) and urinary tract infections. Independent predictors of the development of bacterial infections in hospitalized cirrhotic patients are poor liver synthetic function and admission for gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Short term (seven-day) prophylaxis with norfloxacin reduces the rate of infections and improves survival and should therefore be administered to all patients with cirrhosis and variceal hemorrhage. Cirrhotic patients who develop abdominal pain, tenderness, fever, renal failure or hepatic encephalopathy should undergo diagnostic paracentesis, and those who meet the criterion for SBP (eg, an ascites neutrophil count greater than 250/mm3) should receive antibiotics, preferably a third-generation cephalosporin. In addition to antibiotic therapy, albumin infusions have been shown to reduce the risk of renal failure and mortality in patients with SBP, particularly in those with renal dysfunction and hyperbilirubinemia at the time of diagnosis. Patients who recover from an episode of SBP should be given long term prophylaxis with norfloxacin and should be assessed for liver transplantation.

  14. The utility of biomarkers in differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial lower respiratory tract infection in hospitalized children: difference of the diagnostic performance between acute pneumonia and bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Hoshina, Takayuki; Nanishi, Etsuro; Kanno, Shunsuke; Nishio, Hisanori; Kusuhara, Koichi; Hara, Toshiro

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the utility of several biomarkers in differentiating bacterial community-acquired lower respiratory tract infection (CA-LRTI) from non-bacterial CA-LRTI in children and the difference of their diagnostic performance between pneumonia and bronchitis. A retrospective cohort study composed of 108 pediatric patients hospitalized for CA-LRTI was performed during 2010-2013. Based on the findings of chest X-ray and sputum samples, patients were divided into 4 categories, group of bacterial pneumonia or bronchitis, and non-bacterial (viral or etiology-unknown) pneumonia or bronchitis. Peripheral white blood cell and neutrophil counts, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) levels were compared among the 4 groups. Finally, 54 patients were the subject of this study. In the patients with pneumonia, serum CRP and PCT levels were significantly elevated in the group of bacterial pneumonia (CRP: p = 0.02, PCT: p = 0.0008). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for PCT for distinguishing between bacterial and non-bacterial pneumonia was the largest, and sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of PCT were best among 4 markers. On the other hand, in the patients with bronchitis, neutrophil count was significantly decreased in non-bacterial bronchitis whereas no significant differences of WBC count, CRP level or PCT level were seen. In conclusion, PCT was the most useful marker to differentiate bacterial pneumonia whereas neutrophil count contributed most to the discrimination of bacterial bronchitis. The diagnostic performance of biomarkers may be different between pneumonia and bronchitis.

  15. Acute bacterial sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    DeMuri, Gregory; Wald, Ellen R

    2013-10-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, the pathogenesis of sinusitis involves 3 key factors: sinusostia obstruction, ciliary dysfunction, and thickening of sinus secretions. On the basis of studies of the microbiology of otitis media, H influenzae is playing an increasingly important role in the etiology of sinusitis, exceeding that of S pneumoniae in some areas, and b-lactamase production by H influenzae is increasing in respiratory isolates in the United States. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,the presentation of acute bacterial sinusitis conforms to 1 of 3 predicable patterns; persistent, severe, and worsening symptoms. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,the diagnosis of sinusitis should be made by applying strict clinical criteria. This approach will select children with upper respiratory infection symptoms who are most likely to benefit from an antibiotic. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,imaging is not indicated routinely in the diagnosis of sinusitis. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging provides useful information when complications of sinusitis are suspected. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,amoxicillin-clavulanate should be considered asa first-line agent for the treatment of sinusitis.

  16. Pediatric Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Diagnostic and Treatment Dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Fang, Andrea; England, Jasmin; Gausche-Hill, Marianne

    2015-11-01

    Acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS) is a common complication of a simple upper respiratory infection. Acute bacterial sinusitis and an upper respiratory infection, however, have different management plans. This article will help clinicians establish when a diagnosis of ABS can be made based on the latest guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Also covered will be the pathophysiology of ABS, the role of diagnostic imaging, the recognition of complications of ABS, and treatment options.

  17. Epigenetics and bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Bierne, Hélène; Hamon, Mélanie; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-12-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate expression of the genome to generate various cell types during development or orchestrate cellular responses to external stimuli. Recent studies highlight that bacteria can affect the chromatin structure and transcriptional program of host cells by influencing diverse epigenetic factors (i.e., histone modifications, DNA methylation, chromatin-associated complexes, noncoding RNAs, and RNA splicing factors). In this article, we first review the molecular bases of the epigenetic language and then describe the current state of research regarding how bacteria can alter epigenetic marks and machineries. Bacterial-induced epigenetic deregulations may affect host cell function either to promote host defense or to allow pathogen persistence. Thus, pathogenic bacteria can be considered as potential epimutagens able to reshape the epigenome. Their effects might generate specific, long-lasting imprints on host cells, leading to a memory of infection that influences immunity and might be at the origin of unexplained diseases.

  18. Nanoparticle Approaches against Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weiwei; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide success of antibiotics, the treatment of bacterial infection still faces significant challenges, particularly the emergence of antibiotic resistance. As a result, nanoparticle drug delivery platforms including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and various inorganic nanoparticles have been increasingly exploited to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of existing antibiotics. This review focuses on areas where nanoparticle approaches hold significant potential to advance the treatment of bacterial infection. These areas include targeted antibiotic delivery, environmentally responsive antibiotic delivery, combinatorial antibiotic delivery, nanoparticle-enabled antibacterial vaccination, and nanoparticle-based bacterial detection. In each area we highlight the innovative antimicrobial nanoparticle platforms and review their progress made against bacterial infections. PMID:25044325

  19. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Catherine Hy; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig's angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk.

  20. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  1. Bacterial infection after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Il

    2014-05-28

    Infectious complications are major causes of morbidity and mortality after liver transplantation, despite recent advances in the transplant field. Bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites can cause infection before and after transplantation. Among them, bacterial infections are predominant during the first two months post-transplantation and affect patient and graft survival. They might cause surgical site infections, including deep intra-abdominal infections, bacteremia, pneumonia, catheter-related infections and urinary tract infections. The risk factors for bacterial infections differ between the periods after transplant, and between centers. Recently, the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria is great concern in liver transplant (LT) patients. The instructive data about effects of infections with extended-spectrum beta lactamase producing bacteria, carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria, and glycopeptide-resistant gram-positive bacteria were reported on a center-by-center basis. To prevent post-transplant bacterial infections, proper strategies need to be established based upon center-specific data and evidence from well-controlled studies. This article reviewed the recent epidemiological data, risk factors for each type of infections and important clinical issues in bacterial infection after LT.

  2. Bacterial infection after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Il

    2014-01-01

    Infectious complications are major causes of morbidity and mortality after liver transplantation, despite recent advances in the transplant field. Bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites can cause infection before and after transplantation. Among them, bacterial infections are predominant during the first two months post-transplantation and affect patient and graft survival. They might cause surgical site infections, including deep intra-abdominal infections, bacteremia, pneumonia, catheter-related infections and urinary tract infections. The risk factors for bacterial infections differ between the periods after transplant, and between centers. Recently, the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria is great concern in liver transplant (LT) patients. The instructive data about effects of infections with extended-spectrum beta lactamase producing bacteria, carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria, and glycopeptide-resistant gram-positive bacteria were reported on a center-by-center basis. To prevent post-transplant bacterial infections, proper strategies need to be established based upon center-specific data and evidence from well-controlled studies. This article reviewed the recent epidemiological data, risk factors for each type of infections and important clinical issues in bacterial infection after LT. PMID:24876741

  3. Myeloid ZFP36L1 Does Not Regulate Inflammation or Host Defense in Mouse Models of Acute Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hyatt, Lynnae D.; Wasserman, Gregory A.; Rah, Yoon J.; Matsuura, Kori Y.; Coleman, Fadie T.; Hilliard, Kristie L.; Pepper-Cunningham, Zachary Ash; Ieong, Michael; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Blackshear, Perry J.; Quinton, Lee J.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.; Jones, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc finger protein 36, C3H type-like 1 (ZFP36L1) is one of several Zinc Finger Protein 36 (Zfp36) family members, which bind AU rich elements within 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) to negatively regulate the post-transcriptional expression of targeted mRNAs. The prototypical member of the family, Tristetraprolin (TTP or ZFP36), has been well-studied in the context of inflammation and plays an important role in repressing pro-inflammatory transcripts such as TNF-α. Much less is known about the other family members, and none have been studied in the context of infection. Using macrophage cell lines and primary alveolar macrophages we demonstrated that, like ZFP36, ZFP36L1 is prominently induced by infection. To test our hypothesis that macrophage production of ZFP36L1 is necessary for regulation of the inflammatory response of the lung during pneumonia, we generated mice with a myeloid-specific deficiency of ZFP36L1. Surprisingly, we found that myeloid deficiency of ZFP36L1 did not result in alteration of lung cytokine production after infection, altered clearance of bacteria, or increased inflammatory lung injury. Although alveolar macrophages are critical components of the innate defense against respiratory pathogens, we concluded that myeloid ZFP36L1 is not essential for appropriate responses to bacteria in the lungs. Based on studies conducted with myeloid-deficient ZFP36 mice, our data indicate that, of the Zfp36 family, ZFP36 is the predominant negative regulator of cytokine expression in macrophages. In conclusion, these results imply that myeloid ZFP36 may fully compensate for loss of ZFP36L1 or that Zfp36l1-dependent mRNA expression does not play an integral role in the host defense against bacterial pneumonia. PMID:25299049

  4. Bacterial infections in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Berger, B J; Hussain, F; Roistacher, K

    1994-06-01

    Although the original opportunistic pathogens described in AIDS were protozoal and fungal organisms, bacterial infections are now recognized with increased prevalence and altered expression in patients with HIV infection. Especially since populations outside of North America and populations of i.v. drug abusers have been studied, bacterial infections have been shown to cause substantially increased morbidity and mortality both early and late in the course of HIV infection. Just as strategies have been developed for primary and secondary prophylaxis of classical HIV-related opportunistic infections, prevention of bacterial complications should be a high priority. Good hygiene and avoidance of unsterile needles in illicit drug use, tattooing, ear-piercing, or other cosmetic or ritual activities should be emphasized in patient education. Patients should be counseled to avoid uncooked or poorly cooked eggs and poultry and to avoid unpasteurized milk products. Pneumococcal vaccine is recommended for all HIV-seropositive patients and should be given as early as possible after recognition of HIV infection for maximal efficacy. Influenza vaccine is also recommended. It may have a role in preventing bacterial pneumonia secondary to influenza. Patient management should include regular dental care and nutritional evaluation. The use of intravenous or central catheters should be limited to essential therapies. When patients present with new febrile illness, a high index of suspicion for invasive bacterial disease is appropriate. The signs of serious bacterial infection in HIV-positive patients are subtle. Diagnostic evaluation should include cultures of blood and other relevant clinical specimens. Empiric antimicrobial therapy based on the clinical presentation may be life saving in patients with invasive bacterial disease complicating HIV infection.

  5. Acute Respiratory Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Laxdal, Oliver E.; Robertson, H. E.; Braaten, Virgil; Walker, W. Alan

    1963-01-01

    During a seven-month period from November 1960 to May 1961, 181 infants and children, hospitalized because of acute respiratory infections, were studied intensively to determine the responsible etiologic agents. Forty-two per cent of the illnesses in this group appeared to be caused by bacterial agents, either primary or secondary to virus. Parainfluenza viruses were identified as causes of laryngotracheobronchitis in nearly 50% of the cases. Adenoviruses were also found to be important pathogens, particularly as causes of pneumonia in infants. The over-all infection rate attributed to adenoviruses was 11.6%. An epidemic due to Influenza B virus affected approximately 40% of children in this city just following the hospital study. This study was conducted as the first step in a long-term project undertaken at the Regina General Hospital to determine the effectiveness of vaccines in the prevention and treatment of respiratory infections in children. PMID:20327546

  6. Correlates of Bacterial Ulcers and Acute HSV-2 Infection among Men with Genital Ulcer Disease in South Africa: Age, Recent Sexual Behaviors, and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Leichliter, Jami S.; Lewis, David A.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Data from baseline surveys and STI/HIV laboratory tests (n=615 men) were used to examine correlates of bacterial ulcers (Treponema pallidum, Haemophilus ducreyi, or Chlamydia trachomatis L1–L3 detected in ulcer) and acute HSV-2 ulcers (HSV-2 positive ulcer specimen, HSV-2 sero-negative, and negative for bacterial pathogens) vs. recurrent HSV-2 ulcers (sero-positive), separately. Compared to men with recurrent HSV-2 ulcers, men with bacterial ulcers had larger ulcers but were less likely to be HIV-positive whereas men with acute HSV-2 ulcers were younger with fewer partners. Acute HIV was higher among men with bacterial and acute HSV-2 ulcers; the difference was not statistically significant. PMID:28217702

  7. Correlates of Bacterial Ulcers and Acute HSV-2 Infection among Men with Genital Ulcer Disease in South Africa: Age, Recent Sexual Behaviors, and HIV.

    PubMed

    Leichliter, Jami S; Lewis, David A; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Data from baseline surveys and STI/HIV laboratory tests (n=615 men) were used to examine correlates of bacterial ulcers (Treponema pallidum, Haemophilus ducreyi, or Chlamydia trachomatis L1-L3 detected in ulcer) and acute HSV-2 ulcers (HSV-2 positive ulcer specimen, HSV-2 sero-negative, and negative for bacterial pathogens) vs. recurrent HSV-2 ulcers (sero-positive), separately. Compared to men with recurrent HSV-2 ulcers, men with bacterial ulcers had larger ulcers but were less likely to be HIV-positive whereas men with acute HSV-2 ulcers were younger with fewer partners. Acute HIV was higher among men with bacterial and acute HSV-2 ulcers; the difference was not statistically significant.

  8. Bacterial Infections, Alloimmunity, and Transplantation Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Emily B.; Daniels, Melvin; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Chong, Anita S.

    2010-01-01

    Transplantation of solid organs across histocompatibility barriers in the absence of immunosuppression is invariably followed by acute allograft rejection. Although several immunosuppressive regimens have been developed to prevent allograft rejection, these global immunosuppressive agents effectively inhibit all T cells leaving the host vulnerable to infections. Thus a major goal in transplantation immunology is to induce donor-specific tolerance that results in the extended suppression of allograft-specific immune responses, while leaving the remainder of the immune system competent to fight infections and malignancies. Initial successes in identifying approaches that successfully induce transplantation tolerance in experimental models have led to a newer research focus of identifying potential barriers to the induction of such tolerance as well as events that may reverse established allograft tolerance. Both clinical and experimental studies have identified bacterial infections as a possible trigger of allograft rejection. Recently, experimental models of transplantation tolerance have identified that bacterial signals can promote acute allograft rejection either by preventing the induction of transplantation tolerance or by reversing tolerance after it has been stably established. This review summarizes experimental and clinical literature supporting the hypothesis that bacterial infections and innate immunity can qualitatively and quantitatively alter adaptive alloreactivity through effects on innate immune responses. PMID:21126661

  9. Bacterial Adaptation during Chronic Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Louise; McClean, Siobhán

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lung infections are associated with increased morbidity and mortality for individuals with underlying respiratory conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The process of chronic colonisation allows pathogens to adapt over time to cope with changing selection pressures, co-infecting species and antimicrobial therapies. These adaptations can occur due to environmental pressures in the lung such as inflammatory responses, hypoxia, nutrient deficiency, osmolarity, low pH and antibiotic therapies. Phenotypic adaptations in bacterial pathogens from acute to chronic infection include, but are not limited to, antibiotic resistance, exopolysaccharide production (mucoidy), loss in motility, formation of small colony variants, increased mutation rate, quorum sensing and altered production of virulence factors associated with chronic infection. The evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during chronic lung infection has been widely studied. More recently, the adaptations that other chronically colonising respiratory pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia cepacia complex and Haemophilus influenzae undergo during chronic infection have also been investigated. This review aims to examine the adaptations utilised by different bacterial pathogens to aid in their evolution from acute to chronic pathogens of the immunocompromised lung including CF and COPD. PMID:25738646

  10. Clinical Response of Tedizolid versus Linezolid in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections by Severity Measure Using a Pooled Analysis From Two Phase 3 Double-Blind Trials.

    PubMed

    Sandison, Taylor; De Anda, Carisa; Fang, Edward; Das, Anita F; Prokocimer, Philippe

    2017-03-06

    Tedizolid phosphate is approved for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). In a pooled analysis of 1,333 ABSSSI patients from the ESTABLISH clinical trials, treatment with tedizolid or linezolid demonstrated similar early and posttherapy clinical responses in both non-severe and severe disease, irrespective of the parameters used to measure ABSSSI severity. Shorter 6-day treatment of ABSSSI, including severe infections, with tedizolid phosphate demonstrated comparable efficacy to 10-day treatment with linezolid.

  11. Viral and Atypical Bacterial Etiology of Acute Respiratory Infections in Children under 5 Years Old Living in a Rural Tropical Area of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Jonathan; Rabezanahary, Henintsoa; Randriamarotia, Martin; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Najjar, Josette; Vernet, Guy; Contamin, Bénédicte; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia

    2012-01-01

    Background In Madagascar, very little is known about the etiology and prevalence of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in a rural tropical area. Recent data are needed to determine the viral and atypical bacterial etiologies in children with defined clinical manifestations of ARIs. Methods During one year, we conducted a prospective study on ARIs in children between 2 to 59 months in the community hospital of Ampasimanjeva, located in the south-east of Madagascar. Respiratory samples were analyzed by multiplex real-time RT-PCR, including 18 viruses and 2 atypical bacteria. The various episodes of ARI were grouped into four clinical manifestations with well-documented diagnosis: “Community Acquired Pneumonia”(CAP, group I), “Other acute lower respiratory infections (Other ALRIs, group II)”, “Upper respiratory tract infections with cough (URTIs with cough, group III)”and “Upper respiratory tract infections without cough (URTIs without cough, group IV)”. Results 295 children were included in the study between February 2010 and February 2011. Viruses and/or atypical bacteria respiratory pathogens were detected in 74.6% of samples, the rate of co-infection was 27.3%. Human rhinovirus (HRV; 20.5%), metapneumovirus (HMPV A/B, 13.8%), coronaviruses (HCoV, 12.5%), parainfluenza virus (HPIV, 11.8%) and respiratory syncytial virus A and B (RSV A/B, 11.8%) were the most detected. HRV was predominantly single detected (23.8%) in all the clinical groups while HMPV A/B (23.9%) was mainly related to CAP (group I), HPIV (17.3%) to the “Other ALRIs” (group II), RSV A/B (19.5%) predominated in the group “URTIs with cough” (group III) and Adenovirus (HAdV, 17.8%) was mainly detected in the “without cough” (group IV). Interpretation This study describes for the first time the etiology of respiratory infections in febrile children under 5 years in a malaria rural area of Madagascar and highlights the role of respiratory viruses in a well clinically defined

  12. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis: A critical review and practical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Bunchorntavakul, Chalermrat; Chamroonkul, Naichaya; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection is common and accounts for major morbidity and mortality in cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis are immunocompromised and increased susceptibility to develop spontaneous bacterial infections, hospital-acquired infections, and a variety of infections from uncommon pathogens. Once infection develops, the excessive response of pro-inflammatory cytokines on a pre-existing hemodynamic dysfunction in cirrhosis further predispose the development of serious complications such as shock, acute-on-chronic liver failure, renal failure, and death. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and bacteremia are common in patients with advanced cirrhosis, and are important prognostic landmarks in the natural history of cirrhosis. Notably, the incidence of infections from resistant bacteria has increased significantly in healthcare-associated settings. Serum biomarkers such as procalcitonin may help to improve the diagnosis of bacterial infection. Preventive measures (e.g., avoidance, antibiotic prophylaxis, and vaccination), early recognition, and proper management are required in order to minimize morbidity and mortality of infections in cirrhosis. PMID:26962397

  13. Telavancin for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections, a Post Hoc Analysis of the Phase 3 ATLAS Trials in Light of the 2013 FDA Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Pushkin, Richard; Barriere, Steven L.; Corey, G. Ralph; Stryjewski, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Two phase 3 ATLAS trials demonstrated noninferiority of telavancin compared with vancomycin for complicated skin and skin structure infections. Data from these trials were retrospectively evaluated according to 2013 U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance on acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. This post hoc analysis included patients with lesion sizes of ≥75 cm2 and excluded patients with ulcers or burns (updated all-treated population; n = 1,127). Updated day 3 (early) clinical response was defined as a ≥20% reduction in lesion size from baseline and no rescue antibiotic. Updated test-of-cure (TOC) clinical response was defined as a ≥90% reduction in lesion size, no increase in lesion size since day 3, and no requirement for additional antibiotics or significant surgical procedures. Day 3 (early) clinical responses were achieved in 62.6% and 61.0% of patients receiving telavancin and vancomycin, respectively (difference, 1.7%, with a 95% confidence interval [CI] of −4.0% to 7.4%). Updated TOC visit cure rates were similar for telavancin (68.0%) and vancomycin (63.3%), with a difference of 4.8% (95% CI, −0.7% to 10.3%). Adopting current FDA guidance, this analysis corroborates previous noninferiority findings of the ATLAS trials of telavancin compared with vancomycin. PMID:26248356

  14. Telavancin for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections, a Post Hoc Analysis of the Phase 3 ATLAS Trials in Light of the 2013 FDA Guidance.

    PubMed

    Pushkin, Richard; Barriere, Steven L; Wang, Whedy; Corey, G Ralph; Stryjewski, Martin E

    2015-10-01

    Two phase 3 ATLAS trials demonstrated noninferiority of telavancin compared with vancomycin for complicated skin and skin structure infections. Data from these trials were retrospectively evaluated according to 2013 U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance on acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. This post hoc analysis included patients with lesion sizes of ≥75 cm(2) and excluded patients with ulcers or burns (updated all-treated population; n = 1,127). Updated day 3 (early) clinical response was defined as a ≥20% reduction in lesion size from baseline and no rescue antibiotic. Updated test-of-cure (TOC) clinical response was defined as a ≥90% reduction in lesion size, no increase in lesion size since day 3, and no requirement for additional antibiotics or significant surgical procedures. Day 3 (early) clinical responses were achieved in 62.6% and 61.0% of patients receiving telavancin and vancomycin, respectively (difference, 1.7%, with a 95% confidence interval [CI] of -4.0% to 7.4%). Updated TOC visit cure rates were similar for telavancin (68.0%) and vancomycin (63.3%), with a difference of 4.8% (95% CI, -0.7% to 10.3%). Adopting current FDA guidance, this analysis corroborates previous noninferiority findings of the ATLAS trials of telavancin compared with vancomycin.

  15. Calpains promote neutrophil recruitment and bacterial clearance in an acute bacterial peritonitis model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Everingham, Stephanie; Hall, Christine; Greer, Peter A; Craig, Andrew W B

    2014-03-01

    Activation of the innate immune system is critical for clearance of bacterial pathogens to limit systemic infections and host tissue damage. Here, we report a key role for calpain proteases in bacterial clearance in mice with acute peritonitis. Using transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase primarily in innate immune cells (fes-Cre), we generated conditional capns1 knockout mice. Consistent with capns1 being essential for stability and function of the ubiquitous calpains (calpain-1, calpain-2), peritoneal cells from these mice had reduced levels of calpain-2/capns1, and reduced proteolysis of their substrate selenoprotein K. Using an acute bacterial peritonitis model, we observed impaired bacterial killing within the peritoneum and development of bacteremia in calpain knockout mice. These defects correlated with significant reductions in IL-1α release, neutrophil recruitment, and generation of reactive oxygen species in calpain knockout mice with acute bacterial peritonitis. Peritoneal macrophages from calpain knockout mice infected with enterobacteria ex vivo, were competent in phagocytosis of bacteria, but showed impaired clearance of intracellular bacteria compared with control macrophages. Together, these results implicate calpains as key mediators of effective innate immune responses to acute bacterial infections, to prevent systemic dissemination of bacteria that can lead to sepsis.

  16. [Acute bacterial meningitis as an occupational disease].

    PubMed

    Seixas, Diana; Lebre, Ana; Crespo, Pedro; Ferreira, Eugénia; Serra, José Eduardo; Saraiva da Cunha, José Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen with worldwide distribution, responsible for more than 700 human cases globally reported. This infection affects mostly men, exposed to pig or pork, which leads to its usual classification as an occupational disease. We report a case of acute bacterial meningitis in a 44 years old male. According to his past medical history, the patient had chronic alcoholism and worked in a restaurant as a piglet roaster. Microbiological examination of blood and CSF revealed S. suis. After 14 days of ceftriaxone the patient fully recovered. The authors review the clinical reports previously described in Portugal. In all of them was possible to identify risk exposition to pork. We alert to this microorganism's importance in Portugal where it is probably underdiagnosed.

  17. Sneezing during Micturition: A Possible Trigger of Acute Bacterial Prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, William Derval

    2015-01-01

    A perfectly well 39-year-old man sneezed during micturition and developed classic features of acute bacterial prostatitis corroborated by laboratory evidence of prostatic inflammation/infection. The prostate-specific antigen level at presentation was 9.6 ng/mL and declined to 1.23 ng/mL one month later on levofloxacin. This is the first report in the medical literature of sneezing while voiding being a possible trigger of acute bacterial prostatitis. A biologically plausible mechanism is provided. PMID:26355536

  18. Bacterial colonization or infection in chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Pandak, Nenad; Pajić-Penavić, Ivana; Sekelj, Alen; Tomić-Paradžik, Maja; Cabraja, Ivica; Miklaušić, Božana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was the determination of bacteria present in maxillary and ethmoid cavities in patients with chronic sinusitis and to correlate these findings with bacteria simultaneously present in their nasopharynx. The purpose of this correlation was to establish the role of bacteria found in chronically inflamed sinuses and to evaluate if the bacteria present colonized or infected sinus mucosa. Nasopharyngeal and sinus swabs of 65 patients that underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery were cultivated and at the same time the presence of leukocytes were determined in each swab. The most frequently found bacteria in nasopharynx were Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus spp., Streptococcus viridans and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Maxillary or ethmoidal sinus swabs yielded bacterial growth in 47 (72.31%) patients. The most frequently found bacteria in sinuses were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp. and Streptococci (pneumoniae, viridans and spp.). The insignificant number of leukocytes was present in each sinus and nasopharyngeal swab. Every published microbiology study of chronic sinusitis proved that sinus mucosa were colonized with bacteria and not infected, yet antibiotic therapy was discussed making no difference between infection and colonization. Chronic sinusitis should be considered a chronic inflammatory condition rather than bacterial infection, so routine antibiotic therapy should be avoided. Empiric antibiotic therapy should be prescribed only in cases when the acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis occurs and the antibiotics prescribed should aim the usual bacteria causing acute sinusitis. In case of therapy failure, antibiotics should be changed having in mind that under certain circumstances any bacteria colonizing sinus mucosa can cause acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis.

  19. A Rat Model of Central Venous Catheter to Study Establishment of Long-Term Bacterial Biofilm and Related Acute and Chronic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Ashwini; Lebeaux, David; Decante, Benoit; Kriegel, Irene; Escande, Marie-Christine; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Beloin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Formation of resilient biofilms on medical devices colonized by pathogenic microorganisms is a major cause of health-care associated infection. While in vitro biofilm analyses led to promising anti-biofilm approaches, little is known about their translation to in vivo situations and on host contribution to the in vivo dynamics of infections on medical devices. Here we have developed an in vivo model of long-term bacterial biofilm infections in a pediatric totally implantable venous access port (TIVAP) surgically placed in adult rats. Using non-invasive and quantitative bioluminescence, we studied TIVAP contamination by clinically relevant pathogens, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, and we demonstrated that TIVAP bacterial populations display typical biofilm phenotypes. In our study, we showed that immunocompetent rats were able to control the colonization and clear the bloodstream infection except for up to 30% that suffered systemic infection and death whereas none of the immunosuppressed rats survived the infection. Besides, we mimicked some clinically relevant TIVAP associated complications such as port-pocket infection and hematogenous route of colonization. Finally, by assessing an optimized antibiotic lock therapy, we established that our in vivo model enables to assess innovative therapeutic strategies against bacterial biofilm infections. PMID:22615964

  20. A multicentre study of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections in China: susceptibility to ceftaroline and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Xiao, Meng; Kong, Fanrong; O'Sullivan, Matthew V N; Mao, Lei-Li; Zhao, Hao-Ran; Zhao, Ying; Wang, He; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Ceftaroline is a novel cephalosporin with activity against Gram-positive organisms, including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The objective of this study was to investigate the susceptibility to ceftaroline of hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) isolates causing acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections (ABSSSIs) in China and to examine their relationship by genotyping. A total of 251 HA-MRSA isolates causing ABSSSIs were collected from a multicentre study involving 56 hospitals in 38 large cities across 26 provinces in mainland China. All isolates were characterised by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, spa typing and detection of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin locus (lukS-PV and lukF-PV). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 14 antimicrobial agents, including ceftaroline, were determined by broth microdilution and were interpreted using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints. The ceftaroline MIC50 and MIC90 values (MICs that inhibit 50% and 90% of the isolates, respectively) were 1 μg/mL and 2 μg/mL, respectively; 33.5% (n=84) of the isolates studied were ceftaroline-non-susceptible, with MICs of 2 μg/mL, but no isolate exhibited ceftaroline resistance (MIC>2 μg/mL). All of the ceftaroline-non-susceptible isolates belonged to the predominant HA-MRSA clones: 95.2% (n=80) from MLST clonal complex 8 (CC8), with the remaining 4.8% (n=4) from CC5. The high rate of non-susceptibility to ceftaroline amongst HA-MRSA causing ABSSSIs in China is concerning.

  1. Common bacterial urinary tract infections in women.

    PubMed

    Cimino, J E

    1976-09-01

    Unfortunately, there is no general consensus as to how long patients with bacteriuria or urinary tract infections should be monitored and certainly there is no agreement on how long recurrent episodes should be treated beyond ten days to two weeks. The most important points to remember are: 1. Culture the urine both at the time of therapy and during follow-up. The patient should be examined periodically for the presence of bacteruria. If bacteria cannot be eradicated, at least the physician is aware of the organism most likely causing the patient's symptoms. 2. Do not subject the patient with frequent recurrent (chronic) and complicated infections to continual antibacterial therapy, but rather, manage the acute episodes. 3. Use prophylaxis, particularly single bed-time doses for dysuria and frequency symptoms. 4. Screen for bacteriuria during pregnancy. 5. Avoid the use of catheters except where absolutely necessary. 6. Avoid systemic prophylaxis of infection in patients with catheters; rather, use closed-system drainage with antibacteri-irrigation. It is to be hoped within the next few years, studies now underway will allow specific recommendations regarding the management of asymptomatic bacteruria, the duration of therapy for recurrent infections, the prevention and treatment of L-form bacterial infections, and indications for urologic procedures.

  2. Examination of hospital length of stay in Canada among patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Potashman, Michele H; Stokes, Michael; Liu, Jieruo; Lawrence, Robin; Harris, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Skin infections, particularly those caused by resistant pathogens, represent a clinical burden. Hospitalization associated with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major contributor to the economic burden of the disease. This study was conducted to provide current, real-world data on hospitalization patterns for patients with ABSSSI caused by MRSA across multiple geographic regions in Canada. Patients and methods This retrospective cohort study evaluated length of stay (LOS) for hospitalized patients with ABSSSI due to MRSA diagnosis across four Canadian geographic regions using the Discharge Abstract Database. Patients with ICD-10-CA diagnosis consistent with ABSSSI caused by MRSA between January 2008 and December 2014 were selected and assigned a primary or secondary diagnosis based on a prespecified ICD-10-CA code algorithm. Results Among 6,719 patients, 3,273 (48.7%) and 3,446 (51.3%) had a primary and secondary diagnosis, respectively. Among patients with a primary or secondary diagnosis, the cellulitis/erysipelas subtype was most common. The majority of patients presented with 0 or 1 comorbid condition; the most common comorbidity was diabetes. The mean LOS over the study period varied by geographic region and year; in 2014 (the most recent year analyzed), LOS ranged from 7.7 days in Ontario to 13.4 days in the Canadian Prairie for a primary diagnosis and from 18.2 days in Ontario to 25.2 days in Atlantic Canada for a secondary diagnosis. A secondary diagnosis was associated with higher rates of continuing care compared with a primary diagnosis (10.6%–24.2% vs 4.6%–12.1%). Conclusion This study demonstrated that the mean LOS associated with ABSSSI due to MRSA in Canada was minimally 7 days. Clinical management strategies, including medication management, which might facilitate hospital discharge, have the potential to reduce hospital LOS and related economic

  3. [Septic arthritis? Gonococcal infection despite negative bacterial cultures].

    PubMed

    Saur, M; Distler, O; Müller, N

    2008-09-10

    Clinical signs of acute arthritis are non-specific. An acute painfull joint with effusion of unknown origin needs to be evaluated by puncture. The analysis of the synovial fluid will enable to divide an arthritis into three categories: crystal induced, rheumatological or septic arthritis. A bacterial infection should always be suspected. Cultures from blood, synovia and Gram stain do not reliably exclude a bacterial infection. If gonococcal, mycobacterial, borrelial and non-gonococcal-infective arthritis under antibiotic therapy is suspected, direct DNA-amplification can be helpful. A disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI) must be suspected on appearance of tenosynovitis, polyarthralgia and skin lesions. The clinical picture, diagnosis and therapy of a case with DGI is discussed.

  4. Bacterial and viral infections associated with influenza.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Carol; Togawa, Yu; Shindo, Nahoko

    2013-09-01

    Influenza-associated bacterial and viral infections are responsible for high levels of morbidity and death during pandemic and seasonal influenza episodes. A review was undertaken to assess and evaluate the incidence, epidemiology, aetiology, clinical importance and impact of bacterial and viral co-infection and secondary infection associated with influenza. A review was carried out of published articles covering bacterial and viral infections associated with pandemic and seasonal influenza between 1918 and 2009 (and published through December 2011) to include both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary infections. While pneumococcal infection remains the predominant cause of bacterial pneumonia, the review highlights the importance of other co- and secondary bacterial and viral infections associated with influenza, and the emergence of newly identified dual infections associated with the 2009 H1N1 pandemic strain. Severe influenza-associated pneumonia is often bacterial and will necessitate antibiotic treatment. In addition to the well-known bacterial causes, less common bacteria such as Legionella pneumophila may also be associated with influenza when new influenza strains emerge. This review should provide clinicians with an overview of the range of bacterial and viral co- or secondary infections that could present with influenza illness.

  5. Glyconanomaterials for Combating Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-11-09

    Bacterial infections constitute an increasing problem to human health in response to build-up of resistance to present antibiotics and sluggish development of new pharmaceuticals. However, a means to address this problem is to pinpoint the drug delivery to-and into-the bacteria. This results in a high local concentration of the drug, circumventing the increasingly high doses otherwise necessary. Combined with other effectors, such as covalent attachment to carriers, rendering the drugs less degradable, and the combination with efflux inhibitors, old drugs can be revived. In this context, glyconanomaterials offer exceptional potential, since these materials can be tailored to accommodate different effectors. In this Concept article, we describe the different advantages of glyconanomaterials, and point to their potential in antibiotic "revitalization".

  6. Management of suspected bacterial urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Beckford-Ball, Jason

    New guidelines on the management of suspected bacterial urinary tract infection in adults have just been released by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). The guidance states that the presence of bacteriuria should lead to antibiotic treatment only when there is definitive evidence that eradicating the bacterial infection will result in a tangible health gain at a reasonable level of risk (SIGN, 2006).

  7. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... more than 6 children) Changes in altitude or climate Cold climate Exposure to smoke Family history of ear infections ... or fewer children. This can reduce your child's chances of getting a cold or other infection, and ...

  8. Clinical correlation between HBV infection and concomitant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Jin, Ronghua; Chen, Peng; Zhao, Guoxian; Li, Ning; Wu, Hao

    2015-12-04

    Bacterial infections are common in patients suffering viral hepatitis and critical for prognosis. However, any correlation between HBV and concomitant bacterial infections is not well characterized. A retrospective study was conducted from Jan 2012 to Jan 2014 on 1333 hospitalized patients infected with bacteria. Among them, 491 HBV-infected patients were co-infected with E. coli (268), S. aureus (61), P. aeruginosa (64) or K. pneumoniae (98). A group of 300 complication-free chronically HBV-infected patients were controls. We found that HBV DNA levels were elevated in patients with each of the bacterial infections (all P < 0.05). ALT and HBeAg were strong determinants of high HBV DNA concentration. Patterns of determinants varied in infections by Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Patients with HBV DNA ≥ 2000 IU/mL had higher rates of all four concomitant bacterial infections (all P < 0.001). All types of strains isolated from HBV-positive patients showed less resistance to tested antimicrobials. The HBV DNA serum concentrations were inversely correlated to the number of ineffective antimicrobials in E. coli, P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae infections (P = 0.022, 0.017 and 0.016, respectively), but not S. aureus (P = 0.194). In conclusion, bacterial infections are associated with a high level of HBV replication, which, in turn, has a significant positive impact on bacterial resistance to antimicrobials. These correlations vary between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  9. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute cystitis; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... cause. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  10. Acute pancreatitis: Manifestation of acute HIV infection in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Anas; Altaf, Muhammad; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Pancreatitis in the pediatric age group is not as common as in adults. Etiologies are various and differ from those in adults. Although infectious etiology accounts for a significant number of cases of pancreatitis, acute infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was rarely reported as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in adults. Acute pancreatitis has never been reported as a presenting manifestation of acute HIV infection in children. Case Report: We describe a pediatric patient who presented with acute pancreatitis that revealed acute HIV infection. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis as a primary manifestation of HIV infection is very rare. It may represent an uncommon aspect of primary HIV infection. We suggest that acute HIV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis at all ages. PMID:23569476

  11. Bacterial Infections - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bacterial Infections URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bacterialinfections.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  12. Gram-Negative Bacterial Wound Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    Infections PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Luis A. Actis CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 REPORT DATE: May 2014...SUBTITLE Gram-negative bacterial wound infections 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-2-0035 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-2-0035 5c. PROGRAM...laboratory conditions as well as to infect and kill G. mellonella larvae and BALB/c mice in experimental infection assays. These results validate

  13. Secondary bacterial infections in influenza virus infection pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amber M; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    Influenza is often complicated by bacterial pathogens that colonize the nasopharynx and invade the middle ear and/or lung epithelium. Incidence and pathogenicity of influenza-bacterial coinfections are multifactorial processes that involve various pathogenic virulence factors and host responses with distinct site- and strain-specific differences. Animal models and kinetic models have improved our understanding of how influenza viruses interact with their bacterial co-pathogens and the accompanying immune responses. Data from these models indicate that considerable alterations in epithelial surfaces and aberrant immune responses lead to severe inflammation, a key driver of bacterial acquisition and infection severity following influenza. However, further experimental and analytical studies are essential to determining the full mechanistic spectrum of different viral and bacterial strains and species and to finding new ways to prevent and treat influenza-associated bacterial coinfections. Here, we review recent advances regarding transmission and disease potential of influenza-associated bacterial infections and discuss the current gaps in knowledge.

  14. [The acute bacterial parotitis of the elderly].

    PubMed

    Coutaz, M; Morisod, J

    2009-09-30

    Acute bacterial parotitis (ABP) in elderly is clinically described with a sudden onset of painfull swelling over the cheek and angle of the mandible. The occur of ABP is a factor of very bad prognosis, often an indicator of approaching death. In this paper we discuss eight cases observed in our geriatric clinic. To reduce the frequency of ABP in old and frail people, we must be careful about their oral hygiene and dentition, increase their hydration and reduce their use of anticholinergic drugs.

  15. Severe acute malnutrition and infection

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice. PMID:25475887

  16. Severe acute malnutrition and infection.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-12-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice.

  17. Gram-Negative Bacterial Wound Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    experimental infection models. Accordingly, the presence of Ga-PPIX significantly reduced the growth of all tested A. baumannii strains independently of...bacterial functions involved in critical host-pathogen interactions. These observations also support the potential value of proposed animal experiments... animal models, experimental infections, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, phospolipases

  18. Prevention of allograft tolerance by bacterial infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongmin; Chen, Luqiu; Ahmed, Emily; Ma, Lianli; Yin, Dengping; Zhou, Ping; Shen, Jikun; Xu, Honglin; Wang$, Chyung-Ru; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to certain viruses and parasites has been shown to prevent the induction of transplantation tolerance in mice, via generation of cross-reactive memory T cell responses or induction of bystander activation. Bacterial infections are common in the peri-operative period of solid organ allograft recipients in the clinic, and correlations between bacterial infections and acute allograft rejection have been reported. However, whether bacterial infections at the time of transplantation have any effect on the generation of transplantation tolerance remains to be established. We used the Gram-positive intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (LM) as a model pathogen, as its effects on immune responses are well described. Peri-operative LM infection prevented cardiac and skin allograft acceptance induced by anti-CD154 and donor-specific transfusion (DST) in mice. LM-mediated rejection was not due to the generation of cross-reactive T cells and was largely independent of signaling via MyD88, an adaptor for most toll-like receptors (TLRs), IL-1 and IL-18. Instead, transplant rejection following LM infection was dependent on the expression of the phagosome-lysing pore-former listeriolysin O (LLO) and on IFNα/βR signaling. Our results indicate that bacterial exposure at the time of transplantation can antagonize tolerogenic regimens by enhancing alloantigen-specific immune responses, independent from the generation of cross-reactive memory T cells. PMID:18424719

  19. Influence of bacterial strains on bone infection.

    PubMed

    Cordero, J; Munuera, L; Folgueira, M D

    1996-07-01

    Experiments were performed on 120 rabbits to compare the probability of infection after bone surgery without an implant, with polymethylmethacrylate, and with autografts. Staphylococcus aureus phage type 94/96, isolated from a human osteomyelitis, was instilled into the intramedullar cavity after reaming of the femoral canal and before insertion of the implant. The different 50% infective doses were determined for each of the groups for comparative purposes. The bacterial concentrations required to produce infection in femora without an implant were two times less than those necessary in femora implanted with polymethylmethacrylate. The bone graft required bacterial concentrations nine times less than those necessary to infect femora containing polymethylmethacrylate and four times less than those required to infect femora without an implant. The results presented here confirm that the susceptibility to infection in orthopaedic surgery is not only material dependent but also bacteria dependent.

  20. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an emerging cause of acute bacterial parotitis.

    PubMed

    Nicolasora, Nelson P; Zacharek, Mark A; Malani, Anurag N

    2009-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has long been recognized as a cause of acute bacterial parotitis. A case of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) parotitis is presented, highlighting the emergence of this increasingly important pathogen to cause a wide variety of infections. Also reviewed are the salient clinical and microbiologic features of this novel infection.

  1. Role of quorum sensing in bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Juárez, Israel; Maeda, Toshinari; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; Tomás, María; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; Wood, Thomas K; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-07-16

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell communication that is widely used by bacterial pathogens to coordinate the expression of several collective traits, including the production of multiple virulence factors, biofilm formation, and swarming motility once a population threshold is reached. Several lines of evidence indicate that QS enhances virulence of bacterial pathogens in animal models as well as in human infections; however, its relative importance for bacterial pathogenesis is still incomplete. In this review, we discuss the present evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments in animal models, as well as from clinical studies, that link QS systems with human infections. We focus on two major QS bacterial models, the opportunistic Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, which are also two of the main agents responsible of nosocomial and wound infections. In addition, QS communication systems in other bacterial, eukaryotic pathogens, and even immune and cancer cells are also reviewed, and finally, the new approaches proposed to combat bacterial infections by the attenuation of their QS communication systems and virulence are also discussed.

  2. Role of quorum sensing in bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Juárez, Israel; Maeda, Toshinari; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; Tomás, María; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; Wood, Thomas K; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell communication that is widely used by bacterial pathogens to coordinate the expression of several collective traits, including the production of multiple virulence factors, biofilm formation, and swarming motility once a population threshold is reached. Several lines of evidence indicate that QS enhances virulence of bacterial pathogens in animal models as well as in human infections; however, its relative importance for bacterial pathogenesis is still incomplete. In this review, we discuss the present evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments in animal models, as well as from clinical studies, that link QS systems with human infections. We focus on two major QS bacterial models, the opportunistic Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, which are also two of the main agents responsible of nosocomial and wound infections. In addition, QS communication systems in other bacterial, eukaryotic pathogens, and even immune and cancer cells are also reviewed, and finally, the new approaches proposed to combat bacterial infections by the attenuation of their QS communication systems and virulence are also discussed. PMID:26244150

  3. Early predictors of acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and bacterial infection: urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cardiac output as reliable tools

    PubMed Central

    Ximenes, Rafael O.; Farias, Alberto Q.; Helou, Claudia M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic abnormalities and acute kidney injury (AKI) are often present in infected cirrhotic patients. Hence, an early diagnosis of AKI is necessary, which might require the validation of new predictors as the determinations of urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) and cardiac output. Methods We evaluated 18 infected cirrhotic patients subdivided into two groups at admission (0 hours). In Group I, we collected urine samples at 0 hours, 6 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours for uNGAL and fractional excretion of sodium determinations. In Group II, we measured cardiac output using echocardiography. Results The age of patients was 55.0±1.9 years, and 11 patients were males. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score was 21±1, whereas the Child–Pugh score was C in 11 patients and B in 7 patients. Both patients in Group I and Group II showed similar baseline characteristics. In Group I, we diagnosed AKI in 5 of 9 patients, and the mean time to this diagnosis by measuring serum creatinine was 5.4 days. Patients with AKI showed higher uNGAL levels than those without AKI from 6 hours to 48 hours. The best accuracy using the cutoff values of 68 ng uNGAL/mg creatinine was achieved at 48 hours when we distinguished patients with and without AKI in all cases. In Group II, we diagnosed AKI in 4 of 9 patients, and cardiac output was significantly higher in patients who developed AKI at 0 hours. Conclusion Both uNGAL and cardiac output determinations allow the prediction of AKI in infected cirrhotic patients earlier than increments in serum creatinine. PMID:26484038

  4. Bacterial Respiratory Infections Complicating Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Charles; Anderson, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Opportunistic bacterial and fungal infections of the lower respiratory tract, most commonly those caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Pneumocystis jirovecii, remain the major causes of mortality in those infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Bacterial respiratory pathogens most prevalent in those infected with HIV, other than M. tuberculosis, represent the primary focus of the current review with particular emphasis on the pneumococcus, the leading cause of mortality due to HIV infection in the developed world. Additional themes include (1) risk factors; (2) the predisposing effects of HIV-mediated suppression on pulmonary host defenses, possibly intensified by smoking; (3) clinical and laboratory diagnosis, encompassing assessment of disease severity and outcome; and (4) antibiotic therapy. The final section addresses current recommendations with respect to pneumococcal immunization in the context of HIV infection, including an overview of the rationale underpinning the current "prime-boost" immunization strategy based on sequential administration of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine 23.

  5. Bacterial diversity of symptomatic primary endodontic infection by clonal analysis.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Letícia Maria Menezes; Montagner, Francisco; Ribeiro, Adriana Costa; Mayer, Márcia Alves Pinto; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2016-10-10

    The aim of this study was to explore the bacterial diversity of 10 root canals with acute apical abscess using clonal analysis. Samples were collected from 10 patients and submitted to bacterial DNA isolation, 16S rRNA gene amplification, cloning, and sequencing. A bacterial genomic library was constructed and bacterial diversity was estimated. The mean number of taxa per canal was 15, ranging from 11 to 21. A total of 689 clones were analyzed and 76 phylotypes identified, of which 47 (61.84%) were different species and 29 (38.15%) were taxa reported as yet-uncultivable or as yet-uncharacterized species. Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Filifactor alocis, and Peptostreptococcus stomatis were the most frequently detected species, followed by Dialister invisus, Phocaeicola abscessus, the uncharacterized Lachnospiraceae oral clone, Porphyromonas spp., and Parvimonas micra. Eight phyla were detected and the most frequently identified taxa belonged to the phylum Firmicutes (43.5%), followed by Bacteroidetes (22.5%) and Proteobacteria (13.2%). No species was detected in all studied samples and some species were identified in only one case. It was concluded that acute primary endodontic infection is characterized by wide bacterial diversity and a high intersubject variability was observed. Anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes, followed by Bacteroidetes, were the most frequently detected microorganisms.

  6. Bacterial foodborne infections after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Nicole M; Podczervinski, Sara; Jordan, Kim; Stednick, Zach; Butler-Wu, Susan; McMillen, Kerry; Pergam, Steven A

    2014-11-01

    Diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever are common among patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but such symptoms are also typical with foodborne infections. The burden of disease caused by foodborne infections in patients undergoing HCT is unknown. We sought to describe bacterial foodborne infection incidence after transplantation within a single-center population of HCT recipients. All HCT recipients who underwent transplantation from 2001 through 2011 at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington were followed for 1 year after transplantation. Data were collected retrospectively using center databases, which include information from transplantation, on-site examinations, outside records, and collected laboratory data. Patients were considered to have a bacterial foodborne infection if Campylobacter jejuni/coli, Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Vibrio species, or Yersinia species were isolated in culture within 1 year after transplantation. Nonfoodborne infections with these agents and patients with pre-existing bacterial foodborne infection (within 30 days of transplantation) were excluded from analyses. A total of 12 of 4069 (.3%) patients developed a bacterial foodborne infection within 1 year after transplantation. Patients with infections had a median age at transplantation of 50.5 years (interquartile range [IQR], 35 to 57), and the majority were adults ≥18 years of age (9 of 12 [75%]), male gender (8 of 12 [67%]) and had allogeneic transplantation (8 of 12 [67%]). Infectious episodes occurred at an incidence rate of 1.0 per 100,000 patient-days (95% confidence interval, .5 to 1.7) and at a median of 50.5 days after transplantation (IQR, 26 to 58.5). The most frequent pathogen detected was C. jejuni/coli (5 of 12 [42%]) followed by Yersinia (3 of 12 [25%]), although Salmonella (2 of 12 [17%]) and Listeria (2 of 12 [17%]) showed equal frequencies; no cases of Shigella

  7. The Diagnosis, Evaluation and Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Becknell, Brian; Schober, Megan; Korbel, Lindsey; Spencer, John David

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the most common bacterial infections encountered by pediatricians. Currently, the diagnosis and management of acute urinary tract infection and recurrent urinary tract infection in children remains controversial. Recently published guidelines and large clinical trials have attempted to clarify UTI diagnostic and management strategies. In this manuscript, we review the diagnosis and management of acute and recurrent urinary tract infection in the pediatric population. PMID:25421102

  8. Role of Infections in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are prone to developing bacterial infections. Moreover, bacterial infection is the most common identifiable trigger of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), which is characterized by organ failures and a high risk of death. There is evidence of an excessive immune response of the host as a major mechanism leading to the development of organ failures in patients with cirrhosis. However, a role for direct tissue damage caused by bacterial toxins and virulence factors cannot be excluded. Failed tolerance mechanisms may also contribute to organ failures, although the involved mechanisms are unclear. A proportion of patients with infection-related ACLF have a prolonged stay in the intensive care unit. These patients have immune suppression, increased risk of superinfection and poor outcome. Immune suppression might be a consequence of the first infection episode that has led patients to be admitted to hospital.

  9. The role of bacterial biofilms in chronic infections.

    PubMed

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Acute infections caused by pathogenic bacteria have been studied extensively for well over 100 years. These infections killed millions of people in previous centuries, but they have been combated effectively by the development of modern vaccines, antibiotics and infection control measures. Most research into bacterial pathogenesis has focused on acute infections, but these diseases have now been supplemented by a new category of chronic infections caused by bacteria growing in slime-enclosed aggregates known as biofilms. Biofilm infections, such as pneumonia in cystic fibrosis patients, chronic wounds, chronic otitis media and implant- and catheter-associated infections, affect millions of people in the developed world each year and many deaths occur as a consequence. In general, bacteria have two life forms during growth and proliferation. In one form, the bacteria exist as single, independent cells (planktonic) whereas in the other form, bacteria are organized into sessile aggregates. The latter form is commonly referred to as the biofilm growth phenotype. Acute infections are assumed to involve planktonic bacteria, which are generally treatable with antibiotics, although successful treatment depends on accurate and fast diagnosis. However, in cases where the bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often turns out to be untreatable and will develop into a chronic state. The important hallmarks of chronic biofilm-based infections are extreme resistance to antibiotics and many other conventional antimicrobial agents, and an extreme capacity for evading the host defences. In this thesis, I will assemble the current knowledge on biofilms with an emphasis on chronic infections, guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of these infections, before relating this to my previous research into the area of biofilms. I will present evidence to support a view that the biofilm lifestyle dominates chronic bacterial infections, where bacterial

  10. Bell's palsy may have relations to bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiaqiang; Li, Yongming; Yuan, Xiao; Lin, Zhu

    2009-02-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common acute facial paralysis with its causes still unclear. At present, the most widely accepted causes are viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. Unclear causes lead to unidentified treatments. Most therapeutic methods are simply symptomatic treatment. Fortunately, the pathomechanism of Bell's palsy is relative clear, involving herpes simplex virus (HSV) reactivation within the geniculate ganglion, followed by inflammation and entrapment of the nerve in the bony foramen. This makes symptomatic treatment possible. But the therapeutic effects are not quite satisfactory. Therefore, novel etiological and therapeutic concepts are urgently needed. According to our clinical observation and some facts that do not favor the viral infections theory, we can conclude that all Bell's palsy is not related to viral infections, some even may have relations to bacterial infection. As far as blood routine examination is concerned, though lymphocyte increasing can be seen in most patients with Bell's palsy, there are cases with normal lymphocyte but increased neutrophil. Also, antibiotic treatment in these patients could accelerate recovery to some extent. These results indicate that Bell's palsy in these patients may be caused by bacterial infection.

  11. Pericardial Tamponade in an Adult Suffering from Acute Mumps Infection

    PubMed Central

    Flieger, Robert Rainer; Mankertz, Annette; Yilmaz, Kadir; Roepke, Torsten Kai

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a case of a 51-year-old man with acute pericardial tamponade requiring emergency pericardiocentesis after he suffered from sore throat, headache, malaise, and sweats for two weeks. Serological analyses revealed increased mumps IgM and IgG indicating an acute mumps infection whereas other bacterial and viral infections were excluded. In addition, MRI revealed atypical swelling of the left submandibular gland. Whereas mumps has become a rare entity in children due to comprehensive vaccination regimens in western civilizations, our case highlights mumps as an important differential diagnosis also in adults, where the virus can induce life-threatening complications such as pericardial tamponade. PMID:27818687

  12. Diverging roles of bacterial siderophores during infection.

    PubMed

    Holden, Victoria I; Bachman, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Siderophores are low molecular weight, high affinity iron chelating molecules that are essential virulence factors in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Whereas the chemical structure of siderophores is extremely variable, the function of siderophores has been narrowly defined as the chelation and delivery of iron to bacteria for proliferation. The discovery of the host protein Lipocalin 2, capable of specifically sequestering the siderophore Enterobactin but not its glycosylated-derivative Salmochelin, indicated that diversity in structure could be an immune evasion mechanism that provides functional redundancy during infection. However, there is growing evidence that siderophores are specialized in their iron-acquisition functions, can perturb iron homeostasis in their hosts, and even bind non-iron metals to promote bacterial fitness. The combination of siderophores produced by a pathogen can enable inter-bacterial competition, modulate host cellular pathways, and determine the bacterial "replicative niche" during infection. This review will examine both classical and novel functions of siderophores to address the concept that siderophores are non-redundant virulence factors used to enhance bacterial pathogenesis.

  13. Empiric Antibiotic Therapy of Nosocomial Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotics are commonly used by physicians to treat various infections. The source of infection and causative organisms are not always apparent during the initial evaluation of the patient, and antibiotics are often given empirically to patients with suspected sepsis. Fear of attempting cephalosporins and carbapenems in penicillin-allergic septic patients may result in significant decrease in the spectrum of antimicrobial coverage. Empiric antibiotic therapy should sufficiently cover all the suspected pathogens, guided by the bacteriologic susceptibilities of the medical center. It is important to understand the major pharmacokinetic properties of antibacterial agents for proper use and to minimize the development of resistance. In several septic patients, negative cultures do not exclude active infection and positive cultures may not represent the actual infection. This article will review the important differences in the spectrum of commonly used antibiotics for nosocomial bacterial infections with a particular emphasis on culture-negative sepsis and colonization.

  14. Optimising Antibiotic Usage to Treat Bacterial Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, Iona K.; Hoyle, Andy; Ochoa, Gabriela; Baker-Austin, Craig; Taylor, Nick G. H.

    2016-11-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistant bacteria poses a threat to the continued use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections. The overuse and misuse of antibiotics has been identified as a significant driver in the emergence of resistance. Finding optimal treatment regimens is therefore critical in ensuring the prolonged effectiveness of these antibiotics. This study uses mathematical modelling to analyse the effect traditional treatment regimens have on the dynamics of a bacterial infection. Using a novel approach, a genetic algorithm, the study then identifies improved treatment regimens. Using a single antibiotic the genetic algorithm identifies regimens which minimise the amount of antibiotic used while maximising bacterial eradication. Although exact treatments are highly dependent on parameter values and initial bacterial load, a significant common trend is identified throughout the results. A treatment regimen consisting of a high initial dose followed by an extended tapering of doses is found to optimise the use of antibiotics. This consistently improves the success of eradicating infections, uses less antibiotic than traditional regimens and reduces the time to eradication. The use of genetic algorithms to optimise treatment regimens enables an extensive search of possible regimens, with previous regimens directing the search into regions of better performance.

  15. Optimising Antibiotic Usage to Treat Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Iona K.; Hoyle, Andy; Ochoa, Gabriela; Baker-Austin, Craig; Taylor, Nick G. H.

    2016-01-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistant bacteria poses a threat to the continued use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections. The overuse and misuse of antibiotics has been identified as a significant driver in the emergence of resistance. Finding optimal treatment regimens is therefore critical in ensuring the prolonged effectiveness of these antibiotics. This study uses mathematical modelling to analyse the effect traditional treatment regimens have on the dynamics of a bacterial infection. Using a novel approach, a genetic algorithm, the study then identifies improved treatment regimens. Using a single antibiotic the genetic algorithm identifies regimens which minimise the amount of antibiotic used while maximising bacterial eradication. Although exact treatments are highly dependent on parameter values and initial bacterial load, a significant common trend is identified throughout the results. A treatment regimen consisting of a high initial dose followed by an extended tapering of doses is found to optimise the use of antibiotics. This consistently improves the success of eradicating infections, uses less antibiotic than traditional regimens and reduces the time to eradication. The use of genetic algorithms to optimise treatment regimens enables an extensive search of possible regimens, with previous regimens directing the search into regions of better performance. PMID:27892497

  16. Canadian guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide a clinical summary of the Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) that includes relevant considerations for family physicians. Quality of evidence Guideline authors performed a systematic literature search and drafted recommendations. Recommendations received both strength of evidence and strength of recommendation ratings. Input from external content experts was sought, as was endorsement from Canadian medical societies (Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Canadian Society of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, and the Family Physicians Airways Group of Canada). Main message Diagnosis of ABRS is based on the presence of specific symptoms and their duration; imaging or culture are not needed in uncomplicated cases. Treatment is dependent on symptom severity, with intranasal corticosteroids (INCSs) recommended as monotherapy for mild and moderate cases, although the benefit might be modest. Use of INCSs plus antibiotics is reserved for patients who fail to respond to INCSs after 72 hours, and for initial treatment of patients with severe symptoms. Antibiotic selection must account for the suspected pathogen, the risk of resistance, comorbid conditions, and local antimicrobial resistance trends. Adjunct therapies such as nasal saline irrigation are recommended. Failure to respond to treatment, recurrent episodes, and signs of complications should prompt referral to an otolaryngologist. The guidelines address situations unique to the Canadian health care environment, including actions to take during prolonged wait periods for specialist referral or imaging. Conclusion The Canadian guidelines provide up-to-date recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of ABRS that reflect an evolving understanding of the disease. In addition, the guidelines offer useful tools to help

  17. Approaches to prevent acute bacterial meningitis in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, P. F.

    1989-01-01

    Endemic acute bacterial meningitis of childhood appears to be neglected as a cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries, probably because it has been overshadowed by the dramatic epidemics of meningococcal disease in sub-Saharan Africa. The available data based on reviews of hospitalized patients suggest that endemic meningitis is mostly a disease of young infants, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b being the most important etiologic agents. The epidemiological pattern appears to be different in developing countries, compared with northern Europe or the USA, and closely resembles the early age of onset and high incidence of meningitis observed among the native American populations in Alaska. The mortality from meningitis appears to be much higher in developing countries than in industrialized countries. The availability of vaccines against the pneumococcus and haemophilus, particularly those in which the bacterial polysaccharide is conjugated to a protein, promises protection against systemic bacterial infection from these organisms. The assessment of the efficacy of such vaccines will have to include a close examination of meningitis as an outcome. It is suggested that before such vaccines become available careful clinical and epidemiological studies of meningitis will help both to define the impact of this disease and how to design an intervention strategy. PMID:2611973

  18. CANVAS 1 and 2: analysis of clinical response at day 3 in two phase 3 trials of ceftaroline fosamil versus vancomycin plus aztreonam in treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    PubMed

    Friedland, H David; O'Neal, Tanya; Biek, Donald; Eckburg, Paul B; Rank, Douglas R; Llorens, Lily; Smith, Alex; Witherell, Gary W; Laudano, Joseph B; Thye, Dirk

    2012-05-01

    Scientific and regulatory interest in assessing clinical endpoints after 48 to 72 h of treatment for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) has increased. Historical, pre-antibiotic-era data suggest that a treatment effect relative to untreated controls can be discerned in this time interval. Ceftaroline fosamil, a broad-spectrum bactericidal cephalosporin with activity against Gram-positive organisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and Gram-negative organisms was efficacious in two phase 3 trials of complicated skin infections (CANVAS 1 and 2) using clinical cure rates at the test-of-cure visit. To assess an early clinical response in the CANVAS trials, a retrospective analysis using a day 3 clinical endpoint was conducted. Adults with ABSSSI received intravenous ceftaroline fosamil at 600 mg every 12 h (q12h) or vancomycin at 1 g plus aztreonam at 1 g (V/A) q12h for 5 to 14 days. Clinical response at day 3, defined as cessation of infection spread and absence of fever, was analyzed in patients with a lesion size of ≥ 75 cm(2) and either deep and/or extensive cellulitis, major abscess, or an infected wound. Day 3 integrated CANVAS clinical response rates were 74.0% (296/400) for ceftaroline and 66.2% (263/397) for V/A (difference, 7.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3% to 14.0%). In the individual studies, absolute treatment differences of 9.4% (CANVAS 1) and 5.9% (CANVAS 2) favoring ceftaroline were observed. For ABSSSI due to MRSA, response rates were 81.7% and 77.4% in the ceftaroline and V/A groups, respectively. In this retrospective analysis, ceftaroline fosamil monotherapy had a numerically higher clinical response than V/A at day 3 in the treatment of ABSSSI.

  19. Viral bacterial co-infection of the respiratory tract during early childhood.

    PubMed

    Brealey, Jaelle C; Sly, Peter D; Young, Paul R; Chappell, Keith J

    2015-05-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is an important cause of morbidity in children. Mixed aetiology is frequent, with pathogenic viruses and bacteria co-detected in respiratory secretions. However, the clinical significance of these viral/bacterial co-infections has long been a controversial topic. While severe bacterial pneumonia following influenza infection has been well described, associations are less clear among infections caused by viruses that are more common in young children, such as respiratory syncytial virus. Although assessing the overall contribution of bacteria to disease severity is complicated by the presence of many confounding factors in clinical studies, understanding the role of viral/bacterial co-infections in defining the outcome of paediatric ARI will potentially reveal novel treatment and prevention strategies, improving patient outcomes. This review summarizes current evidence for the clinical significance of respiratory viral/bacterial co-infections in young children, discusses possible mechanisms of cooperative interaction between these pathogens and highlights areas that require further investigation.

  20. Predicting the presence of bacterial pathogens in the airways of primary care patients with acute cough

    PubMed Central

    Teepe, Jolien; Broekhuizen, Berna D.L.; Loens, Katherine; Lammens, Christine; Ieven, Margareta; Goossens, Herman; Little, Paul; Butler, Chris C.; Coenen, Samuel; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Verheij, Theo J.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacterial testing of all patients who present with acute cough is not feasible in primary care. Furthermore, the extent to which easily obtainable clinical information predicts bacterial infection is unknown. We evaluated the diagnostic value of clinical examination and testing for C-reactive protein and procalcitonin for bacterial lower respiratory tract infection. METHODS: Through a European diagnostic study, we recruited 3104 adults with acute cough (≤ 28 days) in primary care settings. All of the patients underwent clinical examination, measurement of C-reactive protein and procalcitonin in blood, and chest radiography. Bacterial infection was determined by conventional culture, polymerase chain reaction and serology, and positive results were defined by the presence of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Bordetella pertussis or Legionella pneumophila. Using multivariable regression analysis, we examined the association of diagnostic variables with the presence of bacterial infection. RESULTS: Overall, 539 patients (17%) had bacterial lower respiratory tract infection, and 38 (1%) had bacterial pneumonia. The only item with diagnostic value for lower respiratory tract infection was discoloured sputum (area under the receiver operating characteristic [ROC] curve 0.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54–0.59). Adding C-reactive protein above 30 mg/L increased the area under the ROC curve to 0.62 (95% CI 0.59–0.65). For bacterial pneumonia, comorbidity, fever and crackles on auscultation had diagnostic value (area under ROC curve 0.68, 95% CI 0.58–0.77). Adding C-reactive protein above 30 mg/L increased the area under the ROC curve to 0.79 (95% CI 0.71–0.87). Procalcitonin did not add diagnostic information for any bacterial lower respiratory tract infection, including bacterial pneumonia. INTERPRETATION: In adults presenting with acute lower respiratory tract infection, signs, symptoms and C

  1. Bacterial Genotoxins: Merging the DNA Damage Response into Infection Biology

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Francesca; Frisan, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial genotoxins are unique among bacterial toxins as their molecular target is DNA. The consequence of intoxication or infection is induction of DNA breaks that, if not properly repaired, results in irreversible cell cycle arrest (senescence) or death of the target cells. At present, only three bacterial genotoxins have been identified. Two are protein toxins: the cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) family produced by a number of Gram-negative bacteria and the typhoid toxin produced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. The third member, colibactin, is a peptide-polyketide genotoxin, produced by strains belonging to the phylogenetic group B2 of Escherichia coli. This review will present the cellular effects of acute and chronic intoxication or infection with the genotoxins-producing bacteria. The carcinogenic properties and the role of these effectors in the context of the host-microbe interaction will be discussed. We will further highlight the open questions that remain to be solved regarding the biology of this unusual family of bacterial toxins. PMID:26270677

  2. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Ayse; Tanir, Gonul; Ozkan, Mehpare; Oguz, Melek; Yıldız, Yasemin Tasci

    2013-03-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is an acute demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, which principally affects the brain and spinal cord. It usually follows a benign infection or vaccination in children. Although a number of infectious agents have been implicated in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, Toxoplasma gondii infection has not been described previously in children. Acquired T. gondii infection presents with lymphadenopathy and fever and usually spontaneously resolves in immunocompetent patients. We describe a previously healthy 10-year-old boy with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with acute acquired Toxoplasma gondii infection, the symptoms of which initially began with nuchal stiffness, difficulty in walking, and urinary and stool incontinence; he later had development of motor and sensory impairment in both lower extremities and classical magnetic resonance imaging lesions suggestive of the disease. The patient recovered completely after the specific therapy for acquired T. gondii infection and pulse prednisolone. Although acute acquired Toxoplasma gondii infection has not been reported previously in association with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, clinicians should keep in mind this uncommon cause of a common disease when evaluating a patient with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  3. Detection of Intracellular Bacterial Communities in Human Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, David A; Hooton, Thomas M; Stamm, Walter E; Humphrey, Peter A; Hultgren, Scott J

    2007-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections and are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). While UTIs are typically considered extracellular infections, it has been recently demonstrated that UPEC bind to, invade, and replicate within the murine bladder urothelium to form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs). These IBCs dissociate and bacteria flux out of bladder facet cells, some with filamentous morphology, and ultimately establish quiescent intracellular reservoirs that can seed recurrent infection. This IBC pathogenic cycle has not yet been investigated in humans. In this study we sought to determine whether evidence of an IBC pathway could be found in urine specimens from women with acute UTI. Methods and Findings We collected midstream, clean-catch urine specimens from 80 young healthy women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and 20 asymptomatic women with a history of UTI. Investigators were blinded to culture results and clinical history. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy for evidence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria. Evidence of IBCs was found in 14 of 80 (18%) urines from women with UTI. Filamentous bacteria were found in 33 of 80 (41%) urines from women with UTI. None of the 20 urines from the asymptomatic comparative group showed evidence of IBCs or filaments. Filamentous bacteria were present in all 14 of the urines with IBCs compared to 19 (29%) of 66 samples with no evidence of IBCs (p < 0.001). Of 65 urines from patients with E. coli infections, 14 (22%) had evidence of IBCs and 29 (45%) had filamentous bacteria, while none of the gram-positive infections had IBCs or filamentous bacteria. Conclusions The presence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria in the urines of women with acute cystitis suggests that the IBC pathogenic pathway characterized in the murine model may occur in humans. The findings

  4. Bacterial Diversity in Oral Samples of Children in Niger with Acute Noma, Acute Necrotizing Gingivitis, and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Stadelmann, Benoît; Baratti-Mayer, Denise; Gizard, Yann; Mombelli, Andrea; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background Noma is a gangrenous disease that leads to severe disfigurement of the face with high morbidity and mortality, but its etiology remains unknown. Young children in developing countries are almost exclusively affected. The purpose of the study was to record and compare bacterial diversity in oral samples from children with or without acute noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis from a defined geographical region in Niger by culture-independent molecular methods. Methods and Principal Findings Gingival samples from 23 healthy children, nine children with acute necrotizing gingivitis, and 23 children with acute noma (both healthy and diseased oral sites) were amplified using “universal” PCR primers for the 16 S rRNA gene and pooled according to category (noma, healthy, or acute necrotizing gingivitis), gender, and site status (diseased or control site). Seven libraries were generated. A total of 1237 partial 16 S rRNA sequences representing 339 bacterial species or phylotypes at a 98–99% identity level were obtained. Analysis of bacterial composition and frequency showed that diseased (noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis) and healthy site bacterial communities are composed of similar bacteria, but differ in the prevalence of a limited group of phylotypes. Large increases in counts of Prevotella intermedia and members of the Peptostreptococcus genus are associated with disease. In contrast, no clear-cut differences were found between noma and non-noma libraries. Conclusions Similarities between acute necrotizing gingivitis and noma samples support the hypothesis that the disease could evolve from acute necrotizing gingivitis in certain children for reasons still to be elucidated. This study revealed oral microbiological patterns associated with noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis, but no evidence was found for a specific infection-triggering agent. PMID:22413030

  5. Host-microbe protein interactions during bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Schweppe, Devin K.; Harding, Christopher; Chavez, Juan D.; Wu, Xia; Ramage, Elizabeth; Singh, Pradeep K.; Manoil, Colin; Bruce, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Interspecies protein-protein interactions are essential mediators of infection. While bacterial proteins required for host cell invasion and infection can be identified through bacterial mutant library screens, information about host target proteins and interspecies complex structures has been more difficult to acquire. Using an unbiased chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry approach, we identified interspecies protein-protein interactions in human lung epithelial cells infected with Acinetobacter baumannii. These efforts resulted in identification of 3076 total cross-linked peptide pairs and 46 interspecies protein-protein interactions. Most notably, the key A. baumannii virulence factor, OmpA, was identified cross-linked to host proteins involved in desmosomes, specialized structures that mediate host cell-to-cell adhesion. Co-immunoprecipitation and transposon mutant experiments were used to verify these interactions and demonstrate relevance for host cell invasion and acute murine lung infection. These results shed new light on A. baumannii-host protein interactions and their structural features and the presented approach is generally applicable to other systems. PMID:26548613

  6. Effectiveness, tolerability and safety of azithromycin 1% in DuraSite® for acute bacterial conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Susannah; Sheikh, Aziz

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Bacterial eye infections are commonly treated with topical antibiotics, despite limited evidence of effectiveness. Azithromycin 1% in DuraSite® is a new formulation of azithromycin in a gel polymer designed for use in acute bacterial conjunctivitis. Methods: We conducted systematic searches of the Cochrane Database of Clinical Trials, PubMed and Google Scholar to find randomized controlled trials of “azithromycin DuraSite®”. These searches of published literature were supplemented with searches for unpublished trials and trials in progress. Results: We found six reports of randomized controlled trials investigating the role of azithromycin 1% in DuraSite® for the management of acute bacterial conjunctivitis. The quality of these trials was judged to be moderate to high. These trials assessed effectiveness, tolerability and safety outcomes, but we found no trials looking at cost-effectiveness. DuraSite® is a relatively stable formulation and so azithromycin 1% in DuraSite® has a simpler dosing schedule than other available topical antibiotics. It appears to be similar to other topical antibiotics in its effectiveness, but minor side effects are quite common. Conclusion: Acute bacterial conjunctivitis is a relatively mild, typically self-limiting, infection. Antibiotics should seldom be required. If, however, a decision to prescribe antibiotics is made, azithromycin 1% in DuraSite® is likely to be broadly comparable in its effectiveness to most other antibiotics used to treat acute bacterial conjunctivitis. Further research is needed to determine its cost-effectiveness. PMID:20517467

  7. Acute neck infections in children.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, A Bülent; Kara, Ateş; Kanra, Güler; Seçmeer, Gülten; Ceyhan, Mehmet; Ozen, Metehan

    2004-01-01

    A retrospective review was conducted on 132 patients aged between two and 15 years with cervical lymphadenitis and/or with abscess formation to determine the epidemiologic and clinical presentation of these infections. The most common locations were the upper anterior cervical space (43.2%) and the submandibular space (27.3%). The duration of symptoms ranged from 12 hours to 20 days. Results of the pus cultures were available in 31 patients (23.5%). Of these, 16 cultures (51.6%) were positive. The isolated organisms were Staphylococcus aureus (50%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (31.3%), group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (12.5%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (6.3%) and Escherichia coli (6.3%). One of the specimens yielded mixed organisms (Staphylococcus epidermidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae). Penicillin resistance was documented in six (37.5%) of the 16 gram-positive bacteria isolated from the pus culture. Both throat and blood cultures were available in all 132 patients. Seven throat cultures (5.3%) were positive for group A beta hemolytic streptococci, whereas five blood cultures (3.8%) were reported to have bacterial growth. Sixty-seven patients (50.8%) were treated with ampicillin-sulbactam, 53 patients (40.1%) with ampicillin-sulbactam and ornidazole and 12 patients (9.1%) with ceftriaxone parenterally. The mean duration of hospital stay related to the infection was 7.30 +/- 3.89 days (range, 2-28 days). The mean period for downsizing of the cervical mass by half was 4.05 +/- 2.05 days, and the recovery period (total antibiotic usage period) was 13.72 +/- 5.33 days. All of the patients had an uneventful recovery without complications. Results of both throat and blood cultures were not predictive for etiologic agents in our study group. Since ultrasonographic evaluation of each patient has limited additional benefits in clinical management, it must be reserved for selected cases to document abscess formation.

  8. Stress and acute respiratory infection

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, N.M.; Douglas, R.M.; Ryan, P.

    1986-09-01

    To examine the relationship between stress and upper respiratory tract infection, 235 adults aged 14-57 years, from 94 families affiliated with three suburban family physicians in Adelaide, South Australia, participated in a six-month prospective study. High and low stress groups were identified by median splits of data collected from the Life Events Inventory, the Daily Hassles Scale, and the General Health Questionnaire, which were administered both before and during the six months of respiratory diary data collection. Using intra-study stress data, the high stress group experienced significantly more episodes (mean of 2.71 vs. 1.56, p less than 0.0005) and symptom days (mean of 29.43 vs. 15.42, p = 0.005) of respiratory illness. The two groups were almost identical with respect to age, sex, occupational status, smoking, passive smoking, exposure to air pollution, family size, and proneness to acute respiratory infection in childhood. In a multivariate model with total respiratory episodes as the dependent variable, 21% of the variance was explained, and two stress variables accounted for 9% of the explained variance. Significant, but less strong relationships were also identified between intra-study stress variables and clinically definite episodes and symptom days in both clinically definite and total respiratory episodes. Pre-study measures of stress emphasized chronic stresses and were less strongly related to measures of respiratory illness than those collected during the study. However, significantly more episodes (mean of 2.50 vs. 1.75, p less than 0.02) and symptom days (mean of 28.00 vs. 17.06, p less than 0.03) were experienced in the high stress group. In the multivariate analyses, pre-study stress remained significantly associated with total respiratory episodes nd symptom days in total and ''definite'' respiratory episodes.

  9. Identification of bacterial infection in neotropical primates.

    PubMed

    Menezes-Costa, Andre; Machado-Ferreira, Erik; Voloch, Carolina M; Bonvicino, Cibele R; Seuánez, Hector N; Leoncini, Orilio; Soares, Carlos A G

    2013-08-01

    Emerging infectious diseases usually arise from wild animal populations. In the present work, we performed a screening for bacterial infection in natural populations of New World primates. The blood cell bulk DNAs from 181 individuals of four Platyrrhini genera were PCR screened for eubacterial 16S rRNA genes. Bacteria were detected and identified in 13 distinct individuals of Alouatta belzebul, Alouatta caraya, and Cebus apella monkeys from geographically distant regions in the states of Mato Grosso and Pará, Brazil. Sequence analyses showed that these Platyrrhini bacteria are closely related not only to human pathogens Pseudomonas spp. but also to Pseudomonas simiae and sheep-Acari infecting Pseudomonas spp. The identified Pseudomonas possibly represents a group of bacteria circulating in natural monkey populations.

  10. [Normal cutaneous flora and secondary bacterial infection].

    PubMed

    Soria, X; Carrascosa, J M

    2007-09-01

    Normal skin microflora consists of those micro-organisms which are usually present on the skin, without causing infection. The infant's skin colonization starts during birth and after the first months of life the skin microbiota is composed of the same micro-organisms as in the adult. The skin microflora is composed of bacteria, mostly gram-positives Staphylococcus species, yeasts which the most prevalent is Malassezia, viruses and arthropods like Demodex folliculorum. In the last years, the development of molecular microbiology and specially techniques like amplification and comparison of 16S rRNA, have demonstrated that cutaneous microbiota is composed of a higher diversity of bacteria than the traditionally observed in culture methods. We also review the main secondary bacterial skin infections.

  11. Guidelines for the management of bacterial and fungal infections during chemotherapy for pediatric acute leukemia or solid tumors: what is available in 2010?

    PubMed Central

    Castagnola, Elio; Caviglia, Ilaria; Haupt, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Febrile episodes and infections represent important complications during antineoplastic chemotherapy for pediatric neoplastic diseases. In the last years many international association published guidelines for the management of these complications in adults, but no document of this type was prepared for children. One of the major causes of this situation is probably the very low number of pediatric clinical trials with adequate power and design. The paper summarizes guidelines provided for the management of infectious complications in adults with cancer by different international and will comment on how much they may be translated in the management of pediatric patients. PMID:21647280

  12. Current Therapy in Acute Mouth Infections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, George; Burnstein, Irwin L.

    1970-01-01

    Until a dental department is added to a college health service, a physician or nurse can give treatment for acute oral infections. Treatment excludes the use of caustic, escharotic chemicals in favor of more benign agents. (Author)

  13. DNA vaccines for targeting bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Ingolotti, Mariana; Kawalekar, Omkar; Shedlock, Devon J; Muthumani, Karuppiah; Weiner, David B

    2010-01-01

    DNA vaccination has been of great interest since its discovery in the 1990s due to its ability to elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses. DNA vaccines consist of a DNA plasmid containing a transgene that encodes the sequence of a target protein from a pathogen under the control of a eukaryotic promoter. This revolutionary technology has proven to be effective in animal models and four DNA vaccine products have recently been approved for veterinary use. Although few DNA vaccines against bacterial infections have been tested, the results are encouraging. Because of their versatility, safety and simplicity a wider range of organisms can be targeted by these vaccines, which shows their potential advantages to public health. This article describes the mechanism of action of DNA vaccines and their potential use for targeting bacterial infections. In addition, it provides an updated summary of the methods used to enhance immunogenicity from codon optimization and adjuvants to delivery techniques including electroporation and use of nanoparticles. PMID:20624048

  14. Utility of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anish; Mahale, Rohan R.; Sudhir, Uchil; Javali, Mahendra; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meningitis remains a serious clinical problem in developing as well as developed countries. Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. The role and levels of intrathecal endogenous cortisol is not known. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels and to evaluate its role as a diagnostic and therapeutic marker in acute bacterial meningitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with acute bacterial meningitis with no prior treatment were evaluated. Cortisol levels were compared with 20 patients with aseptic (viral) meningitis and 25 control subjects. Results: Mean CSF cortisol level was 13.85, 3.47, and 1.05 in bacterial meningitis, aseptic meningitis, and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in bacterial meningitis was significantly higher as compared to controls (P < 0.001). There was significant difference in CSFcortisol levels in bacterial and aseptic meningitis (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Cortisol levels in CSF are highly elevated in patients with acute bacterial meningitis. This suggests that intrathecalcortisol may serve as a valuable, rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic marker in discriminatingbetween bacterial and aseptic meningitis. This helps in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:26019421

  15. [Antibiotherapy in children with atypical bacterial infections].

    PubMed

    Haas, H

    2005-04-01

    Atypical bacteria responsible for infections in children are mainly Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila. Atypical pneumonia is a frequent disease in children. Until recently, the outcome was thought to be rather benign and antibiotherapy to have only a minor impact on the prognosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae were involved in a variety of infections, including acute upper airway disease, otitis and pharyngitis under five. Antibiotherapy was proven able to decrease the rate of complications and recurrence, notably episodes of wheezing and exacerbations of asthma. Atypical bacteria infections may be severe in immunocompromised children and children with underlying disease such as sickle cell anaemia. Whenever bacteriological documentation is lacking, one of the critical issues in choosing an antibiotic is to consider its activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, especially in lower respiratory tract infections. The main available molecules are reviewed and discussed, with a special emphasis on ketolides, a newer family of molecules active on both atypical bacteria and S. pneumoniae.

  16. Robust classification of bacterial and viral infections via integrated host gene expression diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Timothy E.; Wong, Hector R.; Khatri, Purvesh

    2017-01-01

    Improved diagnostics for acute infections could decrease morbidity and mortality by increasing early antibiotics for patients with bacterial infections and reducing unnecessary antibiotics for patients without bacterial infections. Several groups have used gene expression microarrays to build classifiers for acute infections, but these have been hampered by the size of the gene sets, use of overfit models, or lack of independent validation. We used multicohort analysis to derive a set of seven genes for robust discrimination of bacterial and viral infections, which we then validated in 30 independent cohorts. We next used our previously published 11-gene Sepsis MetaScore together with the new bacterial/viral classifier to build an integrated antibiotics decision model. In a pooled analysis of 1057 samples from 20 cohorts (excluding infants), the integrated antibiotics decision model had a sensitivity and specificity for bacterial infections of 94.0 and 59.8%, respectively (negative likelihood ratio, 0.10). Prospective clinical validation will be needed before these findings are implemented for patient care. PMID:27384347

  17. Incidence of acute otitis media and sinusitis complicating upper respiratory tract infection: the effect of age.

    PubMed

    Revai, Krystal; Dobbs, Laura A; Nair, Sangeeta; Patel, Janak A; Grady, James J; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2007-06-01

    Infants and young children are prone to developing upper respiratory tract infections, which often result in bacterial complications such as acute otitis media and sinusitis. We evaluated 623 upper respiratory tract infection episodes in 112 children (6-35 months of age) to determine the proportion of upper respiratory tract infection episodes that result in acute otitis media or sinusitis. Of all upper respiratory tract infections, 30% were complicated by acute otitis media and 8% were complicated by sinusitis. The rate of acute otitis media after upper respiratory tract infection declined with increasing age, whereas the rate of sinusitis after upper respiratory tract infection peaked in the second year of life. Risk for acute otitis media may be reduced substantially by avoiding frequent exposure to respiratory viruses (eg, avoidance of day care attendance) in the first year of life.

  18. Diagnosis of Bacterial Bloodstream Infections: A 16S Metagenomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Puyvelde, Sandra; De Block, Tessa; Maltha, Jessica; Palpouguini, Lompo; Tahita, Marc; Tinto, Halidou; Jacobs, Jan; Deborggraeve, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterial bloodstream infection (bBSI) is one of the leading causes of death in critically ill patients and accurate diagnosis is therefore crucial. We here report a 16S metagenomics approach for diagnosing and understanding bBSI. Methodology/Principal Findings The proof-of-concept was delivered in 75 children (median age 15 months) with severe febrile illness in Burkina Faso. Standard blood culture and malaria testing were conducted at the time of hospital admission. 16S metagenomics testing was done retrospectively and in duplicate on the blood of all patients. Total DNA was extracted from the blood and the V3–V4 regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR and deep sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. Paired reads were curated, taxonomically labeled, and filtered. Blood culture diagnosed bBSI in 12 patients, but this number increased to 22 patients when combining blood culture and 16S metagenomics results. In addition to superior sensitivity compared to standard blood culture, 16S metagenomics revealed important novel insights into the nature of bBSI. Patients with acute malaria or recovering from malaria had a 7-fold higher risk of presenting polymicrobial bloodstream infections compared to patients with no recent malaria diagnosis (p-value = 0.046). Malaria is known to affect epithelial gut function and may thus facilitate bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to the blood. Importantly, patients with such polymicrobial blood infections showed a 9-fold higher risk factor for not surviving their febrile illness (p-value = 0.030). Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate that 16S metagenomics is a powerful approach for the diagnosis and understanding of bBSI. This proof-of-concept study also showed that appropriate control samples are crucial to detect background signals due to environmental contamination. PMID:26927306

  19. Host Biomarkers for Distinguishing Bacterial from Non-Bacterial Causes of Acute Febrile Illness: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Kapasi, Anokhi J.; Dittrich, Sabine; González, Iveth J.; Rodwell, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Background In resource limited settings acute febrile illnesses are often treated empirically due to a lack of reliable, rapid point-of-care diagnostics. This contributes to the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs and poor treatment outcomes. The aim of this comprehensive review was to summarize the diagnostic performance of host biomarkers capable of differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infections to guide the use of antibiotics. Methods Online databases of published literature were searched from January 2010 through April 2015. English language studies that evaluated the performance of one or more host biomarker in differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infection in patients were included. Key information extracted included author information, study methods, population, pathogens, clinical information, and biomarker performance data. Study quality was assessed using a combination of validated criteria from the QUADAS and Lijmer checklists. Biomarkers were categorized as hematologic factors, inflammatory molecules, cytokines, cell surface or metabolic markers, other host biomarkers, host transcripts, clinical biometrics, and combinations of markers. Findings Of the 193 citations identified, 59 studies that evaluated over 112 host biomarkers were selected. Most studies involved patient populations from high-income countries, while 19% involved populations from low- and middle-income countries. The most frequently evaluated host biomarkers were C-reactive protein (61%), white blood cell count (44%) and procalcitonin (34%). Study quality scores ranged from 23.1% to 92.3%. There were 9 high performance host biomarkers or combinations, with sensitivity and specificity of ≥85% or either sensitivity or specificity was reported to be 100%. Five host biomarkers were considered weak markers as they lacked statistically significant performance in discriminating between bacterial and non-bacterial infections. Discussion This manuscript provides a summary

  20. Efficacy and Safety of AFN-1252, the First Staphylococcus-Specific Antibacterial Agent, in the Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections, Including Those in Patients with Significant Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, N.; Murphy, B.

    2015-01-01

    This open-label noncontrolled, phase II multicenter trial was designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of 200 mg of AFN-1252, a selective inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI), given by mouth twice daily in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) due to staphylococci. Important aspects of the current study included a comparison of early response efficacy endpoints with end-of-treatment and follow-up endpoints. Many patients in the intent-to-treat population (n = 103) had significant comorbidities. The overall early response rate at day 3 was 97.3% (wound, 100%; abscess, 96.6%; cellulitis, 94.4%) in the microbiologically evaluable (ME) population. Within the ME population, 82.9% of patients had a ≥20% decrease in the area of erythema, and 77.9% of patients had a ≥20% decrease in the area of induration, on day 3. S. aureus was detected in 97.7% of patients (n = 37 patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA], and n = 39 with methicillin-sensitive S. aureus [MSSA]). No isolates had increased AFN-1252 MICs posttreatment. Microbiologic eradication rates for S. aureus were 93.2% at short-term follow-up (STFU) and 91.9% at long-term follow-up (LTFU) in the ME population. Eradication rates for MRSA and MSSA were 91.9% and 92.3%, respectively, at STFU and 91.9% and 89.7%, respectively, at LTFU. The most frequently reported drug-related adverse events, which were mostly mild or moderate, were headache (26.2%) and nausea (21.4%). These studies demonstrate that AFN-1252 is generally well tolerated and effective in the treatment of ABSSSI due to S. aureus, including MRSA. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01519492.) PMID:26711777

  1. Efficacy and Safety of AFN-1252, the First Staphylococcus-Specific Antibacterial Agent, in the Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections, Including Those in Patients with Significant Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Hafkin, B; Kaplan, N; Murphy, B

    2015-12-28

    This open-label noncontrolled, phase II multicenter trial was designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of 200 mg of AFN-1252, a selective inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI), given by mouth twice daily in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) due to staphylococci. Important aspects of the current study included a comparison of early response efficacy endpoints with end-of-treatment and follow-up endpoints. Many patients in the intent-to-treat population (n = 103) had significant comorbidities. The overall early response rate at day 3 was 97.3% (wound, 100%; abscess, 96.6%; cellulitis, 94.4%) in the microbiologically evaluable (ME) population. Within the ME population, 82.9% of patients had a ≥ 20% decrease in the area of erythema, and 77.9% of patients had a ≥ 20% decrease in the area of induration, on day 3. S. aureus was detected in 97.7% of patients (n = 37 patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA], and n = 39 with methicillin-sensitive S. aureus [MSSA]). No isolates had increased AFN-1252 MICs posttreatment. Microbiologic eradication rates for S. aureus were 93.2% at short-term follow-up (STFU) and 91.9% at long-term follow-up (LTFU) in the ME population. Eradication rates for MRSA and MSSA were 91.9% and 92.3%, respectively, at STFU and 91.9% and 89.7%, respectively, at LTFU. The most frequently reported drug-related adverse events, which were mostly mild or moderate, were headache (26.2%) and nausea (21.4%). These studies demonstrate that AFN-1252 is generally well tolerated and effective in the treatment of ABSSSI due to S. aureus, including MRSA. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01519492.).

  2. Role of the chronic bacterial infection in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Higgy, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether or not bacterial infection of the urinary bladder had a role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis. To investigate this proposition, four separate studies were conducted. The first study developed an experimental animal model where bacterial infection of the urinary bladder could be introduced and maintained for a period in excess of one year. The method of infection, inoculation of bacteria (Escherichia coli type 04) subserosally into the vesical wall, successfully caused persistent infection in the majority of animals. In the second study the temporal effects of bacterial infection on the induction of urothelial ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis were examined. Bacterial infection of the urinary bladder induced urothelial ODC with a peak in enzyme activity 6 hr after infection./sup 3/H-Thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis peaked 48 hr after infection and coincided with the urothelial hyperplasia that occurred in response to the infection. In the third study the specific bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) was given to rats concurrent with the urinary bacterial infection. In the fourth study rats were administered sodium nitrate and either dibutylamine or piperazine in the drinking water. The infected group developed bladder tumors while none were detected in the non-infected rats. From these studies it may be concluded that bacterial infection may have a significant role in the process of urinary bladder carcinogenesis.

  3. Quadrivalvular marantic endocarditis (ME) mimicking acute bacterial endocarditis (ABE).

    PubMed

    Durie, Nicole M; Eisenstein, Lawrence E; Cunha, Burke A; Plummer, Maria Maratta

    2007-01-01

    Marantic endocarditis (ME) is defined by noninfectious valvular vegetations. The most common disorders associated with ME are malignancy with or without hypercoagulable state, intercardiac instrumentation, residual vegetations from previously treated infective endocarditis (IE), renal insufficiency, and burns. Another important cause of ME is systemic lupus erythematosus when accompanied by vegetations, that is, Libman-Sacks endocarditis. ME should be differentiated from IE because they may present with similar clinical features. Both ME and IE may present with fever and a heart murmur with or without embolic phenomenon. Leukocytosis and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate suggest the diagnosis of IE. The hallmark of IE is a cardiac vegetation and continuous high-grade bacteremia. After exclusion of the causes of culture negative endocarditis, the absence of bacteremia clearly differentiates ME from IE. We present a case of ME mimicking acute bacterial endocarditis (ABE). The differential diagnostic features of ME versus IE are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of quadrivalvular ME with massive vegetations on all cardiac valves, as well as the aorta, atria, and pulmonary artery.

  4. Minireview: Invasive fungal infection complicating acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Däbritz, Jan; Schneider, Markward; Just-Nuebling, Gudrun; Groll, Andreas H

    2011-07-01

    Malaria is the most important parasitic infection in people, affecting 5-10% of the world's population with more than two million deaths a year. Whereas invasive bacterial infections are not uncommon during severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria, only a few cases of opportunistic fungal infections have been reported. Here, we present a fatal case of disseminated hyalohyphomycosis associated with acute P. falciparum malaria in a non-immune traveller, review the cases reported in the literature and discuss the theoretical foundations for the increased susceptibility of non-immune individuals with severe P. falciparum malaria to opportunistic fungal infections. Apart from the availability of free iron as sequelae of massive haemolysis, tissue damage, acidosis and measures of advanced life support, patients with complicated P. falciparum malaria also are profoundly immunosuppressed by the organism's interaction with innate and adaptive host immune mechanisms.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  6. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  7. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A.; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  8. 77 FR 61417 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ...: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... entitled ``Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' This guidance addresses FDA's... an indication for the treatment of acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS). This guidance finalizes...

  9. [Advances in the treatment of wound bacterial infection with phage].

    PubMed

    Cui, Zelong

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of wound bacterial infection is an extremely difficult problem in clinic, especially in patients with large wounds which are infected by multidrug resistant, pan-resistant or omni-resistant bacteria. In recent years, with a grim prospect of antibiotic resistance, phage therapy is re-valued by researchers after being ignored for nearly half a century. Phage therapy has made great achievements in prevention and control of bacterial infection of open wounds. This review is mainly focused on the latest research progress of phage therapy in wound bacterial infection.

  10. Acute transverse myelitis complicating breakthrough varicella infection.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Asli; Kurugol, Zafer; Gokben, Sarenur

    2014-11-01

    We report a 10-year-old girl who presented with acute transverse myelitis after breakthrough varicella infection. The diagnosis was based on the development of motor weakness, paraparesis and bladder dysfunction, spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings and detection of anti-varicella zoster virus IgG antibody in the cerebrospinal fluid. This case report highlights that breakthrough varicella can result in serious complications such as acute transverse myelitis.

  11. Review of bacterial and viral zoonotic infections transmitted by dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemzadeh, I; Namazi, SH

    2015-01-01

    Dogs are a major reservoir for zoonotic infections. Dogs transmit several viral and bacterial diseases to humans. Zoonotic diseases can be transmitted to human by infected saliva, aerosols, contaminated urine or feces and direct contact with the dog. Viral infections such as rabies and norovirus and bacterial infections including Pasteurella, Salmonella, Brucella, Yersinia enterocolitica, Campylobacter, Capnocytophaga, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Coxiella burnetii, Leptospira, Staphylococcus intermedius and Methicillin resistance staphylococcus aureus are the most common viral and bacterial zoonotic infections transmitted to humans by dogs. This review, focused on the mentioned infectious diseases by describing general information, signs and symptoms, transmission ways, prevention and treatment of the infection. As far as the infections are concerned, the increase of the knowledge and the awareness of dog owners and the general population regarding zoonotic infections could significantly mitigate zoonoses transmission and consequently their fatal complications. PMID:28316698

  12. Are nasopharyngeal cultures useful in diagnosis of acute bacterial sinusitis in children?

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Nader; Hoberman, Alejandro; Colborn, D Kathleen; Kearney, Diana H; Jeong, Jong H; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Barbadora, Karen A; Bowen, A'delbert; Flom, Lynda L; Wald, Ellen R

    2013-12-01

    The diagnosis of acute bacterial sinusitis can be challenging because symptoms of acute sinusitis and an upper respiratory tract infection (URI) overlap. A rapid test, if accurate in differentiating sinusitis from URI, could be helpful in the diagnostic process. We examined the utility of nasopharyngeal cultures in identifying the subgroup of children with a clinical diagnosis of acute sinusitis who are least likely to benefit from antimicrobial therapy (those with completely normal sinus radiographs). Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 204 children meeting a priori clinical criteria for acute sinusitis. All children had sinus X-rays at the time of diagnosis. To determine if negative nasopharyngeal culture results could reliably identify the subgroup of children with normal radiographs, we calculated negative predictive values and negative likelihood ratios. Absence of pathogens in the nasopharynx was not helpful in identifying this low-risk subgroup.

  13. Chronic filarial infection provides protection against bacterial sepsis by functionally reprogramming macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gondorf, Fabian; Berbudi, Afiat; Buerfent, Benedikt C; Ajendra, Jesuthas; Bloemker, Dominique; Specht, Sabine; Schmidt, David; Neumann, Anna-Lena; Layland, Laura E; Hoerauf, Achim; Hübner, Marc P

    2015-01-01

    Helminths immunomodulate their hosts and induce a regulatory, anti-inflammatory milieu that prevents allergies and autoimmune diseases. Helminth immunomodulation may benefit sepsis outcome by preventing exacerbated inflammation and severe pathology, but the influence on bacterial clearance remains unclear. To address this, mice were chronically infected with the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis (L.s.) and the outcome of acute systemic inflammation caused by i.p. Escherichia coli injection was determined. L.s. infection significantly improved E. coli-induced hypothermia, bacterial clearance and sepsis survival and correlated with reduced concentrations of associated pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and a less pronounced pro-inflammatory macrophage gene expression profile. Improved sepsis outcome in L.s.-infected animals was mediated by macrophages, but independent of the alternatively activated macrophage subset. Endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria that are present in most human pathogenic filariae, as well as L.s., signal via TLR2 and modulate macrophage function. Here, gene expression profiles of peritoneal macrophages from L.s.-infected mice revealed a downregulation of genes involved in TLR signaling, and pulsing of macrophages in vitro with L.s. extract reduced LPS-triggered activation. Subsequent transfer improved sepsis outcome in naïve mice in a Wolbachia- and TLR2-dependent manner. In vivo, phagocytosis was increased in macrophages from L.s.-infected wild type, but not TLR2-deficient animals. In association, L.s. infection neither improved bacterial clearance in TLR2-deficient animals nor ameliorated E. coli-induced hypothermia and sepsis survival. These results indicate that chronic L.s. infection has a dual beneficial effect on bacterial sepsis, reducing pro-inflammatory immune responses and improving bacterial control. Thus, helminths and their antigens may not only improve the outcome of autoimmune and allergic diseases, but may also

  14. The bacterial lysate Lantigen B reduces the number of acute episodes in patients with recurrent infections of the respiratory tract: the results of a double blind, placebo controlled, multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Braido, Fulvio; Melioli, Giovanni; Candoli, Piero; Cavalot, Andrea; Di Gioacchino, Mario; Ferrero, Vittorio; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mereu, Carlo; Ridolo, Erminia; Rolla, Giovanni; Rossi, Oliviero; Savi, Eleonora; Tubino, Libero; Reggiardo, Giorgio; Baiardini, Ilaria; di Marco, Eddi; Rinaldi, Gilberto; Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Accorsi, Carlo; Bossilino, Claudia; Bonzano, Laura; DiLizia, Michela; Fedrighini, Barbara; Garelli, Valentina; Gerace, Vincenzo; Maniscalco, Sara; Massaro, Ilaria; Messi, Alessandro; Milanese, Manlio; Peveri, Silvia; Penno, Arminio; Pizzimenti, Stefano; Pozzo, Tiziana; Raie, Alberto; Regina, Sergio; Sclifò, Francesca

    2014-12-01

    Studies in the 1970s and 1980s reported that bacterial lysates (BL) had a prophylactic effect on recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTI). However, controlled clinical study procedures have evolved substantially since then. We performed a trial using updated methods to evaluate the efficacy of Lantigen B®, a chemical BL. This double blind, placebo controlled, multi-center clinical trial had the primary objective of assessing the capacity of Lantigen B to significantly reduce the total number of infectious episodes in patients with RRTI. Secondary aims were the RRTI duration, the frequency and the severity of the acute episodes, the use of drugs and the number of missed workdays. In the subgroup of allergic patients with RRTI, the number of allergic episodes (AE) and the use of anti-allergic drugs were also evaluated. One hundred and sixty patients, 79 allocated to the treated group (TG) and 81 to the placebo group (PG), were enrolled; 30 were lost during the study and 120 (79 females and 38 males) were evaluated. The PG had 1.43 episodes in the 8-months of follow-up while the TG had 0.86 episodes (p=0.036). A similar result was observed in the allergic patients (1.80 and 0.86 episodes for the PG and the TG, respectively, p=0.047). The use of antibiotics was reduced (mean 1.24 and 2.83 days of treatment for the TG and the PG). Logistic regression analysis indicated that the estimated risk of needing antibiotics and NSAIDs was reduced by 52.1 and 30.6%, respectively. With regard to the number of AE, no significant difference was observed between the two groups, but bronchodilators, antihistamines and local corticosteroids were reduced by 25.7%, 56.2% and 41.6%, respectively, in the TG. Lantigen B significantly reduced the number of infectious episodes in patients with RRTI. This finding suggests a first line use of this drug for the prophylaxis of infectious episodes in these patients.

  15. Acute renal failure in Plasmodium malariae infection.

    PubMed

    Neri, S; Pulvirenti, D; Patamia, I; Zoccolo, A; Castellino, P

    2008-04-01

    We report an unusual case of transfusion-transmitted malaria which remained undiagnosed for several months in an Italian woman splenectomised and polytransfused for thalassaemia major. The infecting species was Plasmodium malariae, and the patient developed acute renal failure, severe thrombocytopenia, and hepatic failure. Treatment with chlorochine was followed by a slow, but complete recovery of renal function.

  16. Etiology of Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Iran: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ghotaslou, Reza; Yeganeh-Sefidan, Fatemeh; Salahi-Eshlaqi, Behnaz; Ebrahimzadeh-Leylabadlo, Hamed

    2015-08-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is one of the most severe infectious diseases, causing neurologic sequel, and a case fatality rate of 20-30%. The aim of this paper was to summarize the main causes of ABM in Iran. We searched the data for relevant articles using meningitis, etiology, and Iran as search terms. We found 23 papers for inclusion in the review that focused specifically on the ABM, addressing etiology and acute meningitis. Finally, during the 23 years, a total of 18163 cases were recorded, and 1074 cases of which met the criteria for bacterial meningitis. The most common agent associated with bacterial meningitis was S. pneumoniae, followed by H. influenzae, Enterobacter spp., N. meningitidis, and group B streptococcus. The total incidence of ABM during 1991 to 2002 was higher than during 2003-2013. S. pneumoniae still remains a main cause of bacterial meningitis. For improved outcomes, studies are needed to further clarify the etiology of meningitis in Iran, explore simple, accurate, and practical diagnostic tools as PCR, and investigate the most appropriate specific and supportive interventions to manage and prevent meningitis as vaccination.

  17. Recovery from an acute infection in C. elegans requires the GATA transcription factor ELT-2.

    PubMed

    Head, Brian; Aballay, Alejandro

    2014-10-01

    The mechanisms involved in the recognition of microbial pathogens and activation of the immune system have been extensively studied. However, the mechanisms involved in the recovery phase of an infection are incompletely characterized at both the cellular and physiological levels. Here, we establish a Caenorhabditis elegans-Salmonella enterica model of acute infection and antibiotic treatment for studying biological changes during the resolution phase of an infection. Using whole genome expression profiles of acutely infected animals, we found that genes that are markers of innate immunity are down-regulated upon recovery, while genes involved in xenobiotic detoxification, redox regulation, and cellular homeostasis are up-regulated. In silico analyses demonstrated that genes altered during recovery from infection were transcriptionally regulated by conserved transcription factors, including GATA/ELT-2, FOXO/DAF-16, and Nrf/SKN-1. Finally, we found that recovery from an acute bacterial infection is dependent on ELT-2 activity.

  18. Microbial transformation from normal oral microbiota to acute endodontic infections

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endodontic infections are a leading cause of oro-facial pain and tooth loss in western countries, and may lead to severe life-threatening infections. These infections are polymicrobial with high bacterial diversity. Understanding the spatial transition of microbiota from normal oral cavities through the infected root canal to the acute periapical abscess can improve our knowledge of the pathogenesis of endodontic infections and lead to more effective treatment. We obtained samples from the oral cavity, infected root canal and periapical abscess of 8 patients (5 with localized and 3 with systemic infections). Microbial populations in these samples were analyzed using next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons. Bioinformatics tools and statistical tests with rigorous criteria were used to elucidate the spatial transition of the microbiota from normal to diseased sites. Results On average, 10,000 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained from each sample. All sequences fell into 11 different bacterial phyla. The microbial diversity in root canal and abscess samples was significantly lower than in the oral samples. Streptococcus was the most abundant genus in oral cavities while Prevotella and Fusobacterium were most abundant in diseased samples. The microbiota community structures of root canal and abscess samples were, however, more similar to each other than to the oral cavity microbiota. Using rigorous criteria and novel bioinformatics tools, we found that Granulicatella adiacens, Eubacterium yurii, Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella salivae, Streptococcus mitis, and Atopobium rimae were over-represented in diseased samples. Conclusions We used a novel approach and high-throughput methodologies to characterize the microbiota associated normal and diseased oral sites in the same individuals. PMID:22839737

  19. Bacterial infections and NSAIDs exposure? Seek septic complications.

    PubMed

    Le Turnier, Paul; Boutoille, David; Joyau, Caroline; Veyrac, Gwenaelle; Asseray, Nathalie

    2017-03-13

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely consumed. Some authors suggested a relationship between more severe infections and NSAIDs exposure, especially skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI). However, their impact during bacterial infections remains unclear. The aim of the study was to report the severity features of patients having bacterial infection who were exposed to NSAIDs prior to their hospitalisation. Cases of infected patients with these characteristics declared to the pharmacovigilance department of a French university hospital from 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Forty-one patients were included, mainly male (61%). Median age was 37years. No underlying disease was noted for 68% of cases. Ibuprofen was the most frequent drug (63%). Self-medication concerned 61% of cases. Respiratory tract, osteoarticular and SSTI were the most frequent infected sites. Patients suffered septic complications: dissemination of infection to more than one site (51%), suppuration (59%), and requirement for invasive procedures (32%). Eleven patients (27%) had severity criteria as usually defined (10 severe sepsis and 1 septic shock) and 30 did not. There was no significant difference regarding the rate of septic complications between the severe and non-severe group. Septic complications frequently occurred in patients with NSAIDs exposure, whether or not there was severe sepsis or shock. Further studies investigating the impact of NSAIDs in bacterial infections should consider the septic complications depicted here as clinically relevant endpoints. Moreover, clinicians should seek those complications in case of bacterial infections and NSAIDs use.

  20. Anomaly Detection in Host Signaling Pathways for the Early Prognosis of Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Hern, Corey S.; Shattuck, Mark D.; Ogle, Serenity; Forero, Adriana; Morrison, Juliet; Slayden, Richard; Katze, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of acute infectious diseases during the early stages of infection is critical to administering the appropriate treatment to improve the disease outcome. We present a data driven analysis of the human cellular response to respiratory viruses including influenza, respiratory syncytia virus, and human rhinovirus, and compared this with the response to the bacterial endotoxin, Lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Using an anomaly detection framework we identified pathways that clearly distinguish between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients infected with the four different respiratory viruses and that accurately diagnosed patients exposed to a bacterial infection. Connectivity pathway analysis comparing the viral and bacterial diagnostic signatures identified host cellular pathways that were unique to patients exposed to LPS endotoxin indicating this type of analysis could be used to identify host biomarkers that can differentiate clinical etiologies of acute infection. We applied the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET) on two human influenza (H1N1 and H3N2) gene expression data sets to define host networks perturbed in the asymptomatic phase of infection. Our analysis identified pathways in the respiratory virus diagnostic signature as prognostic biomarkers that triggered prior to clinical presentation of acute symptoms. These early warning pathways correctly predicted that almost half of the subjects would become symptomatic in less than forty hours post-infection and that three of the 18 subjects would become symptomatic after only 8 hours. These results provide a proof-of-concept for utility of anomaly detection algorithms to classify host pathway signatures that can identify presymptomatic signatures of acute diseases and differentiate between etiologies of infection. On a global scale, acute respiratory infections cause a significant proportion of human co-morbidities and account for 4.25 million deaths annually. The development of clinical

  1. The role of temperate bacteriophages in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Davies, Emily V; Winstanley, Craig; Fothergill, Joanne L; James, Chloe E

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. There are an estimated 10(31) phage on the planet, making them the most abundant form of life. We are rapidly approaching the centenary of their identification, and yet still have only a limited understanding of their role in the ecology and evolution of bacterial populations. Temperate prophage carriage is often associated with increased bacterial virulence. The rise in use of technologies, such as genome sequencing and transcriptomics, has highlighted more subtle ways in which prophages contribute to pathogenicity. This review discusses the current knowledge of the multifaceted effects that phage can exert on their hosts and how this may contribute to bacterial adaptation during infection.

  2. Primary pulmonary botryomycosis: a bacterial lung infection mimicking lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Prota, M A; Pando-Sandoval, A; García-Clemente, M; Jiménez, H; Álvarez-Álvarez, C; Casan-Clara, P

    2013-07-01

    Primary pulmonary botryomycosis, or bacterial pseudomycosis, is an unusual bacterial infection characterised by the formation of eosinophilic granules that resemble those of Actinomyces species infection. The diagnosis of botryomycosis is based on culture of the granules revealing gram-positive cocci or gram-negative bacilli. The bacterial pathogen most frequently found is Staphylococcus aureus. The pathobiology remains unknown. Pulmonary botryomycosis can resemble actinomycosis, tuberculosis or invasive carcinoma. Definitive treatment requires a combination of both surgical debridement and long-term antimicrobial therapy. We present a case of primary pulmonary botryomycosis in an immunocompetent patient.

  3. Adrenal gland hemorrhage in patients with fatal bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Jeannette; Paddock, Christopher D; Bartlett, Jeanine; Zaki, Sherif R

    2008-09-01

    A wide spectrum of adrenal gland pathology is seen during bacterial infections. Hemorrhage is particularly associated with meningococcemia, while abscesses have been described with several neonatal infections. We studied adrenal gland histopathology of 65 patients with bacterial infections documented in a variety of tissues by using immunohistochemistry. The infections diagnosed included Neisseria meningitidies, group A streptococcus, Rickettsia rickettsii, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Ehrlichia sp., Bacillus anthracis, Leptospira sp., Clostridium sp., Klebsiella sp., Legionella sp., Yersinia pestis, and Treponema pallidum. Bacteria were detected in the adrenal of 40 (61%) cases. Adrenal hemorrhage was present in 39 (60%) cases. Bacteria or bacterial antigens were observed in 31 (79%) of the cases with adrenal hemorrhage including 14 with N. meningitidis, four with R. rickettsii, four with S. pneumoniae, three with group A streptococcus, two with S. aureus, two with B. anthracis, one with T. pallidum, and one with Legionella sp. Bacterial antigens were observed in nine of 26 non-hemorrhagic adrenal glands that showed inflammatory foci (four cases), edema (two cases), congestion (two cases), or necrosis (one case). Hemorrhage is the most frequent adrenal gland pathology observed in fatal bacterial infections. Bacteria and bacterial antigens are frequently seen in adrenal glands with hemorrhage and may play a pathogenic role. Although N. meningitidis is the most frequent bacteria associated with adrenal gland pathology, a broad collection of bacteria can also cause adrenal lesions.

  4. The role of bacterial biofilms in ocular infections.

    PubMed

    Zegans, Michael E; Becker, Heidi I; Budzik, Jonathan; O'Toole, George

    2002-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that bacterial biofilms play a role in a variety of ocular infections. Bacterial growth is characterized as a biofilm when bacteria attach to a surface and/or to each other. This is distinguished from a planktonic or free-living mode of bacterial growth where these interactions are not present. Biofilm formation is a genetically controlled process in the life cycle of bacteria resulting in numerous changes in the cellular physiology of the organism, often including increased antibiotic resistance compared to growth under planktonic conditions. The presence of bacterial biofilms has been demonstrated on many medical devices including intravenous catheters, as well as materials relevant to the eye such as contact lenses, scleral buckles, suture material, and intraocular lenses. Many ocular infections often occur when such prosthetic devices come in contact with or are implanted in the eye. For instance, 56% of corneal ulcers in the United States are associated with contact lens wear. Bacterial biofilms may participate in ocular infections by allowing bacteria to persist on abiotic surfaces that come in contact with, or are implanted in the eye, and by direct biofilm formation on the biotic surfaces of the eye. An understanding of the role of bacterial biofilm formation in ocular infections may aid in the development of future antimicrobial strategies in ophthalmology. We review the current literature and concepts relating to biofilm formation and infections of the eye.

  5. New agents approved for treatment of acute staphylococcal skin infections

    PubMed Central

    Tatarkiewicz, Jan; Staniszewska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin has been a predominant treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections for decades. However, growing reservations about its efficacy led to an urgent need for new antibiotics effective against MRSA and other drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. This review covers three new anti-MRSA antibiotics that have been recently approved by the FDA: dalbavancin, oritavancin, and tedizolid. The mechanism of action, indications, antibacterial activity profile, microbial resistance, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, adverse effects, interactions as well as available formulations and administration of each of these new antibiotics are described. Dalbavancin is a once-a-week, two-dose, long-acting intravenous bactericidal lipoglycopeptide antibiotic. Oritavancin, a lipoglycopeptide with bactericidal activity, was developed as a single-dose intravenous treatment for acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections (ABSSSI), which offers simplifying treatment of infections. Tedizolid is an oxazolidinone-class bacteriostatic once-daily agent, available for intravenous as well as oral use. Increased ability to overcome bacterial resistance is the main therapeutic advantage of the novel agents over existing antibiotics. PMID:27904526

  6. Emerging infectious diseases with cutaneous manifestations: Viral and bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Nawas, Zeena Y; Tong, Yun; Kollipara, Ramya; Peranteau, Andrew J; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Yan, Albert C; Lupi, Omar; Tyring, Stephen K

    2016-07-01

    Given increased international travel, immigration, and climate change, bacterial and viral infections that were once unrecognized or uncommon are being seen more frequently in the Western Hemisphere. A delay in diagnosis and treatment of these diseases can lead to significant patient morbidity and mortality. However, the diagnosis and management of these infections is fraught with a lack of consistency because there is a dearth of dermatology literature on the cutaneous manifestations of these infections. We review the epidemiology, cutaneous manifestations, diagnosis, and management of these emerging bacterial and viral diseases.

  7. Cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats--does bacterial translocation occur via a transperitoneal pathway?

    PubMed

    Arendt, T; Wendt, M; Olszewski, M; Falkenhagen, U; Stoffregen, C; Fölsch, U R

    1997-10-01

    Bacterial infectious complications are the most common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with acute pancreatitis. Most pathogens are common gastrointestinal flora, indicating that the gut is the source of pancreatitis-related infections. However, the route whereby the microorganisms reach distant organs remains speculative. We tested the hypothesis that spread of bacteria occurs via a transperitoneal pathway. Acute interstitial pancreatitis (AIP) was induced in antibiotic (gentamicin, bacithracin, neomycin)-decontaminated rats by intravenous infusion of cerulein. Effects of pancreatic necrosis (PN) were studied in rats that received additional injections into the peritoneal cavity of pancreatic tissue obtained from donor rats. The rats were inoculated with Escherichia coli (O2:KN:H18) resistant to the antibiotics used for decontamination either orally (10(12) microorganisms; experiment I) or intraperitoneally (10(8) microorganisms; experiment II). Moreover, the rat peritoneal cavity wash was inoculated with 10(8) E. coli in vitro (experiment III). In rats with AIP and PN, recovery of the bacteria from liver, spleen, pancreas, lung, and blood following oral inoculation demonstrated that acute pancreatitis promotes bacterial translocation from the gut. The absence of E. coli in these organs following intraperitoneal inoculation showed that the bacteria do not spread from the peritoneal cavity. Rats with PN cleared E. coli from the peritoneal cavity in a shorter period than rats with AIP and controls (5 vs. 7 and 8 days; p < 0.05). The multiplication rate of E. coli in peritoneal cavity wash was lower in rats with PN than in rats with AIP and controls (p < 0.01). We conclude that (1) translocation of E. coli from the gut during cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis occurs via nonperitoneal pathways, (2) the peritoneal cavity acts as a trap for the bacteria rather than a source of bacterial seeding, and (3) PN impairs survival of E. coli in the peritoneal

  8. Complex bacterial infections pre- and posttransplant.

    PubMed

    Lease, Erika D; Zaas, David W

    2010-04-01

    Infections complications following lung transplantation are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Management of infections is most challenging in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), but all lung transplant recipients are at heightened risk for opportunistic infections. Particularly in CF, pretransplant infections with PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA, other highly resistant bacteria (e.g., STENOTROPHOMONAS, BURKHOLDERIA), and mycobacteria play a major role in recipient selection and post-lung transplant outcomes. Understanding the clinical impact and management strategies for each of these different pathogens is critical to maximizing the benefit of lung transplantation. In the review, we discuss each of these infections both as pretransplant risk factors as well as posttransplant pathogens and the individual issues that arise with each infection.

  9. Wound infections in clean and potentially contaminated surgery. Importance of bacterial and non-bacterial factors.

    PubMed

    Bröte, L

    1976-01-01

    Postoperative wound infections in clean--and potentially contaminated surgery were studied with regard to demonstrable wound contamination and the occurrence of non-bacterial wound infection promoting factors. The incidence of demonstrable wound contamination in clean surgery was low, and observed rates of wound infection could not be related to differences in wound contamination, but to the occurrence of non-bacterial wound infection potentiating factors, e.g. implantation of foreign materials (osteosynthesis), cicatrical tissues or a compromized host. Corresponding studies in potentially contaminated surgery revealed a significantly higher incidence of wound contamination compared to clean surgery and a significant correlation between Gram negative wound contamination and rates of postoperative wound infections in certain types of gastrointestinal surgery. Patient factors, such as age or malignancy, did not influence the wound infection frequency when the incidence of wound contamination was taken into consideration.

  10. Preventing and treating secondary bacterial infections with antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    McCullers, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacterial super-infections contribute to the significant morbidity and mortality associated with influenza and other respiratory virus infections. There are robust animal model data but only limited clinical information on the effectiveness of licensed antiviral agents for the treatment of bacterial complications of influenza. The association of secondary bacterial pathogens with fatal pneumonia during the recent H1N1 influenza pandemic highlights the need for new development in this area. Basic and clinical research into viral-bacterial interactions over the last decade has revealed several mechanisms that underlie this synergism. By applying these insights to antiviral drug development, the potential exists to improve outcomes by means other than direct inhibition of the virus. PMID:21447860

  11. Autophagy enhances bacterial clearance during P. aeruginosa lung infection.

    PubMed

    Junkins, Robert D; Shen, Ann; Rosen, Kirill; McCormick, Craig; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen which is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among cystic fibrosis patients. Although P. aeruginosa is primarily considered an extacellular pathogen, recent reports have demonstrated that throughout the course of infection the bacterium acquires the ability to enter and reside within host cells. Normally intracellular pathogens are cleared through a process called autophagy which sequesters and degrades portions of the cytosol, including invading bacteria. However the role of autophagy in host defense against P. aeruginosa in vivo remains unknown. Understanding the role of autophagy during P. aeruginosa infection is of particular importance as mutations leading to cystic fibrosis have recently been shown to cause a blockade in the autophagy pathway, which could increase susceptibility to infection. Here we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa induces autophagy in mast cells, which have been recognized as sentinels in the host defense against bacterial infection. We further demonstrate that inhibition of autophagy through pharmacological means or protein knockdown inhibits clearance of intracellular P. aeruginosa in vitro, while pharmacologic induction of autophagy significantly increased bacterial clearance. Finally we find that pharmacological manipulation of autophagy in vivo effectively regulates bacterial clearance of P. aeruginosa from the lung. Together our results demonstrate that autophagy is required for an effective immune response against P. aeruginosa infection in vivo, and suggest that pharmacological interventions targeting the autophagy pathway could have considerable therapeutic potential in the treatment of P. aeruginosa lung infection.

  12. Unusual Bacterial Infections and the Pleura

    PubMed Central

    Kummerfeldt, Carlos E; Huggins, John T; Sahn, Steven A

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsiosis, Q fever, tularemia, and anthrax are all bacterial diseases that can affect the pleura. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) and Mediterranean Spotted Fever (MSF) are caused by Rickettsia rickettsii and Rickettsia conorii, respectively. Pleural fluid from a patient with MSF had a neutrophil-predominant exudate. Coxiella burnetii is the causative agent of Q fever. Of the two cases described in the literature, one was an exudate with a marked eosinophilia while the other case was a transudate due to a constrictive pericarditis. Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. Pleural fluid from three tularemia patients showed a lymphocyte predominant exudate. Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax. Cases of inhalational anthrax from a recent bioterrorist attack evidenced the presence of a serosanguineous exudative pleural effusion. These four bacterial microorganisms should be suspected in patients presenting with a clinical history, exposure to known risk factors and an unexplained pleural effusion. PMID:22977649

  13. Unusual bacterial infections and the pleura.

    PubMed

    Kummerfeldt, Carlos E; Huggins, John T; Sahn, Steven A

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsiosis, Q fever, tularemia, and anthrax are all bacterial diseases that can affect the pleura. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) and Mediterranean Spotted Fever (MSF) are caused by Rickettsia rickettsii and Rickettsia conorii, respectively. Pleural fluid from a patient with MSF had a neutrophil-predominant exudate. Coxiellaburnetii is the causative agent of Q fever. Of the two cases described in the literature, one was an exudate with a marked eosinophilia while the other case was a transudate due to a constrictive pericarditis. Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. Pleural fluid from three tularemia patients showed a lymphocyte predominant exudate. Bacillusanthracis is the causative agent of anthrax. Cases of inhalational anthrax from a recent bioterrorist attack evidenced the presence of a serosanguineous exudative pleural effusion. These four bacterial microorganisms should be suspected in patients presenting with a clinical history, exposure to known risk factors and an unexplained pleural effusion.

  14. Catabolism of host-derived compounds during extracellular bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Jamie A.; Wargo, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Efficient catabolism of host-derived compounds is essential for bacterial survival and virulence. While these links in intracellular bacteria are well-studied, such studies in extracellular bacteria lag behind, mostly for technical reasons. The field has identified important metabolic pathways, but the mechanisms by which they impact infection and in particular, establishing the importance of a compound’s catabolism versus alternate metabolic roles has been difficult. In this review we will examine evidence for catabolism during extracellular bacterial infections in animals and known or potential roles in virulence. In the process, we point out key gaps in the field that will require new or newly adapted techniques. PMID:24038340

  15. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) after pertussis infection.

    PubMed

    Budan, B; Ekici, B; Tatli, B; Somer, A

    2011-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system which is usually precipitated by a viral infection or vaccination. A 3-month-old boy is reported who developed ADEM a week after full recovery from pertussis. MRI detected a high-intensity lesion extending from the pons to the mesencephalon, compatible with ADEM. Following the administration of intravenous immunoglobulins, the patient's clinical symptoms improved. This case report demonstrates that pertussis is capable of inducing an immune-mediated demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system.

  16. [Epidemiology and bacteriological diagnosis of paediatric acute osteoarticular infections].

    PubMed

    Ferroni, A

    2007-10-01

    Acute paediatric osteo-articular infections require a fast and sensitive diagnosis allowing a treatment directed to the causative pathogen. Many micro-organisms can be incriminated, but Staphylococcus aureus and Kingella kingae markedly prevail. K. kingae became the first bacterial species responsible for septic arthritis in children < 3 years. More rarely, (2)haemolytic Streptococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae are found. The incidence of community acquired S. aureus resistant to oxacillin in osteo-articular infections is still low in France. The microbiological diagnosis of septic arthritis relies upon analysis of articular fluid, which requires systematic inoculation of a blood culture vial to increase the recovery rate of K. kingae. If the culture is negative, it is recommended to carry out a universal PCR or a PCR targeted to the main germs responsible for septic arthritis. Indeed, PCR represents an undeniable benefice for the diagnosis of paediatric septic arthritis, particularly for the DNA detection of K. kingae. The diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis relies primarily upon blood cultures, since the bone puncture is not a systematic procedure in this setting. Their efficiency is low, and there is still a need to look for other arguments of diagnosis such as search of possible portals of entry or specific serologies.

  17. Acute encephalitis as initial presentation of primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Añón, Rosário Pazos; Àguas, Maria João

    2012-07-03

    Acute encephalitis is a life-threatening condition. A wide variety of infectious agents are implicated and in many patients no cause is found. HIV acute seroconversion illness can rarely present as acute encephalitis. Although most experts agree in starting antiretroviral treatment in severe acute HIV infection, the evidence of the benefits are still lacking. The authors report a case of severe acute encephalitis as a primary presentation of HIV infection in which introduction of highly active antiretroviral treatment resulted in clinical recovery. This case highlights the need to consider HIV infection in the differential diagnosis of treatable viral encephalitis.

  18. Requirements for Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute burn and chronic surgical wound infection.

    PubMed

    Turner, Keith H; Everett, Jake; Trivedi, Urvish; Rumbaugh, Kendra P; Whiteley, Marvin

    2014-07-01

    Opportunistic infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be acute or chronic. While acute infections often spread rapidly and can cause tissue damage and sepsis with high mortality rates, chronic infections can persist for weeks, months, or years in the face of intensive clinical intervention. Remarkably, this diverse infectious capability is not accompanied by extensive variation in genomic content, suggesting that the genetic capacity to be an acute or a chronic pathogen is present in most P. aeruginosa strains. To investigate the genetic requirements for acute and chronic pathogenesis in P. aeruginosa infections, we combined high-throughput sequencing-mediated transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) and genome-wide insertion mutant fitness profiling (Tn-seq) to characterize gene expression and fitness determinants in murine models of burn and non-diabetic chronic wound infection. Generally we discovered that expression of a gene in vivo is not correlated with its importance for fitness, with the exception of metabolic genes. By combining metabolic models generated from in vivo gene expression data with mutant fitness profiles, we determined the nutritional requirements for colonization and persistence in these infections. Specifically, we found that long-chain fatty acids represent a major carbon source in both chronic and acute wounds, and P. aeruginosa must biosynthesize purines, several amino acids, and most cofactors during infection. In addition, we determined that P. aeruginosa requires chemotactic flagellar motility for fitness and virulence in acute burn wound infections, but not in non-diabetic chronic wound infections. Our results provide novel insight into the genetic requirements for acute and chronic P. aeruginosa wound infections and demonstrate the power of using both gene expression and fitness profiling for probing bacterial virulence.

  19. Corticosteroid Administration and Outcome of Adolescents and Adults With Acute Bacterial Meningitis: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Assiri, Abdullah M.; Alasmari, Faisal A.; Zimmerman, Valerie A.; Baddour, Larry M.; Erwin, Patricia J.; Tleyjeh, Imad M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically assess the effect of the adjunctive administration of corticosteroids in the treatment of acute bacterial meningitis. METHODS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis by searching several databases for reports (published from January 1966 through February 2008) of placebo-controlled randomized trials of corticosteroid use in the treatment of adolescents and adults with acute bacterial meningitis. We used random-effects models. Sources of heterogeneity were explored by preplanned subgroup analyses. RESULTS: The 4 eligible trials (published between 1999 and 2007) were of high methodological quality and included 1261 adult patients. Overall, the short-term mortality rate associated with corticosteroid administration was not significantly lower than that associated with placebo (relative risk [RR], 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-1.20; I2=54%). A significant interaction was found between the effect of corticosteroids and the income status of the country (P=.02) and the prevalence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among study populations (P=.03). The administration of corticosteroids resulted in a lower short-term mortality rate than did the administration of placebo in high-income countries (pooled RR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.27-0.92; I2=0%) and in the studies with a low prevalence of infection with HIV (RR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.44-0.99; I2=0%). In studies from high-income countries, the number needed to treat with corticosteriods to prevent 1 death and 1 neurologic sequela was 12.5 (95% CI, 7.1-100.0) and 11.0 (95% CI, 5.6-100.0), respectively. CONCLUSION: Our meta-analysis suggests that the adjunctive administration of corticosteroids is beneficial in the treatment of adolescents and adults with bacterial meningitis in patient populations similar to those seen in high-income countries and in areas with a low prevalence of HIV infection. PMID:19411436

  20. A case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jae Eun; Lee, Jun-Bum; Cho, Yu Na; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ja Kyung; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2012-07-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a monophasic autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, which typically follows acute viral or bacterial infection or vaccination. We report a case of ADEM associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with positive serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) anti-HCV antibody. After steroid treatment, neurologic symptoms were improved. Virus triggers autoimmunity or direct viral invasion plays a part in the genesis of ADEM. This is the first reported case of ADEM with anti-HCV antibody in the CSF.

  1. Work package 4 report: Broodfish testing for bacterial infections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michel, Christian; Elliott, Diane G.; Jansson, Eva; Urdaci, Maria; Midtlyng, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarises current scientific information and experience obtained with various methods for testing of salmonid broodfish or spawn for bacterial kidney disease (BKD - Renibacterium salmoninarum infection) in order to prevent vertical transmission of the organism to the offspring. Assessment is also being performed for Flavobacterium psychrophilum infections causing rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS) or bacterial coldwater disease (CWD), and for Piscirickettsia salmonis infection causing salmon rickettsial syndrome (SRS) in salmonid fish species. Methods for screening to document the absence of BKD in fish populations are well established. Some of them have also proven successful for testing individual fish from infected populations in order to avoid vertical transmission of the infectious agent. Several diagnostic methods for flavobacteriosis and piscirickettsiosis have also been established but none of them, as yet, has been validated for use in programmes to prevent vertical transmission of disease. Priority subjects for further research in order to improve the management and control of these vertically transmissible fish diseases are suggested.

  2. Thrombosis associated with acute cytomegalovirus infection: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Shany; Eytan, Ori

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis associated with acute cytomegalovirus infection has been reported many times in the literature since the mid 1980s – mainly in case reports and in small case series, but also in four controlled studies. Still, many physicians are unaware of this association although acute cytomegalovirus infection diagnosis in a thrombosis patient may warrant antiviral therapy and may affect anticoagulation therapy duration. Accordingly, the clinical characteristics of patients with thrombosis and acute cytomegalovirus infection are reviewed, and the current knowledge concerning this unique association is presented herein. We believe it is time to add acute cytomegalovirus infection to the list of thrombosis triggers. PMID:25624857

  3. Osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Emma CB; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine MB; Heyderman, Robert S; Garner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Every day children and adults throughout the world die from acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis, particularly in low-income countries. Survivors are at risk of deafness, epilepsy and neurological disabilities. Osmotic therapies have been proposed as an adjunct to improve mortality and morbidity from bacterial meningitis. The theory is that they will attract extra-vascular fluid by osmosis and thus reduce cerebral oedema by moving excess water from the brain into the blood. The intention is to thus reduce death and improve neurological outcomes. Objectives To evaluate the effects on mortality, deafness and neurological disability of osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis in children and adults. Search methods We searched CENTRAL 2012, Issue 11, MEDLINE (1950 to November week 3, 2012), EMBASE (1974 to November 2012), CINAHL (1981 to November 2012), LILACS (1982 to November 2012) and registers of ongoing clinical trials (April 2012). We also searched conference abstracts and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials testing any osmotic therapy in adults or children with acute bacterial meningitis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently screened the search results and selected trials for inclusion. We collected data from each study for mortality, deafness, seizures and neurological disabilities. Results are presented using risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and grouped according to whether the participants received steroids or not. Main results Four trials were included comprising 1091 participants. All compared glycerol (a water-soluble sugar alcohol) with a control; in three trials this was a placebo, and in one a small amount of 50% dextrose. Three trials included comparators of dexamethasone alone or in combination with glycerol. As dexamethasone appeared to have no modifying effect, we aggregated results across arms where both

  4. Infective substructures of measles virus from acutely and persistently infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblatt, S; Koch, T; Pinhasi, O; Bratosin, S

    1979-01-01

    Ribonucleoprotein from cells acutely or persistently infected with measles virus were shown to be infectious by the calcium phosphate technique. Very little or no infectivity was obtained when calcium phosphate precipitation was omitted. Electron microscopy showed that the majority of ribonucleoprotein structures isolated from acutely infected cells were folded, whereas those from persistently infected cells were linear in appearance. Images PMID:120450

  5. Invasive Fungal Infections in Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Vijaya R.; Viola, George M.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed. PMID:23556092

  6. Invasive fungal infections in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya R; Viola, George M; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-08-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed.

  7. Cytokines and progenitor cells of granulocytopoiesis in peripheral blood of patients with bacterial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Selig, C; Nothdurft, W

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the physiological role of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the adaptation mechanisms of myelopoiesis to enhanced demand, we studied both cytokines and their myeloid target cells in hematologically healthy patients suffering from acute bacterial infections. Endogenous serum levels of G-CSF and GM-CSF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC) concentrations, and differential counts were determined for the peripheral blood of 57 patients with clinically apparent bacterial infections (26 males and 31 females aged 16 to 89 years) and 18 healthy controls (8 males and 10 females aged 23 to 84 years). Patients were selected for acute-phase protein and at least two additional clinical signs reflecting a bacterial infection. Patients showed significantly higher numbers of myeloid progenitor cells than controls (median, 68 versus 26 GM-CFC/ml; P < or = 0.01). G-CSF but not GM-CSF levels were found to be elevated (> or = 50 to 863 pg/ml). In the acute stage of infection, progenitor and cytokine levels were not influenced by gender, differences in therapy, or localization of the infection. Progenitor and G-CSF levels were not associated with absolute neutrophil counts or C-reactive protein. However, a negative correlation between number of GM-CFC per milliliter and age (R = -0.47; P < or = 0.001) and an inverse relationship between the incidence of high GM-CFC concentrations and elevated G-CSF levels (phi = -0.34; P < or = 0.01) were found. Combining both parameters into a cytokine-progenitor pattern, we observed a highly significant age-dependent response of myelopoiesis to inflammation (P < or = 0.001). Younger patients had high progenitor counts (> 75 GM-CFC/ml) associated with G-CSF levels below 50 pg/ml, whereas for the older patients, the reverse pattern was predominant. The results indicate that the age-dependent myelopoietic response to acute bacterial infections is

  8. EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Singh, Kshipra; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Barry, Daniel P; Allaman, Margaret M; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-09-01

    EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis.

  9. [Chlamydia and other sexually transmitted bacterial infections].

    PubMed

    Clad, A

    2002-09-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted bacterium worldwide. In Western Europe, the prevalence of gonorrhoea has decreased by more than 95% since the 1970ies; "tripper" and syphilis are essentially confined to high-risk groups while genital chlamydial infections affect people of all social classes, but information about chlamydia is still scarce in many European countries. Clinically genital chlamydial infections resemble gonorrhoea (dysuria, discharge, irregular bleeding, dyspareunia, perihepatitis) and may be mistaken for appendicitis. However, Chlamydia trachomatis persists longer and more often asymptomatic than Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the urogenital tract of men and women. About 20% of all chlamydia infected women suffer from partial or complete tubal occlusion. Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of female infertility, but most of these women never experienced any clinical sign of pelvic inflammatory disease. Since particle concentrations are often very low in urine and cervical secretions only DNA-amplification tests, e.g. PCR or LCR, exhibit sufficient sensitivity for direct detection Chlamydia trachomatis. While Neisseria gonorrhoeae is eradicated by single-shot treatment with commonly used antibiotics like penicillins or cephalosporins Chlamydia trachomatis affords treatment for at least 10 days with doxycyline or macrolides. Partner treatment is essential to avoid reinfections. Condoms not only protect against HIV, but also against chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis.

  10. Type I Interferons in Bacterial Infections: A Balancing Act

    PubMed Central

    Kovarik, Pavel; Castiglia, Virginia; Ivin, Masa; Ebner, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Defense against bacterial infections requires activation of the immune response as well as timely reestablishment of tissue and immune homeostasis. Instauration of homeostasis is critical for tissue regeneration, wound healing, and host recovery. Recent studies revealed that severe infectious diseases frequently result from failures in homeostatic processes rather than from inefficient pathogen eradication. Type I interferons (IFN) appear to play a key role in such processes. Remarkably, the involvement of type I IFNs in the regulation of immune and tissue homeostasis upon bacterial insult may have beneficial or detrimental consequences for the host. The reasons for such ambivalent function of type I IFNs are not understood. The disparate effects of type I IFNs on bacterial infections are in marked contrast to their well-established protective roles in most viral infections. In this review, we will focus on type I IFN effector mechanisms which balance processes involved in immune and tissue homeostasis during specific bacterial infections and highlight the most important missing links in our understanding of type I IFN functions. PMID:28082986

  11. Coxiella Burnetii: Host and Bacterial Responses to Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-16

    investigations into Rocky Mountain spotted fever . Allowing the ticks to feed on guinea pigs resulted in a febrile response [2] and their inflammatory...Introduction .1. History Q fever was first observed in Australia in 1933 as a dis...bacterial response to infection. This review is ntended to provide a basic introduction to C. burnetii and Q fever , while emphasizing immunomodulatory

  12. 77 FR 60126 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ...; Formerly 2008N-0004] Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment... Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' This guidance addresses FDA's current thinking regarding the... treatment of acute bacterial otitis media (ABOM). This guidance finalizes the revised draft guidance of...

  13. [Conjugate vaccines against bacterial infections: typhoid fever].

    PubMed

    Paniagua, J; García, J A; López, C R; González, C R; Isibasi, A; Kumate, J

    1992-01-01

    Capsular polysaccharides have been studied as possible vaccines against infectious diseases. However, they are capable to induce only short-run protection because of their T-independent properties and they would not be protective against infection in high-risk populations. The alternative to face this problem is to develop methods to join covalently the polysaccharide and proteins to both increase the immunogenicity of and to confer the property of T-dependence to this antigen. In order to obtain a conjugate vaccine against typhoid fever, in our laboratory we have tried to synthesize a conjugate immunogen between the Vi antigen and porins from Salmonella typhi.

  14. Strategies for Diagnosing and Treating Suspected Acute Bacterial Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Balk, Ethan M; Zucker, Deborah R; Engels, Eric A; Wong, John B; Williams, John W; Lau, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Symptoms suggestive of acute bacterial sinusitis are common. Available diagnostic and treatment options generate substantial costs with uncertain benefits. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of alternative management strategies to identify the optimal approach. DESIGN For such patients, we created a Markov model to examine four strategies: 1) no antibiotic treatment; 2) empirical antibiotic treatment; 3) clinical criteria-guided treatment; and 4) radiography-guided treatment. The model simulated a 14-day course of illness, included sinusitis prevalence, antibiotic side effects, sinusitis complications, direct and indirect costs, and symptom severity. Strategies costing less than $50,000 per quality-adjusted life year gained were considered “cost-effective.” MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS For mild or moderate disease, basing antibiotic treatment on clinical criteria was cost-effective in clinical settings where sinusitis prevalence is within the range of 15% to 93% or 3% to 63%, respectively. For severe disease, or to prevent sinusitis or antibiotic side effect symptoms, use of clinical criteria was cost-effective in settings with lower prevalence (below 51% or 44%, respectively); empirical antibiotics was cost-effective with higher prevalence. Sinus radiography-guided treatment was never cost-effective for initial treatment. CONCLUSIONS Use of a simple set of clinical criteria to guide treatment is a cost-effective strategy in most clinical settings. Empirical antibiotics are cost-effective in certain settings; however, their use results in many unnecessary prescriptions. If this resulted in increased antibiotic resistance, costs would substantially rise and efficacy would fall. Newer, expensive antibiotics are of limited value. Additional testing is not cost-effective. Further studies are needed to find an accurate, low-cost diagnostic test for acute bacterial sinusitis. PMID:11679039

  15. A silkworm model of pathogenic bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Kaito, C; Sekimizu, K

    2007-10-01

    Silkworms are invertebrate animals that are killed by bacteria pathogenic against humans, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Vibrio cholerae. Injection into the hemolymph of antibiotics that are clinically used for human patients abolishes the killing effects. There are several advantages to using silkworms as an infection model, such as low cost, the absence of ethical problems that are associated with the use of mammals, and a body size large enough to handle while injecting sample solution into the hemolymph. We screened S. aureus mutants with attenuated virulence against silkworms and found three novel virulence regulatory genes, cvfA, cvfB, and cvfC. These genes contribute to virulence against mice and are required for exotoxin production. The cvfA gene is required for expression of the agr locus, which regulates most exotoxin genes, and a novel DNA binding protein SarZ. Silkworms are susceptible to S. aureus beta toxin, P. aeruginosa exotoxin A, and diphtheria toxin. Therefore, silkworms are a promising infection model animal for the identification and evaluation of virulenceassociated genes.

  16. The Role of Virus Infection in Deregulating the Cytokine Response to Secondary Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Divya; Petes, Carlene; Gee, Katrina; Basta, Sameh

    2015-12-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines are produced by macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) after infection to stimulate T helper (Th) cells, linking innate and adaptive immunity. Virus infections can deregulate the proinflammatory cytokine response like tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-2, making the host more susceptible to secondary bacterial infections. Studies using various viruses such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, influenza A virus, and human immunodeficiency virus have revealed several intriguing mechanisms that account for the increased susceptibility to several prevalent bacterial infections. In particular, type I interferons induced during a virus infection have been observed to play a role in suppressing the production of some key antibacterial proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-23 and IL-17. Other suppressive mechanisms as a result of cytokine deregulation by viral infections include reduced function of immune cells such as DC, macrophage, natural killer, CD4(+), and CD8(+) T cells leading to impaired clearance of secondary bacterial infections. In this study, we highlight some of the immune mechanisms that become deregulated by viral infections, and can thus become defective during secondary bacterial infections.

  17. Bacterial infection in exacerbated COPD with changes in sputum characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Monsó, E.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.; Soler, N.; Farrero, E.; Felez, M. A.; Antó, J. M.; Torres, A.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the risk factors for bacterial exacerbation, defined as the presence of pathogenic bacteria in sputum, in 90 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with an exacerbation and changes in sputum characteristics. Smoking, alcohol, lung function, body mass index, medical visits and treatments were the independent variables assessed using multivariable logistic regression modelling (OR, 95% CI). A bacterial exacerbation was diagnosed in 39 (43.3%) of 90 patients. Bacterial exacerbations were more prevalent among current smokers (OR 3.77, 95% CI 1.17-12.12), in patients with poor compliance with inhalation therapy (OR 3.25, 95% CI 1.18-8.93) and with severe lung function impairment (FEV1 OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.93-1.00). Prior use of antibiotics was a risk factor for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection (OR 6.06, 95% CI 1.29-28.44) and influenza vaccination appeared to have a protective effect against this infection (OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.03-0.67). We conclude that severe impairment of lung function, smoking and poor compliance with therapy are risk factors for bacterial infection in COPD, and P. aeruginosa should be suspected in patients who have been treated with antibiotics and in those not vaccinated against influenza. PMID:12948381

  18. Distinct surveillance pathway for immunopathology during acute infection via autophagy and SR-BI

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiler, Susanne; Khandagale, Avinash B.; Magenau, Astrid; Nichols, Maryana; Heijnen, Harry F. G.; Rinninger, Franz; Ziegler, Tilman; Seveau, Stephanie; Schubert, Sören; Zahler, Stefan; Verschoor, Admar; Latz, Eicke; Massberg, Steffen; Gaus, Katharina; Engelmann, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms protecting from immunopathology during acute bacterial infections are incompletely known. We found that in response to apoptotic immune cells and live or dead Listeria monocytogenes scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), an anti-atherogenic lipid exchange mediator, activated internalization mechanisms with characteristics of macropinocytosis and, assisted by Golgi fragmentation, initiated autophagic responses. This was supported by scavenger receptor-induced local increases in membrane cholesterol concentrations which generated lipid domains particularly in cell extensions and the Golgi. SR-BI was a key driver of beclin-1-dependent autophagy during acute bacterial infection of the liver and spleen. Autophagy regulated tissue infiltration of neutrophils, suppressed accumulation of Ly6C+ (inflammatory) macrophages, and prevented hepatocyte necrosis in the core of infectious foci. Perifocal levels of Ly6C+ macrophages and Ly6C− macrophages were unaffected, indicating predominant regulation of the focus core. SR-BI-triggered autophagy promoted co-elimination of apoptotic immune cells and dead bacteria but barely influenced bacterial sequestration and survival or inflammasome activation, thus exclusively counteracting damage inflicted by immune responses. Hence, SR-BI- and autophagy promote a surveillance pathway that partially responds to products of antimicrobial defenses and selectively prevents immunity-induced damage during acute infection. Our findings suggest that control of infection-associated immunopathology can be based on a unified defense operation. PMID:27694929

  19. Complement response after experimental bacterial infection in various nutritional states.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, M; Ishii, S; Nishioka, K; Shimada, K

    1979-01-01

    In malnourished rats, nutritionally rehabilitated rats at various stages, and in well nourished rats, levels of serum complement after bacterial infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus, as well as tuberculin reactivity, were examined. The elevation of complement showed a peak 2--3 days after infection, herein called the first complement response. A reelevation occurred at a later stage, 7--14 days after infection, and is referred to as the second complement response. The first complement response was observed in all the rats after Staphylococcus aureus infection but it was greater in well nourished rats. In malnourished rats, only the first complement response was observed and the tuberculin reaction and second complement response were lacking. After 1 week of nutritional rehabilitation, 40% of the rats showed recovery of tuberculin responses and both the first and second complement responses were observed. Nutritionally rehabilitated rats treated longer than 2 weeks, together with the well nourished control rats, showed positive tuberculin reactivity. The second complement response was also observed in such rats when bacterial infection was severe but not with mild infection. PMID:511223

  20. Serum amyloid A is a retinol binding protein that transports retinol during bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Derebe, Mehabaw G; Zlatkov, Clare M; Gattu, Sureka; Ruhn, Kelly A; Vaishnava, Shipra; Diehl, Gretchen E; MacMillan, John B; Williams, Noelle S; Hooper, Lora V

    2014-01-01

    Retinol plays a vital role in the immune response to infection, yet proteins that mediate retinol transport during infection have not been identified. Serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins are strongly induced in the liver by systemic infection and in the intestine by bacterial colonization, but their exact functions remain unclear. Here we show that mouse and human SAAs are retinol binding proteins. Mouse and human SAAs bound retinol with nanomolar affinity, were associated with retinol in vivo, and limited the bacterial burden in tissues after acute infection. We determined the crystal structure of mouse SAA3 at a resolution of 2 Å, finding that it forms a tetramer with a hydrophobic binding pocket that can accommodate retinol. Our results thus identify SAAs as a family of microbe-inducible retinol binding proteins, reveal a unique protein architecture involved in retinol binding, and suggest how retinol is circulated during infection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03206.001 PMID:25073702

  1. Glucose absorption kinetics in Zambian African patients with and without systemic bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Cook, G. C.

    1971-01-01

    Using a double-lumen tube perfusion system, solutions of glucose (1·0, 2·5, and 5·0 g 100ml−1) have been perfused into the upper jejunum of 22 Zambian African subjects in order to study their glucose absorption kinetics. None of them had clinical evidence of malnutrition or intestinal disease. In 10 there was no evidence of an infective disease (`normal' group); seven had tuberculosis; five had acute bacterial infections. The mean serum albumin concentration was significantly lower in those with infections; the mean total and γ-globulin concentrations were significantly higher in the tuberculosis group. There was good reproducibility in triplicate assessments of glucose and water absorption rates in the individual subjects. Despite a wide scatter, the mean glucose kinetic curves were significantly flatter in those with infections than in the normal group (p<0·02). There was a significant association between glucose and water absorption rates in the individuals. D-xylose absorption was estimated in 11 subjects and there was a significant correlation between that and the glucose absorption rate. Jejunal morphology (n=9) and disaccharidase concentrations (n=6) were normal for African subjects and there were no significant associations between either of those and the absorption rates. Galactose absorption kinetics have been studied in an additional four relatively normal Zambian Africans. This study suggests that systemic bacterial infections can produce malabsorption. This may be relevant to the weight loss in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and also to the aetiology of kwashiorkor. PMID:4110099

  2. Cooperation between Monocyte-Derived Cells and Lymphoid Cells in the Acute Response to a Bacterial Lung Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew S.; Yang, Chao; Fung, Ka Yee; Bachem, Annabell; Bourges, Dorothée; Bedoui, Sammy; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; van Driel, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, a potentially fatal lung infection. Alveolar macrophages support intracellular replication of L. pneumophila, however the contributions of other immune cell types to bacterial killing during infection are unclear. Here, we used recently described methods to characterise the major inflammatory cells in lung after acute respiratory infection of mice with L. pneumophila. We observed that the numbers of alveolar macrophages rapidly decreased after infection coincident with a rapid infiltration of the lung by monocyte-derived cells (MC), which, together with neutrophils, became the dominant inflammatory cells associated with the bacteria. Using mice in which the ability of MC to infiltrate tissues is impaired it was found that MC were required for bacterial clearance and were the major source of IL12. IL12 was needed to induce IFNγ production by lymphoid cells including NK cells, memory T cells, NKT cells and γδ T cells. Memory T cells that produced IFNγ appeared to be circulating effector/memory T cells that infiltrated the lung after infection. IFNγ production by memory T cells was stimulated in an antigen-independent fashion and could effectively clear bacteria from the lung indicating that memory T cells are an important contributor to innate bacterial defence. We also determined that a major function of IFNγ was to stimulate bactericidal activity of MC. On the other hand, neutrophils did not require IFNγ to kill bacteria and alveolar macrophages remained poorly bactericidal even in the presence of IFNγ. This work has revealed a cooperative innate immune circuit between lymphoid cells and MC that combats acute L. pneumophila infection and defines a specific role for IFNγ in anti-bacterial immunity. PMID:27300652

  3. [Usefulness of clinical data and rapid diagnostic tests to identify bacterial etiology in adult respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Toledano-Sierra, Pilar; Arriola-Hernández, Maite; Orueta-Sánchez, Ramón

    2015-01-19

    Respiratory tract infections are a common complaint and most of them, such as common cold and laryngitis, are viral in origin, so antibiotic use should be exceptional. However, there are other respiratory tract infections (sinusitis, pharyngitis, lower respiratory tract infections, and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) where a bacterial etiology is responsible for a non-negligible percentage, and antibiotics are often empirically indicated. The aim of the study is to identify the strength of the data obtained from the symptoms, physical examination and rapid diagnostic methods in respiratory infections in which antibiotic use is frequently proposed in order to improve diagnosis and influence the decision to prescribe these drugs. The review concludes that history, physical examination and rapid tests are useful to guide the need for antibiotic treatment in diseases such as acute sinusitis, acute pharyngitis, exacerbation of lower respiratory tract infection and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, no isolated data is accurate enough by itself to confirm or rule out the need for antibiotics. Therefore, clinical prediction rules bring together history and physical examination, thereby improving the accuracy of the decision to indicate or not antibiotics.

  4. Infection Rates among Acute Leukemia Patients Receiving Alternative Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen; Woo Ahn, Kwang; Chen, Min; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Ahmed, Ibrahim; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Antin, Joseph; Bhatt, Ami S; Boeckh, Michael; Chen, George; Dandoy, Christopher; George, Biju; Laughlin, Mary J; Lazarus, Hillard M; MacMillan, Margaret L; Margolis, David A; Marks, David I; Norkin, Maxim; Rosenthal, Joseph; Saad, Ayman; Savani, Bipin; Schouten, Harry C; Storek, Jan; Szabolcs, Paul; Ustun, Celalettin; Verneris, Michael R; Waller, Edmund K; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Williams, Kirsten M; Wingard, John R; Wirk, Baldeep; Wolfs, Tom; Young, Jo-Anne H; Auletta, Jeffrey; Komanduri, Krishna V; Lindemans, Caroline; Riches, Marcie L

    2016-09-01

    Alternative graft sources (umbilical cord blood [UCB], matched unrelated donors [MUD], or mismatched unrelated donors [MMUD]) enable patients without a matched sibling donor to receive potentially curative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Retrospective studies demonstrate comparable outcomes among different graft sources. However, the risk and types of infections have not been compared among graft sources. Such information may influence the choice of a particular graft source. We compared the incidence of bacterial, viral, and fungal infections in 1781 adults with acute leukemia who received alternative donor HCT (UCB, n= 568; MUD, n = 930; MMUD, n = 283) between 2008 and 2011. The incidences of bacterial infection at 1 year were 72%, 59%, and 65% (P < .0001) for UCB, MUD, and MMUD, respectively. Incidences of viral infection at 1 year were 68%, 45%, and 53% (P < .0001) for UCB, MUD, and MMUD, respectively. In multivariable analysis, bacterial, fungal, and viral infections were more common after either UCB or MMUD than after MUD (P < .0001). Bacterial and viral but not fungal infections were more common after UCB than MMUD (P = .0009 and <.0001, respectively). The presence of viral infection was not associated with an increased mortality. Overall survival (OS) was comparable among UCB and MMUD patients with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥ 90% but was inferior for UCB for patients with KPS < 90%. Bacterial and fungal infections were associated with poorer OS. Future strategies focusing on infection prevention and treatment are indicated to improve HCT outcomes.

  5. Acute kidney injury associated with Plasmodium malariae infection.

    PubMed

    Badiane, Aida S; Diongue, Khadim; Diallo, Seydou; Ndongo, Aliou A; Diedhiou, Cyrille K; Deme, Awa B; Ma, Diallo; Ndiaye, Mouhamadou; Seck, Mame C; Dieng, Therese; Ndir, Omar; Mboup, Souleymane; Ndiaye, Daouda

    2014-06-07

    According to current estimates, Plasmodium malariae is not very common in Senegal, as more than 98% of malaria cases are suspected to be due to Plasmodium falciparum. However, it is possible that other malarial species are being under-reported or misdiagnosed. This is a report of a case of P. malariae in a 30-year-old man previously hospitalized with acute kidney injury after treatment with quinine and re-hospitalized three months later. He was diagnosed with renal cortical necrosis post malaria treatment. Plasmodium malariae was identified with light microscope and confirmed using species-specific small-subunit rRNA (ssrRNA) amplification.The patient was treated for malaria with intravenous quinine for seven days, followed by three days of oral treatment; the bacterial infection was treated using ceftriaxone during the first hospitalization and ciprofloxacin associated with ceftriaxone the second time. He also had four rounds of dialysis after which he partially recovered the renal function. Given the complications that can be caused by P. malariae infection, it should be systematically looked for, even if the predominant species is P. falciparum in Senegal.

  6. The hematology of bacterial infections in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Zipursky, A; Palko, J; Milner, R; Akenzua, G I

    1976-06-01

    A series of premature infants was studied for the presence of bacterial infection. On the basis of clinical evidence and bacteriological studies, they were divided into three groups in which sepsis was considered to be proven, possible, or unlikely. Band neutrophil counts were elevated most frequently in the "sepsis-proven" group and the elevation occurred usually within 24 hours of onset of signs of disease. Qualitative changes in neutrophils (Döhle bodies, toxic granulation, and vacuolization) were more frequent in the sepsis-proven group and, together with the band count, provided valuable techniques for the diagnosis of bacterial infections. Thrombocytopenia occurred frequently in the sepsis-proven group and seemed to result from increased utilization or destruction of platelets rather than failure of production. In such cases, evidence of intravascular coagulation was minimal and it was concluded that thrombocytopenia had resulted from a direct effect of the bacteria or its products on platelets and/or endothelium.

  7. New Insights into IDO Biology in Bacterial and Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Susanne V.; Schultze, Joachim L.

    2014-01-01

    Initially, indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been introduced as a bactericidal effector mechanism and has been linked to T-cell immunosuppression and tolerance. In recent years, evidence has been accumulated that IDO also plays an important role during viral infections including HIV, influenza, and hepatitis B and C. Moreover, novel aspects about the role of IDO in bacterial infections and sepsis have been revealed. Here, we review these recent findings highlighting the central role of IDO and tryptophan metabolism in many major human infections. Moreover, we also shed light on issues concerning human-specific and mouse-specific host–pathogen interactions that need to be considered when studying the biology of IDO in the context of infections. PMID:25157255

  8. Carboxymethylcellulose film for bacterial wound infection control and healing.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tin Wui; Ramli, Nor Amlizan

    2014-11-04

    Infection control and wound healing profiles of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) films were investigated as a function of their anti-bacterial action, physical structures, polymer molecular weights and carboxymethyl substitution degrees. The films were prepared with in vitro polymer/film and in vivo microbe-colonized wound healing/systemic infection profiles examined. Adhesive high carboxymethyl substituted SCMC films aided healing via attaching to microbes and removing them from wound. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was removed via encapsulating in gelling low molecular weight SCMC film, whereas Staphylococcus aureus was trapped in tight folds of high molecular weight SCMC film. Incomplete microbe removal from wound did not necessary translate to inability to heal as microbe remnant at wound induced fibroblast migration and aided tissue reconstruction. Using no film nonetheless will cause systemic blood infection. SCMC films negate infection and promote wound healing via specific polymer-microbe adhesion, and removal of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa requires films of different polymer characteristics.

  9. 99mTc-ciprofloxacin for diagnosis of bacterial infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aungurarat, A.; Ngamprayad, T.; Dangprasert, M.; Phumkem, S.; Jowanaridhi, B.

    2015-05-01

    Preparation of 99mTc-ciprofloxacin for diagnosis of bacterial infection was investigated by varying factors which affected this compound. The optimum conditions for preparation of 99mTc-ciprofloxacin and a lyophilized kit for Tc-99m labelling were studied. The results from biodistribution study showed that the percentages of the injected dose per gram tissues of infected area at 1 and 3 hours after injection were around 0.25-0.56. 99mTc-ciprofloxacin was found sterile, pyrogen-free and non-toxic. Radiochemical purity was greater than 90% with greater than 6 hours of stability.

  10. A bacterial pathogen infecting gametophytes of Saccharina japonica (Laminariales, Phaeophyceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yanting; Li, Wei

    2013-03-01

    A newly identified bacterial disease of kelp ( Saccharina japonica) gametophytes was found in clone cultures. It is characterized by swollen gametophyte cells in the early period of infection followed by filamentous fading. An alginolytic marine bacterium referred to as A-1 was isolated from the diseased gametophytes. On the basis of 16S rDNA sequencing and morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics, the bacterium was identified as a strain of the genus Alteromonas. By testing Koch's postulates, Alteromonas sp. A-1 was further confirmed as the pathogen. The infection process was also investigated using both scanning electron and light microscopy.

  11. Does virus-bacteria coinfection increase the clinical severity of acute respiratory infection?

    PubMed

    Damasio, Guilherme A C; Pereira, Luciane A; Moreira, Suzana D R; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N; Dalla-Costa, Libera M; Raboni, Sonia M

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the presence of bacteria in respiratory secretions of patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections and analyzed the impact of viral and bacterial coinfection on severity and the mortality rate. A total of 169 patients with acute respiratory infections were included, viruses and bacteria in respiratory samples were detected using molecular methods. Among all samples, 73.3% and 59.7% were positive for viruses and bacteria, respectively; 45% contained both virus and bacteria. Bacterial coinfection was more frequent in patients infected by community respiratory viruses than influenza A H1N1pdm (83.3% vs. 40.6%). The most frequently bacteria detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Both species were co-detected in 54 patients and identified alone in 22 and 21 patients, respectively. Overall, there were no significant differences in the period of hospitalization, severity, or mortality rate between patients infected with respiratory viruses alone and those coinfected by viruses and bacteria. The detection of mixed respiratory pathogens is frequent in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory infections, but its impact on the clinical outcome does not appear substantial. However, it should be noted that most of the patients received broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, which may have contributed to this favorable outcome.

  12. Neuralgic amyotrophy complicating acute hepatitis E infection: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Theochari, Evangelia; Vincent-Smith, Lisa; Ellis, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus infection (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that is under-recognised in developed countries. Preceding infection manifested by acute transaminitis has been associated with neurological manifestations, predominately involving the peripheral nervous system, even in immunocompetent patients. We present a case of a 65-year-old previously fit and well Caucasian man with bilateral neuralgic amyotrophy (NA) and acute transaminitis. Serology testing for immunoglobulin (Ig) M and G established the diagnosis of acute HEV infection. The patient received immunomodulatory treatment with an excellent long-term outcome. The temporal association of the clinical presentation of bilateral NA and acute transaminitis from HEV infection suggested the causal association of HEV to NA. We propose screening for HEV in patients presenting with NA and acute hepatitis. PMID:25739795

  13. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ost, Michael; Singh, Anurag; Peschel, Andreas; Mehling, Roman; Rieber, Nikolaus; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) comprise monocytic and granulocytic innate immune cells with the capability of suppressing T- and NK-cell responses. While the role of MDSCs has been studied in depth in malignant diseases, the understanding of their regulation and function in infectious disease conditions has just begun to evolve. Here we summarize and discuss the current view how MDSCs participate in bacterial infections and how this knowledge could be exploited for potential future therapeutics. PMID:27066459

  14. Acute and Chronic Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae Infection in Lambs.

    PubMed

    Ersdal, C; Jørgensen, H J; Lie, K-I

    2015-07-01

    Polyarthritis caused by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a relatively common infection in lambs characterized by low mortality and high morbidity. E. rhusiopathiae is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterium that is both a commensal and a pathogen of vertebrates. The disease was studied during an outbreak in a Norwegian Spæl sheep flock. In the acute phase, 48 of 230 (20%) lambs developed clinical signs and 4 died (1.7%). One acute case was necropsied and E. rhusiopathiae was cultured from all major organs investigated and from joints. There was a fibrinous polyarthritis, increased presence of monocytes in vessels, and necrosis of Purkinje cells. Sixteen of the diseased animals (33%) developed a chronic polyarthritis. Eight of these lambs were necropsied; all had lesions in major limb joints, and 3 of 8 also had lesions in the atlanto-occipital joint. At this stage, E. rhusiopathiae was cultured only from the joints in 7 of 8 (87.5%) lambs, but by real-time polymerase chain reaction, we showed persistence of the bacterium in several organs. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of the bacterial isolates indicated that the same strain caused the acute and chronic disease. Five of 6 (83%) chronically affected animals had amyloidosis of the spleen, and 6 of 8 (75%) had amyloidosis of the liver. All chronically affected animals had a glomerulonephritis, and 6 of 8 (75%) had sparse degeneration in the brain. Ceruloplasmin and haptoglobin were significantly increased in the chronically diseased lambs. These results show that chronic ovine erysipelas is not restricted to joints but is a multisystemic disease.

  15. A rare cause of acute abdomen in adults: Parasitic infection-related acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Küpeli, Aydın Hakan; Özdemir, Murat; Topuz, Sezgin; Sözütek, Alper; Paksoy, Tuğba

    2015-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is a common parasitic disease all over the world, especially in less developed countries. Acute appendicitis related to parasitic infection is a rare condition. Parasitic infections should be kept in mind in patients who are admitted to the emergency department with acute abdomen, especially in endemic areas.

  16. Association between Bacterial Infection and Peripheral Vascular Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Budzyński, Jacek; Wiśniewska, Joanna; Ciecierski, Marek; Kędzia, Anna

    2015-01-01

    There are an increasing number of data showing a clinically important association between bacterial infection and peripheral artery disease (PAD). Bacteria suspected of being involved in PAD pathogenesis are: periodontal bacteria, gut microbiota, Helicobacter pylori, and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Infectious agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis via activation of a systemic or local host immunological response to contamination of extravascular tissues or the vascular wall, respectively. A systemic immunological reaction may damage vascular walls in the course of autoimmunological cross-reactions between anti-pathogen antibodies and host vascular antigens (immunological mimicry), pathogen burden mechanisms (nonspecific activation of inflammatory processes in the vascular wall), and neuroendocrine-immune cross-talk. Besides activating the inflammatory pathway, bacterial infection may trigger PAD progression or exacerbation by enhancement of platelet reactivity, by a stimulatory effect on von Willebrand factor binding, factor VIII, fibrinogen, P-selectin activation, disturbances in plasma lipids, increase in oxidative stress, and resistance to insulin. Local inflammatory host reaction and induction of atherosclerotic plaque progression and/or instability result mainly from atherosclerotic plaque colonization by microorganisms. Despite these premises, the role of bacterial infection in PAD pathogenesis should still be recognized as controversial, and randomized, controlled trials are required to evaluate the outcome of periodontal or gut bacteria modification (through diet, prebiotics, and probiotics) or eradication (using antibiotics) in hard and surrogate cardiovascular endpoints. PMID:26900306

  17. Bacterial sensitivity to fosfomycin in pregnant women with urinary infection.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rodrigo Batista; Trevisol, Daisson José; Schuelter-Trevisol, Fabiana

    2015-01-01

    The aim this study was to determine the in vitro susceptibility to fosfomycin of bacteria isolated from urine samples of pregnant women with urinary tract infection. Samples of urine culture with bacterial growth of pregnant women were collected from clinical laboratories in Tubarão, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, between September 2012 and May 2013. In the experimental stage, the colonies were tested for sensitivity to fosfomycin by using the Kirby-Bauer method. The following information relating to the samples was also collected: patients' age, colony count, type(s) of identified bacterial(s) and result of the antimicrobial sensitivity test. Student's t-test was used for mean comparison. A total of 134 samples were selected for the study. The age of the subjects ranged from 15 to 40 years (mean 26.7). Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive) were the most commonly identified species. In 89% of cases, the microorganisms were sensitive to fosfomycin. E. coli and S. aureus were the main species of bacteria responsible for urinary tract infections in women in the study area. The most prevalent microorganisms in pregnant women with urinary tract infection were susceptible to fosfomycin.

  18. Monocytes regulate the mechanism of T-cell death by inducing Fas-mediated apoptosis during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Daigneault, Marc; De Silva, Thushan I; Bewley, Martin A; Preston, Julie A; Marriott, Helen M; Mitchell, Andrea M; Mitchell, Timothy J; Read, Robert C; Whyte, Moira K B; Dockrell, David H

    2012-01-01

    Monocytes and T-cells are critical to the host response to acute bacterial infection but monocytes are primarily viewed as amplifying the inflammatory signal. The mechanisms of cell death regulating T-cell numbers at sites of infection are incompletely characterized. T-cell death in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) showed 'classic' features of apoptosis following exposure to pneumococci. Conversely, purified CD3(+) T-cells cultured with pneumococci demonstrated necrosis with membrane permeabilization. The death of purified CD3(+) T-cells was not inhibited by necrostatin, but required the bacterial toxin pneumolysin. Apoptosis of CD3(+) T-cells in PBMC cultures required 'classical' CD14(+) monocytes, which enhanced T-cell activation. CD3(+) T-cell death was enhanced in HIV-seropositive individuals. Monocyte-mediated CD3(+) T-cell apoptotic death was Fas-dependent both in vitro and in vivo. In the early stages of the T-cell dependent host response to pneumococci reduced Fas ligand mediated T-cell apoptosis was associated with decreased bacterial clearance in the lung and increased bacteremia. In summary monocytes converted pathogen-associated necrosis into Fas-dependent apoptosis and regulated levels of activated T-cells at sites of acute bacterial infection. These changes were associated with enhanced bacterial clearance in the lung and reduced levels of invasive pneumococcal disease.

  19. Critical appraisal of ceftaroline in the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and skin infections

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Julian J; Martin, Stanley I

    2012-01-01

    Ceftaroline is a novel broad-spectrum cephalosporin β-lactam antibiotic with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as well as multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae among other routine Gram positive and Gram negative organisms. It has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs). Ceftaroline is approved for treatment of ABSSSI due to MRSA, however currently there are no data for pneumonia due to MRSA in humans. Herein we review the major clinical trials as well as ceftaroline microbiology, pharmacokinetics, and safety, followed by a look at further directions for investigation of this new agent. PMID:22547933

  20. Effect of inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production on pancreatic infection in experimental acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Ana Maria M.; Sampietre, Sandra; Patzina, Rosely; Jukemura, Jose; Cunha, Jose Eduardo M.; Machado, Marcel C.C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Acute pancreatitis is one the important causes of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). SIRS results in gut barrier dysfunction that allows bacterial translocation and pancreatic infection to occur. Indomethacin has been used to reduce inflammatory process and bacterial translocation in experimental models. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production on pancreatic infection. Materials and methods. An experimental model of severe acute pancreatitis (AP) was utilized. The animals were divided into three groups: sham (surgical procedure without AP induction); pancreatitis (AP induction); and indomethacin (AP induction plus administration of 3 mg/kg of indomethacin). Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10, PGE2, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured 2 h after the induction of AP. We analyzed the occurrence of pancreatic infection with bacterial cultures performed 24 h after the induction of AP. The occurrence of pancreatic infection (considered positive when the CFU/g was >105), pancreatic histologic analysis, and mortality rate were studied. Results. In spite of the reduction of IL-6, IL-10, and PGE2 levels in the indomethacin group, TNF-α level, bacterial translocation, and pancreatic infection were not influenced by administration of indomethacin. The inhibition of PGE2 production did not reduce pancreatic infection, histologic score, or mortality rate. Conclusion. The inhibition of PGE2 production was not able to reduce the occurrence of pancreatic infection and does not have any beneficial effect in this experimental model. Further investigations will be necessary to discover a specific inhibitor that would make it possible to develop an anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:18345325

  1. Antimicrobial Resistance in the Intensive Care Unit: A Focus on Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    MacVane, Shawn H

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial infections are a frequent cause of hospitalization, and nosocomial infections are an increasingly common condition, particularly within the acute/critical care setting. Infection control practices and new antimicrobial development have primarily focused on gram-positive bacteria; however, in recent years, the incidence of infections caused by gram-negative bacteria has risen considerably in intensive care units. Infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative organisms are associated with high morbidity and mortality, with significant direct and indirect costs resulting from prolonged hospitalizations due to antibiotic treatment failures. Of particular concern is the increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance to β-lactam antibiotics (including carbapenems) among Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii and, recently, among pathogens of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Treatment options for infections caused by these pathogens are limited. Antimicrobial stewardship programs focus on optimizing the appropriate use of currently available antimicrobial agents with the goals of improving outcomes for patients with infections caused by MDR gram-negative organisms, slowing the progression of antimicrobial resistance, and reducing hospital costs. Newly approved treatment options are available, such as β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations, which significantly extend the armamentarium against MDR gram-negative bacteria.

  2. [Intracranial pressure targeted treatment in acute bacterial meningitis increased survival].

    PubMed

    Glimåker, Martin; Johansson, Bibi; Halldorsdottir, Halla; Wanecek, Michael; Elmi-Terander, Adrian; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2014-12-16

    To evaluate the efficacy of intracranial pressure (ICP)-targeted treatment, compared to standard intensive care, in adults with community acquired acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) and severely impaired consciousness, a prospectively designed intervention-control comparison study was performed. Included were patients with confirmed ABM and severely impaired mental status on admission. Fifty-two patients, given ICP-targeted treatment at a neuro-intensive care unit, and 53 control cases, treated with conventional intensive care, were included. All patients received intensive care with me-chanical ventilation, sedation, antibiotics and corticosteroids according to current guidelines. ICP-targeted treatment was performed in the intervention group, aiming at ICP 50 mmHg. The mortality was significantly lower in the intervention group compared to controls, 5/52 (10%) versus 16/53 (30%). Furthermore, only 17 patients (32%) in the control group fully recovered, compared to 28 (54%) in the intervention group. Early neuro-intensive care using ICP-targeted therapy reduces mortality and improves the overall outcome in adult patients with ABM and severely impaired mental status on admission.

  3. Betulin protects mice from bacterial pneumonia and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianchao; Li, Hongyu; Qiu, Jiaming; Feng, Haihua

    2014-10-01

    Betulin, a naturally occurring triterpene, has shown anti-HIV activity, but details on the anti-inflammatory activity are scanty. In this study, we sought to investigate the effect of Betulin on LPS-induced activation of cell lines with relevance for lung inflammation in vitro and on lung inflammation elicited by either LPS or viable Escherichia coli (E. coli) in vivo. In vitro, Betulin inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and (interleukin) IL-6 levels and up-regulated the level of IL-10. Also Betulin suppressed the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 protein in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. In vivo, Betulin alleviated LPS-induced acute lung injury. Treatment with Betulin diminished pro-inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase activity and bacterial loads in lung tissue during gram-negative pneumonia. Our findings demonstrated that Betulin inhibits pro-inflammatory responses induced by the gram-negative stimuli LPS and E. coli, suggesting that Betulin may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of lung inflammation.

  4. Surface charge-conversion polymeric nanoparticles for photodynamic treatment of urinary tract bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijie; Qiao, Shenglin; Li, Lili; Qi, Guobin; Lin, Yaoxin; Qiao, Zengying; Wang, Hao; Shao, Chen

    2015-12-11

    Urinary tract infections are typical bacterial infections which result in a number of economic burdens. With increasing antibiotic resistance, it is urgent that new approaches are explored that can eliminate pathogenic bacteria without inducing drug resistance. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new promising tactic. It is a gentle in situ photochemical reaction in which a photosensitizer (PS) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) under laser irradiation. In this work, we have demonstrated Chlorin e6 (Ce6) encapsulated charge-conversion polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) for efficiently targeting and killing pathogenic bacteria in a weakly acidic urinary tract infection environment. Owing to the surface charge conversion of NPs in an acidic environment, the NPs exhibited enhanced recognition for Gram-positive (ex. S. aureus) and Gram-negative (ex. E. coli) bacteria due to the charge interaction. Also, those NPs showed significant antibacterial efficacy in vitro with low cytotoxicity. The MIC value of NPs to E. coli is 17.91 μg ml(-1), compared with the free Ce6 value of 29.85 μg ml(-1). Finally, a mouse acute cystitis model was used to assess the photodynamic therapy effects in urinary tract infections. A significant decline (P < 0.05) in bacterial cells between NPs and free Ce6 occurred in urine after photodynamic therapy treatment. And the plated counting results revealed a remarkable bacterial cells drop (P < 0.05) in the sacrificed bladder tissue. Above all, this nanotechnology strategy opens a new door for the treatment of urinary tract infections with minimal side effects.

  5. Surface charge-conversion polymeric nanoparticles for photodynamic treatment of urinary tract bacterial infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shijie; Qiao, Shenglin; Li, Lili; Qi, Guobin; Lin, Yaoxin; Qiao, Zengying; Wang, Hao; Shao, Chen

    2015-12-01

    Urinary tract infections are typical bacterial infections which result in a number of economic burdens. With increasing antibiotic resistance, it is urgent that new approaches are explored that can eliminate pathogenic bacteria without inducing drug resistance. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new promising tactic. It is a gentle in situ photochemical reaction in which a photosensitizer (PS) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) under laser irradiation. In this work, we have demonstrated Chlorin e6 (Ce6) encapsulated charge-conversion polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) for efficiently targeting and killing pathogenic bacteria in a weakly acidic urinary tract infection environment. Owing to the surface charge conversion of NPs in an acidic environment, the NPs exhibited enhanced recognition for Gram-positive (ex. S. aureus) and Gram-negative (ex. E. coli) bacteria due to the charge interaction. Also, those NPs showed significant antibacterial efficacy in vitro with low cytotoxicity. The MIC value of NPs to E. coli is 17.91 μg ml-1, compared with the free Ce6 value of 29.85 μg ml-1. Finally, a mouse acute cystitis model was used to assess the photodynamic therapy effects in urinary tract infections. A significant decline (P < 0.05) in bacterial cells between NPs and free Ce6 occurred in urine after photodynamic therapy treatment. And the plated counting results revealed a remarkable bacterial cells drop (P < 0.05) in the sacrificed bladder tissue. Above all, this nanotechnology strategy opens a new door for the treatment of urinary tract infections with minimal side effects.

  6. Metabolic Requirements of Escherichia coli in Intracellular Bacterial Communities during Urinary Tract Infection Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Conover, Matt S.; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria; Palermo, Joseph J.; Hibbing, Michael E.; Dodson, Karen W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary etiological agent of over 85% of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). Mouse models of infection have shown that UPEC can invade bladder epithelial cells in a type 1 pilus-dependent mechanism, avoid a TLR4-mediated exocytic process, and escape into the host cell cytoplasm. The internalized UPEC can clonally replicate into biofilm-like intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs) of thousands of bacteria while avoiding many host clearance mechanisms. Importantly, IBCs have been documented in urine from women and children suffering acute UTI. To understand this protected bacterial niche, we elucidated the transcriptional profile of bacteria within IBCs using microarrays. We delineated the upregulation within the IBC of genes involved in iron acquisition, metabolism, and transport. Interestingly, lacZ was highly upregulated, suggesting that bacteria were sensing and/or utilizing a galactoside for metabolism in the IBC. A ΔlacZ strain displayed significantly smaller IBCs than the wild-type strain and was attenuated during competitive infection with a wild-type strain. Similarly, a galK mutant resulted in smaller IBCs and attenuated infection. Further, analysis of the highly upregulated gene yeaR revealed that this gene contributes to oxidative stress resistance and type 1 pilus production. These results suggest that bacteria within the IBC are under oxidative stress and, consistent with previous reports, utilize nonglucose carbon metabolites. Better understanding of the bacterial mechanisms used for IBC development and establishment of infection may give insights into development of novel anti-virulence strategies. PMID:27073089

  7. Acinetobacter baumannii Genes Required for Bacterial Survival during Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan; Smith, Sara; DeOrnellas, Valerie; Crepin, Sebastien; Kole, Monica; Zahdeh, Carina

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is emerging as a leading global multiple-antibiotic-resistant nosocomial pathogen. The identity of genes essential for pathogenesis in a mammalian host remains largely unknown. Using transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS), we identified A. baumannii genes involved in bacterial survival in a leukopenic mouse model of bloodstream infection. Mice were inoculated with a pooled transposon mutant library derived from 109,000 mutants, and TraDIS was used to map transposon insertion sites in the genomes of bacteria in the inoculum and of bacteria recovered from mouse spleens. Unique transposon insertion sites were mapped and used to calculate a fitness factor for every insertion site based on its relative abundance in the inoculum and postinfection libraries. Eighty-nine transposon insertion mutants that were underrepresented after experimental infection in mice compared to their presence in the inocula were delineated as candidates for further evaluation. Genetically defined mutants lacking feoB (ferrous iron import), ddc (d-ala-d-ala-carboxypeptidase), and pntB (pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase subunit) exhibited a fitness defect during systemic infection resulting from bacteremia. In vitro, these mutants, as well as a fepA (ferric enterobactin receptor) mutant, are defective in survival in human serum and within macrophages and are hypersensitive to killing by antimicrobial peptides compared to the survival of the parental strain under these conditions. Our data demonstrate that FepA is involved in the uptake of exogenous enterobactin in A. baumannii. Genetic complementation rescues the phenotypes of mutants in assays that emulate conditions encountered during infection. In summary, we have determined novel A. baumannii fitness genes involved in the pathogenesis of mammalian infection. IMPORTANCE A. baumannii is a significant cause of bacterial bloodstream infection in humans. Since multiple antibiotic resistance

  8. Evaluation of aztreonam in the treatment of severe bacterial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Vivas, J; Rodríguez-Créixems, M; Bouza, E; Hellín, T; Guerrero, A; Martínez-Beltrán, J; García de la Torre, M

    1985-01-01

    We investigated the clinical efficacy and safety of aztreonam in the treatment of 50 episodes of infection in 46 adult patients. The clinical condition of patients at the beginning of treatment was critical or poor in 28 of the episodes of infection. Episodes treated were 39 urinary tract infections (12 of them with concomitant bacteremia), 2 soft tissue infections, 8 patients with osteomyelitis (1 with concomitant bacteremia), and one episode of pneumonia. Significant isolated microorganisms were aerobic or facultative gram-negative rods and were responsible for the following episodes of infection (number of episodes): members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (49), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5), and Haemophilus influenzae (1). The overall rate of clinical response to aztreonam was 94% of the treated episodes. Colonization or superinfection or both occurred in 29 episodes, but only 8 episodes required antimicrobial therapy. Aztreonam seems to be an effective single agent therapy for many bacterial infections. Colonization and superinfection by Candida sp., Streptococcus faecalis or Staphylococcus aureus must be monitored. PMID:3834832

  9. [PROGNOSTICATION OF LIMITED ACCUMULATIONS LIQUID INFECTION BY SEVERE ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Sheiko, V D; Oganezyan, A G

    2015-07-01

    The results of examination and treatment of 53 patients on limited accumulations of liquid (LAL) for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) were analysed. In 62.5% of patients on acute aseptic LAL celebrated parapancreatyc liquid accumulation were determinened. Most (94.6%) patients infected by LAL revealed heterogeneity of their structure according ultrasonography, in 81.1%--secvestral mass in their cavity. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) observed both aseptic and infected LAL. Prognostically important criteria LAL infection in patients on SAP is the heterogeneity of echostructure in absence of a downward trend. Diagnostic puncture under ultrasound control and microbiological studies are safe methods of diagnosis by infected LAL in SAP.

  10. Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant Bacterial Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant Bacterial Infections PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Andrew M. Gulick, PhD...Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant Bacterial Infections 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0218 5c... infections . Recently, community-acquired infections , infections in wounded U.S. service members, and infections in residents of long-term care facilities

  11. Nanosized Selenium: A Novel Platform Technology to Prevent Bacterial Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi

    As an important category of bacterial infections, healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are considered an increasing threat to the safety and health of patients worldwide. HAIs lead to extended hospital stays, contribute to increased medical costs, and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In the United States, infections encountered in the hospital or a health care facility affect more than 1.7 million patients, cost 35.7 billion to 45 billion, and contribute to 88,000 deaths in hospitals annually. The most conventional and widely accepted method to fight against bacterial infections is using antibiotics. However, because of the widespread and sometimes inappropriate use of antibiotics, many strains of bacteria have rapidly developed antibiotic resistance. Those new, stronger bacteria pose serious, worldwide threats to public health and welfare. In 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported antibiotic resistance as a global serious threat that is no longer a prediction for the future but is now reality. It has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country. The most effective strategy to prevent antibiotic resistance is minimizing the use of antibiotics. In recent years, nanomaterials have been investigated as one of the potential substitutes of antibiotics. As a result of their vastly increased ratio of surface area to volume, nanomaterials will likely exert a stronger interaction with bacteria which may affect bacterial growth and propagation. A major concern of most existing antibacterial nanomaterials, like silver nanoparticles, is their potential toxicity. But selenium is a non-metallic material and a required nutrition for the human body, which is recommended by the FDA at a 53 to 60 μg daily intake. Nanosized selenium is considered to be healthier and less toxic compared with many metal-based nanomaterials due to the generation of reactive oxygen species from metals, especially heavy metals. Therefore, the objectives of

  12. Acute Renal Failure in Dengue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyam, Nambakam Tanuja

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Acute Renal Failure (RF) is a rare but well recognized complication of Dengue Infection (DI). There has been paucity of published data regarding renal involvement in DI. Aim The aim of the present study was to elucidate different clinical presentations, disease outcomes of DI. To study the frequency, severity and predictors of RF in DI. Materials and Methods Patients diagnosed either as Dengue Fever (DF) or Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever/Dengue Shock Syndrome (DHF/DSS) respectively were enrolled for this study. The diagnostic criteria for DI were febrile illness associated with one of the following: 1) detection of dengue-specific IgM capture antibody or Non-Structural Protein1 (NS1) antigen; or 2) a four-fold or greater increase of dengue-specific IgG capture antibody by ELISA and haemoagglutination inhibition assay. Patients were diagnosed as having Acute RF, if serum creatinine was >1.2 mg/dl or who showed improvement by 50% in serum creatinine from the initial value. It is an observational study of medical charts, data of age, gender, and medical history of any underlying diseases in association with the severity of DI of each patient recorded. All of the laboratory results were collected. Parameters that influenced the clinical presentations and outcomes for development of classical DF or DHF/DSS in patients with or without RF were analysed and compared. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis was carried. The Statistical software namely SAS 9.2, SPSS 15.0, Stata 10.1, Med Calc 9.0.1, Systat 12.0 and R environment ver.2.11.1 were used. Results Most common symptoms were fever followed by headache and pain in abdomen. Among the patients with RF, all patients had recovery. The patients with DHF/DSS were more susceptible to develop renal failure compared to DF group. There were statistically significant higher frequencies of renal failure, haemoconcentration, thrombocytopenia, low serum cholesterol. Patients in the RF group also had significantly

  13. Zosteriform Staphylococcus aureus Cutaneous Infection: Report of Two Patients With Dermatomal Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Schepp, Elizabeth D; Cohen, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe cutaneous infections, which are zosteriform in distribution, including two patients with dermatomal Staphylococcus aureus infection. Herpes zoster infectious lesions usually occur in a dermatomal distribution. Other viruses, such as herpes simplex virus, can also appear with zosteriform lesions and closely mimic the clinical presentation of herpes zoster. Additionally, other skin infections, less commonly, are zosteriform. Two patients who developed zosteriform S aureus skin infection are described. A medical literature search for zosteriform dermatomal infections yielded other cutaneous infections with a zosteriform presentation. Two patients had S aureus and methicillin-resistant S aureus infection with skin lesions occupying the T11-T12 dermatomes and the T4 dermatome, respectively. They responded to antibacterial agents and adjuvant therapy. Patients with viral, fungal, and spirochete zosteriform infections are summarized. In addition to varicella-zoster virus infection, zosteriform skin infection can occur with viral (varicella-zoster virus, herpes simplex virus, and Epstein-Barr virus), superficial (dermatophyte), and deep (phaeohyphomycosis and zygomycosis) fungal, and bacterial (S aureus and methicillin-resistant S aureus) infections. These infections should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a zosteriform infection that does not present with the classic clinical picture for herpes zoster or that does not respond to standard treatments for varicellazoster virus.

  14. Acute cerebellar ataxia with human parvovirus B19 infection

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Y.; Ueno, T.; Komatsu, H.; Takada, H.; Nunoue, T.

    1999-01-01

    A 2 year old boy developed acute cerebellar ataxia in association with erythema infectiosum. During the disease, genomic DNA and antibodies against human parvovirus B19 were detected in serum but not in cerebrospinal fluid. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cerebellar ataxia might occur due to transient vascular reaction in the cerebellum during infection.

 PMID:10325764

  15. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure in Plasmodium vivax malaria infection, a rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Sangappa, Jainapur Ravi; Choudhary, Prakash Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male presented with 6 days history of intermittent fever with chills, 2 days history of upper abdomen pain, distension of abdomen, and decreased urine output. He was diagnosed to have Plasmodium vivax malaria, acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure. These constellations of complications in P. vivax infection have never been reported in the past. The patient responded to intravenous chloroquine and supportive treatment. For renal failure, he required hemodialysis. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure form an unusual combination in P. vivax infection. PMID:26629455

  16. Bacterial infections in cynomolgus monkeys given small molecule immunomodulatory antagonists.

    PubMed

    Price, Karen D

    2010-01-01

    Opportunistic infections (OIs) during the course of non-clinical toxicity studies can serve as a clinical indicator of immunosuppression. In monkeys, severity may be magnified since the possibility for fecal-oral and cage-to-cage transmission of bacteria exists, reserve capacity is low, and clinical signs of infection are not easily detected until the infectious process is well underway. This review summarizes a case study presented at the HESI-ILSI ITC-Sponsored workshop on Naturally Occurring Infections in Non-human Primates and Immunotoxicity Implications. It gives an overview on the impact of bacterial infections in monkeys on the development and regulatory assessment of three closely-related representative small molecule immunomodulatory (anti-inflammatory) drug candidates all inhibiting the same drug target. The infections, which sometimes progressed to bacteremia and death, originally manifested in the skin, upper respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, and less frequently as soft tissue abscesses. Infections were sporadic and not observed in all studies despite coverage of equivalent or higher systemic exposures or longer durations of treatment. To address concerns regarding inconsistency in the presentation and type of findings and their potential relationship to infection, steps were taken to identify causative agents (via culture, microscopy), implement various intervention and treatment regimens (supportive care, antibiotics, drug holiday), demonstrate reversibility of clinical and immune effects, and study major immune components/mechanisms affected (cytokine/stress protein profiling, immune cell phenotyping, and humoral/innate immune cell function tests). Appropriate diagnosis and characterization of the infection was critical to discrimination of these findings as a secondary pharmacologic effect rather than a direct drug-related target organ effect, and also guided clinical protocol design and regulatory acceptance.

  17. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J; Lindblade, Kim A

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  18. Virulent bacterial infection improves aversive learning performance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Babin, Aurélie; Kolly, Sylvain; Kawecki, Tadeusz J

    2014-10-01

    Virulent infections are expected to impair learning ability, either as a direct consequence of stressed physiological state or as an adaptive response that minimizes diversion of energy from immune defense. This prediction has been well supported for mammals and bees. Here, we report an opposite result in Drosophila melanogaster. Using an odor-mechanical shock conditioning paradigm, we found that intestinal infection with bacterial pathogens Pseudomonas entomophila or Erwinia c. carotovora improved flies' learning performance after a 1h retention interval. Infection with P. entomophila (but not E. c. carotovora) also improved learning performance after 5 min retention. No effect on learning performance was detected for intestinal infections with an avirulent GacA mutant of P. entomophila or for virulent systemic (hemocoel) infection with E. c. carotovora. Assays of unconditioned responses to odorants and shock do not support a major role for changes in general responsiveness to stimuli in explaining the changes in learning performance, although differences in their specific salience for learning cannot be excluded. Our results demonstrate that the effects of pathogens on learning performance in insects are less predictable than suggested by previous studies, and support the notion that immune stress can sometimes boost cognitive abilities.

  19. Review: phage therapy: a modern tool to control bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic-resistant in bacteria has aggravated curiosity in development of alternative therapy to conventional drugs. One of the emerging drugs that can be used alternative to antibiotics is bacteriophage therapy. The use of living phages in the cure of lethal infectious life threatening diseases caused by Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria has been reported. Another development in the field of bacteriophage therapy is the use of genetically modified and non replicating phages in the treatment of bacterial infection. Genetically engineered bacteriophages can be used as adjuvant along with antibiotic therapy. Phages encoded with lysosomal enzymes are also effectual in the treatment of infectious diseases.

  20. Acute cervico-facial infection in Scotland 2010: patterns of presentation, patient demographics and recording of systemic involvement.

    PubMed

    Byers, J; Lowe, T; Goodall, C A

    2012-10-01

    Acute bacterial cervicofacial infection is a common problem that is most often secondary to dental infection. Most cases present as localised abscesses but some may be associated with serious morbidity including scarring, embarrassment of the airway, SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome), and sepsis syndrome. Fourteen oral surgery or maxillofacial surgery units in Scotland took part in a clinical audit of acute infection during two four-week cycles (August and November) in 2010. Information regarding the patients, signs and symptoms, and management was recorded. Training material was distributed between cycles with information on SIRS, sepsis, and the prescription of antibiotics. Overall, 140 patients presented with acute infection. There was an equal sex distribution and ages ranged from 5 to 87 years. There was an association with deprivation and 36% of patients were from the lowest socioeconomic quintile. Most infections were dental (n=120, 86%), and patients presented with pain and swelling (n=120, 86% and n=134, 96%, respectively) Twenty-three patients (16%) met the criteria for SIRS. A further 23 (16%) had at least one positive SIRS marker with incomplete recording of the remaining markers. Twenty-six patients (19%) had no recorded SIRS markers. Cervicofacial infection can be associated with serious morbidity and mortality, which may be better managed if the systemic signs and symptoms of sepsis are recognised and recorded at presentation. This study showed that the recording of signs of sepsis was variable even with training. Further training of junior staff to recognise severe acute bacterial infection may improve management.

  1. Emerging insights on intestinal dysbiosis during bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tu Anh N; Lawley, Trevor D

    2014-02-01

    Infection of the gastrointestinal tract is commonly linked to pathological imbalances of the resident microbiota, termed dysbiosis. In recent years, advanced high-throughput genomic approaches have allowed us to examine the microbiota in an unprecedented manner, revealing novel biological insights about infection-associated dysbiosis at the community and individual species levels. A dysbiotic microbiota is typically reduced in taxonomic diversity and metabolic function, and can harbour pathobionts that exacerbate intestinal inflammation or manifest systemic disease. Dysbiosis can also promote pathogen genome evolution, while allowing the pathogens to persist at high density and transmit to new hosts. A deeper understanding of bacterial pathogenicity in the context of the intestinal microbiota should unveil new approaches for developing diagnostics and therapies for enteropathogens.

  2. New agents in development for the treatment of bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Abbanat, Darren; Morrow, Brian; Bush, Karen

    2008-10-01

    New antibacterial agents to treat infections caused by antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant pathogens are in various stages of clinical development. In this review are compounds with demonstrated activity against methicillin-resistant staphylococci including investigational cephalosporins, carbapenems, and a new tetracycline, as well as glycopeptides effective against vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and fluoroquinolones with improved potency against respiratory pathogens and multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. Although most recent progress has occurred in the identification of agents for Gram-positive infections, broad-spectrum carbapenems are described for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Also discussed are agents with mechanisms of action other than inhibition of protein synthesis, penicillin-binding proteins, and DNA topoisomerases; among these are inhibitors of bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis, peptidoglycan synthesis, and dihydrofolate reductase.

  3. Yersinia pestis infection and laboratory conditions alter flea-associated bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ryan T; Vetter, Sara M; Montenieiri, John; Holmes, Jennifer; Bernhardt, Scott A; Gage, Kenneth L

    2013-01-01

    We collected Oropsylla montana from rock squirrels, Spermophilus varigatus, and infected a subset of collected fleas with Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague. We used bar-tagged DNA pyrosequencing to characterize bacterial communities of wild, uninfected controls and infected fleas. Bacterial communities within Y. pestis-infected fleas were substantially more similar to one another than communities within wild or control fleas, suggesting that infection alters the bacterial community in a directed manner such that specific bacterial lineages are severely reduced in abundance or entirely eliminated from the community. Laboratory conditions also significantly altered flea-associated bacterial communities relative to wild communities, but much less so than Y. pestis infection. The abundance of Firmicutes decreased considerably in infected fleas, and Bacteroidetes were almost completely eliminated from both the control and infected fleas. Bartonella and Wolbachia were unaffected or responded positively to Y. pestis infection.

  4. Antibiofilm Activity, Compound Characterization, and Acute Toxicity of Extract from a Novel Bacterial Species of Paenibacillus

    PubMed Central

    Alasil, Saad Musbah; Omar, Rahmat; Yusof, Mohd Yasim

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of many antimicrobial agents is currently decreasing; therefore, it is important to search for alternative therapeutics. Our study was carried out to assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity using microtiter plate assay, to characterize the bioactive compounds using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detection and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and to test the oral acute toxicity on Sprague Dawley rats of extract derived from a novel bacterial species of Paenibacillus strain 139SI. Our results indicate that the crude extract and its three identified compounds exhibit strong antibiofilm activity against a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Three potential compounds were identified including an amino acid antibiotic C8H20N3O4P (MW 253.237), phospholipase A2 inhibitor C21H36O5 (MW 368.512), and an antibacterial agent C14H11N3O2 (MW 253.260). The acute toxicity test indicates that the mortality rate among all rats was low and that the biochemical parameters, hematological profile, and histopathology examination of liver and kidneys showed no significant differences between experimental groups (P > 0.05). Overall, our findings suggest that the extract and its purified compounds derived from novel Paenibacillus sp. are nontoxic exhibiting strong antibiofilm activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens that can be useful towards new therapeutic management of biofilm-associated infections. PMID:24790603

  5. Acute cholecystitis associated with infection of Enterobacteriaceae from gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Yan, Q; Luo, F; Shang, D; Wu, D; Zhang, H; Shang, X; Kang, X; Abdo, M; Liu, B; Ma, Y; Xin, Y

    2015-09-01

    Acute cholecystitis (AC) is one of the most common surgical diseases. Bacterial infection accounts for 50% to 85% of the disease's onset. Since there is a close relationship between the biliary system and the gut, the aims of this study were to characterize and determine the influence of gut microbiota on AC, to detect the pathogenic microorganism in the biliary system, and to explore the relationship between the gut and bile microbiota of patients with AC. A total of 185 713 high-quality sequence reads were generated from the faecal samples of 15 patients and 13 healthy controls by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Patients' samples were significantly enriched in Akkermansia, Enterobacter and Escherichia/Shigella group. The healthy controls, however, showed significant enrichment of Clostridiales, Coprococcus, Coprobacillaceae, Paraprevotella, Turicibacter and TM7-3 in their faecal samples. Escherichia coli was the main biliary pathogenic microorganism, among others such as Klebsiella spp., Clostridium perfringens, Citrobacter freundii and Enterobacter cloacae in the bile of the patients. Additionally, the amount of bile endotoxin significantly correlated with the number of Enterobacteriaceae, especially E. coli. Our data indicate that Enterobacteriaceae might play essential role in the pathogenesis and/or progress of AC. This was verified in an in vivo model using a pathogenic E. coli isolated from one of the patients in guinea pigs and observed marked gallbladder inflammation and morphologic changes. This study thus provides insight which could be useful for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of AC and related diseases by controlling the growth of Enterobacteriaceae to alleviate the infection.

  6. Ear Infection (Middle Ear)

    MedlinePlus

    Ear infection (middle ear) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff An ear infection (acute otitis media) is most often a bacterial or viral infection that affects the middle ear, the air-filled space behind the eardrum that ...

  7. Incidence and Predictors of Bacterial infection in Febrile Children with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Benita J; Bycroft, Thomas P; Almossawi, Ofran; Wilkey, Olufunke B; Daniels, Justin G

    2015-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease are at increased risk of developing bacteremia and other serious bacterial infections. Fever is a common symptom in sickle cell disease and can also occur with sickle cell crises and viral infections. We aimed to evaluate the incidence and predictors of bacteremia and bacterial infection in children with sickle cell disease presenting with fever to a district hospital and sickle cell center in London. A retrospective analysis was performed on all attendances of children (aged under 16 years) with sickle cell disease presenting with a fever of 38.5 °C or higher over a 1-year period. Confirmed bacterial infection was defined as bacteremia, bacterial meningitis, urinary tract infection (UTI), pneumonia, osteomyelitis or other bacterial infection with positive identification of organism. Children were defined as having a suspected bacterial infection if a bacterial infection was suspected clinically, but no organism was identified. Over a 1-year period there were 88 episodes analyzed in 59 children. Bacteremia occurred in 3.4% of episodes and confirmed bacterial infection in 7.0%. Suspected bacterial infection occurred in 33.0%. One death occurred from Salmonella typhirium septicemia. C-reactive protein (CRP) level and white blood cell (WBC) count were both significantly associated with bacterial infection (p = 0.004 and 0.02, respectively.) In conclusion, bacterial infections continue to be a significant problem in children with sickle cell disease. C-reactive protein was significantly associated with bacterial infections, and could be included in clinical risk criteria for febrile children with sickle cell disease.

  8. Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland.

    PubMed

    Putkuri, Niina; Kantele, Anu; Levanov, Lev; Kivistö, Ilkka; Brummer-Korvenkontio, Markus; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-05-01

    Inkoo virus (INKV) and Chatanga virus (CHATV), which are circulating in Finland, are mosquitoborne California serogroup orthobunyaviruses that have a high seroprevalence among humans. Worldwide, INKV infection has been poorly described, and CHATV infection has been unknown. Using serum samples collected in Finland from 7,961 patients suspected of having viral neurologic disease or Puumala virus infection during the summers of 2001-2013, we analyzed the samples to detect California serogroup infections. IgM seropositivity revealed 17 acute infections, and cross-neutralization tests confirmed presence of INKV or CHATV infections. All children (<16 years of age) with INKV infection were hospitalized; adults were outpatients with mild disease, except for 1 who was hospitalized with CHATV infection. Symptoms included fever, influenza-like illness, nausea or vomiting, disorientation, nuchal rigidity, headache, drowsiness, and seizures. Although many INKV and CHATV infections appear to be subclinical, these viruses can cause more severe disease, especially in children.

  9. Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland

    PubMed Central

    Kantele, Anu; Levanov, Lev; Kivistö, Ilkka; Brummer-Korvenkontio, Markus; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-01-01

    Inkoo virus (INKV) and Chatanga virus (CHATV), which are circulating in Finland, are mosquitoborne California serogroup orthobunyaviruses that have a high seroprevalence among humans. Worldwide, INKV infection has been poorly described, and CHATV infection has been unknown. Using serum samples collected in Finland from 7,961 patients suspected of having viral neurologic disease or Puumala virus infection during the summers of 2001–2013, we analyzed the samples to detect California serogroup infections. IgM seropositivity revealed 17 acute infections, and cross-neutralization tests confirmed presence of INKV or CHATV infections. All children (<16 years of age) with INKV infection were hospitalized; adults were outpatients with mild disease, except for 1 who was hospitalized with CHATV infection. Symptoms included fever, influenza-like illness, nausea or vomiting, disorientation, nuchal rigidity, headache, drowsiness, and seizures. Although many INKV and CHATV infections appear to be subclinical, these viruses can cause more severe disease, especially in children. PMID:27088268

  10. Observations of Bacterial Behavior during Infection Using the ARGOS Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charest, A. J.; Algarni, S.; Iannacchione, G. S.

    2015-03-01

    This research employed the Area Recorded Generalized Optical Scattering (ARGOS) approach which allowed for the observation of bacterial changes in terms of individual particles and population dynamics in real time. This new approach allows for an aqueous environment to be manipulated while conducting time-specific measurements over an indefinite amount of time. This current study provides a more time-specific method in which the bacteria remained within the initial conditions and allows for more time precision than provided by analyzing concentrations of plaque-forming units (PFU). This study involved the bacteria (F-amp) during infection by bacteriophage (MS2). The relative total intensity allows for detailed measurements of the bacteria population over time. The bacteria characteristics were also evaluated such as the root mean square image difference (at specific wavevectors), fractal dimension and effective radius. The growth rate of the infected bacteria occurred at a rate higher than the uninfected bacteria similarly, the death rates were also higher for the infected bacteria than the uninfected bacteria. The present study indicates that bacteria may react to infection by increasing the rate of population growth.

  11. Vaccines for bacterial sexually transmitted infections: a realistic goal?

    PubMed Central

    Sparling, P F; Elkins, C; Wyrick, P B; Cohen, M S

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial infections of the genital tract (gonorrhea, chlamydia, chancroid, syphilis) are common and cause significant morbidity. Their importance is heightened by recent appreciation of their roles in facilitation of transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Each is capable of causing repeated infections, suggesting lack of permanent broadly effective immunity. An effective vaccine has yet to be developed for any of these diseases. Rapid progress in understanding the molecular basis for pathogenesis of infection, including mechanisms for escape from otherwise effective immune surveillance and mechanisms for causing injury to host cells, has stimulated renewed efforts to make vaccines for some of these infections. Progress has been greatest for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. Present emphasis is on the major or principal outer membrane proteins of N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis, based on evidence for neutralizing antibodies directed against surface-exposed variable domains of each of these proteins. Other surface-exposed proteins, including the iron-repressible transferrin receptor in gonococci and certain heat-shock proteins in chlamydia, also may be targets for vaccines. Although much remains to be learned, cautious optimism is warranted. PMID:8146139

  12. In utero cytomegalovirus infection and development of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Francis, Stephen Starko; Wallace, Amelia D; Wendt, George A; Li, Linlin; Liu, Fenyong; Riley, Lee W; Kogan, Scott; Walsh, Kyle M; de Smith, Adam J; Dahl, Gary V; Ma, Xiaomei; Delwart, Eric; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2017-03-23

    It is widely suspected, yet controversial, that infection plays an etiologic role in the development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood cancer and a disease with a confirmed prenatal origin in most cases. We investigated infections at diagnosis and then assessed the timing of infection at birth in children with ALL and age, gender, and ethnicity matched controls to identify potential causal initiating infections. Comprehensive untargeted virome and bacterial analyses of pretreatment bone marrow specimens (n = 127 ALL in comparison with 38 acute myeloid leukemia cases in a comparison group) revealed prevalent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection at diagnosis in childhood ALL, demonstrating active viral transcription in leukemia blasts as well as intact virions in serum. Screening of newborn blood samples revealed a significantly higher prevalence of in utero CMV infection in ALL cases (n = 268) than healthy controls (n = 270) (odds ratio [OR], 3.71, confidence interval [CI], 1.56-7.92, P = .0016). Risk was more pronounced in Hispanics (OR=5.90, CI=1.89-25.96) than in non-Hispanic whites (OR=2.10 CI= 0.69-7.13). This is the first study to suggest that congenital CMV infection is a risk factor for childhood ALL and is more prominent in Hispanic children. Further investigation of CMV as an etiologic agent for ALL is warranted.

  13. Metagenomic analysis of bloodstream infections in patients with acute leukemia and therapy-induced neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Gyarmati, P.; Kjellander, C.; Aust, C.; Song, Y.; Öhrmalm, L.; Giske, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    Leukemic patients are often immunocompromised due to underlying conditions, comorbidities and the effects of chemotherapy, and thus at risk for developing systemic infections. Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a severe complication in neutropenic patients, and is associated with increased mortality. BSI is routinely diagnosed with blood culture, which only detects culturable pathogens. We analyzed 27 blood samples from 9 patients with acute leukemia and suspected BSI at different time points of their antimicrobial treatment using shotgun metagenomics sequencing in order to detect unculturable and non-bacterial pathogens. Our findings confirm the presence of bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens alongside antimicrobial resistance genes. Decreased white blood cell (WBC) counts were associated with the presence of microbial DNA, and was inversely proportional to the number of sequencing reads. This study could indicate the use of high-throughput sequencing for personalized antimicrobial treatments in BSIs. PMID:26996149

  14. CD8 epitope escape and reversion in acute HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Timm, Joerg; Lauer, Georg M; Kavanagh, Daniel G; Sheridan, Isabelle; Kim, Arthur Y; Lucas, Michaela; Pillay, Thillagavathie; Ouchi, Kei; Reyor, Laura L; Schulze zur Wiesch, Julian; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Chung, Raymond T; Bhardwaj, Nina; Klenerman, Paul; Walker, Bruce D; Allen, Todd M

    2004-12-20

    In the setting of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, robust HCV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses are associated with initial control of viremia. Despite these responses, 70-80% of individuals develop persistent infection. Although viral escape from CD8 responses has been illustrated in the chimpanzee model of HCV infection, the effect of CD8 selection pressure on viral evolution and containment in acute HCV infection in humans remains unclear. Here, we examined viral evolution in an immunodominant human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B8-restricted NS3 epitope in subjects with acute HCV infection. Development of mutations within the epitope coincided with loss of strong ex vivo tetramer and interferon gamma enzyme-linked immunospot responses, and endogenous expression of variant NS3 sequences suggested that the selected mutations altered processing and presentation of the variant epitope. Analysis of NS3 sequences from 30 additional chronic HCV-infected subjects revealed a strong association between sequence variation within this region and expression of HLA-B8, supporting reproducible allele-specific selection pressures at the population level. Interestingly, transmission of an HLA-B8-associated escape mutation to an HLA-B8 negative subject resulted in rapid reversion of the mutation. Together, these data indicate that viral escape from CD8+ T cell responses occurs during human HCV infection and that acute immune selection pressure is of sufficient magnitude to influence HCV evolution.

  15. Clavanin A Improves Outcome of Complications from Different Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Osmar N.; Fensterseifer, Isabel C. M.; Rodrigues, Elaine A.; Holanda, Hortência H. S.; Novaes, Natasha R. F.; Cunha, Junia P. A.; Rezende, Taia M. B.; Magalhães, Kelly G.; Moreno, Susana E.; Jerônimo, Márcio S.; Bocca, Anamélia L.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid increase in the incidence of multidrug-resistant infections today has led to enormous interest in antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as suitable compounds for developing unusual antibiotics. In this study, clavanin A, an antimicrobial peptide previously isolated from the marine tunicate Styela clava, was selected as a purposeful molecule that could be used in controlling infection and further synthesized. Clavanin A was in vitro evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli as well as toward L929 mouse fibroblasts and skin primary cells (SPCs). Moreover, this peptide was challenged here in an in vivo wound and sepsis model, and the immune response was also analyzed. Despite displaying clear in vitro antimicrobial activity toward Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, clavanin A showed no cytotoxic activities against mammalian cells, and in acute toxicity tests, no adverse reaction was observed at any of the concentrations. Moreover, clavanin A significantly reduced the S. aureus CFU in an experimental wound model. This peptide also reduced the mortality of mice infected with E. coli and S. aureus by 80% compared with that of control animals (treated with phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]): these data suggest that clavanin A prevents the start of sepsis and thereby reduces mortality. These data suggest that clavanin A is an AMP that could improve the development of novel peptide-based strategies for the treatment of wound and sepsis infections. PMID:25547358

  16. Acute bacterial sternoclavicular osteomyelitis in a long-term renal transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    Dounousi, Evangelia; Duni, Anila; Xiromeriti, Sofia; Pappas, Charalambos; Siamopoulos, Kostas C

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for a significant number of patients with end-stage renal disease. Although immunosuppression therapy improves graft and patient’s survival, it is a major risk factor for infection following kidney transplantation altering clinical manifestations of the infectious diseases and complicating both the diagnosis and management of renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Existing literature is very limited regarding osteomyelitis in RTRs. Sternoclavicular osteomyelitis is rare and has been mainly reported after contiguous spread of infection or direct traumatic seeding of the bacteria. We present an interesting case of acute, bacterial sternoclavicular osteomyelitis in a long-term RTR. Blood cultures were positive for Streptococcus mitis, while the portal entry site was not identified. Magnetic resonance imaging of the sternoclavicluar region and a three-phase bone scan were positive for sternoclavicular osteomyelitis. Eventually, the patient was successfully treated with Daptomycin as monotherapy. In the presence of immunosuppression, the transplant physician should always remain alert for opportunistic pathogens or unusual location of osteomyelitis. PMID:27358791

  17. Chlorhexidine Gluconate Cleansing in Preventing Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infection and Acquisition of Multi-drug Resistant Organisms in Younger Patients With Cancer or Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-28

    Bacterial Infection; Benign Neoplasm; Malignant Neoplasm; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

  18. Antimicrobial Nanoparticle for the Treatment of Bacterial Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pornpattananangkul, Dissaya

    Liposomes are spherical lipid vesicles with bilayered membrane structure, which have been recognized as one of the most widely used carriers for delivering a myriad of pharmaceuticals. Liposomes can carry both hydrophilic and hydrophobic agents with high efficiency and protect them from undesired effects of external conditions. However, the applications of liposomes are usually limited by their instability during storage. They are inclined to fuse with one another immediately after preparation, resulting in undesired mixing, increase in size, and payload loss. To overcome this limitation, this dissertation will focus on the technology to stabilize liposomes during storage and destabilize at specific conditions in order to allow controllable therapeutic release, as well as demonstrate their application to treat one of the bacterial infection diseases, acne vulgaris. The first area of this research is stimuli-responsive liposomes development, where the liposomes are stabilized by introducing gold nanoparticles to adsorb to their surface. As a result, the liposomes are prevented from fusing with one another and undesirable payload release during storage or physiological environments. Moreover, therapeutic is controllably released depending on environment conditions, such as acidic pH and bacterial virulence factor. In case of acid-responsive liposomes, the bound gold nanoparticles can effectively prevent liposomes from fusing with one another at neutral pH value, while at acidic environment (e.g. pH<5), the gold particle stabilizers will fall off from the liposomes, thereby reinstalling the fusion activity of liposomes. The fusion activity of the stabilized liposomes is found to be 25% at pH=7, in contrast to 80% at pH=4. Another stimulus that can activate drug release from liposomes is virulence factor released from bacteria themselves, such as bacterial toxin. When nanoparticle-stabilized liposomes encounter with bacteria that secrete toxin, the toxin will insert

  19. Elevation of serum thymidine kinase 1 in a bacterial infection: canine pyometra.

    PubMed

    Sharif, H; Hagman, R; Wang, L; Eriksson, S

    2013-01-01

    Pyometra is a bacterial infection of the uterus that is common in dogs and is potentially life-threatening if delayed in diagnosis and/or treatment. Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a cytosolic enzyme involved in DNA precursor synthesis, and it is also present in serum from patients with malignant diseases. TK1 has been used as a cell proliferation biomarker for many years in human medicine and recently in dogs. However, little is known regarding serum TK1 levels in individuals with bacterial infection. The objective of this study was to determine the activity of serum TK1 in dogs with pyometra and compare it with hematologic and biochemical parameters, e.g., acute phase proteins and inflammatory mediators such as C-reactive protein and Prostaglandin F(2α). Serum and plasma TK1 activity of 40 healthy female dogs and 54 dogs with pyometra were analyzed using an optimized [(3)H]-thymidine phosphorylation assay. TK1 activities in serum or plasma were significantly higher in dogs with pyometra as compared with healthy female dogs (mean ± SD: 4.0 ± 7.3 pmol/min/mL in the pyometra group and 1.07 ± 0.34 pmol/min/mL in healthy control group). However, there was no difference in TK1 activity between systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) positive (n = 38) and SIRS negative (n = 16) pyometra cases. Furthermore, the plasma TK1 activity decreased in six and increased in one pyometra patients (n = 10), 24 h after ovariohysterectomy. No significant correlations (P > 0.05) were found between TK1 activity and hematological or other biochemical parameters. In conclusion, the TK1 activity was significantly elevated in dogs with pyometra. Further studies are needed to evaluate the mechanism and role of serum TK1 activity in bacterial infections and its possible diagnostic or prognostic value.

  20. Interleukin-22 reduces lung inflammation during influenza A virus infection and protects against secondary bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Stoyan; Renneson, Joelle; Fontaine, Josette; Barthelemy, Adeline; Paget, Christophe; Fernandez, Elodie Macho; Blanc, Fany; De Trez, Carl; Van Maele, Laurye; Dumoutier, Laure; Huerre, Michel-René; Eberl, Gérard; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Gosset, Pierre; Renauld, Jean Christophe; Sirard, Jean Claude; Faveeuw, Christelle; Trottein, François

    2013-06-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) has redundant, protective, or pathogenic functions during autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Here, we addressed the potential role of IL-22 in host defense and pathogenesis during lethal and sublethal respiratory H3N2 influenza A virus (IAV) infection. We show that IL-22, as well as factors associated with its production, are expressed in the lung tissue during the early phases of IAV infection. Our data indicate that retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-γt (RORγt)-positive αβ and γδ T cells, as well as innate lymphoid cells, expressed enhanced Il22 transcripts as early as 2 days postinfection. During lethal or sublethal IAV infections, endogenous IL-22 played no role in the control of IAV replication and in the development of the IAV-specific CD8(+) T cell response. During lethal infection, where wild-type (WT) mice succumbed to severe pneumonia, the lack of IL-22 did not accelerate or delay IAV-associated pathogenesis and animal death. In stark contrast, during sublethal IAV infection, IL-22-deficient animals had enhanced lung injuries and showed a lower airway epithelial integrity relative to WT littermates. Of importance, the protective effect of endogenous IL-22 in pulmonary damages was associated with a more controlled secondary bacterial infection. Indeed, after challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae, IAV-experienced Il22(-/-) animals were more susceptible than WT controls in terms of survival rate and bacterial burden in the lungs. Together, IL-22 plays no major role during lethal influenza but is beneficial during sublethal H3N2 IAV infection, where it limits lung inflammation and subsequent bacterial superinfections.

  1. Does Viral Co-Infection Influence the Severity of Acute Respiratory Infection in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple viruses are often detected in children with respiratory infection but the significance of co-infection in pathogenesis, severity and outcome is unclear. Objectives To correlate the presence of viral co-infection with clinical phenotype in children admitted with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Methods We collected detailed clinical information on severity for children admitted with ARI as part of a Spanish prospective multicenter study (GENDRES network) between 2011–2013. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was used to detect respiratory viruses in respiratory secretions. Findings were compared to an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results 204 children were recruited in the main cohort and 97 in the replication cohort. The number of detected viruses did not correlate with any markers of severity. However, bacterial superinfection was associated with increased severity (OR: 4.356; P-value = 0.005), PICU admission (OR: 3.342; P-value = 0.006), higher clinical score (1.988; P-value = 0.002) respiratory support requirement (OR: 7.484; P-value < 0.001) and longer hospital length of stay (OR: 1.468; P-value < 0.001). In addition, pneumococcal vaccination was found to be a protective factor in terms of degree of respiratory distress (OR: 2.917; P-value = 0.035), PICU admission (OR: 0.301; P-value = 0.011), lower clinical score (-1.499; P-value = 0.021) respiratory support requirement (OR: 0.324; P-value = 0.016) and oxygen necessity (OR: 0.328; P-value = 0.001). All these findings were replicated in the UK cohort. Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in hospitalized children with ARI is very frequent but it does not seem to have a major clinical impact in terms of severity. However bacterial superinfection increases the severity of the disease course. On the contrary, pneumococcal vaccination plays a protective role. PMID:27096199

  2. Invasive bacterial co-infection in African children with Plasmodium falciparum malaria: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    of severe malaria. Conclusions The accumulated evidence suggests that children with recent or acute malaria are at risk of bacterial infection, which results in an increased risk of mortality. Characterising the exact nature of this association is challenging due to the paucity of appropriate severity-matched controls and the heterogeneous data. Further research to define those at greatest risk is necessary to target antimicrobial treatment. PMID:24548672

  3. Bioluminescent imaging of bacterial biofilm infections in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L; Francis, Kevin P

    2008-01-01

    Whole body biophotonic imaging (BPI) is a technique that has contributed significantly to the way researchers study bacterial pathogens and develop pre-clinical treatments to combat their ensuing infections in vivo. Not only does this approach allow disease profiles and drug efficacy studies to be conducted non-destructively in live animals over the entire course of the disease, but in many cases, it enables investigators to observe disease profiles that could otherwise easily be missed using conventional methodologies. The principles of this technique are that bacterial pathogens engineered to express bioluminescence (visible light) can be readily monitored from outside of the living animal using specialized low-light imaging equipment, enabling their movement, expansion and treatment to be seen completely non-invasively. Moreover, because the same group of animals can be imaged at each time-point throughout the study, the overall number of animals used is dramatically reduced, saving lives, time, and money. Also, as each animal acts as its own control over time, the issues associated with animal-to-animal variation are circumvented, thus improving the quality of the biostatistical data generated. The ability to monitor infections in vivo in a longitudinal fashion is especially appealing to assess chronic infections such as those involving implanted devices. Typically, bacteria grow as biofilms on these foreign bodies and are reputably difficult to monitor with conventional methods. Because of the non-destructive and non-invasive nature of BPI, the procedure can be performed repeatedly in the same animal, allowing the biofilm to be studied in situ without detachment or disturbance. This ability not only allows unique patterns of disease relapse to be seen following termination of antibiotic therapy but also in vivo resistance development during prolonged treatment, both of which are common occurrences with device-related infections. This chapter describes the

  4. Hypoxia determines survival outcomes of bacterial infection through HIF-1alpha dependent re-programming of leukocyte metabolism *

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, A.A.R.; Dickinson, R.S.; Murphy, F.; Thomson, J. P.; Marriott, H.M.; Tavares, A.; Willson, J.; Williams, L.; Lewis, A.; Mirchandani, A.; Dos Santos Coelho, P.; Doherty, C.; Ryan, E.; Watts, E.; Morton, N. M.; Forbes, S.; Stimson, R. H.; Hameed, A. G.; Arnold, N.; Preston, J.A.; Lawrie, A.; Finisguerra, V.; Mazzone, M.; Sadiku, P.; Goveia, J.; Taverna, F.; Carmeliet, P.; Foster, S.J.; Chilvers, E.R.; Cowburn, A.S.; Dockrell, D.H.; Johnson, R.S.; Meehan, R. R.; Whyte, M.K.B.; Walmsley, S.R.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia and bacterial infection frequently co-exist, in both acute and chronic clinical settings, and typically result in adverse clinical outcomes. To ameliorate this morbidity, we investigated the interaction between hypoxia and the host response. In the context of acute hypoxia, both S. aureus and S. pneumoniae infections rapidly induced progressive neutrophil mediated morbidity and mortality, with associated hypothermia and cardiovascular compromise. Preconditioning animals through longer exposures to hypoxia, prior to infection, prevented these pathophysiological responses and profoundly dampened the transcriptome of circulating leukocytes. Specifically, perturbation of HIF pathway and glycolysis genes by hypoxic preconditioning was associated with reduced leukocyte glucose utilisation, resulting in systemic rescue from a global negative energy state and myocardial protection. Thus we demonstrate that hypoxia preconditions the innate immune response and determines survival outcomes following bacterial infection through suppression of HIF-1α and neutrophil metabolism. The therapeutic implications of this work are that in the context of systemic or tissue hypoxia therapies that target the host response could improve infection associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:28386604

  5. Fitness cost of antibiotic susceptibility during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Roux, Damien; Danilchanka, Olga; Guillard, Thomas; Cattoir, Vincent; Aschard, Hugues; Fu, Yang; Angoulvant, Francois; Messika, Jonathan; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Mekalanos, John J; Lory, Stephen; Pier, Gerald B; Skurnik, David

    2015-07-22

    Advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing allow for a comprehensive analysis of bacterial genes that contribute to virulence in a specific infectious setting. Such information can yield new insights that affect decisions on how to best manage major public health issues such as the threat posed by increasing antimicrobial drug resistance. Much of the focus has been on the consequences of the selective advantage conferred on drug-resistant strains during antibiotic therapy. It is thought that the genetic and phenotypic changes that confer resistance also result in concomitant reductions in in vivo fitness, virulence, and transmission. However, experimental validation of this accepted paradigm is modest. Using a saturated transposon library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we identified genes across many functional categories and operons that contributed to maximal in vivo fitness during lung infections in animal models. Genes that bestowed both intrinsic and acquired antibiotic resistance provided a positive in vivo fitness advantage to P. aeruginosa during infection. We confirmed these findings in the pathogenic bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii and Vibrio cholerae using murine and rabbit infection models, respectively. Our results show that efforts to confront the worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance might be exacerbated by fitness advantages that enhance virulence in drug-resistant microbes.

  6. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Antimicrobial Treatment of Acute Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Tunkel, Allan R.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has changed as a result of the widespread use of conjugate vaccines and preventive antimicrobial treatment of pregnant women. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with bacterial meningitis, accurate information is necessary regarding the important etiological agents and populations at risk to ascertain public health measures and ensure appropriate management. In this review, we describe the changing epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in the United States and throughout the world by reviewing the global changes in etiological agents followed by specific microorganism data on the impact of the development and widespread use of conjugate vaccines. We provide recommendations for empirical antimicrobial and adjunctive treatments for clinical subgroups and review available laboratory methods in making the etiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Finally, we summarize risk factors, clinical features, and microbiological diagnostics for the specific bacteria causing this disease. PMID:20610819

  7. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein-based decision tree model for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections.

    PubMed

    Kraszewska-Głomba, Barbara; Szymańska-Toczek, Zofia; Szenborn, Leszek

    2016-03-10

    As no specific laboratory test has been identified, PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis) remains a diagnosis of exclusion. We searched for a practical use of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in distinguishing PFAPA attacks from acute bacterial and viral infections. Levels of PCT and CRP were measured in 38 patients with PFAPA and 81 children diagnosed with an acute bacterial (n=42) or viral (n=39) infection. Statistical analysis with the use of the C4.5 algorithm resulted in the following decision tree: viral infection if CRP≤19.1 mg/L; otherwise for cases with CRP>19.1 mg/L: bacterial infection if PCT>0.65ng/mL, PFAPA if PCT≤0.65 ng/mL. The model was tested using a 10-fold cross validation and in an independent test cohort (n=30), the rule's overall accuracy was 76.4% and 90% respectively. Although limited by a small sample size, the obtained decision tree might present a potential diagnostic tool for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections when interpreted cautiously and with reference to the clinical context.

  8. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein-based decision tree model for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections

    PubMed Central

    Kraszewska-Głomba, Barbara; Szymańska-Toczek, Zofia; Szenborn, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    As no specific laboratory test has been identified, PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis) remains a diagnosis of exclusion. We searched for a practical use of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in distinguishing PFAPA attacks from acute bacterial and viral infections. Levels of PCT and CRP were measured in 38 patients with PFAPA and 81 children diagnosed with an acute bacterial (n=42) or viral (n=39) infection. Statistical analysis with the use of the C4.5 algorithm resulted in the following decision tree: viral infection if CRP≤19.1 mg/L; otherwise for cases with CRP>19.1 mg/L: bacterial infection if PCT>0.65ng/mL, PFAPA if PCT≤0.65 ng/mL. The model was tested using a 10-fold cross validation and in an independent test cohort (n=30), the rule’s overall accuracy was 76.4% and 90% respectively. Although limited by a small sample size, the obtained decision tree might present a potential diagnostic tool for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections when interpreted cautiously and with reference to the clinical context. PMID:27131024

  9. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment Proposal for Acute Endodontic Infection.

    PubMed

    Keine, Kátia Cristina; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Kamila Figueiredo; Diniz, Ana Carolina Soares; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Galoza, Marina Oliveira Gonçalves; Magro, Miriam Graziele; de Barros, Yolanda Benedita Abadia Martins; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the main lesions that simulate clinically and propose a treatment protocol for acute endodontic infection. Signs and clinical symptoms of periodontal abscess, gingival abscess, odontoma, herpes simplex, pericoronitis, acute pulpitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis/periodontitis (NUG/NUP) were described and compared with acute endodontic infections. A treatment protocol was described by optimizing the procedures in access cavity, microbial decontamination and detoxification of the root canal, apical debridement, intracanal and systemic medication and surgical drainage procedures. The convenience of the use of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, root canal instrumentation using a crown-down technique, intracanal medication with 2% chlorhexidine or triple antibiotic paste and the convenience of the use of antibiotics, analgesics, and surgical drainage to solve cases of acute dentoalveolar abscess was discussed.

  10. Imaging in acute renal infection in children

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Wells, R.G.; Starshak, R.J.; Schroeder, B.A.

    1987-03-01

    Infection is the most common disease of the urinary tract in children, and various imaging techniques have been used to verify its presence and location. On retrospective analysis, 50 consecutive children with documented upper urinary tract infection had abnormal findings on renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate. The infection involved the renal poles only in 38 and the poles plus other renal cortical areas in eight. Four had abnormalities that spared the poles. Renal sonograms were abnormal in 32 of 50 children. Excretory urograms were abnormal in six of 23 children in whom they were obtained. Vesicoureteral reflux was found in 34 of 40 children in whom voiding cystourethrography was performed. These data show the high sensitivity of renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate in documenting upper urinary tract infection. The location of the abnormalities detected suggests that renal infections spread via an ascending mode and implies that intrarenal reflux is a major contributing factor.

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of oyster Crassostrea gigas larvae illustrates the response patterns regulated by catecholaminergic system upon acute heat and bacterial stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Liu, Yu; Dong, Miren; Wang, Weilin; Song, Xiaorui; Wang, Mengqiang; Gao, Qiang; Song, Linsheng

    2017-03-07

    Bacterial infection and heat stress, as two major environmental threats of marine molluscs, could affect larval development and dramatically promote mortality of oysters. In the present study, next-generation sequencing, together with determinations of mRNA expression and measurements of enzyme activities, were employed to understand the response patterns of oyster larvae under acute heat and bacterial stress. After RNA-seq, a total of 9472 differentially expressed genes including 4895 significantly up-regulated ones and 4577 significantly down-regulated ones were obtained from 12 transcriptome libraries. GO overrepresentation analysis of the up-regulated genes revealed that the neuroendocrine immunomodulation pathway was activated after acute heat and bacterial stimulation, in which the catecholaminergic regulation played an important role. GO overrepresentation analysis of the down-regulated genes suggested that the immune capacity of Crassostrea gigas larvae was suppressed under stress, which was further validated since superoxide dismutase (SOD) and phenoloxidase (PO) activities in the total protein extract of larvae decreased dramatically after stress. Moreover, the shell formation of trochophore was inhibited and severe mortality was caused after acute heat and bacterial stress. These results collectively indicated that acute heat and bacterial stress could significantly inhibit larval development and suppress immune response of oyster C. gigas larvae. And the neuroendocrine immunomodulation, especially the catecholaminergic regulation, played an indispensable role in the stress response of molluscan larvae.

  12. Norfloxacin in the treatment of bacterial enteric infections.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Palacios, G M

    1986-01-01

    Diarrhoeal diseases are a major cause of illness and death among infants and young children, especially in developing countries. They are also the principal cause of illness in tourists who travel to these countries. Overall, the main causes of diarrhoea are bacterial. Campylobacter, enteropathogenic E. coli, shigella and enterotoxigenic E. coli are, in this order, the most common bacterial enteropathogens isolated in developing countries, and campylobacter and shigella in developed countries. Even though the cornerstone of the treatment of diarrhoea is oral rehydration, especially in children, the better knowledge of the pathogens involved and the mechanisms by which these organisms produce diarrhoea has brought the reconsideration of antibiotic use, which just a few years ago was considered unnecessary except for shigella. The increasing number of shigella and Salmonella typhi resistant to ampicillin and co-trimoxazole and the recognition of campylobacter, an enteropathogen normally resistant to these drugs as a major cause of diarrhoea, makes it necessary to investigate new agents against these three enteropathogens. Antimicrobial susceptibility studies done in Mexico and other parts of the world have shown that norfloxacin, a new quinolone, is very active against multi-resistant S. typhi and shigella and against campylobacter, with MIC values of approximately 0.8 mg/l. Furthermore, it achieves high concentrations in faeces after oral administration. Clinical studies of norfloxacin used in inflammatory diarrhoea and in prophylaxis of traveller's diarrhoea have demonstrated it to be an effective and well-tolerated drug. Norfloxacin has great potential for the treatment of bacterial enteric infections reflected by its broad in vitro activity as well as its effectiveness in initial clinical trials.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. [Treatment results using cefixime for bacterial respiratory tract infections].

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, L

    1990-01-01

    In a prospective open clinical trial 20 patients with the diagnosis bacterial respiratory tract infection and underlying chronic obstructive lung disease were treated for 13 to 17 days with 200 mg cefixime b. i. d. 14 of 16 evaluable patients were treated successfully. In one patient the clinical symptoms remained unchanged and in another patient cefixime treatment failed. Ten of the 16 evaluable patients showed a positive baseline culture. In nine of these patients the initially isolated pathogens could be eliminated. In one patient, in whom cefixime therapy failed, change of pathogens was noticed after the end of treatment. Four of the 20 patients treated with cefixime reported side effects (gastritis, three; fungal dermatitis, one). In the patient with fungal dermatitis cefixime therapy was stopped.

  14. Towards rational treatment of bacterial infections during extended space travel

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter W.; Sommer, Andrei P.

    2007-01-01

    In the next 15–30 years, manned space flight to Mars, our planetary neighbour, will become a reality and astronauts are likely to spend at least 2–3 years away from Earth. Time spent in such extreme environments will result in a diminution of immune status and profound changes in the human bacterial microflora. In microgravity, the efficacy of antibiotics is reduced and microbial mutation rates increase dramatically. These factors will impinge on the capacity to treat effectively the infections that will doubtless arise during such long and stressful endeavour. We highlight new rationales for the treatment of infectious disease that may be applicable to therapy in extreme environments such as deep space. PMID:16118047

  15. Towards rational treatment of bacterial infections during extended space travel.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Peter W; Sommer, Andrei P

    2005-09-01

    In the next 15-30 years, manned space flight to Mars, our planetary neighbour, will become a reality and astronauts are likely to spend at least 2-3 years away from Earth. Time spent in such extreme environments will result in a diminution of immune status and profound changes in the human bacterial microflora. In microgravity, the efficacy of antibiotics is reduced and microbial mutation rates increase dramatically. These factors will impinge on the capacity to treat effectively the infections that will doubtless arise during such long and stressful endeavour. We highlight new rationales for the treatment of infectious disease that may be applicable to therapy in extreme environments such as deep space.

  16. Infection-related hemolysis and susceptibility to Gram-negative bacterial co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Orf, Katharine; Cunnington, Aubrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Increased susceptibility to co-infection with enteric Gram-negative bacteria, particularly non-typhoidal Salmonella, is reported in malaria and Oroya fever (Bartonella bacilliformis infection), and can lead to increased mortality. Accumulating epidemiological evidence indicates a causal association with risk of bacterial co-infection, rather than just co-incidence of common risk factors. Both malaria and Oroya fever are characterized by hemolysis, and observations in humans and animal models suggest that hemolysis causes the susceptibility to bacterial co-infection. Evidence from animal models implicates hemolysis in the impairment of a variety of host defense mechanisms, including macrophage dysfunction, neutrophil dysfunction, and impairment of adaptive immune responses. One mechanism supported by evidence from animal models and human data, is the induction of heme oxygenase-1 in bone marrow, which impairs the ability of developing neutrophils to mount a competent oxidative burst. As a result, dysfunctional neutrophils become a new niche for replication of intracellular bacteria. Here we critically appraise and summarize the key evidence for mechanisms which may contribute to these very specific combinations of co-infections, and propose interventions to ameliorate this risk. PMID:26175727

  17. [Antibiotic therapy of bacterial infections of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Scaglione, F; Castorina, A

    1989-09-30

    More than 300 commencial bacterial species may be found in the oral cavity. Other microorganisms, such as mycoplasms, mycetes, protozoa and viruses are present as well. The virulency of the saprofites and additional contamination by outside microorganisms are factors determining the development of infectious process in the oral tissues. Moreover, streptococci and anaerobes are the most frequent aetiology agents. The antibiotic therapy should comply with the general treatment criteria, on the one hand, and should be specific for these microorganism, on the other. The penicillines (ampicillin, bacampicillin and especially amoxycillin) process pharmacokinetic properties which make them a favorable choice for treatment. These drugs are effective in case of streptococcal infections, with cariogenic processes involvement and dissemination (endocarditis, glomerulonephritis). Other, frequently used drugs are spiramycin, erythromycin, josamycin and myocamycin that are selectively taken up by the oral tissues and present in large quantities in the saliva. The macrolides have a large spectrum of action on microorganisms normally found in the oral cavity. Lincosamides (lincomycin and clindamycin) are active on anaerobes and are drugs of choice for treatment of staphylococcal osteomyelitis. Tetracycline therapy is restricted usually to parodontite cases caused by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Capnocytophaga. In conclusion, the choice of antibacterial therapy should be based on the bacterial aetiology, as well as on the intrinsic drug characteristics (pharmacokinetic, side effects, toxicity etc.).

  18. Metabolic host responses to infection by intracellular bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Heesemann, Jürgen; Rudel, Thomas; Goebel, Werner

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bacterial pathogens with mammalian hosts leads to a variety of physiological responses of the interacting partners aimed at an adaptation to the new situation. These responses include multiple metabolic changes in the affected host cells which are most obvious when the pathogen replicates within host cells as in case of intracellular bacterial pathogens. While the pathogen tries to deprive nutrients from the host cell, the host cell in return takes various metabolic countermeasures against the nutrient theft. During this conflicting interaction, the pathogen triggers metabolic host cell responses by means of common cell envelope components and specific virulence-associated factors. These host reactions generally promote replication of the pathogen. There is growing evidence that pathogen-specific factors may interfere in different ways with the complex regulatory network that controls the carbon and nitrogen metabolism of mammalian cells. The host cell defense answers include general metabolic reactions, like the generation of oxygen- and/or nitrogen-reactive species, and more specific measures aimed to prevent access to essential nutrients for the respective pathogen. Accurate results on metabolic host cell responses are often hampered by the use of cancer cell lines that already exhibit various de-regulated reactions in the primary carbon metabolism. Hence, there is an urgent need for cellular models that more closely reflect the in vivo infection conditions. The exact knowledge of the metabolic host cell responses may provide new interesting concepts for antibacterial therapies. PMID:23847769

  19. Gut microbiota promote hematopoiesis to control bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Arya; Yáñez, Alberto; Price, Jeremy G; Chow, Andrew; Merad, Miriam; Goodridge, Helen S; Mazmanian, Sarkis K

    2014-03-12

    The commensal microbiota impacts specific immune cell populations and their functions at peripheral sites, such as gut mucosal tissues. However, it remains unknown whether gut microbiota control immunity through regulation of hematopoiesis at primary immune sites. We reveal that germ-free mice display reduced proportions and differentiation potential of specific myeloid cell progenitors of both yolk sac and bone marrow origin. Homeostatic innate immune defects may lead to impaired early responses to pathogens. Indeed, following systemic infection with Listeria monocytogenes, germ-free and oral-antibiotic-treated mice display increased pathogen burden and acute death. Recolonization of germ-free mice with a complex microbiota restores defects in myelopoiesis and resistance to Listeria. These findings reveal that gut bacteria direct innate immune cell development via promoting hematopoiesis, contributing to our appreciation of the deep evolutionary connection between mammals and their microbiota.

  20. Clinical Indicators for Bacterial Co-Infection in Ghanaian Children with P. falciparum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Maja Verena; Amemasor, Solomon; Agyekum, Alex; Loag, Wibke; Marks, Florian; Sarpong, Nimako; Dekker, Denise; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; May, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of infectious causes in severely ill children is essential but challenging in sub- Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to determine clinical indicators that are able to identify bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children in rural Ghana. In total, 1,915 severely ill children below the age of 15 years were recruited at Agogo Presbyterian Hospital in Ghana between May 2007 and February 2011. In 771 (40%) of the children malaria parasites were detected. This group was analyzed for indicators of bacterial co-infections using bivariate and multivariate regression analyses with 24 socio-economic variables, 16 terms describing medical history and anthropometrical information and 68 variables describing clinical symptoms. The variables were tested for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. In 46 (6.0%) of the children with malaria infection, bacterial co-infection was detected. The most frequent pathogens were non-typhoid salmonellae (45.7%), followed by Streptococcus spp. (13.0%). Coughing, dehydration, splenomegaly, severe anemia and leukocytosis were positively associated with bacteremia. Domestic hygiene and exclusive breastfeeding is negatively associated with bacteremia. In cases of high parasitemia (>10,000/μl), a significant association with bacteremia was found for splenomegaly (OR 8.8; CI 1.6–48.9), dehydration (OR 18.2; CI 2.0–166.0) and coughing (OR 9.0; CI 0.7–118.6). In children with low parasitemia, associations with bacteremia were found for vomiting (OR 4.7; CI 1.4–15.8), severe anemia (OR 3.3; CI 1.0–11.1) and leukocytosis (OR 6.8 CI 1.9–24.2). Clinical signs of impaired microcirculation were negatively associated with bacteremia. Ceftriaxone achieved best coverage of isolated pathogens. The results demonstrate the limitation of clinical symptoms to determine bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children. Best clinical indicators are dependent on the

  1. Antibiotic resistance in prevalent bacterial and protozoan sexually transmitted infections

    PubMed Central

    Krupp, Karl; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is causing a treatment crisis across the globe. While cephalosporin-resistant gonorrhea is one of the most pressing issues, extensively antibiotic resistant Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma hominis are also becoming commonplace. Experts have suggested that the failure of current treatment regimens are “largely inevitable” and have called for entirely new classes of antimicrobial agents. With the exception of several new classes of drugs primarily targeting nosocomial infections, progress has been slow. While pharmaceutical companies continue to introduce new drugs, they are based on decade-old discoveries. While there is disagreement about what constitutes new classes of antibiotics, many experts suggest that the last truly new family of antimicrobials was discovered in 1987. This review summarizes the existing literature on antibiotic resistance in common bacterial and protozoal STIs. It also briefly discusses several of the most promising alternatives to current therapies, and further examines how advances in drug delivery, formulation, concentration, and timing are improving the efficacy of existing treatments. Finally, the paper discusses the current state of pharmaceutical development for multidrug-resistant STI. PMID:26392647

  2. Borrelia crocidurae infection in acutely febrile patients, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Mediannikov, Oleg; Socolovschi, Cristina; Bassene, Hubert; Diatta, Georges; Ratmanov, Pavel; Fenollar, Florence; Sokhna, Cheikh; Raoult, Didier

    2014-08-01

    As malaria cases in Africa decline, other causes of acute febrile illness are being explored. To determine incidence of Borrelia crocidurae infection during June 2010-October 2011, we collected 1,566 blood specimens from febrile patients in Senegal. Incidence was high (7.3%). New treatment strategies, possibly doxycycline, might be indicated for febrile patients.

  3. Acute pneumonia in Zimbabwe: bacterial isolates by lung aspiration.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeogu, M O

    1988-01-01

    Forty children, aged 2 months to 11 years, with severe acute pneumonia were investigated by needle aspiration of the lung. Fourteen organisms were isolated in only 13 patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated in six patients, Staphylococcus aureus in three, and Haemophilus influenzae in two. Two patients had mixed organisms. PMID:3196056

  4. Comparison of characteristics of bacterial bloodstream infection between adult patients with allogeneic and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Junshik; Moon, Song Mi; Ahn, Hee Kyung; Sym, Sun Jin; Park, Yoon Soo; Park, Jinny; Cho, Yong Kyun; Cho, Eun Kyung; Shin, Dong Bok; Lee, Jae Hoon

    2013-06-01

    Although autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are fundamentally different procedures, a tailored approach to bacterial bloodstream infection (BSI) according to the type of HSCT has not yet been suggested. We evaluated the characteristics of BSI after HSCT, with a focus on comparison of BSIs between recipients of autologous HSCT (auto-HSCT) and allogeneic HSCT (allo-HSCT). Among 134 patients (59 received allo-HSCT and 75 received auto-HSCT) who underwent HSCT, BSIs were reported earlier in patients who underwent auto-HSCT, compared with those who underwent allo-HSCT (mean 12.1 ± 3.4 days versus 32.8 ± 27.1 days, P = .006). Among patients receiving allo-HSCT, postneutrophil-engraftment bacterial BSI showed an association with grade ≥ 2 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In patients who underwent auto-HSCT, results of multivariate analysis showed that not receiving prophylactic antibiotics (P = .004) and having elevated serum C-reactive protein (P = .034) were risk factors of BSI. Elevated CRP (P = .01) and acute GVHD ≥ grade 2 (P = .002) were independent risk factors in patients who underwent allo-HSCT. Those differences originated mainly from the impact of acute GVHD-related postengraftment BSIs of patients who underwent allo-HSCT. To establish the best defense strategy against BSI, the distinctive natures of bacterial BSI after HSCT between auto-HSCT and allo-HSCT should be considered.

  5. Massive Hemolysis Causing Renal Failure in Acute Hepatitis E Infection

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Pragya; Malik, Sarthak; Mallick, Bipadabhanjan; Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute viral hepatitis is usually a self-limiting illness. However, it can lead to complications that can be life-threatening, such as acute liver failure. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the setting of acute viral hepatitis can lead to a massive hemolysis, manifesting as acute kidney injury and markedly raised bilirubin levels; although cases are rare. Here, we report such a case. The patient had a viral hepatitis E infection and presented with kidney injury requiring dialysis. Examination showed very high mixed hyperbilirubinemia due to massive intravascular hemolysis. The patient experienced a long, protracted course of illness, requiring renal replacement therapy with other supportive management, which led to improvement over a period of four weeks. This case highlights the importance of recognizing associated hemolysis in a patient with viral hepatitis who presents with very high bilirubin levels or associated kidney injury. Such patients will require aggressive supportive care with prompt fluid and electrolyte management. PMID:28097104

  6. Risk score to stratify children with suspected serious bacterial infection: observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Brent, Andrew J; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Thompson, Matthew; Collier, Jacqueline; Ray, Samiran; Ninis, Nelly; Levin, Michael; MacFaul, Roddy

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To derive and validate a clinical score to risk stratify children presenting with acute infection. Study design and participants Observational cohort study of children presenting with suspected infection to an emergency department in England. Detailed data were collected prospectively on presenting clinical features, laboratory investigations and outcome. Clinical predictors of serious bacterial infection (SBI) were explored in multivariate logistic regression models using part of the dataset, each model was then validated in an independent part of the dataset, and the best model was chosen for derivation of a clinical risk score for SBI. The ability of this score to risk stratify children with SBI was then assessed in the entire dataset. Main outcome measure Final diagnosis of SBI according to criteria defined by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health working group on Recognising Acute Illness in Children. Results Data from 1951 children were analysed. 74 (3.8%) had SBI. The sensitivity of individual clinical signs was poor, although some were highly specific for SBI. A score was derived with reasonable ability to discriminate SBI (area under the receiver operator characteristics curve 0.77, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.83) and risk stratify children with suspected SBI. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential utility of a clinical score in risk stratifying children with suspected SBI. Further work should aim to validate the score and its impact on clinical decision making in different settings, and ideally incorporate it into a broader management algorithm including additional investigations to further stratify a child's risk. PMID:21266341

  7. Nasopharyngeal Protein Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Burke, Thomas W; Henao, Ricardo; Soderblom, Erik; Tsalik, Ephraim L; Thompson, J Will; McClain, Micah T; Nichols, Marshall; Nicholson, Bradly P; Veldman, Timothy; Lucas, Joseph E; Moseley, M Arthur; Turner, Ronald B; Lambkin-Williams, Robert; Hero, Alfred O; Woods, Christopher W; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2017-02-21

    Infection of respiratory mucosa with viral pathogens triggers complex immunologic events in the affected host. We sought to characterize this response through proteomic analysis of nasopharyngeal lavage in human subjects experimentally challenged with influenza A/H3N2 or human rhinovirus, and to develop targeted assays measuring peptides involved in this host response allowing classification of acute respiratory virus infection. Unbiased proteomic discovery analysis identified 3285 peptides corresponding to 438 unique proteins, and revealed that infection with H3N2 induces significant alterations in protein expression. These include proteins involved in acute inflammatory response, innate immune response, and the complement cascade. These data provide insights into the nature of the biological response to viral infection of the upper respiratory tract, and the proteins that are dysregulated by viral infection form the basis of signature that accurately classifies the infected state. Verification of this signature using targeted mass spectrometry in independent cohorts of subjects challenged with influenza or rhinovirus demonstrates that it performs with high accuracy (0.8623 AUROC, 75% TPR, 97.46% TNR). With further development as a clinical diagnostic, this signature may have utility in rapid screening for emerging infections, avoidance of inappropriate antibacterial therapy, and more rapid implementation of appropriate therapeutic and public health strategies.

  8. Clinical characteristics and prognostic impact of bacterial infection in hospitalized patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Kyoung; Lee, Chang Hun; Kim, In Hee; Kim, Seon Min; Jang, Ji Won; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, Sang Wook; Lee, Seung Ok; Lee, Soo Teik; Kim, Dae-Ghon

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial infection is an important cause of death in patients with liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics and prognostic impact of bacterial infection in hospitalized patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We retrospectively analyzed data from 409 patients consecutively admitted to a tertiary referral center with ALD diagnosis. Of a total of 544 admissions, 133 (24.4%) cases presented with bacterial infection, of which 116 were community-acquired whereas 17 were hospital-acquired. The common types of infection were pneumonia (38%), biliary tract infection (17%), soft tissue infection (12%), and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (9%). Diabetes, serum Na <135 mM/L, albumin <2.5 g/dL, C-reactive protein ≥20 mg/L, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) positivity were independently associated with bacterial infection in patients with ALD. Overall 30-day and 90-day mortalities in patients with bacterial infection were significantly (P < 0.001) higher than those without infection (22.3% vs. 5.1% and 32.3% vs. 8.2%, respectively). Furthermore, bacterial infection (HR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.049-4.579, P = 0.037), SIRS positivity (HR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.240-4.861, P = 0.010), Maddrey's discriminant function score ≥32 (HR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.036-5.222, P = 0.041), and hemoglobin <12 g/dL (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.081-5.450, P = 0.032) were independent predictors of short-term mortality. In conclusion, bacterial infection and SIRS positivity predicted short-term prognosis in hospitalized patients with ALD. A thorough evaluation at admission or on clinical deterioration is required to detect possible infection with prompt management.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in acute canine distemper virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bathen-Noethen, A; Stein, V M; Puff, C; Baumgaertner, W; Tipold, A

    2008-09-01

    Demyelination is the prominent histopathological hallmark in the acute stage of canine distemper virus infection. Magnetic resonance imaging is an important diagnostic tool in human beings to determine demyelination in the brain, for example in multiple sclerosis. Five young dogs with clinically suspected canine distemper virus infection were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Hyperintense lesions and loss of contrast between grey and white matter were detected in T2-weighted images in the cerebellum and/or in the brainstem of three dogs, which correlated with demyelination demonstrated in histopathological examination. Furthermore, increased signal intensities in T2-weighted images were seen in the temporal lobe of four dogs with no evidence of demyelination. Magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a sensitive tool for the visualisation of in vivo myelination defects in dogs with acute canine distemper virus infection. Postictal oedema and accumulation of antigen positive cells have to be considered an important differential diagnosis.

  10. Frequent bacterial skin and soft tissue infections: diagnostic signs and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sunderkötter, Cord; Becker, Karsten

    2015-06-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections rank among the most frequent infections worldwide. Classic erysipelas is defined as a non-purulent infection by beta-hemolytic streptococci. The typical signs are tender, warm, bright erythema with tongue-like extensions and early systemic symptoms such as fever or at least chills. Erysipelas always and best responds to penicillin. Limited soft tissue infection or limited cellulitis are the terms we have introduced for infections frequently caused by S. aureus and often originating from chronic wounds or acute trauma. Clinically, they are marked by tender, erythematous swelling which, unlike erysipelas, exhibit a darker red hue and is not always accompanied by fever or chills at onset. Severe cellulitis is a purulent, partially necrotic infection extending to the fascia, with general symptoms of infection, requiring surgical management in addition to antibiotics. It often fulfils criteria of so-called complicated soft tissue infections according to the definition of the FDA, due to their frequent association with e.g. severe diabetes mellitus, peripheral arterial occlusive disease or severe immunosuppression. In contrast, the rare necrotizing skin and soft tissue infections represent a distinct entity, characterized by rapid progression to ischemic necroses and shock due to special bacterial toxins. Limited cellulitis should be treated with cephalosporins group 1 or 2, or, when S.aureus is the isolated or highly likely causative agent, isoxazolyl-penicillins (exploiting their minimal selection pressure on other bacteria). For severe cellulitis, initial antibiotic treatment (mostly iv) includes - depending on the location - agents also active against gram-negative and/or anaerobic bacteria. (e.g. clindamycine, aminopeniclilline with inhibitors of betalaktamase, fluochinolons, cephalosporines group 4). For cutaneous abscesses, drainage presents the therapy of choice. Only under certain conditions additional antibiotic therapy is

  11. Viral and Bacterial Etiology of Acute Diarrhea among Children under 5 Years of Age in Wuhan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xu-Hui; Tian, Lei; Cheng, Zhong-Ju; Liu, Wei-Yong; Li, Song; Yu, Wei-Ting; Zhang, Wen-Qian; Xiang, Xu; Sun, Zi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute diarrhea remains the serious problem in developing countries, especially among children under 5 years of age. Currently, only two or three common diarrhea pathogens were screened at most hospitals in China. The aim of this study was to provide a wide variety of diarrhea pathogens and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in children under 5 years of age. Methods: Totally 381 stool samples collected from Tongji Hospital between July 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015 were tested by culture and/or polymerase chain reaction for eight kinds of bacteria and five kinds of viruses. An antimicrobial sensitivity test was performed using dilution method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Results: Viral infections were mainly identified in infants (0–11 months), whereas bacterial infections were more prevalent in the age of 24–59 months. About 69.8% of samples were positive for at least one pathogen, 51.7% of samples were virus positive, followed by bacteria positive cases (19.4%), and 12.6% of cases displayed co-infections with two viruses or a virus and a bacterium. Rotavirus was the most prevalent pathogen, followed closely by norovirus, while Salmonella was the most commonly isolated bacteria, followed by diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) and Campylobacter. More than 40% of Salmonella spp. and DEC isolates were resistant to first-line antibiotics (ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline). Around 10% of Salmonella spp. isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin simultaneously. Campylobacter spp. displayed high resistance to ciprofloxacin but kept low resistance to azithromycin and doxycycline. Conclusions: The etiology of acute diarrhea varies in children of different age groups. The high frequency of infection with viruses suggests the urgent demand for new viral vaccine development. Proper use of antibiotics in the treatment of acute diarrhea is crucial due to the high level of antibiotic

  12. Acute bacterial meningitis in Iran: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Seyed Mohammad; Nasiri, Mohammad Javad; Fallah, Fatemeh; Dabiri, Hossein; Pouriran, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Bacterial meningitis persists in being a substantial cause of high mortality and severe neurological morbidity, despite the advances in antimicrobial therapy. Accurate data has not been available regarding the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis particularly in developing countries, yet. Indeed, the present systematic review provides a comprehensive data analysis on the prevalence and epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in Iran. Methods We systematically reviewed articles from 1994 to 2015. The reports which contained the prevalence and etiology of acute bacterial meningitis by valid clinical and laboratory diagnosis were comprised in the present study. Results Our analysis indicated that Streptococcus pneumoniae (30% [I2 = 56% p < 0.01]), Haemophilus influenza type b (15% [I2 = 82.75% p < 0.001]), coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) (14% [I2 = 60.5% p < 0.06]), and Neisseria meningitidis (13% [I2 = 74.16% p < 0.001]) were the most common cause of acute bacterial meningitis among meningitis cases in Iran. Notably, high frequency rates of nosocomial meningitis pathogens were detected in the present analysis. Conclusions It was magnificently attained that the majority of cases for bacterial meningitis in Iran could be avertable by public immunization schemes and by preventive care to inhibit the broadening of hospital acquired pathogens. PMID:28170400

  13. [Emergency antibiotherapy and adjuvant treatments for acute bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Mourvillier, B

    2009-01-01

    The management of bacterial meningitis is based on the combination of several components. The objective of this review is to give an overview of the literature concerning both the arguments for urgent antibiotic treatment associated with a particular focus on the place of corticosteroids. Among other treatments, glycerol seems the best rated but symptomatic measures, which may not be achieved by randomized studies, should not be overlooked. Many animal studies explore other treatment options, but none can be translated into clinical practice. The neuroimaging has been little evaluated despite recent technological advances but remains important in monitoring of patients whose evolution is considered unfavorable.

  14. Prevention, diagnosis, and management of acute postoperative bacterial endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Packer, Mark; Chang, David F; Dewey, Steven H; Little, Brian C; Mamalis, Nick; Oetting, Thomas A; Talley-Rostov, Audrey; Yoo, Sonia H

    2011-09-01

    This distillation of the peer-reviewed scientific literature on infection after cataract surgery summarizes background material on epidemiology, etiology, and pathogenesis, describes the roles of surgical technique and antibiotic prophylaxis in prevention, and discusses diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in cases of suspected endophthalmitis.

  15. Radionuclide imaging of inflammation and infection in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Love, Charito; Palestro, Christopher J

    2013-03-01

    Although infection may be suggested by signs and symptoms such as fever, pain, general malaise, and abnormal laboratory results, imaging tests often are used to confirm its presence. Morphologic imaging tests identify structural alterations of tissues or organs that result from a combination of microbial invasion and the inflammatory response of the host. Functional imaging studies use minute quantities of radioactive material, which are taken up directly by cells, tissues, and organs, or are attached to substances that subsequently migrate to the region of interest. Bone scintigraphy is extremely sensitive and can be positive within 2 days after the onset of symptoms. With an accuracy of more than 90%, 3-phase bone scintigraphy is the radionuclide procedure of choice for diagnosing osteomyelitis in unviolated bone. In patients with acute renal failure, gallium imaging facilitates the differentiation of acute interstitial nephritis from acute tubular necrosis. Gallium imaging also is useful in the evaluation of pulmonary infections and inflammation. Many opportunistic infections affect the lungs, and a normal gallium scan of the chest excludes infection with a high degree of certainty, especially when the chest x-ray is negative. In the human immunodeficiency virus positive patient, lymph node uptake usually is associated with mycobacterial disease or lymphoma. Focal pulmonary parenchymal uptake suggests bacterial pneumonia. Diffuse pulmonary uptake suggests an opportunistic pneumonia. Gallium imaging provides useful information about other acute respiratory conditions, including radiation pneumonitis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. In vitro labeled leukocyte imaging with indium-111 and technetium-99m labeled leukocytes is useful in various acute care situations. The test facilitates the differentiation of normal postoperative changes from infection and is useful for diagnosing prosthetic vascular graft infection. In inflammatory bowel disease, labeled leukocyte

  16. Cytokines and Chemokines as Biomarkers of Community-Acquired Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, David A.; Andersen, Nancy; Beran, Ondřej; Marešová, Vilma

    2013-01-01

    Routinely used biomarkers of bacterial etiology of infection, such as C-reactive protein and procalcitonin, have limited usefulness for evaluation of infections since their expression is enhanced by a number of different conditions. Therefore, several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were analyzed with sera from patients hospitalized for moderate bacterial and viral infectious diseases. In total, 57 subjects were enrolled: 21 patients with community-acquired bacterial infections, 26 patients with viral infections, and 10 healthy subjects (control cohorts). The laboratory analyses were performed using Luminex technology, and the following molecules were examined: IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, INF-γ, MIP-1β, and MCP-1. Bacterial etiology of infection was associated with significantly (P < 0.001) elevated serum concentrations of IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α in comparison to levels observed in the sera of patients with viral infections. In the patients with bacterial infections, IL-1Ra and IL-8 demonstrated positive correlation with C-reactive protein, whereas, IL-1Ra, TNF-α, and MCP-1 correlated with procalcitonin. Furthermore, elevated levels of IL-1Ra, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased within 3 days of antibiotic therapy to levels observed in control subjects. The results show IL-1Ra as a potential useful biomarker of community-acquired bacterial infection. PMID:23690657

  17. Cytokines and chemokines as biomarkers of community-acquired bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Holub, Michal; Lawrence, David A; Andersen, Nancy; Davidová, Alžběta; Beran, Ondřej; Marešová, Vilma; Chalupa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Routinely used biomarkers of bacterial etiology of infection, such as C-reactive protein and procalcitonin, have limited usefulness for evaluation of infections since their expression is enhanced by a number of different conditions. Therefore, several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were analyzed with sera from patients hospitalized for moderate bacterial and viral infectious diseases. In total, 57 subjects were enrolled: 21 patients with community-acquired bacterial infections, 26 patients with viral infections, and 10 healthy subjects (control cohorts). The laboratory analyses were performed using Luminex technology, and the following molecules were examined: IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, TNF- α , INF- γ , MIP-1 β , and MCP-1. Bacterial etiology of infection was associated with significantly (P < 0.001) elevated serum concentrations of IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-6, and TNF- α in comparison to levels observed in the sera of patients with viral infections. In the patients with bacterial infections, IL-1Ra and IL-8 demonstrated positive correlation with C-reactive protein, whereas, IL-1Ra, TNF- α , and MCP-1 correlated with procalcitonin. Furthermore, elevated levels of IL-1Ra, IL-6, and TNF- α decreased within 3 days of antibiotic therapy to levels observed in control subjects. The results show IL-1Ra as a potential useful biomarker of community-acquired bacterial infection.

  18. [Procalcitonin: a reliable marker for the diagnosis and monitoring of the course of bacterial infection].

    PubMed

    Holub, Michal; Rozsypal, Hanus; Chalupa, Pavel

    2008-12-01

    The review is aimed at the importance of determining procalcitonin serum levels (S-PCT) in numerous infectious and non-infectious diseases. Detecting increased S-PCT is particularly important for differential diagnosis of systemic bacterial as well as fungal infections. High S-PCT concentrations are also of predictive value in severe sepsis and septic shock. S-PCT kinetics may be used for monitoring the effect of antibiotic therapy. When compared to the other routinely used markers of bacterial infection (i.e. C-reactive protein, white blood cell count and neutrophil percentage), S-PCT has higher sensitivity and specificity in predicting bacterial infection.

  19. Predictors of serious bacterial infections in pediatric burn patients with fever.

    PubMed

    Vyles, David; Sinha, Madhumita; Rosenberg, David I; Foster, Kevin N; Tran, Melissa; Drachman, David

    2014-01-01

    To determine predictors of serious bacterial infections in pediatric burn patients with fever (core temp ≥38.5°C), the authors conducted a retrospective review of medical records of pediatric (0-18 years) patients admitted to the Arizona Burn Center between 2008 and 2011 with greater than 5% TBSA and inpatient hospitalization for ≥72 hours. The study group comprised patients with a febrile episode during their inpatient stay. Serious bacterial infection (the primary outcome variable) was defined as: bacteremia, urinary tract infection, meningitis (blood, urine, or cerebrospinal fluid culture positive for a pathogen respectively), pneumonia, line, and wound infection. A generalized estimating equation analysis was done to predict the presence or absence of serious bacterial infection. Of 1082 pediatric burn patients hospitalized during the study period, 353 met the study eligibility criteria. A total of 108 patients (30.6%) had at least one fever episode (fever group). No difference in demographic characteristics was noted between the fever and no-fever groups; significant differences were observed for: third-degree TBSA, second-degree TBSA, total operating room visits, length of stay, Injury Severity Score, and death. A total of 47.2% of the patients had one or more episodes of fever with serious bacterial infection. In a generalized estimating equation predictive model, presence of a central line, second-, and third-degree TBSA were predictive of serious bacterial infection in burn patients with fever. In this study, individual clinical variables such as tachypnea and tachycardia were not predictive of serious bacterial infections, but the presence of a central line, and larger TBSA were significant predictors of serious bacterial infections. Younger age (P =.08) and ventilator support (P =.057) also approached significance as predictors of serious bacterial infections.

  20. Dietary Selenium in Adjuvant Therapy of Viral and Bacterial Infections12

    PubMed Central

    Steinbrenner, Holger; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Dkhil, Mohamed A; Wunderlich, Frank; Sies, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Viral and bacterial infections are often associated with deficiencies in macronutrients and micronutrients, including the essential trace element selenium. In selenium deficiency, benign strains of Coxsackie and influenza viruses can mutate to highly pathogenic strains. Dietary supplementation to provide adequate or supranutritional selenium supply has been proposed to confer health benefits for patients suffering from some viral diseases, most notably with respect to HIV and influenza A virus (IAV) infections. In addition, selenium-containing multimicronutrient supplements improved several clinical and lifestyle variables in patients coinfected with HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Selenium status may affect the function of cells of both adaptive and innate immunity. Supranutritional selenium promotes proliferation and favors differentiation of naive CD4-positive T lymphocytes toward T helper 1 cells, thus supporting the acute cellular immune response, whereas excessive activation of the immune system and ensuing host tissue damage are counteracted through directing macrophages toward the M2 phenotype. This review provides an up-to-date overview on selenium in infectious diseases caused by viruses (e.g., HIV, IAV, hepatitis C virus, poliovirus, West Nile virus) and bacteria (e.g., M. tuberculosis, Helicobacter pylori). Data from epidemiologic studies and intervention trials, with selenium alone or in combination with other micronutrients, and animal experiments are discussed against the background of dietary selenium requirements to alter immune functions. PMID:25593145

  1. Bacteriophages: an appraisal of their role in the treatment of bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Geoffrey William

    2007-08-01

    Bacteriophages were first used successfully to treat bacterial infections a decade before penicillin was discovered. However, the excitement that greeted those initial successes was short-lived, as a lack of understanding of basic phage biology subsequently led to a catalogue of clinical failures. As a consequence, bacteriophage therapy was largely abandoned in the West in favour of the newly emerging antibiotics. Now, as the problem of antibiotic resistance becomes ever more acute, a number of scientists and clinicians are looking again at bacteriophages as a therapeutic option in the treatment of bacterial infections. The chances of success second time round would appear to be much better given our current extensive knowledge of bacteriophage biology following their important role in underpinning the advances in molecular biology. We also have available to us the experience of nearly 80 years of clinical usage in the countries of the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe as well as a political climate that encourages sharing of that knowledge. This review outlines those features of bacteriophages that contribute to their utility in therapy and explores the potential for their re-introduction into Western medicine. An abundance of clinical evidence is available in the Soviet literature but much of this is technically flawed and a more realistic appraisal of the clinical value of phages can be obtained from animal studies conducted in the West. As interest in bacteriophages increases, a number of companies throughout the world have begun investing in phage technology and this has led to novel approaches to therapy, some of which will be discussed.

  2. Infection of orthopedic implants with emphasis on bacterial adhesion process and techniques used in studying bacterial-material interactions.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Marta; Monteiro, Fernando J; Ferraz, Maria P

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus comprises up to two-thirds of all pathogens in orthopedic implant infections and they are the principal causative agents of two major types of infection affecting bone: septic arthritis and osteomyelitis, which involve the inflammatory destruction of joint and bone. Bacterial adhesion is the first and most important step in implant infection. It is a complex process influenced by environmental factors, bacterial properties, material surface properties and by the presence of serum or tissue proteins. Properties of the substrate, such as chemical composition of the material, surface charge, hydrophobicity, surface roughness and the presence of specific proteins at the surface, are all thought to be important in the initial cell attachment process. The biofilm mode of growth of infecting bacteria on an implant surface protects the organisms from the host immune system and antibiotic therapy. The research for novel therapeutic strategies is incited by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This work will provide an overview of the mechanisms and factors involved in bacterial adhesion, the techniques that are currently being used studying bacterial-material interactions as well as provide insight into future directions in the field.

  3. Infection of orthopedic implants with emphasis on bacterial adhesion process and techniques used in studying bacterial-material interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Marta; Monteiro, Fernando J.; Ferraz, Maria P.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus comprises up to two-thirds of all pathogens in orthopedic implant infections and they are the principal causative agents of two major types of infection affecting bone: septic arthritis and osteomyelitis, which involve the inflammatory destruction of joint and bone. Bacterial adhesion is the first and most important step in implant infection. It is a complex process influenced by environmental factors, bacterial properties, material surface properties and by the presence of serum or tissue proteins. Properties of the substrate, such as chemical composition of the material, surface charge, hydrophobicity, surface roughness and the presence of specific proteins at the surface, are all thought to be important in the initial cell attachment process. The biofilm mode of growth of infecting bacteria on an implant surface protects the organisms from the host immune system and antibiotic therapy. The research for novel therapeutic strategies is incited by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This work will provide an overview of the mechanisms and factors involved in bacterial adhesion, the techniques that are currently being used studying bacterial-material interactions as well as provide insight into future directions in the field. PMID:23507884

  4. Target Product Profile for a Diagnostic Assay to Differentiate between Bacterial and Non-Bacterial Infections and Reduce Antimicrobial Overuse in Resource-Limited Settings: An Expert Consensus

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, Sabine; Tadesse, Birkneh Tilahun; Moussy, Francis; Chua, Arlene; Zorzet, Anna; Tängdén, Thomas; Dolinger, David L.; Page, Anne-Laure; Crump, John A.; D’Acremont, Valerie; Bassat, Quique; Lubell, Yoel; Newton, Paul N.; Heinrich, Norbert; Rodwell, Timothy J.; González, Iveth J.

    2016-01-01

    Acute fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms globally. In order to reduce the empiric use of antimicrobial drugs and improve outcomes, it is essential to improve diagnostic capabilities. In the absence of microbiology facilities in low-income settings, an assay to distinguish bacterial from non-bacterial causes would be a critical first step. To ensure that patient and market needs are met, the requirements of such a test should be specified in a target product profile (TPP). To identify minimal/optimal characteristics for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial fever test, experts from academia and international organizations with expertise in infectious diseases, diagnostic test development, laboratory medicine, global health, and health economics were convened. Proposed TPPs were reviewed by this working group, and consensus characteristics were defined. The working group defined non-severely ill, non-malaria infected children as the target population for the desired assay. To provide access to the most patients, the test should be deployable to community health centers and informal health settings, and staff should require <2 days of training to perform the assay. Further, given that the aim is to reduce inappropriate antimicrobial use as well as to deliver appropriate treatment for patients with bacterial infections, the group agreed on minimal diagnostic performance requirements of >90% and >80% for sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Other key characteristics, to account for the challenging environment at which the test is targeted, included: i) time-to-result <10 min (but maximally <2 hrs); ii) storage conditions at 0–40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity with a minimal shelf life of 12 months; iii) operational conditions of 5–40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity; and iv) minimal sample collection needs (50–100μL, capillary blood). This expert approach to define assay requirements for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial assay should guide

  5. Target Product Profile for a Diagnostic Assay to Differentiate between Bacterial and Non-Bacterial Infections and Reduce Antimicrobial Overuse in Resource-Limited Settings: An Expert Consensus.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Sabine; Tadesse, Birkneh Tilahun; Moussy, Francis; Chua, Arlene; Zorzet, Anna; Tängdén, Thomas; Dolinger, David L; Page, Anne-Laure; Crump, John A; D'Acremont, Valerie; Bassat, Quique; Lubell, Yoel; Newton, Paul N; Heinrich, Norbert; Rodwell, Timothy J; González, Iveth J

    2016-01-01

    Acute fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms globally. In order to reduce the empiric use of antimicrobial drugs and improve outcomes, it is essential to improve diagnostic capabilities. In the absence of microbiology facilities in low-income settings, an assay to distinguish bacterial from non-bacterial causes would be a critical first step. To ensure that patient and market needs are met, the requirements of such a test should be specified in a target product profile (TPP). To identify minimal/optimal characteristics for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial fever test, experts from academia and international organizations with expertise in infectious diseases, diagnostic test development, laboratory medicine, global health, and health economics were convened. Proposed TPPs were reviewed by this working group, and consensus characteristics were defined. The working group defined non-severely ill, non-malaria infected children as the target population for the desired assay. To provide access to the most patients, the test should be deployable to community health centers and informal health settings, and staff should require <2 days of training to perform the assay. Further, given that the aim is to reduce inappropriate antimicrobial use as well as to deliver appropriate treatment for patients with bacterial infections, the group agreed on minimal diagnostic performance requirements of >90% and >80% for sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Other key characteristics, to account for the challenging environment at which the test is targeted, included: i) time-to-result <10 min (but maximally <2 hrs); ii) storage conditions at 0-40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity with a minimal shelf life of 12 months; iii) operational conditions of 5-40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity; and iv) minimal sample collection needs (50-100μL, capillary blood). This expert approach to define assay requirements for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial assay should guide product

  6. New insight on antimicrobial therapy adjustment strategies for gram-negative bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Chen, Hong; Xiao, Shuzhen; Tang, Wei; Shi, Guochao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Gram-negative bacterial infections, especially multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infection, are becoming a serious threat to public health. Although it is widely accepted that both appropriate initial empirical therapy and targeted therapy are important, but for patients needing therapy adjustment, few studies have explored whether adjustment strategy based on microbiologic susceptibility test (MST) brings better outcome compared with empirical adjustment. A total of 320 patients with gram-negative bacterial infection (airway, blood, or pleural effusion) were selected and a prospective cohort study was conducted. Baseline characteristics and outcomes (microbiologic, clinical, and economic) were documented during follow-up. MDR and nosocomial infections were common among subjects. Initial therapies consistent with MST could result in reduced in-hospital mortality, treatment failure rate, infection-related death, percentages of patients needing therapy adjustment, and daily hospitalization cost with increased successful treatment rate compared with inconsistent with MST, and microbiologic outcomes were also better with appropriate therapies. For patients needing therapy adjustment, relying on MST gained no significant benefit on mortality, clinical, or microbiologic outcomes compared with depending on clinical experience. But for patients with MDR infection, adjustment relying on MST gained more benefit than non-MDR infection. Appropriate initial therapy significantly improved the prognosis of patients with gram-negative bacterial infections, but improvement was not that obvious for patients needing therapy adjustment which was based on MST compared with clinical experience, and more beneficial effects of adjustment relying on MST were obtained for patients with MDR bacterial infection. PMID:28353572

  7. Epidemiology of urinary tract infections, bacterial species and resistances in primary care in France.

    PubMed

    Malmartel, A; Ghasarossian, C

    2016-03-01

    General practitioners often have to manage urinary tract infections (UTI) with probabilistic treatments, although bacterial resistances are increasing. Therefore, the French Society of Infectious Diseases published new guidelines in 2014. The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial epidemiology of UTI in the general population in primary care and analyse risk factors for Escherichia coli resistance to antibiotics. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 12 ambulatory laboratories. Patients over 18 years of age coming for urinalysis were included. Risk factors for UTI were collected using a questionnaire and the laboratory records. Bacteria meeting criteria for UTI were analysed. A positive urinalysis was found in 1119 patients, corresponding to 1125 bacterial isolates. The bacterial species were: E. coli (73 %), Enterococcus spp. (7 %), Klebsiella spp. (6 %), Proteus spp. (4 %), Staphylococcus spp. (3 %) and Pseudomonas spp. (2 %). Regardless of the bacteria, the most common resistance was that to co-trimoxazole: 27 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] = [0.24; 0.30]), followed by ofloxacin resistance: 16 % [0.14; 0.18]. Escherichia coli resistances to co-trimoxazole, ofloxacin, cefixime, nitrofurantoin and fosfomycin were, respectively, 25.5 % [0.23; 0.28], 17 % [0.14; 0.20], 5.6 % [0.04; 0.07], 2.2 % [0.01; 0.03] and 1.2 % [0.005; 0.02]. Independent risk factors for E. coli resistance to ofloxacin were age over 85 years (odds ratio [OR] = 3.08; [1.61; 5.87]) and a history of UTI in the last 6 months (OR = 2.34; [1.54; 3.52]). Our findings support the guidelines recommending fluoroquinolone sparing. The scarcity of E. coli resistance to fosfomycin justifies its use as a first-line treatment in acute cystitis. These results should be reassessed in a few years to identify changes in the bacterial epidemiology of UTI.

  8. Acute phase response in cattle infected with Anaplasma marginale.

    PubMed

    Nazifi, S; Razavi, S M; Kaviani, F; Rakhshandehroo, E

    2012-03-23

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the acute phase responses via the assessment of the concentration of serum sialic acids (total, lipid bound and protein bound), inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ and TNF-α) and acute phase proteins (Hp and SAA) in 20 adult crossbred cattle naturally infected by Anaplasma marginale. The infected animals were divided into 2 subgroups on the basis of parasitemia rate (<20% and >20%). Also, as a control group, 10 clinically healthy cattle from the same farms were sampled. Our data revealed significant decreases in red blood cell count (RBC), hematocrite (PCV) and hemoglobine (Hb) in infected cattle compared to healthy ones. Conversely, the concentrations of Hp, SAA, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen, serum sialic acids and the circulatory IFN-γ and TNF-α were increased in the diseased cattle (P<0.05). In addition, it was evident that the progression of parasitemia in infected cattle did not induce any significant alterations in the hematological indices (RBCs, PCV and Hb) and the concentrations of Hp, SAA, ceruloplasmin and fibrinogen. SAA was the most sensitive factor to change in the diseased cattle. Therefore, increase in SAA concentration may be a good indicator of inflammatory process in cattle naturally infected with Anaplasma marginale.

  9. Multiphasic acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with atypical rubella virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Koji; Asahara, Hideaki; Uehara, Taira; Miyoshi, Katsue; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Iwaki, Toru; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2015-02-01

    We report the first case of an occurrence of multiphasic acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) associated with atypical rubella virus infection with no rash and long-term increased titers of serum anti-rubella IgM in a 17-year-old male who had no history of rubella vaccination. He suffered from at least six clinical exacerbations with disseminated hyperintense lesions on FLAIR MR images during the course of 18 months. Repeated methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy resolved the exacerbations. In patients with multiphasic ADEM of unknown etiology, clinicians should also consider the possibility of preceding infection with rubella virus.

  10. ANA testing in the presence of acute and chronic infections.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Christine M; Binder, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibody testing is performed to help diagnose patients who have clinical symptoms suggestive of possible autoimmune diseases. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are present in many systemic autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, a positive ANA test may also be seen with non-autoimmune inflammatory diseases, including both acute and chronic infections. When the ANA test is used as an initial screen in patients with non-specific clinical symptoms, such as fever, joint pain, myalgias, fatigue, rash, or anemia, the likelihood of a positive result due to infection will increase, especially in children. This article identifies acute and chronic infectious diseases that are likely to produce a positive ANA result and summarizes recent literature addressing both the causes and consequences of these findings.

  11. Cost of acute hepatitis B infection in Swedish adults.

    PubMed

    Struve, J; Giesecke, J

    1993-01-01

    In order to register data on costs for episodes of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in adults, the medical records from 70 adults with acute HBV infection seen at Roslagstull's Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, were reviewed. All cost-consuming events due to medical treatment, absence from work, and secondary prophylaxis were registered. The average cost was 1,230 pounds for medical treatment, 570 pounds for work loss and 290 pounds for secondary cases and prophylaxis, a total of 2,090 pounds in 1992 prices. This figure is considerably lower than that reported in 3 previous European studies. Accurate estimates of the costs for a case of HBV, as well as those of different vaccination strategies, are essential when economic aspects of HBV vaccination programmes are discussed.

  12. Augmented plasma microparticles during acute Plasmodium vivax infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the last few years, the study of microparticles (MPs) - submicron vesicles released from cells upon activation or apoptosis - has gained growing interest in the field of inflammation and in infectious diseases. Their role in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax remains unexplored. Because acute vivax malaria has been related to pro-inflammatory responses, the main hypothesis investigated in this study was that Plasmodium vivax infection is associated with elevated levels of circulating MPs, which may play a role during acute disease in non-immune patients. Methods Plasma MPs were analysed among thirty-seven uncomplicated P. vivax infections from an area of unstable malaria transmission in the Brazilian Amazon. The MP phenotype was analysed by flow cytometry using the classical MP marker, annexin, and fluorochrome-labeled monoclonal antibodies against specific cell surface markers. The frequencies of plasma MPs in P. vivax patients (n = 37) were further compared to malaria-unexposed controls (n = 15) and ovarian carcinoma patients (n = 12), a known MPs-inducing disease non-related to malaria. Results The frequencies of plasma circulating MPs were markedly increased in P. vivax patients, as compared to healthy age-matched malaria-unexposed controls. Although platelets, erythrocytes and leukocytes were the main cellular sources of MPs during vivax malaria, platelet derived-MPs (PMPs) increased in a linear fashion with the presence of fever at the time of blood collection (β = 0.06, p < 0.0001) and length of acute symptoms (β = 0.36, p < 0.0001). Finally, the results suggest that plasma levels of PMPs diminish as patient experience more episodes of clinical malaria (β = 0.07, p < 0.003). Conclusions Abundant circulating MPs are present during acute P. vivax infection, and platelet derived-MPs may play a role on the acute inflammatory symptoms of malaria vivax. PMID:21080932

  13. Association of RNA Biosignatures With Bacterial Infections in Febrile Infants Aged 60 Days or Younger

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Prashant; Kuppermann, Nathan; Mejias, Asuncion; Suarez, Nicolas; Chaussabel, Damien; Casper, T. Charles; Smith, Bennett; Alpern, Elizabeth R.; Anders, Jennifer; Atabaki, Shireen M.; Bennett, Jonathan E.; Blumberg, Stephen; Bonsu, Bema; Borgialli, Dominic; Brayer, Anne; Browne, Lorin; Cohen, Daniel M.; Crain, Ellen F.; Cruz, Andrea T.; Dayan, Peter S.; Gattu, Rajender; Greenberg, Richard; Hoyle, John D.; Jaffe, David M.; Levine, Deborah A.; Lillis, Kathleen; Linakis, James G.; Muenzer, Jared; Nigrovic, Lise E.; Powell, Elizabeth C.; Rogers, Alexander J.; Roosevelt, Genie; Ruddy, Richard M.; Saunders, Mary; Tunik, Michael G.; Tzimenatos, Leah; Vitale, Melissa; Dean, J. Michael; Ramilo, Octavio

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Young febrile infants are at substantial risk of serious bacterial infections; however, the current culture-based diagnosis has limitations. Analysis of host expression patterns (“RNA biosignatures”) in response to infections may provide an alternative diagnostic approach. OBJECTIVE To assess whether RNA biosignatures can distinguish febrile infants aged 60 days or younger with and without serious bacterial infections. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective observational study involving a convenience sample of febrile infants 60 days or younger evaluated for fever (temperature >38° C) in 22 emergency departments from December 2008 to December 2010 who underwent laboratory evaluations including blood cultures. A random sample of infants with and without bacterial infections was selected for RNA biosignature analysis. Afebrile healthy infants served as controls. Blood samples were collected for cultures and RNA biosignatures. Bioinformatics tools were applied to define RNA biosignatures to classify febrile infants by infection type. EXPOSURE RNA biosignatures compared with cultures for discriminating febrile infants with and without bacterial infections and infants with bacteremia from those without bacterial infections. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Bacterial infection confirmed by culture. Performance of RNA biosignatures was compared with routine laboratory screening tests and Yale Observation Scale (YOS) scores. RESULTS Of 1883 febrile infants (median age, 37 days; 55.7%boys), RNA biosignatures were measured in 279 randomly selected infants (89 with bacterial infections—including 32 with bacteremia and 15 with urinary tract infections—and 190 without bacterial infections), and 19 afebrile healthy infants. Sixty-six classifier genes were identified that distinguished infants with and without bacterial infections in the test set with 87%(95%CI, 73%-95%) sensitivity and 89% (95%CI, 81%-93%) specificity. Ten classifier genes distinguished

  14. Enhanced Mucosal Antibody Production and Protection against Respiratory Infections Following an Orally Administered Bacterial Extract

    PubMed Central

    Pasquali, Christian; Salami, Olawale; Taneja, Manisha; Gollwitzer, Eva S.; Trompette, Aurelien; Pattaroni, Céline; Yadava, Koshika; Bauer, Jacques; Marsland, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    Secondary bacterial infections following influenza infection are a pressing problem facing respiratory medicine. Although antibiotic treatment has been highly successful over recent decades, fatalities due to secondary bacterial infections remain one of the leading causes of death associated with influenza. We have assessed whether administration of a bacterial extract alone is sufficient to potentiate immune responses and protect against primary infection with influenza, and secondary infections with either Streptococcus pneumoniae or Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice. We show that oral administration with the bacterial extract, OM-85, leads to a maturation of dendritic cells and B-cells characterized by increases in MHC II, CD86, and CD40, and a reduction in ICOSL. Improved immune responsiveness against influenza virus reduced the threshold of susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections, and thus protected the mice. The protection was associated with enhanced polyclonal B-cell activation and release of antibodies that were effective at neutralizing the virus. Taken together, these data show that oral administration of bacterial extracts provides sufficient mucosal immune stimulation to protect mice against a respiratory tract viral infection and associated sequelae. PMID:25593914

  15. No evidence of an increase of bacterial and viral infections following Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Julia; Andrews, Nick; Taylor, Brent; Miller, Elizabeth

    2009-02-25

    The suggestion that multi-antigen vaccines might overload the immune system has led to calls for single antigen vaccines. In 2003 we showed that rather than an increase there appeared to be a reduced risk of severe bacterial infection in the three months following Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine (MMR). The present analysis of illnesses in a general population is based on an additional 10 years of data for bacterial infections and also includes admissions with viral infections. Analyses were carried out using the self-controlled case-series method and separately for bacterial and viral infection cases, using risk periods of 0-30 days, 31-60 days and 61-90 days post MMR vaccine. An analysis was also carried out for those cases which were given MMR and Meningococcal serogroup C (MCC) vaccines concomitantly. A reduced risk was seen in the 0-30-day period for both bacterial infection (relative incidence=0.68, 95% CI 0.54-0.86) and viral infections (relative incidence=0.68, 95% CI 0.49-0.93). There was no increased risk in any period when looking at combined viral or bacterial infections or for individual infections with the single exception of an increased risk in the 31-60 days post vaccination period for herpes infections (relative incidence=1.69, 95% CI 1.06-2.70). For the children given Meningococcal group C vaccines concomitantly no significantly increased risk was seen in either the bacterial (relative incidence=0.54, 95% CI 0.26-1.13) or viral cases (relative incidence=0.46, 95% CI 0.11-1.93). Our study confirms that the MMR vaccine does not increase the risk of invasive bacterial or viral infection in the 90 days after the vaccination and does not support the hypothesis that there is an induced immune deficiency due to overload from multi-antigen vaccines.

  16. Bacterial Infection of Fly Ovaries Reduces Egg Production and Induces Local Hemocyte Activation

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Stephanie M.; Schneider, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Morbidity, the state of being diseased, is an important aspect of pathogenesis that has gone relatively unstudied in fruit flies. Our interest is in characterizing how bacterial pathogenesis affects various physiologies of the fly. We chose to examine the fly ovary because we found bacterial infection had a striking effect on fly reproduction. We observed decreased egg laying after bacterial infection that correlated with increased bacterial virulence. We also found that bacteria colonized the ovary in a previously undescribed manner; bacteria were found in the posterior of the ovary, adjacent to the lateral oviduct. This local infection in the ovary resulted in melanization and activation of the cellular immune response at the site of infection. PMID:17400292

  17. Pteropine orthoreovirus infection among out-patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Voon, Kenny; Tan, Yeh Fong; Leong, Pooi Pooi; Teng, Cheong Lieng; Gunnasekaran, Rajasekaran; Ujang, Kamsiah; Chua, Kaw Bing; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to assess the incidence rate of Pteropine orthreovirus (PRV) infection in patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in a suburban setting in Malaysia, where bats are known to be present in the neighborhood. Using molecular detection of PRVs directly from oropharyngeal swabs, our study demonstrates that PRV is among one of the common causative agents of acute URTI with cough and sore throat as the commonest presenting clinical features. Phylogenetic analysis on partial major outer and inner capsid proteins shows that these PRV strains are closely related to Melaka and Kampar viruses previously isolated in Malaysia. Further study is required to determine the public health significance of PRV infection in Southeast Asia, especially in cases where co-infection with other pathogens may potentially lead to different clinical outcomes.

  18. Role of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Varma-Basil, Mandira; Dwivedi, Shailendra K D; Kumar, Krishna; Pathak, Rakesh; Rastogi, Ritika; Thukral, S S; Shariff, Malini; Vijayan, V K; Chhabra, Sunil K; Chaudhary, Rama

    2009-03-01

    Eighty per cent of the cases of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) have an infective aetiology, atypical bacteria including Mycoplasma pneumoniae accounting for 5-10 % of these. However, the importance of association of M. pneumoniae with episodes of AECOPD still remains doubtful. The present study was therefore undertaken to delineate the extent of involvement of M. pneumoniae in patients with AECOPD at a referral hospital in Delhi, India. Sputum samples and throat swabs from a total of 100 AECOPD patients attending the Clinical Research Center of Vallabhbhai Patel Chest Institute, Delhi, were collected during a 2-year period (January 2004-June 2006). The samples were investigated for the presence of aerobic bacterial pathogens and M. pneumoniae. Diagnosis of infection with M. pneumoniae was based on culture, serology, direct detection of M. pneumoniae specific antigen and PCR. Bacterial aetiology could be established in 16 of the 100 samples studied. Pseudomonas spp. were recovered from eight cases, Streptococcus pneumoniae from four and Klebsiella spp. from two cases. Acinetobacter sp. and Moraxella catarrhalis were isolated from one case each. Serological evidence of M. pneumoniae infection and/or detection of M. pneumoniae specific antigen were seen in 16 % of the cases. One case with definite evidence of M. pneumoniae infection also had coinfection with Pseudomonas spp. However, no direct evidence of M. pneumoniae infection was found in our study population as defined by culture isolation or PCR. In conclusion, although the serological prevalence of M. pneumoniae infection in our study population was significantly higher than in the control group, there was no direct evidence of it playing a role in AECOPD.

  19. Signs and Symptoms that Differentiate Acute Sinusitis from Viral Upper Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nader; Hoberman, Alejandro; Kearney, Diana H.; Colborn, D. Kathleen; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Jeong, Jong H.; Haralam, Mary Ann; Bowen, A’Delbert; Flom, Lynda L.; Wald, Ellen R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Differentiating acute bacterial sinusitis from viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI) is challenging; 20% to 40% of children diagnosed with acute sinusitis based on clinical criteria likely have an uncomplicated URI. The objective of this study was to determine which signs and symptoms could be used to identify the subgroup of children who meet current clinical criteria for sinusitis but who nevertheless have a viral URI. Methods We obtained sinus radiographs in consecutive children meeting a priori clinical criteria for acute sinusitis. We considered the subgroup of children with completely normal sinus radiographs to have an uncomplicated URI despite meeting the clinical diagnostic criteria for sinusitis. We examined the utility of signs and symptoms in identifying children with URI. Results Of 258 children enrolled, 54 (20.9%) children had completely normal radiographs. The absence of green nasal discharge, the absence of disturbed sleep, and mild symptoms were associated with a diagnosis of URI. No physical exam findings were particularly helpful in distinguishing between children with normal vs. abnormal radiographs. Conclusions Among children meeting current criteria for the diagnosis of acute sinusitis, those with mild symptoms are significantly more likely to have a URI than those with severe symptoms. In addition to assessing overall severity of symptoms, practitioners should ask about sleep disturbance and green nasal discharge when assessing children with suspected sinusitis; their absence favors a diagnosis of URI. PMID:23694838

  20. Defective proviruses rapidly accumulate during acute HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Katherine M; Murray, Alexandra J; Pollack, Ross A; Soliman, Mary G; Laskey, Sarah B; Capoferri, Adam A; Lai, Jun; Strain, Matthew C; Lada, Steven M; Hoh, Rebecca; Ho, Ya-Chi; Richman, Douglas D; Deeks, Steven G; Siliciano, Janet D; Siliciano, Robert F

    2016-09-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses viral replication to clinically undetectable levels, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) persists in CD4(+) T cells in a latent form that is not targeted by the immune system or by ART. This latent reservoir is a major barrier to curing individuals of HIV-1 infection. Many individuals initiate ART during chronic infection, and in this setting, most proviruses are defective. However, the dynamics of the accumulation and the persistence of defective proviruses during acute HIV-1 infection are largely unknown. Here we show that defective proviruses accumulate rapidly within the first few weeks of infection to make up over 93% of all proviruses, regardless of how early ART is initiated. By using an unbiased method to amplify near-full-length proviral genomes from HIV-1-infected adults treated at different stages of infection, we demonstrate that early initiation of ART limits the size of the reservoir but does not profoundly affect the proviral landscape. This analysis allows us to revise our understanding of the composition of proviral populations and estimate the true reservoir size in individuals who were treated early versus late in infection. Additionally, we demonstrate that common assays for measuring the reservoir do not correlate with reservoir size, as determined by the number of genetically intact proviruses. These findings reveal hurdles that must be overcome to successfully analyze future HIV-1 cure strategies.

  1. Acute sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2013-04-01

    Acute rhinosinusitis is a common illness in children. Viral upper respiratory tract infection is the most common presentation of rhinosinusitis. Most children resolve the infection spontaneously and only a small proportion develops a secondary bacterial infection. The proper choice of antibiotic therapy depends on the likely infecting pathogens, bacterial antibiotic resistance, and pharmacologic profiles of antibiotics. Amoxicillin-clavulanate is currently recommended as the empiric treatment in those requiring antimicrobial therapy. Isolation of the causative agents should be considered in those who failed the initial treatment. In addition to antibiotics, adjuvant therapies and surgery may be used in the management of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis.

  2. Incidence of bacterial coinfection with respiratory syncytial virus bronchopulmonary infection in pediatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Hishiki, Haruka; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Fukasawa, Chie; Abe, Katsuaki; Hoshino, Tadashi; Aizawa, Jiro; Ishikawa, Nobuyasu; Kohno, Yoichi

    2011-02-01

    Bacterial coinfection occurs in pediatric bronchopulmonary infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), but the incidence is uncertain. Our subjects are 188 pediatric inpatients having RSV bronchopulmonary infection in two hospitals in Chiba Prefecture between 2005 and 2007. On admission, antigen detection kits using nasopharyngeal aspirate were performed to detect RSV infection and washed sputum bacterial culture was performed to detect bacterial infection. Of the 188 pediatric inpatients with RSV bronchopulmonary infection, 95 (50.5%) patients were aged less than 1 year, 57 (30.3%) were aged 1-2 years, and 36 (19.1%) were aged 2 years or more. Thirty-six (19.1%) patients were associated with bronchial asthma attacks. Pathogenic bacteria were predominantly isolated from 43.6% of the patients. The three most frequently isolated bacteria were Haemophilus influenzae (43.9%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (36.6%), and Moraxella catarrhalis (29.3%). We found that 38.9% of H. influenzae strains were β-lactamase-nonproducing ampicillin-resistant strains. All S. pneumoniae strains were penicillin G (PcG) sensitive. However, 21.9% of S. pneumoniae strains showed PcG minimum inhibitory concentration values of 2 μg/ml. RSV bronchopulmonary infections in hospitalized children are often associated with antimicrobial-resistant bacterial infection in their lower airways. These results indicate that we should be aware of bacterial coinfections in the management of pediatric inpatients with RSV bronchopulmonary infection.

  3. Identification of lysocin E using a silkworm model of bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-02-01

    New antimicrobials with novel mechanisms need to be developed to combat antimicrobial-resistant pathogenic bacteria. The current authors recently reported discovery of a new antibiotic named "Lysocin E". Lysocin E was identified using a silkworm model of bacterial infection. The current review discusses the advantages of using a silkworm model of bacterial infection to identify and develop therapeutically efficacious antimicrobials. This review also discusses the discovery of lysocin E and its novel mechanism of action.

  4. The clinical importance of bacterial urinary tract infections during pregnancy. II. Events during delivery.

    PubMed

    Berbik, I; Kovács, I; Csömör, S; Gyarmati, I; Csapó, Z; Hídvégi, J

    1984-01-01

    Inertia in labour could be more often observed and the number of intra-uterine foetal distress signs increased in case of bacterial infection of the maternal uropoietic and urinary system. Consequently, stimulation of labour pains and surgical termination of the delivery were required several times. The data in concert with those mentioned in the first part of the study indicate that the clinical pictures associated with the bacterial infections of the urine constitute a significant part of the pathological aspects of pregnancy.

  5. Review: apoptotic mechanisms in bacterial infections of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Geetha; Philipp, Mario T.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we review the apoptotic mechanisms most frequently encountered in bacterial infections of the central nervous system (CNS). We focus specifically on apoptosis of neural cells (neurons and glia), and provide first an overview of the phenomenon of apoptosis itself and its extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. We then describe apoptosis in the context of infectious diseases and inflammation caused by bacteria, and review its role in the pathogenesis of the most relevant bacterial infections of the CNS. PMID:23060884

  6. The role of bacterial biofilm in persistent infections and control strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Wen, Yu-mei

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms can be viewed as a specific type of persistent bacterial infection. After initial invasion, microbes can attach to living and non-living surfaces, such as prosthetics and indwelling medical devices, and form a biofilm composed of extracellular polysaccharides, proteins, and other components. In hosts, biofilm formation may trigger drug resistance and inflammation, resulting in persistent infections. The clinical aspects of biofilm formation and leading strategies for biofilm inhibitors will be discussed in this mini-review. PMID:21485310

  7. Evaluation of Innate Immune Biomarkers in Saliva for Diagnostic Potential of Bacterial and Viral Respiratory Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-03

    infection and genetic disease (4). Similar to serum, saliva contains electrolytes, proteins, nucleic acids, and cells of epithelial and immune origin...which play a role in B-cell differentiation and activation (11, 12). While similar immune pathways are activated in response to viral infections... role in diagnostics for detection of infection and disease. Because the clinical symptoms of viral and bacterial respiratory infections are very

  8. Unusual Methylobacterium fujisawaense Infection in a Patient with Acute Leukaemia Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: First Case Report.

    PubMed

    Fanci, Rosa; Corti, Giampaolo; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Tortoli, Enrico; Mariottini, Alessandro; Pecile, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms of the genus Methylobacterium are facultative methylotrophic, gram-negative rods that are ubiquitous in nature and rarely cause human disease, mostly in subjects with preexisting causes of immune depression. Methylobacterium fujisawaense, first proposed as a new species in 1988, has never been reported as a bacterial agent of human infections so far. Here we describe a case of M. fujisawaense infection in a relapsed acute leukaemia undergoing unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Molecular identification of an M. fujisawaense strain was obtained from multiple mycobacterial blood cultures.

  9. Impact of fish oils on the outcomes of a mouse model of acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Caron, Emilie; Desseyn, Jean-Luc; Sergent, Luce; Bartke, Nana; Husson, Marie-Odile; Duhamel, Alain; Gottrand, Frédéric

    2015-01-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium that causes pneumonia in immunocompromised humans and severe pulmonary damage in patients with cystic fibrosis. Imbalanced fatty acid incorporation in membranes, including increased arachidonic acid and decreased DHA concentrations, is known to play a critical role in chronic inflammation associated with bacterial infection. Other lipids, such as EPA and alkylglycerols, are also known to play a role in inflammation, particularly by stimulating the immune system, decreasing inflammation and inhibiting bacterial growth. In this context, the goal of the present study was to assess the effect of dietary DHA/EPA, in a 2:1 ratio, and alkylglycerols, as natural compounds extracted from oils of rays and chimeras, respectively, on the inflammatory reaction induced by P. aeruginosa pulmonary infection in mice. To this end, mice were fed with a control diet or isolipidic, isoenergetic diets prepared with oils enriched in DHA/EPA (2:1) or alkylglycerols for 5 weeks before the induction of acute P. aeruginosa lung infection by endotracheal instillation. In our model, DHA/EPA (2:1) significantly improved the survival of mice after infection, which was associated with the acceleration of bacterial clearance and the resolution of inflammation leading to the improvement of pulmonary injuries. By contrast, alkylglycerols did not affect the outcomes of P. aeruginosa infection. Our findings suggest that supplementation with ray oil enriched in DHA/EPA (2:1) can be considered as a preventive treatment for patients at risk for P. aeruginosa infection.

  10. Serum Galectin-9 and Galectin-3-Binding Protein in Acute Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuan-Ting; Liu, Yao-Hua; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lin, Chun-Yu; Huang, Chung-Hao; Yen, Meng-Chi; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2016-05-27

    Dengue fever is a serious threat for public health and induces various inflammatory cytokines and mediators, including galectins and glycoproteins. Diverse immune responses and immunological pathways are induced in different phases of dengue fever progression. However, the status of serum galectins and glycoproteins is not fully determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum concentration and potential interaction of soluble galectin-1, galectin-3, galectin-9, galectin-3 binding protein (galectin-3BP), glycoprotein 130 (gp130), and E-, L-, and P-selectin in patients with dengue fever in acute febrile phase. In this study, 317 febrile patients (187 dengue patients, 150 non-dengue patients that included 48 patients with bacterial infection and 102 patients with other febrile illness) who presented to the emergency department and 20 healthy controls were enrolled. Our results showed the levels of galectin-9 and galectin-3BP were significantly higher in dengue patients than those in healthy controls. Lower serum levels of galectin-1, galectin-3, and E-, L-, and P-selectin in dengue patients were detected compared to bacteria-infected patients, but not to healthy controls. In addition, strong correlation between galectin-9 and galectin-3BP was observed in dengue patients. In summary, our study suggested galectin-9 and galectin-3BP might be critical inflammatory mediators in acute dengue virus infection.

  11. Comparison of Bacterial Community Composition of Primary and Persistent Endodontic Infections Using Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tzanetakis, Giorgos N.; Azcarate-Peril, Andrea M.; Zachaki, Sophia; Panopoulos, Panos; Kontakiotis, Evangelos G.; Madianos, Phoebus N.; Divaris, Kimon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Elucidating the microbial ecology of endodontic infections (EI) is a necessary step in developing effective intra-canal antimicrobials. The aim of the present study was to investigate the bacterial composition of symptomatic and asymptomatic primary and persistent infections in a Greek population, using high throughput sequencing methods. Methods 16S amplicon pyrosequencing of 48 root canal bacterial samples was conducted and sequencing data were analyzed using an oral microbiome-specific (HOMD) and a generic (Greengenes; GG) database. Bacterial abundance and diversity were examined by EI type (primary or persistent) and statistical analysis was performed by using non-parametric and parametric tests accounting for clustered data. Results Bacteroidetes was the most abundant phylum in both infection groups. Significant, albeit weak associations of bacterial diversity were found, as measured by UniFrac distances with infection type (ANOSIM R=0.087, P=0.005) and symptoms (ANOSIM R=0.055, P=0.047). Persistent infections were significantly enriched for Proteobacteria and Tenericutes as compared to primary ones; at the genus level, significant differences were noted for 14 taxa, including increased enrichment of persistent infections for Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, and Sphingomonas. More but less-abundant phyla were identified using the GG database; among those, Cyanobacteria (0.018%) and Acidobacteria (0.007%) were significantly enriched among persistent infections. Persistent infections showed higher Phylogenetic Diversity (asymptomatic: PD=9.2, [standard error (se)=1.3]; symptomatic: PD=8.2, se=0.7) compared to primary infections (asymptomatic: PD=5.9, se=0.8; symptomatic: PD=7.4 se=1.0). Conclusions The present study revealed a high bacterial diversity of EI and suggests that persistent infections may have more diverse bacterial communities than primary infections. PMID:25906920

  12. Bone and Joint Infections in Children: Acute Hematogenous Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Aggarwal, Aditya N

    2016-08-01

    Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO) is one of the commonest bone infection in childhood. Staphylococcus aureus is the commonest organism causing AHO. With use of advanced diagnostic methods, fastidious Kingella kingae is increasingly becoming an important organism in etiology of osteoarticular infections in children under the age of 3 y. The diagnosis of AHO is primarily clinical. The main clinical symptom and sign in AHO is pain and tenderness over the affected bone especially in the metaphyseal region. However, in a neonate the clinical presentation may be subtle and misleading. Laboratory and radiological investigations supplement the clinical findings. The acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are frequently elevated. Ultrasonography and MRI are key imaging modalities for early detection of AHO. Determination of infecting organism in AHO is the key to the correct antibiotic choice, treatment duration and overall management and therefore, organism isolation using blood cultures and site aspiration should be attempted. Several effective antibiotics regimes are available for managing AHO in children. The choice of antibiotic and its duration and mode of delivery requires individualization depending upon severity of infection, causative organism, regional sensitivity patterns, time elapsed between onset of symptoms and child's presentation and the clinical and laboratory response to the treatment. If pus has been evidenced in the soft tissues or bone region, surgical decompression of abscess is mandatory.

  13. Viral co-infections are common and are associated with higher bacterial burden in children with clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    El Feghaly, Rana E; Stauber, Jennifer L; Tarr, Phillip I; Haslam, David B

    2013-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infections in children are increasing. In this cohort study, we enrolled 62 children with diarrhea and C difficile. We performed polymerase chain reaction assays to detect viral agents of gastroenteritis and quantify C difficile burden. Fifteen (24%) children diagnosed as having C difficile infection had a concomitant viral co-infection. These patients tended to be younger and had a higher C difficile bacterial burden than children with no viral co-infections (median difference = 565,957 cfu/mL; P = 0.011), but were clinically indistinguishable. The contribution of viral co-infection to C difficile disease in children warrants future investigation.

  14. The effect of HIV infection on the host response to bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Huson, Michaëla A M; Grobusch, Martin P; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV. HIV causes increased susceptibility to invasive infections and affects sepsis pathogenesis caused by pre-existing activation and exhaustion of the immune system. We review the effect of HIV on different components of immune responses implicated in bacterial sepsis, and possible mechanisms underlying the increased risk of invasive bacterial infections. We focus on pattern recognition receptors and innate cellular responses, cytokines, lymphocytes, coagulation, and the complement system. A combination of factors causes increased susceptibility to infection and can contribute to a disturbed immune response during a septic event in patients with HIV. HIV-induced perturbations of the immune system depend on stage of infection and are only in part restored by combination antiretroviral therapy. Immunomodulatory treatments currently under development for sepsis might be particularly beneficial to patients with HIV co-infection because many pathogenic mechanisms in HIV and sepsis overlap.

  15. Atypical presentations of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Ansuya; Paruk, Hoosain; Bhagwan, Bhupendra; Moodley, Anand

    2017-02-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a monophasic demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system associated with various viral infections including HIV infection. We present the findings of seven HIV-infected patients with mild to moderate immunosuppression presenting with atypical features. Four patients had a multiphasic course; three patients had tumefactive lesions, and two patients had corpus callosum lesions. Two patients with the multiphasic course also had tumefactive lesions. Their clinical and radiological findings are presented. Despite the few cases, we propose that the dysimmune process lying between marked immunosuppression (CD4 < 200 cells/μL) and normal CD4 counts (CD4 > 500 cells/μL) might be responsible for these atypical presentations.

  16. Bacterial skin infections, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    From 2000 through 2012, health care records of the Military Health System documented 998,671 incident cases of bacterial skin infections among active component members of the U.S. Armed Forces. Most cases (97.3%) were identified from records of outpatient medical encounters rather than hospitalizations. Cellulitis accounted for half (50.9%) of all cases of bacterial skin infection but 96 percent of associated hospital bed days. Of all cases, 42.3 percent were "other" skin infections (i.e., folliculitis, impetigo, pyoderma, pyogenic granuloma, other and unspecified infections). The remainder were attributable to carbuncles/furuncles (6.6%) and erysipelas (0.1%). Rates of infection were higher among female service members except for "other" skin infections. In general, the highest rates were associated with youth, recruit trainee status, and junior enlisted rank; however, rates of erysipelas were highest among those 50 years and older. Annual incidence rates of all bacterial skin infections have increased greatly since 2000. During the entire period, such infections required more than 1.4 million health care encounters and 94,000 hospital bed-days (equivalent to 257 years of lost duty time). The prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of bacterial skin infections, particularly in high risk settings, deserve continued emphasis.

  17. First Report of CD4 Lymphopenia and Defective Neutrophil Functions in a Patient with Amebiasis Associated with CMV Reactivation and Severe Bacterial and Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ghrenassia, Etienne; Guihot, Amélie; Dong, Yuan; Robinet, Pauline; Fontaine, Thierry; Lacombe, Karine; Lescot, Thomas; Meyohas, Marie-Caroline; Elbim, Carole

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with acute necrotizing colitis due to invasive amebiasis associated with CD4 lymphopenia and impaired neutrophil responses. The course of the disease was characterized by CMV reactivation and severe and recurrent bacterial and fungal infections, which might be related to the decreased CD4 T cell count and the impaired functional capacities of neutrophils, respectively. The clinical outcome was positive with normalization of both CD4 cell count and neutrophil functions. PMID:28243230

  18. Defective proviruses rapidly accumulate during acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Katherine M.; Murray, Alexandra J.; Pollack, Ross A.; Soliman, Mary G.; Laskey, Sarah B.; Capoferri, Adam A.; Lai, Jun; Strain, Matthew C.; Lada, Steven M.; Hoh, Rebecca; Ho, Ya-Chi; Richman, Douglas D.; Deeks, Steven G.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses viral replication to clinically undetectable levels, HIV-1 persists in CD4+ T cells in a latent form not targeted by the immune system or ART1–5. This latent reservoir is a major barrier to cure. Many individuals initiate ART during chronic infection, and in this setting, most proviruses are defective6. However, the dynamics of the accumulation and persistence of defective proviruses during acute HIV-1 infection are largely unknown. Here we show that defective proviruses accumulate rapidly within the first few weeks of infection to make up over 93% of all proviruses, regardless of how early ART is initiated. Using an unbiased method to amplify near full-length proviral genomes from HIV-1 infected adults treated at different stages of infection, we demonstrate that early ART initiation limits the size of the reservoir but does not profoundly impact the proviral landscape. This analysis allows us to revise our understanding of the composition of proviral populations and estimate the true reservoir size in individuals treated early vs. late in infection. Additionally, we demonstrate that common assays for measuring the reservoir do not correlate with reservoir size. These findings reveal hurdles that must be overcome to successfully analyze future HIV-1 cure strategies. PMID:27500724

  19. Evaluation of Microbial Bacterial and Fungal Diversity in Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt Infection

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Tamara D.; Pope, Christopher E.; Browd, Samuel R.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Zerr, Danielle M.; Hoffman, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid shunt infection can be recalcitrant. Recurrence is common despite appropriate therapy for the pathogens identified by culture. Improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are required, and culture-independent molecular approaches to cerebrospinal fluid shunt infections have not been described. Objectives To identify the bacteria and fungi present in cerebrospinal fluid from children with cerebrospinal fluid shunt infection using a high-throughput sequencing approach, and to compare those results to those from negative controls and conventional culture. Methods This descriptive study included eight children ≤18 years old undergoing treatment for culture-identified cerebrospinal fluid shunt infection. After routine aerobic culture of each cerebrospinal fluid sample, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extraction was followed by amplification of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and the fungal ITS DNA region tag-encoded FLX-Titanium amplicon pyrosequencing and microbial phylogenetic analysis. Results The microbiota analyses for the initial cerebrospinal fluid samples from all eight infections identified a variety of bacteria and fungi, many of which did not grow in conventional culture. Detection by conventional culture did not predict the relative abundance of an organism by pyrosequencing, but in all cases, at least one bacterial taxon was detected by both conventional culture and pyrosequencing. Individual bacterial species fluctuated in relative abundance but remained above the limits of detection during infection treatment. Conclusions Numerous bacterial and fungal organisms were detected in these cerebrospinal fluid shunt infections, even during and after treatment, indicating diverse and recalcitrant shunt microbiota. In evaluating cerebrospinal fluid shunt infection, fungal and anaerobic bacterial cultures should be considered in addition to aerobic bacterial cultures, and culture-independent approaches offer a promising alternative

  20. Perioperative Bacterial Infections in Deceased Donor and Living Donor Liver Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Joy; Gomathy, Narasimhan; Rajashekhar, Perumalla; Venugopal, Kota; Olithselvan, Arikichenin; Vivekanandan, Shanmugam; Naresh, Shanmugam; Sujatha, Chandrasekaran; Vijaya, Srinivasan; Jayanthi, Venkataraman; Rela, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Background Deceased donor (DDLT) and living donor (LDLT) liver transplant (LT) is in vogue in several centers in India. Most centers are resorting to LDLT as a preferred surgery due to shortage of deceased donor liver. The risk of infection and its effect on survival in both groups of recipients from the Indian subcontinent are not known. The study was conducted to compare the bacterial infection rates among LDLT and DDLT recipients and their impact on survival at a tertiary referral center. Methods Retrospective data on 67 LT recipients were reviewed. Data on pre-, per-, and postoperative bacterial infection rates and the common isolates were obtained. Results Thirty-five patients had LDLT and 32 had DDLT. The prevalence of pre-operative bacterial infection and the isolates was similar in both groups. The perioperative bacterial infection rates were significantly higher in DDLT recipients (P < 0.01) (relative risk: 1.44 95% confidence interval 1.04–1.9). In both LDLT and DDLT, the common source was urinary tract followed by bloodstream infection. The common bacterial isolates in either transplant were Klebsiella followed by Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp. and nonfermenting gram-negative bacteria. Six patients (four LDLT; two DDLT) were treated for tuberculosis. Among the risk factors, cold ischemic time, and duration of stay in the intensive care unit was significantly higher for DDLT (p < 0.01). The death rates were not significantly different in the two groups. However, the odds for death were significantly high at 26.8 (p < 0.05) for postoperative bacterial infection and 1.8 (p < 0.001) for past alcohol. Conclusion Liver transplant recipients are at high-risk for bacterial infection irrespective of type of transplant, more so in DDLT. PMID:25755404

  1. Safety and effectiveness of home intravenous antibiotic therapy for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Mujal, A; Sola, J; Hernandez, M; Villarino, M-A; Machado, M-L; Baylina, M; Tajan, J; Oristrell, J

    2015-06-01

    Home intravenous antibiotic therapy is an alternative to hospital admission for moderately severe infections. However, few studies have analyzed its safety and effectiveness in the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. The purpose of this study is to analyze the safety and effectiveness of home intravenous antibiotic therapy in multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. We analyzed prospectively all patients admitted to our service who underwent home intravenous antibiotic therapy during the period 2008-2012. All the treatments were administered by caretakers or self-administered by patients, through elastomeric infusion devices. Effectiveness was evaluated by analyzing the readmission rate for poor infection control. Safety was evaluated by analyzing adverse events, catheter-related complications, and readmissions not related to poor infection control. There were 433 admissions (in 355 patients) for home intravenous antibiotic therapy during the study period. There were 226 (52.2 %) admissions due to multidrug-resistant bacterial infections and 207 (47.8 %) due to non-multidrug-resistant infections. Hospital readmissions in patients with multidrug-resistant infections were uncommon. Multidrug-resistant enterococcal infections, healthcare-associated infections, and carbapenem therapy were independent variables associated with increased readmissions due to poor infection control. Readmissions not related to poor infection control, adverse events, and catheter-related complications were similar in multidrug-resistant compared to non-multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Home intravenous therapy, administered by patients or their caretakers using elastomeric infusion pumps, was safe and effective for the treatment of most multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

  2. Bacterial adenosine triphosphate as a measure of urinary tract infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1971-01-01

    Procedure detects and counts bacteria present in urine samples. Method also determines bacterial levels in other aqueous body fluids including lymph fluid, plasma, blood, spinal fluid, saliva and mucous.

  3. A host-based RT-PCR gene expression signature to identify acute respiratory viral infection.

    PubMed

    Zaas, Aimee K; Burke, Thomas; Chen, Minhua; McClain, Micah; Nicholson, Bradly; Veldman, Timothy; Tsalik, Ephraim L; Fowler, Vance; Rivers, Emanuel P; Otero, Ronny; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Voora, Deepak; Lucas, Joseph; Hero, Alfred O; Carin, Lawrence; Woods, Christopher W; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2013-09-18

    Improved ways to diagnose acute respiratory viral infections could decrease inappropriate antibacterial use and serve as a vital triage mechanism in the event of a potential viral pandemic. Measurement of the host response to infection is an alternative to pathogen-based diagnostic testing and may improve diagnostic accuracy. We have developed a host-based assay with a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) TaqMan low-density array (TLDA) platform for classifying respiratory viral infection. We developed the assay using two cohorts experimentally infected with influenza A H3N2/Wisconsin or influenza A H1N1/Brisbane, and validated the assay in a sample of adults presenting to the emergency department with fever (n = 102) and in healthy volunteers (n = 41). Peripheral blood RNA samples were obtained from individuals who underwent experimental viral challenge or who presented to the emergency department and had microbiologically proven viral respiratory infection or systemic bacterial infection. The selected gene set on the RT-PCR TLDA assay classified participants with experimentally induced influenza H3N2 and H1N1 infection with 100 and 87% accuracy, respectively. We validated this host gene expression signature in a cohort of 102 individuals arriving at the emergency department. The sensitivity of the RT-PCR test was 89% [95% confidence interval (CI), 72 to 98%], and the specificity was 94% (95% CI, 86 to 99%). These results show that RT-PCR-based detection of a host gene expression signature can classify individuals with respiratory viral infection and sets the stage for prospective evaluation of this diagnostic approach in a clinical setting.

  4. Bacterial species and their associations with acute and chronic mastitis in suckler ewes.

    PubMed

    Smith, E M; Willis, Z N; Blakeley, M; Lovatt, F; Purdy, K J; Green, L E

    2015-10-01

    Acute mastitis in suckler ewes is often detected because of systemic signs such as anorexia or lameness, whereas chronic mastitis, characterized by intramammary abscesses with no systemic disease, is typically detected when ewes are inspected before mating. The aims of the current study were to identify the species and strains of culturable bacteria associated with acutely diseased, chronically diseased, and unaffected mammary glands to investigate whether species and strains vary by state. To investigate acute mastitis, 28 milk samples were obtained from both glands of 14 ewes with acute mastitis in one gland only. To investigate chronic mastitis, 16 ovine udders were obtained from 2 abattoirs; milk was aspirated from the 32 glands where possible, and the udders were sectioned to expose intramammary abscesses, which were swab sampled. All milk and swab samples were cultured aerobically. In total, 37 bacterial species were identified, 4 from acute mastitis, 26 from chronic mastitis, and 8 from apparently healthy glands. In chronic mastitis, the overall coincidence index of overlap of species detected in intramammary abscesses and milk was 0.60, reducing to 0.36 within individual glands, indicating a high degree of species overlap in milk and abscesses overall, but less overlap within specific glands. Staphylococcus aureus was detected frequently in all sample types; it was isolated from 10/14 glands with acute mastitis. In 5 ewes, closely related strains were present in both affected and unaffected glands. In chronic mastitis, closely related Staphylococcus aureus strains were detected in milk and abscesses from the same gland.

  5. High specificity ZnO quantum dots for diagnosis and treatment in bacterial infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    Early diagnosis and effective treatment of bacterial infection has become increasingly important. Herein, we developed a fluorescent nano-probe MPA@ZnO-PEP by conjugating SiO2-stabilized ZnO quantum dot (ZnO@SiO2) with bacteria-targeting peptide PEP, which was encapsulated with MPA, a near infrared (NIR) dye. The nanoprobe MPA@ZnO-PEP showed excellent fluorescence property and could specifically distinguish bacterial infection from sterile inflammation both in vitro and in vivo. The favorable biocompatability of MPA@ZnO-PEP was verified by MTT assay. This probe was further modified with antibiotic methicillin to form the theranostic nanoparticle MPA/Met@ZnO-PEP with amplified antibacterial activity. These results promised the great potential of MPA@ZnO-PEP for efficient non-invasive early diagnosis of bacterial infections and effective bacterial-targeting therapy.

  6. Infection prevention and control measures for acute respiratory infections in healthcare settings: an update.

    PubMed

    Seto, W H; Conly, J M; Pessoa-Silva, C L; Malik, M; Eremin, S

    2013-01-01

    Viruses account for the majority of the acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) globally with a mortality exceeding 4 million deaths per year. The most commonly encountered viruses, in order of frequency, include influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza and adenovirus. Current evidence suggests that the major mode of transmission of ARls is through large droplets, but transmission through contact (including hand contamination with subsequent self-inoculation) and infectious respiratory aerosols of various sizes and at short range (coined as "opportunistic" airborne transmission) may also occur for some pathogens. Opportunistic airborne transmission may occur when conducting highrisk aerosol generating procedures and airborne precautions will be required in this setting. General infection control measures effective for all respiratory viral infections are reviewed and followed by discussion on some of the common viruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and the recently discovered novel coronavirus.

  7. Nitric oxide levels regulate the immune response of Drosophila melanogaster reference laboratory strains to bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Eleftherianos, Ioannis; More, Kareen; Spivack, Stephanie; Paulin, Ethan; Khojandi, Arman; Shukla, Sajala

    2014-10-01

    Studies on the innate immune response against microbial infections in Drosophila melanogaster involve mutant strains and their reference strains that act as experimental controls. We used five standard D. melanogaster laboratory reference strains (Oregon R, w1118, Canton-S, Cinnabar Brown, and Yellow White [YW]) and investigated their response against two pathogenic bacteria (Photorhabdus luminescens and Enterococcus faecalis) and two nonpathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli and Micrococcus luteus). We detected high sensitivity among YW flies to bacterial infections and increased bacterial growth compared to the other strains. We also found variation in the transcription of certain antimicrobial peptide genes among strains, with Oregon and YW infected flies showing the highest and lowest gene transcription levels in most cases. We show that Oregon and w1118 flies possess more circulating hemocytes and higher levels of phenoloxidase activity than the other strains upon infection with the nonpathogenic bacteria. We further observed reduced fat accumulation in YW flies infected with the pathogenic bacteria, which suggests a possible decline in physiological condition. Finally, we found that nitrite levels are significantly lower in infected and uninfected YW flies compared to w1118 flies and that nitric oxide synthase mutant flies in YW background are more susceptible to bacterial infection compared to mutants in w1118 background. Therefore, increased sensitivity of YW flies to bacterial infections can be partly attributed to lower levels of nitric oxide. Such studies will significantly contribute toward a better understanding of the genetic variation between D. melanogaster reference strains.

  8. Nitric Oxide Levels Regulate the Immune Response of Drosophila melanogaster Reference Laboratory Strains to Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    More, Kareen; Spivack, Stephanie; Paulin, Ethan; Khojandi, Arman; Shukla, Sajala

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the innate immune response against microbial infections in Drosophila melanogaster involve mutant strains and their reference strains that act as experimental controls. We used five standard D. melanogaster laboratory reference strains (Oregon R, w1118, Canton-S, Cinnabar Brown, and Yellow White [YW]) and investigated their response against two pathogenic bacteria (Photorhabdus luminescens and Enterococcus faecalis) and two nonpathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli and Micrococcus luteus). We detected high sensitivity among YW flies to bacterial infections and increased bacterial growth compared to the other strains. We also found variation in the transcription of certain antimicrobial peptide genes among strains, with Oregon and YW infected flies showing the highest and lowest gene transcription levels in most cases. We show that Oregon and w1118 flies possess more circulating hemocytes and higher levels of phenoloxidase activity than the other strains upon infection with the nonpathogenic bacteria. We further observed reduced fat accumulation in YW flies infected with the pathogenic bacteria, which suggests a possible decline in physiological condition. Finally, we found that nitrite levels are significantly lower in infected and uninfected YW flies compared to w1118 flies and that nitric oxide synthase mutant flies in YW background are more susceptible to bacterial infection compared to mutants in w1118 background. Therefore, increased sensitivity of YW flies to bacterial infections can be partly attributed to lower levels of nitric oxide. Such studies will significantly contribute toward a better understanding of the genetic variation between D. melanogaster reference strains. PMID:25047850

  9. Identification and expression profiles of multiple genes in Nile tilapia in response to bacterial infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in response of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to bacterial infection, suppression subtractive cDNA hybridization technique was used to identify upregulated genes in the posterior kidney of Nile tilapia at 6h post infection with Aeromonas hydrophi...

  10. Transcriptional response of honey bee larvae infected with the bacterial pathogen Paenibacillus larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    American foulbrood disease of honey bees is caused by the bacterium Paenibacillus larvae. Infection occurs per os in larvae and systemic infection requires a breaching of the host peritrophic matrix and midgut epithelium. Genetic variation exists for both bacterial virulence and host resistance, and...

  11. Targeting bacterial adherence inhibits multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection following burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Huebinger, Ryan M.; Stones, Daniel H.; de Souza Santos, Marcela; Carlson, Deborah L.; Song, Juquan; Vaz, Diana Pereira; Keen, Emma; Wolf, Steven E.; Orth, Kim; Krachler, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Classical antimicrobial drugs target proliferation and therefore place microbes under extreme selective pressure to evolve resistance. Alternative drugs that target bacterial virulence without impacting survival directly offer an attractive solution to this problem, but to date few such molecules have been discovered. We previously discovered a widespread group of bacterial adhesins, termed Multivalent Adhesion Molecules (MAMs) that are essential for initial binding of bacteria to host tissues and virulence. Thus, targeting MAM-based adherence is a promising strategy for displacing pathogens from host tissues and inhibiting infection. Here, we show that topical application of polymeric microbeads functionalized with the adhesin MAM7 to a burn infected with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa substantially decreased bacterial loads in the wound and prevented the spread of the infection into adjacent tissues. As a consequence, the application of this adhesion inhibitor allowed for vascularization and wound healing, and maintained local and systemic inflammatory responses to the burn. We propose that MAM7-functionalized microbeads can be used as a topical treatment, to reduce bacterial attachment and hence prevent bacterial colonization and infection of wounds. As adhesion is not required for microbial survival, this anti-infective strategy has the potential to treat multidrug-resistant infections and limit the emergence of drug-resistant pathogens. PMID:27996032

  12. Actinomyces infection causing acute right iliac fossa pain

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajah, Narendranath; Hameed, Waseem; Middleton, Simon; Booth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This is a case of a 75-year-old man being admitted to the on-call surgical department with acute abdominal pain. On arrival he was clinically dehydrated and shocked with localised pain over McBurney's point and examination findings were suggestive of appendiceal or other colonic pathology. Full blood testing revealed a white cell count of 38×109/L and a C reactive protein (CRP) of 278 mg/L. A CT scan revealed a gallbladder empyema that extended into the right iliac fossa. This case highlights the potential for a hyperdistended gallbladder empyema to present as acute right iliac fossa pain with blood tests suggestive of complicated disease. Further analysis confirmed Actinomyces infection as the underlying aetiology prior to a laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy. This case serves to remind clinicians of this as a rare potential cause of atypical gallbladder pathology. PMID:24872493

  13. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy using zinc phthalocyanine derivatives in treatment of bacterial skin infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Yaxin; Wang, Dong; Li, Linsen; Zhou, Shanyong; Huang, Joy H.; Chen, Jincan; Hu, Ping; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is an effective method for killing bacterial cells in view of the increasing problem of multiantibiotic resistance. We herein reported the PACT effect on bacteria involved in skin infections using a zinc phthalocyanine derivative, pentalysine β-carbonylphthalocyanine zinc (ZnPc-Lys). Compared with its anionic ZnPc counterpart, ZnPc-Lys showed an enhanced antibacterial efficacy in vitro and in an animal model of localized infection. Meanwhile, ZnPc-Lys was observed to significantly reduce the wound skin blood flow during wound healing, indicating an anti-inflammation activity. This study provides new insight on the mechanisms of PACT in bacterial skin infection.

  14. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  15. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27003162

  16. IL-6 ameliorates acute lung injury in influenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chung-Teng; Yang, Shiu-Ju; Leu, Chia-Hsing; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wu, Chao-Liang; Shiau, Ai-Li

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is involved in innate and adaptive immune responses to defend against pathogens. It also participates in the process of influenza infection by affecting viral clearance and immune cell responses. However, whether IL-6 impacts lung repair in influenza pathogenesis remains unclear. Here, we studied the role of IL-6 in acute influenza infection in mice. IL-6-deficient mice infected with influenza virus exhibited higher lethality, lost more body weight and had higher fibroblast accumulation and lower extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover in the lung than their wild-type counterparts. Deficiency in IL-6 enhanced proliferation, migration and survival of lung fibroblasts, as well as increased virus-induced apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. IL-6-deficient lung fibroblasts produced elevated levels of TGF-β, which may contribute to their survival. Furthermore, macrophage recruitment to the lung and phagocytic activities of macrophages during influenza infection were reduced in IL-6-deficient mice. Collectively, our results indicate that IL-6 is crucial for lung repair after influenza-induced lung injury through reducing fibroblast accumulation, promoting epithelial cell survival, increasing macrophage recruitment to the lung and enhancing phagocytosis of viruses by macrophages. This study suggests that IL-6 may be exploited for lung repair during influenza infection. PMID:28262742

  17. Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Morphotypes Show a Synchronized Metabolic Pattern after Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Ivo; Lalk, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a water and soil bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis. A characteristic feature of this bacterium is the formation of different colony morphologies which can be isolated from environmental samples as well as from clinical samples, but can also be induced in vitro. Previous studies indicate that morphotypes can differ in a number of characteristics such as resistance to oxidative stress, cellular adhesion and intracellular replication. Yet the metabolic features of B. pseudomallei and its different morphotypes have not been examined in detail so far. Therefore, this study aimed to characterize the exometabolome of B. pseudomallei morphotypes and the impact of acute infection on their metabolic characteristics. Methods and Principal Findings We applied nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR) in a metabolic footprint approach to compare nutrition uptake and metabolite secretion of starvation induced morphotypes of the B. pseudomallei strains K96243 and E8. We observed gluconate production and uptake in all morphotype cultures. Our study also revealed that among all morphotypes amino acids could be classified with regard to their fast and slow consumption. In addition to these shared metabolic features, the morphotypes varied highly in amino acid uptake profiles, secretion of branched chain amino acid metabolites and carbon utilization. After intracellular passage in vitro or murine acute infection in vivo, we observed a switch of the various morphotypes towards a single morphotype and a synchronization of nutrient uptake and metabolite secretion. Conclusion To our knowledge, this study provides first insights into the basic metabolism of B. pseudomallei and its colony morphotypes. Furthermore, our data suggest, that acute infection leads to the synchronization of B. pseudomallei colony morphology and metabolism through yet unknown host signals and bacterial mechanisms. PMID:26943908

  18. Imaging InlC Secretion to Investigate Cellular Infection by the Bacterial Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Kühbacher, Andreas; Gouin, Edith; Cossart, Pascale; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial intracellular pathogens can be conceived as molecular tools to dissect cellular signaling cascades due to their capacity to exquisitely manipulate and subvert cell functions which are required for the infection of host target tissues. Among these bacterial pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram positive microorganism that has been used as a paradigm for intracellular parasitism in the characterization of cellular immune responses, and which has played instrumental roles in the discovery of molecular pathways controlling cytoskeletal and membrane trafficking dynamics. In this article, we describe a robust microscopical assay for the detection of late cellular infection stages of L. monocytogenes based on the fluorescent labeling of InlC, a secreted bacterial protein which accumulates in the cytoplasm of infected cells; this assay can be coupled to automated high-throughput small interfering RNA screens in order to characterize cellular signaling pathways involved in the up- or down-regulation of infection. PMID:24084755

  19. Incidence of Norwalk-like viruses, rotavirus and adenovirus infection in patients with acute gastroenteritis in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Subekti, D; Lesmana, M; Tjaniadi, P; Safari, N; Frazier, E; Simanjuntak, C; Komalarini, S; Taslim, J; Campbell, J R; Oyofo, B A

    2002-03-25

    Norwalk-like viruses (NLVs), rotavirus and adenovirus are reportedly responsible from 4 to 42% of non-bacterial acute sporadic gastroenteritis. The incidence of NLVs, adenovirus and rotavirus infections in Indonesia is unclear. A total of 402 symptomatic cases from Indonesian patients with acute gastroenteritis and 102 asymptomatic controls that tested negative for bacteria and parasites were screened for the presence of NLVs, rotavirus and adenovirus using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Rotaclone kits and Adenoclone kits. Specific prototype probes were used to ascertain which NLV prototypes were present in the area. NLVs were detected in 45/218 (21%), rotavirus was detected in 170/402 (42%) and adenovirus was detected in 11/273 (4%) samples examined. Genetic analysis of the RT-PCR products using specific prototype probes for NLVs indicated that the prototypes were 42% Taunton agent and 58% Hawaii/Snow Mountain agent. Comparative data on patients showed that the incidence of rotavirus infections was two times greater than the NLVs infections, and that adenovirus infections were the least prevalent. All of the control samples tested were negative for NLVs and adenoviruses, however 8/70 (11%) of the samples were positive for rotaviruses. The high incidence of enteric viral-related infections is a threat among acute diarrheic patients in Jakarta, Indonesia.

  20. The Oral Bacterial Communities of Children with Well-Controlled HIV Infection and without HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Brittany E.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Jones, Cheron E.; Chung, Michelle; Fraser, Claire M.; Tate, Anupama; Zeichner, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    The oral microbial community (microbiota) plays a critical role in human health and disease. Alterations in the oral microbiota may be associated with disorders such as gingivitis, periodontitis, childhood caries, alveolar osteitis, oral candidiasis and endodontic infections. In the immunosuppressed population, the spectrum of potential oral disease is even broader, encompassing candidiasis, necrotizing gingivitis, parotid gland enlargement, Kaposi’s sarcoma, oral warts and other diseases. Here, we used 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to examine the oral microbiome of saliva, mucosal and tooth samples from HIV-positive and negative children. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were collected from a cross-section of patients undergoing routine dental care. Multiple specimens from different sampling sites in the mouth were collected for each patient. The goal of the study was to observe the potential diversity of the oral microbiota among individual patients, sample locations, HIV status and various dental characteristics. We found that there were significant differences in the microbiome among the enrolled patients, and between sampling locations. The analysis was complicated by uneven enrollment in the patient cohorts, with only five HIV-negative patients enrolled in the study and by the rapid improvement in the health of HIV-infected children between the time the study was conceived and completed. The generally good oral health of the HIV-negative patients limited the number of dental plaque samples that could be collected. We did not identify significant differences between well-controlled HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative controls, suggesting that well-controlled HIV-positive patients essentially harbor similar oral flora compared to patients without HIV. Nor were significant differences in the oral microbiota identified between different teeth or with different dental characteristics. Additional studies are needed to better

  1. Extremity trauma, dressings, and wound infection: should every acute limb wound have a silver lining?

    PubMed

    Eardley, William G P; Watts, Sarah A; Clasper, Jon C

    2012-09-01

    The manner in which high-energy transfer limb injuries are dressed can alter the wound environment through manipulation of the bacterial burden, thus minimizing tissue degradation and influencing healing potential. Infection is the principal complication of such wounds, and antiseptic soaked gauze is accepted in early coverage of extremity wounds despite a lack of evidence to support this practice. There has been resurgence in the use of silver in acute wounds, through dressings manipulated to deliver sustained elemental silver to the wound interface. In vitro and in vivo experimentation of silver dressings are characterized however by methodological compromise, primarily through lack of similarity of models to the physiology of the healing wound. Results from in vitro studies caution against the use of silver because of evidence of cytotoxicity, but this is not reproduced in in vivo or clinical experimentation, leading to ambiguity. Review of silver dressing application in burns and chronic wound studies fails to support its use over other dressing systems. Similarly, evidence for the use of silver in acute limb wounds is lacking. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the use of silver dressings in acute wound care and highlights in particular the paucity of evidence regarding its routine use in extremity injury.

  2. [Microbiological diagnosis of bacterial infection associated with delivery and postpartum].

    PubMed

    Padilla-Ortega, Belén; Delgado-Palacio, Susana; García-Garrote, Fernando; Rodríguez-Gómez, Juan Miguel; Romero-Hernández, Beatriz

    2016-05-01

    The newborn may acquire infections during delivery due to maternal colonization of the birth canal, by microorganisms such as Streptococcus agalactiae that caused early neonatal infection, or acquisition through the placenta, amniotic fluid or birth products. After birth, the newborn that needs hospitalization can develop nosocomial infections during their care and exceptionally through lactation by infectious mastitis or incorrect handling of human milk, which does not require to stop breastfeeding in most cases. It is important and necessary to perform microbiological diagnosis for the correct treatment of perinatal infections, especially relevant in preterm infants with low or very low weight with high mortality rates.

  3. Bacterial distribution and tissue targets following experimental Edwardsiella ictaluri infection in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Soto, Esteban; Illanes, Oscar; Revan, Floyd; Griffin, Matt; Riofrio, Andrés

    2013-05-27

    Edwardsiella ictaluri, a Gram-negative enteric bacterium, is the known etiological agent of enteric septicemia of catfish. In the last few years, different strains have been implicated as the causative agent of mortality events in cultured fish, including Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus L. Due to the emergent nature of edwardsiellosis in non-ictalurid fish, little is known about the dynamics of E. ictaluri infection in tilapia. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the pathogenesis of edwardsiellosis in tilapia by determining the median lethal and infective doses, tissue targets of infection, rate of bacterial dissemination, and the specific tissue response to E. ictaluri following an immersion challenge with bacterial strains recovered from outbreak events in tilapia. In addition to histopathology assessment, the bacterial burdens in several tissues of infected fish were determined over a 2 wk course of infection using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The collected data suggest the cutaneous and oral routes as the main ports of entry for the organism, which later spreads hematogenously throughout the body. Even though histopathological assessment of infected fish revealed involvement of a wide range of tissues, the severity of the necrotizing and granulomatous lesions in the spleen and head kidney, with concomitant high levels of bacterial DNA in these organs determined by qPCR, identifies them as the main targets of infection.

  4. Divergent Functions of Toll-like Receptors during Bacterial Lung Infections

    PubMed Central

    Baral, Pankaj; Batra, Sanjay; Zemans, Rachel L.; Downey, Gregory P.

    2014-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections caused by bacteria are a major cause of death in humans irrespective of sex, race, or geography. Indeed, accumulated data indicate greater mortality and morbidity due to these infections than cancer, malaria, or HIV infection. Successful recognition of, followed by an appropriate response to, bacterial pathogens in the lungs is crucial for effective pulmonary host defense. Although the early recruitment and activation of neutrophils in the lungs is key in the response against invading microbial pathogens, other sentinels, such as alveolar macrophages, epithelial cells, dendritic cells, and CD4+ T cells, also contribute to the elimination of the bacterial burden. Pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain–like receptors, are important for recognizing and responding to microbes during pulmonary infections. However, bacterial pathogens have acquired crafty evasive strategies to circumvent the pattern recognition receptor response and thus establish infection. Increased understanding of the function of TLRs and evasive mechanisms used by pathogens during pulmonary infection will deepen our knowledge of immunopathogenesis and is crucial for developing effective therapeutic and/or prophylactic measures. This review summarizes current knowledge of the multiple roles of TLRs in bacterial lung infections and highlights the mechanisms used by pathogens to modulate or interfere with TLR signaling in the lungs. PMID:25033332

  5. Divergent functions of Toll-like receptors during bacterial lung infections.

    PubMed

    Baral, Pankaj; Batra, Sanjay; Zemans, Rachel L; Downey, Gregory P; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2014-10-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections caused by bacteria are a major cause of death in humans irrespective of sex, race, or geography. Indeed, accumulated data indicate greater mortality and morbidity due to these infections than cancer, malaria, or HIV infection. Successful recognition of, followed by an appropriate response to, bacterial pathogens in the lungs is crucial for effective pulmonary host defense. Although the early recruitment and activation of neutrophils in the lungs is key in the response against invading microbial pathogens, other sentinels, such as alveolar macrophages, epithelial cells, dendritic cells, and CD4(+) T cells, also contribute to the elimination of the bacterial burden. Pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors, are important for recognizing and responding to microbes during pulmonary infections. However, bacterial pathogens have acquired crafty evasive strategies to circumvent the pattern recognition receptor response and thus establish infection. Increased understanding of the function of TLRs and evasive mechanisms used by pathogens during pulmonary infection will deepen our knowledge of immunopathogenesis and is crucial for developing effective therapeutic and/or prophylactic measures. This review summarizes current knowledge of the multiple roles of TLRs in bacterial lung infections and highlights the mechanisms used by pathogens to modulate or interfere with TLR signaling in the lungs.

  6. Epidemiology and aetiology of maternal bacterial and viral infections in low- and middle-income countries

    PubMed Central

    Velu, Prasad Palani; Gravett, Courtney A.; Roberts, Tom K.; Wagner, Thor A.; Zhang, Jian Shayne F.; Rubens, Craig E.; Gravett, Michael G.; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Background Maternal morbidity and mortality in low- and middle-income countries has remained exceedingly high. However, information on bacterial and viral maternal infections, which are important contributors to poor pregnancy outcomes, is sparse and poorly characterised. This review aims to describe the epidemiology and aetiology of bacterial and viral maternal infections in low- and middle-income countries. Methods A systematic search of published literature was conducted and data on aetiology and epidemiology of maternal infections was extracted from relevant studies for analysis. Searches were conducted in parallel by two reviewers (using OVID) in the following databases: Medline (1950 to 2010), EMBASE (1980 to 2010) and Global Health (1973 to 2010). Results Data from 158 relevant studies was used to characterise the epidemiology of the 10 most extensively reported maternal infections with the following median prevalence rates: Treponema pallidum (2.6%), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (1.5%), Chlamydia trachomatis (5.8%), Group B Streptococcus (8.6%), bacterial vaginosis (20.9%), hepatitis B virus (4.3%), hepatitis C virus (1.4%), Cytomegalovirus (95.7% past infection), Rubella (8.9% susceptible) and Herpes simplex (20.7%). Large variations in the prevalence of these infections between countries and regions were noted. Conclusion This review confirms the suspected high prevalence of maternal bacterial and viral infections and identifies particular diseases and regions requiring urgent attention in public health policy planning, setting research priorities and donor funding towards reducing maternal morbidity and mortality in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:23198117

  7. Intestinal bacterial overgrowth includes potential pathogens in the carbohydrate overload models of equine acute laminitis.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Janet C; Park, Joong-Wook; Prado, Julio; Eades, Susan C; Mirza, Mustajab H; Fugaro, Michael N; Häggblom, Max M; Reinemeyer, Craig R

    2012-10-12

    Carbohydrate overload models of equine acute laminitis are used to study the development of lameness. It is hypothesized that a diet-induced shift in cecal bacterial communities contributes to the development of the pro-inflammatory state that progresses to laminar failure. It is proposed that vasoactive amines, protease activators and endotoxin, all bacterial derived bioactive metabolites, play a role in disease development. Questions regarding the oral bioavailability of many of the bacterial derived bioactive metabolites remain. This study evaluates the possibility that a carbohydrate-induced overgrowth of potentially pathogenic cecal bacteria occurs and that bacterial translocation contributes toward the development of the pro-inflammatory state. Two groups of mixed-breed horses were used, those with laminitis induced by cornstarch (n=6) or oligofructan (n=6) and non-laminitic controls (n=8). Cecal fluid and tissue homogenates of extra-intestinal sites including the laminae were used to enumerate Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Horses that developed Obel grade2 lameness, revealed a significant overgrowth of potentially pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative intestinal bacteria within the cecal fluid. Although colonization of extra-intestinal sites with potentially pathogenic bacteria was not detected, results of this study indicate that cecal/colonic lymphadenopathy and eosinophilia develop in horses progressing to lameness. It is hypothesized that the pro-inflammatory state in carbohydrate overload models of equine acute laminitis is driven by an immune response to the rapid overgrowth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative cecal bacterial communities in the gut. Further equine research is indicated to study the immunological response, involving the lymphatic system that develops in the model.

  8. DECREASED EFFECT OF GLUCANTIME IN CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS COMPLICATED WITH SECONDARY BACTERIAL INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghian, G; Ziaei, H; Bidabadi, L Shirani; Baghbaderani, A Zolfaghari

    2011-01-01

    Background: Glucantime is regarded as the first-line treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL); however, failure to treatment is a problem in many cases. Aim: The aim was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of glucantime in CL complicated with secondary bacterial infection compared to uncomplicated lesions. Methods: This experimental study was performed in Skin Diseases and Leishmaniasis Research Center, Isfahan, Iran. A total of 161 patients enrolled in the study had CL confirmed by positive smear of lesions. All the patients were treated with systemic glucantime for 3 weeks and followed for 2 months. Response to treatment was defined as loss of infiltration, reepithelization, and negative smear. Depending on the results of bacterial cultures, the lesions were divided into two groups and the efficacy of glucantime was compared. Results: A total of 123 patients (76.4%) were negative, and 38 patients (23.6%) were positive for secondary bacterial infection. In groups with negative bacterial culture response to treatment was 65% (80 patients) and in the other positive group, it was 31.6% (12 patients), with a difference (χ2 = 13.77, P < 0.01). Conclusion: Therapeutic effect of glucantime showed a decrease in CL lesions with secondary bacterial infection. Therefore, in the cases of unresponsiveness to treatment, the lesions should be evaluated for bacterial infection, before repeating the treatment. PMID:21572789

  9. Recent Toxoplasmosis Infection With Acute Myopericarditis and Persistent Troponin Elevation in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Roubille, François; Roubille, Camille; Lattuca, Benoît; Gervasoni, Richard; Vernhet-Kovacsik, Hélène; Leclercq, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Although often considered as "begnin", acute infections in young healthy adults can lead to heart inflammation, including acute myocarditis. We report a rare case of myopericarditis in a young immunocompetent adult, in the context of recent toxoplasmosis infection. Clinical presentation was common acute pericarditis, but with risk biomarkers: high troponin I levels and multiple inflammation-compatible images on MR-scan. Diagnosis of myopericarditis was established. In spite of spontaneous favourable clinical evolution, troponin remained elevated. MR-scan is shown; acute myocarditis in the context of an acute toxoplasmosis infection is discussed.

  10. Increase in Antibiotic-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections in Febrile Neutropenic Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of bacteremia caused by Gram-negative bacteria has increased recently in febrile neutropenic patients with the increase of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections. This study aimed to identify the distribution of causative bacteria and the proportion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in bacteremia diagnosed in febrile neutropenic children. Materials and Methods The medical records of febrile neutropenic children diagnosed with bacteremia between 2010 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The causative bacteria and proportion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria were investigated and compared yearly during the study period. The clinical impact of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections was also determined. Results A total of 336 bacteremia episodes were identified. During the entire study period, 181 (53.9%) and 155 (46.1%) episodes were caused by Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. Viridans streptococci (25.9%), Klebsiella spp. (16.7%), and Escherichia coli (16.4%) were the most frequent causative bacteria. The overall distribution of causative bacteria was not significantly different annually. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were identified in 85 (25.3%) episodes, and the proportion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria was not significantly different annually. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli and Klebsiella spp. were most common among antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, and they accounted for 30.6% (n = 34) of the identified E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci were most common among antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, and it accounted for 88.5% (n = 23) of the identified coagulase-negative staphylococci. Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, especially antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections, caused significantly higher mortality due to bacteremia compared with non-antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections (P <0

  11. Parasitism enhances susceptibility to bacterial infection in tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gyrodactylus is a small elongate monogenetic parasite that mainly lives on the skin and gills of freshwater fish. Gyrodactylus causes mechanical injuries on fish epithelium that can lead to fish mortality under crowded conditions. Streptococcus iniae is a severe bacterial pathogen and the economic l...

  12. Aetiology of acute paediatric gastroenteritis in Bulgaria during summer months: prevalence of viral infections.

    PubMed

    Mladenova, Zornitsa; Steyer, Andrej; Steyer, Adela Fratnik; Ganesh, Balasubramanian; Petrov, Petar; Tchervenjakova, Tanja; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren

    2015-03-01

    Paediatric acute gastroenteritis is a global public health problem. Comprehensive laboratory investigation for viral, bacterial and parasitic agents is helpful for improving management of acute gastroenteritis in health care settings and for monitoring and controlling the spread of these infections. Our study aimed to investigate the role of various pathogens in infantile diarrhoea in Bulgaria outside the classical winter epidemics of rotavirus and norovirus. Stool samples from 115 hospitalized children aged 0-3 years collected during summer months were tested for presence of 14 infectious agents - group A rotavirus, astrovirus, Giardia, Cryptosporidium and Entamoeba using ELISAs; norovirus by real-time RT-PCR; picobirnavirus and sapovirus by RT-PCR; adenovirus using PCR, and Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia coli, Yersinia and Campylobacter using standard bacterial cultures. Infectious origin was established in a total of 92 cases and 23 samples remained negative. A single pathogen was found in 67 stools, of which rotaviruses were the most prevalent (56.7 %), followed by noroviruses (19.4 %), enteric adenoviruses (7.5 %), astroviruses (6.0 %), bacteria and parasites (4.5 % each) and sapoviruses (1.4 %). Rotavirus predominant genotypes were G4P[8] (46.3 %) and G2P[4] (21.4 %); for astroviruses, type 1a was the most common, while the GII.4/2006b variant was the most prevalent among noroviruses. Bacteria were observed in five cases, with Salmonella sp. as the most prevalent, while parasites were found in ten stool samples, with Giardia intestinalis in five cases. The results demonstrated high morbidity associated with viral infections and that rotavirus and norovirus remain the most common pathogens associated with severe gastroenteritis during summer months in Bulgaria, a country with a temperate climate, and significant molecular diversity among circulating virus strains.

  13. Diagnosis of acute bacterial pneumonia in Nigerian children. Value of needle aspiration of lung of countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, M; Stratton, D; Diallo, A; Egler, L J

    1977-01-01

    Eighty-eight Nigerian children with untreated, severe, acute pneumonia were investigated by standard bacteriological techniques (blood culture and culture of pharyngeal secretions) and by needle aspiration of the consolidated lung. Countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) against grouped pneumococcal and Haemophilus influenzae type b antisera was carried out on serum samples from 45 patients. The aetiology of pneumonia was shown by examination of the needle aspirate in 70/88 patients (79%), by CIE in 9/45 patients (20%), and by blood culture in 4/36 patients (11%). Overall, a bacterial cause for pneumonia was shown in 73/88 patients (83%). The results of pharyngeal culture were misleading when compared with cultures of needle aspirates. The prediction of aetiology from the radiological appearance was alos inaccurate, even for labor pneumonia. Needle aspiration of the lung, with a low (5%) and minor complication rate, merits wider application in the diagnosis of acute pulmonary infections in children. Tradiational bacteriological techniques (blood culture and pharyngeal culture) are of very limited value. The place of CIE in the investigation of childhood pneumonia still needs thorough evaluation. PMID:343723

  14. Preparing for the next round: convalescent care after acute infection.

    PubMed

    Rohde, J E

    1978-12-01

    Infections pose a nutritional stress on the growing child. No therapeutic goal is as important as the rapid recovery of preillness weight after acute infections. Successful convalescence, with supernormal growth rates, can be achieved with relatively brief periods of intensive refeeding, offsetting any tendency toward reduced immune defenses or other nutritionally determined susceptibilities to further infection. Since the mother is the only person who can effectively manage convalescent care, she must be given specific tasks with measurable targets in order to reliably oversee the child's rehabilitation. Not generally considered in the realm of preventive medicine, effective home-based convalencent care is the first crucial step in preventing the next round of illness. An approach to the widespread mobilization of mothers to monitor and sustain their children's growth is proposed in this paper. Rather than a passive recipient of health services, the mother becomes the basic health worker, providing diagnostic and therapeutic primary care for her child. Only the mother can break the malnutrition-infection cycle.

  15. Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant Bacterial Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Guillain-Barre syndrome and Miller Fisher syndrome forms of acute inflammatory peripheral neuropathies . J. Endotoxin Res. 6:341– 359. 54. Yuki N, Hartung HP...increasing worldwide. The changing epidemiology and incidence of infections due to Acinetobacter establishes it as a pathogen of increasing medical... diabetic ulcers are favored sites of infection (6, 7). A. baumannii has also been shown to cause infections outside the health care setting, namely, severe

  16. Acute renal damage in infants after first urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Cascio, Salvatore; Chertin, Boris; Yoneda, Akihiro; Rolle, Udo; Kelleher, Jeremiah; Puri, Prem

    2002-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common causes of unexplained fever in neonates. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of urinary tract anomalies and acute renal damage in neonates who presented with first urinary tract infection in the first 8 weeks of life. We reviewed the records of 95 infants, who were hospitalised with UTI during a 6-year period (1994-1999). Patients with antenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis and incomplete radiological investigations were excluded from the study. Of the remaining 57 patients, 42 were boys and 15 girls. The mean age at diagnosis was 32 days (range 5-60 days). All patients underwent renal ultrasonography (US), voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan. Urinary tract abnormalities were detected in 20 (35%) patients. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was found in 19 (33%) neonates, 7 girls and 12 boys. Acute cortical defects on DMSA scan were present in 19 kidneys of patients with VUR and in 25 of those without reflux. Only one-third of neonates after first symptomatic UTI had VUR. We recommend that US, VCUG, and DMSA scan should be routinely performed after the first UTI in infants younger than 8 weeks.

  17. Functional domains and motifs of bacterial type III effector proteins and their roles in infection.

    PubMed

    Dean, Paul

    2011-11-01

    A key feature of the virulence of many bacterial pathogens is the ability to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic cells via a dedicated type three secretion system (T3SS). Many bacterial pathogens, including species of Chlamydia, Xanthomonas, Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, Shigella, Salmonella, Escherichia and Yersinia, depend on the T3SS to cause disease. T3SS effectors constitute a large and diverse group of virulence proteins that mimic eukaryotic proteins in structure and function. A salient feature of bacterial effectors is their modular architecture, comprising domains or motifs that confer an array of subversive functions within the eukaryotic cell. These domains/motifs therefore represent a fascinating repertoire of molecular determinants with important roles during infection. This review provides a snapshot of our current understanding of bacterial effector domains and motifs where a defined role in infection has been demonstrated.

  18. Bilateral acute pyogenic conjunctivitis with iritis induced by unilateral topical application of bacterial peptidoglycan muramyl dipeptide in adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Langford, Marlyn P; Foreman, Bridgett D; Srur, Lana; Ganley, James P; Redens, Thomas B

    2013-11-01

    The factors responsible for the conjunctivitis and iritis associated with acute ocular infection and post enteric inflammatory disease are not fully known. The pro-inflammatory activity of unilateral topical application of muramyl dipeptide (MDP; the smallest bio-active Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell wall component) was investigated in adult rabbits. The resultant bilateral conjunctivitis/iritis and pyogenic responses were characterized. Bilateral symptoms were graded by slit lamp examinations; tear fluid, Schirmer tests (tear production), blood and aqueous humor (AH) samples were obtained from MDP-treated and untreated rabbits. MDP concentration, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity (GGT; key enzyme in glutathione recapture, xenobiotic detoxification, eicosanoid synthesis and neutrophil function), protein concentration, and tear cell density, cytology, and immunofluorescent antibody reactivity to GGT and calreticulin (CRT; MDP-binding protein) were determined. MDP was cleared from ipsilateral tears and serum by 6 h, but was undetected in mock-treated contralateral tears. Bilateral signs of acute transient pyogenic conjunctivitis, characterized by tearing, lid edema, conjunctival hyperemia, chemosis and leukocytic infiltrate with iritis (erythema and aqueous flare) were detected. Milder symptoms occurred in the mock-treated contralateral eyes. Bilateral symptoms, tear production, tear protein, GGT activity, and mucopurulent discharge (containing up to 2.5-5.0 × 10(6) cells/mL) were elevated 4-8 h post MDP and resolved to near pre-treatment levels by 24 h. Tear GGT activity and protein levels were higher in MDP-treated and mock-treated contralateral eyes than in eyes of untreated adult rabbits (p's < 0.001). Elevated tear GGT activity was associated with histopathology and increased vascular and epithelial permeability to serum protein, GGT-positive epithelia cells, macrophages and heterophils. Repeat MDP applications induced recurrent

  19. [Bacterial bone and joint infections in childhood--a review. 3. Bacterial arthritis].

    PubMed

    Handrick, W; Borte, M; Herrmann, E; Spencker, F B; Tischer, W; Bennek, J

    1991-01-01

    This overview presents the most important topics of etiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, differential diagnostics and treatment of septic arthritis in children. A child with bacterial arthritis is always a case of emergency. Only immediate and adequate treatment can avoid permanent sequelae. Medical care for these patients should be done always in close cooperation of pediatricians, pediatric surgeons, radiologists, and sometimes orthopedists.

  20. Patterns of oral bacterial infection in captive snakes.

    PubMed

    Draper, C S; Walker, R D; Lawler, H E

    1981-12-01

    The bacterial isolates from culture specimens of snakes with infectious stomatitis were compared with those from culture specimens of the oral cavity of healthy captive snakes. Cloacal swab specimens were also taken from healthy snakes to compare their intestinal and oral bacterial populations. The healthy snakes had a predominantly gram-positive oral flora, with Corynebacterium spp and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp being the organisms isolated most frequently. The specimens from snakes with infectious stomatitis yielded predominantly gram-negative bacteria. The organisms most frequently isolated from these specimens were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Providencia rettgeri, and P maltophilia. The cloacal swabbing of healthy snakes also resulted in the isolation of predominantly gram-negative organisms, suggesting that these bacteria are not exogenous pathogens but opportunistic invaders.

  1. Interferon in resistance to bacterial and protozoan infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Gould, Cheryl L.; Kierszenbaum, Felipe; Degee, Antonie L. W.; Mansfield, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of genetic differences in mouse strains on the modulation of protozoan infections by interferon (IFN) were investigated. In one set of experiments, three different strains of mice were injected with T. cruzi, and their sera were assayed at five time intervals for IFN titer. A greater quantity of IFN was produced by mouse strains that were susceptible to T. cruzi infection than by the more resistant strain. In another set of experiments, spleen cell cultures from inbred strains of mice were challenged with an antigen made from T.b. rhodesiense. The cells from mice resistant to infection, produced greater amounts of IFN-gamma than did cells from the susceptible mice. In a third set of experiments, it was found that mice injected with T.b. rhodesiense before being infected with a diabetogenic virus (EMC-D) were resistant to the effects of the virus and did not produce virus-specific antibody.

  2. Parasites can enhance infections of fish with bacterial pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In aquaculture systems, fish are commonly infected by multiple pathogens, including parasites. Parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) and bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri are two common pathogens of cultured channel catfish. The objectives were to 1) evaluate the susceptibility of Ich parasitize...

  3. Immunospecific responses to bacterial elongation factor Tu during Burkholderia infection and immunization.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Wildaliz; Heang, Julie; Asakrah, Saja; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Roy, Chad J; Morici, Lisa A

    2010-12-17

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiological agent of melioidosis, a disease endemic in parts of Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. Currently there is no licensed vaccine against infection with this biological threat agent. In this study, we employed an immunoproteomic approach and identified bacterial Elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu) as a potential vaccine antigen. EF-Tu is membrane-associated, secreted in outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), and immunogenic during Burkholderia infection in the murine model of melioidosis. Active immunization with EF-Tu induced antigen-specific antibody and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. Mucosal immunization with EF-Tu also reduced lung bacterial loads in mice challenged with aerosolized B. thailandensis. Our data support the utility of EF-Tu as a novel vaccine immunogen against bacterial infection.

  4. Bacterial etiology and serotypes of acute otitis media in Mexican children.

    PubMed

    Parra, Mercedes Macias; Aguilar, Gerardo Martinez; Echaniz-Aviles, Gabriela; Rionda, Romulo Galo; Estrada, Maria de Los Angeles Meza; Cervantes, Yolanda; Pirçon, Jean-Yves; Van Dyke, Melissa K; Colindres, Romulo E; Hausdorff, William P

    2011-07-26

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae have been consistently reported to be the two major bacterial pathogens responsible for acute otitis media (AOM), mainly from studies in the US and Europe. However, data on bacterial pathogens causing AOM in Latin America are limited. Understanding the relative importance of these pathogens in a specific setting, the serotype distribution, and their antibiotic susceptibility levels is important to provide local vaccine and treatment recommendations. We therefore conducted a prospective, multi-center, tympanocentesis-based epidemiological study of Mexican children three months to less than five years of age. Fifty percent of episodes were in children who had received at least one dose of PCV7. Overall, 64% of samples were culture positive for bacterial pathogens. H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae were the leading causes of bacterial AOM, detected in 34% and 29% of AOM episodes, respectively. The most commonly isolated S. pneumoniae serotypes were 19A, 19F and 23F. All H. influenzae isolates were identified as non-typeable. Seventy-four percent of S. pneumoniae were susceptible to penicillin, while 97% were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanate. All H. influenzae samples were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanate and cefotaxime, 95% to cefuroxime and 75% to ampicillin. Both S. pneumoniae and non-typable H. influenzae represent important targets for vaccination strategies to reduce AOM in Mexican children.

  5. Oral Phage Therapy of Acute Bacterial Diarrhea With Two Coliphage Preparations: A Randomized Trial in Children From Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Shafiqul Alam; Sultana, Shamima; Reuteler, Gloria; Moine, Deborah; Descombes, Patrick; Charton, Florence; Bourdin, Gilles; McCallin, Shawna; Ngom-Bru, Catherine; Neville, Tara; Akter, Mahmuda; Huq, Sayeeda; Qadri, Firdausi; Talukdar, Kaisar; Kassam, Mohamed; Delley, Michèle; Loiseau, Chloe; Deng, Ying; El Aidy, Sahar; Berger, Bernard; Brüssow, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is rising in important bacterial pathogens. Phage therapy (PT), the use of bacterial viruses infecting the pathogen in a species-specific way, is a potential alternative. Method T4-like coliphages or a commercial Russian coliphage product or placebo was orally given over 4 days to Bangladeshi children hospitalized with acute bacterial diarrhea. Safety of oral phage was assessed clinically and by functional tests; coliphage and Escherichia coli titers and enteropathogens were determined in stool and quantitative diarrhea parameters (stool output, stool frequency) were measured. Stool microbiota was studied by 16S rRNA gene sequencing; the genomes of four fecal Streptococcus isolates were sequenced. Findings No adverse events attributable to oral phage application were observed (primary safety outcome). Fecal coliphage was increased in treated over control children, but the titers did not show substantial intestinal phage replication (secondary microbiology outcome). 60% of the children suffered from a microbiologically proven E. coli diarrhea; the most frequent diagnosis was ETEC infections. Bacterial co-pathogens were also detected. Half of the patients contained phage-susceptible E. coli colonies in the stool. E. coli represented less than 5% of fecal bacteria. Stool ETEC titers showed only a short-lived peak and were otherwise close to the replication threshold determined for T4 phage in vitro. An interim analysis after the enrollment of 120 patients showed no amelioration in quantitative diarrhea parameter by PT over standard care (tertiary clinical outcome). Stool microbiota was characterized by an overgrowth with Streptococcus belonging to the Streptococcus gallolyticus and Streptococcus salivarius species groups, their abundance correlated with quantitative diarrhea outcome, but genome sequencing did not identify virulence genes. Interpretation Oral coliphages showed a safe gut transit in children, but failed to achieve

  6. Arpin contributes to bacterial translocation and development of severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wen-Sheng; Zhang, Jian; Ju, Hui; Zheng, Hong-Mei; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Su; Zhang, Dian-Liang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the impact of Arpin protein and tight junction (TJ) proteins in the intestinal mucosa on bacterial translocation in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Fifty SAP patients were identified as study objects and then classified into two groups according to the presence of bacterial translocation (BT) in the blood [i.e., BT(+) and BT(-)]. Twenty healthy individuals were included in the control group. BT was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, colonic mucosal tissue was obtained by endoscopy and the expression of TJ proteins and Arpin protein was determined using immunofluorescence and western blotting. RESULTS: Bacterial DNA was detected in the peripheral blood of 62.0% of patients (31/50) with SAP. The expression of TJ proteins in SAP patients was lower than that in healthy controls. In contrast, Arpin protein expression in SAP patients was higher than in healthy controls (0.38 ± 0.19 vs 0.28 ± 0.16, P < 0.05). Among SAP patients, those positive for BT showed a higher level of claudin-2 expression (0.64 ± 0.27 vs 0.32 ± 0.21, P < 0.05) and a lower level of occludin (OC) (0.61 ± 0.28 vs 0.73 ± 0.32, P < 0.05) and zonula occludens-1 (0.42 ± 0.26 vs 0.58 ± 0.17, P = 0.038) expression in comparison with BT (-) patients. Moreover, the level of Arpin expression in BT (+) patients was higher than in BT (-) patients (0.61 ± 0.28 vs 0.31 ± 0.24, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Arpin protein affects the expression of tight junction proteins and may have an impact on BT. These results contribute to a better understanding of the factors involved in bacterial translocation during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25892881

  7. Bacterial Infections Following Splenectomy for Malignant and Nonmalignant Hematologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Giuseppe; Pizzigallo, Eligio

    2015-01-01

    Splenectomy, while often necessary in otherwise healthy patients after major trauma, finds its primary indication for patients with underlying malignant or nonmalignant hematologic diseases. Indications of splenectomy for hematologic diseases have been reducing in the last few years, due to improved diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In high-income countries, there is a clear decrease over calendar time in the incidence of all indication splenectomy except nonmalignant hematologic diseases. However, splenectomy, even if with different modalities including laparoscopic splenectomy and partial splenectomy, continue to be a current surgical practice both in nonmalignant hematologic diseases, such as Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP), Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), Congenital Hemolytic Anemia such as Spherocytosis, Sickle Cell Anemia and Thalassemia and Malignant Hematological Disease, such as lymphoma. Today millions of people in the world are splenectomized. Splenectomy, independently of its cause, induces an early and late increase in the incidence of venous thromboembolism and infections. Infections remain the most dangerous complication of splenectomy. After splenectomy, the levels of antibody are preserved but there is a loss of memory B cells against pneumococcus and tetanus, and the loss of marginal zone monocytes deputed to immunological defense from capsulated bacteria. Commonly, the infections strictly correlated to the absence of the spleen or a decreased or absent splenic function are due to encapsulated bacteria that are the most virulent pathogens in this set of patients. Vaccination with polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines again Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis should be performed before the splenectomy. This practice reduces but does not eliminate the occurrence of overwhelming infections due to capsulated bacteria. At present, most of infections found in splenectomized patients are due to Gram

  8. Development of a risk reduction intervention to reduce bacterial and viral infections for injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kristina T.; Altman, Jennifer K.; Corsi, Karen F.; Stein, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections are widespread problems among drug injectors, requiring novel preventive intervention. As part of a NIDA-funded study, we developed an intervention based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model, past research, injection hygiene protocols, and data collected from focus groups with 32 injectors in Denver in 2009. Qualitative responses from focus groups indicated that most participants had experienced skin abscesses and believed that bacterial infections were commonly a result of drug cut, injecting intramuscularly, and reusing needles. Access to injection supplies and experiencing withdrawal were the most frequently reported barriers to utilizing risk reduction. Implications for intervention development are discussed. PMID:23017057

  9. High bacterial titers in urine are predictive of abnormal postvoid residual urine in patients with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Caron, F; Alexandre, K; Pestel-Caron, M; Chassagne, P; Grise, P; Etienne, M

    2015-09-01

    Urine bacterial titers (BTs) are influenced by bacterial and host factors. The impact of an abnormal postvoid residual (PVR) on BT in urine was investigated. A total of 103 inpatients with a urine growing Enterobacteriacae (≥ 10(2) CFU/mL) and a PVR measure were analyzed, mostly female (62%), elderly (mean age: 72 years), with urinary tract infection (25% of asymptomatic bacteriuria) due to Escherichia coli (85%). Fifty-two subjects (56%) had BT ≥ 10(6) CFU/mL; 48 (53%) had a PVR ≤ 100 mL, while 26 (25%) had a PVR >250 mL. PVR increased with BT, and a significant (P<0.0001) threshold was reached for 10(6) CFU/mL: 100mL mean PVR for patients with BT ≤ 10(5) CFU/mL versus 248 mL for patients with BT >10(5) CFU/mL. High PVR and BT were associated with complicated infections, concomitant bacteremia, and delayed apyrexia. Screening for patients with BT ≥ 10(6) CFU/mL is an easy way to identify patients at high risk for acute retention and voiding disorders.

  10. Healthcare-associated viral and bacterial infections in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Laheij, A.M.G.A.; Kistler, J.O.; Belibasakis, G.N.; Välimaa, H.; de Soet, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Infection prevention in dentistry is an important topic that has gained more interest in recent years and guidelines for the prevention of cross-transmission are common practice in many countries. However, little is known about the real risks of cross-transmission, specifically in the dental healthcare setting. This paper evaluated the literature to determine the risk of cross-transmission and infection of viruses and bacteria that are of particular relevance in the dental practice environment. Facts from the literature on HSV, VZV, HIV, Hepatitis B, C and D viruses, Mycobacterium spp., Pseudomonas spp., Legionella spp. and multi-resistant bacteria are presented. There is evidence that Hepatitis B virus is a real threat for cross-infection in dentistry. Data for the transmission of, and infection with, other viruses or bacteria in dental practice are scarce. However, a number of cases are probably not acknowledged by patients, healthcare workers and authorities. Furthermore, cross-transmission in dentistry is under-reported in the literature. For the above reasons, the real risks of cross-transmission are likely to be higher. There is therefore a need for prospective longitudinal research in this area, to determine the real risks of cross-infection in dentistry. This will assist the adoption of effective hygiene procedures in dental practice. PMID:22701774

  11. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor protects against bacterial infection by promoting macrophage survival and reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Akihiro; Abe, Hiromi; Tsuruta, Sanae; Chiba, Sayuri; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Sekiya, Takashi; Morita, Rimpei; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2014-04-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is crucial for various immune responses. The relationship between AhR and infection with the intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is poorly understood. Here, we show that in response to LM infection, AhR is required for bacterial clearance by promoting macrophage survival and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. AhR-deficient mice were more susceptible to listeriosis, and AhR deficiency enhances bacterial growth in vivo and in vitro. On the other hand, pro-inflammatory cytokines were increased in AhR-deficient macrophages infected with LM despite enhanced susceptibility to LM infection in AhR-deficient mice. Subsequent studies demonstrate that AhR protects against macrophage cell death induced by LM infection through the induction of the antiapoptotic factor, the apoptosis inhibitor of macrophages, which promotes macrophage survival in the setting of LM infection. Furthermore, AhR promotes ROS production for bacterial clearance. Our results demonstrate that AhR is essential to the resistance against LM infection as it promotes macrophage survival and ROS production. This suggests that the activation of AhR by its ligands may be an effective strategy against listeriosis.

  12. Bacterial Internalization, Localization, and Effectors Shape the Epithelial Immune Response during Shigella flexneri Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, Juliane; Gwinner, Frederik; Rey, Camille; Tamir, Uyanga; Law, Helen K. W.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens are differentially sensed by the compartmentalized host immune system. Nevertheless, gene expression studies of infected cells commonly average the immune responses, neglecting the precise pathogen localization. To overcome this limitation, we dissected the transcriptional immune response to Shigella flexneri across different infection stages in bulk and single cells. This identified six distinct transcriptional profiles characterizing the dynamic, multilayered host response in both bystander and infected cells. These profiles were regulated by external and internal danger signals, as well as whether bacteria were membrane bound or cytosolic. We found that bacterial internalization triggers a complex, effector-independent response in bystander cells, possibly to compensate for the undermined host gene expression in infected cells caused by bacterial effectors, particularly OspF. Single-cell analysis revealed an important bacterial strategy to subvert host responses in infected cells, demonstrating that OspF disrupts concomitant gene expression of proinflammatory, apoptosis, and stress pathways within cells. This study points to novel mechanisms through which bacterial internalization, localization, and injected effectors orchestrate immune response transcriptional signatures. PMID:26123804

  13. Organelle targeting during bacterial infection: insights from Listeria.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, Alice; Stavru, Fabrizia; Cossart, Pascale

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular bacterium responsible for severe foodborne infections, is now recognized as a multifaceted model in infection biology. Comprehensive studies of the molecular and cellular basis of the infection have unraveled how the bacterium crosses the intestinal and feto-placental barriers, invades several cell types in which it multiplies and moves, and spreads from cell to cell. Interestingly, although Listeria does not actively invade host cell organelles, it can interfere with their function. We discuss the effect of Listeria on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the mechanisms leading to the fragmentation of the mitochondrial network and its consequences, and review the strategies used by Listeria to subvert nuclear functions, more precisely to control host gene expression at the chromatin level.

  14. Acute bronchial infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Dorca, J

    1995-10-01

    Bacterial bronchial infection is a frequent cause of COPD exacerbation but not its only aetiology. Increased purulent expectorant appears to be its best indicator rather than fever, non-productive cough or dyspnoea. The clinician must try to recognize this condition rather than systematically prescribe empirical antibiotics. Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis are the major pathogens. Although atypical bacteria are not frequent, Chlamydia pneumoniae could play significant role. During the last years, new antibiotics, much more expensive than other regimens, are widely prescribed, often without a rational approach. In patients not already on antibiotics, sputum Gram stain is useful for deciding which patient should be treated and what would be the best anti-biotic. When it is not available, the chosen antibiotic must be at least active against three major pathogens according to the local susceptibility patterns. In patients not responding to the initial treatment, the consideration of its potential spectrum holes is then more useful than sputum examination.

  15. Feline immunodeficiency virus can be experimentally transmitted via milk during acute maternal infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sellon, R K; Jordan, H L; Kennedy-Stoskopf, S; Tompkins, M B; Tompkins, W A

    1994-01-01

    Postnatal transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in neonates nursed by acutely infected mothers and infection resulting from oral inoculation of kittens with FIV were evaluated. Ten of 16 kittens nursed by four queens with FIV infection established immediately postpartum developed FIV infection. Five of 11 neonates orally administered cell-free FIV culture supernatant developed FIV infection. Kittens that developed FIV infection had greater proportions of CD4+ and Pan-T+ lymphocytes at birth than negative kittens. Infectious virus was recovered from the milk of acutely infected mothers. We conclude that FIV may be experimentally transmitted via milk from queens with acute infections and that oral administration of FIV to neonatal kittens results in infection. Images PMID:8151797

  16. The receptor for advanced glycation end products promotes bacterial growth at distant body sites in Staphylococcus aureus skin infection.

    PubMed

    Achouiti, Ahmed; Van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-09-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) has been implicated in the regulation of skin inflammation. We here sought to study the role of RAGE in host defense during skin infection caused by Staphylococcus (S.) aureus, the most common pathogen in this condition. Wild-type (Wt) and RAGE deficient (rage(-/-)) mice were infected subcutaneously with S. aureus and bacterial loads and local inflammation were quantified at regular intervals up to 8 days after infection. While bacterial burdens were similar in both mouse strains at the primary site of infection, rage(-/-) mice had lower bacterial counts in lungs and liver. Skin cytokine and chemokine levels did not differ between groups. In accordance with the skin model, direct intravenous infection with S. aureus was associated with lower bacterial loads in lungs and liver of rage(-/-) mice. Together these data suggest that RAGE does not impact local host defense during S. aureus skin infection, but facilitates bacterial growth at distant body sites.

  17. Oxidation resistance 1 (OXR1) participates in silkworm defense against bacterial infection through the JNK pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Li-De; Zhang, Qiao-Ling; Lu, Zhiqiang

    2017-02-01

    Bacterial infection causes enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in insects. Oxidation resistance 1 (OXR1) plays an antioxidant role in eukaryotic organisms, including insects. In this report, we demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus infection and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) injection induced the expression of specific transcriptional isoforms of OXR1 in larval silkworms. We further showed that a Jun kinase (JNK) pathway inhibitor, SP600125, down-regulated expression of OXR1 during infection, leading to elevated H2 O2 levels in the hemolymph, resulting in lower viability of the injected bacteria inside the silkworm larvae. Our study suggests that OXR1 participates in protecting larval silkworms from oxidative stress and bacterial infection through the JNK pathway.

  18. Skin, soft tissue and systemic bacterial infections following aquatic injuries and exposures.

    PubMed

    Diaz, James H; Lopez, Fred A

    2015-03-01

    : Bacterial infections following aquatic injuries occur commonly in fishermen and vacationers after freshwater and saltwater exposures. Internet search engines were queried with the key words to describe the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic and treatment strategies and outcomes of both the superficial and the deeper invasive infections caused by more common, newly emerging and unusual aquatic bacterial pathogens. Main findings included the following: (1) aquatic injuries often result in gram-negative polymicrobial infections with marine bacteria; (2) most marine bacteria are resistant to 1st- and 2nd-generation penicillins and cephalosporins; (3) nontuberculous, mycobacterial infections should be considered in late-onset, culture-negative and antibiotic-resistant marine infections; (4) superficial marine infections and pre-existing wounds exposed to seawater may result in deeply invasive infections and sepsis in immunocompromised patients. With the exception of minor marine wounds demonstrating localized cellulitis, most other marine infections and all gram-negative and mycobacterial marine infections will require therapy with antibiotic combinations.

  19. Coxsackievirus A21, Enterovirus 68, and Acute Respiratory Tract Infection, China

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zichun; Gonzalez, Richard; Wang, Zhong; Ren, Lili; Xiao, Yan; Li, Jianguo; Li, Yongjun; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Jin, Qi

    2012-01-01

    During August 2006–April 2010, in Beijing, China, 2 rare human enterovirus serotypes, coxsackievirus A21 and enterovirus 68, were detected most frequently in human enterovirus–positive adults with acute respiratory tract infections. Thus, during some years, these 2 viruses cause a substantial proportion of enterovirus-associated adult acute respiratory tract infections. PMID:22516379

  20. [Some immunological changes in children with bacterial infections treated with bacteriophages].

    PubMed

    Pagava, K I; Metskhvarishvili, G D; Gachechiladze, K K; Korinteli, I A; Khoĭle, N; Dzuliashvili, M G

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to reveal the possible immunological changes in children with bacterial infections treated with commercial bacteriophage preparations administered per os. In case of medical indications (for treatment or diagnostic) blood sampling was carried out. In serum the antibodies against bacteriophage preparations - phage cocktail components (phages against Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were investigated. The neutralisation reaction was used. There were processed samples from 65 children with following diagnoses: sepsis, bacterial pneumonia, urinary tract infection, bacterial infections of upper respiratory ways, bacterial diarrhea. In samples taken in the first days of treatment antibodies were revealed in infants up to one month (I group) in 0/29 cases - 0%, in infants aged from one month till one year (II group)- 1/25 - 4.0%, in children aged from 1 till 15 years (III group) - 3/9 - 33.3%; data after 14-20 days from the beginning of treatment - I group - 0/9 - 0%, II group - 4/15 - 26.7%, III group - 5/5 - 100%; data after 30-60 days from the beginning of the treatment - I group - 1/5 - 20.0%, II group - 6/10 - 60.0%, III group - 3/3 - 100%. Bacteriophages neitralisation degree varied between 50,7% and 97.3%. Any regularity regarding different components of used phage preparations was not established. In case of inclusion of commercial phage preparations administered per os in the treatment of bacterial infections in children, the anti-phage neutralizing antibodies are produced by the macroorganism. This fact limits the duration of phage therapy and its usage in the treatment of future bacterial infections in treated patients. Production of anti-phage antibodies in young infants is substantially less expressed and this indicates to purposefulness and presumably higher efficacy of bacteriophage therapy in this age period.

  1. Human ecology and behavior and sexually transmitted bacterial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, K K

    1994-01-01

    The three direct determinants of the rate of spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are sexual behaviors, the mean duration of infectiousness, and the mean efficiency of sexual transmission of each STD. Underlying ecological and behavioral factors that operate through one or more of these direct determinants lie on a continuum, ranging from those most proximate back to those more remote (in time or mechanism) from the direct determinants. Most remote and least modifiable are the historical stages of economic development that even today conspicuously influence patterns of sexual behavior. Next are the distribution and changing patterns of climate, hygiene, and population density; the global population explosion and stages of the demographic transition; and ongoing changes in human physiology (e.g., menarche at younger age) and culture (e.g., later marriage). More proximate on the continuum are war, migration, and travel; and current policies for economic development and social welfare. Most recent or modifiable are technologic and commercial product development (e.g., oral contraceptives); circumcision, condom, spermicide, and contraception practices; patterns of illicit drug use that influence sexual behaviors; and the accessibility, quality, and use of STD health care. These underlying factors help explain why the curable bacterial STDs are epidemic in developing countries and why the United States is the only industrialized country that has failed to control bacterial STDs during the AIDS era. Images PMID:8146138

  2. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  3. Microbiologically documented infections and infection-related mortality in children with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sung, Lillian; Lange, Beverly J; Gerbing, Robert B; Alonzo, Todd A; Feusner, James

    2007-11-15

    The primary objective was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of microbiologically defined infections and infection-related mortality (IRM) in 492 children with acute myeloid leukemia enrolled on CCG 2961. Secondary objectives were to determine the relationship between demographic, disease-related, and therapeutic variables, and infections and IRM. Institutions documented infections prospectively. Age, ethnicity, body mass index, leukemia karyotype, treatment, and institutional size were examined for association with infection outcomes. More than 60% of children experienced such infections in each of 3 phases of chemotherapy. There were 58 infectious deaths; cumulative incidence of IRM was 11% plus or minus 2%. Thirty-one percent of infectious deaths were associated with Aspergillus, 25.9% with Candida, and 15.5% with alpha hemolytic streptococci. Age older than 16 years (hazard ratio [HR], 3.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.87-5.89; P < .001), nonwhite ethnicity (HR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.10-3.09; P = .02), and underweight status (HR, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.51-6.22; P = .002) were associated with IRM, while size of the treating institution was not. Thus, age, ethnicity, and BMI were important contributors to IRM. Fungi and Gram-positive cocci were the most common organisms associated with IRM and, in particular, Aspergillus species was the largest contributor to infectious deaths.

  4. Airway microbiota and acute respiratory infection in children.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs), such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia, are the leading cause of hospitalization of infants in the US. While the incidence and severity of ARI can vary widely among children, the reasons for these differences are not fully explained by traditional risk factors (e.g., prematurity, viral pathogens). The recent advent of molecular diagnostic techniques has revealed the presence of highly functional communities of microbes inhabiting the human body (i.e., microbiota) that appear to influence development of local and systemic immune response. We propose a 'risk and resilience' model in which airway microbiota are associated with an increased (risk microbiota) or decreased (resilience microbiota) incidence and severity of ARI in children. We also propose that modulating airway microbiota (e.g., from risk to resilience microbiota) during early childhood will optimize airway immunity and, thereby, decrease ARI incidence and severity in children.

  5. Rapidly Escalating Hepcidin and Associated Serum Iron Starvation Are Features of the Acute Response to Typhoid Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Darton, Thomas C.; Blohmke, Christoph J.; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Waddington, Claire S.; Jones, Claire; Sturges, Pamela; Webster, Craig; Drakesmith, Hal; Pollard, Andrew J.; Armitage, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Iron is a key pathogenic determinant of many infectious diseases. Hepcidin, the hormone responsible for governing systemic iron homeostasis, is widely hypothesized to represent a key component of nutritional immunity through regulating the accessibility of iron to invading microorganisms during infection. However, the deployment of hepcidin in human bacterial infections remains poorly characterized. Typhoid fever is a globally significant, human-restricted bacterial infection, but understanding of its pathogenesis, especially during the critical early phases, likewise is poorly understood. Here, we investigate alterations in hepcidin and iron/inflammatory indices following experimental human typhoid challenge. Methodology/Principal Findings Fifty study participants were challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and monitored for evidence of typhoid fever. Serum hepcidin, ferritin, serum iron parameters, C-reactive protein (CRP), and plasma IL-6 and TNF-alpha concentrations were measured during the 14 days following challenge. We found that hepcidin concentrations were markedly higher during acute typhoid infection than at baseline. Hepcidin elevations mirrored the kinetics of fever, and were accompanied by profound hypoferremia, increased CRP and ferritin, despite only modest elevations in IL-6 and TNF-alpha in some individuals. During inflammation, the extent of hepcidin upregulation associated with the degree of hypoferremia. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that strong hepcidin upregulation and hypoferremia, coincident with fever and systemic inflammation, are hallmarks of the early innate response to acute typhoid infection. We hypothesize that hepcidin-mediated iron redistribution into macrophages may contribute to S. Typhi pathogenesis by increasing iron availability for macrophage-tropic bacteria, and that targeting macrophage iron retention may represent a strategy for limiting infections with macrophage-tropic pathogens such as S

  6. (68) Ga-labeled Ciprofloxacin Conjugates as Radiotracers for Targeting Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Satpati, Drishty; Arjun, Chanda; Krishnamohan, Repaka; Samuel, Grace; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2016-05-01

    With an aim of developing a bacteria-specific molecular imaging agent, ciprofloxacin has been modified with a propylamine spacer and linked to two common bifunctional chelators, p-SCN-Bz-DOTA and p-SCN-Bz-NOTA. The two ciprofloxacin conjugates, CP-PA-SCN-Bz-DOTA (1) and CP-PA-SCN-Bz-NOTA (2), were radiolabeled with (68)Ga in >90% radiochemical yield and were moderately stable in vitro for 4 h. The efficacy of (68)Ga-1 and (68)Ga-2 has been investigated in vitro in Staphylococcus aureus cells where bacterial binding of the radiotracers (0.9-1.0% for (68)Ga-1 and 1.6-2.3% for (68)Ga-2) could not be blocked in the presence of excess amount of unlabeled ciprofloxacin. However, uptake of radiotracers in live bacterial cells was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than that in non-viable bacterial cells. Bacterial infection targeting efficacy of (68)Ga-1 and (68)Ga-2 was tested in vivo in rats where the infected muscle-to-inflamed muscle ((68)Ga-1: 2 ± 0.2, (68)Ga-2: 3 ± 0.5) and infected muscle-to-normal muscle ratios ((68)Ga-1: 3 ± 0.4, (68)Ga-2: 6.6 ± 0.8) were found to improve at 120 min p.i. Fast blood clearance and renal excretion was observed for both the radiotracers. The two (68)Ga-labeled infection targeting radiotracers could discriminate between bacterial infection and inflammation in vivo and are worthy of further detailed investigation as infection imaging agents at the clinical level.

  7. Pathogenic bacterial species associated with endodontic infection evade innate immune control by disabling neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Aritsune; Jin, Jun-O; Johnston, Christopher D; Yamazaki, Hajime; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Rittling, Susan R

    2014-10-01

    Endodontic infections, in which oral bacteria access the tooth pulp chamber, are common and do not resolve once established. To investigate the effects of these infections on the innate immune response, we established a mouse subcutaneous chamber model, where a mixture of four oral pathogens commonly associated with these infections (endodontic pathogens [EP]), i.e., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus intermedius, Parvimonas micra, and Prevotella intermedia, was inoculated into subcutaneously implanted titanium chambers. Cells that infiltrated the chamber after these infections were primarily neutrophils; however, these neutrophils were unable to control the infection. Infection with a nonpathogenic oral bacterial species, Streptococcus mitis, resulted in well-controlled infection, with bacterial numbers reduced by 4 to 5 log units after 7 days. Propidium iodide (PI) staining of the chamber neutrophils identified three distinct populations: neutrophils from EP-infected chambers were intermediate in PI staining, while cells in chambers from mice infected with S. mitis were PI positive (apoptotic) or negative (live). Strikingly, neutrophils from EP-infected chambers were severely impaired in their ability to phagocytose and to generate reactive oxygen species in vitro after removal from the chamber compared to cells from S. mitis-infected chambers. The mechanism of neutrophil impairment was necrotic cell death as determined by morphological analyses. P. intermedia alone could induce a similar neutrophil phenotype. We conclude that the endodontic pathogens, particularly P. intermedia, can efficiently disable and kill infiltrating neutrophils, allowing these infections to become established. These results can help explain the persistence of endodontic infections and demonstrate a new virulence mechanism associated with P. intermedia.

  8. Differential expression of uterine NO in pregnant and nonpregnant rats with intrauterine bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Fang, L; Nowicki, B; Yallampalli, C

    2001-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the uterine host defense against bacterial infection. In nonpregnant rats, NO production in the uterus was shown to be lower, and inducible NO synthase (NOS) expression was undetectable. However, studies in pregnant rats show abundant expression of inducible NOS with significant elevation in NO production in the uterus. We have recently reported that intrauterine Escherichia coli infection caused a localized increase in uterine NO production and inducible NOS expression in the nonpregnant rat. In our present study, we examined whether the uterine NO production, NOS expression, and uterine tumor necrosis factor-alpha protein are increased in pregnant rats with intrauterine pathogenic Escherichia coli infection. Unlike the nonpregnant state, the NO production in the infected uterine horn of pregnant rats was not significantly elevated after bacterial inoculation compared with the contralateral uterine horn. The expression of uterine NOS (types II and III) also did not show significant upregulation in the infected horn. This is in contrast to that in nonpregnant animals, in which type II NOS was induced in the uterus on infection. Moreover, intrauterine infection induced an elevated expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha protein in the infected horn both of nonpregnant and of pregnant rats. These data suggest that the sequential stimulation of NOS expression, especially the inducible isoform, and generation of uterine NO are lacking during pregnancy despite an elevated tumor necrosis factor-alpha after infection. In summary, NO synthesis response may be maximal at pregnancy, and infection may not further induce the NO system. Present studies, together with our previous report that intrauterine infection-induced lethality in pregnancy rats was amplified with the inhibition of NO, suggest that pregnancy is a state predisposed for increased complications associated with intrauterine infection and

  9. Pathogenic Bacterial Species Associated with Endodontic Infection Evade Innate Immune Control by Disabling Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Aritsune; Jin, Jun-O; Johnston, Christopher D.; Yamazaki, Hajime; Houri-Haddad, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic infections, in which oral bacteria access the tooth pulp chamber, are common and do not resolve once established. To investigate the effects of these infections on the innate immune response, we established a mouse subcutaneous chamber model, where a mixture of four oral pathogens commonly associated with these infections (endodontic pathogens [EP]), i.e., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus intermedius, Parvimonas micra, and Prevotella intermedia, was inoculated into subcutaneously implanted titanium chambers. Cells that infiltrated the chamber after these infections were primarily neutrophils; however, these neutrophils were unable to control the infection. Infection with a nonpathogenic oral bacterial species, Streptococcus mitis, resulted in well-controlled infection, with bacterial numbers reduced by 4 to 5 log units after 7 days. Propidium iodide (PI) staining of the chamber neutrophils identified three distinct populations: neutrophils from EP-infected chambers were intermediate in PI staining, while cells in chambers from mice infected with S. mitis were PI positive (apoptotic) or negative (live). Strikingly, neutrophils from EP-infected chambers were severely impaired in their ability to phagocytose and to generate reactive oxygen species in vitro after removal from the chamber compared to cells from S. mitis-infected chambers. The mechanism of neutrophil impairment was necrotic cell death as determined by morphological analyses. P. intermedia alone could induce a similar neutrophil phenotype. We conclude that the endodontic pathogens, particularly P. intermedia, can efficiently disable and kill infiltrating neutrophils, allowing these infections to become established. These results can help explain the persistence of endodontic infections and demonstrate a new virulence mechanism associated with P. intermedia. PMID:25024367

  10. Acute hepatitis C: changing epidemiology and association with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Brejt, Nick; Gilleece, Yvonne; Fisher, Martin

    2007-03-01

    Over the past 6 to 7 years an increasing incidence of acute hepatitis C virus (AHCV) has been fuelled by two different changing epidemics: (1) a new resurgence of AHCV amongst intravenous drug users (IVDU); and (2) presumed sexually transmitted AHCV amongst predominantly HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). Increasing incidence amongst IVDUs is likely to be a consequence of changing injecting behaviour, possibly related to changes in perception of HIV as well as HCV risk and consequences. Increasing incidence amongst MSM is likely to be a consequence of changing sexual practices, for example number of sexual partners and type of sexual behaviour, as well as increasing availability of recreational drugs associated with sexual risk-taking, and wider availability of casual sexual partners via the internet or sex-on-premises venues. It remains unclear whether the current outbreaks in MSM, predominantly seen in HIV-positive individuals, reflect a predisposition to AHCV secondary to HIV status per se, or whether this reflects differences in behaviour amongst HIV-positive versus HIV-negative MSM, or potentially increased screening (either routine or secondary to abnormal liver function tests) in HIV-positive MSM. The majority of individuals with AHCV are asymptomatic and therefore routine screening of individuals in at-risk groups with abnormal liver function tests should be considered. Previous historical studies suggest that individuals with concomitant HIV infection are far less likely than those without to spontaneously clear HCV. It is currently recommended that such individuals acutely infected with HCV should undergo monitoring of HCV viral load levels to determine whether spontaneous clearance is likely or whether the opportunity for early treatment should be considered.

  11. Molecular Identification of Cultivable Bacteria From Infected Root Canals Associated With Acute Apical Abscess.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Letícia M M; Montagner, Francisco; Ribeiro, Adriana C; Mayer, Márcia A P; Gomes, Brenda P F A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the bacterial composition present in root canals of teeth associated with acute apical abscess by molecular identification (16S rRNA) of cultivable bacteria. Two hundred and twenty strains isolated by culture from 20 root canals were subjected to DNA extraction and amplification of the 16S rRNA gene (PCR), followed by sequencing. The resulting nucleotide sequences were compared to the GenBank database from the National Center of Biotechnology Information through BLAST. Strains not identified by sequencing were submitted to clonal analysis. The association of microbiological findings with clinical features and the association between microbial species were also investigated. Fifty-nine different cultivable bacteria were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, belonging to 6 phyla, with an average number of 6 species per root canal. Molecular approaches allowed identification of 99% of isolates. The most frequently identified bacteria were Prevotella spp., Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, Parvimonas micra, Dialister invisus, Filifactor alocis, and Peptostreptococcus stomatis. Positive association was found between Prevotella buccae and Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus and between Parvimonas micra and Prevotella nigrescens (both p<0.05). It was concluded that the microbiota of infected root canals associated with acute apical abscess is diverse and heterogeneous, composed mainly of anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, with the great majority belonging to the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes.

  12. Increased bacterial infections after transfusion of leukoreduced non-irradiated blood products in recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplants after reduced-intensity conditioning.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Pérez, José C; Villarreal-Villarreal, César D; Salazar-Riojas, Rosario; Méndez-Ramírez, Nereida; Vázquez-Garza, Eduardo; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2015-03-01

    Blood components transfused to hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients are irradiated to prevent transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD). The effect of transfusing non-irradiated blood products in HSCT outcome, including incidence of transplant complications, bacterial infections, acute and chronic GVHD presentation, and characteristics, has not been documented. Clinical records as well as blood bank and electronic databases of HSCT patients grafted after reduced-intensity conditioning who received irradiated versus non-irradiated blood products, after blood irradiation became unavailable at our center, were scrutinized for transplant outcome, clinical evolution, engraftment characteristics including days to neutrophil and platelet recovery, acute and chronic GVHD, rate and type of infections, and additional transplant-related comorbidities. All transfused blood products were leukoreduced. A total of 156 HSCT recipients was studied, 73 received irradiated and 83 non-irradiated blood components. Bacterial infections were significantly more frequent in patients transfused with non-irradiated blood products, P = .04. Clinically relevant increased rates of fever and neutropenia and mucositis were also documented in these patients. No cases of TA-GVHD occurred. Classical GVHD developed in 37 patients (50.7%) who received irradiated blood products and 36 (43.9%) who received non-irradiated blood products, P = .42. Acute GVHD developed in 28 patients (38.4%) in the blood-irradiated and 33 patients (39.8%) in the non-irradiation group, P = .87. The 2-year GVHD-free survival rate was 40% in the irradiated versus 40.6% in the non-irradiation group, P = .071. Increased bacterial infections were found in HSCT recipients transfused with non-irradiated blood products, which ideally must always be irradiated.

  13. Proteomic discovery of host kinase signaling in bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Mostertz, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by protein kinases acts as a reversible molecular switch in signal transduction, providing a mechanism for the control of protein function in cellular processes. During microbial infection, cellular signaling essentially contributes to immune control to restrict the dissemination of invading pathogens within the host organism. However, pathogenic microbes compete for the control of host signaling to create a beneficial environment for successful invasion and infection. Although efforts to achieve a better understanding of the host–pathogen interaction and its molecular consequences have been made, there is urgent need for a comprehensive characterization of infection‐related host signaling processes. System‐wide and hypothesis‐free analysis of phosphorylation‐mediated host signaling during host–microbe interactions by mass spectrometry (MS)‐based methods is not only promising in view of a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of the infection but also may result in the identification of novel host targets for preventive or therapeutic intervention. Here, we review state‐of‐the‐art MS‐based techniques for the system‐wide identification and quantitation of protein phosphorylation and compare them to array‐based phosphoprotein analyses. We also provide an overview of how phosphoproteomics and kinomics have contributed to our understanding of protein kinase‐driven phosphorylation networks that operate during host–microbe interactions. PMID:27440122

  14. Hypovitaminosis A coupled to secondary bacterial infection in beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Vitamin A is essential for normal growth, development, reproduction, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, immune function and vision. Hypovitaminosis A can lead to a series of pathological damage in animals. This report describes the case of hypovitaminosis A associated with secondary complications in calves. Case presentation From February to March in 2011, 2-and 3-month old beef calves presented with decreased eyesight, apparent blindness and persistent diarrhea occurred in a cattle farm of Hubei province, China. Based on history inspection and clinical observation, we made a tentative diagnosis of hypovitaminosis A. The disease was confirmed as a congenital vitamin A deficiency by determination of the concentrations of vitamin A in serum and feed samples. Furthermore, pathological and microbiological examination showed that the disease was associated with pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) infection and mucosal barriers damage in intestines. The corresponding treatments were taken immediately, and the disease was finally under control for a month. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of hypovitaminosis A coupled to secondary infection of E. coli in beef cattle, advancing our knowledge of how vitamin A affects infection and immunity in animals. This study could also be contributed to scientific diagnosis and treatments of complex hypovitaminosis A in cattle. PMID:23151297

  15. Probiotics: a new way to fight bacterial pulmonary infections?

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Y; Le Blay, G; Boisramé-Gastrin, S; Le Gall, F; Héry-Arnaud, G; Gouriou, S; Vallet, S; Le Berre, R

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics, of which Fleming has identified the first representative, penicillin, in 1928, allowed dramatical improvement of the treatment of patients presenting with infectious diseases. However, once an antibiotic is used, resistance may develop more or less rapidly in some bacteria. It is thus necessary to develop therapeutic alternatives, such as the use of probiotics, defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "micro-organisms which, administered live and in adequate amounts, confer a benefit to the health of the host". The scope of these micro-organisms is broad, concerning many areas including that of infectious diseases, especially respiratory infections. We describe the rational use of probiotics in respiratory tract infections and detail the results of various clinical studies describing the use of probiotics in the management of respiratory infections such as nosocomial or community acquired pneumonia, or on specific grounds such as cystic fibrosis. The results are sometimes contradictory, but the therapeutic potential of probiotics seems promising. Implementing research to understand their mechanisms of action is critical to conduct therapeutic tests based on a specific rational for the strains to be used, the dose, as well as the chosen mode and rhythm of administration.

  16. The insect Galleria mellonella as a powerful infection model to investigate bacterial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramarao, Nalini; Nielsen-Leroux, Christina; Lereclus, Didier

    2012-12-11

    The study of bacterial virulence often requires a suitable animal model. Mammalian models of infection are costly and may raise ethical issues. The use of insects as infection models provides a valuable alternative. Compared to other non-vertebrate model hosts such as nematodes, insects have a relatively advanced system of antimicrobial defenses and are thus more likely to produce information relevant to the mammalian infection process. Like mammals, insects possess a complex innate immune system(1). Cells in the hemolymph are capable of phagocytosing or encapsulating microbial invaders, and humoral responses include the inducible production of lysozyme and small antibacterial peptides(2,3). In addition, analogies are found between the epithelial cells of insect larval midguts and intestinal cells of mammalian digestive systems. Finally, several basic components essential for the bacterial infection process such as cell adhesion, resistance to antimicrobial peptides, tissue degradation and adaptation to oxidative stress are likely to be important in both insects and mammals(1). Thus, insects are polyvalent tools for the identification and characterization of microbial virulence factors involved in mammalian infections. Larvae of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella have been shown to provide a useful insight into the pathogenesis of a wide range of microbial infections including mammalian fungal (Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans) and bacterial pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris, Serratia marcescens Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes or Enterococcus faecalis(4-7). Regardless of the bacterial species, results obtained with Galleria larvae infected by direct injection through the cuticle consistently correlate with those of similar mammalian studies: bacterial strains that are attenuated in mammalian models demonstrate lower virulence in Galleria, and strains causing severe human infections are also

  17. Acute phase response to Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' infection in FIV-infected and non-FIV-infected cats.

    PubMed

    Korman, R M; Cerón, J J; Knowles, T G; Barker, E N; Eckersall, P D; Tasker, S

    2012-08-01

    The pathogenicity of Haemoplasma spp. in cats varies with 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' (CMhm) causing subclinical infection while Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf) often induces haemolytic anaemia. The aims of this study were to characterise the acute phase response (APR) of the cat to experimental infection with Mhf or CMhm, and to determine whether chronic feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection influences this response. The acute phase proteins serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) concentrations were measured pre-infection and every 7-14 days up to day 100 post-infection (pi) in cats infected with either Mhf or CMhm. Half of each group of cats (6/12) were chronically and subclinically infected with FIV. Marbofloxacin treatment was given on days 16-44 pi to half of the Mhf-infected cats, and on days 49-77 pi to half of the CMhm-infected cats. FIV-infected animals had significantly lower AGP concentrations, and significantly greater Hp concentrations than non-FIV-infected cats when infected with CMhm and Mhf, respectively. Both CMhm and Mhf infection were associated with significant increases in SAA concentrations, while AGP concentrations were only significantly increased by Mhf infection. Mhf-infected cats had significantly greater SAA concentrations than CMhm-infected animals. Both Mhf and CMhm infections were associated with an APR, with Mhf infection inducing a greater response. Chronic FIV infection appeared to modify the APR, which varied with the infecting Haemoplasma species.

  18. Bacterial species associated with sound and Botrytis-infected grapes from a Greek vineyard.

    PubMed

    Nisiotou, Aspasia A; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Iliopoulos, Vassilios; Cocolin, Luca; Nychas, George-John E

    2011-02-28

    Grape bacterial microbiota plays central roles in the quality of grapes and wine, yet its diversity remains poorly described. In the present study, bacterial species associated with sound and Botrytis-infected grapes of two cultivars originating from the same vineyard were assessed. Isolates were identified by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and sequence analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene. Comparable counts were recorded between Botrytis-infected and sound grape samples. In all cases, the majority of isolates belonged to different species of Enterobacteriaceae. The dominant species in the vineyard was Klebsiella oxytoca that was found in different combinations with Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter spp., Erwinia sp., Pantoea dispersa, Tatumella ptyseos or other species. In fermenting musts, those populations declined while other species evolved, like Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterobacter ludwigii. Populations in botrytised samples persisted longer during spontaneous fermentations. Present study suggests that bacterial diversity on grapes may be wider than previously described.

  19. Bacterial isolates from equine infections in western Canada (1998–2003)

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Chris; Greenwood, Sarah; Boison, Joe O.; Chirino-Trejo, Manuel; Dowling, Patricia M.

    2008-01-01

    All bacterial samples of equine origin submitted to the diagnostic laboratory at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine from January 1998 to December 2003 from either “in-clinic” or Field Service cases were accessed (1323 submissions). The most common bacterial isolates from specific presenting signs were identified, along with their in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. The most common site from which significant bacterial isolates were recovered was the respiratory tract, followed by wounds. Streptococcus zooepidemicus was the most common isolate from most infections, followed by Escherichia coli. Antimicrobial resistance was not common in the isolates and acquired antimicrobial resistance to multiple drugs was rare. The results are compared with previous published studies from other institutions and used to suggest appropriate antimicrobial treatments for equine infections in western Canada. PMID:18309745

  20. A Long Journey Ahead: Long Non-coding RNAs in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    zur Bruegge, Jennifer; Einspanier, Ralf; Sharbati, Soroush

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens have coevolved with their hosts and acquired strategies to circumvent defense mechanisms of host cells. It was shown that bacteria interfere with the expression of mammalian microRNAs to modify immune signaling, autophagy, or the apoptotic machinery. Recently, a new class of regulatory RNAs, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), was reported to have a pivotal role in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. A growing body of literature reports on specific involvement of lncRNAs in the host cell response toward bacterial infections. This mini review summarizes recent data that focuses on lncRNA function in host cells during bacterial infection and provides a perspective where future research in this regard may be going.

  1. Pathological-Condition-Driven Construction of Supramolecular Nanoassemblies for Bacterial Infection Detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Li; Ma, Huai-Lei; Qi, Guo-Bin; Zhang, Di; Yu, Faquan; Hu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-13

    A pyropheophorbide-α-based building block (Ppa-PLGVRG-Van) can be used to construct self-aggregated superstructures in vivo for highly specific and sensitive diagnosis of bacterial infection by noninvasive photoacoustic tomography. This in vivo supramolecular chemistry approach opens a new avenue for efficient, rapid, and early-stage disease diagnosis with high sensitivity and specificity.

  2. Bacterial Infection in Deep Paraspinal Muscles in a Parturient Following Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xuhong; Song, Jiefu; Liang, Qingyuan; Qin, Jibin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial infection related to epidural catheterizations could occur. In general, the incidence of postoperative infection at the insertion site is very low. Paucity literatures are reported for paraspinal muscle infection after epidural analgesia in parturient. We report a case of paraspinal muscle infection shortly after epidural analgesia in a parturient, who was subjected to because of threatened preterm labor. Epidural morphine was administered for 2 days for childbirth pain control. She began to have constant low-back pain and fever on postpartum Day 2. Magnetic resonance image revealed a broad area of subcutaneous edema with a continuum along the catheter trajectory deep to the paraspinal muscles. A catheter-related bacterial infection was suspected. The surgical debridement and drainage was required combined with intravenous antibiotics on postpartum Day 3. She was soon cured uncomplicatedly. Epidural analgesia is effective to control labor pain and, in general, it is safe. However, the sequelae of complicated infection may be underestimated. A literature search yielded 7 other cases of catheter-related epidural abscess or soft tissue infection. Vigilance for these infections, especially in postpartum patients with backache, is needed. Moreover, early detection and proper treatment of infectious signs at postanesthetic visit are very important. PMID:26683923

  3. Viral Infection in Adults with Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Remolina, Yuly Andrea; Ulloa, María Mercedes; Vargas, Hernán; Díaz, Liliana; Gómez, Sandra Liliana; Saavedra, Alfredo; Sánchez, Edgar; Cortés, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the viral aetiology in adult patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) admitted to sentinel surveillance institutions in Bogotá in 2012. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in which microarray molecular techniques for viral identification were used on nasopharyngeal samples of adult patients submitted to the surveillance system, and further descriptions of clinical features and relevant clinical outcomes, such as mortality, need for critical care, use of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay, were obtained. Setting Respiratory infections requiring hospital admission in surveillance centres in Bogotá, Colombia. Participants Ninety-one adult patients with acute respiratory infection (55% were female). Measurements Viral identification, intensive care unit admission, hospital stay, and mortality. Results Viral identification was achieved for 63 patients (69.2%). Comorbidity was frequently identified and mainly involved chronic pulmonary disease or pregnancy. Influenza, Bocavirus and Adenovirus were identified in 30.8%, 28.6% and 18.7% of the cases, respectively. Admission to the intensive care unit occurred in 42.9% of the cases, while mechanical ventilation was required for 36.3%. The average hospital stay was 9.9 days, and mortality was 15.4%. Antibiotics were empirically used in 90.1% of patients. Conclusions The prevalence of viral aetiology of SARI in this study was high, with adverse clinical outcomes, intensive care requirements and high mortality. PMID:26576054

  4. Bacterial endosymbiont infections in 'living fossils': a case study of North American vaejovid scorpions.

    PubMed

    Bryson, Robert W

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts are common among arthropods, and maternally inherited forms can affect the reproductive and behavioural traits of their arthropod hosts. The prevalence of bacterial endosymbionts and their role in scorpion evolution have rarely been investigated. In this study, 61 samples from 40 species of scorpion in the family Vaejovidae were screened for the presence of the bacterial endosymbionts Cardinium, Rickettsia, Spiroplasma and Wolbachia. No samples were infected by these bacteria. However, one primer pair specifically designed to amplify Rickettsia amplified nontarget genes of other taxa. Similar off-target amplification using another endosymbiont-specific primer was also found during preliminary screenings. Results caution against the overreliance on previously published screening primers to detect bacterial endosymbionts in host taxa and suggest that primer specificity may be higher in primers targeting nuclear rather than mitochondrial genes.

  5. Initial antibodies binding to HIV-1 gp41 in acutely infected subjects are polyreactive and highly mutated

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Munshaw, Supriya; Zhang, Ruijun; Marshall, Dawn J.; Vandergrift, Nathan; Whitesides, John F.; Lu, Xiaozhi; Yu, Jae-Sung; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Gao, Feng; Markowitz, Martin; Heath, Sonya L.; Bar, Katharine J.; Goepfert, Paul A.; Montefiori, David C.; Shaw, George C.; Alam, S. Munir; Margolis, David M.; Denny, Thomas N.; Boyd, Scott D.; Marshal, Eleanor; Egholm, Michael; Simen, Birgitte B.; Hanczaruk, Bozena; Fire, Andrew Z.; Voss, Gerald; Kelsoe, Garnett; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    The initial antibody response to HIV-1 is targeted to envelope (Env) gp41, and is nonneutralizing and ineffective in controlling viremia. To understand the origins and characteristics of gp41-binding antibodies produced shortly after HIV-1 transmission, we isolated and studied gp41-reactive plasma cells from subjects acutely infected with HIV-1. The frequencies of somatic mutations were relatively high in these gp41-reactive antibodies. Reverted unmutated ancestors of gp41-reactive antibodies derived from subjects acutely infected with HIV-1 frequently did not react with autologous HIV-1 Env; however, these antibodies were polyreactive and frequently bound to host or bacterial antigens. In one large clonal lineage of gp41-reactive antibodies, reactivity to HIV-1 Env was acquired only after somatic mutations. Polyreactive gp41-binding antibodies were also isolated from uninfected individuals. These data suggest that the majority of gp41-binding antibodies produced after acute HIV-1 infection are cross-reactive responses generated by stimulating memory B cells that have previously been activated by non–HIV-1 antigens. PMID:21987658

  6. miR-15a/16 regulates macrophage phagocytosis after bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyung-Geun; Yang, Jincheng; Zheng, Yijie; Jin, Yang

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial infection and its associated sepsis are devastating clinical entities that lead to high mortality and morbidity in critically ill patients. Phagocytosis, along with other innate immune responses, exerts crucial impacts on the outcomes of these patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a novel class of regulatory noncoding RNAs that target specific mRNAs for modulation of translation and expression of a targeted protein. The roles of miRNAs in host defense against bacterial sepsis remain unclear. We found that bacterial infections and/or bacterial-derived LPS enhanced the level of miR-15a/16 in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). Deletion of miR-15a/16 (miR-15a/16(-/-)) in myeloid cells significantly decreased the bacterial infection-associated mortality in sepsis mouse models. Moreover, miR-15a/16 deficiency (miR-15a/16(-/-)) resulted in augmented phagocytosis and generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in BMDMs. Supportively, overexpression of miR-15a/16 using miRNA mimics led to decreased phagocytosis and decreased generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Mechanistically, deletion of miR-15a/16 upregulated the expression of TLR4 via targeting the principle transcriptional regulator PU.1 locating on the promoter region of TLR4, and further modulated the downstream signaling molecules of TLR4, including Rho GTPase Cdc 42 and TRAF6. In addition, deficiency of miR-15a/16 also facilitated TLR4-mediated proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine release from BMDMs at the initial phase of infections. Taken together, miR-15a/16 altered phagocytosis and bacterial clearance by targeting, at least partially, on the TLR4-associated pathways, subsequently affecting the survival of septic mice.

  7. Biomarkers and Bacterial Pneumonia Risk in Patients with Treated HIV Infection: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjerk, Sonja M.; Baker, Jason V.; Emery, Sean; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Angus, Brian; Gordin, Fred M.; Pett, Sarah L.; Stephan, Christoph; Kunisaki, Ken M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite advances in HIV treatment, bacterial pneumonia continues to cause considerable morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. Studies of biomarker associations with bacterial pneumonia risk in treated HIV-infected patients do not currently exist. Methods We performed a nested, matched, case-control study among participants randomized to continuous combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy trial. Patients who developed bacterial pneumonia (cases) and patients without bacterial pneumonia (controls) were matched 1∶1 on clinical center, smoking status, age, and baseline cART use. Baseline levels of Club Cell Secretory Protein 16 (CC16), Surfactant Protein D (SP-D), C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and d-dimer were compared between cases and controls. Results Cases (n = 72) and controls (n = 72) were 25.7% female, 51.4% black, 65.3% current smokers, 9.7% diabetic, 36.1% co-infected with Hepatitis B/C, and 75.0% were on cART at baseline. Median (IQR) age was 45 (41, 51) years with CD4+ count of 553 (436, 690) cells/mm3. Baseline CC16 and SP-D were similar between cases and controls, but hsCRP was significantly higher in cases than controls (2.94 µg/mL in cases vs. 1.93 µg/mL in controls; p = 0.02). IL-6 and d-dimer levels were also higher in cases compared to controls, though differences were not statistically significant (p-value 0.06 and 0.10, respectively). Conclusions In patients with cART-treated HIV infection, higher levels of systemic inflammatory markers were associated with increased bacterial pneumonia risk, while two pulmonary-specific inflammatory biomarkers, CC16 and SP-D, were not associated with bacterial pneumonia risk. PMID:23457535

  8. Acute hemorrhagic encephalitis: An unusual presentation of dengue viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Vikram, Naval Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a common viral infection worldwide with presentation varying from clinically silent infection to dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and severe fulminant dengue shock syndrome. Neurological manifestation usually results from multisystem dysfunction secondary to vascular leak. Presentation as hemorrhagic encephalitis is very rare. Here we present the case of a 13-year-old female admitted with generalized tonic clonic seizures. Plain computed tomography (CT) scan of head revealed hypodensities in bilateral deep gray matter nuclei and right posterior parietal lobe without any hemorrhage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serology were positive for IgM and IgG antibodies to dengue viral antigen. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multifocal T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensities in bilateral cerebral parenchyma including basal ganglia. No hemorrhage was seen. She was managed with steroids. As her clinical condition deteriorated, after being stable for 2 days, repeat MRI was done which revealed development of hemorrhage within the lesions, and diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic encephalitis of dengue viral etiology was made. PMID:25709166

  9. Acute hemorrhagic encephalitis: An unusual presentation of dengue viral infection.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Vikram, Naval Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a common viral infection worldwide with presentation varying from clinically silent infection to dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and severe fulminant dengue shock syndrome. Neurological manifestation usually results from multisystem dysfunction secondary to vascular leak. Presentation as hemorrhagic encephalitis is very rare. Here we present the case of a 13-year-old female admitted with generalized tonic clonic seizures. Plain computed tomography (CT) scan of head revealed hypodensities in bilateral deep gray matter nuclei and right posterior parietal lobe without any hemorrhage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serology were positive for IgM and IgG antibodies to dengue viral antigen. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multifocal T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensities in bilateral cerebral parenchyma including basal ganglia. No hemorrhage was seen. She was managed with steroids. As her clinical condition deteriorated, after being stable for 2 days, repeat MRI was done which revealed development of hemorrhage within the lesions, and diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic encephalitis of dengue viral etiology was made.

  10. Anti-bacterial effects of enzymatically-isolated sialic acid from glycomacropeptide in a Helicobacter pylori-infected murine model

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Hye-Ji; Koh, Hong Bum; Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Cho, Hyang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization of the stomach mucosa and duodenum is the major cause of acute and chronic gastroduodenal pathology in humans. Efforts to find effective anti-bacterial strategies against H. pylori for the non-antibiotic control of H. pylori infection are urgently required. In this study, we used whey to prepare glycomacropeptide (GMP), from which sialic acid (G-SA) was enzymatically isolated. We investigated the anti-bacterial effects of G-SA against H. pylori in vitro and in an H. pylori-infected murine model. MATERIALS/METHODS The anti-bacterial activity of G-SA was measured in vitro using the macrodilution method, and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production was measured in H. pylori and AGS cell co-cultures by ELISA. For in vivo study, G-SA 5 g/kg body weight (bw)/day and H. pylori were administered to mice three times over one week. After one week, G-SA 5 g/kg bw/day alone was administered every day for one week. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA to determine the anti-inflammatory effects of G-SA. In addition, real-time PCR was performed to measure the genetic expression of cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA). RESULTS G-SA inhibited the growth of H. pylori and suppressed IL-8 production in H. pylori and in AGS cell co-cultures in vitro. In the in vivo assay, administration of G-SA reduced levels of IL-1β and IL-6 pro-inflammatory cytokines whereas IL-10 level increased. Also, G-SA suppressed the expression of cagA in the stomach of H. pylori-infected mice. CONCLUSION G-SA possesses anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect in an experimental H. pylori-infected murine model. G-SA has potential as an alternative to antibiotics for the prevention of H. pylori infection and H. pylori-induced gastric disease prevention. PMID:28194260

  11. Respirable bacteriophages for the treatment of bacterial lung infections.

    PubMed

    Hoe, Susan; Semler, Diana D; Goudie, Amanda D; Lynch, Karlene H; Matinkhoo, Sadaf; Finlay, Warren H; Dennis, Jonathan J; Vehring, Reinhard

    2013-12-01

    This review article discusses the development of respiratory therapeutics containing bacteriophages indicated for lung infections, specifically those that have become increasingly difficult to treat because of antibiotic resistance. Recent achievements and remaining problems are presented for each step necessary to develop a bacteriophage-containing dosage form for respiratory drug delivery, including selection of appropriate bacteriophages for therapy, processing and purification of phage preparations, formulation into a stable, solid dosage form, and delivery device selection. Safety and efficacy studies in animals and human subjects are also reviewed.

  12. A Study of Plazomicin Compared With Colistin in Patients With Infection Due to Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-03

    Bloodstream Infections (BSI) Due to CRE; Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia (HABP) Due to CRE; Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia (VABP) Due to CRE; Complicated Urinary Tract Infection (cUTI) Due to CRE; Acute Pyelonephritis (AP) Due to CRE

  13. Tamsulosin alters levofloxacin pharmacokinetics in prostates derived from rats with acute bacterial prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guo-Dong; Xiao, Ming-Zhao; Zhou, Yuan-Da; Yang, Jing; He, Hai-Xia; He, Yue; Zeng, Yang

    2013-03-01

    The combination of levofloxacin and α1 adrenergic antagonist treatment is the current preferred choice for both bacterial and non-bacterial prostatitis. The aim of this study is to explore the influence of α1 adrenergic antagonists on the pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin using rat models with acute bacterial prostatitis (ABP) induced by direct injection with Escherichia coli (ATCC25922). A total of 96 model rats were randomly assigned into two groups: the experimental group (treated with both tamsulosin and levofloxacin, n=48) and the control group (treated with levofloxacin and solvents, n=48). Six rats from each group were euthanized to collect blood, liver, kidney and prostate samples at the time points of 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 h after drug administration. The levofloxacin concentrations were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using the 3p97 software program. There were no obvious differences (P>0.05) between the experimental and control groups in the major pharmacokinetic parameters of levofloxacin, including the halftime (t1/2), time to peak (tpeak), clearance rate (CL), maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC0∼12), in the plasma or in the hepatic and kidney tissues of the model rats. However, in the prostatic tissues, tamsulosin increased the Cmax, prolonged the t1/2 and decreased the CL of levofloxacin (P<0.05). These results indicate that tamsulosin may enhance the effect of levofloxacin in the treatment of bacterial prostatitis without changing the drug concentration in the liver and kidney.

  14. Bacterial Infection Increases Reproductive Investment in Burying Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Reavey, Catherine E.; Silva, Farley W. S.; Cotter, Sheena C.

    2015-01-01

    The Nicrophorus genus lives and breeds in a microbe rich environment. As such, it would be expected that strategies should be in place to counter potentially negative effects of the microbes common to this environment. In this study, we show the response of Nicrophorus vespilloides to the common soil bacterium, Bacillus subtilis. Phenoloxidase (PO) levels are not upregulated in response to the challenge and the bacteria are observed to multiply within the haemolymph of the host. Despite the growth of B. subtilis, survival is not affected, either in virgin or in breeding beetles. Some limit on bacterial growth in the haemolymph does seem to be occurring, suggesting mechanisms of resistance, in addition to tolerance mechanisms. Despite limited detrimental effects on the individual, the challenge by Bacillus subtilis appears to act as a cue to increase reproductive investment. The challenge may indicate a suite of negative environmental conditions that could compromise future breeding opportunities. This could act as a cue to increase parental investment in the current bout. PMID:26529021

  15. Emerging Bacterial Infection: Identification and Clinical Significance of Kocuria Species

    PubMed Central

    Palange, Padmavali; Vaish, Ritu; Bhatti, Adnan Bashir; Kale, Vinod; Kandi, Maheshwar Reddy; Bhoomagiri, Mohan Rao

    2016-01-01

    Recently there have been reports of gram-positive cocci which are morphologically similar to both Staphylococci and the Micrococci. These bacteria have been identified as Kocuria species with the help of automated identification system and other molecular methods including 16S rRNA (ribosomal ribonucleic acid) evaluation. Kocuria belongs to the family Micrococcaceae which also includes Staphylococcus species and Micrococcus species. Isolation and clinical significance of these bacteria from human specimens warrant great caution as it does not necessarily confirm infection due to their ubiquitous presence, and as a normal flora of skin and mucous membranes in human and animals. Most clinical microbiology laboratories ignore such bacteria as laboratory and specimen contaminants. With increasing reports of infections associated with these bacteria, it is now important for clinical microbiologists to identify and enumerate the virulence and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of such bacteria and assist clinicians in improving the patient care and management. We review the occurrence and clinical significance of Kocuria species. PMID:27630804

  16. Bacterial Manipulation of NK Cell Regulatory Activity Increases Susceptibility to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Brandon S.; Schmidt, Rebecca L.; Jamieson, Amanda; Merkel, Patricia; Knight, Vijaya; Cole, Caroline M.; Raulet, David H.; Lenz, Laurel L.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells produce interferon (IFN)-γ and thus have been suggested to promote type I immunity during bacterial infections. Yet, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) and some other pathogens encode proteins that cause increased NK cell activation. Here, we show that stimulation of NK cell activation increases susceptibility during Lm infection despite and independent from robust NK cell production of IFNγ. The increased susceptibility correlated with IL-10 production by responding NK cells. NK cells produced IL-10 as their IFNγ production waned and the Lm virulence protein p60 promoted induction of IL-10 production by mouse and human NK cells. NK cells consequently exerted regulatory effects to suppress accumulation and activation of inflammatory myeloid cells. Our results reveal new dimensions of the role played by NK cells during Lm infection and demonstrate the ability of this bacterial pathogen to exploit the induction of regulatory NK cell activity to increase host susceptibility. PMID:27295349

  17. RIG-I detects infection with live Listeria by sensing secreted bacterial nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Zeinab; Schlee, Martin; Roth, Susanne; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Barchet, Winfried; Böttcher, Jan; Hain, Torsten; Geiger, Sergej; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Fritz, Jörg H; Civril, Filiz; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Kurts, Christian; Ruland, Jürgen; Hartmann, Gunther; Chakraborty, Trinad; Knolle, Percy A

    2012-01-01

    Immunity against infection with Listeria monocytogenes is not achieved from innate immune stimulation by contact with killed but requires viable Listeria gaining access to the cytosol of infected cells. It has remained ill-defined how such immune sensing of live Listeria occurs. Here, we report that efficient cytosolic immune sensing requires access of nucleic acids derived from live Listeria to the cytoplasm of infected cells. We found that Listeria released nucleic acids and that such secreted bacterial RNA/DNA was recognized by the cytosolic sensors RIG-I, MDA5 and STING thereby triggering interferon β production. Secreted Listeria nucleic acids also caused RIG-I-dependent IL-1β-production and inflammasome activation. The signalling molecule CARD9 contributed to IL-1β production in response to secreted nucleic acids. In conclusion, cytosolic recognition of secreted bacterial nucleic acids by RIG-I provides a mechanistic explanation for efficient induction of immunity by live bacteria. PMID:23064150

  18. Targeting bacterial membrane function: an underexploited mechanism for treating persistent infections

    PubMed Central

    Hurdle, Julian G.; O’Neill, Alex J.; Chopra, Ian; Lee, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Persistent infections involving slow-growing or non-growing bacteria are hard to treat with antibiotics that target biosynthetic processes in growing cells. Consequently, there is a need for antimicrobials that can treat infections containing dormant bacteria. In this Review, we discuss the emerging concept that disrupting the bacterial membrane bilayer or proteins that are integral to membrane function (including membrane potential and energy metabolism) in dormant bacteria is a strategy for treating persistent infections. The clinical applicability of these approaches is exemplified by the efficacy of lipoglycopeptides that damage bacterial membranes and of the diarylquinoline TMC207, which inhibits membrane-bound ATP synthase. Despite some drawbacks, membrane-active agents form an important new means of eradicating recalcitrant, non-growing bacteria. PMID:21164535

  19. Dissection of a type I interferon pathway in controlling bacterial intracellular infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, Juliane; Müller, Holger C; Naujoks, Jan; Tabeling, Christoph; Shin, Sunny; Witzenrath, Martin; Hellwig, Katharina; Kirschning, Carsten J; Taylor, Gregory A; Barchet, Winfried; Bauer, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Roy, Craig R; Opitz, Bastian

    2011-11-01

    Defence mechanisms against intracellular bacterial pathogens are incompletely understood. Our study characterizes a type I IFN-dependent cell-autonomous defence pathway directed against Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular model organism and frequent cause of pneumonia. We show that macrophages infected with L. pneumophila produced IFNβ in a STING- and IRF3- dependent manner. Paracrine type I IFNs stimulated upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes and a cell-autonomous defence pathway acting on replicating and non-replicating Legionella within their specialized vacuole. Our infection experiments in mice lacking receptors for type I and/or II IFNs show that type I IFNs contribute to expression of IFN-stimulated genes and to bacterial clearance as well as resistance in L. pneumophila pneumonia in addition to type II IFN. Overall, our study shows that paracrine type I IFNs mediate defence against L. pneumophila, and demonstrates a protective role of type I IFNs in in vivo infections with intracellular bacteria.

  20. Rhinovirus-C detection in children presenting with acute respiratory infection to hospital in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fawkner-Corbett, David W; Khoo, Siew Kim; Duarte, Carminha M; Bezerra, Patricia G M; Bochkov, Yury A; Gern, James E; Le Souef, Peter N; McNamara, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (RV) is a common cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children. We aimed to characterize the clinical and demographic features associated with different RV species detected in children attending hospital with ARI, from low-income families in North-east Brazil. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 630 children <5 years with ARI. Clinical diagnosis and disease severity were also recorded. Samples were analyzed by multiplex PCR for 18 viral and atypical bacterial pathogens; RV positive samples underwent partial sequencing to determine species and type. RV was the fourth commonest pathogen accounting for 18.7% of pathogens detected. RV was commonly detected in children with bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma/episodic viral wheeze (EVW). Species and type were assigned in 112 cases (73% RV-A; 27% RV-C; 0% RV-B). Generally, there were no differences in clinical or demographic characteristics between those infected with RV-A and RV-C. However, in children with asthma/EVW, RV-C was detected relatively more frequently than RV-A (23% vs. 5%; P = 0.04). Our findings highlight RV as a potentially important pathogen in this setting. Generally, clinical and demographic features were similar in children in whom RV-A and C species were detected. However, RV-C was more frequently found in children with asthma/EVW than RV-A.

  1. Rhinovirus-C detection in children presenting with acute respiratory infection to hospital in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Fawkner-Corbett, DW; Khoo, SK; Duarte, MC; Bezerra, PGM; Bochkov, YA; Gern, JE; Le Souef, PN; McNamara, PS

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Human rhinovirus (RV) is a common cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children. We aimed to characterise the clinical and demographic features associated with different RV species detected in children attending hospital with ARI, from low-income families in North-east Brazil. Methods Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 630 children <5years with ARI. Clinical diagnosis and disease severity were also recorded. Samples were analysed by multiplex PCR for 18 viral and atypical bacterial pathogens; RV positive samples underwent partial sequencing to determine species and type. Results RV was the fourth commonest pathogen accounting for 18.7% of pathogens detected. RV was commonly detected in children with bronchiolitis, pneumonia and asthma/episodic viral wheeze (EVW). Species and type were assigned in 112 cases (73% RV-A; 27% RV-C; 0% RV-B). Generally, there were no differences in clinical or demographic characteristics between those infected with RV-A and RV-C. However, in children with asthma/EVW, RV-C was detected relatively more frequently than RV-A (23% vs 5%; p=0.04). Conclusions Our findings highlight RV as a potentially important pathogen in this setting. Generally, clinical and demographic features were similar in children in whom RV A and C species were detected. However, RV-C was more frequently found in children with asthma/EVW than RV-A. PMID:26100591

  2. Antibody-Mediated Elimination of the Obligate Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Ehrlichia chaffeensis during Active Infection

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Gary M.; Yager, Eric; Shilo, Konstantin; Volk, Erin; Reilly, Andrew; Chu, Frederick K.

    2000-01-01

    It is generally accepted that cellular, but not humoral immunity, plays an important role in host defense against intracellular bacteria. However, studies of some of these pathogens have provided evidence that antibodies can provide immunity if present during the initiation of infection. Here, we examined immunity against infection by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Studies with mice have demonstrated that immunocompetent strains are resistant to persistent infection but that SCID mice become persistently and fatally infected. Transfer of immune serum or antibodies obtained from immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice to C57BL/6 scid mice provided significant although transient protection from infection. Bacterial clearance was observed when administration occurred at the time of inoculation or well after infection was established. The effect was dose dependent, occurred within 2 days, and persisted for as long as 2 weeks. Weekly serum administration prolonged the survival of susceptible mice. Although cellular immunity is required for complete bacterial clearance, the data show that antibodies can play a significant role in the elimination of this obligate intracellular bacterium during active infection and thus challenge the paradigm that humoral responses are unimportant for immunity to such organisms. PMID:10722619

  3. Aggressive Early Debridement in Treatment of Acute Periprosthetic Joint Infections After Hip and Knee Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Volpin, Andrea; Sukeik, Mohamed; Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic Joint Infection Remains a Dreaded Complication After Hip and Knee Replacement Surgery. Treatment Options for Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Include Arthroscopic or Open Debridement With Retention or Exchange of the Prostheses. This Review Article Aims to Summarize the Evidence for Management of Acute Postoperative And Acute Hematogenous Infections. Methods: A Systematic Literature Search Was Performed Using a Computer-based Search Engine Covering Medline (OvidSP), PubMed Database (U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health), Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane and Google Scholar for Relevant Articles. Results: Common Themes Around Treatment of Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Discussed in this Review Include the Timing of Intervention, Description of the Optimal Procedure and How we Perform it at our Institution, the Role of Arthroscopic Debridement, Most Commonly Isolated Micro-organisms and Prognostic Factors for Infection Control. Conclusion: Success in Treating Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Depends on Early Diagnosis and Aggressive Surgical Debridement Combined With Effective Antibiotic Therapy. PMID:28144377

  4. Perivascular macrophages mediate neutrophil recruitment during bacterial skin infection

    PubMed Central

    Abtin, Arby; Jain, Rohit; Mitchell, Andrew J.; Roediger, Ben; Brzoska, Anthony J.; Tikoo, Shweta; Cheng, Qiang; Ng, Lai Guan; Cavanagh, Lois L.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Hickey, Michael J.; Firth, Neville; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils in post-capillary venules is a key event in the inflammatory response against pathogens and tissue damage. The precise regulation of this process is incompletely understood. We report that perivascular macrophages are critical for neutrophil migration into skin infected with the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Using multiphoton intravital microscopy we show that neutrophils extravasate from inflamed dermal venules in close proximity to perivascular macrophages, which are a major source of neutrophil chemoattractants. The virulence factor alpha-hemolysin lyses perivascular macrophages leading to decreased neutrophil transmigration. Our data illustrate a previously unrecognized role for perivascular macrophages in neutrophil recruitment to inflamed skin, and indicate that Staphylococcus aureus uses hemolysin-dependent killing of these cells as an immune evasion strategy. PMID:24270515

  5. Enterovirus D68 Infection in Children with Acute Flaccid Myelitis, Colorado, USA, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Messacar, Kevin; Pastula, Daniel M.; Robinson, Christine C.; Leshem, Eyal; Sejvar, James J.; Nix, W. Allan; Oberste, M. Steven; Feikin, Daniel R.; Dominguez, Samuel R.

    2016-01-01

    During August 8, 2014–October 14, 2014, a total of 11 children with acute flaccid myelitis and distinctive neuroimaging changes were identified near Denver, Colorado, USA. A respiratory prodrome was experienced by 10, and nasopharyngeal specimens were positive for enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) for 4. To determine whether an association exists between EV-D68 infection and acute flaccid myelitis, we conducted a retrospective case–control study comparing these patients with 2 groups of outpatient control children (1 group tested for acute respiratory illness and 1 for Bordetella pertussis infection). Adjusted analyses indicated that, for children with acute flaccid myelitis, the odds of having EV-D68 infection were 10.3 times greater than for those tested for acute respiratory infection and 4.5 times greater than for those tested for B. pertussis infection. No statistical association was seen between acute flaccid myelitis and non–EV-D68 enterovirus or rhinovirus infection. These findings support an association between EV-D68 infection and acute flaccid myelitis. PMID:27434186

  6. Bacterial infections in horses: a retrospective study at the University Equine Clinic of Bern.

    PubMed

    Panchaud, Y; Gerber, V; Rossano, A; Perreten, V

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial infections present a major challenge in equine medicine. Therapy should be based on bacteriological diagnosis to successfully minimize the increasing number of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. The present study is a retrospective analysis of bacteriological results from purulent infections in horses admitted at the University Equine Clinic of Bern from 2004 to 2008. From 378 samples analyzed, 557 isolates were identified, of which Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus and coliforms were the most common. Special attention was paid to infections with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) ST398 and a non-MRSA, multidrug-resistant S. aureus clone ST1 (BERN100). Screening of newly-admitted horses showed that 2.2 % were carriers of MRSA. Consequent hygiene measures taken at the Clinic helped to overcome a MRSA outbreak and decrease the number of MRSA infections.

  7. Periductal Mastitis: An Inflammatory Disease Related to Bacterial Infection and Consequent Immune Responses?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu; Zhou, Fei; Wang, Pin; Yu, Lixiang; Ma, Zhongbing; Li, Yuyang; Gao, Dezong; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Periductal mastitis (PDM) is a prolonged inflammatory disease, but the cause of PDM is poorly understood. In the present case control study, 87 PDM and 87 healthy controls were enrolled and the results were evaluated to identify the significant risk factors for PDM. To investigate the roles of bacterial infection and critical cytokines expression, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and bacterial culturing were conducted. We also measured the levels of interferon-γ, interleukin-12A, and interleukin-17A by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry method. In a multivariable logistic regression model, we identified overweight/obesity and late onset of menarche as independent risk factors for PDM. In contrast, age of first birth >27 years had a protective effect. With 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we confirmed bacterial infections were found in all PDM patients, but none of the control patients was positive on the gene expression of 16S rRNA. Our results also demonstrated significant increases of the IFN-γ and IL-12A expression in PDM, but there was no difference in IL-17A expression in these two groups. Taken together, this study suggests that reproductive factors and overweight/obesity are possible predisposing risk factors for PDM. Bacterial infection and the increased expression of some proinflammatory cytokines are associated with the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:28182101

  8. Drug repurposing as an alternative for the treatment of recalcitrant bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Bernstein, Lawrence R.; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection remains one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and the options for treating such infections are decreasing, due the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The pharmaceutical industry has produced few new types of antibiotics in more than a decade. Researchers are taking several approaches toward developing new classes of antibiotics, including (1) focusing on new targets and processes, such as bacterial cell–cell communication that upregulates virulence; (2) designing inhibitors of bacterial resistance, such as blockers of multidrug efflux pumps; and (3) using alternative antimicrobials such as bacteriophages. In addition, the strategy of finding new uses for existing drugs is beginning to produce results: antibacterial properties have been discovered for existing anticancer, antifungal, anthelmintic, and anti-inflammatory drugs. In this review, we discuss the antimicrobial properties of gallium compounds, 5-fluorouracil, ciclopirox, diflunisal, and some other FDA-approved drugs and argue that their repurposing for the treatment of bacterial infections, including those that are multidrug resistant, is a feasible strategy. PMID:25914685

  9. Bacterial infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 2000: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Sethi, S; Murphy, T F

    2001-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The precise role of bacterial infection in the course and pathogenesis of COPD has been a source of controversy for decades. Chronic bacterial colonization of the lower airways contributes to airway inflammation; more research is needed to test the hypothesis that this bacterial colonization accelerates the progressive decline in lung function seen in COPD (the vicious circle hypothesis). The course of COPD is characterized by intermittent exacerbations of the disease. Studies of samples obtained by bronchoscopy with the protected specimen brush, analysis of the human immune response with appropriate immunoassays, and antibiotic trials reveal that approximately half of exacerbations are caused by bacteria. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most common causes of exacerbations, while Chlamydia pneumoniae causes a small proportion. The role of Haemophilus parainfluenzae and gram-negative bacilli remains to be established. Recent progress in studies of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of infection in the human respiratory tract and in vaccine development guided by such studies promises to lead to novel ways to treat and prevent bacterial infections in COPD.

  10. Bacterial Infection in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in 2000: a State-of-the-Art Review

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy F.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The precise role of bacterial infection in the course and pathogenesis of COPD has been a source of controversy for decades. Chronic bacterial colonization of the lower airways contributes to airway inflammation; more research is needed to test the hypothesis that this bacterial colonization accelerates the progressive decline in lung function seen in COPD (the vicious circle hypothesis). The course of COPD is characterized by intermittent exacerbations of the disease. Studies of samples obtained by bronchoscopy with the protected specimen brush, analysis of the human immune response with appropriate immunoassays, and antibiotic trials reveal that approximately half of exacerbations are caused by bacteria. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most common causes of exacerbations, while Chlamydia pneumoniae causes a small proportion. The role of Haemophilus parainfluenzae and gram-negative bacilli remains to be established. Recent progress in studies of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of infection in the human respiratory tract and in vaccine development guided by such studies promises to lead to novel ways to treat and prevent bacterial infections in COPD. PMID:11292642

  11. Bacterial aetiological agents of intra-amniotic infections and preterm birth in pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Mendz, George L.; Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Quinlivan, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Infection-related preterm birth is a leading cause of infant mortality and morbidity; knowledge of bacterial populations invading the amniotic cavity and the routes of invasion is required to make progress in the prevention of preterm birth. Significant advances have been made in understanding bacterial communities in the vagina, but much less studied are intra-uterine bacterial populations during pregnancy. A systematic review of data published on the intra-uterine microbiome was performed; molecular information and summaries of species found in healthy individuals and in women with diagnosed infections served to construct a database and to analyse results to date. Thirteen studies fulfilled the review's inclusion criteria. The data of various investigations were collated, organized, and re-analyzed to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of microbial populations in the intra-amniotic space. The most common intra-amniotic bacterial taxa were species that can colonies the vagina in health and disease; there were others associated with the habitats of the mouth, gastrointestinal tract, and respiratory tract. The results suggest a central role for the ascending route of infections during pregnancy, and point to a possible secondary contribution via haematogenous invasion of the intra-amniotic space. The complete census of the intra-uterine microbiome awaits completion. PMID:24137568

  12. Phylogenetic reconstruction of transmission events from individuals with acute HIV infection: toward more-rigorous epidemiological definitions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alison E; Gifford, Robert J; Clewley, Jonathan P; Kucherer, Claudia; Masquelier, Bernard; Porter, Kholoud; Balotta, Claudia; Back, Nicole K T; Jorgensen, Louise Bruun; de Mendoza, Carmen; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Gill, O Noel; Johnson, Anne M; Pillay, Deenan

    2009-02-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions of transmission events from individuals with acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are conducted to illustrate this group's heightened infectivity. Varied definitions of acute infection and assumptions about observed phylogenetic clusters may produce misleading results. We conducted a phylogenetic analysis of HIV pol sequences from 165 European patients with estimated infection dates and calculated the difference between dates within clusters. Nine phylogenetic clusters were observed. Comparison of dates within clusters revealed that only 2 could have been generated during acute infection. Previous analyses may have incorrectly assigned transmission events to the acutely HIV infected when they were more likely to have occurred during chronic infection.

  13. Acute middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in livestock Dromedaries, Dubai, 2014.

    PubMed

    Wernery, Ulrich; Corman, Victor M; Wong, Emily Y M; Tsang, Alan K L; Muth, Doreen; Lau, Susanna K P; Khazanehdari, Kamal; Zirkel, Florian; Ali, Mansoor; Nagy, Peter; Juhasz, Jutka; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Sunitha; Syriac, Ginu; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Patteril, Nissy Annie Georgy; Woo, Patrick C Y; Drosten, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Camels carry Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, but little is known about infection age or prevalence. We studied >800 dromedaries of all ages and 15 mother-calf pairs. This syndrome constitutes an acute, epidemic, and time-limited infection in camels <4 years of age, particularly calves. Delayed social separation of calves might reduce human infection risk.

  14. The Diagnostic and Prognostic Accuracy of Five Markers of Serious Bacterial Infection in Malawian Children with Signs of Severe Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carrol, Enitan D.; Mankhambo, Limangeni A.; Jeffers, Graham; Parker, Deborah; Guiver, Malcolm; Newland, Paul; Banda, Daniel L.; Molyneux, Elizabeth M.; Heyderman, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Early recognition and prompt and appropriate antibiotic treatment can significantly reduce mortality from serious bacterial infections (SBI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of five markers of infection: C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1), CD163 and high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), as markers of SBI in severely ill Malawian children. Methodology and Principal Findings Children presenting with a signs of meningitis (n = 282) or pneumonia (n = 95), were prospectively recruited. Plasma samples were taken on admission for CRP, PCT, sTREM-1 CD163 and HMGB1 and the performance characteristics of each test to diagnose SBI and to predict mortality were determined. Of 377 children, 279 (74%) had SBI and 83 (22%) died. Plasma CRP, PCT, CD163 and HMGB1 and were higher in HIV-infected children than in HIV-uninfected children (p<0.01). In HIV-infected children, CRP and PCT were higher in children with SBI compared to those with no detectable bacterial infection (p<0.0005), and PCT and CD163 were higher in non-survivors (p = 0.001, p = 0.05 respectively). In HIV-uninfected children, CRP and PCT were also higher in children with SBI compared to those with no detectable bacterial infection (p<0.0005), and CD163 was higher in non-survivors (p = 0.05). The best predictors of SBI were CRP and PCT, and areas under the curve (AUCs) were 0.81 (95% CI 0.73–0.89) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.79–0.92) respectively. The best marker for predicting death was PCT, AUC 0.61 (95% CI 0.50–0.71). Conclusions Admission PCT and CRP are useful markers of invasive bacterial infection in severely ill African children. The study of these markers using rapid tests in a less selected cohort would be important in this setting. PMID:19675669

  15. Endophytic bacterial community of grapevine leaves influenced by sampling date and phytoplasma infection process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Endophytic bacteria benefit host plant directly or indirectly, e.g. by biocontrol of the pathogens. Up to now, their interactions with the host and with other microorganisms are poorly understood. Consequently, a crucial step for improving the knowledge of those relationships is to determine if pathogens or plant growing season influence endophytic bacterial diversity and dynamic. Results Four healthy, four phytoplasma diseased and four recovered (symptomatic plants that spontaneously regain a healthy condition) grapevine plants were sampled monthly from June to October 2010 in a vineyard in north-western Italy. Metagenomic DNA was extracted from sterilized leaves and the endophytic bacterial community dynamic and diversity were analyzed by taxon specific real-time PCR, Length-Heterogeneity PCR and genus-specific PCR. These analyses revealed that both sampling date and phytoplasma infection influenced the endophytic bacterial composition. Interestingly, in June, when the plants are symptomless and the pathogen is undetectable (i) the endophytic bacterial community associated with diseased grapevines was different from those in the other sampling dates, when the phytoplasmas are detectable inside samples; (ii) the microbial community associated with recovered plants differs from that living inside healthy and diseased plants. Interestingly, LH-PCR database identified bacteria previously reported as biocontrol agents in the examined grapevines. Of these, Burkholderia, Methylobacterium and Pantoea dynamic was influenced by the phytoplasma infection process and seasonality. Conclusion Results indicated that endophytic bacterial community composition in grapevine is correlated to both phytoplasma infection and sampling date. For the first time, data underlined that, in diseased plants, the pathogen infection process can decrease the impact of seasonality on community dynamic. Moreover, based on experimental evidences, it was reasonable to hypothesize that

  16. Acute Respiratory Infections in Children and Adolescents with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Hana; Dallas, Ronald; Zhou, Yinmei; Pei, Dequing; Cheng, Cheng; Flynn, Patricia M.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Jeha, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Background Knowledge about the incidence, clinical course and impact of respiratory viral infections in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is limited. Methods A retrospective cohort of patients with newly diagnosed ALL on Total Therapy XVI protocol at St Jude Children’s Research Hospital between 2007 and 2011 was evaluated. Results Of 223 children, 95 (43%) developed 133 episodes of viral acute respiratory illness (ARI) (incidence = 1.1/1,000 patient-days). ARI without viral etiology was identified in 65 (29%) patients and no ARI in 63 (28%). There were no significant associations between race, gender, age, or ALL risk group and development of ARI. Children receiving induction chemotherapy were at the highest risk for viral ARI (incidence, 2.3 per 1,000 patient-days). Influenza virus was the most common virus (38%) followed by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (33%). Of 133 episodes of viral ARI, 61% of patients were hospitalized, 26% suffered a complicated course, 80% had their chemotherapy delayed, and 0.7% died. Twenty-four (18%) patients developed viral lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI); of which 5 (21%) had complications. Patients with viral LRTI had significantly lower nadir absolute lymphocyte count, were sicker at presentation, and were more likely to have RSV, to be hospitalized, and to have their chemotherapy delayed for longer time compared to those with viral URTI. Conclusion Despite the low incidence of viral ARI in children with ALL, the associated morbidity, mortality, and delay in chemotherapy remain clinically significant. Viral LRTI was particularly associated with high morbidity requiring intensive care level support. PMID:26700662

  17. Staphylococcus aureus: is it a pathogen of acute bacterial sinusitis in children and adults?

    PubMed

    Wald, Ellen R

    2012-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis are the etiologic agents of acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS). Staphylococcus aureus has been an uncommon cause of ABS despite its frequent occupancy within the anterior nares. A quantitative culture of a maxillary sinus aspirate is the gold standard for determining etiology of ABS. Cultures of the middle meatus cannot be used as a surrogate for a maxillary sinus aspirate in children with ABS, although they may be used in adults if interpretation is confined to usual sinus pathogens. Recent studies highlighting S. aureus as a major pathogen in ABS should be interpreted cautiously. Most isolates in recent pediatric studies were derived from cultures of the middle meatus. The range of reported results for the incidence of S. aureus as a cause of ABS in adults is similar to the results reported for staphylococcal colonization of the middle meatus in healthy adults.

  18. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  19. New Paenibacillus larvae bacterial isolates from honey bee colonies infected with American foulbrood disease in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Masry, Saad Hamdy Daif; Kabeil, Sanaa Soliman; Hafez, Elsayed Elsayed

    2014-01-01

    The American foulbrood disease is widely distributed all over the world and causes a serious problem for the honeybee industry. Different infected larvae were collected from different apiaries, ground in phosphate saline buffer (PSB) and bacterial isolation was carried out on nutrient agar medium. Different colonies were observed and were characterized biologically. Two bacterial isolates (SH11 and SH33) were subjected to molecular identification using 16S rRNA gene and the sequence analysis revealed that the two isolates are Paenibacillus larvae with identity not exceeding 83%. The DNA sequence alignment between the other P. larvae bacterial strains and the two identified bacterial isolates showed that all the examined bacterial strains have the same ancestor, i.e. they have the same origin. The SH33 isolate was closely related to the P. larvae isolated from Germany, whereas the isolate SH11 was close to the P. larvae isolated from India. The phylogenetic tree constructed for 20 different Bacillus sp. and the two isolates SH11 and SH33 demonstrated that the two isolates are Bacillus sp. and they are new isolates. The bacterial isolates will be subjected to more tests for more confirmations. PMID:26740757

  20. Pipecolic acid enhances resistance to bacterial infection and primes salicylic acid and nicotine accumulation in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Vogel-Adghough, Drissia; Stahl, Elia; Návarová, Hana; Zeier, Juergen

    2013-11-01

    Distinct amino acid metabolic pathways constitute integral parts of the plant immune system. We have recently identified pipecolic acid (Pip), a lysine-derived non-protein amino acid, as a critical regulator of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and basal immunity to bacterial infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Arabidopsis, Pip acts as an endogenous mediator of defense amplification and priming. For instance, Pip conditions plants for effective biosynthesis of the phenolic defense signal salicylic acid (SA), accumulation of the phytoalexin camalexin, and expression of defense-related genes. Here, we show that tobacco plants respond to leaf infection by the compatible bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci (Pstb) with a significant accumulation of several amino acids, including Lys, branched-chain, aromatic, and amide group amino acids. Moreover, Pstb strongly triggers, alongside the biosynthesis of SA and increases in the defensive alkaloid nicotine, the production of the Lys catabolites Pip and α-aminoadipic acid. Exogenous application of Pip to tobacco plants provides significant protection to infection by adapted Pstb or by non-adapted, hypersensitive cell death-inducing P. syringae pv maculicola. Pip thereby primes tobacco for rapid and strong accumulation of SA and nicotine following bacterial infection. Thus, our study indicates that the role of Pip as an amplifier of immune responses is conserved between members of the rosid and asterid groups of eudicot plants and suggests a broad practical applicability for Pip as a natural enhancer of plant disease resistance.

  1. Macrophage origin limits functional plasticity in helminth-bacterial co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Sharon M.; Duncan, Sheelagh; Hewitson, James P.; Barr, Tom A.; Jackson-Jones, Lucy H.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2017-01-01

    Rapid reprogramming of the macrophage activation phenotype is considered important in the defense against consecutive infection with diverse infectious agents. However, in the setting of persistent, chronic infection the functional importance of macrophage-intrinsic adaptation to changing environments vs. recruitment of new macrophages remains unclear. Here we show that resident peritoneal macrophages expanded by infection with the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri altered their activation phenotype in response to infection with Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium in vitro and in vivo. The nematode-expanded resident F4/80high macrophages efficiently upregulated bacterial induced effector molecules (e.g. MHC-II, NOS2) similarly to newly recruited monocyte-derived macrophages. Nonetheless, recruitment of blood monocyte-derived macrophages to Salmonella infection occurred with equal magnitude in co-infected animals and caused displacement of the nematode-expanded, tissue resident-derived macrophages from the peritoneal cavity. Global gene expression analysis revealed that although nematode-expanded resident F4/80high macrophages made an anti-bacterial response, this was muted as compared to newly recruited F4/80low macrophages. However, the F4/80high macrophages adopted unique functional characteristics that included enhanced neutrophil-stimulating chemokine production. Thus, our data provide important evidence that plastic adaptation of MΦ activation does occur in vivo, but that cellular plasticity is outweighed by functional capabilities specific to the tissue origin of the cell. PMID:28334040

  2. Salmonella Infection Enhances Erythropoietin Production by the Kidney and Liver, Which Correlates with Elevated Bacterial Burdens.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin-Xi; Benoun, Joseph M; Weiskopf, Kipp; Garcia, K Christopher; McSorley, Stephen J

    2016-10-01

    Salmonella infection profoundly affects host erythroid development, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect remain poorly understood. We monitored the impact of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and found that systemic infection induced anemia, splenomegaly, elevated erythropoietin (EPO) levels, and extramedullary erythropoiesis in a process independent of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) or flagellin. The circulating EPO level was also constitutively higher in mice lacking the expression of signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα). The expression level of EPO mRNA was elevated in the kidney and liver but not increased in the spleens of infected mice despite the presence of extramedullary erythropoiesis in this tissue. In contrast to data from a previous report, mice lacking EPO receptor (EPOR) expression on nonerythroid cells (EPOR rescued) had bacterial loads similar to those of wild-type mice following Salmonella infection. Indeed, treatment to reduce splenic erythroblasts and mature red blood cells correlated with elevated bacterial burdens, implying that extramedullary erythropoiesis benefits the host. Together, these findings emphasize the profound effect of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and suggest that the modulation of erythroid development has both positive and negative consequences for host immunity.

  3. Salmonella Infection Enhances Erythropoietin Production by the Kidney and Liver, Which Correlates with Elevated Bacterial Burdens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Xi; Benoun, Joseph M.; Weiskopf, Kipp; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella infection profoundly affects host erythroid development, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect remain poorly understood. We monitored the impact of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and found that systemic infection induced anemia, splenomegaly, elevated erythropoietin (EPO) levels, and extramedullary erythropoiesis in a process independent of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) or flagellin. The circulating EPO level was also constitutively higher in mice lacking the expression of signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα). The expression level of EPO mRNA was elevated in the kidney and liver but not increased in the spleens of infected mice despite the presence of extramedullary erythropoiesis in this tissue. In contrast to data from a previous report, mice lacking EPO receptor (EPOR) expression on nonerythroid cells (EPOR rescued) had bacterial loads similar to those of wild-type mice following Salmonella infection. Indeed, treatment to reduce splenic erythroblasts and mature red blood cells correlated with elevated bacterial burdens, implying that extramedullary erythropoiesis benefits the host. Together, these findings emphasize the profound effect of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and suggest that the modulation of erythroid development has both positive and negative consequences for host immunity. PMID:27456828

  4. Understanding persistent bacterial lung infections: clinical implications informed by the biology of the microbiota and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Pragman, Alexa A.; Berger, John P.; Williams, Bryan J.

    2015-01-01

    The infections found in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and bronchiectasis share a number of clinical similarities, the most striking of which is bacterial persistence despite the use of antibiotics. These infections have been clinically described using culture-based methods usually performed on sputum samples, and treatment has been directed towards the bacteria found in this manner. Unfortunately the clinical response to antibiotics is frequently not predictable based on these cultures, and the role of these cultured organisms in disease progression has been debated. The past 20 years have seen a revolution in the techniques used to describe bacterial populations and their growth patterns. These techniques have revealed these persistent lung infections are vastly more complicated than described by traditional, and still widely relied upon, sputum cultures. A better understanding of the initiation and evolution of these infections, and better clinical tools to describe them, will dramatically alter the way patients are cared for. While clinical tests to more accurately describe these infections are not yet available, the better appreciation of these infections afforded by current science should enlighten practitioners as to the care of their patients with these diseases. PMID:27004018

  5. Rice Xa21 primed genes and pathways that are critical for combating bacterial blight infection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hai; Chen, Zheng; Fang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Junfei; Xia, Zhihui; Gao, Lifen; Chen, Lihong; Li, Lili; Li, Tiantian; Zhai, Wenxue; Zhang, Weixiong

    2015-07-17

    Rice bacterial blight (BB) is a devastating rice disease. The Xa21 gene confers a broad and persistent resistance against BB. We introduced Xa21 into Oryza sativa L ssp indica (rice 9311), through multi-generation backcrossing, and generated a nearly isogenic, blight-resistant 9311/Xa21 rice. Using next-generation sequencing, we profiled the transcriptomes of both varieties before and within four days after infection of bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The identified differentially expressed (DE) genes and signaling pathways revealed insights into the functions of Xa21. Surprisingly, before infection 1,889 genes on 135 of the 316 signaling pathways were DE between the 9311/Xa21 and 9311 plants. These Xa21-mediated basal pathways included mainly those related to the basic material and energy metabolisms and many related to phytohormones such as cytokinin, suggesting that Xa21 triggered redistribution of energy, phytohormones and resources among essential cellular activities before invasion. Counter-intuitively, after infection, the DE genes between the two plants were only one third of that before the infection; other than a few stress-related pathways, the affected pathways after infection constituted a small subset of the Xa21-mediated basal pathways. These results suggested that Xa21 primed critically important genes and signaling pathways, enhancing its resistance against bacterial infection.

  6. Liver Fibrosis during an Outbreak of Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection in HIV-Infected Men: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Daniel S.; Uriel, Alison J.; Carriero, Damaris C.; Klepper, Arielle; Dieterich, Douglas T.; Mullen, Michael P.; Thung, Swan N.; Fiel, M. Isabel; Branch, Andrea D.

    2015-01-01

    Outbreaks of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are occurring in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. We evaluated risk factors and liver histopathology in 11 consecutively enrolled men with newly acquired HCV infection that was diagnosed on the basis of antibody seroconversion, new elevations in alanine aminotransferase level, and wide fluctuations in HCV RNA level. Ten patients reported unprotected anal intercourse, and 7 reported “club-drug” use, including methamphetamine. Liver biopsy showed moderately advanced fibrosis (Scheuer stage 2) in 9 patients (82%). No cause of liver damage other than acute HCV infection was identified. The specific pathways leading to periportal fibrosis in HIV-infected men with newly acquired HCV infection require investigation. PMID:18627270

  7. Reduced cortisol in the absence of bacterial infection in patients with hepatitis B virus cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Yu, H-W; Li, J; Zhu, Y-K; Wang, K-F; Jia, L; Meng, Q-H

    2015-07-17

    In liver cirrhosis with bacterial infection, hepatoadrenal syndrome has been described recently as a progressive impairment in the adrenocortical reserve, with deficient production or action of glucocorticoids resulting in adrenal insufficiency. The aim of this study was to explore the characteristics of cortisol in hepatitis B virus (HBV) cirrhosis patients in the absence of bacterial infection. Fasting peripheral venous blood samples were collected from 107 patients with HBV cirrhosis in the absence of bacterial infection and 18 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection at 7 a.m. in the morning. The carbohydrate, cortisol-binding globulin, routine chemistry, liver function, and hepatitis B indicators were tested, and free cortisol was calculated. Cortisol (COR) levels were 18.72 ± 6.60 μg/dL in the CHB group and 14.20 ± 7.55 μg/dL in the HBV cirrhosis group (P = 0.002). COR levels were 15.11 ± 5.56, 14.88 ± 6.96, and 12.68 ± 8.36 μg/dL in Child-Pugh class A, B, and C cirrhotic patients, respectively (P = 0.006). Adrenocorticotropic hormone levels were 35.42 ± 24.49, 26.57 ± 15.72, and 19.65 ± 10.72 pg/mL in Child-Pugh class A, B, and C cirrhotic patients, respectively (P = 0.000). Patients with HBV cirrhosis had significantly lower serum COR levels compared with those of CHB patients, even if they are in the absence of bacterial infection. COR levels negatively correlated with Child-Pugh scores. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis might be damaged in patients with HBV cirrhosis.

  8. [Rhinoviruses. Frequency in nonhospitalized children with acute respiratory infection].

    PubMed

    Marcone, Débora N; Ricarte, Carmen; Videla, Cristina; Ekstrom, Jorge; Carballal, Guadalupe; Vidaurreta, Santiago; Echavarría, Marcela

    2012-01-01

    Molecular methods for human rhinoviruses (HRV) have increased the sensitivity in their diagnosis. HRV may cause acute respiratory infections (ARI) of the upper and lower respiratory tract. HRV infection during childhood is a predictor of asthma development. In this study, the HRV frequency in outpatient children with ARI was determined, and their clinical features and previous conditions were evaluated. A total of 186 respiratory samples of children under 6 year old attending the CEMIC pediatric emergency room from June 1, 2008 to May 31, 2010, were studied. Classical respiratory viruses were detected by immunofluorescence. A real time RT-PCR that amplifies part of the 5' non coding genomic region was used for HRV detection. Viral detection was obtained in 61% of children. The frequency was: 27% for HRV, 16% for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), 9% for influenza, 8% for parainfluenza, 7% for metapneumovirus and 0.5% for adenovirus. Dual coinfection was detected in 8 children and HRV were the most frequent, detected in 4 of them. HRV circulated during the two year period of the study, with peaks during winter and spring. No clinical difference was observed between patients with or without HRV, except an increase percent of children with HRV without fever. HRV were the most frequent viruses detected in this population, mainly in children under 2 year old, the second cause of bronchiolitis after RSV and more frequently detected in children exposed to passive smoking (OR = 2.91; p = 0.012), and were detected as the sole etiologic agent in 28% of bronchiolitis.

  9. [Epidemiology of nosocomial bacterial infection in a neonatal intensive care unit in Morocco].

    PubMed

    Maoulainine, F-M-R; Elidrissi, N-S; Chkil, G; Abba, F; Soraa, N; Chabaa, L; Amine, M; Aboussad, A

    2014-09-01

    In neonatal intensive care units, the incidence of nosocomial infection is high. This study aimed to determine the epidemiology of a nosocomial bacterial infection in the neonatal intensive care unit of Mohamed VI university hospital. A total of 702 newborns were included in this study. Of the 702 neonates studied, 91 had developed a nosocomial infection. The incidence rate was 13% and incidence density was 21.2 per 1000 patient-days. The types of infection were: bloodstream infections (89%), pneumonia (6.6%), meningitis (3.3%), and urinary tract infections (1.1%). Nosocomial infection was particularly frequent in cases of low birth weight, prematurity, young age at admission, umbilical venous catheter, and mechanical ventilation. Multiresistant bacteria included enterobacteria producing betalactamase (76.9%), especially enterobacteria that were dominated by Klebsiella pneumoniae (39.7%). The mortality rate was 52.7% in nosocomial infections, 19 (20.87%) of whom had septic shock. The results of this study show that nosocomial infection is an intrahospital health problem that could be remedied by a prevention strategy.

  10. Acute Exposure to Crystalline Silica Reduces Macrophage Activation in Response to Bacterial Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Beamer, Gillian L.; Seaver, Benjamin P.; Jessop, Forrest; Shepherd, David M.; Beamer, Celine A.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined the relationship between alveolar macrophages (AMs) and crystalline silica (SiO2) using in vitro and in vivo immunotoxicity models; however, exactly how exposure to SiO2 alters the functionality of AM and the potential consequences for immunity to respiratory pathogens remains largely unknown. Because recognition and clearance of inhaled particulates and microbes are largely mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) on the surface of AM, we hypothesized that exposure to SiO2 limits the ability of AM to respond to bacterial challenge by altering PRR expression. Alveolar and bone marrow-derived macrophages downregulate TLR2 expression following acute SiO2 exposure (e.g., 4 h). Interestingly, these responses were dependent on interactions between SiO2 and the class A scavenger receptor CD204, but not MARCO. Furthermore, SiO2 exposure decreased uptake of fluorescently labeled Pam2CSK4 and Pam3CSK4, resulting in reduced secretion of IL-1β, but not IL-6. Collectively, our data suggest that SiO2 exposure alters AM phenotype, which in turn affects their ability to uptake and respond to bacterial lipoproteins. PMID:26913035

  11. [Mortality from acute respiratory infections and influenza (1976-1980)].

    PubMed

    Morales Suárez-Varela, M M; Llopis González, A; Sanz Aliaga, S A; Sancho Izquierdo, E

    1992-06-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) and influenza (flu) are extremely common illnesses, which make up the main causes of medical consultation and absence from work. OBJECTIVE. To discover the level of mortality because of ARI and flu in the Health Areas within the Community of Valencia; to analyse their possible relationship with socio-economic factors and also to identify higher-risk groups according to age and sex. DESIGN. Retrospective study. SITE. The Community of Valencia. PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS. Mortality data across the Community were obtained from the mortality statistics published by the Generalitat (Government) of Valencia during the five-year period of 1976 to 1980. MAIN MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS. The results establish that Health Areas 4, 6, 7, 9-12 and 18 present less mortality because of ARI and flu. These are the better areas, socio-economically speaking, although the data are without statistical significance. A spectacular increase in mortality in the age-group of those over 70 was observed, with no great differences found between the sexes. CONCLUSIONS. Given that the main interventions to prevent these diseases are based on vaccination, it would be useful to carry out vaccination programmes with greater thoroughness in those areas identified as of high risk.

  12. Acute HIV infection among pregnant women in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Gay, Cynthia L; Mwapasa, Victor; Murdoch, David M; Kwiek, Jesse J; Fiscus, Susan A; Meshnick, Steven R; Cohen, Myron S

    2010-04-01

    There are limited data on acute HIV infection (AHI) prevalence during pregnancy. Malawian pregnant women admitted in the third trimester and meeting eligibility criteria underwent dual HIV rapid antibody testing. AHI prevalence was retrospectively detected through HIV RNA pooling of seronegative plasma. Among 3,825 pregnant women screened, dual HIV rapid testing indicated that 30.2% were HIV positive, 69.7% were HIV negative, and 0.1% were indeterminate. Sensitivity and specificity of dual rapid testing was 99.0% and 98.7%, respectively. Of 2,666 seronegative specimens, 2,327 had samples available for HIV RNA pooling; 5 women (0.21%) (95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.40%) had AHI with a median peripartum viral load of 1,324,766 copies/mL. Pregnant women are at risk for AHI, warranting counseling of all women and their sexual partners about incident HIV during pregnancy. Dual HIV rapid tests have high sensitivity and specificity. HIV testing should be repeated in the third trimester and/or at delivery.

  13. Acute HIV Infection among Pregnant Women in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Cynthia L.; Mwapasa, Victor; Murdoch, David M.; Kwiek, Jesse J.; Fiscus, Susan A.; Meshnick, Steven R.; Cohen, Myron S.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction There are limited data on acute HIV infection (AHI) prevalence during pregnancy. Methods Malawian pregnant women admitted in the third trimester and meeting eligibility criteria underwent dual HIV rapid antibody testing. AHI prevalence was retrospectively detected through HIV RNA pooling of seronegative plasma. Results Among 3825 pregnant women screened, dual HIV rapid testing indicated that 30.2% were HIV positive, 69.7% were HIV negative and 0.1% were indeterminate. Sensitivity and specificity of dual rapid testing was 99.0% and 98.7%, respectively. Of 2666 seronegative specimens, 2327 had samples available for HIV RNA pooling; 5 women (0.21%) (95% CI: 0.03, 0.40%) had AHI with a median peripartum viral load of 1,324,766 copies/mL. Discussion Pregnant women are at risk for AHI, warranting counseling of all women and their sexual partners about incident HIV during pregnancy. Dual HIV rapid tests have high sensitivity and specificity. HIV testing should be repeated in the third trimester and/or at delivery. PMID:20226326

  14. Neurobehavioral Disturbances During Acute and Early HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Rujvi; Doyle, Katie L.; Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Morgan, Erin E.; Morris, Sheldon; Smith, Davey M.; Little, Susan J.; Grant, Igor; Woods, Steven Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Acute and early human immunodeficiency virus infection (AEH) is accompanied by neuroinflammatory processes as well as impairment in neurocognitive and everyday functions, but little is known about the frequency and clinical correlates of the neurobehavioral disturbances during this period. We compared pre-seroconversion with current levels of apathy, disinhibition, and executive dysfunction; we also examined everyday function and HIV disease correlates of neuropsychiatric impairment in individuals with AEH. Methods In this study, 34 individuals with AEH and 39 HIV-seronegative participants completed neuromedical and neuropsychological assessments, a structured psychiatric interview, and the apathy, disinhibition, and executive dysfunction subscales of the Frontal Systems Behavioral Scale. Results Independent of any substance use and mood disorders, the AEH group had significantly higher levels of current apathy and executive dysfunction than the controls, but not greater disinhibition. Retrospective ratings of pre-seroconversion levels of apathy, disinhibition, and executive dysfunction were all higher in the AEH group than the controls. After seroconversion, the AEH cohort had increases in current apathy and executive dysfunction, but not disinhibition. In the AEH cohort, higher current global neurobehavioral dysfunction was significantly associated with lower nadir CD4 counts, slowed information processing speed, and more everyday function problems. Conclusions These data suggest that individuals who have recently acquired HIV experienced higher-than-normal premorbid levels of neurobehavioral disturbance. Apathy and executive dysfunction are exacerbated during AEH, particularly in association with lower CD4 counts. PMID:27008244

  15. Review of moxifloxacin hydrochloride ophthalmic solution in the treatment of bacterial eye infections

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Darlene

    2008-01-01

    Moxifloxacin hydrochloride ophthalmic solution 0.5% (Vigamox®) is the ocular formulation/adaptation of moxifloxacin. Moxifloxacin is a broad spectrum 8-methoxyfluoroquinolone which terminates bacterial growth by binding to DNA gyrase (topoisomerase II) and topoisomerase IV, essential bacterial enzymes involved in the replication, translation, repair and recombination of deoxyribonucleic acid. Affinity for both enzymes improves potency and reduces the probability of selecting resistant bacterial subpopulations. Vigamox is a bactericidal, concentration dependent, anti-infective. It is preservative free, and well tolerated with minimal ocular side effects. It provides increased penetration into ocular tissues and fluids with improved activity against Streptococci and Staphylococci species and moderate to excellent activity against clinically relevant, gram-negative ocular pathogens. PMID:19668391

  16. Probiotic Activity of a Bacterial Strain Isolated from Ancient Permafrost Against Salmonella Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fursova, O; Potapov, V; Brouchkov, A; Pogorelko, G; Griva, G; Fursova, N; Ignatov, S

    2012-09-01

    Bacillus cereus strain F, collected from relict permafrost located in Siberia, was analyzed for probiotic activity in the mouse Salmonella enterica model. Viable bacterial cells were found in frozen soils taken at Mammoth Mountain in Yakutia from a depth below the level of seasonal thawing. Geological data indicated the absence of a thawing within millions of years of deposited soils, which helped to ensure the ancient origin of our sample. According to DNA analysis, bacterial cells collected from the relict permafrost appeared to be B. cereus strain F. The morphology of these bacteria was analyzed using atomic force microscopy. B. cereus strain F was assessed as a nonpathogenic bacterium by evaluation of its pathogenicity. A S. enterica model is described in mice after per oral inoculation and serves as a model for the human carrier state. Using this model, probiotic activity by the bacterial strain isolated from the ancient permafrost has been shown against Salmonella infection in mice.

  17. Neutrophils of Scophthalmus maximus produce extracellular traps that capture bacteria and inhibit bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Chi, Heng; Sun, Li

    2016-03-01

    Neutrophils constitute an essential part of the innate immune system. Recently, neutrophils have been found to produce a complex extracellular structure called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that capture bacteria, fungi, and parasites. In fish, a few studies on NETs production have been reported, however, the function of fish NETs is unknown. In this study, we examined the ability of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) neutrophils to produce NETs and investigated the effect of turbot NETs on bacterial infection. We found that upon lipopolysaccharides treatment, turbot head kidney neutrophils produced typical NETs structures that contained DNA and histones. Bacteria treatment also induced production of NETs, which in turn entrapped the bacterial cells and inhibited bacterial replication. Furthermore, when introduced into turbot, NETs-trapped bacteria exhibited significantly weakened ability of tissue dissemination and colonization. These results indicate for the first time that teleost NETs possess apparent antibacterial effect both in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Human neutrophil clearance of bacterial pathogens triggers anti-microbial γδ T cell responses in early infection.

    PubMed

    Davey, Martin S; Lin, Chan-Yu; Roberts, Gareth W; Heuston, Sinéad; Brown, Amanda C; Chess, James A; Toleman, Mark A; Gahan, Cormac G M; Hill, Colin; Parish, Tanya; Williams, John D; Davies, Simon J; Johnson, David W; Topley, Nicholas; Moser, Bernhard; Eberl, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    Human blood Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells, monocytes and neutrophils share a responsiveness toward inflammatory chemokines and are rapidly recruited to sites of infection. Studying their interaction in vitro and relating these findings to in vivo observations in patients may therefore provide crucial insight into inflammatory events. Our present data demonstrate that Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells provide potent survival signals resulting in neutrophil activation and the release of the neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL8 (IL-8). In turn, Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells readily respond to neutrophils harboring phagocytosed bacteria, as evidenced by expression of CD69, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. This response is dependent on the ability of these bacteria to produce the microbial metabolite (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMB-PP), requires cell-cell contact of Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells with accessory monocytes through lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), and results in a TNF-α dependent proliferation of Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells. The antibiotic fosmidomycin, which targets the HMB-PP biosynthesis pathway, not only has a direct antibacterial effect on most HMB-PP producing bacteria but also possesses rapid anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting γδ T cell responses in vitro. Patients with acute peritoneal-dialysis (PD)-associated bacterial peritonitis--characterized by an excessive influx of neutrophils and monocytes into the peritoneal cavity--show a selective activation of local Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells by HMB-PP producing but not by HMB-PP deficient bacterial pathogens. The γδ T cell-driven perpetuation of inflammatory responses during acute peritonitis is associated with elevated peritoneal levels of γδ T cells and TNF-α and detrimental clinical outcomes in infections caused by HMB-PP positive microorganisms. Taken together, our findings indicate a direct link between invading pathogens, neutrophils, monocytes and microbe-responsive γδ T cells in early

  19. Differential Alterations in Host Peripheral Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Chemiluminescence During the Course of Bacterial and Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, James P.; Bodroghy, Robert S.; Jahrling, Peter B.; Sobocinski, Philip Z.

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that stimulation of the oxidative metabolism in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) by in vitro phagocytosis of various microorganisms results in photon emission, termed chemiluminescence (CL). Studies were conducted to determine whether bacterial and viral infections induce enhanced basal endogenous host peripheral PMN CL in the absence of in vitro phagocytic stimulation. Nonimmune rats and guinea pigs as well as immune rats were inoculated with various doses (105 to 107) of live vaccine strain Francisella tularensis (per 100 g of body weight). In addition, nonimmune guinea pigs were inoculated with 40,000 plaque-forming units of Pichinde virus. Luminol-assisted endogenous PMN CL was measured at various time intervals after inoculation of microorganisms. Enhanced endogenous PMN CL was detected as early as the appearance of fever (12 h) in nonimmune animals infected with F. tularensis. Addition of sodium azide, N-ethylmaleimide, superoxide dismutase, or catalase to the CL reaction mixture containing PMN from infected animals significantly decreased the CL response. Immune rats challenged with F. tularensis exhibited resistance to infection and a decreased PMN CL compared with nonimmune rats 24 and 48 h after inoculation. However, the CL response from immune rats was significantly elevated, compared with control values. In contrast to the results obtained with the model bacterial infection, PMN isolated from guinea pigs inoculated with Pichinde virus failed to exhibit enhanced CL, compared with controls, despite significant viremia and fever. Results suggest that enhanced endogenous CL during bacterial infection occurs through mechanisms involving increased PMN oxidative metabolism and the subsequent generation of microbicidal forms of oxygen. Further, measurement of endogenous PMN CL may have diagnostic and prognostic value in infectious diseases. PMID:7228389

  20. Serum Procalcitonin for Differentiating Bacterial Infection from Disease Flares in Patients with Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Kowoon; Lim, Mie-Jin; Kwon, Seong-Ryul; Yoon, Jiyeol

    2011-01-01

    Early differentiation between bacterial infections and disease flares in autoimmune disease patients is important due to different treatments. Seventy-nine autoimmune disease patients with symptoms suggestive of infections or disease flares were collected by retrospective chart review. The patients were later classified into two groups, disease flare and infection. C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum procalcitonin (PCT) levels were measured. The CRP and PCT levels were higher in the infection group than the disease flare group (CRP,11.96 mg/dL ± 9.60 vs 6.42 mg/dL ± 7.01, P = 0.003; PCT, 2.44 ng/mL ± 6.55 vs 0.09 ng/mL ± 0.09, P < 0.001). The area under the ROC curve (AUC; 95% confidence interval) for CRP and PCT was 0.70 (0.58-0.82) and 0.84 (0.75-0.93), which showed a significant difference (P < 0.05). The predicted AUC for the CRP and PCT levels combined was 0.83, which was not significantly different compared to the PCT level alone (P = 0.80). The best cut-off value for CRP was 7.18 mg/dL, with a sensitivity of 71.9% and a specificity of 68.1%. The best cut-off value for PCT was 0.09 ng/mL, with a sensitivity of 81.3% and a specificity of 78.7%. The PCT level had better sensitivity and specificity compared to the CRP level in distinguishing between bacterial infections and disease flares in autoimmune disease patients. The CRP level has no additive value when combined with the PCT level when differentiating bacterial infections from disease flares. PMID:21935268

  1. Prevalent bacterial vaginosis infection - a risk factor for incident sexually transmitted infections in women in Durban, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Abbai, Nathlee S; Reddy, Tarylee; Ramjee, Gita

    2016-12-01

    The association between bacterial vaginosis (BV) and incident sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in a cohort of high-risk women from Durban, South Africa was investigated in this study. We undertook a secondary analysis of the Methods for Improving Reproductive Health in Africa trial that assessed effectiveness of the latex diaphragm and lubricant gel on HIV prevention among women. During study visits, urine specimens were collected for testing for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis and Trichomonas vaginalis The presence of BV was based on vaginal pH and wet mount test assessments. The association between BV and the risk for incident STIs was determined using the Cox proportional hazards model. Prevalence of BV was 31% in a cohort of 435 women tested at baseline. Among these women, BV was significantly associated with incident Trichomonas vaginalis (14.6 per 100 PY, p = 0.03) and Chlamydia trachomatis infections (15.8 per 100 PY, p = 0.04). BV remained a significant predictor for Trichomonas vaginalis infections even after adjusting for potential confounders such as age and marital status (HR: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.00, 2.57, p = 0.04). Our study showed an association between baseline BV infections and incident Trichomonas vaginalis and Chlamydia trachomatis infections. Women with BV infections should be counselled on the use of condoms and the risk of new STIs.

  2. RNA-Seq Transcriptomic Responses of Full-Thickness Dermal Excision Wounds to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute and Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsute; Qian, Li-Wu; Fourcaudot, Andrea B.; Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.; You, Tao; Leung, Kai P.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of wounds in clinical settings are major complications whose outcomes are influenced by host responses that are not completely understood. Herein we evaluated transcriptomic changes of wounds as they counter P. aeruginosa infection—first active infection, and then chronic biofilm infection. We used the dermal full-thickness, rabbit ear excisional wound model. We studied the wound response: towards acute infection at 2, 6, and 24 hrs after inoculating 106 bacteria into day-3 wounds; and, towards more chronic biofilm infection of wounds similarly infected for 24 hrs but then treated with topical antibiotic to coerce biofilm growth and evaluated at day 5 and 9 post-infection. The wounds were analyzed for bacterial counts, expression of P. aeruginosa virulence and biofilm-synthesis genes, biofilm morphology, infiltrating immune cells, re-epithelialization, and genome-wide gene expression (RNA-Seq transcriptome). This analysis revealed that 2 hrs after bacterial inoculation into day-3 wounds, the down-regulated genes (infected vs. non-infected) of the wound edge were nearly all non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), comprised of snoRNA, miRNA, and RNU6 pseudogenes, and their down-regulation preceded a general down-regulation of skin-enriched coding gene expression. As the active infection intensified, ncRNAs remained overre