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Sample records for acute barrier disruption

  1. Matrix Metalloproteinases and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lakhan, Shaheen E.; Kirchgessner, Annette; Tepper, Deborah; Leonard, Aidan

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke continues to be one of the most challenging diseases in translational neurology. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but its use is limited to the first hours after stroke onset due to an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation over time resulting in enhanced brain injury. In this review we discuss the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption as a consequence of ischemic stroke. MMP-9 in particular appears to play an important role in tPA-associated hemorrhagic complications. Reactive oxygen species can enhance the effects of tPA on MMP activation through the loss of caveolin-1 (cav-1), a protein encoded in the cav-1 gene that serves as a critical determinant of BBB permeability. This review provides an overview of MMPs’ role in BBB breakdown during acute ischemic stroke. The possible role of MMPs in combination treatment of acute ischemic stroke is also examined. PMID:23565108

  2. 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging characterization of acute blood-brain-barrier disruption achieved with intracranial irreversible electroporation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Rossmeisl, John H; Robertson, John L; Olson, John D; Johnson, Annette J; Ellis, Thomas L; Davalos, Rafael V

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) presents a significant obstacle to the delivery of systemically administered chemotherapeutics for the treatment of brain cancer. Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging technology that uses pulsed electric fields for the non-thermal ablation of tumors. We hypothesized that there is a minimal electric field at which BBB disruption occurs surrounding an IRE-induced zone of ablation and that this transient response can be measured using gadolinium (Gd) uptake as a surrogate marker for BBB disruption. The study was performed in a Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) compliant facility and had Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) approval. IRE ablations were performed in vivo in normal rat brain (n = 21) with 1-mm electrodes (0.45 mm diameter) separated by an edge-to-edge distance of 4 mm. We used an ECM830 pulse generator to deliver ninety 50-μs pulse treatments (0, 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 V/cm) at 1 Hz. The effects of applied electric fields and timing of Gd administration (-5, +5, +15, and +30 min) was assessed by systematically characterizing IRE-induced regions of cell death and BBB disruption with 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathologic evaluations. Statistical analysis on the effect of applied electric field and Gd timing was conducted via Fit of Least Squares with α = 0.05 and linear regression analysis. The focal nature of IRE treatment was confirmed with 3D MRI reconstructions with linear correlations between volume of ablation and electric field. Our results also demonstrated that IRE is an ablation technique that kills brain tissue in a focal manner depicted by MRI (n = 16) and transiently disrupts the BBB adjacent to the ablated area in a voltage-dependent manner as seen with Evan's Blue (n = 5) and Gd administration. PMID:23226293

  3. 7.0-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characterization of Acute Blood-Brain-Barrier Disruption Achieved with Intracranial Irreversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Robertson, John L.; Olson, John D.; Johnson, Annette J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) presents a significant obstacle to the delivery of systemically administered chemotherapeutics for the treatment of brain cancer. Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging technology that uses pulsed electric fields for the non-thermal ablation of tumors. We hypothesized that there is a minimal electric field at which BBB disruption occurs surrounding an IRE-induced zone of ablation and that this transient response can be measured using gadolinium (Gd) uptake as a surrogate marker for BBB disruption. The study was performed in a Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) compliant facility and had Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) approval. IRE ablations were performed in vivo in normal rat brain (n = 21) with 1-mm electrodes (0.45 mm diameter) separated by an edge-to-edge distance of 4 mm. We used an ECM830 pulse generator to deliver ninety 50-μs pulse treatments (0, 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 V/cm) at 1 Hz. The effects of applied electric fields and timing of Gd administration (−5, +5, +15, and +30 min) was assessed by systematically characterizing IRE-induced regions of cell death and BBB disruption with 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathologic evaluations. Statistical analysis on the effect of applied electric field and Gd timing was conducted via Fit of Least Squares with α = 0.05 and linear regression analysis. The focal nature of IRE treatment was confirmed with 3D MRI reconstructions with linear correlations between volume of ablation and electric field. Our results also demonstrated that IRE is an ablation technique that kills brain tissue in a focal manner depicted by MRI (n = 16) and transiently disrupts the BBB adjacent to the ablated area in a voltage-dependent manner as seen with Evan's Blue (n = 5) and Gd administration. PMID:23226293

  4. Cigarette Smoke Disrupted Lung Endothelial Barrier Integrity and Increased Susceptibility to Acute Lung Injury via Histone Deacetylase 6.

    PubMed

    Borgas, Diana; Chambers, Eboni; Newton, Julie; Ko, Junsuk; Rivera, Stephanie; Rounds, Sharon; Lu, Qing

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiologic evidence indicates that cigarette smoke (CS) is associated with the development of acute lung injury (ALI). We have previously shown that brief CS exposure exacerbates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in vivo and endothelial barrier dysfunction in vitro. In this study, we found that CS also exacerbated Pseudomonas-induced ALI in mice. We demonstrated that lung microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) isolated from mice exposed to CS had a greater permeability or incomplete recovery after challenges by LPS and thrombin. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) 6 deacetylates proteins essential for maintenance of endothelial barrier function. We found that HDAC6 phosphorylation at serine-22 was increased in lung tissues of mice exposed to CS and in lung ECs exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Inhibition of HDAC6 attenuated CSE-induced increases in EC permeability and CS priming of ALI. Similar barrier protection was provided by the microtubule stabilizer taxol, which preserved α-tubulin acetylation. CSE decreased α-tubulin acetylation and caused microtubule depolymerization. In coordination with increased HDAC6 phosphorylation, CSE inhibited Akt and activated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β; these effects were ameliorated by the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine. Our results suggest that CS increases lung EC permeability, thereby enhancing susceptibility to ALI, likely through oxidative stress-induced Akt inactivation and subsequent GSK-3β activation. Activated GSK-3β may activate HDAC6 via phosphorylation of serine-22, leading to α-tubulin deacetylation and microtubule disassembly. Inhibition of HDAC6 may be a novel therapeutic option for ALI in cigarette smokers. PMID:26452072

  5. Epidermal growth factor attenuates blood-spinal cord barrier disruption via PI3K/Akt/Rac1 pathway after acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Binbin; Ye, Libing; Zhou, Yulong; Zhu, Sipin; Wang, Qingqing; Shi, Hongxue; Chen, Daqing; Wei, Xiaojie; Wang, Zhouguang; Li, Xiaokun; Xiao, Jian; Xu, Huazi; Zhang, Hongyu

    2016-06-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) elicits blood cell infiltration such as neutrophils and macrophages, contributing to permanent neurological disability. Previous studies show that epidermal growth factor (EGF) produces potent neuroprotective effects in SCI models. However, little is known that whether EGF contributes to the integrity of BSCB. The present study is performed to explore the mechanism of BSCB permeability changes which are induced by EGF treatment after SCI in rats. In this study, we demonstrate that EGF administration inhibits the disruption of BSCB permeability and improves the locomotor activity in SCI model rats. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathways by a specific inhibitor, LY294002, suppresses EGF-induced Rac1 activation as well as tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) expression. Furthermore, the protective effect of EGF on BSCB is related to the activation of Rac1 both in vivo and in vitro. Blockade of Rac1 activation with Rac1 siRNA downregulates EGF-induced TJ and AJ proteins expression in endothelial cells. Taken together, our results indicate that EGF treatment preserves BSCB integrity and improves functional recovery after SCI via PI3K-Akt-Rac1 signalling pathway. PMID:26769343

  6. Osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption: CT and radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Roman-Goldstein, S.; Clunie, D.A.; Stevens, J.; Hogan, R.; Monard, J.; Ramsey, F.; Neuwelt, E.A.

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare CT and radionuclide imaging of osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption, and to develop a quantitative method for imaging osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption and to see if iopamidol could be safety given intravenously in conjunction with blood-brain barrier disruption. Forty-five blood-brain barrier disruption procedures were imaged with CT and radionuclide scans. The scans were evaluated with visual and quantitative scales. Patients were observed for adverse effects after blood-brain barrier disruption. There was a 4% rate of seizures in this study. There was good agreement between visual CT and radionuclide grading systems. Quantitative disruption did not add useful information to visual interpretations. Nonionic iodine-based contrast medium has a lower incidence of seizures when injected intravenously in conjunction with osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption than ionic contrast material. Contrast-enhanced CT is the preferred method to image disruption because it has better spatial resolution than radionuclide techniques. 34 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. LIM kinase 1 promotes endothelial barrier disruption and neutrophil infiltration in mouse lungs

    PubMed Central

    Gorovoy, Matvey; Han, Jingyan; Pan, Haiyun; Welch, Emily; Neamu, Radu; Jia, Zhengping; Predescu, Dan; Vogel, Stephen; Minshall, Richard; Ye, Richard D.; Malik, Asrar B.; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Disruption of endothelial barrier function and neutrophil-mediated injury are two major mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Recently we reported that endotoxin induced activation of RhoA in mice lungs that led to the disruption of endothelial barrier and lung edema formation; however the molecular mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. Objective We reasoned that LIMK1, which participates in the regulation of endothelial cell contractility and is activated by RhoA/Rho kinase pathway, could mediate RhoA-dependent disruption of endothelial barrier function in mouse lungs during ALI. And if that is the case, then attenuation of endothelial cell contractility by down-regulating LIMK1 may lead to the enhancement of endothelial barrier function, which could protect mice from endotoxin-induced ALI. Methods and Results Here we report that LIMK1 deficiency in mice significantly reduced mortality induced by endotoxin. Data showed that lung edema formation, lung microvascular permeability, and neutrophil infiltration into the lungs were suppressed in limk1−/− mice. Conclusions We identified that improvement of endothelial barrier function along with impaired neutrophil chemotaxis were the underlying mechanisms that reduced severity of ALI in limk1−/− mice, pointing to a new therapeutic target for diseases associated with acute inflammation of the lungs. PMID:19679840

  8. Protection of the blood-brain barrier by hypercapnia during acute hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbach, G.L.; Mayhan, W.G.; Heistad, D.D.

    1986-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effects of hypercapnia on susceptibility of the blood-brain barrier to disruption during acute hypertension. Two methods were used to test the hypothesis that cerebral vasodilation during hypercapnia increases disruption of the blood-brain barrier. First, permeability of the blood-brain barrier was measured in anesthetized cats with SVI-labeled serum albumin. Severe hypertension markedly increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier during normocapnia, but not during hypercapnia. The protective effect of hypercapnia was not dependent on sympathetic nerves. Second, in anesthetized rats, permeability of the barrier was quantitated by clearance of fluorescent dextran. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier during hypertension was decreased by hypercapnia. Because disruption of the blood-brain barrier occurred primarily in pial venules, the authors also measured pial venular diameter and pressure. Acute hypertension increased pial venular pressure and diameter in normocapnic rats. Hypercapnia alone increased pial venular pressure and pial venular diameter, and acute hypertension during hypercapnia further increased venular pressure. The magnitude of increase in pial venular pressure during acute hypertension was significantly less in hypercapnic than in normocapnic rats. They conclude that hypercapnia protects the blood-brain barrier. Possible mechanisms of this effect include attenuation of the incremental increase in pial venular pressure by hypercapnia or a direct effect on the blood-brain barrier not related to venous pressure.

  9. Heat stress: intestinal barrier and immune disruption in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Economic losses to the livestock industry due to heat stress (HS) are estimated to be greater than $2.0 billion annually. HS morbidity is linked to disruption of normal intestinal tract (IT) absorptive and barrier functions, is often manifested as decreased performance; however, extreme HS can have ...

  10. Ischemic neurons activate astrocytes to disrupt endothelial barrier via increasing VEGF expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying-Na; Pan, Rong; Qin, Xu-Jun; Yang, Wei-Lin; Qi, Zhifeng; Liu, Wenlan; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption occurring within the first few hours of ischemic stroke onset is closely associated with hemorrhagic transformation following thrombolytic therapy. However, the mechanism of this acute BBB disruption remains unclear. In the neurovascular unit, neurons do not have direct contact with the endothelial barrier, however they are highly sensitive and vulnerable to ischemic injury, and may act as the initiator for disrupting BBB when cerebral ischemia occurs. Herein we employed oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and an in vitro BBB system consisting of brain microvascular cells and astrocytes to test this hypothesis. Neurons (CATH.a cells) were exposed to OGD for 3-hours before co-culturing with endothelial monolayer (bEnd 3 cells), or endothelial cells plus astrocytes (C8-D1A cells). Incubation of OGD-treated neurons with endothelial monolayer alone did not increase endothelial permeability. However, when astrocytes were present, the endothelial permeability was significantly increased, which was accompanied by loss of occludin and claudin-5 proteins as well as increased VEGF secretion into the conditioned medium. Importantly, all these changes were abolished when VEGF was knocked down in astrocytes by siRNA. Our findings suggest that ischemic neurons activate astrocytes to increase VEGF production, which in turn induces endothelial barrier disruption. PMID:24251624

  11. Sensing of Barrier Tissue Disruption with an Organic Electrochemical Transistor

    PubMed Central

    Tria, Scherrine A.; Ramuz, Marc; Jimison, Leslie H.; Hama, Adel; Owens, Roisin M.

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is an example of barrier tissue that provides a physical barrier against entry of pathogens and toxins, while allowing the passage of necessary ions and molecules. A breach in this barrier can be caused by a reduction in the extracellular calcium concentration. This reduction in calcium concentration causes a conformational change in proteins involved in the sealing of the barrier, leading to an increase of the paracellular flux. To mimic this effect the calcium chelator ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid (EGTA) was used on a monolayer of cells known to be representative of the gastrointestinal tract. Different methods to detect the disruption of the barrier tissue already exist, such as immunofluorescence and permeability assays. However, these methods are time-consuming and costly and not suited to dynamic or high-throughput measurements. Electronic methods for measuring barrier tissue integrity also exist for measurement of the transepithelial resistance (TER), however these are often costly and complex. The development of rapid, cheap, and sensitive methods is urgently needed as the integrity of barrier tissue is a key parameter in drug discovery and pathogen/toxin diagnostics. The organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) integrated with barrier tissue forming cells has been shown as a new device capable of dynamically monitoring barrier tissue integrity. The device is able to measure minute variations in ionic flux with unprecedented temporal resolution and sensitivity, in real time, as an indicator of barrier tissue integrity. This new method is based on a simple device that can be compatible with high throughput screening applications and fabricated at low cost. PMID:24561449

  12. Dual role of vinculin in barrier-disruptive and barrier-enhancing endothelial cell responses.

    PubMed

    Birukova, Anna A; Shah, Alok S; Tian, Yufeng; Moldobaeva, Nurgul; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) barrier disruption induced by edemagenic agonists such as thrombin is a result of increased actomyosin contraction and enforcement of focal adhesions (FA) anchoring contracting stress fibers, which leads to cell retraction and force-induced disruption of cell junctions. In turn, EC barrier enhancement by oxidized phospholipids (OxPAPC) and other agonists is a result of increased tethering forces due to enforcement of the peripheral actin rim and enhancement of cell-cell adherens junction (AJ) complexes promoting EC barrier integrity. This study tested participation of the mechanosensitive adaptor, vinculin, which couples FA and AJ to actin cytoskeleton, in control of the EC permeability response to barrier disruptive (thrombin) and barrier enhancing (OxPAPC) stimulation. OxPAPC and thrombin induced different patterns of FA remodeling. Knockdown of vinculin attenuated both, OxPAPC-induced decrease and thrombin-induced increase in EC permeability. Thrombin stimulated the vinculin association with FA protein talin and suppressed the interaction with AJ protein, VE-cadherin. In contrast, OxPAPC stimulated the vinculin association with VE-cadherin. Thrombin and OxPAPC induced different levels of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and caused different patterns of intracellular phospho-MLC distribution. Thrombin-induced talin-vinculin and OxPAPC-induced VE-cadherin-vinculin association were abolished by myosin inhibitor blebbistatin. Expression of the vinculin mutant unable to interact with actin attenuated EC permeability changes and MLC phosphorylation caused by both, thrombin and OxPAPC. These data suggest that the specific vinculin interaction with FA or AJ in different contexts of agonist stimulation is defined by development of regional actyomyosin-based tension and participates in both, the barrier-disruptive and barrier-enhancing endothelial responses. PMID:26923917

  13. Skin Barrier Disruption - A Requirement for Allergen Sensitization?

    PubMed Central

    De Benedetto, Anna; Kubo, Akiharu; Beck, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    For at least half a century, noninvasive techniques have been available to quantify skin barrier function, and these have shown that a number of human skin conditions and disorders are associated with defects in skin permeability. In the last decade, several genes responsible for skin barrier defects observed in both monogenetic and complex, polygenic disorders have been elucidated and functionally characterized. This has led to an explosion of work in the last six years that has identified pathways connecting epidermal barrier disruption and antigen uptake as well as the quality and/or magnitude of the antigen-specific adaptive immune response. This review will introduce the notion that diseases arise from the dynamic crosstalk that occurs between the skin barrier and immune system using atopic dermatitis or eczema as the disease prototype. Nevertheless, the concepts put forth are highly relevant to a number of antigen-driven disorders for which skin barrier is at least transiently compromised such as psoriasis, allergic contact dermatitis and blistering disorders. PMID:22217737

  14. Connexin 43 reboots meiosis and reseals blood-testis barrier following toxicant-mediated aspermatogenesis and barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Mruk, Dolores D; Mok, Ka-Wai; Li, Michelle W M; Wong, Chris K C; Lee, Will M; Han, Daishu; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-04-01

    Earlier studies have shown that rats treated with an acute dose of 1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)-1H-indazole-3-carbohydrazide (adjudin, a male contraceptive under development) causes permanent infertility due to irreversible blood-testis barrier (BTB) disruption even though the population of undifferentiated spermatogonia remains similar to normal rat testes, because spermatogonia fail to differentiate into spermatocytes to enter meiosis. Since other studies have illustrated the significance of connexin 43 (Cx43)-based gap junction in maintaining the homeostasis of BTB in the rat testis and the phenotypes of Sertoli cell-conditional Cx43 knockout mice share many of the similarities of the adjudin-treated rats, we sought to examine if overexpression of Cx43 in these adjudin-treated rats would reseal the disrupted BTB and reinitiate spermatogenesis. A full-length Cx43 cloned into mammalian expression vector pCI-neo was used to transfect testes of adjudin-treated ratsversusempty vector. It was found that overexpression of Cx43 indeed resealed the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier based on a functionalin vivoassay in tubules displaying signs of meiosis as noted by the presence of round spermatids. Thus, these findings suggest that overexpression of Cx43 reinitiated spermatogenesis at least through the steps of meiosis to generate round spermatids in testes of rats treated with an acute dose of adjudin that led to aspermatogenesis. It was also noted that the round spermatids underwent eventual degeneration with the formation of multinucleated cells following Cx43 overexpression due to the failure of spermiogenesis because no elongating/elongated spermatids were detected in any of the tubules examined. The mechanism by which overexpression of Cx43 reboots meiosis and rescues BTB function was also examined. In summary, overexpression of Cx43 in the testis with aspermatogenesis reboots meiosis and reseals toxicant-induced BTB disruption, even though it fails to

  15. Lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier disruption and lung edema: critical role for bicarbonate stimulation of AC10.

    PubMed

    Nickols, Jordan; Obiako, Boniface; Ramila, K C; Putinta, Kevin; Schilling, Sarah; Sayner, Sarah L

    2015-12-15

    Bacteria-induced sepsis is a common cause of pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction and can progress toward acute respiratory distress syndrome. Elevations in intracellular cAMP tightly regulate pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity; however, cAMP signals are highly compartmentalized: whether cAMP is barrier-protective or -disruptive depends on the compartment (plasma membrane or cytosol, respectively) in which the signal is generated. The mammalian soluble adenylyl cyclase isoform 10 (AC10) is uniquely stimulated by bicarbonate and is expressed in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). Elevated extracellular bicarbonate increases cAMP in PMVECs to disrupt the endothelial barrier and increase the filtration coefficient (Kf) in the isolated lung. We tested the hypothesis that sepsis-induced endothelial barrier disruption and increased permeability are dependent on extracellular bicarbonate and activation of AC10. Our findings reveal that LPS-induced endothelial barrier disruption is dependent on extracellular bicarbonate: LPS-induced barrier failure and increased permeability are exacerbated in elevated bicarbonate compared with low extracellular bicarbonate. The AC10 inhibitor KH7 attenuated the bicarbonate-dependent LPS-induced barrier disruption. In the isolated lung, LPS failed to increase Kf in the presence of minimal perfusate bicarbonate. An increase in perfusate bicarbonate to the physiological range (24 mM) revealed the LPS-induced increase in Kf, which was attenuated by KH7. Furthermore, in PMVECs treated with LPS for 6 h, there was a dose-dependent increase in AC10 expression. Thus these findings reveal that LPS-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier failure requires bicarbonate activation of AC10. PMID:26475732

  16. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  17. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  18. Blood-brain barrier disruption during spontaneous canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Melo, G D; Grano, F G; Silva, J E S; Kremer, B E; Lima, V M F; Machado, G F

    2015-12-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a complex disease caused by Leishmania infantum, and in dogs, besides the classical symptoms, there are descriptions of inflammatory alterations in the brain. Brain inflammation is a strictly controlled process, and as the brain counts on the efficiency of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we aimed to assess BBB integrity in dogs with spontaneous visceral leishmaniasis. Therefore, we evaluated markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in brain tissue related to BBB disruption and brain inflammation. Elevated albumin quota revealed BBB breakdown, corroborated by increased concentrations of anti-Leishmania antibodies in the CSF. In the brain, albumin and IgG staining formed halos around blood vessels, a classical indicator of BBB leakage. Soluble IgG was also detected in the choroid plexus and ependyma, and in these structures, IgG stained random resident cells. IgG(+) cells and Fcγ-RI(+) cells were identified in the choroid plexus, ependyma and perivascular in the brain parenchyma. The data support the occurrence of BBB disruption in dogs with spontaneous visceral leishmaniasis, and IgG as a key molecule that is capable of initiating and/or maintaining the inflammatory stimuli in the nervous milieu and the CSF as an important disseminator of inflammatory stimuli within the CNS. PMID:26434684

  19. Microbiome dynamics of human epidermis following skin barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent advances in sequencing technologies have enabled metagenomic analyses of many human body sites. Several studies have catalogued the composition of bacterial communities of the surface of human skin, mostly under static conditions in healthy volunteers. Skin injury will disturb the cutaneous homeostasis of the host tissue and its commensal microbiota, but the dynamics of this process have not been studied before. Here we analyzed the microbiota of the surface layer and the deeper layers of the stratum corneum of normal skin, and we investigated the dynamics of recolonization of skin microbiota following skin barrier disruption by tape stripping as a model of superficial injury. Results We observed gender differences in microbiota composition and showed that bacteria are not uniformly distributed in the stratum corneum. Phylogenetic distance analysis was employed to follow microbiota development during recolonization of injured skin. Surprisingly, the developing neo-microbiome at day 14 was more similar to that of the deeper stratum corneum layers than to the initial surface microbiome. In addition, we also observed variation in the host response towards superficial injury as assessed by the induction of antimicrobial protein expression in epidermal keratinocytes. Conclusions We suggest that the microbiome of the deeper layers, rather than that of the superficial skin layer, may be regarded as the host indigenous microbiome. Characterization of the skin microbiome under dynamic conditions, and the ensuing response of the microbial community and host tissue, will shed further light on the complex interaction between resident bacteria and epidermis. PMID:23153041

  20. HMGB1 induces human lung endothelial cell cytoskeletal rearrangement and barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Rachel K; Chiang, Eddie T; Garcia, Joe G N

    2011-03-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) results from loss of alveolar-capillary barrier integrity and the evolution of high-permeability pulmonary edema resulting in alveolar flooding and significant morbidity and mortality. HMGB1 is a late mediator of sepsis which uniquely participates in the evolution of sepsis and sepsis-induced ALI. The molecular events by which HMGB1 contributes to ALI remain poorly characterized. We characterized the role of HMGB1 in endothelial cell (EC) cytoskeletal rearrangement and vascular permeability, events essential to paracellular gap formation and barrier dysfunction characteristic of ALI. Initial experiments demonstrated HMGB1-mediated dose-dependent (5-20 μg/ml) decreases in transendothelial cell electrical resistance (TER) in the human pulmonary artery EC, a reflection of loss of barrier integrity. Furthermore, HMGB1 produced dose-dependent increases in paracellular gap formation in concert with loss of peripheral organized actin fibers, dissociation of cell-cell junctional cadherins, and the development of central stress fibers, a phenotypic change associated with increased contractile activity and increased EC permeability. Using siRNA strategies directed against known HMGB1 receptors (RAGE, TLR2, TLR4), we systematically determined that the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is the primary receptor signaling HMGB1-induced TER decreases and paracellular gap formation via p38 MAP kinase activation and phosphorylation of the actin-binding protein, Hsp27. These studies add to the understanding of HMGB1-induced inflammatory events and vascular barrier disruption and offer the potential for clinical intervention in sepsis-induced ALI. PMID:21146549

  1. Novel Peptide for Attenuation of Hyperoxia-induced Disruption of Lung Endothelial Barrier and Pulmonary Edema via Modulating Peroxynitrite Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Kondrikov, Dmitry; Gross, Christine; Black, Stephen M.; Su, Yunchao

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary damages of oxygen toxicity include vascular leakage and pulmonary edema. We have previously reported that hyperoxia increases the formation of NO and peroxynitrite in lung endothelial cells via increased interaction of endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS) with β-actin. A peptide (P326TAT) with amino acid sequence corresponding to the actin binding region of eNOS residues 326–333 has been shown to reduce the hyperoxia-induced formation of NO and peroxynitrite in lung endothelial cells. In the present study, we found that exposure of pulmonary artery endothelial cells to hyperoxia (95% oxygen and 5% CO2) for 48 h resulted in disruption of monolayer barrier integrity in two phases, and apoptosis occurred in the second phase. NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester attenuated the endothelial barrier disruption in both phases. Peroxynitrite scavenger uric acid did not affect the first phase but ameliorated the second phase of endothelial barrier disruption and apoptosis. P326TAT inhibited hyperoxia-induced disruption of monolayer barrier integrity in two phases and apoptosis in the second phase. More importantly, injection of P326TAT attenuated vascular leakage, pulmonary edema, and endothelial apoptosis in the lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia. P326TAT also significantly reduced the increase in eNOS-β-actin association and protein tyrosine nitration. Together, these results indicate that peptide P326TAT ameliorates barrier dysfunction of hyperoxic lung endothelial monolayer and attenuates eNOS-β-actin association, peroxynitrite formation, endothelial apoptosis, and pulmonary edema in lungs of hyperoxic mice. P326TAT can be a novel therapeutic agent to treat or prevent acute lung injury in oxygen toxicity. PMID:25315770

  2. Myosin di-phosphorylation and peripheral actin bundle formation as initial events during endothelial barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Mayumi; Hirano, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the 20-kD myosin light chain (MLC) and actin filament formation play a key role in endothelial barrier disruption. MLC is either mono- or di-phosphorylated (pMLC and ppMLC) at T18 or S19. The present study investigated whether there are any distinct roles of pMLC and ppMLC in barrier disruption induced by thrombin. Thrombin induced a modest bi-phasic increase in pMLC and a robust mono-phasic increase in ppMLC. pMLC localized in the perinuclear cytoplasm during the initial phase, while ppMLC localized in the cell periphery, where actin bundles were formed. Later, the actin bundles were rearranged into stress fibers, where pMLC co-localized. Rho-kinase inhibitors inhibited thrombin-induced barrier disruption and peripheral localization of ppMLC and actin bundles. The double, but not single, mutation of phosphorylation sites abolished the formation of peripheral actin bundles and the barrier disruption, indicating that mono-phosphorylation of MLC at either T18 or S19 is functionally sufficient for barrier disruption. Namely, the peripheral localization, but not the degree of phosphorylation, is suggested to be essential for the functional effect of ppMLC. These results suggest that MLC phosphorylation and actin bundle formation in cell periphery are initial events during barrier disruption. PMID:26863988

  3. Neurosurgical Techniques for Disruption of the Blood-Brain Barrier for Glioblastoma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Analiz; Tatter, Stephen B; Debinski, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier remains a main hurdle to drug delivery to the brain. The prognosis of glioblastoma remains grim despite current multimodal medical management. We review neurosurgical technologies that disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We will review superselective intra-arterial mannitol infusion, focused ultrasound, laser interstitial thermotherapy, and non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE). These technologies can lead to transient BBB and blood-brain tumor barrier disruption and allow for the potential of more effective local drug delivery. Animal studies and preliminary clinical trials show promise for achieving this goal. PMID:26247958

  4. Neurosurgical Techniques for Disruption of the Blood–Brain Barrier for Glioblastoma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Analiz; Tatter, Stephen B.; Debinski, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier remains a main hurdle to drug delivery to the brain. The prognosis of glioblastoma remains grim despite current multimodal medical management. We review neurosurgical technologies that disrupt the blood–brain barrier (BBB). We will review superselective intra-arterial mannitol infusion, focused ultrasound, laser interstitial thermotherapy, and non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE). These technologies can lead to transient BBB and blood–brain tumor barrier disruption and allow for the potential of more effective local drug delivery. Animal studies and preliminary clinical trials show promise for achieving this goal. PMID:26247958

  5. Acute Modulations in Permeability Barrier Function Regulate Epidermal Cornification

    PubMed Central

    Demerjian, Marianne; Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Tschachler, Erwin; Denecker, Geertrui; Declercq, Wim; Vandenabeele, Peter; Mauro, Theodora; Hupe, Melanie; Crumrine, Debra; Roelandt, Truus; Houben, Evi; Elias, Peter M.; Feingold, Kenneth R.

    2008-01-01

    Stratum corneum comprises corneocytes, derived from outer stratum granulosum during terminal differentiation, embedded in a lipid-enriched extracellular matrix, secreted from epidermal lamellar bodies. Permeability barrier insults stimulate rapid secretion of preformed lamellar bodies from the outer stratum granulosum, regulated through modulations in ionic gradients and serine protease (SP)/protease-activated receptor type 2 (PAR2) signaling. Because corneocytes are also required for barrier function, we hypothesized that corneocyte formation could also be regulated by barrier function. Barrier abrogation by two unrelated methods initiated a wave of cornification, assessed as TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling-positive cells in stratum granulosum and newly cornified cells by electron microscopy. Because cornification was blocked by occlusion, corneocytes formed specifically in response to barrier, rather than injury or cell replacement, requirements. SP inhibitors and hyperacidification (which decreases SP activity) blocked cornification after barrier disruption. Similarly, cornification was delayed in PAR2−/− mice. Although classical markers of apoptosis [poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase and caspase (Casp)-3] remained unchanged, barrier disruption activated Casp-14. Moreover, the pan-Casp inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK delayed cornification, and corneocytes were structurally aberrant in Casp14−/− mice. Thus, permeability barrier requirements coordinately drive both the generation of the stratum corneum lipid-enriched extracellular matrix and the transformation of granular cells into corneocytes, in an SP- and Casp-14-dependent manner, signaled by PAR2. PMID:18156206

  6. Mechanisms of lung endothelial barrier disruption induced by cigarette smoke: role of oxidative stress and ceramides.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Kelly S; Hatoum, Hadi; Brown, Mary Beth; Gupta, Mehak; Justice, Matthew J; Beteck, Besem; Van Demark, Mary; Gu, Yuan; Presson, Robert G; Hubbard, Walter C; Petrache, Irina

    2011-12-01

    The epithelial and endothelial cells lining the alveolus form a barrier essential for the preservation of the lung respiratory function, which is, however, vulnerable to excessive oxidative, inflammatory, and apoptotic insults. Whereas profound breaches in this barrier function cause pulmonary edema, more subtle changes may contribute to inflammation. The mechanisms by which cigarette smoke (CS) exposure induce lung inflammation are not fully understood, but an early alteration in the epithelial barrier function has been documented. We sought to investigate the occurrence and mechanisms by which soluble components of mainstream CS disrupt the lung endothelial cell barrier function. Using cultured primary rat microvascular cell monolayers, we report that CS induces endothelial cell barrier disruption in a dose- and time-dependent manner of similar magnitude to that of the epithelial cell barrier. CS exposure triggered a mechanism of neutral sphingomyelinase-mediated ceramide upregulation and p38 MAPK and JNK activation that were oxidative stress dependent and that, along with Rho kinase activation, mediated the endothelial barrier dysfunction. The morphological changes in endothelial cell monolayers induced by CS included actin cytoskeletal rearrangement, junctional protein zonula occludens-1 loss, and intercellular gap formation, which were abolished by the glutathione modulator N-acetylcysteine and ameliorated by neutral sphingomyelinase inhibition. The direct application of ceramide recapitulated the effects of CS, by disrupting both endothelial and epithelial cells barrier, by a mechanism that was redox and apoptosis independent and required Rho kinase activation. Furthermore, ceramide induced dose-dependent alterations of alveolar microcirculatory barrier in vivo, measured by two-photon excitation microscopy in the intact rat. In conclusion, soluble components of CS have direct endothelial barrier-disruptive effects that could be ameliorated by glutathione

  7. Centromeric barrier disruption leads to mitotic defects in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Gaither, Terilyn L; Merrett, Stephanie L; Pun, Matthew J; Scott, Kristin C

    2014-04-01

    Centromeres are cis-acting chromosomal domains that direct kinetochore formation, enabling faithful chromosome segregation and preserving genome stability. The centromeres of most eukaryotic organisms are structurally complex, composed of nonoverlapping, structurally and functionally distinct chromatin subdomains, including the specialized core chromatin that underlies the kinetochore and pericentromeric heterochromatin. The genomic and epigenetic features that specify and preserve the adjacent chromatin subdomains critical to centromere identity are currently unknown. Here we demonstrate that chromatin barriers regulate this process in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Reduced fitness and mitotic chromosome segregation defects occur in strains that carry exogenous DNA inserted at centromere 1 chromatin barriers. Abnormal phenotypes are accompanied by changes in the structural integrity of both the centromeric core chromatin domain, containing the conserved CENP-A(Cnp1) protein, and the flanking pericentric heterochromatin domain. Barrier mutant cells can revert to wild-type growth and centromere structure at a high frequency after the spontaneous excision of integrated exogenous DNA. Our results reveal a previously undemonstrated role for chromatin barriers in chromosome segregation and in the prevention of genome instability. PMID:24531725

  8. Assessment of blood–brain barrier disruption using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Heye, Anna K.; Culling, Ross D.; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Thrippleton, Michael J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the importance of blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption in aging, dementia, stroke and multiple sclerosis in addition to more commonly-studied pathologies such as tumors. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is a method for studying BBB disruption in vivo. We review pathologies studied, scanning protocols and data analysis procedures to determine the range of available methods and their suitability to different pathologies. We systematically review the existing literature up to February 2014, seeking studies that assessed BBB integrity using T1-weighted DCE-MRI techniques in animals and humans in normal or abnormal brain tissues. The literature search provided 70 studies that were eligible for inclusion, involving 417 animals and 1564 human subjects in total. The pathologies most studied are intracranial neoplasms and acute ischemic strokes. There are large variations in the type of DCE-MRI sequence, the imaging protocols and the contrast agents used. Moreover, studies use a variety of different methods for data analysis, mainly based on model-free measurements and on the Patlak and Tofts models. Consequently, estimated KTrans values varied widely. In conclusion, DCE-MRI is shown to provide valuable information in a large variety of applications, ranging from common applications, such as grading of primary brain tumors, to more recent applications, such as assessment of subtle BBB dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. Further research is required in order to establish consensus-based recommendations for data acquisition and analysis and, hence, improve inter-study comparability and promote wider use of DCE-MRI. PMID:25379439

  9. Retention of indocyanine green as a potential marker for optical detection of blood brain barrier disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergin, A.; Joshi, S.; Wang, M.; Bigio, I. J.

    2011-03-01

    Preliminary studies have shown that there is great variability in the degree of disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBBD) after the intraarterial injection of mannitol in rabbit models. The disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) is affected by a number of factors, and the variations could have a profound impact on regional delivery of chemotherapeutics. Optically measured brain tissue concentrations of indocyanine green (ICG) and Evan's blue (EB) enable the quantification of BBBD after intraarterial administration of mannitol. Using the optical pharmacokinetics technique, a variation of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, we are able to track in vivo brain tissue concentrations of ICG and EB in rabbits, before and after barrier disruption. This study shows the feasibility of optical monitoring of BBBD, a method that can help improve intraarterial delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs.

  10. A multitheragnostic nanobubble system to induce blood-brain barrier disruption with magnetically guided focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsin-Yang; Liu, Hao-Li; Hsu, Po-Hung; Chiang, Chih-Sheng; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Chi, Huei-Shang; Chen, San-Yuan; Chen, You-Yin

    2015-01-27

    A novel magnetically guidable nanobubble is designed for disrupting the blood-brain barrier (BBB) by combining magnetic guidance with focused ultrasound in vivo. The magnetic-nanobubble platform also demonstrates the potential to serve as a unique theranostic tool via performing focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced BBB disruption and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/ultrasound dual-modality contrast-agent imaging to improve the drug delivery of therapeutic substances or gene therapy into the central nervous system. PMID:25472627

  11. Neutrophil α-Defensins Cause Lung Injury by Disrupting the Capillary–Epithelial Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Bdeir, Khalil; Higazi, Abd Al-Roof; Kulikovskaya, Irina; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Allen, Timothy C.; Idell, Steven; Linzmeier, Rose; Ganz, Tomas; Cines, Douglas B.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: The involvement of neutrophil activation in the sentinel, potentially reversible, events in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) is only partially understood. α-Defensins are the most abundant proteins secreted by activated human neutrophils, but their contribution to ALI in mouse models is hindered by their absence from murine neutrophils and the inability to study their effects in isolation in other species. Objectives: To study the role of α-defensins in the pathogenesis of ALI in a clinically relevant setting using mice transgenic for polymorphonuclear leukocyte expression of α-defensins. Methods: Transgenic mice expressing polymorphonuclear leukocyte α-defensins were generated. ALI was induced by acid aspiration. Pulmonary vascular permeability was studied in vivo using labeled dextran and fibrin deposition. The role of the low-density lipoprotein–related receptor (LRP) in permeability was examined. Measurements and Main Results: Acid aspiration induced neutrophil migration and release of α-defensins into lung parenchyma and airways. ALI was more severe in α-defensin–expressing mice than in wild-type mice, as determined by inspection, influx of neutrophils into the interstitial space and airways, histological evidence of epithelial injury, interstitial edema, extravascular fibrin deposition, impaired oxygenation, and reduced survival. Within 4 hours of insult, α-defensin–expressing mice showed greater disruption of capillary–epithelial barrier function and ALI that was attenuated by systemic or intratracheal administration of specific inhibitors of the LRP. Conclusions: α-Defensins mediate ALI through LRP-mediated loss of capillary–epithelial barrier function, suggesting a potential new approach to intervention. PMID:20093642

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G disrupts blood brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Nasrin; Berg, Carsten Tue; Mørch, Marlene Thorsen; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2015-08-01

    To clarify the significance of immunoglobulin G autoantibody specific for the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 in cerebrospinal fluid, aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G from a neuromyelitis optica patient was administered intrathecally to naïve mice, and the distribution and pathogenic impact was evaluated. A distinct distribution pattern of aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G deposition was observed in the subarachnoid and subpial spaces where vessels penetrate the brain parenchyma, via a paravascular route with intraparenchymal perivascular deposition. Perivascular astrocyte-destructive lesions were associated with blood-borne horseradish peroxidase leakage indicating blood-brain barrier breakdown. The cerebrospinal fluid aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G therefore distributes widely in brain to initiate astrocytopathy and blood-brain barrier breakdown. PMID:26339679

  13. The effects of barrier disruption and moisturization on the dynamic drying mechanics of human stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; German, G K

    2015-09-01

    We study the dynamic drying mechanics of human stratum corneum, the most superficial layer of skin and essential physical and chemical barrier to the external environment. Barrier disruption caused by a depletion of lipids ordinarily found in healthy stratum corneum can occur with ageing, aggressive cleansing or with dry skin disorders and diseases such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. We establish the effects of severe barrier disruption on the dynamic drying mechanics of human stratum corneum by measuring variations in thickness and spatially resolved in-plane displacements in healthy and lipid depleted tissue samples drying in controlled environmental conditions. In-plane displacements recorded at regular intervals during drying are azimuthally averaged and fitted with a profile based on a linear elastic model. The measured thickness of the tissue sample is accounted for in each model fit. Dynamic variations in the drying stress and elastic modulus of the tissue are then established from the model fits. We find that barrier disruption causes dramatic reductions in drying timescales, increases in the elastic modulus of the tissue and larger drying stresses. We expect these changes to increase the propensity for cracking and chapping in skin. The maximum elastic modulus and drying stress of barrier disrupted stratum corneum (ESC=85.4±6.8 MPa, PSC=10.9±0.9 MPa) is reduced to levels comparable with stratum corneum containing lipids (ESC=26.1±3.2 MPa, PSC=2.58±0.45 MPa) after treatment with a 5% aqueous solution of glycerol. Neither 2% nor 5% glycerol solutions slow the accelerated drying timescales in barrier disrupted stratum corneum. PMID:26002418

  14. The role of anthrolysin O in gut epithelial barrier disruption during Bacillus anthracis infection.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Brian L; Lodolce, James P; Kolodziej, Lauren E; Boone, David L; Tang, Wei Jen

    2010-04-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax, caused by the bacterial infection of Bacillus anthracis, posts a significant bioterrorism threat by its relatively high mortality rate in humans. Different from inhalational anthrax by the route of infection, accumulating evidence indicates the bypass of vegetative bacteria across GI epithelium is required to initiate GI anthrax. Previously, we reported that purified anthrolysin O (ALO), instead of tripartite anthrax edema and lethal toxins, is capable of disrupting gut epithelial tight junctions and barrier function in cultured cells. Here, we show that ALO can disrupt intestinal tissue barrier function in an ex vivo mouse model. To explore the effects of ALO in a cell culture model of B. anthracis infection, we showed that anthrax bacteria can effectively reduce the monolayer integrity of human Caco-2 brush-border expressor (C2BBE) cells based on the reduced transepithelial resistance and the increased leakage of fluorescent dye. This disruption is likely caused by tight junction dysfunction observed by the reorganization of the tight junction protein occludin. Consequently, we observe significant passage of vegetative anthrax bacteria across C2BBE cells. This barrier disruption and bacterial crossover requires ALO since ALO-deficient B. anthracis strains fail to induce monolayer dysfunction and allow the passage of anthrax bacteria. Together these findings point to a pivotal role for ALO within the establishment of GI anthrax infection and the initial bypass of the epithelial barrier. PMID:20188700

  15. Abrogation of IFN-γ mediated epithelial barrier disruption by serine protease inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, LEM; Hoetjes, JP; Van Deventer, SJH; Van Tol, EAF

    2005-01-01

    The intestinal barrier function is often impaired in a variety of diseases including chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Increased intestinal permeability during episodes of active disease correlates with destruction or rearrangement of the tight junction protein complex. IFN-γ has been widely studied for its effect on barrier function and tight junction structures but its mode of action remains unclear. Since the claudin family of tight junction proteins is proposed to be involved in barrier maintenance we studied the effect of IFN-γ on claudin expression in relation to epithelial barrier function. Cycloheximide and protease inhibitors were used to study mechanisms of IFN-γ mediated barrier disruption. Intestinal epithelial cells were exposed to IFN-γ and permeability was evaluated by horse radish peroxidase (HRP) and 4 kD FITC-dextran fluxes. Occludin and claudin-1, -2, -3, and -4 tight junction protein expression was determined by Western blotting. Occludin and claudin-2 protein expression was dramatically reduced after IFN-γ exposure, which correlated with increased permeability for HRP and FITC-dextran. Interestingly, cleavage of claudin-2 was observed after incubation with IFN-γ. Serine protease inhibitor AEBSF completely abrogated IFN-γ mediated barrier disruption which was associated with preservation of claudin-2 expression. Moreover, IFN-γ induced loss of barrier integrity was found to affect claudin-2 and occludin expression through different mechanisms. Since inhibition of serine protease activity abrogates IFN-γ mediated barrier disruption this may be an important target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:16232214

  16. PML, a growth suppressor disrupted in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Z M; Chin, K V; Liu, J H; Lozano, G; Chang, K S

    1994-01-01

    The nonrandom chromosomal translocation t(15;17)(q22;q21) in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) juxtaposes the genes for retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) and the putative zinc finger transcription factor PML. The breakpoint site encodes fusion protein PML-RAR alpha, which is able to form a heterodimer with PML. It was hypothesized that PML-RAR alpha is a dominant negative inhibitor of PML. Inactivation of PML function in APL may play a critical role in APL pathogenesis. Our results demonstrated that PML, but not PML-RAR alpha, is a growth suppressor. This is supported by the following findings: (i) PML suppressed anchorage-independent growth of APL-derived NB4 cells on soft agar and tumorigenicity in nude mice, (ii) PML suppressed the oncogenic transformation of rat embryo fibroblasts by cooperative oncogenes, and (iii) PML suppressed transformation of NIH 3T3 cells by the activated neu oncogene. Cotransfection of PML with PML-RAR alpha resulted in a significant reduction in PML's transformation suppressor function in vivo, indicating that the fusion protein can be a dominant negative inhibitor of PML function in APL cells. This observation was further supported by the finding that cotransfection of PML and PML-RAR alpha resulted in altered normal cellular localization of PML. Our results also demonstrated that PML, but not PML-RAR alpha, is a promoter-specific transcription suppressor. Therefore, we hypothesized that disruption of the PML gene, a growth or transformation suppressor, by the t(15;17) translocation in APL is one of the critical events in leukemogenesis. Images PMID:7935403

  17. Use of Ultrasound Pulses Combined with Definity for Targeted Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a method to combine an ultrasound contrast agent (USCA) with low-intensity focused ultrasound pulses combined to produce temporary blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD), a potential non-invasive means for targeted drug delivery in the brain. All of our previous work used the USCA Optison. The purpose of this work was to test the feasibility of using the USCA Definity for BBBD. Thirty-six non-overlapping locations were sonicated through a craniotomy in experiments in the brains of nine rabbits (4 locations per rabbit; US frequency: 0.69MHz, burst: 10ms, PRF: 1Hz, duration: 20s; pressure amplitude: 0.2-1.5 MPa). Eleven locations were sonicated using Optison at 0.5 MPa. For both agents, the probability for BBBD was estimated to be 50% at 0.4 MPa using probit regression. In histology, small isolated areas of extravasated erythrocytes were observed in some locations. At 0.8 MPa and above, this extravasation was sometimes accompanied by tiny (dimensions of 100 μm or less) regions of damaged brain parenchyma. The magnitude of the BBBD was larger with Optison than with Definity at 0.5 MPa (P=0.04), and more areas with extravasated erythrocytes were observed (P=0.03). We conclude that BBBD is possible using Definity for the dosage of USCA and the acoustic parameters tested in this study. While the probability for BBBD as a function of pressure amplitude and the type of acute tissue effects was similar to findings with Optison, under these experimental conditions, Optison produced a larger effect.

  18. Viral Infection of the Central Nervous System and Neuroinflammation Precede Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption during Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Wang, Yueyun; Yu, Lan; Cao, Shengbo; Wang, Ke; Yuan, Jiaolong; Wang, Chong; Wang, Kunlun; Fu, Zhen F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Japanese encephalitis is an acute zoonotic, mosquito-borne disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Japanese encephalitis is characterized by extensive inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) and disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, the pathogenic mechanisms contributing to the BBB disruption are not known. Here, using a mouse model of intravenous JEV infection, we show that virus titers increased exponentially in the brain from 2 to 5 days postinfection. This was accompanied by an early, dramatic increase in the level of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the brain. Enhancement of BBB permeability, however, was not observed until day 4, suggesting that viral entry and the onset of inflammation in the CNS occurred prior to BBB damage. In vitro studies revealed that direct infection with JEV could not induce changes in the permeability of brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayers. However, brain extracts derived from symptomatic JEV-infected mice, but not from mock-infected mice, induced significant permeability of the endothelial monolayer. Consistent with a role for inflammatory mediators in BBB disruption, the administration of gamma interferon-neutralizing antibody ameliorated the enhancement of BBB permeability in JEV-infected mice. Taken together, our data suggest that JEV enters the CNS, propagates in neurons, and induces the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which result in the disruption of the BBB. IMPORTANCE Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia, resulting in 70,000 cases each year, in which approximately 20 to 30% of cases are fatal, and a high proportion of patients survive with serious neurological and psychiatric sequelae. Pathologically, JEV infection causes an acute encephalopathy accompanied by BBB dysfunction; however, the mechanism is not clear. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of BBB disruption in JEV infection is important

  19. Molecular targets in radiation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Nordal, Robert A.; Wong, C. Shun . E-mail: shun.wang@sw.ca

    2005-05-01

    Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key feature of radiation injury to the central nervous system. Studies suggest that endothelial cell apoptosis, gene expression changes, and alteration of the microenvironment are important in initiation and progression of injury. Although substantial effort has been directed at understanding the impact of radiation on endothelial cells and oligodendrocytes, growing evidence suggests that other cell types, including astrocytes, are important in responses that include induced gene expression and microenvironmental changes. Endothelial apoptosis is important in early BBB disruption. Hypoxia and oxidative stress in the later period that precedes tissue damage might lead to astrocytic responses that impact cell survival and cell interactions. Cell death, gene expression changes, and a toxic microenvironment can be viewed as interacting elements in a model of radiation-induced disruption of the BBB. These processes implicate particular genes and proteins as targets in potential strategies for neuroprotection.

  20. Fluoxetine and vitamin C synergistically inhibits blood-spinal cord barrier disruption and improves functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee Y; Choi, Hae Y; Yune, Tae Y

    2016-10-01

    Recently we reported that fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) improves functional recovery by attenuating blood spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption after spinal cord injury (SCI). Here we investigated whether a low-dose of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg) and vitamin C (100 mg/kg), separately not possessing any protective effect, prevents BSCB disruption and improves functional recovery when combined. After a moderate contusion injury at T9 in rat, a low-dose of fluoxetine and vitamin C, or the combination of both was administered intraperitoneally immediately after SCI and further treated once a day for 14 d. Co-treatment with fluoxetine and vitamin C significantly attenuated BSCB permeability at 1 d after SCI. When only fluoxetine or vitamin C was treated after injury, however, there was no effect on BSCB disruption. Co-treatment with fluoxetine and vitamin C also significantly inhibited the expression and activation of MMP-9 at 8 h and 1 d after injury, respectively, and the infiltration of neutrophils (at 1 d) and macrophages (at 5 d) and the expression of inflammatory mediators (at 2 h, 6 h, 8 h or 24 h after injury) were significantly inhibited by co-treatment with fluoxetine and vitamin C. Furthermore, the combination of fluoxetine and vitamin C attenuated apoptotic cell death at 1 d and 5 d and improved locomotor function at 5 weeks after SCI. These results demonstrate the synergistic effect combination of low-dose fluoxetine and vitamin C on BSCB disruption after SCI and furthermore support the effectiveness of the combination treatment regimen for the management of acute SCI. PMID:27256500

  1. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3-dependent microvascular endothelial cell barrier function is disrupted under septic conditions.

    PubMed

    Arpino, Valerie; Mehta, Sanjay; Wang, Lefeng; Bird, Ryan; Rohan, Marta; Pape, Cynthia; Gill, Sean E

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is associated with dysfunction of microvascular endothelial cells (MVEC) leading to tissue edema and multiple organ dysfunction. Metalloproteinases can regulate MVEC function through processing of cell surface proteins, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 (TIMP3) regulates metalloproteinase activity in the lung following injury. We hypothesize that TIMP3 promotes normal pulmonary MVEC barrier function through inhibition of metalloproteinase activity. Naive Timp3(-/-) mice had significantly higher basal pulmonary microvascular Evans blue (EB) dye-labeled albumin leak vs. wild-type (WT) mice. Additionally, cecal-ligation/perforation (CLP)-induced sepsis significantly increased pulmonary microvascular EB-labeled albumin leak in WT but not Timp3(-/-) mice. Similarly, PBS-treated isolated MVEC monolayers from Timp3(-/-) mice displayed permeability barrier dysfunction vs. WT MVEC, evidenced by lower transendothelial electrical resistance and greater trans-MVEC flux of fluorescein-dextran and EB-albumin. Cytomix (equimolar interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 1β) treatment of WT MVEC induced significant barrier dysfunction (by all three methods), and was associated with a time-dependent decrease in TIMP3 mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, basal Timp3(-/-) MVEC barrier dysfunction was associated with disrupted MVEC surface VE-cadherin localization, and both barrier dysfunction and VE-cadherin localization were rescued by treatment with GM6001, a synthetic metalloproteinase inhibitor. TIMP3 promotes normal MVEC barrier function, at least partially, through inhibition of metalloproteinase-dependent disruption of adherens junctions, and septic downregulation of TIMP3 may contribute to septic MVEC barrier dysfunction. PMID:26993226

  2. Acute Pain Speeds Skin Barrier Recovery in Healthy Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jennifer E.; Song, Sunmi; Engeland, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Psychological stress is known to impair skin barrier recovery, but little is known about the impact of pain on skin healing processes. Our primary goals were to examine the degree to which acute pain affects recovery from skin barrier disruption, and the potential mediating impact of cortisol and catecholamines. Methods Healthy non-smokers aged 18-43 (N=53, 65% women) underwent a 3-minute cold pressor pain stimulus to their foot. Tape-stripping of forearm skin occurred at two separate locations: before (site 1) and after (site 2) the pain stimulus. Transepidural water loss (TEWL) was assessed at baseline (pre-stripping), immediately post-stripping, and at 75 minutes to determine skin barrier recovery. Cortisol and catecholamine responses were obtained from multiple saliva and plasma samples, respectively. Results Contrary to expectations, greater pain was associated with faster skin barrier recovery, even after controlling for demographics, mood, anxiety, and other factors. Those who reported higher pain showed faster recovery at site 2 compared to a) individuals who experienced lower pain; and b) their own recovery at site 1. Greater increase in norepinephrine (but not in cortisol) was also associated with faster recovery at site 2, and mediated the impact of pain on recovery. Discussion Results bolster evidence that acute pain can affect immune-related processes. It is possible that acute pain may speed recovery from dermal abrasions, although pain is likely to impair recovery from more severe wounds. As pain is an important potential target for clinical intervention, further investigation of pain, stress, and healing processes is warranted. PMID:23148814

  3. Influenza virus damages the alveolar barrier by disrupting epithelial cell tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Short, Kirsty R; Kasper, Jennifer; van der Aa, Stijn; Andeweg, Arno C; Zaaraoui-Boutahar, Fatiha; Goeijenbier, Marco; Richard, Mathilde; Herold, Susanne; Becker, Christin; Scott, Dana P; Limpens, Ronald W A L; Koster, Abraham J; Bárcena, Montserrat; Fouchier, Ron A M; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Kuiken, Thijs

    2016-03-01

    A major cause of respiratory failure during influenza A virus (IAV) infection is damage to the epithelial-endothelial barrier of the pulmonary alveolus. Damage to this barrier results in flooding of the alveolar lumen with proteinaceous oedema fluid, erythrocytes and inflammatory cells. To date, the exact roles of pulmonary epithelial and endothelial cells in this process remain unclear.Here, we used an in vitro co-culture model to understand how IAV damages the pulmonary epithelial-endothelial barrier. Human epithelial cells were seeded on the upper half of a transwell membrane while human endothelial cells were seeded on the lower half. These cells were then grown in co-culture and IAV was added to the upper chamber.We showed that the addition of IAV (H1N1 and H5N1 subtypes) resulted in significant barrier damage. Interestingly, we found that, while endothelial cells mounted a pro-inflammatory/pro-coagulant response to a viral infection in the adjacent epithelial cells, damage to the alveolar epithelial-endothelial barrier occurred independently of endothelial cells. Rather, barrier damage was associated with disruption of tight junctions amongst epithelial cells, and specifically with loss of tight junction protein claudin-4.Taken together, these data suggest that maintaining epithelial cell integrity is key in reducing pulmonary oedema during IAV infection. PMID:26743480

  4. A statistical model describing combined irreversible electroporation and electroporation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Shirley; Kos, Bor; Last, David; Guez, David; Daniels, Dianne; Harnof, Sagi; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2016-01-01

    Background Electroporation-based therapies such as electrochemotherapy (ECT) and irreversible electroporation (IRE) are emerging as promising tools for treatment of tumors. When applied to the brain, electroporation can also induce transient blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption in volumes extending beyond IRE, thus enabling efficient drug penetration. The main objective of this study was to develop a statistical model predicting cell death and BBB disruption induced by electroporation. This model can be used for individual treatment planning. Material and methods Cell death and BBB disruption models were developed based on the Peleg-Fermi model in combination with numerical models of the electric field. The model calculates the electric field thresholds for cell kill and BBB disruption and describes the dependence on the number of treatment pulses. The model was validated using in vivo experimental data consisting of rats brains MRIs post electroporation treatments. Results Linear regression analysis confirmed that the model described the IRE and BBB disruption volumes as a function of treatment pulses number (r2 = 0.79; p < 0.008, r2 = 0.91; p < 0.001). The results presented a strong plateau effect as the pulse number increased. The ratio between complete cell death and no cell death thresholds was relatively narrow (between 0.88-0.91) even for small numbers of pulses and depended weakly on the number of pulses. For BBB disruption, the ratio increased with the number of pulses. BBB disruption radii were on average 67% ± 11% larger than IRE volumes. Conclusions The statistical model can be used to describe the dependence of treatment-effects on the number of pulses independent of the experimental setup. PMID:27069447

  5. Anthrax lethal toxin disrupts the endothelial permeability barrier through blocking p38 signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiegang; Milia, Erica; Warburton, Rod R; Hill, Nicholas S; Gaestel, Matthias; Kayyali, Usamah S

    2012-04-01

    Exposure to anthrax causes life-threatening disease through the action of the toxin produced by the Bacillus anthracis bacteria. Lethal factor (LF), an anthrax toxin component which causes severe vascular leak and edema, is a protease which specifically degrades MAP kinase kinases (MKK). We have recently shown that p38 MAP kinase activation leading to HSP27 phosphorylation augments the endothelial permeability barrier. We now show that treatment of rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells with anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx), which is composed of LF and the protective antigen, increases endothelial barrier permeability and gap formation between endothelial cells through disrupting p38 signaling. LeTx treatment increases MKK3b degradation and in turn decreases p38 activity at baseline as well as after activation of p38 signaling. Consequently, LeTx treatment decreases activation of the p38 substrate kinase, MK2, and the phosphorylation of the latter's substrate, HSP27. LeTx treatment disrupts other signaling pathways leading to suppression of Erk-mediated signaling, but these effects do not correlate with LeTx-induced barrier compromise. Overexpressing phosphomimicking (pm)HSP27, which protects the endothelial permeability barrier against LeTx, blocks LeTx inactivation of p38 and MK2, but it does not block MKK3b degradation or Erk inactivation. Our results suggest that LeTx might cause vascular leak through inactivating p38-MK2-HSP27 signaling and that activating HSP27 phosphorylation specifically restores p38 signaling and blocks anthrax LeTx toxicity. The fact that barrier integrity could be restored by pmHSP27 overexpression without affecting degradation of MKK3b, or inactivation of Erk, suggests a specific and central role for p38-MK2-HSP27 in endothelial barrier permeability regulation. PMID:21618534

  6. The Application of MRI for Depiction of Subtle Blood Brain Barrier Disruption in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Israeli, David; Tanne, David; Daniels, Dianne; Last, David; Shneor, Ran; Guez, David; Landau, Efrat; Roth, Yiftach; Ocherashvilli, Aharon; Bakon, Mati; Hoffman, Chen; Weinberg, Amit; Volk, Talila; Mardor, Yael

    2011-01-01

    The development of imaging methodologies for detecting blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption may help predict stroke patient's propensity to develop hemorrhagic complications following reperfusion. We have developed a delayed contrast extravasation MRI-based methodology enabling real-time depiction of subtle BBB abnormalities in humans with high sensitivity to BBB disruption and high spatial resolution. The increased sensitivity to subtle BBB disruption is obtained by acquiring T1-weighted MRI at relatively long delays (~15 minutes) after contrast injection and subtracting from them images acquired immediately after contrast administration. In addition, the relatively long delays allow for acquisition of high resolution images resulting in high resolution BBB disruption maps. The sensitivity is further increased by image preprocessing with corrections for intensity variations and with whole body (rigid+elastic) registration. Since only two separate time points are required, the time between the two acquisitions can be used for acquiring routine clinical data, keeping the total imaging time to a minimum. A proof of concept study was performed in 34 patients with ischemic stroke and 2 patients with brain metastases undergoing high resolution T1-weighted MRI acquired at 3 time points after contrast injection. The MR images were pre-processed and subtracted to produce BBB disruption maps. BBB maps of patients with brain metastases and ischemic stroke presented different patterns of BBB opening. The significant advantage of the long extravasation time was demonstrated by a dynamic-contrast-enhancement study performed continuously for 18 min. The high sensitivity of our methodology enabled depiction of clear BBB disruption in 27% of the stroke patients who did not have abnormalities on conventional contrast-enhanced MRI. In 36% of the patients, who had abnormalities detectable by conventional MRI, the BBB disruption volumes were significantly larger in the maps than in

  7. Atelectrauma disrupts pulmonary epithelial barrier integrity and alters the distribution of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and claudin 4.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Anne-Marie; Gaver, Donald P

    2012-11-01

    Mechanical ventilation inevitably exposes the delicate tissues of the airways and alveoli to abnormal mechanical stresses that can induce pulmonary edema and exacerbate conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. The goal of our research is to characterize the cellular trauma caused by the transient abnormal fluid mechanical stresses that arise when air is forced into a liquid-occluded airway (i.e., atelectrauma). Using a fluid-filled, parallel-plate flow chamber to model the "airway reopening" process, our in vitro study examined consequent increases in pulmonary epithelial plasma membrane rupture, paracellular permeability, and disruption of the tight junction (TJ) proteins zonula occludens-1 and claudin-4. Computational analysis predicts the normal and tangential surface stresses that develop between the basolateral epithelial membrane and underlying substrate due to the interfacial stresses acting on the apical cell membrane. These simulations demonstrate that decreasing the velocity of reopening causes a significant increase in basolateral surface stresses, particularly in the region between neighboring cells where TJs concentrate. Likewise, pulmonary epithelial wounding, paracellular permeability, and TJ protein disruption were significantly greater following slower reopening. This study thus demonstrates that maintaining a higher velocity of reopening, which reduces the damaging fluid stresses acting on the airway wall, decreases the mechanical stresses on the basolateral cell surface while protecting cells from plasma membrane rupture and promoting barrier integrity. PMID:22898551

  8. Atelectrauma disrupts pulmonary epithelial barrier integrity and alters the distribution of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and claudin 4

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation inevitably exposes the delicate tissues of the airways and alveoli to abnormal mechanical stresses that can induce pulmonary edema and exacerbate conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. The goal of our research is to characterize the cellular trauma caused by the transient abnormal fluid mechanical stresses that arise when air is forced into a liquid-occluded airway (i.e., atelectrauma). Using a fluid-filled, parallel-plate flow chamber to model the “airway reopening” process, our in vitro study examined consequent increases in pulmonary epithelial plasma membrane rupture, paracellular permeability, and disruption of the tight junction (TJ) proteins zonula occludens-1 and claudin-4. Computational analysis predicts the normal and tangential surface stresses that develop between the basolateral epithelial membrane and underlying substrate due to the interfacial stresses acting on the apical cell membrane. These simulations demonstrate that decreasing the velocity of reopening causes a significant increase in basolateral surface stresses, particularly in the region between neighboring cells where TJs concentrate. Likewise, pulmonary epithelial wounding, paracellular permeability, and TJ protein disruption were significantly greater following slower reopening. This study thus demonstrates that maintaining a higher velocity of reopening, which reduces the damaging fluid stresses acting on the airway wall, decreases the mechanical stresses on the basolateral cell surface while protecting cells from plasma membrane rupture and promoting barrier integrity. PMID:22898551

  9. Postoperative sleep disruptions: a potential catalyst of acute pain?

    PubMed

    Chouchou, Florian; Khoury, Samar; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Denis, Ronald; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2014-06-01

    Despite the substantial advances in the understanding of pain mechanisms and management, postoperative pain relief remains an important health care issue. Surgical patients also frequently report postoperative sleep complaints. Major sleep alterations in the postoperative period include sleep fragmentation, reduced total sleep time, and loss of time spent in slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep. Clinical and experimental studies show that sleep disturbances may exacerbate pain, whereas pain and opioid treatments disturb sleep. Surgical stress appears to be a major contributor to both sleep disruptions and altered pain perception. However, pain and the use of opioid analgesics could worsen sleep alterations, whereas sleep disruptions may contribute to intensify pain. Nevertheless, little is known about the relationship between postoperative sleep and pain. Although the sleep-pain interaction has been addressed from both ends, this review focuses on the impact of sleep disruptions on pain perception. A better understanding of the effect of postoperative sleep disruptions on pain perception would help in selecting patients at risk for more severe pain and may facilitate the development of more effective and safer pain management programs. PMID:24074687

  10. Protective effects of nonionic tri-block copolymers on bile acid-mediated epithelial barrier disruption.

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, A.; Fink, D.; Musch, M.; Valuckaite, V.; Zabornia, O.; Grubjesic, S.; Firestone, M. A.; Matthews, J. B.; Alverdy, J. C.

    2011-11-01

    Translocation of bacteria and other luminal factors from the intestine following surgical injury can be a major driver of critical illness. Bile acids have been shown to play a key role in the loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function during states of host stress. Experiments to study the ability of nonionic block copolymers to abrogate barrier failure in response to bile acid exposure are described. In vitro experiments were performed with the bile salt sodium deoxycholate on Caco-2 enterocyte monolayers using transepithelial electrical resistance to assay barrier function. A bisphenol A coupled triblock polyethylene glycol (PEG), PEG 15-20, was shown to prevent sodium deoxycholate-induced barrier failure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, lactate dehydrogenase, and caspase 3-based cell death detection assays demonstrated that bile acid-induced apoptosis and necrosis were prevented with PEG 15-20. Immunofluorescence microscopic visualization of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) demonstrated that PEG 15-20 prevented significant changes in tight junction organization induced by bile acid exposure. Preliminary transepithelial electrical resistance-based studies examining structure-function correlates of polymer protection against bile acid damage were performed with a small library of PEG-based copolymers. Polymer properties associated with optimal protection against bile acid-induced barrier disruption were PEG-based compounds with a molecular weight greater than 10 kd and amphiphilicity. The data demonstrate that PEG-based copolymer architecture is an important determinant that confers protection against bile acid injury of intestinal epithelia.

  11. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier exacerbates spreading depression in the locust CNS.

    PubMed

    Spong, Kristin E; Rochon-Terry, Geneviève; Money, Tomas G A; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2014-07-01

    In response to cellular stress in the nervous system of the locust (Locusta migratoria) neural function is interrupted in association with ionic disturbances propagating throughout nervous tissue (Spreading depression; SD). The insect blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a critical role in the regulation of ion levels within the CNS. We investigated how a disruption in barrier function by transient exposure to 3M urea affects locusts' vulnerability to disturbances in ion levels. Repetitive SD was induced by bath application of ouabain and the extracellular potassium concentration ([K(+)]o) within the metathoracic ganglion (MTG) was monitored. Urea treatment increased the susceptibility to ouabain and caused a progressive impairment in the ability to maintain baseline [K(+)]o levels during episodes of repetitive SD. Additionally, using a within animal protocol we demonstrate that waves of SD, induced by high K(+), propagate throughout the MTG faster following disruption of the BBB. Lastly, we show that targeting the BBB of intact animals reduces their ability to sustain neural function during anoxic conditions. Our findings indicate that locust's ability to withstand stress is diminished following a reduction in barrier function likely due to an impairment of the ability of neural tissue to maintain ionic gradients. PMID:24837786

  12. Scutellaria baicalensis attenuates blood-brain barrier disruption after intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Won; Kang, Ho-Chang; Shim, Jaewon; Sohn, Nak-Won

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) contributes to the inflammatory response and edema formation in the brain, exacerbating brain damage. The present study evaluated the effects of Scutellaria baicalensis (SR) water extracts on BBB disruption after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in rats. ICH was induced by stereotaxic intrastriatal injection of bacterial type VII collagenase, and SR was administrated orally three times (50 mg/ml/kg) during the 48 h after ICH onset. SR treatment significantly reduced the degree of (1) hemorrhage volume and edema percentage of the ipsilateral hemisphere, (2) brain water content, (3) MPO-positive neutrophil infiltration in the peri-hematoma, and (4) BBB permeability measured by Evans blue leakage. In addition, expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-12, and tissue inhibitor of MMPs (TIMP)-1 were investigated with immunohistochemistry. SR treatment reduced MMP-9 and MMP-12 expression in the peri-hematoma after ICH. These results indicate that SR attenuates the BBB disruption through anti-inflammatory effects and suppression of MMP expression. These findings provide a pharmacological basis for the use of SR in the treatment of the BBB disruption following stroke and trauma. PMID:22298450

  13. Radiographic quantitation of reversible blood-brain barrier disruption in vivo. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Drayer, B.P.; Schmeckel, D.E.; Hedlund, L.W.; Lischko, M.M.; Sage, M.R.; Heinz, E.R.; Dubois, P.J.; Goulding, P.L.

    1982-04-01

    Cranial computed tomography (CT) was used to quantitate disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in dogs in vivo following intracarotid infusion of hypertonic mannitol. The degree of opening varied with the same dose and infusion rate. The ratio of contrast enhancement in brain vs. venous blood was elevated in 4 of 5 mannitol-treated animals, with the ipsilateral basal ganglia and cortical gray matter. The statistical significance and reproducibility of the derived CT numbers used for brain and venous blood calculations, as well as the linear relationship between iodine concentration and CT enhancement, was affirmed by obtaining multiple consecutive scans.

  14. Implications of MMP9 for Blood Brain Barrier Disruption and Hemorrhagic Transformation Following Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Renée J.; Sharp, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented increases in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), specifically MMP-9 levels following stroke, with such perturbations associated with disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB), increased risk of hemorrhagic complications, and worsened outcome. Despite this, controversy remains as to which cells release MMP-9 at the normal and pathological BBB, with even less clarity in the context of stroke. This may be further complicated by the influence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment. The aim of the present review is to examine the relationship between neutrophils, MMP-9 and tPA following ischemic stroke to elucidate which cells are responsible for the increases in MMP-9 and resultant barrier changes and hemorrhage observed following stroke. PMID:26973468

  15. Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization is promoted by barrier disruption and leads to local inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wanke, Ines; Skabytska, Yuliya; Kraft, Beatrice; Peschel, Andreas; Biedermann, Tilo; Schittek, Birgit

    2013-02-01

    Experimental mouse models of bacterial skin infections that have been described show that pathogenic microorganisms can readily invade the epidermis and dermis to produce localized infections. We used an epicutaneous mouse skin infection model to determine how the level of barrier disruption by tape-stripping correlates with persistence of Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization, concomitant induction of cutaneous inflammation and infection. Furthermore, we investigated how murine skin responds to S. aureus colonization in a physiologic setting by analysing proinflammatory cytokines and antimicrobial peptides in mouse skin. We show that previous cutaneous damage allows skin inflammation to develop and favours S. aureus persistence leading to cutaneous colonization, suggesting an interdependence of cutaneous bacteria and skin. Our study suggests that skin barrier defects favour S. aureus skin colonization, which is associated with profound cutaneous inflammation. PMID:23362876

  16. Hyperthermic Laser Ablation of Recurrent Glioblastoma Leads to Temporary Disruption of the Peritumoral Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michael J.; Campian, Jian L.; Kim, Albert H.; Miller-Thomas, Michelle M.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Tran, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Poor central nervous system penetration of cytotoxic drugs due to the blood brain barrier (BBB) is a major limiting factor in the treatment of brain tumors. Most recurrent glioblastomas (GBM) occur within the peritumoral region. In this study, we describe a hyperthemic method to induce temporary disruption of the peritumoral BBB that can potentially be used to enhance drug delivery. Methods Twenty patients with probable recurrent GBM were enrolled in this study. Fourteen patients were evaluable. MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy was applied to achieve both tumor cytoreduction and disruption of the peritumoral BBB. To determine the degree and timing of peritumoral BBB disruption, dynamic contrast-enhancement brain MRI was used to calculate the vascular transfer constant (Ktrans) in the peritumoral region as direct measures of BBB permeability before and after laser ablation. Serum levels of brain-specific enolase, also known as neuron-specific enolase, were also measured and used as an independent quantification of BBB disruption. Results In all 14 evaluable patients, Ktrans levels peaked immediately post laser ablation, followed by a gradual decline over the following 4 weeks. Serum BSE concentrations increased shortly after laser ablation and peaked in 1–3 weeks before decreasing to baseline by 6 weeks. Conclusions The data from our pilot research support that disruption of the peritumoral BBB was induced by hyperthemia with the peak of high permeability occurring within 1–2 weeks after laser ablation and resolving by 4–6 weeks. This provides a therapeutic window of opportunity during which delivery of BBB-impermeant therapeutic agents may be enhanced. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01851733 PMID:26910903

  17. Cellular responses to disruption of the permeability barrier in a three-dimensional organotypic epidermal model

    SciTech Connect

    Ajani, Gati; Sato, Nobuyuki; Mack, Judith A.; Maytin, Edward V. . E-mail: maytine@ccf.org

    2007-08-15

    Repeated injury to the stratum corneum of mammalian skin (caused by friction, soaps, or organic solvents) elicits hyperkeratosis and epidermal thickening. Functionally, these changes serve to restore the cutaneous barrier and protect the organism. To better understand the molecular and cellular basis of this response, we have engineered an in vitro model of acetone-induced injury using organotypic epidermal cultures. Rat epidermal keratinocytes (REKs), grown on a collagen raft in the absence of any feeder fibroblasts, developed all the hallmarks of a true epidermis including a well-formed cornified layer. To induce barrier injury, REK cultures were treated with intermittent 30-s exposures to acetone then were fixed and paraffin-sectioned. After two exposures, increased proliferation (Ki67 and BrdU staining) was observed in basal and suprabasal layers. After three exposures, proliferation became confined to localized buds in the basal layer and increased terminal differentiation was observed (compact hyperkeratosis of the stratum corneum, elevated levels of K10 and filaggrin, and heightened transglutaminase activity). Thus, barrier disruption causes epidermal hyperplasia and/or enhances differentiation, depending upon the extent and duration of injury. Given that no fibroblasts are present in the model, the ability to mount a hyperplastic response to barrier injury is an inherent property of keratinocytes.

  18. Myosin Light Chain Kinase Mediates Intestinal Barrier Disruption following Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuanli; Wang, Pei; Su, Qin; Wang, Shiliang; Wang, Fengjun

    2012-01-01

    Background Severe burn injury results in the loss of intestinal barrier function, however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation mediated by MLC kinase (MLCK) is critical to the pathophysiological regulation of intestinal barrier function. We hypothesized that the MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates the regulation of intestinal barrier function following burn injury, and that MLCK inhibition attenuates the burn-induced intestinal barrier disfunction. Methodology/Principal Findings Male balb/c mice were assigned randomly to either sham burn (control) or 30% total body surface area (TBSA) full thickness burn without or with intraperitoneal injection of ML-9 (2 mg/kg), an MLCK inhibitor. In vivo intestinal permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran was measured. Intestinal mucosa injury was assessed histologically. Tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin and claudin-1 was analyzed by immunofluorescent assay. Expression of MLCK and phosphorylated MLC in ileal mucosa was assessed by Western blot. Intestinal permeability was increased significantly after burn injury, which was accompanied by mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and increase of both MLCK and MLC phosphorylation. Treatment with ML-9 attenuated the burn-caused increase of intestinal permeability, mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and decreased MLC phosphorylation, but not MLCK expression. Conclusions/Significance The MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction after severe burn injury. It is suggested that MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation may be a critical target for the therapeutic treatment of intestinal epithelial barrier disruption after severe burn injury. PMID:22529961

  19. Anthrax lethal toxin disrupts intestinal barrier function and causes systemic infections with enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chen; Fang, Hui; Xie, Tao; Auth, Roger D; Patel, Nayana; Murray, Patrick R; Snoy, Philip J; Frucht, David M

    2012-01-01

    A variety of intestinal pathogens have virulence factors that target mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, including Bacillus anthracis. Anthrax lethal toxin (LT) has specific proteolytic activity against the upstream regulators of MAPKs, the MAPK kinases (MKKs). Using a murine model of intoxication, we show that LT causes the dose-dependent disruption of intestinal epithelial integrity, characterized by mucosal erosion, ulceration, and bleeding. This pathology correlates with an LT-dependent blockade of intestinal crypt cell proliferation, accompanied by marked apoptosis in the villus tips. C57BL/6J mice treated with intravenous LT nearly uniformly develop systemic infections with commensal enteric organisms within 72 hours of administration. LT-dependent intestinal pathology depends upon its proteolytic activity and is partially attenuated by co-administration of broad spectrum antibiotics, indicating that it is both a cause and an effect of infection. These findings indicate that targeting of MAPK signaling pathways by anthrax LT compromises the structural integrity of the mucosal layer, serving to undermine the effectiveness of the intestinal barrier. Combined with the well-described immunosuppressive effects of LT, this disruption of the intestinal barrier provides a potential mechanism for host invasion via the enteric route, a common portal of entry during the natural infection cycle of Bacillus anthracis. PMID:22438953

  20. Clinical trial of blood-brain barrier disruption by pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Alexandre; Canney, Michael; Vignot, Alexandre; Reina, Vincent; Beccaria, Kevin; Horodyckid, Catherine; Karachi, Carine; Leclercq, Delphine; Lafon, Cyril; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Capelle, Laurent; Cornu, Philippe; Sanson, Marc; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Idbaih, Ahmed

    2016-06-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits the delivery of systemically administered drugs to the brain. Methods to circumvent the BBB have been developed, but none are used in standard clinical practice. The lack of adoption of existing methods is due to procedural invasiveness, serious adverse effects, and the complications associated with performing such techniques coincident with repeated drug administration, which is customary in chemotherapeutic protocols. Pulsed ultrasound, a method for disrupting the BBB, was shown to effectively increase drug concentrations and to slow tumor growth in preclinical studies. We now report the interim results of an ultrasound dose-escalating phase 1/2a clinical trial using an implantable ultrasound device system, SonoCloud, before treatment with carboplatin in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). The BBB of each patient was disrupted monthly using pulsed ultrasound in combination with systemically injected microbubbles. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicated that the BBB was disrupted at acoustic pressure levels up to 1.1 megapascals without detectable adverse effects on radiologic (MRI) or clinical examination. Our preliminary findings indicate that repeated opening of the BBB using our pulsed ultrasound system, in combination with systemic microbubble injection, is safe and well tolerated in patients with recurrent GBM and has the potential to optimize chemotherapy delivery in the brain. PMID:27306666

  1. Bacterial induction of Snail1 contributes to blood-brain barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Brandon J.; Hancock, Bryan M.; Bermudez, Andres; Cid, Natasha Del; Reyes, Efren; van Sorge, Nina M.; Lauth, Xavier; Smurthwaite, Cameron A.; Hilton, Brett J.; Stotland, Aleksandr; Banerjee, Anirban; Buchanan, John; Wolkowicz, Roland; Traver, David; Doran, Kelly S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a serious infection of the CNS that results when blood-borne bacteria are able to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of neonatal meningitis; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate bacterial BBB disruption and penetration are not well understood. Here, we found that infection of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) with GBS and other meningeal pathogens results in the induction of host transcriptional repressor Snail1, which impedes expression of tight junction genes. Moreover, GBS infection also induced Snail1 expression in murine and zebrafish models. Tight junction components ZO-1, claudin 5, and occludin were decreased at both the transcript and protein levels in hBMECs following GBS infection, and this repression was dependent on Snail1 induction. Bacteria-independent Snail1 expression was sufficient to facilitate tight junction disruption, promoting BBB permeability to allow bacterial passage. GBS induction of Snail1 expression was dependent on the ERK1/2/MAPK signaling cascade and bacterial cell wall components. Finally, overexpression of a dominant-negative Snail1 homolog in zebrafish elevated transcription of tight junction protein–encoding genes and increased zebrafish survival in response to GBS challenge. Taken together, our data support a Snail1-dependent mechanism of BBB disruption and penetration by meningeal pathogens. PMID:25961453

  2. Characterization of vascular disruption and blood-spinal cord barrier permeability following traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Figley, Sarah A; Khosravi, Ramak; Legasto, Jean M; Tseng, Yun-Fan; Fehlings, Michael G

    2014-03-15

    Significant vascular changes occur subsequent to spinal cord injury (SCI), which contribute to progressive pathophysiology. In the present study, we used female Wistar rats (300-350 g) and a 35-g clip-compression injury at T6 to T7 to characterize the spatial and temporal vascular changes that ensue post-SCI. Before sacrifice, animals were injected with vascular tracing dyes (2% Evans Blue (EB) or fluorescein isothiocyanate/Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin [FITC-LEA]) to assess blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) integrity or vascular architecture, respectively. Spectrophotometry of EB tissue showed maximal BSCB disruption at 24 h postinjury, with significant disruption observed until 5 days postinjury (p<0.01). FITC-LEA-identified functional vasculature was dramatically reduced by 24 h. Similarly, RECA-1 immunohistochemistry showed a significant decrease in the number of vessels at 24 h postinjury, compared to uninjured animals (p<0.01), with slight increases in endogenous revascularization by 10 days postinjury. White versus gray matter (GM) quantification showed that GM vessels are more susceptible to SCI. Finally, we observed an endogenous angiogenic response between 3 and 7 days postinjury: maximal endothelial cell proliferation was observed at day 5. These data indicate that BSCB disruption and endogenous revascularization occur at specific time points after injury, which may be important for developing effective therapeutic interventions for SCI. PMID:24237182

  3. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 prevents toluene diisocyanate-induced airway epithelial barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjia; Dong, Hangming; Zhao, Haijin; Song, Jiafu; Tang, Haixiong; Yao, Lihong; Liu, Laiyu; Tong, Wancheng; Zou, Mengchen; Zou, Fei; Cai, Shaoxi

    2015-07-01

    The loss of airway epithelial integrity contributes significantly to asthma pathogenesis. Evidence suggests that vitamin D plays an important role in the prevention and treatment of asthma. However, its role in airway epithelial barrier function remains uncertain. We have previously demonstrated impaired epithelial junctions in a model of toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-induced asthma. In the present study, we hypothesized that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] may prevent TDI-induced epithelial barrier disruption. Male BALB/c mice were dermally sensitized and then challenged with TDI. The mice were then administered 1,25(OH)2D3 intraperitoneally prior to challenge with TDI. For in vitro experiments, 16HBE bronchial epithelial cells were cultured and stimulated with TDI-human serum albumin (HSA). The results revealed that the mice treated with 1,25(OH)2D3 displayed decreased airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), suppressed neutrophil and eosinophil infiltration into the airways, as well as an increased E-cadherin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) expression at the cell-cell contact sites. In vitro, exposure of the cells to TDI-HSA induced a rapid decline in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and an increase in cell permeability, followed by a decrease in occludin expression and the redistribution of E-cadherin, accompanied by a significant upregulation in the levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. These effects were all partly reversed by treatment with either 1,25(OH)2D3 or an ERK1/2 inhibitor. In conclusion, the findings of our study demonstrate that 1,25(OH)2D3 prevents TDI-induced epithelial barrier disruption, and that the ERK1/2 pathway may play a role in this process. PMID:25998793

  4. Regulation of Thrombin-Induced Lung Endothelial Cell Barrier Disruption by Protein Kinase C Delta

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lishi; Chiang, Eddie T.; Kelly, Gabriel T.; Kanteti, Prasad; Singleton, Patrick A.; Camp, Sara M.; Zhou, Tingting; Dudek, Steven M.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Wang, Ting; Black, Steven M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Protein Kinase C (PKC) plays a significant role in thrombin-induced loss of endothelial cell (EC) barrier integrity; however, the existence of more than 10 isozymes of PKC and tissue–specific isoform expression has limited our understanding of this important second messenger in vascular homeostasis. In this study, we show that PKCδ isoform promotes thrombin-induced loss of human pulmonary artery EC barrier integrity, findings substantiated by PKCδ inhibitory studies (rottlerin), dominant negative PKCδ construct and PKCδ silencing (siRNA). In addition, we identified PKCδ as a signaling mediator upstream of both thrombin-induced MLC phosphorylation and Rho GTPase activation affecting stress fiber formation, cell contraction and loss of EC barrier integrity. Our inhibitor-based studies indicate that thrombin-induced PKCδ activation exerts a positive feedback on Rho GTPase activation and contributes to Rac1 GTPase inhibition. Moreover, PKD (or PKCμ) and CPI-17, two known PKCδ targets, were found to be activated by PKCδ in EC and served as modulators of cytoskeleton rearrangement. These studies clarify the role of PKCδ in EC cytoskeleton regulation, and highlight PKCδ as a therapeutic target in inflammatory lung disorders, characterized by the loss of barrier integrity, such as acute lung injury and sepsis. PMID:27442243

  5. Selective disruption of the blood-brain barrier by photochemical internalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Zhang, Michelle J.; Gach, Michael H.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Chighvinadze, David; Madsen, Steen J.

    2009-02-01

    Introduction: Failure to eradicate infiltrating glioma cells using conventional treatment regimens results in tumor recurrence and is responsible for the dismal prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This is due to the fact that these migratory cells are protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which prevents the delivery of most anti-cancer agents. We have evaluated the ability of photochemical internalization (PCI) to selectively disrupt the BBB in rats. This will permit access of anti-cancer drugs to effectively target the infiltrating tumor cells, and potentially improve the treatment effectiveness for malignant gliomas. Materials and Methods: PCI treatment, coupling a macromolecule therapy of Clostridium perfringens (Cl p) epsilon prototoxin with AlPcS2a-PDT, was performed on non-tumor bearing inbred Fisher rats. T1-weighted post-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were used to evaluate the extent of BBB disruption which can be inferred from the volume contrast enhancement. Results: The synergistic effect of PCI to disrupt the BBB was observed at a fluence level of 1 J with an intraperitoneal injection of Cl p prototoxin. At the fluence level of 2.5J, the extent of BBB opening induced by PCI was similar to the result of PDT suggesting no synergistic effect evoked under these conditions. Conclusion: PCI was found to be highly effective and efficient for inducing selective and localized disruption of the BBB. The extent of BBB opening peaked on day 3 and the BBB was completed restored by day 18 post treatment.

  6. Blood-brain barrier in acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Justin H.

    2011-01-01

    Brain edema remains a challenging obstacle in the management of acute liver failure (ALF). Cytotoxic mechanisms associated with brain edema have been well recognized, but evidence for vasogenic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of brain edema in ALF has been lacking. Recent reports have not only shown a role of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in the pathogenesis of brain edema in experimental ALF but have also found significant alterations in the tight junction elements including occludin and claudin-5, suggesting a vasogenic injury in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity. This article reviews and explores the role of the paracellular tight junction proteins in the increased selective BBB permeability that leads to brain edema in ALF. PMID:22100566

  7. The alkaline pH-adapted skin barrier is disrupted severely by SLS-induced irritation.

    PubMed

    Kim, E; Kim, S; Nam, G W; Lee, H; Moon, S; Chang, I

    2009-08-01

    The pH of the healthy skin is 5.5 and maintained by many regulatory mechanisms. The pH of the skin care product we use on a daily basis can have an influence on the skin properties. To investigate how the physical properties of skin change after the alkaline or acidic pH of the skin care products are applied on the skin for a long term, we adjusted the pH of the skin care products to 3, 5 and 8 (A, B, C), with glycolic acid and triethanolamine. For 5 weeks the skin care products were applied on 20 healthy subjects' ventral forearm and the skin physical properties were measured. After 5 weeks, skin responses to the external stress of 1% (w/v) SLS (sodium lauryl sulphate) irritation and erythema by UV were measured. Skin colour and skin UV response were not altered by the pH. However, on the C-applied site (pH 8) the transepidermal water loss of stratum corneum (SC) increased significantly, the water content increased and desquamation decreased, respectively, and the SLS significantly impaired the skin barrier in comparison with other sites. The alkaline skin care product impaired the skin barrier after repeated application over 5-week period and the skin barrier was disrupted severely by 1% SLS exposure because SC was already impaired by alkaline pH and sensitive to external stress. This suggests that the pH of daily skin care products is very important for skin barrier homeostasis. PMID:19467032

  8. PRDX6 controls multiple sclerosis by suppressing inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease with an unknown etiology and has no effective medications despite extensive research. Antioxidants suppress oxidative damages which are implicated in the pathogenesis of MS. In this study, we showed that the expression of an antioxidant protein peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6) is markedly increased in spinal cord of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) compared to other PRDXs. PRDX6 transgenic (Tg) mice displayed a significant decrease in clinical severity and attenuated demyelination in EAE compared to wide type mice. The increased PRDX6 expression in astrocytes of EAE mice and MS patients reduced MMP9 expression, fibrinogen leakage, chemokines, and free radical stress, leading to reduction in blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption, peripheral immune cell infiltration, and neuroinflammation. Together, these findings suggest that PRDX6 expression may represent a therapeutic way to restrict inflammation in the central nervous system and potentiate oligodendrocyte survival, and suggest a new molecule for neuroprotective therapies in MS. PMID:26327204

  9. PRDX6 controls multiple sclerosis by suppressing inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-08-28

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease with an unknown etiology and has no effective medications despite extensive research. Antioxidants suppress oxidative damages which are implicated in the pathogenesis of MS. In this study, we showed that the expression of an antioxidant protein peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6) is markedly increased in spinal cord of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) compared to other PRDXs. PRDX6 transgenic (Tg) mice displayed a significant decrease in clinical severity and attenuated demyelination in EAE compared to wide type mice. The increased PRDX6 expression in astrocytes of EAE mice and MS patients reduced MMP9 expression, fibrinogen leakage, chemokines, and free radical stress, leading to reduction in blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption, peripheral immune cell infiltration, and neuroinflammation. Together, these findings suggest that PRDX6 expression may represent a therapeutic way to restrict inflammation in the central nervous system and potentiate oligodendrocyte survival, and suggest a new molecule for neuroprotective therapies in MS. PMID:26327204

  10. Hantavirus-induced disruption of the endothelial barrier: neutrophils are on the payroll.

    PubMed

    Schönrich, Günther; Krüger, Detlev H; Raftery, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fever caused by hantaviruses is an emerging infectious disease for which suitable treatments are not available. In order to improve this situation a better understanding of hantaviral pathogenesis is urgently required. Hantaviruses infect endothelial cell layers in vitro without causing any cytopathogenic effect and without increasing permeability. This implies that the mechanisms underlying vascular hyperpermeability in hantavirus-associated disease are more complex and that immune mechanisms play an important role. In this review we highlight the latest developments in hantavirus-induced immunopathogenesis. A possible contribution of neutrophils has been neglected so far. For this reason, we place special emphasis on the pathogenic role of neutrophils in disrupting the endothelial barrier. PMID:25859243

  11. Delayed blood-brain barrier disruption after shallow-water diving demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hadanny, Amir; Tal, Sigal; Fishlev, Gregori; Bechor, Yair; Efrati, Shai

    2015-06-01

    A 22-year-old diver presented to our emergency room complaining of headaches and left side numbness three days after diving to a depth of 6 metres for 25 minutes. On examination, he had left-sided hypaesthesia, and a post-contrast FLAIR brain MRI sequence revealed significant diffuse meningeal enhancement, indicating blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption. The patient was treated with hyperbaric oxygen; the initial four sessions resulted in only partial symptom improvement correlating with partial improvement in the MRI findings. Ten additional hyperbaric treatments resulted in complete resolution of the symptoms and normalization of MRI findings. The main aim of this case report is to present a probable, atypical, delayed-onset case of shallow-water decompression sickness culminating in significant BBB damage, which was demonstrated by special MRI techniques. PMID:26165534

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Enhancement on Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images After Carotid Artery Stenting with Neuroprotective Balloon Occlusions: Hemodynamic Instability and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Ogami, Ryo Nakahara, Toshinori; Hamasaki, Osamu; Araki, Hayato; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: A rare complication of carotid artery stenting (CAS), prolonged reversible neurological symptoms with delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space enhancement on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images, is associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We prospectively identified patients who showed CSF space enhancement on FLAIR images. Methods: Nineteen patients-5 acute-phase and 14 scheduled-underwent 21 CAS procedures. Balloon catheters were navigated across stenoses, angioplasty was performed using a neuroprotective balloon, and stents were placed with after dilation under distal balloon protection. CSF space hyperintensity or obscuration on FLAIR after versus before CAS indicated CSF space enhancement. Correlations with clinical factors were examined. Results: CSF space was enhanced on FLAIR in 12 (57.1%) cases. Postprocedural CSF space enhancement was significantly related to age, stenosis rate, acute-stage procedure, and total occlusion time. All acute-stage CAS patients showed delayed enhancement. Only age was associated with delayed CSF space enhancement in scheduled CAS patients. Conclusions: Ischemic intolerance for severe carotid artery stenosis and temporary neuroprotective balloon occlusion, causing reperfusion injury, seem to be the main factors that underlie BBB disruption with delayed CSF space enhancement shortly after CAS, rather than sudden poststenting hemodynamic change. Our results suggest that factors related to hemodynamic instability or ischemic intolerance seem to be associated with post-CAS BBB vulnerability. Patients at risk for hemodynamic instability or with ischemic intolerance, which decrease BBB integrity, require careful management to prevent intracranial hemorrhagic and other post-CAS complications.

  13. Astrocyte-derived VEGF-A drives blood-brain barrier disruption in CNS inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Argaw, Azeb Tadesse; Asp, Linnea; Zhang, Jingya; Navrazhina, Kristina; Pham, Trinh; Mariani, John N; Mahase, Sean; Dutta, Dipankar J; Seto, Jeremy; Kramer, Elisabeth G; Ferrara, Napoleone; Sofroniew, Michael V; John, Gareth R

    2012-07-01

    In inflammatory CNS conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS), current options to treat clinical relapse are limited, and more selective agents are needed. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an early feature of lesion formation that correlates with clinical exacerbation, leading to edema, excitotoxicity, and entry of serum proteins and inflammatory cells. Here, we identify astrocytic expression of VEGF-A as a key driver of BBB permeability in mice. Inactivation of astrocytic Vegfa expression reduced BBB breakdown, decreased lymphocyte infiltration and neuropathology in inflammatory and demyelinating lesions, and reduced paralysis in a mouse model of MS. Knockdown studies in CNS endothelium indicated activation of the downstream effector eNOS as the principal mechanism underlying the effects of VEGF-A on the BBB. Systemic administration of the selective eNOS inhibitor cavtratin in mice abrogated VEGF-A-induced BBB disruption and pathology and protected against neurologic deficit in the MS model system. Collectively, these data identify blockade of VEGF-A signaling as a protective strategy to treat inflammatory CNS disease. PMID:22653056

  14. Dynamic study of blood–brain barrier closure after its disruption using ultrasound: a quantitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Benjamin; Larrat, Benoit; Van Landeghem, Maxime; Robic, Caroline; Robert, Philippe; Port, Marc; Le Bihan, Denis; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael; Lethimonnier, Franck; Mériaux, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic or diagnostic agents to the brain is majorly hindered by the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Recently, many studies have demonstrated local and transient disruption of the BBB using low power ultrasound sonication combined with intravascular microbubbles. However, BBB opening and closure mechanisms are poorly understood, especially the maximum gap that may be safely generated between endothelial cells and the duration of opening of the BBB. Here, we studied BBB opening and closure under magnetic resonance (MR) guidance in a rat model. First, MR contrast agents (CA) of different hydrodynamic diameters (1 to 65 nm) were employed to estimate the largest molecular size permissible across the cerebral tissues. Second, to estimate the duration of the BBB opening, the CA were injected at various times post-BBB disruption (12 minutes to 24 hours). A T1 mapping strategy was developed to assess CA concentration at the ultrasound (US) focal point. Based on our experimental data and BBB closure modeling, a calibration curve was obtained to compute the half closure time as a function of CA hydrodynamic diameter. These findings and the model provide an invaluable basis for optimal design and delivery of nanoparticles to the brain. PMID:22805875

  15. Quantitative evaluation of the use of microbubbles with transcranial focused ultrasound on blood-brain-barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Fu, Wen-Mei; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Yeh, Wei-Lan; Lin, Win-Li

    2008-04-01

    It has been shown that focused ultrasound (FUS) can disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) noninvasively and reversibly at target locations when applied in the presence of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA). In this study, the dose-dependent effects of UCA on BBB disruption were investigated in the brains of 16 male Wistar rats sonicated by 1.0-MHz transcranial FUS, with the UCA present at four doses. The BBB disruption was evaluated quantitatively based on the extravasation of Evans blue (EB). The amount of EB extravasation in the brain increased with the quantity of UCA injected into the femoral vein prior to sonication. Moreover, the use of a suitable dose of UCA resulted in the BBB disruption being concentrated in the focal region instead of the entire brain. Our results indicate that injecting an appropriate quantity of UCA effectively increases and localizes the BBB disruption induced by transcranial FUS sonications. PMID:17910929

  16. A coculture model mimicking the intestinal mucosa reveals a regulatory role for myofibroblasts in immune-mediated barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, L E M; Schreurs, C C H M; Kroes, H; Spillenaar Bilgen, E J; Van Deventer, S J H; Van Tol, E A F

    2002-10-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease involves a mucosal inflammatory response affecting the barrier function of the gut. Myofibroblasts directly underlining the intestinal epithelium may have a regulatory role in immune-mediated barrier disruption. A coculture system of T84 epithelial and CCD-18Co myofibroblasts was established in order to mimic the in situ spatial interactions between these cell types and to evaluate their role in barrier: integrity. Lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) were introduced in co- and monocultures. Effects of immune cells on barrier integrity was determined by measuring resistance and permeability for macromolecules. Introduction of LPMC in both culture systems caused a time-dependent decrease in barrier integrity. This was found to be less pronounced in cocultures indicating a regulatory role for mesenchymal cells. The effects were also found to depend on the route of LPMC stimulation. Additional analyses suggested that the regulatory role of myofibroblasts in barrier integrity involves production of growth factors. PMID:12395905

  17. Hyaluronan Participates in the Epidermal Response to Disruption of the Permeability Barrier in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Maytin, Edward V.; Chung, Helen H.; Seetharaman, V. Mani

    2004-01-01

    Hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid, HA) is a glycosaminoglycan in the extracellular matrix of tissues that plays a role in cellular migration, proliferation and differentiation. Injury to the stratum corneum elicits an epidermal hyperproliferative response, a pathogenic feature in many cutaneous diseases including eczema and psoriasis. Because HA is abundant in the matrix between keratinocytes, we asked whether the presence of HA is required for epidermal hyperplasia to occur in response to barrier injury. Disruption of the stratum corneum, by acetone application on the skin of hairless mice, led to a marked accumulation of HA in the matrix between epidermal basal and spinous keratinocytes, and also within keratinocytes of the upper epidermis. To test whether HA may have a functional role in epidermal hyperplasia, we used Streptomyces hyaluronidase (StrepH), delivered topically, to degrade epidermal HA and blunt the accumulation of epidermal HA after acetone. StrepH signficantly reduced epidermal HA levels, and also significantly inhibited the development of epidermal hyperplasia. This reduction in epidermal thickness was not attributable to any decrease in keratinocyte proliferation, but rather to an apparent acceleration in terminal differentiation (ie, increased keratin 10 and filaggrin expression). Overall, the data show that HA is a significant participant in the epidermal response to barrier injury. PMID:15466397

  18. ACUTE ETHANOL DISRUPTS PHOTIC AND SEROTONERGIC CIRCADIAN CLOCK PHASE-RESETTING IN THE MOUSE

    PubMed Central

    Brager, Allison J.; Ruby, Christina L.; Prosser, Rebecca A.; Glass, J. David

    2011-01-01

    Background Alcohol abuse is associated with impaired circadian rhythms and sleep. Ethanol administration disrupts circadian clock phase-resetting, suggesting a mode for the disruptive effect of alcohol abuse on the circadian timing system. In this study, we extend previous work in C57BL/6J mice to: 1) characterize the SCN pharmacokinetics of acute systemic ethanol administration; 2) explore the effects of acute ethanol on photic and non-photic phase-resetting; and 2) determine if the SCN is a direct target for photic effects. Methods First, microdialysis was used to characterize the pharmacokinetics of acute i.p. injections of 3 doses of ethanol (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg) in the mouse suprachiasmatic (SCN) circadian clock. Second, the effects of acute i.p. ethanol administration on photic phase-delays and serotonergic ([+]8-OH-DPAT-induced) phase-advances of the circadian activity rhythm were assessed. Third, the effects of reverse-microdialysis ethanol perfusion of the SCN on photic phase-resetting were characterized. Results Peak ethanol levels from the 3 doses of ethanol in the SCN occurred within 20–40 min post-injection with half-lives for clearance ranging from 0.6–1.8 hr. Systemic ethanol treatment dose-dependently attenuated photic and serotonergic phase-resetting. This treatment also did not affect basal SCN neuronal activity as assessed by Fos expression. Intra-SCN perfusion with ethanol markedly reduced photic phase-delays. Conclusions These results confirm that acute ethanol attenuates photic phase-delay shifts and serotonergic phase-advance shifts in the mouse. This dual effect could disrupt photic and non-photic entrainment mechanisms governing circadian clock timing. It is also significant that the SCN clock is a direct target for disruptive effects of ethanol on photic shifting. Such actions by ethanol could underlie the disruptive effects of alcohol abuse on behavioral, physiological, and endocrine rhythms associated with alcoholism. PMID:21463340

  19. Intra-Arterial Delivery of AAV Vectors to the Mouse Brain After Mannitol Mediated Blood Brain Barrier Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Santillan, Alejandro; Sondhi, Dolan; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Gobin, Y. Pierre; Ballon, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutics to neural tissue is greatly hindered by the blood brain barrier (BBB). Direct local delivery via diffusive release from degradable implants or direct intra-cerebral injection can bypass the BBB and obtain high concentrations of the therapeutic in the targeted tissue, however the total volume of tissue that can be treated using these techniques is limited. One treatment modality that can potentially access large volumes of neural tissue in a single treatment is intra-arterial (IA) injection after osmotic blood brain barrier disruption. In this technique, the therapeutic of interest is injected directly into the arteries that feed the target tissue after the blood brain barrier has been disrupted by exposure to a hyperosmolar mannitol solution, permitting the transluminal transport of the therapy. In this work we used contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of IA injections in mice to establish parameters that allow for extensive and reproducible BBB disruption. We found that the volume but not the flow rate of the mannitol injection has a significant effect on the degree of disruption. To determine whether the degree of disruption we observed with this method was sufficient for delivery of nanoscale therapeutics, we performed IA injections of an adeno-associated viral vector containing the CLN2 gene (AAVrh.10CLN2), which is mutated in the lysosomal storage disorder Late Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (LINCL). We demonstrated that IA injection of AAVrh.10CLN2 after BBB disruption can achieve widespread transgene production in the mouse brain after a single administration. Further, we showed that there exists a minimum threshold of BBB disruption necessary to permit the AAV.rh10 vector to pass into the brain parenchyma from the vascular system. These results suggest that IA administration may be used to obtain widespread delivery of nanoscale therapeutics throughout the murine brain after a single

  20. Intra-arterial delivery of AAV vectors to the mouse brain after mannitol mediated blood brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Foley, Conor P; Rubin, David G; Santillan, Alejandro; Sondhi, Dolan; Dyke, Jonathan P; Gobin, Y Pierre; Crystal, Ronald G; Ballon, Douglas J

    2014-12-28

    The delivery of therapeutics to neural tissue is greatly hindered by the blood brain barrier (BBB). Direct local delivery via diffusive release from degradable implants or direct intra-cerebral injection can bypass the BBB and obtain high concentrations of the therapeutic in the targeted tissue, however the total volume of tissue that can be treated using these techniques is limited. One treatment modality that can potentially access large volumes of neural tissue in a single treatment is intra-arterial (IA) injection after osmotic blood brain barrier disruption. In this technique, the therapeutic of interest is injected directly into the arteries that feed the target tissue after the blood brain barrier has been disrupted by exposure to a hyperosmolar mannitol solution, permitting the transluminal transport of the therapy. In this work we used contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of IA injections in mice to establish parameters that allow for extensive and reproducible BBB disruption. We found that the volume but not the flow rate of the mannitol injection has a significant effect on the degree of disruption. To determine whether the degree of disruption that we observed with this method was sufficient for delivery of nanoscale therapeutics, we performed IA injections of an adeno-associated viral vector containing the CLN2 gene (AAVrh.10CLN2), which is mutated in the lysosomal storage disorder Late Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (LINCL). We demonstrated that IA injection of AAVrh.10CLN2 after BBB disruption can achieve widespread transgene production in the mouse brain after a single administration. Further, we showed that there exists a minimum threshold of BBB disruption necessary to permit the AAV.rh10 vector to pass into the brain parenchyma from the vascular system. These results suggest that IA administration may be used to obtain widespread delivery of nanoscale therapeutics throughout the murine brain after a single

  1. Acute restraint stress and corticosterone transiently disrupts novelty preference in an object recognition task.

    PubMed

    Vargas-López, Viviana; Torres-Berrio, Angélica; González-Martínez, Lina; Múnera, Alejandro; Lamprea, Marisol R

    2015-09-15

    The object recognition task is a procedure based on rodents' natural tendency to explore novel objects which is frequently used for memory testing. However, in some instances novelty preference is replaced by familiarity preference, raising questions regarding the validity of novelty preference as a pure recognition memory index. Acute stress- and corticosterone administration-induced novel object preference disruption has been frequently interpreted as memory impairment; however, it is still not clear whether such effect can be actually attributed to either mnemonic disruption or altered novelty seeking. Seventy-five adult male Wistar rats were trained in an object recognition task and subjected to either acute stress or corticosterone administration to evaluate the effect of stress or corticosterone on an object recognition task. Acute stress was induced by restraining movement for 1 or 4h, ending 30 min before the sample trial. Corticosterone was injected intraperitoneally 10 min before the test trial which was performed either 1 or 24h after the sample trial. Four-hour, but not 1-h, stress induced familiar object preference during the test trial performed 1h after the sample trial; however, acute stress had no effects on the test when performed 24h after sample trial. Systemic administration of corticosterone before the test trial performed either 1 or 24h after the sample trial also resulted in familiar object preference. However, neither acute stress nor corticosterone induced changes in locomotor behaviour. Taken together, such results suggested that acute stress probably does not induce memory retrieval impairment but, instead, induces an emotional arousing state which motivates novelty avoidance. PMID:25986403

  2. Disruption of the blood brain barrier following ALA mediated photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Peng, Qian; Uzal, Francisco A.; Chighvinadze, David; Zhang, Michelle J.; Madsen, Steen J.

    2008-02-01

    Introduction: Failure of treatment for high grade gliomas is usually due to local recurrence at the site of surgical resection indicating that a more aggressive form of local therapy, such as PDT, could be of benefit. PDT causes damage to tumor cells as well as degradation of the blood brain barrier (BBB). We have evaluated the ability of ALA mediated PDT to open the BBB in rats. This will permit access of chemotherapeutic agents to brain tumor cells remaining in the resection cavity wall, but limit their penetration into normal brain remote from the site of illumination. Materials and Methods: ALA-PDT was performed on non tumor bearing inbred Fisher rats at increasing fluence levels. T2 weighted MRI scans were used to evaluate edema formation and post-contrast T I MRI scans were used to monitor the degree BBB disruption which could be inferred from the intensity and volume of the contrast agent visualized. Results. PDT at increasing fluence levels between 9J and 26J demonstrated an increasing contrast flow rate. No effect on the BBB was observed if 26J of light were given in the absence of ALA. A similar increased contrast volume was observed with increasing fluence rates. The BBB was found to be disrupted 2hrs. following PDT and 80-100% restored 72hrs later. Conclusion: PDT was highly effective in opening the BBB in a limited region of the brain. The degradation of the BBB was temporary in nature, opening rapidly following treatment and significantly restored during the next 72 hrs.

  3. Iron supplement prevents lead-induced disruption of the blood-brain barrier during rat development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiang; Luo Wenjing; Zheng Wei; Liu Yiping; Xu Hui; Zheng Gang; Dai Zhongming; Zhang Wenbin; Chen Yaoming; Chen Jingyuan . E-mail: jy_chen@fmmu.edu.cn

    2007-02-15

    Children are known to be venerable to lead (Pb) toxicity. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) in immature brain is particularly vulnerable to Pb insults. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that Pb exposure damaged the integrity of the BBB in young animals and iron (Fe) supplement may prevent against Pb-induced BBB disruption. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Three groups of rats were exposed to Pb in drinking water containing 342 {mu}g Pb/mL as Pb acetate, among which two groups were concurrently administered by oral gavage once every other day with 7 mg Fe/kg and 14 mg Fe/kg as FeSO{sub 4} solution as the low and high Fe treatment group, respectively, for 6 weeks. The control group received sodium acetate in drinking water. Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in blood by 6.6-folds (p < 0.05) and brain tissues by 1.5-2.0-folds (p < 0.05) as compared to controls. Under the electron microscope, Pb exposure in young animals caused an extensive extravascular staining of lanthanum nitrate in brain parenchyma, suggesting a leakage of cerebral vasculature. Western blot showed that Pb treatment led to 29-68% reduction (p < 0.05) in the expression of occludin as compared to the controls. Fe supplement among Pb-exposed rats maintained the normal ultra-structure of the BBB and restored the expression of occludin to normal levels. Moreover, the low dose Fe supplement significantly reduced Pb levels in blood and brain tissues. These data suggest that Pb exposure disrupts the structure of the BBB in young animals. The increased BBB permeability may facilitate the accumulation of Pb. Fe supplement appears to protect the integrity of the BBB against Pb insults, a beneficial effect that may have significant clinical implications.

  4. Consequences of Repeated Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Puvenna, Vikram; Janigro, Mattia; Ghosh, Chaitali; Zhong, Jianhui; Zhu, Tong; Blackman, Eric; Stewart, Desiree; Ellis, Jasmina; Butler, Robert; Janigro, Damir

    2013-01-01

    The acknowledgement of risks for traumatic brain injury in American football players has prompted studies for sideline concussion diagnosis and testing for neurological deficits. While concussions are recognized etiological factors for a spectrum of neurological sequelae, the consequences of sub-concussive events are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) and the accompanying surge of the astrocytic protein S100B in blood may cause an immune response associated with production of auto-antibodies. We also wished to determine whether these events result in disrupted white matter on diffusion tensor imaging (DT) scans. Players from three college football teams were enrolled (total of 67 volunteers). None of the players experienced a concussion. Blood samples were collected before and after games (n = 57); the number of head hits in all players was monitored by movie review and post-game interviews. S100B serum levels and auto-antibodies against S100B were measured and correlated by direct and reverse immunoassays (n = 15 players; 5 games). A subset of players underwent DTI scans pre- and post-season and after a 6-month interval (n = 10). Cognitive and functional assessments were also performed. After a game, transient BBB damage measured by serum S100B was detected only in players experiencing the greatest number of sub-concussive head hits. Elevated levels of auto-antibodies against S100B were elevated only after repeated sub-concussive events characterized by BBBD. Serum levels of S100B auto-antibodies also predicted persistence of MRI-DTI abnormalities which in turn correlated with cognitive changes. Even in the absence of concussion, football players may experience repeated BBBD and serum surges of the potential auto-antigen S100B. The correlation of serum S100B, auto-antibodies and DTI changes support a link between repeated BBBD and future risk for cognitive changes. PMID:23483891

  5. Consequences of repeated blood-brain barrier disruption in football players.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Nicola; Bazarian, Jeffrey J; Puvenna, Vikram; Janigro, Mattia; Ghosh, Chaitali; Zhong, Jianhui; Zhu, Tong; Blackman, Eric; Stewart, Desiree; Ellis, Jasmina; Butler, Robert; Janigro, Damir

    2013-01-01

    The acknowledgement of risks for traumatic brain injury in American football players has prompted studies for sideline concussion diagnosis and testing for neurological deficits. While concussions are recognized etiological factors for a spectrum of neurological sequelae, the consequences of sub-concussive events are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) and the accompanying surge of the astrocytic protein S100B in blood may cause an immune response associated with production of auto-antibodies. We also wished to determine whether these events result in disrupted white matter on diffusion tensor imaging (DT) scans. Players from three college football teams were enrolled (total of 67 volunteers). None of the players experienced a concussion. Blood samples were collected before and after games (n = 57); the number of head hits in all players was monitored by movie review and post-game interviews. S100B serum levels and auto-antibodies against S100B were measured and correlated by direct and reverse immunoassays (n = 15 players; 5 games). A subset of players underwent DTI scans pre- and post-season and after a 6-month interval (n = 10). Cognitive and functional assessments were also performed. After a game, transient BBB damage measured by serum S100B was detected only in players experiencing the greatest number of sub-concussive head hits. Elevated levels of auto-antibodies against S100B were elevated only after repeated sub-concussive events characterized by BBBD. Serum levels of S100B auto-antibodies also predicted persistence of MRI-DTI abnormalities which in turn correlated with cognitive changes. Even in the absence of concussion, football players may experience repeated BBBD and serum surges of the potential auto-antigen S100B. The correlation of serum S100B, auto-antibodies and DTI changes support a link between repeated BBBD and future risk for cognitive changes. PMID:23483891

  6. Identification of a Novel Indoline Derivative for in Vivo Fluorescent Imaging of Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) can occur in various pathophysiological conditions. Administration of extraneous tracers that can pass the disrupted, but not the intact, BBB and detection of the extravasation have been widely used to assess BBB disruption in animal models. Although several fluorescent tracers have been successfully used, the administration of these tracers basically requires intravascular injection, which can be laborious when using small animals such as zebrafish. To identify fluorescent tracers that could be easily administered into various animal models and visualize the BBB disruption in vivo, we prepared nine structurally related indoline derivatives (IDs) as a minimum set of diverse fluorescent compounds. We found that one ID, ZMB741, had the highest affinity for serum albumin and emitted the strongest fluorescence in the presence of serum albumin of the nine IDs tested. The affinity to serum albumin and the fluorescence intensity was superior to those of Evans blue and indocyanine green that have been conventionally used to assess the BBB disruption. We showed that ZMB741 could be administered into zebrafish by static immersion or mice by intraperitoneal injection and visualizes the active disruption of their BBB. These results suggest that ZMB741 can be a convenient and versatile tool for in vivo fluorescent imaging of BBB disruption in various animal models. The strategy used in this study can also be applied to diversity-oriented libraries to identify novel fluorescent tracers that may be superior to ZMB741. PMID:23668665

  7. A hematopoietic contribution to microhemorrhage formation during antiviral CD8 T cell-initiated blood-brain barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The extent to which susceptibility to brain hemorrhage is derived from blood-derived factors or stromal tissue remains largely unknown. We have developed an inducible model of CD8 T cell-initiated blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption using a variation of the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) model of multiple sclerosis. This peptide-induced fatal syndrome (PIFS) model results in severe central nervous system (CNS) vascular permeability and death in the C57BL/6 mouse strain, but not in the 129 SvIm mouse strain, despite the two strains' having indistinguishable CD8 T-cell responses. Therefore, we hypothesize that hematopoietic factors contribute to susceptibility to brain hemorrhage, CNS vascular permeability and death following induction of PIFS. Methods PIFS was induced by intravenous injection of VP2121-130 peptide at 7 days post-TMEV infection. We then investigated brain inflammation, astrocyte activation, vascular permeability, functional deficit and microhemorrhage formation using T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in C57BL/6 and 129 SvIm mice. To investigate the contribution of hematopoietic cells in this model, hemorrhage-resistant 129 SvIm mice were reconstituted with C57BL/6 or autologous 129 SvIm bone marrow. Gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted MRI was used to visualize the extent of CNS vascular permeability after bone marrow transfer. Results C57BL/6 and 129 SvIm mice had similar inflammation in the CNS during acute infection. After administration of VP2121-130 peptide, however, C57BL/6 mice had increased astrocyte activation, CNS vascular permeability, microhemorrhage formation and functional deficits compared to 129 SvIm mice. The 129 SvIm mice reconstituted with C57BL/6 but not autologous bone marrow had increased microhemorrhage formation as measured by T2*-weighted MRI, exhibited a profound increase in CNS vascular permeability as measured by three-dimensional volumetric analysis of gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted

  8. Pyruvate blocks blood-brain barrier disruption, lymphocyte infiltration and immune response in excitotoxic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jae K; McLarnon, James G

    2016-01-01

    The effects of pyruvate, the end metabolite of glycolysis, on blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment and immune reactivity were examined in the quinolinic acid (QA)-injected rat striatum. Extensive disruption of BBB was observed at 7 d post QA-injection as demonstrated by increased immunohistochemical staining using antibody against immunoglobulin G (IgG). Animals receiving pyruvate administration (500 mg/kg) with QA-injection exhibited reduced lgG immunoreactivity (by 45%) relative to QA alone. QA intrastriatal injection also resulted in marked increases in the number of infiltrating T-lymphocytes (by 70-fold) and expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC-class II) (by 45-fold) relative to unlesioned control. Treatment with pyruvate significantly reduced infiltration of T-cells (by 68%) and MHC class II expression (by 48%) induced by QA. These results indicate that QA injection into rat striatum leads to impairment in BBB function with pyruvate administration reducing immune response and BBB leakiness in excitotoxic injury. PMID:27073744

  9. Stigma as a barrier to treatment for child acute malnutrition in Marsabit County, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Jessica Robin; Njenga, Martin; Stoltzfus, Rebecca Joyce; Pelletier, David Louis

    2016-01-01

    Acute malnutrition affects millions of children each year, yet global coverage of life-saving treatment through the community-based management of acute malnutrition (CMAM) is estimated to be below 15%. We investigated the potential role of stigma as a barrier to accessing CMAM. We surveyed caregivers bringing children to rural health facilities in Marsabit County, Kenya, divided into three strata based on the mid-upper arm circumference of the child: normal status (n = 327), moderate acute malnutrition (MAM, n = 241) and severe acute malnutrition (SAM, n = 143). We used multilevel mixed effects logistic regression to estimate the odds of reporting shame as a barrier to accessing health care. We found that the most common barriers to accessing child health care were those known to be universally problematic: women's time and labour constraints. These constituted the top five most frequently reported barriers regardless of child acute malnutrition status. In contrast, the odds of reporting shame as a barrier were 3.64 (confidence interval: 1.66-8.03, P < 0.05) times higher in caregivers of MAM and SAM children relative to those of normal children. We conclude that stigma is an under-recognized barrier to accessing CMAM and may constrain programme coverage. In light of the large gap in coverage of CMAM, there is an urgent need to understand the sources of acute malnutrition-associated stigma and adopt effective means of de-stigmatization. PMID:25989353

  10. Bifidobacteria Prevent Tunicamycin-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Subsequent Barrier Disruption in Human Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Takuya; Oishi, Kenji; Wullaert, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is caused by accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER, thereby compromising its vital cellular functions in protein production and secretion. Genome wide association studies in humans as well as experimental animal models linked ER stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) with intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the mechanisms linking the outcomes of ER stress in IECs to intestinal disease have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the impact of ER stress on intestinal epithelial barrier function using human colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 monolayers. Tunicamycin-induced ER stress decreased the trans-epithelial electrical resistance of Caco-2 monolayers, concomitant with loss of cellular plasma membrane integrity. Epithelial barrier disruption in Caco-2 cells after ER stress was not caused by caspase- or RIPK1-dependent cell death but was accompanied by lysosomal rupture and up-regulation of the ER stress markers Grp78, sXBP1 and Chop. Interestingly, several bifidobacteria species inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress and thereby diminished barrier disruption in Caco-2 monolayers. Together, these results showed that ER stress compromises the epithelial barrier function of Caco-2 monolayers and demonstrate beneficial impacts of bifidobacteria on ER stress in IECs. Our results identify epithelial barrier loss as a potential link between ER stress and intestinal disease development, and suggest that bifidobacteria could exert beneficial effects on this phenomenon. PMID:27611782

  11. MR-Guided Unfocused Ultrasound Disruption of the Rat Blood-Brain Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Kelly A.; King, Randy L.; Zaharchuk, Greg; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2011-09-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound with microbubbles can temporarily disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for drug delivery. Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) can visualize gadolinium passage into the brain, indicating BBB opening. Previous studies used focused ultrasound, which is appropriate for the targeted delivery of drugs. The purpose of this study was to investigate unfocused ultrasound for BBB opening across the whole brain. In 10 rats, gadolinium-based MR contrast agent (Gd; 0.25 ml) was administered concurrent with ultrasound microbubbles (Optison, 0.25 ml) and circulated for 20 sec before sonication. A 753 kHz planar PZT transducer, diameter 1.8 cm, sonicated each rat brain with supplied voltage of 300, 400, or 500 mVpp for 10 sec in continuous wave mode, or at 500 mVpp at 20% duty cycle at 10 Hz for 30-300 sec. After sonication, coronal T1-weighted FSE CE-MRI images were acquired with a 3in surface coil. The imaging protocol was repeated 3-5 times after treatment. One control animal was given Gd and microbubbles, but not sonicated, and the other was given Gd and sonicated without microbubbles. Signal change in ROIs over the muscle, mesencephalon/ventricles, and the cortex/striatum were measured at 3-5 time points up to 36 min after sonication. Signal intensity was converted to % signal change compared to the initial image. In the controls, CE-MRI showed brightening of surrounding structures, but not the brain. In the continuous wave subjects, cortex/striatum signal did not increase, but ventricle/mesenchephalon signal did. Those that received pulsed sonications showed signal increases in both the cortex/striatum and ventricles/mesenchephalon. In conclusion, after pulsed unfocused ultrasound sonication, the BBB is disrupted across the whole brain, including cortex and deep grey matter, while continuous wave sonication affects only the ventricles and possibly deeper structures, without opening the cortex BBB. As time passes, the timeline of Gd passage into the brain

  12. Conditional deletion of FAK in mice endothelium disrupts lung vascular barrier function due to destabilization of RhoA and Rac1 activities

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Tracy Thennes; Tauseef, Mohammad; Yue, Lili; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Gothert, Joachim; Shen, Tang-Long; Guan, Jun-Lin; Predescu, Sanda; Sadikot, Ruxana

    2013-01-01

    Loss of lung-fluid homeostasis is the hallmark of acute lung injury (ALI). Association of catenins and actin cytoskeleton with vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin is generally considered the main mechanism for stabilizing adherens junctions (AJs), thereby preventing disruption of lung vascular barrier function. The present study identifies endothelial focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that canonically regulates focal adhesion turnover, as a novel AJ-stabilizing mechanism. In wild-type mice, induction of ALI by intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide or cecal ligation and puncture markedly decreased FAK expression in lungs. Using a mouse model in which FAK was conditionally deleted only in endothelial cells (ECs), we show that loss of EC-FAK mimicked key features of ALI (diffuse lung hemorrhage, increased transvascular albumin influx, edema, and neutrophil accumulation in the lung). EC-FAK deletion disrupted AJs due to impairment of the fine balance between the activities of RhoA and Rac1 GTPases. Deletion of EC-FAK facilitated RhoA's interaction with p115-RhoA guanine exchange factor, leading to activation of RhoA. Activated RhoA antagonized Rac1 activity, destabilizing AJs. Inhibition of Rho kinase, a downstream effector of RhoA, reinstated normal endothelial barrier function in FAK−/− ECs and lung vascular integrity in EC-FAK−/− mice. Our findings demonstrate that EC-FAK plays an essential role in maintaining AJs and thereby lung vascular barrier function by establishing the normal balance between RhoA and Rac1 activities. PMID:23771883

  13. Conditional deletion of FAK in mice endothelium disrupts lung vascular barrier function due to destabilization of RhoA and Rac1 activities.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Tracy Thennes; Tauseef, Mohammad; Yue, Lili; Bonini, Marcelo G; Gothert, Joachim; Shen, Tang-Long; Guan, Jun-Lin; Predescu, Sanda; Sadikot, Ruxana; Mehta, Dolly

    2013-08-15

    Loss of lung-fluid homeostasis is the hallmark of acute lung injury (ALI). Association of catenins and actin cytoskeleton with vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin is generally considered the main mechanism for stabilizing adherens junctions (AJs), thereby preventing disruption of lung vascular barrier function. The present study identifies endothelial focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that canonically regulates focal adhesion turnover, as a novel AJ-stabilizing mechanism. In wild-type mice, induction of ALI by intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide or cecal ligation and puncture markedly decreased FAK expression in lungs. Using a mouse model in which FAK was conditionally deleted only in endothelial cells (ECs), we show that loss of EC-FAK mimicked key features of ALI (diffuse lung hemorrhage, increased transvascular albumin influx, edema, and neutrophil accumulation in the lung). EC-FAK deletion disrupted AJs due to impairment of the fine balance between the activities of RhoA and Rac1 GTPases. Deletion of EC-FAK facilitated RhoA's interaction with p115-RhoA guanine exchange factor, leading to activation of RhoA. Activated RhoA antagonized Rac1 activity, destabilizing AJs. Inhibition of Rho kinase, a downstream effector of RhoA, reinstated normal endothelial barrier function in FAK-/- ECs and lung vascular integrity in EC-FAK-/- mice. Our findings demonstrate that EC-FAK plays an essential role in maintaining AJs and thereby lung vascular barrier function by establishing the normal balance between RhoA and Rac1 activities. PMID:23771883

  14. Fingolimod Prevents Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Induced by the Sera from Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Hideaki; Shimizu, Fumitaka; Sano, Yasuteru; Takeshita, Yukio; Maeda, Toshihiko; Abe, Masaaki; Koga, Michiaki; Kanda, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Effect of fingolimod in multiple sclerosis (MS) is thought to involve the prevention of lymphocyte egress from lymphoid tissues, thereby reducing autoaggressive lymphocyte infiltration into the central nervous system across blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) represent a possible additional target for fingolimod in MS patients by directly repairing the function of BBB, as S1P receptors are also expressed by BMECs. In this study, we evaluated the effects of fingolimod on BMECs and clarified whether fingolimod-phosphate restores the BBB function after exposure to MS sera. Methods Changes in tight junction proteins, adhesion molecules and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) in BMECs were evaluated following incubation in conditioned medium with or without fingolimod/fingolimod-phosphate. In addition, the effects of sera derived from MS patients, including those in the relapse phase of relapse-remitting (RR) MS, stable phase of RRMS and secondary progressive MS (SPMS), on the function of BBB in the presence of fingolimod-phosphate were assessed. Results Incubation with fingolimod-phosphate increased the claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in BMECs, although it did not change the amount of occludin, ICAM-1 or MelCAM proteins. Pretreatment with fingolimod-phosphate restored the changes in the claudin-5 and VCAM-1 protein/mRNA levels and TEER values in BMECs after exposure to MS sera. Conclusions Pretreatment with fingolimod-phosphate prevents BBB disruption caused by both RRMS and SPMS sera via the upregulation of claudin-5 and downregulation of VCAM-1 in BMECs, suggesting that fingolimod-phosphate is capable of directly modifying the BBB. BMECs represent a possible therapeutic target for fingolimod in MS patients. PMID:25774903

  15. Methamphetamine is not Toxic but Disrupts the Cell Cycle of Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D; Gamieldien, K; Mafunda, P S

    2015-07-01

    The cytotoxic effects of methamphetamine (MA) are well established to be caused via induced oxidative stress which in turn compromises the core function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) by reducing its ability to regulate the homeostatic environment of the brain. While most studies were conducted over a period of 24-48 h, this study investigated the mechanisms by which chronic exposure of MA adversely affect the endothelial cells of BBB over an extended period of 96 h. MA induced significant depression of cell numbers at 96 h. This result was supported by flow cytometric data on the cell cycle which showed that brain endothelial cells (bEnd5) at 96 h were significantly suppressed in the S-phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, at 24-72 h control cell numbers for G1, S and G2-M phases were similar to MA-exposed cells. MA (0-1,000 µM) did not, however, statistically affect the viability and cytotoxicity of the bEnd5 cells, and the profile of ATP production and DNA synthesis (BrdU) across 96 h did not provide a rationale for the suppression of cell division. Our study reports for the first time that chronic exposure to MA results in long-term disruption of the cell cycle phases which eventuates in the attenuation of brain capillary endothelial cell growth after 96 h, compounding and contributing to the already well-known adverse short-term permeability effects of MA exposure on the BBB. PMID:25666340

  16. Hypo-osmotic shock-induced subclinical inflammation of skin in a rat model of disrupted skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Chihiro; Minematsu, Takeo; Huang, Lijuan; Mugita, Yuko; Kitamura, Aya; Nakagami, Gojiro; Yamane, Takumi; Yoshida, Mikako; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Funakubo, Megumi; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    Aging disrupts skin barrier function and induces xerosis accompanied by pruritus. In many cases, elderly patients complain of pruritus during skin hygiene care, a condition called aquagenic pruritus of the elderly (APE). To date, the pathophysiology and mechanism of action of APE have not been elucidated. We conducted the present study to test the hypothesis that hypo-osmotic shock of epidermal cells induces skin inflammation and elongation of C-fibers by nerve growth factor β (NGFβ) as a basic mechanism of APE. The dorsal skin of HWY rats, which are a model for disrupted skin barrier function, was treated with distilled water (hypotonic treatment [Hypo] group) or normal saline (isotonic treatment [Iso] group) by applying soaked gauze for 7 days. Untreated rats were used as a control (no-treatment [NT] group). Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses revealed inflammatory responses in the epidermis and the dermal papillary layer in the Hypo group, while no alterations were observed in the Iso or NT groups. Induction of expression and secretion of NGFβ and elongation of C-fibers into the epidermis were found in the Hypo group. In contrast, secretion of NGFβ was significantly lower and elongation of C-fibers was not observed in the Iso group. These results suggest that hypo-osmotic shock-induced inflammatory reactions promote hypersensitivity to pruritus in skin with disrupted barrier function. PMID:25681269

  17. Hydrophilic bile acids protect human blood-brain barrier endothelial cells from disruption by unconjugated bilirubin: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Palmela, Inês; Correia, Leonor; Silva, Rui F. M.; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Kim, Kwang S.; Brites, Dora; Brito, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid and its main conjugate glycoursodeoxycholic acid are bile acids with neuroprotective properties. Our previous studies demonstrated their anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties in neural cells exposed to elevated levels of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) as in severe jaundice. In a simplified model of the blood-brain barrier, formed by confluent monolayers of a cell line of human brain microvascular endothelial cells, UCB has shown to induce caspase-3 activation and cell death, as well as interleukin-6 release and a loss of blood-brain barrier integrity. Here, we tested the preventive and restorative effects of these bile acids regarding the disruption of blood-brain barrier properties by UCB in in vitro conditions mimicking severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and using the same experimental blood-brain barrier model. Both bile acids reduced the apoptotic cell death induced by UCB, but only glycoursodeoxycholic acid significantly counteracted caspase-3 activation. Bile acids also prevented the upregulation of interleukin-6 mRNA, whereas only ursodeoxycholic acid abrogated cytokine release. Regarding barrier integrity, only ursodeoxycholic acid abrogated UCB-induced barrier permeability. Better protective effects were obtained by bile acid pre-treatment, but a strong efficacy was still observed by their addition after UCB treatment. Finally, both bile acids showed ability to cross confluent monolayers of human brain microvascular endothelial cells in a time-dependent manner. Collectively, data disclose a therapeutic time-window for preventive and restorative effects of ursodeoxycholic acid and glycoursodeoxycholic acid against UCB-induced blood-brain barrier disruption and damage to human brain microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:25821432

  18. Sleep disruption and its effect on lymphocyte redeployment following an acute bout of exercise.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Lesley A; Simpson, Richard J; Malone, Eva; Florida-James, Geraint D

    2015-07-01

    Sleep disruption and deprivation are common in contemporary society and have been linked with poor health, decreased job performance and increased life-stress. The rapid redeployment of lymphocytes between the blood and tissues is an archetypal feature of the acute stress response, but it is not known if short-term perturbations in sleep architecture affect lymphocyte redeployment. We examined the effects of a disrupted night sleep on the exercise-induced redeployment of lymphocytes and their subtypes. 10 healthy male cyclists performed 1h of cycling at a fixed power output on an indoor cycle ergometer, following a night of undisrupted sleep (US) or a night of disrupted sleep (DS). Blood was collected before, immediately after and 1h after exercise completion. Lymphocytes and their subtypes were enumerated using direct immunofluorescence assays and 4-colour flow cytometry. DS was associated with elevated concentrations of total lymphocytes and CD3(-)/CD56(+) NK-cells. Although not affecting baseline levels, DS augmented the exercise-induced redeployment of CD8(+) T-cells, with the naïve/early differentiated subtypes (KLRG1(-)/CD45RA(+)) being affected most. While the mobilisation of cytotoxic lymphocyte subsets (NK cells, CD8(+) T-cells γδ T-cells), tended to be larger in response to exercise following DS, their enhanced egress at 1h post-exercise was more marked. This occurred despite similar serum cortisol and catecholamine levels between the US and DS trials. NK-cells redeployed with exercise after DS retained their expression of perforin and Granzyme-B indicating that DS did not affect NK-cell 'arming'. Our findings indicate that short-term changes in sleep architecture may 'prime' the immune system and cause minor enhancements in lymphocyte trafficking in response to acute dynamic exercise. PMID:25582807

  19. Dissolution of lipids from mucus: A possible mechanism for prompt disruption of gut barrier function by alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaofa; Deitch, Edwin A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute and/or chronic alcohol ingestion has been shown to exacerbate the morbidity and mortality rate associated with acute mechanical and/or thermal trauma. While alcohol ingestion can affect many organs and systems, clinical and preclinical studies indicate that alcohol ingestion can cause a ‘leaky gut’ syndrome which in turn contributes to infection and systemic organ dysfunction. This study investigated the acute effect of alcohol on gut barrier function. Using an in vivo isolated gut sac model of naïve male rats, each individual gut sac was injected with different concentrations (0, 5, 10, 20, and 40%, v/v) of alcohol. After different times of alcohol exposure, each isolated gut segment was harvested and intestinal permeability and mucosal surface hydrophobicity (a physiologic marker of mucus barrier function) were measured as well as luminal DNA, mucus, protein and free fatty acids. The results showed that alcohol caused dose-dependent and time-dependent increases in gut permeability and decreases in mucosal surface hydrophobicity, with significant changes to be observed 5 min after treatment with 10% alcohol. In addition, it is further found that these changes in permeability and hydrophobicity are more closely associated with increased intestinal luminal free fatty acids levels but not protein or DNA levels. These results suggest that alcohol may cause loss of gut barrier function by extracting and dissolving lipids from the mucus with a resultant decrease in mucosal surface hydrophobicity, which is a critical component of gut barrier function. PMID:25445722

  20. Nitric oxide attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced barrier disruption and protein tyrosine phosphorylation in monolayers of intestinal epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Takanori; Tsuji, Hideo; Onoda, Makoto

    2007-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium provides a barrier to the transport of harmful luminal molecules into the systemic circulation. A dysfunctional epithelial barrier is closely associated with the pathogenesis of a variety of intestinal and systemic disorders. We investigated here the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on the barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2. When treated with H(2)O(2), Caco-2 cell monolayers grown on permeable supports exhibited several remarkable features of barrier dysfunction as follows: a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance, an increase in paracellular permeability to dextran, and a disruption of the intercellular junctional localization of the scaffolding protein ZO-1. In addition, an induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous cellular proteins including ZO-1, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin, components of tight and adherens junctions, was observed. On the other hand, combined treatment of Caco-2 monolayers with H(2)O(2) and an NO donor (NOC5 or NOC12) relieved the damage to the barrier function and suppressed the protein tyrosine phosphorylation induced by H(2)O(2) alone. These results suggest that NO protects the barrier function of intestinal epithelia from oxidative stress by modulating some intracellular signaling pathways of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in epithelial cells. PMID:17451824

  1. What role does the blood brain barrier play in acute mountain sickness?

    PubMed

    Baneke, Alex

    2010-07-01

    As high altitude travel increases, acute mountain sickness (AMS) and life threatening high altitude cerebral oedema (HACE) are becoming more prevalent. Acute mountain sickness occurs in 45% of lowlanders above 4250 m. Predisposing factors are still unknown and its development is more complex than the original "tight fit" hypothesis. This review examines evidence relating to a possible role of the blood brain barrier in AMS as suggested by MRI studies. Underlying mechanisms may involve vascular endothelial growth factor and free radicals in addition to increases in hydrostatic pressure. An increased understanding is important in advising patients planning high altitude adventures. Current studies have linked increased blood brain barrier permeability to high altitude cerebral oedema, but the role of the blood brain barrier in acute mountain sickness is less clear; varied symptoms include headache. MRI shows vasogenic oedema occurs in high altitude cerebral oedema, suggesting blood brain barrier permeability increases, and acute mountain sickness typically precedes high altitude cerebral oedema. Hypoxia leads to increased hydrostatic pressure, and blood brain barrier permeability has been shown to increase in stroke patients. Vascular endothelial growth factor is upregulated in hypoxia, and may increase blood brain barrier permeability. PMID:20952272

  2. HIF2α signaling inhibits adherens junctional disruption in acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Haixia; Rehman, Jalees; Tang, Haiyang; Wary, Kishore; Mittal, Manish; Chatturvedi, Pallavi; Zhao, Youyang; Komorova, Yulia A.; Vogel, Stephen M.; Malik, Asrar B.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial barrier dysfunction underlies diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), characterized by edema and inflammatory cell infiltration. The transcription factor HIF2α is highly expressed in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and may regulate endothelial barrier function. Here, we analyzed promoter sequences of genes encoding proteins that regulate adherens junction (AJ) integrity and determined that vascular endothelial protein tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP) is a HIF2α target. HIF2α-induced VE-PTP expression enhanced dephosphorylation of VE-cadherin, which reduced VE-cadherin endocytosis and thereby augmented AJ integrity and endothelial barrier function. Mice harboring an EC-specific deletion of Hif2a exhibited decreased VE-PTP expression and increased VE-cadherin phosphorylation, resulting in defective AJs. Mice lacking HIF2α in ECs had increased lung vascular permeability and water content, both of which were further exacerbated by endotoxin-mediated injury. Treatment of these mice with Fg4497, a prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 (PHD2) inhibitor, activated HIF2α-mediated transcription in a hypoxia-independent manner. HIF2α activation increased VE-PTP expression, decreased VE-cadherin phosphorylation, promoted AJ integrity, and prevented the loss of endothelial barrier function. These findings demonstrate that HIF2α enhances endothelial barrier integrity, in part through VE-PTP expression and the resultant VE-cadherin dephosphorylation-mediated assembly of AJs. Moreover, activation of HIF2α/VE-PTP signaling via PHD2 inhibition has the potential to prevent the formation of leaky vessels and edema in inflammatory diseases such as ARDS. PMID:25574837

  3. MMP-Mediated Disruption of Claudin-5 in the Blood–Brain Barrier of Rat Brain After Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Rosenberg, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) has become a major focus of attention in cerebral pathophysiology and disease progression in the central nervous system. Endothelial tight junctions, the basal lamina, and perivascular astrocytes are jointly referred to as BBB or neurovascular unit. Around the cerebral endothelial cells is the basal lamina composed primarily of laminin, fibronectin, and heparan sulfate. The basal lamina provides a structural barrier to extravasation of cellular blood elements and anchors endothelial cells to astrocytes. Barriers limiting transport into and out of the brain are found at the tight junction proteins and at the basal lamina. The relative contribution of these two sites has not been studied, but it is likely that both are disrupted to some extent in various injury scenarios. We have shown that activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) opens the BBB by degrading tight junction proteins (claudin-5 and occludin) and increases BBB permeability after stroke, and that an MMP inhibitor prevents degradation of tight junction proteins and attenuates BBB disruption. PMID:21717368

  4. Acute NMDA receptor antagonism disrupts synchronization of action potential firing in rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Molina, Leonardo A; Skelin, Ivan; Gruber, Aaron J

    2014-01-01

    Antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) have psychotomimetic effects in humans and are used to model schizophrenia in animals. We used high-density electrophysiological recordings to assess the effects of acute systemic injection of an NMDAR antagonist (MK-801) on ensemble neural processing in the medial prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats. Although MK-801 increased neuron firing rates and the amplitude of gamma-frequency oscillations in field potentials, the synchronization of action potential firing decreased and spike trains became more Poisson-like. This disorganization of action potential firing following MK-801 administration is consistent with changes in simulated cortical networks as the functional connections among pyramidal neurons become less clustered. Such loss of functional heterogeneity of the cortical microcircuit may disrupt information processing dependent on spike timing or the activation of discrete cortical neural ensembles, and thereby contribute to hallucinations and other features of psychosis induced by NMDAR antagonists. PMID:24465743

  5. Mechanism of acute pancreatitis complicated with injury of intestinal mucosa barrier*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-ping; Zhang, Jie; Song, Qiao-ling; Chen, Han-qin

    2007-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common acute abdomen in clinic with a rapid onset and dangerous pathogenetic condition. AP can cause an injury of intestinal mucosa barrier, leading to translocation of bacteria or endotoxin through multiple routes, bacterial translocation (BT), gutorigin endotoxaemia, and secondary infection of pancreatic tissue, and then cause systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), which are important factors influencing AP’s severity and mortality. Meanwhile, the injury of intestinal mucosa barrier plays a key role in AP’s process. Therefore, it is clinically important to study the relationship between the injury of intestinal mucosa barrier and AP. In addition, many factors such as microcirculation disturbance, ischemical reperfusion injury, excessive release of inflammatory mediators and apoptosis may also play important roles in the damage of intestinal mucosa barrier. In this review, we summarize studies on mechanisms of AP. PMID:18257123

  6. MRI-guided Disruption of the Blood-brain Barrier using Transcranial Focused Ultrasound in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Meaghan A.; Waspe, Adam C.; Chopra, Rajiv; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2012-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an increasingly investigated technique for circumventing the BBB1-5. The BBB is a significant obstacle to pharmaceutical treatments of brain disorders as it limits the passage of molecules from the vasculature into the brain tissue to molecules less than approximately 500 Da in size6. FUS induced BBB disruption (BBBD) is temporary and reversible4 and has an advantage over chemical means of inducing BBBD by being highly localized. FUS induced BBBD provides a means for investigating the effects of a wide range of therapeutic agents on the brain, which would not otherwise be deliverable to the tissue in sufficient concentration. While a wide range of ultrasound parameters have proven successful at disrupting the BBB2,5,7, there are several critical steps in the experimental procedure to ensure successful disruption with accurate targeting. This protocol outlines how to achieve MRI-guided FUS induced BBBD in a rat model, with a focus on the critical animal preparation and microbubble handling steps of the experiment. PMID:22433937

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated disruption of mucosal barriers and its role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis of HIV/AIDS disease.

    PubMed

    Tugizov, Sharof

    2016-01-01

    Oral, intestinal and genital mucosal epithelia have a barrier function to prevent paracellular penetration by viral, bacterial and other pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HIV can overcome these barriers by disrupting the tight and adherens junctions of mucosal epithelia. HIV-associated disruption of epithelial junctions may also facilitate paracellular penetration and dissemination of other viral pathogens. This review focuses on possible molecular mechanisms of HIV-associated disruption of mucosal epithelial junctions and its role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis of HIV and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:27583187

  8. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Power, Chanikarn; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Livingstone, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete targets. The method presents new opportunities for the use of drugs and for the study of the brain.

  9. Disruption of the blood–brain barrier in pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium, untreated and after anthelmintic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Marzal, Miguel; Cangalaya, Carla; Balboa, Diana; Orrego, Miguel Ángel; Paredes, Adriana; Gonzales-Gustavson, Eloy; Arroyo, Gianfranco; García, Hector H.; González, Armando E.; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Nash, Theodore E.

    2014-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a widely prevalent disease in the tropics that causes seizures and a variety of neurological symptoms in most of the world. Experimental models are limited and do not allow assessment of the degree of inflammation around brain cysts. The vital dye Evans Blue (EB) was injected into 11 pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium cysts to visually identify the extent of disruption of the blood brain barrier. A total of 369 cysts were recovered from the 11 brains and classified according to the staining of their capsules as blue or unstained. The proportion of cysts with blue capsules was significantly higher in brains from pigs that had received anthelmintic treatment 48 and 120 h before the EB infusion, indicating a greater compromise of the blood brain barrier due to treatment. The model could be useful for understanding the pathology of treatment-induced inflammation in neurocysticercosis. PMID:23684909

  10. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier in pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium, untreated and after anthelmintic treatment.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Marzal, Miguel; Cangalaya, Carla; Balboa, Diana; Orrego, Miguel Ángel; Paredes, Adriana; Gonzales-Gustavson, Eloy; Arroyo, Gianfranco; García, Hector H; González, Armando E; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Nash, Theodore E

    2013-08-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a widely prevalent disease in the tropics that causes seizures and a variety into of neurological symptoms in most of the world. Experimental models are limited and do not allow assessment of the degree of inflammation around brain cysts. The vital dye Evans Blue (EB) was injected to 11 pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium cysts to visually identify the extent of disruption of the blood-brain barrier. A total of 369 cysts were recovered from the 11 brains and classified according to the staining of their capsules as blue or unstained. The proportion of cysts with blue capsules was significantly higher in brains from pigs that had received anthelmintic treatment 48 and 120h before the EB infusion, indicating a greater compromise of the blood-brain barrier due to treatment. The model could be useful for understanding the pathology of treatment-induced inflammation in neurocysticercosis. PMID:23684909

  11. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Caused by Ultrasound Bursts Combined with Microbubbles Depends on Anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Vykhodtseva, Natalia

    2011-09-01

    Prior works on BBB disruption via inter-arterial infusions of osmotic agents have shown a strong dependence on anesthesia. Here, we investigated whether different anesthesia agents can affect ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. A piston transducer fired through a rubber aperture (frequency: 532 kHz, diameter: 4 cm, aperture diameter: 16 mm) was used to generate the ultrasound fields, and sonications combined with an ultrasound contrast agent were performed at 5 power levels. BBB disruption was quantified by measuring the MRI contrast enhancement in T1-weighted MRI, and erythrocyte extravasation characterized in light microscopy. For each exposure level tested, experiments performed with ketamine/xylazine resulted in significantly greater (P<0.05) enhancement than with isoflurane/oxygen. The onset of severe red blood cell extravasation occurred at lower power levels with ketamine/xylazine. These results suggest ultrasound-induced BBB disruption can depend on anesthesia agent, possibly due effects on the vasculature. These results suggest that care is needed in comparing experiments with different anesthesia agents and physiological factors need to be considered with ultrasound-induced BBB disruption.

  12. Strain-dependent disruption of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier by Streptoccocus suis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Tobias; Adam, Rüdiger; Eggelnpöhler, Ingo; Matalon, David; Seibt, Annette; K Novotny, Gerd E; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Schroten, Horst

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus suis capsular type 2 is an important agent of diseases including meningitis among pigs worldwide, and is also a zoonotic agent. The barrier function of the choroid plexus epithelium that constitutes the structural basis for the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier has not been elucidated yet in bacterial meningitis. We investigated the influence of various S. suis isolates on the barrier function of cultured porcine choroid plexus epithelial cells with respect to the transepithelial resistance and paracellular [(3)H]-mannitol flux. Preferentially apical application of S. suis isolates significantly decreased transepithelial resistance and significantly increased paracellular [(3)H]-mannitol flux in a time-, dose- and strain-dependent manner. Viable S. suis isolates caused cytotoxicity determined by lactate dehydrogenase assay and electron microscopy, whereas S. suis sonicates and UV-inactivated S. suis did not cause cytotoxicity. The observed effects on porcine choroid plexus epithelial cells barrier function could not exclusively be ascribed to known virulence factors of S. suis such as suilysin. In conclusion, S. suis isolates induce loss of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function in an in vitro model. Thus, S. suis may facilitate trafficking of bacteria and leucocytes across the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. The underlying mechanisms for the barrier breakdown have yet to be determined. PMID:15780575

  13. Retinoic Acid Prevents Disruption of Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier by Inducing Autophagic Flux After Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yulong; Zheng, Binbin; Ye, Libing; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhu, Sipin; Zheng, Xiaomeng; Xia, Qinghai; He, Zili; Wang, Qingqing; Xiao, Jian; Xu, Huazi

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces the disruption of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB), which leads to infiltration of blood cells, inflammatory responses and neuronal cell death, with subsequent development of spinal cord secondary damage. Recent reports pointed to an important role of retinoic acid (RA), the active metabolite of the vitamin A, in the induction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during human and mouse development, however, it is unknown whether RA plays a role in maintaining BSCB integrity under the pathological conditions such as SCI. In this study, we investigated the BSCB protective role of RA both in vivo and in vitro and demonstrated that autophagy are involved in the BSCB protective effect of RA. Our data show that RA attenuated BSCB permeability and also attenuated the loss of tight junction molecules such as P120, β-catenin, Occludin and Claudin5 after injury in vivo as well as in brain microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, RA administration improved functional recovery of the rat model of trauma. We also found that RA could significantly increase the expression of LC3-II and decrease the expression of p62 both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, combining RA with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) partially abolished its protective effect on the BSCB and exacerbated the loss of tight junctions. Together, our studies indicate that RA improved functional recovery in part by the prevention of BSCB disruption via the activation of autophagic flux after SCI. PMID:26582233

  14. Cholera toxin disrupts barrier function by inhibiting exocyst-mediated trafficking of host proteins to intestinal cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Guichard, Annabel; Moreno, Beatriz Cruz; Aguilar, Berenice; van Sorge, Nina M.; Kuang, Jennifer; Kurkciyan, Adrianne A.; Wang, Zhipeng; Hang, Saiyu; Pineton de Chambrun, Guillaume P.; McCole, Declan F.; Watnick, Paula; Nizet, Victor; Bier, Ethan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cholera toxin (CT), a virulence factor elaborated by Vibrio cholerae, is sufficient to induce the severe diarrhea characteristic of cholera. The enzymatic moiety of CT (CtxA) increases cAMP synthesis in intestinal epithelial cells, leading to chloride ion (Cl−) efflux through the CFTR Cl− channel. To preserve electroneutrality and osmotic balance, sodium ions and water also flow into the intestinal lumen via a paracellular route. We find that CtxA-driven cAMP increase also inhibits Rab11/exocyst-mediated trafficking of host proteins including E-cadherin and Notch signaling components to cell-cell junctions in Drosophila, human intestinal epithelial cells, and ligated mouse ileal loops, thereby disrupting barrier function. Additionally, CtxA induces junctional damage, weight loss, and dye leakage in the Drosophila gut, contributing to lethality from live V. cholerae infection, all of which can be rescued by Rab11 over-expression. These barrier-disrupting effects of CtxA may act in parallel with Cl− secretion to drive the pathophysiology of cholera. PMID:24034615

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor Disrupts Claudin-5 Endothelial Tight Junction Barriers in Two Distinct NF-κB-Dependent Phases

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Paul R.; Kim, Richard K.; Pober, Jordan S.; Kluger, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Capillary leak in severe sepsis involves disruption of endothelial cell tight junctions. We modeled this process by TNF treatment of cultured human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (HDMEC) monolayers, which unlike human umbilical vein endothelial cells form claudin-5-dependent tight junctions and a high-resistance permeability barrier. Continuous monitoring with electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing revealed that TNF disrupts tight junction-dependent HDMEC barriers in discrete steps: an ~5% increase in transendothelial electrical resistance over 40 minutes; a decrease to ~10% below basal levels over 2 hours (phase 1 leak); an interphase plateau of 1 hour; and a major fall in transendothelial electrical resistance to < 70% of basal levels by 8–10 hours (phase 2 leak), with EC50 values of TNF for phase 1 and 2 leak of ~30 and ~150 pg/ml, respectively. TNF leak is reversible and independent of cell death. Leak correlates with disruption of continuous claudin-5 immunofluorescence staining, myosin light chain phosphorylation and loss of claudin-5 co-localization with cortical actin. All these responses require NF-κB signaling, shown by inhibition with Bay 11 or overexpression of IκB super-repressor, and are blocked by H-1152 or Y-27632, selective inhibitors of Rho-associated kinase that do not block other NF-κB-dependent responses. siRNA combined knockdown of Rho-associated kinase-1 and -2 also prevents myosin light chain phosphorylation, loss of claudin-5/actin co-localization, claudin-5 reorganization and reduces phase 1 leak. However, unlike H-1152 and Y-27632, combined Rho-associated kinase-1/2 siRNA knockdown does not reduce the magnitude of phase 2 leak, suggesting that H-1152 and Y-27632 have targets beyond Rho-associated kinases that regulate endothelial barrier function. We conclude that TNF disrupts TJs in HDMECs in two distinct NF-κB-dependent steps, the first involving Rho-associated kinase and the second likely to involve an as yet

  16. Lipopolysaccharide potentiates polychlorinated biphenyl-induced disruption of the blood-brain barrier via TLR4/IRF-3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong June; Choi, Yean Jung; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Bei; Eum, Sung Yong; Abreu, Maria T; Toborek, Michal

    2012-12-16

    Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is associated with numerous adverse health effects. Although the main route of exposure to PCBs is through the gastrointestinal tract, little is known about the contribution of the gut to the health effects of PCBs. We hypothesize that PCBs can disrupt intestinal integrity, causing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) translocation into the bloodstream and potentiation of the systemic toxicity of PCBs. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to individual PCB congeners by oral gavage, followed by the assessment of small intestine morphology and plasma levels of proinflammatory mediators. In addition, mice and human brain endothelial cells were exposed to PCB118 in the presence or absence of LPS to evaluate the contribution of LPS to PCB-induced toxicity at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) level. Oral administration of PCB153, PCB118, or PCB126 disrupted intestinal morphology and increased plasma levels of LPS and proinflammatory cytokines. Direct injection of LPS and PCB118 into the cerebral microvasculature resulted in synergistic disruption of BBB integrity and decreased expression of tight junction proteins in brain microvessels. In vitro experiments confirmed these effects and indicated that stimulation of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway can be responsible for these effects via activation of interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3). These results indicate that LPS may be a contributing factor in PCB-induced dysfunction of the brain endothelium via stimulation of the TLR4/IRF-3 pathway. PMID:22906770

  17. Pharmacokinetics of BPA in gliomas with ultrasound induced blood-brain barrier disruption as measured by microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Lin, Yi-Li; Chou, Fong-In; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Hsueh Liu, Yen-Wan; Chang, Lun-Wei; Hsieh, Yu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be transiently disrupted by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles for targeted drug delivery. Previous studies have illustrated the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery across the BBB after sonication using indirect visualization techniques. In this study, we investigated the in vivo extracellular kinetics of boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-f) in glioma-bearing rats with FUS-induced BBB disruption by microdialysis. After simultaneous intravenous administration of BPA and FUS exposure, the boron concentration in the treated brains was quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. With FUS, the mean peak concentration of BPA-f in the glioma dialysate was 3.6 times greater than without FUS, and the area under the concentration-time curve was 2.1 times greater. This study demonstrates that intracerebral microdialysis can be used to assess local BBB transport profiles of drugs in a sonicated site. Applying microdialysis to the study of metabolism and pharmacokinetics is useful for obtaining selective information within a specific brain site after FUS-induced BBB disruption. PMID:24936788

  18. Phenylbutyrate prevents disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yulong; Ye, Libing; Zheng, Binbin; Zhu, Sipin; Shi, Hongxue; Zhang, Hongyu; Wang, Zhouguang; Wei, Xiaojie; Chen, Daqing; Li, Xiaokun; Xu, Huazi; Xiao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the role of endocytoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by spinal cord injury (SCI) in blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption and the effect of phenylbutyrate (PBA) on BSCB disruption after SCI. After a moderate contusion injury at the T9 level of spinal cord with a vascular clip, PBA was immediately administered into injured rat via intraperitoneal injection (100 mg/kg) and then further treated once a day for 2 weeks for behavior test. Spinal cord was collected at 1 day post-injury for evaluation of the effects of ER stress and PBA on BSCB disruption after SCI. PBA significantly attenuated BSCB permeability and degradation of tight junction molecules such as P120, β-catenin, Occludin and Claudin5 at 1 day after injury and improved functional recovery in the rat model of trauma. The BSCB protective effect of PBA is related to the inhibition of ER stress induced by SCI. In addition, PBA significantly inhibited the increase of ER stress markers and prevents loss of tight junction and adherens junction proteins in TG-treated human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Taken together, our data demonstrate that therapeutic strategies targeting ER stress may be suitable for the therapy of preserving BSCB integrity after SCI. PBA may be a new candidate as a therapeutic agent for protecting SCI by a compromised BSCB. PMID:27186310

  19. Rapid endothelial cytoskeletal reorganization enables early blood–brain barrier disruption and long-term ischaemic reperfusion brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yejie; Zhang, Lili; Pu, Hongjian; Mao, Leilei; Hu, Xiaoming; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Na; Stetler, R. Anne; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Xiangrong; Leak, Rehana K.; Keep, Richard F.; Ji, Xunming; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and long-term consequences of early blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption after cerebral ischaemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury are poorly understood. Here we discover that I/R induces subtle BBB leakage within 30–60 min, likely independent of gelatinase B/MMP-9 activities. The early BBB disruption is caused by the activation of ROCK/MLC signalling, persistent actin polymerization and the disassembly of junctional proteins within microvascular endothelial cells (ECs). Furthermore, the EC alterations facilitate subsequent infiltration of peripheral immune cells, including MMP-9-producing neutrophils/macrophages, resulting in late-onset, irreversible BBB damage. Inactivation of actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) causes sustained actin polymerization in ECs, whereas EC-targeted overexpression of constitutively active mutant ADF reduces actin polymerization and junctional protein disassembly, attenuates both early- and late-onset BBB impairment, and improves long-term histological and neurological outcomes. Thus, we identify a previously unexplored role for early BBB disruption in stroke outcomes, whereby BBB rupture may be a cause rather than a consequence of parenchymal cell injury. PMID:26813496

  20. Effects of blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors on blood-brain barrier disruption in focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Hunter, Christine; Weiss, Harvey R; Chi, Oak Z

    2010-12-01

    To determine whether blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors such as NMDA or AMPA receptors would attenuate blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in focal cerebral ischemia, 15 min before middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, CGS-19755 or NBQX was injected intraperitoneally in rats. At 1 h after MCA occlusion, BBB permeability was determined by measuring the transfer coefficient (K(i)) of (14)C-α-aminoisobutyric acid and the volume of dextran distribution. With MCA occlusion, K(i) was increased in the ischemic cortex (IC) (316%). CGS-19755 attenuated the increase in K(i) in the IC (-46%), but NBQX did not significantly decrease it. The difference in the volume of dextran distribution between the IC and the contralateral cortex became insignificant with the blockade of NMDA or AMPA receptors. Our data demonstrated that blockade of NMDA or AMPA receptors could attenuate the BBB disruption in focal cerebral ischemia and suggest that ionotropic glutamate receptors are involved in part in BBB disruption. PMID:20217443

  1. Surgery-Induced Hippocampal Angiotensin II Elevation Causes Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption via MMP/TIMP in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengqian; Mo, Na; Li, Lunxu; Cao, Yiyun; Wang, Wenming; Liang, Yaoxian; Deng, Hui; Xing, Rui; Yang, Lin; Ni, Cheng; Chui, Dehua; Guo, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    Reversible blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption has been uniformly reported in several animal models of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Nevertheless, the precise mechanism underlying this occurrence remains unclear. Using an aged rat model of POCD, we investigated the dynamic changes in expression of molecules involved in BBB disintegration, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 (MMP-9), as well as three of their endogenous tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMP-1, -2, -3), and tried to establish the correlation between MMP/TIMP balance and surgery-induced hippocampal BBB disruption. We validated the increased hippocampal expression of angiotensin II (Ang II) and Ang II receptor type 1 (AT1) after surgery. We also found MMP/TIMP imbalance as early as 6 h after surgery, together with increased BBB permeability and decreased expression of Occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), as well as increased basal lamina protein laminin at 24 h postsurgery. The AT1 antagonist candesartan restored MMP/TIMP equilibrium and modulated expression of Occludin and laminin, but not ZO-1, thereby improving BBB permeability. These events were accompanied by suppression of the surgery-induced canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation cascade. Nevertheless, AT1 antagonism did not affect nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) expression. Collectively, these findings suggest that surgery-induced Ang II release impairs BBB integrity by activating NF-κB signaling and disrupting downstream MMP/TIMP balance via AT1 receptor. PMID:27199659

  2. Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Disruption through Altered Mucosal MicroRNA Expression in Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gaulke, Christopher A.; Porter, Matthew; Han, Yan-Hong; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Grishina, Irina; George, Michael D.; Dang, Angeline T.; Ding, Shou-Wei; Jiang, Guochun; Korf, Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epithelial barrier dysfunction during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has largely been attributed to the rapid and severe depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Although it is known that changes in mucosal gene expression contribute to intestinal enteropathy, the role of small noncoding RNAs, specifically microRNA (miRNA), has not been investigated. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected nonhuman primate model of HIV pathogenesis, we investigated the effect of viral infection on miRNA expression in intestinal mucosa. SIV infection led to a striking decrease in the expression of mucosal miRNA compared to that in uninfected controls. This decrease coincided with an increase in 5′-3′-exoribonuclease 2 protein and alterations in DICER1 and Argonaute 2 expression. Targets of depleted miRNA belonged to molecular pathways involved in epithelial proliferation, differentiation, and immune response. Decreased expression of several miRNA involved in maintaining epithelial homeostasis in the gut was localized to the proliferative crypt region of the intestinal epithelium. Our findings suggest that SIV-induced decreased expression of miRNA involved in epithelial homeostasis, disrupted expression of miRNA biogenesis machinery, and increased expression of XRN2 are involved in the development of epithelial barrier dysfunction and gastroenteropathy. IMPORTANCE MicroRNA (miRNA) regulate the development and function of intestinal epithelial cells, and many viruses disrupt normal host miRNA expression. In this study, we demonstrate that SIV and HIV disrupt expression of miRNA in the small intestine during infection. The depletion of several key miRNA is localized to the proliferative crypt region of the gut epithelium. These miRNA are known to control expression of genes involved in inflammation, cell death, and epithelial maturation. Our data indicate that this disruption might be caused by altered expression of mi

  3. Disruption of the Posterior Medial Network during the Acute Stage of Transient Global Amnesia: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Ho; Jeong, Han-Yeong; Jang, Jae-Won; Park, So Young; Lim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Jeong-Youn; Im, Chang-Hwan; Ahn, Soyeon; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, SangYun

    2016-01-01

    Acute perturbation of the corticohippocampal circuitry is a primary pathophysiological mechanism underlying transient global amnesia (TGA). With regard to memory, 2 distinct corticohippocampal circuitries potentially exist: the anterior temporal network and the posterior medial network. We used electroencephalography (EEG) spectral analysis to determine which network is disrupted during the acute stage of TGA. Patients with TGA who visited Seoul National University Bundang Hospital within 24 hours after symptom onset were retrospectively identified. Twenty patients underwent EEG twice, once in the acute stage (<24 hours after symptom onset) and once in the resolved stage (>2 months after symptom onset). A fast Fourier transform was applied to compute the spectral power of the 6 frequency bands: delta, theta, alpha, beta 1, beta 2, and gamma. We assumed that the frontocentral and temporal regions belonged to the anterior temporal network, whereas the parieto-occipital regions belonged to the posterior medial network. A paired Student's t test was used to evaluate the difference in the regional spectral powers in each frequency band between the acute and resolved TGA stages. Compared with the resolved stage, relative theta power in the left parieto-occipital region was increased and relative alpha power in the right parieto-occipital region was reduced during the acute stage of TGA, with a statistical significance of P<.05 (uncorrected). The cortical regions that belonged to the posterior medial network showed alterations of neuronal activity, which reflects disruption of the posterior medial network during the acute stage of TGA. PMID:25392008

  4. Structure and function of the ependymal barrier and diseases associated with ependyma disruption

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Antonio J; Domínguez-Pinos, María-Dolores; Guerra, María M; Fernández-Llebrez, Pedro; Pérez-Fígares, José-Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The neuroepithelium is a germinal epithelium containing progenitor cells that produce almost all of the central nervous system cells, including the ependyma. The neuroepithelium and ependyma constitute barriers containing polarized cells covering the embryonic or mature brain ventricles, respectively; therefore, they separate the cerebrospinal fluid that fills cavities from the developing or mature brain parenchyma. As barriers, the neuroepithelium and ependyma play key roles in the central nervous system development processes and physiology. These roles depend on mechanisms related to cell polarity, sensory primary cilia, motile cilia, tight junctions, adherens junctions and gap junctions, machinery for endocytosis and molecule secretion, and water channels. Here, the role of both barriers related to the development of diseases, such as neural tube defects, ciliary dyskinesia, and hydrocephalus, is reviewed. PMID:25045600

  5. Deficiency of tenascin-C and attenuation of blood-brain barrier disruption following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Masashi; Shiba, Masato; Kawakita, Fumihiro; Liu, Lei; Shimojo, Naoshi; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Tenascin-C (TNC), a matricellular protein, is induced in the brain following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The authors investigated if TNC causes brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption following experimental SAH. METHODS C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) or TNC knockout (TNKO) mice were subjected to SAH by endovascular puncture. Ninety-seven mice were randomly allocated to WT sham-operated (n = 16), TNKO sham-operated (n = 16), WT SAH (n = 34), and TNKO SAH (n = 31) groups. Mice were examined by means of neuroscore and brain water content 24-48 hours post-SAH; and Evans blue dye extravasation and Western blotting of TNC, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and zona occludens (ZO)-1 at 24 hours post-SAH. As a separate study, 16 mice were randomized to WT sham-operated, TNKO sham-operated, WT SAH, and TNKO SAH groups (n = 4 in each group), and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) was immunohistochemically evaluated at 24 hours post-SAH. Moreover, 40 TNKO mice randomly received an intracerebroventricular injection of TNC or phosphate-buffered saline, and effects of exogenous TNC on brain edema and BBB disruption following SAH were studied. RESULTS Deficiency of endogenous TNC prevented neurological impairments, brain edema formation, and BBB disruption following SAH; it was also associated with the inhibition of both MMP-9 induction and ZO-1 degradation. Endogenous TNC deficiency also inhibited post-SAH MAPK activation in brain capillary endothelial cells. Exogenous TNC treatment abolished the neuroprotective effects shown in TNKO mice with SAH. CONCLUSIONS Tenascin-C may be an important mediator in the development of brain edema and BBB disruption following SAH, mechanisms for which may involve MAPK-mediated MMP-9 induction and ZO-1 degradation. TNC could be a molecular target against which to develop new therapies for SAH-induced brain injuries. PMID:26473781

  6. Arginine-Vasopressin Receptor Blocker Conivaptan Reduces Brain Edema and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption after Experimental Stroke in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zeynalov, Emil; Jones, Susan M.; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Snell, Lawrence D.; Elliott, J. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Stroke is complicated by brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and is often accompanied by increased release of arginine-vasopressin (AVP). AVP acts through V1a and V2 receptors to trigger hyponatremia, vasospasm, and platelet aggregation which can exacerbate brain edema. The AVP receptor blockers conivaptan (V1a and V2) and tolvaptan (V2) are used to correct hyponatremia, but their effect on post-ischemic brain edema and BBB disruption remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate if these drugs can prevent brain edema and BBB disruption in mice after stroke. Methods Experimental mice underwent the filament model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with reperfusion. Mice were treated with conivaptan, tolvaptan, or vehicle. Treatments were initiated immediately at reperfusion and administered IV (conivaptan) or orally (tolvaptan) for 48 hours. Physiological variables, neurological deficit scores (NDS), plasma and urine sodium and osmolality were recorded. Brain water content (BWC) and Evans Blue (EB) extravasation index were evaluated at the end point. Results Both conivaptan and tolvaptan produced aquaresis as indicated by changes in plasma and urine sodium levels. However plasma and urine osmolality was changed only by conivaptan. Unlike tolvaptan, conivaptan improved NDS and reduced BWC in the ipsilateral hemisphere: from 81.66 ± 0.43% (vehicle) to 78.28 ± 0.48% (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05 vs vehicle). Conivaptan also attenuated the EB extravasation from 1.22 ± 0.08 (vehicle) to 1.01 ± 0.02 (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05). Conclusion Continuous IV infusion with conivaptan for 48 hours after experimental stroke reduces brain edema, and BBB disruption. Conivaptan but not tolvaptan may potentially be used in patients to prevent brain edema after stroke. PMID:26275173

  7. Mechanisms of Osteopontin-Induced Stabilization of Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Hasegawa, Yu; Kanamaru, Kenji; Zhang, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Osteopontin (OPN) is an inducible multifunctional extracellular matrix protein that may be protective against blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). However, the protective mechanisms remain unclear. Methods We produced the endovascular perforation model of SAH in rats and studied the time course of OPN induction in brains using Western blotting and immunofluorescence (n=50). Then, 34 rats were randomly assigned to sham (n=3), sham+OPN small interfering RNA (siRNA; n=3), SAH+negative control siRNA (n=14) and SAH+OPN siRNA (n=14) groups, and 109 rats to sham+vehicle (n=17), sham+recombinant OPN (r-OPN; n=17), SAH+vehicle (n=33), SAH+r-OPN (n=31) and SAH+r-OPN+GRGDSP (L-arginyl-glycyl-L-aspartate motif-containing hexapeptide; n=11) groups. Effects of OPN siRNA or r-OPN on BBB disruption and the related proteins were studied. Results OPN was significantly induced in the reactive astrocytes and capillary endothelial cells, peaking at 72 hours post-SAH, during the recovery phase of BBB disruption. Blockage of endogenous OPN induction exacerbated BBB disruption associated with reduction of angiopoietin-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase-1 (an endogenous MAPK inhibitor), activation of MAPKs and induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A at 72 hours post-SAH, while r-OPN treatment improved it associated with MKP-1 induction, MAPK inactivation and VEGF-A reduction, which was blocked by GRGDSP at 24 hours post-SAH. VEGF-B and angiopoietin-2 levels were unchanged. Conclusions OPN may increase MKP-1 that inactivates MAPKs, upstream and downstream of VEGF-A, via binding to L-arginyl-glycyl-L-aspartate-dependent integrin receptors, suggesting a novel mechanism of OPN-induced post-SAH BBB protection. PMID:20616319

  8. Anthrax Lethal Toxin Induces Acute Diastolic Dysfunction in Rats Through Disruption of the Phospholamban Signaling Network

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Honey B.; Watson, Linley E.; Nizamutdinov, Damir; Feng, Hao; Gerilechaogetu, Fnu; Lal, Hind; Verma, Suresh K.; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Foster, Donald M.; Dillmann, Wolfgang H.; Dostal, D.E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anthrax lethal toxin (LT), secreted by Bacillus anthracis, causes severe cardiac dysfunction by unknown mechanisms. LT specifically cleaves the docking domains of MAPKK (MEKs); thus, we hypothesized that LT directly impairs cardiac function through dysregulation of MAPK signaling mechanisms. Methods and Results In a time-course study of LT toxicity, echocardiography revealed acute diastolic heart failure accompanied by pulmonary regurgitation and left atrial dilation in adult Sprague-Dawley rats at time points corresponding to dysregulated JNK, phospholamban (PLB) and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) myocardial signaling. Using isolated rat ventricular myocytes, we identified the MEK7-JNK1-PP2A-PLB signaling axis to be important for regulation of intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) handling, PP2A activation and targeting of PP2A-B56α to Ca2+i handling proteins, such as PLB. Through a combination of gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies, we demonstrated that over-expression of MEK7 protects against LT-induced PP2A activation and Ca2+i dysregulation through activation of JNK1. Moreover, targeted phosphorylation of PLB-Thr17 by Akt improved sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+i release and reuptake during LT toxicity. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments further revealed the pivotal role of MEK7-JNK-Akt complex formation for phosphorylation of PLB-Thr17 during acute LT toxicity. Conclusions Our findings support a cardiogenic mechanism of LT-induced diastolic dysfunction, by which LT disrupts JNK1 signaling and results in Ca2+i dysregulation through diminished phosphorylation of PLB by Akt and increased dephosphorylation of PLB by PP2A. Integration of the MEK7-JNK1 signaling module with Akt represents an important stress-activated signalosome that may confer protection to sustain cardiac contractility and maintain normal levels of Ca2+i through PLB-T17 phosphorylation. PMID:23907041

  9. Disruption of auditory function by acute administration of a room odorizer containing butyl nitrite in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fechter, L.D.; Richard, C.L.; Mungekar, M.; Gomez, J.; Strathern, D.

    1989-01-01

    Butyl nitrite is the predominant and presumed active ingredient in a variety of commercial preparations sold as ''room odorizers.'' These compounds have significant abuse potential, giving the user the sensation of a ''rush'', which may be related to their intense cardiovascular effects. The pharmacological properties of butyl nitrites are similar to those of amyl nitrite which is also abused for its psychological effects, but whose availability is limited by prescription for treatment of angina. A significant body of literature suggests that the inner ear is vulnerable to acute hypoxic exposure. Since butyl nitrite induces high levels of methemoglobin and also reduces blood pressure due to peripheral vasodilation, we hypothesized that this compound might produce auditory dysfunction. We studied the effect of acute exposure to a butyl nitrite ''room odorizer'' on 10- and 40-kHz auditory function in rats. A loss in auditory sensitivity was found at both frequencies on the day following administration of the compound. Auditory dysfunction tended to subside over the next several days at 40 kHz, although a significant loss of sensitivity for tones of 10 kHz was observed over a 6-day period after administration of the agent. Methemoglobin levels measured in rats of the same age were elevated significantly 30 and 60 min after butyl nitrite to levels of 30-45%. Methemoglobin levels were found to be normal 18 hr after administration when the first audiometric tests were conducted. The data suggest that auditory function in the middle of the rats' auditory range, 10 kHz, was disrupted for a longer period than was high-frequency (40 kHz) auditory function.

  10. Probiotics Prevent Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in Acute Pancreatitis in Rats via Induction of Ileal Mucosal Glutathione Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lutgendorff, Femke; Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Sandström, Per A.; Trulsson, Lena M.; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Timmerman, Harro M.; van Minnen, L. Paul; Rijkers, Ger T.; Gooszen, Hein G.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Söderholm, Johan D.

    2009-01-01

    Background During acute pancreatitis (AP), oxidative stress contributes to intestinal barrier failure. We studied actions of multispecies probiotics on barrier dysfunction and oxidative stress in experimental AP. Methodology/Principal Findings Fifty-three male Spraque-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into five groups: 1) controls, non-operated, 2) sham-operated, 3) AP, 4) AP and probiotics and 5) AP and placebo. AP was induced by intraductal glycodeoxycholate infusion and intravenous cerulein (6 h). Daily probiotics or placebo were administered intragastrically, starting five days prior to AP. After cerulein infusion, ileal mucosa was collected for measurements of E. coli K12 and 51Cr-EDTA passage in Ussing chambers. Tight junction proteins were investigated by confocal immunofluorescence imaging. Ileal mucosal apoptosis, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels were determined and glutamate-cysteine-ligase activity and expression were quantified. AP-induced barrier dysfunction was characterized by epithelial cell apoptosis and alterations of tight junction proteins (i.e. disruption of occludin and claudin-1 and up-regulation of claudin-2) and correlated with lipid peroxidation (r>0.8). Probiotic pre-treatment diminished the AP-induced increase in E. coli passage (probiotics 57.4±33.5 vs. placebo 223.7±93.7 a.u.; P<0.001), 51Cr-EDTA flux (16.7±10.1 vs. 32.1±10.0 cm/s10−6; P<0.005), apoptosis, lipid peroxidation (0.42±0.13 vs. 1.62±0.53 pmol MDA/mg protein; P<0.001), and prevented tight junction protein disruption. AP-induced decline in glutathione was not only prevented (14.33±1.47 vs. 8.82±1.30 nmol/mg protein, P<0.001), but probiotics even increased mucosal glutathione compared with sham rats (14.33±1.47 vs. 10.70±1.74 nmol/mg protein, P<0.001). Glutamate-cysteine-ligase activity, which is rate-limiting in glutathione biosynthesis, was enhanced in probiotic pre-treated animals (probiotics 2.88±1.21 vs. placebo 1.94±0.55 nmol/min/mg protein; P<0

  11. Select microtubule inhibitors increase lysosome acidity and promote lysosomal disruption in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Dannie; Gebbia, Marinella; Prabha, Swayam; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Wang, Xiaoming; Hurren, Rose; Sukhai, Mahadeo A; Cho, Eunice E; Manolson, Morris F; Datti, Alessandro; Wrana, Jeffrey; Minden, Mark D; Al-Awar, Rima; Aman, Ahmed; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-07-01

    To identify new biological vulnerabilities in acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a library of natural products for compounds cytotoxic to TEX leukemia cells. This screen identified the novel small molecule Deoxysappanone B 7,4' dimethyl ether (Deox B 7,4), which possessed nanomolar anti-leukemic activity. To determine the anti-leukemic mechanism of action of Deox B 7,4, we conducted a genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identified enrichment of genes related to mitotic cell cycle as well as vacuolar acidification, therefore pointing to microtubules and vacuolar (V)-ATPase as potential drug targets. Further investigations into the mechanisms of action of Deox B 7,4 and a related analogue revealed that these compounds were reversible microtubule inhibitors that bound near the colchicine site. In addition, Deox B 7,4 and its analogue increased lysosomal V-ATPase activity and lysosome acidity. The effects on microtubules and lysosomes were functionally important for the anti-leukemic effects of these drugs. The lysosomal effects were characteristic of select microtubule inhibitors as only the Deox compounds and nocodazole, but not colchicine, vinca alkaloids or paclitaxel, altered lysosome acidity and induced lysosomal disruption. Thus, our data highlight a new mechanism of action of select microtubule inhibitors on lysosomal function. PMID:25832785

  12. The Bacteroides fragilis toxin fragilysin disrupts the paracellular barrier of epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Obiso, R J; Azghani, A O; Wilkins, T D

    1997-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is a member of the normal colonic microflora of most mammals and is the most commonly isolated anaerobe from human clinical specimens. Some strains produce a toxin (fragilysin, a zinc-metalloproteinase) implicated as a cause of diarrheal disease in farm animals and humans. Studies in our laboratory confirm that the proteolytic activity of this toxin is responsible for the fluid secretion and tissue damage observed in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of fragilysin on the paracellular barrier of epithelial cells. Researchers suggest that, since the toxin rapidly intoxicates HT-29 cells, it may be internalized. However, we could not prevent cell rounding by using inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis, which indicates that the toxin may act outside the cell. Based on these observations, we studied the effects of the highly purified B. fragilis fragilysin on the barrier function of cultured epithelial cells. Fragilysin rapidly increased the permeability of the paracellular barrier of epithelial cells to ions (decrease in electrical resistance across monolayers) and to larger molecules (increase in mannitol flux across monolayers). We tested a human colon cell line and cell lines from the lung and the kidney; the human colon cell line was most sensitive, but all three were affected in the same manner. Our studies show that B. fragilis fragilysin alters the barrier function of the epithelial lining, possibly by degrading the tight junction proteins, such as ZO-1. The proteolytic activity is required to cause this effect. The toxin's action has been assumed to be limited to the intestine; however, our studies show that fragilysin could also contribute to the pathogenesis of B. fragilis in extraintestinal infections. PMID:9119484

  13. Penetration of spherical and rod-like gold nanoparticles into intact and barrier-disrupted human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Christina; Nordmeyer, Daniel; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Raabe, Jörg; Vogt, Annika; Lademann, Jürgen; Rancan, Fiorenza; Rühl, Eckart

    2015-03-01

    The penetration of spherical and rod-like gold nanoparticles into human skin is reported. Several skin preparation techniques are applied, including cryo techniques, such as plunge freezing and freeze drying, and the use of wet cells. Their advantages and drawbacks for observing nanoparticle uptake are discussed. Independent of the particle shape no uptake into intact skin is observed by a combination of imaging approaches, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and scanning X-ray microscopy (STXM). These results are discussed along with suitable skin preparation approaches. Experiments on barrier-disrupted skin, i.e. mechanical lesions made by pricking, indicate, however, that gold particles can be identified deep in the dermis, as follows from STXM studies on wet skin samples.

  14. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Muna; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Alexander, Phillip M.; McDannold, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete targets. This review provides insight on the current status of this unique drug delivery technique, experience in preclinical models, and potential for clinical translation. If translated to humans, this method would offer a flexible means to target therapeutics to desired points or volumes in the brain, and enable the whole arsenal of drugs in the CNS that are currently prevented by the BBB. PMID:24462453

  15. Disruption in the Blood-Brain Barrier: The Missing Link between Brain and Body Inflammation in Bipolar Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jay P.; Frey, Benicio N.

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) regulates the transport of micro- and macromolecules between the peripheral blood and the central nervous system (CNS) in order to maintain optimal levels of essential nutrients and neurotransmitters in the brain. In addition, the BBB plays a critical role protecting the CNS against neurotoxins. There has been growing evidence that BBB disruption is associated with brain inflammatory conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis. Considering the increasing role of inflammation and oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD), here we propose a novel model wherein transient or persistent disruption of BBB integrity is associated with decreased CNS protection and increased permeability of proinflammatory (e.g., cytokines, reactive oxygen species) substances from the peripheral blood into the brain. These events would trigger the activation of microglial cells and promote localized damage to oligodendrocytes and the myelin sheath, ultimately compromising myelination and the integrity of neural circuits. The potential implications for research in this area and directions for future studies are discussed. PMID:26075104

  16. Correlations between Blood–Brain Barrier Disruption and Neuroinflammation in an Experimental Model of Penetrating Ballistic-Like Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cartagena, Casandra M.; Lu, Xi-Chun M.; Konopko, Melissa; Dave, Jitendra R.; Tortella, Frank C.; Shear, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a pathological hallmark of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and is associated with neuroinflammatory events contributing to brain edema and cell death. The goal of this study was to elucidate the profile of BBB disruption after penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) in conjunction with changes in neuroinflammatory markers. Brain uptake of biotin-dextran amine (BDA; 3 kDa) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP; 44 kDa) was evaluated in rats at 4 h, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, and 7 days post-PBBI and compared with the histopathologic and molecular profiles for inflammatory markers. BDA and HRP both displayed a uniphasic profile of extravasation, greatest at 24 h post-injury and which remained evident out to 48 h for HRP and 7 days for BDA. This profile was most closely associated with markers for adhesion (mRNA for intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and infiltration of peripheral granulocytes (mRNA for matrix metalloproteinase-9 [MMP-9] and myeloperoxidase staining). Improvement of BBB dysfunction coincided with increased expression of markers implicated in tissue remodeling and repair. The results of this study reveal a uniphasic and gradient opening of the BBB after PBBI and suggest MMP-9 and resident inflammatory cell activation as candidates for future neurotherapeutic intervention after PBBI. PMID:24138024

  17. Protective actions of des-acylated ghrelin on brain injury and blood-brain barrier disruption after stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Ku, Jacqueline M; Taher, Mohammadali; Chin, Kai Yee; Barsby, Tom; Austin, Victoria; Wong, Connie H Y; Andrews, Zane B; Spencer, Sarah J; Miller, Alyson A

    2016-09-01

    The major ghrelin forms, acylated ghrelin and des-acylated ghrelin, are novel gastrointestinal hormones. Moreover, emerging evidence indicates that these peptides may have other functions including neuro- and vaso-protection. Here, we investigated whether post-stroke treatment with acylated ghrelin or des-acylated ghrelin could improve functional and histological endpoints of stroke outcome in mice after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). We found that des-acylated ghrelin (1 mg/kg) improved neurological and functional performance, reduced infarct and swelling, and decreased apoptosis. In addition, it reduced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in vivo and attenuated the hyper-permeability of mouse cerebral microvascular endothelial cells after oxygen glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD + RO). By contrast, acylated ghrelin (1 mg/kg or 5 mg/kg) had no significant effect on these endpoints of stroke outcome. Next we found that des-acylated ghrelin's vasoprotective actions were associated with increased expression of tight junction proteins (occludin and claudin-5), and decreased cell death. Moreover, it attenuated superoxide production, Nox activity and expression of 3-nitrotyrosine. Collectively, these results demonstrate that post-stroke treatment with des-acylated ghrelin, but not acylated ghrelin, protects against ischaemia/reperfusion-induced brain injury and swelling, and BBB disruption, by reducing oxidative and/or nitrosative damage. PMID:27303049

  18. Superselective intraarterial cerebral infusion of cetuximab after osmotic blood/brain barrier disruption for recurrent malignant glioma: phase I study.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Shamik; Filippi, Christopher G; Wong, Tamika; Ray, Ashley; Fralin, Sherese; Tsiouris, A John; Praminick, Bidyut; Demopoulos, Alexis; McCrea, Heather J; Bodhinayake, Imithri; Ortiz, Rafael; Langer, David J; Boockvar, John A

    2016-07-01

    Objective To establish a maximum tolerated dose of superselective intraarterial cerebral infusion (SIACI) of Cetuximab after osmotic disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with mannitol, and examine safety of the procedure in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Methods A total of 15 patients with recurrent malignant glioma were included in the current study. The starting dose of Cetuximab was 100 mg/m(2) and dose escalation was done to 250 mg/m(2). All patients were observed for 28 days post-infusion for any side effects. Results There was no dose-limiting toxicity from a single dose of SIACI of Cetuximab up to 250 mg/m(2) after osmotic BBB disruption with mannitol. A tolerable rash was seen in 2 patients, anaphylaxis in 1 patient, isolated seizure in 1 patient, and seizure and cerebral edema in 1 patient. Discussion SIACI of mannitol followed by Cetuximab (up to 250 mg/m(2)) for recurrent malignant glioma is safe and well tolerated. A Phase I/II trial is currently underway to determine the efficacy of SIACI of cetuximab in patients with high-grade glioma. PMID:26945581

  19. Focused ultrasound induced blood-brain barrier disruption to enhance chemotherapeutic drugs (BCNU) delivery for glioblastoma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hua, Mu-Yi; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2010-03-01

    Focused ultrasound has been recently found to capable of temporally and reversibly disrupt local blood-brain barrier (BBB) and opens new frontier in delivering varies type of drugs into brain for central nerve system (CNS) disorder treatment. In this study, we aim to investigate the feasibility of delivering 1, 3-bits (2-chloroethyl) -1-nitrosourea (BCNU) to treat glioblastoma in animal models and evaluate whether this approach would gain treatment efficacy. Under the presence of microbubbles administration, a 400-kHz focused ultrasound was employed to deliver burst-tone ultrasonic energy stimulation to disrupt BBB in animal brains transcranially, and in-vivo monitored by magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). C6-glioma cells were cultured and implanted into Sprague-Dawley rats as the brain-tumor model. BCNU deposited in brain was quantified by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and brain tissues were examined histologically. MRI was employed to longitudinal evaluate the brain tumor treatment including the analysis of tumor progression and animal survival. We confirmed that the focused ultrasound, under the secure ultrasonic energy level, can significantly enhance the BCNU penetration through BBB over 300% than control without cause hemorrhage. Apparent improvement of treatment efficacy achieved by combining focused ultrasound with BCNU delivery, including significant suppression of tumor growth and a prolonged animal survival. This study highly support that this treatment strategy could be clinically-relevant and may help to provide another potential strategy in increasing local chemotherapeutic drugs for brain-tumor treatment.

  20. Cerebralcare Granule® attenuates blood-brain barrier disruption after middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Zhou, Chang-Man; Qin-Hu; Liu, Yu-Ying; Hu, Bai-He; Chang, Xin; Zhao, Xin-Rong; Xu, Xiang-Shun; Li, Quan; Wei, Xiao-Hong; Mao, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Chuan-She; Fan, Jing-Yu; Han, Jing-Yan

    2012-10-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and subsequent edema are major contributors to the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, for which the current clinical therapy remains unsatisfied. Cerebralcare Granule® (CG) is a compound Chinese medicine widely used in China for treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. CG has been demonstrated efficacy in attenuating the cerebral microcirculatory disturbance and hippocampal neuron injury following global cerebral ischemia. However, the effects of CG on BBB disruption following cerebral ischemia have not been investigated. In this study, we examined the therapeutic effect of CG on the BBB disruption in a focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) rat model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250 to 300 g) were subjected to 1h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). CG (0.4 g/kg or 0.8 g/kg) was administrated orally 3h after reperfusion for the first time and then once daily up to 6 days. The results showed that Evans blue extravasation, brain water content, albumin leakage, infarction volume and neurological deficits increased in MCAO model rats, and were attenuated significantly by CG treatment. T2-weighted MRI and electron microscopy further confirmed the brain edema reduction in CG-treated rats. Treatment with CG improved cerebral blood flow (CBF). Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy showed that the tight junction proteins claudin-5, JAM-1, occludin and zonula occluden-1 between endothelial cells were significantly degradated, but the protein expression of caveolin-1, the principal marker of caveolae in endothelial cells, increased after ischemia, all of which were alleviated by CG treatment. In conclusion, the post-treatment with CG significantly reduced BBB permeability and brain edema, which were correlated with preventing the degradation of the tight junction proteins and inhibiting the expression of caveolin-1 in the endothelial cells. These findings provide a novel approach to the treatment of ischemic stroke. PMID

  1. Hypoxia and Inflammation-Induced Disruptions of the Blood-Brain and Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barriers Assessed Using a Novel T1-Based MRI Method.

    PubMed

    Nathoo, Nabeela; Jalal, Hamza; Natah, Sirajedin S; Zhang, Qiong; Wu, Ying; Dunn, Jeff F

    2016-01-01

    Subtle blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is involved in numerous neurological conditions. This disruption is found diffusely in the brain and requires quantitative methods for assessment. We propose a statistical method to identify individual voxels where the BBB is disrupted using T1-weighted MRI. We used models of severe and focal vs. mild and generalized disruption of the BBB to show proof of principle with the cold injury model, hypoxia, and a model of inflammation using low- and high-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. Using voxel-based analysis, we found that mild hypoxia resulted in diffuse disruption of the BBB, whereas more severe hypoxia and high-dose LPS treatment resulted in prominent leakage, particularly in the periventricular area, suggestive of blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier disruption. Our data suggest that the periventricular area may be compromised first in conditions of inflammation and hypoxia. Voxel-based analysis could be used in future studies assessing subtle blood-CSF or BBB disruption. PMID:26463918

  2. Estrogen protects the blood-brain barrier from inflammation-induced disruption and increased lymphocyte trafficking.

    PubMed

    Maggioli, E; McArthur, S; Mauro, C; Kieswich, J; Kusters, D H M; Reutelingsperger, C P M; Yaqoob, M; Solito, E

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences have been widely reported in neuroinflammatory disorders, focusing on the contributory role of estrogen. The microvascular endothelium of the brain is a critical component of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and it is recognized as a major interface for communication between the periphery and the brain. As such, the cerebral capillary endothelium represents an important target for the peripheral estrogen neuroprotective functions, leading us to hypothesize that estrogen can limit BBB breakdown following the onset of peripheral inflammation. Comparison of male and female murine responses to peripheral LPS challenge revealed a short-term inflammation-induced deficit in BBB integrity in males that was not apparent in young females, but was notable in older, reproductively senescent females. Importantly, ovariectomy and hence estrogen loss recapitulated an aged phenotype in young females, which was reversible upon estradiol replacement. Using a well-established model of human cerebrovascular endothelial cells we investigated the effects of estradiol upon key barrier features, namely paracellular permeability, transendothelial electrical resistance, tight junction integrity and lymphocyte transmigration under basal and inflammatory conditions, modeled by treatment with TNFα and IFNγ. In all cases estradiol prevented inflammation-induced defects in barrier function, action mediated in large part through up-regulation of the central coordinator of tight junction integrity, annexin A1. The key role of this protein was then further confirmed in studies of human or murine annexin A1 genetic ablation models. Together, our data provide novel mechanisms for the protective effects of estrogen, and enhance our understanding of the beneficial role it plays in neurovascular/neuroimmune disease. PMID:26321046

  3. Barrier Function of the Repaired Skin Is Disrupted Following Arrest of Dicer in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ghatak, Subhadip; Chan, Yuk Cheung; Khanna, Savita; Banerjee, Jaideep; Weist, Jessica; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K

    2015-01-01

    Tissue injury transiently silences miRNA-dependent posttranscriptional gene silencing in its effort to unleash adult tissue repair. Once the wound is closed, miRNA biogenesis is induced averting neoplasia. In this work, we report that Dicer plays an important role in reestablishing the barrier function of the skin post-wounding via a miRNA-dependent mechanism. MicroRNA expression profiling of skin and wound-edge tissue revealed global upregulation of miRNAs following wound closure at day 14 post-wounding with significant induction of Dicer expression. Barrier function of the skin, as measured by trans-epidermal water loss, was compromised in keratinocyte-specific conditional (K14/Lox-Cre) Dicer-ablated mice because of malformed cornified epithelium lacking loricrin expression. Studies on human keratinocytes recognized that loricrin expression was inversely related to the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1. Compared to healthy epidermis, wound-edge keratinocytes from Dicer-ablated skin epidermis revealed elevated p21Waf1/Cip1 expression. Adenoviral and pharmacological suppression of p21Waf1/Cip1 in keratinocyte-specific conditional Dicer-ablated mice improved wound healing indicating a role of Dicer in the suppression of p21Waf1/Cip1. This work upholds p21Waf1/Cip1 as a druggable target to restore barrier function of skin suffering from loss of Dicer function as would be expected in diabetes and other forms of oxidant insult. PMID:25896246

  4. Acute response of airway muscle to extreme temperature includes disruption of actin-myosin interaction.

    PubMed

    Dyrda, Peter; Tazzeo, Tracy; DoHarris, Lindsay; Nilius, Berndt; Roman, Horia Nicolae; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Aziz, Tariq; Lukic, Dusan; Janssen, Luke J

    2011-02-01

    Despite the emerging use of bronchial thermoplasty in asthma therapy, the response of airway smooth muscle (ASM) to extreme temperatures is unknown. We investigated the immediate effects of exposing ASM to supraphysiologic temperatures. Isometric contractions were studied in bovine ASM before and after exposure to various thermal loads and/or pharmacologic interventions. Actin-myosin interactions were investigated using a standard in vitro motility assay. We found steep thermal sensitivity for isometric contractions evoked by acetylcholine, with threshold and complete inhibition at less than 50°C and greater than 55°C, respectively. Contractile responses to serotonin or KCl were similarly affected, whereas isometric relaxations evoked by the nitric oxide donor S-nitrosyl-N-acetylpenicillamine or the β-agonist isoproterenol were unaffected. This thermal sensitivity developed within 15 minutes, but did not evolve further over the course of several days (such a rapid time-course rules out heat shock proteins, apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis). Although heat-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRPV2) channels and the calmodulin-dependent (Cam) kinase-II-induced inactivation of myosin light chain kinase are both acutely thermally sensitive, with a temperature producing half-maximal effect (T(1/2)) of 52.5°C, the phenomenon we describe was not prevented by blockers of TRPV2 channels (e.g., ruthenium red, gadolinium, zero-Ca(2+) or zero-Na(+)/zero-Ca(2+) media, and cromakalim) or of Cam kinase-II (e.g., W7, trifluoperazine, and KN-93). However, direct measurements of actin-myosin interactions showed the same steep thermal profile. The functional changes preceded any histologic evidence of necrosis or apoptosis. We conclude that extreme temperatures (such as those used in bronchial thermoplasty) directly disrupt actin-myosin interactions, likely through a denaturation of the motor protein, leading to an immediate loss of ASM cell function. PMID:20395634

  5. Mixed-species Biofilm Compromises Wound Healing by Disrupting Epidermal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mithun; Ganesh, Kasturi; Chaney, Sarah; Mann, Ethan; Miller, Christina; Khanna, Savita; Bergdall, Valerie K.; Powell, Heather M.; Cook, Charles H.; Gordillo, Gayle M.; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    In chronic wounds, biofilm infects host tissue for extended periods of time. This work establishes the first chronic pre-clinical model of wound biofilm infection aimed at addressing long-term host response. Although biofilm infected wounds did not show marked differences in wound closure, the repaired skin demonstrated compromised barrier function. This observation is clinically significant because it leads to the notion that even if a biofilm infected wound is closed as observed visually, it may be complicated by the presence of failed skin which is likely to be infected and or further complicated post-closure. Study of underlying mechanisms recognized for the first time biofilm-inducible miR-146a and miR-106b in the host skin wound-edge tissue. These miRs silenced ZO-1 and ZO-2 to compromise tight junction function resulting in leaky skin as measured by transepidermal water loss. Intervention strategies aimed at inhibiting biofilm-inducible miRNAs may be productive in restoring barrier function of host skin. PMID:24771509

  6. Hydrogen Sulfide Ameliorates Homocysteine-Induced Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathology, Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption, and Synaptic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Pradip K; Kyles, Philip; Kalani, Anuradha; Tyagi, Neetu

    2016-05-01

    Elevated plasma total homocysteine (Hcy) level is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). During transsulfuration pathways, Hcy is metabolized into hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is a synaptic modulator, as well as a neuro-protective agent. However, the role of hydrogen sulfide, as well as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation, in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and synaptic dysfunction, leading to AD pathology is not clear. Therefore, we hypothesized that the inhibition of neuronal NMDA-R by H2S and MK801 mitigate the Hcy-induced BBB disruption and synapse dysfunction, in part by decreasing neuronal matrix degradation. Hcy intracerebral (IC) treatment significantly impaired cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral circulation and memory function. Hcy treatment also decreases the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) in the brain along with increased expression of NMDA-R (NR1) and synaptosomal Ca(2+) indicating excitotoxicity. Additionally, we found that Hcy treatment increased protein and mRNA expression of intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9 and also increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in the brain. The increased expression of ICAM-1, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and the decreased expression of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin and claudin-5 indicates BBB disruption and vascular inflammation. Moreover, we also found decreased expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP-97), synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), synaptophysin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) showing synapse dysfunction in the hippocampus. Furthermore, NaHS and MK801 treatment ameliorates BBB disruption, CBF, and synapse functions in the mice brain. These results demonstrate a neuro-protective effect of H2S over Hcy

  7. Blood-brain barrier disruption by continuous-wave radio frequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Sirav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2009-01-01

    The increasing use of cellular phones and the increasing number of associated base stations are becoming a widespread source of non ionizing electromagnetic radiation. Some biological effects are likely to occur even at low-level EM fields. This study was designed to investigate the effects of 900 and 1,800 MHz Continuous Wave Radio Frequency Radiation (CW RFR) on the permeability of Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) of rats. Results have shown that 20 min RFR exposure of 900 and 1,800 MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of BBB of male rats. There was no change in female rats. The scientific evidence on RFR safety or harm remains inconclusive. More studies are needed to demonstrate the effects of RFR on the permeability of BBB and the mechanisms of that breakdown. PMID:19811403

  8. Outer Membrane Permeability Barrier Disruption by Polymyxin in Polymyxin-Susceptible and -Resistant Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Vaara, Martti; Vaara, Timo

    1981-01-01

    In contrast to their polymyxin-susceptible parent strains, polymyxin-resistant Salmonella typhimurium mutants (pmrA strains) did not lose their outer membrane permeability barrier to macromolecules such as lysozyme and periplasmic proteins upon polymyxin treatment. The sensitization of pmrA strains to deoxycholate-induced lysis required 10-times-higher polymyxin concentrations than did the sensitization of the parent strains. These findings indicate that the pmrA mutation affects the outer membrane and decreases its susceptibility to polymyxin. By contrast, the pmrA mutants did not differ from their parents in the uptake of gentian violet after treatment with polymyxin, suggesting a degree of specificity in the pmrA effect in the outer membrane. Images PMID:6264852

  9. Acute exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol disrupts audience effect on male-female interactions in Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Forette, Lindsay M; Mannion, Krystal L; Dzieweczynski, Teresa L

    2015-04-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals can negatively impact the morphology and behavior of organisms inhabiting polluted waters. Male-typical behaviors are often reduced after exposure, suggesting that exposure may have population-level effects. One way in which exposure may exert population-level effects is by interfering with communication within a network of individuals. Acute exposure to the estrogen mimic 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) disrupts the ability of male Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens, to modify their behavior during male-male interactions when an audience is present. However, it is unknown whether audience effects during male-female interactions may be similarly altered. To examine this, male-female pairs that were given an acute exposure to EE2 or remained unexposed interacted in the presence of a female, male, or no audience. Sex differences were found between unexposed males and females. More interactant-directed gill flaring was displayed by control males when a male audience was present while control females performed this behavior more in the presence of an audience, regardless of sex. Both males and females in the control group performed more interactant-directed tail beats in the presence of a female audience. EE2 exposure made all audience effects disappear as treated males and females did not differ in their responses between audience types. These results demonstrate that acute exposure to EE2 may disrupt behavioral adjustments to audience type within a social network. This disruption may, in turn, influence population dynamics in this species as both males and females use information obtained from observing interactions in later encounters with the observed individuals. PMID:25697944

  10. Behavioral alterations following blood-brain barrier disruption stimulated by focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Huang, Sheng-Fang; Cheng, Irene Han-Juo

    2016-05-10

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the behavioral alterations and histological changes of the brain after FUS-induced BBB disruption (BBBD). Rats were behaviorally tested using the open field, hole-board, and grip strength tests from day 1 through day 32 after undergoing BBBD induced by FUS with either a mild or heavy parameter. In the open field test, we found an increase in center entries on day 1 and day 9 following heavy FUS treatment and a decrease in center entries at day 18 following mild FUS treatment. With regard to memory-related alterations, rats subjected to heavy FUS treatment exhibited longer latency to start exploring and to find the first baited hole. However, rats subjected to mild FUS treatment exhibited no significant differences in terms of memory performance or grip force. The obtained data suggest that heavy FUS treatment might induce hyperactivity, spatial memory impairment, and forelimb gripping deficits. Furthermore, while mild FUS treatment may have an impact on anxiety-related behaviors, the data suggested it had no impact on locomotor activity, memory, or grip force. Thus, the behavioral alterations following FUS-induced BBBD require further investigation before clinical application. PMID:27034007

  11. Effects of acute intra-abdominal hypertension on multiple intestinal barrier functions in rats

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Yuxin; Yi, Min; Fan, Jie; Bai, Yu; Ge, Qinggang; Yao, Gaiqi

    2016-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) is a common and serious complication in critically ill patients for which there is no well-defined treatment strategy. Here, we explored the effect of IAH on multiple intestinal barriers and discussed whether the alteration in microflora provides clues to guide the rational therapeutic treatment of intestinal barriers during IAH. Using a rat model, we analysed the expression of tight junction proteins (TJs), mucins, chemotactic factors, and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by immunohistochemistry. We also analysed the microflora populations using 16S rRNA sequencing. We found that, in addition to enhanced permeability, acute IAH (20 mmHg for 90 min) resulted in significant disturbances to mucosal barriers. Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota was also induced, as represented by decreased Firmicutes (relative abundance), increased Proteobacteria and migration of Bacteroidetes from the colon to the jejunum. At the genus level, Lactobacillus species and Peptostreptococcaceae incertae sedis were decreased, whereas levels of lactococci remained unchanged. Our findings outline the characteristics of IAH-induced barrier changes, indicating that intestinal barriers might be treated to alleviate IAH, and the microflora may be an especially relevant target. PMID:26980423

  12. Disruption of astrocyte-vascular coupling and the blood-brain barrier by invading glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Stacey; Robel, Stefanie; Kimbrough, Ian F.; Robert, Stephanie M.; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Sontheimer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic endfeet cover the entire cerebral vasculature and serve as exchange sites for ions, metabolites, and energy substrates from the blood to the brain. They maintain endothelial tight junctions that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and release vasoactive molecules that regulate vascular tone. Malignant gliomas are highly invasive tumors that use the perivascular space for invasion and co-opt existing vessels as satellite tumors form. Here we use a clinically relevant mouse model of glioma and find that glioma cells, as they populate the perivascular space of pre-existing vessels, displace astrocytic endfeet from endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells. This causes a focal breach in the BBB. Furthermore, astrocyte-mediated gliovascular coupling is lost, and glioma cells seize control over regulation of vascular tone through Ca2+-dependent release of K+. These findings have important clinical implications regarding blood flow in the tumor-associated brain and the ability to locally deliver chemotherapeutic drugs in disease. PMID:24943270

  13. Disruption of blood-testis barrier dynamics in ether-lipid-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Komljenovic, Dorde; Sandhoff, Roger; Teigler, Andre; Heid, Hans; Just, Wilhelm W; Gorgas, Karin

    2009-08-01

    One of the major roles of Sertoli cells is to establish the blood-testis (Sertoli cell) barrier (BTB), which is permanently assembled and disassembled to accommodate the translocation of leptotene spermatocytes from the basal into the adluminal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium and to guarantee completion of meiosis and spermiogenesis. Recently, we have demonstrated spermatogenesis to be arrested before spermatid elongation in Gnpat-null mice with selective deficiency of ether lipids (ELs) whose functions are poorly understood. In this study, we have focused on the spatio-temporal expression of several BTB tight-junctional proteins in the first wave of spermatogenesis to obtain insights into the physiological role of ELs during BTB establishment and dynamics. Our data confirm the transient existence of Russell's intermediate or translocation compartment delineated by two separate claudin-3-positive luminal and basal tight junctions and reveal that EL deficiency blocks BTB remodeling. This block is associated with (1) downregulation and mistargeting of claudin-3 and (2) impaired BTB disassembly resulting in deficient sealing of the intermediate compartment as shown by increased BTB permeability to biotin. These results suggest that ELs are essential for cyclic BTB dynamics ensuring the sluice mechanism for leptotene translocation into the adluminal compartment. PMID:19495798

  14. Acute Methamphetamine Intoxication: Brain Hyperthermia, Blood-Brain Barrier and Brain Edema

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A.; Sharma, Hari S.

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a powerful and often abused stimulant with potent addictive and neurotoxic properties. While it is generally assumed that multiple chemical substances released in the brain following METH-induced metabolic activation (or oxidative stress) are primary factors underlying damage of neural cells, in this work we will present data suggesting a role of brain hyperthermia and associated leakage of the brain-blood barrier (BBB) in acute METH-induced toxicity. First, we show that METH induces a dose-dependent brain and body hyperthermia, which is strongly potentiated by associated physiological activation and in warm environments that prevent proper heat dissipation to the external environment. Second, we demonstrate that acute METH intoxication induces robust, widespread but structure-specific leakage of the BBB, acute glial activation, and increased water content (edema), which are related to drug-induced brain hyperthermia. Third, we document widespread morphological abnormalities of brain cells, including neurons, glia, epithelial and endothelial cells developing rapidly during acute METH intoxication. These structural abnormalities are tightly related to the extent of brain hyperthermia, leakage of the BBB, and brain edema. While it is unclear whether these rapidly developed morphological abnormalities are reversible, this study demonstrates that METH induces multiple functional and structural perturbations in the brain, determining its acute toxicity and possibly contributing to neurotoxicity. PMID:19897075

  15. Tight junction disruption: Helicobacter pylori and dysregulation of the gastric mucosal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Tyler J; Scott, Kathleen E; Fox, James G; Hagen, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    Long-term chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a risk factor for gastric cancer development. In the multi-step process that leads to gastric cancer, tight junction dysfunction is thought to occur and serve as a risk factor by permitting the permeation of luminal contents across an otherwise tight mucosa. Mechanisms that regulate tight junction function and structure in the normal stomach, or dysfunction in the infected stomach, however, are largely unknown. Although conventional tight junction components are expressed in gastric epithelial cells, claudins regulate paracellular permeability and are likely the target of inflammation or H. pylori itself. There are 27 different claudin molecules, each with unique properties that render the mucosa an intact barrier that is permselective in a way that is consistent with cell physiology. Understanding the architecture of tight junctions in the normal stomach and then changes that occur during infection is important but challenging, because most of the reports that catalog claudin expression in gastric cancer pathogenesis are contradictory. Furthermore, the role of H. pylori virulence factors, such as cytotoxin-associated gene A and vacoulating cytotoxin, in regulating tight junction dysfunction during infection is inconsistent in different gastric cell lines and in vivo, likely because non-gastric epithelial cell cultures were initially used to unravel the details of their effects on the stomach. Hampering further study, as well, is the relative lack of cultured cell models that have tight junction claudins that are consistent with native tissues. This summary will review the current state of knowledge about gastric tight junctions, normally and in H. pylori infection, and make predictions about the consequences of claudin reorganization during H. pylori infection. PMID:26523106

  16. Antioxidant protects blood-testis barrier against synchrotron radiation X-ray-induced disruption

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Tengyuan; Shao, Jiaxiang; Sheng, Caibin; Hong, Yunyi; Ying, Weihai; Xia, Weiliang

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray has wide biomedical applications including high resolution imaging and brain tumor therapy due to its special properties of high coherence, monochromaticity and high intensity. However, its interaction with biological tissues remains poorly understood. In this study, we used the rat testis as a model to investigate how SR X-ray would induce tissue responses, especially the blood-testis barrier (BTB) because BTB dynamics are critical for spermatogenesis. We irradiated the male gonad with increasing doses of SR X-ray and obtained the testicles 1, 10 and 20 d after the exposures. The testicle weight and seminiferous tubule diameter reduced in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cryosections of testes were stained with tight junction (TJ) component proteins such as occludin, claudin-11, JAM-A and ZO-1. Morphologically, increasing doses of SR X-ray consistently induced developing germ cell sloughing from the seminiferous tubules, accompanied by shrinkage of the tubules. Interestingly, TJ constituent proteins appeared to be induced by the increasing doses of SR X-ray. Up to 20 d after SR X-ray irradiation, there also appeared to be time-dependent changes on the steady-state level of these protein exhibiting differential patterns at 20-day after exposure, with JAM-A/claudin-11 still being up-regulated whereas occludin/ZO-1 being down-regulated. More importantly, the BTB damage induced by 40 Gy of SR X-ray could be significantly attenuated by antioxidant N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC) at a dose of 125 mg/kg. Taken together, our studies characterized the changes of TJ component proteins after SR X-ray irradiation, illustrating the possible protective effects of antioxidant NAC to BTB integrity. PMID:26413412

  17. Effects of a disrupted blood-brain barrier on cholesterol homeostasis in the brain.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Ahmed A; Genové, Guillem; Li, Tian; Lütjohann, Dieter; Olin, Maria; Mast, Natalia; Pikuleva, Irina A; Crick, Peter; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William; Betsholtz, Christer; Björkhem, Ingemar

    2014-08-22

    The presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical for cholesterol metabolism in the brain, preventing uptake of lipoprotein-bound cholesterol from the circulation. The metabolic consequences of a leaking BBB for cholesterol metabolism have not been studied previously. Here we used a pericyte-deficient mouse model, Pdgfb(ret/ret), shown to have increased permeability of the BBB to a range of low-molecular mass and high-molecular mass tracers. There was a significant accumulation of plant sterols in the brains of the Pdgfb(ret/ret) mice. By dietary treatment with 0.3% deuterium-labeled cholesterol, we could demonstrate a significant flux of cholesterol from the circulation into the brains of the mutant mice roughly corresponding to about half of the measured turnover of cholesterol in the brain. We expected the cholesterol flux into the brain to cause a down-regulation of cholesterol synthesis. Instead, cholesterol synthesis was increased by about 60%. The levels of 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OHC) were significantly reduced in the brains of the pericyte-deficient mice but increased in the circulation. After treatment with 1% cholesterol in diet, the difference in cholesterol synthesis between mutants and controls disappeared. The findings are consistent with increased leakage of 24S-OHC from the brain into the circulation in the pericyte-deficient mice. This oxysterol is an efficient suppressor of cholesterol synthesis, and the results are consistent with a regulatory role of 24S-OHC in the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that a defective BBB may lead to increased flux of a lipophilic compound out from the brain. The relevance of the findings for the human situation is discussed. PMID:24973215

  18. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Oxidative Stress in Guinea Pig after Systemic Exposure to Modified Cell-Free Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Omer I.; Buehler, Paul W.; D'Agnillo, Felice

    2011-01-01

    Systemic exposure to cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) or its breakdown products after hemolysis or with the use of Hb-based oxygen therapeutics may alter the function and integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Using a guinea pig exchange transfusion model, we investigated the effect of a polymerized cell-free Hb (HbG) on the expression of endothelial tight junction proteins (zonula occludens 1, claudin-5, and occludin), astrocyte activation, IgG extravasation, heme oxygenase (HO), iron deposition, oxidative end products (4-hydroxynonenal adducts and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine), and apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3). Reduced zonula occludens 1 expression was observed after HbG transfusion as evidenced by Western blot and confocal microscopy. Claudin-5 distribution was altered in small- to medium-sized vessels. However, total expression of claudin-5 and occludin remained unchanged except for a notable increase in occludin 72 hours after HbG transfusion. HbG-transfused animals also showed increased astrocytic glial fibrillary acidic protein expression and IgG extravasation after 72 hours. Increased HO activity and HO-1 expression with prominent enhancement of HO-1 immunoreactivity in CD163-expressing perivascular cells and infiltrating monocytes/macrophages were also observed. Consistent with oxidative stress, HbG increased iron deposition, 4-hydroxynonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine immunoreactivity, and cleaved caspase-3 expression. Systemic exposure to an extracellular Hb triggers blood-brain barrier disruption and oxidative stress, which may have important implications for the use of Hb-based therapeutics and may provide indirect insight on the central nervous system vasculopathies associated with excessive hemolysis. PMID:21356382

  19. Nafamostat mesilate protects against acute cerebral ischemia via blood-brain barrier protection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Li, Chenhui; Chen, Tao; Fang, Yinquan; Shi, Xinzhong; Pang, Tao; Zhang, Luyong; Liao, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Serine proteases, such as thrombin, are contributors to the disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and exacerbate brain damage during ischemic stroke, for which the current clinical therapy remains unsatisfactory. However, the effect of nafamostat mesilate (NM), a synthetic serine protease inhibitor, on BBB disruption following cerebral ischemia is unknown. Here, we investigated the in vivo effect of NM on BBB integrity in rats subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and explored the possible mechanism in an in vitro BBB model comprising rat brain microvascular endothelial cells and astrocytes after oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in the presence of thrombin. The results showed that NM treatment remarkably attenuated transient MCAO-induced brain infarcts, brain oedema and motor dysfunction in addition to BBB disruption, which might be related to changes in tight junction protein expression and localization. Meanwhile, NM preserved BBB integrity and alleviated the changes in tight junction protein expression and localization and cytoskeleton rearrangement in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells via thrombin inhibition. Our findings suggest that NM treatment can preserve BBB integrity through the inhibition of thrombin, which might be correlated with the regulation of PKCα/RhoA/MLC2 pathway components. PMID:26861077

  20. Temozolomide down-regulates P-glycoprotein in human blood-brain barrier cells by disrupting Wnt3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Riganti, Chiara; Salaroglio, Iris C; Pinzòn-Daza, Martha L; Caldera, Valentina; Campia, Ivana; Kopecka, Joanna; Mellai, Marta; Annovazzi, Laura; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Bosia, Amalia; Ghigo, Dario; Schiffer, Davide

    2014-02-01

    Low delivery of many anticancer drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a limitation to the success of chemotherapy in glioblastoma. This is because of the high levels of ATP-binding cassette transporters like P-glycoprotein (Pgp/ABCB1), which effluxes drugs back to the bloodstream. Temozolomide is one of the few agents able to cross the BBB; its effects on BBB cells permeability and Pgp activity are not known. We found that temozolomide, at therapeutic concentration, increased the transport of Pgp substrates across human brain microvascular endothelial cells and decreased the expression of Pgp. By methylating the promoter of Wnt3 gene, temozolomide lowers the endogenous synthesis of Wnt3 in BBB cells, disrupts the Wnt3/glycogen synthase kinase 3/β-catenin signaling, and reduces the binding of β-catenin on the promoter of mdr1 gene, which encodes for Pgp. In co-culture models of BBB cells and human glioblastoma cells, pre-treatment with temozolomide increases the delivery, cytotoxicity, and antiproliferative effects of doxorubicin, vinblastine, and topotecan, three substrates of Pgp that are usually poorly delivered across BBB. Our work suggests that temozolomide increases the BBB permeability of drugs that are normally effluxed by Pgp back to the bloodstream. These findings may pave the way to new combinatorial chemotherapy schemes in glioblastoma. PMID:23771630

  1. Influence of radiation-crosslinking on flame retarded polymer materials-How crosslinking disrupts the barrier effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnier, Rodolphe; Caro-Bretelle, Anne-Sophie; Dumazert, Loïc; Longerey, Marc; Otazaghine, Belkacem

    2015-01-01

    Fire behavior of flame retardant-free and flame retarded PP/PA6 blends was studied using pyrolysis-combustion flow calorimeter, cone calorimeter and epiradiator equipped with infrared camera and pyrometer. Blends were previously γ-irradiated in presence of crosslinking agents at various doses (up to 100 kGy) in order to assess the influence of irradiation crosslinking on flame retardancy. Crosslinked specimens exhibit a solid-like behavior under high temperature gradient in cone calorimeter and then distort considerably. The influence of such a behavior depends on the material properties. When the flame retardancy is provided by heat shielding effect, heat distortion disrupts the top protective layer leading to a substantial increase of peak of heat release rate (pHRR). The barrier layer is no longer able to prevent the heat transfer to the underlying condensed phase. In other cases (flame retardant-free blends or flame retardancy provided by other effects than heat shielding), heat distortion has negligible influence on heat release rate curves in cone calorimeter tests.

  2. Poly(I:C) Induces Human Lung Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction by Disrupting Tight Junction Expression of Claudin-5

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Yun; Stuart, Christine; Takeda, Kazuyo; D’Agnillo, Felice; Golding, Basil

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections are often accompanied by pulmonary microvascular leakage and vascular endothelial dysfunction via mechanisms that are not completely defined. Here, we investigated the effect of the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [Poly(I:C)], a synthetic analog of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) commonly used to simulate viral infections, on the barrier function and tight junction integrity of primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Poly(I:C) stimulated IL-6, IL-8, TNFα, and IFNβ production in conjunction with the activation of NF-κB and IRF3 confirming the Poly(I:C)-responsiveness of these cells. Poly(I:C) increased endothelial monolayer permeability with a corresponding dose- and time-dependent decrease in the expression of claudin-5, a transmembrane tight junction protein and reduction of CLDN5 mRNA levels. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed disappearance of membrane-associated claudin-5 and co-localization of cytoplasmic claudin-5 with lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1. Chloroquine and Bay11-7082, inhibitors of TLR3 and NF-κB signaling, respectively, protected against the loss of claudin-5. Together, these findings provide new insight on how dsRNA-activated signaling pathways may disrupt vascular endothelial function and contribute to vascular leakage pathologies. PMID:27504984

  3. Modified Pulsatilla decoction attenuates oxazolone-induced colitis in mice through suppression of inflammation and epithelial barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuewei; Fan, Fugang; Cao, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders caused by a dysregulated mucosal immune response and epithelial barrier disruption. Conventional treatment of IBD is currently limited to overcoming patient symptoms and is often associated with severe adverse effects from the drugs used. Modified Pulsatilla decoction has been used previously to treat ulcerative colitis (UC) in clinical practice in China, however, the underlying mechanism in the treatment of UC remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the efficiency and mechanisms of modified Pulsatilla decoction in the treatment of oxazolone-induced colitis were investigated. Assessment of clinical colitis and histological examination found that the administration of modified Pulsatilla decoction attenuated the severity of oxazolone-induced colitis in mice. Measurement of cytokine concentration, western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction demonstrated modified Pulsatilla decoction treatment significantly reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and restored alterations in tight junction proteins in the colon tissues. In addition, modified Pulsatilla decoction suppressed the activation of the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway. Thus, the findings of the present study demonstrated that modified Pulsatilla decoction offers an effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of IBD and revealed the underlying mechanisms of action offered by modified Pulsatilla decoction. PMID:27278299

  4. Rhubarb attenuates blood-brain barrier disruption via increased zonula occludens-1 expression in a rat model of intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YANG; PENG, FAN; XIE, GUI; CHEN, ZE-QI; LI, HAI-GANG; TANG, TAO; LUO, JIE-KUN

    2016-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a key pathophysiological factor of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The level of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) has been closely associated with the degree of BBB damage, and is an indicator of BBB destruction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of rhubarb on BBB function in a rat model of ICH. ICH was induced in rats by treatment with type VII collagenase. Sham-operated rats were administered with an equal volume of saline. Following the administration of rhubarb decoction (20 g/kg), neurobehavioral function evaluation and Evans blue extravasation assays were performed at days 1, 3 and 5 after ICH. ZO-1 expression in the brain of ICH-induced rats were analyzed via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical analyses. The results suggested that rhubarb significantly ameliorated neurological symptoms and attenuated BBB permeability. The results of immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR studies indicated that the expression of ZO-1 expression was robust in the sham-operated group and was weak in the vehicle-treated group at day 3. The present data indicated that rhubarb effectively attenuated ICH-induced BBB damage in rats, raising the possibility that rhubarb or its active components may be considered useful as neuroprotective drugs for ICH. The protective mechanisms appeared to involve the preservation of BBB integrity and elevation of ZO-1 protein expression levels. PMID:27347045

  5. Arginase 1: an unexpected mediator of pulmonary capillary barrier dysfunction in models of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Rudolf; Czikora, Istvàn; Sridhar, Supriya; Zemskov, Evgeny A; Oseghale, Aluya; Circo, Sebastian; Cederbaum, Stephen D; Chakraborty, Trinad; Fulton, David J; Caldwell, Robert W; Romero, Maritza J

    2013-01-01

    The integrity of epithelial and endothelial barriers in the lower airspaces of the lungs has to be tightly regulated, in order to prevent leakage and to assure efficient gas exchange between the alveoli and capillaries. Both G(-) and G(+) bacterial toxins, such as lipopolysaccharide and pneumolysin, respectively, can be released in high concentrations within the pulmonary compartments upon antibiotic treatment of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or severe pneumonia. These toxins are able to impair endothelial barrier function, either directly, or indirectly, by induction of pro-inflammatory mediators and neutrophil sequestration. Toxin-induced endothelial hyperpermeability can involve myosin light chain phosphorylation and/or microtubule rearrangement. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was proposed to be a guardian of basal barrier function, since eNOS knock-out mice display an impaired expression of inter-endothelial junction proteins and as such an increased vascular permeability, as compared to wild type mice. The enzyme arginase, the activity of which can be regulated by the redox status of the cell, exists in two isoforms - arginase 1 (cytosolic) and arginase 2 (mitochondrial) - both of which can be expressed in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Upon activation, arginase competes with eNOS for the substrate l-arginine, as such impairing eNOS-dependent NO generation and promoting reactive oxygen species generation by the enzyme. This mini-review will discuss recent findings regarding the interaction between bacterial toxins and arginase during acute lung injury and will as such address the role of arginase in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:23966993

  6. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Middle Ear Inflammation Disrupts the cochlear Intra-Strial Fluid–Blood Barrier through Down-Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Hou, Zhiqiang; Cai, Jing; Dong, Mingmin; Shi, Xiaorui

    2015-01-01

    Middle ear infection (or inflammation) is the most common pathological condition that causes fluid to accumulate in the middle ear, disrupting cochlear homeostasis. Lipopolysaccharide, a product of bacteriolysis, activates macrophages and causes release of inflammatory cytokines. Many studies have shown that lipopolysaccharides cause functional and structural changes in the inner ear similar to that of inflammation. However, it is specifically not known how lipopolysaccharides affect the blood-labyrinth barrier in the stria vascularis (intra-strial fluid–blood barrier), nor what the underlying mechanisms are. In this study, we used a cell culture-based in vitro model and animal-based in vivo model, combined with immunohistochemistry and a vascular leakage assay, to investigate lipopolysaccharide effects on the integrity of the mouse intra-strial fluid–blood barrier. Our results show lipopolysaccharide-induced local infection significantly affects intra-strial fluid–blood barrier component cells. Pericytes and perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes are particularly affected, and the morphological and functional changes in these cells are accompanied by substantial changes in barrier integrity. Significant vascular leakage is found in the lipopolysaccharide treated-animals. Consistent with the findings from the in vivo animal model, the permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer to FITC-albumin was significantly higher in the lipopolysaccharide-treated monolayer than in an untreated endothelial cell monolayer. Further study has shown the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation to have a major effect on the expression of tight junctions in the blood barrier. Lipopolysaccharide was also shown to cause high frequency hearing loss, corroborated by previous reports from other laboratories. Our findings show lipopolysaccharide-evoked middle ear infection disrupts inner ear fluid balance, and its particular effects on the intra-strial fluid

  7. Emodin enhances alveolar epithelial barrier function in rats with experimental acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xian-Ming; Wang, Fang-Yu; Wang, Zhen-Kai; Wan, Hai-Jun; Xu, Wen-An; Lu, Heng

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of emodin on expression of claudin-4, claudin-5 and occludin, as well as the alveolar epithelial barrier in rats with pancreatitis induced by sodium taurocholate. METHODS: Experimental pancreatitis was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. Emodin was injected via the external jugular vein 3 h after induction of acute pancreatitis. Rats from sham operation group and acute pancreatitis group were injected with normal saline (an equivalent volume as emodin) at the same time point. Samples of lung and serum were obtained 6 h after drug administration. Pulmonary morphology was examined with HE staining. Pulmonary edema was estimated by measuring water content in lung tissue samples. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) level were measured by enzyme-linked immunospecific assay. Serum amylase and pulmonary myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were detected by spectrophotometry. Alveolar epithelial barrier was assessed by pulmonary dye extravasation. Expression of claudin-4, claudin-5 and occludin in lung tissue samples was examined by immunohistology, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analysis, respectively. RESULTS: Pancreatitis-associated lung injury was characterized by pulmonary edema, leukocyte infiltration, alveolar collapse, and elevated serum amylase level. The pulmonary damage, pulmonary pathological scores, serum amylase and MPO activity, TNF-α and IL-6 levels, and wet/dry ratio were decreased in rats after treatment with emodin. Immunostaining of claudin-4, claudin-5 and occludin was detected in lung tissue samples from rats in sham operation group, which was distributed in alveolar epithelium, vascular endothelium, and bronchial epithelium, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression levels of claudin-4, claudin-5 and occludin in lung tissue samples were markedly decreased, the expression level of

  8. Endothelial lipid phosphate phosphatase-3 deficiency that disrupts the endothelial barrier function is a modifier of cardiovascular development

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Ishita; Baruah, Jugajyoti; Lurie, Erin E.; Wary, Kishore K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Lipid phosphate phosphatase-3 (LPP3) is expressed at high levels in endothelial cells (ECs). Although LPP3 is known to hydrolyse the phosphate group from lysolipids such as spingosine-1-phosphate and its structural homologues, the function of Lpp3 in ECs is not completely understood. In this study, we investigated how tyrosine-protein kinase receptor (TEK or Tie2) promoter–dependent deletion of Lpp3 alters EC activities. Methods and results Lpp3fl/fl mice were crossed with the tg.Tie2Cre transgenic line. Vasculogenesis occurred normally in embryos with Tie2Cre-mediated deletion of Lpp3 (called Lpp3ECKO), but embryonic lethality occurred in two waves, the first wave between E8.5 and E10.5, while the second between E11.5 and E13.5. Lethality in Lpp3ECKO embryos after E11.5 was accompanied by vascular leakage and haemorrhage, which likely resulted in insufficient cardiovascular development. Analyses of haematoxylin- and eosin-stained heart sections from E11.5 Lpp3ECKO embryos showed insufficient heart growth associated with decreased trabeculation, reduced growth of the compact wall, and absence of cardiac cushions. Staining followed by microscopic analyses of Lpp3ECKO embryos revealed the presence of apoptotic ECs. Furthermore, Lpp3-deficient ECs showed decreased gene expression and protein levels of Cyclin-D1, VE-cadherin, Fibronectin, Klf2, and Klf4. To determine the underlying mechanisms of vascular leakage and barrier disruption, we performed knockdown and rescue experiments in cultured ECs. LPP3 knockdown decreased transendothelial electrical resistance and increased permeability. Re-expression of β-catenin cDNA in LPP3-knockdown ECs partially restored the effect of the LPP3 loss, whereas re-expression of p120ctn cDNA did not. Conclusion These findings demonstrate the essential roles of LPP3 in the maturation of EC barrier integrity and normal cardiovascular development. PMID:27125875

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus infection of human astrocytes disrupts blood-brain barrier integrity by a gap junction-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Eugenin, Eliseo A; Clements, Janice E; Zink, M Christine; Berman, Joan W

    2011-06-29

    HIV infection of the CNS is an early event after primary infection, resulting in neurological complications in a significant number of individuals despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). The main cells infected with HIV within the CNS are macrophages/microglia and a small fraction of astrocytes. The role of these few infected astrocytes in the pathogenesis of neuroAIDS has not been examined extensively. Here, we demonstrate that few HIV-infected astrocytes (4.7 ± 2.8% in vitro and 8.2 ± 3.9% in vivo) compromise blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity. This BBB disruption is due to endothelial apoptosis, misguided astrocyte end feet, and dysregulation of lipoxygenase/cyclooxygenase, BK(Ca) channels, and ATP receptor activation within astrocytes. All of these alterations in BBB integrity induced by a few HIV-infected astrocytes were gap junction dependent, as blocking these channels protected the BBB from HIV-infected astrocyte-mediated compromise. We also demonstrated apoptosis in vivo of BBB cells in contact with infected astrocytes using brain tissue sections from simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques as a model of neuroAIDS, suggesting an important role for these few infected astrocytes in the CNS damage seen with HIV infection. Our findings describe a novel mechanism of bystander BBB toxicity mediated by low numbers of HIV-infected astrocytes and amplified by gap junctions. This mechanism of toxicity contributes to understanding how CNS damage is spread even in the current ART era and how minimal or controlled HIV infection still results in cognitive impairment in a large population of infected individuals. PMID:21715610

  10. Neutrophil DNA contributes to the antielastase barrier during acute lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Balloy, Viviane; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Crestani, Bruno; Dehoux, Monique; Chignard, Michel

    2003-06-01

    During acute lung inflammation, the airspaces are invaded by circulating neutrophils. These may then injure tissues through the release of elastase. Different natural specific inhibitors such as alpha1-proteinase inhibitor, secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor, and elafin are nonetheless able to counteract the enzymatic activity of elastase. The present study was undertaken to assess the role of these different inhibitors in the intrinsic antielastase barrier during lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation in mice. Upon intranasal administration of lipopolysaccharide to mice, the antielastase activity recovered from bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) increases progressively up to 48 h (7-fold) and returns to the basal level within 72 h. By contrast, when the same experiments are performed with neutropenic mice (pretreatment with an antigranulocyte antibody, or vinblastine), the increase is almost totally absent. Ultrafiltration of BALF through 100 kD cutoff membranes shows that the activity remains in the retentate, thus ruling out a role for native alpha1-proteinase inhibitor, secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor, and elafin. Gel filtration and fraction analysis show that the material eluted with a Mr of 600 kD. Agarose gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining reveal that the activity corresponds to the presence a large amount of DNA. Interestingly, DNase treatment of the active fraction suppresses the antielastase activity. Analysis of BALF from patients with acute lung inflammation shows the presence of DNA with antielastase activity. We therefore concluded that during acute lung inflammation, the recruitment of neutrophils in the airspaces accounts for the increased presence of DNA, which in turn contributes to the antielastase barrier. PMID:12600833

  11. Localized Down-regulation of P-glycoprotein by Focused Ultrasound and Microbubbles induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Cho, HongSeok; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Han, Mun; Choi, Jong-Ryul; Ahn, Sanghyun; Lee, Taekwan; Chang, Yongmin; Park, Juyoung

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant efflux transporters found in Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) acts as a functional barrier, by pumping out most of the drugs into the blood. Previous studies showed focused ultrasound (FUS) induced microbubble oscillation can disrupt the BBB by loosening the tight junctions in the brain endothelial cells; however, no study was performed to investigate its impact on the functional barrier of the BBB. In this study, the BBB in rat brains were disrupted using the MRI guided FUS and microbubbles. The immunofluorescence study evaluated the expression of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the most dominant multi-drug resistant protein found in the BBB. Intensity of the P-gp expression at the BBB disruption (BBBD) regions was significantly reduced (63.2 ± 18.4%) compared to the control area. The magnitude of the BBBD and the level of the P-gp down-regulation were significantly correlated. Both the immunofluorescence and histologic analysis at the BBBD regions revealed no apparent damage in the brain endothelial cells. The results demonstrate that the FUS and microbubbles can induce a localized down-regulation of P-gp expression in rat brain. The study suggests a clinically translation of this method to treat neural diseases through targeted delivery of the wide ranges of brain disorder related drugs. PMID:27510760

  12. Localized Down-regulation of P-glycoprotein by Focused Ultrasound and Microbubbles induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cho, HongSeok; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Han, Mun; Choi, Jong-ryul; Ahn, Sanghyun; Lee, Taekwan; Chang, Yongmin; Park, Juyoung

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant efflux transporters found in Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) acts as a functional barrier, by pumping out most of the drugs into the blood. Previous studies showed focused ultrasound (FUS) induced microbubble oscillation can disrupt the BBB by loosening the tight junctions in the brain endothelial cells; however, no study was performed to investigate its impact on the functional barrier of the BBB. In this study, the BBB in rat brains were disrupted using the MRI guided FUS and microbubbles. The immunofluorescence study evaluated the expression of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the most dominant multi-drug resistant protein found in the BBB. Intensity of the P-gp expression at the BBB disruption (BBBD) regions was significantly reduced (63.2 ± 18.4%) compared to the control area. The magnitude of the BBBD and the level of the P-gp down-regulation were significantly correlated. Both the immunofluorescence and histologic analysis at the BBBD regions revealed no apparent damage in the brain endothelial cells. The results demonstrate that the FUS and microbubbles can induce a localized down-regulation of P-gp expression in rat brain. The study suggests a clinically translation of this method to treat neural diseases through targeted delivery of the wide ranges of brain disorder related drugs. PMID:27510760

  13. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli inhibits type I interferon- and RNase L-mediated host defense to disrupt intestinal epithelial cell barrier function.

    PubMed

    Long, Tiha M; Nisa, Shahista; Donnenberg, Michael S; Hassel, Bret A

    2014-07-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) primarily infects children in developing countries and causes diarrhea that can be deadly. EPEC pathogenesis occurs through type III secretion system (T3SS)-mediated injection of effectors into intestinal epithelial cells (IECs); these effectors alter actin dynamics, modulate the immune response, and disrupt tight junction (TJ) integrity. The resulting compromised barrier function and increased gastrointestinal (GI) permeability may be responsible for the clinical symptoms of infection. Type I interferon (IFN) mediates anti-inflammatory activities and serves essential functions in intestinal immunity and homeostasis; however, its role in the immune response to enteric pathogens, such as EPEC, and its impact on IEC barrier function have not been examined. Here, we report that IFN-β is induced following EPEC infection and regulates IEC TJ proteins to maintain barrier function. The EPEC T3SS effector NleD counteracts this protective activity by inhibiting IFN-β induction and enhancing tumor necrosis factor alpha to promote barrier disruption. The endoribonuclease RNase L is a key mediator of IFN induction and action that promotes TJ protein expression and IEC barrier integrity. EPEC infection inhibits RNase L in a T3SS-dependent manner, providing a mechanism by which EPEC evades IFN-induced antibacterial activities. This work identifies novel roles for IFN-β and RNase L in IEC barrier functions that are targeted by EPEC effectors to escape host defense mechanisms and promote virulence. The IFN-RNase L axis thus represents a potential therapeutic target for enteric infections and GI diseases involving compromised barrier function. PMID:24733098

  14. Provider perceptions of barriers to the emergency use of tPA for Acute Ischemic Stroke: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Only 1-3% of ischemic stroke patients receive thrombolytic therapy. Provider barriers to adhering with guidelines recommending tPA delivery in acute stroke are not well known. The main objective of this study was to describe barriers to thrombolytic use in acute stroke care. Methods Twenty-four hospitals were randomly selected and matched into 12 pairs. Barrier assessment occurred at intervention sites only, and utilized focus groups and structured interviews. A pre-specified taxonomy was employed to characterize barriers. Two investigators independently assigned themes to transcribed responses. Seven facilitators (three emergency physicians, two nurses, and two study coordinators) conducted focus groups and interviews of emergency physicians (65), nurses (62), neurologists (15), radiologists (12), hospital administrators (12), and three others (hospitalists and pharmacist). Results The following themes represented the most important external barriers: environmental and patient factors. Important barriers internal to the clinician included familiarity with and motivation to adhere to the guidelines, lack of self-efficacy and outcome expectancy. The following themes were not substantial barriers: lack of awareness of the existence of acute stroke guidelines, presence of conflicting guidelines, and lack of agreement with the guidelines. Conclusions Healthcare providers perceive environmental and patient-related factors as the primary barriers to adherence with acute stroke treatment guidelines. Interventions focused on increasing physician familiarity with and motivation to follow guidelines may be of highest yield in improving adherence. Improving self-efficacy in performing guideline concordant care may also be useful. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00349479 PMID:21548943

  15. Mechanical failure (leaflet disruption) of a porcine aortic heterograft: rare cause of acute aortic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Housman, L B; Pitt, W A; Mazur, J H; Litchford, B; Gross, S A

    1978-08-01

    Use of the Hancock, glutaraldehyde-preserved, stented heterograft for aortic valve replacement has gained wide acceptance in the past 7 years. Nevertheless, very little is known about the long-term mechanical and pathological characteristics following implantation. A rare case is presented in which mechanical valve failure occurred secondary to leaflet disruption in the absence of infection 23 months after implantation. The literature is reviewed and the implications of this unusual complication are discussed. PMID:567263

  16. Transient disruption of vascular barriers using focused ultrasound and microbubbles for targeted drug delivery in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Muna

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS) which includes the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and other factors, prevents the transport of most anticancer agents to the brain and restricts delivery to infiltrating brain tumors. The heterogeneous vascular permeability in tumor vessels (blood-tumor barrier; BTB), along with several other factors, creates additional hurdles for drug treatment of brain tumors. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB/BTB, but they have their own limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Magnetic Resonance Imaging guided Focused Ultrasound (MRIgFUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is an emerging noninvasive method to temporarily permeabilize the BBB and BTB. The purpose of this thesis was to use this alternative approach to deliver chemotherapeutic agents through the BBB/BTB for brain tumor treatment in a rodent model to overcome the hinderances encountered in prior approaches tested for drug delivery in the CNS. The results presented in thesis demonstrate that MRIgFUS can be used to achieve consistent and reproducible BBB/BTB disruption in rats. It enabled us to achieve clinically-relevant concentrations of doxorubicin (~ 4.8+/-0.5 microg/g) delivered to the brain with the sonication parameters (0.69 MHz; 0.55 MPa; 10 ms bursts; 1 Hz PRF; 60 s duration), microbubble concentration (Definity, 10 microl/kg), and liposomoal doxorubicin (Lipo-DOX) dose (5.67 mg/kg) used. The resulting doxorubicin concentration was reduced by 32% when the agent was injected 10 minute after the last sonication. Three weekly sessions of FUS and Lipo-DOX appeared to be safe in the rat brain, despite some minor tissue damage. Importantly, the severe neurotoxicity seen in earlier works using other approaches does not appear to occur with delivery via FUS-BBB disruption. The resuls from three weekly treatments of FUS and Lipo-DOX in a rat glioma model are highly

  17. Transient disruption of vascular barriers using focused ultrasound and microbubbles for targeted drug delivery in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Muna

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS) which includes the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and other factors, prevents the transport of most anticancer agents to the brain and restricts delivery to infiltrating brain tumors. The heterogeneous vascular permeability in tumor vessels (blood-tumor barrier; BTB), along with several other factors, creates additional hurdles for drug treatment of brain tumors. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB/BTB, but they have their own limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Magnetic Resonance Imaging guided Focused Ultrasound (MRIgFUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is an emerging noninvasive method to temporarily permeabilize the BBB and BTB. The purpose of this thesis was to use this alternative approach to deliver chemotherapeutic agents through the BBB/BTB for brain tumor treatment in a rodent model to overcome the hinderances encountered in prior approaches tested for drug delivery in the CNS. The results presented in thesis demonstrate that MRIgFUS can be used to achieve consistent and reproducible BBB/BTB disruption in rats. It enabled us to achieve clinically-relevant concentrations of doxorubicin (~ 4.8+/-0.5 microg/g) delivered to the brain with the sonication parameters (0.69 MHz; 0.55 MPa; 10 ms bursts; 1 Hz PRF; 60 s duration), microbubble concentration (Definity, 10 microl/kg), and liposomoal doxorubicin (Lipo-DOX) dose (5.67 mg/kg) used. The resulting doxorubicin concentration was reduced by 32% when the agent was injected 10 minute after the last sonication. Three weekly sessions of FUS and Lipo-DOX appeared to be safe in the rat brain, despite some minor tissue damage. Importantly, the severe neurotoxicity seen in earlier works using other approaches does not appear to occur with delivery via FUS-BBB disruption. The resuls from three weekly treatments of FUS and Lipo-DOX in a rat glioma model are highly

  18. Low humidity environmental challenge causes barrier disruption and cornification of the mouse corneal epithelium via a c-jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) pathway.

    PubMed

    Pelegrino, F S A; Pflugfelder, S C; De Paiva, C S

    2012-01-01

    Patients with tear dysfunction often experience increased irritation symptoms when subjected to drafty and/or low humidity environmental conditions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of low humidity stress (LHS) on corneal barrier function and expression of cornified envelope (CE) precursor proteins in the epithelium of C57BL/6 and c-jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) knockout (KO) mice. LHS was induced in both strains by exposure to an air draft for 15 (LHS15D) or 30 days (LHS30D) at a relative humidity <30%RH. Nonstressed (NS) mice were used as controls. Oregon-green-dextran uptake was used to measure corneal barrier function. Levels of small proline-rich protein (SPRR)-2, involucrin, occludin, and MMP-9 were evaluated by immunofluorescent staining in cornea sections. Wholemount corneas immunostained for occludin were used to measure mean apical cell area. Gelatinase activity was evaluated by in situ zymography. Expression of MMP, CE and inflammatory cytokine genes was evaluated by qPCR. C57BL/6 mice exposed to LHS15D showed corneal barrier dysfunction, decreased apical corneal epithelial cell area, higher MMP-9 expression and gelatinase activity and increased involucrin and SPRR-2 immunoreactivity in the corneal epithelium compared to NS mice. JNK2KO mice were resistant to LHS-induced corneal barrier disruption. MMP-3,-9,-13, IL-1α, IL-1β, involucrin and SPRR-2a RNA transcripts were significantly increased in C57BL/6 mice at LHS15D, while no change was noted in JNK2KO mice. LHS is capable of altering corneal barrier function, promoting pathologic alteration of the TJ complex and stimulating production of CE proteins by the corneal epithelium. Activation of the JNK2 signaling pathway contributes to corneal epithelial barrier disruption in LHS. PMID:22166618

  19. Multiple sessions of liposomal doxorubicin delivery via focused ultrasound mediated blood-brain barrier disruption: a safety study

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Muna; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; McDannold, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound is a rapidly advancing method for delivering therapeutic and imaging agents to the brain. It has the ability to facilitate the passage of therapeutics from the vasculature to the brain parenchyma, which is normally protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The method’s main advantages are that it is both targeted and noninvasive, and that it can be easily repeated. Studies have shown that liposomal doxorubicin (Lipo-DOX), a chemotherapy agent with promise for tumors in the central nervous system, can be delivered into the brain across BBB. However, prior studies have suggested that doxorubicin can be significantly neurotoxic, even at small concentrations. Here, we studied whether multiple sessions of Lipo-DOX administered after FUS-induced BBB disruption (FUS-BBBD) induces severe adverse events in the normal brain tissues. First, we used fluorometry to measure the doxorubicin concentrations in the brain after FUS-BBBD to ensure that a clinically relevant doxorubicin concentration was achieved in the brain. Next, we performed three weekly sessions with FUS-BBBD ± Lipo-DOX administration. Five to twelve targets were sonicated each week, following a schedule described previously in a survival study in glioma-bearing rats (Aryal et al., 2013). Five rats received three weekly sessions where i.v. injected Lipo-DOX was combined with FUS-BBBD; an additional four rats received FUS-BBBD only. Animals were euthanized 70 days from the first session and brains were examined in histology. We found that clinically-relevant concentrations of doxorubicin (4.8 ± 0.5 µg/g) were delivered to the brain with the sonication parameters (0.69 MHz; 0.55–0.81 MPa; 10 ms bursts; 1 Hz PRF; 60s duration), microbubble concentration (Definity, 10 µl/kg), and the administered Lipo-DOX dose (5.67 mg/kg) used. The resulting concentration of Lipo-DOX was reduced by 32% when it was injected 10 minutes after the last sonication compared to cases

  20. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Eum, Sung Yong Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1 h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24 h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. - Highlights: • PCB153 disturbed human brain endothelial barrier through disruption of occludin. • Lipid raft-associated PP

  1. Improved survival in rats with glioma using MRI-guided focused ultrasound and microbubbles to disrupt the blood-brain barrier and deliver Doxil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Muna; Zhi Zhang, Yong; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Park, Juyoung; Power, Chanikarn; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-02-01

    Blood-brain-barrier (BBB) limits the transportation of most neuropeptides, proteins (enzymes, antibodies), chemotherapeutic agents, and genes that have therapeutic potential for the treatment of brain diseases. Different methods have been used to overcome this limitation, but they are invasive, non-targeted, or require the development of new drugs. We have developed a method that uses MRI-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with circulating microbubbles to temporarily open BBB in and around brain tumors to deliver chemotherapy agents. Here, we tested whether this noninvasive technique could enhance the effectiveness of a chemotherapy agent (Doxil). Using 690 kHz FUS transducer and microbubble (Definity), we induced BBB disruption in intracranially-implanted 9L glioma tumors in rat's brain in three weekly sessions. Animals who received BBB disruption and Doxil had a median survival time of 34.5 days, which was significantly longer than that found in control animals which is 16, 18.5, 21 days who received no treatment, BBB disruption only and Doxil only respectively This work demonstrates that FUS technique has promise in overcoming barriers to drug delivery, which are particularly stark in the brain due to the BBB.

  2. Induced Disruption of the Iron-Regulatory Hormone Hepcidin Inhibits Acute Inflammatory Hypoferraemia.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Andrew E; Lim, Pei Jin; Frost, Joe N; Pasricha, Sant-Rayn; Soilleux, Elizabeth J; Evans, Emma; Morovat, Alireza; Santos, Ana; Diaz, Rebeca; Biggs, Daniel; Davies, Benjamin; Gileadi, Uzi; Robbins, Peter A; Lakhal-Littleton, Samira; Drakesmith, Hal

    2016-01-01

    Withdrawal of iron from serum (hypoferraemia) is a conserved innate immune antimicrobial strategy that can withhold this critical nutrient from invading pathogens, impairing their growth. Hepcidin (Hamp1) is the master regulator of iron and its expression is induced by inflammation. Mice lacking Hamp1 from birth rapidly accumulate iron and are susceptible to infection by blood-dwelling siderophilic bacteria such as Vibrio vulnificus. In order to study the innate immune role of hepcidin against a background of normal iron status, we developed a transgenic mouse model of tamoxifen-sensitive conditional Hamp1 deletion (termed iHamp1-KO mice). These mice attain adulthood with an iron status indistinguishable from littermate controls. Hamp1 disruption and the consequent decline of serum hepcidin concentrations occurred within hours of a single tamoxifen dose. We found that the TLR ligands LPS and Pam3CSK4 and heat-killed Brucella abortus caused an equivalent induction of inflammation in control and iHamp1-KO mice. Pam3CSK4 and B. abortus only caused a drop in serum iron in control mice, while hypoferraemia due to LPS was evident but substantially blunted in iHamp1-KO mice. Our results characterise a powerful new model of rapidly inducible hepcidin disruption, and demonstrate the critical contribution of hepcidin to the hypoferraemia of inflammation. PMID:27423740

  3. TIMP-1 attenuates blood–brain barrier permeability in mice with acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Radisky, Evette S; Das, Pritam; Batra, Jyotica; Hata, Toshiyuki; Hori, Tomohide; Baine, Ann-Marie T; Gardner, Lindsay; Yue, Mei Y; Bu, Guojun; del Zoppo, Gregory; Patel, Tushar C; Nguyen, Justin H

    2013-01-01

    Blood–brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction in acute liver failure (ALF) results in increased BBB permeability that often precludes the patients from obtaining a life-saving liver transplantation. It remains controversial whether matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) from the injured liver contributes to the deregulation of BBB function in ALF. We selectively upregulated a physiologic inhibitor of MMP-9 (TIMP-1) with a single intracerebroventricular injection of TIMP-1 cDNA plasmids at 48 and 72 hours, or with pegylated-TIMP-1 protein. Acute liver failure was induced with tumor necrosis factor-α and 𝒟-(+)-galactosamine in mice. Permeability of BBB was assessed with sodium fluorescein (NaF) extravasation. We found a significant increase in TIMP-1 within the central nervous system (CNS) after the administration of TIMP-1 cDNA plasmids and that increased TIMP-1 within the CNS resulted in an attenuation of BBB permeability, a reduction in activation of epidermal growth factor receptor and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signals, and a restoration of the tight junction protein occludin in mice with experimental ALF. Pegylated TIMP-1 provided similar protection against BBB permeability in mice with ALF. Our results provided a proof of principle that MMP-9 contributes to the BBB dysfunction in ALF and suggests a potential therapeutic role of TIMP-1 in ALF. PMID:23532086

  4. Genetic NMDA receptor deficiency disrupts acute and chronic effects of cocaine but not amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Amy J; Laakso, Aki; Cyr, Michel; Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Salahpour, Ali; Medvedev, Ivan O; Dykstra, Linda A; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Caron, Marc G

    2008-10-01

    NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate transmission is required for several forms of neuronal plasticity. Its role in the neuronal responses to addictive drugs is an ongoing subject of investigation. We report here that the acute locomotor-stimulating effect of cocaine is absent in NMDA receptor-deficient mice (NR1-KD). In contrast, their acute responses to amphetamine and to direct dopamine receptor agonists are not significantly altered. The striking attenuation of cocaine's acute effects is not likely explained by alterations in the dopaminergic system of NR1-KD mice, since most parameters of pre- and postsynaptic dopamine function are unchanged. Consistent with the behavioral findings, cocaine induces less c-Fos expression in the striatum of these mice, while amphetamine-induced c-Fos expression is intact. Furthermore, chronic cocaine-induced sensitization and conditioned place preference are attenuated and develop more slowly in mutant animals, but amphetamine's effects are not altered significantly. Our results highlight the importance of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic transmission specifically in cocaine actions, and support a hypothesis that cocaine and amphetamine elicit their effects through differential actions on signaling pathways. PMID:18185498

  5. Intestinal hypoperfusion contributes to gut barrier failure in severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Sakhawat H; Ammori, Basil J; Holmfield, John; Larvin, Michael; McMahon, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    Intestinal barrier failure and subsequent bacterial translocation have been implicated in the development of organ dysfunction and septic complications associated with severe acute pancreatitis. Splanchnic hypoperfusion and ischemia/reperfusion injury have been postulated as a cause of increased intestinal permeability. The urinary concentration of intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) has been shown to be a sensitive marker of intestinal ischemia, with increased levels being associated with ischemia/reperfusion. The aim of the current study was to assess the relationship between excretion of IFABP in urine, gut mucosal barrier failure (intestinal hyperpermeability and systemic exposure to endotoxemia), and clinical severity. Patients with a clinical and biochemical diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were studied within 72 hours of onset of pain. Polyethylene glycol probes of 3350 kDa and 400 kDa were administered enterally, and the ratio of the percentage of retrieval of each probe after renal excretion was used as a measure of intestinal macromolecular permeability. Collected urine was also used to determine the IFABP concentration (IFABP-c) and total IFABP (IFABP-t) excreted over the 24-hour period, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. The systemic inflammatory response was estimated from peak 0 to 72-hour plasma C-reactive protein levels, and systemic exposure to endotoxins was measured using serum IgM endotoxin cytoplasmic antibody (EndoCAb) levels. The severity of the attack was assessed on the basis of the Atlanta criteria. Sixty-one patients with acute pancreatitis (severe in 19) and 12 healthy control subjects were studied. Compared to mild attacks, severe attacks were associated with significantly higher urinary IFABP-c (median 1092 pg/ml vs. 84 pg/ml; P < 0.001) and IFABP-t (median 1.14 microg vs. 0.21 microg; P = 0.003). Furthermore, the control group had significantly lower IFABP-c (median 37 pg/ml; P = 0.029) and IFABP-t (median

  6. Magnetic field enhanced convective diffusion of iron oxide nanoparticles in an osmotically disrupted cell culture model of the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhizhi; Worden, Matthew; Wroczynskyj, Yaroslav; Yathindranath, Vinith; van Lierop, Johan; Hegmann, Torsten; Miller, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The present study examines the use of an external magnetic field in combination with the disruption of tight junctions to enhance the permeability of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) across an in vitro model of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). The feasibility of such an approach, termed magnetic field enhanced convective diffusion (MFECD), along with the effect of IONP surface charge on permeability, was examined. Methods The effect of magnetic field on the permeability of positively (aminosilane-coated [AmS]-IONPs) and negatively (N-(trimethoxysilylpropyl)ethylenediaminetriacetate [EDT]-IONPs) charged IONPs was evaluated in confluent monolayers of mouse brain endothelial cells under normal and osmotically disrupted conditions. Results Neither IONP formulation was permeable across an intact cell monolayer. However, when tight junctions were disrupted using D-mannitol, flux of EDT-IONPs across the bEnd.3 monolayers was 28%, increasing to 44% when a magnetic field was present. In contrast, the permeability of AmS-IONPs after osmotic disruption was less than 5%. The cellular uptake profile of both IONPs was not altered by the presence of mannitol. Conclusions MFECD improved the permeability of EDT-IONPs through the paracellular route. The MFECD approach favors negatively charged IONPs that have low affinity for the brain endothelial cells and high colloidal stability. This suggests that MFECD may improve IONP-based drug delivery to the brain. PMID:25018630

  7. Retinoic Acid Induced-Autophagic Flux Inhibits ER-Stress Dependent Apoptosis and Prevents Disruption of Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yulong; Zhang, Hongyu; Zheng, Binbin; Ye, Libing; Zhu, Sipin; Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Zhouguang; Wei, Xiaojie; Chen, Daqing; Cao, Guodong; Fu, Xiaobing; Li, Xiaokun; Xu, Hua-Zi; Xiao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces the disruption of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) which leads to infiltration of blood cells, an inflammatory response, and neuronal cell death, resulting spinal cord secondary damage. Retinoic acid (RA) has a neuroprotective effect in both ischemic brain injury and SCI, however the relationship between BSCB disruption and RA in SCI is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that autophagy and ER stress are involved in the protective effect of RA on the BSCB. RA attenuated BSCB permeability and decreased the loss of tight junction (TJ) molecules such as P120, β-catenin, Occludin and Claudin5 after injury in vivo as well as in Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells (BMECs). Moreover, RA administration improved functional recovery in the rat model of SCI. RA inhibited the expression of CHOP and caspase-12 by induction of autophagic flux. However, RA had no significant effect on protein expression of GRP78 and PDI. Furthermore, combining RA with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) partially abolished its protective effect on the BSCB via exacerbated ER stress and subsequent loss of tight junctions. Taken together, the neuroprotective role of RA in recovery from SCI is related to prevention of of BSCB disruption via the activation of autophagic flux and the inhibition of ER stress-induced cell apoptosis. These findings lay the groundwork for future translational studies of RA for CNS diseases, especially those related to BSCB disruption. PMID:26722220

  8. Glutamine supplementation attenuates ethanol-induced disruption of apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and ameliorates gut barrier dysfunction and fatty liver in mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit K; Shukla, Pradeep K; Mir, Hina; Manda, Bhargavi; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; McMullen, Megan; Nagy, Laura E; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that glutamine (Gln) prevents acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers and human colonic mucosa. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Gln supplementation on ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury in mice in vivo. Ethanol feeding caused a significant increase in inulin permeability in distal colon. Elevated permeability was associated with a redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins and depletion of detergent-insoluble fractions of these proteins, suggesting that ethanol disrupts apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and increases paracellular permeability. Ethanol-induced increase in colonic mucosal permeability and disruption of junctional complexes were most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet. Gln supplementation attenuated ethanol-induced mucosal permeability and disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potential role of Gln in nutritional intervention to alcoholic tissue injury. Gln supplementation dose-dependently elevated reduced-protein thiols in colon without affecting the level of oxidized-protein thiols. Ethanol feeding depleted reduced protein thiols and elevated oxidized protein thiols. Ethanol-induced protein thiol oxidation was most severe in mice fed with Gln-free diet and absent in mice fed with Gln-supplemented diet, suggesting that antioxidant effect is one of the likely mechanisms involved in Gln-mediated amelioration of ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction. Ethanol feeding elevated plasma transaminase and liver triglyceride, which was accompanied by histopathologic lesions in the liver; ethanol-induced liver damage was attenuated by Gln supplementation. These results indicate that Gln supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced gut and liver injury. PMID:26365579

  9. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Eum, Sung Yong; Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. PMID:26080028

  10. Evolution of blood-brain barrier damage associated with changes in brain metabolites following acute ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yan, Gen; Xuan, Yinghua; Dai, Zhuozhi; Zhang, Guishan; Xu, Haiyun; Mikulis, David; Wu, Renhua

    2015-11-11

    Stroke is a serious medical condition that requires emergency care. In the case of ischemic stroke, ischemia may lead to damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB); the damage in turn may exacerbate the condition. Therefore, noninvasive detection of BBB damage represents a challenge for experimental and clinical researchers. In this study, we assessed the onset of BBB disruption by means of T1-weighted images with administration of the contrast enhancement agent gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and related BBB breakdown to brain metabolite changes in proton magnetic resonance spectrum (H-MRS) in the infarcted site following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats. It was shown that MCAO for 30 min and 1.5 h caused no Gd-DTPA signal change in the T1-weighted images, whereas MCAO for 1 h significantly altered some of H-MRS brain metabolites, suggesting that brain metabolite changes occurred earlier than BBB damage after ischemic stroke. MCAO for 2 h caused BBB breakdown, which was related to changes in the levels of some brain metabolites detected by H-MRS. Between the second and the third hour after MCAO, brain metabolite changes continued as the result of BBB breakdown and the concurrent overperfusion to the infarcted site, which may ameliorate the metabolite changes, thus compensating for the functional failures of the brain after stroke. PMID:26366833

  11. Urinary mitochondrial DNA is a biomarker of mitochondrial disruption and renal dysfunction in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Ryan M.; Stallons, L. Jay; Kneff, Joshua E.; Alge, Joseph L.; Harmon, Jennifer L.; Rahn, Jennifer J.; Arthur, John M.; Beeson, Craig C.; Chan, Sherine L.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies show the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in the initiation and progression of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, no biomarkers exist linking renal injury to mitochondrial function and integrity. To this end, we evaluated urinary mitochondrial DNA (UmtDNA) as a biomarker of renal injury and function in humans with AKI following cardiac surgery. mtDNA was isolated from the urine of patients following cardiac surgery and quantified by qPCR. Patients were stratified into no AKI, stable AKI and progressive AKI groups based on Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) staging. UmtDNA was elevated in progressive AKI patients, and was associated with progression of patients with AKI at collection to higher AKIN stages. To evaluate the relationship of UmtDNA to measures of renal mitochondrial integrity in AKI, mice were subjected to sham surgery or varying degrees of ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. UmtDNA increased in mice after 10-15 minutes of ischemia and positively correlated with ischemia time. Furthermore, UmtDNA was predictive of AKI in the mouse model. Finally, UmtDNA levels were negatively correlated with renal cortical mtDNA and mitochondrial gene expression. These translational studies demonstrate that UmtDNA is associated with recovery from AKI following cardiac surgery by serving as an indicator of mitochondrial integrity. Thus, UmtDNA may serve as valuable biomarker for the development of mitochondrial targeted therapies in AKI. PMID:26287315

  12. Disrupted functional connectivity of the default mode network due to acute vestibular deficit

    PubMed Central

    Klingner, Carsten M.; Volk, Gerd F.; Brodoehl, Stefan; Witte, Otto W.; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular neuritis is defined as a sudden unilateral partial failure of the vestibular nerve that impairs the forwarding of vestibular information from the labyrinth. The patient suffers from vertigo, horizontal nystagmus and postural instability with a tendency toward ipsilesional falls. Although vestibular neuritis is a common disease, the central mechanisms to compensate for the loss of precise vestibular information remain poorly understood. It was hypothesized that symptoms following acute vestibular neuritis originate from difficulties in the processing of diverging sensory information between the responsible brain networks. Accordingly an altered resting activity was shown in multiple brain areas of the task-positive network. Because of the known balance between the task-positive and task-negative networks (default mode network; DMN) we hypothesize that also the DMN is involved. Here, we employ functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the resting state to investigate changes in the functional connectivity between the DMN and task-positive networks, in a longitudinal design combined with measurements of caloric function. We demonstrate an initially disturbed connectedness of the DMN after vestibular neuritis. We hypothesize that the disturbed connectivity between the default mode network and particular parts of the task-positive network might be related to a sustained utilization of processing capacity by diverging sensory information. The current results provide some insights into mechanisms of central compensation following an acute vestibular deficit and the importance of the DMN in this disease. PMID:25379422

  13. Boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors: Enhanced survival following intracarotid injection of sodium borocaptate with or without blood-brain barrier disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.; Barth, R.F.; Rotaru, J.H.

    1997-02-01

    Sodium borocaptate (Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 11}SH or BSH) has been used clinically for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of patients with primary brain tumors. The purpose of the present study was to determine if tumor uptake of BSH and efficacy of BNCT could be enhanced in F98 glioma-bearing rats by intracarotid (i.c.) injection of the compound with or without blood-brain barrier disruption (BBB-D). 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Aroclor 1254 disrupts liver glycogen metabolism and enhances acute stressor-mediated glycogenolysis in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Steve; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of short-term exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls on the acute stress response in rainbow trout. Fish were exposed to dietary Aroclor1254 (10mg kg(-1) body mass/day) for 3 days and then subjected to a 3-min handling disturbance and sampled over a 24h recovery after the stressor exposure. In the pre-stress fish, PCB exposure significantly elevated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and cytochrome P4501A1 (Cyp1A1) mRNA abundance and Cyp1A protein expression confirming AhR activation. There was no significant effect of PCB on plasma cortisol and glucose levels, while plasma lactate levels were significantly elevated compared to the sham group. PCB exposure significantly elevated liver glycogen content and hexokinase activity, whereas lactate dehydrogenase activity was depressed. Short-term PCB exposure did not modify the acute stressor-induced plasma cortisol, glucose and lactate responses. Liver glycogen content dropped significantly after stressor exposure in the PCB group but not in the sham group. This was matched by a significantly higher liver LDH activity and a lower HK activity during recovery in the PCB group suggesting enhanced glycolytic capacity to fuel hepatic metabolism. Liver AhR, but not Cyp1A1, transcript levels were significantly reduced during recovery from handling stressor in the Aroclor fed fish. Collectively, this study demonstrates that short-term PCB exposure may impair the liver metabolic performance that is critical to cope with the enhanced energy demand associated with additional stressor exposure in rainbow trout. PMID:21745595

  15. Disrupted Nitric Oxide Metabolism from Type II Diabetes and Acute Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Ashley P.; Kipen, Howard; Laumbach, Robert; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Kelly-McNeill, Kathleen; Cepeda, Clarimel; Fan, Zhi-Hua; Amorosa, Louis; Lubitz, Sara; Schneider, Stephen; Gow, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Type II diabetes is an established cause of vascular impairment. Particulate air pollution is known to exacerbate cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, particularly in susceptible populations. This study set out to determine the impact of exposure to traffic pollution, with and without particle filtration, on vascular endothelial function in Type II diabetes. Endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO) has previously been linked to vascular health. Reactive hyperemia induces a significant increase in plasma nitrite, the proximal metabolite of NO, in healthy subjects, while diabetics have a lower and more variable level of response. Twenty type II diabetics and 20 controls (ages 46–70 years) were taken on a 1.5hr roadway traffic air pollution exposure as passengers. We analyzed plasma nitrite, as a measure of vascular function, using forearm ischemia to elicit a reactive hyperemic response before and after exposure to one ride with and one without filtration of the particle components of pollution. Control subjects displayed a significant increase in plasma nitrite levels during reactive hyperemia. This response was no longer present following exposure to traffic air pollution, but did not vary with whether or not the particle phase was filtered out. Diabetics did not display an increase in nitrite levels following reactive hyperemia. This response was not altered following pollution exposure. These data suggest that components of acute traffic pollution exposure diminish vascular reactivity in non-diabetic individuals. It also confirms that type II diabetics have a preexisting diminished ability to appropriately respond to a vascular challenge, and that traffic pollution exposure does not cause a further measureable acute change in plasma nitrite levels in Type II diabetics. PMID:26656561

  16. Facilitators and barriers to doing workplace mental health research: Case study of acute psychological trauma in a public transit system.

    PubMed

    Links, Paul S; Bender, Ash; Eynan, Rahel; O'Grady, John; Shah, Ravi

    2016-03-10

    The Acute Psychological Trauma (APT) Study was a collaboration between an acute care hospital, a specialized multidisciplinary program designed to meet the mental health needs of injured workers, and a large urban public transit system. The overall purpose was to evaluate a Best Practices Intervention (BPI) for employees affected by acute psychological trauma compared to a Treatment as Usual (TAU) group. The specific purpose is to discuss facilitators and barriers that were recognized in implementing and carrying out mental health research in a workplace setting. Over the course of the APT study, a joint implementation committee was responsible for day-to-day study operations and made regular observations on the facilitators and barriers that arose throughout the study. The facilitators to this study included the longstanding relationships among the partners, increased recognition for the need of mental health research in the workplace, and the existence of a community advisory committee. The significant barriers to doing this study of mental health research in the workplace included differences in organizational culture, inconsistent union support, co-interventions, and stigma. Researchers and funding agencies need to be flexible and provide additional resources in order to overcome the barriers that can exist doing workplace mental health research. PMID:26967029

  17. Noninvasive localized delivery of Herceptin to the mouse brain by MRI-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Manabu; McDannold, Nathan; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-08-01

    Antibody-based anticancer agents are promising chemotherapeutic agents. Among these agents, Herceptin (trastuzumab), a humanized anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/c-erbB2) monoclonal antibody, has been used successfully in patients with breast cancer. However, in patients with brain metastasis, the blood-brain barrier limits its use, and a different delivery method is needed to treat these patients. Here, we report that Herceptin can be delivered locally and noninvasively into the mouse central nervous system through the blood-brain barrier under image guidance by using an MRI-guided focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier disruption technique. The amount of Herceptin delivered to the target tissue was correlated with the extent of the MRI-monitored barrier opening, making it possible to estimate indirectly the amount of Herceptin delivered. Histological changes attributable to this procedure were minimal. This method may represent a powerful technique for the delivery of macromolecular agents such as antibodies to treat patients with diseases of the central nervous system. brain tumor | microbubble

  18. Secondary hypoxia exacerbates acute disruptions of energy metabolism in rats resulting from fluid percussion injury.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Richard A; Widholm, John; Long, Joseph B

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to determine whether secondary hypoxia exacerbates the metabolic consequences of fluid percussion injury (FPI). In Experiment I, rats were trained to press a lever for their entire daily ration of food at any time during a 12-h light/dark cycle and run in an activity wheel. After food intake and body weight stabilized, rats were surgically prepared, assigned to one of four groups [FPI+Hypoxia (IH), FPI+Normoxia (IN), Sham Injury+Hypoxia (SH), Sham Injury+Normoxia (SN)] and, after recovery from surgery, anesthetized with halothane delivered by a 21% O2 source. Immediately after injury or sham injury, the O2 source was switched to 13% for rats in Groups IH and SH for 30 min. Post-traumatic hypoxemia exacerbated the ensuing FPI-induced reductions of food intake and body weight, but did not change FPI-induced reduction in wheel running. In Experiment II, rats were assigned to one of three groups (SH, IN, or IH) and subjected to sham injury and 13% O2 or FPI and either 13 or 21% O2. Immediately after 30 min of hypoxia or normoxia, rats were confined to metabolism cages that were used to quantify rates of oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2), and heat production (H). Post-traumatic hypoxia exacerbated the FPI-induced increases in VO2, VCO2, and H. The results of Experiments I and II provide convergent confirmation that secondary hypoxemia exacerbates the FPI-induced hypermetabolic state in rats and therefore might significantly exacerbate the brain injury-induced disruptions of energy metabolism in humans. PMID:15836897

  19. Acute Calcium Ingestion Attenuates Exercise-induced Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Daniel W; Hansen, Kent C; Van Pelt, Rachael E; Witten, Michael; Wolfe, Pamela; Kohrt, Wendy M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Exercise is associated with a decrease in bone mineral density under certain conditions. One potential mechanism is increased bone resorption due to an exercise-induced increase in parathyroid hormone (PTH), possibly triggered by dermal calcium loss. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether calcium supplementation either before or during exercise attenuates exercise-induced increases in PTH and C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX; a marker of bone resorption). Methods Male endurance athletes (n=20) completed three 35-km cycling time trials under differing calcium supplementation conditions: 1) 1000 mg calcium 20 minutes before exercise and placebo during, 2) placebo before and 250 mg calcium every 15 minutes during exercise (1000 mg total), or 3) placebo before and during exercise. Calcium was delivered in a 1000 mg/L solution. Supplementation was double-blinded and trials were performed in random order. PTH, CTX, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP; a marker of bone formation), and ionized calcium (iCa) were measured before and immediately after exercise. Results CTX increased and iCa decreased similarly in response to exercise under all test conditions. When compared to placebo, calcium supplementation before exercise attenuated the increase in PTH (55.8 ± 15.0 vs. 74.0 ± 14.2; mean ± SE; p=0.04); there was a similar trend (58.0 ± 17.4; p=0.07) for calcium supplementation during exercise. There were no effects of calcium on changes in CTX, BAP, and iCa. Conclusions Calcium supplementation before exercise attenuated the disruption of PTH. Further research is needed to determine the effects of repeated increases in PTH and CTX on bone (i.e., exercise training), and whether calcium supplementation can diminish any exercise-induced demineralization. PMID:20798655

  20. Contribution of G-CSF to the acute mobilization of endothelial precursor cells by vascular disrupting agents

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Yuval; Tang, Terence; Woloszynek, Jill; Daenen, Laura G.; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Cai, Shi-Rong; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Voest, Emile E.; Chaplin, David; Smythe, Jon; Harris, Adrian; Nathan, Paul; Judson, Ian; Rustin, Gordon; Bertolini, Francesco; Link, Daniel C.; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) cause acute shutdown of abnormal established tumor vasculature, followed by massive intratumoral hypoxia and necrosis. However, a viable rim of tumor tissue invariably remains from which tumor regrowth rapidly resumes. We have recently shown that an acute systemic mobilization and homing of bone marrow derived circulating endothelial precursor cells (CEPs) can promote tumor regrowth following treatment with either a VDA or certain chemotherapy drugs. The molecular mediators of this systemic reactive host process are unknown. Here we show that following treatment of mice with OXi-4503, a second generation potent pro-drug derivative of combretastatin-A 4 phosphate (CA4P), rapid increases in circulating plasma VEGF, SDF-1, and G-CSF levels are detected. With the aim of determining whether G-CSF is involved in VDA-induced CEP mobilization, mutant G-CSF-R−/− mice were treated with OXI-4503. We found that as opposed to wildtype controls, G-CSF-R−/− mice failed to mobilize CEPs or show induction of SDF-1 plasma levels. Furthermore, Lewis lung carcinomas grown in such mice treated with OXi-4503 showed greater levels of necrosis compared to tumors treated in wildtype mice. Evidence for rapid elevations in circulating plasma G-CSF, VEGF, and SDF-1 were also observed in VDA (CA4P) treated cancer patients. These results highlight the possible impact of drug-induced G-CSF on tumor re-growth following certain cytotoxic drug therapies, in this case using a VDA, and hence G-CSF as a possible therapeutic target. PMID:19738066

  1. Deferoxamine inhibits microglial activation, attenuates blood-brain barrier disruption, rescues dendritic damage, and improves spatial memory in a mouse model of microhemorrhages.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Fei; Lan, Yue; Zhang, Qun; Liu, Dong-Xu; Wang, Qinmei; Liang, Feng-Ying; Zeng, Jin-Sheng; Xu, Guang-Qing; Pei, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral microbleeds are strongly linked to cognitive dysfunction in the elderly. Iron accumulation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of intracranial hemorrhage. Deferoxamine (DFX), a metal chelator, removes iron overload and protects against brain damage in intracranial hemorrhage. In this study, the protective effects of DFX against microhemorrhage were examined in mice. C57BL6 and Thy-1 green fluorescent protein transgenic mice were subjected to perforating artery microhemorrhages on the right posterior parietal cortex using two-photon laser irradiation. DFX (100 mg/kg) was administered 6 h after microhemorrhage induction, followed by every 12 h for three consecutive days. The water maze task was conducted 7 days after induction of microhemorrhages, followed by measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability, iron deposition, microglial activation, and dendritic damage. Laser-induced multiple microbleeds in the right parietal cortex clearly led to spatial memory disruption, iron deposits, microglial activation, and dendritic damage, which were significantly attenuated by DFX, supporting the targeting of iron overload as a therapeutic option and the significant potential of DFX in microhemorrhage treatment. Irons accumulation after intracranial hemorrhage induced a serious secondary damage to the brain. We proposed that irons accumulation after parietal microhemorrhages impaired spatial cognition. After parietal multiple microhemorrhages, increased irons and ferritin contents induced blood-brain barrier disruption, microglial activation, and further induced dendrites loss, eventually impaired the water maze, deferoxamine treatment protected from these damages. PMID:27167158

  2. Effect of rapid correction of hyponatremia on the blood-brain barrier of rats.

    PubMed

    Adler, S; Verbalis, J G; Williams, D

    1995-05-01

    Brain demyelination sometimes follows rapid correction of hyponatremia, especially if the hyponatremia is chronic. During correction brain water decreases and the brain shrinks. The present study examined whether such shrinkage might be sufficient to disrupt the tight junctions of the blood-brain barrier. Barrier intactness was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging and intravenous gadolinium contrast administration. Hypertonic saline infusion rapidly increased the plasma sodium concentration and caused barrier disruption more frequently in chronic than in acute hyponatremic rats. Similar increases in plasma sodium concentration did not disrupt the barrier in normonatremic rats. The disruption appeared to be due to altered plasma osmolality since infusion of hypertonic mannitol, which raised plasma osmolality without changing the plasma sodium concentration, disrupted the barrier in hyponatremic but not normonatremic rats. Moreover, the osmotic threshold for barrier disruption was lowest in chronic hyponatremia, intermediate in acute hyponatremia, and highest in normonatremia. The greater susceptibility to osmotic disruption in chronic hyponatremia suggests that blood-brain barrier disruption may play a significant role in causing the demyelination sometimes found following too rapid correction of hyponatremia, possibly through exposure of oligodendrocytes to plasma macromolecules such as complement. PMID:7648255

  3. Outpatient care of patients with acute myeloid leukemia: Benefits, barriers, and future considerations.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Jennifer E; Buckley, Sarah A; Walter, Roland B

    2016-06-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who receive intensive induction or re-induction chemotherapy with curative intent typically experience prolonged cytopenias upon completion of treatment. Due to concerns regarding infection and bleeding risk as well as significant transfusion and supportive care requirements, patients have historically remained in the hospital until blood count recovery-a period of approximately 30 days. The rising cost of AML care has prompted physicians to reconsider this practice, and a number of small studies have suggested the safety and feasibility of providing outpatient supportive care to patients following intensive AML (re-) induction therapy. Potential benefits include a significant reduction of healthcare costs, improvement in quality of life, and decreased risk of hospital-acquired infections. In this article, we will review the currently available literature regarding this practice and discuss questions to be addressed in future studies. In addition, we will consider some of the barriers that must be overcome by institutions interested in implementing an "early discharge" policy. While outpatient management of selected AML patients appears safe, careful planning is required in order to provide the necessary support, education and rapid management of serious complications that occur among this very vulnerable patient population. PMID:27101148

  4. The impact of standing wave effects on transcranial focused ultrasound disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Meaghan A.; Huang, Yuexi; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-09-01

    Microbubble-mediated disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for targeted drug delivery using focused ultrasound shows great potential as a therapy for a wide range of brain disorders. This technique is currently at the pre-clinical stage and important work is being conducted in animal models. Measurements of standing waves in ex vivo rat skulls were conducted using an optical hydrophone and a geometry dependence was identified. Standing waves could not be eliminated through the use of swept frequencies, which have been suggested to eliminate standing waves. Definitive standing wave patterns were detected in over 25% of animals used in a single study. Standing waves were successfully eliminated using a wideband composite sharply focused transducer and a reduced duty cycle. The modified pulse parameters were used in vivo to disrupt the BBB in a rat indicating that, unlike some other bioeffects, BBB disruption is not dependent on standing wave conditions. Due to the high variability of standing waves and the inability to correctly estimate in situ pressures given standing wave conditions, attempts to minimize standing waves should be made in all future work in this field to ensure that results are clinically translatable.

  5. Treatment with Sodium Orthovanadate Reduces Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption via Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog Deleted on Chromosome 10 (PTEN) Phosphorylation in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yu; Suzuki, Hidenori; Altay, Orhan; Chen, Hank; Zhang, John H

    2012-01-01

    Attenuation of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is one of the therapeutic candidates for treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In this study, the protective effect of sodium orthovanadate (SOV) on BBB disruption was investigated in SAH using the endovascular perforation model. Fifty-five rats were randomly assigned to sham-operated, SAH treated with saline (as a vehicle) or 10mg/kg SOV groups, and evaluated for neurofunction and Evans blue dye extravasation. The phosphorylation of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), occludin, and collagen-IV were examined by Western blot analyses. Cell death on endothelial cells were revealed by immunofluorescence and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine 5′-triphosphate-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining. SOV significantly improved neurofunction and reduced Evans blue dye extravasation in brains after SAH. SOV phosphorylated PTEN, decreased phospho-JNK and MMP-9, and preserved occludin expression. SOV also attenuated SAH-induced capillary endothelial cell death. The current study showed that SOV was protective against BBB disruption after SAH possibly via PTEN phosphorylation. PMID:22183833

  6. The anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin protects the genital mucosal epithelial barrier from disruption and blocks replication of HIV-1 and HSV-2.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Victor H; Nazli, Aisha; Dizzell, Sara E; Mueller, Kristen; Kaushic, Charu

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a known mechanism that facilitates HIV acquisition and the spread of infection. In this study, we evaluated whether curcumin, a potent and safe anti-inflammatory compound, could be used to abrogate inflammatory processes that facilitate HIV-1 acquisition in the female genital tract (FGT) and contribute to HIV amplification. Primary, human genital epithelial cells (GECs) were pretreated with curcumin and exposed to HIV-1 or HIV glycoprotein 120 (gp120), both of which have been shown to disrupt epithelial tight junction proteins, including ZO-1 and occludin. Pre-treatment with curcumin prevented disruption of the mucosal barrier by maintaining ZO-1 and occludin expression and maintained trans-epithelial electric resistance across the genital epithelium. Curcumin pre-treatment also abrogated the gp120-mediated upregulation of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-6, which mediate barrier disruption, as well as the chemokines IL-8, RANTES and interferon gamma-induced protein-10 (IP-10), which are capable of recruiting HIV target cells to the FGT. GECs treated with curcumin and exposed to the sexually transmitted co-infecting microbes HSV-1, HSV-2 and Neisseria gonorrhoeae were unable to elicit innate inflammatory responses that indirectly induced activation of the HIV promoter and curcumin blocked Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated induction of HIV replication in chronically infected T-cells. Finally, curcumin treatment resulted in significantly decreased HIV-1 and HSV-2 replication in chronically infected T-cells and primary GECs, respectively. All together, our results suggest that the use of anti-inflammatory compounds such as curcumin may offer a viable alternative for the prevention and/or control of HIV replication in the FGT. PMID:25856395

  7. Effects of pharmacological and genetic disruption of CXCR4 chemokine receptor function in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Shubhchintan; Cho, Byung S; Ghosh, Dipanjan; Sivina, Mariela; Koehrer, Stefan; Müschen, Markus; Peled, Amnon; Davis, Richard E; Konopleva, Marina; Burger, Jan A

    2016-08-01

    B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL) cells express high levels of CXCR4 chemokine receptors for homing and retention within the marrow microenvironment. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) secrete CXCL12, the ligand for CXCR4, and protect B-ALL cells from cytotoxic drugs. Therefore, the therapeutic use of CXCR4 antagonists has been proposed to disrupt cross talk between B-ALL cells and the protective stroma. Because CXCR4 antagonists can have activating agonistic function, we compared the genetic and pharmacological deletion of CXCR4 in B-ALL cells, using CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing and CXCR4 antagonists that are in clinical use (plerixafor, BKT140). Both genetic and pharmacological CXCR4 inhibition significantly reduced B-ALL cell migration to CXCL12 gradients and beneath BMSC, and restored drug sensitivity to dexamethasone, vincristine and cyclophosphamide. NOD/SCID/IL-2rγnull mice injected with CXCR4 gene-deleted B-ALL cells had significant delay in disease progression and superior survival when compared to control mice injected with CXCR4 wild-type B-ALL cells. These findings indicate that anti-leukaemia activity of CXCR4 antagonists is primarily due to CXCR4 inhibition, rather than agonistic activity, and corroborate that CXCR4 is an important target to overcome stroma-mediated drug resistance in B-ALL. PMID:27071778

  8. Lead exposure results in hearing loss and disruption of the cochlear blood-labyrinth barrier and the protective role of iron supplement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinqin; Zheng, Gang; Wu, Yongxiang; Shen, Xuefeng; Jing, Jinfei; Yu, Tao; Song, Han; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2013-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the impact of lead (Pb(2+)) on the auditory system and its molecular mechanisms. Pb(AC)2 was administrated to male SD rats aged 21-22 d for 8 weeks at a dose of 300ppm. Male guinea pigs were also administrated with 50mg/kg Pb(AC)2 two times a week for 8 weeks. The auditory nerve-brainstem evoked responses (ABR) was recorded and the morphological changes of the outer hair cells (OHCs) were observed with Phallodin-FITC staining. In addition, the integrity of the blood-labyrinth barrier was observed by TEM and the expression of tight junction proteins (TJPs) in the cochlear stria vascularis was determined by immunofluorescence. Our results showed that Pb(2+) exposure resulted in increased ABR threshold in both rats and guinea pigs. Abnormal shapes and loss of OHCs were found in the cochlear basilar membrane following the Pb(2+) exposure. TEM study showed that the tight junctions between the endothelial cells and the border cells were lost and disrupted. Down-regulation of the occludin, ZO-1 and claudin-5 in the stria vascularis suggested that the increased permeability of the blood-labyrinth barrier may attribute to the Pb(2+)-induced decrease of TJPs' expression. Additionally, Fe(2+) supplement partly reversed the Pb(2+)-induced hearing loss and down-regulation of TJPs. Taken together, these data indicate that the disruption of blood-labyrinth barrier by down-regulating the expression of TJPs plays a role in the Pb(2+)-induced hearing loss, and Fe(2+) supplement protects the auditory system against Pb(2+)-induced toxicity and may have significant clinical implications. PMID:24144481

  9. Overexpression of plastin 3 in Sertoli cells disrupts actin microfilament bundle homeostasis and perturbs the tight junction barrier.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis, actin microfilaments arranged as bundles near the Sertoli cell plasma membrane at the Sertoli cell-cell interface that constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB) undergo extensive re-organization by converting between bundled and unbundled/branched configuration to give plasticity to the F-actin network. This is crucial to accommodate the transport of preleptotene spermatocytes across the BTB. Herein, we sought to examine changes in the actin microfilament organization at the Sertoli cell BTB using an in vitro model since Sertoli cells cultured in vitro is known to establish a functional tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier that mimics the BTB in vivo. Plastin 3, a known actin microfilament cross-linker and bundling protein, when overexpressed in Sertoli cells using a mammalian expression vector pCI-neo was found to perturb the Sertoli cell TJ-barrier function even though its overexpression increased the overall actin bundling activity in these cells. Furthermore, plastin 3 overexpression also perturbed the localization and distribution of BTB-associated proteins, such as occludin-ZO1 and N-cadherin-β-catenin, this thus destabilized the barrier function. Collectively, these data illustrate that a delicate balance of actin microfilaments between organized in bundles vs. an unbundled/branched configuration is crucial to confer the homeostasis of the BTB and its integrity. PMID:27559491

  10. Corneodesmosin gene ablation induces lethal skin-barrier disruption and hair-follicle degeneration related to desmosome dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Emilie A; Huchenq, Anne; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R; Metzger, Daniel; Chambon, Pierre; Ghyselinck, Norbert B; Serre, Guy; Jonca, Nathalie; Guerrin, Marina

    2009-08-01

    Corneodesmosin (CDSN) is specific to desmosomes of epithelia undergoing cornification, mainly the epidermis and the inner root sheath of the hair follicles. CDSN nonsense mutations are associated with hypotrichosis simplex of the scalp, a rare disease that leads to complete baldness in young adults. CDSN displays adhesive properties, mostly attributable to its N-terminal glycine-rich domain, and is sequentially proteolyzed as corneocytes migrate towards the skin surface. K14-promoter driven Cre-mediated deletion of Cdsn in mice resulted in neonatal death as a result of epidermal tearing upon minor mechanical stress. Ultrastructural analyses revealed a desmosomal break at the interface between the living and cornified layers. After grafting onto nude mice, knockout skin showed a chronic defect in the epidermal permeability barrier. The epidermis was first hyperproliferative with a thick cornified layer, then, both the epidermis and the hair follicles degenerated. In adults, Cdsn deletion resulted in similar histological abnormalities and in a lethal barrier defect. We demonstrate that Cdsn is not essential for skin-barrier formation in utero, but is vital throughout life to preserve this barrier by maintaining desmosome integrity. The strong adhesive function that the protein confers on corneodesmosomes also seems necessary for maintaining the architecture of the hair follicle. PMID:19596793

  11. IL-22 modulates gut epithelial and immune barrier functions following acute alcohol exposure and burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Rendon, Juan L.; Li, Xiaoling; Akhtar, Suhail; Choudhry, Mashkoor A.

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)–22 maintains gut epithelial integrity and expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) Reg3β and Reg3γ. Our laboratory has shown that acute alcohol/ethanol (EtOH) exposure prior to burn injury results in increased gut permeability, intestinal T cell suppression and enhanced bacterial translocation. Herein, we determined the effect of combined EtOH intoxication and burn injury on intestinal levels of IL-22 as well as Reg3β and Reg3γ expression. We further examined whether in vivo restitution of IL-22 restores gut permeability, Reg3β and Reg3γ levels, and bacterial load (e.g. gut bacterial growth) within the intestine following EtOH and burn injury. Male mice, ~25g, were gavaged with EtOH (2.9 mg/kg) prior to receiving a ~12.5% total body surface area full thickness burn. Mice were immediately treated with saline control or IL-22 (1 mg/kg) by i.p. injection. One day post injury, there was a significant decrease in intestinal IL-22, Reg3β and Reg3γ expression along with an increase in intestinal permeability and gut bacterial load following EtOH combined with burn injury, as compared to sham injury. Treatment with IL-22 normalized Reg3β and Reg3γ expression, and attenuated the increase in intestinal permeability following EtOH and burn injury. Qualitatively, IL-22 treatment reduced the bacterial load in nearly half of mice receiving EtOH combined with burn injury. Our data indicate that IL-22 maintains gut epithelial and immune barrier integrity following EtOH and burn injury; thus, the IL-22/AMP pathway may provide a therapeutic target for the treatment of patients who sustain burn injury under the influence of EtOH. PMID:23143063

  12. Protective effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on epithelial barrier disruption caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunpeng; Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Weina; Ma, Xianyong; Wang, Li; Yang, Xuefen; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-04-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) play an important role in maintaining the mucosal barrier function and gastrointestinal health of animals. Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) was reported to protect the intestinal barrier function of early-weaned piglets against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 challenge; however, the underlying cellular mechanism of this protection was unclear. Here, an established intestinal porcine epithelia cell (IPEC-J2) model was used to investigate the protective effects and related mechanisms of L. plantarum on epithelial barrier damages induced by ETEC K88. Epithelial permeability, expression of inflammatory cytokines, and abundance of TJ proteins, were determined. Pre-treatment with L. plantarum for 6h prevented the reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) (P<0.05), inhibited the increased transcript abundances of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) (P<0.05), decreased expression of claudin-1, occludin and zonula occludens (ZO-1) (P<0.05) and protein expression of occludin (P<0.05) of IPEC-J2 cells caused by ETEC K88. Moreover, the mRNA expression of negative regulators of toll-like receptors (TLRs) [single Ig Il-1-related receptor (SIGIRR), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 3 (Bcl3), and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1)] in IPEC-J2 cells pre-treated with L. plantarum were higher (P<0.05) compared with those in cells just exposed to K88. Furthermore, L. plantarum was shown to regulate proteins of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. These results indicated that L. plantarum may improve epithelial barrier function by maintenance of TEER, inhibiting the reduction of TJ proteins, and reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines induced by ETEC K88, possibly through modulation of TLRs, NF-κB and MAPK pathways. PMID:27032504

  13. Targeted disruption of the mouse gene encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein provides insights into congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Kathleen M.; Soo, Shiu-Ching; Wetsel, William C.; Stocco, Douglas M.; Clark, Barbara J.; Parker, Keith L.

    1997-01-01

    An essential component of regulated steroidogenesis is the translocation of cholesterol from the cytoplasm to the inner mitochondrial membrane where the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme carries out the first committed step in steroidogenesis. Recent studies showed that a 30-kDa mitochondrial phosphoprotein, designated steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), is essential for this translocation. To allow us to explore the roles of StAR in a system amenable to experimental manipulation and to develop an animal model for the human disorder lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH), we used targeted gene disruption to produce StAR knockout mice. These StAR knockout mice were indistinguishable initially from wild-type littermates, except that males and females had female external genitalia. After birth, they failed to grow normally and died from adrenocortical insufficiency. Hormone assays confirmed severe defects in adrenal steroids—with loss of negative feedback regulation at hypothalamic–pituitary levels—whereas hormones constituting the gonadal axis did not differ significantly from levels in wild-type littermates. Histologically, the adrenal cortex of StAR knockout mice contained florid lipid deposits, with lesser deposits in the steroidogenic compartment of the testis and none in the ovary. The sex-specific differences in gonadal involvement support a two-stage model of the pathogenesis of StAR deficiency, with trophic hormone stimulation inducing progressive accumulation of lipids within the steroidogenic cells and ultimately causing their death. These StAR knockout mice provide a useful model system in which to determine the mechanisms of StAR’s essential roles in adrenocortical and gonadal steroidogenesis. PMID:9326645

  14. Rapid disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junction and barrier dysfunction by ionizing radiation in mouse colon in vivo: protection by N-acetyl-l-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pradeep K; Gangwar, Ruchika; Manda, Bhargavi; Meena, Avtar S; Yadav, Nikki; Szabo, Erzsebet; Balogh, Andrea; Lee, Sue Chin; Tigyi, Gabor; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-05-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on apical junctions in colonic epithelium and mucosal barrier function in mice in vivo. Adult mice were subjected to total body irradiation (4 Gy) with or without N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) feeding for 5 days before irradiation. At 2-24 h postirradiation, the integrity of colonic epithelial tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and the actin cytoskeleton was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis of detergent-insoluble fractions for TJ and AJ proteins. The barrier function was evaluated by measuring vascular-to-luminal flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin in vivo and luminal-to-mucosal flux in vitro. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring protein thiol oxidation. Confocal microscopy showed that radiation caused redistribution of occludin, zona occludens-1, claudin-3, E-cadherin, and β-catenin, as well as the actin cytoskeleton as early as 2 h postirradiation, and this effect was sustained for at least 24 h. Feeding NAC before irradiation blocked radiation-induced disruption of TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton. Radiation increased mucosal permeability to inulin in colon, which was blocked by NAC feeding. The level of reduced-protein thiols in colon was depleted by radiation with a concomitant increase in the level of oxidized-protein thiol. NAC feeding blocked the radiation-induced protein thiol oxidation. These data demonstrate that radiation rapidly disrupts TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism that can be prevented by NAC feeding. PMID:26822914

  15. Intra-Subtype Variation in Enteroadhesion Accounts for Differences in Epithelial Barrier Disruption and Is Associated with Metronidazole Resistance in Blastocystis Subtype-7

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei

    2014-01-01

    Blastocystis is an extracellular, enteric pathogen that induces intestinal disorders in a range of hosts including humans. Recent studies have identified potential parasite virulence factors in and host responses to this parasite; however, little is known about Blastocystis-host attachment, which is crucial for colonization and virulence of luminal stages. By utilizing 7 different strains of the parasite belonging to two clinically relevant subtypes ST-4 and ST-7, we investigated Blastocystis-enterocyte adhesion and its association with parasite-induced epithelial barrier disruption. We also suggest that drug resistance in ST-7 strains might result in fitness cost that manifested as impairment of parasite adhesion and, consequently, virulence. ST-7 parasites were generally highly adhesive to Caco-2 cells and preferred binding to intercellular junctions. These strains also induced disruption of ZO-1 and occludin tight junction proteins as well as increased dextran-FITC flux across epithelial monolayers. Interestingly, their adhesion was correlated with metronidazole (Mz) susceptibility. Mz resistant (Mzr) strains were found to be less pathogenic, owing to compromised adhesion. Moreover, tolerance of nitrosative stress was also reduced in the Mzr strains. In conclusion, the findings indicate that Blastocystis attaches to intestinal epithelium and leads to epithelial barrier dysfunction and that drug resistance might entail a fitness cost in parasite virulence by limiting entero-adhesiveness. This is the first study of the cellular basis for strain-to-strain variation in parasite pathogenicity. Intra- and inter-subtype variability in cytopathogenicity provides a possible explanation for the diverse clinical outcomes of Blastocystis infections. PMID:24851944

  16. Excess salt exacerbates blood-brain barrier disruption via a p38/MAPK/SGK1-dependent pathway in permanent cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tongshuai; Fang, Shaohong; Wan, Cong; Kong, Qingfei; Wang, Guangyou; Wang, Shuangshuang; Zhang, Haoqiang; Zou, Haifeng; Sun, Bo; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Yao; Mu, Lili; Wang, Jinghua; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Haiyu; Wang, Dandan; Li, Hulun

    2015-01-01

    High salt diet (HSD) is one of the most important risk factors that contribute to many vascular diseases including ischemic stroke. One proposed mechanism underlying the disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) mediated by HSD is indirectly through enhancing blood pressure. The direct role of HSD on BBB integrity is unclear. Our purpose is to determine whether and how HSD might be involved in BBB breakdown during ischemia. To test that, we induced model of cerebral ischemia by permanent middle cerebral artery ligation (pMCAL) in either normal diet or HSD fed mice. We observed that HSD significantly enhanced ischemic brain damage which was associated with enhanced BBB disruption, increased leukocytes infiltration and loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins expression without apparently altering blood pressure. Our in vitro experiment also revealed that sodium chloride (NaCl) treatment down-regulated TJ protein expression by endothelial cells and substantially increased BBB permeability during starvation. Inhibition of p38/MAPK/SGK1 pathway eliminated the effect of NaCl on BBB permeability in vitro. In addition, we noticed a positive correlation between urinary sodium levels and ischemic lesion size in stroke patients. Together, our study demonstrates a hypertension-independent role of HSD during ischemia and provides rationale for post cerebral ischemic attack management. PMID:26549644

  17. Effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 on blood-brain barrier disruption in focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Chi, Oak Z; Barsoum, Sylviana; Grayson, Jeremy; Hunter, Christine; Liu, Xia; Weiss, Harvey R

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether WIN 55,212-2 (WIN), a cannabinoid receptor agonist, could attenuate blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in focal cerebral ischemia in rats and whether the CB 1 receptor antagonist rimonabant could prevent this attenuation. A total of 0.3 or 1 mg/kg of WIN was injected intravenously before and after permanent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. Some animals were pretreated with rimonabant 2 mg/kg i.p. before receiving 0.3 mg/kg of WIN. At 1 h after MCA occlusion, BBB permeability was determined by measuring the transfer coefficient (K(i)) of (14)C-α-aminoisobutyric acid and the volume of dextran distribution. With MCA occlusion, K(i) increased in the ischemic cortex (IC) in all of the experimental groups. However, the K(i) of the IC of the WIN 0.3 and 1 mg/kg groups was lower (–46 and –42%, respectively, p < 0.05) than that of the control group. With rimonabant pretreatment, the K(i) of the IC became higher ((+)88%, p < 0.05) than with WIN 0.3 mg/kg alone and similar to that of the control rats. The difference in the volume of dextran distribution between the IC and the contralateral cortex was significant in the control but not in the WIN-treated rats. With rimonabant pretreatment, however, the difference became significant. Our data demonstrated that WIN could attenuate BBB disruption in focal cerebral ischemia and this attenuation could be prevented with rimonabant. Our data suggest an involvement of CB(1) receptors in the regulation of BBB disruption in the early stage of stroke. PMID:22678129

  18. Importance of dose intensity in neuro-oncology clinical trials: summary report of the Sixth Annual Meeting of the Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Consortium.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, N D; Anderson, C P; Bleyer, W A; Cairncross, J G; Cloughesy, T; Eck, S L; Guastadisegni, P; Hall, W A; Muldoon, L L; Patel, S J; Peereboom, D; Siegal, T; Neuwelt, E A

    2001-01-01

    Therapeutic options for the treatment of malignant brain tumors have been limited, in part, because of the presence of the blood-brain barrier. For this reason, the Sixth Annual Meeting of the Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Consortium, the focus of which was the "Importance of Dose Intensity in Neuro-Oncology Clinical Trials," was convened in April 2000, at Government Camp, Mount Hood, Oregon. This meeting, which was supported by the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, brought together clinicians and basic scientists from across the U.S. to discuss the role of dose intensity and enhanced chemotherapy delivery in the treatment of malignant brain tumors and to design multicenter clinical trials. Optimizing chemotherapy delivery to the CNS is crucial, particularly in view of recent progress identifying certain brain tumors as chemosensitive. The discovery that specific constellations of genetic alterations can predict which tumors are chemoresponsive, and can therefore more accurately predict prognosis, has important implications for delivery of intensive, effective chemotherapy regimens with acceptable toxicities. This report summarizes the discussions, future directions, and key questions regarding dose-intensive treatment of primary CNS lymphoma, CNS relapse of systemic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, high-grade glioma, and metastatic cancer of the brain. The promising role of cytoenhancers and chemoprotectants as part of dose-intensive regimens for chemosensitive brain tumors and development of improved gene therapies for malignant gliomas are discussed. PMID:11305417

  19. Increased skin barrier disruption by sodium lauryl sulfate in mice expressing a constitutively active STAT6 in T cells.

    PubMed

    DaSilva, Sonia C; Sahu, Ravi P; Konger, Raymond L; Perkins, Susan M; Kaplan, Mark H; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a pruritic, chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects 10-20% of children and 1-3% of adults worldwide. Recent studies have indicated that the ability of Th2 cytokines, such as interleukin-4 (IL-4) to regulate skin barrier function may be a predisposing factor for AD development. The present studies examined the ability of increased Th2 activity to affect cutaneous barrier function in vivo and epidermal thickening. Mice that express a constitutively active Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 6 (STAT6VT) have increased Th2 cells and a predisposition to allergic inflammation were used in these studies, they demonstrate that topical treatment with the irritant sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) caused increased transepidermal water loss and epidermal thickening in STAT6VT mice over similarly treated wild-type mice. The proliferation marker Ki-67 was increased in the epidermis of STAT6VT compared to the wild-type mice. However, these differences do not appear to be linked to the addition of an irritant as control-treated STAT6VT skin also exhibited elevated Ki-67 levels, suggesting that the increased epidermal thickness in SLS-treated STAT6VT mice is primarily driven by epidermal cell hypertrophy rather than an increase in cellular proliferation. Our results suggest that an environment with increased Th2 cytokines results in abnormal responses to topical irritants. PMID:21959772

  20. Ischemic Postconditioning Decreases Cerebral Edema and Brain Blood Barrier Disruption Caused by Relief of Carotid Stenosis in a Rat Model of Cerebral Hypoperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fuwei; Zhang, Xiaojie; Sun, Ying; Wang, Boyu; Zhou, Chuibing; Luo, Yinan; Ge, Pengfei

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Complications due to brain edema and breakdown of blood brain barrier are an important factor affecting the treatment effects of patients with severe carotid stenosis. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of ischemic postconditioning on brain edema and disruption of blood brain barrier via establishing rat model of hypoperfusion due to severe carotid stenosis. Methods Wistar rat model of hypoperfusion due to severe carotid stenosis was established by binding a stainless microtube to both carotid arteries. Ischemic postconditioning procedure consisted of three cycles of 30 seconds ischemia and 30 seconds reperfusion. Brain edema was evaluated by measuring cerebral water content, and blood brain barrier permeability was assayed by examining cerebral concentration of Evans' Blue (EB) and fluorescein sodium (NaF). ELISA was used to analyze the expression of MMP-9, claudin-5 and occludin. The activity and location of MMP-9 was analyzed by gelatin zymography and in situ zymography, respectively. The distribution of tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin was observed by immunohistochemistry. Results The increased brain water content and cerebral concentration of EB and NaF were suppressed by administration of ischemic postconditioning prior to relief of carotid stenosis. Zymographic studies showed that MMP-9 was mainly located in the cortex and its activity was significantly improved by relief of carotid stenosis and, but the elevated MMP-9 activity was inhibited markedly by ischemic postconditioning. Immunohistochemistry revealed that ischemic postconditioning improved the discontinuous distribution of claudin-5 and occludin. ELISA detected that the expression of up-regulated MMP-9 and down-regulated claudin-5 and occludin caused by carotid relief were all attenuated by ischemic postconditioning. Conclusions Ischemic postconditioning is an effective method to prevent brain edema and improve BBB permeability and could be

  1. Barriers to the Adoption of Safety-Engineered Needles Following a Regulatory Standard: Lessons Learned from Three Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Andrea; Mustard, Cameron A.; Holness, D. Linn; Nichol, Kathryn; Breslin, F. Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of jurisdictions have introduced regulation to accelerate the adoption of safety-engineered needles (SENs). This study examined the transition to SENs in three acute care hospitals prior to and following the implementation of a regulatory standard in Ontario. This paper focuses on the ongoing barriers to the prevention of needlestick injuries among healthcare workers. Methods: Information from document review and 30 informant interviews were used to prepare three case studies detailing each organization's implementation activities and outcomes. Results: All three hospitals responded to the regulatory requirements with integrity and needlestick injuries declined. However, needlestick injuries continued to occur during the activation of safety devices, during procedures and during instrument disposal. The study documented substantial barriers to further progress in needlestick injury prevention. Conclusions: Healthcare organizations should focus on understanding their site-specific challenges that contribute to ongoing injury risk to better understand issues related to product limitations, practice constraints and the work environment. PMID:26571471

  2. Acute modulations in permeability barrier function regulate epidermal cornification: role of caspase-14 and the protease-activated receptor type 2.

    PubMed

    Demerjian, Marianne; Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Tschachler, Erwin; Denecker, Geertrui; Declercq, Wim; Vandenabeele, Peter; Mauro, Theodora; Hupe, Melanie; Crumrine, Debra; Roelandt, Truus; Houben, Evi; Elias, Peter M; Feingold, Kenneth R

    2008-01-01

    Stratum corneum comprises corneocytes, derived from outer stratum granulosum during terminal differentiation, embedded in a lipid-enriched extracellular matrix, secreted from epidermal lamellar bodies. Permeability barrier insults stimulate rapid secretion of preformed lamellar bodies from the outer stratum granulosum, regulated through modulations in ionic gradients and serine protease (SP)/protease-activated receptor type 2 (PAR2) signaling. Because corneocytes are also required for barrier function, we hypothesized that corneocyte formation could also be regulated by barrier function. Barrier abrogation by two unrelated methods initiated a wave of cornification, assessed as TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling-positive cells in stratum granulosum and newly cornified cells by electron microscopy. Because cornification was blocked by occlusion, corneocytes formed specifically in response to barrier, rather than injury or cell replacement, requirements. SP inhibitors and hyperacidification (which decreases SP activity) blocked cornification after barrier disruption. Similarly, cornification was delayed in PAR2(-/-) mice. Although classical markers of apoptosis [poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase and caspase (Casp)-3] remained unchanged, barrier disruption activated Casp-14. Moreover, the pan-Casp inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK delayed cornification, and corneocytes were structurally aberrant in Casp14(-/-) mice. Thus, permeability barrier requirements coordinately drive both the generation of the stratum corneum lipid-enriched extracellular matrix and the transformation of granular cells into corneocytes, in an SP- and Casp-14-dependent manner, signaled by PAR2. PMID:18156206

  3. Acute Kidney Injury in Low-Resource Settings: Barriers to Diagnosis, Awareness, and Treatment and Strategies to Overcome These Barriers.

    PubMed

    Lunyera, Joseph; Kilonzo, Kajiru; Lewington, Andrew; Yeates, Karen; Finkelstein, Fredric O

    2016-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly recognized as a major health problem worldwide, responsible for an estimated 1.4 million deaths per year. The occurrence of and approach to AKI in low-resource settings (LRS) present special challenges due to often limited health care resources, including insufficient numbers of trained personnel, diagnostic tools, and treatment options. Although the International Society of Nephrology set a goal of eliminating preventable deaths from AKI by 2025, implementation of this program in LRS presents major challenges not only because of the lack of resources, but also because of the lack of awareness of the impact of AKI on patient outcomes, factors that are complicated by the challenge of cognitively dissociating the care of patients with AKI from the care of patients with chronic kidney failure. To better understand how to increase the awareness of AKI and develop strategies to improve the identification and treatment of patients with AKI in LRS, we administered an 18-item web-based questionnaire to physicians actively engaged in providing nephrology care in LRS. A checklist was then developed of meaningful and targeted approaches for implementation, with focus on engaging local and regional stakeholders, developing education programs and appropriate guidelines, enhancing training of health care workers, expanding health care resources, linking with other regional health care projects, and broadening research opportunities. PMID:26830256

  4. Prostacyclin post-treatment improves LPS-induced acute lung injury and endothelial barrier recovery via Rap1

    PubMed Central

    Birukova, Anna A.; Meng, Fanyong; Tian, Yufeng; Meliton, Angelo; Sarich, Nicolene; Quilliam, Lawrence A.; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2015-01-01

    Protective effects of prostacyclin (PC) or its stable analog beraprost against agonist-induced lung vascular inflammation have been associated with elevation of intracellular cAMP and Rac GTPase signaling which inhibited the RhoA GTPase-dependent pathway of endothelial barrier dysfunction. This study investigated a distinct mechanism of PC-stimulated lung vascular endothelial (EC) barrier recovery and resolution of LPS-induced inflammation mediated by small GTPase Rap1. Efficient barrier recovery was observed in LPS-challenged pulmonary EC after prostacyslin administration even after 15 hrs of initial inflammatory insult and was accompanied by the significant attenuation of p38 MAP kinase and NFkB signaling and decreased production of IL-8 and soluble ICAM1. These effects were reproduced in cells post-treated with 8CPT, a small molecule activator of Rap1-specific nucleotide exchange factor Epac. By contrast, pharmacologic Epac inhibitor, Rap1 knockdown, or knockdown of cell junction-associated Rap1 effector afadin attenuated EC recovery caused by PC or 8CPT post-treatment. The key role of Rap1 in lung barrier restoration was further confirmed in the murine model of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Lung injury was monitored by measurements of bronchoalveolar lavage protein content, cell count, and Evans blue extravasation and live imaging of vascular leak over 6 days using a fluorescent tracer. The data showed significant acceleration of lung recovery by PC and 8CPT post-treatment, which was abrogated in Rap1a−/− mice. These results suggest that post-treatment with PC triggers the Epac/Rap1/afadin-dependent mechanism of endothelial barrier restoration and downregulation of p38MAPK and NFkB inflammatory cascades, altogether leading to accelerated lung recovery. PMID:25545047

  5. Effects of GABA(A) receptor blockade on regional cerebral blood flow and blood-brain barrier disruption in focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chi, Oak Z; Hunter, Christine; Liu, Xia; Chi, Youngchan; Weiss, Harvey R

    2011-02-15

    In cerebral ischemia, transmission by the inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is altered. This study was performed to determine whether blockade of GABA(A) receptor would affect regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in a focal ischemic area of the brain. Rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and mechanically ventilated. Fifteen minutes after a permanent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, one half of the rats were infused with bicuculline 1mg/kg/min iv for 2 min followed by 0.1mg/kg/min iv to the end of the experiment. The other half were infused with normal saline. At one hour after MCA occlusion, rCBF was determined using ¹⁴C-iodoantipyrine and BBB permeability was determined by measuring the transfer coefficient (Ki) of ¹⁴C-α-aminoisobutyric acid. With MCA occlusion, rCBF was decreased in the ischemic cortex (IC) (-70%) in the control rats. In the bicuculline treated rats, the rCBF of the IC was lower (-48%) than the contralateral cortex but higher than the rCBF of the IC of the control rats (+55%). MCA occlusion increased Ki in the IC of the control rats (+72%) and bicuculline administration increased Ki further (+53%) in the IC. Blockade of GABA(A) receptors did not significantly affect rCBF or BBB permeability in the non-ischemic brain regions under isoflurane anesthesia. Our data demonstrated that blockade of GABA(A) receptors increased rCBF and enhanced the BBB disruption in focal cerebral ischemia. Our data suggest that GABA(A) receptors are involved, at least in part, in modulating rCBF and BBB disruption in focal cerebral ischemia. PMID:21094956

  6. Estrogen provides neuroprotection against brain edema and blood brain barrier disruption through both estrogen receptors α and β following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, Vida; Khaksari, Mohammad; Abbasi, Reza; Maghool, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Estrogen (E2) has neuroprotective effects on blood-brain-barrier (BBB) after traumatic brain injury (TBI). In order to investigate the roles of estrogen receptors (ERs) in these effects, ER-α antagonist (MPP) and, ER-β antagonist (PHTPP), or non-selective estrogen receptors antagonist (ICI 182780) were administered. Materials and Methods: Ovariectomized rats were divided into 10 groups, as follows: Sham, TBI, E2, oil, MPP+E2, PHTPP+E2, MPP+PHTPP+E2, ICI+E2, MPP, and DMSO. E2 (33.3 µg/Kg) or oil were administered 30 min after TBI. 1 dose (150 µg/Kg) of each of MPP, PHTPP, and (4 mg/kg) ICI182780 was injected two times, 24 hr apart, before TBI and estrogen treatment. BBB disruption (Evans blue content) and brain edema (brain water content) evaluated 5 hr and 24 hr after the TBI were evaluated, respectively. Results: The results showed that E2 reduced brain edema after TBI compared to vehicle (P<0.01). The brain edema in the MPP+E2 and PHTPP+E2 groups decreased compared to the vehicle (P<0.001). There was no significant difference in MPP+PHTPP+E2 and ICI+E2 compared to TBI. This parameter in MPP was similar to vehicle. Evans blue content in E2 group was lower than vehicle (P<0.05). The inhibitory effect of E2 on Evans blue was not reduced by MPP+E2 and PHTPP+E2 groups, but decreased by treatment with MPP+PHTPP or ICI. MPP had no effect on Evans blue content. Conclusion: A combined administration of MPP and PHTPP or ICI inhibited the E2-induced decrease in brain edema and BBB disruption; this may suggest that these effects were mediated via both receptors. PMID:25810887

  7. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids mitigate blood-brain barrier disruption after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenting; Zhang, Hui; Mu, Hongfeng; Zhu, Wen; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Hu, Xiaoming; Shi, Yejie; Leak, Rehana K; Dong, Qiang; Chen, Jun; Gao, Yanqin

    2016-07-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) have been shown to protect the neonatal brain against hypoxic/ischemic (H/I) injury. However, the mechanism of n-3 PUFA-afforded neuroprotection is not well understood. One major determinant of H/I vulnerability is the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Therefore, we examined the effects of n-3 PUFAs on BBB integrity after neonatal H/I. Female rats were fed a diet with or without n-3 PUFA enrichment from day 2 of pregnancy to 14days after parturition. H/I was introduced in 7day-old offspring. We observed relatively rapid BBB penetration of the small molecule cadaverine (640Da) at 4h post-H/I and a delayed penetration of larger dextrans (3kD-40kD) 24-48h after injury. Surprisingly, the neonatal BBB was impermeable to Evans Blue or 70kD dextran leakage for up to 48h post-H/I, despite evidence of IgG extravasation at this time. As expected, n-3 PUFAs ameliorated H/I-induced BBB damage, as shown by reductions in tracer efflux and IgG extravasation, preservation of BBB ultrastructure, and enhanced tight junction protein expression. Furthermore, n-3 PUFAs prevented the elevation in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in the brain and blood after H/I. Thus, n-3 PUFAs may protect neonates against BBB damage by blunting MMPs activation after H/I. PMID:26921472

  8. Submicron-Bubble-Enhanced Focused Ultrasound for Blood–Brain Barrier Disruption and Improved CNS Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Chien-Yu; Lee, Ya-Hsuan; Huang, Chih-Ying; Ma, Yan-Jung; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    The use of focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles has been proven to induce transient blood–brain barrier opening (BBB-opening). However, FUS-induced inertial cavitation of microbubbles can also result in erythrocyte extravasations. Here we investigated whether induction of submicron bubbles to oscillate at their resonant frequency would reduce inertial cavitation during BBB-opening and thereby eliminate erythrocyte extravasations in a rat brain model. FUS was delivered with acoustic pressures of 0.1–4.5 MPa using either in-house manufactured submicron bubbles or standard SonoVue microbubbles. Wideband and subharmonic emissions from bubbles were used to quantify inertial and stable cavitation, respectively. Erythrocyte extravasations were evaluated by in vivo post-treatment magnetic resonance susceptibility-weighted imaging, and finally by histological confirmation. We found that excitation of submicron bubbles with resonant frequency-matched FUS (10 MHz) can greatly limit inertial cavitation while enhancing stable cavitation. The BBB-opening was mainly caused by stable cavitation, whereas the erythrocyte extravasation was closely correlated with inertial cavitation. Our technique allows extensive reduction of inertial cavitation to induce safe BBB-opening. Furthermore, the safety issue of BBB-opening was not compromised by prolonging FUS exposure time, and the local drug concentrations in the brain tissues were significantly improved to 60 times (BCNU; 18.6 µg versus 0.3 µg) by using chemotherapeutic agent-loaded submicron bubbles with FUS. This study provides important information towards the goal of successfully translating FUS brain drug delivery into clinical use. PMID:24788566

  9. Identifying barriers and facilitators to ambulance service assessment and treatment of acute asthma: a focus group study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute asthma is a common reason for patients to seek care from ambulance services. Although better care of acute asthma can prevent avoidable morbidity and deaths, there has been little research into ambulance clinicians’ adherence to national guidelines for asthma assessment and management and how this might be improved. Our research aim was to explore paramedics’ attitudes, perceptions and beliefs about prehospital management of asthma, to identify barriers and facilitators to guideline adherence. Methods We conducted three focus group interviews of paramedics in a regional UK ambulance trust. We used framework analysis supported by NVivo 8 to code and analyse the data. Results Seventeen participants, including paramedics, advanced paramedics or paramedic operational managers at three geographical sites, contributed to the interviews. Analysis led to five themes: (1) guidelines should be made more relevant to ambulance service care; (2) there were barriers to assessment; (3) the approach needed to address conflicts between clinicians’ and patients’ expectations; (4) the complexity of ambulance service processes and equipment needed to be taken into account; (5) and finally there were opportunities for improved prehospital education, information, communication, support and care pathways for asthma. Conclusions This qualitative study provides insight into paramedics’ perceptions of the assessment and management of asthma, including why paramedics may not always follow guidelines for assessment or management of asthma. These findings provide opportunities to strengthen clinical support, patient communication, information transfer between professionals and pathways for prehospital care of patients with asthma. PMID:25086749

  10. Expression of claudins -2 and -4 and cingulin is coordinated with the start of stratification and differentiation in corneal epithelial cells: retinoic acid reversibly disrupts epithelial barrier

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Melo, María Teresa; Sánchez-Guzmán, Erika; González-Robles, Arturo; Valdés, Jesús; Gómez-Flores, Eber; Castro-Muñozledo, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Summary Although tight junctions (TJ) have been extensively studied in simple epithelial cells, it is still unknown whether their organization is coupled to cell differentiation in stratified epithelia. We studied the expression of TJ in RCE1(5T5) cells, an in vitro model which mimics the sequential steps of rabbit corneal epithelial differentiation. RCE1(5T5) cells expressed TJ components which were assembled once cells constituted differentiated epithelia, as suggested by the increase of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) which followed a similar kinetic to the expression of the early differentiation marker Pax-6. TJ were functional as indicated by the establishment of an epithelial barrier nonpermeable to ruthenium red or a biotin tracer. In immunostaining experiments, TJ were located at the superficial cells from the suprabasal layers; Western blot and RT-PCR suggested that TJ were composed of claudins (cldn) -1, -2, -4, cingulin (cgn), occludin (ocln) and ZO-1. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and TER measurements showed that TJ became organized when cells began to form a 3–5 layers stratified epithelium; TER increased once cells reached confluence, with a time course comparable to the raise in the expression of cgn, cldn-2 and -4. Nevertheless, cldn-1, -2, ZO-1 and ocln were present in the cells from the beginning of cultivation, suggesting that TER increases mainly depend on TJ assembly. While EGF increased epithelial barrier strength, retinoic acid disrupted it, increasing paracellular flux about 2-fold; this effect was concentration dependent and completely reversible. Our results suggest that TJ assembly is tightly linked to the expression of corneal epithelial terminal phenotype. PMID:23429425

  11. Silver nanoparticles induce tight junction disruption and astrocyte neurotoxicity in a rat blood–brain barrier primary triple coculture model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liming; Dan, Mo; Shao, Anliang; Cheng, Xiang; Zhang, Cuiping; Yokel, Robert A; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Niwa, Masami; Watanabe, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) can enter the brain and induce neurotoxicity. However, the toxicity of Ag-NPs on the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and the underlying mechanism(s) of action on the BBB and the brain are not well understood. Method To investigate Ag-NP suspension (Ag-NPS)-induced toxicity, a triple coculture BBB model of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes was established. The BBB permeability and tight junction protein expression in response to Ag-NPS, NP-released Ag ions, and polystyrene-NP exposure were investigated. Ultrastructural changes of the microvascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Global gene expression of astrocytes was measured using a DNA microarray. Results A triple coculture BBB model of primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes was established, with the transendothelial electrical resistance values >200 Ω·cm2. After Ag-NPS exposure for 24 hours, the BBB permeability was significantly increased and expression of the tight junction (TJ) protein ZO-1 was decreased. Discontinuous TJs were also observed between microvascular endothelial cells. After Ag-NPS exposure, severe mitochondrial shrinkage, vacuolations, endoplasmic reticulum expansion, and Ag-NPs were observed in astrocytes by TEM. Global gene expression analysis showed that three genes were upregulated and 20 genes were downregulated in astrocytes treated with Ag-NPS. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that the 23 genes were associated with metabolic processes, biosynthetic processes, response to stimuli, cell death, the MAPK pathway, and so on. No GO term and KEGG pathways were changed in the released-ion or polystyrene-NP groups. Ag-NPS inhibited the antioxidant defense of the astrocytes by increasing thioredoxin interacting protein, which inhibits the Trx system, and

  12. Regulation and repair of the alveolar-capillary barrier in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Jahar; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding the basic mechanisms that regulate fluid and protein exchange across the endothelial and epithelial barriers of the lung under both normal and pathological conditions. Clinically relevant lung injury occurs most commonly from severe viral and bacterial infections, aspiration syndromes, and severe shock. The mechanisms of lung injury have been identified in both experimental and clinical studies. Recovery from lung injury requires the reestablishment of an intact endothelial barrier and a functional alveolar epithelial barrier capable of secreting surfactant and removing alveolar edema fluid. Repair mechanisms include the participation of endogenous progenitor cells in strategically located niches in the lung. Novel treatment strategies include the possibility of cell-based therapy that may reduce the severity of lung injury and enhance lung repair. PMID:23398155

  13. Improved anti-tumor effect of liposomal doxorubicin after targeted blood-brain barrier disruption by MRI-guided focused ultrasound in rat glioma

    PubMed Central

    Treat, Lisa H.; McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) inhibits the entry of the majority of chemotherapeutic agents into the brain. Previous studies have illustrated the feasibility of drug delivery across the BBB using focused ultrasound (FUS) and microbubbles. Here, we investigated the effect of FUS-enhanced delivery of doxorubicin on survival in rats with and 9L gliosarcoma cells inoculated in the brain. Each rat received either: (1) no treatment (control; N=11), (2) FUS only (N=9), (3) i.v. liposomal doxorubicin (DOX only; N=17), or (4) FUS with concurrent i.v. injections of liposomal doxorubicin (FUS+DOX; N=20). Post-treatment MRI showed that FUS+DOX reduced tumor growth compared to DOX only. Further, we observed a modest but significant increase in median survival time after a single treatment FUS+DOX treatment (p=0.0007), whereas neither DOX nor FUS had any significant impact on survival on its own. These results suggest that combined ultrasound-mediated BBB disruption may significantly increase the antineoplastic efficacy of liposomal doxorubicin in the brain. PMID:22818878

  14. Barriers to the use of the library service amongst clinical staff in an acute hospital setting: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gaynor; Preston, Hugh

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on research into the reasons why clinical staff in an acute hospital may be reluctant to use library services. The research was conducted by Gaynor Thomas at the Prince Philip Hospital in Llanelli in Wales as part of the dissertation she completed for an MSc in Economics. She graduated in July 2014 from Aberystwyth University and has co-written the article with Hugh Preston, her dissertation supervisor. The article summarises the key findings from the interviews undertaken as part of the research process and lists the resulting recommendations. Gaynor also highlights the initiatives which have been put in place with the express aim of removing barriers to use and encouraging clinical staff to make the most of the library which is, she argues, a time-saving resource. AM. PMID:27168257

  15. Dual Function of Novel Pollen Coat (Surface) Proteins: IgE-binding Capacity and Proteolytic Activity Disrupting the Airway Epithelial Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamed Elfatih H.; Ward, Jason M.; Cummings, Matthew; Karrar, Eltayeb E.; Root, Michael; Mohamed, Abu Bekr A.; Naclerio, Robert M.; Preuss, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Background The pollen coat is the first structure of the pollen to encounter the mucosal immune system upon inhalation. Prior characterizations of pollen allergens have focused on water-soluble, cytoplasmic proteins, but have overlooked much of the extracellular pollen coat. Due to washing with organic solvents when prepared, these pollen coat proteins are typically absent from commercial standardized allergenic extracts (i.e., “de-fatted”), and, as a result, their involvement in allergy has not been explored. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a unique approach to search for pollen allergenic proteins residing in the pollen coat, we employed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to assess the impact of organic solvents on the structural integrity of the pollen coat. TEM results indicated that de-fatting of Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda grass) pollen (BGP) by use of organic solvents altered the structural integrity of the pollen coat. The novel IgE-binding proteins of the BGP coat include a cysteine protease (CP) and endoxylanase (EXY). The full-length cDNA that encodes the novel IgE-reactive CP was cloned from floral RNA. The EXY and CP were purified to homogeneity and tested for IgE reactivity. The CP from the BGP coat increased the permeability of human airway epithelial cells, caused a clear concentration-dependent detachment of cells, and damaged their barrier integrity. Conclusions/Significance Using an immunoproteomics approach, novel allergenic proteins of the BGP coat were identified. These proteins represent a class of novel dual-function proteins residing on the coat of the pollen grain that have IgE-binding capacity and proteolytic activity, which disrupts the integrity of the airway epithelial barrier. The identification of pollen coat allergens might explain the IgE-negative response to available skin-prick-testing proteins in patients who have positive symptoms. Further study of the role of these pollen coat proteins in allergic responses is

  16. Research Article Flavocoxid Protects Against Cadmium-Induced Disruption of the Blood-Testis Barrier and Improves Testicular Damage and Germ Cell Impairment in Mice.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Micali, Antonio; Pisani, Antonina; Puzzolo, Domenico; Bitto, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Pizzino, Gabriele; Irrera, Natasha; Galfo, Federica; Arena, Salvatore; Pallio, Giovanni; Mecchio, Anna; Germanà, Antonino; Bruschetta, Daniele; Laurà, Rosaria; Magno, Carlo; Marini, Herbert; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) causes male infertility. There is the need to identify safe treatments counteracting this toxicity. Flavocoxid is a flavonoid that induces a balanced inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 peroxidase moieties and of 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) and has efficacy in the male genitourinary system. We investigated flavocoxid effects on Cd-induced testicular toxicity in mice. Swiss mice were divided into 4 groups: 2 control groups received 0.9% NaCl (vehicle; 1 ml/kg/day) or flavocoxid (20 mg/kg/day ip); 2 groups were challenged with cadmium chloride (CdCl2; 2 mg/kg/day ip) and administered with vehicle or flavocoxid. The treatment lasted for 1 or 2 weeks. The testes were processed for biochemical and morphological studies. CdCl2 increased phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) 1/2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, COX-2, 5-LOX, malondialdehyde (MDA), B-cell-lymphoma (Bcl)-2-associated X protein (Bax), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), transforming growth factor (TGF) -β3, decreased Bcl-2, testosterone, inhibin-B, occludin, N-Cadherin, induced structural damages in the testis and disrupted the blood-testis barrier. Many TUNEL-positive germ cells and changes in claudin-11, occludin, and N-cadherin localization were present. Flavocoxid administration reduced, in a time-dependent way, p-ERK 1/2, TNF-α, COX-2, 5-LOX, MDA, Bax, FSH, LH, TGF-β3, augmented Bcl-2, testosterone, inhibin B, occludin, N-Cadherin, and improved the structural organization of the testis and the blood-testis barrier. Few TUNEL-positive germ cells were present and a morphological retrieval of the intercellular junctions was observed. In conclusion, flavocoxid has a protective anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiapoptotic function against Cd-induced toxicity in mice testis. We suggest that flavocoxid may play a relevant positive role against environmental levels of Cd, otherwise deleterious to gametogenesis and tubular integrity. PMID

  17. Metabolomic profiles delineate the potential role of glycine in gold nanorod-induced disruption of mitochondria and blood-testis barrier factors in TM-4 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bo; Chen, Minjian; Ji, Xiaoli; Mao, Zhilei; Zhang, Xuemei; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2014-06-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) are commonly used nanomaterials with potential harmful effects on male reproduction. However, the mechanism by which GNRs affect male reproduction remains largely undetermined. In this study, the metabolic changes in spermatocyte-derived cells GC-2 and Sertoli cell line TM-4 were analyzed after GNR treatment for 24 h. Metabolomic analysis revealed that glycine was highly decreased in TM-4 cells after GNR-10 nM treatment while there was no significant change in GC-2 cells. RT-PCR showed that the mRNA levels of glycine synthases in the mitochondrial pathway decreased after GNR treatment, while there was no significant difference in mRNA levels of glycine synthases in the cytoplasmic pathway. High content screening (HCS) showed that GNRs decreased membrane permeability and mitochondrial membrane potential of TM-4 cells, which was also confirmed by JC-1 staining. In addition, RT-PCR and Western blot indicated that the mRNA and protein levels of blood-testis barrier (BTB) factors (ZO-1, occludin, claudin-5, and connexin-43) in TM-4 cells were also disrupted by GNRs. After glycine was added into the medium, the GNR-induced harmful effects on mitochondria and BTB factors were recovered in TM-4 cells. Our results showed that even low doses of GNRs could induce significant toxic effects on mitochondria and BTB factors in TM-4 cells. Furthermore, we revealed that glycine was a potentially important metabolic intermediary for the changes of membrane permeability, mitochondrial membrane potential and BTB factors after GNR treatment in TM-4 cells.Gold nanorods (GNRs) are commonly used nanomaterials with potential harmful effects on male reproduction. However, the mechanism by which GNRs affect male reproduction remains largely undetermined. In this study, the metabolic changes in spermatocyte-derived cells GC-2 and Sertoli cell line TM-4 were analyzed after GNR treatment for 24 h. Metabolomic analysis revealed that glycine was highly decreased in TM-4 cells

  18. Early ghrelin treatment attenuates disruption of the blood brain barrier and apoptosis after traumatic brain injury through a UCP-2 mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lopez, N E; Gaston, L; Lopez, K R; Coimbra, R C; Hageny, A; Putnam, J; Eliceiri, B; Coimbra, R; Bansal, V

    2012-12-13

    Ghrelin has been shown to be anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective in models of neurologic injury. We hypothesize that treatment with ghrelin will attenuate breakdown of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and apoptosis 24h following traumatic brain injury (TBI). We believe this protection is at least in part mediated by up-regulation of UCP-2, thereby stabilizing mitochondria and preventing up-regulation of caspase-3. A weight drop model was used to create severe TBI. Balb/c mice were divided into 3 groups. Sham: no TBI or ghrelin treatment; TBI: TBI only; TBI/ghrelin: 20μg (IP) ghrelin at the time of TBI. BBB permeability to 70kDa FITC-Dextran was measured 24h following injury and quantified in arbitrary integrated fluorescence (afu). Brain tissue was subjected to TUNEL staining and TUNEL positive cells were quantified. Immunohistochemistry was performed on injured tissue to reveal patterns of caspase-3 and UCP-2 expression. TBI increased cerebral vascular permeability by three-fold compared to sham. Ghrelin treatment restored vascular permeability to the level of shams. TUNEL staining showed that ghrelin mitigated the significant increase in apoptosis that follows TBI. TBI increased both caspase-3 compared to sham. Treatment with ghrelin significantly increased UCP-2 compared to TBI alone and this increase in UCP-2 expression was associated with a decrease in expression of caspase-3. Early ghrelin treatment prevents TBI induced BBB disruption and TBI mediated apoptosis 24h following injury. These results demonstrate the neuroprotective potential of ghrelin as a therapy in TBI. PMID:23099053

  19. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Intra-Arterial Methotrexate-Based Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Primary CNS Lymphoma: A Multi-Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Angelov, Lilyana; Doolittle, Nancy D.; Kraemer, Dale F.; Siegal, Tali; Barnett, Gene H.; Peereboom, David M.; Stevens, Glen; McGregor, John; Jahnke, Kristoph; Lacy, Cynthia A.; Hedrick, Nancy A.; Shalom, Edna; Ference, Sandra; Bell, Susan; Sorenson, Lisa; Tyson, Rose Marie; Haluska, Marianne; Neuwelt, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) is confined to the CNS and/or the eyes at presentation and is usually initially treated with intravenous methotrexate-based chemotherapy and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). However, the intact blood-brain barrier (BBB) can limit diffusion of methotrexate into brain and tumor. With BBB disruption (BBBD), enhanced drug delivery to the tumor can be achieved. Patients and Methods This report summarizes the multi-institutional experience of 149 newly diagnosed (with no prior WBRT) patients with PCNSL treated with osmotic BBBD and intra-arterial (IA) methotrexate at four institutions from 1982 to 2005. In this series, 47.6% of patients were age ≥ 60 years, and 42.3% had Karnofsky performance score (KPS) less than 70 at diagnosis. Results The overall response rate was 81.9% (57.8% complete; 24.2% partial). Median overall survival (OS) was 3.1 years (25% estimated survival at 8.5 years). Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 1.8 years, with 5-year PFS of 31% and 7-year PFS of 25%. In low-risk patients (age < 60 years and KPS ≥ 70), median OS was approximately 14 years, with a plateau after approximately 8 years. Procedures were generally well tolerated; focal seizures (9.2%) were the most frequent side effect and lacked long-term sequelae. Conclusion This large series of patients treated over a 23-year period demonstrates that BBBD/IA methotrexate-based chemotherapy results in successful and durable tumor control and outcomes that are comparable or superior to other PCNSL treatment regimens. PMID:19451444

  20. The effect of regadenoson-induced transient disruption of the blood–brain barrier on temozolomide delivery to normal rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Sadhana; Anders, Nicole M.; Mangraviti, Antonella; Wanjiku, Teresia M.; Sankey, Eric W.; Liu, Ann; Brem, Henry; Tyler, Betty; Rudek, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) significantly reduces the delivery of many systemically administered agents to the central nervous system. Although temozolomide is the only chemotherapy to improve survival in patients with glioblastoma, its concentration in brain is only 20 % of that in blood. Regadenoson, an FDA approved adenosine receptor agonist used for cardiac stress testing, transiently disrupts rodent BBB allowing high molecular weight dextran (70 kD) to enter the brain. This study was conducted to determine if regadenoson could facilitate entry of temozolomide into normal rodent brain. Temozolomide (50 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage to non-tumor bearing F344 rats. Two-thirds of the animals received a single dose of intravenous regadenoson 60–90 min later. All animals were sacrificed 120 or 360 min after temozolomide administration. Brain and plasma temozolomide concentrations were determined using HPLC/MS/MS. Brain temozolomide concentrations were significantly higher at 120 min when it was given with regadenoson versus alone (8.1 ± 2.7 and 5.1 ± 3.5 μg/g, P <0.05). A similar trend was noted in brain:plasma ratios (0.45 ± 0.08 and 0.29 ± 0.09, P < 0.05). Brain concentrations and brain:plasma ratios were not significantly different 360 min after temozolomide administration. No differences were seen in plasma temozolomide concentrations with or without regadenoson. These results suggest co-administration of regadenoson with temozolomide results in 60 % higher temozolomide levels in normal brain without affecting plasma concentrations. This novel approach to increasing intracranial concentrations of systemically administered agents has potential to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy in neuro-oncologic disorders. PMID:26626489

  1. TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis promotes blood brain barrier disruption and increases neuronal cell death in MRL/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Doerner, Jessica; Weidenheim, Karen; Xia, Yumin; Stock, Ariel; Michaelson, Jennifer S; Baruch, Kuti; Deczkowska, Aleksandra; Gulinello, Maria; Schwartz, Michal; Burkly, Linda C; Putterman, Chaim

    2015-06-01

    Neuropsychiatric disease is one of the most common manifestations of human systemic lupus erythematosus, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. In human brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro, TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) decreases tight junction ZO-1 expression and increases the permeability of monolayer cell cultures. Furthermore, knockout (KO) of the TWEAK receptor, Fn14, in the MRL/lpr lupus mouse strain markedly attenuates neuropsychiatric disease, as demonstrated by significant reductions in depressive-like behavior and improved cognitive function. The purpose of the present study was to determine the mechanisms by which TWEAK signaling is instrumental in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric lupus (NPSLE). Evaluating brain sections of MRL/lpr Fn14WT and Fn14KO mice, we found that Fn14KO mice displayed significantly decreased cellular infiltrates in the choroid plexus. To evaluate the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) in MRL/lpr mice, Western blot for fibronectin, qPCR for iNOS, and immunohistochemical staining for VCAM-1/ICAM-1 were performed. We found preserved BBB permeability in MRL/lpr Fn14KO mice, attributable to reduced brain expression of VCAM-1/ICAM-1 and iNOS. Additionally, administration of Fc-TWEAK intravenously directly increased the leakage of a tracer (dextran-FITC) into brain tissue. Furthermore, MRL/lpr Fn14KO mice displayed reduced antibody (IgG) and complement (C3, C6, and C4a) deposition in the brain. Finally, we found that MRL/lpr Fn14KO mice manifested reduced neuron degeneration and hippocampal gliosis. Our studies indicate that TWEAK/Fn14 interactions play an important role in the pathogenesis of NPSLE by increasing the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the choroid plexus, disrupting BBB integrity, and increasing neuronal damage, suggesting a novel target for therapy in this disease. PMID:25911200

  2. TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis promotes blood brain barrier disruption and increases neuronal cell death in MRL/lpr mice

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Doerner, Jessica; Weidenheim, Karen; Xia, Yumin; Stock, Ariel; Michaelson, Jennifer S.; Baruch, Kuti; Deczkowska, Aleksandra; Gulinello, Maria; Schwartz, Michal; Burkly, Linda C.; Putterman, Chaim

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric disease is one of the most common manifestations of human systemic lupus erythematosus, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. In human brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro, TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) decreases tight junction ZO-1 expression and increases the permeability of monolayer cell cultures. Furthermore, knockout (KO) of the TWEAK receptor, Fn14, in the MRL/lpr lupus mouse strain markedly attenuates neuropsychiatric disease, as demonstrated by significant reductions in depressive-like behavior and improved cognitive function. The purpose of the present study was to determine the mechanisms by which TWEAK signaling is instrumental in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric lupus (NPSLE). Evaluating brain sections of MRL/lpr Fn14WT and Fn14KO mice, we found that Fn14KO mice displayed significantly decreased cellular infiltrates in the choroid plexus. To evaluate the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) in MRL/lpr mice, Western blot for fibronectin, qPCR for iNOS, and immunohistochemical staining for VCAM-1/ICAM-1 were performed. We found preserved BBB permeability in MRL/lpr Fn14KO mice, attributable to reduced brain expression of VCAM-1/ICAM-1 and iNOS. Additionally, administration of Fc-TWEAK intravenously directly increased the leakage of a tracer (dextran-FITC) into brain tissue. Furthermore, MRL/lpr Fn14KO mice displayed reduced antibody (IgG) and complement (C3, C6, and C4a) deposition in the brain. Finally, we found that MRL/lpr Fn14KO mice manifested reduced neuron degeneration and hippocampal gliosis. Our studies indicate that TWEAK/Fn14 interactions play an important role in the pathogenesis of NPSLE by increasing the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the choroid plexus, disrupting BBB integrity, and increasing neuronal damage, suggesting a novel target for therapy in this disease. PMID:25911200

  3. Perfluorooctanoic acid disrupts the blood-testis barrier and activates the TNFα/p38 MAPK signaling pathway in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yin; Luo, Bin; Li, Jing; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-04-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is correlated with male reproductive dysfunction in animals and humans, but the underlying mechanisms for this remain unknown. To explore the potential reproductive toxicity of PFOA, we studied blood-testis barrier (BTB) damage using in vivo and in vitro models. Male mice were gavage-administered PFOA (0-20 mg/kg/d) for 28 consecutive days, and breeding capacity and permeability of the Sertoli cell-based BTB were estimated. Primary Sertoli cells (SCs) were exposed to PFOA (0-500 μM) for 48 h, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) was assessed. Furthermore, BTB-associated protein expression, TNFα content, and phosphorylation and protein levels of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway were detected. An apparent decrease in mated and pregnant females per male mouse as well as litter weight was observed. Marked BTB damage was evidenced by increased red biotin fluorescence in the lumen tubular of the testes and the decrease in TER in SCs in vitro. The protein levels of claudin-11, connexin-43, N-cadherin, β-catenin, and occludin were significantly decreased in the testes and also in the SCs in vitro except for N-cadherin and β-catenin. TNFα content showed a dose-dependent increase in the testes and a dose- and time-dependent increase in the SCs, with the p-p38/p38 MAPK ratio also increasing in testes and SCs after PFOA exposure. Moreover, PFOA altered expressions of claudin-11, connexin-43, TNFα, and p-p38 MAPK were recovered 48 h after PFOA removal in the SCs. The SCs appeared to be target to PFOA, and the disruption of the BTB may be crucial to PFOA-induced reproductive dysfunction in mice. PMID:25743374

  4. Chemical modulators of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors as barrier-oriented therapeutic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Marsolais, David; Rosen, Hugh

    2015-01-01

    Biological barriers regulate the passage of cells, pathogens, fluids, nutrients, ions and signalling molecules between anatomical compartments during homeostasis and disease. Yet strategies that allow for reversible therapeutic modulation of these barriers are still in their infancy. The enhancement or protection of natural barriers is desirable in conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or ischaemia–reperfusion injuries, whereas a temporary disruption could facilitate the penetration of drugs across such barriers. This Review discusses the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors in the regulation and protection of biological barriers, and the potential of therapeutic strategies that target this receptor family. PMID:19300460

  5. Structural Analysis of Major Species Barriers between Humans and Palm Civets for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infections

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fang

    2008-09-23

    It is believed that a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), was passed from palm civets to humans and caused the epidemic of SARS in 2002 to 2003. The major species barriers between humans and civets for SARS-CoV infections are the specific interactions between a defined receptor-binding domain (RBD) on a viral spike protein and its host receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). In this study a chimeric ACE2 bearing the critical N-terminal helix from civet and the remaining peptidase domain from human was constructed, and it was shown that this construct has the same receptor activity as civet ACE2. In addition, crystal structures of the chimeric ACE2 complexed with RBDs from various human and civet SARS-CoV strains were determined. These structures, combined with a previously determined structure of human ACE2 complexed with the RBD from a human SARS-CoV strain, have revealed a structural basis for understanding the major species barriers between humans and civets for SARS-CoV infections. They show that the major species barriers are determined by interactions between four ACE2 residues (residues 31, 35, 38, and 353) and two RBD residues (residues 479 and 487), that early civet SARS-CoV isolates were prevented from infecting human cells due to imbalanced salt bridges at the hydrophobic virus/receptor interface, and that SARS-CoV has evolved to gain sustained infectivity for human cells by eliminating unfavorable free charges at the interface through stepwise mutations at positions 479 and 487. These results enhance our understanding of host adaptations and cross-species infections of SARS-CoV and other emerging animal viruses.

  6. The effect of a combination of 0.1% octenidine dihydrochloride and 2% 2-phenoxyethanol (octenisept) on wound healing in pigs in vivo and its in vitro percutaneous permeation through intact and barrier disrupted porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Jessica; Braun, Michael; Siebert, Joerg; Kietzmann, Manfred

    2010-02-01

    A combination of 0.1% octenidine dihydrochloride and 2% 2-phenoxyethanol (octenisept) is a commonly used disinfectant in human medicine. As porcine skin represents an adequate model for human skin, the effect of octenidine dihydrochloride and phenoxyethanol on wound healing is studied in pigs. Furthermore, the in vitro percutaneous permeation of the test substances is studied. The impact of the test formulations on wound healing is examined (A) under non occlusive conditions and (B) in comparison to another disinfectant based on povidone-iodine under occlusive conditions, while wounds are treated daily with the test substances. The percutaneous permeation of octenidine dihydrochloride and phenoxyethanol is studied in Franz-type diffusion cells with intact skin as well as barrier disrupted after tape stripping. Compared with povidone-iodine or vehicle treatment as well as untreated control wounds the treatment of wounds with the test formulation has no influence on the healing rate in pigs and does not induce retardation of wound healing. The in vitro diffusion experiment reveals that octenidine dihydrochloride is only detectable in the acceptor chamber of three-barrier disrupted skin samples. Phenoxyethanol permeates through intact porcine skin in amounts of 11.3% and through barrier disrupted skin in amounts of 43.9% PMID:20409252

  7. Effects of acute hyperosmolality on blood-brain barrier function in ovine fetuses and lambs.

    PubMed

    Stonestreet, Barbara S; Sadowska, Grazyna B; Leeman, Joanne; Hanumara, R Choudary; Petersson, Katherine H; Patlak, Clifford S

    2006-10-01

    We examined the effects of hyperosmolality on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability during development to test the vulnerability of the immature barrier to stress. The BBB response to hyperosmolality was quantified using the blood-to-brain transfer constant (Ki) with alpha-aminoisobutyric acid in fetuses at 60% and 90% gestation, premature, newborn, and older lambs. Ki plotted against osmolality increased as a function of increases in osmolality in all groups and brain regions. The relationship was described (P < 0.05) by a segmented regression model. At lower osmolalities, changes in Ki were minimal, but after a break point (threshold) was reached, the increase (P < 0.05) was linear. We examined the responses of Ki to hyperosmolality within each brain region by comparing the thresholds and slopes of the second regression segment. Lower thresholds and higher slopes imply greater vulnerability to hyperosmolality in the younger groups. Thresholds increased (P < 0.05) with development in the thalamus, superior colliculus, pons, and spinal cord, and slopes of the second regression segment decreased (P < 0.05) in the cerebellum, hippocampus, inferior colliculus, medulla, and spinal cord. BBB resistance to hyperosmolality increased (P < 0.05) with development in most brain regions. The pattern of the Ki plotted against osmolality was (P < 0.05) heterogenous among brain regions in fetuses and premature and newborn lambs, but not in older lambs. We conclude that 1) BBB permeability increased as a function of changes in osmolality, 2) the barrier becomes more resistant to hyperosmolality during development, and 3) the permeability response to hyperosmolality is heterogenous among brain regions in fetuses and premature and newborn lambs. PMID:16690764

  8. Production of interferon-γ by activated T-cell receptor-αβ CD8αβ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes is required and sufficient for disruption of the intestinal barrier integrity

    PubMed Central

    Zufferey, Christel; Erhart, Dominik; Saurer, Leslie; Mueller, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Maintenance of intestinal epithelial barrier function is of vital importance in preventing uncontrolled influx of antigens and the potentially ensuing inflammatory disorders. Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) are in intimate contact with epithelial cells and may critically regulate the epithelial barrier integrity. While a preserving impact has been ascribed to the T-cell receptor (TCR)-γδ subset of IEL, IEL have also been shown to attenuate the barrier function. The present study sought to clarify the effects of IEL by specifically investigating the influence of the TCR-αβ CD8αβ and TCR-αβ CD8αα subsets of IEL on the intestinal epithelial barrier integrity. To this end, an in vitro coculture system of the murine intestinal crypt-derived cell-line mICcl2 and syngeneic ex vivo isolated IEL was employed. Epithelial integrity was assessed by analysis of transepithelial resistance (TER) and paracellular flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated (FITC-) dextran. The TCR-αβ CD8αα IEL and resting TCR-αβ CD8αβ IEL did not affect TER of mICcl2 or flux of FITC-dextran. In contrast, activated TCR-αβ CD8αβ IEL clearly disrupted the integrity of the mICcl2 monolayer. No disrupting effect was seen with activated TCR-αβ CD8αβ IEL from interferon-γ knockout mice. These findings demonstrate that secretion of interferon-γ by activated TCR-αβ CD8αβ IEL is strictly required and also sufficient for disrupting the intestinal epithelial barrier function. PMID:20067535

  9. Sleep disruption and the sequelae associated with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Smith, Kelly E.; Nguyen, Linda; Turner, Ryan C.; Logsdon, Aric F.; Jackson, Garrett J.; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.; Miller, Diane B.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disruption, which includes a loss of sleep as well as poor quality fragmented sleep, frequently follows traumatic brain injury (TBI) impacting a large number of patients each year in the United States. Fragmented and/or disrupted sleep can worsen neuropsychiatric, behavioral, and physical symptoms of TBI. Additionally, sleep disruption impairs recovery and can lead to cognitive decline. The most common sleep disruption following TBI is insomnia, which is difficulty staying asleep. The consequences of disrupted sleep following injury range from deranged metabolomics and blood brain barrier compromise to altered neuroplasticity and degeneration. There are several theories for why sleep is necessary (e.g., glymphatic clearance and metabolic regulation) and these may help explain how sleep disruption contributes to degeneration within the brain. Experimental data indicate disrupted sleep allows hyperphosphorylated tau and amyloid β plaques to accumulate. As sleep disruption may act as a cellular stressor, target areas warranting further scientific investigation include the increase in endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress following acute periods of sleep deprivation. Potential treatment options for restoring the normal sleep cycle include melatonin derivatives and cognitive behavioral therapy. PMID:25956251

  10. Sleep disruption and the sequelae associated with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Smith, Kelly E; Nguyen, Linda; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Jackson, Garrett J; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L; Miller, Diane B

    2015-08-01

    Sleep disruption, which includes a loss of sleep as well as poor quality fragmented sleep, frequently follows traumatic brain injury (TBI) impacting a large number of patients each year in the United States. Fragmented and/or disrupted sleep can worsen neuropsychiatric, behavioral, and physical symptoms of TBI. Additionally, sleep disruption impairs recovery and can lead to cognitive decline. The most common sleep disruption following TBI is insomnia, which is difficulty staying asleep. The consequences of disrupted sleep following injury range from deranged metabolomics and blood brain barrier compromise to altered neuroplasticity and degeneration. There are several theories for why sleep is necessary (e.g., glymphatic clearance and metabolic regulation) and these may help explain how sleep disruption contributes to degeneration within the brain. Experimental data indicate disrupted sleep allows hyperphosphorylated tau and amyloid β plaques to accumulate. As sleep disruption may act as a cellular stressor, target areas warranting further scientific investigation include the increase in endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress following acute periods of sleep deprivation. Potential treatment options for restoring the normal sleep cycle include melatonin derivatives and cognitive behavioral therapy. PMID:25956251

  11. Necrotizing Enterocolitis in a mouse model leads to widespread renal inflammation, acute kidney injury and disruption of renal tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Parvesh M; Tatum, Rodney; Ravisankar, Srikanth; Shekhawat, Prem S; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating condition affecting premature infants and leads to high mortality and chronic morbidity. Severe form of NEC is associated with acute renal failure, fluid imbalance, hyponatremia and acidosis. We investigated the effect of NEC on tight junction (TJ) proteins in kidneys using a NEC mouse model to investigate the basis for the observed renal dysfunction. METHODS NEC was induced in C57BL/6 mice by formula feeding and subjecting them to periods of hypoxia and cold stress. NEC was confirmed by gross and histological examination. We studied various markers of inflammation in kidneys and investigated changes in expression of several TJ proteins and AQP2 using immunofluorecent staining and Western blotting. RESULTS We found markedly increased expression of NFκB, TGFβ and ERK1/2 along with claudin-1, -2, -3, -4, -8 and AQP-2 in NEC kidneys. The membrane localization of claudin-2 was altered in the NEC kidneys and its immunostaining signal at TJ was disrupted. CONCLUSION NEC led to a severe inflammatory response not only in the gut but also the kidneys. NEC increased expression of several TJ proteins and caused disruption of claudin-2 in renal tubules. These observed changes can help explain some of the clinical findings observed in NEC. PMID:26270572

  12. SIRT2 inhibition exacerbates neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier disruption in experimental traumatic brain injury by enhancing NF-κB p65 acetylation and activation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang; Xu, Zhi-Ming; Lu, Li-Yan; Nie, Hui; Ding, Jun; Ying, Wei-Hai; Tian, Heng-Li

    2016-02-01

    Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) is a member of the sirtuin family of NAD(+) -dependent protein deacetylases. In recent years, SIRT2 inhibition has emerged as a promising treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. However, to date, there is no evidence of a specific role for SIRT2 in traumatic brain injury (TBI). We investigated the effects of SIRT2 inhibition on experimental TBI using the controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury model. Adult male mice underwent CCI or sham surgery. A selective brain-permeable SIRT2 inhibitor, AK-7, was administrated 30 min before injury. The volume of the brain edema lesion and the water content of the brain were significantly increased in mice treated with AK-7 (20 mg/kg), compared with the vehicle group, following TBI (p < 0.05 at 1 day and p < 0.05 at 3 days, respectively). Concomitantly, AK-7 administration greatly worsened neurobehavioral deficits on days 3 and 7 after CCI. Furthermore, blood-brain barrier disruption and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-9 activity increased following SIRT2 inhibition. AK-7 treatment increased TBI-induced microglial activation both in vivo and in vitro, accompanied by a large increase in the expression and release of inflammatory cytokines. Mechanistically, SIRT2 inhibition increased both K310 acetylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, leading to enhanced NF-κB activation and up-regulation of its target genes, including aquaporin 4 (AQP4), MMP-9, and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Together, these data demonstrate that SIRT2 inhibition exacerbates TBI by increasing NF-κB p65 acetylation and activation. Our findings provide additional evidence of an anti-inflammatory effect of SIRT2. SIRT2 is a member of the sirtuin family of NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases. Our study suggests that the SIRT2 inhibitor AK-7 exacerbates traumatic brain injury (TBI) via a potential mechanism involving increased acetylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, resulting in up-regulation of NF-κB target genes

  13. Evaluation of a Booster Intervention Three Years after Acute Treatment for Early-Onset Disruptive Behavior Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Hart, Jonathan; Bukstein, Oscar G.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the impact of a brief booster treatment administered three years after the delivery of an acute treatment in a group (N = 118) of clinically referred boys and girls (ages 6 to 11) originally diagnosed with Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) or Conduct Disorder (CD). At the conclusion of the acute treatment and three-year follow-up period (i.e., study month 42), the sample was re-randomized into Booster treatment or Enhanced Usual Care and then assessed at four later timepoints (i.e., post-booster, and 6-, 12- and 24-month booster follow-up). Booster treatment was directed towards addressing individualized problems and some unique developmental issues of adolescence based on the same original protocol content and treatment setting, whereas the no-booster condition involved providing clinical recommendations based on the assessment and an outside referral for services. HLM analyses identified no significant group differences and few time effects across child, parent, and teacher reports on a broad range of child functioning and impairment outcomes. Analyses examining the role of putative moderators or mediators (e.g., severity of externalizing behavior, dose of treatment) were likewise non-significant. We discuss the nature and implications of these novel findings regarding the role and timing of booster treatment to address the continuity of DBD over time. PMID:23494526

  14. The Synthetic Tie2 Agonist Peptide Vasculotide Protects Renal Vascular Barrier Function In Experimental Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rübig, Eva; Stypmann, Jörg; Van Slyke, Paul; Dumont, Daniel J; Spieker, Tilmann; Buscher, Konrad; Reuter, Stefan; Goerge, Tobias; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kümpers, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular barrier dysfunction plays a major role in the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury (AKI). Angiopoietin-1, the natural agonist ligand for the endothelial-specific Tie2 receptor, is a non-redundant endothelial survival and vascular stabilization factor. Here we evaluate the efficacy of a polyethylene glycol-clustered Tie2 agonist peptide, vasculotide (VT), to protect against endothelial-cell activation with subsequent microvascular dysfunction in a murine model of ischemic AKI. Renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) was induced by clamping of the renal arteries for 35 minutes. Mice were treated with VT or PEGylated cysteine before IRI. Sham-operated animals served as time-matched controls. Treatment with VT significantly reduced transcapillary albumin flux and renal tissue edema after IRI. The protective effects of VT were associated with activation of Tie2 and stabilization of its downstream effector, VE-cadherin in renal vasculature. VT abolished the decline in renal tissue blood flow, attenuated the increase of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen after IRI, improved recovery of renal function and markedly reduced mortality compared to PEG [HR 0.14 (95% CI 0.05–0.78) P < 0.05]. VT is inexpensive to produce, chemically stable and unrelated to any Tie2 ligands. Thus, VT may represent a novel therapy to prevent AKI in patients. PMID:26911791

  15. Disruption of neuroendocrine stress responses to acute ferret odor by medial, but not central amygdala lesions in rats

    PubMed Central

    Masini, Cher V.; Sasse, Sarah K.; Garcia, Robert J.; Nyhuis, Tara J.; Day, Heidi E.W.; Campeau, Serge

    2009-01-01

    Investigations of the neural pathways associated with responses to predators have implicated the medial amygdala (MeA) as an important region involved in defensive behaviors. To our knowledge, however, the involvement of the MeA in neuroendocrine responses to predator odor exposure has not been investigated. Therefore, the present study examined the effects of MeA disruption in rats exposed to ferret or control odor on hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activation. Bilateral lesions of the MeA were made in Sprague- Dawley rats with the neurotoxin ibotenic acid (10 µg/µl; 0.3 µl /side). As a control for regional specificity, additional groups of rats were given lesions in the central amygdala (CeA). One week after recovery, the rats were exposed to ferret or strawberry control towels in small cages to examine HPA axis responses as determined by plasma corticosterone and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) levels. Rats with complete bilateral MeA but not CeA lesions displayed significantly less corticosterone and ACTH release compared to sham-operated control rats only in the ferret odor conditions. These results suggest that the MeA is an important structure involved in the HPA axis responses to predator odors, in support of previous studies investigating behavioral responses under similar conditions. PMID:19615352

  16. Breakdown of Epithelial Barrier Integrity and Overdrive Activation of Alveolar Epithelial Cells in the Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yanagi, Shigehisa; Tsubouchi, Hironobu; Miura, Ayako; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Individual alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) collaboratively form a tight barrier between atmosphere and fluid-filled tissue to enable normal gas exchange. The tight junctions of AECs provide intercellular sealing and are integral to the maintenance of the AEC barrier integrity. Disruption and failure of reconstitution of AEC barrier result in catastrophic consequences, leading to alveolar flooding and subsequent devastating fibrotic scarring. Recent evidences reveal that many of the fibrotic lung diseases involve AECs both as a frequent target of injury and as a driver of ongoing pathological processes. Aberrantly activated AECs express most of the growth factors and chemokines responsible for the proliferation, migration, and activation of fibroblasts. Current evidences suggest that AECs may acquire overdrive activation in the initial step of fibrosis by several mechanisms, including abnormal recapitulation of the developmental pathway, defects of the molecules essential for epithelial integrity, and acceleration of aging-related properties. Among these initial triggering events, epithelial Pten, a multiple phosphatase that negatively regulates the PI3K/Akt pathway and is crucial for lung development, is essential for the prevention of alveolar flooding and lung fibrosis through the regulation of AEC barrier integrity after injury. Reestablishment of AEC barrier integrity also involves the deployment of specialized stem/progenitor cells. PMID:26523279

  17. Co-Regulation and Interdependence of the Mammalian Epidermal Permeability and Antimicrobial Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Aberg, Karin M.; Man, Mao-Qiang; Gallo, Richard L.; Ganz, Tomas; Crumrine, Debra; Brown, Barbara E.; Choi, Eung-Ho; Kim, Dong-Kun; Schröder, Jens M.; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Elias, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    Human epidermis elaborates two small cationic, highly hydrophobic antimicrobial peptides (AMP), β-defensin 2 (hBD2), and the carboxypeptide cleavage product of human cathelicidin (hCAP18), LL-37, which are co-packaged along with lipids within epidermal lamellar bodies (LBs) before their secretion. Because of their colocalization, we hypothesized that AMP and barrier lipid production could be coregulated by altered permeability barrier requirements. mRNA and immunostainable protein levels for mBD3 and cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) (murine homologues of hBD2 and LL-37, respectively) increase 1–8 hours after acute permeability barrier disruption and normalize by 24 hours, kinetics that mirror the lipid metabolic response to permeability barrier disruption. Artificial permeability barrier restoration, which inhibits the lipid-synthetic response leading to barrier recovery, blocks the increase in AMP mRNA/protein expression, further evidence that AMP expression is linked to permeability barrier function. Conversely, LB-derived AMPs are also important for permeability barrier homeostasis. Despite an apparent increase in mBD3 protein, CRAMP−/− mice delayed permeability barrier recovery, attributable to defective LB contents and abnormalities in the structure of the lamellar membranes that regulate permeability barrier function. These studies demonstrate that (1) the permeability and antimicrobial barriers are coordinately regulated by permeability barrier requirements and (2) CRAMP is required for permeability barrier homeostasis. PMID:17943185

  18. Epidermal Differentiation in Barrier Maintenance and Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Wikramanayake, Tongyu Cao; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-03-01

    Significance: The epidermal barrier prevents water loss and serves as the body's first line of defense against toxins, chemicals, and infectious microbes. Disruption of the barrier, either through congenital disorders of barrier formation or through wounds, puts the individual at risk for dehydration, hypersensitivity, infection, and prolonged inflammation. Epidermal barrier disorders affect millions of patients in the United States, causing loss of productivity and diminished quality of life for patients and their families, and represent a burden to the health-care system and society. Recent Advances: The genetic basis of many congenital barrier disorders has been identified in recent years, and great advances have been made in the molecular mechanisms of the formation and homeostasis of epidermal barrier, as well as acute and chronic wound healing. Progress in stem cell (SC) biology, particularly in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), has opened new doors for cell-based therapy of chronic wounds. Critical Issues: Understanding of the molecular mechanisms of barrier homeostasis in health and disease, as well as contributions of iPSCs and allogeneic MSCs to wound healing, will lead to the identification of novel targets for developing therapeutics for congenital barrier and wound healing disorders. Future Directions: Future studies should focus on better understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to disrupted homeostasis of epidermal barrier to identify potential therapeutic targets to combat its associated diseases. PMID:24669361

  19. Alterations in blood-brain barrier function following acute hypertension: comparison of the blood-to-brain transfer of horseradish peroxidase with that of alpha-aminisobutyric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, M.D.B.

    1985-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) selectively restricts the blood-to-brain passage of many solutes owing to unique properties of cerebrovascular endothelial cell membranes. To date, experimental study of the BBB has been accomplished primarily through the use of two different methodological approaches. Morphological studies have mostly employed large molecular weight (MW) tracers to detect morphological alterations underlying increased permeability. Physiological studies, employing smaller, more physiologic tracers have successfully described, quantitatively, certain functional aspects of blood-to-brain transfer. The current work attempts to merge these two approaches and to consider barrier function/dysfunction from both a morphological and a functional perspective. Specifically, the study compares in rats, following acute hypertension, the cerebrovascular passage of /sup 14/C-alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The blood-to-brain passage of AIB and HRP were compared following acute hypertension, with regard to both the distributions of the tracer extravasation patterns and the magnitude of tracer extravasation. The results of this study suggest that traditional morphological barrier studies alone do not reveal all aspects of altered barrier status and that multiple mechanisms underlying increased BBB permeability may operate simultaneously during BBB dysfunction.

  20. Disrupted Membrane Structure and Intracellular Ca2+ Signaling in Adult Skeletal Muscle with Acute Knockdown of Bin1

    PubMed Central

    Tjondrokoesoemo, Andoria; Park, Ki Ho; Ferrante, Christopher; Komazaki, Shinji; Lesniak, Sebastian; Brotto, Marco; Ko, Jae-Kyun; Zhou, Jingsong; Weisleder, Noah; Ma, Jianjie

    2011-01-01

    Efficient intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) homeostasis in skeletal muscle requires intact triad junctional complexes comprised of t-tubule invaginations of plasma membrane and terminal cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum. Bin1 consists of a specialized BAR domain that is associated with t-tubule development in skeletal muscle and involved in tethering the dihydropyridine receptors (DHPR) to the t-tubule. Here, we show that Bin1 is important for Ca2+ homeostasis in adult skeletal muscle. Since systemic ablation of Bin1 in mice results in postnatal lethality, in vivo electroporation mediated transfection method was used to deliver RFP-tagged plasmid that produced short –hairpin (sh)RNA targeting Bin1 (shRNA-Bin1) to study the effect of Bin1 knockdown in adult mouse FDB skeletal muscle. Upon confirming the reduction of endogenous Bin1 expression, we showed that shRNA-Bin1 muscle displayed swollen t-tubule structures, indicating that Bin1 is required for the maintenance of intact membrane structure in adult skeletal muscle. Reduced Bin1 expression led to disruption of t-tubule structure that was linked with alterations to intracellular Ca2+ release. Voltage-induced Ca2+ released in isolated single muscle fibers of shRNA-Bin1 showed that both the mean amplitude of Ca2+ current and SR Ca2+ transient were reduced when compared to the shRNA-control, indicating compromised coupling between DHPR and ryanodine receptor 1. The mean frequency of osmotic stress induced Ca2+ sparks was reduced in shRNA-Bin1, indicating compromised DHPR activation. ShRNA-Bin1 fibers also displayed reduced Ca2+ sparks' amplitude that was attributed to decreased total Ca2+ stores in the shRNA-Bin1 fibers. Human mutation of Bin1 is associated with centronuclear myopathy and SH3 domain of Bin1 is important for sarcomeric protein organization in skeletal muscle. Our study showing the importance of Bin1 in the maintenance of intact t-tubule structure and ([Ca2+]i) homeostasis in adult skeletal muscle

  1. Acute exposure to selenium disrupts associative conditioning and long-term memory recall in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Burden, Christina M; Elmore, Christopher; Hladun, Kristen R; Trumble, John T; Smith, Brian H

    2016-05-01

    A plethora of toxic compounds - including pesticides, heavy metals, and metalloids - have been detected in honey bees (Apis mellifera) and their colonies. One such compound is selenium, which bees are exposed to by consuming nectar and pollen from flowers grown in contaminated areas. Though selenium is lethal at high concentrations, sublethal exposure may also impair honey bees' ability to function normally. Examining the effect of selenium exposure on learning and memory provides a sensitive assay with which to identify sublethal effects on honey bee health and behavior. To determine whether sublethal selenium exposure causes learning and memory deficits, we used proboscis extension reflex conditioning coupled with recall tests 30min and 24h post-conditioning. We exposed forager honey bees to a single sublethal dose of selenium, and 3h later we used an olfactory conditioning assay to train the bees to discriminate between one odor associated with sucrose-reinforcement and a second unreinforced odor. Following conditioning we tested short- and long-term recall of the task. Acute exposure to as little as 1.8ng of an inorganic form of selenium (sodium selenate) before conditioning caused a reduction in behavioral performance during conditioning. And, exposure to 18ng of either an inorganic form (sodium selenate) or an organic form (methylseleno-l-cysteine) of selenium caused a reduction in the bees' performance during the long-term recall test. These concentrations of selenium are lower than those found in the nectar of plants grown in selenium-contaminated soil, indicating that even low-grade selenium toxicity produces significant learning and memory impairments. This may reduce foragers' ability to effectively gather resources for the colony or nurse bees' ability to care for and maintain a healthy colony. PMID:26802564

  2. Fronto-limbic novelty processing in acute psychosis: disrupted relationship with memory performance and potential implications for delusions

    PubMed Central

    Schott, Björn H.; Voss, Martin; Wagner, Benjamin; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Düzel, Emrah; Behr, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Recent concepts have highlighted the role of the hippocampus and adjacent medial temporal lobe (MTL) in positive symptoms like delusions in schizophrenia. In healthy individuals, the MTL is critically involved in the detection and encoding of novel information. Here, we aimed to investigate whether dysfunctional novelty processing by the MTL might constitute a potential neural mechanism contributing to the pathophysiology of delusions, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 16 unmedicated patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 20 age-matched healthy controls. All patients experienced positive symptoms at time of participation. Participants performed a visual target detection task with complex scene stimuli in which novel and familiar rare stimuli were presented randomly intermixed with a standard and a target picture. Presentation of novel relative to familiar images was associated with hippocampal activation in both patients and healthy controls, but only healthy controls showed a positive relationship between novelty-related hippocampal activation and recognition memory performance after 24 h. Patients, but not controls, showed a robust neural response in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) during presentation of novel stimuli. Functional connectivity analysis in the patients further revealed a novelty-related increase of functional connectivity of both the hippocampus and the OFC with the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) and the ventral striatum (VS). Notably, delusions correlated positively with the difference of the functional connectivity of the hippocampus vs. the OFC with the rACC. Taken together, our results suggest that alterations of fronto-limbic novelty processing may contribute to the pathophysiology of delusions in patients with acute psychosis. PMID:26082697

  3. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  4. Acute nicotine induces anxiety and disrupts temporal pattern organization of rat exploratory behavior in hole-board: a potential role for the lateral habenula

    PubMed Central

    Casarrubea, Maurizio; Davies, Caitlin; Faulisi, Fabiana; Pierucci, Massimo; Colangeli, Roberto; Partridge, Lucy; Chambers, Stephanie; Cassar, Daniel; Valentino, Mario; Muscat, Richard; Benigno, Arcangelo; Crescimanno, Giuseppe; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine is one of the most addictive drugs of abuse. Tobacco smoking is a major cause of many health problems, and is the first preventable cause of death worldwide. Several findings show that nicotine exerts significant aversive as well as the well-known rewarding motivational effects. Less certain is the anatomical substrate that mediates or enables nicotine aversion. Here, we show that acute nicotine induces anxiogenic-like effects in rats at the doses investigated (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), as measured by the hole-board apparatus and manifested in behaviors such as decreased rearing and head-dipping and increased grooming. No changes in locomotor behavior were observed at any of the nicotine doses given. T-pattern analysis of the behavioral outcomes revealed a drastic reduction and disruption of complex behavioral patterns induced by all three nicotine doses, with the maximum effect for 1 mg/kg. Lesion of the lateral habenula (LHb) induced hyperlocomotion and, strikingly, reversed the nicotine-induced anxiety obtained at 1 mg/kg to an anxiolytic-like effect, as shown by T-pattern analysis. We suggest that the LHb is critically involved in emotional behavior states and in nicotine-induced anxiety, most likely through modulation of monoaminergic nuclei. PMID:26082682

  5. Exposure to acute severe hypoxia leads to increased urea loss and disruptions in acid-base and ionoregulatory balance in dogfish sharks (Squalus acanthias).

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Alex M; Wood, Chris M

    2014-01-01

    The effects of acute moderate (20% air O2 saturation; 6-h exposure) and severe (5% air O2 saturation; 4-h exposure) hypoxia on N-waste, acid-base, and ion balance in dogfish sharks (Squalus acanthias suckleyi) were evaluated. We predicted that the synthesis and/or retention of urea, which are active processes, would be inhibited by hypoxia. Exposure to moderate hypoxia had negligible effects on N-waste fluxes or systemic physiology, except for a modest rise in plasma lactate. Exposure to severe hypoxia led to a significant increase in urea excretion (Jurea), while plasma, liver, and muscle urea concentrations were unchanged, suggesting a loss of urea retention. Ammonia excretion (Jamm) was elevated during normoxic recovery. Moreover, severe hypoxia led to disruptions in acid-base balance, indicated by a large increase in plasma [lactate] and substantial decreases in arterial pHa and plasma [Formula: see text], as well as loss of ionic homeostasis, indicated by increases in plasma [Mg(2+)], [Ca(2+)], and [Na(+)]. We suggest that severe hypoxia in dogfish sharks leads to a reduction in active gill homeostatic processes, such as urea retention, acid-base regulation and ionoregulation, and/or an osmoregulatory compromise due to increased functional gill surface area. Overall, the results provide a comprehensive picture of the physiological responses to a severe degree of hypoxia in an ancient fish species. PMID:25244375

  6. The ability to cross the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier is a generic property of acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark T S; Yousafzai, Yasar M; Elder, Alex; Rehe, Klaus; Bomken, Simon; Frishman-Levy, Liron; Tavor, Sigal; Sinclair, Paul; Dormon, Katie; Masic, Dino; Perry, Tracey; Weston, Victoria J; Kearns, Pamela; Blair, Helen; Russell, Lisa J; Heidenreich, Olaf; Irving, Julie A E; Izraeli, Shai; Vormoor, Josef; Graham, Gerard J; Halsey, Christina

    2016-04-21

    Prevention of central nervous system (CNS) relapse is critical for cure of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL). Despite this, mechanisms of CNS infiltration are poorly understood, and the timing, frequency, and properties of BCP-ALL blasts entering the CNS compartment are unknown. We investigated the CNS-engrafting potential of BCP-ALL cells xenotransplanted into immunodeficient NOD.Cg- ITALIC! Prkdc (ITALIC! scid) ITALIC! Il2rg (ITALIC! tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice. CNS engraftment was seen in 23 of 29 diagnostic samples (79%): 2 of 2 from patients with overt CNS disease and 21 of 27 from patients thought to be CNS negative by diagnostic lumbar puncture. Histologic findings mimic human pathology and demonstrate that leukemic cells transit the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier situated close to the dural sinuses, the site of recently discovered CNS lymphatics. Retrieval of blasts from the CNS showed no evidence for chemokine receptor-mediated selective trafficking. The high frequency of infiltration and lack of selective trafficking led us to postulate that CNS tropism is a generic property of leukemic cells. To test this, we performed serial dilution experiments which showed CNS engraftment in 5 of 6 mice after transplant of as few as 10 leukemic cells. Clonal tracking techniques confirmed the polyclonal nature of CNS-infiltrating cells, with multiple clones engrafting in both the CNS and periphery. Overall, these findings suggest that subclinical seeding of the CNS is likely to be present in most BCP-ALL patients at original diagnosis, and efforts to prevent CNS relapse should concentrate on effective eradication of disease from this site rather than targeting entry mechanisms. PMID:26869395

  7. Limb Ischemic Perconditioning Attenuates Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption by Inhibiting Activity of MMP-9 and Occludin Degradation after Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Changhong; Li, Ning; Wang, Brian; Yang, Yong; Gao, Jinhuan; Li, Sijie; Ding, Yuchuan; Jin, Kunlin; Ji, Xunming

    2015-01-01

    Remote ischemic perconditioning (PerC) has been proved to have neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia, however, the effect of PerC on the BBB disruption and underlying mechanisms remains largely unknown. To address these issues, total 90 adult male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were used. The rats underwent 90-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and the limb remote ischemic PerC was immediately applied after the onset of MCAO. We found that limb remote PerC protected BBB breakdown and brain edema, in parallel with reduced infarct volume and improved neurological deficits, after MCAO. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that MCAO resulted in disrupted continuity of claudin-5 staining in the cerebral endothelial cells with significant gap formation, which was significantly improved after PerC. Western blot analysis demonstrated that expression of tight junction (TJ) protein occludin was significantly increased, but other elements of TJ proteins, claudin-5 and ZO-1, in the BBB endothelial cells were not altered at 48 h after PerC, compared to MCAO group. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9), which was involved in TJ protein degradation, was decreased after PerC. Interestingly, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (pERK1/2), an upstream of MMP-9 signaling, was significantly reduced in the PerC group. Our data suggest that PerC inhibits MMP-9-mediated occludin degradation, which could lead to decreased BBB disruption and brain edema after ischemic stroke. PMID:26618042

  8. Novel regulators of endothelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Krishnan; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial barrier function is an essential and tightly regulated process that ensures proper compartmentalization of the vascular and interstitial space, while allowing for the diffusive exchange of small molecules and the controlled trafficking of macromolecules and immune cells. Failure to control endothelial barrier integrity results in excessive leakage of fluid and proteins from the vasculature that can rapidly become fatal in scenarios such as sepsis or the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding on the regulation of endothelial permeability, with a specific focus on the endothelial glycocalyx and endothelial scaffolds, regulatory intracellular signaling cascades, as well as triggers and mediators that either disrupt or enhance endothelial barrier integrity, and provide our perspective as to areas of seeming controversy and knowledge gaps, respectively. PMID:25381026

  9. Vitamin D prevents hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption via vitamin D receptor-mediated NF-kB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Won, Soonmi; Sayeed, Iqbal; Peterson, Bethany L; Wali, Bushra; Kahn, Jared S; Stein, Donald G

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining blood-brain barrier integrity and minimizing neuronal injury are critical components of any therapeutic intervention following ischemic stroke. However, a low level of vitamin D hormone is a risk factor for many vascular diseases including stroke. The neuroprotective effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 (vitamin D) after ischemic stroke have been studied, but it is not known whether it prevents ischemic injury to brain endothelial cells, a key component of the neurovascular unit. We analyzed the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on brain endothelial cell barrier integrity and tight junction proteins after hypoxia/reoxygenation in a mouse brain endothelial cell culture model that closely mimics many of the features of the blood-brain barrier in vitro. Following hypoxic injury in bEnd.3 cells, 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment prevented the decrease in barrier function as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance and permeability of FITC-dextran (40 kDa), the decrease in the expression of the tight junction proteins zonula occludin-1, claudin-5, and occludin, the activation of NF-kB, and the increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression. These responses were blocked when the interaction of 1,25(OH) )2D3 with the vitamin D receptor (VDR) was inhibited by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate treatment. Our findings show a direct, VDR-mediated, protective effect of 1,25(OH) )2D3 against ischemic injury-induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction in cerebral endothelial cells. PMID:25815722

  10. Vitamin D Prevents Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption via Vitamin D Receptor-Mediated NF-kB Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Won, Soonmi; Sayeed, Iqbal; Peterson, Bethany L.; Wali, Bushra; Kahn, Jared S.; Stein, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining blood-brain barrier integrity and minimizing neuronal injury are critical components of any therapeutic intervention following ischemic stroke. However, a low level of vitamin D hormone is a risk factor for many vascular diseases including stroke. The neuroprotective effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 (vitamin D) after ischemic stroke have been studied, but it is not known whether it prevents ischemic injury to brain endothelial cells, a key component of the neurovascular unit. We analyzed the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on brain endothelial cell barrier integrity and tight junction proteins after hypoxia/reoxygenation in a mouse brain endothelial cell culture model that closely mimics many of the features of the blood-brain barrier in vitro. Following hypoxic injury in bEnd.3 cells, 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment prevented the decrease in barrier function as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance and permeability of FITC-dextran (40 kDa), the decrease in the expression of the tight junction proteins zonula occludin-1, claudin-5, and occludin, the activation of NF—kB, and the increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression. These responses were blocked when the interaction of 1,25(OH) )2D3 with the vitamin D receptor (VDR) was inhibited by pyridoxal 5’-phosphate treatment. Our findings show a direct, VDR-mediated, protective effect of 1,25(OH) )2D3 against ischemic injury-induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction in cerebral endothelial cells. PMID:25815722

  11. Prostaglandin-mediated closure of paracellular pathway and not restitution is the primary determinant of barrier recovery in acutely injured porcine ileum

    PubMed Central

    Gookin, Jody L.; Galanko, Joseph A.; Blikslager, Anthony T.; Argenzio, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Small bowel epithelium is at the frontline of intestinal barrier function. Restitution is considered to be the major determinant of epithelial repair as function recovers in parallel with restitution after acute injury. As such, studies of intact mucosa have largely been replaced by migration assays of cultured epithelia. These latter studies fail to account for the simultaneous roles played by villous contraction and paracellular permeability in recovery of barrier function. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) result in increased intestinal permeability and disease exacerbation in patients with IBD. Thus, we examined the reparative attributes of endogenous prostaglandins (PG) after injury of ileal mucosa by deoxycholate (6 mM) in Ussing chambers. Recovery of transepithelial resistance (TER) from 20–40 Ω.cm2 was abolished by indomethacin (INDO), whereas restitution of 40–100% of the villous surface was unaffected despite concurrent arrest of villous contraction. In the presence of PG, resident crypt and migrating epithelial cells were tightly apposed. In tissues treated with INDO, crypt epithelial cells had dilated intercellular spaces that were accentuated in the migrating epithelium. TER was fully rescued from the effects of INDO by osmotic-driven collapse of the paracellular space and PG-mediated recovery was significantly impaired by blockade of Cl− secretion. These studies are the first to clearly distinguish the relative contribution of paracellular resistance versus restitution to acute recovery of epithelial barrier function. Restitution was ineffective in the absence of PG-mediated paracellular space closure. Failure of PG-mediated repair mechanisms may underlie barrier failure resulting from NSAID use in patients with underlying enteropathy. PMID:12801887

  12. PG-mediated closure of paracellular pathway and not restitution is the primary determinant of barrier recovery in acutely injured porcine ileum.

    PubMed

    Gookin, Jody L; Galanko, Joseph A; Blikslager, Anthony T; Argenzio, Robert A

    2003-11-01

    Small bowel epithelium is at the frontline of intestinal barrier function. Restitution is considered to be the major determinant of epithelial repair, because function recovers in parallel with restitution after acute injury. As such, studies of intact mucosa have largely been replaced by migration assays of cultured epithelia. These latter studies fail to account for the simultaneous roles played by villous contraction and paracellular permeability in recovery of barrier function. NSAIDs result in increased intestinal permeability and disease exacerbation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Thus we examined the reparative attributes of endogenous PGs after injury of ileal mucosa by deoxycholate (6 mM) in Ussing chambers. Recovery of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) from 20-40 Omega.cm2 was abolished by indomethacin (Indo), whereas restitution of 40-100% of the villous surface was unaffected despite concurrent arrest of villous contraction. In the presence of PG, resident crypt and migrating epithelial cells were tightly apposed. In tissues treated with Indo, crypt epithelial cells had dilated intercellular spaces that were accentuated in the migrating epithelium. TER was fully rescued from the effects of Indo by osmotic-driven collapse of the paracellular space, and PG-mediated recovery was significantly impaired by blockade of Cl- secretion. These studies are the first to clearly distinguish the relative contribution of paracellular resistance vs. restitution to acute recovery of epithelial barrier function. Restitution was ineffective in the absence of PG-mediated paracellular space closure. Failure of PG-mediated repair mechanisms may underlie barrier failure resulting from NSAID use in patients with underlying enteropathy. PMID:12801887

  13. Vitamin D/VDR signaling attenuates lipopolysaccharide‑induced acute lung injury by maintaining the integrity of the pulmonary epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yong-Yan; Liu, Tian-Jing; Fu, Jian-Hua; Xu, Wei; Wu, Lin-Lin; Hou, A-Na; Xue, Xin-Dong

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D and its receptor have a protective effect on epithelial barriers in various tissues. Low levels of vitamin D are associated with numerous pulmonary diseases, including acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome. The present study investigated whether the vitamin D/vitamin D receptor (VDR) pathway may ameliorate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑induced ALI through maintaining the integrity of the alveolar epithelial barrier. This was investigated by exposing wild‑type (WT) and VDR knockout C57BL/6J mice to LPS, then comparing the healthy and LPS‑treated mice lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). More specifically, lung histology, mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and protein expression levels of tight junction proteins were determined. In addition, a vitamin D analog (paricalcitol) was administered to WT mice in order to investigate the effect of vitamin D on the alveolar epithelial barrier following exposure to LPS. VDR knockout mice exhibited severe lung injuries (P<0.001), increased alveolar permeability [demonstrated by a higher wet‑dry ratio of lung weight (P<0.05), greater expression levels of BALF protein (P<0.001) and fluorescein isothiocyanate‑conjugated 4 kDa dextran (P<0.001) leakage into the alveolar space], elevated proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNA levels, as demonstrated by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction (P<0.05), and decreased protein and mRNA expression levels of occludin (P<0.01) and zonula occludens‑1 (ZO‑1; P<0.01) compared with WT mice. Paricalcitol treatment partially inhibited these pathological changes in WT mice by maintaining the mRNA and protein expression levels of occludin (P<0.01) and ZO‑1 (P<0.05). A lack of VDRs in the pulmonary epithelial barrier appeared to compromise its defense, leading to more severe LPS‑induced lung injury. Furthermore, vitamin D treatment alleviated LPS‑induced lung injury and preserved alveolar

  14. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Mahesh M.; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used “over the counter” sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to understand how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models, and a combination of multi-disciplinary experimental methodologies to examine and understand anatomical and cellular substrates mediating the effects of acute and chronic alcohol exposure on sleep-wakefulness. The results of our studies suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol’s action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Lesions of the BF cholinergic neurons or blockade of AD A1 receptors results in attenuation of alcohol-induced sleep promotion, suggesting that AD and BF cholinergic neurons are critical for sleep-promoting effects of alcohol. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern

  15. Disruption model

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G.; Bronner, G.

    1982-07-01

    Calculations of disruption time and energy dissipation have been obtained by simulating the plasma as an electrical conducting loop that varies in resistivity, current density, major radius. The calculations provide results which are in good agreement with experimental observations. It is believed that this approach allows engineering designs for disruptions to be completed in large tokamaks such as INTOR or FED.

  16. Characterization of tight junction disruption and immune response modulation in a miniaturized Caco-2/U937 coculture-based in vitro model of the human intestinal barrier.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Qasem; Jing, Lin

    2016-02-01

    A microfluidic-based dynamic in vitro model of the human intestinal barrier has been constructed and characterized. The intestinal epithelial monolayer was mimicked by culturing caco-2 cells on a porous membrane in a double-layered microfluidic chip and interfaced with a co-culture of U937 as a model of immune responsive cells. The physiological flow was also mimicked by a continuous perfusion of culture media from the apical and basolateral side of the porous membrane. This dynamic "in vivo-like" environment maintains a continuous supply of cell nutrient and waste removal and create mechanical shear stress within the physiological ranges which promotes uniform cell growth and tight junction formation. The monolayer permeability to soluble ion changes after treating with LPS, and TNF α as indicated by the reduction of the TEER value. In addition, the immune competent caco-2/U937-based model allowed the investigating the role of the epithelial layer as a protection barrier to biological hazards as indicated by the suppressing of the pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. PMID:26809386

  17. Disruption of the Sjögren-Larsson Syndrome Gene Aldh3a2 in Mice Increases Keratinocyte Growth and Retards Skin Barrier Recovery.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Tatsuro; Takagi, Shuyu; Kanetake, Tsukasa; Kitamura, Takuya; Hattori, Satoko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Sassa, Takayuki; Kihara, Akio

    2016-05-27

    The fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH) ALDH3A2 is the causative gene of Sjögren Larsson syndrome (SLS). To date, the molecular mechanism underlying the symptoms characterizing SLS has been poorly understood. Using Aldh3a2(-/-) mice, we found here that Aldh3a2 was the major FALDH active in undifferentiated keratinocytes. Long-chain base metabolism was greatly impaired in Aldh3a2(-/-) keratinocytes. Phenotypically, the intercellular spaces were widened in the basal layer of the Aldh3a2(-/-) epidermis due to hyperproliferation of keratinocytes. Furthermore, oxidative stress-induced genes were up-regulated in Aldh3a2(-/-) keratinocytes. Upon keratinocyte differentiation, the activity of another FALDH, Aldh3b2, surpassed that of Aldh3a2 As a result, Aldh3a2(-/-) mice were indistinguishable from wild-type mice in terms of their whole epidermis FALDH activity, and their skin barrier function was uncompromised under normal conditions. However, perturbation of the stratum corneum caused increased transepidermal water loss and delayed barrier recovery in Aldh3a2(-/-) mice. In conclusion, Aldh3a2(-/-) mice replicated some aspects of SLS symptoms, especially at the basal layer of the epidermis. Our results suggest that hyperproliferation of keratinocytes via oxidative stress responses may partly contribute to the ichthyosis symptoms of SLS. PMID:27053112

  18. Acute irritant threshold correlates with barrier function, skin hydration and contact hypersensitivity in atopic dermatitis and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Kazandjieva, Jana; Tsankov, Nikolai; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to disclose interactions between epidermal barrier, skin irritation and sensitization in healthy and diseased skin. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum hydration (SCH) were assessed in adult patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), rosacea and healthy controls. A 4-h patch test with seven concentrations of sodium lauryl sulphate was performed to determine the irritant threshold (IT). Contact sensitization pattern was revealed by patch testing with European baseline series. Subjects with a lower IT had higher TEWL values and lower SCH. Subjects with positive allergic reactions had significantly lower IT. In AD, epidermal barrier deterioration was detected on both volar forearm and nasolabial fold, while in rosacea, impeded skin physiology parameters were observed on the facial skin only, suggesting that barrier impediment is restricted to the face in rosacea, in contrast with AD where the abnormal skin physiology is generalized. PMID:24112695

  19. Alteration in Intrapulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Aerosolized Model Compounds Due to Disruption of the Alveolar Epithelial Barriers Following Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Tada, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a lethal lung disease that is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix and a change in lung structure. In this study, intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of aerosolized model compounds were evaluated using rats with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Aerosol formulations of indocyanine green, 6-carboxyfluorescein (6-CF), and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextrans (FD; 4.4, 10, 70, and 250 kDa) were administered to rat lungs using a MicroSprayer. Indocyanine green fluorescence signals were significantly weaker in fibrotic lungs than in control lungs and 6-CF and FD concentrations in the plasma of pulmonary fibrotic animals were markedly higher than in the plasma of control animals. Moreover, disrupted epithelial tight junctions, including claudins-1, -3, and -5, were observed in pulmonary fibrotic lesions using immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, destruction of tight junctions on model alveolar epithelial cells (NCI-H441) by transforming growth factor-β1 treatment enhanced the permeability of 6-CF and FDs through NCI-H441 cell monolayers. These results indicate that aerosolized drugs are easily distributed into the plasma after leakage through damaged tight junctions of alveolar epithelium. Therefore, the development of delivery systems for anti-fibrotic agents to improve intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics may be necessary for effective idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis therapy. PMID:26886341

  20. NLRP3 protects alveolar barrier integrity by an inflammasome-independent increase of epithelial cell adherence.

    PubMed

    Kostadinova, Elena; Chaput, Catherine; Gutbier, Birgitt; Lippmann, Juliane; Sander, Leif E; Mitchell, Timothy J; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin; Opitz, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, characterized by alveolar barrier disruption. NLRP3 is best known for its ability to form inflammasomes and to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production in myeloid cells. Here we show that NLRP3 protects the integrity of the alveolar barrier in a mouse model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and ex vivo upon treatment of isolated perfused and ventilated lungs with the purified bacterial toxin, pneumolysin. We reveal that the preserving effect of NLRP3 on the lung barrier is independent of inflammasomes, IL-1β and IL-18. NLRP3 improves the integrity of alveolar epithelial cell monolayers by enhancing cellular adherence. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel function of NLRP3 by demonstrating that it protects epithelial barrier function independently of inflammasomes. PMID:27476670

  1. NLRP3 protects alveolar barrier integrity by an inflammasome-independent increase of epithelial cell adherence

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinova, Elena; Chaput, Catherine; Gutbier, Birgitt; Lippmann, Juliane; Sander, Leif E.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin; Opitz, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, characterized by alveolar barrier disruption. NLRP3 is best known for its ability to form inflammasomes and to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production in myeloid cells. Here we show that NLRP3 protects the integrity of the alveolar barrier in a mouse model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and ex vivo upon treatment of isolated perfused and ventilated lungs with the purified bacterial toxin, pneumolysin. We reveal that the preserving effect of NLRP3 on the lung barrier is independent of inflammasomes, IL-1β and IL-18. NLRP3 improves the integrity of alveolar epithelial cell monolayers by enhancing cellular adherence. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel function of NLRP3 by demonstrating that it protects epithelial barrier function independently of inflammasomes. PMID:27476670

  2. Neuroinvasion of the Highly Pathogenic Influenza Virus H7N1 Is Caused by Disruption of the Blood Brain Barrier in an Avian Model

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Aida J.; Vergara-Alert, Júlia; Busquets, Núria; Valle, Rosa; Rivas, Raquel; Ramis, Antonio; Darji, Ayub; Majó, Natàlia

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) causes central nervous system (CNS) lesions in avian and mammalian species, including humans. However, the mechanism used by IAV to invade the brain has not been determined. In the current work, we used chickens infected with a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus as a model to elucidate the mechanism of entry of IAV into the brain. The permeability of the BBB was evaluated in fifteen-day-old H7N1-infected and non-infected chickens using three different methods: (i) detecting Evans blue (EB) extravasation into the brain, (ii) determining the leakage of the serum protein immunoglobulin Y (IgY) into the brain and (iii) assessing the stability of the tight-junction (TJ) proteins zonula occludens-1 and claudin-1 in the chicken brain at 6, 12, 18, 24, 36 and 48 hours post-inoculation (hpi). The onset of the induced viremia was evaluated by quantitative real time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) at the same time points. Viral RNA was detected from 18 hpi onward in blood samples, whereas IAV antigen was detected at 24 hpi in brain tissue samples. EB and IgY extravasation and loss of integrity of the TJs associated with the presence of viral antigen was first observed at 36 and 48 hpi in the telencephalic pallium and cerebellum. Our data suggest that the mechanism of entry of the H7N1 HPAI into the brain includes infection of the endothelial cells at early stages (24 hpi) with subsequent disruption of the TJs of the BBB and leakage of virus and serum proteins into the adjacent neuroparenchyma. PMID:25506836

  3. Early Activation of MAPK p44/42 Is Partially Involved in DON-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier Function and Tight Junction Network.

    PubMed

    Springler, Alexandra; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Mayer, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), produced by the plant pathogens Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum, is one of the most common mycotoxins, contaminating cereal and cereal-derived products. Although worldwide contamination of food and feed poses health threats to humans and animals, pigs are particularly susceptible to this mycotoxin. DON derivatives, such as deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (DOM-1), are produced by bacterial transformation of certain intestinal bacteria, which are naturally occurring or applied as feed additives. Intestinal epithelial cells are the initial barrier against these food- and feed-borne toxins. The present study confirms DON-induced activation of MAPK p44/42 and inhibition of p44/42 by MAPK-inhibitor U0126 monoethanolate. Influence of DON and DOM-1 on transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), viability and expression of seven tight junction proteins (TJ), as well as the potential of U0126 to counteract DON-induced effects, was assessed. While DOM-1 showed no effect, DON significantly reduced TEER of differentiated IPEC-J2 and decreased expression of claudin-1 and -3, while leaving claudin-4; ZO-1, -2, and -3 and occludin unaffected. Inhibition of p44/42 counteracted DON-induced TEER decrease and restored claudin-3, but not claudin-1 expression. Therefore, effects of DON on TEER and claudin-3 are at least partially p44/42 mediated, while effects on viability and claudin-1 are likely mediated via alternative pathways. PMID:27618100

  4. Malaria-associated L-arginine deficiency induces mast cell-associated disruption to intestinal barrier defenses against nontyphoidal Salmonella bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Chau, Jennifer Y; Tiffany, Caitlin M; Nimishakavi, Shilpa; Lawrence, Jessica A; Pakpour, Nazzy; Mooney, Jason P; Lokken, Kristen L; Caughey, George H; Tsolis, Renee M; Luckhart, Shirley

    2013-10-01

    Coinfection with malaria and nontyphoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS) can cause life-threatening bacteremia in humans. Coinfection with malaria is a recognized risk factor for invasive NTS, suggesting that malaria impairs intestinal barrier function. Here, we investigated mechanisms and strategies for prevention of coinfection pathology in a mouse model. Our findings reveal that malarial-parasite-infected mice, like humans, develop L-arginine deficiency, which is associated with intestinal mastocytosis, elevated levels of histamine, and enhanced intestinal permeability. Prevention or reversal of L-arginine deficiency blunts mastocytosis in ileal villi as well as bacterial translocation, measured as numbers of mesenteric lymph node CFU of noninvasive Escherichia coli Nissle and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, the latter of which is naturally invasive in mice. Dietary supplementation of malarial-parasite-infected mice with L-arginine or L-citrulline reduced levels of ileal transcripts encoding interleukin-4 (IL-4), a key mediator of intestinal mastocytosis and macromolecular permeability. Supplementation with L-citrulline also enhanced epithelial adherens and tight junctions in the ilea of coinfected mice. These data suggest that increasing L-arginine bioavailability via oral supplementation can ameliorate malaria-induced intestinal pathology, providing a basis for testing nutritional interventions to reduce malaria-associated mortality in humans. PMID:23690397

  5. Malaria-Associated l-Arginine Deficiency Induces Mast Cell-Associated Disruption to Intestinal Barrier Defenses against Nontyphoidal Salmonella Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Jennifer Y.; Tiffany, Caitlin M.; Nimishakavi, Shilpa; Lawrence, Jessica A.; Pakpour, Nazzy; Mooney, Jason P.; Lokken, Kristen L.; Caughey, George H.; Tsolis, Renee M.

    2013-01-01

    Coinfection with malaria and nontyphoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS) can cause life-threatening bacteremia in humans. Coinfection with malaria is a recognized risk factor for invasive NTS, suggesting that malaria impairs intestinal barrier function. Here, we investigated mechanisms and strategies for prevention of coinfection pathology in a mouse model. Our findings reveal that malarial-parasite-infected mice, like humans, develop l-arginine deficiency, which is associated with intestinal mastocytosis, elevated levels of histamine, and enhanced intestinal permeability. Prevention or reversal of l-arginine deficiency blunts mastocytosis in ileal villi as well as bacterial translocation, measured as numbers of mesenteric lymph node CFU of noninvasive Escherichia coli Nissle and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, the latter of which is naturally invasive in mice. Dietary supplementation of malarial-parasite-infected mice with l-arginine or l-citrulline reduced levels of ileal transcripts encoding interleukin-4 (IL-4), a key mediator of intestinal mastocytosis and macromolecular permeability. Supplementation with l-citrulline also enhanced epithelial adherens and tight junctions in the ilea of coinfected mice. These data suggest that increasing l-arginine bioavailability via oral supplementation can ameliorate malaria-induced intestinal pathology, providing a basis for testing nutritional interventions to reduce malaria-associated mortality in humans. PMID:23690397

  6. MYELIN BASIC PROTEIN INDUCES INFLAMMATORY MEDIATORS FROM PRIMARY HUMAN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS AND BLOOD-BRAIN-BARRIER DISRUPTION: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PATHOGENESIS OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    D’Aversa, Teresa G.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Lopez, Lillie; Berman, Joan W.

    2012-01-01

    Aim Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS), characterized by demyelination of white matter, loss of myelin forming oligodendrocytes, changes in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB), and leukocyte infiltration. Myelin basic protein (MBP) is a component of the myelin sheath. Degradation of myelin is believed to be an important step that leads to MS pathology. Transmigration of leukocytes across the vasculature, and a compromised BBB participate in the neuroinflammation of MS. We examined the expression and regulation of the chemokine CCL2 and the cytokine IL-6 in human endothelial cells (EC), a component of the BBB, after treatment with MBP. Methods EC were treated with full length MBP. CCL2 and IL-6 protein were determined by ELISA. Western blot analysis was used to determine signaling pathways. A BBB model was treated with MBP and permeability was assayed using albumin conjugated to Evan’s blue dye. The levels of the tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-1, and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-2 were assayed by Western blot. Results MBP significantly induced CCL2 and IL-6 protein from EC. This induction was partially mediated by the p38 MAPK pathway as there was phosphorylation after MBP treatment. MBP treatment of a BBB model caused an increase in permeability that correlated with a decrease in occludin and claudin-1, and an induction of MMP-2. Conclusion These data demonstrate that MBP induces chemotactic and inflammatory mediators. MBP also alters BBB permeability and tight junction expression, indicating additional factors that may contribute to the BBB breakdown characteristic of MS. PMID:22524708

  7. Moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation results in blood-brain barrier breakdown via oxidative stress-dependent tight-junction protein disruption.

    PubMed

    Zehendner, Christoph M; Librizzi, Laura; Hedrich, Jana; Bauer, Nina M; Angamo, Eskedar A; de Curtis, Marco; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2013-01-01

    Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR) on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC). BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC) or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO) with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF), MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ) integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin 5 (Cl5), decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role in this

  8. The Use of Susceptibility-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Characterize the Safety Window of Focused Ultrasound Exposure for Localized Blood—Brain-Barrier Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hsu, Po-Hong; Wai, Yau-Yau; Chen, Jin-Chung; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Wang, Jiun-Jie

    2009-04-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound has been discovered to be able to locally and reversibly increase the permeability of the blood—brain barrier (BBB), which can be detected using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, side effects such as microhemorrhage, erythrocyte extravasations, or even extensive hemorrhage can also occur. Although current contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI can be used to detect the changes in BBB permeability, its efficacy in detecting tissue hemorrhage after focused-ultrasound sonication remains limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using MR susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to identify tissue hemorrhage associated with the process of BBB permeability increase and characterize the safety window of acoustic pressure level. Brains of 42 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 107 sonications either unilaterally or bilaterally. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, together with SWI were performed. Tissue damage and hemorrhage were analyzed histologically with light microscopy and staining by Evan's blue, HE staining as well as TUNEL staining. Our results showed that contrast-enhanced T1 weighted imaging is sensitive to the presence of the BBB disrupture, but was unable to differentiate from extensive tissue damage such as hemorrhage. Also, SWI proved to be a superior tool for the realtime monitoring of the presence of hemorrhage, which is essential to the clinical concerns. The safety operation window in vivo in our study indicated a pressure of 0.78 to 1.1 MPa. to increase the BBB permeability successfully without hemorrhage. Potential applications such as drug delivery in the brain might be benefited.

  9. Moderate Hypoxia Followed by Reoxygenation Results in Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown via Oxidative Stress-Dependent Tight-Junction Protein Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Zehendner, Christoph M.; Librizzi, Laura; Hedrich, Jana; Bauer, Nina M.; Angamo, Eskedar A.; de Curtis, Marco; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2013-01-01

    Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR) on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC). BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC) or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO) with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF), MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ) integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin 5 (Cl5), decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role in

  10. The dynamic blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Keaney, James; Campbell, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    With the endothelium as its central unit, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a complex multicellular structure separating the central nervous system (CNS) from the systemic circulation. Disruption of the BBB has now been implicated in a multitude of acute and chronic CNS disorders indicating the potentially devastating effects of BBB breakdown on brain function. However, the healthy BBB is not an impermeable wall, but rather a communication 'centre', responding to and passing signals between the CNS and blood. New studies are identifying BBB-specific transport pathways that tightly regulate the entry and exit of molecules to and from the brain. They are revealing a highly plastic barrier in which dynamic changes in BBB components like paracellular tight junction complexes can contribute to BBB maintenance. Here, we provide a succinct overview of the current state-of-play in BBB research and summarize novel findings into BBB regulation in homeostatic regulation of the brain. PMID:26277326

  11. Nox2-dependent glutathionylation of endothelial NOS leads to uncoupled superoxide production and endothelial barrier dysfunction in acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Feng; Szczepaniak, William S.; Shiva, Sruti; Liu, Huanbo; Wang, Yinna; Wang, Ling; Wang, Ying; Kelley, Eric E.; Chen, Alex F.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular barrier integrity is dependent on bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) produced locally by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Under conditions of limited substrate or cofactor availability or by enzymatic modification, eNOS may become uncoupled, producing superoxide in lieu of NO. This study was designed to investigate how eNOS-dependent superoxide production contributes to endothelial barrier dysfunction in inflammatory lung injury and its regulation. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with intratracheal LPS. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for protein accumulation, and lung tissue homogenate was assayed for endothelial NOS content and function. Human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HLMVEC) monolayers were exposed to LPS in vitro, and barrier integrity and superoxide production were measured. Biopterin species were quantified, and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays were performed to identify protein interactions with eNOS that putatively drive uncoupling. Mice exposed to LPS demonstrated eNOS-dependent increased alveolar permeability without evidence for altered canonical NO signaling. LPS-induced superoxide production and permeability in HLMVEC were inhibited by the NOS inhibitor nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, eNOS-targeted siRNA, the eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin, and superoxide dismutase. Co-IP indicated that LPS stimulated the association of eNOS with NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2), which correlated with augmented eNOS S-glutathionylation both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, Nox2-specific inhibition prevented LPS-induced eNOS modification and increases in both superoxide production and permeability. These data indicate that eNOS uncoupling contributes to superoxide production and barrier dysfunction in the lung microvasculature after exposure to LPS. Furthermore, the results implicate Nox2-mediated eNOS-S-glutathionylation as a mechanism underlying LPS-induced eNOS uncoupling in the lung microvasculature. PMID:25326583

  12. ACUTE INDUCTION OF EPILEPTIFORM DISCHARGES BY PILOCARPINE IN THE IN VITRO ISOLATED GUINEA-PIG BRAIN REQUIRES ENHANCEMENT OF BLOOD–BRAIN BARRIER PERMEABILITY

    PubMed Central

    UVA, L.; LIBRIZZI, L.; MARCHI, N.; NOE, F.; BONGIOVANNI, R.; VEZZANI, A.; JANIGRO, D.; DE CURTIS, M.

    2008-01-01

    Systemic application of the muscarinic agonist, pilocarpine, is commonly utilized to induce an acute status epilepticus that evolves into a chronic epileptic condition characterized by spontaneous seizures. Recent findings suggest that the status epilepticus induced by pilocarpine may be triggered by changes in the blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability. We tested the role of the BBB in an acute pilocarpine model by using the in vitro model brain preparation and compared our finding with in vivo data. Arterial perfusion of the in vitro isolated guinea-pig brain with <1 mM pilocarpine did not cause epileptiform activity, but rather reduced synaptic transmission and induced steady fast (20–25 Hz) oscillatory activity in limbic cortices. These effects were reversibly blocked by co-perfusion of the muscarinic antagonist atropine sulfate (5 μM). Brain pilocarpine measurements in vivo and in vitro suggested modest BBB penetration. Pilocarpine induced epileptiform discharges only when perfused with compounds that enhance BBB permeability, such as bradykinin (n=2) or histamine (n=10). This pro-epileptic effect was abolished when the BBB-impermeable muscarinic antagonist atropine methyl bromide (5 μM) was co-perfused with histamine and pilocarpine. In the absence of BBB permeability enhancing drugs, pilocarpine induced epileptiform activity only after arterial perfusion at concentrations >10 mM. Ictal discharges correlated with a high intracerebral pilocarpine concentration measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. We propose that acute epileptiform discharges induced by pilocarpine treatment in the in vitro isolated brain preparation are mediated by a dose-dependent, atropine-sensitive muscarinic effect promoted by an increase in BBB permeability. Pilocarpine accumulation secondary to BBB permeability changes may contribute to in vivo ictogenesis in the pilocarpine epilepsy model. PMID:18082973

  13. TNF-α Mediated Increase of HIF-1α Inhibits VASP Expression, Which Reduces Alveolar-Capillary Barrier Function during Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Doulin; Lv, Jiawei; Li, Qun; Kuang, Changchun; Hu, Pengchao; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jing; Su, Ke; Wei, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is an inflammatory disorder associated with reduced alveolar-capillary barrier function and increased pulmonary vascular permeability. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) is widely associated with all types of modulations of cytoskeleton rearrangement-dependent cellular morphology and function, such as adhesion, shrinkage, and permeability. The present studies were conducted to investigate the effects and mechanisms by which tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) increases the tight junction permeability in lung tissue associated with acute lung inflammation. After incubating A549 cells for 24 hours with different concentrations (0–100 ng/mL) of TNF-α, 0.1 to 8 ng/mL TNF-α exhibited no significant effect on cell viability compared with the 0 ng/mL TNF-α group (control group). However, 10 ng/mL and 100 ng/mL TNF-α dramatically inhibited the viability of A549 cells compared with the control group (*p<0.05). Monolayer cell permeability assay results indicated that A549 cells incubated with 10 ng/mL TNF-α for 24 hours displayed significantly increased cell permeability (*p<0.05). Moreover, the inhibition of VASP expression increased the cell permeability (*p<0.05). Pretreating A549 cells with cobalt chloride (to mimic a hypoxia environment) increased protein expression level of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) (*p<0.05), whereas protein expression level of VASP decreased significantly (*p<0.05). In LPS-induced ALI mice, the concentrations of TNF-α in lung tissues and serum significantly increased at one hour, and the value reached a peak at four hours. Moreover, the Evans Blue absorption value of the mouse lung tissues reached a peak at four hours. The HIF-1α protein expression level in mouse lung tissues increased significantly at four hours and eight hours (**p<0.001), whereas the VASP protein expression level decreased significantly (**p<0.01). Taken together, our data demonstrate that HIF-1α acts downstream of TNF

  14. Apocynum venetum leaf extract attenuates disruption of the blood-brain barrier and upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9/-2 in a rat model of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jun; Lan, Rui; Tang, Yu-Ping; Chen, Yi-Ping; Cai, Ding-Fang

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the neuroprotective effects of Apocynum venetum leaf extract (AVLE) on a rat model of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury and explored the underlying mechanisms. Rats were randomly divided into five groups: sham, ischemia-reperfusion, AVLE125, AVLE250, and AVLE500. Cerebral ischemia was induced by 1.5 h of occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. Cerebral infarct area was measured by tetrazolium staining at 24 and 72 h after reperfusion, and neurological function was evaluated at 24, 48 and 72 h after reperfusion. Pathological changes on the ultrastructure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) were observed by transmission electron microscopy. BBB permeability was assessed by detecting leakage of Evan's blue (EB) dye in brain tissue. The expression and activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9/-2 were measured by western blot analyses and gelatin zymography at 24 h after reperfusion. AVLE (500 mg/kg/day) significantly reduced cerebral infarct area, improved recovery of neurological function, relieved morphological damage to the BBB, reduced water content and EB leakage in the brain, and downregulated the expression and activities of MMP-9/-2. These findings suggest that AVLE protects against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury by alleviating BBB disruption. This action may be due to its inhibitory effects on the expression and activities of MMP-9/-2. PMID:22592643

  15. Intrapartum Pubic Symphysis Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Pires, RES; Labronici, PJ; Giordano, V; Kojima, KE; Kfuri, M; Barbisan, M; Wajnsztejn, A; de Andrade, MAP

    2015-01-01

    During pregnancy, high progesterone and relaxin levels produce physiological ligament relaxation on the pelvis. Therefore, moderate pubic symphysis and sacroiliac joints relaxing provide birth canal widening, thereby facilitating vaginal delivery. Sometimes, functional pain or pelvic instability may occur during pregnancy or puerperium, which is defined as symptomatic pelvic girdle relaxation. In rare cases, a pubic symphysis disruption can occur during the labor, causing severe pain and functional limitations. The early recognition of this injury is crucial to prevent complications and improve clinical and functional outcomes. This study reports an acute symphyseal disruption resulting from childbirth in a primiparous patient who underwent open reduction and internal fixation with plate and screws. After a 6 months follow-up, the patient presented no pain and satisfactory functional recovery. PMID:27057391

  16. Family Disruptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Returns Do you or your spouse frequently travel on business? These can be disruptive times for your child and for the family as ... these out-of-town trips. Spend as much time as it takes to explain where you are ... before and during your travels. You need to acknowledge and accept her feelings: " ...

  17. Problems and Barriers in Ensuring Effective Acute and Post-Operative Pain Management--an International Perspective.

    PubMed

    Mędrzycka-Dąbrowska, Wioletta; Dąbrowski, Sebastian; Basiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Pain management originated at the turn of the 1960s and 70s in the United States, and spread to Western Europe almost a decade later. It is estimated today that a lack of adequate pain management affects 80% of the global population, and is a serious problem in over 150 countries. At the national level, the greatest burden of inadequate pain management is borne by the elderly, pregnant and breastfeeding women, children, people coping with addictions to harmful substances, and the mentally ill. In spite of enormous progress, there are still significant barriers to comprehensive pain management. Pain management should be considered a priority. It is an interdisciplinary task requiring the cooperation of the whole medical staff. The current review of literature revealed a number of factors limiting the possibility of achieving effective pain management, related to healthcare systems, medical staff and patients. PMID:26768644

  18. EGb761 provides a protective effect against Aβ1-42 oligomer-induced cell damage and blood-brain barrier disruption in an in vitro bEnd.3 endothelial model.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wen-bin; Cao, Lan; Liu, Lu-mei; Kalionis, Bill; Chen, Chuan; Tai, Xian-tao; Li, Ya-ming; Xia, Shi-jin

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of senile dementia which is characterized by abnormal amyloid beta (Aβ) accumulation and deposition in brain parenchyma and cerebral capillaries, and leads to blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Despite great progress in understanding the etiology of AD, the underlying pathogenic mechanism of BBB damage is still unclear, and no effective treatment has been devised. The standard Ginkgo biloba extract EGb761 has been widely used as a potential cognitive enhancer for the treatment of AD. However, the cellular mechanism underlying the effect remain to be clarified. In this study, we employed an immortalized endothelial cell line (bEnd.3) and incubation of Aβ(1-42) oligomer, to mimic a monolayer BBB model under conditions found in the AD brain. We investigated the effect of EGb761 on BBB and found that Aβ1-42 oligomer-induced cell injury, apoptosis, and generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), were attenuated by treatment with EGb761. Moreover, treatment of the cells with EGb761 decreased BBB permeability and increased tight junction scaffold protein levels including ZO-1, Claudin-5 and Occludin. We also found that the Aβ(1-42) oligomer-induced upregulation of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), which mediates Aβ cytotoxicity and plays an essential role in AD progression, was significantly decreased by treatment with EGb761. To our knowledge, we provide the first direct in vitro evidence of an effect of EGb761 on the brain endothelium exposed to Aβ(1-42) oligomer, and on the expression of tight junction (TJ) scaffold proteins and RAGE. Our results provide a new insight into a possible mechanism of action of EGb761. This study provides a rational basis for the therapeutic application of EGb761 in the treatment of AD. PMID:25426944

  19. Neurological diseases in relation to the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Gary A

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) has an important part in cellular damage in neurological diseases, including acute and chronic cerebral ischemia, brain trauma, multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, and brain infections. The neurovascular unit (NVU) forms the interface between the blood and brain tissues. During an injury, the cascade of molecular events ends in the final common pathway for BBB disruption by free radicals and proteases, which attack membranes and degrade the tight junction proteins in endothelial cells. Free radicals of oxygen and nitrogen and the proteases, matrix metalloproteinases and cyclooxgyenases, are important in the early and delayed BBB disruption as the neuroinflammatory response progresses. Opening of the BBB occurs in neurodegenerative diseases and contributes to the cognitive changes. In addition to the importance of the NVU in acute injury, angiogenesis contributes to the recovery process. The challenges to treatment of the brain diseases involve not only facilitating drug entry into the brain, but also understanding the timing of the molecular cascades to block the early NVU injury without interfering with recovery. This review will describe the molecular and cellular events associated with NVU disruption and potential strategies directed toward restoring its integrity. PMID:22252235

  20. The "caveolae brake hypothesis" and the epidermal barrier.

    PubMed

    Roelandt, Truus; Giddelo, Christina; Heughebaert, Carol; Denecker, Geertrui; Hupe, Melanie; Crumrine, Debra; Kusuma, Andy; Haftek, Marek; Roseeuw, Diane; Declercq, Wim; Feingold, Kenneth R; Elias, Peter M; Hachem, Jean-Pierre

    2009-04-01

    Epidermal permeability barrier formation depends upon lamellar body (LB) secretion/fusion with the apical plasma membrane (APM) of outermost stratum granulosum (SG) cell, creating cholesterol/glycosphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts-like domains. We found that the dimensions of these domains are comparable to lipid raft in other cell types; and that acute barrier disruption regulates their size and dynamics. To assess the function of these LB-derived raft-like domains, we assessed APM dynamics and barrier recovery in methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD)-treated hairless mice and caveolin-1 knockouts (cav-1(-/-)). MbetaCD treatment impaired APM raft-like domain formation and barrier recovery. Accelerated barrier recovery is observed in cav-1(-/-) in parallel with expansion of raft-like domains. Barrier abrogation of normal epidermis resulted in translocation of cav-1 from the cytoplasm to raft-like membrane domains, restricting further raft-like domain formation and initiating terminal differentiation. Inhibition of LB secretion by monensin and absence of cav-1 delayed terminal differentiation. Furthermore, cav-1(-/-) mice exhibited an increased propensity to develop experimentally induced epidermal hyperplasia correlating with lipid raft persistence. Finally, the epidermal hyperplasia in psoriasis and Netherton syndrome is paralleled by increased lipid raft formation. These studies demonstrate that cav-1 delivery to the APM by LB trafficking to APM "brakes" further LB secretion, signals terminal differentiation, and regulates epidermal hyperproliferation. PMID:19005485

  1. Acute intermittent hypoxia-induced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor is disrupted in the brainstem of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Vermehren-Schmaedick, A; Jenkins, V K; Knopp, S J; Balkowiec, A; Bissonnette, J M

    2012-03-29

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). One of its targets is the gene encoding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf). In vitro studies using cultured neurons have produced conflicting results with respect to the role of MeCP2 in BDNF expression. Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces plasticity in the respiratory system characterized by long-term facilitation of phrenic nerve amplitude. This paradigm induces an increase in BDNF protein. We hypothesized that AIH leads to augmentation of BDNF transcription in respiratory-related areas of the brainstem and that MeCP2 is necessary for this process. Wild-type and mecp2 null (mecp2(-/y)) mice were subjected to three 5-min episodes of exposure to 8% O(2)/4% CO(2)/88% N(2), delivered at 5-min intervals. Normoxia control wild-type and mecp2 null mice were exposed to room air for the total length of time, that is, 30 min. Following a recovery in room air, the pons and medulla were rapidly removed. Expression of BDNF protein and transcripts were determined by ELISA and quantitative PCR, respectively. AIH induced a significant increase in BDNF protein in the pons and medulla, and in mRNA transcript levels in the pons of wild-type animals. In contrast, there were no significant changes in either BDNF protein or transcripts in the pons or medulla of mice lacking MeCP2. The results indicate that MeCP2 is required for regulation of BDNF expression by acute intermittent hypoxia in vivo. PMID:22297041

  2. Acute intermittent hypoxia-induced expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor is disrupted in the brainstem of mecp2 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Vermehren-Schmaedick, Anke; Jenkins, Victoria K.; Knopp, Sharon J.; Balkowiec, Agnieszka; Bissonnette, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss of function mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). One of its targets is the gene encoding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf). In vitro studies using cultured neurons have produced conflicting results with respect to the role of MeCP2 in BDNF expression. Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces plasticity in the respiratory system characterized by long-term facilitation of phrenic nerve amplitude. This paradigm induces an increase in BDNF protein. We hypothesized that AIH leads to augmentation of BDNF transcription in respiratory-related areas of the brainstem and that MeCP2 is necessary for this process. Wild-type and mecp2 null (mecp2−/y) mice were subjected to three 5-min episodes of exposure to 8% O2/4% CO2/88% N2, delivered at 5-min intervals. Normoxia control wild-type and mecp2 null mice were exposed to room air for the total length of time, i.e. 30 min. Following a recovery in room air, the pons and medulla were rapidly removed. Expression of BDNF protein and transcripts were determined by ELISA and quantitative PCR, respectively. AIH induced a significant increase in BDNF protein in the pons and medulla, and in mRNA transcript levels in the pons of wild-type animals. In contrast, there were no significant changes in either BDNF protein or transcripts in the pons or medulla of mice lacking Mecp2. The results indicate that Mecp2 is required for regulation of BDNF expression by acute intermittent hypoxia in vivo. PMID:22297041

  3. The secretion, synthesis, and metabolism of cortisol and its downstream genes in the H-P-I axis of rare minnows (Gobiocypris rarus) are disrupted by acute waterborne cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xie, Bi-Wen; Wang, Zhi-Jian; Jin, Li; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2016-01-01

    The H (hypothalamic)-P (pituitary)-I (interrenal) axis plays a critical role in the fish stress response and is regulated by several factors. Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most toxic heavy metals in the world, but its effects on the H-P-I axis of teleosts are largely unknown. Using rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) as an experimental animal, we found that Cd only disrupted the secretion and synthesis of cortisol. Neither hormones at the H or P level nor the expressions of their receptor genes (corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor (CRHR) and melanocortin receptor 2 (MC2R)) were affected. Steroidogenic acute regulator (StAR), CYP11A1 and CYP11B1, which encode the key enzymes in the cortisol synthesis pathway, were significantly up-regulated in the kidney (including the head kidney). The level of 11β-HSD2, which is required for the conversion of cortisol to cortisone, was increased in the kidney, intestine, brain, and hepatopancreas, whereas the expression of 11β-HSD1, which encodes the reverse conversion enzyme, was increased in the gill, kidney and almost unchanged in other tissues. The enzyme activity concentration of 11β-HSD2 was increased in the kidney as well. The level of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) decreased in the intestine, gill and muscle, and the key GR regulator FK506 binding protein5 (FKBP5) was up-regulated in the GR-decreased tissues, whereas the level of nuclear receptor co-repressor 1 (NCoR1), another GR regulator remained almost unchanged. Thus, GR, FKBP5 and 11β-HSD2 may be involved in Cd-induced cortisol disruption. PMID:27033032

  4. Acute exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol disrupts audience effects on male-male interactions in Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Dzieweczynski, Teresa L; Buckman, Christina M

    2013-03-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals can have profound effects on the behavior of aquatic organisms residing in polluted waters. Males are especially sensitive to the effects of estrogen mimics and both courtship and aggression may be dramatically reduced by chemical exposure. Population-level impacts may occur if these chemicals decrease the ability of males to obtain mates or defend territories. Exposure might also have far-reaching impacts by interfering with information transfer within a network of individuals. For example, males exposed to an endocrine disruptor may be less sensitive to the presence of an audience. Male Siamese fighting fish were used to examine how short-term exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) alters audience effects on male-male interactions. Males either received a nominal dose of EE2 or remained unexposed and then interacted with an opponent in one of three treatments (female, male, or no audience). EE2 altered audience effects in this study. Opponent-directed gill flaring was lower when a female audience was present compared to when there was a male or no audience in both EE2 and control males. The number of opponent-directed tail beats did not differ as a function of audience type in EE2 males. In contrast, unexposed males increased opponent-directed tail beats when a female audience is present. Therefore, EE2 reduces the ability of males to communicate with multiple individuals simultaneously. If this is the case, endocrine disruptor exposure may alter population structure as selection should favor individuals that are able to readily adjust their signaling behavior as a function of social context. PMID:23333768

  5. Adenosine A2B receptor modulates intestinal barrier function under hypoxic and ischemia/reperfusion conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Qiu, Yuan; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Liang, Hongyin; Zhang, Chaojun; Yang, Hanwenbo; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Sun, Li-Hua; Yang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intestinal barrier function failure from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and acute hypoxia has been implicated as a critical determinant in the predisposition to intestinal inflammation and a number of inflammatory disorders. Here, we identified the role of Adenosine A2B receptor (A2BAR) in the regulation of intestinal barrier function under I/R and acute hypoxic conditions. Methods: C57BL/6J mice were used, and were randomized into three groups: Sham, I/R, IR+PSB1115 (a specific A2BAR antagonist) groups. After surgery, the small bowel was harvested for immunohistochemical staining, RNA and protein content, and intestinal permeability analyses. Using an epithelial cell culture model, we investigated the influence of hypoxia on the epithelial function, and the role of A2BAR in the expressions of tight junction and epithelial permeability. The expressions of Claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western-Blot. Epithelial barrier function was assessed with transepithelial resistance (TER). Results and conclusions: The A2BAR antagonist, PSB1115, significantly increased tight junction protein expression after intestinal I/R or acute hypoxia conditions. PSB1115 also attenuated the disrupted distribution of TJ proteins. Furthermore, inhibition of A2BAR attenuated the decrease in TER induced by I/R or acute hypoxic conditions, and maintained intestinal barrier function. Antagonism of A2BAR activity improves intestinal epithelial structure and barrier function in a mouse model of intestinal I/R and a cell model of acute hypoxia. These findings support a potentially destructive role for A2BAR under intestinal I/R and acute hypoxic conditions. PMID:24966910

  6. The challenge of change in acute mental health services: measuring staff perceptions of barriers to change and their relationship to job status and satisfaction using a new measure (VOCALISE)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health services are subject to frequent changes, yet there has been insufficient research to address how staff working within these services perceive the climate for implementation. Staff perceptions, particularly of barriers to change, may affect successful implementation and the resultant quality of care. This study measures staff perceptions of barriers to change in acute mental healthcare. We identify whether occupational status and job satisfaction are related to these perceptions, as this might indicate a target for intervention that could aid successful implementation. As there were no available instruments capturing staff perceptions of barriers to change, we created a new measure (VOCALISE) to assess this construct. Methods All nursing staff from acute in-patient settings in one large London mental health trust were eligible. Using a participatory method, a nurse researcher interviewed 32 staff to explore perceptions of barriers to change. This generated a measure through thematic analyses and staff feedback (N = 6). Psychometric testing was undertaken according to standard guidelines for measure development (N = 40, 42, 275). Random effects models were used to explore the associations between VOCALISE, occupational status, and job satisfaction (N = 125). Results VOCALISE was easy to understand and complete, and showed acceptable reliability and validity. The factor analysis revealed three underlying constructs: ‘confidence,’ ‘de-motivation’ and ‘powerlessness.’ Staff with negative perceptions of barriers to change held more junior positions, and had poorer job satisfaction. Qualitatively, nursing assistants expressed a greater sense of organisational unfairness in response to change. Conclusions VOCALISE can be used to explore staff perceptions of implementation climate and to assess how staff attitudes shape the successful outcomes of planned changes. Negative perceptions were linked with poor job satisfaction and to

  7. Nitric Oxide and Airway Epithelial Barrier Function: Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins and Epithelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nels; Greul, Anne-Katrin; Hristova, Milena; Bove, Peter F.; Kasahara, David I.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Acute airway inflammation is associated with enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO•) and altered airway epithelial barrier function, suggesting a role of NO• or its metabolites in epithelial permeability. While high concentrations of S-nitrosothiols disrupted transepithelial resistance (TER) and increased permeability in 16HBE14o- cells, no significant barrier disruption was observed by NONOates, in spite of altered distribution and expression of some TJ proteins. Barrier disruption of mouse tracheal epithelial (MTE) cell monolayers in response to inflammatory cytokines was independent of NOS2, based on similar effects in MTE cells from NOS2-/- mice and a lack of effect of the NOS2-inhibitor 1400W. Cell pre-incubation with LPS protected MTE cells from TER loss and increased permeability by H2O2, which was independent of NOS2. However, NOS2 was found to contribute to epithelial wound repair and TER recovery after mechanical injury. Overall, our results demonstrate that epithelial NOS2 is not responsible for epithelial barrier dysfunction during inflammation, but may contribute to restoration of epithelial integrity. PMID:19100237

  8. Effects of salinity acclimation on the endocrine disruption and acute toxicity of bifenthrin in freshwater and euryhaline strains of Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Riar, Navneet; Crago, Jordan; Jiang, Weiying; Maryoung, Lindley A; Gan, Jay; Schlenk, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    The pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin is frequently detected at ng/L concentrations in tributaries of the San Francisco Bay Delta. The estuary is also experiencing increasing salinity through climate change and water redirection. To evaluate the impacts of hypersaline conditions on bifenthrin toxicity in anadromous salmonids of the San Francisco Bay Delta (CA, USA), a 14-d laboratory exposure was performed using 2 strains of Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout and steelhead) acclimated to freshwater and to 8 g/L and 17 g/L salinity. The fish were then exposed to nominal concentrations of 0 µg/L, 0.1 µg/L, and 1.5 µg/L bifenthrin. Rainbow trout exhibited significant mortality following exposure to 1.5 µg/L (1.07 ± 0.35 µg/L measured) bifenthrin in freshwater. Elevated levels of Na⁺ /K⁺ adenosine triphosphatase α1A mRNA subunit expression was observed in the gill of rainbow trout acclimated to hypersaline conditions relative to freshwater animals. No significant difference was noted in Na⁺ /K⁺ adenosine triphosphatase subunit levels in brains of either strain in freshwater or hypersaline conditions. Likewise, significant differences were not observed in plasma vitellogenin or steroid hormone concentrations in either strain whether maintained in freshwater or saltwater. Saltwater acclimation significantly reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-catalyzed biotransformation of bifenthrin in liver microsomes of rainbow trout but not of steelhead. The present study showed that, relative to steelhead, rainbow trout have different responses to bifenthrin acute toxicity as well as different rates of hepatic bifenthrin biotransformation and regulation of Na⁺ /K⁺ adenosine triphosphatase subunits in gills. These data indicate that significant differences exist between the strains and that animal life history may have important effects on the susceptibility of each strain to environmental contaminants. PMID:23983063

  9. BASIS FOR ENHANCED BARRIER FUNCTION OF PIGMENTED SKIN

    PubMed Central

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Lin, Tzu-Kai; Santiago, Juan Luis; Celli, Anna; Zhong, Lily; Huang, Zhi-Ming; Roelandt, Truus; Hupe, Melanie; Sundberg, John P.; Silva, Kathleen A.; Crumrine, Debra; Martin-Ezquerra, Gemma; Trullas, Carles; Sun, Richard; Wakefield, Joan S.; Wei, Maria L.; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Mauro, Theodora M.; Elias, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Humans with darkly-pigmented skin display superior permeability barrier function in comparison to humans with lightly-pigmented skin. The reduced pH of the stratum corneum (SC) of darkly-pigmented skin could account for enhanced function, because acidifying lightly-pigmented human SC resets barrier function to darkly-pigmented levels. In SKH1 (non-pigmented) vs. SKH2/J (pigmented) hairless mice, we evaluated how a pigment-dependent reduction in pH could influence epidermal barrier function. Permeability barrier homeostasis is enhanced in SKH2/J vs. SKH1 mice, correlating with a reduced pH in the lower SC that co-localizes with the extrusion of melanin granules. Darkly-pigmented human epidermis also shows substantial melanin extrusion in the outer epidermis. Both acute barrier disruption and topical basic pH challenges accelerate re-acidification of SKH2/J (but not SKH1) SC, while inducing melanin extrusion. SKH2/J mice also display enhanced expression of the SC acidifying enzyme, secretory phospholipase A2f (sPLA2f). Enhanced barrier function of SKH2/J mice could be attributed to enhanced activity of two acidic pH-dependent, ceramide-generating enzymes, β-glucocerebrosidase and acidic sphingomyelinase, leading to accelerated maturation of SC lamellar bilayers. Finally, organotypic cultures of darkly-pigmented-bearing human keratinocytes display enhanced barrier function in comparison to lightly-pigmented cultures. Together, these results suggest that the superior barrier function of pigmented epidermis can be largely attributed to the pH-lowering impact of melanin persistence/extrusion and enhanced sPLA2f expression. PMID:24732399

  10. Caspase-3 Contributes to ZO-1 and Cl-5 Tight-Junction Disruption in Rapid Anoxic Neurovascular Unit Damage

    PubMed Central

    de Curtis, Marco; Kuhlmann, Christoph R. W.; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Tight-junction (TJ) protein degradation is a decisive step in hypoxic blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown in stroke. In this study we elucidated the impact of acute cerebral ischemia on TJ protein arrangement and the role of the apoptotic effector protease caspase-3 in this context. Methodology/Principal Findings We used an in vitro model of the neurovascular unit and the guinea pig whole brain preparation to analyze with immunohistochemical methods the BBB properties and neurovascular integrity. In both methodological approaches we observed rapid TJ protein disruptions after 30 min of oxygen and glucose deprivation or middle cerebral artery occlusion, which were accompanied by strong caspase-3 activation in brain endothelial cells (BEC). Surprisingly only few DNA-fragmentations were detected with TUNEL stainings in BEC. Z-DEVD-fmk, an irreversible caspase-3 inhibitor, partly blocked TJ disruptions and was protective on trans-endothelial electrical resistance. Conclusions/Significance Our data provide evidence that caspase-3 is rapidly activated during acute cerebral ischemia predominantly without triggering DNA-fragmentation in BEC. Further we detected fast TJ protein disruptions which could be partly blocked by caspase-3 inhibition with Z-DEVD-fmk. We suggest that the basis for clinically relevant BBB breakdown in form of TJ disruptions is initiated within minutes during ischemia and that caspase-3 contributes to this process. PMID:21364989

  11. Differential elastic responses to barrier-altering agonists in two types of human lung endothelium.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, P; Ephstein, Y; Garcia, J G N; Cho, M; Dudek, S M

    2016-09-16

    Vascular integrity is primarily determined by endothelial cell (EC) cytoskeletal structure that is differentially regulated by various stimuli. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize structural and mechanical properties in the cytoskeleton of cultured human pulmonary artery EC (HPAEC) and human lung microvascular EC (HLMVEC) by determining elastic properties (Young's modulus) in response to endogenous barrier protective agents sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), or the barrier disruptive molecule thrombin. Initial studies in unstimulated cells indicate higher baseline peripheral elastic modulus values in HPAEC (mean 2.9 KPa) than in HLMVEC (1.8 KPa). After 30 min of stimulation, S1P induced the highest Young's modulus increase (6.1 KPa) compared to the other barrier enhancing stimuli, HGF (5.8 KPa) and the pharmaceutical agent and S1P analog FTY720 (4.1 KPa). In contrast, the barrier disruptive agent thrombin decreased values from 2.5 KPa to 0.7 KPa depending on the cell type and treatment time. AFM topographical imaging supports these quantitative biophysical data regarding differential peripheral elastic properties in EC. Overall, these AFM studies provide novel insights into the biomechanical properties of human lung EC that regulate vascular barrier function and have potential applicability to pathophysiologic vascular leak syndromes such as acute lung injury. PMID:27473658

  12. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction after primary blast injury in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hue, Christopher D; Cao, Siqi; Haider, Syed F; Vo, Kiet V; Effgen, Gwen B; Vogel, Edward; Panzer, Matthew B; Bass, Cameron R Dale; Meaney, David F; Morrison, Barclay

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has increased substantially in recent military conflicts. However, the consequences of bTBI on the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a specialized cerebrovascular structure essential for brain homeostasis, remain unknown. In this study, we utilized a shock tube driven by compressed gas to generate operationally relevant, ideal pressure profiles consistent with improvised explosive devices (IEDs). By multiple measures, the barrier function of an in vitro BBB model was disrupted following exposure to a range of controlled blast loading conditions. Trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) decreased acutely in a dose-dependent manner that was most strongly correlated with impulse, as opposed to peak overpressure or duration. Significantly increased hydraulic conductivity and solute permeability post-injury further confirmed acute alterations in barrier function. Compromised ZO-1 immunostaining identified a structural basis for BBB breakdown. After blast exposure, TEER remained significantly depressed 2 days post-injury, followed by spontaneous recovery to pre-injury control levels at day 3. This study is the first to report immediate disruption of an in vitro BBB model following primary blast exposure, which may be important for the development of novel helmet designs to help mitigate the effects of blast on the BBB. PMID:23581482

  13. Diastolic timed Vibro-Percussion at 50 Hz delivered across a chest wall sized meat barrier enhances clot dissolution and remotely administered Streptokinase effectiveness in an in-vitro model of acute coronary thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Low Frequency Vibro-Percussion (LFVP) assists clearance of thrombi in catheter systems and when applied to the heart and timed to diastole is known to enhance coronary flow. However LFVP on a clotted coronary like vessel given engagement over a chest wall sized barrier (to resemble non-invasive heart attack therapy) requires study. Methods One hour old clots (n=16) were dispensed within a flexible segment of Soft-Flo catheter (4 mm lumen), weighted, interfaced with Heparinized Saline (HS), secured atop a curved dampening base, and photographed. A ~4 cm meat slab was placed over the segment and randomized to receive intermittent LFVP (engaged, - disengaged at 1 second intervals), or no LFVP for 20 minutes. HS was pulsed (~120/80 mmHg), with the diastolic phase coordinated to match LFVP delivery. The segment was then re-photographed and aspirated of fluid to determine post clot weight. The trial was then repeated with 0.5 mls of Streptokinase (15,000 IU/100 microlitre) delivered ~ 2 cm upstream from the clot. Results LFVP - HS only samples (vs. controls) showed; a) development of clot length fluid channels absent in the control group (p < 0.0002); b) enhanced dissolved clot mixing scores ( 5.0 vs. 0.8, p < 2.8 E – 6); and c) increased percent clot dissolution (23.0% vs. 1.8% respectively, p < 8.5 E-6). LFVP - SK samples had a similar comparative clot disruptive profile, however fluid channels developed faster and percent clot dissolution more than doubled (51.0% vs. 3.0%, p< 9.8 E- 6). Conclusion Diastolic timed LFVP (50 Hz) engaged across a chest wall sized barrier enhances clot disruptive effects to an underlying coronary like system. PMID:23146079

  14. Role of histaminergic system in blood-brain barrier dysfunction associated with neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos-Cabrera, Ivette; Valle-Dorado, María Guadalupe; Aldana, Blanca Irene; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra Adela; Rocha, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption has been associated with several acute and chronic brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy. This represents a critical situation because damaged integrity of the BBB is related to the influx of immune mediators, plasma proteins and other outside elements from blood to the central nervous system (CNS) that may trigger a cascade of events that leads to neuroinflammation. In this review, evidence that mast cells and the release of factors such as histamine play an important role in the neuroinflammatory process associated with brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy is presented. PMID:25446620

  15. Protective effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on ethanol-induced intestinal barrier injury both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan-Wen; Ma, Yuan-Yuan; Zhu, Jing; Zuo, Shuai; Zhang, Jun-Ling; Chen, Zi-Yi; Chen, Guo-Wei; Wang, Xin; Pan, Yi-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Cun; Wang, Peng-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Studies have suggested the role of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) in protecting intestinal barrier function from injuries induced by multiple reagents. Vitamin D deficiency was reported to be associated with poor prognosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). This study is designed to investigate the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on ethanol-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction and the underlying mechanisms utilizing Caco-2 cell monolayers and a mouse model with acute ethanol injury. In Caco-2 monolayers, ethanol significantly increased monolayer permeability, disrupted TJ distribution, increased phosphorylation level of MLC, and induced generation of ROS compared with controls. However, pre-treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 greatly ameliorated the ethanol-induced barrier dysfunction, TJ disruption, phosphorylation level of MLC, and generation of ROS compared with ethanol-exposed monolayers. Mice fed with vitamin d-sufficient diet had a higher plasma level of 25(OH)D3 and were more resistant to ethanol-induced acute intestinal barrier injury compared with the vitamin d-deficient group. These results suggest that the suppression of generation of ROS and increased phosphorylation level of MLC might be one of the mechanisms underlying the protective effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on ethanol-induced intestinal barrier injury and provide evidence for the application of vitamin D as therapeutic factors against ethanol-induced gut leakiness. PMID:26068064

  16. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  17. Acute Arterial Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Dagnone, L. E.; Brown, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the primary care physician in the initial assessment and management of acute arterial injuries will often be the deciding factor in survival of life, limb or organ system. Most arterial emergencies occur as a result of trauma, disruption of vessel wall and/or occlusion of flow. The common clinical syndromes of acute arterial emergencies are injuries to and beyond the aorta, acute aortic dissection, ruptured aortic aneurysm, and thromboembolic occlusive arterial disease. The role of arteriography and the urgency of definitive surgical repair in acute arterial emergencies is summarized. PMID:21283323

  18. Very High Resolution Ultrasound Imaging for Real-Time Quantitative Visualization of Vascular Disruption after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Soubeyrand, Marc; Badner, Anna; Vawda, Reaz; Chung, Young Sun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by vascular disruption with intramedullary hemorrhage, alterations in blood-spinal cord barrier integrity, and perilesional ischemia. A safe and easily applied imaging technique to quantify evolving intraspinal vascular changes after SCI is lacking. We evaluated the utility of very high resolution ultrasound (VHRUS) imaging to assess SCI-induced vascular disruption in a clinically relevant rodent model. The spinal cords of Wistar rats were lesioned at the 11th thoracic vertebra (Th11) by a 35 g 1-minute clip compression. Three-dimensional quantification of intraspinal hemorrhage using VHRUS (at an acute 90-min and subacute 24-h time point post-SCI) was compared with lesional hemoglobin and extravasated Evans blue dye measured spectrophotometrically. The anatomy of hemorrhage was comparatively assessed using VHRUS and histology. Time-lapse videos demonstrated the evolution of parenchymal hemorrhage. VHRUS accurately depicted the structural (gray and white matter) and vascular anatomy of the spinal cord (after laminectomy) and was safely repeated in the same animal. After SCI, a hyperechoic signal extended from the lesion epicenter. Significant correlations were found between VHRUS signal and hemorrhage in the acute (r=0.88, p<0.0001) and subacute (r=0.85, p<0.0001) phases and extravasated Evans blue (a measure of vascular disruption) in the subacute phase (r=0.94, p<0.0001). Time-lapse videos demonstrated that the expanding parenchymal hemorrhage is preceded by new perilesional hemorrhagic foci. VHRUS enables real-time quantitative live anatomical imaging of acute and subacute vascular disruption after SCI in rats. This technique has important scientific and clinical translational applications. PMID:24831774

  19. Very high resolution ultrasound imaging for real-time quantitative visualization of vascular disruption after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Soubeyrand, Marc; Badner, Anna; Vawda, Reaz; Chung, Young Sun; Fehlings, Michael G

    2014-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by vascular disruption with intramedullary hemorrhage, alterations in blood-spinal cord barrier integrity, and perilesional ischemia. A safe and easily applied imaging technique to quantify evolving intraspinal vascular changes after SCI is lacking. We evaluated the utility of very high resolution ultrasound (VHRUS) imaging to assess SCI-induced vascular disruption in a clinically relevant rodent model. The spinal cords of Wistar rats were lesioned at the 11th thoracic vertebra (Th11) by a 35 g 1-minute clip compression. Three-dimensional quantification of intraspinal hemorrhage using VHRUS (at an acute 90-min and subacute 24-h time point post-SCI) was compared with lesional hemoglobin and extravasated Evans blue dye measured spectrophotometrically. The anatomy of hemorrhage was comparatively assessed using VHRUS and histology. Time-lapse videos demonstrated the evolution of parenchymal hemorrhage. VHRUS accurately depicted the structural (gray and white matter) and vascular anatomy of the spinal cord (after laminectomy) and was safely repeated in the same animal. After SCI, a hyperechoic signal extended from the lesion epicenter. Significant correlations were found between VHRUS signal and hemorrhage in the acute (r=0.88, p<0.0001) and subacute (r=0.85, p<0.0001) phases and extravasated Evans blue (a measure of vascular disruption) in the subacute phase (r=0.94, p<0.0001). Time-lapse videos demonstrated that the expanding parenchymal hemorrhage is preceded by new perilesional hemorrhagic foci. VHRUS enables real-time quantitative live anatomical imaging of acute and subacute vascular disruption after SCI in rats. This technique has important scientific and clinical translational applications. PMID:24831774

  20. Hyperintense Acute Reperfusion Marker on FLAIR in a Patient with Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Alex; Wenz, Holger; Groden, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) has initially been described in acute ischemic stroke. The phenomenon is caused by blood-brain barrier disruption following acute reperfusion and consecutive delayed gadolinium enhancement in the subarachnoid space on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Here we report the case of an 80-year-old man who presented with transient paresis and sensory loss in the right arm. Initial routine stroke MRI including diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging demonstrated no acute pathology. Follow-up MRI after three hours demonstrated subarachnoid gadolinium enhancement in the left middle cerebral artery territory consistent with HARM that completely resolved on follow-up MRI three days later. This case illustrates that even in transient ischemic attack patients disturbances of the blood-brain barrier may be present which significantly exceed the extent of acute ischemic lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging. Inclusion of FLAIR images with delayed acquisition after intravenous contrast agent application in MRI stroke protocols might facilitate the diagnosis of a recent acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27127673

  1. Stress-induced changes in skin barrier function in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Altemus, M; Rao, B; Dhabhar, F S; Ding, W; Granstein, R D

    2001-08-01

    Despite clear exacerbation of several skin disorders by stress, the effect of psychologic or exertional stress on human skin has not been well studied. We investigated the effect of three different stressors, psychologic interview stress, sleep deprivation, and exercise, on several dermatologic measures: transepidermal water loss, recovery of skin barrier function after tape stripping, and stratum corneum water content (skin conductance). We simultaneously measured the effects of stress on plasma levels of several stress-response hormones and cytokines, natural killer cell activity, and absolute numbers of peripheral blood leukocytes. Twenty-five women participated in a laboratory psychologic interview stress, 11 women participated in one night of sleep deprivation, and 10 women participated in a 3 d exercise protocol. The interview stress caused a delay in the recovery of skin barrier function, as well as increases in plasma cortisol, norepinephrine, interleukin-1beta and interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and an increase in circulating natural killer cell activity and natural killer cell number. Sleep deprivation also decreased skin barrier function recovery and increased plasma interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and natural killer cell activity. The exercise stress did not affect skin barrier function recovery, but caused an increase in natural killer cell activity and circulating numbers of both cytolytic T lymphocytes and helper T cells. In addition, cytokine responses to the interview stress were inversely correlated with changes in barrier function recovery. These results suggest that acute psychosocial and sleep deprivation stress disrupts skin barrier function homeostasis in women, and that this disruption may be related to stress-induced changes in cytokine secretion. PMID:11511309

  2. Endothelial Barrier and Its Abnormalities in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) form a unique barrier between the vascular lumen and the vascular wall. In addition, the endothelium is highly metabolically active. In cardiovascular disease such as atherosclerosis and hypertension, normal endothelial function could be severely disturbed leading to endothelial dysfunction that then could progress to complete and irreversible loss of EC functionality and contribute to entire vascular dysfunction. Proatherogenic stimuli such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, and oxidative stress could initiate endothelial dysfunction and in turn vascular dysfunction and lead to the development of atherosclerotic arterial disease, a background for multiple cardiovascular disorders including coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndrome, stroke, and thrombosis. Intercellular junctions between ECs mediate the barrier function. Proinflammatory stimuli destabilize the junctions causing the disruption of the endothelial barrier and increased junctional permeability. This facilitates transendothelial migration of immune cells to the arterial intima and induction of vascular inflammation. Proatherogenic stimuli attack endothelial microtubule function that is regulated by acetylation of tubulin, an essential microtubular constituent. Chemical modification of tubulin caused by cardiometabolic risk factors and oxidative stress leads to reorganization of endothelial microtubules. These changes destabilize vascular integrity and increase permeability, which finally results in increasing cardiovascular risk. PMID:26696899

  3. Acute pain.

    PubMed

    Good, M

    1999-01-01

    The review of acute pain describes the problem of unresolved pain and its effects on the neural, autonomic, and immune systems. Conceptualizations and mechanisms of pain are reviewed as well as theories of pain management. Descriptive studies of patient and nurse factors that inhibit effective pain management are discussed, followed by studies of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Critical analysis reveals that most studies were atheoretical, and therefore, this proliferation of information lacked conceptual coherence and organization. Furthermore, the nature and extent of barriers to pain management were described, but few intervention studies have been devised, as yet, to modify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of nurses and patients that are barriers to pain management. Although some of the complementary therapies have sufficient research support to be used in clinical pain management, the physiological mechanisms and outcomes need to be studied. It is critical at this time to design studies of interventions to improve assessment, decision making, attentive care, and patient teaching. PMID:10418655

  4. Bevacizumab is safe in acute relapses of neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Mealy, Maureen A.; Shin, Kyong; John, Gareth; Levy, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a relapsing autoimmune disease targeting the spinal cord and optic nerve leading to paralysis and blindness. Current treatment for acute NMO attacks is immunosuppression with high-dose corticosteroids and/or plasmapheresis. Preclinical animal studies suggest that bevacizumab might be beneficial in limiting the extent of inflammation during a NMO relapse by reducing the disruption of the blood–brain barrier. Methods We carried out an open-label phase 1b safety and proof-of-concept trial in 10 participants with NMO immunoglobulin G seropositive NMO, NMO spectrum disease and those at high risk for developing NMO/NMO spectrum disease who presented with an acute attack of transverse myelitis, optic neuritis or brainstem inflammation. In addition to treating with 1 g of daily intravenous methylprednisolone, we infused 10 mg/kg of bevacizumab intravenously on day 1 of treatment. The primary outcome measure was safety and the secondary outcome measure was efficacy. Results Of the 10 participants enrolled, five presented with acute transverse myelitis, four with acute optic neuritis and one with a brainstem lesion. Bevacizumab was safe in all 10 participants, with only one serious adverse event within the 90-day follow up that was not attributed to the medication. Three patients recovered to pre-attack neurological function or better, and no patients required escalation to plasmapheresis. Conclusions Bevacizumab is a safe add-on therapy to high-dose corticosteroids for NMO/NMO spectrum disease patients presenting with an acute relapse. PMID:26834844

  5. Vehicle barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hirsh, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

  6. Disrupting Vestibular Activity Disrupts Body Ownership.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Adria E N; Harris, Laurence R

    2015-01-01

    People are more sensitive at detecting asynchrony between a self-generated movement and visual feedback concerning that movement when the movement is viewed from a first-person perspective. We call this the 'self-advantage' and interpret it as an objective measure of self. Here we ask if disruption of the vestibular system in healthy individuals affects the self-advantage. Participants performed finger movements while viewing their hand in a first-person ('self') or third-person ('other') perspective and indicated which of two periods (one with minimum delay and the other with an added delay of 33-264 ms) was delayed. Their sensitivity to the delay was calculated from the psychometric functions obtained. During the testing, disruptive galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was applied in five-minute blocks interleaved with five minutes of no stimulation for a total of 40 min. We confirmed the self-advantage under no stimulation (31 ms). In the presence of disruptive GVS this advantage disappeared and there was no longer a difference in performance between perspectives. The threshold delay for the 'other' perspective was not affected by the GVS. These results suggest that an intact vestibular signal is required to distinguish 'self' from 'other' and to maintain a sense of body ownership. PMID:26595957

  7. Brain damage from sup 125 I brachytherapy evaluated by MR imaging, a blood-brain barrier tracer, and light and electron microscopy in a rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, M.; Marotta, T.; Stewart, P.; Glen, J.; Resch, L.; Henkelman, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Changes in normal rat brain were studied acutely, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months following interstitial brachytherapy with high-activity {sup 125}I seeds. An 80-Gy radiation dose was administered to an area with a 5.5-mm radius. Effects were measured with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (with and without gadolinium enhancement), leakage of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), electron microscopy, and light microscopy. Significant histological damage was seen at radiation doses above 295 Gy, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier was observed only in tissue receiving a dose of 165 Gy or greater. Blood-brain barrier breakdown increased up to the 6-month time point, and thereafter appeared to stabilize or decrease. The area of blood-brain barrier disruption indicated by gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging was greater than that indicated by leakage of HRP.

  8. Bifidobacterium longum CCM 7952 Promotes Epithelial Barrier Function and Prevents Acute DSS-Induced Colitis in Strictly Strain-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Srutkova, Dagmar; Schwarzer, Martin; Hudcovic, Tomas; Zakostelska, Zuzana; Drab, Vladimir; Spanova, Alena; Rittich, Bohuslav; Kozakova, Hana; Schabussova, Irma

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduced microbial diversity has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and probiotic bacteria have been proposed for its prevention and/or treatment. Nevertheless, comparative studies of strains of the same subspecies for specific health benefits are scarce. Here we compared two Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum strains for their capacity to prevent experimental colitis. Methods Immunomodulatory properties of nine probiotic bifidobacteria were assessed by stimulation of murine splenocytes. The immune responses to B. longum ssp. longum CCM 7952 (Bl 7952) and CCDM 372 (Bl 372) were further characterized by stimulation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cell, HEK293/TLR2 or HEK293/NOD2 cells. A mouse model of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis was used to compare their beneficial effects in vivo. Results The nine bifidobacteria exhibited strain-specific abilities to induce cytokine production. Bl 372 induced higher levels of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in spleen and dendritic cell cultures compared to Bl 7952. Both strains engaged TLR2 and contain ligands for NOD2. In a mouse model of DSS-induced colitis, Bl 7952, but not Bl 372, reduced clinical symptoms and preserved expression of tight junction proteins. Importantly, Bl 7952 improved intestinal barrier function as demonstrated by reduced FITC-dextran levels in serum. Conclusions We have shown that Bl 7952, but not Bl 372, protected mice from the development of experimental colitis. Our data suggest that although some immunomodulatory properties might be widespread among the genus Bifidobacterium, others may be rare and characteristic only for a specific strain. Therefore, careful selection might be crucial in providing beneficial outcome in clinical trials with probiotics in IBD. PMID:26218526

  9. Time-dependent retinal ganglion cell loss, microglial activation and blood-retina-barrier tightness in an acute model of ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Trost, A; Motloch, K; Bruckner, D; Schroedl, F; Bogner, B; Kaser-Eichberger, A; Runge, C; Strohmaier, C; Klein, B; Aigner, L; Reitsamer, H A

    2015-07-01

    Glaucoma is a group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons, and is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide. Elevated intraocular pressure is a well known risk factor for the development of glaucomatous optic neuropathy and pharmacological or surgical lowering of intraocular pressure represents a standard procedure in glaucoma treatment. However, the treatment options are limited and although lowering of intraocular pressure impedes disease progression, glaucoma cannot be cured by the currently available therapy concepts. In an acute short-term ocular hypertension model in rat, we characterize RGC loss, but also microglial cell activation and vascular alterations of the retina at certain time points. The combination of these three parameters might facilitate a better evaluation of the disease progression, and could further serve as a new model to test novel treatment strategies at certain time points. Acute ocular hypertension (OHT) was induced by the injection of magnetic microbeads into the rat anterior chamber angle (n = 22) with magnetic position control, leading to constant elevation of IOP. At certain time points post injection (4d, 7d, 10d, 14d and 21d), RGC loss, microglial activation, and microvascular pericyte (PC) coverage was analyzed using immunohistochemistry with corresponding specific markers (Brn3a, Iba1, NG2). Additionally, the tightness of the retinal vasculature was determined via injections of Texas Red labeled dextran (10 kDa) and subsequently analyzed for vascular leakage. For documentation, confocal laser-scanning microscopy was used, followed by cell counts, capillary length measurements and morphological and statistical analysis. The injection of magnetic microbeads led to a progressive loss of RGCs at the five time points investigated (20.07%, 29.52%, 41.80%, 61.40% and 76.57%). Microglial cells increased in number and displayed an activated morphology

  10. Control of Disruptive Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, S. A.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. In tokamak devices, at critical values of discharge parameters (n_ e, q(a), beta) the plasma can suddenly be terminated. The process is called a disruption. It is a major limitation in the operation of tokamaks, not only because of the limitation it imposes on the operation parameter space, but also due to the severe thermal and electromechanical loadings on the vessel. These difficulties and implications for fusion reactors have attracted increasing attention and a variety of approaches in the attempt to avoid, reduce or overcome the problem have been investigated. The growth of a magnetic perturbation is believed to be responsible for the disruptive process, and previous experiments have examined the effect on this perturbation of magnetic feedback. In DITE experiments have been done to extend this work by using a more sophisticated feedback loop. The detector-coils and feedback saddle-coils (configured to treat the m = 21, n = 1 structure which is dominant in disruption precursors) were mounted inside the vacuum vessel and fast programmable loop-gain and loop-phase controllers were used. Open-loop experiments contained studies of mode locking and plasma response to applied (2,1) fields. The feedback work explored the effect on disruption precursors over a large area in parameter space and was the first to address in detail the effect of feedback on disruptions. Both open-loop and feedback experiments were conducted on Ohmic discharges and discharges with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD). The experiments have demonstrated disruption precursor control in both types of discharge. Disruptions were studied in Ohmic plasmas. They were postponed and the density limit was extended.

  11. Extensor Mechanism Disruption in Knee Dislocation.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Michael; Reardon, Patrick; Pareek, Ayoosh; Krych, Aaron; Levy, Bruce A; Stuart, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Disruption of the knee extensor mechanism is a challenging injury with no clear consensus on optimal treatment. Although rare in the setting of knee dislocations, these injuries should not be overlooked. Acute, complete rupture of either the quadriceps or patellar tendon necessitates primary repair with or without augmentation. Surgical management may also be required in the setting of a partial tear if a significant extensor lag is present or nonoperative treatment has failed. Tendon augmentation is used during primary repair if the native tissue is inadequate or after a failed primary repair. The purpose of this study is to evaluate extensor mechanism disruption incidence, injury patterns, associated injuries, and surgical options, including a novel tendon augmentation technique. This procedure consists of primary patellar or quadriceps tendon repair with semitendinosus autograft augmentation utilizing a distal or proximal patellar socket. Advantages of repair with tendon augmentation include accelerated rehabilitation, decreased risk of patellar fracture from transverse or longitudinal bone tunnels, and less hardware complications. We recommend consideration of this technique for selected cases of acute extensor mechanism disruption in the setting of tibiofemoral dislocation. PMID:26636488

  12. Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, Suvi

    2013-12-01

    The majority of supermassive black holes in the Universe lie dormant and starved of fuel. These hidden beasts can be temporarily illuminated when an unlucky star passes close enough to be tidally disrupted and consumed by the black hole. Theorists first proposed in 1975 that tidal disruption events should be an inevitable consequence of supermassive black holes in galaxy nuclei and later argued that the resulting flare of radiation from the accretion of the stellar debris could be a unique signpost for the presence of a dormant black hole in the center of a normal galaxy. It was not until over two decades later that the first convincing tidal disruption event candidates emerged in the X-rays by the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. Since then, over a dozen total candidates have now emerged from searches across the electromagnetic spectrum, including the X-rays, the ultraviolet, and the optical. In the last couple of years, we have also witnessed a paradigm shift with the discovery of relativistic beamed emission associated with tidal disruption events. I review the census of observational candidates to date and discuss the exciting prospects for using large samples of tidal disruption events discovered with the next-generation of ground-based and space-based synoptic surveys to probe accretion disk and/or jet formation and black hole demographics.

  13. The disruption management model.

    PubMed

    McAlister, James

    2011-10-01

    Within all organisations, business continuity disruptions present a set of dilemmas that managers may not have dealt with before in their normal daily duties. The disruption management model provides a simple but effective management tool to enable crisis management teams to stay focused on recovery in the midst of a business continuity incident. The model has four chronological primary headlines, which steer the team through a quick-time crisis decision-making process. The procedure facilitates timely, systematic, rationalised and justified decisions, which can withstand post-event scrutiny. The disruption management model has been thoroughly tested within an emergency services environment and is proven to significantly support clear and concise decision making in a business continuity context. PMID:22130341

  14. Interruptions disrupt reading comprehension.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Cyrus K; Werner, Nicole E; Barragán, Daniela; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Previous research suggests that being interrupted while reading a text does not disrupt the later recognition or recall of information from that text. This research is used as support for Ericsson and Kintsch's (1995) long-term working memory (LT-WM) theory, which posits that disruptions while reading (e.g., interruptions) do not impair subsequent text comprehension. However, to fully comprehend a text, individuals may need to do more than recognize or recall information that has been presented in the text at a later time. Reading comprehension often requires individuals to connect and synthesize information across a text (e.g., successfully identifying complex topics such as themes and tones) and not just make a familiarity-based decision (i.e., recognition). The goal for this study was to determine whether interruptions while reading disrupt reading comprehension when the questions assessing comprehension require participants to connect and synthesize information across the passage. In Experiment 1, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension. In Experiment 2, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension but not recognition of information from the text. In Experiment 3, the addition of a 15-s time-out prior to the interruption successfully removed these negative effects. These data suggest that the time it takes to process the information needed to successfully comprehend text when reading is greater than that required for recognition. Any interference (e.g., an interruption) that occurs during the comprehension process may disrupt reading comprehension. This evidence supports the need for transient activation of information in working memory for successful text comprehension and does not support LT-WM theory. PMID:25867225

  15. Coping with Campus Disruption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crookston, Burns B.

    Following a short introduction about the current status of student unrest and campus disruption, this paper discusses the contributing factors: (1) the unique aspects of the present generation gap; (2) confusion on the role of the university in contemporary society; (3) the inability, on the basis of their organizational structure, of universities…

  16. Citrus Leafminer Mating Disruption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mating disruption targets a specific pest and has no negative impact on natural enemies, the environment, or agricultural workers. A flowable wax dispenser was tested for releasing the female sex pheromone of the citrus leafminer, Phyllocnistis citrella. These dispensers are biodegradable, inexpens...

  17. Language barriers

    PubMed Central

    Ngwakongnwi, Emmanuel; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Musto, Richard; King-Shier, Kathryn M.; Quan, Hude

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess use of regular medical doctors (RMDs), as well as awareness and use of telephone health lines or telehealth services, by official language minorities (OLMs) in Canada. Design Analysis of data from the 2006 postcensal survey on the vitality of OLMs. Setting Canada. Participants In total, 7691 English speakers in Quebec and 12 376 French speakers outside Quebec, grouped into those who experienced language barriers and those with no language barriers. Main outcome measures Health services utilization (HSU) by the presence of language barriers; HSU measures included having an RMD, use of an RMD’s services, and awareness of and use of telephone health lines or telehealth services. Multivariable models examined the associations between HSU and language barriers. Results After adjusting for age and sex, English speakers residing in Quebec with limited proficiency in French were less likely to have RMDs (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.66, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.87) and to use the services of their RMDs (AOR 0.65, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.86), but were more likely to be aware of the existence of (AOR 1.50, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.93) and to use (AOR 1.43, 95% CI 0.97 to 2.11) telephone health lines or telehealth services. This pattern of having and using RMDs and telehealth services was not observed for French speakers residing outside of Quebec. Conclusion Overall we found variation in HSU among the language barrier populations, with lower use observed in Quebec. Age older than 45 years, male sex, being married or in common-law relationships, and higher income were associated with having RMDs for OLMs. PMID:23242902

  18. Disruption of iron homeostasis and lung disease.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Andrew J

    2009-07-01

    As a result of a direct exchange with the external environment, the lungs are exposed to both iron and agents with a capacity to disrupt the homeostasis of this metal (e.g. particles). An increased availability of catalytically reactive iron can result from these exposures and, by generating an oxidative stress, this metal can contribute to tissue injury. By importing this Fe(3+) into cells for storage in a chemically less reactive form, the lower respiratory tract demonstrates an ability to mitigate both the oxidative stress presented by iron and its potential for tissue injury. This means that detoxification is accomplished by chemical reduction to Fe(2+) (e.g. by duodenal cytochrome b and other ferrireductases), iron import (e.g. by divalent metal transporter 1 and other transporters), and storage in ferritin. The metal can subsequently be exported from the cell (e.g. by ferroportin 1) in a less reactive state relative to that initially imported. Iron is then transported out of the lung via the mucociliary pathway or blood and lymphatic pathways to the reticuloendothelial system for long term storage. This coordinated handling of iron in the lung appears to be disrupted in several acute diseases on the lung including infections, acute respiratory distress syndrome, transfusion-related acute lung injury, and ischemia-reperfusion. Exposures to bleomycin, dusts and fibers, and paraquat similarly alter iron homeostasis in the lung to affect an oxidative stress. Finally, iron homeostasis is disrupted in numerous chronic lung diseases including pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, transplantation, cigarette smoking, and cystic fibrosis. PMID:19100311

  19. The blood-brain barrier: geriatric relevance of a critical brain-body interface.

    PubMed

    Zeevi, Neer; Pachter, Joel; McCullough, Louise D; Wolfson, Leslie; Kuchel, George A

    2010-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents the interface between the brain and other body tissues. Its ability to protect the brain from harmful compounds has attracted the attention of clinicians and investigators, but far from being a simple physical barrier, the BBB is a complex, heterogeneous, and dynamic tissue. The integrated function of the cerebral microvasculature, tight junction proteins, brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), cellular transport pathways, and enzymatic machinery jointly contribute to normal BBB integrity. Aging, systemic diseases, and ischemic injury can disrupt these processes, resulting in a decline in overall BBB function and integrity. Based on the published literature, this study proposes that age- and disease-related BBB alterations play a key role in diminishing the ability of older patients to recover from acute ischemic stroke. Evidence linking deficits in the cerebral microvasculature and BBB integrity to dementia, medication-related cognitive decline, white matter disease (WMD or leukoaraiosis), and related geriatric syndromes including delirium, gait disorders, and urinary incontinence is also reviewed. Priority areas for a future research agenda include strategies to improve clinicians' ability to diagnose, prevent, and manage BBB abnormalities. In future years, in vivo measures such as functional and contrast-enhanced neuroimaging will be used to evaluate BBB integrity in older adults while also assessing the effectiveness of interventions, some targeting inflammatory pathways known to disrupt the BBB, for their ability to prevent or slow the progression of these complex multifactorial geriatric syndromes. PMID:20863334

  20. Production without environmental disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    Coal mining at the Butterwell site in the U.K. is discussed. The operation is owned by the National Coal Board and has caused special planning to keep from disrupting the environment. The close proximity of villages has caused the need for air and noise pollution control, and protection of the land. A discussion of the methods of removing the overburden, processing the coal, and reclaiming the area is included.

  1. Coincident disruptive coloration

    PubMed Central

    Cuthill, Innes C.; Székely, Aron

    2008-01-01

    Even if an animal matches its surroundings perfectly in colour and texture, any mismatch between the spatial phase of its pattern and that of the background, or shadow created by its three-dimensional relief, is potentially revealing. Nevertheless, for camouflage to be fully broken, the shape must be recognizable. Disruptive coloration acts against object recognition by the use of high-contrast internal colour boundaries to break up shape and form. As well as the general outline, characteristic features such as eyes and limbs must also be concealed; this can be achieved by having the colour patterns on different, but adjacent, body parts aligned to match each other (i.e. in phase). Such ‘coincident disruptive coloration’ ensures that there is no phase disjunction where body parts meet, and causes different sections of the body to blend perceptually. We tested this theory using field experiments with predation by wild birds on artificial moth-like targets, whose wings and (edible pastry) bodies had colour patterns that were variously coincident or not. We also carried out an experiment with humans searching for analogous targets on a computer screen. Both experiments show that coincident disruptive coloration is an effective mechanism for concealing an otherwise revealing body form. PMID:18990668

  2. Endocrine disrupting chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Bonnie HY; Wan, Hin T; Law, Alice YS

    2011-01-01

    In the past 200 years, an enormous number of synthetic chemicals with diverse structural features have been produced for industrial, medical and domestic purposes. These chemicals, originally thought to have little or no biological toxicity, are widely used in our daily lives as well as are commonly present in foods. It was not until the first World Wildlife Federation Wingspread Conference held in 1994 were concerns about the endocrine disrupting (ED) effects of these chemicals articulated. The potential hazardous effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on human health and ecological well-being are one of the global concerns that affect the health and propagation of human beings. Considerable numbers of studies indicated that endocrine disruption is linked to “the developmental basis of adult disease,” highlighting the significant effects of EDC exposure on a developing organism, leading to the propensity of an individual to develop a disease or dysfunction in later life. In this review, we intend to provide environmental, epidemiological and experimental data to associate pollutant exposure with reproductive disorders, in particular on the development and function of the male reproductive system. Possible effects of pollutant exposure on the processes of embryonic development, like sex determination and masculinization are described. In addition, the effects of pollutant exposure on hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, testicular signaling, steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis are also discussed. PMID:22319671

  3. Acute Alcohol Intoxication-Induced Microvascular Leakage

    PubMed Central

    Doggett, Travis M.; Breslin, Jerome W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol intoxication can increase inflammation and worsen injury, yet the mechanisms involved are not clear. We investigated whether acute alcohol intoxication elevates microvascular permeability, and investigated potential signaling mechanisms in endothelial cells that may be involved. Methods Conscious rats received a 2.5 g/kg alcohol bolus via gastric catheters to produce acute intoxication. Microvascular leakage of intravenously administered FITC-albumin from the mesenteric microcirculation was assessed by intravital microscopy. Endothelial-specific mechanisms were studied using cultured endothelial cell monolayers. Transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) served as an index of barrier function, before and after treatment with alcohol or its metabolite acetaldehyde. Pharmacologic agents were used to test the roles of alcohol metabolism, oxidative stress, p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), rho kinase (ROCK), and exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac). VE-cadherin localization was investigated to assess junctional integrity. Rac1 and RhoA activation were assessed by ELISA assays. Results Alcohol significantly increased FITC-albumin extravasation from the mesenteric microcirculation. Alcohol also significantly decreased TER and disrupted VE-cadherin organization at junctions. Acetaldehyde significantly decreased TER, but inhibition of ADH or application of a superoxide dismutase mimetic failed to prevent alcohol-induced decreases in TER. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase, but not MLCK or ROCK, significantly attenuated the alcohol-induced barrier dysfunction. Alcohol rapidly decreased GTP-bound Rac1 but not RhoA during the drop in TER. Activation of Epac increased TER, but did not prevent alcohol from decreasing TER. However, activation of Epac after initiation of alcohol-induced barrier dysfunction quickly resolved TER to baseline levels. Conclusions Our results suggest that alcohol intoxication increases

  4. 3D numerical study of tumor microenvironmental flow in response to vascular-disrupting treatments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Cai, Yan; Xu, Shixiong; Longs, Quan; Ding, Zurong; Dong, Cheng

    2012-06-01

    The effects of vascular-disrupting treatments on normalization of tumor microvasculature and its microenvironmental flow were investigated, by mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of tumor vascular-disrupting and tumor haemodynamics. Four disrupting approaches were designed according to the abnormal characteristics of tumor microvasculature compared with the normal one. The results predict that the vascular-disrupting therapies could improve tumor microenvironment, eliminate drug barrier and inhibit metastasis of tumor cells to some extent. Disrupting certain types of vessels may get better effects. In this study, the flow condition on the networks with "vascular-disrupting according to flowrate" is the best comparing with the other three groups, and disrupting vessels of lower maturity could effectively enhance fluid transport across vasculature into interstitial space. PMID:23113373

  5. Astrocytic laminin regulates pericyte differentiation and maintains blood brain barrier integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Chen, Zu-Lin; Norris, Erin H.; Strickland, Sidney

    2014-03-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) breakdown is not only a consequence of but also contributes to many neurological disorders, including stroke and Alzheimer’s disease. How the basement membrane (BM) contributes to the normal functioning of the BBB remains elusive. Here we use conditional knockout mice and an acute adenovirus-mediated knockdown model to show that lack of astrocytic laminin, a brain-specific BM component, induces BBB breakdown. Using functional blocking antibody and RNAi, we further demonstrate that astrocytic laminin, by binding to integrin α2 receptor, prevents pericyte differentiation from the BBB-stabilizing resting stage to the BBB-disrupting contractile stage, and thus maintains the integrity of BBB. Additionally, loss of astrocytic laminin decreases aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction protein expression. Altogether, we report a critical role for astrocytic laminin in BBB regulation and pericyte differentiation. These results indicate that astrocytic laminin maintains the integrity of BBB through, at least in part, regulation of pericyte differentiation.

  6. The impact of disruptive innovations in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Erik; Bozic, Kevin J

    2009-10-01

    The US healthcare system is currently facing daunting demographic and economic challenges. Because musculoskeletal disorders and disease represent a substantial and growing portion of this healthcare burden, novel approaches will be needed to continue to provide high-quality, affordable, and accessible orthopaedic care to our population. The concept of "disruptive innovations," which has been studied and popularized by Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen, may offer a potential framework for developing strategies to improve quality and control costs associated with musculoskeletal care. The introduction of mobile fluoroscopic imaging systems, the development of the Surgical Implant Generation Network intramedullary nail for treatment of long bone fractures in the developing world, the expanding role and contributions of physician assistants and nurse practitioners to the orthopaedic team, and the rise of ambulatory surgery centers are all examples of disruptive innovations in the field of orthopaedics. Although numerous cultural and regulatory barriers have limited the widespread adoption of these "disruptive innovations," we believe they represent an opportunity for clinicians to regain leadership in health care while at the same time improving quality and access to care for patients with musculoskeletal disease. PMID:19415405

  7. Detergent-induced epidermal barrier dysfunction and its prevention.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Minehiro; Yoshiike, Takashi; Ogawa, Hideoki

    2002-12-01

    Various detergents are used as skin cleansing products. In some cases, skin cleanser removes not only dirt but also valuable skin lipids. Therefore, detergents may disrupt epidermal barrier function despite that using of detergents are required for good skin hygiene. Lipid supplements can reverse detergent-induced dysfunction of the skin barrier. Elevated transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and riboflavin penetration in 5% SLS-treated rat and human skin were reversed by supplementation of monoglyceride (MG), squalene (SQ), cholesterol ester (CE) and pseudo-ceramide (Cer2). MG and Cer2 achieved the best results. MG appears to inhibit elution of intercellular ceramides, since more ceramides remained when the detergent was supplemented with MG. Topical application of Cer2 is not effective for recovery from artificially induced barrier disruption, but supplemented Cer2 into skin cleanser has a beneficial effect for prevention of detergent-induced barrier disruption. In conclusion, the prevention of barrier disruption is most important matter for maintaining skin health and barrier function. Therefore, we think that Cer2-supplemented skin cleanser is useful for conservation of skin barrier function. PMID:12443839

  8. Blunt Abdominal Wall Disruption by Seatbelt Injury; A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Maarten Philip; van Buijtenen, Jesse; van den Heuvel, Baukje; Bloemers, Frank; Geeraedts Jr., Leo

    2016-01-01

    With the introduction of the use of seatbelts in cars, mortality following motor vehicle crashes has decreased significantly. However, two patterns of injuries, the ‘seatbelt sign’ and ‘seatbelt syndrome’ have emerged. Injuries may consist of traumatic abdominal wall disruption. We present two cases of severe abdominal wall disruption caused by a seatbelt injury and treated with primary repair. A review of the literature is provided. Two patients were brought in after a high velocity Motor Vehicle Collision. Both presented with an acute abdomen and a seatbelt sign upon which the decision was made to perform emergency laparotomies. Both patients had an abdominal wall disruption along the seatbelt sign. These disruptions were primarily closed and during six months of follow-up no complications occurred. A disruption of the abdominal wall is a rare complication. However, it is a diagnosis that may not be missed as patients have a higher risk of morbidity and mortality. CT-scanning is an accurate method to detect disruptions. Closure of blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruption can be done primarily with sutures or addition of a mesh. In both cases of the severe abdominal wall disruption, primary repair without mesh in the acute phase was successful. When a laparotomy is not indicated, the abdominal wall must be assessed for disruption. If there is a disruption primary repair is a good option. PMID:27331068

  9. Overcoming Barriers.

    PubMed

    Neal-Boylan, Leslie; Schmidt, Kari L

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Neal-Boylan's program of scholarship has always focused on nurse workforce issues. She recently published two books related to how nurses work. One (The Nurse's Reality Gap: Overcoming Barriers Between Academic Achievement and Clinical Success; Neal-Boylan, 2013) focused on the experience of new graduates from baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral programs. The second book, The Nurse's Reality Shift: Using Our History to Transform Our Future (Neal-Boylan, 2014), focuses on the problems nursing continues to face throughout our history and has failed to correct. PMID:26200309

  10. Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Medina, J.F.; Sarvide, S.; Bervoets, T.J.M.; Everts, V.; DenBesten, P.; Smith, C.E.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl− for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b−/− mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b−/− mice and was strongly correlated with Cl−. Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl− levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins. PMID:24170372

  11. Magnitude-dependent regulation of pulmonary endothelial cell barrier function by cyclic stretch.

    PubMed

    Birukov, Konstantin G; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Flores, Alejandro A; Ye, Shui Q; Birukova, Anna A; Verin, Alexander D; Garcia, Joe G N

    2003-10-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury syndromes are characterized by profound increases in vascular leakiness and activation of inflammatory processes. To explore whether excessive cyclic stretch (CS) directly causes vascular barrier disruption or enhances endothelial cell sensitivity to edemagenic agents, human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAEC) were exposed to physiologically (5% elongation) or pathologically (18% elongation) relevant levels of strain. CS produced rapid (10 min) increases in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, activation of p38 and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 MAP kinases, and actomyosin remodeling. Acute (15 min) and chronic (48 h) CS markedly enhanced thrombin-induced MLC phosphorylation (2.1-fold and 3.2-fold for 15-min CS at 5 and 18% elongation and 2.1-fold and 3.1-fold for 48-h CS at 5 and 18% elongation, respectively). HPAEC preconditioned at 18% CS, but not at 5% CS, exhibited significantly enhanced thrombin-induced reduction in transendothelial electrical resistance but did not affect barrier protective effect of sphingosine-1-phosphate (0.5 microM). Finally, expression profiling analysis revealed a number of genes, including small GTPase rho, apoptosis mediator ZIP kinase, and proteinase activated receptor-2, to be regulated by CS in an amplitude-dependent manner. Thus our study demonstrates a critical role for the magnitude of CS in regulation of agonist-mediated pulmonary endothelial cell permeability and strongly suggests phenotypic regulation of HPAEC barrier properties by CS. PMID:12639843

  12. Manuel's asteroid disruption technique

    PubMed Central

    John, Manuel; Ipe, Abraham; Jacob, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    A seventy-year-old male presented with dense asteroid hyalosis in both eyes. He had undergone cataract extraction in one eye 3 years ago, and the other eye had immature cataract. Both the autorefractor and dilated streak retinoscopy did not give readings and subjective visual improvement could not be achieved. Immediately following YAG posterior capsulotomy and anterior vitreous asteroid disruption, the vision improved to 20/20 with recordable auto refractor and streak retinoscopy values. Our initial experience indicates that the treatment is simple, safe and effective but needs controlled and prospective studies to confirm its long-term safety. PMID:23571244

  13. [Children's disruptive behavior].

    PubMed

    Aronen, Eeva

    2016-01-01

    During normal development, a child learns to regulate her/his aggressions and follow the social norms of her/his community.This learning takes place in interaction with the environment. Risk factors associated with the child, parenthood and environment underlie the disruptive behavior. If a child of preschool/school age exhibits age group deviant difficulties in the management of aggression, defiant, rule-breaking behavior or difficulties in social relationships, there is every reason to get worried and to evaluate the child's symptoms and situation. The earlier the support and therapy is provided, the better are the possibilities to influence the prognosis of conduct disorders. PMID:27382832

  14. Early enteral feeding in severe acute pancreatitis: can it prevent secondary pancreatic (super) infection?

    PubMed

    Lehocky, P; Sarr, M G

    2000-01-01

    Sepsis continues to account for a second peak in mortality in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. The prevention of these septic complications and subsequent development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome remains a major focus for investigators, yet despite considerable clinical and experimental work addressing its etiology, septic complications remain high. Several studies have been designed to demonstrate the mechanism of origin of these septic complications with an attempt to define strategies for their prevention to improve patient outcomes. There is clear evidence that the origin of this secondary bacterial infection arises from enteric bacterial translocation secondary to disruption of the gut mucosal barrier during acute pancreatitis. Strategies designed to prevent secondary pancreatic infection include aggressive fluid resuscitation to maximize organ perfusion, early systemic antibiotic treatment or selective gut decontamination, and recently attempts to block mediators of the systemic inflammatory response. This discussion will summarize our present understanding of the etiopathogenesis of secondary bacterial 'superinfection' of necrotizing pancreatitis and how the initiation of enteral feeding early in the course of acute pancreatitis may prove to be an effective means of preventing and/or reversing the breakdown of the gut mucosal defense barrier. PMID:11155001

  15. Relativistic tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A.

    2012-12-01

    In March 2011 Swift detected an extremely luminous and long-lived outburst from the nucleus of an otherwise quiescent, low luminosity (LMC-like) galaxy. Named Swift J1644+57, its combination of high-energy luminosity (1048 ergs s-1 at peak), rapid X-ray variability (factors of >100 on timescales of 100 seconds) and luminous, rising radio emission suggested that we were witnessing the birth of a moderately relativistic jet (Γ ˜ 2 - 5), created when a star is tidally disrupted by the supermassive black hole in the centre of the galaxy. A second event, Swift J2058+0516, detected two months later, with broadly similar properties lends further weight to this interpretation. Taken together this suggests that a fraction of tidal disruption events do indeed create relativistic outflows, demonstrates their detectability, and also implies that low mass galaxies can host massive black holes. Here, I briefly outline the observational properties of these relativistic tidal flares observed last year, and their evolution over the first year since their discovery.

  16. Immunobiological barriers to xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David K C; Ekser, Burcin; Tector, A Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Binding of natural anti-pig antibodies in humans and nonhuman primates to carbohydrate antigens expressed on the transplanted pig organ, the most important of which is galactose-α1,3-galactose (Gal), activate the complement cascade, which results in destruction of the graft within minutes or hours, known as hyperacute rejection. Even if antibody is removed from the recipient's blood by plasmapheresis, recovery of antibody is associated with acute humoral xenograft rejection. If immunosuppressive therapy is inadequate, the development of high levels of T cell-dependent elicited anti-pig IgG similarly results in graft destruction, though classical acute cellular rejection is rarely seen. Vascular endothelial activation by low levels of anti-nonGal antibody, coupled with dysregulation of the coagulation-anticoagulation systems between pigs and primates, leads to a thrombotic microangiopathy in the graft that may be associated with a consumptive coagulopathy in the recipient. The most successful approach to overcoming these barriers is by genetically-engineering the pig to provide it with resistance to the human humoral and cellular immune responses and to correct the coagulation discrepancies between the two species. Organs and cells from pigs that (i) do not express the important Gal antigen, (ii) express a human complement-regulatory protein, and (iii) express a human coagulation-regulatory protein, when combined with an effective immunosuppressive regimen, have been associated with prolonged pig graft survival in nonhuman primates. PMID:26159291

  17. Disruptions in the TFTR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Janos, A.; Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.; Batha, S.H.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Efthimion, P.C.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Levinton, F.; Mansfield, D.; Meade, D.; Medley, S.S.; Monticello, D.; Mueller, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Post, D.E.; Schivell, J.; Strachan, J.D.; Taylor, G.; Ulrickson, M.; von Goeler, S.; Wilfrid, E.; Wong, K.L.; Yamada, M.; Young, K.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J.; Drake, J.F.; Kleva, R.G.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1993-03-01

    For a successful reactor, it will be useful to predict the occurrence of disruptions and to understand disruption effects including how a plasma disrupts onto the wall and how reproducibly it does so. Studies of disruptions on TFTR at both high-{beta}{sub pol} and high-density have shown that, in both types, a fast growing m/n=1/1 mode plays an important role. In highdensity disruptions, a newly observed fast m/n = 1/1 mode occurs early in the thermal decay phase. For the first time in TFTR q-profile measurements just prior to disruptions have been made. Experimental studies of heat deposition patterns on the first wall of TFTR due to disruptions have provided information on MHD phenomena prior to or during the disruption, how the energy is released to the wall, and the reproducibility of the heat loads from disruptions. This information is important in the design of future devices such as ITER. Several new processes of runaway electron generation are theoretically suggested and their application to TFTR and ITER is considered, together with a preliminary assessment of x-ray data from runaways generated during disruptions.

  18. Disruptions in the TFTR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Janos, A.; Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.; Batha, S.H.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Efthimion, P.C.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Levinton, F.; Mansfield, D.; Meade, D.; Medley, S.S.; Monticello, D.; Mueller, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Post, D.E.; Schivell, J.; Strachan, J.D.; Taylor, G.; Ulrickson, M.; von Goeler, S.; Wilfrid, E.; Wong, K.L.; Yamad

    1993-03-01

    For a successful reactor, it will be useful to predict the occurrence of disruptions and to understand disruption effects including how a plasma disrupts onto the wall and how reproducibly it does so. Studies of disruptions on TFTR at both high-[beta][sub pol] and high-density have shown that, in both types, a fast growing m/n=1/1 mode plays an important role. In highdensity disruptions, a newly observed fast m/n = 1/1 mode occurs early in the thermal decay phase. For the first time in TFTR q-profile measurements just prior to disruptions have been made. Experimental studies of heat deposition patterns on the first wall of TFTR due to disruptions have provided information on MHD phenomena prior to or during the disruption, how the energy is released to the wall, and the reproducibility of the heat loads from disruptions. This information is important in the design of future devices such as ITER. Several new processes of runaway electron generation are theoretically suggested and their application to TFTR and ITER is considered, together with a preliminary assessment of x-ray data from runaways generated during disruptions.

  19. Disrupted Saccadic Corollary Discharge in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Schall, Jeffrey D.; Heckers, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Disruptions in corollary discharge (CD), motor signals that send information to sensory areas and allow for prediction of sensory states, are argued to underlie the perceived loss of agency in schizophrenia. Behavioral and neurophysiological evidence for CD in primates comes largely from the saccadic double-step task, which requires participants to make two visually triggered saccadic eye movements in brief succession. Healthy individuals use CD to anticipate the change in eye position resulting from the first saccade when preparing the second saccade. In the current study with human participants, schizophrenia patients and healthy controls of both sexes performed a modified double-step task. Most trials required a saccade to a single visual target (T1). On a subset of trials, a second target (T2) was flashed shortly following T1. Subjects were instructed to look directly at T2. Healthy individuals also use CD to make rapid, corrective responses following erroneous saccades to T1. To assess CD in schizophrenia, we examined the following on error trials: (1) frequency and latency of corrective saccades, and (2) mislocalization of the corrective (second) saccade in the direction predicted by a failure to use CD to account for the first eye movement. Consistent with disrupted CD, patients made fewer and slower error corrections. Importantly, the corrective saccade vector angle was biased in a manner consistent with disrupted CD. These results provide novel and clear evidence for dysfunctional CD in the oculomotor system in patients with schizophrenia. Based on neurophysiology work, these disturbances might have their basis in medial thalamus dysfunction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT According to the World Health Organization, acute schizophrenia carries more disability weight than any other disease, but its etiology remains unknown. One promising theory of schizophrenia highlights alterations in a sense of self, in which self-generated thoughts or actions are attributed

  20. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  1. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  2. Neonatal skin barrier: structure, function, and disorders.

    PubMed

    Shwayder, Tor; Akland, Tom

    2005-01-01

    The development of the human skin from intrauterine to extrauterine life is a balletic interplay of maturing layers and interlocking structures. We discuss this transition and then branch out to touch on issues of premature infant as well as neonatal skin care. Disruption of the barrier function due to toxins and development errors are expounded upon. Staph scalded skin syndrome, collodion membrane, bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, autosomal recessive ichthyosis (lamellar and congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma), and harlequin fetus are used as examples of these disruptions. Discussion of therapy with the authors' experience highlights each disease. PMID:15953139

  3. Gastrointestinal mucosal barrier function and diseases.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Tadayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2016-08-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosal barrier plays an essential role in the separation of the inside of the body from the outside environment. Tight junctions (TJs) are the most important component for construction of a constitutive barrier of epithelial cells, and they regulate the permeability of the barrier by tightly sealing the cell-cell junctions. TJ proteins are represented by claudins, occludin, junctional adhesion molecules, and scaffold protein zonula occludens. Among these TJ proteins, claudins are the major components of TJs and are responsible for the barrier and the polarity of the epithelial cells. Gastrointestinal diseases including reflux esophagitis, inflammatory bowel disease, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and cancers may be regulated by these molecules, and disruption of their functions leads to chronic inflammatory conditions and chronic or progressive disease. Therefore, regulation of the barrier function of epithelial cells by regulating the expression and localization of TJ proteins is a potential new target for the treatment of these diseases. Treatment strategies for these diseases might thus be largely altered if symptom generation and/or immune dysfunction could be regulated through improvement of mucosal barrier function. Since TJ proteins may also modify tumor infiltration and metastasis, other important goals include finding a good TJ biomarker of cancer progression and patient prognosis, and developing TJ protein-targeted therapies that can modify patient prognosis. This review summarizes current understanding of gastrointestinal barrier function, TJ protein expression, and the mechanisms underlying epithelial barrier dysregulation in gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27048502

  4. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin-Induced Acute Transient Encephalopathy in a Patient with Breast Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Michelle; Markman, Maurie; Niu, Jiaxin

    2014-01-01

    Background Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) has a unique pharmacokinetic profile and is widely used to treat a variety of malignancies, alone or in combination with other agents. Case Report A 57-year-old female patient with metastatic breast cancer developed dural metastases to the brain and underwent craniotomy and whole-brain radiation. She continued to receive chemotherapy with carboplatin without any serious complications. Four months later, there was evidence of progression leading to the institution of PLD. During the first course of PLD, there was evidence of acute encephalopathy which resolved after 18 h with discontinuation of this agent. Interestingly, she did well when she was rechallenged with conventional doxorubicin in the following cycles. Conclusion We hereby report, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of acute transient encephalopathy induced by PLD. We postulate that partial disruption of the blood-brain barrier may have been responsible for PLD-induced encephalopathy. PMID:24803900

  5. Cell disruption for microalgae biorefineries.

    PubMed

    Günerken, E; D'Hondt, E; Eppink, M H M; Garcia-Gonzalez, L; Elst, K; Wijffels, R H

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are a potential source for various valuable chemicals for commercial applications ranging from nutraceuticals to fuels. Objective in a biorefinery is to utilize biomass ingredients efficiently similarly to petroleum refineries in which oil is fractionated in fuels and a variety of products with higher value. Downstream processes in microalgae biorefineries consist of different steps whereof cell disruption is the most crucial part. To maintain the functionality of algae biochemicals during cell disruption while obtaining high disruption yields is an important challenge. Despite this need, studies on mild disruption of microalgae cells are limited. This review article focuses on the evaluation of conventional and emerging cell disruption technologies, and a comparison thereof with respect to their potential for the future microalgae biorefineries. The discussed techniques are bead milling, high pressure homogenization, high speed homogenization, ultrasonication, microwave treatment, pulsed electric field treatment, non-mechanical cell disruption and some emerging technologies. PMID:25656098

  6. Endocrine disrupters as obesogens

    PubMed Central

    Grün, Felix; Blumberg, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The recent dramatic rise in obesity rates is an alarming global health trend that consumes an ever increasing portion of health care budgets in Western countries. The root cause of obesity is thought to be a prolonged positive energy balance. Hence, the major focus of preventative programs for obesity has been to target overeating and inadequate physical exercise. Recent research implicates environmental risk factors, including nutrient quality, stress, fetal environment and pharmaceutical or chemical exposure as relevant contributing influences. Evidence points to endocrine disrupting chemicals that interfere with the body's adipose tissue biology, endocrine hormone systems or central hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as suspects in derailing the homeostatic mechanisms important to weight control. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms of action for these compounds and areas of future research needed to evaluate the significance of their contribution to obesity. PMID:19433244

  7. Disruption of groundwater systems by earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xin; Wang, Chi-Yuen; Liu, Chun-Ping

    2015-11-01

    Earthquakes are known to enhance permeability at great distances, and this phenomenon may also disrupt groundwater systems by breaching the barrier between different reservoirs. Here we analyze the tidal response of water level in a deep (~4 km) well before and after the 2008 M7.9 Wenchuan earthquake to show that the earthquake not only changed the permeability but also altered the poroelastic properties of the groundwater system. Based on lithologic well logs and experimental data for rock properties, we interpret the change to reflect a coseismic breaching of aquitards bounding the aquifer, due perhaps to clearing of preexisting cracks and creation of new cracks, to depths of several kilometers. This may cause mixing of groundwater from previously isolated reservoirs and impact the safety of groundwater supplies and underground waste repositories. The method demonstrated here may hold promise for monitoring aquitard breaching by both natural and anthropogenic processes.

  8. Repartnering after First Union Disruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Zheng; Schimmele, Christoph M.

    2005-01-01

    Using data from the 1995 General Social Survey (N= 2,639), this study examines two competing repartnering choices made by Canadians after first union disruption: marriage or cohabitation. About 42% of women and 54% of men form a second union 5 years after union disruption, with cohabitation being the most prevalent choice. The timing of second…

  9. Sprache als Barriere (Language as a Barrier)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattheier, Klaus

    1974-01-01

    The concept of language barrier has its derivations in the fields of dialectology, sociology and psychology. In contemporary usage however, the concept has two meanings i.e. regional-cultural barrier and socio-cultural barrier. (Text is in German.) (DS)

  10. Adrenocortical endocrine disruption.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip W

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal has been neglected in endocrine disruption regulatory testing strategy. The adrenal is a vital organ, adrenocortical insufficiency is recognised in life threatening "adrenal crises" and Addison's disease, and the consequences of off-target toxicological inhibition of adrenocortical steroidogenesis is well recognised in clinical medicine, where drugs such as aminoglutethimide and etomidate killed patients via unrecognised inhibition of adrenocortical steroidogenic enzymes (e.g. CYP11B1) along the cortisol and aldosterone pathways. The consequences of adrenocortical dysfunction during early development are also recognised in the congenital salt wasting and adrenogenital syndromes presenting neonatally, yet despite a remit to focus on developmental and reproductive toxicity mechanisms of endocrine disruption by many regulatory agencies (USEPA EDSTAC; REACH) the assessment of adrenocortical function has largely been ignored. Further, every step in the adrenocortical steroidogenic pathway (ACTH receptor, StAR, CYP's 11A1, 17, 21, 11B1, 11B2, and 3-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Δ4,5 isomerase) is known to be a potential target with multiple examples of chemicals inhibiting these targets. Many of these chemicals have been detected in human and wildlife tissues. This raises the question of whether exposure to low level environmental chemicals may be affecting adrenocortical function. This review examines the omission of adrenocortical testing in the current regulatory frameworks; the characteristics that make the adrenal cortex particularly vulnerable to toxic insult; chemicals and their toxicological targets within the adrenocortical steroidogenic pathways; the typical manifestations of adrenocortical toxicity (e.g. human iatrogenically induced pharmacotoxicological adrenal insufficiency, manifestations in typical mammalian regulatory general toxicology studies, manifestations in wildlife) and models of adrenocortical functional assessment. The utility of the

  11. The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Mechanisms and Perspective Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, JN; Lucas, R; Verin, AD

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a severe lung inflammatory disorder with a 30–50% mortality. Sepsis and pneumonia are the leading causes of ARDS. On the cellular level there is pulmonary capillary endothelial cell permeability and fluid leakage into the pulmonary parenchyma, followed by neutrophils, cytokines and an acute inflammatory response. When fluid increases in the interstitium then the outward movement continues and protein rich fluid floods the alveolar spaces through the tight junctions of the epithelial cells. Neutrophils play an important role in the development of pulmonary edema associated with acute lung injury or ARDS. Animal studies have shown that endothelial injury appears within minutes to hours after Acute Lung Injury (ALI) initiation with resulting intercellular gaps of the endothelial cells. The Endothelial Cell (EC) gaps allow for permeability of fluid, neutrophils and cytokines into the pulmonary parenchymal space. The neutrophils that infiltrate the lungs and migrate into the airways express pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and contribute to both the endothelial and epithelial integrity disruption of the barriers. Pharmacological treatments have been ineffective. The ARDS Network trial identified low tidal volume mechanical ventilation, positive end expiratory pressure and fluid management guidelines that have improved outcomes for patients with ARDS. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is used in specialized centers for severe cases. Prone positioning has recently proven to have significantly decreased ventilator days and days in the intensive care unit. Current investigation includes administration of mesenchymal stem cell therapy, partial fluid ventilation, TIP peptide nebulized administration and the continued examination of pharmacologic drugs. PMID:26973981

  12. Intranasal exposure to manganese disrupts neurotransmitter release from glutamatergic synapses in the central nervous system in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Moberly, Andrew H.; Czarnecki, Lindsey A.; Pottackal, Joseph; Rubinstein, Tom; Turkel, Daniel J.; Kass, Marley D.; McGann, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic exposure to aerosolized manganese induces a neurological disorder that includes extrapyramidal motor symptoms and cognitive impairment. Inhaled manganese can bypass the blood-brain barrier and reach the central nervous system by transport down the olfactory nerve to the brain’s olfactory bulb. However, the mechanism by which Mn disrupts neural function remains unclear. Here we used optical imaging techniques to visualize exocytosis in olfactory nerve terminals in vivo in the mouse olfactory bulb. Acute Mn exposure via intranasal instillation of 2–200 μg MnCl2 solution caused a dose-dependent reduction in odorant-evoked neurotransmitter release, with significant effects at as little as 2 μg MnCl2 and a 90% reduction compared to vehicle controls with a 200 μg exposure. This reduction was also observed in response to direct electrical stimulation of the olfactory nerve layer in the olfactory bulb, demonstrating that Mn’s action is occurring centrally, not peripherally. This is the first direct evidence that Mn intoxication can disrupt neurotransmitter release, and is consistent with previous work suggesting that chronic Mn exposure limits amphetamine-induced dopamine increases in the basal ganglia despite normal levels of dopamine synthesis (Guilarte et al., J Neurochem 2008). The commonality of Mn’s action between glutamatergic neurons in the olfactory bulb and dopaminergic neurons in the basal ganglia suggests that a disruption of neurotransmitter release may be a general consequence wherever Mn accumulates in the brain and could underlie its pleiotropic effects. PMID:22542936

  13. Laser Microbial Killing and Biofilm Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krespi, Yosef P.; Kizhner, Victor

    2009-06-01

    Objectives: To analyze the ability of NIR lasers to reduce bacterial load and demonstrate the capability of fiber-based Q-switched Nd:YAG laser disrupting biofilm. Study Design: NIR diode laser was tested in vitro and in vivo using pathogenic microorganisms (S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa). In addition biofilms were grown from clinical Pseudomonas isolates and placed in culture plates, screws, tympanostomy tubes and PET sutures. Methods: In the animal experiments acute rhinosinusitis model was created by packing the rabbit nose with bacteria soaked solution. The nasal pack was removed in two days and nose was exposed to laser irradiation. A 940 nm diode laser with fiber diffuser was used. Nasal cultures were obtained before and after the laser treatments. Animals were sacrificed fifteen days following laser treatment and bacteriologic/histologic results analyzed. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser generated shockwave pulses were delivered on biofilm using special probes over culture plates, screws, tubes, and PET sutures for the biofilm experiments. Results: Average of two log bacteria reduction was achieved with NIR laser compared to controls. Histologic studies demonstrated preservation of tissue integrity without significant damage to mucosa. Biofilms were imaged before, during and after treatment using a confocal microscope. During laser-generated shockwave application, biofilm was initially seen to oscillate and eventually break off. Large and small pieces of biofilm were totally and instantly removed from the surface to which they were attached in seconds. Conclusions: Significant bacterial reduction was achieved with NIR laser therapy in this experimental in vitro and animal study. In addition we disrupted Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and special probes generating plasma and shockwave. This new and innovative method of bacteria killing and biofilm disruption without injuring host tissue may have clinical application in the

  14. AIDS and economic disruption.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G S

    1996-10-01

    Child and adult mortality increases in Cameroon due to AIDS will cause life expectancy to fall by as many as 8 years, from just over 50 to just over 40 years. The social consequences of AIDS include grieving, stigmatizing, and the large-scale disruption of family and community structures. Widows and widowers due to AIDS mortality are affected differently from each other, with the widows of men who have died from AIDS facing potential sociocultural and economic hardship. The economic consequences of AIDS in Bamenda and elsewhere in Cameroon will occur mainly through the epidemic's impact upon the size and quality of the labor force. By killing a significant number of male and female workers aged 15-60 years, AIDS will reduce the size and growth rate of the labor force. Despite, rapid population growth, labor is a relatively scarce factor of agricultural production in Cameroon. The spread of HIV in rural areas, combined with the intensity and scarcity of agricultural labor, suggests that AIDS will have an impact upon production and per capita incomes, and increase the already high rates of hunger and absolute poverty. In the context of HIV/AIDS, young people must be empowered to make informed decisions about sex. Adolescents are most at risk because they tend to experiment more than married couples and have many sex partners. Sexual activity begins as early as age 8 years and penetrative sex at age 13 or earlier. The author considers the factors which encourage adolescents to engage in sexual activities. PMID:12293251

  15. Interception and disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, J.C.

    1995-07-01

    Given sufficient warning we might try to avert a collision with a comet or asteroid by using beamed energy or by using the kinetic energy of an interceptor rocket. If motivated by the opportunity to convert the object into a space asset, perhaps a microgravity mine for construction materials or spacecraft fuels, we might try a rendezvous to implant a propulsion system of some sort. But the most cost-effective means of disruption is a nuclear explosive. In this paper, I discuss optimal tactics for terminal intercept, which can be extended to remote-interdiction scenarios as well. I show that the optimal mass ratio of an interceptor rock carrying a nuclear explosive depends mainly on the ratio of the exhaust velocity to the assailant-object closing velocity. I compare the effectiveness of stand-off detonation, surface burst, and penetration, for both deflection and pulverization, concluding that a penetrator has no clear advantage over a surface-burst device for deflection, but is a distinctly more capable pulverizer. The advantage of a stand-off device is to distribute the impulse more evenly over the surface of the object and to prevent fracture, an event which would greatly complicate the intercept problem. Finally, I present some results of a model for gravitationally bound objects and obtain the maximum non-fracturing deflection speed for a variety of object sizes and structures. For a single engagement, I conclude that the non-fracturing deflection speed obtainable with a stand-off device is about four times the speed obtainable with a surface-burst device. Furthermore, the non-fracturing deflection speed is somewhat dependent on the number of competent components of the object, the speed for a 13 component object being about twice that for a 135 component object.

  16. Tidal disruption event demographics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2016-09-01

    We survey the properties of stars destroyed in tidal disruption events (TDEs) as a function of black hole (BH) mass, stellar mass and evolutionary state, star formation history and redshift. For M_{BH} ≲ 10^7 M_{⊙}, the typical TDE is due to a M* ˜ 0.3 M⊙ M-dwarf, although the mass function is relatively flat for M_{ast } ≲ M_{⊙}. The contribution from older main-sequence stars and sub-giants is small but not negligible. From MBH ≃ 107.5-108.5 M⊙, the balance rapidly shifts to higher mass stars and a larger contribution from evolved stars, and is ultimately dominated by evolved stars at higher BH masses. The star formation history has little effect until the rates are dominated by evolved stars. TDE rates should decline very rapidly towards higher redshifts. The volumetric rate of TDEs is very high because the BH mass function diverges for low masses. However, any emission mechanism which is largely Eddington-limited for low BH masses suppresses this divergence in any observed sample and leads to TDE samples dominated by MBH ≃ 106.0-107.5 M⊙ BHs with roughly Eddington peak accretion rates. The typical fall-back time is relatively long, with 16 per cent having tfb < 10-1 yr (37 d), and 84 per cent having longer time-scales. Many residual rate discrepancies can be explained if surveys are biased against TDEs with these longer tfb, which seems very plausible if tfb has any relation to the transient rise time. For almost any BH mass function, systematic searches for fainter, faster time-scale TDEs in smaller galaxies, and longer time-scale TDEs in more massive galaxies are likely to be rewarded.

  17. When Disruptive Approaches Meet Disruptive Technologies: Learning at a Distance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Chere Campbell

    2000-01-01

    Reviews research on constructivism in learning and selection of learning strategies. Suggests linking constructivism with instructional technologies for continuing medical education in order to "disrupt" reactive, habitual ways of learning and encourage active engagement. (SK)

  18. Endocrine Effects of Circadian Disruption.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Fonken, Laura K; Nelson, Randy J

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms, provoked by artificial lighting at night, inconsistent sleep-wake schedules, and transmeridian air travel, is increasingly prevalent in modern society. Desynchrony of biological rhythms from environmental light cycles has dramatic consequences for human health. In particular, disrupting homeostatic oscillations in endocrine tissues and the hormones that these tissues regulate can have cascading effects on physiology and behavior. Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic disruption of circadian organization of endocrine function may lead to metabolic, reproductive, sleep, and mood disorders. This review discusses circadian control of endocrine systems and the consequences of distorting rhythmicity of these systems. PMID:26208951

  19. Acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  20. Acute aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corvera, Joel S

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  1. Thermal barrier research

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, K.G.

    1990-03-07

    The thermal barrier region in the TARA device is a complex arrangement combining ion-plugging by sloshing ions with an ECRH-generated thermal barrier plasma. An axisymmetric, high-mirror-ratio magnetic field, adjacent to the central cell, provides the confinement of the thermal barrier plasma and sloshing ions. This paper discusses research being done in this thermal barrier region.

  2. Intestinal barrier: Molecular pathways and modifiers.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Min Kyung; Klaus, Christina; Kaemmerer, Elke; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2013-11-15

    The gastrointestinal tract is frequently challenged by pathogens/antigens contained in food and water and the intestinal epithelium must be capable of rapid regeneration in the event of tissue damage. Disruption of the intestinal barrier leads to a number of immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, food allergy, and celiac disease. The intestinal mucosa is composed of different types of epithelial cells in specific barrier functions. Epithelial cells control surface-associated bacterial populations without disrupting the intestinal microflora that is crucial for host health. They are also capable of modulating mucosal immune system, and are thus essential in maintaining homeostasis in the gut. Thus, the regulation of intestinal epithelial homeostasis is crucial for the maintenance of the structure of the mucosa and the defensive barrier functions. Recent studies have demonstrated that multiple molecular pathways are involved in the regulation of intestinal epithelial cell polarity. These include the Wnt, Notch, Hippo, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Hedgehog pathways, most of which were identified in lower organisms where they play important roles during embryogenesis. These pathways are also used in adult organisms to regulate multiple self-renewing organs. Understanding the interactions between these molecular mechanisms and intestinal barrier function will therefore provide important insight into the pathogenesis of intestinal-based immune-mediated diseases. PMID:24244877

  3. Male reprotoxicity and endocrine disruption

    PubMed Central

    Campion, Sarah; Catlin, Natasha; Heger, Nicholas; McDonnell, Elizabeth V.; Pacheco, Sara E.; Saffarini, Camelia; Sandrof, Moses A.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian reproductive tract development is a tightly regulated process that can be disrupted following exposure to drugs, toxicants, endocrine disrupting chemicals or other compounds via alterations to gene and protein expression or epigenetic regulation. Indeed, the impacts of developmental exposure to certain toxicants may not be fully realized until puberty or adulthood when the reproductive tract becomes sexually mature and altered functionality is manifested. Exposures that occur later in life, once development is complete, can also disrupt the intricate hormonal and paracrine interactions responsible for adult functions, such as spermatogenesis. In this chapter, the biology and toxicology of the male reproductive tract is explored, proceeding through the various life stages including in utero development, puberty, adulthood and senescence. Special attention is given to the discussion of endocrine disrupting chemicals, chemical mixtures, low dose effects, transgenerational effects, and potential exposure-related causes of male reproductive tract cancers. PMID:22945574

  4. Neurotoxicity of Thyroid Disrupting Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones playa critical role in the normal development ofthe mammalian brain. Thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs) are environmental contaminants that alter the structure or function ofthe thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeost...

  5. Ultrasonic disruption of algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. M.; Nowotarski, K.; Joyce, E. M.; Mason, T. J.

    2012-05-01

    During last decade there has been increasing interest in the production of sustainable fuels from microalgae (R.H. Wijffels and M.J. Barbosa, 2010; Singh et al 2011; D.H. Lee 2011). The aim of this project was to determine if algal cells can be ultrasonically disrupted to release lipids for biofuel production. Ultrasonic disruption of two unicellular algal species: Dunnaliella salina and Nannochloropsis oculata was investigated using a 20 kHz probe. Haemocytometer, optical density, UV-Vis, fluoro-spectrophotometer and confocal microscopy results demonstrated complete cell destruction of Dunaliella salina within 16 minutes of sonication. Results obtained for Nannochloropsis oculata differed in that ultrasound dispersed clumped cells with little or no cell disruption, as observed by haemocytometer and confocal microscopy analysis. However, UV-Visible and fluoro-spectrophotometer analysis indicated chlorophyll release following sonication, suggesting some cell disruption had occurred.

  6. Causes of major tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Monticello, D.A.

    1980-07-01

    The nonlinear saturation theory of the tearing mode is used to examine the necessary conditions for the occurrence of a major tokamak disruption. The results are compared with full three-dimensional numerical simulations, and with experimental data.

  7. Plasma disruption modeling and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.

    1994-07-01

    Disruptions in tokamak reactors are considered a limiting factor to successful operation and a reliable design. The behavior of plasma-facing components during a disruption is critical to the overall integrity of the reactor. Erosion of plasma facing-material (PFM) surfaces due to thermal energy dump during the disruption can severely limit the lifetime of these components and thus diminish the economic feasibility of the reactor.Initially, the incident plasma particles will deposit their energy directly on the PFM surface, heating it to a very high temperature where ablation occurs. Models for plasma-material interactions have been developed and used to predict material thermal evolution during the disruption. Within a few microseconds after the start of the disruption, enough material is vaporized to intercept most of the incoming plasma particles. Models for plasma-vapor interactions are necessary to predict vapor cloud expansion and hydrodynamics. Continuous heating of the vapor cloud above the material surface by the incident plasma particles will excite, ionize, and cause vapor atoms to emit thermal radiation. Accurate models for radiation transport in the vapor are essential for calculating the net radiated flux to the material surface which determines the final erosion thickness and consequently component lifetime. A comprehensive model that takes into account various stages of plasma-material interaction has been developed and used to predict erosion rates during reactor disruption, as well during induced disruption in laboratory experiments. Differences between various simulation experiments and reactor conditions are discussed. A two-dimensional radiation transport model has been developed to particularly simulate the effect of small test samples used in laboratory disruption experiments.

  8. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  9. Cell-free hemoglobin: a novel mediator of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Ciara M; Upchurch, Cameron P; Janz, David R; Grove, Brandon S; Putz, Nathan D; Wickersham, Nancy E; Dikalov, Sergey I; Ware, Lorraine B; Bastarache, Julie A

    2016-03-15

    Patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have elevated levels of cell-free hemoglobin (CFH) in the air space, but the contribution of CFH to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that levels of CFH in the air space correlate with measures of alveolar-capillary barrier dysfunction in humans with ARDS (r = 0.89, P < 0.001) and in mice with ventilator-induced acute lung injury (r = 0.89, P < 0.001). To investigate the specific contribution of CFH to ARDS, we studied the impact of purified CFH in the mouse lung and on cultured mouse lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells. Intratracheal delivery of CFH in mice causes acute lung injury with air space inflammation and alveolar-capillary barrier disruption. Similarly, in MLE-12 cells, CFH increases proinflammatory cytokine expression and increases paracellular permeability as measured by electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing. Next, to determine whether these effects are mediated by the iron-containing heme moiety of CFH, we treated mice with intratracheal hemin, the chloride salt of heme, and found that hemin was sufficient to increase alveolar permeability but failed to induce proinflammatory cytokine expression or epithelial cell injury. Together, these data identify CFH in the air space as a previously unrecognized driver of lung epithelial injury in human and experimental ARDS and suggest that CFH and hemin may contribute to ARDS through different mechanisms. Interventions targeting CFH and heme in the air space could provide a new therapeutic approach for ARDS. PMID:26773065

  10. Blood brain barrier dysfunction and delayed neurological deficits in mild traumatic brain injury induced by blast shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Ashok K.; Mishra, Vikas; Kodali, Maheedhar; Hattiangady, Bharathi

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs) is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting from exposure to BSWs appears to be the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Studies in animal models suggest that exposure to relatively milder BSWs (123 kPa) initially induces free radical generating enzymes in and around brain capillaries, which enhances oxidative stress resulting in loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins, edema formation, and leakiness of BBB with disruption or loss of its components pericytes and astrocyte end-feet. On the other hand, exposure to more intense BSWs (145–323 kPa) causes acute disruption of the BBB with vascular lesions in the brain. Both of these scenarios lead to apoptosis of endothelial and neural cells and neuroinflammation in and around capillaries, which may progress into chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and/or a variety of neurological impairments, depending on brain regions that are afflicted with such lesions. This review discusses studies that examined alterations in the brain milieu causing dysfunction or disruption of the BBB and neuroinflammation following exposure to different intensities of BSWs. Furthermore, potential of early intervention strategies capable of easing oxidative stress, repairing the BBB or blocking inflammation for minimizing delayed neurological deficits resulting from exposure to BSWs is conferred. PMID:25165433

  11. Blood brain barrier dysfunction and delayed neurological deficits in mild traumatic brain injury induced by blast shock waves.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ashok K; Mishra, Vikas; Kodali, Maheedhar; Hattiangady, Bharathi

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs) is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting from exposure to BSWs appears to be the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Studies in animal models suggest that exposure to relatively milder BSWs (123 kPa) initially induces free radical generating enzymes in and around brain capillaries, which enhances oxidative stress resulting in loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins, edema formation, and leakiness of BBB with disruption or loss of its components pericytes and astrocyte end-feet. On the other hand, exposure to more intense BSWs (145-323 kPa) causes acute disruption of the BBB with vascular lesions in the brain. Both of these scenarios lead to apoptosis of endothelial and neural cells and neuroinflammation in and around capillaries, which may progress into chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and/or a variety of neurological impairments, depending on brain regions that are afflicted with such lesions. This review discusses studies that examined alterations in the brain milieu causing dysfunction or disruption of the BBB and neuroinflammation following exposure to different intensities of BSWs. Furthermore, potential of early intervention strategies capable of easing oxidative stress, repairing the BBB or blocking inflammation for minimizing delayed neurological deficits resulting from exposure to BSWs is conferred. PMID:25165433

  12. Online Education Cast as "Disruptive Innovation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totter, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Technology-based forces of "disruptive innovation" are gathering around public education and will overhaul the way K-12 students learn--with potentially dramatic consequences for established public schools, according to an upcoming book that draws parallels to disruptions in other industries. In his "Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation…

  13. Clusterin Seals the Ocular Surface Barrier in Mouse Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Bauskar, Aditi; Mack, Wendy J.; Mauris, Jerome; Argüeso, Pablo; Heur, Martin; Nagel, Barbara A.; Kolar, Grant R.; Gleave, Martin E.; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Panjwani, Noorjahan; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Wilson, Mark R.; Fini, M. Elizabeth; Jeong, Shinwu

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye is a common disorder caused by inadequate hydration of the ocular surface that results in disruption of barrier function. The homeostatic protein clusterin (CLU) is prominent at fluid-tissue interfaces throughout the body. CLU levels are reduced at the ocular surface in human inflammatory disorders that manifest as severe dry eye, as well as in a preclinical mouse model for desiccating stress that mimics dry eye. Using this mouse model, we show here that CLU prevents and ameliorates ocular surface barrier disruption by a remarkable sealing mechanism dependent on attainment of a critical all-or-none concentration. When the CLU level drops below the critical all-or-none threshold, the barrier becomes vulnerable to desiccating stress. CLU binds selectively to the ocular surface subjected to desiccating stress in vivo, and in vitro to the galectin LGALS3, a key barrier component. Positioned in this way, CLU not only physically seals the ocular surface barrier, but it also protects the barrier cells and prevents further damage to barrier structure. These findings define a fundamentally new mechanism for ocular surface protection and suggest CLU as a biotherapeutic for dry eye. PMID:26402857

  14. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Ramsey, David R.; Stampfer, Joseph F.; Macdonald, John M.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material.

  15. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

  16. Tidal disruption of viscous bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, S.; Tremaine, S.

    1992-01-01

    Tidal disruptions are investigated in viscous-fluid planetesimals whose radius is small relative to the distance of closest (parabolic-orbit) approach to a planet. The planetesimal surface is in these conditions always ellipsoidal, facilitating treatment by coupled ODEs which are solvable with high accuracy. While the disrupted planetesimals evolve into needlelike ellipsoids, their density does not decrease. The validity of viscous fluid treatment holds for solid (ice or rock) planetesimals in cases where tidal stresses are greater than material strength, but integrity is maintained by self-gravity.

  17. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  18. Barrier products in the treatment of incontinence-associated dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yaping

    2016-07-20

    This article reviews contemporary primary research studies to establish the evidence supporting the use of barrier products and evaluate practice regarding their use in the acute hospital setting. Six primary research studies investigating the use of barrier products for preventing and managing incontinence-associated dermatitis were reviewed. The aim was to identify the most effective treatments for incontinence-associated dermatitis to enhance the quality of life of patients. The studies identified that there is no significant difference in efficacy between petrolatum, zinc oxide oil and a polymer-based barrier film, and that a polymer-based barrier film is more cost-effective than petrolatum or zinc oxide. However, further robust research studies are required to inform practice. The efficacy and cost-effectiveness of barrier products can be enhanced by providing education in clinical practice on consistent skin care regimens and effective use of barrier products. PMID:27440366

  19. Activation of proto-oncogenes by disruption of chromosome neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Hnisz, Denes; Weintraub, Abraham S; Day, Daniel S; Valton, Anne-Laure; Bak, Rasmus O; Li, Charles H; Goldmann, Johanna; Lajoie, Bryan R; Fan, Zi Peng; Sigova, Alla A; Reddy, Jessica; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Lee, Tong Ihn; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Porteus, Matthew H; Dekker, Job; Young, Richard A

    2016-03-25

    Oncogenes are activated through well-known chromosomal alterations such as gene fusion, translocation, and focal amplification. In light of recent evidence that the control of key genes depends on chromosome structures called insulated neighborhoods, we investigated whether proto-oncogenes occur within these structures and whether oncogene activation can occur via disruption of insulated neighborhood boundaries in cancer cells. We mapped insulated neighborhoods in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and found that tumor cell genomes contain recurrent microdeletions that eliminate the boundary sites of insulated neighborhoods containing prominent T-ALL proto-oncogenes. Perturbation of such boundaries in nonmalignant cells was sufficient to activate proto-oncogenes. Mutations affecting chromosome neighborhood boundaries were found in many types of cancer. Thus, oncogene activation can occur via genetic alterations that disrupt insulated neighborhoods in malignant cells. PMID:26940867

  20. Modulation of bronchial epithelial cell barrier function by in vitro jet propulsion fuel 8 exposure.

    PubMed

    Robledo, R F; Barber, D S; Witten, M L

    1999-09-01

    The loss of epithelial barrier integrity in bronchial and bronchiolar airways may be an initiating factor in the observed onset of toxicant-induced lung injuries. Acute 1-h inhalation exposures to aerosolized jet propulsion fuel 8 (JP-8) have been shown to induce cellular and morphological indications of pulmonary toxicity that was associated with increased respiratory permeability to 99mTc-DTPA. To address the hypothesis that JP-8 jet fuel-induced lung injury is initiated through a disruption in the airway epithelial barrier function, paracellular mannitol flux of BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells was measured. Incubation of confluent cell cultures with non-cytotoxic concentrations of JP-8 or n-tetradecane (C14), a primary constituent of JP-8, for a 1-h exposure period resulted in dose-dependent increases of paracellular flux. Following exposures of 0.17, 0.33, 0.50, or 0.67 mg/ml, mannitol flux increased above vehicle controls by 10, 14, 29, and 52%, respectively, during a 2-h incubation period immediately after each JP-8 exposure. C14 caused greater mannitol flux increases of 37, 42, 63, and 78%, respectively, following identical exposure conditions. The effect on transepithelial mannitol flux reached a maximum at 12 h and spontaneously reversed to control values over a 48-h recovery period, for both JP-8 and C14 exposure. These data indicate that non-cytotoxic exposures to JP-8 or C14 exert a noxious effect on bronchial epithelial barrier function that may preclude pathological lung injury. PMID:10496683

  1. Disruptive camouflage impairs object recognition.

    PubMed

    Webster, Richard J; Hassall, Christopher; Herdman, Chris M; Godin, Jean-Guy J; Sherratt, Thomas N

    2013-01-01

    Whether hiding from predators, or avoiding battlefield casualties, camouflage is widely employed to prevent detection. Disruptive coloration is a seemingly well-known camouflage mechanism proposed to function by breaking up an object's salient features (for example their characteristic outline), rendering objects more difficult to recognize. However, while a wide range of animals are thought to evade detection using disruptive patterns, there is no direct experimental evidence that disruptive coloration impairs recognition. Using humans searching for computer-generated moth targets, we demonstrate that the number of edge-intersecting patches on a target reduces the likelihood of it being detected, even at the expense of reduced background matching. Crucially, eye-tracking data show that targets with more edge-intersecting patches were looked at for longer periods prior to attack, and passed-over more frequently during search tasks. We therefore show directly that edge patches enhance survivorship by impairing recognition, confirming that disruptive coloration is a distinct camouflage strategy, not simply an artefact of background matching. PMID:24152693

  2. Alternative Programs for Disruptive Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. Angele, Ed.; And Others

    The book addresses issues in meeting the educational needs of disruptive students. In the introduction, R. Sarri examines the rise of alternative schools and discusses common elements in their design and operation. D. Sabatino follows with "Issues and Concerns: Problems with Alternative Schools," in which he examines the particular difficulties…

  3. The Convergence of Environmental Disruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Marshall I.

    1970-01-01

    Considers reasons for water, air, and land pollution in the Soviet Union, incentives to pollute under socialism and the advantages socialism has for environmental management. Concludes that industrialization, not private enterprise, causes environmental disruption, and that strongly centralized planned economics do not necessarily avoid…

  4. Disruptive Technologies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the role of "disruptive" innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally adopted and…

  5. Comparing barrier algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Jordan, Harry F.

    1987-01-01

    A barrier is a method for synchronizing a large number of concurrent computer processes. After considering some basic synchronization mechanisms, a collection of barrier algorithms with either linear or logarithmic depth are presented. A graphical model is described that profiles the execution of the barriers and other parallel programming constructs. This model shows how the interaction between the barrier algorithms and the work that they synchronize can impact their performance. One result is that logarithmic tree structured barriers show good performance when synchronizing fixed length work, while linear self-scheduled barriers show better performance when synchronizing fixed length work with an imbedded critical section. The linear barriers are better able to exploit the process skew associated with critical sections. Timing experiments, performed on an eighteen processor Flex/32 shared memory multiprocessor, that support these conclusions are detailed.

  6. Comparing barrier algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Jordan, Harry F.

    1989-01-01

    A barrier is a method for synchronizing a large number of concurrent computer processes. After considering some basic synchronization mechanisms, a collection of barrier algorithms with either linear or logarithmic depth are presented. A graphical model is described that profiles the execution of the barriers and other parallel programming constructs. This model shows how the interaction between the barrier algorithms and the work that they synchronize can impact their performance. One result is that logarithmic tree structured barriers show good performance when synchronizing fixed length work, while linear self-scheduled barriers show better performance when synchronizing fixed length work with an imbedded critical section. The linear barriers are better able to exploit the process skew associated with critical sections. Timing experiments, performed on an eighteen processor Flex/32 shared memory multiprocessor that support these conclusions, are detailed.

  7. Gut barrier function in malnourished patients

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, F; Farmery, S; MacLennan, K; Sheridan, M; Barclay, G; Guillou, P; Reynolds, J

    1998-01-01

    Background—The integrity of the gastrointestinal mucosa is a key element in preventing systemic absorption of enteric toxins and bacteria. In the critically ill, breakdown of gut barrier function may fuel sepsis. Malnourished patients have an increased risk of postoperative sepsis; however, the effects of malnutrition on intestinal barrier function in man are unknown. 
Aims—To quantify intestinal barrier function, endotoxin exposure, and the acute phase cytokine response in malnourished patients. 
Patients—Malnourished and well nourished hospitalised patients. 
Methods—Gastrointestinal permeability was measured in malnourished patients and well nourished controls using the lactulose:mannitol test. Endoscopic biopsy specimens were stained and morphological and immunohistochemical features graded. The polymerase chain reaction was used to determine mucosal cytokine expression. The immunoglobulin G antibody response to endotoxin and serum interleukin 6 were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. 
Results—There was a significant increase in intestinal permeability in the malnourished patients in association with phenotypic and molecular evidence of activation of lamina propria mononuclear cells and enterocytes, and a heightened acute phase response. 
Conclusions—Intestinal barrier function is significantly compromised in malnourished patients, but the clinical significance is unclear. 

 Keywords: protein-energy malnutrition; intestinal permeability; endotoxin; cytokine PMID:9577348

  8. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  9. Targeting testis-specific proteins to inhibit spermatogenesis: lesson from endocrine disrupting chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Wan, HT; Mruk, Dolores D; Wong, Chris KC; Cheng, C Yan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has recently been linked to declining fertility in men in both developed and developing countries. Since many EDCs possess intrinsic estrogenic or androgenic activities, thus, the gonad is one of the major targets of EDCs. Areas covered For the past 2 decades, studies found in the literature regarding the disruptive effects of these EDCs on reproductive function in human males and also rodents were mostly focused on oxidative stress-induced germ cell apoptosis, disruption of steroidogenesis, abnormal sperm production and disruption of spermatogenesis in particular cell adhesion function and the blood–testis-barrier (BTB) function. Herein, we highlight recent findings in the field illustrating testis-specific proteins are also targets of EDCs. Expert opinion This information should be helpful in developing better therapeutic approach to manage ECD-induced reproductive toxicity. This information is also helpful to identify potential targets for male contraceptive development. PMID:23600530

  10. Calcium-Ask1-MKK7-JNK2-c-Src Signaling Cascade Mediates Disruption of Intestinal Epithelial Tight Junctions by Dextran Sulfate Sodium

    PubMed Central

    Samak, Geetha; Chaudhry, Kamaljit K.; Gangwar, Ruchika; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions is an important event in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induces colitis in mice with the symptoms similar to ulcerative colitis. However, the mechanism of DSS-induced colitis is unknown. We investigated the mechanism of DSS-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions and barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers in vitro and mouse colon in vivo. DSS treatment resulted in disruption of tight junctions, adherens junctions and actin cytoskeleton leading to barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers. DSS induced a rapid activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the inhibition or knockdown of JNK2 attenuated DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. In mice, DSS administration for 4 days caused redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins from the epithelial junctions, which was blocked by JNK inhibitor. In Caco-2 cell monolayers, DSS increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration, and depletion of intracellular Ca2+ by BAPTA or thapsigargin attenuated DSS-induced JNK activation, tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Knockdown of Ask1 or MKK7 blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS activated c-Src by a Ca2+ and JNK-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of Src kinase activity or knockdown of c-Src blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS increased Tyr-phosphorylation of occludin, ZO-1, E-cadherin and β-catenin. SP600125 abrogated DSS-induced Tyr-phosphorylation of junctional proteins. Recombinant JNK2 induced threonine phosphorylation and auto phosphorylation of c-Src. This study demonstrates that Ca2+-Ask1-MKK7-JNK2-cSrc signaling cascade mediates DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. PMID:25377781

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase-2-mediated occludin degradation and caveolin-1-mediated claudin-5 redistribution contribute to blood-brain barrier damage in early ischemic stroke stage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Jin, Xinchun; Liu, Ke J; Liu, Wenlan

    2012-02-29

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption occurs early enough to be within the thrombolytic time window, and this early ischemic BBB damage is closely associated with hemorrhagic transformation and thus emerging as a promising target for reducing the hemorrhagic complications of thrombolytic stroke therapy. However, the mechanisms underlying early ischemic BBB damage remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated the early molecular events of ischemic BBB damage using in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and in vivo rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) models. Exposure of bEND3 monolayer to OGD for 2 h significantly increased its permeability to FITC-labeled dextran and promoted the secretion of metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2/9) and cytosolic translocation of caveolin-1 (Cav-1). This same OGD treatment also led to rapid degradation of tight junction protein occludin and dissociation of claudin-5 from the cytoskeleton, which contributed to OGD-induced endothelial barrier disruption. Using selective MMP-2/9 inhibitor SB-3CT (2-[[(4-phenoxyphenyl)sulfonyl]methyl]-thiirane) or their neutralizing antibodies or Cav-1 siRNA, we found that MMP-2 was the major enzyme mediating OGD-induced occludin degradation, while Cav-1 was responsible for claudin-5 redistribution. The interaction between Cav-1 and claudin-5 was further confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation. Consistent with these in vitro findings, we observed fluorescence tracer extravasation, increased gelatinolytic activity, and elevated interstitial MMP-2 levels in ischemic subcortical tissue after 2 h MCAO. Moreover, occludin protein loss and claudin-5 redistribution were detected in ischemic cerebromicrovessels. These data indicate that cerebral ischemia initiates two rapid parallel processes, MMP-2-mediated occludin degradation and Cav-1-mediated claudin-5 redistribution, to cause BBB disruption at early stroke stages relevant to acute thrombolysis. PMID:22378877

  12. Effects of social disruption in elephants persist decades after culling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multi-level fission-fusion societies, characteristic of a number of large brained mammal species including some primates, cetaceans and elephants, are among the most complex and cognitively demanding animal social systems. Many free-ranging populations of these highly social mammals already face severe human disturbance, which is set to accelerate with projected anthropogenic environmental change. Despite this, our understanding of how such disruption affects core aspects of social functioning is still very limited. Results We now use novel playback experiments to assess decision-making abilities integral to operating successfully within complex societies, and provide the first systematic evidence that fundamental social skills may be significantly impaired by anthropogenic disruption. African elephants (Loxodonta africana) that had experienced separation from family members and translocation during culling operations decades previously performed poorly on systematic tests of their social knowledge, failing to distinguish between callers on the basis of social familiarity. Moreover, elephants from the disrupted population showed no evidence of discriminating between callers when age-related cues simulated individuals on an increasing scale of social dominance, in sharp contrast to the undisturbed population where this core social ability was well developed. Conclusions Key decision-making abilities that are fundamental to living in complex societies could be significantly altered in the long-term through exposure to severely disruptive events (e.g. culling and translocation). There is an assumption that wildlife responds to increasing pressure from human societies only in terms of demography, however our study demonstrates that the effects may be considerably more pervasive. These findings highlight the potential long-term negative consequences of acute social disruption in cognitively advanced species that live in close-knit kin-based societies, and

  13. Psychological stress and epidermal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Orion, Edith; Wolf, Ronni

    2012-01-01

    The skin is the organ that acts as a barrier between the outer and inner environments of the body. It is thus exposed not only to a wide variety of physical, chemical, and thermal insults from the outside world but also to inner endogenous stimuli. Stress, once an abstract psychologic phenomenon, has taken research's center stage in recent years. The "mind-body connection" is now less of an obscure New Age term and more of an elaborate physiologic pathway by which bilateral communication occurs between body and brain. Dermatologists and dermatologic patients have long acknowledged the effect of stress on the skin and its capability to initiate, maintain, or exacerbate several skin diseases. Because disruption of epidermal barrier integrity may be important in the development of some common skin diseases, it is crucial to understand its vulnerability to psychologic stress. PMID:22507042

  14. Multilayer moisture barrier

    DOEpatents

    Pankow, Joel W; Jorgensen, Gary J; Terwilliger, Kent M; Glick, Stephen H; Isomaki, Nora; Harkonen, Kari; Turkulainen, Tommy

    2015-04-21

    A moisture barrier, device or product having a moisture barrier or a method of fabricating a moisture barrier having at least a polymer layer, and interfacial layer, and a barrier layer. The polymer layer may be fabricated from any suitable polymer including, but not limited to, fluoropolymers such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), or ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE). The interfacial layer may be formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD). In embodiments featuring an ALD interfacial layer, the deposited interfacial substance may be, but is not limited to, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, AlSiO.sub.x, TiO.sub.2, and an Al.sub.2O.sub.3/TiO.sub.2 laminate. The barrier layer associated with the interfacial layer may be deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The barrier layer may be a SiO.sub.xN.sub.y film.

  15. Diagnosis and therapy for the disruptive physician.

    PubMed

    Kissoon, Niranjan; Lapenta, Susan; Armstrong, George

    2002-01-01

    A disruptive physician can alienate staff, drive away patients, and even land your organization in a lawsuit. Consider some practical advice on how to identify and deal with disruptive physicians. PMID:11806231

  16. Density limit disruptions in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleva, Robert G.; Drake, J. F.

    1991-02-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic simulations are presented which reproduce the rapid drop in the central temperature observed during density limit disruptions in tokamaks. The loss of central confinement is triggered by edge radiation which destabilizes a q=1 kink mode. A bubble of cold plasma is injected from the edge into the center by the q=1 kink. This bubble bears a striking resemblance to the cold plasma that is observed to move from the edge into the center during density limit disruptions on the JET tokamak [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1986 (IAEA, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 433], initiating the loss of central confinement. The bubble profile produced by the q=1 kink is unstable to a broad spectrum of modes which progressively reduce the magnetic shear between the q=2 surface and the center. The q=2 mode then grows across the center, broadening the current and throwing the hot plasma to the wall.

  17. Predictive methodology for supply disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, M.; D'Acierno, J.

    1982-04-01

    Energy supply disruptions do not suddenly arise in a full-blown fashion. Lags in the energy system provide a time horizon which allows for the prediction of a possible supply problem. A simple model is described which can be used to provide a set of indicators for the possible onset of an energy emergency. The methodology was tested on the gasoline shortage of 1979, and the results are presented.

  18. Biliary Mucosal Barrier and Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Verdier, Julien; Luedde, Tom; Sellge, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    Background The biliary system is in continuous contact with the complex microbiota of the intestine. Microbial products have recently been proposed as potential triggers for biliary diseases. Methods The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the current knowledge regarding the role of the biliary and intestinal microbiome in biliary inflammatory diseases. Results Previously, it was suggested that the healthy biliary system is a sterile organ, while acute cholangitis and cholecystitis may occur from ascending infections. Although non-inflammatory biliary colonization by certain bacteria such as Salmonella spp. has been already recognized since several decades, human and animal studies indicated only very recently that the gallbladder harbors a complex microbiota also under non-pathologic conditions. Novel findings suggested that – similar to the situation in the intestine – the biliary mucosa features a chemical, mechanical, and immunological barrier, ensuring immunological tolerance against commensals. However, microbial triggers might influence acute and chronic inflammatory disease of the biliary system and the whole liver. Conclusion Although yet undefined, dysbiosis of the biliary or intestinal microbiota rather than a single microorganism may influence disease progression. PMID:26468308

  19. Pharmacological disruption of maladaptive memory.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jane R; Torregrossa, Mary M

    2015-01-01

    Many psychiatric disorders are characterized by intrusive, distracting, and disturbing memories that either perpetuate the illness or hinder successful treatment. For example, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) involves such strong reemergence of memories associated with a traumatic event that the individual feels like the event is happening again. Furthermore, drug addiction is characterized by compulsive use and repeated relapse that is often driven by internal memories of drug use and/or by exposure to external stimuli that were associated with drug use. Therefore, identifying pharmacological methods to weaken the strength of maladaptive memories is a major goal of research efforts aimed at finding new treatments for these disorders. The primary mechanism by which memories could be pharmacologically disrupted or altered is through manipulation of memory reconsolidation. Reconsolidation occurs when an established memory is remembered or reactivated, reentering a labile state before again being consolidated into long-term memory storage. Memories are subject to disruption during this labile state. In this chapter we will discuss the preclinical and clinical studies identifying potential pharmacological methods for disrupting the integrity of maladaptive memory to treat mental illness. PMID:25977090

  20. Engineering analysis of TFTR disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G.; Rothe, K.E.; Bronner, G.

    1984-09-01

    This report covers an engineering approach quantifying the currents, forces, and times, as well as plasma position, for the worst-case disruption based on engineerign circuit assumptions for the plasma. As the plasma moves toward the wall during the current-decay phase of disruption, the wall currents affect the rate of movement and, hence, the decay time. The calculated structure-induced currents differ considerably from those calculated using a presently available criterion, which specifies that the plasma remains stationary in the center of the torus while decaying in 10 ms. This report outlines the method and basis for the engineering calculation used to determine the current and forces as a function of the circuit characteristics. It provides specific calculations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with variations in parameters such as the thermal decay time, the torus resistance, and plasma temperature during the current decay. The study reviews possible ways to reduce the disruption damage of TFTR by reducing the magnitude of the plasma external field energy that is absorbed by the plasma during the current decay.

  1. Bulk-barrier transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, H.; Mueller, R.; Beinvogl, W.

    1983-10-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented on a bulk-barrier transistor (BBT). In this device the charge-carrier transportation is determined by an energy barrier, which is located inside a semiconductor. The barrier is the result of a space-charge region in a three-layered n-p-n or p-n-p structure with a very thin middle layer. The height of the energy barrier, which is adjustable by technological parameters, can be controlled by an external voltage.

  2. Timescale and magnitude of plasma thermal energy loss before and during disruptions in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardo, V.; Loarte, A.; JET EFDA Contributors

    2005-11-01

    In this paper we analyse and discuss the thermal energy loss dynamics before and during JET disruptions that occurred between 2002 and 2004 in discharges which reached >4.5 MJ of thermal energy. We observe the slow thermal energy transients with diamagnetic loops and the fast ones with electron cyclotron emission and soft x-ray diagnostics. For most disruption types in JET, the plasma thermal energy at the time of the thermal quench is substantially less than that of the full performance plasma, typically in the range of 10-50% depending on plasma conditions and disruption type. The exceptions to this observation are disruptions in plasmas with a strong internal transport barrier (ITB) and in discharges terminating in a pure vertical displacement event, in which the plasma conserves a very high energy content up to the thermal quench. These disruption types are very sudden, leaving little scope for the combined action of soft plasma landing strategies and intrinsic performance degradation, both requiring >500 ms to be effective, to decrease the available thermal energy. The characteristic time for the loss of energy from the main plasma towards the PFCs in the thermal quench of JET disruptions is in the range 0.05-3.0 ms. The shortest timescales are typical of disruptions caused by excessive pressure peaking in ITB discharges. The available thermal energy fraction and thermal quench duration observed in JET can be processed (with due caution) into estimates for the projected PFC lifetime of the ITER target.

  3. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  4. Dealing with Disruptive Behavior of Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobmeier, Robert; Moran, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The adult education literature on disruptive behavior of adult learners was reviewed and a survey on disruptive behavior of adult learners was conducted with adult educators. The findings are synthesized in a conceptual framework for understanding the types and causes of disruptive behavior, which fall into the categories of inattention,…

  5. School Disruptions: Tips for Educators and Police.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Community Relations Service.

    This brochure briefly outlines a few basic steps for school and police officials to take in developing a joint approach to problems of school disruption. Section 1, "Preventing Disruptions," consists of three parts that focus in turn on conducting a needs assessment, develping joint preventive measures, and planning for a disruption. Section 2,…

  6. Skin barrier modification with organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Barba, Clara; Alonso, Cristina; Martí, Meritxell; Manich, Albert; Coderch, Luisa

    2016-08-01

    The primary barrier to body water loss and influx of exogenous substances resides in the stratum corneum (SC). The barrier function of the SC is provided by patterned lipid lamellae localized to the extracellular spaces between corneocytes. SC lipids are intimately involved in maintaining the barrier function. It is generally accepted that solvents induce cutaneous barrier disruption. The main aim of this work is the evaluation of the different capability of two solvent systems on inducing changes in the SC barrier function. SC lipid modifications will be evaluated by lipid analysis, water sorption/desorption experiments, confocal-Raman visualization and FSTEM images. The amount of SC lipids extracted by chloroform/methanol was significantly higher than those extracted by acetone. DSC results indicate that acetone extract has lower temperature phase transitions than chloroform/methanol extract. The evaluation of the kinetics of the moisture uptake and loss demonstrated that when SC is treated with chloroform/methanol the resultant sample reach equilibrium in shorter times indicating a deterioration of the SC tissue with higher permeability. Instead, acetone treatment led to a SC sample with a decreased permeability thus with an improved SC barrier function. Confocal-Raman and FSTEM images demonstrated the absence of the lipids on SC previously treated with chloroform/methanol. However, they were still present when the SC was treated with acetone. Results obtained with all the different techniques used were consistent. The results obtained increases the knowledge of the interaction lipid-solvent, being this useful for understanding the mechanism of reparation of damaged skin. PMID:27184268

  7. Thromboxane A2 exacerbates acute lung injury via promoting edema formation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Koji; Horikami, Daiki; Omori, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Yamazaki, Arisa; Maeda, Shingo; Murata, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is produced in the lungs of patients suffering from acute lung injury (ALI). We assessed its contribution in disease progression using three different ALI mouse models. The administration of hydrochloric acid (HCl) or oleic acid (OA)+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused tissue edema and neutrophil infiltration with TXA2 production in the lungs of the experimental mice. The administration of LPS induced only neutrophil accumulation without TXA2 production. Pretreatment with T prostanoid receptor (TP) antagonist attenuated the tissue edema but not neutrophil infiltration in these models. Intravital imaging and immunostaining demonstrated that administration of TP agonist caused vascular hyper-permeability by disrupting the endothelial barrier formation in the mouse ear. In vitro experiments showed that TP-stimulation disrupted the endothelial adherens junction, and it was inhibited by Ca(2+) channel blockade or Rho kinase inhibition. Thus endogenous TXA2 exacerbates ALI, and its blockade attenuates it by modulating the extent of lung edema. This can be explained by the endothelial hyper-permeability caused by the activation of TXA2-TP axis, via Ca(2+)- and Rho kinase-dependent signaling. PMID:27562142

  8. Thromboxane A2 exacerbates acute lung injury via promoting edema formation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koji; Horikami, Daiki; Omori, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Yamazaki, Arisa; Maeda, Shingo; Murata, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is produced in the lungs of patients suffering from acute lung injury (ALI). We assessed its contribution in disease progression using three different ALI mouse models. The administration of hydrochloric acid (HCl) or oleic acid (OA)+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused tissue edema and neutrophil infiltration with TXA2 production in the lungs of the experimental mice. The administration of LPS induced only neutrophil accumulation without TXA2 production. Pretreatment with T prostanoid receptor (TP) antagonist attenuated the tissue edema but not neutrophil infiltration in these models. Intravital imaging and immunostaining demonstrated that administration of TP agonist caused vascular hyper-permeability by disrupting the endothelial barrier formation in the mouse ear. In vitro experiments showed that TP-stimulation disrupted the endothelial adherens junction, and it was inhibited by Ca2+ channel blockade or Rho kinase inhibition. Thus endogenous TXA2 exacerbates ALI, and its blockade attenuates it by modulating the extent of lung edema. This can be explained by the endothelial hyper-permeability caused by the activation of TXA2-TP axis, via Ca2+- and Rho kinase-dependent signaling. PMID:27562142

  9. Netrin 1 regulates blood–brain barrier function and neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Podjaski, Cornelia; Alvarez, Jorge I.; Bourbonniere, Lyne; Larouche, Sandra; Terouz, Simone; Bin, Jenea M.; Lécuyer, Marc-André; Saint-Laurent, Olivia; Larochelle, Catherine; Darlington, Peter J.; Arbour, Nathalie; Antel, Jack P.; Kennedy, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Blood–brain barrier function is driven by the influence of astrocyte-secreted factors. During neuroinflammatory responses the blood–brain barrier is compromised resulting in central nervous system damage and exacerbated pathology. Here, we identified endothelial netrin 1 induction as a vascular response to astrocyte-derived sonic hedgehog that promotes autocrine barrier properties during homeostasis and increases with inflammation. Netrin 1 supports blood–brain barrier integrity by upregulating endothelial junctional protein expression, while netrin 1 knockout mice display disorganized tight junction protein expression and barrier breakdown. Upon inflammatory conditions, blood–brain barrier endothelial cells significantly upregulated netrin 1 levels in vitro and in situ, which prevented junctional breach and endothelial cell activation. Finally, netrin 1 treatment during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis significantly reduced blood–brain barrier disruption and decreased clinical and pathological indices of disease severity. Our results demonstrate that netrin 1 is an important regulator of blood–brain barrier maintenance that protects the central nervous system against inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. PMID:25903786

  10. Fish oil disrupts seabird feather microstructure and waterproofing.

    PubMed

    Morandin, Lora A; O'Hara, Patrick D

    2014-10-15

    Seabirds and other aquatic avifauna are highly sensitive to exposure to petroleum oils. A small amount of oil is sufficient to break down the feather barrier that is necessary to prevent water penetration and hypothermia. Far less attention has been paid to potential effects on aquatic birds of so called 'edible oils', non-petroleum oils such as vegetable and fish oils. In response to a sardine oil discharge by a vessel off the coast of British Columbia, we conducted an experiment to assess if feather exposure to sheens of sardine oil (ranging from 0.04 to 3 μm in thickness) resulted in measurable oil and water uptake and significant feather microstructure disruption. We designed the experiment based on a previous experiment on effects of petroleum oils on seabird feathers. Feathers exposed to the thinnest fish oil sheens (0.04 μm) resulted in measurable feather weight gain (from oil and water uptake) and significant feather microstructure disruption. Both feather weight gain and microstructure disruption increased with increasing fish oil thickness. Because of the absence of primary research on effects of edible oils on sea birds, we conducted interviews with wildlife rehabilitation professionals with experience rehabilitating sea birds after edible oil exposure. The consensus from interviews and our experiment indicated that physical contact with fish and other 'edible oils' in the marine environment is at least as harmful to seabirds as petroleum oils. PMID:25089687

  11. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  12. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  13. Assessing barriers to immunization.

    PubMed

    Niederhauser, Victoria; Ferris, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    Parental barriers to childhood immunizations vary among countries, states and communities. There is a plethora of studies that exist to examine barriers to immunizations including many intervention studies designed to improve immunization rates in children. Often, intervention studies designed to minimize barriers and increase immunization uptake among children lack the inclusion of a standardized instrument to measure accurately parental barriers to childhood immunizations before and after interventions. The Searching for Hardships and Obstacles To Shots (SHOTS) survey is a standardized survey instrument to measure parental barriers to childhood immunizations. In several studies, the SHOTS survey has demonstrated consistent reliability and has been validated in diverse populations. The inclusion of the SHOTS survey instrument in studies to examine barriers to childhood immunization will provide researchers and clinicians with a better understanding of parents' individualized barriers to immunizations. Furthermore, use of the SHOTS survey instrument to collect information about parental barriers to immunizations can lead to targeted interventions to minimize these obstacles at the individual and community level and to help us to achieve our national, state and community childhood immunization goals. PMID:26810618

  14. Penetration resistant barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, William R.; Mead, Keith E.; Street, Henry K.

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a barrier for resisting penetration by such as hand tools and oxy-acetylene cutting torches. The barrier comprises a layer of firebrick, which is preferably epoxy impregnated sandwiched between inner and outer layers of steel. Between the firebrick and steel are layers of resilient rubber-like filler.

  15. Liquid metal hydrogen barriers

    DOEpatents

    Grover, George M.; Frank, Thurman G.; Keddy, Edward S.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

  16. Effects of N-Cadherin Disruption on Spine Morphological Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mysore, Shreesh P.; Tai, Chin-Yin; Schuman, Erin M.

    2007-01-01

    Structural changes at synapses are thought to be a key mechanism for the encoding of memories in the brain. Recent studies have shown that changes in the dynamic behavior of dendritic spines accompany bidirectional changes in synaptic plasticity, and that the disruption of structural constraints at synapses may play a mechanistic role in spine plasticity. While the prolonged disruption of N-cadherin, a key synaptic adhesion molecule, has been shown to alter spine morphology, little is known about the short-term regulation of spine morphological dynamics by N-cadherin. With time-lapse, confocal imaging in cultured hippocampal neurons, we examined the progression of structural changes in spines following an acute treatment with AHAVD, a peptide known to interfere with the function of N-cadherin. We characterized fast and slow timescale spine dynamics (minutes and hours, respectively) in the same population of spines. We show that N-cadherin disruption leads to enhanced spine motility and reduced length, followed by spine loss. The structural effects are accompanied by a loss of functional connectivity. Further, we demonstrate that early structural changes induced by AHAVD treatment, namely enhanced motility and reduced length, are indicators for later spine fate, i.e., spines with the former changes are more likely to be subsequently lost. Our results thus reveal the short-term regulation of synaptic structure by N-cadherin and suggest that some forms of morphological dynamics may be potential readouts for subsequent, stimulus-induced rewiring in neuronal networks. PMID:18946519

  17. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  18. TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis during ischemic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    White, Laura E.; Santora, Rachel J.; Cui, Yan; Moore, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advancements in renal replacement therapy, the mortality rate for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unacceptably high, likely due to remote organ injury. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) activates cellular and soluble mediators that incite a distinct pulmonary proinflammatory and proapoptotic response. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) has been identified as a prominent death receptor activated in the lungs during ischemic AKI. We hypothesized that circulating TNF-α released from the postischemic kidney induces TNFR1-mediated pulmonary apoptosis, and we aimed to elucidate molecular pathways to programmed cell death. Using an established murine model of kidney IRI, we characterized the time course for increased circulatory and pulmonary TNF-α levels and measured concurrent upregulation of pulmonary TNFR1 expression. We then identified TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis after ischemic AKI using TNFR1−/− mice. Subsequent TNF-α signaling disruption with Etanercept implicated circulatory TNF-α as a key soluble mediator of pulmonary apoptosis and lung microvascular barrier dysfunction during ischemic AKI. We further elucidated pathways of TNFR1-mediated apoptosis with NF-κB (Complex I) and caspase-8 (Complex II) expression and discovered that TNFR1 proapoptotic signaling induces NF-κB activation. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB (Complex I) resulted in a proapoptotic phenotype, lung barrier leak, and altered cellular flice inhibitory protein signaling independent of caspase-8 (Complex II) activation. Ischemic AKI activates soluble TNF-α and induces TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis through augmentation of the prosurvival and proapoptotic TNFR1 signaling pathway. Kidney-lung crosstalk after ischemic AKI represents a complex pathological process, yet focusing on specific biological pathways may yield potential future therapeutic targets. PMID:22728466

  19. NOS-2 Inhibition in Phosgene-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Filipczak, Piotr T.; Senft, Albert P.; Seagrave, JeanClare; Weber, Waylon; Kuehl, Philip J.; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; McDonald, Jacob D.; Baron, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Phosgene exposure via an industrial or warfare release produces severe acute lung injury (ALI) with high mortality, characterized by massive pulmonary edema, disruption of epithelial tight junctions, surfactant dysfunction, and oxidative stress. There are no targeted treatments for phosgene-induced ALI. Previous studies demonstrated that nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS-2) is upregulated in the lungs after phosgene exposure; however, the role of NOS-2 in the pathogenesis of phosgene-induced ALI remains unknown. We previously demonstrated that NOS-2 expression in lung epithelium exacerbates inhaled endotoxin-induced ALI in mice, mediated partially through downregulation of surfactant protein B (SP-B) expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that a selective NOS-2 inhibitor delivered to the lung epithelium by inhalation would mitigate phosgene-induced ALI. Inhaled phosgene produced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein, histologic lung injury, and lung NOS-2 expression at 24 h. Administration of the selective NOS-2 inhibitor 1400 W via inhalation, but not via systemic delivery, significantly attenuated phosgene-induced ALI and preserved epithelial barrier integrity. Furthermore, aerosolized 1400 W augmented expression of SP-B and prevented downregulation of tight junction protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), both critical for maintenance of normal lung physiology and barrier integrity. We also demonstrate for the first time that NOS-2-derived nitric oxide downregulates the ZO-1 expression at the transcriptional level in human lung epithelial cells, providing a novel target for ameliorating vascular leak in ALI. Our data demonstrate that lung NOS-2 plays a critical role in the development of phosgene-induced ALI and suggest that aerosolized NOS-2 inhibitors offer a novel therapeutic strategy for its treatment. PMID:25870319

  20. Habitat loss through disruption of constrained dispersal networks.

    PubMed

    Eikaas, Hans S; McIntosh, Angus R

    2006-06-01

    Large losses of habitat could be caused by land use change that disrupts the dispersal networks used by migratory species. We assessed the relative losses of habitat for diadromous fish (i.e., those migrating between sea and freshwater) due to physical barriers, degradation of migratory passage associated with catchment land use, and site-scale land use characteristics on the West Coast, South Island, New Zealand. Fish occurrence, land use data, and river network models were analyzed in a GIS and subjected to a three-level hierarchical analysis. To identify accessible habitat not restricted by physical barriers, we used the migratory distance and maximum downstream slope encountered to identify accessible sites in least-impacted catchments and applied the results to all catchments within the study area. For two fish species, banded kokopu (Galaxias fasciatus) and koaro (G. brevipinnis), sites modeled as accessible using logistic regression in least-impacted catchments were then used to assess the impacts of catchment-scale deforestation and downstream land uses on habitat loss. Finally, sites not restricted by physical barriers or land-use-related impacts on migratory passage were used to model the effects of local land use. The models indicated that koaro and banded kokopu potentially had access to 28,000 km and 5300 km, respectively, of the 40,600 km of streams within the study area. Impacts due to intensive agricultural land use downstream in catchments affecting migratory passage were predicted to reduce the accessible habitats for koaro and banded kokopu by 55% and 70%, respectively. Local land use further reduced koaro and banded kokopu habitats to 70% and 90%, respectively, of total accessible habitat. Habitat lost through disruption of the dispersal network was disproportionately large because potentially useable habitat was rendered inaccessible. PMID:16826997

  1. Environmental disruption or environmental improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J.L.

    1981-03-01

    Paul Ehrich's concern for environmental disruption (Social Sci. Quarterly, 62, No. 1, 1981) are challenged here by Simon as unsubstantiated scare rhetoric. The refutation focuses on whether Ehrlich disregards history and oversimplifies the relationship between ecology and the social sciences. Simon notes that although historical data is shown to contradict Ehrlich's past predictions, his style of using soft data and identifying with the lay reader finds a receptive audience among those seeking understandable and value-free answers. 24 references, 6 figures, 3 tables. (DCK)

  2. Circadian Disruption in Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephanie G; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    Evidence suggests that abnormalities in circadian rhythms might prove causally or pathophysiologically significant in psychiatric illness. The circadian regulation of hormonal and behavioral timekeeping processes is often altered in patients with major depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, and a susceptibility to rhythm instability may contribute to the functional impairment. For some patients, interventions that stabilize or resynchronize circadian rhythms prove therapeutically effective. Circadian disruption in the clinical profiles of most psychiatric illnesses and the treatment efficacy of chronobiological interventions suggest that attention to circadian phenotypes in a range of psychiatric disorders may help to uncover shared pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:26568124

  3. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, Jacob I.

    2012-09-06

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  4. Nurses' perceptions of nurse residency: identifying barriers to implementation.

    PubMed

    Wierzbinski-Cross, Heather; Ward, Kristin; Baumann, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to describe the benefits and components of successful nurse residency programs, as well as gain insight into the perceptions of staff nurses, nurse educators, and nurse leaders regarding value, feasibility, and barriers to implementing nurse residency programs in acute care settings. This study has important implications for implementing an effective residency program. PMID:25608092

  5. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2009-01-01

    The complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) is designed to eliminate the major dark current sources in the superlattice infrared detector. The concept can also be applied to bulk semiconductor- based infrared detectors. CBIRD uses two different types of specially designed barriers: an electron barrier that blocks electrons but not holes, and a hole barrier that blocks holes but not electrons. The CBIRD structure consists of an n-contact, a hole barrier, an absorber, an electron barrier, and a p-contact. The barriers are placed at the contact-absorber junctions where, in a conventional p-i-n detector structure, there normally are depletion regions that produce generation-recombination (GR) dark currents due to Shockley-Read- Hall (SRH) processes. The wider-bandgap complementary barriers suppress G-R dark current. The barriers also block diffusion dark currents generated in the diffusion wings in the neutral regions. In addition, the wider gap barriers serve to reduce tunneling dark currents. In the case of a superlattice-based absorber, the superlattice itself can be designed to suppress dark currents due to Auger processes. At the same time, the barriers actually help to enhance the collection of photo-generated carriers by deflecting the photo-carriers that are diffusing in the wrong direction (i.e., away from collectors) and redirecting them toward the collecting contacts. The contact layers are made from materials with narrower bandgaps than the barriers. This allows good ohmic contacts to be made, resulting in lower contact resistances. Previously, THALES Research and Technology (France) demonstrated detectors with bulk InAsSb (specifically InAs0.91Sb0.09) absorber lattice-matched to GaSb substrates. The absorber is surrounded by two wider bandgap layers designed to minimize impedance to photocurrent flow. The wide bandgap materials also serve as contacts. The cutoff wavelength of the InAsSb absorber is fixed. CBIRD may be considered as a modified

  6. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  7. Sleep Deprivation-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown and Brain Dysfunction are Exacerbated by Size-Related Exposure to Ag and Cu Nanoparticles. Neuroprotective Effects of a 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonist Ondansetron.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aruna; Muresanu, Dafin F; Lafuente, José V; Patnaik, Ranjana; Tian, Z Ryan; Buzoianu, Anca D; Sharma, Hari S

    2015-10-01

    Military personnel are often subjected to sleep deprivation (SD) during combat operations. Since SD is a severe stress and alters neurochemical metabolism in the brain, a possibility exists that acute or long-term SD will influence blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and brain pathology. This hypothesis was examined in young adult rats (age 12 to 14 weeks) using an inverted flowerpot model. Rats were placed over an inverted flowerpot platform (6.5 cm diameter) in a water pool where the water levels are just 3 cm below the surface. In this model, animals can go to sleep for brief periods but cannot achieve deep sleep as they would fall into water and thus experience sleep interruption. These animals showed leakage of Evans blue in the cerebellum, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, parietal, temporal, occipital, cingulate cerebral cortices, and brain stem. The ventricular walls of the lateral and fourth ventricles were also stained blue, indicating disruption of the BBB and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). Breakdown of the BBB or the BCSFB fluid barrier was progressive in nature from 12 to 48 h but no apparent differences in BBB leakage were seen between 48 and 72 h of SD. Interestingly, rats treated with metal nanoparticles, e.g., Cu or Ag, showed profound exacerbation of BBB disruption by 1.5- to 4-fold, depending on the duration of SD. Measurement of plasma and brain serotonin showed a close correlation between BBB disruption and the amine level. Repeated treatment with the serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron (1 mg/kg, s.c.) 4 and 8 h after SD markedly reduced BBB disruption and brain pathology after 12 to 24 h SD but not following 48 or 72 h after SD. However, TiO2-nanowired ondansetron (1 mg/kg, s.c) in an identical manner induced neuroprotection in rats following 48 or 72 h SD. However, plasma and serotonin levels were not affected by ondansetron treatment. Taken together, our observations are the first to show that (i) SD could induce BBB

  8. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper. 2 tabs.

  9. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment, and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

  10. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

  11. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Barker, Stacey G.; Wowczuk, Andrew; Vellenoweth, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture spikes for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture spikes have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture spikes removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The plurality of barrier blocks hare hingedly interconnected by complementary hinges integrally formed into the side of each barrier block which allow the strip to be rolled for easy storage and retrieval, but which prevent irregular or back bending of the strip. The shafts of adjacent barrier blocks are pivotally interconnected via a double hinged universal joint to accommodate irregularities in a roadway surface and to transmit torsional motion of the shaft from block to block. A single flexshaft cable is connected to the shaft of an end block to allow a user to selectively cause the shafts of a plurality of adjacently connected barrier blocks to rotate the tire-puncture spikes to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire, and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. The flexshaft is provided with a resiliently biased retracting mechanism, and a release latch for allowing the spikes to be quickly retracted after the intended vehicle tire is punctured.

  12. Highway noise barrier perceived benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, D. N.; Osman, M. M.

    1980-05-01

    A laboratory experiment was performed in which 82 subjects judged the benefit of a noise barrier by listening to tape recordings of before-barrier and after-barrier traffic noise. These perceived benefit judgments were related by regression analysis to the barrier attenuation, the before-barrier traffic sound level, and a music background level, all of which were varied over the course of the experiment. Prediction equations were developed for barrier benefit in terms of these sound levels, their purpose being to provide a model for barrier benefit that can be used in barrier site selection and design. An unexpected finding was that barrier benefit was highest when before-barrier sound levels were lowest: i.e., subjects preferred a noise barrier that solved a moderate noise problem over an equally-attenuating barrier that only partially solved a more severe noise problem.

  13. Complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An infrared detector having a hole barrier region adjacent to one side of an absorber region, an electron barrier region adjacent to the other side of the absorber region, and a semiconductor adjacent to the electron barrier.

  14. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Lampi, Marsha C.; Faber, Courtney J.; Huynh, John; Bordeleau, Francois; Zanotelli, Matthew R.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening. PMID:26761203

  15. Transgenerational neuroendocrine disruption of reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Deena M.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is associated with dysfunctions of metabolism, energy balance, thyroid function and reproduction, and an increased risk of endocrine cancers. These multifactorial disorders can be ‘programmed’ through molecular epigenetic changes induced by exposure to EDCs early in life, the expression of which may not manifest until adulthood. In some cases, EDCs have detrimental effects on subsequent generations, which indicates that traits for disease predisposition may be passed to future generations by nongenomic inheritance. This Review discusses current understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms that underlie sexual differentiation of reproductive neuroendocrine systems in mammals and summarizes the literature on transgenerational epigenetic effects of representative EDCs: vinclozolin, diethylstilbesterol, bisphenol A and polychlorinated biphenyls. The article differentiates between context-dependent epigenetic transgenerational changes—namely, those that require environmental exposure, either via the EDC itself or through behavioral or physiological differences in parents—and germline-dependent epigenetic mechanisms. These processes, albeit discrete, are not mutually exclusive and can involve similar molecular mechanisms including DNA methylation and histone modifications and may predispose exposed individuals to transgenerational disruption of reproductive processes. New insights stress the crucial need to develop a clear understanding of how EDCs may program the epigenome of exposed individuals and their descendants. PMID:21263448

  16. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  17. Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In order to reduce heat transfer between a hot gas heat source and a metallic engine component, a thermal insulating layer of material is placed between them. This thermal barrier coating is applied by plasma spray processing the thin films. The coating has been successfully employed in aerospace applications for many years. Lewis Research Center, a leader in the development engine components coating technology, has assisted Caterpillar, Inc. in applying ceramic thermal barrier coatings on engines. Because these large engines use heavy fuels containing vanadium, engine valve life is sharply decreased. The barrier coating controls temperatures, extends valve life and reduces operating cost. Additional applications are currently under development.

  18. Statistical instability of barrier microdischarges operating in townsend regime

    SciTech Connect

    Nagorny, V. P.

    2007-01-15

    The dynamics of barrier microdischarges operating in a Townsend regime is studied analytically and via kinetic particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that statistical fluctuations of the number of charged particles in the discharge gap strongly influence the dynamics of natural oscillations of the discharge current and may even lead to a disruption of the discharge. Analysis of the statistical effects based on a simple model is suggested. The role of external sources in stabilizing microdischarges is clarified.

  19. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  20. Effects of blockade of NMDA receptors on cerebral oxygen consumption during hyperosmolar BBB disruption in rats.

    PubMed

    Chi, Oak Z; Barsoum, Sylviana; Grayson, Jeremy; Hunter, Christine; Liu, Xia; Weiss, Harvey R

    2013-03-15

    Hyperosmolar blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption has been reported to increase cerebral O2 consumption. This study was performed to test whether blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor would affect cerebral O2 consumption during hyperosmolar BBB disruption. A competitive NMDA receptor antagonist CGS-19755 10mg/kg was injected iv 15min before intracarotid infusion of 25% mannitol. Twelve min after BBB disruption, the BBB transfer coefficient (Ki) of (14)C-α-aminoisobutyric acid ((14)C-AIB) was measured. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional arteriolar and venular O2 saturation (SaO2 and SvO2 respectively), and O2 consumption were determined using (14)C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography and cryomicrospectrophotometry in alternate slices of the brain tissue. The Ki of (14)C-AIB was markedly increased with hyperosmolar mannitol in both the control (5.8×) and the CGS treated rats (5.2×). With BBB disruption, the O2 consumption was significantly increased (+39%) only in the control but not in the CGS treated rats and was significantly lower (-29%) in the CGS treated than the control rats. The distribution of SvO2 was significantly shifted to the higher concentrations with CGS treatment. Our data demonstrated an increase of O2 consumption by hyperosmolar BBB disruption and attenuation of the increase with NMDA blockade without affecting the degree of BBB disruption. PMID:23357315

  1. Information barriers and authentication.

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, D. W.; Wolford, J. K.

    2001-01-01

    Acceptance of nuclear materials into a monitoring regime is complicated if the materials are in classified shapes or have classified composition. An attribute measurement system with an information barrier can be emplo,yed to generate an unclassified display from classified measurements. This information barrier must meet two criteria: (1) classified information cannot be released to the monitoring party, and (2) the monitoring party must be convinced that the unclassified output accurately represents the classified input. Criterion 1 is critical to the host country to protect the classified information. Criterion 2 is critical to the monitoring party and is often termed the 'authentication problem.' Thus, the necessity for authentication of a measurement system with an information barrier stems directly from the description of a useful information barrier. Authentication issues must be continually addressed during the entire development lifecycle of the measurement system as opposed to being applied only after the system is built.

  2. Barrier Island Hazard Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilkey, Orrin H.; Neal, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Describes efforts to evaluate and map the susceptibility of barrier islands to damage from storms, erosion, rising sea levels and other natural phenomena. Presented are criteria for assessing the safety and hazard potential of island developments. (WB)

  3. Optimistic barrier synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    Barrier synchronization is fundamental operation in parallel computation. In many contexts, at the point a processor enters a barrier it knows that it has already processed all the work required of it prior to synchronization. The alternative case, when a processor cannot enter a barrier with the assurance that it has already performed all the necessary pre-synchronization computation, is treated. The problem arises when the number of pre-sychronization messages to be received by a processor is unkown, for example, in a parallel discrete simulation or any other computation that is largely driven by an unpredictable exchange of messages. We describe an optimistic O(log sup 2 P) barrier algorithm for such problems, study its performance on a large-scale parallel system, and consider extensions to general associative reductions as well as associative parallel prefix computations.

  4. β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase gene therapy upregulates tight junctions to rescue lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Barravecchia, M; Kothari, P; Young, J L; Dean, D A

    2016-06-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are associated with diverse disorders and characterized by disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leakage of edema fluid into the lung, and substantial inflammation leading to acute respiratory failure. Gene therapy is a potentially powerful approach to treat ALI/ARDS through repair of alveolar epithelial function. Herein, we show that delivery of a plasmid expressing β1-subunit of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase) alone or in combination with epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) α1-subunit using electroporation not only protected from subsequent lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated lung injury, but also treated injured lungs. However, transfer of α1-subunit of ENaC (α1-ENaC) alone only provided protection benefit rather than treatment benefit although alveolar fluid clearance had been remarkably enhanced. Gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, but not α1-ENaC, not only enhanced expression of tight junction protein zona occludins-1 (ZO-1) and occludin both in cultured cells and in mouse lungs, but also reduced pre-existing increase of lung permeability in vivo. These results demonstrate that gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase upregulates tight junction formation and therefore treats lungs with existing injury, whereas delivery of α1-ENaC only maintains pre-existing tight junction but not for generation. This indicates that the restoration of epithelial/endothelial barrier function may provide better treatment of ALI/ARDS. PMID:26910760

  5. Current Concepts in Neuroendocrine Disruption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  6. Neuro-Immune Interactions at Barrier Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique; Mucida, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Multidirectional interactions between the nervous and immune systems have been documented in homeostasis and pathologies ranging from multiple sclerosis to autism, and from leukemia to acute and chronic inflammation. Recent studies have addressed this crosstalk using cell-specific targeting, novel sequencing, imaging, and analytical tools, shedding light on unappreciated mechanisms of neuro-immune regulation. This Review focuses on neuro-immune interactions at barrier surfaces-mostly the gut, but also including the skin and the airways, areas densely populated by neurons and immune cells that constantly sense and adapt to tissue-specific environmental challenges. PMID:27153494

  7. The blood-brain barrier and methamphetamine: open sesame?

    PubMed Central

    Turowski, Patric; Kenny, Bridget-Ann

    2015-01-01

    The chemical and electrical microenvironment of neurons within the central nervous system is protected and segregated from the circulation by the vascular blood–brain barrier. This barrier operates on the level of endothelial cells and includes regulatory crosstalk with neighboring pericytes, astrocytes, and neurons. Within this neurovascular unit, the endothelial cells form a formidable, highly regulated barrier through the presence of inter-endothelial tight junctions, the absence of fenestrations, and the almost complete absence of fluid-phase transcytosis. The potent psychostimulant drug methamphetamine transiently opens the vascular blood–brain barrier through either or both the modulation of inter-endothelial junctions and the induction of fluid-phase transcytosis. Direct action of methamphetamine on the vascular endothelium induces acute opening of the blood-brain barrier. In addition, striatal effects of methamphetamine and resultant neuroinflammatory signaling can indirectly lead to chronic dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier. Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier may exacerbate the neuronal damage that occurs during methamphetamine abuse. However, this process also constitutes a rare example of agonist-induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and the adjunctive use of methamphetamine may present an opportunity to enhance