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Sample records for acute barrier disruption

  1. MALT1 Protease Activation Triggers Acute Disruption of Endothelial Barrier Integrity via CYLD Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Klei, Linda R; Hu, Dong; Panek, Robert; Alfano, Danielle N; Bridwell, Rachel E; Bailey, Kelly M; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine I; Concel, Vincent J; Hess, Emily M; Van Beek, Matthew; Delekta, Phillip C; Gu, Shufang; Watkins, Simon C; Ting, Adrian T; Gough, Peter J; Foley, Kevin P; Bertin, John; McAllister-Lucas, Linda M; Lucas, Peter C

    2016-09-27

    Microvascular endothelial cells maintain a tight barrier to prevent passage of plasma and circulating immune cells into the extravascular tissue compartment, yet endothelial cells respond rapidly to vasoactive substances, including thrombin, allowing transient paracellular permeability. This response is a cornerstone of acute inflammation, but the mechanisms responsible are still incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that thrombin triggers MALT1 to proteolytically cleave cylindromatosis (CYLD). Fragmentation of CYLD results in microtubule disruption and a cascade of events leading to endothelial cell retraction and an acute permeability response. This finding reveals an unexpected role for the MALT1 protease, which previously has been viewed mostly as a driver of pro-inflammatory NF-κB signaling in lymphocytes. Thus, MALT1 not only promotes immune cell activation but also acutely regulates endothelial cell biology, actions that together facilitate tissue inflammation. Pharmacologic inhibition of MALT1 may therefore have synergistic impact by targeting multiple disparate steps in the overall inflammatory response.

  2. Characterization of the canine skin barrier restoration following acute disruption by tape stripping.

    PubMed

    Vidémont, Emilie; Mariani, Claire; Vidal, Stéphanie; Pin, Didier

    2012-04-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) forms the main part of the permeability barrier of the skin. In mice and in humans, cutaneous barrier disruption can be generated by removing the SC with tape stripping (TS) and the skin barrier function can be assessed by measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL). The aim of the present study was to characterize the skin barrier restoration in the dog following mechanical disruption and to analyse the correlation between the skin barrier recovery and TEWL measurement. Thirty sequential TS were performed on 12 sites on four healthy beagle dogs. The number of TS was chosen to ensure a sufficient barrier disruption with a slow recovery. Skin repair was assessed for 72 h by clinical and histological examinations, and TEWL measurements. The results showed that performing 30 TS was adequate to disrupt the skin barrier in the dog. The homeostatic repair response, initiated in the skin, was rapid and characterized by complete restoration of the SC within 72 h, accompanied by greater basal cell proliferation, and dermal eosinophilic inflammation. TEWL was significantly increased by complete removal of the SC but recovered along with restoration of the SC (Scheffe test, P ≤ 0.05). Characterization of a canine model of barrier disruption and restoration and assessment of the skin barrier function by TEWL measurements could help better understand the events implied in skin barrier function. Development of this canine model is also necessary for future studies on the effects of treatments aimed at restoring the skin barrier.

  3. Reevaluation of the non-lesional dry skin in atopic dermatitis by acute barrier disruption: an abnormal permeability barrier homeostasis with defective processing to generate ceramide.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Ayumi; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Atsuko; Imokawa, Genji

    2014-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is characterized by disruption of the cutaneous barrier due to reduced ceramide levels even in non-lesional dry skin. Following further acute barrier disruption by repeated tape strippings, we re-characterized the non-lesional dry skin of subjects with atopic dermatitis, which shows significantly reduced levels of barrier function and ceramide but not of beta-glucocerebrosidase activity. For the first time, we report an abnormal trans-epidermal water loss homeostasis in which delayed recovery kinetics of trans-epidermal water loss occurred on the first day during the 4 days after acute barrier disruption compared with healthy control skin. Interestingly, whereas the higher ceramide level in the stratum corneum of healthy control skin was further significantly up-regulated at 4 days post-tape stripping, the lower ceramide level in the stratum corneum of subjects with atopic dermatitis was not significantly changed. In a parallel study, whereas beta-glucocerebrosidase activity at 4 days post-tape stripping was significantly up-regulated in healthy control skin compared with before tape stripping, the level of that activity remained substantially unchanged in atopic dermatitis. These findings indicate that subjects with atopic dermatitis have a defect in sphingolipid-metabolic processing that generates ceramide in the interface between the stratum corneum and the epidermis. The results also support the notion that the continued disruption of barrier function in atopic dermatitis non-lesional skin is associated with the impaired homeostasis of a ceramide-generating process, which underscores an atopy-specific inflammation-triggered ceramide deficiency that is distinct from other types of dermatitis.

  4. Acute transverse myelitis as a rare manifestation of Campylobacter diarrhoea with concomitant disruption of the blood brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Gozzard, Paul; Orr, David; Sanderson, Frances; Sandberg, Michael; Kennedy, Angus

    2012-02-01

    We describe a case of acute transverse myelitis following Campylobacter diarrhoea in an adult. The patient presented with diplegia due to a longitudinal spinal cord lesion. The CSF demonstrated an aseptic meningitis. Oligoclonal bands and C. jejuni-specific IgG were detected in serum and cerebrospinal fluid at the beginning of the neurological illness. The patient was treated with antimicrobial therapy and steroids. A near full recovery was made and there were no relapses. C. jejuni is strongly implicated in the aetiology of acute motor axonal neuropathy and Miller Fisher syndrome through molecular mimicry of neuronal gangliosides. These gangliosides are expressed throughout the nervous system yet C. jejuni related central nervous system disease is exceedingly rare. We conclude that disruption of the blood-brain barrier was the key event in the pathogenesis of immune mediated post-infectious myelitis in our patient.

  5. 7.0-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characterization of Acute Blood-Brain-Barrier Disruption Achieved with Intracranial Irreversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Robertson, John L.; Olson, John D.; Johnson, Annette J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) presents a significant obstacle to the delivery of systemically administered chemotherapeutics for the treatment of brain cancer. Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging technology that uses pulsed electric fields for the non-thermal ablation of tumors. We hypothesized that there is a minimal electric field at which BBB disruption occurs surrounding an IRE-induced zone of ablation and that this transient response can be measured using gadolinium (Gd) uptake as a surrogate marker for BBB disruption. The study was performed in a Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) compliant facility and had Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) approval. IRE ablations were performed in vivo in normal rat brain (n = 21) with 1-mm electrodes (0.45 mm diameter) separated by an edge-to-edge distance of 4 mm. We used an ECM830 pulse generator to deliver ninety 50-μs pulse treatments (0, 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 V/cm) at 1 Hz. The effects of applied electric fields and timing of Gd administration (−5, +5, +15, and +30 min) was assessed by systematically characterizing IRE-induced regions of cell death and BBB disruption with 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathologic evaluations. Statistical analysis on the effect of applied electric field and Gd timing was conducted via Fit of Least Squares with α = 0.05 and linear regression analysis. The focal nature of IRE treatment was confirmed with 3D MRI reconstructions with linear correlations between volume of ablation and electric field. Our results also demonstrated that IRE is an ablation technique that kills brain tissue in a focal manner depicted by MRI (n = 16) and transiently disrupts the BBB adjacent to the ablated area in a voltage-dependent manner as seen with Evan's Blue (n = 5) and Gd administration. PMID:23226293

  6. Not just the brain: methamphetamine disrupts blood-spinal cord barrier and induces acute glial activation and structural damage of spinal cord cells.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Sharma, Hari S

    2015-01-01

    Acute methamphetamine (METH) intoxication induces metabolic brain activation as well as multiple physiological and behavioral responses that could result in life-threatening health complications. Previously, we showed that METH (9 mg/kg) used in freely moving rats induces robust leakage of blood-brain barrier, acute glial activation, vasogenic edema, and structural abnormalities of brain cells. These changes were tightly correlated with drug-induced brain hyperthermia and were greatly potentiated when METH was used at warm ambient temperatures (29°C), inducing more robust and prolonged hyperthermia. Extending this line of research, here we show that METH also strongly increases the permeability of the blood-spinal cord barrier as evidenced by entry of Evans blue and albumin immunoreactivity in T9-12 segments of the spinal cord. Similar to the blood-brain barrier, leakage of bloodspinal cord barrier was associated with acute glial activation, alterations of ionic homeostasis, water tissue accumulation (edema), and structural abnormalities of spinal cord cells. Similar to that in the brain, all neurochemical alterations correlated tightly with drug-induced elevations in brain temperature and they were enhanced when the drug was used at 29°C and brain hyperthermia reached pathological levels (>40°C). We discuss common features and differences in neural responses between the brain and spinal cord, two inseparable parts of the central nervous system affected by METH exposure.

  7. Effects of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and matrix metalloproteinase-9 on alveolar-capillary barrier disruption and lung edema in rat models of severe acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Qi, Bing; Chen, Hai-Long; Shang, Dong; Dong, Ying; Zhang, Gui-Xin; Yu, Lei

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) on alveolar-capillary barrier disruption and lung edema in rat models of severe acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury (PALI). A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sham surgery group (n=10) and three PALI groups, in which acute pancreatitis was induced by the retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg). The PALI groups were as follows: i) Untreated PALI group (n=10); ii) 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) group (5 mg/kg body mass; n=10); and iii) 2ME2 group (15 mg/kg body mass; n=10). In the two 2ME2 groups, the HIF-1α inhibitor 2ME2 was administered intraperitoneally 1 h after the induction of AP. The severity of the pancreatitis was evaluated by the serum amylase levels and pathology. The severity of the lung injury was evaluated by the wet/dry ratio, blood gas analysis and pathology. The alveolar-capillary barrier disruption was assessed by Evans blue dye extravasation. The protein and mRNA expression levels of HIF-1α and MMP-9 were studied using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The active tumor necrosis factor-α levels were measured using an ELISA. The HIF-1α inhibitor 2ME2 attenuated the severity of the pancreatitis and PALI, while the lung edema and alveolar-capillary barrier disruption were significantly ameliorated compared with those in the untreated PALI group. Administration of the higher dose of 2ME2 significantly suppressed the protein expression of MMP-9 in the lung tissues. The results indicate that HIF-1α has a major function in alveolar-capillary barrier disruption and lung edema in PALI via a molecular pathway cascade involving MMP-9. Inhibition of HIF-1α by 2ME2 attenuates alveolar-capillary barrier disruption and lung edema. Pharmacological blockade of this pathway in patients with PALI

  8. Lipid rafts are disrupted in mildly inflamed intestinal microenvironments without overt disruption of the epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Bowie, Rachel V; Donatello, Simona; Lyes, Clíona; Owens, Mark B; Babina, Irina S; Hudson, Lance; Walsh, Shaun V; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid P; Amu, Sylvie; Barry, Sean P; Fallon, Padraic G; Hopkins, Ann M

    2012-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial barrier disruption is a feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but whether barrier disruption precedes or merely accompanies inflammation remains controversial. Tight junction (TJ) adhesion complexes control epithelial barrier integrity. Since some TJ proteins reside in cholesterol-enriched regions of the cell membrane termed lipid rafts, we sought to elucidate the relationship between rafts and intestinal epithelial barrier function. Lipid rafts were isolated from Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells primed with the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or treated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin as a positive control for raft disruption. Rafts were also isolated from the ilea of mice in which colitis had been induced in conjunction with in vivo intestinal permeability measurements, and lastly from intestinal biopsies of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with predominantly mild or quiescent disease. Raft distribution was analyzed by measuring activity of the raft-associated enzyme alkaline phosphatase and by performing Western blot analysis for flotillin-1. Epithelial barrier integrity was estimated by measuring transepithelial resistance in cytokine-treated cells or in vivo permeability to fluorescent dextran in colitic mice. Raft and nonraft fractions were analyzed by Western blotting for the TJ proteins occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Our results revealed that lipid rafts were disrupted in IFN-γ-treated cells, in the ilea of mice with subclinical colitis, and in UC patients with quiescent inflammation. This was not associated with a clear pattern of occludin or ZO-1 relocalization from raft to nonraft fractions. Significantly, a time-course study in colitic mice revealed that disruption of lipid rafts preceded the onset of increased intestinal permeability. Our data suggest for the first time that lipid raft disruption occurs early in the inflammatory cascade in murine and human colitis and, we speculate, may contribute to

  9. Sensing of Barrier Tissue Disruption with an Organic Electrochemical Transistor

    PubMed Central

    Tria, Scherrine A.; Ramuz, Marc; Jimison, Leslie H.; Hama, Adel; Owens, Roisin M.

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is an example of barrier tissue that provides a physical barrier against entry of pathogens and toxins, while allowing the passage of necessary ions and molecules. A breach in this barrier can be caused by a reduction in the extracellular calcium concentration. This reduction in calcium concentration causes a conformational change in proteins involved in the sealing of the barrier, leading to an increase of the paracellular flux. To mimic this effect the calcium chelator ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid (EGTA) was used on a monolayer of cells known to be representative of the gastrointestinal tract. Different methods to detect the disruption of the barrier tissue already exist, such as immunofluorescence and permeability assays. However, these methods are time-consuming and costly and not suited to dynamic or high-throughput measurements. Electronic methods for measuring barrier tissue integrity also exist for measurement of the transepithelial resistance (TER), however these are often costly and complex. The development of rapid, cheap, and sensitive methods is urgently needed as the integrity of barrier tissue is a key parameter in drug discovery and pathogen/toxin diagnostics. The organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) integrated with barrier tissue forming cells has been shown as a new device capable of dynamically monitoring barrier tissue integrity. The device is able to measure minute variations in ionic flux with unprecedented temporal resolution and sensitivity, in real time, as an indicator of barrier tissue integrity. This new method is based on a simple device that can be compatible with high throughput screening applications and fabricated at low cost. PMID:24561449

  10. Development, maintenance and disruption of the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Obermeier, Birgit; Daneman, Richard; Ransohoff, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The interface between the blood circulation and the neural tissue features unique characteristics which are embraced by the term ‘blood-brain barrier’ (BBB). The main functions of this barrier, namely maintenance of brain homeostasis, regulation of influx and efflux transport, and protection from harm, are determined by its specialized multicellular structure. Every constituent cell type makes an indispensible contribution to the BBB’s integrity. But, if one member of the BBB fails and as a result, the barrier breaks down, there can be dramatic consequences, and neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration can occur. In this Review we highlight recently gained mechanistic insights into the development and maintenance of the BBB. We then discuss how BBB disruption can cause or contribute to neurological disease. Finally, we examine how this knowledge can be used to explore new possibilities for BBB repair. PMID:24309662

  11. Connexin 43 reboots meiosis and reseals blood-testis barrier following toxicant-mediated aspermatogenesis and barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Mruk, Dolores D; Mok, Ka-Wai; Li, Michelle W M; Wong, Chris K C; Lee, Will M; Han, Daishu; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-04-01

    Earlier studies have shown that rats treated with an acute dose of 1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)-1H-indazole-3-carbohydrazide (adjudin, a male contraceptive under development) causes permanent infertility due to irreversible blood-testis barrier (BTB) disruption even though the population of undifferentiated spermatogonia remains similar to normal rat testes, because spermatogonia fail to differentiate into spermatocytes to enter meiosis. Since other studies have illustrated the significance of connexin 43 (Cx43)-based gap junction in maintaining the homeostasis of BTB in the rat testis and the phenotypes of Sertoli cell-conditional Cx43 knockout mice share many of the similarities of the adjudin-treated rats, we sought to examine if overexpression of Cx43 in these adjudin-treated rats would reseal the disrupted BTB and reinitiate spermatogenesis. A full-length Cx43 cloned into mammalian expression vector pCI-neo was used to transfect testes of adjudin-treated ratsversusempty vector. It was found that overexpression of Cx43 indeed resealed the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier based on a functionalin vivoassay in tubules displaying signs of meiosis as noted by the presence of round spermatids. Thus, these findings suggest that overexpression of Cx43 reinitiated spermatogenesis at least through the steps of meiosis to generate round spermatids in testes of rats treated with an acute dose of adjudin that led to aspermatogenesis. It was also noted that the round spermatids underwent eventual degeneration with the formation of multinucleated cells following Cx43 overexpression due to the failure of spermiogenesis because no elongating/elongated spermatids were detected in any of the tubules examined. The mechanism by which overexpression of Cx43 reboots meiosis and rescues BTB function was also examined. In summary, overexpression of Cx43 in the testis with aspermatogenesis reboots meiosis and reseals toxicant-induced BTB disruption, even though it fails to

  12. TNF-induced endothelial barrier disruption: beyond actin and Rho.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Ramiro, B; García-Weber, D; Millán, J

    2014-12-01

    The decrease of endothelial barrier function is central to the long-term inflammatory response. A pathological alteration of the ability of endothelial cells to modulate the passage of cells and solutes across the vessel underlies the development of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis and multiple sclerosis. The inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) mediates changes in the barrier properties of the endothelium. TNF activates different Rho GTPases, increases filamentous actin and remodels endothelial cell morphology. However, inhibition of actin-mediated remodelling is insufficient to prevent endothelial barrier disruption in response to TNF, suggesting that additional molecular mechanisms are involved. Here we discuss, first, the pivotal role of Rac-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to regulate the integrity of endothelial cell-cell junctions and, second, the ability of endothelial adhesion receptors such as ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and PECAM-1, involved in leukocyte transendothelial migration, to control endothelial permeability to small molecules, often through ROS generation. These adhesion receptors regulate endothelial barrier function in ways both dependent on and independent of their engagement by immune cells, and orchestrate the crosstalk between leukocyte transendothelial migration and endothelial permeability during inflammation.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier disruption and lung edema: critical role for bicarbonate stimulation of AC10

    PubMed Central

    Nickols, Jordan; Obiako, Boniface; Ramila, K. C.; Putinta, Kevin; Schilling, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria-induced sepsis is a common cause of pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction and can progress toward acute respiratory distress syndrome. Elevations in intracellular cAMP tightly regulate pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity; however, cAMP signals are highly compartmentalized: whether cAMP is barrier-protective or -disruptive depends on the compartment (plasma membrane or cytosol, respectively) in which the signal is generated. The mammalian soluble adenylyl cyclase isoform 10 (AC10) is uniquely stimulated by bicarbonate and is expressed in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). Elevated extracellular bicarbonate increases cAMP in PMVECs to disrupt the endothelial barrier and increase the filtration coefficient (Kf) in the isolated lung. We tested the hypothesis that sepsis-induced endothelial barrier disruption and increased permeability are dependent on extracellular bicarbonate and activation of AC10. Our findings reveal that LPS-induced endothelial barrier disruption is dependent on extracellular bicarbonate: LPS-induced barrier failure and increased permeability are exacerbated in elevated bicarbonate compared with low extracellular bicarbonate. The AC10 inhibitor KH7 attenuated the bicarbonate-dependent LPS-induced barrier disruption. In the isolated lung, LPS failed to increase Kf in the presence of minimal perfusate bicarbonate. An increase in perfusate bicarbonate to the physiological range (24 mM) revealed the LPS-induced increase in Kf, which was attenuated by KH7. Furthermore, in PMVECs treated with LPS for 6 h, there was a dose-dependent increase in AC10 expression. Thus these findings reveal that LPS-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier failure requires bicarbonate activation of AC10. PMID:26475732

  14. Effect of "rose essential oil" inhalation on stress-induced skin-barrier disruption in rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Mika; Kano, Eri; Miyoshi, Michio; Komaki, Ryoichi; Watanabe, Tatsuo

    2012-05-01

    In stressed animals, several brain regions (e.g., hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus [PVN]) exhibit neuronal activation, which increases plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and glucocorticoids. We previously reported that so-called "green odor" inhibits stress-induced activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPA axis) and thereby prevents the chronic stress-induced disruption of the skin barrier. Here, we investigated whether rose essential oil, another sedative odorant, inhibits the stress-induced 1) increases in PVN neuronal activity in rats and plasma glucocorticoids (corticosterone [CORT] in rats and cortisol in humans) and 2) skin-barrier disruption in rats and humans. The results showed that in rats subjected to acute restraint stress, rose essential oil inhalation significantly inhibited the increase in plasma CORT and reduced the increases in the number of c-Fos-positive cells in PVN. Inhalation of rose essential oil significantly inhibited the following effects of chronic stress: 1) the elevation of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), an index of the disruption of skin-barrier function, in both rats and humans and 2) the increase in the salivary concentration of cortisol in humans. These results suggest that in rats and humans, chronic stress-induced disruption of the skin barrier can be limited or prevented by rose essential oil inhalation, possibly through its inhibitory effect on the HPA axis.

  15. Lipocalin 2 and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in White Matter after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Egashira, Yusuke; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F; Iwama, Toru; Xi, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    We reported previously that subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) causes acute white matter injury in mice. In this study, we investigated lipocalin 2 (LCN2) mediated blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in white matter, which may lead to subsequent injury. SAH was induced by endovascular perforation in wild-type (WT) and LCN2-knockout (LCN2(-/-)) mice. Sham mice underwent the same procedure without perforation. Mice underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 24 h after SAH to confirm the development of T2-hyperintensity in white matter. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to elucidate the mechanisms of LCN2-mediated white matter injury and BBB disruption. It was confirmed that LCN2 expression was significantly increased in white matter of WT mice after SAH by Western blotting (versus sham; p < 0.05). Immunohistochemistry showed that LCN2 receptor 24p3R was expressed in oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, endothelial cells, and pericytes in the white matter. In WT mice with SAH, albumin leakage along the white matter was prominently observed and was consistent with T2-hyperintensity on MRI. As with our previous report, LCN2(-/-) mice scarcely developed T2-hyperintensity on MRI or albumin leakage in white matter. Our results suggest that BBB leakage occurs in white matter after SAH and that LCN2 contributes to SAH-induced BBB disruption.

  16. The cross-talk between autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    He, Zili; Zou, Shuang; Wang, Qingqing; Li, Jiawei; Zheng, Zengming; Chen, Jian; Wu, Fenzan; Gong, Fanhua; Zhang, Hongyu; Xu, Huazi; Xiao, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury induces the disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier and triggers a complex array of tissue responses, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. However, the roles of ER stress and autophagy in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption have not been discussed in acute spinal cord trauma. In the present study, we respectively detected the roles of ER stress and autophagy in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after spinal cord injury. Besides, we also detected the cross-talking between autophagy and ER stress both in vivo and in vitro. ER stress inhibitor, 4-phenylbutyric acid, and autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine, were respectively or combinedly administrated in the model of acute spinal cord injury rats. At day 1 after spinal cord injury, blood-spinal cord barrier was disrupted and activation of ER stress and autophagy were involved in the rat model of trauma. Inhibition of ER stress by treating with 4-phenylbutyric acid decreased blood-spinal cord barrier permeability, prevented the loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins and reduced autophagy activation after spinal cord injury. On the contrary, inhibition of autophagy by treating with chloroquine exacerbated blood-spinal cord barrier permeability, promoted the loss of TJ proteins and enhanced ER stress after spinal cord injury. When 4-phenylbutyric acid and chloroquine were combinedly administrated in spinal cord injury rats, chloroquine abolished the blood-spinal cord barrier protective effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid by exacerbating ER stress after spinal cord injury, indicating that the cross-talking between autophagy and ER stress may play a central role on blood-spinal cord barrier integrity in acute spinal cord injury. The present study illustrates that ER stress induced by spinal cord injury plays a detrimental role on blood-spinal cord barrier integrity, on the contrary, autophagy induced by spinal cord injury plays a furthersome role in blood-spinal cord barrier integrity in

  17. The cross-talk between autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yulong; Wu, Yanqing; Liu, Yanlong; He, Zili; Zou, Shuang; Wang, Qingqing; Li, Jiawei; Zheng, Zengming; Chen, Jian; Wu, Fenzan; Gong, Fanhua; Zhang, Hongyu; Xu, Huazi; Xiao, Jian

    2017-01-03

    Spinal cord injury induces the disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier and triggers a complex array of tissue responses, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. However, the roles of ER stress and autophagy in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption have not been discussed in acute spinal cord trauma. In the present study, we respectively detected the roles of ER stress and autophagy in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after spinal cord injury. Besides, we also detected the cross-talking between autophagy and ER stress both in vivo and in vitro. ER stress inhibitor, 4-phenylbutyric acid, and autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine, were respectively or combinedly administrated in the model of acute spinal cord injury rats. At day 1 after spinal cord injury, blood-spinal cord barrier was disrupted and activation of ER stress and autophagy were involved in the rat model of trauma. Inhibition of ER stress by treating with 4-phenylbutyric acid decreased blood-spinal cord barrier permeability, prevented the loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins and reduced autophagy activation after spinal cord injury. On the contrary, inhibition of autophagy by treating with chloroquine exacerbated blood-spinal cord barrier permeability, promoted the loss of TJ proteins and enhanced ER stress after spinal cord injury. When 4-phenylbutyric acid and chloroquine were combinedly administrated in spinal cord injury rats, chloroquine abolished the blood-spinal cord barrier protective effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid by exacerbating ER stress after spinal cord injury, indicating that the cross-talking between autophagy and ER stress may play a central role on blood-spinal cord barrier integrity in acute spinal cord injury. The present study illustrates that ER stress induced by spinal cord injury plays a detrimental role on blood-spinal cord barrier integrity, on the contrary, autophagy induced by spinal cord injury plays a furthersome role in blood-spinal cord barrier integrity in

  18. Rhinovirus Disrupts the Barrier Function of Polarized Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sajjan, Umadevi; Wang, Qiong; Zhao, Ying; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Secondary bacterial infection following rhinovirus (RV) infection has been recognized in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Objectives: We sought to understand mechanisms by which RV infection facilitates secondary bacterial infection. Methods: Primary human airway epithelial cells grown at air–liquid interface and human bronchial epithelial (16HBE14o-) cells grown as polarized monolayers were infected apically with RV. Transmigration of bacteria (nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and others) was assessed by colony counting and transmission electron microscopy. Transepithelial resistance (RT) was measured by using a voltmeter. The distribution of zona occludins (ZO)-1 was determined by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Measurements and Main Results: Epithelial cells infected with RV showed 2-log more bound bacteria than sham-infected cultures, and bacteria were recovered from the basolateral media of RV- but not sham-infected cells. Infection of polarized airway epithelial cell cultures with RV for 24 hours caused a significant decrease in RT without causing cell death or apoptosis. Ultraviolet-treated RV did not decrease RT, suggesting a requirement for viral replication. Reduced RT was associated with increased paracellular permeability, as determined by flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin. Neutralizing antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IFN-γ and IL-1β reversed corresponding cytokine-induced reductions in RT but not that induced by RV, indicating that the RV effect is independent of these proinflammatory cytokines. Confocal microscopy and immunoblotting revealed the loss of ZO-1 from tight junction complexes in RV-infected cells. Intranasal inoculation of mice with RV1B also caused the loss of ZO-1 from the bronchial epithelium tight junctions in vivo. Conclusions: RV facilitates binding, translocation, and persistence of bacteria by disrupting airway epithelial barrier function. PMID:18787220

  19. Novel Peptide for Attenuation of Hyperoxia-induced Disruption of Lung Endothelial Barrier and Pulmonary Edema via Modulating Peroxynitrite Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Kondrikov, Dmitry; Gross, Christine; Black, Stephen M.; Su, Yunchao

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary damages of oxygen toxicity include vascular leakage and pulmonary edema. We have previously reported that hyperoxia increases the formation of NO and peroxynitrite in lung endothelial cells via increased interaction of endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS) with β-actin. A peptide (P326TAT) with amino acid sequence corresponding to the actin binding region of eNOS residues 326–333 has been shown to reduce the hyperoxia-induced formation of NO and peroxynitrite in lung endothelial cells. In the present study, we found that exposure of pulmonary artery endothelial cells to hyperoxia (95% oxygen and 5% CO2) for 48 h resulted in disruption of monolayer barrier integrity in two phases, and apoptosis occurred in the second phase. NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester attenuated the endothelial barrier disruption in both phases. Peroxynitrite scavenger uric acid did not affect the first phase but ameliorated the second phase of endothelial barrier disruption and apoptosis. P326TAT inhibited hyperoxia-induced disruption of monolayer barrier integrity in two phases and apoptosis in the second phase. More importantly, injection of P326TAT attenuated vascular leakage, pulmonary edema, and endothelial apoptosis in the lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia. P326TAT also significantly reduced the increase in eNOS-β-actin association and protein tyrosine nitration. Together, these results indicate that peptide P326TAT ameliorates barrier dysfunction of hyperoxic lung endothelial monolayer and attenuates eNOS-β-actin association, peroxynitrite formation, endothelial apoptosis, and pulmonary edema in lungs of hyperoxic mice. P326TAT can be a novel therapeutic agent to treat or prevent acute lung injury in oxygen toxicity. PMID:25315770

  20. Myosin di-phosphorylation and peripheral actin bundle formation as initial events during endothelial barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Mayumi; Hirano, Katsuya

    2016-02-11

    The phosphorylation of the 20-kD myosin light chain (MLC) and actin filament formation play a key role in endothelial barrier disruption. MLC is either mono- or di-phosphorylated (pMLC and ppMLC) at T18 or S19. The present study investigated whether there are any distinct roles of pMLC and ppMLC in barrier disruption induced by thrombin. Thrombin induced a modest bi-phasic increase in pMLC and a robust mono-phasic increase in ppMLC. pMLC localized in the perinuclear cytoplasm during the initial phase, while ppMLC localized in the cell periphery, where actin bundles were formed. Later, the actin bundles were rearranged into stress fibers, where pMLC co-localized. Rho-kinase inhibitors inhibited thrombin-induced barrier disruption and peripheral localization of ppMLC and actin bundles. The double, but not single, mutation of phosphorylation sites abolished the formation of peripheral actin bundles and the barrier disruption, indicating that mono-phosphorylation of MLC at either T18 or S19 is functionally sufficient for barrier disruption. Namely, the peripheral localization, but not the degree of phosphorylation, is suggested to be essential for the functional effect of ppMLC. These results suggest that MLC phosphorylation and actin bundle formation in cell periphery are initial events during barrier disruption.

  1. Neurosurgical Techniques for Disruption of the Blood–Brain Barrier for Glioblastoma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Analiz; Tatter, Stephen B.; Debinski, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier remains a main hurdle to drug delivery to the brain. The prognosis of glioblastoma remains grim despite current multimodal medical management. We review neurosurgical technologies that disrupt the blood–brain barrier (BBB). We will review superselective intra-arterial mannitol infusion, focused ultrasound, laser interstitial thermotherapy, and non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE). These technologies can lead to transient BBB and blood–brain tumor barrier disruption and allow for the potential of more effective local drug delivery. Animal studies and preliminary clinical trials show promise for achieving this goal. PMID:26247958

  2. Accountable Care Units: A Disruptive Innovation in Acute Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Castle, Bryan W; Shapiro, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Accountable Care Units are a disruptive innovation that has moved care on acute care units from a traditional silo model, in which each discipline works separately from all others, to one in which multiple disciplines work together with patients and their families to move patients safely through their hospital stay. This article describes the "what," "how," and "why" of the Accountable Care Units model as it has evolved in different locations across a single health system and includes the lessons learned as different units and hospitals continue working to implement the model in their complex care environments.

  3. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Induced by Chronic Sleep Loss: Low-Grade Inflammation May Be the Link

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Moctezuma, J.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a vital phenomenon related to immunomodulation at the central and peripheral level. Sleep deficient in duration and/or quality is a common problem in the modern society and is considered a risk factor to develop neurodegenerative diseases. Sleep loss in rodents induces blood-brain barrier disruption and the underlying mechanism is still unknown. Several reports indicate that sleep loss induces a systemic low-grade inflammation characterized by the release of several molecules, such as cytokines, chemokines, and acute-phase proteins; all of them may promote changes in cellular components of the blood-brain barrier, particularly on brain endothelial cells. In the present review we discuss the role of inflammatory mediators that increase during sleep loss and their association with general disturbances in peripheral endothelium and epithelium and how those inflammatory mediators may alter the blood-brain barrier. Finally, this manuscript proposes a hypothetical mechanism by which sleep loss may induce blood-brain barrier disruption, emphasizing the regulatory effect of inflammatory molecules on tight junction proteins. PMID:27738642

  4. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Induced by Chronic Sleep Loss: Low-Grade Inflammation May Be the Link.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Alvarado, G; Domínguez-Salazar, E; Pavon, L; Velázquez-Moctezuma, J; Gómez-González, B

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a vital phenomenon related to immunomodulation at the central and peripheral level. Sleep deficient in duration and/or quality is a common problem in the modern society and is considered a risk factor to develop neurodegenerative diseases. Sleep loss in rodents induces blood-brain barrier disruption and the underlying mechanism is still unknown. Several reports indicate that sleep loss induces a systemic low-grade inflammation characterized by the release of several molecules, such as cytokines, chemokines, and acute-phase proteins; all of them may promote changes in cellular components of the blood-brain barrier, particularly on brain endothelial cells. In the present review we discuss the role of inflammatory mediators that increase during sleep loss and their association with general disturbances in peripheral endothelium and epithelium and how those inflammatory mediators may alter the blood-brain barrier. Finally, this manuscript proposes a hypothetical mechanism by which sleep loss may induce blood-brain barrier disruption, emphasizing the regulatory effect of inflammatory molecules on tight junction proteins.

  5. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis disrupts intestinal barrier integrity through hematopoietic TLR-2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Camille; Meinzer, Ulrich; Montcuquet, Nicolas; Thachil, Elodie; Château, Danielle; Thiébaut, Raphaële; Roy, Maryline; Alnabhani, Ziad; Berrebi, Dominique; Dussaillant, Monique; Pedruzzi, Eric; Thenet, Sophie; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Barreau, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal barrier function requires intricate cooperation between intestinal epithelial cells and immune cells. Enteropathogens are able to invade the intestinal lymphoid tissue known as Peyer’s patches (PPs) and disrupt the integrity of the intestinal barrier. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of this process are poorly understood. In mice infected with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, we found that PP barrier dysfunction is dependent on the Yersinia virulence plasmid and the expression of TLR-2 by hematopoietic cells, but not by intestinal epithelial cells. Upon TLR-2 stimulation, Y. pseudotuberculosis–infected monocytes activated caspase-1 and produced IL-1β. In turn, IL-1β increased NF-κB and myosin light chain kinase activation in intestinal epithelial cells, thus disrupting the intestinal barrier by opening the tight junctions. Therefore, Y. pseudotuberculosis subverts intestinal barrier function by altering the interplay between immune and epithelial cells during infection. PMID:22565313

  6. Disruption of barrier function in dermatophytosis and pityriasis versicolor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Weon Ju; Kim, Jun Young; Song, Chang Hyun; Jung, Hong Dae; Lee, Su Hyun; Lee, Seok-Jong; Kim, Do Won

    2011-11-01

    Dermatophytes have the ability to form molecular attachments to keratin and use it as a source of nutrients, colonizing keratinized tissues, including the stratum corneum of the skin. Malassezia species also affect the stratum corneum of the skin. Therefore, dermatophytosis and pityriasis versicolor of the skin are thought to be important factors of profound changes in skin barrier structure and function. We aimed to describe the changes in transepidermal water loss (TEWL), stratum corneum hydration, and skin pH in the lesions of the dermatophytosis and pityriasis versicolor. Thirty-six patients with dermatophytosis (14 with tinea cruris, 13 with tinea corporis and nine with tinea pedis or tinea manus) and 11 patients with pityriasis versicolor were included in this study. TEWL, stratum corneum conductance and skin pH were determined by biophysical methods to examine whether our patients exhibited changes in barrier function. Dermatophytosis and pityriasis versicolor except tinea pedis and tinea manus showed highly significant increase in TEWL compared with adjacent infection-free skin. Hydration was significantly reduced in lesional skin compared with adjacent infection-free skin. From this study, infections with dermatophytes and Malassezia species on the body can alter biophysical properties of the skin, especially the function of stratum corneum as a barrier to water loss. On the contrary, infections with dermatophytes on the palms and soles little affect the barrier function of the skin.

  7. Dasatinib-loaded albumin nanoparticles possess diminished endothelial cell barrier disruption and retain potent anti-leukemia cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Shetty, Sreerama; Fu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Dasatinib (DAS), a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is highly effective in treating chronic myeloid leukemia and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, its clinical use is limited due to serious adverse effects. DAS can disrupt endothelial barrier integrity and increase endothelial permeability which may cause peripheral edema and pleural effusion. Albumin nanoparticles (NPs) as a drug carrier may serve as a useful tool for cell-selective drug delivery to reduce DAS-induced endothelial hyperpermeability and maintain endothelial barrier integrity. In this study, we reported that DAS-loaded NPs exhibited potent anti-leukemia efficacy as DAS alone. Importantly, albumin NPs as a drug carrier markedly reduced DAS-induced endothelial hyperpermeability by restraining the inhibition of Lyn kinase signaling pathway in endothelial cells. Therefore, albumin NPs could be a potential tool to improve anti-leukemia efficacy of DAS through its cell-selective effects. PMID:27391073

  8. Retention of indocyanine green as a potential marker for optical detection of blood brain barrier disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergin, A.; Joshi, S.; Wang, M.; Bigio, I. J.

    2011-03-01

    Preliminary studies have shown that there is great variability in the degree of disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBBD) after the intraarterial injection of mannitol in rabbit models. The disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) is affected by a number of factors, and the variations could have a profound impact on regional delivery of chemotherapeutics. Optically measured brain tissue concentrations of indocyanine green (ICG) and Evan's blue (EB) enable the quantification of BBBD after intraarterial administration of mannitol. Using the optical pharmacokinetics technique, a variation of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, we are able to track in vivo brain tissue concentrations of ICG and EB in rabbits, before and after barrier disruption. This study shows the feasibility of optical monitoring of BBBD, a method that can help improve intraarterial delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs.

  9. Assessment of blood–brain barrier disruption using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Heye, Anna K.; Culling, Ross D.; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Thrippleton, Michael J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the importance of blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption in aging, dementia, stroke and multiple sclerosis in addition to more commonly-studied pathologies such as tumors. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is a method for studying BBB disruption in vivo. We review pathologies studied, scanning protocols and data analysis procedures to determine the range of available methods and their suitability to different pathologies. We systematically review the existing literature up to February 2014, seeking studies that assessed BBB integrity using T1-weighted DCE-MRI techniques in animals and humans in normal or abnormal brain tissues. The literature search provided 70 studies that were eligible for inclusion, involving 417 animals and 1564 human subjects in total. The pathologies most studied are intracranial neoplasms and acute ischemic strokes. There are large variations in the type of DCE-MRI sequence, the imaging protocols and the contrast agents used. Moreover, studies use a variety of different methods for data analysis, mainly based on model-free measurements and on the Patlak and Tofts models. Consequently, estimated KTrans values varied widely. In conclusion, DCE-MRI is shown to provide valuable information in a large variety of applications, ranging from common applications, such as grading of primary brain tumors, to more recent applications, such as assessment of subtle BBB dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. Further research is required in order to establish consensus-based recommendations for data acquisition and analysis and, hence, improve inter-study comparability and promote wider use of DCE-MRI. PMID:25379439

  10. NK Cells Promote Th-17 Mediated Corneal Barrier Disruption in Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Volpe, Eugene A.; Gandhi, Niral B.; Schaumburg, Chris S.; Siemasko, Karyn F.; Pangelinan, Solherny B.; Kelly, Scott D.; Hayday, Adrian C.; Li, De-Quan; Stern, Michael E.; Niederkorn, Jerry Y.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; De Paiva, Cintia S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The conjunctiva contains a specialized population of lymphocytes that reside in the epithelium, named intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). Methodology/Principal Findings Here we characterized the IEL population prior to and after experimental desiccating stress (DS) for 5 or 10 days (DS5, DS10) and evaluated the effect of NK depletion on DS. The frequency of IELs in normal murine conjunctiva was CD3+CD103+ (∼22%), CD3+γδ+ (∼9.6%), CD3+NK+ (2%), CD3−NK+ (∼4.4%), CD3+CD8α (∼0.9%), and CD4 (∼0.6%). Systemic depletion of NK cells prior and during DS led to a decrease in the frequency of total and activated DCs, a decrease in T helper-17+ cells in the cervical lymph nodes and generation of less pathogenic CD4+T cells. B6.nude recipient mice of adoptively transferred CD4+T cells isolated from NK-depleted DS5 donor mice showed significantly less corneal barrier disruption, lower levels of IL-17A, CCL20 and MMP-3 in the cornea epithelia compared to recipients of control CD4+T cells. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results show that the NK IELs are involved in the acute immune response to desiccation-induced dry eye by activating DC, which in turn coordinate generation of the pathogenic Th-17 response. PMID:22590618

  11. Loss of ceramide synthase 3 causes lethal skin barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Jennemann, Richard; Rabionet, Mariona; Gorgas, Karin; Epstein, Sharon; Dalpke, Alexander; Rothermel, Ulrike; Bayerle, Aline; van der Hoeven, Franciscus; Imgrund, Silke; Kirsch, Joachim; Nickel, Walter; Willecke, Klaus; Riezman, Howard; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Sandhoff, Roger

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum as the outermost epidermal layer protects against exsiccation and infection. Both the underlying cornified envelope (CE) and the intercellular lipid matrix contribute essentially to these two main protective barriers. Epidermis-unique ceramides with ultra-long-chain acyl moities (ULC-Cers) are key components of extracellular lipid lamellae (ELL) and are bound to CE proteins, thereby contributing to the cornified lipid envelope (CLE). Here, we identified human and mouse ceramide synthase 3 (CerS3), among CerS1-6, to be exclusively required for the ULC-Cer synthesis in vitro and of mouse CerS3 in vivo. Deficiency of CerS3 in mice results in complete loss of ULC-Cers (≥C26), lack of continuous ELL and a non-functional CLE. Consequently, newborn mutant mice die shortly after birth from transepidermal water loss. Mutant skin is prone to Candida albicans infection highlighting ULC-Cers to be pivotal for both barrier functions. Persistent periderm, hyperkeratosis and deficient cornification are hallmarks of mutant skin demonstrating loss of Cers to trigger a keratinocyte maturation arrest at an embryonic pre-barrier stage.

  12. Propitious Therapeutic Modulators to Prevent Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Disruption in Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hemant; Ropper, Alexander E; Lee, Soo-Hong; Han, Inbo

    2016-05-18

    The blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) is a specialized protective barrier that regulates the movement of molecules between blood vessels and the spinal cord parenchyma. Analogous to the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the BSCB plays a crucial role in maintaining the homeostasis and internal environmental stability of the central nervous system (CNS). After spinal cord injury (SCI), BSCB disruption leads to inflammatory cell invasion such as neutrophils and macrophages, contributing to permanent neurological disability. In this review, we focus on the major proteins mediating the BSCB disruption or BSCB repair after SCI. This review is composed of three parts. Section 1. SCI and the BSCB of the review describes critical events involved in the pathophysiology of SCI and their correlation with BSCB integrity/disruption. Section 2. Major proteins involved in BSCB disruption in SCI focuses on the actions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), angiopoietins (Angs), bradykinin, nitric oxide (NO), and endothelins (ETs) in BSCB disruption and repair. Section 3. Therapeutic approaches discusses the major therapeutic compounds utilized to date for the prevention of BSCB disruption in animal model of SCI through modulation of several proteins.

  13. Histamine Induces Vascular Hyperpermeability by Increasing Blood Flow and Endothelial Barrier Disruption In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ashina, Kohei; Tsubosaka, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Omori, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Koji; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Murata, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a mediator of allergic inflammation released mainly from mast cells. Although histamine strongly increases vascular permeability, its precise mechanism under in vivo situation remains unknown. We here attempted to reveal how histamine induces vascular hyperpermeability focusing on the key regulators of vascular permeability, blood flow and endothelial barrier. Degranulation of mast cells by antigen-stimulation or histamine treatment induced vascular hyperpermeability and tissue swelling in mouse ears. These were abolished by histamine H1 receptor antagonism. Intravital imaging showed that histamine dilated vasculature, increased blood flow, while it induced hyperpermeability in venula. Whole-mount staining showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier formation of venula indicated by changes in vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) localization at endothelial cell junction. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis (NOS) by L-NAME or vasoconstriction by phenylephrine strongly inhibited the histamine-induced blood flow increase and hyperpermeability without changing the VE-cadherin localization. In vitro, measurements of trans-endothelial electrical resistance of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) or Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), NOS attenuated the histamine-induced barrier disruption. These observations suggested that histamine increases vascular permeability mainly by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vascular dilation and subsequent blood flow increase and maybe partially by PKC/ROCK/NO-dependent endothelial barrier disruption.

  14. Disruption of in vitro endothelial barrier integrity by Japanese encephalitis virus-Infected astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Li, Jian-Ri; Chen, Wen-Ying; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Lai, Ching-Yi; Hu, Yu-Hui; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chang, Chen-Jung; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2015-05-08

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) characteristics are induced and maintained by crosstalk between brain microvascular endothelial cells and neighboring cells. Using in vitro cell models, we previously found that a bystander effect was a cause for Japanese encephalitis-associated endothelial barrier disruption. Brain astrocytes, which neighbor BBB endothelial cells, play roles in the maintenance of BBB integrity. By extending the scope of relevant studies, a potential mechanism has been shown that the activation of neighboring astrocytes could be a cause of disruption of endothelial barrier integrity during the course of Japanese encephalitis viral (JEV) infection. JEV-infected astrocytes were found to release biologically active molecules that activated ubiquitin proteasome, degraded zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-5, and disrupted endothelial barrier integrity in cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells. JEV infection caused astrocytes to release vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2/MMP-9). Our data demonstrated that VEGF and IL-6 released by JEV-infected astrocytes were critical for the proteasomal degradation of ZO-1 and the accompanying disruption of endothelial barrier integrity through the activation of Janus kinase-2 (Jak2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) signaling as well as the induction of ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component, n-recognin-1 (Ubr 1) in endothelial cells. MMP-induced endothelial barrier disruption was accompanied by MMP-mediated proteolytic degradation of claudin-5 and ubiquitin proteasome-mediated degradation of ZO-1 via extracellular VEGF release. Collectively, these data suggest that JEV infection could activate astrocytes and cause release of VEGF, IL-6, and MMP-2/MMP-9, thereby contributing, in a concerted action, to the induction of Japanese encephalitis-associated BBB breakdown. GLIA 2015.

  15. The effects of barrier disruption and moisturization on the dynamic drying mechanics of human stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; German, G K

    2015-09-01

    We study the dynamic drying mechanics of human stratum corneum, the most superficial layer of skin and essential physical and chemical barrier to the external environment. Barrier disruption caused by a depletion of lipids ordinarily found in healthy stratum corneum can occur with ageing, aggressive cleansing or with dry skin disorders and diseases such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. We establish the effects of severe barrier disruption on the dynamic drying mechanics of human stratum corneum by measuring variations in thickness and spatially resolved in-plane displacements in healthy and lipid depleted tissue samples drying in controlled environmental conditions. In-plane displacements recorded at regular intervals during drying are azimuthally averaged and fitted with a profile based on a linear elastic model. The measured thickness of the tissue sample is accounted for in each model fit. Dynamic variations in the drying stress and elastic modulus of the tissue are then established from the model fits. We find that barrier disruption causes dramatic reductions in drying timescales, increases in the elastic modulus of the tissue and larger drying stresses. We expect these changes to increase the propensity for cracking and chapping in skin. The maximum elastic modulus and drying stress of barrier disrupted stratum corneum (ESC=85.4±6.8 MPa, PSC=10.9±0.9 MPa) is reduced to levels comparable with stratum corneum containing lipids (ESC=26.1±3.2 MPa, PSC=2.58±0.45 MPa) after treatment with a 5% aqueous solution of glycerol. Neither 2% nor 5% glycerol solutions slow the accelerated drying timescales in barrier disrupted stratum corneum.

  16. Prevention of Barrier Disruption by Heme Oxygenase-1 in Intestinal Bleeding Model.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Reiko; Akagi, Masaaki; Hatori, Yuta; Inouye, Sachiye

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of free heme, the local level of which was increased by bleeding, on the intestinal barrier function, using human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2). Our results show that the addition of hemin to the culture medium markedly disrupted the barrier function, which was significantly improved by glutamine supplementation. Although hemin treatment caused the increased expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, the inhibition of HO activity resulted in the aggravation of hemin-induced barrier dysfunction. Up-regulation of HO-1 by pretreatment with a low concentration of hemin almost completely prevented hemin-induced barrier dysfunction. Taken together, these observations indicate that an abnormally high level of intracellular free heme causes barrier dysfunction, probably through the modulation of proteins forming tight junctions.

  17. Breakdown of Blood-Brain and Blood-Spinal Cord Barriers During Acute Methamphetamine Intoxication: Role of Brain Temperature.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Sharma, Hari S

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a powerful and often-abused stimulant with potent addictive and neurotoxic properties. While it is generally believed that structural brain damage induced by METH results from oxidative stress, in this work we present data suggesting robust disruption of blood-brain and blood-spinal cord barriers during acute METH intoxication in rats. We demonstrate the relationships between METH-induced brain hyperthermia and widespread but structure-specific barrier leakage, acute glial cell activation, changes in brain water and ionic homeostasis, and structural damage of different types of cells in the brain and spinal cord. Therefore, METH-induced leakage of the blood-brain and blood-spinal cord barriers is a significant contributor to different types of functional and structural brain abnormalities that determine acute toxicity of this drug and possibly neurotoxicity during its chronic use.

  18. Use of Ultrasound Pulses Combined with Definity for Targeted Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a method to combine an ultrasound contrast agent (USCA) with low-intensity focused ultrasound pulses combined to produce temporary blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD), a potential non-invasive means for targeted drug delivery in the brain. All of our previous work used the USCA Optison. The purpose of this work was to test the feasibility of using the USCA Definity for BBBD. Thirty-six non-overlapping locations were sonicated through a craniotomy in experiments in the brains of nine rabbits (4 locations per rabbit; US frequency: 0.69MHz, burst: 10ms, PRF: 1Hz, duration: 20s; pressure amplitude: 0.2-1.5 MPa). Eleven locations were sonicated using Optison at 0.5 MPa. For both agents, the probability for BBBD was estimated to be 50% at 0.4 MPa using probit regression. In histology, small isolated areas of extravasated erythrocytes were observed in some locations. At 0.8 MPa and above, this extravasation was sometimes accompanied by tiny (dimensions of 100 μm or less) regions of damaged brain parenchyma. The magnitude of the BBBD was larger with Optison than with Definity at 0.5 MPa (P=0.04), and more areas with extravasated erythrocytes were observed (P=0.03). We conclude that BBBD is possible using Definity for the dosage of USCA and the acoustic parameters tested in this study. While the probability for BBBD as a function of pressure amplitude and the type of acute tissue effects was similar to findings with Optison, under these experimental conditions, Optison produced a larger effect.

  19. Fibronectin changes in eosinophilic meningitis with blood-CSF barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Shyu, Ling-Yuh; Hu, Ming-E; Chou, Chun-Hui; Chen, Ke-Min; Chiu, Ping-Sung; Lai, Shih-Chan

    2015-01-01

    Fibronectin, which is present at relatively low levels in healthy central nervous systems (CNS), shows increased levels in meningitis. In this study, fibronectin processing was correlated with the increased permeability of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier as well as with the formation of eosinophil infiltrates in angiostrongyliasis meningitis. The immunohistochemistry results show matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is localized in the choroid plexus epithelium. Coimmunoprecipitation demonstrated fibronectin strongly binds MMP-9. Furthermore, treatment with the MMP-9 inhibitor GM6001 significantly inhibited fibronectin processing, reduced the blood-CSF barrier permeability, and decreased the eosinophil counts. The decreased fibronectin processing in CSF implies decreased cellular invasion of the subarachnoid space across the blood-CSF barrier. Therefore, increased fibronectin processing may be associated with barrier disruption and participate in the extravasation and migration of eosinophils into the CNS during experimental parasitic infection.

  20. Clathrin inhibitor Pitstop-2 disrupts the nuclear pore complex permeability barrier

    PubMed Central

    Liashkovich, Ivan; Pasrednik, Dzmitry; Prystopiuk, Valeria; Rosso, Gonzalo; Oberleithner, Hans; Shahin, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Existence of a selective nucleocytoplasmic permeability barrier is attributed to Phenylalanine-Glycine rich proteins (FG-nups) within the central channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Limited understanding of the FG-nup structural arrangement hinders development of strategies directed at disrupting the NPC permeability barrier. In this report we explore an alternative approach to enhancing the NPC permeability for exogenous macromolecules. We demonstrate that the recently discovered inhibitor of clathrin coat assembly Pitstop-2 compromises the NPC permeability barrier in a rapid and effective manner. Treatment with Pitstop-2 causes a collapse of the NPC permeability barrier and a reduction of Importin β binding accompanied by alteration of the NPC ultrastructure. Interestingly, the effects are induced by the same chemical agent that is capable of inhibiting clathrin-mediated endocytosis. To our knowledge, this is the first functional indication of the previously postulated evolutionary relation between clathrin and NPC scaffold proteins. PMID:25944393

  1. Selective HDAC6 inhibition prevents TNF-α-induced lung endothelial cell barrier disruption and endotoxin-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinyan; Ma, Zhongsen; Shetty, Sreerama; Ma, Mengshi; Fu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Lung endothelial damage contributes to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. New strategies against lung endothelial barrier dysfunction may provide therapeutic benefits against lung vascular injury. Cell-cell junctions and microtubule cytoskeleton are basic components in maintaining endothelial barrier integrity. HDAC6, a deacetylase primarily localized in the cytoplasm, has been reported to modulate nonnuclear protein function through deacetylation. Both α-tubulin and β-catenin are substrates for HDAC6. Here, we examined the effects of tubastatin A, a highly selective HDAC6 inhibitor, on TNF-α induced lung endothelial cell barrier disruption and endotoxin-induced pulmonary edema. Selective HDAC6 inhibition by tubastatin A blocked TNF-α-induced lung endothelial cell hyperpermeability, which was associated with increased α-tubulin acetylation and microtubule stability. Tubastatin A pretreatment inhibited TNF-α-induced endothelial cell contraction and actin stress fiber formation with reduced myosin light chain phosphorylation. Selective HDAC6 inhibition by tubastatin A also induced β-catenin acetylation in human lung endothelial cells, which was associated with increased membrane localization of β-catenin and stabilization of adherens junctions. HDAC6 knockdown by small interfering RNA also prevented TNF-α-induced barrier dysfunction and increased α-tubulin and β-catenin acetylation in endothelial cells. Furthermore, in a mouse model of endotoxemia, tubastatin A was able to prevent endotoxin-induced deacetylation of α-tubulin and β-catenin in lung tissues, which was associated with reduced pulmonary edema. Collectively, our data indicate that selective HDAC6 inhibition by tubastatin A is a potent approach against lung endothelial barrier dysfunction.

  2. Effects of 2,4-dinitrophenol on ischemia-induced blood-brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Ennis, S R; Keep, R F

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the effect of 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a mitochondrial uncoupling agent, during focal brain ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption was assessed after 2 hours of occlusion with 2 hours of reperfusion or 4 hours of permanent occlusion by measurement of the influx rate constant (K(i)) for 3H-inulin in the MCA territory ipsi- and contralateral to the occlusion. Three experimental groups were examined: vehicle and 1 and 5 mg/kg DNP treated animals (given 30 minutes prior to occlusion). Four hours of permanent MCA occlusion only induced a modest increase in the K(i) for inulin in vehicle-treated animals (0.09 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.07 +/- 0.01 microL/g/min in contralateral tissue). Although 5 mg/kg DNP significantly increased this disruption (p < 0.01), this effect was relatively minor (0.14 +/- 0.02 microL/g/min). In contrast, DNP treatment in transient ischemia markedly increased barrier disruption. The ipsilateral K(i) for 3H-inulin were 0.15 +/- 0.04, 0.37 +/- 0.06, and 0.79 +/- 0.17 microL/g/min in vehicle, 1 mg/kg DNP and 5 mg/kg DNP groups, respectively. DNP did not induce barrier disruption in the contralateral hemisphere. Thus, while there is evidence that DNP can be neuroprotective, it has adverse effects on the BBB during ischemia, particularly with reperfusion. Considering the importance of naturally- or therapeutically-induced reperfusion in limiting brain damage, this may limit the utility of DNP and mitochondrial uncouplers as therapeutic agents.

  3. Controlled ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption using passive acoustic emissions monitoring.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Costas D; Livingstone, Margaret S; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The ability of ultrasonically-induced oscillations of circulating microbubbles to permeabilize vascular barriers such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) holds great promise for noninvasive targeted drug delivery. A major issue has been a lack of control over the procedure to ensure both safe and effective treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of passively-recorded acoustic emissions as a means to achieve this control. An acoustic emissions monitoring system was constructed and integrated into a clinical transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system. Recordings were analyzed using a spectroscopic method that isolates the acoustic emissions caused by the microbubbles during sonication. This analysis characterized and quantified harmonic oscillations that occur when the BBB is disrupted, and broadband emissions that occur when tissue damage occurs. After validating the system's performance in pilot studies that explored a wide range of exposure levels, the measurements were used to control the ultrasound exposure level during transcranial sonications at 104 volumes over 22 weekly sessions in four macaques. We found that increasing the exposure level until a large harmonic emissions signal was observed was an effective means to ensure BBB disruption without broadband emissions. We had a success rate of 96% in inducing BBB disruption as measured by in contrast-enhanced MRI, and we detected broadband emissions in less than 0.2% of the applied bursts. The magnitude of the harmonic emissions signals was significantly (P<0.001) larger for sonications where BBB disruption was detected, and it correlated with BBB permeabilization as indicated by the magnitude of the MRI signal enhancement after MRI contrast administration (R(2) = 0.78). Overall, the results indicate that harmonic emissions can be a used to control focused ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. These results are promising for clinical translation of this technology.

  4. Controlled Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Using Passive Acoustic Emissions Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The ability of ultrasonically-induced oscillations of circulating microbubbles to permeabilize vascular barriers such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) holds great promise for noninvasive targeted drug delivery. A major issue has been a lack of control over the procedure to ensure both safe and effective treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of passively-recorded acoustic emissions as a means to achieve this control. An acoustic emissions monitoring system was constructed and integrated into a clinical transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system. Recordings were analyzed using a spectroscopic method that isolates the acoustic emissions caused by the microbubbles during sonication. This analysis characterized and quantified harmonic oscillations that occur when the BBB is disrupted, and broadband emissions that occur when tissue damage occurs. After validating the system's performance in pilot studies that explored a wide range of exposure levels, the measurements were used to control the ultrasound exposure level during transcranial sonications at 104 volumes over 22 weekly sessions in four macaques. We found that increasing the exposure level until a large harmonic emissions signal was observed was an effective means to ensure BBB disruption without broadband emissions. We had a success rate of 96% in inducing BBB disruption as measured by in contrast-enhanced MRI, and we detected broadband emissions in less than 0.2% of the applied bursts. The magnitude of the harmonic emissions signals was significantly (P<0.001) larger for sonications where BBB disruption was detected, and it correlated with BBB permeabilization as indicated by the magnitude of the MRI signal enhancement after MRI contrast administration (R2 = 0.78). Overall, the results indicate that harmonic emissions can be a used to control focused ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. These results are promising for clinical translation of this technology. PMID:23029240

  5. Atelectrauma disrupts pulmonary epithelial barrier integrity and alters the distribution of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and claudin 4

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation inevitably exposes the delicate tissues of the airways and alveoli to abnormal mechanical stresses that can induce pulmonary edema and exacerbate conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. The goal of our research is to characterize the cellular trauma caused by the transient abnormal fluid mechanical stresses that arise when air is forced into a liquid-occluded airway (i.e., atelectrauma). Using a fluid-filled, parallel-plate flow chamber to model the “airway reopening” process, our in vitro study examined consequent increases in pulmonary epithelial plasma membrane rupture, paracellular permeability, and disruption of the tight junction (TJ) proteins zonula occludens-1 and claudin-4. Computational analysis predicts the normal and tangential surface stresses that develop between the basolateral epithelial membrane and underlying substrate due to the interfacial stresses acting on the apical cell membrane. These simulations demonstrate that decreasing the velocity of reopening causes a significant increase in basolateral surface stresses, particularly in the region between neighboring cells where TJs concentrate. Likewise, pulmonary epithelial wounding, paracellular permeability, and TJ protein disruption were significantly greater following slower reopening. This study thus demonstrates that maintaining a higher velocity of reopening, which reduces the damaging fluid stresses acting on the airway wall, decreases the mechanical stresses on the basolateral cell surface while protecting cells from plasma membrane rupture and promoting barrier integrity. PMID:22898551

  6. Assessment of skin barrier function and biochemical changes of ex vivo human skin in response to physical and chemical barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Döge, Nadine; Avetisyan, Araks; Hadam, Sabrina; Pfannes, Eva Katharina Barbosa; Rancan, Fiorenza; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2016-12-21

    Topical dermatotherapy is intended to be used on diseased skin. Novel drug delivery systems even address differences between intact and diseased skin underlining the need for pre-clinical assessment of different states of barrier disruption. Herein, we studied how short-term incubation in culture media compared to incubation in humidified chambers affects human skin barrier function and viability. On both models we assessed different types and intensities of physical and chemical barrier disruption methods with regard to structural integrity, biophysical parameters and cytokine levels. Tissue degeneration and proliferative activity limited the use of tissue cultures to 48h. Viability is better preserved in cultured tissue. Tape-stripping (50×TS) and 4h sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) pre-treatment were identified as highly reproducible and effective procedures for barrier disruption. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) values reproducibly increased with the intensity of disruption while sebum content and skin surface pH were of limited value. Interleukin (IL)-6/8 and various chemokines and proteases were increased in tape-stripped skin which was more pronounced in SLS-treated skin tissue extracts. Thus, albeit limited to 48h, cultured full-thickness skin maintained several barrier characteristics and responded to different intensities of barrier disruption. Potentially, these models can be used to assess pre-clinically the efficacy and penetration of anti-inflammatory compounds.

  7. Protective effects of nonionic tri-block copolymers on bile acid-mediated epithelial barrier disruption.

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, A.; Fink, D.; Musch, M.; Valuckaite, V.; Zabornia, O.; Grubjesic, S.; Firestone, M. A.; Matthews, J. B.; Alverdy, J. C.

    2011-11-01

    Translocation of bacteria and other luminal factors from the intestine following surgical injury can be a major driver of critical illness. Bile acids have been shown to play a key role in the loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function during states of host stress. Experiments to study the ability of nonionic block copolymers to abrogate barrier failure in response to bile acid exposure are described. In vitro experiments were performed with the bile salt sodium deoxycholate on Caco-2 enterocyte monolayers using transepithelial electrical resistance to assay barrier function. A bisphenol A coupled triblock polyethylene glycol (PEG), PEG 15-20, was shown to prevent sodium deoxycholate-induced barrier failure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, lactate dehydrogenase, and caspase 3-based cell death detection assays demonstrated that bile acid-induced apoptosis and necrosis were prevented with PEG 15-20. Immunofluorescence microscopic visualization of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) demonstrated that PEG 15-20 prevented significant changes in tight junction organization induced by bile acid exposure. Preliminary transepithelial electrical resistance-based studies examining structure-function correlates of polymer protection against bile acid damage were performed with a small library of PEG-based copolymers. Polymer properties associated with optimal protection against bile acid-induced barrier disruption were PEG-based compounds with a molecular weight greater than 10 kd and amphiphilicity. The data demonstrate that PEG-based copolymer architecture is an important determinant that confers protection against bile acid injury of intestinal epithelia.

  8. Heat stress-induced disruption of endothelial barrier function is via PAR1 signaling and suppressed by Xuebijing injection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiulin; Liu, Jingxian; Wang, Zhenglian; Guo, Xiaohua; Zhou, Gengbiao; Liu, Yanan; Huang, Qiaobing; Su, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Increased vascular permeability leading to acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is central to the pathogenesis of heatstroke. Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), the receptor for thrombin, plays a key role in disruption of endothelial barrier function in response to extracellular stimuli. However, the role of PAR1 in heat stress-induced endothelial hyper-permeability is unknown. In this study, we measured PAR1 protein expression in heat-stressed human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs), investigated the influences of PAR1 on endothelial permeability, F-actin rearrangement, and moesin phosphorylation by inhibiting PAR1 with its siRNA, neutralizing antibody (anti-PAR1), specific inhibitor(RWJ56110), and Xuebijing injection (XBJ), a traditional Chinese medicine used for sepsis treatment, and evaluated the role of PAR1 in heatstroke-related ALI/ARDS in mice by suppressing PAR1 with RWJ56110, anti-PAR1and XBJ. We found that heat stress induced PAR1 protein expression 2h after heat stress in endothelial cells, caused the release of endothelial matrix metalloprotease 1, an activator of PAR1, after 60 or 120 min of heat stimulation, as well as promoted endothelial hyper-permeability and F-actin rearrangement, which were inhibited by suppressing PAR1 with RWJ56110, anti-PAR1 and siRNA. PAR1 mediated moesin phosphorylation, which caused F-actin rearrangement and disruption of endothelial barrier function. To corroborate findings from in vitro experiments, we found that RWJ56110 and the anti-PAR1 significantly decreased lung edema, pulmonary microvascular permeability, protein exudation, and leukocytes infiltrations in heatstroke mice. Additionally, XBJ was found to suppress PAR1-moesin signal pathway and confer protective effects on maintaining endothelial barrier function both in vitro and in vivo heat-stressed model, similar to those observed above with the inhibition of PAR1. These results suggest that PAR1 is a potential

  9. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier exacerbates spreading depression in the locust CNS.

    PubMed

    Spong, Kristin E; Rochon-Terry, Geneviève; Money, Tomas G A; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2014-07-01

    In response to cellular stress in the nervous system of the locust (Locusta migratoria) neural function is interrupted in association with ionic disturbances propagating throughout nervous tissue (Spreading depression; SD). The insect blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a critical role in the regulation of ion levels within the CNS. We investigated how a disruption in barrier function by transient exposure to 3M urea affects locusts' vulnerability to disturbances in ion levels. Repetitive SD was induced by bath application of ouabain and the extracellular potassium concentration ([K(+)]o) within the metathoracic ganglion (MTG) was monitored. Urea treatment increased the susceptibility to ouabain and caused a progressive impairment in the ability to maintain baseline [K(+)]o levels during episodes of repetitive SD. Additionally, using a within animal protocol we demonstrate that waves of SD, induced by high K(+), propagate throughout the MTG faster following disruption of the BBB. Lastly, we show that targeting the BBB of intact animals reduces their ability to sustain neural function during anoxic conditions. Our findings indicate that locust's ability to withstand stress is diminished following a reduction in barrier function likely due to an impairment of the ability of neural tissue to maintain ionic gradients.

  10. Cannabidiol attenuates high glucose-induced endothelial cell inflammatory response and barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Mohanraj; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Bátkai, Sándor; Haskó, György; Liaudet, Lucas; Drel, Viktor R; Obrosova, Irina G; Pacher, Pál

    2007-07-01

    A nonpsychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) has been shown to exert potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects and has recently been reported to lower the incidence of diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice and to preserve the blood-retinal barrier in experimental diabetes. In this study we have investigated the effects of CBD on high glucose (HG)-induced, mitochondrial superoxide generation, NF-kappaB activation, nitrotyrosine formation, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression, monocyte-endothelial adhesion, transendothelial migration of monocytes, and disruption of endothelial barrier function in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). HG markedly increased mitochondrial superoxide generation (measured by flow cytometry using MitoSOX), NF-kappaB activation, nitrotyrosine formation, upregulation of iNOS and adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, transendothelial migration of monocytes, and monocyte-endothelial adhesion in HCAECs. HG also decreased endothelial barrier function measured by increased permeability and diminished expression of vascular endothelial cadherin in HCAECs. Remarkably, all the above mentioned effects of HG were attenuated by CBD pretreatment. Since a disruption of the endothelial function and integrity by HG is a crucial early event underlying the development of various diabetic complications, our results suggest that CBD, which has recently been approved for the treatment of inflammation, pain, and spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis in humans, may have significant therapeutic benefits against diabetic complications and atherosclerosis.

  11. Real-time monitoring of human blood-brain barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Korhonen, Vesa; Kortelainen, Jukka; Rytky, Seppo; Keinänen, Tuija; Tuovinen, Timo; Isokangas, Matti; Sonkajärvi, Eila; Siniluoto, Topi; Nikkinen, Juha; Alahuhta, Seppo; Tervonen, Osmo; Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, Taina; Myllylä, Teemu; Kuittinen, Outi; Voipio, Juha

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy aided by opening of the blood-brain barrier with intra-arterial infusion of hyperosmolar mannitol improves the outcome in primary central nervous system lymphoma. Proper opening of the blood-brain barrier is crucial for the treatment, yet there are no means available for its real-time monitoring. The intact blood-brain barrier maintains a mV-level electrical potential difference between blood and brain tissue, giving rise to a measurable electrical signal at the scalp. Therefore, we used direct-current electroencephalography (DC-EEG) to characterize the spatiotemporal behavior of scalp-recorded slow electrical signals during blood-brain barrier opening. Nine anesthetized patients receiving chemotherapy were monitored continuously during 47 blood-brain barrier openings induced by carotid or vertebral artery mannitol infusion. Left or right carotid artery mannitol infusion generated a strongly lateralized DC-EEG response that began with a 2 min negative shift of up to 2000 μV followed by a positive shift lasting up to 20 min above the infused carotid artery territory, whereas contralateral responses were of opposite polarity. Vertebral artery mannitol infusion gave rise to a minimally lateralized and more uniformly distributed slow negative response with a posterior-frontal gradient. Simultaneously performed near-infrared spectroscopy detected a multiphasic response beginning with mannitol-bolus induced dilution of blood and ending in a prolonged increase in the oxy/deoxyhemoglobin ratio. The pronounced DC-EEG shifts are readily accounted for by opening and sealing of the blood-brain barrier. These data show that DC-EEG is a promising real-time monitoring tool for blood-brain barrier disruption augmented drug delivery. PMID:28319185

  12. Real-time monitoring of human blood-brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Korhonen, Vesa; Kortelainen, Jukka; Rytky, Seppo; Keinänen, Tuija; Tuovinen, Timo; Isokangas, Matti; Sonkajärvi, Eila; Siniluoto, Topi; Nikkinen, Juha; Alahuhta, Seppo; Tervonen, Osmo; Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, Taina; Myllylä, Teemu; Kuittinen, Outi; Voipio, Juha

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy aided by opening of the blood-brain barrier with intra-arterial infusion of hyperosmolar mannitol improves the outcome in primary central nervous system lymphoma. Proper opening of the blood-brain barrier is crucial for the treatment, yet there are no means available for its real-time monitoring. The intact blood-brain barrier maintains a mV-level electrical potential difference between blood and brain tissue, giving rise to a measurable electrical signal at the scalp. Therefore, we used direct-current electroencephalography (DC-EEG) to characterize the spatiotemporal behavior of scalp-recorded slow electrical signals during blood-brain barrier opening. Nine anesthetized patients receiving chemotherapy were monitored continuously during 47 blood-brain barrier openings induced by carotid or vertebral artery mannitol infusion. Left or right carotid artery mannitol infusion generated a strongly lateralized DC-EEG response that began with a 2 min negative shift of up to 2000 μV followed by a positive shift lasting up to 20 min above the infused carotid artery territory, whereas contralateral responses were of opposite polarity. Vertebral artery mannitol infusion gave rise to a minimally lateralized and more uniformly distributed slow negative response with a posterior-frontal gradient. Simultaneously performed near-infrared spectroscopy detected a multiphasic response beginning with mannitol-bolus induced dilution of blood and ending in a prolonged increase in the oxy/deoxyhemoglobin ratio. The pronounced DC-EEG shifts are readily accounted for by opening and sealing of the blood-brain barrier. These data show that DC-EEG is a promising real-time monitoring tool for blood-brain barrier disruption augmented drug delivery.

  13. Safety Validation of Repeated Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Using Focused Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kobus, Thiele; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Pilatou, Magdalini; Zhang, Yongzhi; McDannold, Nathan

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on the brain of multiple sessions of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption using focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with micro-bubbles over a range of acoustic exposure levels. Six weekly sessions of FUS, using acoustical pressures between 0.66 and 0.80 MPa, were performed under magnetic resonance guidance. The success and degree of BBB disruption was estimated by signal enhancement of post-contrast T1-weighted imaging of the treated area. Histopathological analysis was performed after the last treatment. The consequences of repeated BBB disruption varied from no indications of vascular damage to signs of micro-hemorrhages, macrophage infiltration, micro-scar formations and cystic cavities. The signal enhancement on the contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging had limited value for predicting small-vessel damage. T2-weighted imaging corresponded well with the effects on histopathology and could be used to study treatment effects over time. This study demonstrates that repeated BBB disruption by FUS can be performed with no or limited damage to the brain tissue.

  14. Antiretroviral Treatment with Efavirenz Disrupts the Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and Increases Stroke Severity

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Luc; Dygert, Levi; Toborek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of antiretroviral drugs (ARVd) changed the prognosis of HIV infection from a deadly disease to a chronic disease. However, even with undetectable viral loads, patients still develop a wide range of pathologies, including cerebrovascular complications and stroke. It is hypothesized that toxic side effects of ARVd may contribute to these effects. To address this notion, we evaluated the impact of several non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI; Efavirenz, Etravirine, Rilpivirine and Nevirapine) on the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, and their impact on severity of stroke. Among studied drugs, Efavirenz, but not other NNRTIs, altered claudin-5 expression, increased endothelial permeability, and disrupted the blood-brain barrier integrity. Importantly, Efavirenz exposure increased the severity of stroke in a model of middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. Taken together, these results indicate that selected ARVd can exacerbate HIV-associated cerebrovascular pathology. Therefore, careful consideration should be taken when choosing an anti-retroviral therapy regimen. PMID:28008980

  15. Implications of MMP9 for Blood Brain Barrier Disruption and Hemorrhagic Transformation Following Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Renée J.; Sharp, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented increases in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), specifically MMP-9 levels following stroke, with such perturbations associated with disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB), increased risk of hemorrhagic complications, and worsened outcome. Despite this, controversy remains as to which cells release MMP-9 at the normal and pathological BBB, with even less clarity in the context of stroke. This may be further complicated by the influence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment. The aim of the present review is to examine the relationship between neutrophils, MMP-9 and tPA following ischemic stroke to elucidate which cells are responsible for the increases in MMP-9 and resultant barrier changes and hemorrhage observed following stroke. PMID:26973468

  16. Cellular responses to disruption of the permeability barrier in a three-dimensional organotypic epidermal model

    SciTech Connect

    Ajani, Gati; Sato, Nobuyuki; Mack, Judith A.; Maytin, Edward V. . E-mail: maytine@ccf.org

    2007-08-15

    Repeated injury to the stratum corneum of mammalian skin (caused by friction, soaps, or organic solvents) elicits hyperkeratosis and epidermal thickening. Functionally, these changes serve to restore the cutaneous barrier and protect the organism. To better understand the molecular and cellular basis of this response, we have engineered an in vitro model of acetone-induced injury using organotypic epidermal cultures. Rat epidermal keratinocytes (REKs), grown on a collagen raft in the absence of any feeder fibroblasts, developed all the hallmarks of a true epidermis including a well-formed cornified layer. To induce barrier injury, REK cultures were treated with intermittent 30-s exposures to acetone then were fixed and paraffin-sectioned. After two exposures, increased proliferation (Ki67 and BrdU staining) was observed in basal and suprabasal layers. After three exposures, proliferation became confined to localized buds in the basal layer and increased terminal differentiation was observed (compact hyperkeratosis of the stratum corneum, elevated levels of K10 and filaggrin, and heightened transglutaminase activity). Thus, barrier disruption causes epidermal hyperplasia and/or enhances differentiation, depending upon the extent and duration of injury. Given that no fibroblasts are present in the model, the ability to mount a hyperplastic response to barrier injury is an inherent property of keratinocytes.

  17. Cellular responses to disruption of the permeability barrier in a three-dimensional organotypic epidermal model.

    PubMed

    Ajani, Gati; Sato, Nobuyuki; Mack, Judith A; Maytin, Edward V

    2007-08-15

    Repeated injury to the stratum corneum of mammalian skin (caused by friction, soaps, or organic solvents) elicits hyperkeratosis and epidermal thickening. Functionally, these changes serve to restore the cutaneous barrier and protect the organism. To better understand the molecular and cellular basis of this response, we have engineered an in vitro model of acetone-induced injury using organotypic epidermal cultures. Rat epidermal keratinocytes (REKs), grown on a collagen raft in the absence of any feeder fibroblasts, developed all the hallmarks of a true epidermis including a well-formed cornified layer. To induce barrier injury, REK cultures were treated with intermittent 30-s exposures to acetone then were fixed and paraffin-sectioned. After two exposures, increased proliferation (Ki67 and BrdU staining) was observed in basal and suprabasal layers. After three exposures, proliferation became confined to localized buds in the basal layer and increased terminal differentiation was observed (compact hyperkeratosis of the stratum corneum, elevated levels of K10 and filaggrin, and heightened transglutaminase activity). Thus, barrier disruption causes epidermal hyperplasia and/or enhances differentiation, depending upon the extent and duration of injury. Given that no fibroblasts are present in the model, the ability to mount a hyperplastic response to barrier injury is an inherent property of keratinocytes.

  18. Th17 Cytokines Disrupt the Airway Mucosal Barrier in Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Ramezanpour, Mahnaz; Moraitis, Sophia; Smith, Jason L. P.; Wormald, P. J.; Vreugde, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine mediated changes in paracellular permeability contribute to a multitude of pathological conditions including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of interferons and of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines on respiratory epithelium barrier function. Cytokines and interferons were applied to the basolateral side of air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures of primary human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) from CRS with nasal polyp patients. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability of FITC-conjugated dextrans were measured over time. Additionally, the expression of the tight junction protein Zona Occludens-1 (ZO-1) was examined via immunofluorescence. Data was analysed using ANOVA, followed by Tukey HSD post hoc test. Our results showed that application of interferons and of Th1 or Th2 cytokines did not affect the mucosal barrier function. In contrast, the Th17 cytokines IL-17, IL-22, and IL-26 showed a significant disruption of the epithelial barrier, evidenced by a loss of TEER, increased paracellular permeability of FITC-dextrans, and discontinuous ZO-1 immunolocalisation. These results indicate that Th17 cytokines may contribute to the development of CRSwNP by promoting a leaky mucosal barrier. PMID:26903715

  19. The Role of Circulating Tight Junction Proteins in Evaluating Blood Brain Barrier Disruption following Intracranial Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiaoyang; He, Ping; Li, Yazhen; Fan, Zhicheng; Si, Mengya; Xie, Qingdong; Chang, Xiaolan; Huang, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Brain injury after intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a hallmark of ICH-induced brain injury; however, data mirroring BBB disruption in human ICH are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the significance of circulating biomarkers in evaluating BBB disruption after ICH. Twenty-two patients with ICH were recruited in this study. Concentrations of the tight junction proteins (TJs) Claudin-5 (CLDN5), Occludin (OCLN), and zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from patients with ICH. The white blood cell (WBC) count in blood and CSF, albumin (ALB) levels in the CSF (ALBCSF), and the BBB ratio were significantly higher in the ICH than in controls (p < 0.05). Significantly higher levels of CLDN5, OCLN, ZO-1, MMP-9, and VEGF in CSF were observed in the ICH group; these biomarkers were also positively associated with BBB ratio (p < 0.05). Our data revealed that circulating TJs could be considered the potential biomarkers reflecting the integrity of the BBB in ICH.

  20. The Role of Circulating Tight Junction Proteins in Evaluating Blood Brain Barrier Disruption following Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Xiaoyang; He, Ping; Li, Yazhen; Fan, Zhicheng; Si, Mengya; Xie, Qingdong; Chang, Xiaolan; Huang, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Brain injury after intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a hallmark of ICH-induced brain injury; however, data mirroring BBB disruption in human ICH are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the significance of circulating biomarkers in evaluating BBB disruption after ICH. Twenty-two patients with ICH were recruited in this study. Concentrations of the tight junction proteins (TJs) Claudin-5 (CLDN5), Occludin (OCLN), and zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from patients with ICH. The white blood cell (WBC) count in blood and CSF, albumin (ALB) levels in the CSF (ALBCSF), and the BBB ratio were significantly higher in the ICH than in controls (p < 0.05). Significantly higher levels of CLDN5, OCLN, ZO-1, MMP-9, and VEGF in CSF were observed in the ICH group; these biomarkers were also positively associated with BBB ratio (p < 0.05). Our data revealed that circulating TJs could be considered the potential biomarkers reflecting the integrity of the BBB in ICH. PMID:26586924

  1. Bacterial induction of Snail1 contributes to blood-brain barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Brandon J.; Hancock, Bryan M.; Bermudez, Andres; Cid, Natasha Del; Reyes, Efren; van Sorge, Nina M.; Lauth, Xavier; Smurthwaite, Cameron A.; Hilton, Brett J.; Stotland, Aleksandr; Banerjee, Anirban; Buchanan, John; Wolkowicz, Roland; Traver, David; Doran, Kelly S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a serious infection of the CNS that results when blood-borne bacteria are able to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of neonatal meningitis; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate bacterial BBB disruption and penetration are not well understood. Here, we found that infection of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) with GBS and other meningeal pathogens results in the induction of host transcriptional repressor Snail1, which impedes expression of tight junction genes. Moreover, GBS infection also induced Snail1 expression in murine and zebrafish models. Tight junction components ZO-1, claudin 5, and occludin were decreased at both the transcript and protein levels in hBMECs following GBS infection, and this repression was dependent on Snail1 induction. Bacteria-independent Snail1 expression was sufficient to facilitate tight junction disruption, promoting BBB permeability to allow bacterial passage. GBS induction of Snail1 expression was dependent on the ERK1/2/MAPK signaling cascade and bacterial cell wall components. Finally, overexpression of a dominant-negative Snail1 homolog in zebrafish elevated transcription of tight junction protein–encoding genes and increased zebrafish survival in response to GBS challenge. Taken together, our data support a Snail1-dependent mechanism of BBB disruption and penetration by meningeal pathogens. PMID:25961453

  2. Interleukin-1β induces blood-brain barrier disruption by downregulating Sonic hedgehog in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Jin, Shijie; Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Cheng, Yi; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Parajuli, Bijay; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Suzumura, Akio

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is composed of capillary endothelial cells, pericytes, and perivascular astrocytes, which regulate central nervous system homeostasis. Sonic hedgehog (SHH) released from astrocytes plays an important role in the maintenance of BBB integrity. BBB disruption and microglial activation are common pathological features of various neurologic diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), a major pro-inflammatory cytokine released from activated microglia, increases BBB permeability. Here we show that IL-1β abolishes the protective effect of astrocytes on BBB integrity by suppressing astrocytic SHH production. Astrocyte conditioned media, SHH, or SHH signal agonist strengthened BBB integrity by upregulating tight junction proteins, whereas SHH signal inhibitor abrogated these effects. Moreover, IL-1β increased astrocytic production of pro-inflammatory chemokines such as CCL2, CCL20, and CXCL2, which induce immune cell migration and exacerbate BBB disruption and neuroinflammation. Our findings suggest that astrocytic SHH is a potential therapeutic target that could be used to restore disrupted BBB in patients with neurologic diseases.

  3. Regulation of Thrombin-Induced Lung Endothelial Cell Barrier Disruption by Protein Kinase C Delta

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lishi; Chiang, Eddie T.; Kelly, Gabriel T.; Kanteti, Prasad; Singleton, Patrick A.; Camp, Sara M.; Zhou, Tingting; Dudek, Steven M.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Wang, Ting; Black, Steven M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Protein Kinase C (PKC) plays a significant role in thrombin-induced loss of endothelial cell (EC) barrier integrity; however, the existence of more than 10 isozymes of PKC and tissue–specific isoform expression has limited our understanding of this important second messenger in vascular homeostasis. In this study, we show that PKCδ isoform promotes thrombin-induced loss of human pulmonary artery EC barrier integrity, findings substantiated by PKCδ inhibitory studies (rottlerin), dominant negative PKCδ construct and PKCδ silencing (siRNA). In addition, we identified PKCδ as a signaling mediator upstream of both thrombin-induced MLC phosphorylation and Rho GTPase activation affecting stress fiber formation, cell contraction and loss of EC barrier integrity. Our inhibitor-based studies indicate that thrombin-induced PKCδ activation exerts a positive feedback on Rho GTPase activation and contributes to Rac1 GTPase inhibition. Moreover, PKD (or PKCμ) and CPI-17, two known PKCδ targets, were found to be activated by PKCδ in EC and served as modulators of cytoskeleton rearrangement. These studies clarify the role of PKCδ in EC cytoskeleton regulation, and highlight PKCδ as a therapeutic target in inflammatory lung disorders, characterized by the loss of barrier integrity, such as acute lung injury and sepsis. PMID:27442243

  4. Selective disruption of the blood-brain barrier by photochemical internalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Zhang, Michelle J.; Gach, Michael H.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Chighvinadze, David; Madsen, Steen J.

    2009-02-01

    Introduction: Failure to eradicate infiltrating glioma cells using conventional treatment regimens results in tumor recurrence and is responsible for the dismal prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This is due to the fact that these migratory cells are protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which prevents the delivery of most anti-cancer agents. We have evaluated the ability of photochemical internalization (PCI) to selectively disrupt the BBB in rats. This will permit access of anti-cancer drugs to effectively target the infiltrating tumor cells, and potentially improve the treatment effectiveness for malignant gliomas. Materials and Methods: PCI treatment, coupling a macromolecule therapy of Clostridium perfringens (Cl p) epsilon prototoxin with AlPcS2a-PDT, was performed on non-tumor bearing inbred Fisher rats. T1-weighted post-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were used to evaluate the extent of BBB disruption which can be inferred from the volume contrast enhancement. Results: The synergistic effect of PCI to disrupt the BBB was observed at a fluence level of 1 J with an intraperitoneal injection of Cl p prototoxin. At the fluence level of 2.5J, the extent of BBB opening induced by PCI was similar to the result of PDT suggesting no synergistic effect evoked under these conditions. Conclusion: PCI was found to be highly effective and efficient for inducing selective and localized disruption of the BBB. The extent of BBB opening peaked on day 3 and the BBB was completed restored by day 18 post treatment.

  5. MRI-guided targeted blood-brain barrier disruption with focused ultrasound: histological findings in rabbits.

    PubMed

    McDannold, Nathan; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Raymond, Scott; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2005-11-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a method to disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) noninvasively and reversibly at targeted locations. The purpose of this study was to test the safety of this method by searching for ischemia and apoptosis in areas with BBB disruption induced by pulsed ultrasound in the presence of preformed gas bubbles and by looking for delayed effects up to one month after sonication. Pulsed ultrasound exposures (sonications) were performed in the brains of 24 rabbits under monitoring by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (ultrasound: frequency = 1.63 MHz, burst length = 100 ms, PRF = 1 Hz, duration = 20 s, pressure amplitude 0.7 to 1.0 MPa). Before sonication, an ultrasound contrast agent (Optison, GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA) was injected IV. BBB disruption was confirmed with contrast-enhanced MR images. Whole brain histologic examination was performed using haematoxylin and eosin staining for general histology, vanadium acid fuchsin-toluidine blue staining for ischemic neurons and TUNEL staining for apoptosis. The main effects observed were tiny regions of extravasated red blood cells scattered around the sonicated locations, indicating affected capillaries. Despite these vasculature effects, only a few cells in some of the sonicated areas showed evidence for apoptosis or ischemia. No ischemic or apoptotic regions were detected that would indicate a compromised blood supply was induced by the sonications. No delayed effects were observed either by MRI or histology up to 4 wk after sonication. Ultrasound-induced BBB disruption is possible without inducing substantial vascular damage that would result in ischemic or apoptotic death to neurons. These findings indicate that this method is safe for targeted drug delivery, at least when compared with the currently available invasive methods.

  6. Blood-brain barrier disruption in the striatum of rats treated with 3-nitropropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Duran-Vilaregut, Joaquim; del Valle, Jaume; Camins, Antoni; Pallàs, Mercè; Pelegrí, Carme; Vilaplana, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) is a natural toxin that is used to induce models of Huntington's disease (HD) in experimental animals. Here we injected 3-NPA into Sprague-Dawley rats in order to evaluate its effects on the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Evans blue (EB) extravasation was used to identify injured areas in the brains of the treated animals and immunostainings of endothelial brain barrier antigen (EBA), zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) and laminin were used as markers to characterize the effects of the neurotoxin on the BBB. Treated rats had a significant loss of body weight compared to controls, and a correlation between motor affectation and body weight loss was observed in the former. The lateral part of the striatum was specifically injured in treated animals and the BBB almost disappeared in the core of the injured areas, as evidenced by a high EB extravasation and severe alterations of the immunostainings of the three BBB integrity markers compared to those of control animals. We conclude that the BBB is severely affected in the 3-NPA rat model of HD and that disruption of this barrier is a crucial event during the development of this disease.

  7. Acute administration of interleukin-1beta disrupts motor learning.

    PubMed

    Larson, Susan J; Hartle, Kelly D; Ivanco, Tammy L

    2007-12-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines have been shown to disrupt the normal transfer of short-term memory to long-term storage sites. Previous research has focused predominantly on the effect of cytokines on hippocampus-mediated spatial learning. To further understand the effects of cytokines on learning and memory, the authors evaluated the effects of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) on a motor learning task. Male Long-Evans rats were rewarded with food pellets after they traversed a runway. The runway was either flat (control condition) or had up-ended dowels (motor learning condition). Subjects traversed the flat runway or dowel task for 5 days, 10 trials per day, and were treated with either saline or with 4 microg/kg IL-1beta immediately after training on the first 2 days. Rats in the motor learning task treated with IL-1beta were consistently slower at traversing the runway. IL-1beta did not impair performance in the control condition; rats in the flat condition performed similarly regardless of whether they were treated with saline or IL-1beta. These data are the first evidence demonstrating IL-1beta can disrupt performance in a motor learning task.

  8. Self-care Barriers Reported by Emergency Department Patients With Acute Heart Failure: A Sociotechnical Systems-based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Richard J.; Schubert, Christiane C.; Eiland, Eugene C.; Storrow, Alan B.; Miller, Karen F.; Collins, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To pilot a sociotechnical systems-based instrument that assesses the prevalence and nature of self-care barriers among patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute heart failure. Methods A semi-structured instrument for measuring self-reported self-care barriers was developed and administered by ED clinicians and non-clinician researchers to 31 ED patients diagnosed with acute heart failure. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative content analysis. Feasibility was assessed by examining participant cooperation rates, instrument completion times, item nonresponse, and data yield. Results Of 47 distinct self-care barriers assessed, a median of 15 per patient were indicated as “sometimes” or “often” present. Thirty-four specific barriers were reported by over 25% of patients and nine were reported by over 50%. The sources of barriers included the person, self-care tasks, tools and technologies, and organizational, social, and physical contexts. Seven of the top ten most prevalent barriers were related to patient characteristics and the next three to the organizational context (e.g., life disruptions). A preliminary feasibility assessment found few item nonresponses or comprehension difficulties, good cooperation, high data yield from both closed- and open-ended items, but opportunities to reduce median administration time and variability. Conclusions An instrument assessing self-care barriers from multiple system sources can be feasibly implemented in the ED. Further research is required to modify the instrument for widespread use and evaluate its implementation across institutions and cultural contexts. Self-care barriers measurement can be one component of broader inquiry into the distributed health-related “work” activity of patients, caregivers, and clinicians. PMID:25616317

  9. PROGRESS AND PROBLEMS IN THE APPLICATION OF FOCUSED ULTRASOUND FOR BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER DISRUPTION

    PubMed Central

    Vykhodtseva, Natalia; McDannold, Nathan; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2008-01-01

    Advances in neuroscience have resulted in the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic agents for potential use in the central nervous system (CNS). However, the ability to deliver the majority of these agents to the brain is limited by the blood–brain barrier (BBB), a specialized structure of the blood vessel wall that hampers transport and diffusion from the blood to the brain. Many CNS disorders could be treated with drugs, enzymes, genes, or large-molecule biotechnological products such as recombinant proteins, if they could cross the BBB. This article reviews the problems of the BBB presence in treating the vast majority of CNS diseases and the efforts to circumvent the BBB through the design of new drugs and the development of more sophisticated delivery methods. Recent advances in the development of noninvasive, targeted drug delivery by MRI-guided ultrasound-induced BBB disruption are also summarized. PMID:18511095

  10. Cerebral mast cells contribute to postoperative cognitive dysfunction by promoting blood brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Susu; Dong, Hongquan; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Nana; Sun, Jie; Qian, Yanning

    2016-02-01

    Trauma induced neuroinflammation plays a key role in the development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). The blood-brain barrier (BBB), a highly specialized endothelial layer, is exquisitely sensitive to inflammatory insults, which can result in numerous neurocognitive syndromes. While brain mast cells are the "first responder" in the injury, the functional interactions between mast cells and the BBB remain poorly understood. Our results demonstrate that tibial fracture surgery can induce cognitive impairment relating to an inflammatory response and destabilization of the BBB. Disodium cromoglycate (cromolyn)--which acts as a mast cell stabilizer--inhibited this effect. Specifically, cromolyn resulted in ameliorated cognitive ability, decrease of inflammatory cytokines and increase of BBB stability. Taken together, these results suggest that activated mast cells contributed to central nervous system inflammation and cognitive dysfunction by promoting BBB disruption, and interactions between mast cells and the BBB could constitute a new and unique therapeutic target for POCD.

  11. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier in Parkinson's disease: curse or route to a cure?

    PubMed

    Lee, Heyne; Pienaar, Ilse S

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical for ensuring the maintenance of brain homeostasis, whilst protecting the brain against toxic insults. Various pathological events disrupt BBB integrity, holding several important clinical implications. In instances where the normal mechanisms controlling passage of substances into the brain are compromised, these could sensitize or even worsen endogenous pathological conditions. Recognition has grown recently that patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD) present with concurrent medical problems, including cerebrovascular lesions. However, cerebrovascular disturbances may also result from PD-related disease processes; the pathological mechanisms which could entail interaction between environment-derived and genetic factors. The current review addresses the accumulation of studies aimed at better understanding the series of processes affecting the neurovascular unit in human Parkinsonism, due in part to the BBB presenting as a formidable opponent in the effective delivery of therapeutics that have shown promise as therapeutic strategies for treating aspects of PD when tested in vitro.

  12. Effects of deferoxamine on blood-brain barrier disruption after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Wei; Gu, Yuxiang

    2017-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a key mechanism of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced brain injury. This study examined the mechanism of iron-induced BBB disruption after SAH and investigated the potential therapeutic effect of iron chelation on SAH. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats had an endovascular perforation of left internal carotid artery bifurcation or sham operation. The rats were treated with deferoxamine (DFX) or vehicle (100mg/kg) for a maximum of 7 days. Brain edema, BBB leakage, behavioral and cognitive impairment were examined. In SAH rat, the peak time of brain edema and BBB impairment in the cortex was at day 3 after SAH. SAH resulted in a significant increase in ferritin expression in the cortex. The ferritin positive cells were colocalized with endothelial cells, pericytes, astrocytes, microglia and neurons. Compared with vehicle, DFX caused less ferritin upregulation, brain water content, BBB impairment, behavioral and cognitive deficits in SAH rats. The results suggest iron overload could be a therapeutic target for SAH induced BBB damage. PMID:28249040

  13. Astrocyte-derived VEGF-A drives blood-brain barrier disruption in CNS inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Argaw, Azeb Tadesse; Asp, Linnea; Zhang, Jingya; Navrazhina, Kristina; Pham, Trinh; Mariani, John N; Mahase, Sean; Dutta, Dipankar J; Seto, Jeremy; Kramer, Elisabeth G; Ferrara, Napoleone; Sofroniew, Michael V; John, Gareth R

    2012-07-01

    In inflammatory CNS conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS), current options to treat clinical relapse are limited, and more selective agents are needed. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an early feature of lesion formation that correlates with clinical exacerbation, leading to edema, excitotoxicity, and entry of serum proteins and inflammatory cells. Here, we identify astrocytic expression of VEGF-A as a key driver of BBB permeability in mice. Inactivation of astrocytic Vegfa expression reduced BBB breakdown, decreased lymphocyte infiltration and neuropathology in inflammatory and demyelinating lesions, and reduced paralysis in a mouse model of MS. Knockdown studies in CNS endothelium indicated activation of the downstream effector eNOS as the principal mechanism underlying the effects of VEGF-A on the BBB. Systemic administration of the selective eNOS inhibitor cavtratin in mice abrogated VEGF-A-induced BBB disruption and pathology and protected against neurologic deficit in the MS model system. Collectively, these data identify blockade of VEGF-A signaling as a protective strategy to treat inflammatory CNS disease.

  14. Dynamic study of blood-brain barrier closure after its disruption using ultrasound: a quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Marty, Benjamin; Larrat, Benoit; Van Landeghem, Maxime; Robic, Caroline; Robert, Philippe; Port, Marc; Le Bihan, Denis; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael; Lethimonnier, Franck; Mériaux, Sébastien

    2012-10-01

    Delivery of therapeutic or diagnostic agents to the brain is majorly hindered by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recently, many studies have demonstrated local and transient disruption of the BBB using low power ultrasound sonication combined with intravascular microbubbles. However, BBB opening and closure mechanisms are poorly understood, especially the maximum gap that may be safely generated between endothelial cells and the duration of opening of the BBB. Here, we studied BBB opening and closure under magnetic resonance (MR) guidance in a rat model. First, MR contrast agents (CA) of different hydrodynamic diameters (1 to 65 nm) were employed to estimate the largest molecular size permissible across the cerebral tissues. Second, to estimate the duration of the BBB opening, the CA were injected at various times post-BBB disruption (12 minutes to 24 hours). A T(1) mapping strategy was developed to assess CA concentration at the ultrasound (US) focal point. Based on our experimental data and BBB closure modeling, a calibration curve was obtained to compute the half closure time as a function of CA hydrodynamic diameter. These findings and the model provide an invaluable basis for optimal design and delivery of nanoparticles to the brain.

  15. Dynamic study of blood–brain barrier closure after its disruption using ultrasound: a quantitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Benjamin; Larrat, Benoit; Van Landeghem, Maxime; Robic, Caroline; Robert, Philippe; Port, Marc; Le Bihan, Denis; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael; Lethimonnier, Franck; Mériaux, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic or diagnostic agents to the brain is majorly hindered by the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Recently, many studies have demonstrated local and transient disruption of the BBB using low power ultrasound sonication combined with intravascular microbubbles. However, BBB opening and closure mechanisms are poorly understood, especially the maximum gap that may be safely generated between endothelial cells and the duration of opening of the BBB. Here, we studied BBB opening and closure under magnetic resonance (MR) guidance in a rat model. First, MR contrast agents (CA) of different hydrodynamic diameters (1 to 65 nm) were employed to estimate the largest molecular size permissible across the cerebral tissues. Second, to estimate the duration of the BBB opening, the CA were injected at various times post-BBB disruption (12 minutes to 24 hours). A T1 mapping strategy was developed to assess CA concentration at the ultrasound (US) focal point. Based on our experimental data and BBB closure modeling, a calibration curve was obtained to compute the half closure time as a function of CA hydrodynamic diameter. These findings and the model provide an invaluable basis for optimal design and delivery of nanoparticles to the brain. PMID:22805875

  16. Effects of deferoxamine on blood-brain barrier disruption after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjiang; Yang, Heng; Ni, Wei; Gu, Yuxiang

    2017-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a key mechanism of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced brain injury. This study examined the mechanism of iron-induced BBB disruption after SAH and investigated the potential therapeutic effect of iron chelation on SAH. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats had an endovascular perforation of left internal carotid artery bifurcation or sham operation. The rats were treated with deferoxamine (DFX) or vehicle (100mg/kg) for a maximum of 7 days. Brain edema, BBB leakage, behavioral and cognitive impairment were examined. In SAH rat, the peak time of brain edema and BBB impairment in the cortex was at day 3 after SAH. SAH resulted in a significant increase in ferritin expression in the cortex. The ferritin positive cells were colocalized with endothelial cells, pericytes, astrocytes, microglia and neurons. Compared with vehicle, DFX caused less ferritin upregulation, brain water content, BBB impairment, behavioral and cognitive deficits in SAH rats. The results suggest iron overload could be a therapeutic target for SAH induced BBB damage.

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Enhancement on Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images After Carotid Artery Stenting with Neuroprotective Balloon Occlusions: Hemodynamic Instability and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Ogami, Ryo Nakahara, Toshinori; Hamasaki, Osamu; Araki, Hayato; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: A rare complication of carotid artery stenting (CAS), prolonged reversible neurological symptoms with delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space enhancement on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images, is associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We prospectively identified patients who showed CSF space enhancement on FLAIR images. Methods: Nineteen patients-5 acute-phase and 14 scheduled-underwent 21 CAS procedures. Balloon catheters were navigated across stenoses, angioplasty was performed using a neuroprotective balloon, and stents were placed with after dilation under distal balloon protection. CSF space hyperintensity or obscuration on FLAIR after versus before CAS indicated CSF space enhancement. Correlations with clinical factors were examined. Results: CSF space was enhanced on FLAIR in 12 (57.1%) cases. Postprocedural CSF space enhancement was significantly related to age, stenosis rate, acute-stage procedure, and total occlusion time. All acute-stage CAS patients showed delayed enhancement. Only age was associated with delayed CSF space enhancement in scheduled CAS patients. Conclusions: Ischemic intolerance for severe carotid artery stenosis and temporary neuroprotective balloon occlusion, causing reperfusion injury, seem to be the main factors that underlie BBB disruption with delayed CSF space enhancement shortly after CAS, rather than sudden poststenting hemodynamic change. Our results suggest that factors related to hemodynamic instability or ischemic intolerance seem to be associated with post-CAS BBB vulnerability. Patients at risk for hemodynamic instability or with ischemic intolerance, which decrease BBB integrity, require careful management to prevent intracranial hemorrhagic and other post-CAS complications.

  18. Methamphetamine disrupts blood-brain barrier function by induction of oxidative stress in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Servio H; Potula, Raghava; Fan, Shongshan; Eidem, Tess; Papugani, Anil; Reichenbach, Nancy; Dykstra, Holly; Weksler, Babette B; Romero, Ignacio A; Couraud, Pierre O; Persidsky, Yuri

    2009-12-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), a potent stimulant with strong euphoric properties, has a high abuse liability and long-lasting neurotoxic effects. Recent studies in animal models have indicated that METH can induce impairment of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), thus suggesting that some of the neurotoxic effects resulting from METH abuse could be the outcome of barrier disruption. In this study, we provide evidence that METH alters BBB function through direct effects on endothelial cells and explore possible underlying mechanisms leading to endothelial injury. We report that METH increases BBB permeability in vivo, and exposure of primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) to METH diminishes the tightness of BMVEC monolayers in a dose- and time-dependent manner by decreasing the expression of cell membrane-associated tight junction (TJ) proteins. These changes were accompanied by the enhanced production of reactive oxygen species, increased monocyte migration across METH-treated endothelial monolayers, and activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in BMVEC. Antioxidant treatment attenuated or completely reversed all tested aspects of METH-induced BBB dysfunction. Our data suggest that BBB injury is caused by METH-mediated oxidative stress, which activates MLCK and negatively affects the TJ complex. These observations provide a basis for antioxidant protection against brain endothelial injury caused by METH exposure.

  19. Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and -9 Secreted by Leukemic Cells Increase the Permeability of Blood-Brain Barrier by Disrupting Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Saran; Cen, Jiannong; Huang, Yihong; Shen, Hongjie; Yao, Li; Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Zixing

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in acute leukemia, the mechanisms of leukemic cell infiltration into the CNS have not yet been elucidated. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) makes CNS become a refugee to leukemic cells and serves as a resource of cells that seed extraneural sites. How can the leukemic cells disrupt this barrier and invasive the CNS, even if many of the currently available chemotherapies can not cross the BBB? Tight junction in endothelial cells occupies a central role in the function of the BBB. Except the well known role of degrading extracellular matrix in metastasis of cancer cells, here we show matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9, secreted by leukemic cells, mediate the BBB opening by disrupting tight junction proteins in the CNS leukemia. We demonstrated that leukemic cells impaired tight junction proteins ZO-1, claudin-5 and occludin resulting in increased permeability of the BBB. However, these alterations reduced when MMP-2 and -9 activities were inhibited by RNA interference strategy or by MMP inhibitor GM6001 in an in vitro BBB model. We also found that the disruption of the BBB in company with the down-regulation of ZO-1, claudin-5 and occludin and the up-regulation of MMP-2 and -9 in mouse brain tissues with leukemic cell infiltration by confocal imaging and the assay of in situ gelatin zymography. Besides, GM6001 protected all mice against CNS leukemia. Our findings suggest that the degradation of tight junction proteins ZO-1, claudin-5 and occludin by MMP-2 and -9 secreted by leukemic cells constitutes an important mechanism in the BBB breakdown which contributes to the invasion of leukemic cells to the CNS in acute leukemia. PMID:21857898

  20. The estrous cycle of the ewe is resistant to disruption by repeated, acute psychosocial stress.

    PubMed

    Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Breen, Kellie M; Oakley, Amy E; Tilbrook, Alan J; Karsch, Fred J

    2010-06-01

    Five experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that psychosocial stress interferes with the estrous cycle of sheep. In experiment 1, ewes were repeatedly isolated during the follicular phase. Timing, amplitude, and duration of the preovulatory luteinizing hormone (LH) surge were not affected. In experiment 2, follicular-phase ewes were subjected twice to a "layered stress" paradigm consisting of sequential, hourly application of isolation, restraint, blindfold, and predator cues. This reduced the LH pulse amplitude but did not affect the LH surge. In experiment 3, different acute stressors were given sequentially within the follicular phase: food denial plus unfamiliar noises and forced exercise, layered stress, exercise around midnight, and transportation. This, too, did not affect the LH surge. In experiment 4, variable acute psychosocial stress was given every 1-2 days for two entire estrous cycles; this did not disrupt any parameter of the cycle monitored. Lastly, experiment 5 examined whether the psychosocial stress paradigms of experiment 4 would disrupt the cycle and estrous behavior if sheep were metabolically stressed by chronic food restriction. Thirty percent of the food-restricted ewes exhibited deterioration of estrous cycle parameters followed by cessation of cycles and failure to express estrous behavior. However, disruption was not more evident in ewes that also encountered psychosocial stress. Collectively, these findings indicate the estrous cycle of sheep is remarkably resistant to disruption by acute bouts of psychosocial stress applied intermittently during either a single follicular phase or repeatedly over two estrous cycles.

  1. Consequences of repeated blood-brain barrier disruption in football players.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Nicola; Bazarian, Jeffrey J; Puvenna, Vikram; Janigro, Mattia; Ghosh, Chaitali; Zhong, Jianhui; Zhu, Tong; Blackman, Eric; Stewart, Desiree; Ellis, Jasmina; Butler, Robert; Janigro, Damir

    2013-01-01

    The acknowledgement of risks for traumatic brain injury in American football players has prompted studies for sideline concussion diagnosis and testing for neurological deficits. While concussions are recognized etiological factors for a spectrum of neurological sequelae, the consequences of sub-concussive events are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) and the accompanying surge of the astrocytic protein S100B in blood may cause an immune response associated with production of auto-antibodies. We also wished to determine whether these events result in disrupted white matter on diffusion tensor imaging (DT) scans. Players from three college football teams were enrolled (total of 67 volunteers). None of the players experienced a concussion. Blood samples were collected before and after games (n = 57); the number of head hits in all players was monitored by movie review and post-game interviews. S100B serum levels and auto-antibodies against S100B were measured and correlated by direct and reverse immunoassays (n = 15 players; 5 games). A subset of players underwent DTI scans pre- and post-season and after a 6-month interval (n = 10). Cognitive and functional assessments were also performed. After a game, transient BBB damage measured by serum S100B was detected only in players experiencing the greatest number of sub-concussive head hits. Elevated levels of auto-antibodies against S100B were elevated only after repeated sub-concussive events characterized by BBBD. Serum levels of S100B auto-antibodies also predicted persistence of MRI-DTI abnormalities which in turn correlated with cognitive changes. Even in the absence of concussion, football players may experience repeated BBBD and serum surges of the potential auto-antigen S100B. The correlation of serum S100B, auto-antibodies and DTI changes support a link between repeated BBBD and future risk for cognitive changes.

  2. Iron supplement prevents lead-induced disruption of the blood-brain barrier during rat development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiang; Luo Wenjing; Zheng Wei; Liu Yiping; Xu Hui; Zheng Gang; Dai Zhongming; Zhang Wenbin; Chen Yaoming; Chen Jingyuan . E-mail: jy_chen@fmmu.edu.cn

    2007-02-15

    Children are known to be venerable to lead (Pb) toxicity. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) in immature brain is particularly vulnerable to Pb insults. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that Pb exposure damaged the integrity of the BBB in young animals and iron (Fe) supplement may prevent against Pb-induced BBB disruption. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Three groups of rats were exposed to Pb in drinking water containing 342 {mu}g Pb/mL as Pb acetate, among which two groups were concurrently administered by oral gavage once every other day with 7 mg Fe/kg and 14 mg Fe/kg as FeSO{sub 4} solution as the low and high Fe treatment group, respectively, for 6 weeks. The control group received sodium acetate in drinking water. Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in blood by 6.6-folds (p < 0.05) and brain tissues by 1.5-2.0-folds (p < 0.05) as compared to controls. Under the electron microscope, Pb exposure in young animals caused an extensive extravascular staining of lanthanum nitrate in brain parenchyma, suggesting a leakage of cerebral vasculature. Western blot showed that Pb treatment led to 29-68% reduction (p < 0.05) in the expression of occludin as compared to the controls. Fe supplement among Pb-exposed rats maintained the normal ultra-structure of the BBB and restored the expression of occludin to normal levels. Moreover, the low dose Fe supplement significantly reduced Pb levels in blood and brain tissues. These data suggest that Pb exposure disrupts the structure of the BBB in young animals. The increased BBB permeability may facilitate the accumulation of Pb. Fe supplement appears to protect the integrity of the BBB against Pb insults, a beneficial effect that may have significant clinical implications.

  3. Disruption of the blood brain barrier following ALA mediated photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Peng, Qian; Uzal, Francisco A.; Chighvinadze, David; Zhang, Michelle J.; Madsen, Steen J.

    2008-02-01

    Introduction: Failure of treatment for high grade gliomas is usually due to local recurrence at the site of surgical resection indicating that a more aggressive form of local therapy, such as PDT, could be of benefit. PDT causes damage to tumor cells as well as degradation of the blood brain barrier (BBB). We have evaluated the ability of ALA mediated PDT to open the BBB in rats. This will permit access of chemotherapeutic agents to brain tumor cells remaining in the resection cavity wall, but limit their penetration into normal brain remote from the site of illumination. Materials and Methods: ALA-PDT was performed on non tumor bearing inbred Fisher rats at increasing fluence levels. T2 weighted MRI scans were used to evaluate edema formation and post-contrast T I MRI scans were used to monitor the degree BBB disruption which could be inferred from the intensity and volume of the contrast agent visualized. Results. PDT at increasing fluence levels between 9J and 26J demonstrated an increasing contrast flow rate. No effect on the BBB was observed if 26J of light were given in the absence of ALA. A similar increased contrast volume was observed with increasing fluence rates. The BBB was found to be disrupted 2hrs. following PDT and 80-100% restored 72hrs later. Conclusion: PDT was highly effective in opening the BBB in a limited region of the brain. The degradation of the BBB was temporary in nature, opening rapidly following treatment and significantly restored during the next 72 hrs.

  4. Consequences of Repeated Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Puvenna, Vikram; Janigro, Mattia; Ghosh, Chaitali; Zhong, Jianhui; Zhu, Tong; Blackman, Eric; Stewart, Desiree; Ellis, Jasmina; Butler, Robert; Janigro, Damir

    2013-01-01

    The acknowledgement of risks for traumatic brain injury in American football players has prompted studies for sideline concussion diagnosis and testing for neurological deficits. While concussions are recognized etiological factors for a spectrum of neurological sequelae, the consequences of sub-concussive events are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) and the accompanying surge of the astrocytic protein S100B in blood may cause an immune response associated with production of auto-antibodies. We also wished to determine whether these events result in disrupted white matter on diffusion tensor imaging (DT) scans. Players from three college football teams were enrolled (total of 67 volunteers). None of the players experienced a concussion. Blood samples were collected before and after games (n = 57); the number of head hits in all players was monitored by movie review and post-game interviews. S100B serum levels and auto-antibodies against S100B were measured and correlated by direct and reverse immunoassays (n = 15 players; 5 games). A subset of players underwent DTI scans pre- and post-season and after a 6-month interval (n = 10). Cognitive and functional assessments were also performed. After a game, transient BBB damage measured by serum S100B was detected only in players experiencing the greatest number of sub-concussive head hits. Elevated levels of auto-antibodies against S100B were elevated only after repeated sub-concussive events characterized by BBBD. Serum levels of S100B auto-antibodies also predicted persistence of MRI-DTI abnormalities which in turn correlated with cognitive changes. Even in the absence of concussion, football players may experience repeated BBBD and serum surges of the potential auto-antigen S100B. The correlation of serum S100B, auto-antibodies and DTI changes support a link between repeated BBBD and future risk for cognitive changes. PMID:23483891

  5. Middle cerebral artery thrombosis: acute blood-brain barrier consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, W.D.; Prado, R.; Watson, B.D.; Nakayama, H.

    1988-07-01

    The effect of middle cerebral artery (MCA) thrombosis on the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was studied in rats using horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Endothelial injury with subsequent platelet thrombosis was produced by means of a rose bengal-sensitized photochemical reaction, facilitated by irradiating the right proximal MCA segment with the focused beam of an argon laser. At 15 minutes following thrombosis formation, diffuse leakage of HRP was observed bilaterally within cortical and subcortical brain areas. Peroxidase extravasation was most dense within the territory of the occluded artery including neocortical areas and dorso-lateral striatum. Contralaterally, a similar distribution was observed but with less intense HRP leakage. Ultrastructural studies demonstrated an increase in permeability to HRP within arterioles, venules and capillaries. At these sites, the vascular endothelium contained HRP-filled pinocytotic vesicles and tubular profiles. Although less intense, bilateral HRP leakage was also observed following MCA stenosis or femoral artery occlusion. Endothelial-platelet interactions at the site of vascular injury may be responsible for releasing substances or neurohumoral factors which contribute to the acute opening of the BBB.

  6. Capsaicin pretreatment prevents disruption of the blood-aqueous barrier in the rabbit eye

    SciTech Connect

    Bynke, G.

    1983-06-01

    Capsaicin, the irritating agent of red pepper, produces ocular inflammation through a neurogenic mechanism. The present study is concerned with the long-term effects of capsaicin pretreatment on the capacity of the eye to respond to different inflammatory stimuli. Following retrobulbar injection of capsaicin to rabbits the aqueous flare response induced by subsequent infrared irradiation (IR) of the iris, subcutaneously administered alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and exogenously administered prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was reduced greatly. In the case of IR and alpha-MSH the reduced responsiveness was manifest for several weeks after capsaicin pretreatment, involving first the capsaicin-treated eye, but later also the contralateral control eye. After 2-3 months the aqueous flare response was normal in both eyes. In the case of PGE2 the responsiveness was reduced for a shorter time; after 3 weeks the response was normal in both eyes. The results indicate that all three stimuli tested are at least partly dependent upon an intact sensory innervation to disrupt the blood-aqueous barrier, but that the mechanism of action of PGE2 is different from that of IR and alpha-MSH.

  7. Bifidobacteria Prevent Tunicamycin-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Subsequent Barrier Disruption in Human Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Takuya; Oishi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is caused by accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER, thereby compromising its vital cellular functions in protein production and secretion. Genome wide association studies in humans as well as experimental animal models linked ER stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) with intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the mechanisms linking the outcomes of ER stress in IECs to intestinal disease have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the impact of ER stress on intestinal epithelial barrier function using human colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 monolayers. Tunicamycin-induced ER stress decreased the trans-epithelial electrical resistance of Caco-2 monolayers, concomitant with loss of cellular plasma membrane integrity. Epithelial barrier disruption in Caco-2 cells after ER stress was not caused by caspase- or RIPK1-dependent cell death but was accompanied by lysosomal rupture and up-regulation of the ER stress markers Grp78, sXBP1 and Chop. Interestingly, several bifidobacteria species inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress and thereby diminished barrier disruption in Caco-2 monolayers. Together, these results showed that ER stress compromises the epithelial barrier function of Caco-2 monolayers and demonstrate beneficial impacts of bifidobacteria on ER stress in IECs. Our results identify epithelial barrier loss as a potential link between ER stress and intestinal disease development, and suggest that bifidobacteria could exert beneficial effects on this phenomenon. PMID:27611782

  8. ACUTE ETHANOL DISRUPTS PHOTIC AND SEROTONERGIC CIRCADIAN CLOCK PHASE-RESETTING IN THE MOUSE

    PubMed Central

    Brager, Allison J.; Ruby, Christina L.; Prosser, Rebecca A.; Glass, J. David

    2011-01-01

    Background Alcohol abuse is associated with impaired circadian rhythms and sleep. Ethanol administration disrupts circadian clock phase-resetting, suggesting a mode for the disruptive effect of alcohol abuse on the circadian timing system. In this study, we extend previous work in C57BL/6J mice to: 1) characterize the SCN pharmacokinetics of acute systemic ethanol administration; 2) explore the effects of acute ethanol on photic and non-photic phase-resetting; and 2) determine if the SCN is a direct target for photic effects. Methods First, microdialysis was used to characterize the pharmacokinetics of acute i.p. injections of 3 doses of ethanol (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg) in the mouse suprachiasmatic (SCN) circadian clock. Second, the effects of acute i.p. ethanol administration on photic phase-delays and serotonergic ([+]8-OH-DPAT-induced) phase-advances of the circadian activity rhythm were assessed. Third, the effects of reverse-microdialysis ethanol perfusion of the SCN on photic phase-resetting were characterized. Results Peak ethanol levels from the 3 doses of ethanol in the SCN occurred within 20–40 min post-injection with half-lives for clearance ranging from 0.6–1.8 hr. Systemic ethanol treatment dose-dependently attenuated photic and serotonergic phase-resetting. This treatment also did not affect basal SCN neuronal activity as assessed by Fos expression. Intra-SCN perfusion with ethanol markedly reduced photic phase-delays. Conclusions These results confirm that acute ethanol attenuates photic phase-delay shifts and serotonergic phase-advance shifts in the mouse. This dual effect could disrupt photic and non-photic entrainment mechanisms governing circadian clock timing. It is also significant that the SCN clock is a direct target for disruptive effects of ethanol on photic shifting. Such actions by ethanol could underlie the disruptive effects of alcohol abuse on behavioral, physiological, and endocrine rhythms associated with alcoholism. PMID:21463340

  9. MR-Guided Unfocused Ultrasound Disruption of the Rat Blood-Brain Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Kelly A.; King, Randy L.; Zaharchuk, Greg; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2011-09-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound with microbubbles can temporarily disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for drug delivery. Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) can visualize gadolinium passage into the brain, indicating BBB opening. Previous studies used focused ultrasound, which is appropriate for the targeted delivery of drugs. The purpose of this study was to investigate unfocused ultrasound for BBB opening across the whole brain. In 10 rats, gadolinium-based MR contrast agent (Gd; 0.25 ml) was administered concurrent with ultrasound microbubbles (Optison, 0.25 ml) and circulated for 20 sec before sonication. A 753 kHz planar PZT transducer, diameter 1.8 cm, sonicated each rat brain with supplied voltage of 300, 400, or 500 mVpp for 10 sec in continuous wave mode, or at 500 mVpp at 20% duty cycle at 10 Hz for 30-300 sec. After sonication, coronal T1-weighted FSE CE-MRI images were acquired with a 3in surface coil. The imaging protocol was repeated 3-5 times after treatment. One control animal was given Gd and microbubbles, but not sonicated, and the other was given Gd and sonicated without microbubbles. Signal change in ROIs over the muscle, mesencephalon/ventricles, and the cortex/striatum were measured at 3-5 time points up to 36 min after sonication. Signal intensity was converted to % signal change compared to the initial image. In the controls, CE-MRI showed brightening of surrounding structures, but not the brain. In the continuous wave subjects, cortex/striatum signal did not increase, but ventricle/mesenchephalon signal did. Those that received pulsed sonications showed signal increases in both the cortex/striatum and ventricles/mesenchephalon. In conclusion, after pulsed unfocused ultrasound sonication, the BBB is disrupted across the whole brain, including cortex and deep grey matter, while continuous wave sonication affects only the ventricles and possibly deeper structures, without opening the cortex BBB. As time passes, the timeline of Gd passage into the brain

  10. Acute restraint stress and corticosterone transiently disrupts novelty preference in an object recognition task.

    PubMed

    Vargas-López, Viviana; Torres-Berrio, Angélica; González-Martínez, Lina; Múnera, Alejandro; Lamprea, Marisol R

    2015-09-15

    The object recognition task is a procedure based on rodents' natural tendency to explore novel objects which is frequently used for memory testing. However, in some instances novelty preference is replaced by familiarity preference, raising questions regarding the validity of novelty preference as a pure recognition memory index. Acute stress- and corticosterone administration-induced novel object preference disruption has been frequently interpreted as memory impairment; however, it is still not clear whether such effect can be actually attributed to either mnemonic disruption or altered novelty seeking. Seventy-five adult male Wistar rats were trained in an object recognition task and subjected to either acute stress or corticosterone administration to evaluate the effect of stress or corticosterone on an object recognition task. Acute stress was induced by restraining movement for 1 or 4h, ending 30 min before the sample trial. Corticosterone was injected intraperitoneally 10 min before the test trial which was performed either 1 or 24h after the sample trial. Four-hour, but not 1-h, stress induced familiar object preference during the test trial performed 1h after the sample trial; however, acute stress had no effects on the test when performed 24h after sample trial. Systemic administration of corticosterone before the test trial performed either 1 or 24h after the sample trial also resulted in familiar object preference. However, neither acute stress nor corticosterone induced changes in locomotor behaviour. Taken together, such results suggested that acute stress probably does not induce memory retrieval impairment but, instead, induces an emotional arousing state which motivates novelty avoidance.

  11. Methamphetamine is not Toxic but Disrupts the Cell Cycle of Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D; Gamieldien, K; Mafunda, P S

    2015-07-01

    The cytotoxic effects of methamphetamine (MA) are well established to be caused via induced oxidative stress which in turn compromises the core function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) by reducing its ability to regulate the homeostatic environment of the brain. While most studies were conducted over a period of 24-48 h, this study investigated the mechanisms by which chronic exposure of MA adversely affect the endothelial cells of BBB over an extended period of 96 h. MA induced significant depression of cell numbers at 96 h. This result was supported by flow cytometric data on the cell cycle which showed that brain endothelial cells (bEnd5) at 96 h were significantly suppressed in the S-phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, at 24-72 h control cell numbers for G1, S and G2-M phases were similar to MA-exposed cells. MA (0-1,000 µM) did not, however, statistically affect the viability and cytotoxicity of the bEnd5 cells, and the profile of ATP production and DNA synthesis (BrdU) across 96 h did not provide a rationale for the suppression of cell division. Our study reports for the first time that chronic exposure to MA results in long-term disruption of the cell cycle phases which eventuates in the attenuation of brain capillary endothelial cell growth after 96 h, compounding and contributing to the already well-known adverse short-term permeability effects of MA exposure on the BBB.

  12. Hypo-osmotic shock-induced subclinical inflammation of skin in a rat model of disrupted skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Chihiro; Minematsu, Takeo; Huang, Lijuan; Mugita, Yuko; Kitamura, Aya; Nakagami, Gojiro; Yamane, Takumi; Yoshida, Mikako; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Funakubo, Megumi; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    Aging disrupts skin barrier function and induces xerosis accompanied by pruritus. In many cases, elderly patients complain of pruritus during skin hygiene care, a condition called aquagenic pruritus of the elderly (APE). To date, the pathophysiology and mechanism of action of APE have not been elucidated. We conducted the present study to test the hypothesis that hypo-osmotic shock of epidermal cells induces skin inflammation and elongation of C-fibers by nerve growth factor β (NGFβ) as a basic mechanism of APE. The dorsal skin of HWY rats, which are a model for disrupted skin barrier function, was treated with distilled water (hypotonic treatment [Hypo] group) or normal saline (isotonic treatment [Iso] group) by applying soaked gauze for 7 days. Untreated rats were used as a control (no-treatment [NT] group). Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses revealed inflammatory responses in the epidermis and the dermal papillary layer in the Hypo group, while no alterations were observed in the Iso or NT groups. Induction of expression and secretion of NGFβ and elongation of C-fibers into the epidermis were found in the Hypo group. In contrast, secretion of NGFβ was significantly lower and elongation of C-fibers was not observed in the Iso group. These results suggest that hypo-osmotic shock-induced inflammatory reactions promote hypersensitivity to pruritus in skin with disrupted barrier function.

  13. Effect of skin barrier disruption on immune responses to topically applied cross-reacting material, CRM(197), of diphtheria toxin.

    PubMed

    Godefroy, S; Peyre, M; Garcia, N; Muller, S; Sesardic, D; Partidos, C D

    2005-08-01

    The high accessibility of the skin and the presence of immunocompetent cells in the epidermis makes this surface an attractive route for needle-free administration of vaccines. However, the lining of the skin by the stratum corneum is a major obstacle to vaccine delivery. In this study we examined the effect of skin barrier disruption on the immune responses to the cross-reacting material CRM(197), a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin (DTx) that is considered as a vaccine candidate. Application of CRM(197), together with cholera toxin (CT), onto the tape-stripped skin of mice elicited antibody responses that had anti-DTx neutralizing activity. Vaccine delivery onto mildly ablated skin or intact skin did not elicit any detectable anti-CRM(197) antibodies. Mice immunized with CRM(197) alone onto the tape-stripped skin mounted a vigorous antigen-specific proliferative response. In contrast, the induction of cellular immunity after CRM(197) deposition onto mildly ablated or intact skin was adjuvant dependent. Furthermore, epidermal cells were activated and underwent apoptosis that was more pronounced when the stratum corneum was removed by tape stripping. Overall, these findings highlight the potential for transcutaneous delivery of CRM(197) and establish a correlation between the degree of barrier disruption and levels of antigen-specific immune responses. Moreover, these results provide the first evidence that the development of a transcutaneous immunization strategy for diphtheria, based on simple and practical methods to disrupt the skin barrier, is feasible.

  14. Role of nitric oxide synthases in early blood-brain barrier disruption following transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zheng; Li, Chun; Arrick, Denise M; Yang, Shu; Baluna, Alexandra E; Sun, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) in early blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption was determined using a new mouse model of transient focal cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was induced by ligating the middle cerebral artery (MCA) at its M2 segment and reperfusion was induced by releasing the ligation. The diameter alteration of the MCA, arterial anastomoses and collateral arteries were imaged and measured in real time. BBB disruption was assessed by Evans Blue (EB) and sodium fluorescein (Na-F) extravasation at 3 hours of reperfusion. The reperfusion produced an extensive vasodilation and a sustained hyperemia. Although expression of NOSs was not altered at 3 hours of reperfusion, L-NAME (a non-specific NOS inhibitor) abolished reperfusion-induced vasodilation/hyperemia and significantly reduced EB and Na-F extravasation. L-NIO (an endothelial NOS (eNOS) inhibitor) significantly attenuated cerebral vasodilation but not BBB disruption, whereas L-NPA and 7-NI (neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibitors) significantly reduced BBB disruption but not cerebral vasodilation. In contrast, aminoguanidine (AG) (an inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitor) had less effect on either cerebral vasodilation or BBB disruption. On the other hand, papaverine (PV) not only increased the vasodilation/hyperemia but also significantly reduced BBB disruption. Combined treatment with L-NAME and PV preserved the vasodilation/hyperemia and significantly reduced BBB disruption. Our findings suggest that nNOS may play a major role in early BBB disruption following transient focal cerebral ischemia via a hyperemia-independent mechanism.

  15. Opioid-induced gut microbial disruption and bile dysregulation leads to gut barrier compromise and sustained systemic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Santanu; Sindberg, Gregory; Wang, Fuyuan; Meng, Jingjing; Sharma, Umakant; Zhang, Li; Dauer, Patricia; Chen, Chi; Dalluge, Joseph; Johnson, Timothy; Roy, Sabita

    2016-01-01

    Morphine and its pharmacological derivatives are the most prescribed analgesics for moderate to severe pain management. However, chronic use of morphine reduces pathogen clearance and induces bacterial translocation across the gut barrier. The enteric microbiome has been shown to play a critical role in the preservation of the mucosal barrier function and metabolic homeostasis. Here, we show for the first time, using bacterial 16s rDNA sequencing, that chronic morphine treatment significantly alters the gut microbial composition and induces preferential expansion of gram-positive pathogenic and reduction in bile-deconjugating bacterial strains. A significant reduction in both primary and secondary bile acid levels was seen in the gut, but not in the liver with morphine treatment. Morphine induced microbial dysbiosis and gut barrier disruption was rescued by transplanting placebo-treated microbiota into morphine-treated animals, indicating that microbiome modulation could be exploited as a therapeutic strategy for patients using morphine for pain management. PMID:26906406

  16. The effect of timolol maleate on the disruption of the blood-aqueous barrier in the rabbit eye

    SciTech Connect

    Holmdahl, G.; Bengtsson, E.

    1981-06-01

    A disruption of the blood-aqueous barrier in rabbit eyes was elicited by use of topical prostaglandin E2(PGE2), infrared irradiation of the iris, or by subcutaneous alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH). The aqueous flare provoked was measured quantitatively with a photoelectric instrument. The effect of the (topical) beta-adrenergic antagonist timolol maleate on the breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier was tested. Timolol applied topically in very large doses had no effect on exogenously administered PGE2. However, even in a very small concentration applied topically, timolol reduced the flare response to both infrared irradiation and alpha-MSH. These results support the theory that the effect of alpha-MSH and infrared irradiation on the blood-aqueous barrier is dependent on intact beta-adrenergic receptor sites.

  17. Anesthesia-Induced Hypothermia Attenuates Early-Phase Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption but Not Infarct Volume following Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Cheng; Lee, Yu-Da; Wang, Hwai-Lee; Liao, Kate Hsiurong; Chen, Kuen-Bao; Poon, Kin-Shing; Pan, Yu-Ling; Lai, Ted Weita

    2017-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is thought to facilitate the development of cerebral infarction after a stroke. In a typical stroke model (such as the one used in this study), the early phase of BBB disruption reaches a peak 6 h post-ischemia and largely recovers after 8-24 h, whereas the late phase of BBB disruption begins 48-58 h post-ischemia. Because cerebral infarct develops within 24 h after the onset of ischemia, and several therapeutic agents have been shown to reduce the infarct volume when administered at 6 h post-ischemia, we hypothesized that attenuating BBB disruption at its peak (6 h post-ischemia) can also decrease the infarct volume measured at 24 h. We used a mouse stroke model obtained by combining 120 min of distal middle cerebral arterial occlusion (dMCAo) with ipsilateral common carotid arterial occlusion (CCAo). This model produced the most reliable BBB disruption and cerebral infarction compared to other models characterized by a shorter duration of ischemia or obtained with dMCAO or CCAo alone. The BBB permeability was measured by quantifying Evans blue dye (EBD) extravasation, as this tracer has been shown to be more sensitive for the detection of early-phase BBB disruption compared to other intravascular tracers that are more appropriate for detecting late-phase BBB disruption. We showed that a 1 h-long treatment with isoflurane-anesthesia induced marked hypothermia and attenuated the peak of BBB disruption when administered 6 h after the onset of dMCAo/CCAo-induced ischemia. We also demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of isoflurane was hypothermia-dependent because the same treatment had no effect on ischemic BBB disruption when the mouse body temperature was maintained at 37°C. Importantly, inhibiting the peak of BBB disruption by hypothermia had no effect on the volume of brain infarct 24 h post-ischemia. In conclusion, inhibiting the peak of BBB disruption is not an effective neuroprotective strategy, especially in comparison

  18. Anesthesia-Induced Hypothermia Attenuates Early-Phase Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption but Not Infarct Volume following Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Cheng; Lee, Yu-Da; Wang, Hwai-Lee; Liao, Kate Hsiurong; Chen, Kuen-Bao; Poon, Kin-Shing; Pan, Yu-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is thought to facilitate the development of cerebral infarction after a stroke. In a typical stroke model (such as the one used in this study), the early phase of BBB disruption reaches a peak 6 h post-ischemia and largely recovers after 8–24 h, whereas the late phase of BBB disruption begins 48–58 h post-ischemia. Because cerebral infarct develops within 24 h after the onset of ischemia, and several therapeutic agents have been shown to reduce the infarct volume when administered at 6 h post-ischemia, we hypothesized that attenuating BBB disruption at its peak (6 h post-ischemia) can also decrease the infarct volume measured at 24 h. We used a mouse stroke model obtained by combining 120 min of distal middle cerebral arterial occlusion (dMCAo) with ipsilateral common carotid arterial occlusion (CCAo). This model produced the most reliable BBB disruption and cerebral infarction compared to other models characterized by a shorter duration of ischemia or obtained with dMCAO or CCAo alone. The BBB permeability was measured by quantifying Evans blue dye (EBD) extravasation, as this tracer has been shown to be more sensitive for the detection of early-phase BBB disruption compared to other intravascular tracers that are more appropriate for detecting late-phase BBB disruption. We showed that a 1 h-long treatment with isoflurane-anesthesia induced marked hypothermia and attenuated the peak of BBB disruption when administered 6 h after the onset of dMCAo/CCAo-induced ischemia. We also demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of isoflurane was hypothermia-dependent because the same treatment had no effect on ischemic BBB disruption when the mouse body temperature was maintained at 37°C. Importantly, inhibiting the peak of BBB disruption by hypothermia had no effect on the volume of brain infarct 24 h post-ischemia. In conclusion, inhibiting the peak of BBB disruption is not an effective neuroprotective strategy, especially in

  19. Nitric oxide attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced barrier disruption and protein tyrosine phosphorylation in monolayers of intestinal epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Takanori; Tsuji, Hideo; Onoda, Makoto

    2007-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium provides a barrier to the transport of harmful luminal molecules into the systemic circulation. A dysfunctional epithelial barrier is closely associated with the pathogenesis of a variety of intestinal and systemic disorders. We investigated here the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on the barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2. When treated with H(2)O(2), Caco-2 cell monolayers grown on permeable supports exhibited several remarkable features of barrier dysfunction as follows: a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance, an increase in paracellular permeability to dextran, and a disruption of the intercellular junctional localization of the scaffolding protein ZO-1. In addition, an induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous cellular proteins including ZO-1, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin, components of tight and adherens junctions, was observed. On the other hand, combined treatment of Caco-2 monolayers with H(2)O(2) and an NO donor (NOC5 or NOC12) relieved the damage to the barrier function and suppressed the protein tyrosine phosphorylation induced by H(2)O(2) alone. These results suggest that NO protects the barrier function of intestinal epithelia from oxidative stress by modulating some intracellular signaling pathways of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in epithelial cells.

  20. Dissolution of lipids from mucus: a possible mechanism for prompt disruption of gut barrier function by alcohol.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaofa; Deitch, Edwin A

    2015-01-22

    Acute and/or chronic alcohol ingestion has been shown to exacerbate the morbidity and mortality rate associated with acute mechanical and/or thermal trauma. While alcohol ingestion can affect many organs and systems, clinical and preclinical studies indicate that alcohol ingestion can cause a 'leaky gut' syndrome which in turn contributes to infection and systemic organ dysfunction. This study investigated the acute effect of alcohol on gut barrier function. Using an in vivo isolated gut sac model of naïve male rats, each individual gut sac was injected with different concentrations (0, 5, 10, 20, and 40%, v/v) of alcohol. After different times of alcohol exposure, each isolated gut segment was harvested and intestinal permeability and mucosal surface hydrophobicity (a physiologic marker of mucus barrier function) were measured as well as luminal DNA, mucus, protein and free fatty acids. The results showed that alcohol caused dose-dependent and time-dependent increases in gut permeability and decreases in mucosal surface hydrophobicity, with significant changes to be observed 5 min after treatment with 10% alcohol. In addition, it is further found that these changes in permeability and hydrophobicity are more closely associated with increased intestinal luminal free fatty acids levels but not protein or DNA levels. These results suggest that alcohol may cause loss of gut barrier function by extracting and dissolving lipids from the mucus with a resultant decrease in mucosal surface hydrophobicity, which is a critical component of gut barrier function.

  1. Cyclo-oxygenase isozymes in mucosal ulcerogenic and functional responses following barrier disruption in rat stomachs

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Takuya; Ukawa, Hideki; Yamakuni, Hisashi; Kato, Shinichi; Takeuchi, Koji

    1997-01-01

    We examined the effects of selective and nonselective cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors on various functional changes in the rat stomach induced by topical application of taurocholate (TC) and investigated the preferential role of COX isozymes in these responses. Rat stomachs mounted in ex vivo chambers were perfused with 50 mM HCl and transmucosal potential difference (p.d.), mucosal blood flow (GMBF), luminal acid loss and luminal levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were measured before, during and after exposure to 20 mM TC. Mucosal application of TC in control rats caused a reduction in p.d., followed by an increase of luminal acid loss and GMBF, and produced only minimal damage in the mucosa 2 h later. Pretreatment with indomethacin (10 mg kg−1, s.c.), a nonselective COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitor, attenuated the gastric hyperaemic response caused by TC without affecting p.d. and acid loss, resulting in haemorrhagic lesions in the mucosa. In contrast, selective COX-2 inhibitors, such as NS-398 and nimesulide (10 mg kg−1, s.c.), had no effect on any of the responses induced by TC and did not cause gross damage in the mucosa. Luminal PGE2 levels were markedly increased during and after exposure to TC and this response was significantly inhibited by indomethacin but not by either NS-398 or nimesulide. The expression of COX-1-mRNA was consistently detected in the gastric mucosa before and after TC treatment, while a faint expression of COX-2-mRNA was detected only 2 h after TC treatment. Both NS-398 and nimesulide significantly suppressed carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema, similar to indomethacin. These results confirmed a mediator role for prostaglandins in the gastric hyperaemic response following TC-induced barrier disruption, and suggest that COX-1 but not COX-2 is a key enzyme in maintaining ‘housekeeping' functions in the gastric mucosa under both normal and adverse conditions. PMID:9351500

  2. Disruption of paracellular sealing is an early event in acute caerulein-pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Marcus; Klonowski-Stumpe, Hanne; Eckert, Mario; Lüthen, Reinhard; Häussinger, Dieter

    2004-03-01

    Caerulein-induced pancreatitis is a widely used experimental model for studies on acute pancreatitis, however, the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatitis in response to caerulein hyperstimulation are incompletely understood. We therefore studied early effects of caerulein on tight junctional integrity. Mice were injected with the cholecystokinin analogue caerulein (50microg/kg BW/h) to induce pancreatitis. In pancreatic tissue occludin, claudin 1, zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) were stained immunohistochemically and F-actin was visualized with phalloidin-TRITC. Stained sections and isolated acini were studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Under control conditions occludin, claudin1, ZO-1, and F-actin showed a linear staining pattern delineating the apical membranes of intralobular duct cells and of acinar cells. While in vitro caerulein hyperstimulation induced within 10 minutes disassembly of both occludin and ZO-1, in vivo caerulein hyperstimulation induced disassembly of occludin and claudin1 but not of ZO-1 from the tight junctions. Subsequent progressive disruption of ZO-1 was detected in a time dependent manner. Disruption of the transmembrane tight junction proteins occludin and claudin1 is an early event of caerulein hyperstimulation and may allow evasion of noxious luminal content into the interstitium, which may augment edema formation in acute pancreatitis.

  3. Induction of VEGFA and Snail-1 by meningitic Escherichia coli mediates disruption of the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruicheng; Liu, Wentong; Miao, Ling; Yang, Xiaopei; Fu, Jiyang; Dou, Beibei; Cai, Aoling; Zong, Xin; Tan, Chen; Chen, Huanchun; Wang, Xiangru

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common Gram-negative bacterium that possesses the ability to cause neonatal meningitis, which develops as circulating bacteria penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, whether meningitic E. coli could induce disruption of the BBB and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Our current work highlight for the first time the participation of VEGFA and Snail-1, as well as the potential mechanisms, in meningitic E. coli induced disruption of the BBB. Here, we characterized a meningitis-causing E. coli PCN033, and demonstrated that PCN033 invasion could increase the BBB permeability through downregulating and remodeling the tight junction proteins (TJ proteins). This process required the PCN033 infection-induced upregulation of VEGFA and Snail-1, which involves the activation of TLR2-MAPK-ERK1/2 signaling cascade. Moreover, production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in response to infection also promoted the upregulation of VEGFA and Snail-1, therefore further mediating the BBB disruption. Our observations reported here directly support the involvement of VEGFA and Snail-1 in meningitic E. coli induced BBB disruption, and VEGFA and Snail-1 would therefore represent the essential host targets for future prevention of clinical E. coli meningitis. PMID:27588479

  4. Sleep disruption and its effect on lymphocyte redeployment following an acute bout of exercise.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Lesley A; Simpson, Richard J; Malone, Eva; Florida-James, Geraint D

    2015-07-01

    Sleep disruption and deprivation are common in contemporary society and have been linked with poor health, decreased job performance and increased life-stress. The rapid redeployment of lymphocytes between the blood and tissues is an archetypal feature of the acute stress response, but it is not known if short-term perturbations in sleep architecture affect lymphocyte redeployment. We examined the effects of a disrupted night sleep on the exercise-induced redeployment of lymphocytes and their subtypes. 10 healthy male cyclists performed 1h of cycling at a fixed power output on an indoor cycle ergometer, following a night of undisrupted sleep (US) or a night of disrupted sleep (DS). Blood was collected before, immediately after and 1h after exercise completion. Lymphocytes and their subtypes were enumerated using direct immunofluorescence assays and 4-colour flow cytometry. DS was associated with elevated concentrations of total lymphocytes and CD3(-)/CD56(+) NK-cells. Although not affecting baseline levels, DS augmented the exercise-induced redeployment of CD8(+) T-cells, with the naïve/early differentiated subtypes (KLRG1(-)/CD45RA(+)) being affected most. While the mobilisation of cytotoxic lymphocyte subsets (NK cells, CD8(+) T-cells γδ T-cells), tended to be larger in response to exercise following DS, their enhanced egress at 1h post-exercise was more marked. This occurred despite similar serum cortisol and catecholamine levels between the US and DS trials. NK-cells redeployed with exercise after DS retained their expression of perforin and Granzyme-B indicating that DS did not affect NK-cell 'arming'. Our findings indicate that short-term changes in sleep architecture may 'prime' the immune system and cause minor enhancements in lymphocyte trafficking in response to acute dynamic exercise.

  5. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Power, Chanikarn; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Livingstone, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete targets. The method presents new opportunities for the use of drugs and for the study of the brain.

  6. Disruption of the blood–brain barrier in pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium, untreated and after anthelmintic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Marzal, Miguel; Cangalaya, Carla; Balboa, Diana; Orrego, Miguel Ángel; Paredes, Adriana; Gonzales-Gustavson, Eloy; Arroyo, Gianfranco; García, Hector H.; González, Armando E.; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Nash, Theodore E.

    2014-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a widely prevalent disease in the tropics that causes seizures and a variety of neurological symptoms in most of the world. Experimental models are limited and do not allow assessment of the degree of inflammation around brain cysts. The vital dye Evans Blue (EB) was injected into 11 pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium cysts to visually identify the extent of disruption of the blood brain barrier. A total of 369 cysts were recovered from the 11 brains and classified according to the staining of their capsules as blue or unstained. The proportion of cysts with blue capsules was significantly higher in brains from pigs that had received anthelmintic treatment 48 and 120 h before the EB infusion, indicating a greater compromise of the blood brain barrier due to treatment. The model could be useful for understanding the pathology of treatment-induced inflammation in neurocysticercosis. PMID:23684909

  7. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Caused by Ultrasound Bursts Combined with Microbubbles Depends on Anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Vykhodtseva, Natalia

    2011-09-01

    Prior works on BBB disruption via inter-arterial infusions of osmotic agents have shown a strong dependence on anesthesia. Here, we investigated whether different anesthesia agents can affect ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. A piston transducer fired through a rubber aperture (frequency: 532 kHz, diameter: 4 cm, aperture diameter: 16 mm) was used to generate the ultrasound fields, and sonications combined with an ultrasound contrast agent were performed at 5 power levels. BBB disruption was quantified by measuring the MRI contrast enhancement in T1-weighted MRI, and erythrocyte extravasation characterized in light microscopy. For each exposure level tested, experiments performed with ketamine/xylazine resulted in significantly greater (P<0.05) enhancement than with isoflurane/oxygen. The onset of severe red blood cell extravasation occurred at lower power levels with ketamine/xylazine. These results suggest ultrasound-induced BBB disruption can depend on anesthesia agent, possibly due effects on the vasculature. These results suggest that care is needed in comparing experiments with different anesthesia agents and physiological factors need to be considered with ultrasound-induced BBB disruption.

  8. Persistence and Toxin Production by Clostridium difficile within Human Intestinal Organoids Result in Disruption of Epithelial Paracellular Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Jhansi L.; Huang, Sha; Opp, Judith S.; Nagy, Melinda S.; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Young, Vincent B.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of infectious nosocomial diarrhea. The pathogenesis of C. difficile infection (CDI) results from the interactions between the pathogen, intestinal epithelium, host immune system, and gastrointestinal microbiota. Previous studies of the host-pathogen interaction in CDI have utilized either simple cell monolayers or in vivo models. While much has been learned by utilizing these approaches, little is known about the direct interaction of the bacterium with a complex host epithelium. Here, we asked if human intestinal organoids (HIOs), which are derived from pluripotent stem cells and demonstrate small intestinal morphology and physiology, could be used to study the pathogenesis of the obligate anaerobe C. difficile. Vegetative C. difficile, microinjected into the lumen of HIOs, persisted in a viable state for up to 12 h. Upon colonization with C. difficile VPI 10463, the HIO epithelium is markedly disrupted, resulting in the loss of paracellular barrier function. Since similar effects were not observed when HIOs were colonized with the nontoxigenic C. difficile strain F200, we directly tested the role of toxin using TcdA and TcdB purified from VPI 10463. We show that the injection of TcdA replicates the disruption of the epithelial barrier function and structure observed in HIOs colonized with viable C. difficile. PMID:25312952

  9. Probiotics ameliorate the hydrogen peroxide-induced epithelial barrier disruption by a PKC- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Seth, A.; Yan, Fang; Polk, D.Brent; Rao, R. K.

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics promote intestinal epithelial integrity and reduce infection and diarrhea. We evaluated the effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-produced soluble proteins (p40 and p75) on the hydrogen peroxide-induced disruption of tight junctions and barrier function in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Pretreatment of cell monolayers with p40 or p75 attenuated the hydrogen peroxide-induced decrease in transepithelial resistance and increase in inulin permeability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. p40 and p75 also prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced redistribution of occludin, ZO-1, E-cadherin, and β-catenin from the intercellular junctions and their dissociation from the detergent-insoluble fractions. Both p40 and p75 induced a rapid increase in the membrane translocation of PKCβI and PKCε. The attenuation of hydrogen peroxide-induced inulin permeability and redistribution of tight junction proteins by p40 and p75 was abrogated by Ro-32-0432, a PKC inhibitor. p40 and p75 also rapidly increased the levels of phospho-ERK1/2 in the detergent-insoluble fractions. U0126 (a MAP kinase inhibitor) attenuated the p40- and p75-mediated reduction of hydrogen peroxide-induced tight junction disruption and inulin permeability. These studies demonstrate that probiotic-secretory proteins protect the intestinal epithelial tight junctions and the barrier function from hydrogen peroxide-induced insult by a PKC- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. PMID:18292183

  10. Probiotics ameliorate the hydrogen peroxide-induced epithelial barrier disruption by a PKC- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Seth, A; Yan, Fang; Polk, D Brent; Rao, R K

    2008-04-01

    Probiotics promote intestinal epithelial integrity and reduce infection and diarrhea. We evaluated the effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-produced soluble proteins (p40 and p75) on the hydrogen peroxide-induced disruption of tight junctions and barrier function in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Pretreatment of cell monolayers with p40 or p75 attenuated the hydrogen peroxide-induced decrease in transepithelial resistance and increase in inulin permeability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. p40 and p75 also prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced redistribution of occludin, ZO-1, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin from the intercellular junctions and their dissociation from the detergent-insoluble fractions. Both p40 and p75 induced a rapid increase in the membrane translocation of PKCbetaI and PKCepsilon. The attenuation of hydrogen peroxide-induced inulin permeability and redistribution of tight junction proteins by p40 and p75 was abrogated by Ro-32-0432, a PKC inhibitor. p40 and p75 also rapidly increased the levels of phospho-ERK1/2 in the detergent-insoluble fractions. U0126 (a MAP kinase inhibitor) attenuated the p40- and p75-mediated reduction of hydrogen peroxide-induced tight junction disruption and inulin permeability. These studies demonstrate that probiotic-secretory proteins protect the intestinal epithelial tight junctions and the barrier function from hydrogen peroxide-induced insult by a PKC- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanism.

  11. Persistence and toxin production by Clostridium difficile within human intestinal organoids result in disruption of epithelial paracellular barrier function.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Jhansi L; Huang, Sha; Opp, Judith S; Nagy, Melinda S; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Young, Vincent B; Spence, Jason R

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of infectious nosocomial diarrhea. The pathogenesis of C. difficile infection (CDI) results from the interactions between the pathogen, intestinal epithelium, host immune system, and gastrointestinal microbiota. Previous studies of the host-pathogen interaction in CDI have utilized either simple cell monolayers or in vivo models. While much has been learned by utilizing these approaches, little is known about the direct interaction of the bacterium with a complex host epithelium. Here, we asked if human intestinal organoids (HIOs), which are derived from pluripotent stem cells and demonstrate small intestinal morphology and physiology, could be used to study the pathogenesis of the obligate anaerobe C. difficile. Vegetative C. difficile, microinjected into the lumen of HIOs, persisted in a viable state for up to 12 h. Upon colonization with C. difficile VPI 10463, the HIO epithelium is markedly disrupted, resulting in the loss of paracellular barrier function. Since similar effects were not observed when HIOs were colonized with the nontoxigenic C. difficile strain F200, we directly tested the role of toxin using TcdA and TcdB purified from VPI 10463. We show that the injection of TcdA replicates the disruption of the epithelial barrier function and structure observed in HIOs colonized with viable C. difficile.

  12. Growth inhibition in a brain metastasis model by antibody delivery using focused ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Kobus, Thiele; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Zhang, Yongzhi; McDannold, Nathan J

    2016-09-28

    HER2-targeting antibodies (i.e. trastuzumab and pertuzumab) prolong survival in HER2-positive breast cancer patients with extracranial metastases. However, the response of brain metastases to these drugs is poor, and it is hypothesized that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits drug delivery to the brain. We investigated whether we could improve the response by temporary disruption of the BBB using focused ultrasound in combination with microbubbles. To study this, we inoculated 30 nude rats with HER2-positive cells derived from a brain metastasis of a breast cancer patient (MDA-MB-361). The animals were divided into three groups: a control-group that received no treatment; an antibody-only group that received six weekly treatments of trastuzumab and pertuzumab; and an ultrasound+antibody group that received trastuzumab and pertuzumab in combination with six weekly sessions of BBB disruption using focused ultrasound. In two animals, the leakiness of the tumors before disruption was evaluated using contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and found that the tumors were not leaky. The same technique was used to evaluate the effectiveness of BBB disruption, which was successful in all sessions. The tumor in the control animals grew exponentially with a growth constant of 0.042±0.011mm(3)/day. None of the antibody-only animals responded to the treatment and the growth constant was 0.033±0.009mm(3)/day during the treatment period. Four of the ten animals in the ultrasound+antibody-group showed a response to the treatment with an average growth constant of 0.010±0.007mm(3)/day, compared to a growth constant 0.043±0.013mm(3)/day for the six non-responders. After the treatment period, the tumors in all groups grew at similar rates. As the tumors were not leaky before BBB disruption and there were no responders in the antibody-only group, these results show that at least in some cases disruption of the BBB is necessary for a response to the antibodies in

  13. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Neurovascular Unit Dysfunction in Diabetic Mice: Protection with the Mitochondrial Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitor Topiramate.

    PubMed

    Salameh, Therese S; Shah, Gul N; Price, Tulin O; Hayden, Melvin R; Banks, William A

    2016-12-01

    All forms of diabetes mellitus are characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, resulting in the development of a number of microvascular and macrovascular pathologies. Diabetes is also associated with changes in brain microvasculature, leading to dysfunction and ultimately disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). These changes are correlated with a decline in cognitive function. In diabetes, BBB damage is associated with increased oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species. This occurs because of the increased oxidative metabolism of glucose caused by hyperglycemia. Decreasing the production of bicarbonate with the use of a mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (mCAi) limits oxidative metabolism and the production of reactive oxygen species. In this study, we have demonstrated that 1) streptozotocin-induced diabetes resulted in BBB disruption, 2) ultrastructural studies showed a breakdown of the BBB and changes to the neurovascular unit (NVU), including a loss of brain pericytes and retraction of astrocytes, the two cell types that maintain the BBB, and 3) treatment with topiramate, a mCAi, attenuated the effects of diabetes on BBB disruption and ultrastructural changes in the neurovascular unit.

  14. Surgery-Induced Hippocampal Angiotensin II Elevation Causes Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption via MMP/TIMP in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengqian; Mo, Na; Li, Lunxu; Cao, Yiyun; Wang, Wenming; Liang, Yaoxian; Deng, Hui; Xing, Rui; Yang, Lin; Ni, Cheng; Chui, Dehua; Guo, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    Reversible blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption has been uniformly reported in several animal models of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Nevertheless, the precise mechanism underlying this occurrence remains unclear. Using an aged rat model of POCD, we investigated the dynamic changes in expression of molecules involved in BBB disintegration, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 (MMP-9), as well as three of their endogenous tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMP-1, -2, -3), and tried to establish the correlation between MMP/TIMP balance and surgery-induced hippocampal BBB disruption. We validated the increased hippocampal expression of angiotensin II (Ang II) and Ang II receptor type 1 (AT1) after surgery. We also found MMP/TIMP imbalance as early as 6 h after surgery, together with increased BBB permeability and decreased expression of Occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), as well as increased basal lamina protein laminin at 24 h postsurgery. The AT1 antagonist candesartan restored MMP/TIMP equilibrium and modulated expression of Occludin and laminin, but not ZO-1, thereby improving BBB permeability. These events were accompanied by suppression of the surgery-induced canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation cascade. Nevertheless, AT1 antagonism did not affect nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) expression. Collectively, these findings suggest that surgery-induced Ang II release impairs BBB integrity by activating NF-κB signaling and disrupting downstream MMP/TIMP balance via AT1 receptor. PMID:27199659

  15. Targeted gene delivery to the mouse brain by MRI-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qin; Deng, Jinmu; Wang, Feng; Chen, Song; Liu, Yingjiang; Wang, Zhibiao; Wang, Zhigang; Cheng, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of targeted gene transfer into central nervous system (CNS) by MRI-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Before each sonication, T2-weighted images were obtained to select the target region. Followed by injecting DNA-loaded microbubbles into the tail vein, sonication was performed. The state of local BBB, distribution of plasmid DNA through the opened BBB, the ultrastructural changes of neurons and BDNF expression were detected. The results showed that MRI-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) could accomplish noninvasive, transient, and local BBB disruption, at 1h after sonication, plasmid DNA across the opened BBB had been internalized into the neurons presenting heterogeneous distribution and numerous transparent vesicles were observed in the cytoplasm of the neurons at the sonicated region, suggesting vesicle-mediated endocytosis. At 48 h after sonication, the expressions of exogenous gene pBDNF-EGFP were observed in the cytoplasm of some neurons, and BDNF expressions were markedly enhanced by the combination of ultrasound and pBDNF-EGFP-loaded microbubbles about 20-fold than that of the control group (P<0.01). The method by using MRI-guided FUS to induce the local BBB disruption could accomplish effective targeted exogenous gene transfer in CNS. This technique may provide a new option for the treatment of various CNS diseases.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of BPA in gliomas with ultrasound induced blood-brain barrier disruption as measured by microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Lin, Yi-Li; Chou, Fong-In; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Hsueh Liu, Yen-Wan; Chang, Lun-Wei; Hsieh, Yu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be transiently disrupted by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles for targeted drug delivery. Previous studies have illustrated the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery across the BBB after sonication using indirect visualization techniques. In this study, we investigated the in vivo extracellular kinetics of boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-f) in glioma-bearing rats with FUS-induced BBB disruption by microdialysis. After simultaneous intravenous administration of BPA and FUS exposure, the boron concentration in the treated brains was quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. With FUS, the mean peak concentration of BPA-f in the glioma dialysate was 3.6 times greater than without FUS, and the area under the concentration-time curve was 2.1 times greater. This study demonstrates that intracerebral microdialysis can be used to assess local BBB transport profiles of drugs in a sonicated site. Applying microdialysis to the study of metabolism and pharmacokinetics is useful for obtaining selective information within a specific brain site after FUS-induced BBB disruption.

  17. Phenylbutyrate prevents disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yulong; Ye, Libing; Zheng, Binbin; Zhu, Sipin; Shi, Hongxue; Zhang, Hongyu; Wang, Zhouguang; Wei, Xiaojie; Chen, Daqing; Li, Xiaokun; Xu, Huazi; Xiao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the role of endocytoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by spinal cord injury (SCI) in blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption and the effect of phenylbutyrate (PBA) on BSCB disruption after SCI. After a moderate contusion injury at the T9 level of spinal cord with a vascular clip, PBA was immediately administered into injured rat via intraperitoneal injection (100 mg/kg) and then further treated once a day for 2 weeks for behavior test. Spinal cord was collected at 1 day post-injury for evaluation of the effects of ER stress and PBA on BSCB disruption after SCI. PBA significantly attenuated BSCB permeability and degradation of tight junction molecules such as P120, β-catenin, Occludin and Claudin5 at 1 day after injury and improved functional recovery in the rat model of trauma. The BSCB protective effect of PBA is related to the inhibition of ER stress induced by SCI. In addition, PBA significantly inhibited the increase of ER stress markers and prevents loss of tight junction and adherens junction proteins in TG-treated human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Taken together, our data demonstrate that therapeutic strategies targeting ER stress may be suitable for the therapy of preserving BSCB integrity after SCI. PBA may be a new candidate as a therapeutic agent for protecting SCI by a compromised BSCB. PMID:27186310

  18. Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Disruption through Altered Mucosal MicroRNA Expression in Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gaulke, Christopher A.; Porter, Matthew; Han, Yan-Hong; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Grishina, Irina; George, Michael D.; Dang, Angeline T.; Ding, Shou-Wei; Jiang, Guochun; Korf, Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epithelial barrier dysfunction during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has largely been attributed to the rapid and severe depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Although it is known that changes in mucosal gene expression contribute to intestinal enteropathy, the role of small noncoding RNAs, specifically microRNA (miRNA), has not been investigated. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected nonhuman primate model of HIV pathogenesis, we investigated the effect of viral infection on miRNA expression in intestinal mucosa. SIV infection led to a striking decrease in the expression of mucosal miRNA compared to that in uninfected controls. This decrease coincided with an increase in 5′-3′-exoribonuclease 2 protein and alterations in DICER1 and Argonaute 2 expression. Targets of depleted miRNA belonged to molecular pathways involved in epithelial proliferation, differentiation, and immune response. Decreased expression of several miRNA involved in maintaining epithelial homeostasis in the gut was localized to the proliferative crypt region of the intestinal epithelium. Our findings suggest that SIV-induced decreased expression of miRNA involved in epithelial homeostasis, disrupted expression of miRNA biogenesis machinery, and increased expression of XRN2 are involved in the development of epithelial barrier dysfunction and gastroenteropathy. IMPORTANCE MicroRNA (miRNA) regulate the development and function of intestinal epithelial cells, and many viruses disrupt normal host miRNA expression. In this study, we demonstrate that SIV and HIV disrupt expression of miRNA in the small intestine during infection. The depletion of several key miRNA is localized to the proliferative crypt region of the gut epithelium. These miRNA are known to control expression of genes involved in inflammation, cell death, and epithelial maturation. Our data indicate that this disruption might be caused by altered expression of mi

  19. Arginine-Vasopressin Receptor Blocker Conivaptan Reduces Brain Edema and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption after Experimental Stroke in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zeynalov, Emil; Jones, Susan M.; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Snell, Lawrence D.; Elliott, J. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Stroke is complicated by brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and is often accompanied by increased release of arginine-vasopressin (AVP). AVP acts through V1a and V2 receptors to trigger hyponatremia, vasospasm, and platelet aggregation which can exacerbate brain edema. The AVP receptor blockers conivaptan (V1a and V2) and tolvaptan (V2) are used to correct hyponatremia, but their effect on post-ischemic brain edema and BBB disruption remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate if these drugs can prevent brain edema and BBB disruption in mice after stroke. Methods Experimental mice underwent the filament model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with reperfusion. Mice were treated with conivaptan, tolvaptan, or vehicle. Treatments were initiated immediately at reperfusion and administered IV (conivaptan) or orally (tolvaptan) for 48 hours. Physiological variables, neurological deficit scores (NDS), plasma and urine sodium and osmolality were recorded. Brain water content (BWC) and Evans Blue (EB) extravasation index were evaluated at the end point. Results Both conivaptan and tolvaptan produced aquaresis as indicated by changes in plasma and urine sodium levels. However plasma and urine osmolality was changed only by conivaptan. Unlike tolvaptan, conivaptan improved NDS and reduced BWC in the ipsilateral hemisphere: from 81.66 ± 0.43% (vehicle) to 78.28 ± 0.48% (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05 vs vehicle). Conivaptan also attenuated the EB extravasation from 1.22 ± 0.08 (vehicle) to 1.01 ± 0.02 (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05). Conclusion Continuous IV infusion with conivaptan for 48 hours after experimental stroke reduces brain edema, and BBB disruption. Conivaptan but not tolvaptan may potentially be used in patients to prevent brain edema after stroke. PMID:26275173

  20. Deficiency of tenascin-C and attenuation of blood-brain barrier disruption following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Masashi; Shiba, Masato; Kawakita, Fumihiro; Liu, Lei; Shimojo, Naoshi; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Tenascin-C (TNC), a matricellular protein, is induced in the brain following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The authors investigated if TNC causes brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption following experimental SAH. METHODS C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) or TNC knockout (TNKO) mice were subjected to SAH by endovascular puncture. Ninety-seven mice were randomly allocated to WT sham-operated (n = 16), TNKO sham-operated (n = 16), WT SAH (n = 34), and TNKO SAH (n = 31) groups. Mice were examined by means of neuroscore and brain water content 24-48 hours post-SAH; and Evans blue dye extravasation and Western blotting of TNC, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and zona occludens (ZO)-1 at 24 hours post-SAH. As a separate study, 16 mice were randomized to WT sham-operated, TNKO sham-operated, WT SAH, and TNKO SAH groups (n = 4 in each group), and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) was immunohistochemically evaluated at 24 hours post-SAH. Moreover, 40 TNKO mice randomly received an intracerebroventricular injection of TNC or phosphate-buffered saline, and effects of exogenous TNC on brain edema and BBB disruption following SAH were studied. RESULTS Deficiency of endogenous TNC prevented neurological impairments, brain edema formation, and BBB disruption following SAH; it was also associated with the inhibition of both MMP-9 induction and ZO-1 degradation. Endogenous TNC deficiency also inhibited post-SAH MAPK activation in brain capillary endothelial cells. Exogenous TNC treatment abolished the neuroprotective effects shown in TNKO mice with SAH. CONCLUSIONS Tenascin-C may be an important mediator in the development of brain edema and BBB disruption following SAH, mechanisms for which may involve MAPK-mediated MMP-9 induction and ZO-1 degradation. TNC could be a molecular target against which to develop new therapies for SAH-induced brain injuries.

  1. Safe long-term repeated disruption of the blood-brain barrier using an implantable ultrasound device: a multiparametric study in a primate model.

    PubMed

    Horodyckid, Catherine; Canney, Michael; Vignot, Alexandre; Boisgard, Raphael; Drier, Aurélie; Huberfeld, Gilles; François, Chantal; Prigent, Annick; Santin, Mathieu D; Adam, Clovis; Willer, Jean-Claude; Lafon, Cyril; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Carpentier, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE The main limitation to the efficacy of chemotherapy for brain tumors is the restricted access to the brain because of the limited permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Previous animal studies have shown that the application of pulsed ultrasound (US), in combination with the intravenous injection of microbubbles, can temporarily disrupt the BBB to deliver drugs that normally cannot reach brain tissue. Although many previous studies have been performed with external focused US transducers, the device described in the current work emits US energy using an unfocused transducer implanted in the skull thickness. This method avoids distortion of the US energy by the skull bone and allows for simple, repetitive, and broad disruption of the BBB without the need for MRI monitoring. The purpose of the present study was to determine if the BBB can be safely and repeatedly disrupted using such an implantable unfocused US device in a primate model. METHODS An 11.5-mm-diameter, 1-MHz, planar US device was implanted via a bur hole into the skull of 3 primates (2 Papio anubis [olive] baboons and 1 Macaca fascicularis [macaque]) for 4 months. Pulsed US sonications were applied together with the simultaneous intravenous injection of sulfur hexafluoride microbubbles (SonoVue) every 2 weeks to temporarily disrupt the BBB. In each primate, a total of 7 sonications were performed with a 23.2-msec burst length (25,000 cycles) and a 1-Hz pulse repetition frequency at acoustic pressure levels of 0.6-0.8 MPa. Potential toxicity induced by repeated BBB opening was analyzed using MRI, PET, electroencephalography (EEG), somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring, behavioral scales, and histopathological analysis. RESULTS The T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR images acquired after each sonication exhibited a zone of hypersignal underneath the transducer that persisted for more than 4 hours, indicating a broad region of BBB opening in the acoustic field of the implant

  2. Enteric Pathogens and Their Toxin-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier through Alteration of Tight Junctions in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Wageha A.; Hess, Claudia; Hess, Michael

    2017-01-01

    can utilize tight junction proteins as receptors for attachment and subsequent internalization, while others modify or destroy the tight junction proteins by different pathways and thereby provide a gateway to the underlying tissue. This review aims to deliver an overview of the tight junction structures and function, and its role in enteric bacterial pathogenesis with a special focus on chickens. A main conclusion will be that the molecular mechanisms used by enteric pathogens to disrupt epithelial barrier function in chickens needs a much better understanding, explicitly highlighted for Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enterica and Clostridium perfringens. This is a requirement in order to assist in discovering new strategies to avoid damages of the intestinal barrier or to minimize consequences from infections. PMID:28208612

  3. Enteric Pathogens and Their Toxin-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier through Alteration of Tight Junctions in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Hess, Claudia; Hess, Michael

    2017-02-10

    utilize tight junction proteins as receptors for attachment and subsequent internalization, while others modify or destroy the tight junction proteins by different pathways and thereby provide a gateway to the underlying tissue. This review aims to deliver an overview of the tight junction structures and function, and its role in enteric bacterial pathogenesis with a special focus on chickens. A main conclusion will be that the molecular mechanisms used by enteric pathogens to disrupt epithelial barrier function in chickens needs a much better understanding, explicitly highlighted for Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enterica and Clostridium perfringens. This is a requirement in order to assist in discovering new strategies to avoid damages of the intestinal barrier or to minimize consequences from infections.

  4. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Muna; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Alexander, Phillip M.; McDannold, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete targets. This review provides insight on the current status of this unique drug delivery technique, experience in preclinical models, and potential for clinical translation. If translated to humans, this method would offer a flexible means to target therapeutics to desired points or volumes in the brain, and enable the whole arsenal of drugs in the CNS that are currently prevented by the BBB. PMID:24462453

  5. Effects on P-Glycoprotein Expression after Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Using Focused Ultrasound and Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Muna; Fischer, Krisztina; Gentile, Caroline; Gitto, Salvatore; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; McDannold, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    Many blood-borne substances attempting to pass through the luminal membrane of brain endothelial cells are acted upon by a variety of metabolizing enzymes or are actively expelled back into the capillary lumen by embedded efflux transporters, such as Permeability-glycoprotein (Pgp). Overexpression of this protein has also been linked to multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Previous studies have shown that focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with a microbubble agent, has ability to temporarily disrupt blood-brain barrier (BBBD). In this work, we investigated whether modulation of Pgp expression is part of the FUS-induced effects. We found that ultrasound can temporarily suppress Pgp expression. When BBBD was produced at 0.55 MPa, Pgp was suppressed up to 48 hours and restored by 72 hours. At 0.81 MPa, suppression can last 72 hours or longer. These findings support the idea that microbubble-enhanced FUS disrupts the functional components of the BBB through suppression of drug efflux. PMID:28045902

  6. Focused ultrasound induced blood-brain barrier disruption to enhance chemotherapeutic drugs (BCNU) delivery for glioblastoma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hua, Mu-Yi; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2010-03-01

    Focused ultrasound has been recently found to capable of temporally and reversibly disrupt local blood-brain barrier (BBB) and opens new frontier in delivering varies type of drugs into brain for central nerve system (CNS) disorder treatment. In this study, we aim to investigate the feasibility of delivering 1, 3-bits (2-chloroethyl) -1-nitrosourea (BCNU) to treat glioblastoma in animal models and evaluate whether this approach would gain treatment efficacy. Under the presence of microbubbles administration, a 400-kHz focused ultrasound was employed to deliver burst-tone ultrasonic energy stimulation to disrupt BBB in animal brains transcranially, and in-vivo monitored by magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). C6-glioma cells were cultured and implanted into Sprague-Dawley rats as the brain-tumor model. BCNU deposited in brain was quantified by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and brain tissues were examined histologically. MRI was employed to longitudinal evaluate the brain tumor treatment including the analysis of tumor progression and animal survival. We confirmed that the focused ultrasound, under the secure ultrasonic energy level, can significantly enhance the BCNU penetration through BBB over 300% than control without cause hemorrhage. Apparent improvement of treatment efficacy achieved by combining focused ultrasound with BCNU delivery, including significant suppression of tumor growth and a prolonged animal survival. This study highly support that this treatment strategy could be clinically-relevant and may help to provide another potential strategy in increasing local chemotherapeutic drugs for brain-tumor treatment.

  7. Blood-brain barrier disruption and complement activation in the brain following rapid correction of chronic hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Baker, E A; Tian, Y; Adler, S; Verbalis, J G

    2000-10-01

    In previous studies we developed a rat model in which demyelination is reproducibly produced following rapid correction of chronic hyponatremia and demonstrated that the development of demyelination in this model is strongly associated with NMR indices of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Because complement is toxic to oligodendrocytes, we evaluated the hypothesis that BBB disruption precipitated by correction of hypoosmolality is followed by an influx of complement into the brain, which then contributes to the demyelination that occurs under these conditions. We studied four groups of rats with immunocytochemical analysis using primary antibodies to IgG and the C3d split-fragment of activated complement: (1) normal rats; (2) rats in which hyponatremia was maintained for 7 days; (3) chronically hyponatremic rats in which the plasma [Na(+)] was rapidly corrected with hypertonic saline administration 20 h prior to perfusion; and (4) chronically hyponatremic rats in which the plasma [Na(+)] was rapidly corrected with hypertonic saline administration 5 days prior to perfusion. In normonatremic and uncorrected hyponatremic rats only background staining was observed in areas lacking a BBB and in blood vessel walls, whereas marked increases in IgG and C3d staining were seen in the brains of rats both 20 h and 5 days after rapid correction of hyponatremia. The staining intensity was significantly correlated with the degree of neurological impairment. These results provide evidence for functional BBB disruption following rapid correction of hyponatremia and support the hypothesis that complement activation may be involved in the pathogenesis of osmotic demyelination.

  8. Multimodality MRI assessment of grey and white matter injury and blood-brain barrier disruption after intracerebral haemorrhage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Li, Qian; Wang, Zhongyu; Qi, Cunfang; Han, Xiaoning; Lan, Xi; Wan, Jieru; Wang, Wenzhu; Zhao, Xiaochun; Hou, Zhipeng; Gao, Cong; Carhuapoma, J. Ricardo; Mori, Susumu; Zhang, Jiangyang; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we examined injury progression after intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) induced by collagenase in mice using a preclinical 11.7 Tesla MRI system. On T2-weighted MRI, lesion and striatal volumes were increased on day 3 and then decreased from days 7 to 28. On day 3, with an increase in striatal water content, vasogenic oedema in the perihaematomal region presented as increased T2 and increased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) signal. With a synchronous change in T2 and ADC signals, microglial activation peaked on day 3 in the same region and decreased over time. Iron deposition appeared on day 3 around the haematoma border but did not change synchronously with ADC signals. Vascular permeability measured by Evans blue extravasation on days 1, 3, and 7 correlated with the T1-gadolinium results, both of which peaked on day 3. On diffusion tensor imaging, white matter injury was prominent in the corpus callosum and internal capsule on day 3 and then partially recovered over time. Our results indicate that the evolution of grey/white matter injury and blood-brain barrier disruption after ICH can be assessed with multimodal MRI, and that perihaematomal vasogenic oedema might be attributable to microglial activation, iron deposition, and blood-brain barrier breakdown. PMID:28084426

  9. Blood-brain barrier disruption by continuous-wave radio frequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Sirav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2009-01-01

    The increasing use of cellular phones and the increasing number of associated base stations are becoming a widespread source of non ionizing electromagnetic radiation. Some biological effects are likely to occur even at low-level EM fields. This study was designed to investigate the effects of 900 and 1,800 MHz Continuous Wave Radio Frequency Radiation (CW RFR) on the permeability of Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) of rats. Results have shown that 20 min RFR exposure of 900 and 1,800 MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of BBB of male rats. There was no change in female rats. The scientific evidence on RFR safety or harm remains inconclusive. More studies are needed to demonstrate the effects of RFR on the permeability of BBB and the mechanisms of that breakdown.

  10. Viral nanoparticles associate with regions of inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption during CNS infection

    PubMed Central

    Shriver, Leah P.; Koudelka, Kristopher J.; Manchester, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Targeted treatment of inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) remains problematic due to the complex pathogenesis of these disorders and difficulty in drug delivery. The plant virus, cow pea mosaic virus (CPMV), has recently been explored as a nanoparticle delivery system for therapeutics targeting a number of diseases including cancer and neurodegeneration. To understand the biodistribution of CPMV in the CNS, we examined CPMV uptake during infection of mice with neurotropic mouse hepatitis virus (MHV). CPMV localized mainly to the CNS endothelium in areas that contained an intact blood brain barrier. However, in inflammatory lesions containing macrophage/microglial cell infiltration and IgG, CPMV could be detected in the brain parenchyma. Furthermore, CPMV showed rapid internalization in an in vitro model of the BBB. These results suggest that CPMV particles could be used to a vehicle to deliver therapeutics to the damaged CNS during neurodegenerative and infectious diseases of the CNS. PMID:19394707

  11. Propofol protects against blood-spinal cord barrier disruption induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Li-jie; Huang, Jin-xiu; Yang, Jian; Yuan, Fen; Zhang, Shuang-shuang; Yu, Qi-jing; Hu, Ji

    2017-01-01

    Propofol has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects on the injured spinal cord. However, the effect of propofol on the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) after ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) is poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated whether propofol could maintain the integrity of the BSCB. Spinal cord IRI (SCIRI) was induced in rabbits by infrarenal aortic occlusion for 30 minutes. Propofol, 30 mg/kg, was intravenously infused 10 minutes before aortic clamping as well as at the onset of reperfusion. Then, 48 hours later, we performed histological and mRNA/protein analyses of the spinal cord. Propofol decreased histological damage to the spinal cord, attenuated the reduction in BSCB permeability, downregulated the mRNA and protein expression levels of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and upregulated the protein expression levels of occludin and claudin-5. Our findings suggest that propofol helps maintain BSCB integrity after SCIRI by reducing MMP-9 expression, by inhibiting the NF-κB signaling pathway, and by maintaining expression of tight junction proteins. PMID:28250758

  12. Effects of acute intra-abdominal hypertension on multiple intestinal barrier functions in rats

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Yuxin; Yi, Min; Fan, Jie; Bai, Yu; Ge, Qinggang; Yao, Gaiqi

    2016-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) is a common and serious complication in critically ill patients for which there is no well-defined treatment strategy. Here, we explored the effect of IAH on multiple intestinal barriers and discussed whether the alteration in microflora provides clues to guide the rational therapeutic treatment of intestinal barriers during IAH. Using a rat model, we analysed the expression of tight junction proteins (TJs), mucins, chemotactic factors, and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by immunohistochemistry. We also analysed the microflora populations using 16S rRNA sequencing. We found that, in addition to enhanced permeability, acute IAH (20 mmHg for 90 min) resulted in significant disturbances to mucosal barriers. Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota was also induced, as represented by decreased Firmicutes (relative abundance), increased Proteobacteria and migration of Bacteroidetes from the colon to the jejunum. At the genus level, Lactobacillus species and Peptostreptococcaceae incertae sedis were decreased, whereas levels of lactococci remained unchanged. Our findings outline the characteristics of IAH-induced barrier changes, indicating that intestinal barriers might be treated to alleviate IAH, and the microflora may be an especially relevant target. PMID:26980423

  13. Lycium barbarum Extracts Protect the Brain from Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Cerebral Edema in Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Di; Li, Suk-Yee; Yeung, Chung-Man; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; So, Kwok-Fai; Wong, David; Lo, Amy C. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ischemic stroke is a destructive cerebrovascular disease and a leading cause of death. Yet, no ideal neuroprotective agents are available, leaving prevention an attractive alternative. The extracts from the fruits of Lycium barbarum (LBP), a Chinese anti-aging medicine and food supplement, showed neuroprotective function in the retina when given prophylactically. We aim to evaluate the protective effects of LBP pre-treatment in an experimental stroke model. Methods C57BL/6N male mice were first fed with either vehicle (PBS) or LBP (1 or 10 mg/kg) daily for 7 days. Mice were then subjected to 2-hour transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) by the intraluminal method followed by 22-hour reperfusion upon filament removal. Mice were evaluated for neurological deficits just before sacrifice. Brains were harvested for infarct size estimation, water content measurement, immunohistochemical analysis, and Western blot experiments. Evans blue (EB) extravasation was determined to assess blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption after MCAO. Results LBP pre-treatment significantly improved neurological deficits as well as decreased infarct size, hemispheric swelling, and water content. Fewer apoptotic cells were identified in LBP-treated brains by TUNEL assay. Reduced EB extravasation, fewer IgG-leaky vessels, and up-regulation of occludin expression were also observed in LBP-treated brains. Moreover, immunoreactivity for aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were significantly decreased in LBP-treated brains. Conclusions Seven-day oral LBP pre-treatment effectively improved neurological deficits, decreased infarct size and cerebral edema as well as protected the brain from BBB disruption, aquaporin-4 up-regulation, and glial activation. The present study suggests that LBP may be used as a prophylactic neuroprotectant in patients at high risk for ischemic stroke. PMID:22438957

  14. Tetramethylpyrazine-2'-O-sodium ferulate attenuates blood-brain barrier disruption and brain oedema after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Xu, S-H; Yin, M-S; Liu, B; Chen, M-L; He, G-W; Zhou, P-P; Cui, Y-J; Yang, D; Wu, Y-L

    2016-07-06

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and subsequent oedema are major causes of the pathogenesis in ischaemic stroke with which the current clinical therapy remains unsatisfied. In this study, we examined the therapeutic effect of tetramethylpyrazine-2'-O-sodium ferulate (TSF)-a novel analogue of tetramethylpyrazine in alleviating BBB breakdown and brain oedema after cerebral ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R). Then, we explored the potential mechanism of the protection on BBB disruption in cerebral I/R rat models. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) were subjected to 120 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), followed by 48 h reperfusion. TSF (10.8, 18 and 30 mg kg(-1)) and ozagrel (18 mg kg(-1)) were administrated by intravenous injection immediately for the first time and then received the same dose every 24 h for 2 days. We found that TSF treatment significantly attenuated the cerebral water content, infarction volume and improved neurological outcomes in MCAO rats compared to I/R models. Moreover, we investigated the effect of TSF on the BBB for that cerebral oedema is closely related to the permeability of the BBB. We found that the permeability of BBB was improved significantly in TSF groups compared to I/R model group by Evans blue leakage testing. Furthermore, the expressions of tight junction (TJ) proteins junction adhesion molecule-1 and occludin significantly decreased, but the protein expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) increased after cerebral I/R, all of which were alleviated by TSF treatment. In conclusion, TSF significantly reduced BBB permeability and brain oedema, which were correlated with regulating the expression of TJ proteins, MMP-9 and AQP4. These findings provide a novel approach to the treatment of ischaemic stroke.

  15. Tight junction disruption: Helicobacter pylori and dysregulation of the gastric mucosal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Tyler J; Scott, Kathleen E; Fox, James G; Hagen, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    Long-term chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a risk factor for gastric cancer development. In the multi-step process that leads to gastric cancer, tight junction dysfunction is thought to occur and serve as a risk factor by permitting the permeation of luminal contents across an otherwise tight mucosa. Mechanisms that regulate tight junction function and structure in the normal stomach, or dysfunction in the infected stomach, however, are largely unknown. Although conventional tight junction components are expressed in gastric epithelial cells, claudins regulate paracellular permeability and are likely the target of inflammation or H. pylori itself. There are 27 different claudin molecules, each with unique properties that render the mucosa an intact barrier that is permselective in a way that is consistent with cell physiology. Understanding the architecture of tight junctions in the normal stomach and then changes that occur during infection is important but challenging, because most of the reports that catalog claudin expression in gastric cancer pathogenesis are contradictory. Furthermore, the role of H. pylori virulence factors, such as cytotoxin-associated gene A and vacoulating cytotoxin, in regulating tight junction dysfunction during infection is inconsistent in different gastric cell lines and in vivo, likely because non-gastric epithelial cell cultures were initially used to unravel the details of their effects on the stomach. Hampering further study, as well, is the relative lack of cultured cell models that have tight junction claudins that are consistent with native tissues. This summary will review the current state of knowledge about gastric tight junctions, normally and in H. pylori infection, and make predictions about the consequences of claudin reorganization during H. pylori infection. PMID:26523106

  16. Effects of a disrupted blood-brain barrier on cholesterol homeostasis in the brain.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Ahmed A; Genové, Guillem; Li, Tian; Lütjohann, Dieter; Olin, Maria; Mast, Natalia; Pikuleva, Irina A; Crick, Peter; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William; Betsholtz, Christer; Björkhem, Ingemar

    2014-08-22

    The presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical for cholesterol metabolism in the brain, preventing uptake of lipoprotein-bound cholesterol from the circulation. The metabolic consequences of a leaking BBB for cholesterol metabolism have not been studied previously. Here we used a pericyte-deficient mouse model, Pdgfb(ret/ret), shown to have increased permeability of the BBB to a range of low-molecular mass and high-molecular mass tracers. There was a significant accumulation of plant sterols in the brains of the Pdgfb(ret/ret) mice. By dietary treatment with 0.3% deuterium-labeled cholesterol, we could demonstrate a significant flux of cholesterol from the circulation into the brains of the mutant mice roughly corresponding to about half of the measured turnover of cholesterol in the brain. We expected the cholesterol flux into the brain to cause a down-regulation of cholesterol synthesis. Instead, cholesterol synthesis was increased by about 60%. The levels of 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OHC) were significantly reduced in the brains of the pericyte-deficient mice but increased in the circulation. After treatment with 1% cholesterol in diet, the difference in cholesterol synthesis between mutants and controls disappeared. The findings are consistent with increased leakage of 24S-OHC from the brain into the circulation in the pericyte-deficient mice. This oxysterol is an efficient suppressor of cholesterol synthesis, and the results are consistent with a regulatory role of 24S-OHC in the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that a defective BBB may lead to increased flux of a lipophilic compound out from the brain. The relevance of the findings for the human situation is discussed.

  17. Acute dietary zinc deficiency before conception compromises oocyte epigenetic programming and disrupts embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Tian, X; Diaz, FJ

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings show that zinc is an important factor necessary for regulating the meiotic cell cycle and ovulation. However, the role of zinc in promoting oocyte quality and developmental potential is not known. Using an in vivo model of acute dietary zinc deficiency, we show that feeding a zinc deficient diet (ZDD) for 3–5 days before ovulation (preconception) dramatically disrupts oocyte chromatin methylation and preimplantation development. There was a dramatic decrease in histone H3K4 trimethylation and global DNA methylation in zinc deficient oocytes. Moreover, there was a 3–20 fold increase in transcript abundance of repetitive elements (Iap, Line1, Sineb1, Sineb2), but a decrease in Gdf9, Zp3 and Figla mRNA. Only 53% and 8% of mature eggs reached the 2-cell stage after IVF in animals receiving a 3 and 5 day ZDD, respectively, while a 5 day ZDD in vivo reduced the proportion of 2-cells to 49%. In vivo fertilized 2-cell embryos cultured in vitro formed fewer (38%) blastocysts compared to control embryos (74%). Likewise, fewer blastocyst and expanded blastocyst were collected from the reproductive tract of zinc deficient animals on day 3.5 of pregnancy. This could be due to a decrease in Igf2 and H19 mRNA in ZDD blastocyst. Supplementation with a methyl donor (SAM) during IVM restored histone H3K4me3 and doubled the IVF success rate from 17% to 43% in oocytes from zinc deficient animals. Thus, the terminal period of oocyte development is extremely sensitive to perturbation in dietary zinc availability. PMID:23348678

  18. Assessing barriers to care and readiness for cognitive behavioral therapy in early acute care PTSD interventions.

    PubMed

    Trusz, Sarah Geiss; Wagner, Amy W; Russo, Joan; Love, Jeff; Zatzick, Douglas F

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) interventions are efficacious in reducing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) but are challenging to implement in acute care and other non-specialty mental health settings. This investigation identified barriers impacting CBT delivery through a content analysis of interventionist chart notes from an acute care PTSD prevention trial. Only 8.5% of all intervention patients were able to complete CBT. Lack of engagement, clinical and logistical barriers had the greatest impact on CBT entry. Treatment preferences and stigma only prevented entry when more primary barriers resolved. Patients with prior diagnosis of alcohol abuse or dependence were able to enter CBT after six months of sobriety. Based on the first trial, we developed a CBT readiness assessment tool. We implemented and evaluated the tool in a second early intervention trial. Lack of engagement emerged again as the primary impediment to CBT entry. Patients who were willing to enter CBT treatment but demonstrated high rates of past trauma or diagnosis of PTSD were also the least likely to engage in any PTSD treatment one month post-discharge. Findings support the need for additional investigations into engagement and alternative delivery strategies, including those which dismantle traditional office-based, multi-session CBT into stepped, deliverable components.

  19. Influence of radiation-crosslinking on flame retarded polymer materials-How crosslinking disrupts the barrier effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnier, Rodolphe; Caro-Bretelle, Anne-Sophie; Dumazert, Loïc; Longerey, Marc; Otazaghine, Belkacem

    2015-01-01

    Fire behavior of flame retardant-free and flame retarded PP/PA6 blends was studied using pyrolysis-combustion flow calorimeter, cone calorimeter and epiradiator equipped with infrared camera and pyrometer. Blends were previously γ-irradiated in presence of crosslinking agents at various doses (up to 100 kGy) in order to assess the influence of irradiation crosslinking on flame retardancy. Crosslinked specimens exhibit a solid-like behavior under high temperature gradient in cone calorimeter and then distort considerably. The influence of such a behavior depends on the material properties. When the flame retardancy is provided by heat shielding effect, heat distortion disrupts the top protective layer leading to a substantial increase of peak of heat release rate (pHRR). The barrier layer is no longer able to prevent the heat transfer to the underlying condensed phase. In other cases (flame retardant-free blends or flame retardancy provided by other effects than heat shielding), heat distortion has negligible influence on heat release rate curves in cone calorimeter tests.

  20. Rhubarb attenuates blood-brain barrier disruption via increased zonula occludens-1 expression in a rat model of intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YANG; PENG, FAN; XIE, GUI; CHEN, ZE-QI; LI, HAI-GANG; TANG, TAO; LUO, JIE-KUN

    2016-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a key pathophysiological factor of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The level of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) has been closely associated with the degree of BBB damage, and is an indicator of BBB destruction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of rhubarb on BBB function in a rat model of ICH. ICH was induced in rats by treatment with type VII collagenase. Sham-operated rats were administered with an equal volume of saline. Following the administration of rhubarb decoction (20 g/kg), neurobehavioral function evaluation and Evans blue extravasation assays were performed at days 1, 3 and 5 after ICH. ZO-1 expression in the brain of ICH-induced rats were analyzed via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical analyses. The results suggested that rhubarb significantly ameliorated neurological symptoms and attenuated BBB permeability. The results of immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR studies indicated that the expression of ZO-1 expression was robust in the sham-operated group and was weak in the vehicle-treated group at day 3. The present data indicated that rhubarb effectively attenuated ICH-induced BBB damage in rats, raising the possibility that rhubarb or its active components may be considered useful as neuroprotective drugs for ICH. The protective mechanisms appeared to involve the preservation of BBB integrity and elevation of ZO-1 protein expression levels. PMID:27347045

  1. Modified Pulsatilla decoction attenuates oxazolone-induced colitis in mice through suppression of inflammation and epithelial barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuewei; Fan, Fugang; Cao, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders caused by a dysregulated mucosal immune response and epithelial barrier disruption. Conventional treatment of IBD is currently limited to overcoming patient symptoms and is often associated with severe adverse effects from the drugs used. Modified Pulsatilla decoction has been used previously to treat ulcerative colitis (UC) in clinical practice in China, however, the underlying mechanism in the treatment of UC remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the efficiency and mechanisms of modified Pulsatilla decoction in the treatment of oxazolone-induced colitis were investigated. Assessment of clinical colitis and histological examination found that the administration of modified Pulsatilla decoction attenuated the severity of oxazolone-induced colitis in mice. Measurement of cytokine concentration, western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction demonstrated modified Pulsatilla decoction treatment significantly reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and restored alterations in tight junction proteins in the colon tissues. In addition, modified Pulsatilla decoction suppressed the activation of the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway. Thus, the findings of the present study demonstrated that modified Pulsatilla decoction offers an effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of IBD and revealed the underlying mechanisms of action offered by modified Pulsatilla decoction. PMID:27278299

  2. Acute exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol disrupts audience effect on male-female interactions in Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Forette, Lindsay M; Mannion, Krystal L; Dzieweczynski, Teresa L

    2015-04-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals can negatively impact the morphology and behavior of organisms inhabiting polluted waters. Male-typical behaviors are often reduced after exposure, suggesting that exposure may have population-level effects. One way in which exposure may exert population-level effects is by interfering with communication within a network of individuals. Acute exposure to the estrogen mimic 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) disrupts the ability of male Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens, to modify their behavior during male-male interactions when an audience is present. However, it is unknown whether audience effects during male-female interactions may be similarly altered. To examine this, male-female pairs that were given an acute exposure to EE2 or remained unexposed interacted in the presence of a female, male, or no audience. Sex differences were found between unexposed males and females. More interactant-directed gill flaring was displayed by control males when a male audience was present while control females performed this behavior more in the presence of an audience, regardless of sex. Both males and females in the control group performed more interactant-directed tail beats in the presence of a female audience. EE2 exposure made all audience effects disappear as treated males and females did not differ in their responses between audience types. These results demonstrate that acute exposure to EE2 may disrupt behavioral adjustments to audience type within a social network. This disruption may, in turn, influence population dynamics in this species as both males and females use information obtained from observing interactions in later encounters with the observed individuals.

  3. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Middle Ear Inflammation Disrupts the cochlear Intra-Strial Fluid–Blood Barrier through Down-Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Hou, Zhiqiang; Cai, Jing; Dong, Mingmin; Shi, Xiaorui

    2015-01-01

    Middle ear infection (or inflammation) is the most common pathological condition that causes fluid to accumulate in the middle ear, disrupting cochlear homeostasis. Lipopolysaccharide, a product of bacteriolysis, activates macrophages and causes release of inflammatory cytokines. Many studies have shown that lipopolysaccharides cause functional and structural changes in the inner ear similar to that of inflammation. However, it is specifically not known how lipopolysaccharides affect the blood-labyrinth barrier in the stria vascularis (intra-strial fluid–blood barrier), nor what the underlying mechanisms are. In this study, we used a cell culture-based in vitro model and animal-based in vivo model, combined with immunohistochemistry and a vascular leakage assay, to investigate lipopolysaccharide effects on the integrity of the mouse intra-strial fluid–blood barrier. Our results show lipopolysaccharide-induced local infection significantly affects intra-strial fluid–blood barrier component cells. Pericytes and perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes are particularly affected, and the morphological and functional changes in these cells are accompanied by substantial changes in barrier integrity. Significant vascular leakage is found in the lipopolysaccharide treated-animals. Consistent with the findings from the in vivo animal model, the permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer to FITC-albumin was significantly higher in the lipopolysaccharide-treated monolayer than in an untreated endothelial cell monolayer. Further study has shown the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation to have a major effect on the expression of tight junctions in the blood barrier. Lipopolysaccharide was also shown to cause high frequency hearing loss, corroborated by previous reports from other laboratories. Our findings show lipopolysaccharide-evoked middle ear infection disrupts inner ear fluid balance, and its particular effects on the intra-strial fluid

  4. Lipopolysaccharide-induced middle ear inflammation disrupts the cochlear intra-strial fluid-blood barrier through down-regulation of tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Hou, Zhiqiang; Cai, Jing; Dong, Mingmin; Shi, Xiaorui

    2015-01-01

    Middle ear infection (or inflammation) is the most common pathological condition that causes fluid to accumulate in the middle ear, disrupting cochlear homeostasis. Lipopolysaccharide, a product of bacteriolysis, activates macrophages and causes release of inflammatory cytokines. Many studies have shown that lipopolysaccharides cause functional and structural changes in the inner ear similar to that of inflammation. However, it is specifically not known how lipopolysaccharides affect the blood-labyrinth barrier in the stria vascularis (intra-strial fluid-blood barrier), nor what the underlying mechanisms are. In this study, we used a cell culture-based in vitro model and animal-based in vivo model, combined with immunohistochemistry and a vascular leakage assay, to investigate lipopolysaccharide effects on the integrity of the mouse intra-strial fluid-blood barrier. Our results show lipopolysaccharide-induced local infection significantly affects intra-strial fluid-blood barrier component cells. Pericytes and perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes are particularly affected, and the morphological and functional changes in these cells are accompanied by substantial changes in barrier integrity. Significant vascular leakage is found in the lipopolysaccharide treated-animals. Consistent with the findings from the in vivo animal model, the permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer to FITC-albumin was significantly higher in the lipopolysaccharide-treated monolayer than in an untreated endothelial cell monolayer. Further study has shown the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation to have a major effect on the expression of tight junctions in the blood barrier. Lipopolysaccharide was also shown to cause high frequency hearing loss, corroborated by previous reports from other laboratories. Our findings show lipopolysaccharide-evoked middle ear infection disrupts inner ear fluid balance, and its particular effects on the intra-strial fluid-blood barrier

  5. Attenuation of acute d-amphetamine-induced disruption of conflict resolution by clozapine, but not α-flupenthixol in rats.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Amy C; Good, Mark A; Killcross, Simon

    2013-11-01

    Previous research demonstrates that disruption of forebrain dopamine systems impairs the use of high-order information to guide goal-directed performance, and that this deficit may be related to impaired use of task-setting cues in patients with schizophrenia. Such deficits can be interrogated through conflict resolution, which has been demonstrated to be sensitive to prefrontal integrity in rodents. We sought to examine the effects of acute systemic d-amphetamine administration on the contextual control of response conflict in rats, and whether deficits were reversed through pre-treatment with clozapine or the D₁/D₂ antagonist α-flupenthixol. Acute d-amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg) disrupted the utilisation of contextual cues; therefore rats were impaired during presentation of stimulus compounds that require conflict resolution. Evidence suggested that this effect was attenuated through pre-treatment with the atypical antipsychotic clozapine (5.0 mg/kg), but not the typical antipsychotic α-flupenthixol (0.25 mg/kg), at doses previously shown to attenuate d-amphetamine-induced cognitive deficits. These studies therefore demonstrate a potentially viable model of disrupted executive function such as that seen in schizophrenia.

  6. Influenza causes prolonged disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier in mice unresponsive to mesenchymal stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Jason; Matthay, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Viral pneumonia is a major cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Anti-inflammatory therapies for viral-induced lung injury show promise in preclinical models. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent, self-renewing cells that secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines and epithelial and endothelial growth factors. We inoculated mice intranasally with influenza A (murine-adapted Puerto Rico/8/34) or PBS, and the mice were killed at multiple time points after infection for measures of lung injury and viral load. We report that influenza induces marked, long-lasting dysfunction of the alveolar-capillary barrier peaking at 1 wk but lasting longer than 3 wk postinfection. Weight loss, commonly employed as a criterion for euthanasia (and hence “survival”), was found to be poorly predictive of the severity of lung injury at its peak; rather, persistent weight loss 11 days postinfection identified mice with impaired injury resolution. Murine and human bone marrow-derived MSCs (obtained from the National Institutes of Health repository) were then administered intravenously during the rapid phase of injury progression. Murine MSCs (mMSCs) given two times 24 h apart failed to improve weight loss, lung water, bronchoalveolar lavage inflammation, or histology. However, mMSCs prevented influenza-induced thrombocytosis and caused a modest reduction in lung viral load at day 7. Human MSCs administered intravenously showed a similar lack of efficacy. The results demonstrate that the influenza murine model bears important similarities to the slow resolution of ARDS in patients. Despite their potent therapeutic effects in many models of acute inflammation and lung injury, MSCs do not improve influenza-mediated lung injury in mice. PMID:25038188

  7. The ameliorative effects of exercise on cognitive impairment and white matter injury from blood-brain barrier disruption induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Min; Park, Jong-Min; Song, Min Kyung; Oh, Yoo Joung; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Youn-Jung

    2017-01-18

    Vascular dementia is the progressive change in blood vessels that leads to neuronal injuries in vulnerable areas induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH). CCH induces disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB), and this BBB disruption can initiate the cognitive impairment and white matter injury. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of treadmill exercise on the cognitive impairment, white matter injury, and BBB disruption induced by CCH. Vascular dementia was induced by permanent bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (BCCAO) in rats. The rats in the exercise group were made to run on a treadmill for 30min once a day for 14 weeks, starting 4 weeks after birth. Our results revealed that treadmill exercise group was alleviated the cognitive impairment and myelin degradation induced by CCH. The disruption of BBB after CCH indicates degradation of occludin, zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1), and up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Treadmill exercise may provide protective effects on BBB disruption from degradation of occludin, ZO-1, and overexpression of MMP-9 after CCH. These findings suggest that treadmill exercise ameliorates cognitive impairment and white matter injury from BBB disruption induced by CCH in rats. The present study will be valuable for means of prophylactic and therapeutic intervention for patients with CCH.

  8. Protection of blood-brain barrier breakdown by nifedipine in adrenaline-induced acute hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nukhet Turkel, A; Ziya Ziylan, Y

    2004-04-01

    The question of whether influxes of ionic Ca+2 into cerebral endothelium plays an important role in increased vascular permeability consequent to an acute hypertension is not accurately resolved. We tested the effect of nifedipine, a calcium entry blocker, on the cerebrovascular permeability for proteins in adrenalin-induced acute hypertension. The experiments were carried out on male Wistar rats. The experimental groups consisted of normotensive saline controls, adrenaline-induced hypertensive rats, and adrenalin-induced hypertensive rats as pre-treated or post-treated with a bolus of nifedipine. Brains of hypertensive rats showed increased permeability to Evans Blue-Albumin complex, when blood pressure elevated rapidly to more than 170 mmHg. The number and size of areas of Evans-Blue extravasation were smaller if an increase in blood pressure was prevented. The short lasting elevation of blood pressure did not result in protein extravasation in brains of hypertensive rats. The results suggest that nifedipine can modify the permeability disruptions observed in acutely hypertensive rats. The data also support the hypothesis that Ca+2 may be responsible for the changes in permeability of BBB in hypertension by mediating the contraction of vascular muscles.

  9. Localized Down-regulation of P-glycoprotein by Focused Ultrasound and Microbubbles induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cho, HongSeok; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Han, Mun; Choi, Jong-ryul; Ahn, Sanghyun; Lee, Taekwan; Chang, Yongmin; Park, Juyoung

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant efflux transporters found in Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) acts as a functional barrier, by pumping out most of the drugs into the blood. Previous studies showed focused ultrasound (FUS) induced microbubble oscillation can disrupt the BBB by loosening the tight junctions in the brain endothelial cells; however, no study was performed to investigate its impact on the functional barrier of the BBB. In this study, the BBB in rat brains were disrupted using the MRI guided FUS and microbubbles. The immunofluorescence study evaluated the expression of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the most dominant multi-drug resistant protein found in the BBB. Intensity of the P-gp expression at the BBB disruption (BBBD) regions was significantly reduced (63.2 ± 18.4%) compared to the control area. The magnitude of the BBBD and the level of the P-gp down-regulation were significantly correlated. Both the immunofluorescence and histologic analysis at the BBBD regions revealed no apparent damage in the brain endothelial cells. The results demonstrate that the FUS and microbubbles can induce a localized down-regulation of P-gp expression in rat brain. The study suggests a clinically translation of this method to treat neural diseases through targeted delivery of the wide ranges of brain disorder related drugs. PMID:27510760

  10. Localized Down-regulation of P-glycoprotein by Focused Ultrasound and Microbubbles induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hongseok; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Han, Mun; Choi, Jong-Ryul; Ahn, Sanghyun; Lee, Taekwan; Chang, Yongmin; Park, Juyoung

    2016-08-01

    Multi-drug resistant efflux transporters found in Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) acts as a functional barrier, by pumping out most of the drugs into the blood. Previous studies showed focused ultrasound (FUS) induced microbubble oscillation can disrupt the BBB by loosening the tight junctions in the brain endothelial cells; however, no study was performed to investigate its impact on the functional barrier of the BBB. In this study, the BBB in rat brains were disrupted using the MRI guided FUS and microbubbles. The immunofluorescence study evaluated the expression of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the most dominant multi-drug resistant protein found in the BBB. Intensity of the P-gp expression at the BBB disruption (BBBD) regions was significantly reduced (63.2 ± 18.4%) compared to the control area. The magnitude of the BBBD and the level of the P-gp down-regulation were significantly correlated. Both the immunofluorescence and histologic analysis at the BBBD regions revealed no apparent damage in the brain endothelial cells. The results demonstrate that the FUS and microbubbles can induce a localized down-regulation of P-gp expression in rat brain. The study suggests a clinically translation of this method to treat neural diseases through targeted delivery of the wide ranges of brain disorder related drugs.

  11. Transient disruption of vascular barriers using focused ultrasound and microbubbles for targeted drug delivery in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Muna

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS) which includes the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and other factors, prevents the transport of most anticancer agents to the brain and restricts delivery to infiltrating brain tumors. The heterogeneous vascular permeability in tumor vessels (blood-tumor barrier; BTB), along with several other factors, creates additional hurdles for drug treatment of brain tumors. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB/BTB, but they have their own limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Magnetic Resonance Imaging guided Focused Ultrasound (MRIgFUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is an emerging noninvasive method to temporarily permeabilize the BBB and BTB. The purpose of this thesis was to use this alternative approach to deliver chemotherapeutic agents through the BBB/BTB for brain tumor treatment in a rodent model to overcome the hinderances encountered in prior approaches tested for drug delivery in the CNS. The results presented in thesis demonstrate that MRIgFUS can be used to achieve consistent and reproducible BBB/BTB disruption in rats. It enabled us to achieve clinically-relevant concentrations of doxorubicin (~ 4.8+/-0.5 microg/g) delivered to the brain with the sonication parameters (0.69 MHz; 0.55 MPa; 10 ms bursts; 1 Hz PRF; 60 s duration), microbubble concentration (Definity, 10 microl/kg), and liposomoal doxorubicin (Lipo-DOX) dose (5.67 mg/kg) used. The resulting doxorubicin concentration was reduced by 32% when the agent was injected 10 minute after the last sonication. Three weekly sessions of FUS and Lipo-DOX appeared to be safe in the rat brain, despite some minor tissue damage. Importantly, the severe neurotoxicity seen in earlier works using other approaches does not appear to occur with delivery via FUS-BBB disruption. The resuls from three weekly treatments of FUS and Lipo-DOX in a rat glioma model are highly

  12. [Effect of apparatus plasmapheresis on the bowel barrier and motility function in patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Dronov, O I; Koval's'ka, I O; Uvarov, V Iu; Horlach, A I; Fedoruk, V I; Burmich, K S; Lykhodeĭ, K O; Shvets', Iu P

    2013-04-01

    Influence of therapeutic plasmapheresis on bowel barrier function and evacuation was investigated in 83 patients with severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Except standard therapy patient obtained therapeutic plasmapheresis using "Haemonetics" PCS 2 system. Complex treatment of patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis and dynamic ileus using plasmapheresis increases contractive and propulsive function of stomach and duodenum and prolongs period of activity of these organs on 32%. Intestinal barrier function associates with restoration of bowel evacuation. Addition of plasmapheresis to standard therapy of necrotizing pancreatitis can be effective prevention of dynamic ileus.

  13. Neuroinflammation and disruption in working memory in aged mice after acute stimulation of the peripheral innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Buchanan, Jessica B.; Sparkman, Nathan L.; Godbout, Jonathan P.; Freund, Gregory G.; Johnson, Rodney W.

    2008-01-01

    Acute cognitive disorders are common in elderly patients with peripheral infections but it is not clear why. Here we injected old and young mice with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mimic an acute peripheral infection and separated the hippocampal neuronal cell layers from the surrounding hippocampal tissue by laser capture microdissection and measured mRNA for several inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα) that are known to disrupt cognition. The results showed that old mice had an increased inflammatory response in the hippocampus after LPS compared to younger cohorts. Immunohistochemistry further showed more microglial cells in the hippocampus of old mice compared to young adults, and that more IL-1β-positive cells were present in the dentate gyrus and in the CA1, CA2 and CA3 regions of LPS-treated old mice compared to young adults. In a test of cognition that required animals to effectively integrate new information with a preexisting schema to complete a spatial task, we found that hippocampal processing is more easily disrupted in old animals than in younger ones when the peripheral innate immune system is stimulated. Collectively, the results suggest that aging can facilitate neurobehavioral complications associated with peripheral infections probably by allowing the over expression of inflammatory cytokines in brain areas that mediate cognitive processing. PMID:17951027

  14. Multiple sessions of liposomal doxorubicin delivery via focused ultrasound mediated blood-brain barrier disruption: a safety study

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Muna; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; McDannold, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound is a rapidly advancing method for delivering therapeutic and imaging agents to the brain. It has the ability to facilitate the passage of therapeutics from the vasculature to the brain parenchyma, which is normally protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The method’s main advantages are that it is both targeted and noninvasive, and that it can be easily repeated. Studies have shown that liposomal doxorubicin (Lipo-DOX), a chemotherapy agent with promise for tumors in the central nervous system, can be delivered into the brain across BBB. However, prior studies have suggested that doxorubicin can be significantly neurotoxic, even at small concentrations. Here, we studied whether multiple sessions of Lipo-DOX administered after FUS-induced BBB disruption (FUS-BBBD) induces severe adverse events in the normal brain tissues. First, we used fluorometry to measure the doxorubicin concentrations in the brain after FUS-BBBD to ensure that a clinically relevant doxorubicin concentration was achieved in the brain. Next, we performed three weekly sessions with FUS-BBBD ± Lipo-DOX administration. Five to twelve targets were sonicated each week, following a schedule described previously in a survival study in glioma-bearing rats (Aryal et al., 2013). Five rats received three weekly sessions where i.v. injected Lipo-DOX was combined with FUS-BBBD; an additional four rats received FUS-BBBD only. Animals were euthanized 70 days from the first session and brains were examined in histology. We found that clinically-relevant concentrations of doxorubicin (4.8 ± 0.5 µg/g) were delivered to the brain with the sonication parameters (0.69 MHz; 0.55–0.81 MPa; 10 ms bursts; 1 Hz PRF; 60s duration), microbubble concentration (Definity, 10 µl/kg), and the administered Lipo-DOX dose (5.67 mg/kg) used. The resulting concentration of Lipo-DOX was reduced by 32% when it was injected 10 minutes after the last sonication compared to cases

  15. Diverse action of lipoteichoic acid and lipopolysaccharide on neuroinflammation, blood-brain barrier disruption, and anxiety in mice.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Fröhlich, Esther E; Reichmann, Florian; Farzi, Aitak; Kogelnik, Nora; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Sattler, Wolfgang; Holzer, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Microbial metabolites are known to affect immune system, brain, and behavior via activation of pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Unlike the effect of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the role of other TLR agonists in immune-brain communication is insufficiently understood. We therefore hypothesized that the TLR2 agonist lipoteichoic acid (LTA) causes immune activation in the periphery and brain, stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and has an adverse effect on blood-brain barrier (BBB) and emotional behavior. Since LTA preparations may be contaminated by LPS, an extract of LTA (LTAextract), purified LTA (LTApure), and pure LPS (LPSultrapure) were compared with each other in their effects on molecular and behavioral parameters 3h after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection to male C57BL/6N mice. The LTAextract (20mg/kg) induced anxiety-related behavior in the open field test, enhanced the circulating levels of particular cytokines and the cerebral expression of cytokine mRNA, and blunted the cerebral expression of tight junction protein mRNA. A dose of LPSultrapure matching the amount of endotoxin/LPS contaminating the LTAextract reproduced several of the molecular and behavioral effects of LTAextract. LTApure (20mg/kg) increased plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 and interferon-γ, and enhanced the transcription of TNF-α, interleukin-1β and other cytokines in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex. These neuroinflammatory effects of LTApure were associated with transcriptional down-regulation of tight junction-associated proteins (claudin 5, occludin) in the brain. LTApure also enhanced circulating corticosterone, but failed to alter locomotor and anxiety-related behavior in the open field test. These data disclose that TLR2 agonism by LTA causes peripheral immune activation and initiates neuroinflammatory processes in the brain that are associated with down-regulation of BBB

  16. Disruption of the endothelial barrier by proteases from the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa: implication of matrilysis and receptor cleavage.

    PubMed

    Beaufort, Nathalie; Corvazier, Elisabeth; Mlanaoindrou, Saouda; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Pidard, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Within the vasculature, uncontrolled pericellular proteolysis can lead to disruption of cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix interactions and subsequent detachment-induced cell apoptosis, or anoikis, contributing to inflammatory vascular diseases, with the endothelium as the major target. Most studies so far have focused on endogenous proteinases. However, during bloodstream infections, bacterial proteinases may also trigger endothelial anoikis. We thus investigated the potential apoptotic activity of the proteinases secreted by the haematotropic opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and particularly its predominant metalloproteinase, LasB. For this, we used the secretome of the LasB-expressing pseudomonal strain, PAO1, and compared it with that from the isogenic, LasB-deficient strain (PAO1∆lasB), as well as with purified LasB. Secretomes were tested for apoptotic activity on cultured human endothelial cells derived from the umbilical vein or from the cerebral microvasculature. We found that the PAO1 secretome readily induced endothelial cell anoikis, as did secretomes of LasB-positive clinical pseudomonal isolates, while the PAO1∆lasB secretome had only a limited impact on endothelial adherence and viability. Notably, purified LasB reproduced most of the effects of the LasB-containing secretomes, and these were drastically reduced in the presence of the LasB-selective inhibitor, phosphoramidon. A precocious and extensive LasB-dependent degradation of several proteins associated with the endothelial extracellular matrix, fibronectin and von Willebrand factor, was observed by immunofluorescence and/or immunoblotting analysis of cell cultures. Moreover, the PAO1 secretome, but not that from PAO1∆lasB, specifically induced rapid endoproteolysis of two major interendothelial junction components, VE-cadherin and occludin, as well as of the anti-anoikis, integrin-associated urokinase receptor, uPAR. Taken as a prototype for exogenous haemorrhagic proteinases

  17. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Eum, Sung Yong Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1 h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24 h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. - Highlights: • PCB153 disturbed human brain endothelial barrier through disruption of occludin. • Lipid raft-associated PP

  18. Improved survival in rats with glioma using MRI-guided focused ultrasound and microbubbles to disrupt the blood-brain barrier and deliver Doxil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Muna; Zhi Zhang, Yong; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Park, Juyoung; Power, Chanikarn; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-02-01

    Blood-brain-barrier (BBB) limits the transportation of most neuropeptides, proteins (enzymes, antibodies), chemotherapeutic agents, and genes that have therapeutic potential for the treatment of brain diseases. Different methods have been used to overcome this limitation, but they are invasive, non-targeted, or require the development of new drugs. We have developed a method that uses MRI-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with circulating microbubbles to temporarily open BBB in and around brain tumors to deliver chemotherapy agents. Here, we tested whether this noninvasive technique could enhance the effectiveness of a chemotherapy agent (Doxil). Using 690 kHz FUS transducer and microbubble (Definity), we induced BBB disruption in intracranially-implanted 9L glioma tumors in rat's brain in three weekly sessions. Animals who received BBB disruption and Doxil had a median survival time of 34.5 days, which was significantly longer than that found in control animals which is 16, 18.5, 21 days who received no treatment, BBB disruption only and Doxil only respectively This work demonstrates that FUS technique has promise in overcoming barriers to drug delivery, which are particularly stark in the brain due to the BBB.

  19. Blood -brain barrier disruption was less under isoflurane than pentobarbital anesthesia via a PI3K/Akt pathway in early cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chi, Oak Z; Mellender, Scott J; Kiss, Geza K; Liu, Xia; Weiss, Harvey R

    2017-02-24

    One of the important factors altering the degree of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in cerebral ischemia is the anesthetic used. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway has been reported to be involved in modulating BBB permeability and in isoflurane induced neuroprotection. This study was performed to compare the degree of BBB disruption in focal cerebral ischemia under isoflurane vs pentobarbital anesthesia and to determine whether inhibition of PI3K/Akt would affect the disruption in the early stage of focal cerebral ischemia. Permanent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion was performed in rats under 1.4% isoflurane or pentobarbital (50mg/kg i.p.) anesthesia with controlled ventilation. In half of each group LY294002, which is a PI3K/Akt inhibitor, was applied on the ischemic cortex immediately after MCA occlusion. After one hour of MCA occlusion, the transfer coefficient (Ki) of (14)C-α-aminoisobutyric acid ((14)C-AIB) was determined to quantify the degree of BBB disruption. MCA occlusion increased the Ki both in the isoflurane and pentobarbital anesthetized rats. However, the value of Ki was lower under isoflurane (11.5±6.0μL/g/min) than under pentobarbital (18.3±7.1μL/g/min) anesthesia. The Ki of the contralateral cortex of the pentobarbital group was higher (+74%) than that of the isoflurane group. Application of LY294002 on the ischemic cortex increased the Ki (+99%) only in the isoflurane group. The degree of BBB disruption by MCA occlusion was significantly lower under isoflurane than pentobarbital anesthesia in the early stage of cerebral ischemia. Our data demonstrated the importance of choice of anesthetics and suggest that PI3K/Akt signaling pathway plays a significant role in altering BBB disruption in cerebral ischemia during isoflurane but not during pentobarbital anesthesia.

  20. Magnetic field enhanced convective diffusion of iron oxide nanoparticles in an osmotically disrupted cell culture model of the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhizhi; Worden, Matthew; Wroczynskyj, Yaroslav; Yathindranath, Vinith; van Lierop, Johan; Hegmann, Torsten; Miller, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The present study examines the use of an external magnetic field in combination with the disruption of tight junctions to enhance the permeability of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) across an in vitro model of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). The feasibility of such an approach, termed magnetic field enhanced convective diffusion (MFECD), along with the effect of IONP surface charge on permeability, was examined. Methods The effect of magnetic field on the permeability of positively (aminosilane-coated [AmS]-IONPs) and negatively (N-(trimethoxysilylpropyl)ethylenediaminetriacetate [EDT]-IONPs) charged IONPs was evaluated in confluent monolayers of mouse brain endothelial cells under normal and osmotically disrupted conditions. Results Neither IONP formulation was permeable across an intact cell monolayer. However, when tight junctions were disrupted using D-mannitol, flux of EDT-IONPs across the bEnd.3 monolayers was 28%, increasing to 44% when a magnetic field was present. In contrast, the permeability of AmS-IONPs after osmotic disruption was less than 5%. The cellular uptake profile of both IONPs was not altered by the presence of mannitol. Conclusions MFECD improved the permeability of EDT-IONPs through the paracellular route. The MFECD approach favors negatively charged IONPs that have low affinity for the brain endothelial cells and high colloidal stability. This suggests that MFECD may improve IONP-based drug delivery to the brain. PMID:25018630

  1. Retinoic Acid Induced-Autophagic Flux Inhibits ER-Stress Dependent Apoptosis and Prevents Disruption of Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yulong; Zhang, Hongyu; Zheng, Binbin; Ye, Libing; Zhu, Sipin; Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Zhouguang; Wei, Xiaojie; Chen, Daqing; Cao, Guodong; Fu, Xiaobing; Li, Xiaokun; Xu, Hua-Zi; Xiao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces the disruption of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) which leads to infiltration of blood cells, an inflammatory response, and neuronal cell death, resulting spinal cord secondary damage. Retinoic acid (RA) has a neuroprotective effect in both ischemic brain injury and SCI, however the relationship between BSCB disruption and RA in SCI is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that autophagy and ER stress are involved in the protective effect of RA on the BSCB. RA attenuated BSCB permeability and decreased the loss of tight junction (TJ) molecules such as P120, β-catenin, Occludin and Claudin5 after injury in vivo as well as in Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells (BMECs). Moreover, RA administration improved functional recovery in the rat model of SCI. RA inhibited the expression of CHOP and caspase-12 by induction of autophagic flux. However, RA had no significant effect on protein expression of GRP78 and PDI. Furthermore, combining RA with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) partially abolished its protective effect on the BSCB via exacerbated ER stress and subsequent loss of tight junctions. Taken together, the neuroprotective role of RA in recovery from SCI is related to prevention of of BSCB disruption via the activation of autophagic flux and the inhibition of ER stress-induced cell apoptosis. These findings lay the groundwork for future translational studies of RA for CNS diseases, especially those related to BSCB disruption. PMID:26722220

  2. Physical Exercise Attenuates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Inhibiting Peripheral Immune Response and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption.

    PubMed

    Souza, Priscila S; Gonçalves, Elaine D; Pedroso, Giulia S; Farias, Hemelin R; Junqueira, Stella C; Marcon, Rodrigo; Tuon, Talita; Cola, Maíra; Silveira, Paulo C L; Santos, Adair R; Calixto, João B; Souza, Cláudio T; de Pinho, Ricardo A; Dutra, Rafael C

    2016-07-22

    ), with inhibition of 30 % and 50 %, respectively, based on the AUC, compared with EAEuntreated group. In addition, ST and ET decreased oxidative stress, possibly, through genomic antioxidant defense, Nrf2-Keap1 signaling pathway, in the CNS. Physical exercise inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-1β in the spinal cord after EAE induction, as well as spleen cells obtained from ST group showed a significant upregulation of regulatory T cell markers, such as CD25 and IL-10 levels, and blocked IL-6, MCP-1 and TNF-α production, mainly, during acute and chronic phase of EAE. Finally, these immunomodulatory effects of exercise were associated with inhibition of adhesion molecules and reestablishment of tight junctions expression in spinal cord tissue, thereby limiting BBB permeability and transmigration of autoreactive T cells to the CNS. NO, nitric oxide; GPx, glutathione peroxidase, GSH, glutathione; Nrf2, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2; CNS, central nervous system; BBB, blood-brain barrier; IFN-g, interferon-gamma; IL-17, interleukin 17; IL-1b, interleukin-1beta.

  3. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Eum, Sung Yong; Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs.

  4. Glutamine supplementation attenuates ethanol-induced disruption of apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and ameliorates gut barrier dysfunction and fatty liver in mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit K; Shukla, Pradeep K; Mir, Hina; Manda, Bhargavi; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; McMullen, Megan; Nagy, Laura E; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that glutamine (Gln) prevents acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers and human colonic mucosa. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Gln supplementation on ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury in mice in vivo. Ethanol feeding caused a significant increase in inulin permeability in distal colon. Elevated permeability was associated with a redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins and depletion of detergent-insoluble fractions of these proteins, suggesting that ethanol disrupts apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and increases paracellular permeability. Ethanol-induced increase in colonic mucosal permeability and disruption of junctional complexes were most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet. Gln supplementation attenuated ethanol-induced mucosal permeability and disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potential role of Gln in nutritional intervention to alcoholic tissue injury. Gln supplementation dose-dependently elevated reduced-protein thiols in colon without affecting the level of oxidized-protein thiols. Ethanol feeding depleted reduced protein thiols and elevated oxidized protein thiols. Ethanol-induced protein thiol oxidation was most severe in mice fed with Gln-free diet and absent in mice fed with Gln-supplemented diet, suggesting that antioxidant effect is one of the likely mechanisms involved in Gln-mediated amelioration of ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction. Ethanol feeding elevated plasma transaminase and liver triglyceride, which was accompanied by histopathologic lesions in the liver; ethanol-induced liver damage was attenuated by Gln supplementation. These results indicate that Gln supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced gut and liver injury.

  5. Glutamine Supplementation Attenuates Ethanol-Induced Disruption of Apical Junctional Complexes in Colonic Epithelium and Ameliorates Gut Barrier Dysfunction and Fatty Liver in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit K.; Shukla, Pradeep K.; Mir, Hina; Manda, Bhargavi; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; McMullen, Megan; Nagy, Laura E.; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2015-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that glutamine (Gln) prevents acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers and human colonic mucosa. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Gln supplementation on ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury in mice in vivo. Ethanol feeding caused a significant increase in inulin permeability in distal colon. Elevated permeability was associated with a redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins and depletion of detergent-insoluble fractions of these proteins, suggesting that ethanol disrupts apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and increases paracellular permeability. Ethanol-induced increase in colonic mucosal permeability and disruption of junctional complexes were most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet. Gln supplementation attenuated ethanol-induced mucosal permeability and disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potential role of glutamine in nutritional intervention to alcoholic tissue injury. Gln supplementation dose-dependently elevated reduced-protein thiols in colon without affecting the level of oxidized-protein thiols. Ethanol feeding depleted reduced protein thiols and elevated oxidized protein thiols. Ethanol-induced protein thiol oxidation was most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet and absent in mice fed Gln-supplemented diet, suggesting that antioxidant effect is one of the likely mechanisms involved in Gln-mediated amelioration of ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction. Ethanol feeding elevated plasma transaminase and liver triglyceride, which was accompanied by histopathologic lesions in the liver; ethanol-induced liver damage was attenuated by Gln supplementation. These results indicate that Gln supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced gut and liver injury. PMID:26365579

  6. Sphingolipids are required for mammalian epidermal barrier function. Inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis delays barrier recovery after acute perturbation.

    PubMed Central

    Holleran, W M; Man, M Q; Gao, W N; Menon, G K; Elias, P M; Feingold, K R

    1991-01-01

    Stratum corneum lipids comprise an approximately equimolar mixture of sphingolipids, cholesterol, and free fatty acids, arranged as intercellular membrane bilayers that are presumed to mediate the epidermal permeability barrier. Prior studies have shown that alterations in epidermal barrier function lead to a rapid increase in cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis which parallels the early stages of the repair process. Despite an abundance of indirect evidence for their role in the barrier, the importance of sphingolipids has yet to be demonstrated directly. Whereas sphingolipid synthesis also increases during barrier repair, this response is delayed in comparison to cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis (Holleran, W.M., et al. 1991. J. Lipid Res. 32:1151-1158). To further delineate the role of sphingolipids in barrier homeostasis, we assessed the impact of inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis on epidermal barrier recovery. A single topical application of beta-chloro-L-alanine (beta-CA), an irreversible inhibitor of serine-palmitoyl transferase (SPT), applied to acetone-treated skin of hairless mice resulted in: (a) greater than 75% inhibition of SPT activity at 30 min (P less than 0.001); (b) a global decrease in sphingolipid synthesis between 1 and 3 h (P less than 0.02); (c) reduction of epidermal sphingolipid content at 18 h (P less than 0.01); (d) delayed reaccumulation of histochemical staining for sphingolipids in the stratum corneum; and (e) reduced numbers and contents of lamellar bodies in the stratum granulosum. Finally, despite its immediate, marked diminution of sphingolipid synthesis, beta-CA slowed barrier recovery only at late time points (greater than 6 h) after acetone treatment. This inhibition was overridden by coapplications of ceramides (the distal SPT product), indicating that the delay in repair was not due to non-specific toxicity. These studies demonstrate a distinctive role for epidermal sphingolipids in permeability barrier homeostasis

  7. Noninvasive localized delivery of Herceptin to the mouse brain by MRI-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Manabu; McDannold, Nathan; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-08-01

    Antibody-based anticancer agents are promising chemotherapeutic agents. Among these agents, Herceptin (trastuzumab), a humanized anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/c-erbB2) monoclonal antibody, has been used successfully in patients with breast cancer. However, in patients with brain metastasis, the blood-brain barrier limits its use, and a different delivery method is needed to treat these patients. Here, we report that Herceptin can be delivered locally and noninvasively into the mouse central nervous system through the blood-brain barrier under image guidance by using an MRI-guided focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier disruption technique. The amount of Herceptin delivered to the target tissue was correlated with the extent of the MRI-monitored barrier opening, making it possible to estimate indirectly the amount of Herceptin delivered. Histological changes attributable to this procedure were minimal. This method may represent a powerful technique for the delivery of macromolecular agents such as antibodies to treat patients with diseases of the central nervous system. brain tumor | microbubble

  8. Effects of N-acetylcysteine and imipramine in a model of acute rhythm disruption in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Luísa K; Trojan, Yasmine; Quiles, Caroline L; Benvenutti, Radharani; Melo, Gabriela; Levandovski, Rosa; Hidalgo, Maria Paz L; Elisabetsky, Elaine

    2015-03-01

    Circadian rhythm disturbances are among the risk factors for depression, but specific animal models are lacking. This study aimed to characterize the effects of acute rhythm disruption in mice and investigate the effects of imipramine and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on rhythm disruption-induced changes. Mice were exposed to 12:12-hour followed by 10:10-hour light:dark cycles (LD); under the latter, mice were treated with saline, imipramine or NAC. Rhythms of rest/activity and temperature were assessed with actigraphs and iButtons, respectively. Hole-board and social preference tests were performed at the beginning of the experiment and again at the 8th 10:10 LD, when plasma corticosterone and IL-6 levels were also assessed. Actograms showed that the 10:10 LD schedule prevents the entrainment of temperature and activity rhythms for at least 13 cycles. Subsequent light regimen change activity and temperature amplitudes showed similar patterns of decline followed by recovery attempts. During the 10:10 LD schedule, activity and temperature amplitudes were significantly decreased (paired t test), an effect exacerbated by imipramine (ANOVA/SNK). The 10:10 LD schedule increased anxiety (paired t test), an effect prevented by NAC (30 mg/kg). This study identified mild but significant behavioral changes at specific time points after light regimen change. We suggest that if repeated overtime, these subtle changes may contribute to lasting behavioral disturbancess relevant to anxiety and mood disorders. Data suggest that imipramine may contribute to sustained rhythm disturbances, while NAC appears to prevent rhythm disruption-induced anxiety. Associations between sleep/circadian disturbances and the recurrence of depressive episodes underscore the relevance of potential drug-induced maintenance of disturbed rhythms.

  9. Chronic and acute adenosine A2A receptor blockade prevents long-term episodic memory disruption caused by acute cannabinoid CB1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Mouro, Francisco M; Batalha, Vânia L; Ferreira, Diana G; Coelho, Joana E; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Lopes, Luísa V; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M

    2017-05-01

    Cannabinoid-mediated memory impairment is a concern in cannabinoid-based therapies. Caffeine exacerbates cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R)-induced memory deficits through an adenosine A1 receptor-mediated mechanism. We now evaluated how chronic or acute blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) affects long-term episodic memory deficits induced by a single injection of a selective CB1R agonist. Long-term episodic memory was assessed by the novel object recognition (NOR) test. Mice received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of the CB1/CB2 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 (1 mg/kg) immediately after the NOR training, being tested for novelty recognition 24 h later. Anxiety levels were assessed by the Elevated Plus Maze test, immediately after the NOR. Mice were also tested for exploratory behaviour at the Open Field. For chronic A2AR blockade, KW-6002 (istradefylline) (3 mg/kg/day) was administered orally for 30 days; acute blockade of A2ARs was assessed by i.p. injection of SCH 58261 (1 mg/kg) administered either together with WIN 55,212-2 or only 30 min before the NOR test phase. The involvement of CB1Rs was assessed by using the CB1R antagonist, AM251 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). WIN 55,212-2 caused a disruption in NOR, an action absent in mice also receiving AM251, KW-6002 or SCH 58261 during the encoding/consolidation phase; SCH 58251 was ineffective if present during retrieval only. No effects were detected in the Elevated Plus maze or Open Field Test. The finding that CB1R-mediated memory disruption is prevented by antagonism of adenosine A2ARs, highlights a possibility to prevent cognitive side effects when therapeutic application of CB1R drugs is desired.

  10. Induced Disruption of the Iron-Regulatory Hormone Hepcidin Inhibits Acute Inflammatory Hypoferraemia

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Andrew E.; Lim, Pei Jin; Frost, Joe N.; Pasricha, Sant-Rayn; Soilleux, Elizabeth J.; Evans, Emma; Morovat, Alireza; Santos, Ana; Diaz, Rebeca; Biggs, Daniel; Davies, Benjamin; Gileadi, Uzi; Robbins, Peter A.; Lakhal-Littleton, Samira; Drakesmith, Hal

    2016-01-01

    Withdrawal of iron from serum (hypoferraemia) is a conserved innate immune antimicrobial strategy that can withhold this critical nutrient from invading pathogens, impairing their growth. Hepcidin (Hamp1) is the master regulator of iron and its expression is induced by inflammation. Mice lacking Hamp1 from birth rapidly accumulate iron and are susceptible to infection by blood-dwelling siderophilic bacteria such as Vibrio vulnificus. In order to study the innate immune role of hepcidin against a background of normal iron status, we developed a transgenic mouse model of tamoxifen-sensitive conditional Hamp1 deletion (termed iHamp1-KO mice). These mice attain adulthood with an iron status indistinguishable from littermate controls. Hamp1 disruption and the consequent decline of serum hepcidin concentrations occurred within hours of a single tamoxifen dose. We found that the TLR ligands LPS and Pam3CSK4 and heat-killed Brucella abortus caused an equivalent induction of inflammation in control and iHamp1-KO mice. Pam3CSK4 and B. abortus only caused a drop in serum iron in control mice, while hypoferraemia due to LPS was evident but substantially blunted in iHamp1-KO mice. Our results characterise a powerful new model of rapidly inducible hepcidin disruption, and demonstrate the critical contribution of hepcidin to the hypoferraemia of inflammation. PMID:27423740

  11. Facilitators and barriers to doing workplace mental health research: Case study of acute psychological trauma in a public transit system.

    PubMed

    Links, Paul S; Bender, Ash; Eynan, Rahel; O'Grady, John; Shah, Ravi

    2016-03-10

    The Acute Psychological Trauma (APT) Study was a collaboration between an acute care hospital, a specialized multidisciplinary program designed to meet the mental health needs of injured workers, and a large urban public transit system. The overall purpose was to evaluate a Best Practices Intervention (BPI) for employees affected by acute psychological trauma compared to a Treatment as Usual (TAU) group. The specific purpose is to discuss facilitators and barriers that were recognized in implementing and carrying out mental health research in a workplace setting. Over the course of the APT study, a joint implementation committee was responsible for day-to-day study operations and made regular observations on the facilitators and barriers that arose throughout the study. The facilitators to this study included the longstanding relationships among the partners, increased recognition for the need of mental health research in the workplace, and the existence of a community advisory committee. The significant barriers to doing this study of mental health research in the workplace included differences in organizational culture, inconsistent union support, co-interventions, and stigma. Researchers and funding agencies need to be flexible and provide additional resources in order to overcome the barriers that can exist doing workplace mental health research.

  12. Acute effects of rotavirus and malnutrition on intestinal barrier function in neonatal piglets

    PubMed Central

    Jacobi, Sheila K; Moeser, Adam J; Blikslager, Anthony T; Rhoads, J Marc; Corl, Benjamin A; Harrell, Robert J; Odle, Jack

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of protein-energy malnutrition on intestinal barrier function during rotavirus enteritis in a piglet model. METHODS: Newborn piglets were allotted at day 4 of age to the following treatments: (1) full-strength formula (FSF)/noninfected; (2) FSF/rotavirus infected; (3) half-strength formula (HSF)/noninfected; or (4) HSF/rotavirus infected. After one day of adjustment to the feeding rates, pigs were infected with rotavirus and acute effects on growth and diarrhea were monitored for 3 d and jejunal samples were collected for Ussing-chamber analyses. RESULTS: Piglets that were malnourished or infected had lower body weights on days 2 and 3 post-infection (P < 0.05). Three days post-infection, marked diarrhea and weight loss were accompanied by sharp reductions in villus height (59%) and lactase activity (91%) and increased crypt depth (21%) in infected compared with non-infected pigs (P < 0.05). Malnutrition also increased crypt depth (21%) compared to full-fed piglets. Villus:crypt ratio was reduced (67%) with viral infection. There was a trend for reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance with rotavirus infection and malnutrition (P = 0.1). 3H-mannitol flux was significantly increased (50%; P < 0.001) in rotavirus-infected piglets compared to non-infected piglets, but there was no effect of nutritional status. Furthermore, rotavirus infection reduced localization of the tight junction protein, occludin, in the cell membrane and increased localization in the cytosol. CONCLUSION: Overall, malnutrition had no additive effects to rotavirus infection on intestinal barrier function at day 3 post-infection in a neonatal piglet model. PMID:23964143

  13. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Form a Barrier between Necrotic and Viable Areas in Acute Abdominal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bilyy, Rostyslav; Fedorov, Volodymyr; Vovk, Volodymyr; Leppkes, Moritz; Dumych, Tetiana; Chopyak, Valentyna; Schett, Georg; Herrmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) of decondensed DNA and histones that trap and immobilize particulate matter and microbial pathogens like bacteria. NET aggregates reportedly surround and isolate large objects like monosodium urate crystals, which cannot be sufficiently cleared from tissues. In the setting of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, massive tissue necrosis occurs, which is organized as pancreatic pseudocysts (1). In contrast to regular cysts, these pseudocysts are not surrounded by epithelial layers. We hypothesize that, instead, the necrotic areas observed in necrotizing pancreatitis are isolated from the surrounding healthy tissues by aggregated NETs. These may form an alternative, putatively transient barrier, separating necrotic areas from viable tissue. To test this hypothesis, we investigated histological samples from the necropsy material of internal organs of two patients with necrotizing pancreatitis and peritonitis accompanied by multiple organ failure. Tissues including the inflammatory zone were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and evaluated for signs of inflammation. Infiltrating neutrophils and NETs were detected by immunohistochemistry for DNA, neutrophil elastase (NE), and citrullinated histone H3. Interestingly, in severely affected areas of pancreatic necrosis or peritonitis, chromatin stained positive for NE and citrullinated histone H3, and may, therefore, be considered NET-derived. These NET structures formed a layer, which separated the necrotic core from the areas of viable tissue remains. A condensed layer of aggregated NETs, thus, spatially shields and isolates the site of necrosis, thereby limiting the spread of necrosis-associated proinflammatory mediators. We propose that necrotic debris may initiate and/or facilitate the formation of the NET-based surrogate barrier. PMID:27777576

  14. Acute Acrolein Exposure Induces Impairment of Vocal Fold Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Sivasankar, M. Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous pollutant abundant in cigarette smoke, mobile exhaust, and industrial waste. There is limited literature on the effects of acrolein on vocal fold tissue, although there are clinical reports of voice changes after pollutant exposures. Vocal folds are responsible for voice production. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the effects of acrolein exposure on viable, excised vocal fold epithelial tissue and to characterize the mechanism underlying acrolein toxicity. Vocal fold epithelia were studied because they form the outermost layer of the vocal folds and are a primary recipient of inhaled pollutants. Porcine vocal fold epithelia were exposed to 0, 50, 100, 500, 900 or 1300 μM of acrolein for 3 hours; the metabolic activity, epithelial resistance, epithelial permeability, tight junction protein (occludin and claudin 3) expression, cell membrane integrity and lipid peroxidation were investigated. The data demonstrated that acrolein exposure at 500 μM significantly reduced vocal fold epithelial metabolic activity by 27.2% (p≤0.001). Incubation with 100 μM acrolein caused a marked increase in epithelial permeability by 130.5% (p<0.05) and a reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) by 180.0% (p<0.001). While the expression of tight junctional protein did not change in acrolein-treated samples, the cell membrane integrity was significantly damaged with a 45.6% increase of lipid peroxidation as compared to controls (p<0.05). Taken together, these data provide evidence that acute acrolein exposure impairs vocal fold epithelial barrier integrity. Lipid peroxidation-induced cell membrane damage may play an important role in reducing the barrier function of the epithelium. PMID:27643990

  15. Inflammation-associated repression of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) reduces alveolar-capillary barrier function during acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Henes, Janek; Schmit, Marthe A.; Morote-Garcia, Julio C.; Mirakaj, Valbona; Köhler, David; Glover, Louise; Eldh, Therese; Walter, Ulrich; Karhausen, Jörn; Colgan, Sean P.; Rosenberger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is an inflammatory disorder associated with reduced alveolar-capillary barrier function, increased pulmonary vascular permeability, and infiltration of leukocytes into the alveolar space. Pulmonary function might be compromised, its most severe form being the acute respiratory distress syndrome. A protein central to physiological barrier properties is vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). Given the fact that VASP expression is reduced during periods of cellular hypoxia, we investigated the role of VASP during ALI. Initial studies revealed reduced VASP expressional levels through cytokines in vitro. Studies in the putative human VASP promoter identified NF-κB as a key regulator of VASP transcription. This VASP repression results in increased paracellular permeability and migration of neutrophils in vitro. In a model of LPS-induced ALI, VASP−/− mice demonstrated increased pulmonary damage compared with wild-type animals. These findings were confirmed in a second model of ventilator-induced lung injury. Studies employing bone marrow chimeric animals identified tissue-specific repression of VASP as the underlying cause of decreased barrier properties of the alveolar-capillary barrier during ALI. Taken together these studies identify tissue-specific VASP as a central protein in the control of the alveolar-capillary barrier properties during ALI.—Henes, J., Schmit, M. A., Morote-Garcia, J. C., Mirakaj, V., Köhler, D., Glover, L., Eldh, T., Walter, U., Karhausen, J., Colgan, S. P., Rosenberger, P. Inflammation-associated repression of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) reduces alveolar-capillary barrier function during acute lung injury. PMID:19690214

  16. Design and experimental evaluations of a low-frequency hemispherical ultrasound phased-array system for transcranial blood-brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Chen, Heng-Wen; Kuo, Zhen-Hao; Huang, Wen-Cheng

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a prototype design of a low-frequency multiple-channel hemispherical focused-ultrasound phased-array system for transcranial disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A 32-channel ultrasound driving system tunable in the frequency range from 200 to 400 kHz was designed for producing a suitable ultrasound output for BBB disruption. The driving system includes a microcontroller/field-programmable gate-array-based control kernel with multiple-channel driving circuits implemented by a high-voltage switching/LC-resonance/impedance-matching circuit module. Three hemispherical phased arrays comprising 22, 31, and 80 elements were fabricated and tested. The pressure distributions at the geometric center and at off-center positions were tested experimentally. The focal performance of the different hemispherical arrays was also evaluated theoretically. The results showed that the developed phased-array system can successfully drive the hemispherical array with multiple-channel ultrasound signals with independent phase control at 8-bit resolution. Good focusing abilities were evident both at the geometric center and at specific off-center target positions. Preliminary animal experiments show that the BBB in rat can be locally disrupted successfully. The system will serve as a reference platform for developing a focused-ultrasound system for clinical use in brain drug delivery applications.

  17. Skin barrier disruptions in tape stripped and allergic dermatitis models have no effect on dermal penetration and systemic distribution of AHAPS-functionalized silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Anja; Nordmeyer, Daniel; Boreham, Alexander; Brodwolf, Robert; Mundhenk, Lars; Fluhr, Joachim W; Lademann, Jürgen; Graf, Christina; Rühl, Eckart; Alexiev, Ulrike; Gruber, Achim D

    2014-10-01

    The skin is a potential site of entry for nanoparticles (NP) but the role of disease-associated barrier disturbances on the path and extent of skin penetration of NP remains to be characterized. Silica nanoparticles (SiO2-NP) possess promising potential for various medical applications. Here, effects of different skin barrier disruptions on the penetration of N-(6-aminohexyl)-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (AHAPS) functionalized SiO2-NP were studied. AHAPS-SiO2-NP (55±6 nm diameter) were topically applied on intact, tape stripped or on inflamed skin of SKH1 mice with induced allergic contact dermatitis for one or five consecutive days, respectively. Penetration of AHAPS-SiO2-NP through the skin was not observed regardless of the kind of barrier disruption. However, only after subcutaneous injection, AHAPS-SiO2-NP were incorporated by macrophages and transported to the regional lymph node only. Adverse effects on cells or tissues were not observed. In conclusion, AHAPS-SiO2-NP seem to not cross the normal or perturbed mouse skin. From the clinical editor: Skin is a potential site of entry for nanoparticles; however, it is poorly understood how skin diseases may alter this process. In tape-stripped skin and allergic contact dermatitis models the delivery properties of AHAPS-SiO2 nanoparticles remained unchanged, and in neither case were these NP-s able to penetrate the skin. No adverse effects were noted on the skin in these models and control mice.

  18. Outpatient care of patients with acute myeloid leukemia: Benefits, barriers, and future considerations

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Jennifer E.; Buckley, Sarah A.; Walter, Roland B.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who receive intensive induction or re-induction chemotherapy with curative intent typically experience prolonged cytopenias upon completion of treatment. Due to concerns regarding infection and bleeding risk as well as significant transfusion and supportive care requirements, patients have historically remained in the hospital until blood count recovery—a period of approximately 30 days. The rising cost of AML care has prompted physicians to reconsider this practice, and a number of small studies have suggested the safety and feasibility of providing outpatient supportive care to patients following intensive AML (re-) induction therapy. Potential benefits include a significant reduction of healthcare costs, improvement in quality of life, and decreased risk of hospital-acquired infections. In this article, we will review the currently available literature regarding this practice and discuss questions to be addressed in future studies. In addition, we will consider some of the barriers that must be overcome by institutions interested in implementing an “early discharge” policy. While outpatient management of selected AML patients appears safe, careful planning is required in order to provide the necessary support, education and rapid management of serious complications that occur among this very vulnerable patient population. PMID:27101148

  19. Disrupted functional connectivity of the default mode network due to acute vestibular deficit.

    PubMed

    Klingner, Carsten M; Volk, Gerd F; Brodoehl, Stefan; Witte, Otto W; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular neuritis is defined as a sudden unilateral partial failure of the vestibular nerve that impairs the forwarding of vestibular information from the labyrinth. The patient suffers from vertigo, horizontal nystagmus and postural instability with a tendency toward ipsilesional falls. Although vestibular neuritis is a common disease, the central mechanisms to compensate for the loss of precise vestibular information remain poorly understood. It was hypothesized that symptoms following acute vestibular neuritis originate from difficulties in the processing of diverging sensory information between the responsible brain networks. Accordingly an altered resting activity was shown in multiple brain areas of the task-positive network. Because of the known balance between the task-positive and task-negative networks (default mode network; DMN) we hypothesize that also the DMN is involved. Here, we employ functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the resting state to investigate changes in the functional connectivity between the DMN and task-positive networks, in a longitudinal design combined with measurements of caloric function. We demonstrate an initially disturbed connectedness of the DMN after vestibular neuritis. We hypothesize that the disturbed connectivity between the default mode network and particular parts of the task-positive network might be related to a sustained utilization of processing capacity by diverging sensory information. The current results provide some insights into mechanisms of central compensation following an acute vestibular deficit and the importance of the DMN in this disease.

  20. Urinary mitochondrial DNA is a biomarker of mitochondrial disruption and renal dysfunction in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Ryan M.; Stallons, L. Jay; Kneff, Joshua E.; Alge, Joseph L.; Harmon, Jennifer L.; Rahn, Jennifer J.; Arthur, John M.; Beeson, Craig C.; Chan, Sherine L.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies show the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in the initiation and progression of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, no biomarkers exist linking renal injury to mitochondrial function and integrity. To this end, we evaluated urinary mitochondrial DNA (UmtDNA) as a biomarker of renal injury and function in humans with AKI following cardiac surgery. mtDNA was isolated from the urine of patients following cardiac surgery and quantified by qPCR. Patients were stratified into no AKI, stable AKI and progressive AKI groups based on Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) staging. UmtDNA was elevated in progressive AKI patients, and was associated with progression of patients with AKI at collection to higher AKIN stages. To evaluate the relationship of UmtDNA to measures of renal mitochondrial integrity in AKI, mice were subjected to sham surgery or varying degrees of ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. UmtDNA increased in mice after 10-15 minutes of ischemia and positively correlated with ischemia time. Furthermore, UmtDNA was predictive of AKI in the mouse model. Finally, UmtDNA levels were negatively correlated with renal cortical mtDNA and mitochondrial gene expression. These translational studies demonstrate that UmtDNA is associated with recovery from AKI following cardiac surgery by serving as an indicator of mitochondrial integrity. Thus, UmtDNA may serve as valuable biomarker for the development of mitochondrial targeted therapies in AKI. PMID:26287315

  1. Disrupted functional connectivity of the default mode network due to acute vestibular deficit

    PubMed Central

    Klingner, Carsten M.; Volk, Gerd F.; Brodoehl, Stefan; Witte, Otto W.; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular neuritis is defined as a sudden unilateral partial failure of the vestibular nerve that impairs the forwarding of vestibular information from the labyrinth. The patient suffers from vertigo, horizontal nystagmus and postural instability with a tendency toward ipsilesional falls. Although vestibular neuritis is a common disease, the central mechanisms to compensate for the loss of precise vestibular information remain poorly understood. It was hypothesized that symptoms following acute vestibular neuritis originate from difficulties in the processing of diverging sensory information between the responsible brain networks. Accordingly an altered resting activity was shown in multiple brain areas of the task-positive network. Because of the known balance between the task-positive and task-negative networks (default mode network; DMN) we hypothesize that also the DMN is involved. Here, we employ functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the resting state to investigate changes in the functional connectivity between the DMN and task-positive networks, in a longitudinal design combined with measurements of caloric function. We demonstrate an initially disturbed connectedness of the DMN after vestibular neuritis. We hypothesize that the disturbed connectivity between the default mode network and particular parts of the task-positive network might be related to a sustained utilization of processing capacity by diverging sensory information. The current results provide some insights into mechanisms of central compensation following an acute vestibular deficit and the importance of the DMN in this disease. PMID:25379422

  2. Annexin A1 restores Aβ1-42 -induced blood-brain barrier disruption through the inhibition of RhoA-ROCK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Chan; Baik, Sung Hoon; Han, Sun-Ho; Cho, Hyun Jin; Choi, Hyunjung; Kim, Haeng Jun; Choi, Heesun; Lee, Wonik; Kim, Dong Kyu; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2017-02-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is composed of brain capillary endothelial cells and has an important role in maintaining homeostasis of the brain separating the blood from the parenchyma of the central nervous system (CNS). It is widely known that disruption of the BBB occurs in various neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Annexin A1 (ANXA1), an anti-inflammatory messenger, is expressed in brain endothelial cells and regulates the BBB integrity. However, its role and mechanism for protecting BBB in AD have not been identified. We found that β-Amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42)-induced BBB disruption was rescued by human recombinant ANXA1 (hrANXA1) in the murine brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3. Also, ANXA1 was decreased in the bEnd.3 cells, the capillaries of 5XFAD mice, and the human serum of patients with AD. To find out the mechanism by which ANXA1 recovers the BBB integrity in AD, the RhoA-ROCK signaling pathway was examined in both Aβ42-treated bEnd.3 cells and the capillaries of 5XFAD mice as RhoA was activated in both cases. RhoA inhibitors alleviated Aβ42-induced BBB disruption and constitutively overexpressed RhoA-GTP (active form of RhoA) attenuated the protective effect of ANXA1. When pericytes were cocultured with bEnd.3 cells, Aβ42-induced RhoA activation of bEnd.3 cells was inhibited by the secretion of ANXA1 from pericytes. Taken together, our results suggest that ANXA1 restores Aβ42-induced BBB disruption through inhibition of RhoA-ROCK signaling pathway and we propose ANXA1 as a therapeutic reagent, protecting against the breakdown of the BBB in AD.

  3. Corneodesmosin gene ablation induces lethal skin-barrier disruption and hair-follicle degeneration related to desmosome dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Emilie A; Huchenq, Anne; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R; Metzger, Daniel; Chambon, Pierre; Ghyselinck, Norbert B; Serre, Guy; Jonca, Nathalie; Guerrin, Marina

    2009-08-01

    Corneodesmosin (CDSN) is specific to desmosomes of epithelia undergoing cornification, mainly the epidermis and the inner root sheath of the hair follicles. CDSN nonsense mutations are associated with hypotrichosis simplex of the scalp, a rare disease that leads to complete baldness in young adults. CDSN displays adhesive properties, mostly attributable to its N-terminal glycine-rich domain, and is sequentially proteolyzed as corneocytes migrate towards the skin surface. K14-promoter driven Cre-mediated deletion of Cdsn in mice resulted in neonatal death as a result of epidermal tearing upon minor mechanical stress. Ultrastructural analyses revealed a desmosomal break at the interface between the living and cornified layers. After grafting onto nude mice, knockout skin showed a chronic defect in the epidermal permeability barrier. The epidermis was first hyperproliferative with a thick cornified layer, then, both the epidermis and the hair follicles degenerated. In adults, Cdsn deletion resulted in similar histological abnormalities and in a lethal barrier defect. We demonstrate that Cdsn is not essential for skin-barrier formation in utero, but is vital throughout life to preserve this barrier by maintaining desmosome integrity. The strong adhesive function that the protein confers on corneodesmosomes also seems necessary for maintaining the architecture of the hair follicle.

  4. Loss of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) disrupts skin barrier integrity and sensitizes mice to epicutaneous allergen challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Mei; Zhao, Baozhong; Shea, Christopher R.; Shah, Palak; Qiang, Lei; White, Steven R.; Sims, Diane M.; He, Yu-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Background Skin barrier integrity requires a highly coordinated molecular system involving the structural protein filaggrin. Mutational loss of the skin barrier protein filaggrin predisposes individuals to the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). Objective to determine the role of SIRT1 in skin barrier function, filaggrin expression, and the development of AD. Methods Skin histology of mice with skin-specific SIRT1 deletion and wild-type controls was examined by Hematoxyline and Eosin (H&E). Protein and mRNA abundance was analyzed by immunoblot, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and RT-PCR. Serum antibody levels were assessed by ELISA. Results Here we show that filaggrin is regulated by the protein deacetylase SIRT1, and that SIRT1 is critical for skin barrier integrity. Epidermis-specific SIRT1 ablation causes AD-like skin lesions in mice, and mice with epidermal SIRT1 deletion are sensitive to percutaneous challenge by the protein allergen ovalbumin. In normal human keratinocytes and mouse skin, SIRT1 knockdown or genetic deletion down-regulates filaggrin, and regulation of filaggrin expression by SIRT1 requires the deacetylase activity of SIRT1. SIRT1 also promotes the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and the AhR ligand restores filaggrin expression in SIRT1-inhibited cells. As compared with normal human skin, SIRT1 is down-regulated in the lesions of atopic dermatitis as well as non-atopic dermatitis. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate a critical role of SIRT1 in skin barrier maintenance, open up new opportunities to use SIRT1 as a pharmacological target, and may facilitate the development of mechanism-based agents for AD prevention and therapy. PMID:25445829

  5. Acute intensive insulin therapy exacerbates diabetic blood-retinal barrier breakdown via hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and VEGF

    PubMed Central

    Poulaki, Vassiliki; Qin, Wenying; Joussen, Antonia M.; Hurlbut, Peter; Wiegand, Stanley J.; Rudge, John; Yancopoulos, George D.; Adamis, Anthony P.

    2002-01-01

    Acute intensive insulin therapy is an independent risk factor for diabetic retinopathy. Here we demonstrate that acute intensive insulin therapy markedly increases VEGF mRNA and protein levels in the retinae of diabetic rats. Retinal nuclear extracts from insulin-treated rats contain higher hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) levels and demonstrate increased HIF-1α–dependent binding to hypoxia-responsive elements in the VEGF promoter. Blood-retinal barrier breakdown is markedly increased with acute intensive insulin therapy but can be reversed by treating animals with a fusion protein containing a soluble form of the VEGF receptor Flt; a control fusion protein has no such protective effect. The insulin-induced retinal HIF-1α and VEGF increases and the related blood-retinal barrier breakdown are suppressed by inhibitors of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, but not inhibitors of p42/p44 MAPK or protein kinase C. Taken together, these findings indicate that acute intensive insulin therapy produces a transient worsening of diabetic blood-retinal barrier breakdown via an HIF-1α–mediated increase in retinal VEGF expression. Insulin-induced VEGF expression requires p38 MAPK and PI 3-kinase, whereas hyperglycemia-induced VEGF expression is HIF-1α–independent and requires PKC and p42/p44 MAPK. To our knowledge, these data are the first to identify a specific mechanism for the transient worsening of diabetic retinopathy, specifically blood-retinal barrier breakdown, that follows the institution of intensive insulin therapy. PMID:11901189

  6. Acute Exposure to Pacific Ciguatoxin Reduces Electroencephalogram Activity and Disrupts Neurotransmitter Metabolic Pathways in Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gajendra; Au, Ngan Pan Bennett; Lei, Elva Ngai Yu; Mak, Yim Ling; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang; Lam, Michael Hon Wah; Chan, Leo Lai; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing; Ma, Chi Him Eddie

    2016-09-10

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a common human food poisoning caused by consumption of ciguatoxin (CTX)-contaminated fish affecting over 50,000 people worldwide each year. CTXs are classified depending on their origin from the Pacific (P-CTXs), Indian Ocean (I-CTXs), and Caribbean (C-CTXs). P-CTX-1 is the most toxic CTX known and the major source of CFP causing an array of neurological symptoms. Neurological symptoms in some CFP patients last for several months or years; however, the underlying electrophysiological properties of acute exposure to CTXs remain unknown. Here, we used CTX purified from ciguatera fish sourced in the Pacific Ocean (P-CTX-1). Delta and theta electroencephalography (EEG) activity was reduced remarkably in 2 h and returned to normal in 6 h after a single exposure. However, second exposure to P-CTX-1 induced not only a further reduction in EEG activities but also a 2-week delay in returning to baseline EEG values. Ciguatoxicity was detected in the brain hours after the first and second exposure by mouse neuroblastoma assay. The spontaneous firing rate of single motor cortex neuron was reduced significantly measured by single-unit recording with high spatial resolution. Expression profile study of neurotransmitters using targeted profiling approach based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the motor cortex. Our study provides a possible link between the brain oscillations and neurotransmitter release after acute exposure to P-CTX-1. Identification of EEG signatures and major metabolic pathways affected by P-CTX-1 provides new insight into potential biomarker development and therapeutic interventions.

  7. Disrupted Nitric Oxide Metabolism from Type II Diabetes and Acute Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Ashley P; Kipen, Howard; Laumbach, Robert; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Kelly-McNeill, Kathleen; Cepeda, Clarimel; Fan, Zhi-Hua; Amorosa, Louis; Lubitz, Sara; Schneider, Stephen; Gow, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Type II diabetes is an established cause of vascular impairment. Particulate air pollution is known to exacerbate cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, particularly in susceptible populations. This study set out to determine the impact of exposure to traffic pollution, with and without particle filtration, on vascular endothelial function in Type II diabetes. Endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO) has previously been linked to vascular health. Reactive hyperemia induces a significant increase in plasma nitrite, the proximal metabolite of NO, in healthy subjects, while diabetics have a lower and more variable level of response. Twenty type II diabetics and 20 controls (ages 46-70 years) were taken on a 1.5 hr roadway traffic air pollution exposure as passengers. We analyzed plasma nitrite, as a measure of vascular function, using forearm ischemia to elicit a reactive hyperemic response before and after exposure to one ride with and one without filtration of the particle components of pollution. Control subjects displayed a significant increase in plasma nitrite levels during reactive hyperemia. This response was no longer present following exposure to traffic air pollution, but did not vary with whether or not the particle phase was filtered out. Diabetics did not display an increase in nitrite levels following reactive hyperemia. This response was not altered following pollution exposure. These data suggest that components of acute traffic pollution exposure diminish vascular reactivity in non-diabetic individuals. It also confirms that type II diabetics have a preexisting diminished ability to appropriately respond to a vascular challenge, and that traffic pollution exposure does not cause a further measureable acute change in plasma nitrite levels in Type II diabetics.

  8. Disrupted Nitric Oxide Metabolism from Type II Diabetes and Acute Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Ashley P.; Kipen, Howard; Laumbach, Robert; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Kelly-McNeill, Kathleen; Cepeda, Clarimel; Fan, Zhi-Hua; Amorosa, Louis; Lubitz, Sara; Schneider, Stephen; Gow, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Type II diabetes is an established cause of vascular impairment. Particulate air pollution is known to exacerbate cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, particularly in susceptible populations. This study set out to determine the impact of exposure to traffic pollution, with and without particle filtration, on vascular endothelial function in Type II diabetes. Endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO) has previously been linked to vascular health. Reactive hyperemia induces a significant increase in plasma nitrite, the proximal metabolite of NO, in healthy subjects, while diabetics have a lower and more variable level of response. Twenty type II diabetics and 20 controls (ages 46–70 years) were taken on a 1.5hr roadway traffic air pollution exposure as passengers. We analyzed plasma nitrite, as a measure of vascular function, using forearm ischemia to elicit a reactive hyperemic response before and after exposure to one ride with and one without filtration of the particle components of pollution. Control subjects displayed a significant increase in plasma nitrite levels during reactive hyperemia. This response was no longer present following exposure to traffic air pollution, but did not vary with whether or not the particle phase was filtered out. Diabetics did not display an increase in nitrite levels following reactive hyperemia. This response was not altered following pollution exposure. These data suggest that components of acute traffic pollution exposure diminish vascular reactivity in non-diabetic individuals. It also confirms that type II diabetics have a preexisting diminished ability to appropriately respond to a vascular challenge, and that traffic pollution exposure does not cause a further measureable acute change in plasma nitrite levels in Type II diabetics. PMID:26656561

  9. Secondary hypoxia exacerbates acute disruptions of energy metabolism in rats resulting from fluid percussion injury.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Richard A; Widholm, John; Long, Joseph B

    2005-05-07

    The purpose of these experiments was to determine whether secondary hypoxia exacerbates the metabolic consequences of fluid percussion injury (FPI). In Experiment I, rats were trained to press a lever for their entire daily ration of food at any time during a 12-h light/dark cycle and run in an activity wheel. After food intake and body weight stabilized, rats were surgically prepared, assigned to one of four groups [FPI+Hypoxia (IH), FPI+Normoxia (IN), Sham Injury+Hypoxia (SH), Sham Injury+Normoxia (SN)] and, after recovery from surgery, anesthetized with halothane delivered by a 21% O2 source. Immediately after injury or sham injury, the O2 source was switched to 13% for rats in Groups IH and SH for 30 min. Post-traumatic hypoxemia exacerbated the ensuing FPI-induced reductions of food intake and body weight, but did not change FPI-induced reduction in wheel running. In Experiment II, rats were assigned to one of three groups (SH, IN, or IH) and subjected to sham injury and 13% O2 or FPI and either 13 or 21% O2. Immediately after 30 min of hypoxia or normoxia, rats were confined to metabolism cages that were used to quantify rates of oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2), and heat production (H). Post-traumatic hypoxia exacerbated the FPI-induced increases in VO2, VCO2, and H. The results of Experiments I and II provide convergent confirmation that secondary hypoxemia exacerbates the FPI-induced hypermetabolic state in rats and therefore might significantly exacerbate the brain injury-induced disruptions of energy metabolism in humans.

  10. Distinct roles of short and long thymic stromal lymphopoietin isoforms in house dust mite-induced asthmatic airway epithelial barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hangming; Hu, Yahui; Liu, Laiyu; Zou, Mengchen; Huang, Chaowen; Luo, Lishan; Yu, Changhui; Wan, Xuan; Zhao, Haijin; Chen, JiaLong; Xie, Zhefan; Le, Yanqing; Zou, Fei; Cai, Shaoxi

    2016-01-01

    Loss of airway epithelial integrity contributes significantly to asthma pathogenesis. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) may have dual immunoregulatory roles. In inflammatory disorders of the bowel, the long isoform of TSLP (lfTSLP) promotes inflammation while the short isoform (sfTSLP) inhibits inflammation. We hypothesize that lfTSLP contributes to house dust mite (HDM)-induced airway epithelial barrier dysfunction and that synthetic sfTSLP can prevent these effects. In vitro, airway epithelial barrier function was assessed by monitoring transepithelial electrical resistance, fluorescent-dextran permeability, and distribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin. In vivo, BALB/c mice were exposed to HDM by nasal inhalation for 5 consecutive days per week to establish an asthma model. sfTSLP and 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) were administered 1 h before HDM exposure. After 8 weeks, animal lung function tests and pathological staining were performed to evaluate asthma progression. We found that HDM and lfTSLP impaired barrier function. Treatment with sfTSLP and 1,25D3 prevented HDM-induced airway epithelial barrier disruption. Moreover, sfTSLP and 1,25D3 treatment ameliorated HDM-induced asthma in mice. Our data emphasize the importance of the different expression patterns and biological properties of sfTSLP and lfTSLP. Moreover, our results indicate that sfTSLP and 1,25D3 may serve as novel therapeutic agents for individualized treatment of asthma. PMID:27996052

  11. Protective effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on epithelial barrier disruption caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunpeng; Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Weina; Ma, Xianyong; Wang, Li; Yang, Xuefen; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-04-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) play an important role in maintaining the mucosal barrier function and gastrointestinal health of animals. Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) was reported to protect the intestinal barrier function of early-weaned piglets against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 challenge; however, the underlying cellular mechanism of this protection was unclear. Here, an established intestinal porcine epithelia cell (IPEC-J2) model was used to investigate the protective effects and related mechanisms of L. plantarum on epithelial barrier damages induced by ETEC K88. Epithelial permeability, expression of inflammatory cytokines, and abundance of TJ proteins, were determined. Pre-treatment with L. plantarum for 6h prevented the reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) (P<0.05), inhibited the increased transcript abundances of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) (P<0.05), decreased expression of claudin-1, occludin and zonula occludens (ZO-1) (P<0.05) and protein expression of occludin (P<0.05) of IPEC-J2 cells caused by ETEC K88. Moreover, the mRNA expression of negative regulators of toll-like receptors (TLRs) [single Ig Il-1-related receptor (SIGIRR), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 3 (Bcl3), and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1)] in IPEC-J2 cells pre-treated with L. plantarum were higher (P<0.05) compared with those in cells just exposed to K88. Furthermore, L. plantarum was shown to regulate proteins of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. These results indicated that L. plantarum may improve epithelial barrier function by maintenance of TEER, inhibiting the reduction of TJ proteins, and reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines induced by ETEC K88, possibly through modulation of TLRs, NF-κB and MAPK pathways.

  12. VE-Cadherin Disassembly and Cell Contractility in the Endothelium are Necessary for Barrier Disruption Induced by Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aragon-Sanabria, Virginia; Pohler, Steven E.; Eswar, Vikram J.; Bierowski, Matthew; Gomez, Esther W.; Dong, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    During metastasis, breakdown of the endothelial barrier is critical for tumor cell extravasation through blood vessel walls and is mediated by a combination of tumor secreted soluble factors and receptor-ligand interactions. However, a complete mechanism governing tumor cell transendothelial migration remains unclear. Here, we investigate the roles of tumor-associated signals in regulating endothelial cell contractility and adherens junction disassembly leading to endothelial barrier breakdown. We show that Src mediates VE-cadherin disassembly in response to metastatic melanoma cells. Through the use of pharmacological inhibitors of cytoskeletal contractility we find that endothelial cell contractility is responsive to interactions with metastatic cancer cells and that reducing endothelial cell contractility abrogates migration of melanoma cells across endothelial monolayers. Furthermore, we find that a combination of tumor secreted soluble factors and receptor-ligand interactions mediate activation of Src within endothelial cells that is necessary for phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and for breakdown of the endothelial barrier. Together, these results provide insight into how tumor cell signals act in concert to modulate cytoskeletal contractility and adherens junctions disassembly during extravasation and may aid in identification of therapeutic targets to block metastasis. PMID:28393886

  13. Targeted disruption of CK1α in Toxoplasma gondii increases acute virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zedong; Wang, Shuchao; Wang, Wei; Gu, Yi; Liu, Huanhuan; Wei, Feng; Liu, Quan

    2016-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, encodes two casein kinase 1 (CK1) isoforms, CK1α and CK1β, with only CK1α having enzyme activity. Here we investigated the biological role of CK1α by construction of a CK1α deletion mutant (Δck1α) based on the type I parasite, and complement the mutant with restored expression of CK1α. Deletion of CK1α resulted in markedly defective parasite replication in vitro. Infected mice with Δck1α parasite caused suppression of IL-12 production, severe liver damage, higher tissue burdens, and short survival time relative to the CK1α-positive parental strain. Western blot analysis revealed that deletion of CK1α led to increased activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 in infected mice and bone marrow-derived microphages. The transcriptome analysis showed that deletion of CK1α may increase expression of rhoptry proteins (ROPs). Western blot showed enhanced expression of ROP16 in the Δck1α parasite as compared with the wild-type and complemented parasites. These findings demonstrated that deletion of CK1α may increase acute virulence of T. gondii in mice by increased expression of ROPs, activation of STAT3, and suppression of IL-12 production, which have important implications for elucidating regulation mechanism of virulence factors for T. gondii.

  14. Contribution of G-CSF to the acute mobilization of endothelial precursor cells by vascular disrupting agents

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Yuval; Tang, Terence; Woloszynek, Jill; Daenen, Laura G.; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Cai, Shi-Rong; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Voest, Emile E.; Chaplin, David; Smythe, Jon; Harris, Adrian; Nathan, Paul; Judson, Ian; Rustin, Gordon; Bertolini, Francesco; Link, Daniel C.; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) cause acute shutdown of abnormal established tumor vasculature, followed by massive intratumoral hypoxia and necrosis. However, a viable rim of tumor tissue invariably remains from which tumor regrowth rapidly resumes. We have recently shown that an acute systemic mobilization and homing of bone marrow derived circulating endothelial precursor cells (CEPs) can promote tumor regrowth following treatment with either a VDA or certain chemotherapy drugs. The molecular mediators of this systemic reactive host process are unknown. Here we show that following treatment of mice with OXi-4503, a second generation potent pro-drug derivative of combretastatin-A 4 phosphate (CA4P), rapid increases in circulating plasma VEGF, SDF-1, and G-CSF levels are detected. With the aim of determining whether G-CSF is involved in VDA-induced CEP mobilization, mutant G-CSF-R−/− mice were treated with OXI-4503. We found that as opposed to wildtype controls, G-CSF-R−/− mice failed to mobilize CEPs or show induction of SDF-1 plasma levels. Furthermore, Lewis lung carcinomas grown in such mice treated with OXi-4503 showed greater levels of necrosis compared to tumors treated in wildtype mice. Evidence for rapid elevations in circulating plasma G-CSF, VEGF, and SDF-1 were also observed in VDA (CA4P) treated cancer patients. These results highlight the possible impact of drug-induced G-CSF on tumor re-growth following certain cytotoxic drug therapies, in this case using a VDA, and hence G-CSF as a possible therapeutic target. PMID:19738066

  15. Contribution of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor to the acute mobilization of endothelial precursor cells by vascular disrupting agents.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Yuval; Tang, Terence; Woloszynek, Jill; Daenen, Laura G; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Cai, Shi-Rong; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Voest, Emile E; Chaplin, David J; Smythe, Jon; Harris, Adrian; Nathan, Paul; Judson, Ian; Rustin, Gordon; Bertolini, Francesco; Link, Daniel C; Kerbel, Robert S

    2009-10-01

    Vascular disrupting agents (VDA) cause acute shutdown of abnormal established tumor vasculature, followed by massive intratumoral hypoxia and necrosis. However, a viable rim of tumor tissue invariably remains from which tumor regrowth rapidly resumes. We have recently shown that an acute systemic mobilization and homing of bone marrow-derived circulating endothelial precursor (CEP) cells could promote tumor regrowth following treatment with either a VDA or certain chemotherapy drugs. The molecular mediators of this systemic reactive host process are unknown. Here, we show that following treatment of mice with OXi-4503, a second-generation potent prodrug derivative of combretastatin-A4 phosphate, rapid increases in circulating plasma vascular endothelial growth factor, stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels are detected. With the aim of determining whether G-CSF is involved in VDA-induced CEP mobilization, mutant G-CSF-R(-/-) mice were treated with OXi-4503. We found that as opposed to wild-type controls, G-CSF-R(-/-) mice failed to mobilize CEPs or show induction of SDF-1 plasma levels. Furthermore, Lewis lung carcinomas grown in such mice treated with OXi-4503 showed greater levels of necrosis compared with tumors treated in wild-type mice. Evidence for rapid elevations in circulating plasma G-CSF, vascular endothelial growth factor, and SDF-1 were also observed in patients with VDA (combretastatin-A4 phosphate)-treated cancer. These results highlight the possible effect of drug-induced G-CSF on tumor regrowth following certain cytotoxic drug therapies, in this case using a VDA, and hence G-CSF as a possible therapeutic target.

  16. Disruption of striatal glutamatergic/GABAergic homeostasis following acute methamphetamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Frederico C; Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Viana, Sofia D; Travassos, Ana S; Nunes, Sara; Silva, Carlos; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Rego, A Cristina; Ali, Syed F; Ribeiro, Carlos Alberto Fontes

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine leads to functional changes in basal ganglia that are linked to impairment in motor activity. Previous studies from our group and others have shown that a single high-methamphetamine injection induces striatal dopaminergic changes in rodents. However, striatal glutamatergic, GABAergic and serotoninergic changes remain elusive under this methamphetamine regimen. Moreover, nothing is known about the participation of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), which is overexpressed upon synaptic dysfunction and glial response, on methamphetamine-induced striatal dysfunction. The aim of this work was to provide an integrative characterization of the striatal changes in amino acids, monoamines and astroglia, as well as in the RAGE levels, and the associated motor activity profile of C57BL/6 adult mice, 72 h after a single-high dose of methamphetamine (30 mg/kg, i.p.). Our findings indicate, for the first time, that methamphetamine decreases striatal glutamine, glutamate and GABA levels, as well as glutamine/glutamate and GABA/glutamate ratios, while serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels remain unchanged. This methamphetamine regimen also produced dopaminergic terminal degeneration in the striatum, as evidenced by dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase depletion. Consistently, methamphetamine decreased the locomotor activity of mice, in the open field test. In addition, increased levels of glutamine synthase and glial fibrillary acidic protein were observed. Nevertheless, methamphetamine failed to change RAGE levels. Our results show that acute methamphetamine intoxication induces pronounced changes in the striatal glutamatergic/GABAergic and dopaminergic homeostasis, along with astrocyte activation. These neurochemical and glial alterations are accompanied by impairment in locomotor activity.

  17. Intra-Subtype Variation in Enteroadhesion Accounts for Differences in Epithelial Barrier Disruption and Is Associated with Metronidazole Resistance in Blastocystis Subtype-7

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei

    2014-01-01

    Blastocystis is an extracellular, enteric pathogen that induces intestinal disorders in a range of hosts including humans. Recent studies have identified potential parasite virulence factors in and host responses to this parasite; however, little is known about Blastocystis-host attachment, which is crucial for colonization and virulence of luminal stages. By utilizing 7 different strains of the parasite belonging to two clinically relevant subtypes ST-4 and ST-7, we investigated Blastocystis-enterocyte adhesion and its association with parasite-induced epithelial barrier disruption. We also suggest that drug resistance in ST-7 strains might result in fitness cost that manifested as impairment of parasite adhesion and, consequently, virulence. ST-7 parasites were generally highly adhesive to Caco-2 cells and preferred binding to intercellular junctions. These strains also induced disruption of ZO-1 and occludin tight junction proteins as well as increased dextran-FITC flux across epithelial monolayers. Interestingly, their adhesion was correlated with metronidazole (Mz) susceptibility. Mz resistant (Mzr) strains were found to be less pathogenic, owing to compromised adhesion. Moreover, tolerance of nitrosative stress was also reduced in the Mzr strains. In conclusion, the findings indicate that Blastocystis attaches to intestinal epithelium and leads to epithelial barrier dysfunction and that drug resistance might entail a fitness cost in parasite virulence by limiting entero-adhesiveness. This is the first study of the cellular basis for strain-to-strain variation in parasite pathogenicity. Intra- and inter-subtype variability in cytopathogenicity provides a possible explanation for the diverse clinical outcomes of Blastocystis infections. PMID:24851944

  18. Effects of pharmacological and genetic disruption of CXCR4 chemokine receptor function in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Shubhchintan; Cho, Byung S; Ghosh, Dipanjan; Sivina, Mariela; Koehrer, Stefan; Müschen, Markus; Peled, Amnon; Davis, Richard E; Konopleva, Marina; Burger, Jan A

    2016-08-01

    B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL) cells express high levels of CXCR4 chemokine receptors for homing and retention within the marrow microenvironment. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) secrete CXCL12, the ligand for CXCR4, and protect B-ALL cells from cytotoxic drugs. Therefore, the therapeutic use of CXCR4 antagonists has been proposed to disrupt cross talk between B-ALL cells and the protective stroma. Because CXCR4 antagonists can have activating agonistic function, we compared the genetic and pharmacological deletion of CXCR4 in B-ALL cells, using CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing and CXCR4 antagonists that are in clinical use (plerixafor, BKT140). Both genetic and pharmacological CXCR4 inhibition significantly reduced B-ALL cell migration to CXCL12 gradients and beneath BMSC, and restored drug sensitivity to dexamethasone, vincristine and cyclophosphamide. NOD/SCID/IL-2rγnull mice injected with CXCR4 gene-deleted B-ALL cells had significant delay in disease progression and superior survival when compared to control mice injected with CXCR4 wild-type B-ALL cells. These findings indicate that anti-leukaemia activity of CXCR4 antagonists is primarily due to CXCR4 inhibition, rather than agonistic activity, and corroborate that CXCR4 is an important target to overcome stroma-mediated drug resistance in B-ALL.

  19. Epithelial-specific A2B adenosine receptor signaling protects the colonic epithelial barrier during acute colitis

    PubMed Central

    Aherne, CM; Saeedi, B; Collins, CB; Masterson, JC; McNamee, EN; Perrenoud, L; Rapp, CR; Curtis, VF; Bayless, A; Fletcher, A; Glover, LE; Evans, CM; Jedlicka, P; Furuta, GT; de Zoeten, EF; Colgan, SP; Eltzschig, HK

    2015-01-01

    Central to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) pathogenesis is loss of mucosal barrier function. Emerging evidence implicates extracellular adenosine signaling in attenuating mucosal inflammation. We hypothesized that adenosine-mediated protection from intestinal barrier dysfunction involves tissue-specific signaling through the A2B adenosine receptor (Adora2b) at the intestinal mucosal surface. To address this hypothesis, we combined pharmacologic studies and studies in mice with global or tissue-specific deletion of the Adora2b receptor. Adora2b−/− mice experienced a significantly heightened severity of colitis, associated with a more acute onset of disease and loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function. Comparison of mice with Adora2b deletion on vascular endothelial cells (Adora2bfl/flVeCadCre+) or intestinal epithelia (Adora2bfl/flVillinCre+) revealed a selective role for epithelial Adora2b signaling in attenuating colonic inflammation. In vitro studies with Adora2b knockdown in intestinal epithelial cultures or pharmacologic studies highlighted Adora2b-driven phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a specific barrier repair response. Similarly, in vivo studies in genetic mouse models or treatment studies with an Adora2b agonist (BAY 60-6583) recapitulate these findings. Taken together, our results suggest that intestinal epithelial Adora2b signaling provides protection during intestinal inflammation via enhancing mucosal barrier responses. PMID:25850656

  20. Reversal of West Nile virus-induced blood-brain barrier disruption and tight junction proteins degradation by matrix metalloproteinases inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Saguna; Kumar, Mukesh; Gurjav, Ulziijargal; Lum, Stephanie; Nerurkar, Vivek R.

    2011-01-01

    Though compromised blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a pathological hallmark of WNV- associated neurological sequelae, underlying mechanisms are unclear. We characterized the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in WNV-infected human brain-microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE) and -cortical astrocytes (HBCA), components of BBB and their role in BBB disruption. Expression of multiple MMPs was significantly induced in WNV-infected HBCA cells. Naïve HBMVE cells incubated with the supernatant from WNV-infected HBCA cells demonstrated loss of tight junction proteins, which was rescued in the presence of MMP inhibitor, GM6001. Further, supernatant from WNV-infected HBCA cells compromised the in-vitro BBB models integrity. Our data suggests astrocytes as one of the sources of MMP in the brain, which mediates BBB disruption allowing unrestricted entry of immune cells into the brain, thereby contributing to WNV-neuropathogenesis. Because of the unavailability of WNV antivirals and vaccines, use of MMP inhibitors as an adjunct therapy to ameliorate WNV disease progression is warranted. PMID:19922973

  1. Mild hypothermia alleviates brain oedema and blood-brain barrier disruption by attenuating tight junction and adherens junction breakdown in a swine model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiebin; Li, Chunsheng; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Yongzhen

    2017-01-01

    Mild hypothermia improves survival and neurological recovery after cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether mild hypothermia alleviates early blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We investigated the effects of mild hypothermia on neurologic outcome, survival rate, brain water content, BBB permeability and changes in tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) after CA and CPR. Pigs were subjected to 8 min of untreated ventricular fibrillation followed by CPR. Mild hypothermia (33°C) was intravascularly induced and maintained at this temperature for 12 h, followed by active rewarming. Mild hypothermia significantly reduced cortical water content, decreased BBB permeability and attenuated TJ ultrastructural and basement membrane breakdown in brain cortical microvessels. Mild hypothermia also attenuated the CPR-induced decreases in TJ (occludin, claudin-5, ZO-1) and AJ (VE-cadherin) protein and mRNA expression. Furthermore, mild hypothermia decreased the CA- and CPR-induced increases in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and increased angiogenin-1 (Ang-1) expression. Our findings suggest that mild hypothermia attenuates the CA- and resuscitation-induced early brain oedema and BBB disruption, and this improvement might be at least partially associated with attenuation of the breakdown of TJ and AJ, suppression of MMP-9 and VEGF expression, and upregulation of Ang-1 expression. PMID:28355299

  2. Interferon-Stimulated Gene 15 Upregulation Precedes the Development of Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Cerebral Edema after Traumatic Brain Injury in Young Mice.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Janet L; Todd, Tracey; Daniels, Zachary; Bazan, Nicolas G; Belayev, Ludmila

    2015-07-15

    Recent studies show that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) plays a pivotal role in development of cerebral edema, a known complication following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children and a contributing factor to worsened neurologic recovery. Interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is upregulated after cerebral ischemia and is neuroprotective. The significant role of ISG15 after TBI has not been studied. Postnatal Day (PND) 21 and PND24 mice were subjected to lateral closed-skull injury with impact depth of 2.0 or 2.25 mm. Behavior was examined at 7 d using two-object novel recognition and Wire Hang tests. Mice were sacrificed at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, and 7 d. ISG15 and MLCK were analyzed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry, blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption with Evans Blue (EB), and cerebral edema with wet/dry weights. EB extravasation and edema peaked at 72 h in both ages. PND21 mice had more severe neurological deficits, compared with PND24 mice. PND24 mice showed peak ISG15 expression at 6 h, and PND21 mice at 72 h. MLCK peaked in both age groups at 12 h and co-localized with ISG15 on immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation. These studies provide evidence, ISG15 is elevated following TBI in mice, preceding MLCK elevation, development of BBB disruption, and cerebral edema.

  3. ATP Induces Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins via IL-1 Beta-Dependent MMP-9 Activation of Human Blood-Brain Barrier In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuxing; Zhao, Kai; Zhang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Bainan

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) follows brain trauma or central nervous system (CNS) stress. However, the mechanisms leading to this process or the underlying neural plasticity are not clearly known. We hypothesized that ATP/P2X7R signaling regulates the integrity of BBB. Activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) by ATP induces the release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which in turn enhances the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Degradation of tight junction proteins (TJPs) such as ZO-1 and occludin occurs, which finally contributes to disruption of BBB. A contact coculture system using human astrocytes and hCMEC/D3, an immortalized human brain endothelial cell line, was used to mimic BBB in vitro. Permeability was used to evaluate changes in the integrity of TJPs. ELISA, Western blot, and immunofluorescent staining procedures were used. Our data demonstrated that exposure to the photoreactive ATP analog, 3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BzATP), induced a significant decrease in ZO-1 and occludin expression. Meanwhile, the decrease of ZO-1 and occludin was significantly attenuated by P2X7R inhibitors, as well as IL-1R and MMP antagonists. Further, the induction of IL-1β and MMP-9 was closely linked to ATP/P2X7R-associated BBB leakage. In conclusion, our study explored the mechanism of ATP/P2X7R signaling in the disruption of BBB following brain trauma/stress injury, especially focusing on the relationship with IL-1β and MMP-9.

  4. ATP Induces Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins via IL-1 Beta-Dependent MMP-9 Activation of Human Blood-Brain Barrier In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) follows brain trauma or central nervous system (CNS) stress. However, the mechanisms leading to this process or the underlying neural plasticity are not clearly known. We hypothesized that ATP/P2X7R signaling regulates the integrity of BBB. Activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) by ATP induces the release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which in turn enhances the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Degradation of tight junction proteins (TJPs) such as ZO-1 and occludin occurs, which finally contributes to disruption of BBB. A contact coculture system using human astrocytes and hCMEC/D3, an immortalized human brain endothelial cell line, was used to mimic BBB in vitro. Permeability was used to evaluate changes in the integrity of TJPs. ELISA, Western blot, and immunofluorescent staining procedures were used. Our data demonstrated that exposure to the photoreactive ATP analog, 3′-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5′-triphosphate (BzATP), induced a significant decrease in ZO-1 and occludin expression. Meanwhile, the decrease of ZO-1 and occludin was significantly attenuated by P2X7R inhibitors, as well as IL-1R and MMP antagonists. Further, the induction of IL-1β and MMP-9 was closely linked to ATP/P2X7R-associated BBB leakage. In conclusion, our study explored the mechanism of ATP/P2X7R signaling in the disruption of BBB following brain trauma/stress injury, especially focusing on the relationship with IL-1β and MMP-9. PMID:27795859

  5. Rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of the target of rapamycin complex 1, disrupts intestinal barrier integrity in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Liu, S Q; Zhao, J P; Fan, X X; Liu, G H; Jiao, H C; Wang, X J; Sun, S H; Lin, H

    2016-04-01

    To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying the intestinal barrier integrity, this study determined whether the rapamycin (RAPA)-sensitive target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) pathway was involved in this process. Three groups of 4-day-old male chicks were randomly subjected to one of the following treatments for 6 days: high-dose RAPA [a specific inhibitor of TORC1; an intraperitoneal injection of 1.0 mg/kg body weight (BW), once daily at 09:00 hours], low-dose RAPA (0.4 mg/kg BW) and RAPA vehicle (control). Results showed that the RAPA treatment increased mortality, while decreasing villus height (p < 0.01), claudin 1 expression, content of immunoglobulin A (IgA), extent of TORC1 phosphorylation (p < 0.05), ratio of villus height to crypt depth (p < 0.01), and population of IgA-positive B cells in intestinal mucosa, particularly for the jejunum. Some aspects of these responses were dose dependent and appeared to result from weight loss. Together, RAPA exerts the expected inhibition of small intestinal development and IgA production in birds, suggesting the important role of TORC1 in gut barrier integrity.

  6. The quantification of blood-brain barrier disruption using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in aging rhesus monkeys with spontaneous type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ziqian; Zeng, Wen; Sun, Jiayu; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Ruzhi; Yang, Zunyuan; Yao, Zunwei; Wang, Lei; Song, Li; Chen, Yushu; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Chunhua; Gong, Li; Wu, Bing; Wang, Tinghua; Zheng, Jie; Gao, Fabao

    2016-07-08

    Microvascular lesions of the body are one of the most serious complications that can affect patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a highly selective permeable barrier around the microvessels of the brain. This study investigated BBB disruption in diabetic rhesus monkeys using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Multi-slice DCE-MRI was used to quantify BBB permeability. Five diabetic monkeys and six control monkeys underwent magnetic resonance brain imaging in 3 Tesla MRI system. Regions of the frontal cortex, the temporal cortex, the basal ganglia, the thalamus, and the hippocampus in the two groups were selected as regions of interest to calculate the value of the transport coefficient K(trans) using the extended Tofts model. Permeability in the diabetic monkeys was significantly increased as compared with permeability in the normal control monkeys. Histopathologically, zonula occludens protein-1 decreased, immunoglobulin G leaked out of the blood, and nuclear factor E2-related factor translocated from the cytoplasm to the nuclei. It is likely that diabetes contributed to the increased BBB permeability.

  7. Pro-inflammatory NF-κB and early growth response gene 1 regulate epithelial barrier disruption by food additive carrageenan in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye Jin; Kim, Juil; Park, Seong-Hwan; Do, Kee Hun; Yang, Hyun; Moon, Yuseok

    2012-06-20

    The widely used food additive carrageenan (CGN) has been shown to induce intestinal inflammation, ulcerative colitis-like symptoms, or neoplasm in the gut epithelia in animal models, which are also clinical features of human inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, the effects of CGN on pro-inflammatory transcription factors NF-κB and early growth response gene 1 product (EGR-1) were evaluated in terms of human intestinal epithelial barrier integrity. Both pro-inflammatory transcription factors were elevated by CGN and only NF-κB activation was shown to be involved in the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8. Moreover, the integrity of the in vitro epithelial monolayer under the CGN insult was maintained by both activated pro-inflammatory transcription factors NF-κB and EGR-1. Suppression of NF-κB or EGR-1 aggravated barrier disruption by CGN, which was associated with the reduced gene expression of tight junction component zonula occludens 1 and its irregular localization in the epithelial monolayer.

  8. Evaluation of permeability, doxorubicin delivery, and drug retention in a rat brain tumor model after ultrasound-induced blood-tumor barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Park, Juyoung; Aryal, Muna; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; McDannold, Nathan

    2017-03-28

    Drug delivery in brain tumors is challenging because of the presence of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-tumor barrier (BTB). Focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with microbubbles can enhance the permeability of the BTB in brain tumors, as well as disrupting the BBB in the surrounding tissue. In this study, dynamic contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) was used to characterize FUS-induced permeability changes in a rat glioma model and in the normal brain and to investigate the relationship between these changes and the resulting concentration of the chemotherapy agent doxorubicin (DOX). 9L gliosarcoma cells were implanted in both hemispheres in male rats. At day 10-12 after implantation, FUS-induced BTB disruption using 690kHz ultrasound and Definity microbubbles was performed in one of the tumors and in a normal brain region in each animal. After FUS, DOX was administered at a dose of 5.67mg/kg. The resulting DOX concentration was measured via fluorometry at 1 or 24h after FUS. The transfer coefficient Ktrans describing extravasation of the MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA was significantly increased in both the sonicated tumors and in the normal brain tissue (P<0.001) between the two DCE-MRI acquisitions obtained before and after FUS, while no significant difference was found in the controls (non-sonicated tumor/normal brain tissue). DOX concentrations were also significantly larger than controls in both the sonicated tumors and in the normal tissue volumes at 1 and 24h after sonication. The DOX concentrations were significantly larger (P<0.01) in the control tumors harvested 1h after FUS than in those harvested at 24h, when the tumor concentrations were not significantly different than in the non-sonicated normal brain. In contrast, there was no significant difference in the DOX concentrations between the tumors harvested at 1 and 24h after FUS or in the concentrations measured in the brain at these time points. The transfer coefficient Ktrans

  9. Focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption enhances the delivery of cytarabine to the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Han-Qing; Lü, Lin; Wang, Feng; Luo, Yun; Lou, Shi-Feng

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles for targeted delivery of cytarabine to the brain. Sprague-Dawly rats (weighing 200-250 g) received focused ultrasound with intravenous injection microbubbles. At 0, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours (n=5 for each time point) after sonication, animals received intravenous administration of cytarabine at a normal dose of 4 mg/kg body weight. Additional five rats were given with a high dose (50 mg/kg body weight) of cytarabine alone. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cerebral cytarabine were determined. FUS in conjunction with microbubbles caused a transient BBB opening. Sonication exposure promoted cytarabine accumulation at the sonicated site. Animals injected with a normal dose of cytarabine 2 hours after sonication had similar concentrations of cerebral cytarabine compared to those with higher cytarabine without sonication. FUS can temporarily open the BBB and thus facilitate the penetration of systemic cytarabine into the brain.

  10. Caffeine protects against disruptions of the blood-brain barrier in animal models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesong; Ghribi, Othman; Geiger, Jonathan D

    2010-01-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are two of the most common neurodegenerative diseases and as such they represent major public health problems. Finding effective treatments for AD and PD represents an unmet and elusive goal largely because these diseases are chronic and progressive, and have a complicated and ill-understood pathogenesis. Although the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, caffeine, the most commonly ingested psychoactive drug in the world, has been shown in human and animal studies to be protective against AD and PD. One mechanism implicated in the pathogenesis of AD and PD is blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction and we reported recently that caffeine exerts protective effects against AD and PD at least in part by keeping the BBB intact. The present review focuses on the role of BBB dysfunction in the pathogenesis of AD and PD, caffeine's protective effects against AD and PD, and potential mechanisms whereby caffeine protects against BBB leakage.

  11. Effect of acute poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition by 3-AB on blood-brain barrier permeability and edema formation after focal traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Lescot, Thomas; Fulla-Oller, Laurence; Palmier, Bruno; Po, Christelle; Beziaud, Tiphaine; Puybasset, Louis; Plotkine, Michel; Gillet, Brigitte; Meric, Philippe; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine

    2010-06-01

    Recent evidence supports a crucial role for matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and vasogenic edema formation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Although the exact causes of MMP-9 upregulation after TBI are not fully understood, several arguments suggest a contribution of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) in the neuroinflammatory response leading to MMP-9 activation. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of PARP inhibition by 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB) (1) on MMP-9 upregulation and BBB integrity, (2) on edema formation as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), (3) on neuron survival as assessed by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), and (4) on neurological deficits at the acute phase of TBI. Western blots and zymograms showed blunting of MMP-9 upregulation 6 h after TBI. BBB permeability was decreased at the same time point in 3-AB-treated rats compared to vehicle-treated rats. Cerebral MRI showed less "free" water in 3-AB-treated than in vehicle-treated rats 6 h after TBI. MRI findings 24 h after TBI indicated predominant cytotoxic edema, and at this time point no significant differences were found between 3-AB- and vehicle-treated rats with regard to MMP-9 upregulation, BBB permeability, or MRI changes. At both 6 and 24 h, neurological function was better in the 3-AB-treated than in the vehicle-treated rats. These data suggest that PARP inhibition by 3-AB protected the BBB against hyperpermeability induced by MMP-9 upregulation, thereby decreasing vasogenic edema formation 6 h after TBI. Furthermore, our data confirm the neuroprotective effect of 3-AB at the very acute phase of TBI.

  12. Targeted disruption of the mouse gene encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein provides insights into congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Caron, K M; Soo, S C; Wetsel, W C; Stocco, D M; Clark, B J; Parker, K L

    1997-10-14

    An essential component of regulated steroidogenesis is the translocation of cholesterol from the cytoplasm to the inner mitochondrial membrane where the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme carries out the first committed step in steroidogenesis. Recent studies showed that a 30-kDa mitochondrial phosphoprotein, designated steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), is essential for this translocation. To allow us to explore the roles of StAR in a system amenable to experimental manipulation and to develop an animal model for the human disorder lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH), we used targeted gene disruption to produce StAR knockout mice. These StAR knockout mice were indistinguishable initially from wild-type littermates, except that males and females had female external genitalia. After birth, they failed to grow normally and died from adrenocortical insufficiency. Hormone assays confirmed severe defects in adrenal steroids-with loss of negative feedback regulation at hypothalamic-pituitary levels-whereas hormones constituting the gonadal axis did not differ significantly from levels in wild-type littermates. Histologically, the adrenal cortex of StAR knockout mice contained florid lipid deposits, with lesser deposits in the steroidogenic compartment of the testis and none in the ovary. The sex-specific differences in gonadal involvement support a two-stage model of the pathogenesis of StAR deficiency, with trophic hormone stimulation inducing progressive accumulation of lipids within the steroidogenic cells and ultimately causing their death. These StAR knockout mice provide a useful model system in which to determine the mechanisms of StAR's essential roles in adrenocortical and gonadal steroidogenesis.

  13. Disruption of the SCL gene by a t(1;3) translocation in a patient with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    SCL gene disruptions are the most common chromosomal abnormality associated with the development of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Such disruptions can be the result of t(1;14) and t(1;7) translocations, as well as a cytogenetically undetectable interstitial deletion of chromosome 1. We present here a case of T cell ALL with a t(1;3)(p34;p21) translocation that also disrupts the SCL locus and leads to dysregulated SCL gene expression. This translocation, similar to previously reported SCL gene disruptions, appears to have been mediated, at least in part, by the V(D)J recombinase complex, since cryptic heptamer recognition sequences, as well as nontemplated N region nucleotide addition, are present at the breakpoints. The t(1;3) also disrupts a region on chromosome 3 characterized by alternating purine and pyrimidine residues, which can form a Z-DNA structure, reported to be prone to recombination events. A previously undescribed, evolutionarily conserved transcript unit is detected within 8 kb of the breakpoint on chromosome 3. This report extends the spectrum of recognized SCL translocations associated with T cell ALL, and underscores the contention that dysregulated SCL expression may be a causal event in T cell ALL. PMID:1402676

  14. Phenotypic changes in colonocytes following acute stress or activation of mast cells in mice: implications for delayed epithelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Demaude, J; Salvador‐Cartier, C; Fioramonti, J; Ferrier, L; Bueno, L

    2006-01-01

    Background and aim Stressful life events are known to modulate the development or relapse of disease in both inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel disease patients but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Stress is known to effect mast cells, interferon γ (IFN‐γ), and myosin light chain phosphorylation to trigger colonic epithelial barrier dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether acute stress induced or chemical mast cell activation impaired expression and function of epithelial tight junctions, and altered colonocyte differentiation in mice. Methods Colonic paracellular permeability was assessed as the in vivo lumen to blood ratio of 51Cr‐EDTA in different groups of mice (controls, stressed, mast cell degranulator BrX‐537A treated), pretreated or not with the mast cell stabiliser doxantrazole. Involvement of mast cells and IFN‐γ was evaluated in wild‐type and IFN‐γ deficient mice. Tight junction alteration was assessed by histology, transmission electron microscopy, and real time reverse transcription‐polymerase chain reaction. Colonocyte differentiation was determined by protein kinase C ζ (PKCζ) immunofluorescence and western blotting, and alkaline phosphatase activity assay. Results Acute stress induced a three day delayed increase in colonic paracellular permeability which involved mast cell degranulation and overproduction of IFN‐γ. The colonic epithelial barrier was morphologically altered and expression of mRNA encoding tight junction proteins ZO‐2 and occludin was decreased. Moreover, three days after acute stress, colonocyte differentiation was reduced, as shown by decreased expression of both PKCζ isotype and alkaline phosphatase. Conclusion These data highlight new mechanisms whereby an acute stress acts on the gastrointestinal tract by inducing alterations in colonocyte differentiation and decreased expression of mRNA encoding tight junction proteins. Thus phenotypic changes in colonocytes could

  15. Drug delivery to the brain by focused ultrasound induced blood-brain barrier disruption: quantitative evaluation of enhanced permeability of cerebral vasculature using two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nhan, Tam; Burgess, Alison; Cho, Eunice E; Stefanovic, Bojana; Lilge, Lothar; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-11-28

    Reversible and localized blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) using focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with intravascularly administered microbubbles (MBs) has been established as a non-invasive method for drug delivery to the brain. Using two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2 PFM), we imaged the cerebral vasculature during BBBD and observed the extravasation of fluorescent dye in real-time in vivo. We measured the enhanced permeability upon BBBD for both 10 kDa and 70 kDa dextran conjugated Texas Red (TR) at the acoustic pressure range of 0.2-0.8 MPa and found that permeability constants of TR10 kDa and TR70 kDa vary from 0.0006 to 0.0359 min(-1) and from 0.0003 to 0.0231 min(-1), respectively. For both substances, a linear regression was applied on the permeability constant against the acoustic pressure and the slope from best-fit was found to be 0.039 ± 0.005 min(-1)/MPa and 0.018 ± 0.005 min(-1)/MPa, respectively. In addition, the pressure threshold for successfully induced BBBD was confirmed to be 0.4-0.6MPa. Finally, we identified two types of leakage kinetics (fast and slow) that exhibit distinct permeability constants and temporal disruption onsets, as well as demonstrated their correlations with the applied acoustic pressure and vessel diameter. Direct assessment of vascular permeability and insights on its dependency on acoustic pressure, vessel size and leakage kinetics are important for treatment strategies of BBBD-based drug delivery.

  16. Estrogen provides neuroprotection against brain edema and blood brain barrier disruption through both estrogen receptors α and β following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, Vida; Khaksari, Mohammad; Abbasi, Reza; Maghool, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Estrogen (E2) has neuroprotective effects on blood-brain-barrier (BBB) after traumatic brain injury (TBI). In order to investigate the roles of estrogen receptors (ERs) in these effects, ER-α antagonist (MPP) and, ER-β antagonist (PHTPP), or non-selective estrogen receptors antagonist (ICI 182780) were administered. Materials and Methods: Ovariectomized rats were divided into 10 groups, as follows: Sham, TBI, E2, oil, MPP+E2, PHTPP+E2, MPP+PHTPP+E2, ICI+E2, MPP, and DMSO. E2 (33.3 µg/Kg) or oil were administered 30 min after TBI. 1 dose (150 µg/Kg) of each of MPP, PHTPP, and (4 mg/kg) ICI182780 was injected two times, 24 hr apart, before TBI and estrogen treatment. BBB disruption (Evans blue content) and brain edema (brain water content) evaluated 5 hr and 24 hr after the TBI were evaluated, respectively. Results: The results showed that E2 reduced brain edema after TBI compared to vehicle (P<0.01). The brain edema in the MPP+E2 and PHTPP+E2 groups decreased compared to the vehicle (P<0.001). There was no significant difference in MPP+PHTPP+E2 and ICI+E2 compared to TBI. This parameter in MPP was similar to vehicle. Evans blue content in E2 group was lower than vehicle (P<0.05). The inhibitory effect of E2 on Evans blue was not reduced by MPP+E2 and PHTPP+E2 groups, but decreased by treatment with MPP+PHTPP or ICI. MPP had no effect on Evans blue content. Conclusion: A combined administration of MPP and PHTPP or ICI inhibited the E2-induced decrease in brain edema and BBB disruption; this may suggest that these effects were mediated via both receptors. PMID:25810887

  17. Submicron-bubble-enhanced focused ultrasound for blood-brain barrier disruption and improved CNS drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Liu, Hao-Li; Ting, Chien-Yu; Lee, Ya-Hsuan; Huang, Chih-Ying; Ma, Yan-Jung; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    The use of focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles has been proven to induce transient blood-brain barrier opening (BBB-opening). However, FUS-induced inertial cavitation of microbubbles can also result in erythrocyte extravasations. Here we investigated whether induction of submicron bubbles to oscillate at their resonant frequency would reduce inertial cavitation during BBB-opening and thereby eliminate erythrocyte extravasations in a rat brain model. FUS was delivered with acoustic pressures of 0.1-4.5 MPa using either in-house manufactured submicron bubbles or standard SonoVue microbubbles. Wideband and subharmonic emissions from bubbles were used to quantify inertial and stable cavitation, respectively. Erythrocyte extravasations were evaluated by in vivo post-treatment magnetic resonance susceptibility-weighted imaging, and finally by histological confirmation. We found that excitation of submicron bubbles with resonant frequency-matched FUS (10 MHz) can greatly limit inertial cavitation while enhancing stable cavitation. The BBB-opening was mainly caused by stable cavitation, whereas the erythrocyte extravasation was closely correlated with inertial cavitation. Our technique allows extensive reduction of inertial cavitation to induce safe BBB-opening. Furthermore, the safety issue of BBB-opening was not compromised by prolonging FUS exposure time, and the local drug concentrations in the brain tissues were significantly improved to 60 times (BCNU; 18.6 µg versus 0.3 µg) by using chemotherapeutic agent-loaded submicron bubbles with FUS. This study provides important information towards the goal of successfully translating FUS brain drug delivery into clinical use.

  18. Temporal analysis of blood-brain barrier disruption and cerebrospinal fluid matrix metalloproteinases in rhesus monkeys subjected to transient ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingqian; Fan, Feng; Zeng, Guojun; Zhou, Linlin; Zhang, Yinbing; Zhang, Jie; Jiao, He; Zhang, Ting; Su, Dan; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Xin; Xiao, Kai; Li, Hongxia; Zhong, Zhihui

    2016-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption plays an important role in pathophysiological progress of ischemic stroke. However, our knowledge of the dynamic change of BBB permeability and its mechanism remains limited. In the current study, we used a non-human primate (NHP) MCAO model and a serial CSF sampling method that allowed us to determine the dynamic change of BBB permeability by calculating the CSF/serum albumin ratio (AR). We showed that AR increased rapidly and significantly after ischemia, and the fold increase of AR is highly correlated with the infarction size during the subacute phase. Moreover, we determined the temporal change of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-13, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in CSF and serum. Each MMP and TIMP showed different change patterns when comparing their values in CSF and serum. Based on the longitudinal dataset, we showed that the fold increase of MMP-9 in serum and CSF are both correlated to infarction size. Among the measured MMPs and TIMPs, only MMP-2, MMP-13, and TIMP-2 in CSF correlated with AR to some extent. Our data suggest there is no single MMP or TIMP fully responsible for BBB breakdown, which is regulated by a much more complicated signal network and further investigations of the mechanisms are needed.

  19. The role of transpapillary drainage in management of patients with pancreatic fluid collections and pancreatic duct disruption as a consequences of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jagielski, Mateusz; Smoczyński, Marian; Adrych, Krystian

    In last thirty years we have been observing significant development of an endoscopic treatment of pancreatic fluid collections, including transmural drainage of walled-off pancreatic necrosis. Simultaneously, the use of endotherapy in treatment of main pancreatic ducts disruptions has increased. Despite many publications available in current literature, concerning the endoscopic treatment of consequences of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, the role of transpapillary drainage in management of patients with pancreatic fluid collections and pancreatic duct disruption as an after-effect of severe acute pancreatitis remains unclear and is still a current problem. This publication includes comment on the article entitled 'Early dual drainage combining transpapillary endotherapy and percutaneous catheter drainage in patients with pancreatic fistula associated with severe acute pancreatitis' published by Yokoi et al. in the July-August 2016 issue of Pancreatology together with questions to the authors. Furthermore, in the article we did pay particular attention to the role of transpapillary drainage in management of pancreatic fluid collections, especially of walled-of pancreatic necrosis.

  20. Systemic lipopolysaccharide administration impairs retrieval of context-object discrimination, but not spatial, memory: Evidence for selective disruption of specific hippocampus-dependent memory functions during acute neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Czerniawski, Jennifer; Miyashita, Teiko; Lewandowski, Gail; Guzowski, John F

    2015-02-01

    Neuroinflammation is implicated in impairments in neuronal function and cognition that arise with aging, trauma, and/or disease. Therefore, understanding the underlying basis of the effect of immune system activation on neural function could lead to therapies for treating cognitive decline. Although neuroinflammation is widely thought to preferentially impair hippocampus-dependent memory, data on the effects of cytokines on cognition are mixed. One possible explanation for these inconsistent results is that cytokines may disrupt specific neural processes underlying some forms of memory but not others. In an earlier study, we tested the effect of systemic administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on retrieval of hippocampus-dependent context memory and neural circuit function in CA3 and CA1 (Czerniawski and Guzowski, 2014). Paralleling impairment in context discrimination memory, we observed changes in neural circuit function consistent with disrupted pattern separation function. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that acute neuroinflammation selectively disrupts memory retrieval in tasks requiring hippocampal pattern separation processes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats given LPS systemically prior to testing exhibited intact performance in tasks that do not require hippocampal pattern separation processes: novel object recognition and spatial memory in the water maze. By contrast, memory retrieval in a task thought to require hippocampal pattern separation, context-object discrimination, was strongly impaired in LPS-treated rats in the absence of any gross effects on exploratory activity or motivation. These data show that LPS administration does not impair memory retrieval in all hippocampus-dependent tasks, and support the hypothesis that acute neuroinflammation impairs context discrimination memory via disruption of pattern separation processes in hippocampus.

  1. Acute kidney injury in 2013: Breaking barriers for biomarkers in AKI--progress at last.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Dinna N; Mehta, Ravindra L

    2014-02-01

    In 2013, four important papers were published that provide new insights on biomarkers in acute kidney injury (AKI). These studies demonstrate the potential for biomarkers to aid clinicians in improving the therapeutic management of patients with AKI and potentially improve patient outcomes.

  2. Circulating concentrations, cerebral output of the CINC-1 and blood–brain barrier disruption in Wistar rats after pneumococcal meningitis induction.

    PubMed

    Barichello, T; Generoso, J S; Silvestre, C; Costa, C S; Carrodore, M M; Cipriano, A L; Michelon, C M; Petronilho, F; Dal-Pizzol, F; Vilela, M C; Teixeira, A L

    2012-08-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a severe infectious illness of the central nervous system (CNS), with high rates of lethality and morbidity, being that the microorganism and the host's inflammatory response are responsible for cerebral complications. Moreover, the blood–brain barrier (BBB) itself secretes cytokines and, because of the bipolar nature of the BBB, these substances can be secreted into either the CNS compartment or in the blood, so patients with acute bacterial meningitis frequently develop sepsis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the cytokine/chemokine levels in different vessels and the BBB integrity after pneumococcal meningitis induction. Wistar rats were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae, and the BBB integrity was investigated using Evan's blue dye. Also, blood from the carotid artery and jugular vein was collected in order to perform tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-60 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1) analyses by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CINC-1 levels were increased at 6 h in the arterial plasma and at 3 and 6 h in the jugular plasma. We observed BBB breakdown between 12 and 24 h in the hippocampus and at 12 and 18 h in the cortex after pneumococcal meningitis induction. The increase of CINC-1 occurred prior to the BBB breakdown. CINC-1 is a neutrophil chemoattractant and it may be related to early events in the pneumococcal meningitis pathophysiology.

  3. The effect of regadenoson-induced transient disruption of the blood-brain barrier on temozolomide delivery to normal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sadhana; Anders, Nicole M; Mangraviti, Antonella; Wanjiku, Teresia M; Sankey, Eric W; Liu, Ann; Brem, Henry; Tyler, Betty; Rudek, Michelle A; Grossman, Stuart A

    2016-02-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) significantly reduces the delivery of many systemically administered agents to the central nervous system. Although temozolomide is the only chemotherapy to improve survival in patients with glioblastoma, its concentration in brain is only 20 % of that in blood. Regadenoson, an FDA approved adenosine receptor agonist used for cardiac stress testing, transiently disrupts rodent BBB allowing high molecular weight dextran (70 kD) to enter the brain. This study was conducted to determine if regadenoson could facilitate entry of temozolomide into normal rodent brain. Temozolomide (50 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage to non-tumor bearing F344 rats. Two-thirds of the animals received a single dose of intravenous regadenoson 60-90 min later. All animals were sacrificed 120 or 360 min after temozolomide administration. Brain and plasma temozolomide concentrations were determined using HPLC/MS/MS. Brain temozolomide concentrations were significantly higher at 120 min when it was given with regadenoson versus alone (8.1 ± 2.7 and 5.1 ± 3.5 µg/g, P < 0.05). A similar trend was noted in brain:plasma ratios (0.45 ± 0.08 and 0.29 ± 0.09, P < 0.05). Brain concentrations and brain:plasma ratios were not significantly different 360 min after temozolomide administration. No differences were seen in plasma temozolomide concentrations with or without regadenoson. These results suggest co-administration of regadenoson with temozolomide results in 60% higher temozolomide levels in normal brain without affecting plasma concentrations. This novel approach to increasing intracranial concentrations of systemically administered agents has potential to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy in neuro-oncologic disorders.

  4. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Intra-Arterial Methotrexate-Based Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Primary CNS Lymphoma: A Multi-Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Angelov, Lilyana; Doolittle, Nancy D.; Kraemer, Dale F.; Siegal, Tali; Barnett, Gene H.; Peereboom, David M.; Stevens, Glen; McGregor, John; Jahnke, Kristoph; Lacy, Cynthia A.; Hedrick, Nancy A.; Shalom, Edna; Ference, Sandra; Bell, Susan; Sorenson, Lisa; Tyson, Rose Marie; Haluska, Marianne; Neuwelt, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) is confined to the CNS and/or the eyes at presentation and is usually initially treated with intravenous methotrexate-based chemotherapy and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). However, the intact blood-brain barrier (BBB) can limit diffusion of methotrexate into brain and tumor. With BBB disruption (BBBD), enhanced drug delivery to the tumor can be achieved. Patients and Methods This report summarizes the multi-institutional experience of 149 newly diagnosed (with no prior WBRT) patients with PCNSL treated with osmotic BBBD and intra-arterial (IA) methotrexate at four institutions from 1982 to 2005. In this series, 47.6% of patients were age ≥ 60 years, and 42.3% had Karnofsky performance score (KPS) less than 70 at diagnosis. Results The overall response rate was 81.9% (57.8% complete; 24.2% partial). Median overall survival (OS) was 3.1 years (25% estimated survival at 8.5 years). Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 1.8 years, with 5-year PFS of 31% and 7-year PFS of 25%. In low-risk patients (age < 60 years and KPS ≥ 70), median OS was approximately 14 years, with a plateau after approximately 8 years. Procedures were generally well tolerated; focal seizures (9.2%) were the most frequent side effect and lacked long-term sequelae. Conclusion This large series of patients treated over a 23-year period demonstrates that BBBD/IA methotrexate-based chemotherapy results in successful and durable tumor control and outcomes that are comparable or superior to other PCNSL treatment regimens. PMID:19451444

  5. Barriers to the use of the library service amongst clinical staff in an acute hospital setting: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gaynor; Preston, Hugh

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on research into the reasons why clinical staff in an acute hospital may be reluctant to use library services. The research was conducted by Gaynor Thomas at the Prince Philip Hospital in Llanelli in Wales as part of the dissertation she completed for an MSc in Economics. She graduated in July 2014 from Aberystwyth University and has co-written the article with Hugh Preston, her dissertation supervisor. The article summarises the key findings from the interviews undertaken as part of the research process and lists the resulting recommendations. Gaynor also highlights the initiatives which have been put in place with the express aim of removing barriers to use and encouraging clinical staff to make the most of the library which is, she argues, a time-saving resource. AM.

  6. Effect of toll-like receptor 3 agonist poly I:C on intestinal mucosa and epithelial barrier function in mouse models of acute colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong-Wei; Yue, Yue-Hong; Han, Hua; Chen, Xiu-Li; Lu, Yong-Gang; Zheng, Ji-Min; Hou, Hong-Tao; Lang, Xiao-Meng; He, Li-Li; Hu, Qi-Lu; Dun, Zi-Qian

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate potential effects of poly I:C on mucosal injury and epithelial barrier disruption in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis. METHODS Thirty C57BL/6 mice were given either regular drinking water (control group) or 2% (w/v) DSS drinking water (model and poly I:C groups) ad libitum for 7 d. Poly I:C was administrated subcutaneously (20 μg/mouse) 2 h prior to DSS induction in mice of the poly I:C group. Severity of colitis was evaluated by disease activity index, body weight, colon length, histology and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, as well as the production of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 17 (IL-17) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Intestinal permeability was analyzed by the fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled-dextran (FITC-D) method. Ultrastructural features of the colon tissue were observed under electron microscopy. Expressions of tight junction (TJ) proteins, including zo-1, occludin and claudin-1, were measured by immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence, Western blot and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). RESULTS DSS caused significant damage to the colon tissue in the model group. Administration of poly I:C dramatically protected against DSS-induced colitis, as demonstrated by less body weight loss, lower disease activity index score, longer colon length, colonic MPO activity, and improved macroscopic and histological scores. It also ameliorated DSS-induced ultrastructural changes of the colon epithelium, as observed under scanning electron microscopy, as well as FITC-D permeability. The mRNA and protein expressions of TJ protein, zo-1, occludin and claudin-1 were also found to be significantly enhanced in the poly I:C group, as determined by immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence, Western blot and RT-qPCR. By contrast, poly I:C pretreatment markedly reversed the DSS-induced up-regulated expressions of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-17 and IFN

  7. Structural Analysis of Major Species Barriers between Humans and Palm Civets for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infections

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fang

    2008-09-23

    It is believed that a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), was passed from palm civets to humans and caused the epidemic of SARS in 2002 to 2003. The major species barriers between humans and civets for SARS-CoV infections are the specific interactions between a defined receptor-binding domain (RBD) on a viral spike protein and its host receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). In this study a chimeric ACE2 bearing the critical N-terminal helix from civet and the remaining peptidase domain from human was constructed, and it was shown that this construct has the same receptor activity as civet ACE2. In addition, crystal structures of the chimeric ACE2 complexed with RBDs from various human and civet SARS-CoV strains were determined. These structures, combined with a previously determined structure of human ACE2 complexed with the RBD from a human SARS-CoV strain, have revealed a structural basis for understanding the major species barriers between humans and civets for SARS-CoV infections. They show that the major species barriers are determined by interactions between four ACE2 residues (residues 31, 35, 38, and 353) and two RBD residues (residues 479 and 487), that early civet SARS-CoV isolates were prevented from infecting human cells due to imbalanced salt bridges at the hydrophobic virus/receptor interface, and that SARS-CoV has evolved to gain sustained infectivity for human cells by eliminating unfavorable free charges at the interface through stepwise mutations at positions 479 and 487. These results enhance our understanding of host adaptations and cross-species infections of SARS-CoV and other emerging animal viruses.

  8. Delayed increases in microvascular pathology after experimental traumatic brain injury are associated with prolonged inflammation, blood-brain barrier disruption, and progressive white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Glushakova, Olena Y; Johnson, Danny; Hayes, Ronald L

    2014-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant risk factor for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and Parkinson's disease (PD). Cerebral microbleeds, focal inflammation, and white matter damage are associated with many neurological and neurodegenerative disorders including CTE, AD, PD, vascular dementia, stroke, and TBI. This study evaluates microvascular abnormalities observed at acute and chronic stages following TBI in rats, and examines pathological processes associated with these abnormalities. TBI in adult rats was induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI) of two magnitudes. Brain pathology was assessed in white matter of the corpus callosum for 24 h to 3 months following injury using immunohistochemistry (IHC). TBI resulted in focal microbleeds that were related to the magnitude of injury. At the lower magnitude of injury, microbleeds gradually increased over the 3 month duration of the study. IHC revealed TBI-induced focal abnormalities including blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage (IgG), endothelial damage (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 [ICAM-1]), activation of reactive microglia (ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 [Iba1]), gliosis (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP]) and macrophage-mediated inflammation (cluster of differentiation 68 [CD68]), all showing different temporal profiles. At chronic stages (up to 3 months), apparent myelin loss (Luxol fast blue) and scattered deposition of microbleeds were observed. Microbleeds were surrounded by glial scars and co-localized with CD68 and IgG puncta stainings, suggesting that localized BBB breakdown and inflammation were associated with vascular damage. Our results indicate that evolving white matter degeneration following experimental TBI is associated with significantly delayed microvascular damage and focal microbleeds that are temporally and regionally associated with development of punctate BBB breakdown and progressive inflammatory responses. Increased

  9. Sleep disruption and the sequelae associated with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Smith, Kelly E.; Nguyen, Linda; Turner, Ryan C.; Logsdon, Aric F.; Jackson, Garrett J.; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.; Miller, Diane B.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disruption, which includes a loss of sleep as well as poor quality fragmented sleep, frequently follows traumatic brain injury (TBI) impacting a large number of patients each year in the United States. Fragmented and/or disrupted sleep can worsen neuropsychiatric, behavioral, and physical symptoms of TBI. Additionally, sleep disruption impairs recovery and can lead to cognitive decline. The most common sleep disruption following TBI is insomnia, which is difficulty staying asleep. The consequences of disrupted sleep following injury range from deranged metabolomics and blood brain barrier compromise to altered neuroplasticity and degeneration. There are several theories for why sleep is necessary (e.g., glymphatic clearance and metabolic regulation) and these may help explain how sleep disruption contributes to degeneration within the brain. Experimental data indicate disrupted sleep allows hyperphosphorylated tau and amyloid β plaques to accumulate. As sleep disruption may act as a cellular stressor, target areas warranting further scientific investigation include the increase in endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress following acute periods of sleep deprivation. Potential treatment options for restoring the normal sleep cycle include melatonin derivatives and cognitive behavioral therapy. PMID:25956251

  10. Sleep disruption and the sequelae associated with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Smith, Kelly E; Nguyen, Linda; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Jackson, Garrett J; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L; Miller, Diane B

    2015-08-01

    Sleep disruption, which includes a loss of sleep as well as poor quality fragmented sleep, frequently follows traumatic brain injury (TBI) impacting a large number of patients each year in the United States. Fragmented and/or disrupted sleep can worsen neuropsychiatric, behavioral, and physical symptoms of TBI. Additionally, sleep disruption impairs recovery and can lead to cognitive decline. The most common sleep disruption following TBI is insomnia, which is difficulty staying asleep. The consequences of disrupted sleep following injury range from deranged metabolomics and blood brain barrier compromise to altered neuroplasticity and degeneration. There are several theories for why sleep is necessary (e.g., glymphatic clearance and metabolic regulation) and these may help explain how sleep disruption contributes to degeneration within the brain. Experimental data indicate disrupted sleep allows hyperphosphorylated tau and amyloid β plaques to accumulate. As sleep disruption may act as a cellular stressor, target areas warranting further scientific investigation include the increase in endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress following acute periods of sleep deprivation. Potential treatment options for restoring the normal sleep cycle include melatonin derivatives and cognitive behavioral therapy.

  11. Necrotizing Enterocolitis in a mouse model leads to widespread renal inflammation, acute kidney injury and disruption of renal tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Parvesh M; Tatum, Rodney; Ravisankar, Srikanth; Shekhawat, Prem S; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating condition affecting premature infants and leads to high mortality and chronic morbidity. Severe form of NEC is associated with acute renal failure, fluid imbalance, hyponatremia and acidosis. We investigated the effect of NEC on tight junction (TJ) proteins in kidneys using a NEC mouse model to investigate the basis for the observed renal dysfunction. METHODS NEC was induced in C57BL/6 mice by formula feeding and subjecting them to periods of hypoxia and cold stress. NEC was confirmed by gross and histological examination. We studied various markers of inflammation in kidneys and investigated changes in expression of several TJ proteins and AQP2 using immunofluorecent staining and Western blotting. RESULTS We found markedly increased expression of NFκB, TGFβ and ERK1/2 along with claudin-1, -2, -3, -4, -8 and AQP-2 in NEC kidneys. The membrane localization of claudin-2 was altered in the NEC kidneys and its immunostaining signal at TJ was disrupted. CONCLUSION NEC led to a severe inflammatory response not only in the gut but also the kidneys. NEC increased expression of several TJ proteins and caused disruption of claudin-2 in renal tubules. These observed changes can help explain some of the clinical findings observed in NEC. PMID:26270572

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Profile of Blood–Brain Barrier Injury in Patients With Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Didem; Bammer, Roland; Mlynash, Michael; Venkatasubramanian, Chitra; Eyngorn, Irina; Snider, Ryan W.; Gupta, Sandeep N.; Narayana, Rashmi; Fischbein, Nancy; Wijman, Christine A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with blood–brain barrier (BBB) injury, which is a poorly understood factor in ICH pathogenesis, potentially contributing to edema formation and perihematomal tissue injury. We aimed to assess and quantify BBB permeability following human spontaneous ICH using dynamic contrast‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI). We also investigated whether hematoma size or location affected the amount of BBB leakage. Methods and Results Twenty‐five prospectively enrolled patients from the Diagnostic Accuracy of MRI in Spontaneous intracerebral Hemorrhage (DASH) study were examined using DCE MRI at 1 week after symptom onset. Contrast agent dynamics in the brain tissue and general tracer kinetic modeling were used to estimate the forward leakage rate (Ktrans) in regions of interest (ROI) in and surrounding the hematoma and in contralateral mirror–image locations (control ROI). In all patients BBB permeability was significantly increased in the brain tissue immediately adjacent to the hematoma, that is, the hematoma rim, compared to the contralateral mirror ROI (P<0.0001). Large hematomas (>30 mL) had higher Ktrans values than small hematomas (P<0.005). Ktrans values of lobar hemorrhages were significantly higher than the Ktrans values of deep hemorrhages (P<0.005), independent of hematoma volume. Higher Ktrans values were associated with larger edema volumes. Conclusions BBB leakage in the brain tissue immediately bordering the hematoma can be measured and quantified by DCE MRI in human ICH. BBB leakage at 1 week is greater in larger hematomas as well as in hematomas in lobar locations and is associated with larger edema volumes. PMID:23709564

  13. Acute effects of focused ultrasound-induced increases in blood-brain barrier permeability on rat microvascular transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Dallan; Bendayan, Reina; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic treatment options for central nervous system diseases are greatly limited by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Focused ultrasound (FUS), in conjunction with circulating microbubbles, can be used to induce a targeted and transient increase in BBB permeability, providing a unique approach for the delivery of drugs from the systemic circulation into the brain. While preclinical research has demonstrated the utility of FUS, there remains a large gap in our knowledge regarding the impact of sonication on BBB gene expression. This work is focused on investigating the transcriptional changes in dorsal hippocampal rat microvessels in the acute stages following sonication. Microarray analysis of microvessels was performed at 6 and 24 hrs post-FUS. Expression changes in individual genes and bioinformatic analysis suggests that FUS may induce a transient inflammatory response in microvessels. Increased transcription of proinflammatory cytokine genes appears to be short-lived, largely returning to baseline by 24 hrs. This observation may help to explain some previously observed bioeffects of FUS and may also be a driving force for the angiogenic processes and reduced drug efflux suggested by this work. While further studies are necessary, these results open up intriguing possibilities for novel FUS applications and suggest possible routes for pharmacologically modifying the technique. PMID:28374753

  14. The Synthetic Tie2 Agonist Peptide Vasculotide Protects Renal Vascular Barrier Function In Experimental Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rübig, Eva; Stypmann, Jörg; Van Slyke, Paul; Dumont, Daniel J; Spieker, Tilmann; Buscher, Konrad; Reuter, Stefan; Goerge, Tobias; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kümpers, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular barrier dysfunction plays a major role in the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury (AKI). Angiopoietin-1, the natural agonist ligand for the endothelial-specific Tie2 receptor, is a non-redundant endothelial survival and vascular stabilization factor. Here we evaluate the efficacy of a polyethylene glycol-clustered Tie2 agonist peptide, vasculotide (VT), to protect against endothelial-cell activation with subsequent microvascular dysfunction in a murine model of ischemic AKI. Renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) was induced by clamping of the renal arteries for 35 minutes. Mice were treated with VT or PEGylated cysteine before IRI. Sham-operated animals served as time-matched controls. Treatment with VT significantly reduced transcapillary albumin flux and renal tissue edema after IRI. The protective effects of VT were associated with activation of Tie2 and stabilization of its downstream effector, VE-cadherin in renal vasculature. VT abolished the decline in renal tissue blood flow, attenuated the increase of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen after IRI, improved recovery of renal function and markedly reduced mortality compared to PEG [HR 0.14 (95% CI 0.05–0.78) P < 0.05]. VT is inexpensive to produce, chemically stable and unrelated to any Tie2 ligands. Thus, VT may represent a novel therapy to prevent AKI in patients. PMID:26911791

  15. Acute exposure to synthetic pyrethroids causes bioconcentration and disruption of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenqing; Xu, Chao; Lu, Bin; Lin, Chunmian; Wu, Yongming; Liu, Weiping

    2016-01-15

    Synthetic pyrethroids (SPs) have the potential to disrupt the thyroid endocrine system in mammals; however, little is known of the effects of SPs and underlying mechanisms in fish. In the current study, embryonic zebrafish were exposed to various concentrations (1, 3 and 10 μg/L) of bifenthrin (BF) or λ-cyhalothrin (λ-CH) until 72 h post fertilization, and body condition, bioaccumulation, thyroid hormone levels and transcription of related genes along the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis examined. Body weight was significantly decreased in the λ-CH exposure groups, but not the BF exposure groups. BF and λ-CH markedly accumulated in the larvae, with concentrations ranging from 90.7 to 596.8 ng/g. In both exposure groups, alterations were observed in thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels. In addition, the majority of the HPT axis-related genes examined, including CRH, TSHβ, TTR, UGT1ab, Pax8, Dio2 and TRα, were significantly upregulated in the presence of BF. Compared to BF, λ-CH induced different transcriptional regulation patterns of the tested genes, in particular, significant stimulation of TTR, Pax8, Dio2 and TRα levels along with concomitant downregulation of Dio1. Molecular docking analyses revealed that at the atomic level, BF binds to thyroid hormone receptor (TRα) protein more potently than λ-CH, consequently affecting HPT axis signal transduction. In vitro and in silico experiments disclosed that during the early stages of zebrafish development, BF and λ-CH have the potential to disrupt thyroid endocrine system.

  16. Food proteins and gut mucosal barrier. IV. Effects of acute and chronic ethanol administration on handling and uptake of bovine serum albumin by rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, M.; Carter, E.A.; Walker, W.A.

    1986-11-01

    The effects of ethanol exposure on small intestinal handling and uptake of radiolabeled bovine serum albumin were investigated using everted gut sacs. There was less breakdown of BSA after acute ethanol administration in vitro and after acute and chronic in vivo exposure. Thus, the vascular compartment of the small intestine was confronted with more complete and potentially more antigenic material after ethanol. Changes in BSA binding and uptake after acute exposure were shown to be reversible after 4-6 hr. In all groups, there was more BSA binding when the small intestine was exposed to ethanol. This difference was most pronounced after chronic exposure. In the same group, uptake of BSA was correlated with binding and significantly increased. Combined effects of ethanol on the gut mucosal barrier may account for changes in food antigen handling and uptake.

  17. Central nervous system penetration for small molecule therapeutic agents does not increase in multiple sclerosis- and Alzheimer's disease-related animal models despite reported blood-brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ziqiang; Zhang, Jinqiang; Liu, Houfu; Li, Yi; Zhao, Yonggang; Yang, Eric

    2010-08-01

    Therapy for central nervous system (CNS) diseases requires drugs that can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). BBB disruption has been reported in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the related animal models as evidenced by increased infiltration of inflammatory cells or increased staining of Igs in the central nervous system. Although CNS penetration of therapeutic agents under pathological conditions has rarely been investigated, it is commonly assumed that BBB disruption may lead to enhanced CNS penetration and also provide a "window of opportunity" through which drugs that do not normally cross BBB are able to do so. In this article, we have compared brain penetration of eight small molecules in naive animals and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice, streptozotocin-induced mice, and TASTPM transgenic mice. The tool compounds are lipophilic transcellular drugs [GlaxoSmithKline (GSK)-A, GSK-B, GSK-C, and naproxen], lipophilic P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates (amprenavir and loperamide), and hydrophilic paracellular compounds (sodium fluorescein and atenolol). Our data showed that rate and extent of CNS penetration for lipophilic transcellular drugs and P-gp substrates are similar in naive and all tested animal models. The brain penetration for paracellular drugs in EAE mice is transiently increased but similar to that in naive mice at steady state. Our data suggest that, despite reported BBB disruption, CNS penetration for small molecule therapeutic agents does not increase in MS- and AD-related animal models.

  18. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  19. Acute exposure to selenium disrupts associative conditioning and long-term memory recall in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Burden, Christina M; Elmore, Christopher; Hladun, Kristen R; Trumble, John T; Smith, Brian H

    2016-05-01

    A plethora of toxic compounds - including pesticides, heavy metals, and metalloids - have been detected in honey bees (Apis mellifera) and their colonies. One such compound is selenium, which bees are exposed to by consuming nectar and pollen from flowers grown in contaminated areas. Though selenium is lethal at high concentrations, sublethal exposure may also impair honey bees' ability to function normally. Examining the effect of selenium exposure on learning and memory provides a sensitive assay with which to identify sublethal effects on honey bee health and behavior. To determine whether sublethal selenium exposure causes learning and memory deficits, we used proboscis extension reflex conditioning coupled with recall tests 30min and 24h post-conditioning. We exposed forager honey bees to a single sublethal dose of selenium, and 3h later we used an olfactory conditioning assay to train the bees to discriminate between one odor associated with sucrose-reinforcement and a second unreinforced odor. Following conditioning we tested short- and long-term recall of the task. Acute exposure to as little as 1.8ng of an inorganic form of selenium (sodium selenate) before conditioning caused a reduction in behavioral performance during conditioning. And, exposure to 18ng of either an inorganic form (sodium selenate) or an organic form (methylseleno-l-cysteine) of selenium caused a reduction in the bees' performance during the long-term recall test. These concentrations of selenium are lower than those found in the nectar of plants grown in selenium-contaminated soil, indicating that even low-grade selenium toxicity produces significant learning and memory impairments. This may reduce foragers' ability to effectively gather resources for the colony or nurse bees' ability to care for and maintain a healthy colony.

  20. WP1066 disrupts Janus kinase-2 and induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Van, Quin; Koch, Patricia; Harris, David; Liu, Zhiming; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Wang, Yongtao; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Priebe, Waldemar; Estrov, Zeev

    2007-12-01

    Several cytokines and growth factors that stimulate the proliferation of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells transduce their signals by activating the transcription factor Janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2). Accordingly, the inhibition of JAK2 or of its downstream signaling pathways suppresses the proliferation of AML cells. Because (E)-3(6-bromopyridin-2-yl)-2-cyano-N-((S0-1-phenylethyl)acrylamide) (WP1066) is a novel analogue of the JAK2 inhibitor AG490, we tested its activity in AML cells and investigated its mechanism of action. Using clonogenic assays, we found that although WP1066 had a marginal effect on normal marrow progenitors, it inhibited the proliferation of AML colony-forming cells obtained from patients with newly diagnosed AML and that of the AML cell lines OCIM2 and K562. WP1066 inhibited OCIM2 cell multiplication by inducing accumulation of cells at the G(0)-G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Similar to its parent compound AG490, WP1066 inhibited the phosphorylation of JAK2, but unlike AG490, WP1066 also degraded JAK2 protein, thereby blocking its downstream signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) and phosphoinositide-3-kinase pathways. These effects resulted in the activation of the caspase pathway. Incubation of both OCIM2 and K562 cells with WP1066 activated caspase-3, induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and caused caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Thus, WP1066 is a potent JAK2 inhibitor whose effects in AML and other hematologic malignancies merit further investigation.

  1. Fronto-limbic novelty processing in acute psychosis: disrupted relationship with memory performance and potential implications for delusions

    PubMed Central

    Schott, Björn H.; Voss, Martin; Wagner, Benjamin; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Düzel, Emrah; Behr, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Recent concepts have highlighted the role of the hippocampus and adjacent medial temporal lobe (MTL) in positive symptoms like delusions in schizophrenia. In healthy individuals, the MTL is critically involved in the detection and encoding of novel information. Here, we aimed to investigate whether dysfunctional novelty processing by the MTL might constitute a potential neural mechanism contributing to the pathophysiology of delusions, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 16 unmedicated patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 20 age-matched healthy controls. All patients experienced positive symptoms at time of participation. Participants performed a visual target detection task with complex scene stimuli in which novel and familiar rare stimuli were presented randomly intermixed with a standard and a target picture. Presentation of novel relative to familiar images was associated with hippocampal activation in both patients and healthy controls, but only healthy controls showed a positive relationship between novelty-related hippocampal activation and recognition memory performance after 24 h. Patients, but not controls, showed a robust neural response in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) during presentation of novel stimuli. Functional connectivity analysis in the patients further revealed a novelty-related increase of functional connectivity of both the hippocampus and the OFC with the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) and the ventral striatum (VS). Notably, delusions correlated positively with the difference of the functional connectivity of the hippocampus vs. the OFC with the rACC. Taken together, our results suggest that alterations of fronto-limbic novelty processing may contribute to the pathophysiology of delusions in patients with acute psychosis. PMID:26082697

  2. Exposure to acute severe hypoxia leads to increased urea loss and disruptions in acid-base and ionoregulatory balance in dogfish sharks (Squalus acanthias).

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Alex M; Wood, Chris M

    2014-01-01

    The effects of acute moderate (20% air O2 saturation; 6-h exposure) and severe (5% air O2 saturation; 4-h exposure) hypoxia on N-waste, acid-base, and ion balance in dogfish sharks (Squalus acanthias suckleyi) were evaluated. We predicted that the synthesis and/or retention of urea, which are active processes, would be inhibited by hypoxia. Exposure to moderate hypoxia had negligible effects on N-waste fluxes or systemic physiology, except for a modest rise in plasma lactate. Exposure to severe hypoxia led to a significant increase in urea excretion (Jurea), while plasma, liver, and muscle urea concentrations were unchanged, suggesting a loss of urea retention. Ammonia excretion (Jamm) was elevated during normoxic recovery. Moreover, severe hypoxia led to disruptions in acid-base balance, indicated by a large increase in plasma [lactate] and substantial decreases in arterial pHa and plasma [Formula: see text], as well as loss of ionic homeostasis, indicated by increases in plasma [Mg(2+)], [Ca(2+)], and [Na(+)]. We suggest that severe hypoxia in dogfish sharks leads to a reduction in active gill homeostatic processes, such as urea retention, acid-base regulation and ionoregulation, and/or an osmoregulatory compromise due to increased functional gill surface area. Overall, the results provide a comprehensive picture of the physiological responses to a severe degree of hypoxia in an ancient fish species.

  3. Barriers to nutritional intake in patients with acute hip fracture: time to treat malnutrition as a disease and food as a medicine?

    PubMed

    Bell, Jack; Bauer, Judith; Capra, Sandra; Pulle, Chrys Ranjeev

    2013-06-01

    Inadequate energy and protein intake leads to malnutrition; a clinical disease not without consequence post acute hip fracture. Data detailing malnutrition prevalence, incidence, and intake adequacy varies widely in this patient population. The limited success of reported interventional strategies may result from poorly defined diagnostic criteria, failure to address root causes of inadequate intake, or errors associated with selection bias. This pragmatic study used a sequential, explanatory mixed methods design to identify malnutrition aetiology, prevalence, incidence, intake adequacy, and barriers to intake in a representative sample of 44 acute hip fracture patients (73% female; mean age, 81.7 ± 10.8 years). On admission, malnutrition prevalence was 52.2%. Energy and protein requirements were only met twice in 58 weighed 24 h food records. Mean daily patient energy intake was 2957 kJ (50.9 ± 36.1 kJ·kg(-1)) and mean protein intake was 22.8 g (0.6 ± 0.46 g·kg(-1)). This contributed to a further in-patient malnutrition incidence of 11%. Barriers to intake included patient perceptions that malnutrition and (or) inadequate intake were not a problem, as well as patient and clinician perceptions that treatment for malnutrition was not a priority. Malnutrition needs to be treated as a disease not without consequence, and food should be considered as a medicine after acute hip fracture.

  4. Disruptive Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This paper attempts to develop guidelines relating to the problem of disruptive pupils in the classroom. A disruptive student is defined as one who interferes with the learning process. He is often male, physically aggressive, verbally hostile, over-age and frequently absent. The study examines the overlap between disruptive behavior and emotional…

  5. Depletion of Caco-2 cell cholesterol disrupts barrier function by altering the detergent solubility and distribution of specific tight-junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the role of cholesterol in maintaining the barrier properties of the model intestinal cell line Caco-2. We have extracted membrane cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin and demonstrated that maximally, methyl-β-cyclodextrin lowered cell cholesterol levels by 40–45%. Depletion of cell cholesterol was accompanied by an 80–90% decrease in monolayer transepithelial electrical resistance and a significant increase in the paracellular permeability of dextrans of 4, 10 and 40 kDa. The increase in dextran permeability was most pronounced for the two lower molecular mass species. In addition to the decline in the barrier properties of the monolayers, extraction of cell cholesterol produced an increase in the Triton X-100 solubility of claudin 3, claudin 4 and occludin, and the loss of all three proteins from the plasma membrane (tight junctions). In contrast, removal of cholesterol had no detectable influence on the detergent solubility or morphological distribution of claudin 1. These results indicate that membrane cholesterol is a critical factor in maintaining the barrier property of epithelial monolayers. More specifically, cholesterol appears to stabilize the association of certain proteins with the tight junctions. PMID:15500448

  6. Acute exposure to ergot alkaloids from endophyte-infected tall fescue does not alter absorptive or barrier function of the isolated bovine ruminal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Foote, A P; Penner, G B; Walpole, M E; Klotz, J L; Brown, K R; Bush, L P; Harmon, D L

    2014-07-01

    Ergot alkaloids in endophyte-infected (Neotyphodium coenophialum) tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) have been shown to cause a reduction in blood flow to the rumen epithelium as well as a decrease in volatile fatty acids (VFA) absorption from the washed rumen of steers. Previous data also indicates that incubating an extract of endophyte-infected tall fescue seed causes an increase in the amount of VFA absorbed per unit of blood flow, which could result from an alteration in the absorptive or barrier function of the rumen epithelium. An experiment was conducted to determine the acute effects of an endophyte-infected tall fescue seed extract (EXT) on total, passive or facilitated acetate and butyrate flux across the isolated bovine rumen as well as the barrier function measured by inulin flux and tissue conductance (G t ). Flux of ergovaline across the rumen epithelium was also evaluated. Rumen tissue from the caudal dorsal sac of Holstein steers (n=6), fed a common diet, was collected and isolated shortly after slaughter and mounted between two halves of Ussing chambers. In vitro treatments included vehicle control (80% methanol, 0.5% of total volume), Low EXT (50 ng ergovaline/ml) and High EXT (250 ng ergovaline/ml). Results indicate that there is no effect of acute exposure to ergot alkaloids on total, passive or facilitated flux of acetate or butyrate across the isolate bovine rumen epithelium (P>0.51). Inulin flux (P=0.16) and G t (P>0.17) were not affected by EXT treatment, indicating no alteration in barrier function due to acute ergot alkaloid exposure. Ergovaline was detected in the serosal buffer of the High EXT treatment indicating that the flux rate is ~0.25 to 0.44 ng/cm2 per hour. Data indicate that specific pathways for VFA absorption and barrier function of the rumen epithelium are not affected by acute exposure to ergot alkaloids from tall fescue at the concentrations tested. Ergovaline has the potential to be absorbed from the rumen of cattle that

  7. Identifying Barriers and Practical Solutions to Conducting Site-Based Research in North America: Exploring Acute Heart Failure Trials As a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Ambrosy, Andrew P; Mentz, Robert J; Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Greene, Stephen J; Severance, Harry W

    2015-10-01

    Although the prognosis of ambulatory heart failure (HF) has improved dramatically there have been few advances in the management of acute HF (AHF). Despite regional differences in patient characteristics, background therapy, and event rates, AHF clinical trial enrollment has transitioned from North America and Western Europe to Eastern Europe, South America, and Asia-Pacific where regulatory burden and cost of conducting research may be less prohibitive. It is unclear if the results of clinical trials conducted outside of North America are generalizable to US patient populations. This article uses AHF as a paradigm and identifies barriers and practical solutions to successfully conducting site-based research in North America.

  8. Vitamin D/VDR signaling attenuates lipopolysaccharide‑induced acute lung injury by maintaining the integrity of the pulmonary epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yong-Yan; Liu, Tian-Jing; Fu, Jian-Hua; Xu, Wei; Wu, Lin-Lin; Hou, A-Na; Xue, Xin-Dong

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D and its receptor have a protective effect on epithelial barriers in various tissues. Low levels of vitamin D are associated with numerous pulmonary diseases, including acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome. The present study investigated whether the vitamin D/vitamin D receptor (VDR) pathway may ameliorate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑induced ALI through maintaining the integrity of the alveolar epithelial barrier. This was investigated by exposing wild‑type (WT) and VDR knockout C57BL/6J mice to LPS, then comparing the healthy and LPS‑treated mice lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). More specifically, lung histology, mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and protein expression levels of tight junction proteins were determined. In addition, a vitamin D analog (paricalcitol) was administered to WT mice in order to investigate the effect of vitamin D on the alveolar epithelial barrier following exposure to LPS. VDR knockout mice exhibited severe lung injuries (P<0.001), increased alveolar permeability [demonstrated by a higher wet‑dry ratio of lung weight (P<0.05), greater expression levels of BALF protein (P<0.001) and fluorescein isothiocyanate‑conjugated 4 kDa dextran (P<0.001) leakage into the alveolar space], elevated proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNA levels, as demonstrated by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction (P<0.05), and decreased protein and mRNA expression levels of occludin (P<0.01) and zonula occludens‑1 (ZO‑1; P<0.01) compared with WT mice. Paricalcitol treatment partially inhibited these pathological changes in WT mice by maintaining the mRNA and protein expression levels of occludin (P<0.01) and ZO‑1 (P<0.05). A lack of VDRs in the pulmonary epithelial barrier appeared to compromise its defense, leading to more severe LPS‑induced lung injury. Furthermore, vitamin D treatment alleviated LPS‑induced lung injury and preserved alveolar

  9. Modification in CSF specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and acute on chronic liver failure independent of encephalopathy, evidences for an early blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Nicolas; Rosselli, Matteo; Mouri, Sarah; Galanaud, Damien; Puybasset, Louis; Agarwal, Banwari; Thabut, Dominique; Jalan, Rajiv

    2017-04-01

    Although hepatic encephalopathy (HE) on the background of acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) is associated with high mortality rates, it is unknown whether this is due to increased blood-brain barrier permeability. Specific gravity of cerebrospinal fluid measured by CT is able to estimate blood-cerebrospinal fluid-barrier permeability. This study aimed to assess cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and to compare it in patients with or without ACLF and with or without hepatic encephalopathy. We identified all the patients admitted for acute decompensation of cirrhosis who underwent a brain CT-scan. Those patients could present acute decompensation with or without ACLF. The presence of hepatic encephalopathy was noted. They were compared to a group of stable cirrhotic patients and healthy controls. Quantitative brain CT analysis used the Brainview software that gives the weight, the volume and the specific gravity of each determined brain regions. Results are given as median and interquartile ranges and as relative variation compared to the control/baseline group. 36 patients presented an acute decompensation of cirrhosis. Among them, 25 presented with ACLF and 11 without ACLF; 20 presented with hepatic encephalopathy grade ≥ 2. They were compared to 31 stable cirrhosis patients and 61 healthy controls. Cirrhotic patients had increased cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity (CSF-SG) compared to healthy controls (+0.4 %, p < 0.0001). Cirrhotic patients with ACLF have decreased CSF-SG as compared to cirrhotic patients without ACLF (-0.2 %, p = 0.0030) that remained higher than in healthy controls. The presence of hepatic encephalopathy did not modify CSF-SG (-0.09 %, p = 0.1757). Specific gravity did not differ between different brain regions according to the presence or absence of either ACLF or HE. In patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis, and those with ACLF, CSF specific gravity is modified compared to

  10. HIV-1 gp120 Glycoprotein Interacting with Dendritic Cell-specific Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 3-grabbing Non-integrin (DC-SIGN) Down-Regulates Tight Junction Proteins to Disrupt the Blood Retinal Barrier and Increase Its Permeability.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi-Wen; Li, Chuan; Jiang, Ai-Ping; Ge, Shengfang; Gu, Ping; Fan, Xianqun; Li, Tai-Sheng; Jin, Xia; Wang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Liang

    2016-10-28

    Approximately 70% of HIV-1 infected patients acquire ocular opportunistic infections and manifest eye disorders during the course of their illness. The mechanisms by which pathogens invade the ocular site, however, are unclear. Under normal circumstances, vascular endothelium and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which possess a well developed tight junction complex, form the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) to prevent pathogen invasion. We hypothesize that disruption of the BRB allows pathogen entry into ocular sites. The hypothesis was tested using in vitro models. We discovered that human RPE cells could bind to either HIV-1 gp120 glycoproteins or HIV-1 viral particles. Furthermore, the binding was mediated by dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) expressed on RPE cells. Upon gp120 binding to DC-SIGN, cellular NF-κB signaling was triggered, leading to the induction of matrix metalloproteinases, which subsequently degraded tight junction proteins and disrupted the BRB integrity. DC-SIGN knockdown or prior blocking with a specific antibody abolished gp120-induced matrix metalloproteinase expression and reduced the degradation of tight junction proteins. This study elucidates a novel mechanism by which HIV, type 1 invades ocular tissues and provides additional insights into the translocation or invasion process of ocular complication-associated pathogens.

  11. Disruption of the Sjögren-Larsson Syndrome Gene Aldh3a2 in Mice Increases Keratinocyte Growth and Retards Skin Barrier Recovery.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Tatsuro; Takagi, Shuyu; Kanetake, Tsukasa; Kitamura, Takuya; Hattori, Satoko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Sassa, Takayuki; Kihara, Akio

    2016-05-27

    The fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH) ALDH3A2 is the causative gene of Sjögren Larsson syndrome (SLS). To date, the molecular mechanism underlying the symptoms characterizing SLS has been poorly understood. Using Aldh3a2(-/-) mice, we found here that Aldh3a2 was the major FALDH active in undifferentiated keratinocytes. Long-chain base metabolism was greatly impaired in Aldh3a2(-/-) keratinocytes. Phenotypically, the intercellular spaces were widened in the basal layer of the Aldh3a2(-/-) epidermis due to hyperproliferation of keratinocytes. Furthermore, oxidative stress-induced genes were up-regulated in Aldh3a2(-/-) keratinocytes. Upon keratinocyte differentiation, the activity of another FALDH, Aldh3b2, surpassed that of Aldh3a2 As a result, Aldh3a2(-/-) mice were indistinguishable from wild-type mice in terms of their whole epidermis FALDH activity, and their skin barrier function was uncompromised under normal conditions. However, perturbation of the stratum corneum caused increased transepidermal water loss and delayed barrier recovery in Aldh3a2(-/-) mice. In conclusion, Aldh3a2(-/-) mice replicated some aspects of SLS symptoms, especially at the basal layer of the epidermis. Our results suggest that hyperproliferation of keratinocytes via oxidative stress responses may partly contribute to the ichthyosis symptoms of SLS.

  12. Multiple treatments with liposomal doxorubicin and ultrasound-induced disruption of blood-tumor and blood-brain barriers improves outcomes in a rat glioma model

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Muna; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Park, Juyoung; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) prevents the transport of most anticancer agents to the central nervous system and restricts delivery to infiltrating brain tumors. The heterogeneous vascular permeability in tumor vessels, along with several other factors, creates additional barriers for drug treatment for brain tumors. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is an emerging noninvasive method to temporarily permeabilize the BBB and the “blood-tumor barrier”. Here, we tested the impact of three weekly sessions of FUS and liposomal doxorubicin (DOX) in 9L rat glioma tumors. Animals that received FUS + DOX (N = 8) had a median survival time that was increased significantly (P < 0.001) compared to animals who received DOX only (N = 6), FUS only (N = 8), or no treatment (N = 7). Median survival for animals that received FUS + DOX was increased by 100% relative to untreated controls, whereas animals who received DOX alone had only a 16% improvement. Animals who received only FUS showed no improvement. No tumor cells were found in histology in 4/8 animals in the FUS + DOX group, and in two animals, only a few tumor cells were detected. Adverse events in the treatment group included skin toxicity, impaired activity, damage to surrounding brain tissue, and tissue loss at the tumor site. In one animal, intratumoral hemorrhage was observed. These events are largely consistent with known side effects of doxorubicin and with an extensive tumor burden. Overall this work demonstrates that multiple sessions using this FUS technique to enhance the delivery of liposomal doxorubicin has a pronounced therapeutic effect in this rat glioma model. PMID:23603615

  13. NLRP3 protects alveolar barrier integrity by an inflammasome-independent increase of epithelial cell adherence

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinova, Elena; Chaput, Catherine; Gutbier, Birgitt; Lippmann, Juliane; Sander, Leif E.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin; Opitz, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, characterized by alveolar barrier disruption. NLRP3 is best known for its ability to form inflammasomes and to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production in myeloid cells. Here we show that NLRP3 protects the integrity of the alveolar barrier in a mouse model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and ex vivo upon treatment of isolated perfused and ventilated lungs with the purified bacterial toxin, pneumolysin. We reveal that the preserving effect of NLRP3 on the lung barrier is independent of inflammasomes, IL-1β and IL-18. NLRP3 improves the integrity of alveolar epithelial cell monolayers by enhancing cellular adherence. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel function of NLRP3 by demonstrating that it protects epithelial barrier function independently of inflammasomes. PMID:27476670

  14. Alteration in Intrapulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Aerosolized Model Compounds Due to Disruption of the Alveolar Epithelial Barriers Following Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Tada, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a lethal lung disease that is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix and a change in lung structure. In this study, intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of aerosolized model compounds were evaluated using rats with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Aerosol formulations of indocyanine green, 6-carboxyfluorescein (6-CF), and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextrans (FD; 4.4, 10, 70, and 250 kDa) were administered to rat lungs using a MicroSprayer. Indocyanine green fluorescence signals were significantly weaker in fibrotic lungs than in control lungs and 6-CF and FD concentrations in the plasma of pulmonary fibrotic animals were markedly higher than in the plasma of control animals. Moreover, disrupted epithelial tight junctions, including claudins-1, -3, and -5, were observed in pulmonary fibrotic lesions using immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, destruction of tight junctions on model alveolar epithelial cells (NCI-H441) by transforming growth factor-β1 treatment enhanced the permeability of 6-CF and FDs through NCI-H441 cell monolayers. These results indicate that aerosolized drugs are easily distributed into the plasma after leakage through damaged tight junctions of alveolar epithelium. Therefore, the development of delivery systems for anti-fibrotic agents to improve intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics may be necessary for effective idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis therapy.

  15. Acute irritant threshold correlates with barrier function, skin hydration and contact hypersensitivity in atopic dermatitis and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Kazandjieva, Jana; Tsankov, Nikolai; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to disclose interactions between epidermal barrier, skin irritation and sensitization in healthy and diseased skin. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum hydration (SCH) were assessed in adult patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), rosacea and healthy controls. A 4-h patch test with seven concentrations of sodium lauryl sulphate was performed to determine the irritant threshold (IT). Contact sensitization pattern was revealed by patch testing with European baseline series. Subjects with a lower IT had higher TEWL values and lower SCH. Subjects with positive allergic reactions had significantly lower IT. In AD, epidermal barrier deterioration was detected on both volar forearm and nasolabial fold, while in rosacea, impeded skin physiology parameters were observed on the facial skin only, suggesting that barrier impediment is restricted to the face in rosacea, in contrast with AD where the abnormal skin physiology is generalized.

  16. HIV-1 Latency-Reversing Agents Prostratin and Bryostatin-1 Induce Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption/Inflammation and Modulate Leukocyte Adhesion/Transmigration.

    PubMed

    Dental, Clélia; Proust, Alizé; Ouellet, Michel; Barat, Corinne; Tremblay, Michel J

    2017-02-01

    A shock-and-kill approach involving the simultaneous treatment of HIV-1-infected patients with latency-reversing agents (LRAs) and combination antiretroviral therapy was proposed as a means to eradicate viral reservoirs. Currently available LRAs cannot discriminate between HIV-1-infected and uninfected cells. Therefore, the risks and benefits of using broad-spectrum LRAs need to be carefully evaluated, particularly in the CNS, where inflammation and leukocyte transmigration must be tightly regulated. We used a real-time impedance-sensing system to dynamically record the impact of different classes of LRAs on the integrity of tight monolayers of the immortalized human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Results show that prostratin and bryostatin-1 can significantly damage the integrity of an endothelial monolayer. Moreover, prostratin and bryostatin-1 induce secretion of some proinflammatory cytokines and an increase of ICAM-1 expression. Additional studies demonstrated that prostratin and bryostatin-1 also affect adhesion and transmigration of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells as well as monocytes in an in vitro human blood-brain barrier (BBB) model. Prostratin and bryostatin-1 could thus be considered as potent regulators of BBB permeability and inflammation that influence leukocyte transport across the BBB. Altogether, these findings contribute to a better understanding of the potential risks and benefits of using a shock-and-kill approach with LRAs on the normal physiological functions of the BBB.

  17. Targeted delivery of neural stem cells to the brain using MRI-guided focused ultrasound to disrupt the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Alison; Ayala-Grosso, Carlos A; Ganguly, Milan; Jordão, Jessica F; Aubert, Isabelle; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy to treat neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury, and stroke. For stem cells to progress towards clinical use, the risks associated with invasive intracranial surgery used to deliver the cells to the brain, needs to be reduced. Here, we show that MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRIgFUS) is a novel method for non-invasive delivery of stem cells from the blood to the brain by opening the blood brain barrier (BBB) in specific brain regions. We used MRI guidance to target the ultrasound beam thereby delivering the iron-labeled, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing neural stem cells specifically to the striatum and the hippocampus of the rat brain. Detection of cellular iron using MRI established that the cells crossed the BBB to enter the brain. After sacrifice, 24 hours later, immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the presence of GFP-positive cells in the targeted brain regions. We determined that the neural stem cells expressed common stem cell markers (nestin and polysialic acid) suggesting they survived after transplantation with MRIgFUS. Furthermore, delivered stem cells expressed doublecortin in vivo indicating the stem cells were capable of differentiating into neurons. Together, we demonstrate that transient opening of the BBB with MRIgFUS is sufficient for transplantation of stem cells from the blood to targeted brain structures. These results suggest that MRIgFUS may be an effective alternative to invasive intracranial surgery for stem cell transplantation.

  18. Early Activation of MAPK p44/42 Is Partially Involved in DON-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier Function and Tight Junction Network

    PubMed Central

    Springler, Alexandra; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Mayer, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), produced by the plant pathogens Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum, is one of the most common mycotoxins, contaminating cereal and cereal-derived products. Although worldwide contamination of food and feed poses health threats to humans and animals, pigs are particularly susceptible to this mycotoxin. DON derivatives, such as deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (DOM-1), are produced by bacterial transformation of certain intestinal bacteria, which are naturally occurring or applied as feed additives. Intestinal epithelial cells are the initial barrier against these food- and feed-borne toxins. The present study confirms DON-induced activation of MAPK p44/42 and inhibition of p44/42 by MAPK-inhibitor U0126 monoethanolate. Influence of DON and DOM-1 on transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), viability and expression of seven tight junction proteins (TJ), as well as the potential of U0126 to counteract DON-induced effects, was assessed. While DOM-1 showed no effect, DON significantly reduced TEER of differentiated IPEC-J2 and decreased expression of claudin-1 and -3, while leaving claudin-4; ZO-1, -2, and -3 and occludin unaffected. Inhibition of p44/42 counteracted DON-induced TEER decrease and restored claudin-3, but not claudin-1 expression. Therefore, effects of DON on TEER and claudin-3 are at least partially p44/42 mediated, while effects on viability and claudin-1 are likely mediated via alternative pathways. PMID:27618100

  19. Mixed oligomers and monomeric amyloid-β disrupts endothelial cells integrity and reduces monomeric amyloid-β transport across hCMEC/D3 cell line as an in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    PubMed

    Qosa, Hisham; LeVine, Harry; Keller, Jeffrey N; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2014-09-01

    Senile amyloid plaques are one of the diagnostic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the severity of clinical symptoms of AD is weakly correlated with the plaque load. AD symptoms severity is reported to be more strongly correlated with the level of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) assemblies. Formation of soluble Aβ assemblies is stimulated by monomeric Aβ accumulation in the brain, which has been related to its faulty cerebral clearance. Studies tend to focus on the neurotoxicity of specific Aβ species. There are relatively few studies investigating toxic effects of Aβ on the endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We hypothesized that a soluble Aβ pool more closely resembling the in vivo situation composed of a mixture of Aβ40 monomer and Aβ42 oligomer would exert higher toxicity against hCMEC/D3 cells as an in vitro BBB model than either component alone. We observed that, in addition to a disruptive effect on the endothelial cells integrity due to enhancement of the paracellular permeability of the hCMEC/D3 monolayer, the Aβ mixture significantly decreased monomeric Aβ transport across the cell culture model. Consistent with its effect on Aβ transport, Aβ mixture treatment for 24h resulted in LRP1 down-regulation and RAGE up-regulation in hCMEC/D3 cells. The individual Aβ species separately failed to alter Aβ clearance or the cell-based BBB model integrity. Our study offers, for the first time, evidence that a mixture of soluble Aβ species, at nanomolar concentrations, disrupts endothelial cells integrity and its own transport across an in vitro model of the BBB.

  20. Polychlorinated biphenyls impair blood-brain barrier integrity via disruption of tight junction proteins in cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus of female Wistar rats: neuropotential role of quercetin.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, K; Prabha, R Lakshmi; Saranya, K; Bavithra, S; Krishnamoorthy, G; Arunakaran, J

    2013-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) comprise a ubiquitous class of toxic substances associated with carcinogenic and tumor-promoting effects as well as neurotoxic properties. Reactive oxygen species, which is produced from PCBs, alters blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, which is paralleled by cytoskeletal rearrangements and redistribution and disappearance of tight junction proteins (TJPs) like claudin-5 and occludin. Quercetin, a potent antioxidant present in onion and other vegetables, appears to protect brain cells against oxidative stress, a tissue-damaging process associated with Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative disorders. The aim of this study is to analyze the role of quercetin on oxidative stress markers and transcription of transmembrane and cytoplasmic accessory TJPs on cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus of female rats exposed to PCBs. Rats were divided into the following four groups. Group I: received only vehicle (corn oil) intraperitoneally (i.p.); group II: received Aroclor 1254 at a dose of 2 mg/kg body weight (bwt)/day (i.p); group III: received Aroclor 1254 (i.p.) and simultaneously quercetin 50 mg/kg bwt/day through gavage and group IV: received quercetin alone gavage. From the experiment, the levels of hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxidation and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were observed to increase significantly in cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus as 50%, 25% and 20%, respectively, after exposure to PCB, and the messenger RNA expression of TJP in rats exposed to PCBs is decreased and is retrieved to the normal level simultaneously in quercetin-treated rats. Hence, quercetin can be used as a preventive medicine to PCBs exposure and prevents neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) disrupts blood-brain barrier integrity through a mechanism involving P2X7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Araiz, Ana; Perez-Hernandez, Mercedes; Urrutia, Andrés; Porcu, Francesca; Borcel, Erika; Gutierrez-Lopez, Maria Dolores; O'Shea, Esther; Colado, Maria Isabel

    2014-08-01

    The recreational drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; 'ecstasy') produces a neuro-inflammatory response in rats characterized by an increase in microglial activation and IL-1β levels. The integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is important in preserving the homeostasis of the brain and has been shown to be affected by neuro-inflammatory processes. We aimed to study the effect of a single dose of MDMA on the activity of metalloproteinases (MMPs), expression of extracellular matrix proteins, BBB leakage and the role of the ionotropic purinergic receptor P2X7 (P2X7R) in the changes induced by the drug. Adult male Dark Agouti rats were treated with MDMA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and killed at several time-points in order to evaluate MMP-9 and MMP-3 activity in the hippocampus and laminin and collagen-IV expression and IgG extravasation in the dentate gyrus. Microglial activation, P2X7R expression and localization were also determined in the dentate gyrus. Separate groups were treated with MDMA and the P2X7R antagonists Brilliant Blue G (BBG; 50 mg/kg, i.p.) or A-438079 (30 mg/kg, i.p.). MDMA increased MMP-3 and MMP-9 activity, reduced laminin and collagen-IV expression and increased IgG immunoreactivity. In addition, MDMA increased microglial activation and P2X7R immunoreactivity in these cells. BBG suppressed the increase in MMP-9 and MMP-3 activity, prevented basal lamina degradation and IgG extravasation into the brain parenchyma. A-438079 also prevented the MDMA-induced reduction in laminin and collagen-IV immunoreactivity. These results indicate that MDMA alters BBB permeability through an early P2X7R-mediated event, which in turn leads to enhancement of MMP-9 and MMP-3 activity and degradation of extracellular matrix.

  2. Moderate Hypoxia Followed by Reoxygenation Results in Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown via Oxidative Stress-Dependent Tight-Junction Protein Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Zehendner, Christoph M.; Librizzi, Laura; Hedrich, Jana; Bauer, Nina M.; Angamo, Eskedar A.; de Curtis, Marco; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2013-01-01

    Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR) on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC). BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC) or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO) with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF), MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ) integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin 5 (Cl5), decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role in

  3. The Effector Domain Region of the Vibrio vulnificus MARTX Toxin Confers Biphasic Epithelial Barrier Disruption and Is Essential for Systemic Spread from the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, Hannah E.; Beubier, Nike T.

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus causes highly lethal bacterial infections in which the Multifunctional Autoprocessing Repeats-in-Toxins (MARTX) toxin product of the rtxA1 gene is a key virulence factor. MARTX toxins are secreted proteins up to 5208 amino acids in size. Conserved MARTX N- and C-terminal repeat regions work in concert to form pores in eukaryotic cell membranes, through which the toxin’s central region of modular effector domains is translocated. Upon inositol hexakisphosphate-induced activation of the of the MARTX cysteine protease domain (CPD) in the eukaryotic cytosol, effector domains are released from the holotoxin by autoproteolytic activity. We previously reported that the native MARTX toxin effector domain repertoire is dispensable for epithelial cellular necrosis in vitro, but essential for cell rounding and apoptosis prior to necrotic cell death. Here we use an intragastric mouse model to demonstrate that the effector domain region is required for bacterial virulence during intragastric infection. The MARTX effector domain region is essential for bacterial dissemination from the intestine, but dissemination occurs in the absence of overt intestinal tissue pathology. We employ an in vitro model of V. vulnificus interaction with polarized colonic epithelial cells to show that the MARTX effector domain region induces rapid intestinal barrier dysfunction and increased paracellular permeability prior to onset of cell lysis. Together, these results negate the inherent assumption that observations of necrosis in vitro directly predict bacterial virulence, and indicate a paradigm shift in our conceptual understanding of MARTX toxin function during intestinal infection. Results implicate the MARTX effector domain region in mediating early bacterial dissemination from the intestine to distal organs–a key step in V. vulnificus foodborne pathogenesis–even before onset of overt intestinal pathology. PMID:28060924

  4. The Use of Susceptibility-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Characterize the Safety Window of Focused Ultrasound Exposure for Localized Blood—Brain-Barrier Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hsu, Po-Hong; Wai, Yau-Yau; Chen, Jin-Chung; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Wang, Jiun-Jie

    2009-04-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound has been discovered to be able to locally and reversibly increase the permeability of the blood—brain barrier (BBB), which can be detected using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, side effects such as microhemorrhage, erythrocyte extravasations, or even extensive hemorrhage can also occur. Although current contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI can be used to detect the changes in BBB permeability, its efficacy in detecting tissue hemorrhage after focused-ultrasound sonication remains limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using MR susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to identify tissue hemorrhage associated with the process of BBB permeability increase and characterize the safety window of acoustic pressure level. Brains of 42 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 107 sonications either unilaterally or bilaterally. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, together with SWI were performed. Tissue damage and hemorrhage were analyzed histologically with light microscopy and staining by Evan's blue, HE staining as well as TUNEL staining. Our results showed that contrast-enhanced T1 weighted imaging is sensitive to the presence of the BBB disrupture, but was unable to differentiate from extensive tissue damage such as hemorrhage. Also, SWI proved to be a superior tool for the realtime monitoring of the presence of hemorrhage, which is essential to the clinical concerns. The safety operation window in vivo in our study indicated a pressure of 0.78 to 1.1 MPa. to increase the BBB permeability successfully without hemorrhage. Potential applications such as drug delivery in the brain might be benefited.

  5. Nox2-dependent glutathionylation of endothelial NOS leads to uncoupled superoxide production and endothelial barrier dysfunction in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Szczepaniak, William S; Shiva, Sruti; Liu, Huanbo; Wang, Yinna; Wang, Ling; Wang, Ying; Kelley, Eric E; Chen, Alex F; Gladwin, Mark T; McVerry, Bryan J

    2014-12-15

    Microvascular barrier integrity is dependent on bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) produced locally by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Under conditions of limited substrate or cofactor availability or by enzymatic modification, eNOS may become uncoupled, producing superoxide in lieu of NO. This study was designed to investigate how eNOS-dependent superoxide production contributes to endothelial barrier dysfunction in inflammatory lung injury and its regulation. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with intratracheal LPS. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for protein accumulation, and lung tissue homogenate was assayed for endothelial NOS content and function. Human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HLMVEC) monolayers were exposed to LPS in vitro, and barrier integrity and superoxide production were measured. Biopterin species were quantified, and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays were performed to identify protein interactions with eNOS that putatively drive uncoupling. Mice exposed to LPS demonstrated eNOS-dependent increased alveolar permeability without evidence for altered canonical NO signaling. LPS-induced superoxide production and permeability in HLMVEC were inhibited by the NOS inhibitor nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, eNOS-targeted siRNA, the eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin, and superoxide dismutase. Co-IP indicated that LPS stimulated the association of eNOS with NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2), which correlated with augmented eNOS S-glutathionylation both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, Nox2-specific inhibition prevented LPS-induced eNOS modification and increases in both superoxide production and permeability. These data indicate that eNOS uncoupling contributes to superoxide production and barrier dysfunction in the lung microvasculature after exposure to LPS. Furthermore, the results implicate Nox2-mediated eNOS-S-glutathionylation as a mechanism underlying LPS-induced eNOS uncoupling in the lung microvasculature.

  6. The barriers to and enablers of providing reasonably adjusted health services to people with intellectual disabilities in acute hospitals: evidence from a mixed-methods study

    PubMed Central

    Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene; Goulding, Lucy; Giatras, Nikoletta; Abraham, Elisabeth; Gillard, Steve; White, Sarah; Edwards, Christine; Hollins, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the factors that promote and compromise the implementation of reasonably adjusted healthcare services for patients with intellectual disabilities in acute National Health Service (NHS) hospitals. Design A mixed-methods study involving interviews, questionnaires and participant observation (July 2011–March 2013). Setting Six acute NHS hospital trusts in England. Methods Reasonable adjustments for people with intellectual disabilities were identified through the literature. Data were collected on implementation and staff understanding of these adjustments. Results Data collected included staff questionnaires (n=990), staff interviews (n=68), interviews with adults with intellectual disabilities (n=33), questionnaires (n=88) and interviews (n=37) with carers of patients with intellectual disabilities, and expert panel discussions (n=42). Hospital strategies that supported implementation of reasonable adjustments did not reliably translate into consistent provision of such adjustments. Good practice often depended on the knowledge, understanding and flexibility of individual staff and teams, leading to the delivery of reasonable adjustments being haphazard throughout the organisation. Major barriers included: lack of effective systems for identifying and flagging patients with intellectual disabilities, lack of staff understanding of the reasonable adjustments that may be needed, lack of clear lines of responsibility and accountability for implementing reasonable adjustments, and lack of allocation of additional funding and resources. Key enablers were the Intellectual Disability Liaison Nurse and the ward manager. Conclusions The evidence suggests that ward culture, staff attitudes and staff knowledge are crucial in ensuring that hospital services are accessible to vulnerable patients. The authors suggest that flagging the need for specific reasonable adjustments, rather than the vulnerable condition itself, may address some of the barriers

  7. Long-term air pollution exposure is associated with neuroinflammation, an altered innate immune response, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, ultrafine particulate deposition, and accumulation of amyloid beta-42 and alpha-synuclein in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Solt, Anna C; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Nuse, Bryan; Herritt, Lou; Villarreal-Calderón, Rafael; Osnaya, Norma; Stone, Ida; García, Raquel; Brooks, Diane M; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Reed, William

    2008-02-01

    Air pollution is a serious environmental problem. We investigated whether residency in cities with high air pollution is associated with neuroinflammation/neurodegeneration in healthy children and young adults who died suddenly. We measured mRNA cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-1beta, and CD14 in target brain regions from low (n = 12) or highly exposed residents (n = 35) aged 25.1 +/- 1.5 years. Upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-1beta, and CD14 in olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, substantia nigrae and vagus nerves; disruption of the blood-brain barrier; endothelial activation, oxidative stress, and inflammatory cell trafficking were seen in highly exposed subjects. Amyloid beta42 (Abeta42) immunoreactivity was observed in 58.8% of apolipoprotein E (APOE) 3/3 < 25 y, and 100% of the APOE 4 subjects, whereas alpha-synuclein was seen in 23.5% of < 25 y subjects. Particulate material (PM) was seen in olfactory bulb neurons, and PM < 100 nm were observed in intraluminal erythrocytes from lung, frontal, and trigeminal ganglia capillaries. Exposure to air pollution causes neuroinflammation, an altered brain innate immune response, and accumulation of Abeta42 and alpha-synuclein starting in childhood. Exposure to air pollution should be considered a risk factor for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, and carriers of the APOE 4 allele could have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease if they reside in a polluted environment.

  8. A blood-brain barrier (BBB) disrupter is also a potent α-synuclein (α-syn) aggregation inhibitor: a novel dual mechanism of mannitol for the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD).

    PubMed

    Shaltiel-Karyo, Ronit; Frenkel-Pinter, Moran; Rockenstein, Edward; Patrick, Christina; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Schiller, Abigail; Egoz-Matia, Nirit; Masliah, Eliezer; Segal, Daniel; Gazit, Ehud

    2013-06-14

    The development of disease-modifying therapy for Parkinson disease has been a main drug development challenge, including the need to deliver the therapeutic agents to the brain. Here, we examined the ability of mannitol to interfere with the aggregation process of α-synuclein in vitro and in vivo in addition to its blood-brain barrier-disrupting properties. Using in vitro studies, we demonstrated the effect of mannitol on α-synuclein aggregation. Although low concentration of mannitol inhibited the formation of fibrils, high concentration significantly decreased the formation of tetramers and high molecular weight oligomers and shifted the secondary structure of α-synuclein from α-helical to a different structure, suggesting alternative potential pathways for aggregation. When administered to a Parkinson Drosophila model, mannitol dramatically corrected its behavioral defects and reduced the amount of α-synuclein aggregates in the brains of treated flies. In the mThy1-human α-synuclein transgenic mouse model, a decrease in α-synuclein accumulation was detected in several brain regions following treatment, suggesting that mannitol promotes α-synuclein clearance in the cell bodies. It appears that mannitol has a general neuroprotective effect in the transgenic treated mice, which includes the dopaminergic system. We therefore suggest mannitol as a basis for a dual mechanism therapeutic agent for the treatment of Parkinson disease.

  9. Sex-dependent changes in blood-brain barrier permeability and brain NA(+),K(+) ATPase activity in rats following acute water intoxication.

    PubMed

    Oztaş, B; Koçak, H; Oner, P; Küçük, M

    2000-12-01

    To understand the increased susceptibility of the development of serious complications to hypoosmotic hyponatremia in young females, we examined the resistance of blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability to water along with the synaptosomal Na(+),K(+)ATPase activity in both sexes of rats during acute water intoxication. Four groups of rats were used: Group I and II were normal female and male rats injected with only Evans-blue. Group III and IV were water intoxicated female and male rats respectively. BBB permeability in female rats was found to be increased following acute water intoxication. In contrast, synaptosomal Na(+),K(+)ATPase activities in both water intoxicated male and female rats were found significantly lower than those in control rats. But inhibition in enzyme activity in synaptosomes from water intoxicated female rats was more pronounced than those of corresponding male rats. Our results concluded that female sex steroids may be responsible for the highly significant decrease in synaptosomal Na(+),K(+)ATPase activity and increased BBB permeability in female rats following water intoxication.

  10. ACUTE INDUCTION OF EPILEPTIFORM DISCHARGES BY PILOCARPINE IN THE IN VITRO ISOLATED GUINEA-PIG BRAIN REQUIRES ENHANCEMENT OF BLOOD–BRAIN BARRIER PERMEABILITY

    PubMed Central

    UVA, L.; LIBRIZZI, L.; MARCHI, N.; NOE, F.; BONGIOVANNI, R.; VEZZANI, A.; JANIGRO, D.; DE CURTIS, M.

    2008-01-01

    Systemic application of the muscarinic agonist, pilocarpine, is commonly utilized to induce an acute status epilepticus that evolves into a chronic epileptic condition characterized by spontaneous seizures. Recent findings suggest that the status epilepticus induced by pilocarpine may be triggered by changes in the blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability. We tested the role of the BBB in an acute pilocarpine model by using the in vitro model brain preparation and compared our finding with in vivo data. Arterial perfusion of the in vitro isolated guinea-pig brain with <1 mM pilocarpine did not cause epileptiform activity, but rather reduced synaptic transmission and induced steady fast (20–25 Hz) oscillatory activity in limbic cortices. These effects were reversibly blocked by co-perfusion of the muscarinic antagonist atropine sulfate (5 μM). Brain pilocarpine measurements in vivo and in vitro suggested modest BBB penetration. Pilocarpine induced epileptiform discharges only when perfused with compounds that enhance BBB permeability, such as bradykinin (n=2) or histamine (n=10). This pro-epileptic effect was abolished when the BBB-impermeable muscarinic antagonist atropine methyl bromide (5 μM) was co-perfused with histamine and pilocarpine. In the absence of BBB permeability enhancing drugs, pilocarpine induced epileptiform activity only after arterial perfusion at concentrations >10 mM. Ictal discharges correlated with a high intracerebral pilocarpine concentration measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. We propose that acute epileptiform discharges induced by pilocarpine treatment in the in vitro isolated brain preparation are mediated by a dose-dependent, atropine-sensitive muscarinic effect promoted by an increase in BBB permeability. Pilocarpine accumulation secondary to BBB permeability changes may contribute to in vivo ictogenesis in the pilocarpine epilepsy model. PMID:18082973

  11. TNF-α mediated increase of HIF-1α inhibits VASP expression, which reduces alveolar-capillary barrier function during acute lung injury (ALI).

    PubMed

    Tang, Mengjie; Tian, Yihao; Li, Doulin; Lv, Jiawei; Li, Qun; Kuang, Changchun; Hu, Pengchao; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jing; Su, Ke; Wei, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is an inflammatory disorder associated with reduced alveolar-capillary barrier function and increased pulmonary vascular permeability. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) is widely associated with all types of modulations of cytoskeleton rearrangement-dependent cellular morphology and function, such as adhesion, shrinkage, and permeability. The present studies were conducted to investigate the effects and mechanisms by which tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) increases the tight junction permeability in lung tissue associated with acute lung inflammation. After incubating A549 cells for 24 hours with different concentrations (0-100 ng/mL) of TNF-α, 0.1 to 8 ng/mL TNF-α exhibited no significant effect on cell viability compared with the 0 ng/mL TNF-α group (control group). However, 10 ng/mL and 100 ng/mL TNF-α dramatically inhibited the viability of A549 cells compared with the control group (*p<0.05). Monolayer cell permeability assay results indicated that A549 cells incubated with 10 ng/mL TNF-α for 24 hours displayed significantly increased cell permeability (*p<0.05). Moreover, the inhibition of VASP expression increased the cell permeability (*p<0.05). Pretreating A549 cells with cobalt chloride (to mimic a hypoxia environment) increased protein expression level of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) (*p<0.05), whereas protein expression level of VASP decreased significantly (*p<0.05). In LPS-induced ALI mice, the concentrations of TNF-α in lung tissues and serum significantly increased at one hour, and the value reached a peak at four hours. Moreover, the Evans Blue absorption value of the mouse lung tissues reached a peak at four hours. The HIF-1α protein expression level in mouse lung tissues increased significantly at four hours and eight hours (**p<0.001), whereas the VASP protein expression level decreased significantly (**p<0.01). Taken together, our data demonstrate that HIF-1α acts downstream of TNF-α to

  12. Breakdown of the normal optic nerve head blood-brain barrier following acute elevation of intraocular pressure in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1980-03-01

    Five hours of elevated intraocular pressure produced evidence of an altered blood-brain barrier at the optic nerve head in 27 of 29 monkey eyes. The change in vascular permeability was documented by fluorescein angiography (18 of 21 eyes), by Evans blue fluorescence microscopy (21 of 23 eyes), or by both methods. Leakage occurred from major blood vessels as well as from microvasculature of the nerve head. In 22 eyes, rapid axonal transport was studied after intravitreal injection of tritiated leucine. In 18 of these 22 eyes, autoradiography demonstrated a local interruption of axonal transport. In 15 eyes examined by all three methods, leakage from microvasculature (as opposed to leakage from the major vessels) was loosely associated with severe and widespread blockade of axonal transport at the lamina cribrosa. Although cause-and-effect relationships are not proved, ischemia may be responsible both for the focal endothelial damage with breakdown of the normal blood-brain barrier and for the local abnormalities of axonal transport.

  13. Effects of glutamine supplementation on gut barrier, glutathione content and acute phase response in malnourished rats during inflammatory shock

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Liliana; Coëffier, Moïse; Pessot, Florence Le; Miralles-Barrachina, Olga; Hiron, Martine; Leplingard, Antony; Lemeland, Jean-François; Hecketsweiler, Bernadette; Daveau, Maryvonne; Ducrotté, Philippe; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of glutamine on intestinal mucosa integrity, glutathione stores and acute phase response in protein-depleted rats during an inflammatory shock. METHODS: Plasma acute phase proteins (APP), jejunal APP mRNA levels, liver and jejunal glutathione concentrations were measured before and one, three and seven days after turpentine injection in 4 groups of control, protein-restricted, protein-restricted rats supplemented with glutamine or protein powder. Bacterial translocation in mesenteric lymph nodes and intestinal morphology were also assessed. RESULTS: Protein deprivation and turpentine injection significantly reduced jejunal villus height, and crypt depths. Mucosal glutathione concentration significantly decreased in protein-restricted rats. Before turpentine oil, glutamine supplementation restored villus heights and glutathione concentration (3.24 ± 1.05 vs 1.72 ± 0.46 μmol/g tissue, P < 0.05) in the jejunum, whereas in the liver glutathione remained low. Glutamine markedly increased jejunal α1-acid glycoprotein mRNA level after turpentine oil but did not affect its plasma concentration. Bacterial translocation in protein-restricted rats was not prevented by glutamine or protein powder supplementation. CONCLUSION: Glutamine restored gut glutathione stores and villus heights in malnourished rats but had no preventive effect on bacterial translocation in our model. PMID:17569119

  14. Intrapartum Pubic Symphysis Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Pires, RES; Labronici, PJ; Giordano, V; Kojima, KE; Kfuri, M; Barbisan, M; Wajnsztejn, A; de Andrade, MAP

    2015-01-01

    During pregnancy, high progesterone and relaxin levels produce physiological ligament relaxation on the pelvis. Therefore, moderate pubic symphysis and sacroiliac joints relaxing provide birth canal widening, thereby facilitating vaginal delivery. Sometimes, functional pain or pelvic instability may occur during pregnancy or puerperium, which is defined as symptomatic pelvic girdle relaxation. In rare cases, a pubic symphysis disruption can occur during the labor, causing severe pain and functional limitations. The early recognition of this injury is crucial to prevent complications and improve clinical and functional outcomes. This study reports an acute symphyseal disruption resulting from childbirth in a primiparous patient who underwent open reduction and internal fixation with plate and screws. After a 6 months follow-up, the patient presented no pain and satisfactory functional recovery. PMID:27057391

  15. Disruptive Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David H., Ed.

    A committee was formed to explore ways of helping school districts develop more effective programs for disruptive students. Committee findings revealed the need for the development of local guidelines to satisfy each school district's needs and for reliable feedback. Therefore, this report reflects efforts to sample various local approaches to the…

  16. Family Disruptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Returns Do you or your spouse frequently travel on business? These can be disruptive times for your child and for the family as ... these out-of-town trips. Spend as much time as it takes to explain where you are ... before and during your travels. You need to acknowledge and accept her feelings: " ...

  17. Barrier-protective effects of activated protein C in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Puig, Ferranda; Fuster, Gemma; Adda, Mélanie; Blanch, Lluís; Farre, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel; Artigas, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a clinical manifestation of respiratory failure, caused by lung inflammation and the disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier. Preservation of the physical integrity of the alveolar epithelial monolayer is of critical importance to prevent alveolar edema. Barrier integrity depends largely on the balance between physical forces on cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, and this balance might be affected by alterations in the coagulation cascade in patients with ALI. We aimed to study the effects of activated protein C (APC) on mechanical tension and barrier integrity in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) exposed to thrombin. Cells were pretreated for 3 h with APC (50 µg/ml) or vehicle (control). Subsequently, thrombin (50 nM) or medium was added to the cell culture. APC significantly reduced thrombin-induced cell monolayer permeability, cell stiffening, and cell contraction, measured by electrical impedance, optical magnetic twisting cytometry, and traction microscopy, respectively, suggesting a barrier-protective response. The dynamics of the barrier integrity was also assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis of the tight junction ZO-1. Thrombin resulted in more elongated ZO-1 aggregates at cell-cell interface areas and induced an increase in ZO-1 membrane protein content. APC attenuated the length of these ZO-1 aggregates and reduced the ZO-1 membrane protein levels induced by thrombin. In conclusion, pretreatment with APC reduced the disruption of barrier integrity induced by thrombin, thus contributing to alveolar epithelial barrier protection.

  18. Barcelona: visa barriers may disrupt conference.

    PubMed

    James, John S

    2002-06-28

    Almost everyone from Africa or Asia needs a visa to enter Spain--although citizens of the U.S. and over 50 other countries do not. Many delegates from developing countries have had great difficulties getting a Spanish visa to attend the big international conference in Barcelona; we do not know how many were kept away as a result. In addition, we look at another access and solidarity issues, the price of the international AIDS conferences--and show that other large meetings can make a profit on a tenth the price.

  19. Rehab rounds: overcoming barriers to individualized psychosocial rehabilitation in an acute treatment unit of a state hospital.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, A S; Dollieslager, L P

    2000-03-01

    Psychiatric rehabilitation begins during the acute stages of a psychiatric disorder and continues throughout the person's lifetime, with the types of services flexibly keyed to the person's phase of illness, needs, and personal goals. During periods of relapse and exacerbation of symptoms, when hospitalization is often required, psychiatric rehabilitation should include the following five objectives: * Clarify how the person's own goals in life, such as a desire for more self-control, freedom of choice, privacy, and time with friends and family, can be served by inpatient treatment and symptom stabilization. * Educate the patient about the nature of his or her illness and how medications work to restore self-control. * Teach the patient about side effects and self-monitoring and negotiating about medication and its effects in a collaborative way with the psychiatrist and other members of the treatment team. * Connect with the family or other natural supports that the person has in the community. * Enable the patient to make appropriate aftercare plans for residential and continuing treatment needs after discharge. When rehabilitation is viewed from the vantage point of these objectives, the inextricable interweaving of "treatment" with "rehabilitation" becomes clear. Treatment and rehabilitation are two sides of the same. It is much easier to integrate psychiatric rehabilitation into more traditional methods of treatment than it is to reorganize a treatment program or facility so that it blends rehabilitation with prevailing treatment imperatives of pharmacotherapy, supervision, and security and safety. In previous Rehab Rounds columns, we have described examples of creative methods for bringing the principles and practices of psychiatric rehabilitation into the treatment milieu (1,2,3). Faced with regulatory criticism from governmental agencies, Dr. Dhillon and his colleagues at Eastern State Hospital in Williamsburg, Virginia, launched a vigorous initiative to

  20. Intestinal Barrier and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Julio-Pieper, M; Bravo, J A

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier function contributes to gut homeostasis by modulating absorption of water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the lumen into the circulation while restricting the passage of noxious luminal substances and microorganisms. Chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and celiac disease are associated to intestinal barrier dysfunction. Here, the hypothesis is that a leaky intestinal wall allowing for indiscriminate passage of intraluminal compounds to the vascular compartment could in turn lead to systemic inflammation. An increasing number of studies are now investigating the association between gut permeability and CNS disorders, under the premise that translocation of intestinal luminal contents could affect CNS function, either directly or indirectly. Still, it is unknown whether disruption of intestinal barrier is a causative agent or a consequence in these situations. Here, we discuss the latest evidence pointing to an association between increased gut permeability and disrupted behavioral responses.

  1. Steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein and cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc)-regulated steroidogenesis as an organ-specific molecular and cellular target for endocrine disrupting chemicals in fish.

    PubMed

    Arukwe, Augustine

    2008-12-01

    Biologically active steroids are synthesised de novo in specialised cells of several organs, including the adrenal gland, testis, ovary, brain, placenta and adipose tissue. Regardless of organ or tissue, the rate-limiting step in steroid hormone synthesis is the movement of cholesterol across the mitochondrial membrane (i.e. from the outer to the inner membrane) mediated by the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein. Subsequent conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone by cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450scc) represents the initiation of steroidogenesis. Chemically mediated disruption of StAR and P450scc expression may represent the first step in the sequence of related event cascades underlying xenoestrogen-induced toxicity and transmittable disturbances to the whole organism level. This may include, but is not limited to, alterations in sexual differentiation, growth, reproduction, development and metabolism. Despite the integral role of StAR and P450scc in acute steroidogenesis, and popular demand from regulatory agencies, bioassays for evaluating the effect of endocrine-disrupting chemicals have the potential to overlook chemicals that may modulate estrogenic responses through mechanisms that do not involve direct binding to estrogen receptors (ERs). In addition to their effect as direct ER agonists, the effects of endocrine disruptors may be evaluated and interpreted as interference with steroidogenesis and with the steroidal regulation of the normal development and function of juvenile, male and female individuals. Knowledge of these effects is scarce, indicating that relatively little is known about the mechanisms or mode-of-action of chemical alterations to steroidogenesis and their potential toxicity for wildlife species. In addition, analytical methods for the complete adaptation of these responses as biomarkers of response and effect are yet to be properly validated.

  2. Acute exposure to sarin increases blood brain barrier permeability and induces neuropathological changes in the rat brain: dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, A; Shetty, A K; Abou-Donia, M B

    2002-01-01

    We hypothesize that a single exposure to an LD(50) dose of sarin induces widespread early neuropathological changes in the adult brain. In this study, we evaluated the early changes in the adult brain after a single exposure to different doses of sarin. Adult male rats were exposed to sarin by a single intramuscular injection at doses of 1, 0.5, 0.1 and 0.01 x LD(50). Twenty-four hours after the treatment, both sarin-treated and vehicle-treated (controls) animals were analyzed for: (i) plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity; (ii) brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, (iii) m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m2 mAChR) ligand binding; (iv) blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability using [H(3)]hexamethonium iodide uptake assay and immunostaining for endothelial barrier antigen (EBA); and (v) histopathological changes in the brain using H&E staining, and microtubule-associated protein (MAP-2) and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunostaining. In animals treated with 1 x LD(50) sarin, the significant changes include a decreased plasma BChE, a decreased AChE in the cerebrum, brainstem, midbrain and the cerebellum, a decreased m2 mAChR ligand binding in the cerebrum, an increased BBB permeability in the cerebrum, brainstem, midbrain and the cerebellum associated with a decreased EBA expression, a diffuse neuronal cell death and a decreased MAP-2 expression in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus, and degeneration of Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum. Animals treated with 0.5 x LD(50) sarin however exhibited only a few alterations, which include decreased plasma BChE, an increased BBB permeability in the midbrain and the brain stem but without a decrease in EBA expression, and degeneration of Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum. In contrast, animals treated with 0.1 and 0.01 x LD(50) did not exhibit any of the above changes. However, m2 mAChR ligand binding in the brainstem was increased after exposure to all doses of the sarin.Collectively, the above

  3. Relationship between expression of triggering receptor-1 on myeloid cells in intestinal tissue and intestinal barrier dysfunction in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kai; Dang, Sheng-chun; Zhang, Jian-xin

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) in the intestine was upregulated and correlated with disease activity in inflammatory bowel diseases. Membrane-bound TREM-1 protein is increased in the pancreas, liver and kidneys of patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), suggesting that TREM-1 may act as an important mediator of inflammation and subsequent extra-pancreatic organ injury. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the expression of TREM-1 in intestinal tissue and intestinal barrier dysfunction in SAP. METHODS: Sixty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into a sham operation group (SO group, n=32) and a SAP group (n=32). A SAP model was established by retrograde injection of 5% sodium deoxycholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. Specimens were taken from blood and intestinal tissue 2, 6, 12, and 48 hours after operation respectively. The levels of D-lactate, diamine oxidase (DAO) and endotoxin in serum were measured using an improved spectro-photometric method. The expression levels of TREM-1, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA in terminal ileum were detected by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Specimens of the distal ileum were taken to determine pathological changes by a validated histology score. RESULTS: The serum levels of D-lactate, DAO and endotoxin were significantly increased in each subgroup of SAP compared with the SO group (P<0.01, P<0.05). The expression levels of TREM-1, IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA in the terminal ileum in each subgroup of SAP were significantly higher than those in the SO group (P<0.01, P<0.05). The expression level of TREM-1mRNA was positively correlated with IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA (r=0.956, P=0.044; r=0.986, P=0.015), but the correlation was not found between IL-1β mRNA and TNF-α mRNA (P=0.133). Compared to the SO group, the pathological changes were aggravated significantly in the SAP group. CONCLUSIONS

  4. Effect of PPAR-β/δ agonist GW0742 treatment in the acute phase response and blood-brain barrier permeability following brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chehaibi, Khouloud; le Maire, Laura; Bradoni, Sarah; Escola, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Slimane, Mohamed Naceur

    2017-04-01

    The systemic response to ischemic stroke is associated with the hepatic acute phase response (APR) that modulates leukocytes recruitment to the injured brain. The inappropriate recruitment of leukocytes to the brain parenchyma can result in blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown. Emerging data suggest that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta (PPAR-β/δ) activation has a potential neuroprotective role in ischemic stroke. However, mechanisms of PPAR-β/δ mediated protection in ischemic insults remain unclear. In the present study, we determined for the first time, the effects of GW0742, a PPAR-β/δ agonist on the APR following brain injury and assessed the effects on BBB permeability and tight junction integrity via claudin-5, occludin, and zona occludens-1 expression. C57/BL6 mice were exposed to 1 hour of ischemia and received 10 minutes before reperfusion either a vehicle solution or GW0742. Hepatic expression of chemokines (C-X-C motif ligand: CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCL10), serum amyloid A-1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 was measured, and the extent of brain and hepatic neutrophil infiltration was determined. The results showed that GW0742 treatment decreased infarct volume and edema, reactant production and neutrophil recruitment to the brain and liver, which is a hallmark of the APR. GW0742 significantly reduced BBB leakage and metalloproteinase 9 expression and upregulated the expression of tight junction proteins. These findings may help to guide the experimental and clinical therapeutic use of PPAR-β/δ agonists against brain injury.

  5. Adenosine A2B receptor modulates intestinal barrier function under hypoxic and ischemia/reperfusion conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Qiu, Yuan; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Liang, Hongyin; Zhang, Chaojun; Yang, Hanwenbo; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Sun, Li-Hua; Yang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intestinal barrier function failure from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and acute hypoxia has been implicated as a critical determinant in the predisposition to intestinal inflammation and a number of inflammatory disorders. Here, we identified the role of Adenosine A2B receptor (A2BAR) in the regulation of intestinal barrier function under I/R and acute hypoxic conditions. Methods: C57BL/6J mice were used, and were randomized into three groups: Sham, I/R, IR+PSB1115 (a specific A2BAR antagonist) groups. After surgery, the small bowel was harvested for immunohistochemical staining, RNA and protein content, and intestinal permeability analyses. Using an epithelial cell culture model, we investigated the influence of hypoxia on the epithelial function, and the role of A2BAR in the expressions of tight junction and epithelial permeability. The expressions of Claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western-Blot. Epithelial barrier function was assessed with transepithelial resistance (TER). Results and conclusions: The A2BAR antagonist, PSB1115, significantly increased tight junction protein expression after intestinal I/R or acute hypoxia conditions. PSB1115 also attenuated the disrupted distribution of TJ proteins. Furthermore, inhibition of A2BAR attenuated the decrease in TER induced by I/R or acute hypoxic conditions, and maintained intestinal barrier function. Antagonism of A2BAR activity improves intestinal epithelial structure and barrier function in a mouse model of intestinal I/R and a cell model of acute hypoxia. These findings support a potentially destructive role for A2BAR under intestinal I/R and acute hypoxic conditions. PMID:24966910

  6. Nitric Oxide and Airway Epithelial Barrier Function: Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins and Epithelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nels; Greul, Anne-Katrin; Hristova, Milena; Bove, Peter F.; Kasahara, David I.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Acute airway inflammation is associated with enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO•) and altered airway epithelial barrier function, suggesting a role of NO• or its metabolites in epithelial permeability. While high concentrations of S-nitrosothiols disrupted transepithelial resistance (TER) and increased permeability in 16HBE14o- cells, no significant barrier disruption was observed by NONOates, in spite of altered distribution and expression of some TJ proteins. Barrier disruption of mouse tracheal epithelial (MTE) cell monolayers in response to inflammatory cytokines was independent of NOS2, based on similar effects in MTE cells from NOS2-/- mice and a lack of effect of the NOS2-inhibitor 1400W. Cell pre-incubation with LPS protected MTE cells from TER loss and increased permeability by H2O2, which was independent of NOS2. However, NOS2 was found to contribute to epithelial wound repair and TER recovery after mechanical injury. Overall, our results demonstrate that epithelial NOS2 is not responsible for epithelial barrier dysfunction during inflammation, but may contribute to restoration of epithelial integrity. PMID:19100237

  7. BASIS FOR ENHANCED BARRIER FUNCTION OF PIGMENTED SKIN

    PubMed Central

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Lin, Tzu-Kai; Santiago, Juan Luis; Celli, Anna; Zhong, Lily; Huang, Zhi-Ming; Roelandt, Truus; Hupe, Melanie; Sundberg, John P.; Silva, Kathleen A.; Crumrine, Debra; Martin-Ezquerra, Gemma; Trullas, Carles; Sun, Richard; Wakefield, Joan S.; Wei, Maria L.; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Mauro, Theodora M.; Elias, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Humans with darkly-pigmented skin display superior permeability barrier function in comparison to humans with lightly-pigmented skin. The reduced pH of the stratum corneum (SC) of darkly-pigmented skin could account for enhanced function, because acidifying lightly-pigmented human SC resets barrier function to darkly-pigmented levels. In SKH1 (non-pigmented) vs. SKH2/J (pigmented) hairless mice, we evaluated how a pigment-dependent reduction in pH could influence epidermal barrier function. Permeability barrier homeostasis is enhanced in SKH2/J vs. SKH1 mice, correlating with a reduced pH in the lower SC that co-localizes with the extrusion of melanin granules. Darkly-pigmented human epidermis also shows substantial melanin extrusion in the outer epidermis. Both acute barrier disruption and topical basic pH challenges accelerate re-acidification of SKH2/J (but not SKH1) SC, while inducing melanin extrusion. SKH2/J mice also display enhanced expression of the SC acidifying enzyme, secretory phospholipase A2f (sPLA2f). Enhanced barrier function of SKH2/J mice could be attributed to enhanced activity of two acidic pH-dependent, ceramide-generating enzymes, β-glucocerebrosidase and acidic sphingomyelinase, leading to accelerated maturation of SC lamellar bilayers. Finally, organotypic cultures of darkly-pigmented-bearing human keratinocytes display enhanced barrier function in comparison to lightly-pigmented cultures. Together, these results suggest that the superior barrier function of pigmented epidermis can be largely attributed to the pH-lowering impact of melanin persistence/extrusion and enhanced sPLA2f expression. PMID:24732399

  8. Two learning tasks provide evidence for disrupted behavioural flexibility in an animal model of schizophrenia-like behaviour induced by acute MK-801: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Lobellova, Veronika; Entlerova, Marie; Svojanovska, Barbora; Hatalova, Hana; Prokopova, Iva; Petrasek, Tomas; Vales, Karel; Kubik, Stepan; Fajnerova, Iveta; Stuchlik, Ales

    2013-06-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic and devastating illness. Exact causes of the disease remain elusive; however, neurodevelopmental changes in the brain glutamate system are recognized to play an important role. Several animal models of the disease are induced by a systemic blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. This study examined the animal model of schizophrenia-like behaviours induced by acute treatment with MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA-receptor antagonist. Behavioural flexibility is an ability to adapt to the changes in environment, and schizophrenia is often accompanied by its decrease. The study tested the effect of MK-801 on behavioural flexibility in an active place avoidance task and the Morris water maze (MWM). Flexibility was tested under reversal conditions, i.e., after changing the location of the target. Each spatial task addressed different functions; continuous coordinate-frame segregation was present in the active place avoidance and precise place representation in the MWM. Results showed that reversal was altered in both tasks by MK-801 at doses of 0.10-0.15 mgkg(-1). Some impairment was observed in the active place avoidance task at 0.08 mgkg(-1). Swimming towards a visible platform was impaired only by the highest dose (0.15 mgkg(-1)). The results demonstrate that a significant impairment of behavioural flexibility accompanies this acute animal model of schizophrenia-like behaviours, and that active place avoidance had higher sensitivity for such deficits than the MWM. This suggests the usefulness of the reversal paradigm in both tasks for examining novel drugs with antipsychotic and procognitive actions.

  9. Acute intermittent hypoxia-induced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor is disrupted in the brainstem of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Vermehren-Schmaedick, A; Jenkins, V K; Knopp, S J; Balkowiec, A; Bissonnette, J M

    2012-03-29

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). One of its targets is the gene encoding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf). In vitro studies using cultured neurons have produced conflicting results with respect to the role of MeCP2 in BDNF expression. Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces plasticity in the respiratory system characterized by long-term facilitation of phrenic nerve amplitude. This paradigm induces an increase in BDNF protein. We hypothesized that AIH leads to augmentation of BDNF transcription in respiratory-related areas of the brainstem and that MeCP2 is necessary for this process. Wild-type and mecp2 null (mecp2(-/y)) mice were subjected to three 5-min episodes of exposure to 8% O(2)/4% CO(2)/88% N(2), delivered at 5-min intervals. Normoxia control wild-type and mecp2 null mice were exposed to room air for the total length of time, that is, 30 min. Following a recovery in room air, the pons and medulla were rapidly removed. Expression of BDNF protein and transcripts were determined by ELISA and quantitative PCR, respectively. AIH induced a significant increase in BDNF protein in the pons and medulla, and in mRNA transcript levels in the pons of wild-type animals. In contrast, there were no significant changes in either BDNF protein or transcripts in the pons or medulla of mice lacking MeCP2. The results indicate that MeCP2 is required for regulation of BDNF expression by acute intermittent hypoxia in vivo.

  10. The secretion, synthesis, and metabolism of cortisol and its downstream genes in the H-P-I axis of rare minnows (Gobiocypris rarus) are disrupted by acute waterborne cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xie, Bi-Wen; Wang, Zhi-Jian; Jin, Li; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2016-01-01

    The H (hypothalamic)-P (pituitary)-I (interrenal) axis plays a critical role in the fish stress response and is regulated by several factors. Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most toxic heavy metals in the world, but its effects on the H-P-I axis of teleosts are largely unknown. Using rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) as an experimental animal, we found that Cd only disrupted the secretion and synthesis of cortisol. Neither hormones at the H or P level nor the expressions of their receptor genes (corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor (CRHR) and melanocortin receptor 2 (MC2R)) were affected. Steroidogenic acute regulator (StAR), CYP11A1 and CYP11B1, which encode the key enzymes in the cortisol synthesis pathway, were significantly up-regulated in the kidney (including the head kidney). The level of 11β-HSD2, which is required for the conversion of cortisol to cortisone, was increased in the kidney, intestine, brain, and hepatopancreas, whereas the expression of 11β-HSD1, which encodes the reverse conversion enzyme, was increased in the gill, kidney and almost unchanged in other tissues. The enzyme activity concentration of 11β-HSD2 was increased in the kidney as well. The level of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) decreased in the intestine, gill and muscle, and the key GR regulator FK506 binding protein5 (FKBP5) was up-regulated in the GR-decreased tissues, whereas the level of nuclear receptor co-repressor 1 (NCoR1), another GR regulator remained almost unchanged. Thus, GR, FKBP5 and 11β-HSD2 may be involved in Cd-induced cortisol disruption.

  11. Acute exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol disrupts audience effects on male-male interactions in Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Dzieweczynski, Teresa L; Buckman, Christina M

    2013-03-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals can have profound effects on the behavior of aquatic organisms residing in polluted waters. Males are especially sensitive to the effects of estrogen mimics and both courtship and aggression may be dramatically reduced by chemical exposure. Population-level impacts may occur if these chemicals decrease the ability of males to obtain mates or defend territories. Exposure might also have far-reaching impacts by interfering with information transfer within a network of individuals. For example, males exposed to an endocrine disruptor may be less sensitive to the presence of an audience. Male Siamese fighting fish were used to examine how short-term exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) alters audience effects on male-male interactions. Males either received a nominal dose of EE2 or remained unexposed and then interacted with an opponent in one of three treatments (female, male, or no audience). EE2 altered audience effects in this study. Opponent-directed gill flaring was lower when a female audience was present compared to when there was a male or no audience in both EE2 and control males. The number of opponent-directed tail beats did not differ as a function of audience type in EE2 males. In contrast, unexposed males increased opponent-directed tail beats when a female audience is present. Therefore, EE2 reduces the ability of males to communicate with multiple individuals simultaneously. If this is the case, endocrine disruptor exposure may alter population structure as selection should favor individuals that are able to readily adjust their signaling behavior as a function of social context.

  12. Combination Targeted Therapy to Disrupt Aberrant Oncogenic Signaling and Reverse Epigenetic Dysfunction in IDH2- and TET2-Mutant Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shih, Alan H; Meydan, Cem; Shank, Kaitlyn; Garrett-Bakelman, Francine E; Ward, Patrick S; Intlekofer, Andrew; Nazir, Abbas; Stein, Eytan; Knapp, Kristina; Glass, Jacob; Travins, Jeremy; Straley, Kim; Gliser, Camelia; Mason, Chris; Yen, Katharine; Thompson, Craig B; Melnick, Ari; Levine, Ross L

    2017-02-13

    Genomic studies in acute myeloid leukemias (AML) have identified mutations which drive altered DNA methylation, including TET2 and IDH2. Here we show that models of AMLs resulting from TET2 or IDH2 mutations combined with FLT3ITD mutations are sensitive to 5-Azacytidine or to the IDH2 inhibitor AG-221, respectively. 5-Azacytidine and AG-221 treatment induced an attenuation of aberrant DNA methylation and transcriptional output, and resulted in a reduction in leukemic blasts consistent with anti-leukemic activity. These therapeutic benefits were associated with restoration of leukemic cell differentiation, and the normalization of hematopoiesis was derived from mutant cells. By contrast, combining AG-221 or 5-Azacytidine with FLT3 inhibition resulted in a reduction in mutant allele burden, progressive recovery of normal hematopoiesis from non-mutant stem-progenitor cells, and reversal of dysregulated DNA methylation and transcriptional output. Together, our studies suggest combined targeting of signaling and epigenetic pathways can increase therapeutic response in AML.

  13. α-Aminoadipic acid protects against retinal disruption through attenuating Müller cell gliosis in a rat model of acute ocular hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolei; Su, Jier; Ding, Jingwen; Han, Song; Ma, Wei; Luo, Hong; Hughes, Guy; Meng, Zhaoyang; Yin, Yi; Wang, Yanling; Li, Junfa

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ocular hypertension is an important risk factor for glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the gliotoxic effects of α-aminoadipic acid (AAA) in a rat model of AOH and its underlying mechanisms. Materials and methods In the rat model of acute ocular hypertension (AOH), intraocular pressure was increased to 110 mmHg for 60 minutes. Animals were divided into four groups: sham operation (Ctrl), AOH, AOH + phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and AOH + AAA. Cell apoptosis in the ganglion cell layer was detected with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine 5′-triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) immunostained with Thy-1 were counted. Müller cell activation was detected using immunostaining with glutamine synthetase and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was examined using Western blot. Results In the rat model of AOH, cell apoptosis was induced in the ganglion cell layer and the number of RGCs was decreased. Müller cell gliosis in the retinas of rats was induced, and retinal protein levels of TNF-α were increased. Intravitreal treatment of AAA versus PBS control attenuated these retinal abnormalities to show protective effects in the rat model of AOH. Conclusion In the retinas of the rat model of AOH, AAA treatment attenuated retinal apoptosis in the ganglion cell layer and preserved the number of RGCs, likely through the attenuation of Müller cell gliosis and suppression of TNF-α induction. Our observations suggest that AAA might be a potential therapeutic target in glaucoma. PMID:27799744

  14. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  15. Role of histaminergic system in blood-brain barrier dysfunction associated with neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos-Cabrera, Ivette; Valle-Dorado, María Guadalupe; Aldana, Blanca Irene; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra Adela; Rocha, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption has been associated with several acute and chronic brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy. This represents a critical situation because damaged integrity of the BBB is related to the influx of immune mediators, plasma proteins and other outside elements from blood to the central nervous system (CNS) that may trigger a cascade of events that leads to neuroinflammation. In this review, evidence that mast cells and the release of factors such as histamine play an important role in the neuroinflammatory process associated with brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy is presented.

  16. Epidermal Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Production Is Required for Permeability Barrier Homeostasis, Dermal Angiogenesis, and the Development of Epidermal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.; Arbiser, Jack; Brown, Barbara E.; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Man, Mao-Qiang; Cerimele, Francesca; Crumrine, Debra; Gunathilake, Roshan; Choi, Eung Ho; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Tschachler, Erwin; Feingold, Kenneth R.

    2008-01-01

    Primary abnormalities in permeability barrier function appear to underlie atopic dermatitis and epidermal trauma; a concomitant barrier dysfunction could also drive other inflammatory dermatoses, including psoriasis. Central to this outside-inside view of disease pathogenesis is the epidermal generation of cytokines/growth factors, which in turn signal downstream epidermal repair mechanisms. Yet, this cascade, if sustained, signals downstream epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. We found here that acute barrier disruption rapidly stimulates mRNA and protein expression of epidermal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in normal hairless mice, a specific response to permeability barrier requirements because up-regulation is blocked by application of a vapor-impermeable membrane. Moreover, epidermal vegf−/− mice display abnormal permeability barrier homeostasis, attributable to decreased VEGF signaling of epidermal lamellar body production; a paucity of dermal capillaries with reduced vascular permeability; and neither angiogenesis nor epidermal hyperplasia in response to repeated tape stripping (a model of psoriasiform hyperplasia). These results support a central role for epidermal VEGF in the maintenance of epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and a link between epidermal VEGF production and both dermal angiogenesis and the development of epidermal hyperplasia. Because psoriasis is commonly induced by external trauma [isomorphic (Koebner) phenomenon] and is associated with a prominent permeability barrier abnormality, excess VEGF production, prominent angiogenesis, and epidermal hyperplasia, these results could provide a potential outside-inside mechanistic basis for the development of psoriasis. PMID:18688025

  17. Vehicle barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hirsh, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

  18. Topical stratum corneum lipids accelerate barrier repair after tape stripping, solvent treatment and some but not all types of detergent treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Mao-Qiang, M; Taljebini, M; Elias, P M; Feingold, K R

    1995-11-01

    Topical acetone treatment extracts lipids from the stratum corneum, and disrupts the permeability barrier, resulting in a homeostatic response in the viable epidermis that ultimately repairs the barrier. Recently, we have developed an optimal lipid mixture (cholesterol, ceramide, palmitate and linoleate 4.3:2.3:1:1.08) that, when applied topically, accelerates barrier repair following extensive disruption of the barrier by acetone. The present study determined if topical treatment with this optimal lipid mixture would have beneficial effects following disruption of the barrier by petroleum ether, tape stripping, or by detergent treatment. Also, we determined if barrier repair was accelerated after moderate disturbances of barrier function. Following moderate or extensive disruption of the barrier by acetone or petroleum ether (solvents), or tape stripping (mechanical), application of the optimal lipid mixture accelerated barrier repair. Additionally, following barrier disruption with N-laurosarcosine free acid or dodecylbenzensulphuric acid (detergents), the optimal lipid mixture similarly accelerated barrier repair. However, following disruption of the barrier with different detergents, sodium dodecyl sulphate and ammonium lauryl sulphosuccinate, the optimal lipid mixture did not improve barrier recovery. Thus, the optimal lipid mixture is capable of accelerating barrier repair following disruption of the barrier by solvent treatment or tape stripping (mechanical), and by certain detergents such as Sarkosyl and dodecylbenzensulphuric acid. The ability of the optimal lipid mixture to accelerate barrier repair after both moderate and extensive degrees of barrier disruption suggests a potential clinical use for this approach.

  19. Stratum corneum barrier integrity controls skin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Smith, W

    1999-04-01

    The stratum corneum water barrier controls structural and functional properties of both the epidermis and the dermis. Treatments which chronically disrupt the stratum corneum water barrier can induce changes similar to those seen with 'anti-aging' treatments such as (-Hydroxy acids (AHAs) and Retin Atrade mark. Barrier disruption via daily tape stripping increases epidermal and dermal thickness, superficial and integral skin firmness, and improves skin surface texture. Modest or transitory disruption did not produce such effects. Similar results were observed with topical application of AHAs, retinoids or mild irritants after about 4-6 weeks provided such treatments resulted in prolonged elevation in TEWL (trans-epidermal water loss). Treatments that did not chronically elevate TEWL could also produce positive cosmetic effects, but such effects were in general restricted to the skin surface or epidermis. Irritation, which was observed with some treatments, was not solely responsible for the positive effects observed.

  20. Early radiation-induced endothelial cell loss and blood-spinal cord barrier breakdown in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Qing; Chen, Paul; Jain, Vipan; Reilly, Raymond M; Wong, C Shun

    2004-02-01

    Using a rat spinal cord model, this study was designed to characterize radiation-induced vascular endothelial cell loss and its relationship to early blood-brain barrier disruption in the central nervous system. Adult rats were given a single dose of 0, 2, 8, 19.5, 22, 30 or 50 Gy to the cervical spinal cord. At various times up to 2 weeks after irradiation, the spinal cord was processed for histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Radiation-induced apoptosis was assessed by morphology and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling combined with immunohistochemical markers for endothelial and glial cells. Image analysis was performed to determine endothelial cell and microvessel density using immunohistochemistry with endothelial markers, namely endothelial barrier antigen, glucose transporter isoform 1, laminin and zonula occludens 1. Blood-spinal cord barrier permeability was assessed using immunohistochemistry for albumin and (99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid as a vascular tracer. Endothelial cell proliferation was assessed using in vivo BrdU labeling. During the first 24 h after irradiation, apoptotic endothelial cells were observed in the rat spinal cord. The decrease in endothelial cell density at 24 h after irradiation was associated with an increase in albumin immunostaining around microvessels. The decrease in the number of endothelial cells persisted for 7 days and recovery of endothelial density was apparent by day 14. A similar pattern of blood-spinal cord barrier disruption and recovery of permeability was observed over the 2 weeks, and an increase in BrdU-labeled endothelial cells was seen at day 3. These results are consistent with an association between endothelial cell death and acute blood-spinal cord barrier disruption in the rat spinal cord after irradiation.

  1. The ITPA disruption database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidietis, N. W.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Granetz, R. S.; Kawano, Y.; Lehnen, M.; Lister, J. B.; Pautasso, G.; Riccardo, V.; Tanna, R. L.; Thornton, A. J.; ITPA Disruption Database Participants, The

    2015-06-01

    A multi-device database of disruption characteristics has been developed under the auspices of the International Tokamak Physics Activity magneto-hydrodynamics topical group. The purpose of this ITPA disruption database (IDDB) is to find the commonalities between the disruption and disruption mitigation characteristics in a wide variety of tokamaks in order to elucidate the physics underlying tokamak disruptions and to extrapolate toward much larger devices, such as ITER and future burning plasma devices. In contrast to previous smaller disruption data collation efforts, the IDDB aims to provide significant context for each shot provided, allowing exploration of a wide array of relationships between pre-disruption and disruption parameters. The IDDB presently includes contributions from nine tokamaks, including both conventional aspect ratio and spherical tokamaks. An initial parametric analysis of the available data is presented. This analysis includes current quench rates, halo current fraction and peaking, and the effectiveness of massive impurity injection. The IDDB is publicly available, with instruction for access provided herein.

  2. Brain damage from sup 125 I brachytherapy evaluated by MR imaging, a blood-brain barrier tracer, and light and electron microscopy in a rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, M.; Marotta, T.; Stewart, P.; Glen, J.; Resch, L.; Henkelman, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Changes in normal rat brain were studied acutely, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months following interstitial brachytherapy with high-activity {sup 125}I seeds. An 80-Gy radiation dose was administered to an area with a 5.5-mm radius. Effects were measured with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (with and without gadolinium enhancement), leakage of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), electron microscopy, and light microscopy. Significant histological damage was seen at radiation doses above 295 Gy, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier was observed only in tissue receiving a dose of 165 Gy or greater. Blood-brain barrier breakdown increased up to the 6-month time point, and thereafter appeared to stabilize or decrease. The area of blood-brain barrier disruption indicated by gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging was greater than that indicated by leakage of HRP.

  3. Stem Cells behind the Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Cangkrama, Michael; Ting, Stephen B.; Darido, Charbel

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal stem cells sustain the adult skin for a lifetime through self-renewal and the production of committed progenitors. These stem cells generate progeny that will undergo terminal differentiation leading to the development of a protective epidermal barrier. Whereas the molecular mechanisms that govern epidermal barrier repair and renewal have been extensively studied, pathways controlling stem cell differentiation remain poorly understood. Asymmetric cell divisions, small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs), chromatin remodeling complexes, and multiple differentiation factors tightly control the balance of stem and progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation, and disruption of this balance leads to skin diseases. In this review, we summarize and discuss current advances in our understanding of the mechanisms regulating epidermal stem and progenitor cell differentiation, and explore new relationships for maintenance of skin barrier function. PMID:23812084

  4. Confronting the disruptive physician.

    PubMed

    Linney, B J

    1997-01-01

    Ignoring disruptive behavior is no longer an option in today's changing health care environment. Competition and managed care have caused more organizations to deal with the disruptive physician, rather than look the other way as many did in years past. But it's not an easy task, possibly the toughest of your management career. How should you confront a disruptive physician? By having clearly stated expectations for physician behavior and policies in place for dealing with problem physicians, organizations have a context from which to address the situation.

  5. Understanding disruptions in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Leonid

    2011-10-01

    Disruptions in tokamaks are known since 1963 but even now some aspects of them remain a mystery. This talk describes progress made recently in understanding disruptions. A major step forward occurred in 2007 when the importance of galvanic contact of the plasma with the wall in plasma dynamics was pointed out. The toroidal asymmetry of plasma current, observed in JET vertical disruptions, was explained by the theory of the wall touching kink mode. The currents shared by the plasma with the wall and responsible for the asymmetry were identified as generated by the kink mode. Such currents are referred to as Hiro currents. They have shown exceptional consistency with the entire JET disruption data base (more than 5500 cases) and ruled out the long lasting interpretation based on ``halo currents,'' which contradict experiments even in the sign of the measured asymmetry. Accordingly, the sideways forces are understood and their scaling from JET to ITER was justified. Hiro currents provide also a plausible explanation of the current spike at the beginning of the disruptions. The important role of the plasma edge and its interaction with the wall was revealed. Based on this new understanding of disruptions, dedicated experiments on the current spike (J-TEXT, Wuhan, China) and runaway prevention by the repetitive triggering of kink modes (T-10, AUG, Tore Supra) were motivated and are in progress. Accordingly, the need for new, adaptive grid approaches to numerical simulations of disruptions became evident. In addition to the core MHD, simulations of realistic wall geometry, disruption specific plasma edge physics, plasma-wall interaction, and energetic particles need be developed. The first results of simulations of the fast MHD regime, Hiro current generation, and slower plasma decay due to a wall touching kink mode made with the new DSC code are presented. This work is supported by US DoE contract No. DE-AC02-09-CH11466.

  6. Language barriers

    PubMed Central

    Ngwakongnwi, Emmanuel; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Musto, Richard; King-Shier, Kathryn M.; Quan, Hude

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess use of regular medical doctors (RMDs), as well as awareness and use of telephone health lines or telehealth services, by official language minorities (OLMs) in Canada. Design Analysis of data from the 2006 postcensal survey on the vitality of OLMs. Setting Canada. Participants In total, 7691 English speakers in Quebec and 12 376 French speakers outside Quebec, grouped into those who experienced language barriers and those with no language barriers. Main outcome measures Health services utilization (HSU) by the presence of language barriers; HSU measures included having an RMD, use of an RMD’s services, and awareness of and use of telephone health lines or telehealth services. Multivariable models examined the associations between HSU and language barriers. Results After adjusting for age and sex, English speakers residing in Quebec with limited proficiency in French were less likely to have RMDs (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.66, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.87) and to use the services of their RMDs (AOR 0.65, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.86), but were more likely to be aware of the existence of (AOR 1.50, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.93) and to use (AOR 1.43, 95% CI 0.97 to 2.11) telephone health lines or telehealth services. This pattern of having and using RMDs and telehealth services was not observed for French speakers residing outside of Quebec. Conclusion Overall we found variation in HSU among the language barrier populations, with lower use observed in Quebec. Age older than 45 years, male sex, being married or in common-law relationships, and higher income were associated with having RMDs for OLMs. PMID:23242902

  7. Serum-borne bioactivity caused by pulmonary multiwalled carbon nanotubes induces neuroinflammation via blood-brain barrier impairment.

    PubMed

    Aragon, Mario J; Topper, Lauren; Tyler, Christina R; Sanchez, Bethany; Zychowski, Katherine; Young, Tamara; Herbert, Guy; Hall, Pamela; Erdely, Aaron; Eye, Tracy; Bishop, Lindsey; Saunders, Samantha A; Muldoon, Pretal P; Ottens, Andrew K; Campen, Matthew J

    2017-03-07

    Pulmonary exposure to multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) causes indirect systemic inflammation through unknown pathways. MWCNTs translocate only minimally from the lungs into the systemic circulation, suggesting that extrapulmonary toxicity may be caused indirectly by lung-derived factors entering the circulation. To assess a role for MWCNT-induced circulating factors in driving neuroinflammatory outcomes, mice were acutely exposed to MWCNTs (10 or 40 µg/mouse) via oropharyngeal aspiration. At 4 h after MWCNT exposure, broad disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was observed across the capillary bed with the small molecule fluorescein, concomitant with reactive astrocytosis. However, pronounced BBB permeation was noted, with frank albumin leakage around larger vessels (>10 µm), overlain by a dose-dependent astroglial scar-like formation and recruitment of phagocytic microglia. As affirmed by elevated inflammatory marker transcription, MWCNT-induced BBB disruption and neuroinflammation were abrogated by pretreatment with the rho kinase inhibitor fasudil. Serum from MWCNT-exposed mice induced expression of adhesion molecules in primary murine cerebrovascular endothelial cells and, in a wound-healing in vitro assay, impaired cell motility and cytokinesis. Serum thrombospondin-1 level was significantly increased after MWCNT exposure, and mice lacking the endogenous receptor CD36 were protected from the neuroinflammatory and BBB permeability effects of MWCNTs. In conclusion, acute pulmonary exposure to MWCNTs causes neuroinflammatory responses that are dependent on the disruption of BBB integrity.

  8. Serum-borne bioactivity caused by pulmonary multiwalled carbon nanotubes induces neuroinflammation via blood–brain barrier impairment

    PubMed Central

    Aragon, Mario J.; Topper, Lauren; Tyler, Christina R.; Sanchez, Bethany; Zychowski, Katherine; Young, Tamara; Herbert, Guy; Hall, Pamela; Erdely, Aaron; Eye, Tracy; Bishop, Lindsey; Saunders, Samantha A.; Muldoon, Pretal P.; Ottens, Andrew K.; Campen, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary exposure to multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) causes indirect systemic inflammation through unknown pathways. MWCNTs translocate only minimally from the lungs into the systemic circulation, suggesting that extrapulmonary toxicity may be caused indirectly by lung-derived factors entering the circulation. To assess a role for MWCNT-induced circulating factors in driving neuroinflammatory outcomes, mice were acutely exposed to MWCNTs (10 or 40 µg/mouse) via oropharyngeal aspiration. At 4 h after MWCNT exposure, broad disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was observed across the capillary bed with the small molecule fluorescein, concomitant with reactive astrocytosis. However, pronounced BBB permeation was noted, with frank albumin leakage around larger vessels (>10 µm), overlain by a dose-dependent astroglial scar-like formation and recruitment of phagocytic microglia. As affirmed by elevated inflammatory marker transcription, MWCNT-induced BBB disruption and neuroinflammation were abrogated by pretreatment with the rho kinase inhibitor fasudil. Serum from MWCNT-exposed mice induced expression of adhesion molecules in primary murine cerebrovascular endothelial cells and, in a wound-healing in vitro assay, impaired cell motility and cytokinesis. Serum thrombospondin-1 level was significantly increased after MWCNT exposure, and mice lacking the endogenous receptor CD36 were protected from the neuroinflammatory and BBB permeability effects of MWCNTs. In conclusion, acute pulmonary exposure to MWCNTs causes neuroinflammatory responses that are dependent on the disruption of BBB integrity. PMID:28223486

  9. Carotenoids, Retinol, and Intestinal Barrier Function in Children From Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Milena M.; Paik, Jisun; Blaner, William S.; Soares, Alberto M.; Mota, Rosa M.S.; Guerrant, Richard L.; Lima, Aldo A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association of carotenoids and retinol (vitamin A) with intestinal barrier function in children in an urban community in Fortaleza, northeastern Brazil. Methods Descriptive analysis of serum carotenoids and retinol concentrations with intestinal barrier function in 102 children from an urban community, July 2000 to August 2001. Results The weight for height z score (wasting) showed that 19.6% (20/102) had mild malnutrition (–1 to –2 z score). All of the children's serum retinol concentrations were determined and none were severely deficient (≤0.35 μmol/L), 2.9% (3/102) were moderately (0.36–0.70 μmol/L) deficient, 20.6% (21/102) were mildly (0.71–1.05 μmol/L) deficient; 76.5% (78/102) were vitamin A sufficient (>1.05 μmol/L). The lactulose:mannitol (L/M) ratio was elevated (≥0.0864) in 49% (47/97) of children when compared with healthy children with normal L/M ratio (<0.0864) in the same geographic area. Serum carotenoids, lutein, β-cryptoxanthin and β-carotene showed significant inverse correlations with the L/M ratio, but not lutein after adjusting for age. Acute phase proteins (C-reactive protein and β-acid glycoprotein) were significantly inversely correlated with retinol but not with carotenoids. Retinol and retinol-binding protein were not significantly associated with L/M ratio. Conclusions These data suggest a disruption of intestinal barrier function in the paracellular pathway with low serum concentrations of carotenoids. Carotenoids may provide a better marker for disrupted intestinal barrier function than retinol-binding protein or retinol. PMID:18955868

  10. Acute liver failure impairs function and expression of breast cancer-resistant protein (BCRP) at rat blood-brain barrier partly via ammonia-ROS-ERK1/2 activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Ji; Xu, Ping; Sun, Binbin; Zhong, Zeyu; Liu, Can; Ling, Zhaoli; Chen, Yang; Shu, Nan; Zhao, Kaijing; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong

    2016-07-01

    We once reported that P-glycoprotein (P-GP) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) were oppositely regulated at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of thioacetamide-induced acute liver failure (ALF) rats. This study aimed to investigate whether ALF affected function and expression of breast cancer-resistant protein (BCRP) at the BBB of rats and the role of ammonia in the regulation. ALF rats were developed by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of thioacetamide (300 mg/kg) for 2 days. Hyperammonemic rats were developed by NH4 Ac (i.p. 4.5 mmol/kg). BCRP function and expression were measured by brain distribution of specific substrates (prazosin and methotrexate) and western blot, respectively. MDCK-BCRP cells and primarily cultured rat brain microvessel endothelial cells (rBMECs) were employed to investigate possible mechanisms through which ammonia regulated BCRP function and expression. The results showed that both ALF and hyperammonemia significantly weakened function and expression of BCRP in the brain of rats. The function and expression of BCRP in MDCK-BCRP cells and rBMECs were strikingly decreased after exposure to NH4 Cl and H2 O2 , accompanied by remarkable increases in the levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The altered BCRP expression and function by ammonia and H2 O2 were restored by ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine and ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Markedly increased levels of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and ROS were found in the brains of ALF rats and hyperammonemic rats. All above results indicated ALF down-regulated expression and function of BCRP at BBB of rats partly via hyperammonemia. Activation of ROS-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation may be one of the reasons that ammonia impaired BCRP expression and function at the BBB. The present study showed that the expression and function of breast cancer resistant protein (BCRP) at blood-brain barrier (BBB) of thioacetamide-induced ALF rats were down-regulated which partly

  11. Atrial natriuretic peptide protects against Staphylococcus aureus-induced lung injury and endothelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Junjie; Moldobaeva, Nurgul

    2011-01-01

    Lung inflammation and alterations in endothelial cell (EC) permeability are key events to development of acute lung injury (ALI). Protective effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) have been shown against inflammatory signaling and endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by gram-negative bacterial wall liposaccharide. We hypothesized that ANP may possess more general protective effects and attenuate lung inflammation and EC barrier dysfunction by suppressing inflammatory cascades and barrier-disruptive mechanisms shared by gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens. C57BL/6J wild-type or ANP knockout mice (Nppa−/−) were treated with gram-positive bacterial cell wall compounds, Staphylococcus aureus-derived peptidoglycan (PepG) and/or lipoteichoic acid (LTA) (intratracheal, 2.5 mg/kg each), with or without ANP (intravenous, 2 μg/kg). In vitro, human pulmonary EC barrier properties were assessed by morphological analysis of gap formation and measurements of transendothelial electrical resistance. LTA and PepG markedly increased pulmonary EC permeability and activated p38 and ERK1/2 MAP kinases, NF-κB, and Rho/Rho kinase signaling. EC barrier dysfunction was further elevated upon combined LTA and PepG treatment, but abolished by ANP pretreatment. In vivo, LTA and PepG-induced accumulation of protein and cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, tissue neutrophil infiltration, and increased Evans blue extravasation in the lungs was significantly attenuated by intravenous injection of ANP. Accumulation of bronchoalveolar lavage markers of LTA/PepG-induced lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction was further augmented in ANP−/− mice and attenuated by exogenous ANP injection. These results strongly suggest a protective role of ANP in the in vitro and in vivo models of ALI associated with gram-positive infection. Thus ANP may have important implications in therapeutic strategies aimed at the treatment of sepsis and ALI-induced gram-positive bacterial

  12. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several emerging or disruptive technologies can be identified that might, at some point in the future, displace established laboratory medicine technologies and practices. These include increased automation in the form of robots, 3-D printing, technology convergence (e.g., plug-in glucose meters for smart phones), new point-of-care technologies (e.g., contact lenses with sensors, digital and wireless enabled pregnancy tests) and testing locations (e.g., Retail Health Clinics, new at-home testing formats), new types of specimens (e.g., cell free DNA), big biology/data (e.g., million genome projects), and new regulations (e.g., for laboratory developed tests). In addition, there are many emerging technologies (e.g., planar arrays, mass spectrometry) that might find even broader application in the future and therefore also disrupt current practice. One interesting source of disruptive technology may prove to be the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, currently in its final stages. PMID:27683538

  13. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies.

    PubMed

    Kricka, Larry J

    2016-08-01

    Several emerging or disruptive technologies can be identified that might, at some point in the future, displace established laboratory medicine technologies and practices. These include increased automation in the form of robots, 3-D printing, technology convergence (e.g., plug-in glucose meters for smart phones), new point-of-care technologies (e.g., contact lenses with sensors, digital and wireless enabled pregnancy tests) and testing locations (e.g., Retail Health Clinics, new at-home testing formats), new types of specimens (e.g., cell free DNA), big biology/data (e.g., million genome projects), and new regulations (e.g., for laboratory developed tests). In addition, there are many emerging technologies (e.g., planar arrays, mass spectrometry) that might find even broader application in the future and therefore also disrupt current practice. One interesting source of disruptive technology may prove to be the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, currently in its final stages.

  14. The disruption management model.

    PubMed

    McAlister, James

    2011-10-01

    Within all organisations, business continuity disruptions present a set of dilemmas that managers may not have dealt with before in their normal daily duties. The disruption management model provides a simple but effective management tool to enable crisis management teams to stay focused on recovery in the midst of a business continuity incident. The model has four chronological primary headlines, which steer the team through a quick-time crisis decision-making process. The procedure facilitates timely, systematic, rationalised and justified decisions, which can withstand post-event scrutiny. The disruption management model has been thoroughly tested within an emergency services environment and is proven to significantly support clear and concise decision making in a business continuity context.

  15. Interruptions disrupt reading comprehension.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Cyrus K; Werner, Nicole E; Barragán, Daniela; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Previous research suggests that being interrupted while reading a text does not disrupt the later recognition or recall of information from that text. This research is used as support for Ericsson and Kintsch's (1995) long-term working memory (LT-WM) theory, which posits that disruptions while reading (e.g., interruptions) do not impair subsequent text comprehension. However, to fully comprehend a text, individuals may need to do more than recognize or recall information that has been presented in the text at a later time. Reading comprehension often requires individuals to connect and synthesize information across a text (e.g., successfully identifying complex topics such as themes and tones) and not just make a familiarity-based decision (i.e., recognition). The goal for this study was to determine whether interruptions while reading disrupt reading comprehension when the questions assessing comprehension require participants to connect and synthesize information across the passage. In Experiment 1, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension. In Experiment 2, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension but not recognition of information from the text. In Experiment 3, the addition of a 15-s time-out prior to the interruption successfully removed these negative effects. These data suggest that the time it takes to process the information needed to successfully comprehend text when reading is greater than that required for recognition. Any interference (e.g., an interruption) that occurs during the comprehension process may disrupt reading comprehension. This evidence supports the need for transient activation of information in working memory for successful text comprehension and does not support LT-WM theory.

  16. Immune Cell Responses and Mucosal Barrier Disruptions in Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Khalmuratova, Roza; Park, Jong-Wan

    2017-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is one of the most common presentations of upper airway illness and severely affects patient quality of life. Its frequency is not surprising given levels of environmental exposure to microbes, pollutants, and allergens. Inflammatory cells, inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and airway remodeling have been detected in the sinonasal mucosae of CRS patients, although the precise pathophysiological mechanisms causing such persistent inflammation remain unclear. Given its high prevalence and considerable associated morbidity, continued research into CRS is necessary to increase our understanding of factors likely to contribute to its pathogenesis, and facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to improve treatment. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding immune cell responses and epithelial alterations in CRS. PMID:28261021

  17. The disruptive radiologist.

    PubMed

    Ulreich, Sidney; Harris, Robert D; Sze, Gordon; Moriarity, Andrew K; Bluth, Edward

    2015-08-01

    Radiologists interact with many individuals during daily practice, including patients, technologists, and other physicians. Some interactions may potentially negatively affect patient care and are termed "disruptive" behaviors. These actions are not uncommon and may begin during training, long before a radiologist enters clinical practice. The causes of disruptive behavior are multifactorial, and it is important that educators and radiologists in practice alike be able to identify them and respond accordingly. An escalated approach for both trainees and practicing radiologists is recommended, with substantial penalties after each incident that can include termination of employment. Training programs and practices must have clearly defined methods for confronting this potentially time-consuming and difficult issue.

  18. Asef mediates HGF protective effects against LPS-induced lung injury and endothelial barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanyong; Meliton, Angelo; Moldobaeva, Nurgul; Mutlu, Gokhan; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu; Birukova, Anna A

    2015-03-01

    Increased vascular endothelial permeability and inflammation are major pathological mechanisms of pulmonary edema and its life-threatening complication, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We have previously described potent protective effects of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) against thrombin-induced hyperpermeability and identified the Rac pathway as a key mechanism of HGF-mediated endothelial barrier protection. However, anti-inflammatory effects of HGF are less understood. This study examined effects of HGF on the pulmonary endothelial cell (EC) inflammatory activation and barrier dysfunction caused by the gram-negative bacterial pathogen lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We tested involvement of the novel Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Asef in the HGF anti-inflammatory effects. HGF protected the pulmonary EC monolayer against LPS-induced hyperpermeability, disruption of monolayer integrity, activation of NF-kB signaling, expression of adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and production of IL-8. These effects were critically dependent on Asef. Small-interfering RNA-induced downregulation of Asef attenuated HGF protective effects against LPS-induced EC barrier failure. Protective effects of HGF against LPS-induced lung inflammation and vascular leak were also diminished in Asef knockout mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate potent anti-inflammatory effects by HGF and delineate a key role of Asef in the mediation of the HGF barrier protective and anti-inflammatory effects. Modulation of Asef activity may have important implications in therapeutic strategies aimed at the treatment of sepsis and acute lung injury/ARDS-induced gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

  19. Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Medina, J.F.; Sarvide, S.; Bervoets, T.J.M.; Everts, V.; DenBesten, P.; Smith, C.E.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl− for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b−/− mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b−/− mice and was strongly correlated with Cl−. Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl− levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins. PMID:24170372

  20. Boomtowns and Lifeworld Disruption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    England, J. Lynn; Albrect, Stan

    Three intermountain communities in Colorado and Utah were studied to determine the impact of rapid development on residents of rural communities, especially on their views of the world and their personal well-being, and to assess the degree to which energy boomtowns experience the social disruption suggested in the classical boomtown studies. Two…

  1. Astrocytic laminin regulates pericyte differentiation and maintains blood brain barrier integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Chen, Zu-Lin; Norris, Erin H.; Strickland, Sidney

    2014-03-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) breakdown is not only a consequence of but also contributes to many neurological disorders, including stroke and Alzheimer’s disease. How the basement membrane (BM) contributes to the normal functioning of the BBB remains elusive. Here we use conditional knockout mice and an acute adenovirus-mediated knockdown model to show that lack of astrocytic laminin, a brain-specific BM component, induces BBB breakdown. Using functional blocking antibody and RNAi, we further demonstrate that astrocytic laminin, by binding to integrin α2 receptor, prevents pericyte differentiation from the BBB-stabilizing resting stage to the BBB-disrupting contractile stage, and thus maintains the integrity of BBB. Additionally, loss of astrocytic laminin decreases aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction protein expression. Altogether, we report a critical role for astrocytic laminin in BBB regulation and pericyte differentiation. These results indicate that astrocytic laminin maintains the integrity of BBB through, at least in part, regulation of pericyte differentiation.

  2. 3D numerical study of tumor microenvironmental flow in response to vascular-disrupting treatments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Cai, Yan; Xu, Shixiong; Longs, Quan; Ding, Zurong; Dong, Cheng

    2012-06-01

    The effects of vascular-disrupting treatments on normalization of tumor microvasculature and its microenvironmental flow were investigated, by mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of tumor vascular-disrupting and tumor haemodynamics. Four disrupting approaches were designed according to the abnormal characteristics of tumor microvasculature compared with the normal one. The results predict that the vascular-disrupting therapies could improve tumor microenvironment, eliminate drug barrier and inhibit metastasis of tumor cells to some extent. Disrupting certain types of vessels may get better effects. In this study, the flow condition on the networks with "vascular-disrupting according to flowrate" is the best comparing with the other three groups, and disrupting vessels of lower maturity could effectively enhance fluid transport across vasculature into interstitial space.

  3. [Xenoestrogens: endocrine disrupting compounds].

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Milena; Murias, Marek

    2008-11-01

    In recent years much attention has been paid to the issues of chemicals that disrupt the normal function of endocrine system, namely xenoestrogens. These chemicals can mimic the activity of endogenous estrogens, antagonize their interaction with estrogen receptors or disrupt the synthesis, metabolism and functions of endogenous female hormones. Due to the fact that they act thanks to many different mechanisms, it is very difficult to estimate their estrogenic activity by means of a simple tests. The important issue remains the fact that xenoestrogens may have a positive or negative influence on the function of the endocrine system. It seems to be very important that there are many sources of xenoestrogens, that is not only vegetables and fruit (phytoestrogens), but also metals (Co, Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb), dental appliances (alkilphenols), food containers or blood containers (PVC--polyvinyl chloride, DEHP--di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate), cosmetics (parabens) and pesticides (DDT--dichlor-diphenyl-trichlorethylane, endosulfane).

  4. RhoA S-nitrosylation as a regulatory mechanism influencing endothelial barrier function in response to G(+)-bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; Wang, Y; Rafikov, R; Haigh, S; Zhi, W B; Kumar, S; Doulias, P T; Rafikova, O; Pillich, H; Chakraborty, T; Lucas, R; Verin, A D; Catravas, J D; She, J X; Black, S M; Fulton, D J R

    2017-03-01

    Disruption of the endothelial barrier in response to Gram positive (G(+)) bacterial toxins is a major complication of acute lung injury (ALI) and can be further aggravated by antibiotics which stimulate toxin release. The integrity of the pulmonary endothelial barrier is mediated by the balance of disruptive forces such as the small GTPase RhoA, and protective forces including endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO). How NO protects against the barrier dysfunction is incompletely understood and our goal was to determine whether NO and S-nitrosylation can modulate RhoA activity and whether this mechanism is important for G(+) toxin-induced microvascular permeability. We found that the G(+) toxin listeriolysin-O (LLO) increased RhoA activity and that NO and S-NO donors inhibit RhoA activity. RhoA was robustly S-nitrosylated as determined by biotin-switch and mercury column analysis. MS revealed that three primary cysteine residues are S-nitrosylated including cys16, cys20 and cys159. Mutation of these residues to serine diminished S-nitrosylation to endogenous NO and mutant RhoA was less sensitive to inhibition by S-NO. G(+)-toxins stimulated the denitrosylation of RhoA which was not mediated by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR), thioredoxin (TRX) or thiol-dependent enzyme activity but was instead stimulated directly by elevated calcium levels. Calcium-promoted the direct denitrosylation of WT but not mutant RhoA and mutant RhoA adenovirus was more effective than WT in disrupting the barrier integrity of human lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we reveal a novel mechanism by which NO and S-nitrosylation reduces RhoA activity which may be of significance in the management of pulmonary endothelial permeability induced by G(+)-toxins.

  5. Neutrophil-derived JAML Inhibits Repair of Intestinal Epithelial Injury During Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Dominique A.; Sumagin, Ronen; McCall, Ingrid C.; Leoni, Giovanna; Neumann, Philipp A.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Brazil, Jennifer C.; Medina-Contreras, Oscar; Denning, Timothy L.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil transepithelial migration (TEM) during acute inflammation is associated with mucosal injury. Using models of acute mucosal injury in-vitro and in-vivo, we describe a new mechanism by which neutrophils infiltrating the intestinal mucosa disrupt epithelial homeostasis. We report that junctional adhesion molecule-like protein (JAML) is cleaved from neutrophil surface by zinc-metalloproteases during TEM. Neutrophil-derived soluble JAML bound to the epithelial tight junction protein coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) resulting in compromised barrier and inhibition of wound repair, through decreased epithelial proliferation. The deleterious effects of JAML on barrier and wound repair were reversed with an anti-JAML mAb that inhibits JAML-CAR binding. Thus, JAML released from transmigrating neutrophils across inflamed epithelia can promote recruitment of leukocytes and aid in clearance of invading microorganisms. However, sustained release of JAML under pathologic conditions associated with persistence of large numbers of infiltrated neutrophil would compromise intestinal barrier and inhibit mucosal healing. Targeting JAML-CAR interactions may thus improve mucosal healing responses under conditions of dysregulated neutrophil recruitment. PMID:24621992

  6. Manuel's asteroid disruption technique.

    PubMed

    John, Manuel; Ipe, Abraham; Jacob, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    A seventy-year-old male presented with dense asteroid hyalosis in both eyes. He had undergone cataract extraction in one eye 3 years ago, and the other eye had immature cataract. Both the autorefractor and dilated streak retinoscopy did not give readings and subjective visual improvement could not be achieved. Immediately following YAG posterior capsulotomy and anterior vitreous asteroid disruption, the vision improved to 20/20 with recordable auto refractor and streak retinoscopy values. Our initial experience indicates that the treatment is simple, safe and effective but needs controlled and prospective studies to confirm its long-term safety.

  7. Enzymatic vitreous disruption.

    PubMed

    Gandorfer, A

    2008-10-01

    Enzymatic vitreous disruption refers to cleaving the vitreoretinal junction by enzymatic means, thereby inducing posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) and liquefaction of the vitreous gel. Several enzymes have been proposed in this respect, including chondroitinase, hyaluronidase, dispase, and plasmin. In an experimental setting, chondroitinase induced PVD and was helpful in removing epiretinal membranes but no further data have been reported yet. Hyaluronidase liquefies the vitreous as demonstrated in a phase III trial in diabetic patients with vitreous haemorrhage. Dispase induces PVD but also causes inner retinal damage and is now used as an animal model of proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Plasmin has the capability of both PVD induction and liquefaction. However, plasmin is highly unstable and not available for clinical use. Microplasmin (ThromboGenics Ltd, Dublin, Ireland) is a truncated form of human plasmin sharing the same catalytic activity like plasmin. Recombinant microplasmin is under clinical investigation in patients with vitreomacular traction. This review article reports on the current knowledge of enzymatic vitreous disruption and discusses details of the enzyme candidates in basic and clinical research terms.

  8. Relativistic tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A.

    2012-12-01

    In March 2011 Swift detected an extremely luminous and long-lived outburst from the nucleus of an otherwise quiescent, low luminosity (LMC-like) galaxy. Named Swift J1644+57, its combination of high-energy luminosity (1048 ergs s-1 at peak), rapid X-ray variability (factors of >100 on timescales of 100 seconds) and luminous, rising radio emission suggested that we were witnessing the birth of a moderately relativistic jet (Γ ˜ 2 - 5), created when a star is tidally disrupted by the supermassive black hole in the centre of the galaxy. A second event, Swift J2058+0516, detected two months later, with broadly similar properties lends further weight to this interpretation. Taken together this suggests that a fraction of tidal disruption events do indeed create relativistic outflows, demonstrates their detectability, and also implies that low mass galaxies can host massive black holes. Here, I briefly outline the observational properties of these relativistic tidal flares observed last year, and their evolution over the first year since their discovery.

  9. Disrupted Saccadic Corollary Discharge in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Schall, Jeffrey D.; Heckers, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Disruptions in corollary discharge (CD), motor signals that send information to sensory areas and allow for prediction of sensory states, are argued to underlie the perceived loss of agency in schizophrenia. Behavioral and neurophysiological evidence for CD in primates comes largely from the saccadic double-step task, which requires participants to make two visually triggered saccadic eye movements in brief succession. Healthy individuals use CD to anticipate the change in eye position resulting from the first saccade when preparing the second saccade. In the current study with human participants, schizophrenia patients and healthy controls of both sexes performed a modified double-step task. Most trials required a saccade to a single visual target (T1). On a subset of trials, a second target (T2) was flashed shortly following T1. Subjects were instructed to look directly at T2. Healthy individuals also use CD to make rapid, corrective responses following erroneous saccades to T1. To assess CD in schizophrenia, we examined the following on error trials: (1) frequency and latency of corrective saccades, and (2) mislocalization of the corrective (second) saccade in the direction predicted by a failure to use CD to account for the first eye movement. Consistent with disrupted CD, patients made fewer and slower error corrections. Importantly, the corrective saccade vector angle was biased in a manner consistent with disrupted CD. These results provide novel and clear evidence for dysfunctional CD in the oculomotor system in patients with schizophrenia. Based on neurophysiology work, these disturbances might have their basis in medial thalamus dysfunction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT According to the World Health Organization, acute schizophrenia carries more disability weight than any other disease, but its etiology remains unknown. One promising theory of schizophrenia highlights alterations in a sense of self, in which self-generated thoughts or actions are attributed

  10. Comparison of blood brain barrier permeability in normal and ovariectomized female rats that demonstrate right or left paw preference.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, N; Mutlu, F; Vural, K; Cezayirli, E

    2012-11-01

    We explored the relations among paw preference, cerebral asymmetry and asymmetrical disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in normal and ovariectomized female rats with known paw preference. A high dose of pentylenetetrazol was used to disrupt the BBB and induce acute hypertension. To determine the areas of macroscopic infarct, samples were stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. Histological staining techniques were used to show the areas of infarct microscopically on paraffin sections. Sixty-two percent of the rats demonstrated right paw preference, 24% demonstrated left paw preference and 14% were ambidextrous. Areas of infarct, which indicated destruction of the BBB, were determined microscopically and macroscopically in rats that demonstrated right and left paw preference. We found a relation between permeability of the BBB and paw preference. There may be a relation between paw preference, cerebral asymmetry and asymmetrical destruction of the BBB in rats. Asymmetrical destruction of the BBB in experimental rats was similar to the control group, which had asymmetrically disrupted BBB with respect to paw preference. Like the control rats, asymmetrical areas of infarct consistent with cerebral asymmetry were observed in ovariectomized rats.

  11. Cell disruption for microalgae biorefineries.

    PubMed

    Günerken, E; D'Hondt, E; Eppink, M H M; Garcia-Gonzalez, L; Elst, K; Wijffels, R H

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are a potential source for various valuable chemicals for commercial applications ranging from nutraceuticals to fuels. Objective in a biorefinery is to utilize biomass ingredients efficiently similarly to petroleum refineries in which oil is fractionated in fuels and a variety of products with higher value. Downstream processes in microalgae biorefineries consist of different steps whereof cell disruption is the most crucial part. To maintain the functionality of algae biochemicals during cell disruption while obtaining high disruption yields is an important challenge. Despite this need, studies on mild disruption of microalgae cells are limited. This review article focuses on the evaluation of conventional and emerging cell disruption technologies, and a comparison thereof with respect to their potential for the future microalgae biorefineries. The discussed techniques are bead milling, high pressure homogenization, high speed homogenization, ultrasonication, microwave treatment, pulsed electric field treatment, non-mechanical cell disruption and some emerging technologies.

  12. Endocrine disrupters as obesogens

    PubMed Central

    Grün, Felix; Blumberg, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The recent dramatic rise in obesity rates is an alarming global health trend that consumes an ever increasing portion of health care budgets in Western countries. The root cause of obesity is thought to be a prolonged positive energy balance. Hence, the major focus of preventative programs for obesity has been to target overeating and inadequate physical exercise. Recent research implicates environmental risk factors, including nutrient quality, stress, fetal environment and pharmaceutical or chemical exposure as relevant contributing influences. Evidence points to endocrine disrupting chemicals that interfere with the body's adipose tissue biology, endocrine hormone systems or central hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as suspects in derailing the homeostatic mechanisms important to weight control. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms of action for these compounds and areas of future research needed to evaluate the significance of their contribution to obesity. PMID:19433244

  13. HIV and mucosal barrier interactions: consequences for transmission and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Burgener, Adam; McGowan, Ian; Klatt, Nichole R

    2015-10-01

    The mucosal barrier plays an integral function in human health as it is the primary defense against pathogens, and provides a critical transition between the external environment and the human internal body. In the context of HIV infection, the most relevant mucosal surfaces include those of the gastrointestinal (GI) and genital tract compartments. Several components help maintain the effectiveness of this mucosal surface, including the physical anatomy of the barrier, cellular immunity, soluble factors, and interactions between the epithelial barrier and the local microenvironment, including mucus and host microbiota. Any defects in barrier integrity or function can rapidly lead to an increase in acquisition risk, or with established infection may result in increased pathogenesis, morbidities, or mortality. Indeed, a key feature to all aspects of HIV infection from transmission to pathogenesis is disruption and/or dysfunction of mucosal barriers. Herein, we will detail the host-pathogen relationship of HIV and mucosal barriers in both of these scenarios.

  14. The characteristics of railway service disruption: implications for disruption management.

    PubMed

    Golightly, D; Dadashi, N

    2017-03-01

    Rail disruption management is central to operational continuity and customer satisfaction. Disruption is not a unitary phenomenon - it varies by time, cause, location and complexity of coordination. Effective, user-centred technology for rail disruption must reflect this variety. A repertory grid study was conducted to elicit disruption characteristics. Construct elicitation with a group of experts (n = 7) captured 26 characteristics relevant to rail disruption. A larger group of operational staff (n = 28) rated 10 types of rail incident against the 26 characteristics. The results revealed distinctions such as business impact and public perception, and the importance of management of the disruption over initial detection. There were clear differences between those events that stop the traffic, as opposed to those that only slow the traffic. The results also demonstrate the utility of repertory grid for capturing the characteristics of complex work domains. Practitioner Summary: The aim of the paper is to understand how variety in rail disruption influences socio-technical design. It uses repertory grid to identify and prioritise 26 constructs, and group 10 disruption types, identifying critical factors such as whether an incident stops or merely slows the service, and business reputation.

  15. Disruption of groundwater systems by earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xin; Wang, Chi-Yuen; Liu, Chun-Ping

    2015-11-01

    Earthquakes are known to enhance permeability at great distances, and this phenomenon may also disrupt groundwater systems by breaching the barrier between different reservoirs. Here we analyze the tidal response of water level in a deep (~4 km) well before and after the 2008 M7.9 Wenchuan earthquake to show that the earthquake not only changed the permeability but also altered the poroelastic properties of the groundwater system. Based on lithologic well logs and experimental data for rock properties, we interpret the change to reflect a coseismic breaching of aquitards bounding the aquifer, due perhaps to clearing of preexisting cracks and creation of new cracks, to depths of several kilometers. This may cause mixing of groundwater from previously isolated reservoirs and impact the safety of groundwater supplies and underground waste repositories. The method demonstrated here may hold promise for monitoring aquitard breaching by both natural and anthropogenic processes.

  16. Disruptive Youth Programs in Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Peggy G.

    This document describes the work of the Pupil Services Branch of the Maryland State Department of Education in its efforts to assist school districts and individual schools in the state in examining the causes of student disruption and in developing programs that are aimed at impacting disruptive students and creating more effective schools. A…

  17. Adrenocortical endocrine disruption.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip W

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal has been neglected in endocrine disruption regulatory testing strategy. The adrenal is a vital organ, adrenocortical insufficiency is recognised in life threatening "adrenal crises" and Addison's disease, and the consequences of off-target toxicological inhibition of adrenocortical steroidogenesis is well recognised in clinical medicine, where drugs such as aminoglutethimide and etomidate killed patients via unrecognised inhibition of adrenocortical steroidogenic enzymes (e.g. CYP11B1) along the cortisol and aldosterone pathways. The consequences of adrenocortical dysfunction during early development are also recognised in the congenital salt wasting and adrenogenital syndromes presenting neonatally, yet despite a remit to focus on developmental and reproductive toxicity mechanisms of endocrine disruption by many regulatory agencies (USEPA EDSTAC; REACH) the assessment of adrenocortical function has largely been ignored. Further, every step in the adrenocortical steroidogenic pathway (ACTH receptor, StAR, CYP's 11A1, 17, 21, 11B1, 11B2, and 3-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Δ4,5 isomerase) is known to be a potential target with multiple examples of chemicals inhibiting these targets. Many of these chemicals have been detected in human and wildlife tissues. This raises the question of whether exposure to low level environmental chemicals may be affecting adrenocortical function. This review examines the omission of adrenocortical testing in the current regulatory frameworks; the characteristics that make the adrenal cortex particularly vulnerable to toxic insult; chemicals and their toxicological targets within the adrenocortical steroidogenic pathways; the typical manifestations of adrenocortical toxicity (e.g. human iatrogenically induced pharmacotoxicological adrenal insufficiency, manifestations in typical mammalian regulatory general toxicology studies, manifestations in wildlife) and models of adrenocortical functional assessment. The utility of the

  18. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute cystitis; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... cause. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  19. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Avsenik, Jernej; Bisdas, Sotirios; Popovic, Katarina Surlan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with pathologies such as acute stroke, tumors, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Conclusions. Blood-brain barrier permeability can be evaluated in vivo by perfusion computed tomography - an efficient diagnostic method that involves the sequential acquisition of tomographic images during the intravenous administration of iodinated contrast material. The major clinical applications of perfusion computed tomography are in acute stroke and in brain tumor imaging. PMID:26029020

  20. Acute hyperglycemia worsens ischemic stroke-induced brain damage via high mobility group box-1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingyang; Liu, Baoyi; Yang, Chenghui; Chen, Haili; Eunice, Dzivor; Yuan, Zhongrui

    2013-10-16

    Hyperglycemia adversely affects the outcome of ischemic stroke. Extracellular HMGB1 plays a role in aggravating brain damage in the postischemic brain. The aim of this study was to determine whether the extracellular HMGB1 is involved in the worsened ischemic damage during hyperglycemic stroke. Male Wistar rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 90 min with reperfusion. Acute hyperglycemia was induced by an injection of 50% dextrose. Rats received glycyrrhizin, a specific HMGB1 inhibitor, or vehicle. HMGB-1 in cerebrospinal fluid and in brain parenchyma was detected at 2 or 4 h post-reperfusion. Neurological deficits, infarct volume and cerebral edema were assessed 24 h post-MCAO the disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the expression of tight junction protein Occludin were measured at 4 h post-reperfusion. Hyperglycemia enhanced the early release of HMGB1 from ischemic brain tissue, which was accompanied by increased infarct volume, neurological deficit, cerebral edema and BBB disruption. Glycyrrhizin alleviated the aggravation of infarct volume, neurological deficit, cerebral edema and BBB disruption by decreasing the degradation of tight junction protein Occludin in the ischemic hemisphere of hyperglycemic rats. In conclusion, enhanced early extracellular release of HMGB1 might represent an important mechanism for worsened ischemic damage, particularly early BBB disruption, during hyperglycemic stroke. An HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizin is a potential therapeutic option for hyperglycemic stroke.

  1. Short-Term Effects of Low-LET Radiation on the Endothelial Barrier: Uncoupling of PECAM-1 and the Production of Endothelial Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Templin, Thomas; Sharma, Preety; Guida, Peter; Grabham, Peter

    2016-12-01

    A significant target for radiation-induced effects is the microvascular system, which is critical to healthy tissue function and its pathology is linked to disrupted endothelial barrier function. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation is a source of noncancer pathologies in humans and little is known about the early events that could initiate subsequent diseases. However, it is well known that gamma radiation causes a very early disruption of the endothelial barrier at doses below those required for cytotoxic effects. After irradiation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to doses as low as 2 Gy, transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) is transiently reduced at 3 h, and the platelet-derived endothothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1 or CD31) is uncoupled from the cells along with the release of endothelial microparticles (EMPs). In this study, we measured TEER reduction as an indicator of barrier function loss, and specifically examined the shedding of EMPs from human endothelial barrier models after a variety of low-LET irradiations, including photons and charged particles. Our findings showed two TEER responses, dependent on radiation type and environmental conditions. The first response was diminishing oscillations of TEER, which occurred during the first 10 h postirradiation. This response occurred after a 5 Gy proton or helium-ion (1 GeV/n) dose in addition to a 5 Gy gamma or X radiation dose. This occurred only in the presence of multiple growth factors and did not show a dose response, nor was it associated with EMP release. The second response was a single acute drop in TEER at 3 h after photon irradiation. Dose response was observed and was associated with the shedding of EMPs in 2D barrier cultures and in 3D vessel models. In this case, helium-ion and proton irradiations did not induce a drop in TEER or shedding of EMPs. The photon radiation effects was observed both in serum-free media and in the presence of multiple

  2. Laser Microbial Killing and Biofilm Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krespi, Yosef P.; Kizhner, Victor

    2009-06-01

    Objectives: To analyze the ability of NIR lasers to reduce bacterial load and demonstrate the capability of fiber-based Q-switched Nd:YAG laser disrupting biofilm. Study Design: NIR diode laser was tested in vitro and in vivo using pathogenic microorganisms (S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa). In addition biofilms were grown from clinical Pseudomonas isolates and placed in culture plates, screws, tympanostomy tubes and PET sutures. Methods: In the animal experiments acute rhinosinusitis model was created by packing the rabbit nose with bacteria soaked solution. The nasal pack was removed in two days and nose was exposed to laser irradiation. A 940 nm diode laser with fiber diffuser was used. Nasal cultures were obtained before and after the laser treatments. Animals were sacrificed fifteen days following laser treatment and bacteriologic/histologic results analyzed. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser generated shockwave pulses were delivered on biofilm using special probes over culture plates, screws, tubes, and PET sutures for the biofilm experiments. Results: Average of two log bacteria reduction was achieved with NIR laser compared to controls. Histologic studies demonstrated preservation of tissue integrity without significant damage to mucosa. Biofilms were imaged before, during and after treatment using a confocal microscope. During laser-generated shockwave application, biofilm was initially seen to oscillate and eventually break off. Large and small pieces of biofilm were totally and instantly removed from the surface to which they were attached in seconds. Conclusions: Significant bacterial reduction was achieved with NIR laser therapy in this experimental in vitro and animal study. In addition we disrupted Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and special probes generating plasma and shockwave. This new and innovative method of bacteria killing and biofilm disruption without injuring host tissue may have clinical application in the

  3. Tidal disruption event demographics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2016-09-01

    We survey the properties of stars destroyed in tidal disruption events (TDEs) as a function of black hole (BH) mass, stellar mass and evolutionary state, star formation history and redshift. For M_{BH} ≲ 10^7 M_{⊙}, the typical TDE is due to a M* ˜ 0.3 M⊙ M-dwarf, although the mass function is relatively flat for M_{ast } ≲ M_{⊙}. The contribution from older main-sequence stars and sub-giants is small but not negligible. From MBH ≃ 107.5-108.5 M⊙, the balance rapidly shifts to higher mass stars and a larger contribution from evolved stars, and is ultimately dominated by evolved stars at higher BH masses. The star formation history has little effect until the rates are dominated by evolved stars. TDE rates should decline very rapidly towards higher redshifts. The volumetric rate of TDEs is very high because the BH mass function diverges for low masses. However, any emission mechanism which is largely Eddington-limited for low BH masses suppresses this divergence in any observed sample and leads to TDE samples dominated by MBH ≃ 106.0-107.5 M⊙ BHs with roughly Eddington peak accretion rates. The typical fall-back time is relatively long, with 16 per cent having tfb < 10-1 yr (37 d), and 84 per cent having longer time-scales. Many residual rate discrepancies can be explained if surveys are biased against TDEs with these longer tfb, which seems very plausible if tfb has any relation to the transient rise time. For almost any BH mass function, systematic searches for fainter, faster time-scale TDEs in smaller galaxies, and longer time-scale TDEs in more massive galaxies are likely to be rewarded.

  4. Interception and disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, J.C.

    1995-07-01

    Given sufficient warning we might try to avert a collision with a comet or asteroid by using beamed energy or by using the kinetic energy of an interceptor rocket. If motivated by the opportunity to convert the object into a space asset, perhaps a microgravity mine for construction materials or spacecraft fuels, we might try a rendezvous to implant a propulsion system of some sort. But the most cost-effective means of disruption is a nuclear explosive. In this paper, I discuss optimal tactics for terminal intercept, which can be extended to remote-interdiction scenarios as well. I show that the optimal mass ratio of an interceptor rock carrying a nuclear explosive depends mainly on the ratio of the exhaust velocity to the assailant-object closing velocity. I compare the effectiveness of stand-off detonation, surface burst, and penetration, for both deflection and pulverization, concluding that a penetrator has no clear advantage over a surface-burst device for deflection, but is a distinctly more capable pulverizer. The advantage of a stand-off device is to distribute the impulse more evenly over the surface of the object and to prevent fracture, an event which would greatly complicate the intercept problem. Finally, I present some results of a model for gravitationally bound objects and obtain the maximum non-fracturing deflection speed for a variety of object sizes and structures. For a single engagement, I conclude that the non-fracturing deflection speed obtainable with a stand-off device is about four times the speed obtainable with a surface-burst device. Furthermore, the non-fracturing deflection speed is somewhat dependent on the number of competent components of the object, the speed for a 13 component object being about twice that for a 135 component object.

  5. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

  6. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Ramsey, David R.; Stampfer, Joseph F.; Macdonald, John M.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material.

  7. Endocrine Effects of Circadian Disruption.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Fonken, Laura K; Nelson, Randy J

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms, provoked by artificial lighting at night, inconsistent sleep-wake schedules, and transmeridian air travel, is increasingly prevalent in modern society. Desynchrony of biological rhythms from environmental light cycles has dramatic consequences for human health. In particular, disrupting homeostatic oscillations in endocrine tissues and the hormones that these tissues regulate can have cascading effects on physiology and behavior. Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic disruption of circadian organization of endocrine function may lead to metabolic, reproductive, sleep, and mood disorders. This review discusses circadian control of endocrine systems and the consequences of distorting rhythmicity of these systems.

  8. The Barriers Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Confederation Coll. of Applied Arts and Technology, Thunder Bay (Ontario).

    In 1987, the Barriers Project was initiated by Confederation College of Applied Arts and Technology to engage 31 selected community colleges in Canada in an organized self-appraisal of institutional barriers to the enrollment of part-time credit students. From the outset, colleges were encouraged to limit their investigation to barriers over which…

  9. A permeability barrier surrounds taste buds in lingual epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dando, Robin; Pereira, Elizabeth; Kurian, Mani; Barro-Soria, Rene; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are characterized by specialized cell-cell junctions, typically localized to the apical regions of cells. These junctions are formed by interacting membrane proteins and by cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix components. Within the lingual epithelium, tight junctions join the apical tips of the gustatory sensory cells in taste buds. These junctions constitute a selective barrier that limits penetration of chemosensory stimuli into taste buds (Michlig et al. J Comp Neurol 502: 1003-1011, 2007). We tested the ability of chemical compounds to permeate into sensory end organs in the lingual epithelium. Our findings reveal a robust barrier that surrounds the entire body of taste buds, not limited to the apical tight junctions. This barrier prevents penetration of many, but not all, compounds, whether they are applied topically, injected into the parenchyma of the tongue, or circulating in the blood supply, into taste buds. Enzymatic treatments indicate that this barrier likely includes glycosaminoglycans, as it was disrupted by chondroitinase but, less effectively, by proteases. The barrier surrounding taste buds could also be disrupted by brief treatment of lingual tissue samples with DMSO. Brief exposure of lingual slices to DMSO did not affect the ability of taste buds within the slice to respond to chemical stimulation. The existence of a highly impermeable barrier surrounding taste buds and methods to break through this barrier may be relevant to basic research and to clinical treatments of taste.

  10. Clusterin Seals the Ocular Surface Barrier in Mouse Dry Eye.

    PubMed

    Bauskar, Aditi; Mack, Wendy J; Mauris, Jerome; Argüeso, Pablo; Heur, Martin; Nagel, Barbara A; Kolar, Grant R; Gleave, Martin E; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Panjwani, Noorjahan; Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Wilson, Mark R; Fini, M Elizabeth; Jeong, Shinwu

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye is a common disorder caused by inadequate hydration of the ocular surface that results in disruption of barrier function. The homeostatic protein clusterin (CLU) is prominent at fluid-tissue interfaces throughout the body. CLU levels are reduced at the ocular surface in human inflammatory disorders that manifest as severe dry eye, as well as in a preclinical mouse model for desiccating stress that mimics dry eye. Using this mouse model, we show here that CLU prevents and ameliorates ocular surface barrier disruption by a remarkable sealing mechanism dependent on attainment of a critical all-or-none concentration. When the CLU level drops below the critical all-or-none threshold, the barrier becomes vulnerable to desiccating stress. CLU binds selectively to the ocular surface subjected to desiccating stress in vivo, and in vitro to the galectin LGALS3, a key barrier component. Positioned in this way, CLU not only physically seals the ocular surface barrier, but it also protects the barrier cells and prevents further damage to barrier structure. These findings define a fundamentally new mechanism for ocular surface protection and suggest CLU as a biotherapeutic for dry eye.

  11. Clusterin Seals the Ocular Surface Barrier in Mouse Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Bauskar, Aditi; Mack, Wendy J.; Mauris, Jerome; Argüeso, Pablo; Heur, Martin; Nagel, Barbara A.; Kolar, Grant R.; Gleave, Martin E.; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Panjwani, Noorjahan; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Wilson, Mark R.; Fini, M. Elizabeth; Jeong, Shinwu

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye is a common disorder caused by inadequate hydration of the ocular surface that results in disruption of barrier function. The homeostatic protein clusterin (CLU) is prominent at fluid-tissue interfaces throughout the body. CLU levels are reduced at the ocular surface in human inflammatory disorders that manifest as severe dry eye, as well as in a preclinical mouse model for desiccating stress that mimics dry eye. Using this mouse model, we show here that CLU prevents and ameliorates ocular surface barrier disruption by a remarkable sealing mechanism dependent on attainment of a critical all-or-none concentration. When the CLU level drops below the critical all-or-none threshold, the barrier becomes vulnerable to desiccating stress. CLU binds selectively to the ocular surface subjected to desiccating stress in vivo, and in vitro to the galectin LGALS3, a key barrier component. Positioned in this way, CLU not only physically seals the ocular surface barrier, but it also protects the barrier cells and prevents further damage to barrier structure. These findings define a fundamentally new mechanism for ocular surface protection and suggest CLU as a biotherapeutic for dry eye. PMID:26402857

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: breaking down barriers.

    PubMed

    Berube, Bryan J; Rangel, Stephanie M; Hauser, Alan R

    2016-02-01

    Many bacterial pathogens have evolved ingenious ways to escape from the lung during pneumonia to cause bacteremia. Unfortunately, the clinical consequences of this spread to the bloodstream are frequently dire. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to breach the lung barrier. We have recently shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired pneumonia, utilizes the type III secretion system effector ExoS to intoxicate pulmonary epithelial cells. Injection of these cells leads to localized disruption of the pulmonary-vascular barrier and dissemination of P. aeruginosa to the bloodstream. We put these data in the context of previous studies to provide a holistic model of P. aeruginosa dissemination from the lung. Finally, we compare P. aeruginosa dissemination to that of other bacteria to highlight the complexity of bacterial pneumonia. Although respiratory pathogens use distinct and intricate strategies to escape from the lungs, a thorough understanding of these processes can lay the foundation for new therapeutic approaches for bacterial pneumonia.

  13. Calcium Channels and Oxidative Stress Mediate a Synergistic Disruption of Tight Junctions by Ethanol and Acetaldehyde in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Samak, Geetha; Gangwar, Ruchika; Meena, Avtar S; Rao, Roshan G; Shukla, Pradeep K; Manda, Bhargavi; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-12-13

    Ethanol is metabolized into acetaldehyde in most tissues. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on the tight junction integrity in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Expression of alcohol dehydrogenase sensitized Caco-2 cells to ethanol-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction, whereas aldehyde dehydrogenase attenuated acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption. Ethanol up to 150 mM did not affect tight junction integrity or barrier function, but it dose-dependently increased acetaldehyde-mediated tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Src kinase and MLCK inhibitors blocked this synergistic effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on tight junction. Ethanol and acetaldehyde caused a rapid and synergistic elevation of intracellular calcium. Calcium depletion by BAPTA or Ca(2+)-free medium blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced barrier dysfunction and tight junction disruption. Diltiazem and selective knockdown of TRPV6 or CaV1.3 channels, by shRNA blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Ethanol and acetaldehyde induced a rapid and synergistic increase in reactive oxygen species by a calcium-dependent mechanism. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cyclosporine A, blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced barrier dysfunction and tight junction disruption. These results demonstrate that ethanol and acetaldehyde synergistically disrupt tight junctions by a mechanism involving calcium, oxidative stress, Src kinase and MLCK.

  14. Calcium Channels and Oxidative Stress Mediate a Synergistic Disruption of Tight Junctions by Ethanol and Acetaldehyde in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Samak, Geetha; Gangwar, Ruchika; Meena, Avtar S.; Rao, Roshan G.; Shukla, Pradeep K.; Manda, Bhargavi; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is metabolized into acetaldehyde in most tissues. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on the tight junction integrity in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Expression of alcohol dehydrogenase sensitized Caco-2 cells to ethanol-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction, whereas aldehyde dehydrogenase attenuated acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption. Ethanol up to 150 mM did not affect tight junction integrity or barrier function, but it dose-dependently increased acetaldehyde-mediated tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Src kinase and MLCK inhibitors blocked this synergistic effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on tight junction. Ethanol and acetaldehyde caused a rapid and synergistic elevation of intracellular calcium. Calcium depletion by BAPTA or Ca2+-free medium blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced barrier dysfunction and tight junction disruption. Diltiazem and selective knockdown of TRPV6 or CaV1.3 channels, by shRNA blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Ethanol and acetaldehyde induced a rapid and synergistic increase in reactive oxygen species by a calcium-dependent mechanism. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cyclosporine A, blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced barrier dysfunction and tight junction disruption. These results demonstrate that ethanol and acetaldehyde synergistically disrupt tight junctions by a mechanism involving calcium, oxidative stress, Src kinase and MLCK. PMID:27958326

  15. Blood brain barrier dysfunction and delayed neurological deficits in mild traumatic brain injury induced by blast shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Ashok K.; Mishra, Vikas; Kodali, Maheedhar; Hattiangady, Bharathi

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs) is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting from exposure to BSWs appears to be the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Studies in animal models suggest that exposure to relatively milder BSWs (123 kPa) initially induces free radical generating enzymes in and around brain capillaries, which enhances oxidative stress resulting in loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins, edema formation, and leakiness of BBB with disruption or loss of its components pericytes and astrocyte end-feet. On the other hand, exposure to more intense BSWs (145–323 kPa) causes acute disruption of the BBB with vascular lesions in the brain. Both of these scenarios lead to apoptosis of endothelial and neural cells and neuroinflammation in and around capillaries, which may progress into chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and/or a variety of neurological impairments, depending on brain regions that are afflicted with such lesions. This review discusses studies that examined alterations in the brain milieu causing dysfunction or disruption of the BBB and neuroinflammation following exposure to different intensities of BSWs. Furthermore, potential of early intervention strategies capable of easing oxidative stress, repairing the BBB or blocking inflammation for minimizing delayed neurological deficits resulting from exposure to BSWs is conferred. PMID:25165433

  16. Male reprotoxicity and endocrine disruption

    PubMed Central

    Campion, Sarah; Catlin, Natasha; Heger, Nicholas; McDonnell, Elizabeth V.; Pacheco, Sara E.; Saffarini, Camelia; Sandrof, Moses A.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian reproductive tract development is a tightly regulated process that can be disrupted following exposure to drugs, toxicants, endocrine disrupting chemicals or other compounds via alterations to gene and protein expression or epigenetic regulation. Indeed, the impacts of developmental exposure to certain toxicants may not be fully realized until puberty or adulthood when the reproductive tract becomes sexually mature and altered functionality is manifested. Exposures that occur later in life, once development is complete, can also disrupt the intricate hormonal and paracrine interactions responsible for adult functions, such as spermatogenesis. In this chapter, the biology and toxicology of the male reproductive tract is explored, proceeding through the various life stages including in utero development, puberty, adulthood and senescence. Special attention is given to the discussion of endocrine disrupting chemicals, chemical mixtures, low dose effects, transgenerational effects, and potential exposure-related causes of male reproductive tract cancers. PMID:22945574

  17. Neurotoxicity of Thyroid Disrupting Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones playa critical role in the normal development ofthe mammalian brain. Thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs) are environmental contaminants that alter the structure or function ofthe thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeost...

  18. Tidal disruption of inviscid protoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.; Cameron, A. G. W.; Benz, W.

    1991-01-01

    Roche showed that equilibrium is impossible for a small fluid body synchronously orbiting a primary within a critical radius now termed the Roche limit. Tidal disruption of orbitally unbound bodies is a potentially important process for planetary formation through collisional accumulation, because the area of the Roche limit is considerably larger then the physical cross section of a protoplanet. Several previous studies were made of dynamical tidal disruption and different models of disruption were proposed. Because of the limitation of these analytical models, we have used a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code to model the tidal disruption process. The code is basically the same as the one used to model giant impacts; we simply choose impact parameters large enough to avoid collisions. The primary and secondary both have iron cores and silicate mantles, and are initially isothermal at a molten temperature. The conclusions based on the analytical and numerical models are summarized.

  19. Ultrasonic disruption of algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. M.; Nowotarski, K.; Joyce, E. M.; Mason, T. J.

    2012-05-01

    During last decade there has been increasing interest in the production of sustainable fuels from microalgae (R.H. Wijffels and M.J. Barbosa, 2010; Singh et al 2011; D.H. Lee 2011). The aim of this project was to determine if algal cells can be ultrasonically disrupted to release lipids for biofuel production. Ultrasonic disruption of two unicellular algal species: Dunnaliella salina and Nannochloropsis oculata was investigated using a 20 kHz probe. Haemocytometer, optical density, UV-Vis, fluoro-spectrophotometer and confocal microscopy results demonstrated complete cell destruction of Dunaliella salina within 16 minutes of sonication. Results obtained for Nannochloropsis oculata differed in that ultrasound dispersed clumped cells with little or no cell disruption, as observed by haemocytometer and confocal microscopy analysis. However, UV-Visible and fluoro-spectrophotometer analysis indicated chlorophyll release following sonication, suggesting some cell disruption had occurred.

  20. Standards for the Protection of Skin Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Arnau, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The skin is a vital organ, and through our skin we are in close contact with the entire environment. If we lose our skin we lose our life. The barrier function of the skin is mainly driven by the sophisticated epidermis in close relationship with the dermis. The epidermal epithelium is a mechanically, chemically, biologically and immunologically active barrier submitted to continuous turnover. The barrier function of the skin needs to be protected and restored. Its own physiology allows its recovery, but many times this is not sufficient. This chapter is focused on the standards to restore, treat and prevent barrier function disruption. These standards were developed from a scientific, academic and clinical point of view. There is a lack of standardized administrative recommendations. Still, there is a walk to do that will help to reduce the social and economic burden of diseases characterized by an abnormal skin barrier function.

  1. Extremal surface barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Netta; Wall, Aron C.

    2014-03-01

    We present a generic condition for Lorentzian manifolds to have a barrier that limits the reach of boundary-anchored extremal surfaces of arbitrary dimension. We show that any surface with nonpositive extrinsic curvature is a barrier, in the sense that extremal surfaces cannot be continuously deformed past it. Furthermore, the outermost barrier surface has nonnegative extrinsic curvature. Under certain conditions, we show that the existence of trapped surfaces implies a barrier, and conversely. In the context of AdS/CFT, these barriers imply that it is impossible to reconstruct the entire bulk using extremal surfaces. We comment on the implications for the firewall controversy.

  2. Disruptive innovation: the demand side.

    PubMed

    Havighurst, Clark C

    2008-01-01

    The notion of disruptive innovation provides a welcome framework for considering the prospects for low-cost alternatives in American medicine. Such innovations as have been seen, however, are largely the result of demand by patients paying their own bills because they have high-deductible coverage or are uninsured. Many other cost-saving innovations are discouraged by financing systems that are themselves largely immune to competition from disruptive innovators.

  3. Barrier products in the treatment of incontinence-associated dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yaping

    2016-07-20

    This article reviews contemporary primary research studies to establish the evidence supporting the use of barrier products and evaluate practice regarding their use in the acute hospital setting. Six primary research studies investigating the use of barrier products for preventing and managing incontinence-associated dermatitis were reviewed. The aim was to identify the most effective treatments for incontinence-associated dermatitis to enhance the quality of life of patients. The studies identified that there is no significant difference in efficacy between petrolatum, zinc oxide oil and a polymer-based barrier film, and that a polymer-based barrier film is more cost-effective than petrolatum or zinc oxide. However, further robust research studies are required to inform practice. The efficacy and cost-effectiveness of barrier products can be enhanced by providing education in clinical practice on consistent skin care regimens and effective use of barrier products.

  4. Online Education Cast as "Disruptive Innovation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totter, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Technology-based forces of "disruptive innovation" are gathering around public education and will overhaul the way K-12 students learn--with potentially dramatic consequences for established public schools, according to an upcoming book that draws parallels to disruptions in other industries. In his "Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation…

  5. A New ITPA Disruption Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, A. W.; Wesley, J. C.; Strait, E. J.; Schissel, D. P.

    2003-10-01

    A new multi-institutional database of tokamak disruption relevant information is being proposed. Its purpose is to allow a user at any participating institution access to a broad range of disruption and preceding equilibrium data of vetted discharges from each institution. The goal is a common set of data allowing scientific exploration and engineering extrapolation. The data for any given discharge can be in many forms. For example, each discharge may have identifying information (shot number, type of disruption, institution/device, etc.), equilibrium scalar parameters (β, I_p, B_tor, etc.), disruption scalar parameters (max dI/dt, thermal quench time, toroidal asymmetry, etc.), equilibrium radial profile data [j(r), p(r), v_rot(r), etc.], time sequenced data [I(t), β(t), precursor amplitude (t), etc.]. Scalar data will be stored in a SQL format and cross-linked with vector data stored in a MDSPLUS format. Institutions will populate and maintain their own disruption data. Data visualization and analysis tools will be developed. Data available to all is managed by a principal at each institution. Data structure, accessibility and security issues will be discussed, and participation solicited.

  6. Multilayer moisture barrier

    DOEpatents

    Pankow, Joel W; Jorgensen, Gary J; Terwilliger, Kent M; Glick, Stephen H; Isomaki, Nora; Harkonen, Kari; Turkulainen, Tommy

    2015-04-21

    A moisture barrier, device or product having a moisture barrier or a method of fabricating a moisture barrier having at least a polymer layer, and interfacial layer, and a barrier layer. The polymer layer may be fabricated from any suitable polymer including, but not limited to, fluoropolymers such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), or ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE). The interfacial layer may be formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD). In embodiments featuring an ALD interfacial layer, the deposited interfacial substance may be, but is not limited to, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, AlSiO.sub.x, TiO.sub.2, and an Al.sub.2O.sub.3/TiO.sub.2 laminate. The barrier layer associated with the interfacial layer may be deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The barrier layer may be a SiO.sub.xN.sub.y film.

  7. Barriers to screening mammography.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BRCA) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the USA, and mammography is an effective means for the early detection of BRCA. Identifying the barriers to screening mammography can inform research, policy and practice aiming to increase mammography adherence. A literature review was conducted to determine common barriers to screening mammography adherence. PsycINFO and PubMed databases were searched to identify studies published between 2000 and 2012 that examined barriers associated with reduced mammography adherence. Three thematic groups of barriers, based on social ecology, were identified from the literature: healthcare system-level, social and individual-level barriers. Researchers must consider screening behaviour in context and, therefore, should simultaneously consider each level of barriers when attempting to understand screening behaviour and create interventions to increase mammography adherence.

  8. Calcium-mediated oxidative stress: a common mechanism in tight junction disruption by different types of cellular stress.

    PubMed

    Gangwar, Ruchika; Meena, Avtar S; Shukla, Pradeep K; Nagaraja, Archana S; Dorniak, Piotr L; Pallikuth, Sandeep; Waters, Christopher M; Sood, Anil; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2017-02-20

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in osmotic stress, dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and cyclic stretch-induced tight junction (TJ) disruption was investigated in Caco-2 cell monolayers in vitro and restraint stress-induced barrier dysfunction in mouse colon in vivo Live cell imaging showed that osmotic stress, cyclic stretch and DSS triggered rapid production of ROS in Caco-2 cell monolayers, which was blocked by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) by 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid. Knockdown of CaV1.3 or TRPV6 channels blocked osmotic stress and DSS-induced ROS production and attenuated TJ disruption and barrier dysfunction. N-Acetyl l-cysteine (NAC) and l-N(G)-Nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME) blocked stress-induced TJ disruption and barrier dysfunction. NAC and l-NAME also blocked stress-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Src. ROS was colocalized with the mitochondrial marker in stressed cells. Cyclosporin A blocked osmotic stress and DSS-induced ROS production, barrier dysfunction, TJ disruption and JNK activation. Mitochondria-targeted Mito-TEMPO blocked osmotic stress and DSS-induced barrier dysfunction and TJ disruption. Chronic restraint stress in mice resulted in the elevation of intracellular Ca(2+), activation of JNK and c-Src, and disruption of TJ in the colonic epithelium. Furthermore, corticosterone administration induced JNK and c-Src activation, TJ disruption and protein thiol oxidation in colonic mucosa. The present study demonstrates that oxidative stress is a common signal in the mechanism of TJ disruption in the intestinal epithelium by different types of cellular stress in vitro and bio behavioral stress in vivo.

  9. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute bronchitis, your health care provider will ask about your symptoms and listen to your breathing. You may also have other tests. Treatments include rest, fluids, and aspirin (for adults) or ...

  10. Tidal disruption of inviscid planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Cameron, A. G. W.; Benz, W.

    1991-01-01

    In view of previous efforts' demonstration that strongly dissipative planetesimals are immune to tidal disruption, an examination is presently conducted of the complementary case of inviscid planetesimals arising from collisions that are sufficiently energetic to entirely melt the resulting planetesimal and debris. The tidal disruption is numerically simulated by means of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code of Cameron and Benz (1991), concentrating on the tidal disruption of 0.01 earth-mass planetesimals passing by the earth with variations in the impact parameter at perigee and velocity at infinity. The SPH models show that tidal forces during a close encounter can efficiently convert orbital angular momentum into spin angular momentum, thereby initiating equatorial mass-shedding to inviscid planetesimals that have been spun up beyond the limit of rotational stability.

  11. Endocrine disrupters and menopausal health.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Philip; Rumsby, Paul; Harrison, Paul T C

    2004-06-01

    Chemicals known to disrupt the endocrine system of animal models are assessed for their potential impact on the health of menopausal and postmenopausal women. These "endocrine disrupters" consist of two groups of compounds - man-made and naturally occurring. There is some evidence to suggest that the naturally occurring phytoestrogens, derived from plant material, may have some beneficial effects on menopausal symptoms and the risk of breast cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Further studies are required to confirm these possibilities. Some man-made environmental pollutants appear to increase the risk of breast cancer, although again the evidence is inconclusive. Mechanistic experiments indicate that these chemicals interact with oestrogen receptors and alter metabolism in a number of different ways, some of which may be important in postmenopausal women. Further investigation of the differences in mode of action between the man-made and the natural endocrine disrupters may lead to important insights into their effects on women's health.

  12. Tidal disruption of dissipative planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, H.; Boss, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    A self-consistent numerical model is developed for the tidal disruption of a solid planetesimal. The planetesimal is treated as a highly viscous, slightly compressible fluid whose disturbed parts are an inviscid, pressureless fluid undergoing distortion and disruption. The distortions were constrained to being symmetrical above and below the equatorial plane. The tidal potential is expanded in terms of Legendre polynomials, which eliminates the center of mass acceleration effects, permitting definition of equations of motion in a noninertial frame. Consideration is given to viscous dissipation and to characteristics of the solid-atmosphere boundary. The model is applied to sample cases in one, two and three dimensions.

  13. Tidal disruption of viscous bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, S.; Tremaine, S.

    1992-01-01

    Tidal disruptions are investigated in viscous-fluid planetesimals whose radius is small relative to the distance of closest (parabolic-orbit) approach to a planet. The planetesimal surface is in these conditions always ellipsoidal, facilitating treatment by coupled ODEs which are solvable with high accuracy. While the disrupted planetesimals evolve into needlelike ellipsoids, their density does not decrease. The validity of viscous fluid treatment holds for solid (ice or rock) planetesimals in cases where tidal stresses are greater than material strength, but integrity is maintained by self-gravity.

  14. Exercise, intestinal barrier dysfunction and probiotic supplementation.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Manfred; Frauwallner, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Athletes exposed to high-intensity exercise show an increased occurrence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms like cramps, diarrhea, bloating, nausea, and bleeding. These problems have been associated with alterations in intestinal permeability and decreased gut barrier function. The increased GI permeability, a so-called 'leaky gut', also leads to endotoxemia, and results in increased susceptibility to infectious and autoimmune diseases, due to absorption of pathogens/toxins into tissue and the bloodstream. Key components that determine intestinal barrier function and GI permeability are tight junctions, protein structures located in the paracellular channels between epithelial cells of the intestinal wall. The integrity of tight junctions depends on sophisticated interactions between the gut residents and their expressed substances, the intestinal epithelial cell metabolism and the activities of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Probiotic supplements are an upcoming group of nutraceuticals that could offer positive effects on athlete's gut and entire health. Some results demonstrate promising benefits for probiotic use on the athlete's immune system. There is also evidence that probiotic supplementation can beneficially influence intestinal barrier integrity in acute diseases. With regard to exercise-induced GI permeability problems, there is still a lack of studies with appropriate data and a gap to understand the underlying mechanisms to support such health beneficial statements implicitly. This article refers (i) to exercise-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction, (ii) provides suggestions to estimate increased gut barrier permeability in athletes, and (iii) discusses the potential of probiotic supplementation to counteract an exercise-induced leaky gut.

  15. Cigarette smoke causes lung vascular barrier dysfunction via oxidative stress-mediated inhibition of RhoA and focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Sakhatskyy, Pavlo; Grinnell, Katie; Newton, Julie; Ortiz, Melanie; Wang, Yulian; Sanchez-Esteban, Juan; Harrington, Elizabeth O.; Rounds, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is a major cause of chronic lung and cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies indicate that tobacco use is also a risk factor for acute lung injury (ALI) associated with blunt trauma. Increased endothelial cell (EC) permeability is a hallmark of ALI. CS increases EC permeability in vitro and in vivo; however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we found that only 6 h of exposure to CS impaired endothelial barrier function in vivo, an effect associated with increased oxidative stress in the lungs and attenuated by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). CS also exacerbated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced increase in vascular permeability in vivo. Similar additive effects were also seen in cultured lung EC exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and LPS. We further demonstrated that CSE caused disruption of focal adhesion complexes (FAC), F-actin fibers, and adherens junctions (AJ) and decreased activities of RhoA and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in cultured lung EC. CSE-induced inhibition of RhoA and FAK, endothelial barrier dysfunction, and disassembly of FAC, F-actin, and AJ were prevented by NAC. In addition, the deleterious effects of CSE on FAC, F-actin fibers, and AJ were blunted by overexpression of constitutively active RhoA and of FAK. Our data indicate that CS causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via oxidative stress-mediated inhibition of RhoA and FAK. PMID:21984567

  16. Netrin 1 regulates blood-brain barrier function and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Podjaski, Cornelia; Alvarez, Jorge I; Bourbonniere, Lyne; Larouche, Sandra; Terouz, Simone; Bin, Jenea M; Lécuyer, Marc-André; Saint-Laurent, Olivia; Larochelle, Catherine; Darlington, Peter J; Arbour, Nathalie; Antel, Jack P; Kennedy, Timothy E; Prat, Alexandre

    2015-06-01

    Blood-brain barrier function is driven by the influence of astrocyte-secreted factors. During neuroinflammatory responses the blood-brain barrier is compromised resulting in central nervous system damage and exacerbated pathology. Here, we identified endothelial netrin 1 induction as a vascular response to astrocyte-derived sonic hedgehog that promotes autocrine barrier properties during homeostasis and increases with inflammation. Netrin 1 supports blood-brain barrier integrity by upregulating endothelial junctional protein expression, while netrin 1 knockout mice display disorganized tight junction protein expression and barrier breakdown. Upon inflammatory conditions, blood-brain barrier endothelial cells significantly upregulated netrin 1 levels in vitro and in situ, which prevented junctional breach and endothelial cell activation. Finally, netrin 1 treatment during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis significantly reduced blood-brain barrier disruption and decreased clinical and pathological indices of disease severity. Our results demonstrate that netrin 1 is an important regulator of blood-brain barrier maintenance that protects the central nervous system against inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

  17. Transforming Education: Overcoming Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Jane L.; Goren, Paul D.

    Barriers to progress in educational reform exist inside and outside the education system. Some arise where new practices encounter traditional expectations and boundaries, but others go much deeper than education, such as poverty, racism, local political conflicts, and human resistance to change. The following five categories of barriers are…

  18. OVERCOMING CULTURAL BARRIERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARRUTIA, RICHARD

    THE RELATIONSHIP OF LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT TO CULTURAL BARRIERS AND THE TEACHING OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES IS DISCUSSED IN THIS ARTICLE. VARIOUS VIEWS OF THE MEANING OF CULTURE ARE MENTIONED IN ORDER TO SINGLE OUT ANTHROPOLOGICAL CULTURE AS A MAIN FOCAL POINT. INTERCULTURAL DIFFERENCES ARE SPELLED OUT WITH EXAMPLES OF LINGUISTIC BARRIERS, AND…

  19. Penetration resistant barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, William R.; Mead, Keith E.; Street, Henry K.

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a barrier for resisting penetration by such as hand tools and oxy-acetylene cutting torches. The barrier comprises a layer of firebrick, which is preferably epoxy impregnated sandwiched between inner and outer layers of steel. Between the firebrick and steel are layers of resilient rubber-like filler.

  20. Liquid metal hydrogen barriers

    DOEpatents

    Grover, George M.; Frank, Thurman G.; Keddy, Edward S.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase-2-mediated occludin degradation and caveolin-1-mediated claudin-5 redistribution contribute to blood-brain barrier damage in early ischemic stroke stage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Jin, Xinchun; Liu, Ke J; Liu, Wenlan

    2012-02-29

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption occurs early enough to be within the thrombolytic time window, and this early ischemic BBB damage is closely associated with hemorrhagic transformation and thus emerging as a promising target for reducing the hemorrhagic complications of thrombolytic stroke therapy. However, the mechanisms underlying early ischemic BBB damage remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated the early molecular events of ischemic BBB damage using in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and in vivo rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) models. Exposure of bEND3 monolayer to OGD for 2 h significantly increased its permeability to FITC-labeled dextran and promoted the secretion of metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2/9) and cytosolic translocation of caveolin-1 (Cav-1). This same OGD treatment also led to rapid degradation of tight junction protein occludin and dissociation of claudin-5 from the cytoskeleton, which contributed to OGD-induced endothelial barrier disruption. Using selective MMP-2/9 inhibitor SB-3CT (2-[[(4-phenoxyphenyl)sulfonyl]methyl]-thiirane) or their neutralizing antibodies or Cav-1 siRNA, we found that MMP-2 was the major enzyme mediating OGD-induced occludin degradation, while Cav-1 was responsible for claudin-5 redistribution. The interaction between Cav-1 and claudin-5 was further confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation. Consistent with these in vitro findings, we observed fluorescence tracer extravasation, increased gelatinolytic activity, and elevated interstitial MMP-2 levels in ischemic subcortical tissue after 2 h MCAO. Moreover, occludin protein loss and claudin-5 redistribution were detected in ischemic cerebromicrovessels. These data indicate that cerebral ischemia initiates two rapid parallel processes, MMP-2-mediated occludin degradation and Cav-1-mediated claudin-5 redistribution, to cause BBB disruption at early stroke stages relevant to acute thrombolysis.

  2. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  3. Alternative Programs for Disruptive Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. Angele, Ed.; And Others

    The book addresses issues in meeting the educational needs of disruptive students. In the introduction, R. Sarri examines the rise of alternative schools and discusses common elements in their design and operation. D. Sabatino follows with "Issues and Concerns: Problems with Alternative Schools," in which he examines the particular difficulties…

  4. The Convergence of Environmental Disruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Marshall I.

    1970-01-01

    Considers reasons for water, air, and land pollution in the Soviet Union, incentives to pollute under socialism and the advantages socialism has for environmental management. Concludes that industrialization, not private enterprise, causes environmental disruption, and that strongly centralized planned economics do not necessarily avoid…

  5. Disruptive Technologies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the role of "disruptive" innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally…

  6. Calcium/Ask1/MKK7/JNK2/c-Src signalling cascade mediates disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions by dextran sulfate sodium.

    PubMed

    Samak, Geetha; Chaudhry, Kamaljit K; Gangwar, Ruchika; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2015-02-01

    Disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions is an important event in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induces colitis in mice with symptoms similar to ulcerative colitis. However, the mechanism of DSS-induced colitis is unknown. We investigated the mechanism of DSS-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions and barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers in vitro and mouse colon in vivo. DSS treatment resulted in disruption of tight junctions, adherens junctions and actin cytoskeleton leading to barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers. DSS induced a rapid activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the inhibition or knockdown of JNK2 attenuated DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. In mice, DSS administration for 4 days caused redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins from the epithelial junctions, which was blocked by JNK inhibitor. In Caco-2 cell monolayers, DSS increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, and depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) by 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester) (BAPTA/AM) or thapsigargin attenuated DSS-induced JNK activation, tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Knockdown of apoptosis signal-regulated kinase 1 (Ask1) or MKK7 blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS activated c-Src by a Ca2+ and JNK-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of Src kinase activity or knockdown of c-Src blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS increased tyrosine phosphorylation of occludin, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), E-cadherin and β-catenin. SP600125 abrogated DSS-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of junctional proteins. Recombinant JNK2 induced threonine phosphorylation and auto-phosphorylation of c-Src. The present study demonstrates that Ca(2+)/Ask1/MKK7/JNK2/cSrc signalling cascade mediates DSS-induced tight

  7. Fisheries-induced disruptive selection.

    PubMed

    Landi, Pietro; Hui, Cang; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2015-01-21

    Commercial harvesting is recognized to induce adaptive responses of life-history traits in fish populations, in particular by shifting the age and size at maturation through directional selection. In addition to such evolution of a target stock, the corresponding fishery itself may adapt, in terms of fishing policy, technological progress, fleet dynamics, and adaptive harvest. The aim of this study is to assess how the interplay between natural and artificial selection, in the simplest setting in which a fishery and a target stock coevolve, can lead to disruptive selection, which in turn may cause trait diversification. To this end, we build an eco-evolutionary model for a size-structured population, in which both the stock׳s maturation schedule and the fishery׳s harvest rate are adaptive, while fishing may be subject to a selective policy based on fish size and/or maturity stage. Using numerical bifurcation analysis, we study how the potential for disruptive selection changes with fishing policy, fishing mortality, harvest specialization, life-history tradeoffs associated with early maturation, and other demographic and environmental parameters. We report the following findings. First, fisheries-induced disruptive selection is readily caused by commonly used fishing policies, and occurs even for policies that are not specific for fish size or maturity, provided that the harvest is sufficiently adaptive and large individuals are targeted intensively. Second, disruptive selection is more likely in stocks in which the selective pressure for early maturation is naturally strong, provided life-history tradeoffs are sufficiently consequential. Third, when a fish stock is overexploited, fisheries targeting only large individuals might slightly increase sustainable yield by causing trait diversification (even though the resultant yield always remains lower than the maximum sustainable yield that could be obtained under low fishing mortality, without causing disruptive

  8. Targeting testis-specific proteins to inhibit spermatogenesis: lesson from endocrine disrupting chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Wan, HT; Mruk, Dolores D; Wong, Chris KC; Cheng, C Yan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has recently been linked to declining fertility in men in both developed and developing countries. Since many EDCs possess intrinsic estrogenic or androgenic activities, thus, the gonad is one of the major targets of EDCs. Areas covered For the past 2 decades, studies found in the literature regarding the disruptive effects of these EDCs on reproductive function in human males and also rodents were mostly focused on oxidative stress-induced germ cell apoptosis, disruption of steroidogenesis, abnormal sperm production and disruption of spermatogenesis in particular cell adhesion function and the blood–testis-barrier (BTB) function. Herein, we highlight recent findings in the field illustrating testis-specific proteins are also targets of EDCs. Expert opinion This information should be helpful in developing better therapeutic approach to manage ECD-induced reproductive toxicity. This information is also helpful to identify potential targets for male contraceptive development. PMID:23600530

  9. Mechanisms of Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction by Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shawki, Ali; McCole, Declan F

    2017-01-01

    Pathobiont expansion, such as that of adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC), is an emerging factor associated with inflammatory bowel disease. The intestinal epithelial barrier is the first line of defense against these pathogens. Inflammation plays a critical role in altering the epithelial barrier and is a major factor involved in promoting the expansion and pathogenesis of AIEC. AIEC in turn can exacerbate intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction by targeting multiple elements of the barrier. One critical element of the epithelial barrier is the tight junction. Increasing evidence suggests that AIEC may selectively target protein components of tight junctions, leading to increased barrier permeability. This may represent one mechanism by which AIEC could contribute to the development of inflammatory bowel disease. This review article discusses potential mechanisms by which AIEC can disrupt epithelial tight junction function and intestinal barrier function.

  10. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Barker, Stacey G.; Wowczuk, Andrew; Vellenoweth, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture spikes for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture spikes have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture spikes removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The plurality of barrier blocks hare hingedly interconnected by complementary hinges integrally formed into the side of each barrier block which allow the strip to be rolled for easy storage and retrieval, but which prevent irregular or back bending of the strip. The shafts of adjacent barrier blocks are pivotally interconnected via a double hinged universal joint to accommodate irregularities in a roadway surface and to transmit torsional motion of the shaft from block to block. A single flexshaft cable is connected to the shaft of an end block to allow a user to selectively cause the shafts of a plurality of adjacently connected barrier blocks to rotate the tire-puncture spikes to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire, and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. The flexshaft is provided with a resiliently biased retracting mechanism, and a release latch for allowing the spikes to be quickly retracted after the intended vehicle tire is punctured.

  11. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper. 2 tabs.

  12. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment, and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

  13. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

  14. Assessing and Managing Acute Pain: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Jungquist, Carla R; Vallerand, April Hazard; Sicoutris, Corinna; Kwon, Kyung N; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2017-03-01

    : Acute pain, which is usually sudden in onset and time limited, serves a biological protective function, warning the body of impending danger. However, while acute pain often resolves over time with normal healing, unrelieved acute pain can disrupt activities of daily living and transition to chronic pain. This article describes the effects of unrelieved acute pain on patients and clinical outcomes. The authors call on nurses to assess and manage acute pain in accordance with evidence-based guidelines, expert consensus reports, and position statements from professional nursing organizations in order to minimize the likelihood of its becoming chronic.

  15. Counseling for barrier methods.

    PubMed

    Guest, F

    1979-08-01

    Despite the less serious risks of barrier methods (diaphragm, condom, foam, and other vaginal spermicides) compared with other contraceptive methods, many family planning programs find that only a minority of patients accept barrier methods as primary contraceptive choices. Some misconceptions patients have about barrier methods are: 1) they are less effective compared to oral contraceptives or IUDs, 2) foam kills sperm that are still inside a man's body, and 3) you need a prescription to use a barrier method. This article provides the following information about barrier methods to use in counseling patients: 1) couples who use barriers exactly right all the time can achieve high levels of effectiveness; average effectiveness rates for longterm users are 87% for the diaphragm, 90% for condoms, and 85% for foam; 2) noncontraceptive benefits include protection against sexually transmitted infections; barrier methods are nonhormonal and nonsurgical and posters to that effect are recommended for the counselor's waiting room; 3) patients need to be encouraged to use barrier methods even though they are less convenient in certain situations; support groups could improve patients' success; 4) counselors may be able to help users by giving them permission not to use the method on certain cycle days as a tradeoff for diligent use at other times thereby relieving the contraceptive burden; 5) recurring problems that patients should be warned about include waiting too late to put on a condom, running out of foam, using too little cream with the diaphragm, and douching after intercourse; and 6) improper care and storage problems which could cause failure are storing latex near heat, separating the foam bottle from the applicator, using old condoms and diaphragms, and suppositories that fail to melt. Patients' 2 biggest complaints about vaginal suppositories are messiness and irritation and switching to condoms can help. The last page of the article is a one page handout for

  16. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  17. Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In order to reduce heat transfer between a hot gas heat source and a metallic engine component, a thermal insulating layer of material is placed between them. This thermal barrier coating is applied by plasma spray processing the thin films. The coating has been successfully employed in aerospace applications for many years. Lewis Research Center, a leader in the development engine components coating technology, has assisted Caterpillar, Inc. in applying ceramic thermal barrier coatings on engines. Because these large engines use heavy fuels containing vanadium, engine valve life is sharply decreased. The barrier coating controls temperatures, extends valve life and reduces operating cost. Additional applications are currently under development.

  18. Bodily illusions disrupt tactile sensations.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Sarah; Pritchett, Lisa M; Harris, Laurence R

    2015-02-01

    To accurately interpret tactile information, the brain needs to have an accurate representation of the body to which to refer the sensations. Despite this, body representation has only recently been incorporated into the study of tactile perception. Here, we investigate whether distortions of body representation affect tactile sensations. We perceptually altered the length of the arm and the width of the waist using a tendon vibration illusion and measured spatial acuity and sensitivity. Surprisingly, we found reduction in both tactile acuity and sensitivity thresholds when the arm or waist was perceptually altered, which indicates a general disruption of low-level tactile processing. We postulate that the disruptive changes correspond to the preliminary stage as the body representation starts to change and may give new insights into sensory processing in people with long-term or sudden abnormal body representation such as are found in eating disorders or following amputation.

  19. Optimistic barrier synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    Barrier synchronization is fundamental operation in parallel computation. In many contexts, at the point a processor enters a barrier it knows that it has already processed all the work required of it prior to synchronization. The alternative case, when a processor cannot enter a barrier with the assurance that it has already performed all the necessary pre-synchronization computation, is treated. The problem arises when the number of pre-sychronization messages to be received by a processor is unkown, for example, in a parallel discrete simulation or any other computation that is largely driven by an unpredictable exchange of messages. We describe an optimistic O(log sup 2 P) barrier algorithm for such problems, study its performance on a large-scale parallel system, and consider extensions to general associative reductions as well as associative parallel prefix computations.

  20. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  1. Great Barrier Reef

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Australia's Great Barrier Reef     View Larger Image ... reef, but a vast maze of reefs, passages, and coral cays (islands that are part of the reef). This nadir true-color image was acquired by ...

  2. Barrier Island Hazard Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilkey, Orrin H.; Neal, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Describes efforts to evaluate and map the susceptibility of barrier islands to damage from storms, erosion, rising sea levels and other natural phenomena. Presented are criteria for assessing the safety and hazard potential of island developments. (WB)

  3. Engineering analysis of TFTR disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G.; Rothe, K.E.; Bronner, G.

    1984-09-01

    This report covers an engineering approach quantifying the currents, forces, and times, as well as plasma position, for the worst-case disruption based on engineerign circuit assumptions for the plasma. As the plasma moves toward the wall during the current-decay phase of disruption, the wall currents affect the rate of movement and, hence, the decay time. The calculated structure-induced currents differ considerably from those calculated using a presently available criterion, which specifies that the plasma remains stationary in the center of the torus while decaying in 10 ms. This report outlines the method and basis for the engineering calculation used to determine the current and forces as a function of the circuit characteristics. It provides specific calculations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with variations in parameters such as the thermal decay time, the torus resistance, and plasma temperature during the current decay. The study reviews possible ways to reduce the disruption damage of TFTR by reducing the magnitude of the plasma external field energy that is absorbed by the plasma during the current decay.

  4. Sideways Force Produced During Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, H. R.; Paccagnella, R.; Breslau, J.; Jardin, S.; Sugiyama, L.

    2012-10-01

    We extend previous studies [1] of vertical displacement events (VDE) which can produce disruptions. The emphasis is on the non axisymmetric ``sideways'' wall force Fx. Simulations are performed using the M3D [2] code. A VDE expels magnetic flux through the resistive wall until the last closed flux surface has q < 3. At this point the plasma is unstable to an (m,n) = (2,1) mode. A theory of sideways force produced by this mode in the presence of a VDE is presented. The wall force depends strongly on γτw, where γ is the mode growth rate and τw is the wall resistive penetration time. The force Fx is largest when γτw is a constant of order unity, which depends on the initial conditions. For large values of γτw, the wall force asymptotes to a relatively smaller value, well below the critical value ITER is designed to withstand. The principle of disruption mitigation by massive gas injection is to cause a disruption with large γτw. [4pt] [1] H. R. Strauss, R. Paccagnella, and J. Breslau,Phys. Plasmas 17, 082505 (2010) [2] W. Park, E.V. Belova, G.Y. Fu, X. Tang, H.R. Strauss, L.E. Sugiyama, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1796 (1999).

  5. Endocrine disrupting pesticides: a leading cause of cancer among rural people in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ejaz, Sohail; Akram, Waseem; Lim, Chae Woong; Lee, Jong Jin; Hussain, Imtiaz

    2004-06-01

    Evidence on the relationship between cancer and occupational exposure to pesticides and endocrine disrupting chemicals is reviewed. In animal studies it has been proved that majority of endocrine disrupting pesticides are carcinogenic. In humans, pesticides have been classified as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Farmers may therefore be at higher risk for acute and chronic health effects associated with pesticides. Human data, however, are limited by the small number of studies that evaluate individual endocrine disrupting pesticide. Cancer of the breast, ovary, prostate, testis, and thyroid are hormone-dependent, which fostered research on the potential risk associated with occupational and environmental exposure to the so-called endocrine-disrupting pesticides. Professional as well as public exposure to pesticides raises cancer risk. Interaction with adjuvant and with other toxicants increases the actual risk. On the other hand, organochlorine pesticides and triazine herbicides require further investigation for a possible etiologic role in some hormone-dependent cancers.

  6. Revision Hope: Writing Disruption in Composition Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Julie

    1997-01-01

    Uses Roland Barthes's metaphor of the "punctum" to explore the transformative potential of disruptions. Argues that writing teachers have been trained to read disruption in texts and classrooms as "evidence of poor taste or failed pedagogy," but that disruptions delay closure and thereby create spaces wherein theories and…

  7. Disruption and Distinctiveness in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    "Disruption"--while an evocative word triggering feelings of anxiety and perhaps even fear--also signals renewal and growth. The Higher Education (HE) sector in England has experienced some profound disruption over the years, and yet has emerged stronger and renewed in many ways. The impact of recent disruptive forces, from fees to the…

  8. Dealing with Disruptive Behavior of Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobmeier, Robert; Moran, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The adult education literature on disruptive behavior of adult learners was reviewed and a survey on disruptive behavior of adult learners was conducted with adult educators. The findings are synthesized in a conceptual framework for understanding the types and causes of disruptive behavior, which fall into the categories of inattention,…

  9. Attachment, skin deep? Relationships between adult attachment and skin barrier recovery.

    PubMed

    Robles, Theodore F; Brooks, Kathryn P; Kane, Heidi S; Schetter, Christine Dunkel

    2013-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between individual differences in adult attachment and skin barrier recovery. Dating couples (N = 34) completed a self-report measure of attachment anxiety and avoidance, and during two separate laboratory visits, normal skin barrier function was disrupted using a tape-stripping procedure, followed by a 20 min discussion of personal concerns in one visit and relationship problems in the other, counterbalanced randomly across visits. Skin barrier recovery was assessed by measuring transepidermal water loss up to 2 h after skin disruption. Multilevel modeling showed that skin barrier recovery did not differ between the personal concern or relationship problem discussions. Among women, greater attachment anxiety predicted faster skin barrier recovery across the two visits, while greater attachment avoidance predicted slower skin barrier recovery. Among men, greater attachment anxiety predicted slower skin barrier recovery during the personal concern discussion only. The observed effects remained significant after controlling for transepidermal water loss in undisturbed skin, suggesting that the relationship between attachment security and skin barrier recovery was not due to other skin-related factors like sweating. Cortisol changes, self-reported emotions, stress appraisals, and supportiveness ratings were tested as potential mediators, and none explained the relationships between attachment and skin barrier recovery. These findings are the first to demonstrate associations between individual differences in attachment style and restorative biological processes in the skin, even in a sample of young dating couples in satisfied relationships.

  10. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.; McQueen, M.A.

    1996-04-16

    A portable barrier strip is described having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use. 13 figs.

  11. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Barker, Stacey G.; McQueen, Miles A.

    1996-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests stable in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use.

  12. Fish oil disrupts seabird feather microstructure and waterproofing.

    PubMed

    Morandin, Lora A; O'Hara, Patrick D

    2014-10-15

    Seabirds and other aquatic avifauna are highly sensitive to exposure to petroleum oils. A small amount of oil is sufficient to break down the feather barrier that is necessary to prevent water penetration and hypothermia. Far less attention has been paid to potential effects on aquatic birds of so called 'edible oils', non-petroleum oils such as vegetable and fish oils. In response to a sardine oil discharge by a vessel off the coast of British Columbia, we conducted an experiment to assess if feather exposure to sheens of sardine oil (ranging from 0.04 to 3 μm in thickness) resulted in measurable oil and water uptake and significant feather microstructure disruption. We designed the experiment based on a previous experiment on effects of petroleum oils on seabird feathers. Feathers exposed to the thinnest fish oil sheens (0.04 μm) resulted in measurable feather weight gain (from oil and water uptake) and significant feather microstructure disruption. Both feather weight gain and microstructure disruption increased with increasing fish oil thickness. Because of the absence of primary research on effects of edible oils on sea birds, we conducted interviews with wildlife rehabilitation professionals with experience rehabilitating sea birds after edible oil exposure. The consensus from interviews and our experiment indicated that physical contact with fish and other 'edible oils' in the marine environment is at least as harmful to seabirds as petroleum oils.

  13. Biological Signatures of Brain Damage Associated with High Serum Ferritin Levels in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke and Thrombolytic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Millán, Mónica; Sobrino, Tomás; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; García, María; Nombela, Florentino; Castellanos, Mar; de la Ossa, Natalia Pérez; Cuadras, Patricia; Serena, Joaquín; Castillo, José; Dávalos, Antoni

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Increased body iron stores have been related to greater oxidative stress and brain injury in clinical and experimental cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. We aimed to investigate the biological signatures of excitotoxicity, inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption potentially associated with high serum ferritin levels-related damage in acute stroke patients treated with i.v. t-PA. Methods: Serum levels of ferritin (as index of increased cellular iron stores), glutamate, interleukin-6, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cellular fibronectin were determined in 134 patients treated with i.v. t-PA within 3 hours from stroke onset in blood samples obtained before t-PA treatment, at 24 and 72 hours. Results: Serum ferritin levels before t-PA infusion correlated to glutamate (r = 0.59, p < 0.001) and interleukin-6 (r = 0.55, p <0.001) levels at baseline, and with glutamate (r = 0.57,p <0.001), interleukin-6 (r = 0.49,p <0.001), metalloproteinase-9 (r = 0.23, p = 0.007) and cellular fibronectin (r = 0.27, p = 0.002) levels measured at 24 hours and glutamate (r = 0.415, p < 0.001), interleukin-6 (r = 0.359, p < 0.001) and metalloproteinase-9 (r = 0.261, p = 0.004) at 72 hours. The association between ferritin and glutamate levels remained after adjustment for confounding factors in generalized linear models. Conclusions: Brain damage associated with increased iron stores in acute ischemic stroke patients treated with iv. tPA may be mediated by mechanisms linked to excitotoxic damage. The role of inflammation, blood brain barrier disruption and oxidative stress in this condition needs further research. PMID:19096131

  14. Statistical instability of barrier microdischarges operating in townsend regime

    SciTech Connect

    Nagorny, V. P.

    2007-01-15

    The dynamics of barrier microdischarges operating in a Townsend regime is studied analytically and via kinetic particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that statistical fluctuations of the number of charged particles in the discharge gap strongly influence the dynamics of natural oscillations of the discharge current and may even lead to a disruption of the discharge. Analysis of the statistical effects based on a simple model is suggested. The role of external sources in stabilizing microdischarges is clarified.

  15. Skin barrier defects in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rachana; Woodfolk, Judith A

    2014-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with complex etiology that is dependent upon interactions between the host and the environment. Acute skin lesions exhibit the features of a Th2-driven inflammatory disorder, and many patients are highly atopic. The skin barrier plays key roles in immune surveillance and homeostasis, and in preventing penetration of microbial products and allergens. Defects that compromise the structural integrity or else the immune function of the skin barrier play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD. This article provides an overview of the array of molecular building blocks that are essential to maintaining healthy skin. The basis for structural defects in the skin is discussed in relation to AD, with an emphasis on filaggrin and its genetic underpinnings. Aspects of innate immunity, including the role of antimicrobial peptides and proteases, are also discussed.

  16. The blood-brain barrier and methamphetamine: open sesame?

    PubMed Central

    Turowski, Patric; Kenny, Bridget-Ann

    2015-01-01

    The chemical and electrical microenvironment of neurons within the central nervous system is protected and segregated from the circulation by the vascular blood–brain barrier. This barrier operates on the level of endothelial cells and includes regulatory crosstalk with neighboring pericytes, astrocytes, and neurons. Within this neurovascular unit, the endothelial cells form a formidable, highly regulated barrier through the presence of inter-endothelial tight junctions, the absence of fenestrations, and the almost complete absence of fluid-phase transcytosis. The potent psychostimulant drug methamphetamine transiently opens the vascular blood–brain barrier through either or both the modulation of inter-endothelial junctions and the induction of fluid-phase transcytosis. Direct action of methamphetamine on the vascular endothelium induces acute opening of the blood-brain barrier. In addition, striatal effects of methamphetamine and resultant neuroinflammatory signaling can indirectly lead to chronic dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier. Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier may exacerbate the neuronal damage that occurs during methamphetamine abuse. However, this process also constitutes a rare example of agonist-induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and the adjunctive use of methamphetamine may present an opportunity to enhance delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the underlying neural tissue. PMID:25999807

  17. Preschool children's observed disruptive behavior: variations across sex, interactional context, and disruptive psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Gray, Sarah A O; Carter, Alice S; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J; Hill, Carri; Danis, Barbara; Keenan, Kate; Wakschlag, Lauren S

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in disruptive behavior and sensitivity to social context are documented, but the intersection between them is rarely examined empirically. This report focuses on sex differences in observed disruptive behavior across interactional contexts and diagnostic status. Preschoolers (n = 327) were classified as nondisruptive (51%), clinically at risk (26%), and disruptive (23%) using parent and teacher reports on developmentally validated measures of disruptive behavior and impairment. Observed disruptive behavior was measured with the Disruptive Behavior Diagnostic Observation Schedule, a developmentally sensitive observational paradigm characterizing variation in preschoolers' disruptive behavior across two interactional contexts (parent and examiner). Repeated measures analyses of variance revealed a three-way interaction of child sex by diagnostic status by interactional context (F = 9.81, p < .001). Disruptive boys were the only subgroup whose behavior was not sensitive to interactional context: They displayed comparable levels of disruptive behavior with parents and examiners. In contrast, disruptive girls demonstrated the strongest context effect of any group. Specifically, with the examiner, disruptive girls' behavior was comparable to nondisruptive boys (though still more elevated than nondisruptive girls). However, in interactions with their mothers, disruptive girls displayed the highest rates of disruptive behavior of any subgroup in any context, although the difference between disruptive boys and disruptive girls in this context was not statistically significant. Findings suggest the importance of sex-specific conceptualizations of disruptive behavior in young children that take patterns across social contexts into account.

  18. Sleep Deprivation-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown and Brain Dysfunction are Exacerbated by Size-Related Exposure to Ag and Cu Nanoparticles. Neuroprotective Effects of a 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonist Ondansetron.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aruna; Muresanu, Dafin F; Lafuente, José V; Patnaik, Ranjana; Tian, Z Ryan; Buzoianu, Anca D; Sharma, Hari S

    2015-10-01

    Military personnel are often subjected to sleep deprivation (SD) during combat operations. Since SD is a severe stress and alters neurochemical metabolism in the brain, a possibility exists that acute or long-term SD will influence blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and brain pathology. This hypothesis was examined in young adult rats (age 12 to 14 weeks) using an inverted flowerpot model. Rats were placed over an inverted flowerpot platform (6.5 cm diameter) in a water pool where the water levels are just 3 cm below the surface. In this model, animals can go to sleep for brief periods but cannot achieve deep sleep as they would fall into water and thus experience sleep interruption. These animals showed leakage of Evans blue in the cerebellum, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, parietal, temporal, occipital, cingulate cerebral cortices, and brain stem. The ventricular walls of the lateral and fourth ventricles were also stained blue, indicating disruption of the BBB and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). Breakdown of the BBB or the BCSFB fluid barrier was progressive in nature from 12 to 48 h but no apparent differences in BBB leakage were seen between 48 and 72 h of SD. Interestingly, rats treated with metal nanoparticles, e.g., Cu or Ag, showed profound exacerbation of BBB disruption by 1.5- to 4-fold, depending on the duration of SD. Measurement of plasma and brain serotonin showed a close correlation between BBB disruption and the amine level. Repeated treatment with the serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron (1 mg/kg, s.c.) 4 and 8 h after SD markedly reduced BBB disruption and brain pathology after 12 to 24 h SD but not following 48 or 72 h after SD. However, TiO2-nanowired ondansetron (1 mg/kg, s.c) in an identical manner induced neuroprotection in rats following 48 or 72 h SD. However, plasma and serotonin levels were not affected by ondansetron treatment. Taken together, our observations are the first to show that (i) SD could induce BBB

  19. Thromboxane A2 exacerbates acute lung injury via promoting edema formation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koji; Horikami, Daiki; Omori, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Yamazaki, Arisa; Maeda, Shingo; Murata, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is produced in the lungs of patients suffering from acute lung injury (ALI). We assessed its contribution in disease progression using three different ALI mouse models. The administration of hydrochloric acid (HCl) or oleic acid (OA)+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused tissue edema and neutrophil infiltration with TXA2 production in the lungs of the experimental mice. The administration of LPS induced only neutrophil accumulation without TXA2 production. Pretreatment with T prostanoid receptor (TP) antagonist attenuated the tissue edema but not neutrophil infiltration in these models. Intravital imaging and immunostaining demonstrated that administration of TP agonist caused vascular hyper-permeability by disrupting the endothelial barrier formation in the mouse ear. In vitro experiments showed that TP-stimulation disrupted the endothelial adherens junction, and it was inhibited by Ca2+ channel blockade or Rho kinase inhibition. Thus endogenous TXA2 exacerbates ALI, and its blockade attenuates it by modulating the extent of lung edema. This can be explained by the endothelial hyper-permeability caused by the activation of TXA2-TP axis, via Ca2+- and Rho kinase-dependent signaling. PMID:27562142

  20. Barriers to managing TB in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Morton, Rachel

    Improved management of tuberculosis is a key priority for Public Health England due to unacceptably high rates of the disease in the UK, particularly in London and other major cities. A survey of 20 staff in the acute medical unit at Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, explored potential barriers to early TB detection and infection control in busy emergency departments. Low awareness and little familiarity with TB among many emergency admissions staff increased the likelihood of transmission from undiagnosed patients in crowded waiting areas. The study suggested regular updates on TB so staff could refresh their knowledge and awareness, and help improve TB detection and infection control.

  1. Changing perspectives in medical practice: disruptive innovation.

    PubMed

    Paterick, Zachary R; Pradhan, Sala R; Paterick, Timothy E; Waterhouse, Blake E

    2009-01-01

    Disruptive innovation represents a business model that identifies a market location and increases consumer options. Retail clinics may represent a disruptive healthcare innovation that identifies strategies to reduce the cost of healthcare at the primary care level. The future of healthcare demands disruptive innovation that will allow for the 50 million uninsured members of our society to receive medical care. Disruptive innovative solutions need to ensure access, quality, and reasonable cost. Retail clinics represent the tip of the iceberg in disruptive innovative thinking. The obstacles that retail clinics must solve will be lessons learned for those that identify future innovative techniques.

  2. Beyond substance abuse: stress, burnout, and depression as causes of physician impairment and disruptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen D; Goske, Marilyn J; Johnson, Craig M

    2009-07-01

    Disruptive physician behavior may diminish productivity, lead to medical errors, and compromise patient safety. The purpose of this paper is to review how common psychological conditions such as depression, stress, and burnout may drive disruptive behavior in the workplace and result in impaired patterns of professional conduct similar to what is seen with substance abuse. Problems related to these psychological morbidities may be more effectively managed with improved understanding of the conditions and behaviors, their associated risk factors, and the barriers that exist to reporting them. Further research and educational programs are warranted to address how these conditions might affect radiology.

  3. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, Roger P.

    1992-01-01

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput.

  4. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, R.P.

    1992-09-15

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput. 3 figs.

  5. Gut barrier in health and disease: focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, D; Ianiro, G; Vanella, G; Bibbò, S; Bruno, G; Simeone, G; Mele, G

    2015-01-01

    The gut barrier is a functional unit, organized as a multi-layer system, made up of two main components: a physical barrier surface, which prevents bacterial adhesion and regulates paracellular diffusion to the host tissues, and a deep functional barrier, that is able to discriminate between pathogens and commensal microorganisms, organizing the immune tolerance and the immune response to pathogens. Other mechanisms, such as gastric juice and pancreatic enzymes (which both have antibacterial properties) participate in the luminal integrity of the gut barrier. From the outer layer to the inner layer, the physical barrier is composed of gut microbiota (that competes with pathogens to gain space and energy resources, processes the molecules necessary to mucosal integrity and modulates the immunological activity of deep barrier), mucus (which separates the intraluminal content from more internal layers and contains antimicrobial products and secretory IgA), epithelial cells (which form a physical and immunological barrier) and the innate and adaptive immune cells forming the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (which is responsible for antigen sampling and immune responses). Disruption of the gut barrier has been associated with many gastrointestinal diseases, but also with extra-intestinal pathological condition, such as type 1 diabetes mellitus, allergic diseases or autism spectrum disorders. The maintenance of a healthy intestinal barrier is therefore of paramount importance in children, for both health and economic reasons. Many drugs or compounds used in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders act through the restoration of a normal intestinal permeability. Several studies have highlighted the role of probiotics in the modulation and reduction of intestinal permeability, considering the strong influence of gut microbiota in the modulation of the function and structure of gut barrier, but also on the immune response of the host. To date, available weapons for the

  6. Micro heat barrier

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2003-08-12

    A highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  7. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, Jacob I.

    2012-09-06

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  8. Environmental disruption or environmental improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J.L.

    1981-03-01

    Paul Ehrich's concern for environmental disruption (Social Sci. Quarterly, 62, No. 1, 1981) are challenged here by Simon as unsubstantiated scare rhetoric. The refutation focuses on whether Ehrlich disregards history and oversimplifies the relationship between ecology and the social sciences. Simon notes that although historical data is shown to contradict Ehrlich's past predictions, his style of using soft data and identifying with the lay reader finds a receptive audience among those seeking understandable and value-free answers. 24 references, 6 figures, 3 tables. (DCK)

  9. Method of installing subsurface barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2007-10-09

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  10. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  11. MMP-3 Deficiency Alleviates Endotoxin-Induced Acute Inflammation in the Posterior Eye Segment

    PubMed Central

    Van Hove, Inge; Lefevere, Evy; De Groef, Lies; Sergeys, Jurgen; Salinas-Navarro, Manuel; Libert, Claude; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn; Moons, Lieve

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) is known to mediate neuroinflammatory processes by activating microglia, disrupting blood–central nervous system barriers and supporting neutrophil influx into the brain. In addition, the posterior part of the eye, more specifically the retina, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the blood–retinal barrier, is affected upon neuroinflammation, but a role for MMP-3 during ocular inflammation remains elusive. We investigated whether MMP-3 contributes to acute inflammation in the eye using the endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) model. Systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide induced an increase in MMP-3 mRNA and protein expression level in the posterior part of the eye. MMP-3 deficiency or knockdown suppressed retinal leukocyte adhesion and leukocyte infiltration into the vitreous cavity in mice subjected to EIU. Moreover, retinal and RPE mRNA levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (Icam1), interleukin 6 (Il6), cytokine-inducible nitrogen oxide synthase (Nos2) and tumor necrosis factor α (Tnfα), which are key molecules involved in EIU, were clearly reduced in MMP-3 deficient mice. In addition, loss of MMP-3 repressed the upregulation of the chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1). These findings suggest a contribution of MMP-3 during EIU, and its potential use as a therapeutic drug target in reducing ocular inflammation. PMID:27809288

  12. Skin barrier in rosacea.

    PubMed

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea.

  13. Skin barrier in rosacea*

    PubMed Central

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  14. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A high temperature oxidation resistant, thermal barrier coating system is disclosed for a nickel cobalt, or iron base alloy substrate. An inner metal bond coating contacts the substrate, and a thermal barrier coating covers the bond coating. NiCrAlR, FeCrAlR, and CoCrAlR alloys are satisfactory as bond coating compositions where R=Y or Yb. These alloys contain, by weight, 24.9-36.7% chromium, 5.4-18.5% aluminum, and 0.05 to 1.55% yttrium or 0.05 to 0.53% ytterbium. The coatings containing ytterbium are preferred over those containing yttrium. An outer thermal barrier coating of partial stabilized zirconium oxide (zirconia) which is between 6% and 8%, by weight, of yttrium oxide (yttria) covers the bond coating. Partial stabilization provides a material with superior durability. Partially stabilized zirconia consists of mixtures of cubic, tetragonal, and monoclinic phases.

  15. Disruptive innovation for social change.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Clayton M; Baumann, Heiner; Ruggles, Rudy; Sadtler, Thomas M

    2006-12-01

    Countries, organizations, and individuals around the globe spend aggressively to solve social problems, but these efforts often fail to deliver. Misdirected investment is the primary reason for that failure. Most of the money earmarked for social initiatives goes to organizations that are structured to support specific groups of recipients, often with sophisticated solutions. Such organizations rarely reach the broader populations that could be served by simpler alternatives. There is, however, an effective way to get to those underserved populations. The authors call it "catalytic innovation." Based on Clayton Christensen's disruptive-innovation model, catalytic innovations challenge organizational incumbents by offering simpler, good-enough solutions aimed at underserved groups. Unlike disruptive innovations, though, catalytic innovations are focused on creating social change. Catalytic innovators are defined by five distinct qualities. First, they create social change through scaling and replication. Second, they meet a need that is either overserved (that is, the existing solution is more complex than necessary for many people) or not served at all. Third, the products and services they offer are simpler and cheaper than alternatives, but recipients view them as good enough. Fourth, they bring in resources in ways that initially seem unattractive to incumbents. And fifth, they are often ignored, put down, or even encouraged by existing organizations, which don't see the catalytic innovators' solutions as viable. As the authors show through examples in health care, education, and economic development, both nonprofit and for-profit groups are finding ways to create catalytic innovation that drives social change.

  16. Ice barrier construction

    SciTech Connect

    Finucane, R. G.; Jahns, H. O.

    1985-06-18

    A method is provided for constructing spray ice barriers to protect offshore structures in a frigid body of water from mobile ice, waves and currents. Water is withdrawn from the body of water and is sprayed through ambient air which is below the freezing temperature of the water so that a substantial amount of the water freezes as it passes through the air. The sprayed water is directed to build up a mass of ice having a size and shape adapted to protect the offshore structure. Spray ice barriers can also be constructed for the containment of pollutant spills.

  17. Barriers to cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Womeodu, R J; Bailey, J E

    1996-01-01

    Many barriers to cancer screening have been summarized and discussed. Barriers have been documented in all patient populations, but some groups such as ethnic minorities and the elderly face unique barriers. The barriers to cancer screening, are multifactorial, but much of the responsibility for change must lie with health care providers and the health care delivery industry. This is not to free the patient of all responsibility, but some significant barriers are beyond their direct control. Take, for example, socioeconomic status, disease knowledge, and culturally related perceptions and myths about cancer detection and treatment. The health care industry must do a better job identifying and overcoming these barriers. The significant effects of provider counseling and advice must not be underestimated. Patients must first be advised, and then further actions must be taken if they reject the screening advice. Did they refuse adherence to recommendations because they do not view themselves as susceptible, because of overwhelming personal barriers, or because of a fatalistic attitude toward cancer detection and treatment? If that is the case, physicians and health care institutions must attempt to change perceptions, educate, and personalize the message so that patients accept their disease susceptibility [table: see text]. Multiple patient and provider risk factors have been identified that can be used to target patients particularly at high risk for inadequate cancer screening and providers at high risk for performing inadequate screening. Research has clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of interventions to improve tracking of patient and physician compliance with screening recommendations. Further research is needed to show the impact of managed-care penetration and payer status on screening efforts, and incentive schemes need to be tested that reward institutions and third-party payers who develop uniform standards and procedures for cancer screening. The

  18. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J. (Compiler); Lee, W. Y. (Compiler); Goedjen, J. G. (Compiler); Dapkunas, S. J. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains the agenda and presentation abstracts for the Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, sponsored by NASA, DOE, and NIST. The workshop covered thermal barrier coating (TBC) issues related to applications, processing, properties, and modeling. The intent of the workshop was to highlight the state of knowledge on TBC's and to identify critical gaps in knowledge that may hinder TBC use in advanced applications. The workshop goals were achieved through presentations by 22 speakers representing industry, academia, and government as well as through extensive discussion periods.

  19. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.; Leibert, C. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A coating system which contains a bond coating and a thermal barrier coating is applied to metal surfaces such as turbine blades and provides both low thermal conductivity and improved adherence when exposed to high temperature gases or liquids. The bond coating contains NiCrAlY and the thermal barrier coating contains a reflective oxide. The reflective oxides ZrO2-Y2O3 and ZrO2-MgO have demonstrated significant utility in high temperature turbine applications.

  20. Influences of nanomaterials on the barrier function of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shariq; Rytting, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have led to exciting opportunities in medicine, energy, manufacturing, and other fields. Nevertheless, it is important to adequately assess the potential impacts of nanomaterial exposure. This chapter focuses on the interactions of nanomaterials with epithelial barriers in the lungs, intestine, kidneys, skin, and placenta. Methods for determining transepithelial electrical resistance and paracellular permeability are described. Effects on cell viability and barrier integrity depend on the chemical nature of the nanomaterial, nanoparticle size, surface coatings, and concentration. Disruption of tight junctions can affect permeability and interfere with normal regulatory processes of the epithelial barrier. Future research is needed to better understand the possibilities and the limits of novel approaches in nanotechnology.

  1. The Role of the Skin Barrier in Occupational Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kasemsarn, Pranee; Bosco, Joanna; Nixon, Rosemary L

    2016-01-01

    Occupational skin diseases (OSDs) are the second most common occupational diseases worldwide. Occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) is the most frequent OSD, and comprises irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), contact urticaria and protein contact dermatitis. There are many endogenous and exogenous factors which affect the development of OCD, including age, sex, ethnicity, atopic skin diathesis, certain occupations and environmental factors. One of the most important contributing causes is skin barrier dysfunction. The skin provides a first-line defense from environmental assaults and incorporates physical, chemical and biological protection. Skin barrier disturbance plays a crucial role in various skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD), ichthyosis, ICD and ACD. Genetic factors, such as filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations, and external factors, such as skin irritants interfering with stratum corneum structure and composition, may lead to abnormalities in skin barrier function and increased vulnerability to skin diseases. FLG encodes the cornified envelope protein, filaggrin, which is involved in skin barrier function. FLG mutation is associated with the development of OCD. High-risk occupations for OCD include health care workers, hairdressers and construction workers. There are often multiple contributing causes to OCD, as workers are exposed to both irritants and allergens. AD is also associated with skin barrier disruption and plays an important role in OCD. ICD often precedes and facilitates the development of ACD, with impairment of the skin barrier contributing to the concurrence of ICD and ACD in many workers with OCD.

  2. The blood-brain barrier: an engineering perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Andrew D.; Ye, Mao; Levy, Amanda F.; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Bergles, Dwight E.; Searson, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    It has been more than 100 years since Paul Ehrlich reported that various water-soluble dyes injected into the circulation did not enter the brain. Since Ehrlich's first experiments, only a small number of molecules, such as alcohol and caffeine have been found to cross the blood-brain barrier, and this selective permeability remains the major roadblock to treatment of many central nervous system diseases. At the same time, many central nervous system diseases are associated with disruption of the blood-brain barrier that can lead to changes in permeability, modulation of immune cell transport, and trafficking of pathogens into the brain. Therefore, advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the blood-brain barrier are key to developing effective treatments for a wide range of central nervous system diseases. Over the past 10 years it has become recognized that the blood-brain barrier is a complex, dynamic system that involves biomechanical and biochemical signaling between the vascular system and the brain. Here we reconstruct the structure, function, and transport properties of the blood-brain barrier from an engineering perspective. New insight into the physics of the blood-brain barrier could ultimately lead to clinical advances in the treatment of central nervous system diseases. PMID:24009582

  3. Dexamethasone Chemotherapy Does Not Disrupt Orexin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kram, David E.; Krasnow, Stephanie M.; Levasseur, Peter R.; Zhu, Xinxia; Stork, Linda C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Steroid-induced sleep disturbance is a common and highly distressing morbidity for children receiving steroid chemotherapy for the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Sleep disturbance can negatively impact overall quality of life, neurodevelopment, memory consolidation, and wound healing. Hypothalamic orexin neurons are influential wake-promoting neurons, and disturbances in orexin signaling leads to abnormal sleep behavior. A new class of drug, the orexin receptor antagonists, could be an intriguing option for sleep disorders caused by increased orexinergic output. Our aim was to examine the impact of ALL treatment doses of corticosteroids on the orexin system in rodents and in children undergoing treatment for childhood ALL. Methods We administered repeated injections of dexamethasone to rodents and measured responsive orexin neural activity compared to controls. In children with newly diagnosed standard risk B-cell ALL receiving dexamethasone therapy per Children’s Oncology Group (COG) induction therapy from 2014–2016, we collected pre- and during-steroids matched CSF samples and measured the impact of steroids on CSF orexin concentration. Results In both rodents, all markers orexin signaling, including orexin neural output and orexin receptor expression, were preserved in the setting of dexamethasone. Additionally, we did not detect a difference in pre- and during-dexamethasone CSF orexin concentrations in children receiving dexamethasone. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that rodent and human orexin physiology is largely preserved in the setting of high dose dexamethasone. The data obtained in our experimental model fail to demonstrate a causative role for disruption of the orexin pathway in steroid-induced sleep disturbance. PMID:27997622

  4. The disruptive orthopaedic surgeon: implications for patient safety and malpractice liability.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pranay; Robinson, Brooke S; Novicoff, Wendy M; Dunnington, Gary L; Brenner, Michael J; Saleh, Khaled J

    2011-11-02

    Disruptive physician behavior imperils patient safety, erodes the morale of other health care providers, and dramatically increases the risk of malpractice litigation. Increasing patient volume, decreasing physician reimbursement, malpractice litigation, elevated stress, and growing job dissatisfaction have been implicated in disruptive behavior, which has emerged as one of the major challenges in health care. Because the aging patient population relies increasingly on orthopaedic services to maintain quality of life, improving professionalism and eradicating disruptive behavior are urgent concerns in orthopaedic surgery. Although many steps have been taken by The Joint Commission to improve patient care and define disruptive behavior, there is further room for improvement by physicians. Barriers to eliminating disruptive behavior by orthopaedic surgeons include fear of retaliation, lack of awareness among the surgeon's peers, and financial factors. Surgeons have a duty to address patterns of negative peer behavior for the benefit of patient care. This manuscript addresses the causes and consequences of disruptive physician behavior as well as management strategies, especially in orthopaedic surgery.

  5. Barrier methods of contraception.

    PubMed

    Skrine, R L

    1985-05-01

    Barrier methods of contraception make up an essential part of the present contraceptive range, and doctors need to know in detail how to choose and fit them as well as how to instruct patients in their use. This discussion reviews the mode of action of the barrier method and then focuses on the vaginal diaphragm, the cervical or vault cap, the collatex (Today) sponge, condoms, emotionl problems associated with the use of barrier methods, advantages of barrier methods, and future developments. Barrier methods of contraception are only effective if used consistently and carefully. Failure rates vary greatly between studies, but in selected populations the failure rate for the diaphragm with spermicide can be as low as 1.9/100 woman years (wy) and for the condom 3.6 per 100wy (Vessey et al., 1982). If known user failures are removed, the figure for the condom can drop to as low as 0.4 per 100wy (John, 1973), which compares favorably with that of the combined oral contraceptive. Other studies quote failure rates of 10 per 100wy or more. These methods call for considerable participation by the patient at or before each act of intercourse and there is, therefore, great scope for inefficient use, either as a result of poor instruction or because couples find that they interfere with happy, relaxed sexual activity -- or fear that they may do so. Doctors need to understand the feelings of their patients before recommending them. The aim of a barrier method is to prevent live sperm from meeting the ovum. This is accomplished by the combination of a physical barrier with a spermicide. In the case of the condom, the integrity of the physical barrier is the most important factor, although some patients feel more secure with an additional spermicide. The vaginal barriers used at present do not produce a "water-tight" fit, and the principle is that the spermicide is held over the cervix by the barrier. It is also possible that the device acts partially by holding the alkaline

  6. Apolipoprotein E-Mimetic COG1410 Reduces Acute Vasogenic Edema following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Fang; Wu, Yue; Zhong, Jianjun; Liu, Jieshi; Qin, Xinghu; Chen, Ligang; Vitek, Michael P.; Li, Fengqiao; Xu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The degree of post-traumatic brain edema and dysfunction of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) influences the neurofunctional outcome after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Previous studies have demonstrated that the administration of apolipoprotein E-mimetic peptide COG1410 reduces the brain water content after subarachnoid hemorrhage, intra-cerebral hemorrhage, and focal brain ischemia. However, the effects of COG1410 on vasogenic edema following TBI are not known. The current study evaluated the effects of 1 mg/kg daily COG1410 versus saline administered intravenously after a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury on BBB dysfunction and vasogenic edema at an acute stage in mice. The results demonstrated that treatment with COG1410 suppressed the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9, reduced the disruption of the BBB and Evans Blue dye extravasation, reduced the TBI lesion volume and vasogenic edema, and decreased the functional deficits compared with mice treated with vehicle, at an acute stage after CCI. These findings suggest that COG1410 is a promising preclinical therapeutic agent for the treatment of traumatic brain injury. PMID:26192010

  7. [Acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hecker, M; Mayer, K; Askevold, I; Collet, P; Weigand, M A; Krombach, G A; Padberg, W; Hecker, A

    2014-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially fatal disease with individually differing expression of systemic involvement. For this reason early diagnosis with subsequent risk stratification is essential in the clinical management of this frequent gastroenterological disorder. Severe forms of acute pancreatitis occur in approximately 20 % of cases often requiring intensive care monitoring and interdisciplinary therapeutic approaches. In the acute phase adequate fluid replacement and sufficient analgesic therapy is of major therapeutic importance. Concerning the administration of antibiotics and the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis a change in paradigms could be observed in recent years. Furthermore, endoscopic, radiological or surgical interventions can be necessary depending on the severity of the disease and potential complications.

  8. Bronchitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... to breathe. Other symptoms of bronchitis are a cough and coughing up mucus. Acute means the symptoms ... diagnosed with chronic bronchitis, you must have a cough with mucus on most days for at least ...

  9. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is inflammation of your bronchial tree. The bronchial tree consists of tubes that carry air into your ... weeks or months. This happens because the bronchial tree takes a while to heal. A lasting cough ...

  10. Telephone-Based Mental Health Interventions for Child Disruptive Behavior or Anxiety Disorders: Randomized Trials and Overall Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Patrick J.; Lingley-Pottie, Patricia; Thurston, Catherine; MacLean, Cathy; Cunningham, Charles; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Watters, Carolyn; Stewart, Sherry; Bagnell, Alexa; Santor, Darcy; Chaplin, William

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Most children with mental health disorders do not receive timely care because of access barriers. These initial trials aimed to determine whether distance interventions provided by nonprofessionals could significantly decrease the proportion of children diagnosed with disruptive behavior or anxiety disorders compared with usual care.…

  11. Thermal barrier coating

    DOEpatents

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles; Sabol, Stephen M.; Goedjen, John G.

    2001-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

  12. The Fission Barrier Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Phair, L.; Moretto, L. G.

    2008-04-17

    Fission excitation functions have been measured for a chain of neighboring compound nuclei from {sup 207}Po to {sup 212}Po. We present a new analysis which provides a determination of the fission barriers and ground state shell effects with nearly spectroscopic accuracy. The accuracy achieved in this analysis may lead to a future detailed exploration of the saddle mass surface and its spectroscopy.

  13. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An oxide thermal barrier coating comprises ZrO3-Yb2O3 that is plasma sprayed onto a previously applied bond coating. The zirconia is partially stabilized with about 124 w/o ytterbia to insure cubic, monoclinic, and terragonal phases.

  14. Barriers Regarding Using Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekenoogen, John Russell

    2014-01-01

    The University of Florida (UF) used an open-source course management system (CMS) called Sakai. Sakai was the fourth CMS the university has used to help teach live, blended (or hybrid), and online courses over the past ten years. The objective of this dissertation was to identify what barriers may be preventing university personnel from using…

  15. Overcoming Language Barriers

    PubMed Central

    De Buda, Yvonne

    1976-01-01

    Many family physicians in Canada experience language and cultural barriers between themselves and their patients. Several aspects of the ensuing problems are described and some practical suggestions for solutions are made. The importance of health education for new Canadians in the family physician's office as well as through the media and community projects is stressed. Imagesp68-ap68-bp70-a PMID:21308059

  16. Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A better than average view of the Great Barrier Reef was captured by SeaWiFS on a recent overpass. There is sunglint northeast of the reef and there appears to be some sort of filamentous bloom in the Capricorn Channel.

  17. Addressing the phenomenon of disruptive physician behavior.

    PubMed

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2003-01-01

    This timely article provides current information on an age-old issue of disruptive physician behavior within the hospital setting. Documented in medical literature over 100 years ago, disruptive physician behavior has been an ongoing challenge to the hospital staff and the quality of patient care in the hospital. Covered in this article are the negative consequences of disruptive physician behavior and the call to respond. If allowed to go unchecked, a physician exhibiting disruptive behavior may threaten a hospital's image, staff morale, finance, and quality of care. Failure to respond undermines the leadership of the hospital and the trust of the community in the hospital's mission. Included in this article are suggestions obtained from the literature and from the author's experience in responding to disruptive physician behavior. Of emphasis is a methodology that includes supporting bylaws and policies to manage disruptive physician behavior.

  18. Current Concepts in Neuroendocrine Disruption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  19. Addressing disruptive behaviors in the organizational setting: the win-win approach.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Alan H

    2013-01-01

    Disruptive behaviors can have a significant impact on organizational dynamics and work relationships and a profound negative effect on staff and patient satisfaction, performance efficiency, and patient outcomes. Despite the growing call for action, many organizations still have difficulty in addressing these issues in a consistent, effective manner. Presented below is a model that focuses on causes and barriers and offers solutions designed to promote a "What's in it for me?" win-win approach for improving morale, job satisfaction, and patient care.

  20. β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase gene therapy upregulates tight junctions to rescue lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Barravecchia, M; Kothari, P; Young, J L; Dean, D A

    2016-06-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are associated with diverse disorders and characterized by disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leakage of edema fluid into the lung, and substantial inflammation leading to acute respiratory failure. Gene therapy is a potentially powerful approach to treat ALI/ARDS