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Sample records for acute bilirubin encephalopathy

  1. Galactosaemia: an unusual cause of chronic bilirubin encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Tanushree; Thukral, Anu; Agarwal, Ramesh; Sankar, Mari Jeeva

    2015-01-23

    Galactosaemia is a disorder of galactose metabolism in which raised levels of galactose and galactose-1-phosphate damage various organs. Although galactosaemia is a common metabolic liver disease in childhood, it is a rare cause of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia requiring intervention. We report an unusual case of neonatal galactosaemia that at presentation had features of acute bilirubin encephalopathy requiring exchange transfusion and at discharge had features of chronic bilirubin encephalopathy. This case report emphasises the need for timely suspicion and diagnosis of this disease for prevention of chronic morbidity.

  2. A Hypothesis for Using Pathway Genetic Load Analysis for Understanding Complex Outcomes in Bilirubin Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Sean M.; Bittel, Douglas C.; Le Pichon, Jean-Baptiste; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Watchko, Jon F.; Wennberg, Richard P.; Shapiro, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic-based susceptibility to bilirubin neurotoxicity and chronic bilirubin encephalopathy (kernicterus) is still poorly understood. Neonatal jaundice affects 60–80% of newborns, and considerable effort goes into preventing this relatively benign condition from escalating into the development of kernicterus making the incidence of this potentially devastating condition very rare in more developed countries. The current understanding of the genetic background of kernicterus is largely comprised of mutations related to alterations of bilirubin production, elimination, or both. Less is known about mutations that may predispose or protect against CNS bilirubin neurotoxicity. The lack of a monogenetic source for this risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity suggests that disease progression is dependent upon an overall decrease in the functionality of one or more essential genetically controlled metabolic pathways. In other words, a “load” is placed on key pathways in the form of multiple genetic variants that combine to create a vulnerable phenotype. The idea of epistatic interactions creating a pathway genetic load (PGL) that affects the response to a specific insult has been previously reported as a PGL score. We hypothesize that the PGL score can be used to investigate whether increased susceptibility to bilirubin-induced CNS damage in neonates is due to a mutational load being placed on key genetic pathways important to the central nervous system's response to bilirubin neurotoxicity. We propose a modification of the PGL score method that replaces the use of a canonical pathway with custom gene lists organized into three tiers with descending levels of evidence combined with the utilization of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) causality prediction methods. The PGL score has the potential to explain the genetic background of complex bilirubin induced neurological disorders (BIND) such as kernicterus and could be the key to understanding ranges of outcome severity

  3. A Hypothesis for Using Pathway Genetic Load Analysis for Understanding Complex Outcomes in Bilirubin Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Riordan, Sean M; Bittel, Douglas C; Le Pichon, Jean-Baptiste; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Watchko, Jon F; Wennberg, Richard P; Shapiro, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic-based susceptibility to bilirubin neurotoxicity and chronic bilirubin encephalopathy (kernicterus) is still poorly understood. Neonatal jaundice affects 60-80% of newborns, and considerable effort goes into preventing this relatively benign condition from escalating into the development of kernicterus making the incidence of this potentially devastating condition very rare in more developed countries. The current understanding of the genetic background of kernicterus is largely comprised of mutations related to alterations of bilirubin production, elimination, or both. Less is known about mutations that may predispose or protect against CNS bilirubin neurotoxicity. The lack of a monogenetic source for this risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity suggests that disease progression is dependent upon an overall decrease in the functionality of one or more essential genetically controlled metabolic pathways. In other words, a "load" is placed on key pathways in the form of multiple genetic variants that combine to create a vulnerable phenotype. The idea of epistatic interactions creating a pathway genetic load (PGL) that affects the response to a specific insult has been previously reported as a PGL score. We hypothesize that the PGL score can be used to investigate whether increased susceptibility to bilirubin-induced CNS damage in neonates is due to a mutational load being placed on key genetic pathways important to the central nervous system's response to bilirubin neurotoxicity. We propose a modification of the PGL score method that replaces the use of a canonical pathway with custom gene lists organized into three tiers with descending levels of evidence combined with the utilization of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) causality prediction methods. The PGL score has the potential to explain the genetic background of complex bilirubin induced neurological disorders (BIND) such as kernicterus and could be the key to understanding ranges of outcome severity in

  4. Defining encephalopathy in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Fridinger, S E; Alper, Gulay

    2014-06-01

    The International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group requires the presence of encephalopathy to diagnose acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Clinical characteristics of encephalopathy are inadequately delineated in the pediatric demyelinating literature. The authors' purpose was to better define encephalopathy in pediatric acute disseminated encephalomyelitis by describing the details of the mental status change. A retrospective chart review was conducted for 25 children diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis according to the International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group guidelines. Frequency of encephalopathy-defining features was determined. Clinical characteristics, cerebrospinal fluid findings, and electroencephalography (EEG) findings were compared between patients with different stages of encephalopathy. The authors found irritability (36%), sleepiness (52%), confusion (8%), obtundation (20%), and coma (16%) as encephalopathy-defining features in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Twenty-eight percent had seizures, and 65% demonstrated generalized slowing on EEG. Approximately half of the patients in this study were diagnosed with encephalopathy based on the presence of irritability and/or sleepiness only. Such features in young children are often subtle and transient and thus difficult to objectively determine.

  5. Hashimoto's Encephalopathy Presenting with Acute Cognitive Dysfunction and Convulsion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Woo-Hyuk; Na, Ju-Young; Kim, Meyung-Kug; Yoo, Bong-Goo

    2013-12-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by acute or subacute encephalopathy related to increased anti-thyroid antibodies. Clinical manifestations of Hashimoto's encephalopathy may include stroke-like episodes, altered consciousness, psychosis, myoclonus, abnormal movements, seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. Acute cognitive dysfunction with convulsion as initial clinical manifestations of Hashimoto's encephalopathy is very rare. We report a 65-year-old man who developed acute onset of cognitive decline and convulsion due to Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

  6. Determining Prevalence of Acute Bilirubin Encephalopathy in Developing Countries

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-11

    Demonstrate BIND II Score of >=5, is Valid for Detecting Moderate to Severe ABE in Neonates <14 Days Old.; Demonstrate Community-BIND Instrument, a Modified BIND II, is a Valid and Reliable Tool for Detecting ABE.; Demonstrate That Community-BIND Can be Used for Acquiring Population-based Prevalence of ABE in the Community.

  7. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: An Underrecognized Clinicoradiologic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiujuan; Wu, Wei; Pan, Wei; Wu, Limin; Liu, Kangding; Zhang, Hong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rare but distinctive type of acute encephalopathy with global distribution. Occurrence of ANE is usually preceded by a virus-associated febrile illness and ensued by rapid deterioration. However, the causal relationship between viral infections and ANE and the exact pathogenesis of ANE remain unclear; both environmental and host factors might be involved. Most cases of ANE are sporadic and nonrecurrent, namely, isolated or sporadic ANE; however, few cases are recurrent and with familial episodes. The recurrent and familial forms of ANE were found to be incompletely autosomal-dominant. Further the missense mutations in the gene encoding the nuclear pore protein Ran Binding Protein 2 (RANBP2) were identified. Although the clinical course and the prognosis of ANE are diverse, the hallmark of neuroradiologic manifestation of ANE is multifocal symmetric brain lesions which are demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The treatment of ANE is still under investigation. We summarize the up-to-date knowledge on ANE, with emphasis on prompt diagnosis and better treatment of this rare but fatal disease. PMID:25873770

  8. Hepatic encephalopathy in acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guan-Huei

    2015-10-01

    The presence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) within 4 weeks is part of the criteria for defining acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The pathophysiology of HE is complex, and hyperammonemia and cerebral hemodynamic dysfunction appear to be central in the pathogenesis of encephalopathy. Recent data also suggest that inflammatory mediators may have a significant role in modulating the cerebral effect of ammonia. Multiple prospective and retrospective studies have shown that hepatic encephalopathy in ACLF patients is associated with higher mortality, especially in those with grade III-IV encephalopathy, similar to that of acute liver failure (ALF). Although significant cerebral edema detected by CT in ACLF patients appeared to be less common, specialized MRI imaging was able to detect cerebral edema even in low grade HE. Ammonia-focused therapy constitutes the basis of current therapy, as in the treatment of ALF. Emerging treatment strategies focusing on modulating the gut-liver-circulation-brain axis are discussed.

  9. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood (ANEC): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HASSANZADEH RAD, Afagh; AMINZADEH, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC) is a specific type of encephalopathy. After viral infection, it can be diagnosed by bilateral symmetrical lesions predominantly observed in thalami & brainstem of infants & children. Although, it is commonly occurred in Japanese and Taiwanese population. The goal of this article is to report a rare case of ANEC in a 15 months old girl infant from Thaleghani Hospital, Ramian, Gorgan, northern Iran. PMID:28277560

  10. Gray matter heterotopia and acute necrotizing encephalopathy in trichothiodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wetzburger, C L; Van Regemorter, N; Szliwowski, H B; Abramowicz, M J; Van Bogaert, P

    1998-11-01

    Trichothiodystrophy was diagnosed in a 3-year-old male presenting with speech delay, brittle hair, chronic neutropenia, and a history of febrile convulsions. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a focal subcortical and periventricular gray matter heterotopia. An acute encephalopathy with status epilepticus and coma occurred when he was 4 years of age during an upper respiratory tract infection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multifocal T2-weighted hypersignal lesions involving mainly the thalami, hippocampi, midbrain, and pons. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid revealed hyperproteinorachia without pleocytosis. Results of an extensive metabolic evaluation of this acute brain injury, resembling the syndrome of acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood described in Japan, were negative. Focal neuronal migration disorder and acute encephalopathy with symmetric thalamic involvement are newly described neurologic manifestations of syndromes with trichothiodystrophy, which suggests that these conditions may have a common genetic background.

  11. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  12. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  13. Bilirubin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also known as: Total Bilirubin; TBIL; Neonatal Bilirubin; Direct Bilirubin; Conjugated Bilirubin; Indirect Bilirubin; Unconjugated Bilirubin Formal ... Hepatitis B ; Hepatitis C ; Complete Blood Count ; Urinalysis ; Direct Antiglobulin Test ; Haptoglobin ; Reticulocyte Count All content on ...

  14. Acute Wernicke encephalopathy and sensorineural hearing loss complicating bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Jethava, Ashif; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2012-01-01

    Health-care professionals must be aware of the mandatory vitamin supplementation in patients status post bariatric surgery. A recent increase in the number of gastric bypass surgeries in US has been associated with a proportional increase in Wernicke encephalopathy reports. Subtle or atypical neurologic features are not uncommon. Our report is of a female patient with acute Wernicke encephalopathy accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss six weeks after bariatric surgery. The patient had only a partial recovery of her neurologic symptoms eightweeks after vigorous therapy for this condition. Symptomatic thiamine (vitamin B1) and vitamin B12 deficiencies are particularly concerning effects of bariatric procedures, as neurologic and cognitive deficits may be long lasting or even permanent despite aggressive replacement therapy.

  15. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Mimicking Acute Onset Stroke Diagnosed by CT Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Rajiv; Kurz, Kathinka D.; Kurz, Martin W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Metabolic syndromes such as Wernicke's encephalopathy may present with a sudden neurological deficit, thus mimicking acute onset stroke. Due to current emphasis on rapid admission and treatment of acute stroke patients, there is a significant risk that these stroke mimics may end up being treated with thrombolysis. Rigorous clinical and radiological skills are necessary to correctly identify such metabolic stroke mimics, in order to avoid doing any harm to these patients due to the unnecessary use of thrombolysis. Patient. A 51-year-old Caucasian male was admitted to our hospital with suspicion of an acute stroke due to sudden onset dysarthria and unilateral facial nerve paresis. Clinical examination revealed confusion and dysconjugate gaze. Computed tomography (CT) including a CT perfusion (CTP) scan revealed bilateral thalamic hyperperfusion. The use of both clinical and radiological findings led to correctly diagnosing Wernicke's encephalopathy. Conclusion. The application of CTP as a standard diagnostic tool in acute stroke patients can improve the detection of stroke mimics caused by metabolic syndromes as shown in our case report. PMID:24716022

  16. Acute headache as a presenting symptom of tacrolimus encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, I M; de Leeuw, F-E; Ramos, L M P; van Gijn, J

    2003-08-01

    A 24 year old woman presented with a sudden excruciating headache mimicking an acute vascular event. She had undergone a lung transplantation because of cystic fibrosis and was receiving maintenance treatment with tacrolimus and prednisone. Ancillary investigation excluded vascular causes. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated hyperintense lesions in the infratentorial and parieto-occipital regions consistent with posterior leucencephalopathy syndrome. Both her clinical condition improved and the lesions disappeared completely after withdrawal of tacrolimus, suggesting that her condition could be explained by a tacrolimus encephalopathy.

  17. Study of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia After Induction Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ji-Hong; Tian, Jian-Mei; Sheng, Mao; Hu, Shao-Yan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Li-Ya; Gu, Qing; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Increasing occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome has been reported in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the etiology of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is not clear. To study the possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment of this complication, we reported 11 cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after induction chemotherapy. After appropriate treatment, the clinical symptoms of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in most cases disappeared even though induction chemotherapy continued. During the 1-year follow-up, no recurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was observed. Although the clinical and imaging features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome may be diverse, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be recognized as a possible important complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia when neurologic symptoms appear. In line with previous reports, our study also indicated that posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was reversible when diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Thus, the occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be considered and investigated to optimize the early induction scheme of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment.

  18. Acute cortical blindness due to posterior reversible encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Lam, Jenny; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2008-10-01

    An acutely hypertensive 55 year-old male experienced seizures and cortical blindness post-operatively. CT scans demonstrated hypointensities in the occipital lobes bilaterally. MRI revealed symmetrical bilateral hyperintense signals in the same region, involving both grey and white matter. Thromboembolic screening investigations including vertebral artery doppler studies were normal and echocardiography demonstrated borderline left ventricular hypertrophy. A diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) was reached and there was complete resolution of blindness with antihypertensive therapy. This case supports the vasogenic theory of PRES which suggests that sustained high grade fluctuations in blood pressure lead to a reduction in cerebral vascular autoregulatory function. The resultant failure of compensatory vasoconstriction to prevent hyperperfusion causes fluid to extravasate into the occipital lobes, which in the present case resulted in cortical blindness.

  19. Novel Human Reovirus Isolated from Children with Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Louise A.; Barin, Francis; Barthez, Marie Anne; Bonnaud, Bertrand; Roingeard, Philippe; Goudeau, Alain; Castelnau, Pierre; Vernet, Guy; Komurian-Pradel, Florence

    2011-01-01

    For many encephalitis cases, the cause remains unidentified. After 2 children (from the same family) received a diagnosis of acute necrotizing encephalopathy at Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (Tours, France), we attempted to identify the etiologic agent. Because clinical samples from the 2 patients were negative for all pathogens tested, urine and throat swab specimens were added to epithelial cells, and virus isolates detected were characterized by molecular analysis and electron microscopy. We identified a novel reovirus strain (serotype 2), MRV2Tou05, which seems to be closely related to porcine and human strains. A specific antibody response directed against this new reovirus strain was observed in convalescent-phase serum specimens from the patients, whereas no response was observed in 38 serum specimens from 38 healthy adults. This novel reovirus is a new etiologic agent of encephalitis. PMID:21801621

  20. Biology of Bilirubin Photoisomers.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Thor Willy Ruud

    2016-06-01

    Phototherapy is the main treatment for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. In acute treatment of extreme hyperbilirubinemia, intensive phototherapy may have a role in 'detoxifying' the bilirubin molecule to more polar photoisomers, which should be less prone to crossing the blood-brain barrier, providing a 'brain-sparing' effect. This article reviews the biology of bilirubin isomers. Although there is evidence supporting the lower toxicity of bilirubin photoisomers, there are studies showing the opposite. There are methodologic weaknesses in most studies and better-designed experiments are needed. In an infant acutely threatened by bilirubin-induced brain damage, intensified phototherapy should be used expediently and aggressively.

  1. MRI gadolinium enhancement precedes neuroradiological findings in acute necrotizing encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Tamura, Takuya; Nagai, Yuhki; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Awaya, Tomonari; Shibata, Minoru; Kato, Takeo; Heike, Toshio

    2013-11-01

    We report a 2-year-old Japanese boy with acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) triggered by human herpes virus-6, who presented insightful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. He was admitted due to impaired consciousness and a convulsion, 2 days after the onset of an upper respiratory infection. At admission, cranial MRI showed marked gadolinium enhancement at the bilateral thalami, brainstem and periventricular white matter without abnormal findings in noncontrast MRI sequences. On the following day, noncontrast computed tomography demonstrated homogeneous low-density lesions in the bilateral thalami and severe diffuse brain edema. The patient progressively deteriorated and died on the 18th day of admission. The pathogenesis of ANE remains mostly unknown, but it has been suggested that hypercytokinemia may play a major role. Overproduced cytokines cause vascular endothelial damage and alter the permeability of the vessel wall in the multiple organs, including the brain. The MRI findings in our case demonstrate that blood-brain barrier permeability was altered prior to the appearance of typical neuroradiological findings. This suggests that alteration of blood-brain barrier permeability is the first step in the development of the brain lesions in ANE, and supports the proposed mechanism whereby hypercytokinemia causes necrotic brain lesions. This is the first report demonstrating MRI gadolinium enhancement antecedent to typical neuroradiological findings in ANE.

  2. The diagnostic value of white cell count, C-reactive protein and bilirubin in acute appendicitis and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Parashar, D; Lin, R; Antonowicz, S; Wells, AD; Bajwa, FM; Krijgsman, B

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory markers such as white cell count (WCC) and C-reactive protein (CRP) and, more recently, bilirubin have been used as adjuncts in the diagnosis of appendicitis. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the above markers in acute and perforated appendicitis as well as their value in excluding the condition. Methods A retrospective analysis of 1,169 appendicectomies was performed. Patients were grouped according to histological examination of appendicectomy specimens (normal appendix = NA, acute appendicitis = AA, perforated appendicitis = PA) and preoperative laboratory test results were correlated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve area analysis (area under the curve [AUC]) was performed to examine diagnostic accuracy. Results ROC analysis of all laboratory variables showed that no independent variable was diagnostic for AA. Good diagnostic accuracy was seen for AA when all variables were combined (WCC/CRP/bilirubin combined AUC: 0.8173). In PA, the median CRP level was significantly higher than that of AA (158mg/l vs 30mg, p<0.0001). CRP also showed the highest sensitivity (100%) and negative predictive value (100%) for PA. CRP had the highest diagnostic accuracy in PA (AUC: 0.9322) and this was increased when it was combined with WCC (AUC: 0.9388). Bilirubin added no diagnostic value in PA. Normal levels of WCC, CRP and bilirubin could not rule out appendicitis. Conclusions CRP provides the highest diagnostic accuracy for PA. Bilirubin did not provide any discriminatory value for AA and its complications. Normal inflammatory markers cannot exclude appendicitis, which remains a clinical diagnosis. PMID:23827295

  3. Cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome in childhood: clinical features and risk of seizure recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, J G; duPlessis, A J; Barnes, P D; Riviello, J J

    1998-07-01

    Cyclosporin A is associated with an acute encephalopathy including seizures and alterations in mental status, herein referred to as cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome. The clinical history, electroencephalogram (EEG), and neuroimaging findings in 19 children with cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome over a 10-year period were reviewed in order to delineate clinical characteristics, imaging features, and to determine the risk of seizure recurrence in this population. All 19 had motor seizures associated with other features of cortical and subcortical dysfunction. The acute mean cyclosporin A level was 342 microg/L, but was within the "therapeutic" range in five cases. Brain imaging by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute or subacute phase revealed lesions characteristic of cyclosporin A toxicity in 14 cases. Acute EEG abnormalities were present in all and included epileptiform discharges or focal slowing. Patients were followed for a median of 49 months (1-9 years). Follow-up imaging (n = 10) showed lesion resolution or improvement in the majority while EEG (n = 10) had normalized in only three. Seizures recurred in six patients and only in those with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities. No patient had a second episode of cyclosporin A associated neurotoxicity or seizure. It appears that a significant risk of seizure recurrence exists following cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome and primarily in those children with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities.

  4. Arthrogryposis and multicystic encephalopathy after acute fetal distress in the end stage of gestation.

    PubMed

    Charollais, A; Lacroix, C; Nouyrigat, V; Devictor, D; Landrieu, P

    2001-02-01

    The natural history of the rare association "multicystic encephalopathy-arthrogryposis" was traced in a fetus carefully followed after artificial insemination. The fetus exhibited normal viability and brain morphology up to the 32nd week. At 36 weeks, active movements diminished and at 37 weeks, hydramnios and signs of fetal distress led to cesarean section. The infant presented with severe arthrogryposis of the limbs and spine, but not with the other elements of a long-lasting akinesia. US showed multicystic encephalopathy. Both the clinical and the neuropathological findings established that multicystic encephalopathy was neither the cause nor the sequential consequence of the fetal akinesia, but the result of a recent diffuse, acute malacic process that also involved the anterior horn cells. Acute fetal distress, responsible for major ischemic damage to CNS but compatible with fetal survival, remains an obscure condition which allows for the development of severe arthrogryposis in a few weeks.

  5. A case of life-threatening acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy caused by Dioscorea quinqueloba.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung-Sik; Heo, Sang Taek

    2015-01-01

    Some herbal medications induce acute kidney injury. The acute kidney injuries caused by herbal medications are mild and commonly treated by palliative care. A 51-years-old man who drank the juice squeezed from the raw tubers of Dioscorea quinqueloba (D. quinqueloba) was admitted with nausea, vomiting and chilling. He developed a seizure with decreased level of consciousness. He was diagnosed with acute kidney injury, which was cured by continuous venovenous hemodialfiltration. Non-detoxified D. quinqueloba can cause severe acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy. It is critical to inform possible adverse effects of the medicinal herbs and to implement more strict regulation of these products.

  6. Identification of Viruses in Cases of Pediatric Acute Encephalitis and Encephalopathy Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Jun-ichi; Okuno, Yusuke; Torii, Yuka; Okada, Ryo; Hayano, Satoshi; Ando, Shotaro; Kamiya, Yasuko; Kojima, Seiji; Ito, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Acute encephalitis/encephalopathy is a severe neurological syndrome that is occasionally associated with viral infection. Comprehensive virus detection assays are desirable because viral pathogens have not been identified in many cases. We evaluated the utility of next-generation sequencing (NGS) for detecting viruses in clinical samples of encephalitis/encephalopathy patients. We first determined the sensitivity and quantitative performance of NGS by comparing the NGS-determined number of sequences of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) in clinical serum samples with the HHV-6 load measured using real-time PCR. HHV-6 was measured as it occasionally causes neurologic disorders in children. The sensitivity of NGS for detection of HHV-6 sequences was equivalent to that of real-time PCR, and the number of HHV-6 reads was significantly correlated with HHV-6 load. Next, we investigated the ability of NGS to detect viral sequences in 18 pediatric patients with acute encephalitis/encephalopathy of unknown etiology. A large number of Coxsackievirus A9 and mumps viral sequences were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of 2 and 1 patients, respectively. In addition, Torque teno virus and Pepper mild mottle viral sequences were detected in the sera of one patient each. These data indicate that NGS is useful for detection of causative viruses in patients with pediatric encephalitis/encephalopathy. PMID:27625312

  7. Influenza Virus-Associated Fatal Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: Role of Nonpermissive Viral Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Mungaomklang, Anek; Chomcheoy, Jiraruj; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Joyjinda, Yutthana; Jittmittraphap, Akanitt; Rodpan, Apaporn; Ghai, Siriporn; Saraya, Abhinbhen; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, two unusual peaks of H1N1 influenza outbreak occurred in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, in Thailand. Among 2,406 cases, one of the 22 deaths in the province included a 6-year-old boy, who initially presented with acute necrotizing encephalopathy. On the other hand, his sibling was mildly affected by the same influenza virus strain, confirmed by whole-genome sequencing, with one silent mutation. Absence of acute necrotizing encephalopathy and other neurological illnesses in the family and the whole province, with near identical whole viral genomic sequences from the two siblings, and an absence of concomitant severe lung infection (cytokine storm) at onset suggest nonpermissive infection as an alternative pathogenetic mechanism of influenza virus. PMID:27812294

  8. Acute Pancreatitis and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Magno Pereira, Vítor; Marote Correia, Luís; Rodrigues, Tiago; Serrão Faria, Gorete

    2016-09-01

    The posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a neurological syndrome characterized by headache, confusion, visual disturbances and seizures associated with identifiable areas of cerebral edema on imaging studies. The authors report the case of a man, 33 years-old, leukodermic with a history of chronic alcohol and tobacco consumption, who is admitted to the emergency department for epigastric pain radiating to the back and vomiting with about six hours of evolution and an intense holocranial headache for two hours. His physical examination was remarkable for a blood pressure of 190/100 mmHg and tenderness in epigastrium. His analytical results revealed emphasis on amylase 193 U/L and lipase 934 U/L. During the observation in the emergency department,he presented a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed and suggestive of pancreatitis withoutgallstones signals. Head computed tomography showed subarachnoid haemorrhage and a small right frontal cortical haemorrhage. The brain magnetic resonance imaging done one week after admission showed areas of a bilateral and symmetrical T2 / FLAIR hyperintensities in the subcortical white matter of the parietal and superior frontal regions, suggesting a diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Abdominal computed tomography (10 days after admission) demonstrated a thickened pancreas in connection with inflammation and two small hypodense foci in the anterior part of the pancreas body, translating small foci of necrosis. The investigation of a thrombophilic defect revealed a heterozygous G20210A prothrombin gene mutation. The patient was discharged without neurological sequelae and asymptomatic. The follow-up brain magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the reversal of the lesions, confirming the diagnosis.

  9. Serum and CSF levels of cytokines in acute encephalopathy following prolonged febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Ichiyama, Takashi; Suenaga, Naoko; Kajimoto, Madoka; Tohyama, Jun; Isumi, Hiroshi; Kubota, Masaya; Mori, Masato; Furukawa, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that an acute encephalopathy occasionally follows prolonged febrile seizures. We measured the concentrations of interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNFR1) in serum and CSF during the acute stage in 13 children with acute encephalopathy following prolonged febrile seizures (AEPFS) and 23 with prolonged febrile seizures without encephalopathy (PFS) to investigate the pathogenesis of AEPFS. Serum IL-6, IL-10, sTNFR1, and CSF IL-6 levels were significantly higher in AEPFS and PFS compared with control subjects. CSF IL-6 levels in AEPFS were significantly higher than those in PFS, but not serum IL-6, IL-10, or sTNFR1. The CSF IL-6 levels were significantly higher than the serum levels in AEPFS, but not PFS. The serum levels of sTNFR1 and IL-10 were significantly higher than those in the CSF in AEPFS and PFS. The serum IL-10 and sTNFR1 levels in patients who did not experience a second seizure were significantly higher than those in patients who experienced a second seizure, which was characterized by clusters of complex partial seizures several days after the initial prolonged febrile seizure. Our results suggest that serum IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, and CSF IL-6 are part of the regulatory system of cytokines in AEPFS.

  10. Acute and chronic traumatic encephalopathies: pathogenesis and biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    DeKosky, Steven T.; Blennow, Kaj; Ikonomovic, Milos D.; Gandy, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, public awareness of the long-term pathological consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has increased. Such awareness has been stimulated mainly by reports of progressive neurological dysfunction in athletes exposed to repetitive concussions in high-impact sports such as boxing and American football, and by the rising number of TBIs in war veterans who are now more likely to survive explosive blasts owing to improved treatment. Moreover, the entity of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)—which is marked by prominent neuropsychiatric features including dementia, parkinsonism, depression, agitation, psychosis, and aggression—has become increasingly recognized as a potential late outcome of repetitive TBI. Annually, about 1% of the population in developed countries experiences a clinically relevant TBI. The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the latest understanding of CTE pathophysiology, and to delineate the key issues that are challenging clinical and research communities, such as accurate quantification of the risk of CTE, and development of reliable biomarkers for single-incident TBI and CTE. PMID:23558985

  11. Acute and chronic traumatic encephalopathies: pathogenesis and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    DeKosky, Steven T; Blennow, Kaj; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Gandy, Sam

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, public awareness of the long-term pathological consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has increased. Such awareness has been stimulated mainly by reports of progressive neurological dysfunction in athletes exposed to repetitive concussions in high-impact sports such as boxing and American football, and by the rising number of TBIs in war veterans who are now more likely to survive explosive blasts owing to improved treatment. Moreover, the entity of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)--which is marked by prominent neuropsychiatric features including dementia, parkinsonism, depression, agitation, psychosis, and aggression--has become increasingly recognized as a potential late outcome of repetitive TBI. Annually, about 1% of the population in developed countries experiences a clinically relevant TBI. The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the latest understanding of CTE pathophysiology, and to delineate the key issues that are challenging clinical and research communities, such as accurate quantification of the risk of CTE, and development of reliable biomarkers for single-incident TBI and CTE.

  12. Bilirubin - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be due to: Biliary tract disease Cirrhosis Gallstones in the biliary tract Hepatitis Liver disease Tumors ... duct stricture Biliary system Bilirubin blood test Cirrhosis Gallstones Hepatitis Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma Review Date 5/ ...

  13. Acute multiple focal neuropathies and delayed postanoxic encephalopathy after alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Che; Yang, Hsiu-Chun; Chen, Yao-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Acute-onset alcohol-associated neuropathy is only occasionally reported, and delayed postanoxic encephalopathy is rare. Here, we report a male who developed acute multiple focal neuropathies and later delayed postanoxic encephalopathy after alcohol intoxication. He had hypoxia and rhabdomyolysis, presenting with acute renal failure initially, and cardiopulmonary support, including mechanical ventilation, led to improvement of the patient at the acute stage. He suffered from bilateral hand numbness and mild weakness of the right lower limb thereafter. Nerve-conduction study revealed no pickup of compound muscle action potential or sensory nerve action potential in the bilateral ulnar nerve, but showed attenuated amplitude of compound muscle action potential in the right femoral nerve. Multiple focal neuropathies were suspected, and he received outpatient rehabilitation after being discharged. However, the patient developed gradual onset of weakness in four limbs and cognitive impairment 23 days after the hypoxia event. Brain computed tomography showed low attenuation over bilateral globus pallidus, and brain magnetic resonance imaging disclosed diffuse increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery in bilateral white matter. He was admitted again under the impression of delayed postanoxic brain injury. Supportive treatment and active rehabilitation were given. He had gradual improvement in motor and functional status after rehabilitation. He could walk with festinating gait under supervision, and needed only minimal assistance in performing activities of daily living approximately 1 year later. PMID:26229472

  14. Hearing loss during osteosarcoma chemotherapy: when acute ifosfamide toxicity revealed unnoticed methotrexate encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Robert, Guillaume; Chappé, Céline; Taque, Sophie; Bruneau, Bertrand; Gandemer, Virginie

    2014-03-01

    Ifosfamide and methotrexate are widely used for the treatment of pediatric osteosarcoma. However, both these chemotherapeutic drugs can cause encephalopathy. A 17-year-old girl presented with profound hearing loss and dizziness during a postoperative course of ifosfamide, 20 days after a course of methotrexate. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed bilateral white matter hypersignal in Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery sequences. The clinical evolution was rapidly favorable after methylene blue infusion. This is the second reported case of acute deafness, possibly associated with ifosfamide, whereas MRI data revealed unnoticed chronic methotrexate toxicity. Systematic MRI screening and hearing evaluation may be useful in such cases.

  15. Tranilast reduces serum IL-6 and IL-13 and protects against thioacetamide-induced acute liver injury and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Rania R; Elkashef, Wagdi F; Said, Eman

    2015-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious neuropsychiatric disorder usually affecting either acute or chronic hepatic failure patients. Hepatic encephalopathy was replicated in a validated rat model to assess the potential protective efficacy of tranilast against experimentally induced hepatic encephalopathy. Thioacetamide injection significantly impaired hepatic synthetic, metabolic and excretory functions with significant increase in serum NO, IL-6 and IL-13 levels and negative shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance. Most importantly, there was a significant increase in serum ammonia levels with significant astrocytes' swelling and vacuolization; hallmarks of hepatic encephalopathy. Tranilast administration (300 mg/kg, orally) for 15 days significantly improved hepatic functions, restored oxidant/antioxidant balance, reduced serum NO, IL-6 and IL-13 levels. Meanwhile, serum ammonia significantly declined with significant reduction in astrocytes' swelling and vacuolization. Several mechanisms can be implicated in the observed hepato- and neuroprotective potentials of tranilast, such as its anti-inflammatory potential, its antioxidant potential as well as its immunomodulatory properties.

  16. [Wernicke encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Djelantik, M; Bloemkolk, D; Tijdink, J

    2015-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is an acute neuropsychiatric disease with heterogeneous symptoms, including changes in mental status, ataxia and ocular abnormalities; if left untreated, these symptoms can lead to morbidity and even to mortality. The treatment is thiamine suppletion. Because of the heterogeneity of the symptoms and the high risk of morbidity and mortality if the symptoms are not treated, it is vitally important that on observing a patient's early symptoms the clinician immediately suspects that the symptoms could point to Wernicke encephalopathy.

  17. Bilirubin prevents acute DSS-induced colitis by inhibiting leukocyte infiltration and suppressing upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Stephen D; Vogel, Megan E; Kindel, Tammy L; Smith, Darcey L H; Idelman, Gila; Avissar, Uri; Kakarlapudi, Ganesh; Masnovi, Michelle E

    2015-11-15

    Bilirubin is thought to exert anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1)-dependent leukocyte migration and by suppressing the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). As VCAM-1 and iNOS are important mediators of tissue injury in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) murine model of inflammatory colitis, we examined whether bilirubin prevents colonic injury in DSS-treated mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were administered 2.5% DSS in the drinking water for 7 days, while simultaneously receiving intraperitoneal injections of bilirubin (30 mg/kg) or potassium phosphate vehicle. Disease activity was monitored, peripheral blood counts and serum nitrate levels were determined, and intestinal specimens were analyzed for histological injury, leukocyte infiltration, and iNOS expression. The effect of bilirubin on IL-5 production by HSB-2 cells and on Jurkat cell transendothelial migration also was determined. DSS-treated mice that simultaneously received bilirubin lost less body weight, had lower serum nitrate levels, and exhibited reduced disease severity than vehicle-treated animals. Concordantly, histopathological analyses revealed that bilirubin-treated mice manifested significantly less colonic injury, including reduced infiltration of eosinophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes, and diminished iNOS expression. Bilirubin administration also was associated with decreased eosinophil and monocyte infiltration into the small intestine, with a corresponding increase in peripheral blood eosinophilia. Bilirubin prevented Jurkat migration but did not alter IL-5 production. In conclusion, bilirubin prevents DSS-induced colitis by inhibiting the migration of leukocytes across the vascular endothelium and by suppressing iNOS expression.

  18. The Optimal Management of Acute Febrile Encephalopathy in the Aged Patient: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sheybani, Fereshte; Naderi, HamidReza; Sajjadi, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    The elderly comprise less than 13 percent of world population. Nonetheless, they represent nearly half of all hospitalized adults. Acute change in mental status from baseline is commonly seen among the elderly even when the main process does not involve the central nervous system. The term “geriatric syndrome” is used to capture those clinical conditions in older people that do not fit into discrete disease categories, including delirium, falls, frailty, dizziness, syncope, and urinary incontinence. Despite the growing number of elderly population, especially those who require hospitalization and the high burden of common infections accompanied by encephalopathy among them, there are several unresolved questions regarding the optimal management they deserve. The questions posed in this systematic review concern the need to rule out CNS infection in all elderly patients presented with fever and altered mental status in the routine management of febrile encephalopathy. In doing so, we sought to identify all potentially relevant articles using searches of web-based databases with no language restriction. Finally, we reviewed 93 research articles that were relevant to each part of our study. No prospective study was found to address how should AFE in the aged be optimally managed. PMID:26989409

  19. The role of gamma-aminobutyric acid/glycinergic synaptic transmission in mediating bilirubin-induced hyperexcitation in developing auditory neurons.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xin-Lu; Liang, Min; Shi, Hai-Bo; Wang, Lu-Yang; Li, Chun-Yan; Yin, Shan-Kai

    2016-01-05

    Hyperbilirubinemia is a common clinical phenomenon observed in human newborns. A high level of bilirubin can result in severe jaundice and bilirubin encephalopathy. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying bilirubin excitotoxicity are unclear. Our previous studies showed the action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)/glycine switches from excitatory to inhibitory during development in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), one of the most sensitive auditory nuclei to bilirubin toxicity. In the present study, we investigated the roles of GABAA/glycine receptors in the induction of bilirubin hyperexcitation in early developing neurons. Using the patch clamp technique, GABAA/glycine receptor-mediated spontaneous inhibitory synaptic currents (sIPSCs) were recorded from bushy and stellate cells in acute brainstem slices from young mice (postnatal day 2-6). Bilirubin significantly increased the frequency of sIPSCs, and this effect was prevented by pretreatments of slices with either fast or slow Ca(2+) chelators BAPTA-AM and EGTA-AM suggesting that bilirubin can increase the release of GABA/glycine via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms. Using cell-attached recording configuration, we found that antagonists of GABAA and glycine receptors strongly attenuated spontaneous spiking firings in P2-6 neurons but produced opposite effect in P15-19 neurons. Furthermore, these antagonists reversed bilirubin-evoked hyperexcitability in P2-6 neurons, indicating that excitatory action of GABA/glycinergic transmission specifically contribute to bilirubin-induced hyperexcitability in the early stage of development. Our results suggest that bilirubin-induced enhancement of presynaptic release GABA/Glycine via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms may play a critical role in mediating neuronal hyperexcitation associated with jaundice, implicating potential new strategies for predicting, preventing, and treating bilirubin neurotoxicity.

  20. [Methods for the prevention and treatment of toxico-hypoxic encephalopathy in patients with acute severe poisoning].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The study included 147 patients with toxico-hypoxic encephalopathy resulting from acute poisoning. It was shown that intensive therapy with cytoflavin (20 ml in 400 ml of 5% glucose solution twice daily for 7 days) reduced severity of hypoxic brain lesions and suppression of CNS as apparent from the improvement of its bioelectric activity. The recovery of CNS regulatory action on the life-sustaining systems of the body promoted normalization of the respiratory component of oxygen transport. The improvement of the patients' conditions in the acute phase contributed to accelerated recovery of cognitive-amnestic functions and social adaptation. Cytoflavin therapy improved the clinical picture of toxico-hypoxic encephalopathy due to the reduction in the duration of the comatose state from 45.3 +/- 8.2 to 27.7 +/- 6.9 hr and the decrease in the frequency of secondary pulmonary complications from 72.7 to 35.9%.

  1. Melphalan Culprit or Confounder in Acute Encephalopathy during Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Alayón-Laguer, Diógenes; Alsina, Melissa; Ochoa-Bayona, Jose L.; Ayala, Ernesto

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a female patient with Durie-Salmon stage 3A/ISS stage I IgG kappa multiple myeloma (MM) who developed encephalopathy after high-dose melphalan and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). The most common etiologies for encephalopathy such as infection, narcotic medications, metabolic-electrolyte disturbance, stroke, and central nervous system (CNS) hemorrhages were ruled out. The patient recovered from the altered mental status spontaneously. The possibilities of melphalan-induced encephalopathy versus critical-state delirium versus hypercytokinemia induce encephalopathy were contemplated. PMID:23259145

  2. Acute influenza virus-associated encephalitis and encephalopathy in adults: a challenging diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Linn, Francisca H. H.; Wensing, Anne M. J.; Leavis, Helen L.; van Riel, Debby; GeurtsvanKessel, Corine H.; Wattjes, Mike P.; Murk, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute influenza-associated encephalopathy/encephalitis (IAE) in adults is a rare but well-known complication of influenza virus infection. The diagnosis is difficult to make due to the absence of distinctive clinical symptoms and validated diagnostic criteria. We present an illustrative case and a case review on acute IAE in adults. Methods: We performed a Medline search of the English literature using the terms influenz*, encephal* and adult, and constructed a database of detailed descriptions of patients with influenza virus infection with influenza-like symptoms at the onset of neurological symptoms. Results: A total of 44 patients were included. Confusion and seizures were the most prevalent neurological symptoms, present in 12 (27 %) and 10 (23 %) patients, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 21 patients and anomalies were found in 13 (62 %), with lesions located throughout the brain. Influenza virus RNA was detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in 5 (16 %) of 32 patients. Eight (18 %) of the forty-four patients died. The benefits of antiviral and immunomodulatory therapy have not been well studied. Discussion: Our results show that many different neurological symptoms can be present in patients with acute onset IAE. Therefore, the diagnosis should be considered in patients with fever and neurological symptoms, especially during the influenza season. Laboratory diagnosis consists of demonstration of influenza virus RNA in brain tissue, CSF or respiratory samples, and demonstration of intrathecal antibody production against influenza virus. The presence of brain lesions in MRI and influenza virus in CSF appear to be of prognostic value. PMID:28348797

  3. Blood Test: Bilirubin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Blood Test: Bilirubin KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Bilirubin A A A What's in this article? What ... Análisis de sangre: bilirrubina What It Is A bilirubin test measures the level of bilirubin (a byproduct ...

  4. Hepatic encephalopathy with reversible focal neurologic signs resembling acute stroke: case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Yamazaki, Mineo; Katayama, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    A 64-year-old female with a history of primary biliary cirrhosis and esophageal varices starting at age 39 was brought to our Stroke Care Unit by ambulance with right-side weakness and speech difficulty. Physical examination revealed right hemiparesis (including the face), sensory disturbances, pathological reflexes, and slightly decreased consciousness, with a Glasgow Coma Scale rating of E3V4M6. Flapping tremors and speech disturbance, as well as anarithmia, construction apraxia, and ideomotor apraxia, were noted, and her National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 13. Initially, the patient was diagnosed with acute stroke and treated accordingly; however, subsequent findings from clinical images and electroencephalography led to a diagnosis of focal neurologic signs due to hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The patient had significantly reduced cerebral blood flow in the left side of the brain, probably due to microsurgical repair of an aneurysm done 2 years earlier. HE with exaggerated chronic liver damage might have made the previously silent ischemia clinically apparent. This interpretation is supported by the fact that the patient's neurologic deficits resolved once HE was adequately controlled. This case illustrates the need for careful assessment of background pathophysiology when diagnosing patients with stroke-like symptoms.

  5. Predictive score for early diagnosis of acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD).

    PubMed

    Tada, Hiroko; Takanashi, Jun-ichi; Okuno, Hideo; Kubota, Masaya; Yamagata, Takanori; Kawano, Gou; Shiihara, Takashi; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Hirose, Shinichi; Hayashi, Takuya; Osaka, Hitoshi; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2015-11-15

    Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) at onset manifests an early seizure (ES) usually lasting more than 30 min. Following ES, some patients exhibit almost clear consciousness with no neurological symptoms, and no MRI abnormality for a few days, which may lead to an initial misdiagnosis of prolonged febrile seizures (PFS). To allow an early diagnosis of AESD, we retrospectively analyzed clinical manifestations, laboratory data, and radiologic and EEG findings in patients with AESD (n=62) having ES of over 30 min, and ones with PFS (n=54), using logistic regression analyses. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that an age below 1.5 years and a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 14 or less than 14 (Japan Coma Scale score of 1 or higher) were high risk factors of developing AESD. We proposed an AESD prediction score system consisting of consciousness level, age, duration of convulsions, enforcement of mechanical intubation, and aspartate aminotransferase, blood glucose and creatinine levels (full score: 9), the mean scores in AESD and PFS being 5.9 and 1.8, which were significantly different (p<0.001). We herein propose a scoring system for differentiating patients with AESD and PFS around the time of ES (score of 4 or more than 4 suggesting AESD), which may contribute to early therapeutic intervention and an improved neurologic outcome.

  6. Complete recovery from acute encephalopathy of late-onset ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency in a 3-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Mak, C M; Siu, T-S; Lam, C-W; Chan, G C-F; Poon, G W-K; Wong, K-Y; Low, L C-K; Tang, N L; Li, S K; Lau, K-Y; Kwong, N-S; Tam, S

    2007-11-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency is the commonest urea cycle disorder which is transmitted in X-linked inheritance. It is mainly characterized in males by acute encephalopathy and hyperammonaemia with fatal outcomes in both classical neonatal and late-onset types. We report a 3-year-old healthy Hong Kong Chinese boy who presented with acute encephalopathy and coma after three days of gastroenteritis. He had no focal neurological deficit and brain CT imaging was normal. His plasma ammonia (54 micromol/L) and glutamine (747 micromol/L) concentrations were normal. The only biochemical abnormalities detected were marked orotic aciduria (700 micromol/mmol creatinine) and elevated urinary uracil. He regained consciousness spontaneously after three days under intensive care with parenteral fluid therapy. He recovered completely without any neurological deficits. Five months after discharge, urinary uracil concentration remained elevated despite normalized orotic acid concentration. Finally, ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency was diagnosed by DNA analysis. A missense mutation of arginine-to-glutamine substitution on amino acid 277 (p.R277Q) was revealed to be a late-onset mutant. Our case strengthens the argument that in any child with coma or acute encephalopathy of undetermined cause, genetic analysis of the OTC gene and the measurement of urinary uracil concentration remain the most reliable indicators of late-onset OTCD during acute and even quiescent phases. Existing neonatal screening programmes for inheritable metabolic disorders fail to detect late-onset variants. Therefore, a high clinical suspicion is a key to correct and timely diagnosis, especially in those patients with atypical presentations.

  7. Ornicetil on encephalopathy. Effect of ornicetil (ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate) on encephalopathy in patients with acute and chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chainuvati, T; Plengvanit, U; Viranuvatti, V

    1977-12-01

    Di-L (+)-ornithine, alpha ketogluterate infusions were compared with infusions of dextrose water in 27 comatosed patients with acute and chronic liver disease. Of 7 patients with acute liver disease no improvement of conciousness was found in any of these patients. Of 20 patients with chronic liver disease, lowering of blood ammonia level during ornicetil therapy occurred in 8, during the control infusion in 6, and no effect was seen in 4. Improvement of conciousness during ornicetil occurred in 11, during the control infusion in 6 and 3 had no improvement. Among those who improved, 4 in the ornicetil group and 2 in the control group improved after the precipitating causes were controlled or corrected. This study indicated that ornicetil has no beneficial effect on the treatment of coma in various forms of hepatic disease.

  8. Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion associated with staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome caused by burns.

    PubMed

    Yokochi, Takaoki; Sakanishi, Shinpei; Ishidou, Yuuki; Kawano, Go; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Akita, Yukihiro; Obu, Keizo

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) associated with toxic shock syndrome caused by burns. A one-year-old girl was admitted to our hospital for treatment of severe burns. On day 3, she exhibited a fever, generalized rash and multiple organ failure. She was diagnosed with toxic shock syndrome after burns. She had seizures with fever twice on the same day, followed by secondary seizures on day 8 and transient deterioration of the gross motor functions involved in sitting alone and rolling over. On day 9, MRI diffusion-weighted images showed bright tree appearance (BTA). We conclude that she developed AESD.

  9. Blood Test: Bilirubin

    MedlinePlus

    ... two forms in the body: indirect (unconjugated) and direct (conjugated). Indirect bilirubin, which doesn't dissolve in ... liver to be changed into the soluble form, direct bilirubin. Why It's Done Healthy newborns — especially those ...

  10. Current pathogenetic aspects of hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Cichoż-Lach, Halina; Michalak, Agata

    2013-01-07

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a medical phenomenon that is described as a neuropsychiatric manifestation of chronic or acute liver disease that is characterized by psychomotor, intellectual and cognitive abnormalities with emotional/affective and behavioral disturbances. This article focuses on the underlying mechanisms of the condition and the differences between hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious condition that can cause neurological death with brain edema and intracranial hypertension. It is assumed that approximately 60%-80% of patients with liver cirrhosis develop hepatic encephalopathy. This review explores the complex mechanisms that lead to hepatic encephalopathy. However, noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is not associated with hepatic diseases and has a completely different etiology. Noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a severe occurrence that is connected with multiple pathogeneses.

  11. Nitric oxide mediates effects of acute, not chronic, naltrexone on LPS-induced hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic rats.

    PubMed

    Ghiassy, Bentolhoda; Rahimi, Nastaran; Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest endogenous opioids and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, the interaction between the opioid receptor antagonist and NO was investigated on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HE in cirrhotic rats. Male rats were divided in the sham- and bile duct ligation (BDL)-operated groups. Animals were treated with saline; naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i.p.); or L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or in combination with naltrexone. To induce HE, LPS (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 1 h after the final drug treatment. HE scoring, hepatic histology, and plasma NO metabolites levels and mortality rate were recorded. Deteriorated level of consciousness and mortality after LPS administration significantly ameliorated following both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone in cirrhotic rats. However, acute and chronic administration of L-NAME did not change HE scores in cirrhotic rats. The effects of acute but not chronic treatment of naltrexone on HE parameters were reversed by L-NAME. Plasma NOx concentrations elevated in BDL rats, which were decreased after acute and chronic treatment by naltrexone or L-NAME, significantly. We suggest both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone improved LPS-induced HE. But, only acute treatment with naltrexone may affect through NO pathway.

  12. Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, H C; Marsharani, U

    2000-05-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a subacute condition associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. Its presentation varies from focal neurologic deficits to global confusion. Unlike encephalopathy associated with hypothyroidism, Hashimoto's encephalopathy responds to steroid therapy and not thyroxine replacement.

  13. Bilirubin oxidation in brain.

    PubMed

    Hansen, T W

    2000-01-01

    Bilirubin is a product of heme catabolism which by virtue of its lipid solubility can cross the blood-brain barrier and enter the brain. Neonatal jaundice is a common transitional phenomenon which is due to the combination of increased heme catabolism and rate limitations as far as hepatic conjugation and biliary excretion of bilirubin. In the great majority of cases this is an innocuous condition, which is even posited to have some beneficial effects due to the ability of bilirubin to quench free oxygen radicals. However, because bilirubin is neurotoxic, hyperbilirubinemia in the newborn may exceptionally result in death in the neonatal period, or survival with severe neurological sequelae (kernicterus). Bilirubin enters the brain through an intact blood-brain barrier. Clearance of bilirubin from brain partly involves retro-transfer through the blood-brain barrier, and possibly also through the brain-CSF barrier into CSF. Work in our lab during the past 5 years has substantiated earlier work which had suggested that bilirubin may also be metabolized in brain. The responsible enzyme is found on the inner mitochondrial membrane, and oxidizes bilirubin at a rate of 100-300 pmol bilirubin/mg protein/minute. The enzyme activity is lower in the newborn compared with the mature animal, and is also lower in neurons compared with glia. Studies of different rat strains have documented genetic variability. The enzyme is cytochrome-c-dependent, but has as yet not been unequivocally identified. The rate of oxidation of bilirubin is such that this enzyme probably contributes meaningfully to the clearance of bilirubin from brain.

  14. MR Imaging Findings in Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Acute Wernicke's Encephalopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Gaetana; De Gennaro, Angela; Cozzolino, Attilio; Serino, Antonietta; Fenza, Giacomo; Manto, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological syndrome caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency and clinically characterized by the sudden onset of mental status changes, ocular abnormalities, and ataxia. Apart from chronic alcoholism, the most common cause of WE, a lot of other conditions causing malnutrition and decreasing thiamine absorption such as gastrointestinal surgical procedures and hyperemesis gravidarum must be considered as predisposing factors. Due to its low prevalence and clinical heterogeneity, WE is often misdiagnosed, leading to persistent dysfunctions and, in some cases, to death. Nowadays, MR imaging of the brain, showing T2 and FLAIR hyperintensities in typical (thalami, mammillary bodies, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area) and atypical areas (cerebellum, cranial nerve nuclei, and cerebral cortex), is surely the most important and effective tool in the diagnostic assessment of WE. The aim of this paper is to propose a state of the art of the role of MR imaging in the early diagnosis of this complex disease. PMID:25050351

  15. Formation of bilirubin glucoside

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kim Ping

    1971-01-01

    1. Rat liver microsomal preparation can effect the transglucosylation from UDP-glucose to bilirubin in the presence of Mg2+. 2. Other nucleotides, namely CDP-glucose, ADP-glucose and GDP-glucose, were not active as glucosyl donors. 3. Only trace amounts of galactose, galacturonic acid and N-acetylglucosamine were conjugated to bilirubin when their respective UDP derivatives were used in the reaction mixture. 4. The azobilirubin glucosides produced by coupling with p-diazobenzenesulphonic acid and diazotized ethyl anthranilic acid were separable from the corresponding azobilirubin glucuronides by t.l.c. 5. The glucoside was, however, hydrolysed by both β-glucosidase and various preparations of β-glucuronidase; azobilirubin and glucose were liberated in the process. 6. Kinetic studies showed that the effects of pH and Mg2+ on the two conjugating systems were similar. 7. The specific activities of hepatic bilirubin UDP-glucosyltransferase, expressed as μg of bilirubin `equivalents' conjugated/h per mg of protein, are respectively 1.7 and 2.4 for male and female rats. 8. The Km values for bilirubin and UDP-glucose are 5.7×10−5m and 1.6×10−3m respectively. 9. The glucoside and glucuronide conjugations of bilirubin are discussed in relation to the availability of the conjugating agents and aglycone in the liver. ImagesFig. 1. PMID:5144254

  16. Modification in CSF specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and acute on chronic liver failure independent of encephalopathy, evidences for an early blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Nicolas; Rosselli, Matteo; Mouri, Sarah; Galanaud, Damien; Puybasset, Louis; Agarwal, Banwari; Thabut, Dominique; Jalan, Rajiv

    2017-04-01

    Although hepatic encephalopathy (HE) on the background of acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) is associated with high mortality rates, it is unknown whether this is due to increased blood-brain barrier permeability. Specific gravity of cerebrospinal fluid measured by CT is able to estimate blood-cerebrospinal fluid-barrier permeability. This study aimed to assess cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and to compare it in patients with or without ACLF and with or without hepatic encephalopathy. We identified all the patients admitted for acute decompensation of cirrhosis who underwent a brain CT-scan. Those patients could present acute decompensation with or without ACLF. The presence of hepatic encephalopathy was noted. They were compared to a group of stable cirrhotic patients and healthy controls. Quantitative brain CT analysis used the Brainview software that gives the weight, the volume and the specific gravity of each determined brain regions. Results are given as median and interquartile ranges and as relative variation compared to the control/baseline group. 36 patients presented an acute decompensation of cirrhosis. Among them, 25 presented with ACLF and 11 without ACLF; 20 presented with hepatic encephalopathy grade ≥ 2. They were compared to 31 stable cirrhosis patients and 61 healthy controls. Cirrhotic patients had increased cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity (CSF-SG) compared to healthy controls (+0.4 %, p < 0.0001). Cirrhotic patients with ACLF have decreased CSF-SG as compared to cirrhotic patients without ACLF (-0.2 %, p = 0.0030) that remained higher than in healthy controls. The presence of hepatic encephalopathy did not modify CSF-SG (-0.09 %, p = 0.1757). Specific gravity did not differ between different brain regions according to the presence or absence of either ACLF or HE. In patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis, and those with ACLF, CSF specific gravity is modified compared to

  17. Clinically mild infantile encephalopathy associated with excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Nozomi; Yoshimaru, Daisuke; Moriyama, Yoko; Honda, Takafumi; Yasukawa, Kumi; Takanashi, Jun-Ichi

    2017-02-15

    Acute infectious encephalopathy is very frequently observed in children in East Asia including Japan. Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) is the most common subtype in Japan; however, more than 40% of the patients remain unclassified into specific syndromes. To investigate the underlying pathomechanism in those with unclassified acute encephalopathy, we evaluated brain metabolism by MR spectroscopy. Among 20 patients with acute encephalopathy admitted to our hospital during January 2015 to May 2016, 12 could not be classified into specific syndromes. MR spectroscopy was performed in 8 of these 12 patients with unclassified encephalopathy. MR spectroscopy showed an increase of glutamine with a normal N-acetyl aspartate level on days 3 to 8 in three of the 8 patients, which had normalized by follow-up studies. The three patients clinically recovered completely. This study suggests that excitotoxicity may be the underlying pathomechanism in some patients with unclassified mild encephalopathy.

  18. Toxic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Woo

    2012-01-01

    This article schematically reviews the clinical features, diagnostic approaches to, and toxicological implications of toxic encephalopathy. The review will focus on the most significant occupational causes of toxic encephalopathy. Chronic toxic encephalopathy, cerebellar syndrome, parkinsonism, and vascular encephalopathy are commonly encountered clinical syndromes of toxic encephalopathy. Few neurotoxins cause patients to present with pathognomonic neurological syndromes. The symptoms and signs of toxic encephalopathy may be mimicked by many psychiatric, metabolic, inflammatory, neoplastic, and degenerative diseases of the nervous system. Thus, the importance of good history-taking that considers exposure and a comprehensive neurological examination cannot be overemphasized in the diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy. Neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging typically play ancillary roles. The recognition of toxic encephalopathy is important because the correct diagnosis of occupational disease can prevent others (e.g., workers at the same worksite) from further harm by reducing their exposure to the toxin, and also often provides some indication of prognosis. Physicians must therefore be aware of the typical signs and symptoms of toxic encephalopathy, and close collaborations between neurologists and occupational physicians are needed to determine whether neurological disorders are related to occupational neurotoxin exposure. PMID:23251840

  19. Evaluation of oxidant and antioxidant status in term neonates: a plausible protective role of bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Shekeeb Shahab, M; Kumar, Praveen; Sharma, Neeraj; Narang, Anil; Prasad, Rajendra

    2008-10-01

    In vitro studies have shown unequivocally that bilirubin is an antioxidant. We hypothesized that bilirubin serves a physiological role of an antioxidant in vivo. To investigate the probable protective role of bilirubin in vivo, term babies with clinical jaundice were grouped into four categories-serum total bilirubin (STB) <160 mg/l, 160-200 mg/l, >200 mg/l, and kernicterus. Serum bilirubin, serum albumin, plasma glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), lipid peroxidation in blood cells, and reduced glutathione (GSH) content in whole blood were investigated. We also measured superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in hemolysate and total plasma antioxidant capacity (TAC). Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes were significantly lower in babies with STB <200 mg/l compared to controls. TAC had a positive and MDA had a negative correlation with STB till 200 mg/l. However, TAC had a negative and MDA had a positive correlation with bilirubin >200 mg/l and in babies with bilirubin encephalopathy. Elevated levels of MDA, SOD, and catalase and significantly decreased levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were observed in STB >200 mg/l group. Antioxidant enzymes were also significantly inhibited in bilirubin encephalopathy babies. Post phototherapy, MDA production and antioxidant levels were significantly increased whilst total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were significantly decreased compared to pre-phototherapy values. Exchange transfusion resulted in reduced oxidative stress in subjects with encephalopathy, whereas no significant difference was observed in other babies with STB >200 mg/l. Taken together, the present study propounds that bilirubin acts as a physiological antioxidant till 200 mg/l concentration in full-term normal neonates. It is conjectured that beyond 200 mg/l, it can no longer be considered physiologic. However, the cause of pathological jaundice needs to be identified and treated. The present data documents

  20. Optical transcutaneous bilirubin detector

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-11-09

    A transcutaneous bilirubin detector is designed comprising a source of light having spectral components absorbable and not absorbable by bilirubin, a handle assembly, electronic circuitry and a fiber optic bundle connecting the assembly to the light source and circuitry. Inside the assembly is a prism that receives the light from one end of the fiber optic bundle and directs it onto the skin and directs the reflected light back into the bundle. The other end of the bundle is trifucated, with one end going to the light source and the other two ends going to circuitry that determines how much light of each kind has been reflected. A relatively greater amount absorbed by the skin from the portion of the spectrum absorbable by bilirubin may indicate the presence of the illness. Preferably, two measurements are made, one on the kneecap and one on the forehead, and compared to determine the presence of bilirubin. To reduce the impact of light absorption by hemoglobin in the blood carried by the skin, pressure is applied with a plunger and spring in the handle assembly, the pressure limited by points of a button slidably carried in the assembly that are perceived by touch when the pressure applied is sufficient. 6 figures.

  1. Optical transcutaneous bilirubin detector

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    A transcutaneous bilirubin detector comprising a source of light having spectral components absorbable and not absorbable by bilirubin, a handle assembly, electronic circuitry and a fiber optic bundle connecting the assembly to the light source and circuitry. Inside the assembly is a prism that receives the light from one end of the fiber optic bundle and directs it onto the skin and directs the reflected light back into the bundle. The other end of the bundle is trifucated, with one end going to the light source and the other two ends going to circuitry that determines how much light of each kind has been reflected. A relatively greater amount absorbed by the skin from the portion of the spectrum absorbable by bilirubin may indicate the presence of the illness. Preferably, two measurements are made, one on the kneecap and one on the forehead, and compared to determine the presence of bilirubin. To reduce the impact of light absorption by hemoglobin in the blood carried by the skin, pressure is applied with a plunger and spring in the handle assembly, the pressure limited by points of a button slidably carried in the assembly that are perceived by touch when the pressure applied is sufficient.

  2. Optical transcutaneous bilirubin detector

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-03-04

    This invention consists of a transcutaneous bilirubin detector comprising a source of light having spectral components absorbable and not absorbable by bilirubin, a handle assembly, electronic circuitry and a fiber optic bundle connecting the assembly to the light source and circuitry. Inside the assembly is a prism that receives the light from one end of the fiber optic bundle and directs it onto the skin and directs the reflected light back into the bundle. The other end of the bundle is trifucated, with one end going to the light source and the other two ends going to circuitry that determines how much light of each kind has been reflected. A relatively greater amount absorbed by the skin from the portion of the spectrum absorbable by bilirubin may indicate the presence of the illness. Preferably, two measurements are made, one on the kneecap and one on the forehead, and compared to determine the presence of bilirubin. To reduce the impact of light absorption by hemoglobin in the blood carried by the skin, pressure is applied with a plunger and spring in the handle assembly, the pressure limited by points of a button slidably carried in the assembly that are perceived by touch when the pressure applied is sufficient.

  3. Eosinophilic Fasciitis and Acute Encephalopathy Toxicity from Pembrolizumab Treatment of a Patient with Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Maurice, Catherine; Chappell, MaryAnne; MacMillan, Leslie; Al-Habeeb, Ayman S; Al-Faraidy, Nada; Butler, Marcus O; Rogalla, Patrik; Mason, Warren; Joshua, Anthony M; Hogg, David

    2016-03-01

    Anti-PD-1 inhibitors have significant activity in metastatic melanoma. Responses often occur early and may be sustained. The optimal duration of treatment with these agents is unknown. Here, we report the case of a 51-year-old woman treated with pembrolizumab, as part of the Keynote-001 trial, as first-line treatment for metastatic disease. She experienced a complete response after 13.8 months of treatment with no adverse events. One month after the last drug infusion and 18 months from starting treatment, the patient presented with eosinophilic fasciitis. She then developed acute confusion and weakness, thought to be due to intracranial vasculitis. High-dose steroids were initiated with resolution of the fasciitis. Aspirin was commenced for presumed vasculitis with resolution of the neurologic symptoms. To our knowledge, there are no previous reports of eosinophilic fasciitis or cerebral vasculitis due to anti-PD-1 agents. This case demonstrates that toxicity may occur in association with pembrolizumab treatment after a prolonged period of treatment without toxicity. Future trials should explore the optimal duration of treatment with pembrolizumab.

  4. Bilirubin measurements in neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Gregory J.

    2000-04-01

    Infant Jaundice is a physiologic condition of elevated bilirubin in the tissue that affects nearly 60 percent of all term newborns and virtually 100 percent of premature infants. The high production of bilirubin in the newborn circulatory system and the inability of the immature liver to process and eliminate it case the condition. When the bilirubin levels rise, it starts to deposit in the baby's skin and in the brain. The deposits in the brain can cause neurologic impairment and death. The BiliCheck is a handheld, battery-powered device that measures the level of jaundice non-invasively using BioPhotonics at the point of care. The result is displayed on an LCD screen immediately, so physicians can now make treatment decision without waiting for results to return from the lab. The BiliCheck System has been marketed worldwide since April of 1998 and has received FDA clearance for use in the USA on pre-photo therapy infants in March of 1999.

  5. Aquaporin-4 Deletion in Mice Reduces Encephalopathy and Brain Edema in Experimental Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V.; Verkman, A. S.; Curtis, Kevin M.; Norenberg, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Brain edema and associated astrocyte swelling leading to increased intracranial pressure are hallmarks of acute liver failure (ALF). Elevated blood and brain levels of ammonia have been implicated in the development of brain edema in ALF. Cultured astrocytes treated with ammonia have been shown to undergo cell swelling and such swelling was associated with an increase in the plasma membrane expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) protein. Further, silencing the AQP4 gene in cultured astrocytes was shown to prevent the ammonia-induced cell swelling. Here, we examined the evolution of brain edema in AQP4-null mice and their wild type counterparts (WT-mice) in different models of ALF induced by thioacetamide (TAA) or acetaminophen (APAP). Induction of ALF with TAA or APAP significantly increased brain water content in WT mice (by 1.6 ± 0.3 and 2.3 ± 0.4 %, respectively). AQP4 protein was significantly increased in brain plasma membranes of WT mice with ALF induced by either TAA or APAP. In contrast to WT-mice, brain water content did not increase in AQP4-null mice. Additionally, AQP4-null mice treated with either TAA or APAP showed a remarkably lesser degree of neurological deficits as compared to WT mice; the latter displayed an inability to maintain proper gait, and demonstrated a markedly reduced exploratory behavior, with the mice remaining in one corner of the cage with its head tilted downwards. These results support a central role of AQP4 in the brain edema associated with ALF. PMID:24321433

  6. Increased toll-like receptor 4 in cerebral endothelial cells contributes to the astrocyte swelling and brain edema in acute hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Tong, Xiao Y; Curtis, Kevin M; Ruiz-Cordero, Roberto; Abreu, Maria T; Norenberg, Michael D

    2014-03-01

    Astrocyte swelling and the subsequent increase in intracranial pressure and brain herniation are major clinical consequences in patients with acute hepatic encephalopathy. We recently reported that conditioned media from brain endothelial cells (ECs) exposed to ammonia, a mixture of cytokines (CKs) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), when added to astrocytes caused cell swelling. In this study, we investigated the possibility that ammonia and inflammatory agents activate the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in ECs, resulting in the release of factors that ultimately cause astrocyte swelling. We found a significant increase in TLR4 protein expression when ECs were exposed to ammonia, CKs or LPS alone, while exposure of ECs to a combination of these agents potentiate such effects. In addition, astrocytes exposed to conditioned media from TLR4-silenced ECs that were treated with ammonia, CKs or LPS, resulted in a significant reduction in astrocyte swelling. TLR4 protein up-regulation was also detected in rat brain ECs after treatment with the liver toxin thioacetamide, and that thioacetamide-treated TLR4 knock-out mice exhibited a reduction in brain edema. These studies strongly suggest that ECs significantly contribute to the astrocyte swelling/brain edema in acute hepatic encephalopathy, likely as a consequence of increased TLR4 protein expression by blood-borne noxious agents.

  7. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy and autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Encephalopathy occasionally occurs in association with thyroid disorders, but most of these are treatable. These encephalopathies include a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with hypothyroidism, called myxedema encephalopathy. Moreover, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) has been recognized as a new clinical disease based on an autoimmune mechanism associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Steroid treatment was successfully administered to these patients. Recently, we discovered that the serum autoantibodies against the NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) are highly specific diagnostic biomarkers for HE. Further, we analyzed serum anti-NAE autoantibodies and the clinical features in many cases of HE from institutions throughout Japan and other countries. Approximately half of assessed HE patients carry anti-NAE antibodies. The age was widely distributed with 2 peaks (20-30 years and 50-70 years). Most HE patients were in euthyroid states, and all patients had anti-thyroid (TG) antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies. Anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies were observed in some cases. The common neuropsychiatry features are consciousness disturbance and psychosis, followed by cognitive dysfunction, involuntary movements, seizures, and ataxia. Abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow on brain SPECT were common findings, whereas abnormal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rare. HE patients have various clinical phenotypes such as the acute encephalopathy form, the chronic psychiatric form, and other particular clinical forms, including limbic encephalitis, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)-like form. The cerebellar ataxic form of HE clinically mimics spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and is characterized by the absence of nystagmus, absent or mild cerebellar atrophy, and lazy background activities on EEG. Taken together, these data suggest that the possibility of

  8. Total corpus callosotomy for epileptic spasms after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) in a case with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Okanishi, Tohru; Fujimoto, Ayataka; Motoi, Hirotaka; Kanai, Sotaro; Nishimura, Mitsuyo; Yamazoe, Tomohiro; Takagi, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Takamichi; Enoki, Hideo

    2016-12-03

    Corpus callosotomy is a palliative therapy for refractory epilepsy, including West syndrome, without a resectable epileptic focus. The surgical outcome of corpus callosotomy is relatively favorable in cryptogenic (non-lesional) West syndrome. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a disorder that frequently leads to the development of refractory seizures by multiple cortical tubers. The multiple cortical tubers cause multiple or wide epileptic networks in these cases. Most of West syndrome cases in TSC with multiple tubers need additional resective surgery after corpus callosotomy. We describe a case of TSC in a boy aged 4years and 8months. He had multiple cortical tubers on his brain and developed epileptic spasms. The seizures were controlled with valproate. At the age of 1year and 4months, he presented with acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), and had relapsed epileptic spasms one month after the onset of the encephalopathy. The seizures were refractory to multiple antiepileptic drugs. A total corpus callosotomy was performed at the age of 3years and 8months. The patient did not show any seizures after the surgery. During 12months of the follow-up, the patient was free from any seizures. Even in cases of symptomatic WS with multiple lesions, total corpus callosotomy may be a good strategy if the patients have secondary diffuse brain insults.

  9. Infection-Triggered Familial or Recurrent Cases of Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy Caused by Mutations in a Component of the Nuclear Pore, RANBP2

    PubMed Central

    Neilson, Derek E.; Adams, Mark D.; Orr, Caitlin M.D.; Schelling, Deborah K.; Eiben, Robert M.; Kerr, Douglas S.; Anderson, Jane; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Bye, Ann M.; Childs, Anne-Marie; Clarke, Antonia; Crow, Yanick J.; Di Rocco, Maja; Dohna-Schwake, Christian; Dueckers, Gregor; Fasano, Alfonso E.; Gika, Artemis D.; Gionnis, Dimitris; Gorman, Mark P.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic J.; Hackenberg, Annette; Kuster, Alice; Lentschig, Markus G.; Lopez-Laso, Eduardo; Marco, Elysa J.; Mastroyianni, Sotiria; Perrier, Julie; Schmitt-Mechelke, Thomas; Servidei, Serenella; Skardoutsou, Angeliki; Uldall, Peter; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Goglin, Karrie C.; Tefft, David L.; Aubin, Cristin; de Jager, Philip; Hafler, David; Warman, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rapidly progressive encephalopathy that can occur in otherwise healthy children after common viral infections such as influenza and parainfluenza. Most ANE is sporadic and nonrecurrent (isolated ANE). However, we identified a 7 Mb interval containing a susceptibility locus (ANE1) in a family segregating recurrent ANE as an incompletely penetrant, autosomal-dominant trait. We now report that all affected individuals and obligate carriers in this family are heterozygous for a missense mutation (c.1880C→T, p.Thr585Met) in the gene encoding the nuclear pore protein Ran Binding Protein 2 (RANBP2). To determine whether this mutation is the susceptibility allele, we screened controls and other patients with ANE who are unrelated to the index family. Patients from 9 of 15 additional kindreds with familial or recurrent ANE had the identical mutation. It arose de novo in two families and independently in several other families. Two other patients with familial ANE had different RANBP2 missense mutations that altered conserved residues. None of the three RANBP2 missense mutations were found in 19 patients with isolated ANE or in unaffected controls. We conclude that missense mutations in RANBP2 are susceptibility alleles for familial and recurrent cases of ANE. PMID:19118815

  10. Cat scratch encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Silver, B E; Bean, C S

    1991-06-01

    Cat scratch disease is usually benign, self-limited and without sequelae. Margileth has established four clinical criteria, three of which must be satisfied to make the diagnosis: 1) a history of animal exposure, usually kitten, with primary skin or ocular lesions; 2) regional chronic adenopathy without other apparent cause; 3) a positive cat scratch disease antigen skin test; and 4) lymph node biopsy demonstrating noncaseating granulomas and germinal center hyperplasia. Central nervous system involvement in cat scratch disease has been previously reported, although it is extremely uncommon. In a several-month period, we encountered two cases of cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy. The intents of this paper are twofold: 1) to briefly review the current literature on cat scratch disease, 2) to demonstrate that cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy presents acutely with seizures, posturing and coma and resolves rapidly with supportive care.

  11. Wernicke encephalopathy and ethanol-related syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Eun; Lee, Eun Ja; Young, Jeong Bo; Shin, Dong Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2014-04-01

    Ethanol causes diverse neurologic conditions caused by acute and chronic brain damage. This review provides an overview of Wernicke encephalopathy and other ethanol-related brain changes, such as chronic brain atrophy, Marchiafava-Bignami disease, osmotic demyelination syndrome, chronic hepatic encephalopathy, and acute alcohol withdrawal. As clinical symptoms of this spectrum of diseases have nonspecific neurologic alterations, radiologists should have current radiologic information and understand the imaging findings pertaining to the pathophysiology to support diagnosis.

  12. The Biological Effects of Bilirubin Photoisomers.

    PubMed

    Jasprova, Jana; Dal Ben, Matteo; Vianello, Eleonora; Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanova, Marie; Vyroubalova, Karolina; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Sticha, Martin; Cerna, Marcela; Vitek, Libor

    2016-01-01

    Although phototherapy was introduced as early as 1950's, the potential biological effects of bilirubin photoisomers (PI) generated during phototherapy remain unclear. The aim of our study was to isolate bilirubin PI in their pure forms and to assess their biological effects in vitro. The three major bilirubin PI (ZE- and EZ-bilirubin and Z-lumirubin) were prepared by photo-irradiation of unconjugated bilirubin. The individual photoproducts were chromatographically separated (TLC, HPLC), and their identities verified by mass spectrometry. The role of Z-lumirubin (the principle bilirubin PI) on the dissociation of bilirubin from albumin was tested by several methods: peroxidase, fluorescence quenching, and circular dichroism. The biological effects of major bilirubin PI (cell viability, expression of selected genes, cell cycle progression) were tested on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. Lumirubin was found to have a binding site on human serum albumin, in the subdomain IB (or at a close distance to it); and thus, different from that of bilirubin. Its binding constant to albumin was much lower when compared with bilirubin, and lumirubin did not affect the level of unbound bilirubin (Bf). Compared to unconjugated bilirubin, bilirubin PI did not have any effect on either SH-SY5Y cell viability, the expression of genes involved in bilirubin metabolism or cell cycle progression, nor in modulation of the cell cycle phase. The principle bilirubin PI do not interfere with bilirubin albumin binding, and do not exert any toxic effect on human neuroblastoma cells.

  13. Rifaximin in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Iadevaia, Maddalena Diana; Prete, Anna Del; Cesaro, Claudia; Gaeta, Laura; Zulli, Claudio; Loguercio, Carmelina

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a challenging complication in patients with advanced liver disease. It can be defined as a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by portosystemic venous shunting, ranging from minimal to overt hepatic encephalopathy or coma. Its pathophysiology is still unclear, although increased levels of ammonia play a key role. Diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy is currently based on specific tests evaluating the neuropsychiatric state of patients and their quality of life; the severity of hepatic encephalopathy is measured by the West Haven criteria. Treatment of hepatic encephalopathy consists of pharmacological and corrective measures, as well as nutritional interventions. Rifaximin received approval for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in 2010 because of its few side effects and pharmacological benefits. The aim of this work is to review the use and efficacy of rifaximin both in acute and long-term management of hepatic encephalopathy. Treatment of overt hepatic encephalopathy involves management of the acute episode as well as maintenance of remission in those patients who have previously experienced an episode, in order to improve their quality of life. The positive effect of rifaximin in reducing health care costs is also discussed. PMID:24367227

  14. Bilirubin Binding Capacity in the Preterm Neonate.

    PubMed

    Amin, Sanjiv B

    2016-06-01

    Total serum/plasma bilirubin (TB), the biochemical measure currently used to evaluate and manage hyperbilirubinemia, is not a useful predictor of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in premature infants. Altered bilirubin-albumin binding in premature infants limits the usefulness of TB in premature infants. In this article, bilirubin-albumin binding, a modifying factor for bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity, in premature infants is reviewed.

  15. Quantitative imaging of bilirubin by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Noninvasive detection of both bilirubin concentration and its distribution is important for disease diagnosis. Here we implemented photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to detect bilirubin distribution. We first demonstrate that our PAM system can measure the absorption spectra of bilirubin and blood. We also image bilirubin distributions in tissuemimicking samples, both without and with blood mixed. Our results show that PAM has the potential to quantitatively image bilirubin in vivo for clinical applications.

  16. Bilirubin-albumin binding, bilirubin/albumin ratios, and free bilirubin levels: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Hulzebos, Christian V; Dijk, Peter H

    2014-11-01

    Treatment for unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia is predominantly based on one parameter, i.e., total serum bilirubin (TSB) levels. Yet, overt kernicterus has been reported in preterm infants at relatively low TSB levels, and it has been repeatedly shown that free unconjugated bilirubin (freeUCB) levels, or bilirubin/albumin (B/A) ratios for that matter, are more closely associated with bilirubin neurotoxicity. In this article, we review bilirubin-albumin binding, UCBfree levels, and B/A ratios in addition to TSB levels to individualize and optimize treatment especially in preterm infants. Methods to measure bilirubin-albumin binding or UCBfree are neither routinely performed in Western clinical laboratories nor incorporated in current management guidelines on unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. For bilirubin-albumin binding, this seems justified because several of these methods have been challenged, and sufficiently powered prospective trials on the clinical benefits are lacking. Technological advances in the measurement of UCBfree may provide a convenient means for integrating UCBfree measurements into routine clinical management of jaundiced infants. A point-of-care method, as well as determination of UCBfree levels in various newborn populations, is desirable to learn more about variations in time and how various clinical pathophysiological conditions affect UCBfree levels. This will improve the estimation of approximate UCBfree levels associated with neurotoxicity. To delineate the role of UCBfree in the management of jaundiced (preterm) infants, trials are needed using UCBfree as treatment parameter. The additional use of the B/A ratio in jaundiced preterms has been evaluated in the Bilirubin Albumin Ratio Trial (BARTrial; Clinical Trials: ISRCTN74465643) but failed to demonstrate better neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm infants <32 weeks assigned to the study group. Awaiting a study in which infants are assigned to be managed solely on the basis of their B

  17. Influenza virus-induced encephalopathy in mice: interferon production and natural killer cell activity during acute infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wabuke-Bunoti, M A; Bennink, J R; Plotkin, S A

    1986-01-01

    Mice injected intracerebrally with infectious influenza virus (60 hemagglutinin units) developed lethargy, seizures, comas, and died 2 to 5 days postinfection. As early as 6 h after infection, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in these animals was infiltrated with polymorphonuclear cells, mononuclear leukocytes, and large granular lymphocytes. Potent natural killer (NK) cell activity was observed for both CSF and spleen cell populations over the same period. This NK cell activity correlated with interferon (IFN) levels in the CSF and serum. Treatment of lethally infected mice with either anti-IFN alpha-IFN beta or anti-ganglio-n-tetraoglyceramide antiserum ameliorated the disease, reduced mortality, and effected changes in the relative proportions of inflammatory cell populations infiltrating the CSF. The possible significance of IFN and NK cell activity in the development of this influenza virus-induced encephalopathy is discussed. PMID:2431159

  18. Photoacoustic microscopy of bilirubin in tissue phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-12-01

    Determining both bilirubin's concentration and its spatial distribution are important in disease diagnosis. Here, for the first time, we applied quantitative multiwavelength photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to detect bilirubin concentration and distribution simultaneously. By measuring tissue-mimicking phantoms with different bilirubin concentrations, we showed that the root-mean-square error of prediction has reached 0.52 and 0.83 mg/dL for pure bilirubin and for blood-mixed bilirubin detection (with 100% oxygen saturation), respectively. We further demonstrated the capability of the PAM system to image bilirubin distribution both with and without blood. Finally, by underlaying bilirubin phantoms with mouse skins, we showed that bilirubin can be imaged with consistent accuracy down to >400 μm in depth. Our results show that PAM has potential for noninvasive bilirubin monitoring in vivo, as well as for further clinical applications.

  19. Acute amnestic encephalopathy in amyloid-β oligomer-injected mice is due to their widespread diffusion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Epelbaum, Stéphane; Youssef, Ihsen; Lacor, Pascale N; Chaurand, Pierre; Duplus, Eric; Brugg, Bernard; Duyckaerts, Charles; Delatour, Benoît

    2015-06-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers are the suspected culprit as initiators of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, their diffusion in the brain remains unknown. Here, we studied Aβ oligomers' dissemination and evaluated their in vivo toxicity. Wild-type mice were injected with 50 pmol of synthetic Aβ oligomers (of different size) in the hippocampus. Oligomers diffused largely in the brain as soon as 1 hour and up to 7 days after injection. A transient encephalopathy with memory impairment was induced by this unique injection. The immunoreactivity of the postsynaptic marker PSD95 was diffusely decreased. Similar results (both on memory and PSD95 immunoreactivity) were obtained with delipidated and high molecular weight oligomers (>50 kDa) but not with smaller assemblies. Tau hyperphosphorylation was observed in the oligomer-injected brains. Finally, fos immunostaining was increased in Aβ-derived diffusible ligands-injected mice, suggesting neuronal hyperactivity. Rapid and widespread diffusion of Aβ oligomers was demonstrated in vivo and associated with decreased synaptic markers and memory deficits which gives new insight to the pathogenicity of Aβ.

  20. Carnitine, acylcarnitine and amino acid profiles analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry in a surfactant/virus mouse model of acute hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M G; Crocker, J F S; O'Regan, P; Lee, S H S; Geldenhuys, L; Dooley, K; Al-Khalidi, M; Acott, P D

    2007-08-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to analyze multiple serum metabolites for the first time in a surfactant/virus mouse model of acute hepatic encephalopathy (AHE). AHE is characterized by acute liver failure that can lead to potentially lethal increases in intracranial pressure. We have reproduced AHE in young CD-1 mice exposed from postnatal day (P) 2-13 to the industrial surfactant, Toximul 3409F (Tox), and then infected intranasally on P14 with sublethal doses (LD(10-30)) of mouse-adapted human influenza B (Lee) virus (FluB). The sera analyzed by MS/MS were from mice exhibiting typical markers of Tox-mediated potentiation of viral illness, including reduced weights and blood glucose levels. Most metabolite abnormalities were not evident until five days after viral infection (P19), the time corresponding to the onset of weight loss and mortality. Values for fatty acylcarnitines and amino acids in the Tox+FluB-treated mice were either additive or supra-additive relative to the effects of either treatment alone. Amino acid profiles were consistent with those reported for human AHE. None of the treated mice exhibited signs of carnitine deficiency, and propionylcarnitine levels were normal. On P19, mice given combined Tox+FluB treatment had significant increases in levels of both medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines (C6:0-C12:0 and C14:0-C20:0, respectively), including their monounsaturated metabolites. Levels of medium-chain dicarboxylic and long-chain hydroxy-acylcarnitines were also elevated in the combined treatment group. The results of this study indicate a diffuse mitochondrial dysfunction in Tox+FluB-treated mice that results in a serum metabolite profile unique from those observed in classic inherited metabolic disorders.

  1. Combined application of dexamethasone and hyperbaric oxygen therapy yields better efficacy for patients with delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Wenping; Xue, Hui; Wang, Baojun; Li, Yuechun; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Changchun; Liang, Furu; Pang, Jiangxia; Yu, Lehua

    2017-01-01

    Background Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning (DEACMP) commonly occurs after recovering from acute CO poisoning. This study was performed to assess the efficacy of the combined application of dexamethasone and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy in patients with DEACMP. Patients and methods A total of 120 patients with DEACMP were recruited and randomly assigned into the experimental group (receiving dexamethasone 5 mg/day or 10 mg/day plus HBO therapy) and control group (HBO therapy as monotherapy). Meanwhile, the conventional treatments were provided for all the patients. We used the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scale to assess the cognitive function, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) to assess the neurological function and the remission rate (RR) to assess the clinical efficacy. Myelin basic protein (MBP) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was also measured. Results After 4 weeks of treatment, compared to the control group, the experimental group had a significantly higher remission rate (P=0.032), a significantly higher average MMSE score (P=0.037) and a significantly lower average NIHSS score (P=0.002). Meanwhile, there was a trend toward better improvement with dexamethasone 10 mg/day, and the level of MBP in the CSF of patients was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.0001). The addition of dexamethasone did not significantly increase the incidence of adverse events. Conclusion These results indicate that the combined application of dexamethasone and HBO therapy could yield better efficacy for patients with DEACMP and should be viewed as a potential new therapy. PMID:28260864

  2. The Biological Effects of Bilirubin Photoisomers

    PubMed Central

    Jasprova, Jana; Dal Ben, Matteo; Vianello, Eleonora; Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanova, Marie; Vyroubalova, Karolina; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Sticha, Martin; Cerna, Marcela; Vitek, Libor

    2016-01-01

    Although phototherapy was introduced as early as 1950’s, the potential biological effects of bilirubin photoisomers (PI) generated during phototherapy remain unclear. The aim of our study was to isolate bilirubin PI in their pure forms and to assess their biological effects in vitro. The three major bilirubin PI (ZE- and EZ-bilirubin and Z-lumirubin) were prepared by photo-irradiation of unconjugated bilirubin. The individual photoproducts were chromatographically separated (TLC, HPLC), and their identities verified by mass spectrometry. The role of Z-lumirubin (the principle bilirubin PI) on the dissociation of bilirubin from albumin was tested by several methods: peroxidase, fluorescence quenching, and circular dichroism. The biological effects of major bilirubin PI (cell viability, expression of selected genes, cell cycle progression) were tested on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. Lumirubin was found to have a binding site on human serum albumin, in the subdomain IB (or at a close distance to it); and thus, different from that of bilirubin. Its binding constant to albumin was much lower when compared with bilirubin, and lumirubin did not affect the level of unbound bilirubin (Bf). Compared to unconjugated bilirubin, bilirubin PI did not have any effect on either SH-SY5Y cell viability, the expression of genes involved in bilirubin metabolism or cell cycle progression, nor in modulation of the cell cycle phase. The principle bilirubin PI do not interfere with bilirubin albumin binding, and do not exert any toxic effect on human neuroblastoma cells. PMID:26829016

  3. Hyponatremia in hepatic encephalopathy: an accomplice or innocent bystander?

    PubMed

    Yun, Byung Cheol; Kim, W Ray

    2009-06-01

    Hyponatremia, a common complication inpatients with advanced liver disease and impaired free water clearance, has been shown to be an important predictor of short-term mortality. Hepatic encephalopathy, also a late complication of end-stage liver disease, has been associated with low-grade cerebral edema as a result of swelling of astrocytes. Guevara et al. hypothesized that hyponatremia and the resultant depletion of organic osmolytes (e.g.,myo-inositol) from brain cells contribute to brain edema, playing an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. Using a multivariable analysis, they demonstrated that hyponatremia increased the risk of hepatic encephalopathy more than eightfold, after adjustment for serum bilirubin and creatinine concentrations and previous history of encephalopathy. Their magnetic resonance spectroscopy data correlated low brain concentrations of myoinositol with hepatic encephalopathy. As both hyponatremia and encephalopathy occur in patients with advanced liver disease, it has been difficult to implicate hyponatremia independently in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. Guevara's data do suggest that hyponatremia is more likely an accomplice than an innocent bystander.

  4. Challenges in diagnosing hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Weissenborn, K

    2015-02-01

    The term "hepatic encephalopathy" (HE) covers the neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with acute, chronic and acute-on-chronic liver disease (CLD). This paper deals with clinical features and diagnosis of HE in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension or porto-systemic shunts. The possible impact of concomitant disorders and the cirrhosis underlying liver disease upon brain function is described emphasizing the need of a detailed diagnostic work up of every individual case before diagnosing HE. Currently used methods for diagnosing minimal or covert hepatic encephalopathy are compared with regard to their sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing HE against the background of a multitude of concomitant disorders and diseases that could contribute to brain dysfunction.

  5. Hypertension and hypertensive encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Price, Raymond S; Kasner, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    The definition of hypertension has continuously evolved over the last 50 years. Hypertension is currently defined as a blood pressure greater than 140/90mmHg. One in every four people in the US has been diagnosed with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension increases further with age, affecting 75% of people over the age of 70. Hypertension is by far the most common risk factor identified in stroke patients. Hypertension causes pathologic changes in the walls of small (diameter<300 microns) arteries and arterioles usually at short branches of major arteries, which may result in either ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Reduction of blood pressure with diuretics, β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have all been shown to markedly reduce the incidence of stroke. Hypertensive emergency is defined as a blood pressure greater than 180/120mmHg with end organ dysfunction, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, encephalopathy, or focal neurologic deficits. Hypertensive encephalopathy is believed to be caused by acute failure of cerebrovascular autoregulation. Hypertensive emergency is treated with intravenous antihypertensive agents to reduce blood pressure by 25% within the first hour. Selective inhibition of cerebrovascular blood vessel permeability for the treatment of hypertensive emergency is beginning early clinical trials.

  6. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Omalu, Bennet

    2014-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome, which is caused by single, episodic, or repetitive blunt force impacts to the head and transfer of acceleration-deceleration forces to the brain. CTE presents clinically as a composite syndrome of mood disorders and behavioral and cognitive impairment, with or without sensorimotor impairment. Symptoms of CTE may begin with persistent symptoms of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) following a documented episode of brain trauma or after a latent period that may range from days to weeks to months and years, up to 40 years following a documented episode of brain trauma or cessation of repetitive TBI. Posttraumatic encephalopathy is distinct from CTE, can be comorbid with CTE, and is a clinicopathologic syndrome induced by focal and/or diffuse, gross and/or microscopic destruction of brain tissue following brain trauma. The brain of a CTE sufferer may appear grossly unremarkable, but shows microscopic evidence of primary and secondary proteinopathies. The primary proteinopathy of CTE is tauopathy, while secondary proteinopathies may include, but are not limited to, amyloidopathy and TDP proteinopathy. Reported prevalence rates of CTE in cohorts exposed to TBI ranges from 3 to 80% across age groups.

  7. Efficacy of N-Butylphthalide and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy on Cognitive Dysfunction in Patients with Delayed Encephalopathy After Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Wenping; Xue, Hui; Wang, Baojun; Li, Yuechun; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Changchun; Pang, Jiangxia

    2017-01-01

    Background Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning (DEACMP) is one of the most serious complications after CO poisoning. This study was conducted to explore the efficacy of the combined application of N-Butylphthalide and hyperbaric oxygenation therapy (HBO) on cognitive dysfunction in patients with DEACMP. Material/Methods A total of 184 patients with DEACMP were randomly assigned to either receive HBO or N-Butylphthalide and HBO. Meanwhile, all patients received conventional treatment. The total remission rate (RR) was used to assess the clinical efficacy. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to assess the cognitive function, and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was used to assess the neurological function. Results Finally, there were 90 and 94 patients in the control and experimental groups, respectively. After eight weeks of treatment, the total RR in the experimental group (47.9%) was significantly higher than that in the control group (33.3%). Compared to the control group, significantly more patients in the experimental group had MMSE scores of 24–30. The lower NIHSS score in the experimental group showed that N-Butylphthalide had the effect of preservation and restoration of neurological function. No obvious drug toxicity or liver and kidney dysfunction was observed, and there was no significant change in the level of blood glucose and blood lipids. Conclusions These results indicated that the combined application of N-Butylphthalide and HBO could significantly improve the cognitive dysfunction of patients with DEACMP and have great clinical efficacy, which should be further studied. PMID:28352069

  8. Autoimmune encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, Frank; Armangue, Thaís; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 10 years the continual discovery of novel forms of encephalitis associated with antibodies to cell-surface or synaptic proteins has changed the paradigms for diagnosing and treating disorders that were previously unknown or mischaracterized. We review here the process of discovery, the symptoms, and the target antigens of twelve autoimmune encephatilic disorders, grouped by syndromes and approached from a clinical perspective. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, several subtypes of limbic encephalitis, stiff-person spectrum disorders, and other autoimmune encephalitides that result in psychosis, seizures, or abnormal movements are described in detail. We include a novel encephalopathy with prominent sleep dysfunction that provides an intriguing link between chronic neurodegeneration and cell-surface autoimmunity (IgLON5). Some of the caveats of limited serum testing are outlined. In addition, we review the underlying cellular and synaptic mechanisms that for some disorders confirm the antibody pathogenicity. The multidisciplinary impact of autoimmune encephalitis has been expanded recently by the discovery that herpes simplex encephalitis is a robust trigger of synaptic autoimmunity, and that some patients may develop overlapping syndromes, including anti-NMDAR encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica or other demyelinating diseases. PMID:25315420

  9. Newborn jaundice technologies: unbound bilirubin and bilirubin binding capacity in neonates.

    PubMed

    Amin, Sanjiv B; Lamola, Angelo A

    2011-06-01

    Neonatal jaundice (hyperbilirubinemia), which is extremely common in neonates, can be associated with neurotoxicity. A safe level of bilirubin has not been defined in either premature or term infants. Emerging evidence suggest that the level of unbound (or "free") bilirubin has a better sensitivity and specificity than total serum bilirubin for bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity. Although recent studies suggest the usefulness of free bilirubin measurements in managing high-risk neonates, including premature infants, no widely available method exists to assay the serum free bilirubin concentration. To keep pace with the growing demand, in addition to reevaluation of old methods, several promising new methods are being developed for sensitive, accurate, and rapid measurement of free bilirubin and bilirubin binding capacity. These innovative methods need to be validated before adopting for clinical use. We provide an overview of some promising methods for free bilirubin and binding capacity measurements with the goal to enhance research in this area of active interest and apparent need.

  10. Treatment of portal systemic encephalopathy: standard and new treatments.

    PubMed

    Marín, E; Uribe, M

    1990-07-01

    The management of hepatic encephalopathy should be considered accordingly with the precipitating factor and the type of encephalopathy. Ideally the therapeutic approach must be useful for both acute and chronic forms of encephalopathy. Current treatment of hepatic encephalopathy consists of certain well-established measures attempting to identify and treat the precipitating factors, and to reduce the intestinal nitrogenous compounds formation and absorption by dietary restriction or bowel-cleansing with catartics or antibiotics such as neomycin, metronidazol, etc. This review describes briefly several therapeutic modalities.

  11. Early use of noninvasive techniques for clearing respiratory secretions during noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypercapnic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinrong; Cui, Zhaobo; Liu, Shuhong; Gao, Xiuling; Gao, Pan; Shi, Yi; Guo, Shufen; Li, Peipei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) might be superior to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPDs). Inefficient clearance of respiratory secretions provokes NPPV failure in patients with hypercapnic encephalopathy (HE). This study compared CMV and NPPV combined with a noninvasive strategy for clearing secretions in HE and AECOPD patients. The present study is a prospective cohort study of AECOPD and HE patients enrolled between October 2013 and August 2015 in a critical care unit of a major university teaching hospital in China. A total of 74 patients received NPPV and 90 patients received CMV. Inclusion criteria included the following: physician-diagnosed AECOPD, spontaneous airway clearance of excessive secretions, arterial blood gas analysis requiring intensive care, moderate-to-severe dyspnea, and a Kelly–Matthay scale score of 3 to 5. Exclusion criteria included the following: preexisting psychiatric/neurological disorders unrelated to HE, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, upper airway obstruction, acute coronary syndromes, preadmission tracheostomy or endotracheal intubation, and urgent endotracheal intubation for cardiovascular, psychomotor agitation, or severe hemodynamic conditions. Intensive care unit participants were managed by NPPV. Participants received standard treatment consisting of controlled oxygen therapy during NPPV-free periods; antibiotics, intravenous doxofylline, corticosteroids (e.g., salbutamol and ambroxol), and subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin; and therapy for comorbidities if necessary. Nasogastric tubes were inserted only in participants who developed gastric distension. No pharmacological sedation was administered. The primary and secondary outcome measures included comparative complication rates, durations of ventilation and hospitalization, number of invasive devices/patient, and in-hospital and 1-year mortality

  12. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Stec, David E.; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J.; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W.; Baum, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin. PMID:27071062

  13. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Stec, David E; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W; Baum, Justin; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin.

  14. The effect of bilirubin photoisomers on unbound-bilirubin concentrations estimated by the peroxidase method.

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, S; Yamakawa, T; Onishi, S; Isobe, K; Manabe, M; Sasaki, K

    1986-01-01

    Unbound bilirubin is oxidized to nearly colourless substances in the presence of H2O2 or ethyl hydroperoxide and horseradish peroxidase. To predict the risk of kernicterus (degenerated yellow pigmentation of nerve cells), this principle has been widely utilized for estimating the concentration of unbound bilirubin in hyperbilirubinaemic serum. However, the serum contains polar geometric photoisomers of bilirubin. Therefore, to clarify the effect of bilirubin photoisomer concentrations on unbound-bilirubin concentration, the concentration of bilirubin and its photoisomer and of unbound bilirubin in samples obtained from experiments in vivo and in vitro were simultaneously and individually estimated by h.p.l.c. and the peroxidase method. During photoirradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, the serum polar (ZE)-bilirubin IX alpha concentration increased remarkably, but unbound-bilirubin values were not affected at all. However, during experiments in vitro, unbound bilirubin concentrations increased only when concentrations of the rather polar (EZ)- and (EE)-cyclobilirubin IX alpha increased considerably in a human serum albumin-bilirubin solution irradiated with blue light. Thus it is concluded that unbound-bilirubin concentrations, and consequently the initial rate of the peroxidase reaction, is not accelerated by the increase in either (ZE)-bilirubin or (EZ)-cyclobilirubin concentration within the clinically observed range. PMID:3545181

  15. Interaction of bilirubin with human erythrocyte membranes. Bilirubin binding to neuraminidase- and phospholipase-treated membranes.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Aono, S; Semba, R; Kashiwamata, S

    1987-11-15

    Saturable bilirubin binding to human erythrocyte membranes was measured before and after digestion with neuraminidase and phospholipases. Neuraminidase-treated erythrocyte membranes did not show any change in their binding properties, indicating that gangliosides could be excluded as candidates for saturable bilirubin-binding sites on erythrocyte membranes. Although bilirubin-binding properties of the membranes did not change after phospholipase D digestion, either, phospholipase C treatment greatly enhanced bilirubin binding. Thus it is suggested that a negatively charged phosphoric acid moiety of phospholipids on the membrane surface may play a role to prevent a large amount of bilirubin from binding to the membranes. Further saturable bilirubin binding to inside-out sealed erythrocyte membrane vesicles showed values comparable with those of the right-side-out sealed membranes, suggesting that the bilirubin-binding sites may be distributed on both outer and inner surfaces of the membranes, or may exist in the membranes where bilirubin may be accessible from either side.

  16. Bilirubin and Its Carbohydrate Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanckaert, Norbert J. C.

    In mammals, the open tetrapyrrole bilirubin (structure 2, Fig. 1) is the principal degradation product of iron-protoporphyrin-IX (heme). The latter molecule is a tetrapyrrolic macrocycle and plays a critical role in aerobic metabolism by reversibly binding oxygen in hemoglobin and myoglobin, and by serving as the active site in oxidation reactions catalyzed by hemoprotein enzymes. Important cyclic tetrapyrroles in nature related to heme are chlorophylls, which contain magnesium and are derived from protoporphyrin-IX, and vitamin B12, a corrinoid derived from uroporphyrinogen-III.

  17. Functionalized SBA-15 materials for bilirubin adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tao; Zhao, Yanling; Xu, Yao; Wu, Dong; Xu, Jun; Deng, Feng

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the driving force for bilirubin adsorption on mesoporous materials, a comparative study was carried out between pure siliceous SBA-15 and three functionalized SBA-15 mesoporous materials: CH 3-SBA-15 (MS), NH 2-SBA-15 (AS), and CH 3/NH 2-SBA-15 (AMS) that were synthesized by one-pot method. The obtained materials exhibited large surface areas (553-810 m 2/g) and pore size (6.6-7.1 nm) demonstrated by XRD and N 2-ad/desorption analysis. The SEM images showed that the materials had similar fiberlike morphology. The functionalization extent was calculated according to 29Si MAS NMR spectra and it was close to the designed value (10%). The synthesized mesoporous materials were used as bilirubin adsorbents and showed higher bilirubin adsorption capacities than the commercial active carbon. The adsorption capacities of amine functionalized samples AMS and AS were larger than those of pure siliceous SBA-15 and MS, indicating that electrostatic interaction was the dominant driving force for bilirubin adsorption on mesoporous materials. Increasing the ionic strength of bilirubin solution by adding NaCl would decrease the bilirubin adsorption capacity of mesoporous material, which further demonstrated that the electrostatic interaction was the dominant driving force for bilirubin adsorption. In addition, the hydrophobic interaction provided by methyl groups could promote the bilirubin adsorption.

  18. THE RENAL ELIMINATION OF BILIRUBIN

    PubMed Central

    Haessler, Herbert; Rous, Peyton; Broun, G. O.

    1922-01-01

    The elimination of bile pigment during jaundice is, for practical purposes, unincreased by diuresis from water by mouth. Possibly, though, the flushing of the kidneys tends to lessen pigment accumulation within these organs and thus to diminish a serious potential source of trouble in long continued jaundice. Flood diuresis from intravenous injections of salt solution markedly increases the output of bile pigment. It is important to know the effect of variations in the urinary output on the elimination of bile salts, but methods for the purpose are not available at present. The passage of bile pigment into the kidney cells during jaundice is attested by the presence in the freshly voided urine of desquamated renal elements specifically stained, stippled, or granulated with bilirubin. Pigmentation of this sort is readily to be distinguished from the indiscriminate staining of cellular debris that occurs in icteric urines on standing. It has clinical significance, furnishing direct evidence on the degree of renal change. PMID:19868627

  19. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also referred to as “mad cow disease” is a chronic, non-febrile, neuro-degenerative disease affecting the central nervous system. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of domestic animals, of which BSE is a member includes scrapie of sheep...

  20. Animal pigment bilirubin discovered in plants.

    PubMed

    Pirone, Cary; Quirke, J Martin E; Priestap, Horacio A; Lee, David W

    2009-03-04

    The bile pigment bilirubin-IXalpha is the degradative product of heme, distributed among mammals and some other vertebrates. It can be recognized as the pigment responsible for the yellow color of jaundice and healing bruises. In this paper we present the first example of the isolation of bilirubin in plants. The compound was isolated from the brilliant orange-colored arils of Strelitzia nicolai, the white bird of paradise tree, and characterized by HPLC-ESMS, UV-visible, (1)H NMR, and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, as well as comparison with an authentic standard. This discovery indicates that plant cyclic tetrapyrroles may undergo degradation by a previously unknown pathway. Preliminary analyses of related plants, including S. reginae, the bird of paradise, also revealed bilirubin in the arils and flowers, indicating that the occurrence of bilirubin is not limited to a single species or tissue type.

  1. Intermolecular interactions in the bilirubin-cholate-silica system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, N. N.; Golovkova, L. P.; Severinovskaya, O. V.

    2007-06-01

    Bilirubin-cholate interactions in aqueous solutions were studied. The constants of binding of bilirubin with taurocholate dimers and taurodeoxycholate trimers were calculated. The adsorption of bilirubin and cholates on the surface of highly dispersed silica was studied. It was shown that taurine-conjugated cholates are poorly adsorbed from micellar solutions on the silica surface, the specific amount of bilirubin adsorbed decreases with increasing concentration of cholates in the solution, the affinity of free bilirubin for the silica surface is independent of the nature of the cholic acid, and that the affinity of cholate-bilirubin complexes for the silica surface is lower than the affinity of free bilirubin.

  2. Late onset arginase deficiency presenting with encephalopathy and midbrain hyperintensity

    PubMed Central

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Raja, Rajat; Balagopal, Anuroop

    2016-01-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are very rare metabolic disorders that present with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia. Of the UCDs, Arginase deficiency (ARD) is the rarest and presents in childhood with a progressive spastic diplegia or seizures. Acute presentation in adulthood is extremely unusual.[1] We present the first case of adult onset ARD presenting with encephalopathy and diffusion weighted MRI findings that resembled a moustache in the midbrain. PMID:27570396

  3. Does bilirubin protect against developing diabetes mellitus?

    PubMed

    Breimer, Lars H; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2016-01-01

    After 25 years of evaluating bilirubin as a possible protective agent in neonatal and cardiovascular disease, interest has moved on to a exploring a possible protective role in diabetes mellitus (DM). This review finds conflicting prospective data for a protective relationship though there are retrospective, case-controlled data, that can only show association, which is not causality. Only prospective studies can show causality. Also, it would appear that the underlying biochemical assumptions do not readily translate from the animal to the human setting. Given that many factors impact on circulating bilirubin levels, it is not surprising that a clear-cut answer is not available; the jury is still out. Any relationship between DM and bilirubin might relate to intermediates in bilirubin metabolism, including relationships involving the genes for the enzymes participating in those steps. Nevertheless, the pursuit of bilirubin in disease causation is opening new avenues for research and if it is established that serum bilirubin can predict risks, much will have been achieved. The answer may have to come from molecular genetic analyses.

  4. Noncirrhotic hyperammonaemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Laish, Ido; Ben Ari, Ziv

    2011-10-01

    Adult hyperammonaemia is associated with severe liver disease in 90% of cases. In the remainder, noncirrhotic causes should be considered. Measurements of serum ammonia level must be part of the basic work-up in all patients presenting with encephalopathy of unknown origin, even when liver function is normal. Clinician awareness of noncirrhotic hyperammonaemic encephalopathy can contribute to early diagnosis and the initiation of sometimes life-saving treatment. This review focuses on the physiology, aetiology and underlying mechanisms of noncirrhotic hyperammonaemic encephalopathy and discusses the available treatment modalities.

  5. Supramolecular Complexes Formed in Systems Bile Salt-Bilirubin-Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, N. N.; Severinovskaya, O. V.; Golovkova, L. P.

    The formation of supramolecular complexes between bilirubin and primary micelles of bile salts has been studied. The association constants of bile salts and binding of bilirubin with these associates have been determined. The adsorption of bilirubin and bile salts from individual and mixed aqueous solutions onto hydrophobic silica surfaces has been investigated. The interaction of bilirubin with primary bile salt micelles and the strong retention in mixed micelles, which are supramolecular complexes, result in the adsorption of bilirubin in free state only.

  6. Endotoxemia, encephalopathy, and mortality in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Bigatello, L M; Broitman, S A; Fattori, L; Di Paoli, M; Pontello, M; Bevilacqua, G; Nespoli, A

    1987-01-01

    Endotoxemia without sepsis was detected with a chromogenic Limulus assay in 36 of 39 (92.3%) cirrhotic patients and was absent in seven healthy volunteers. In 11 patients who underwent elective portasystemic shunt, portal vein endotoxemia was higher than inferior vena caval: p less than 0.05, systemic endotoxin levels did not change, compared to preoperative levels, on the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd postoperative days, attendant to an uneventful recovery. In 21 patients in hepatic encephalopathy after esophagogastric hemorrhage, systemic endotoxemia was higher than in well-compensated cirrhotics: p less than 0.001; it was higher in deep than in light coma: p less than 0.05; it was higher in those who died than in those who survived: p less than 0.001. Endotoxin levels showed a positive correlation with serum bilirubin: r = 0.59, p less than 0.001, and a negative correlation with prothrombin activity: r = -0.59, p less than 0.001. These data show endotoxemia without sepsis is a constant finding in cirrhosis and increasing levels of endotoxemia are associated with hepatic failure, encephalopathy, and death.

  7. Value of plasmapheresis in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Riviello, J J; Halligan, G E; Dunn, S P; Widzer, S J; Foley, C M; Breningstall, G N; Grover, W D

    1990-01-01

    Plasmapheresis is used for treating the complications of liver failure. We performed plasmapheresis on 6 children with hepatic encephalopathy resulting from acute hepatic failure and prospectively assessed its effects on neurologic and electrophysiologic (electroencephalography and evoked potentials) function. Clinical improvement was observed in 3 of 6 patients; changes in the serum ammonia value or the results of initial electrophysiologic tests did not predict the patient response. Two patients underwent transplantation after neurologic improvement was produced by plasmapheresis; however, despite plasmapheresis, 4 patients progressed to brain death. Our data demonstrate that plasmapheresis may transiently improve the encephalopathy of acute hepatic failure but is not curative alone. Therefore, plasmapheresis may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of liver failure, potentially improving the pretransplantation status of the patient.

  8. PPARα: A Master Regulator of Bilirubin Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kaeding, Jenny; El Husseini, Diala; Rudkowska, Iwona; Verreault, Mélanie

    2014-01-01

    Hypolipidemic fibrates activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α to modulate lipid oxidation and metabolism. The present study aimed at evaluating how 3 PPARα agonists, namely, fenofibrate, gemfibrozil, and Wy14,643, affect bilirubin synthesis and metabolism. Human umbilical vein epithelial cells (HUVEC) and coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMC) were cultured in the absence or presence of the 3 activators, and mRNA, protein, and/or activity levels of the bilirubin synthesizing heme oxygenase- (HO-) 1 and biliverdin reductase (BVR) enzymes were determined. Human hepatocytes (HH) and HepG2 cells sustained similar treatments, except that the expression of the bilirubin conjugating UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 enzyme and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 transporter was analyzed. In HUVECs, gemfibrozil, fenofibrate, and Wy14,643 upregulated HO-1 mRNA expression without affecting BVR. Wy14,643 and fenofibrate also caused HO-1 protein accumulation, while gemfibrozil and fenofibrate favored the secretion of bilirubin in cell media. Similar positive regulations were also observed with the 3 PPARα ligands in CASMCs where HO-1 mRNA and protein levels were increased. In HH and HepG2 cells, both UGT1A1 and MRP2 transcripts were also accumulating. These observations indicate that PPARα ligands activate bilirubin synthesis in vascular cells and metabolism in liver cells. The clinical implications of these regulatory events are discussed. PMID:25147562

  9. PPARα: A Master Regulator of Bilirubin Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Bigo, Cyril; Kaeding, Jenny; El Husseini, Diala; Rudkowska, Iwona; Verreault, Mélanie; Vohl, Marie Claude; Barbier, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Hypolipidemic fibrates activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α to modulate lipid oxidation and metabolism. The present study aimed at evaluating how 3 PPARα agonists, namely, fenofibrate, gemfibrozil, and Wy14,643, affect bilirubin synthesis and metabolism. Human umbilical vein epithelial cells (HUVEC) and coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMC) were cultured in the absence or presence of the 3 activators, and mRNA, protein, and/or activity levels of the bilirubin synthesizing heme oxygenase- (HO-) 1 and biliverdin reductase (BVR) enzymes were determined. Human hepatocytes (HH) and HepG2 cells sustained similar treatments, except that the expression of the bilirubin conjugating UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 enzyme and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 transporter was analyzed. In HUVECs, gemfibrozil, fenofibrate, and Wy14,643 upregulated HO-1 mRNA expression without affecting BVR. Wy14,643 and fenofibrate also caused HO-1 protein accumulation, while gemfibrozil and fenofibrate favored the secretion of bilirubin in cell media. Similar positive regulations were also observed with the 3 PPARα ligands in CASMCs where HO-1 mRNA and protein levels were increased. In HH and HepG2 cells, both UGT1A1 and MRP2 transcripts were also accumulating. These observations indicate that PPARα ligands activate bilirubin synthesis in vascular cells and metabolism in liver cells. The clinical implications of these regulatory events are discussed.

  10. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy - rare encephalopathy with good prognosis].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Patalong-Ogiewa, M; Krzystanek, E

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with increased level of antithyroid antibodies. Two types of clinical manifestation can be described: a vasculitic type with stroke like episodes and diffuse progressive type with deterioration of mental function. Neurologic symptoms are present in euthyreosis as well as in thyroid dysfunction. Because of good response to immunosuppressive therapy, the prompt diagnosis and management of HE are crucial. In this study we present the review of current literature and discuss two representative cases.

  11. Serum bilirubin fractionation using multilayer film method in hepatobiliary diseases in comparison with high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Y; Inufusa, H; Yamashita, M; Ozaki, K; Kanbe, A; Nanno, T; Ohba, Y; Nakamura, H; Yamamoto, T

    1987-10-01

    The Ektachem multilayer film method (Ektachem) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were employed to fractionate and evaluate serum bilirubin species in 45 serum samples. The false-positive or false-high levels of bilirubin close-bonded with albumin (i.e. the delta bilirubin fraction (B delta] was obtained by Ektachem in sera of cases with normal bilirubin concentration and cases with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia when compared with the results of HPLC. In the sera of cases with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, Ektachem gave comparable levels of total bilirubin (TB), and unconjugated bilirubin (Bu) to those of HPLC, but underestimated conjugated bilirubin (Bc) and slightly overestimated B delta. To investigate the clinical significance of B delta in 113 cases of various hepatobiliary diseases with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, the ratios of B delta to TB (B delta/TB) and to directly-reacting bilirubin fractions (B delta/(Bc + B delta] and that of Bc to B delta (Bc/B delta) were calculated based on the results of Ektachem and compared with each other during the course of jaundice. The mean B delta/TB was below 40% in various hepatobiliary diseases but became as high as approximately 60% in the convalescence stage. The mean B delta/(Bc + B delta) was below 50% in acute hepatitis (the serum bilirubin-elevating stage) and obstructive jaundice, and it increased to above 80% in the recovery stage. In decompensated liver cirrhosis and intrahepatic cholestasis the mean B delta/(Bc + B delta) was about 60%, indicating continuous backflow of Bc from liver cells. The changes in B delta/(Bc + B delta) were much greater than in B delta/TB.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Wernicke's Encephalopathy following Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    PubMed Central

    Kotha, V.K.; De Souza, A.

    2013-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) due to causes other than chronic alcohol abuse is an uncommon and often misdiagnosed condition. In the setting of hyperemesis gravidarum, an acute deficiency of thiamine results from body stores being unable to meet increased metabolic demands. The condition produces typical clinical and radiological findings and when diagnosed early and treated promptly has a good prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is sensitive and specific for diagnosis. We describe three patients with hyperemesis gravidarum who developed WE, and highlight a range of clinical and imaging features important for appropriate diagnosis. A high degree of clinical suspicion is essential. Treatment is often empirical pending results of investigation, and consists of parenteral repletion of thiamine stores. Reversal of MRI findings parallels clinical improvement. Neurologic outcomes are usually good, but half the pregnancies complicated by this condition do not produce healthy children. PMID:23859165

  13. Thiamine in the treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy in patients with alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Latt, N; Dore, G

    2014-09-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is an acute, reversible neuropsychiatric emergency due to thiamine deficiency. Urgent and adequate thiamine replacement is necessary to avoid death or progression to Korsakoff syndrome with largely irreversible brain damage. Wernicke Korsakoff syndrome refers to a condition where features of Wernicke encephalopathy are mixed with those of Korsakoff syndrome. Although thiamine is the cornerstone of treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy, there are no universally accepted guidelines with regard to its optimal dose, mode of administration, frequency of administration or duration of treatment. Currently, different dose recommendations are being made. We present recommendations for the assessment and treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy based on literature review and our clinical experience.

  14. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Zamora Nava, Luis Eduardo; Torre Delgadillo, Aldo

    2011-06-01

    The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to the subtle changes in cognitive function, electrophysiological parameters, cerebral neurochemical/neurotransmitter homeostasis, cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and fluid homeostasis that can be observed in patients with cirrhosis who have no clinical evidence of hepatic encephalopathy; the prevalence is as high as 84% in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. Physician does generally not perceive cirrhosis complications, and neuropsychological tests and another especial measurement like evoked potentials and image studies like positron emission tomography can only make diagnosis. Diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy may have prognostic and therapeutic implications in cirrhotic patients. The present review pretends to explore the clinic, therapeutic, diagnosis and prognostic aspects of this complication.

  15. Impairment of enzymatic antioxidant defenses is associated with bilirubin-induced neuronal cell death in the cerebellum of Ugt1 KO mice.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, G; Codarin, E; Antoniali, G; Vascotto, C; Vodret, S; Arena, S; Cesaratto, L; Scaloni, A; Tell, G; Muro, A F

    2015-05-07

    Severe hyperbilirubinemia is toxic during central nervous system development. Prolonged and uncontrolled high levels of unconjugated bilirubin lead to bilirubin-induced encephalopathy and eventually death by kernicterus. Despite extensive studies, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of bilirubin toxicity are still poorly defined. To fill this gap, we investigated the molecular processes underlying neuronal injury in a mouse model of severe neonatal jaundice, which develops hyperbilirubinemia as a consequence of a null mutation in the Ugt1 gene. These mutant mice show cerebellar abnormalities and hypoplasia, neuronal cell death and die shortly after birth because of bilirubin neurotoxicity. To identify protein changes associated with bilirubin-induced cell death, we performed proteomic analysis of cerebella from Ugt1 mutant and wild-type mice. Proteomic data pointed-out to oxidoreductase activities or antioxidant processes as important intracellular mechanisms altered during bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity. In particular, they revealed that down-representation of DJ-1, superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxins 2 and 6 was associated with hyperbilirubinemia in the cerebellum of mutant mice. Interestingly, the reduction in protein levels seems to result from post-translational mechanisms because we did not detect significant quantitative differences in the corresponding mRNAs. We also observed an increase in neuro-specific enolase 2 both in the cerebellum and in the serum of mutant mice, supporting its potential use as a biomarker of bilirubin-induced neurological damage. In conclusion, our data show that different protective mechanisms fail to contrast oxidative burst in bilirubin-affected brain regions, ultimately leading to neurodegeneration.

  16. Impairment of enzymatic antioxidant defenses is associated with bilirubin-induced neuronal cell death in the cerebellum of Ugt1 KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Bortolussi, G; Codarin, E; Antoniali, G; Vascotto, C; Vodret, S; Arena, S; Cesaratto, L; Scaloni, A; Tell, G; Muro, A F

    2015-01-01

    Severe hyperbilirubinemia is toxic during central nervous system development. Prolonged and uncontrolled high levels of unconjugated bilirubin lead to bilirubin-induced encephalopathy and eventually death by kernicterus. Despite extensive studies, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of bilirubin toxicity are still poorly defined. To fill this gap, we investigated the molecular processes underlying neuronal injury in a mouse model of severe neonatal jaundice, which develops hyperbilirubinemia as a consequence of a null mutation in the Ugt1 gene. These mutant mice show cerebellar abnormalities and hypoplasia, neuronal cell death and die shortly after birth because of bilirubin neurotoxicity. To identify protein changes associated with bilirubin-induced cell death, we performed proteomic analysis of cerebella from Ugt1 mutant and wild-type mice. Proteomic data pointed-out to oxidoreductase activities or antioxidant processes as important intracellular mechanisms altered during bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity. In particular, they revealed that down-representation of DJ-1, superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxins 2 and 6 was associated with hyperbilirubinemia in the cerebellum of mutant mice. Interestingly, the reduction in protein levels seems to result from post-translational mechanisms because we did not detect significant quantitative differences in the corresponding mRNAs. We also observed an increase in neuro-specific enolase 2 both in the cerebellum and in the serum of mutant mice, supporting its potential use as a biomarker of bilirubin-induced neurological damage. In conclusion, our data show that different protective mechanisms fail to contrast oxidative burst in bilirubin-affected brain regions, ultimately leading to neurodegeneration. PMID:25950469

  17. Burn encephalopathy in children.

    PubMed

    Mohnot, D; Snead, O C; Benton, J W

    1982-07-01

    Among 287 children with burns treated over a recent two-year period, 13 (5%) showed evidence of encephalopathy. The major clinical symptoms were an altered sensorium and seizures. The majority of symptoms began later than 48 hours after the burn and were accompanied by multiple metabolic aberrations including hypocalcemia. Three children had a relapsing course, and 1 had temporarily enlarged cerebral ventricles. Eleven children improved to normal. In the majority of instances, burn encephalopathy probably reflects central nervous system dysfunction resulting from complex metabolic, hematological, and hemodynamic abnormalities rather than from a single metabolic abnormality.

  18. Can Excess Bilirubin Levels Cause Learning Difficulties?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretorius, E.; Naude, H.; Becker, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    Examined learning problems in South African sample of 7- to 14-year-olds whose mothers reported excessively high infant bilirubin shortly after the child's birth. Found that this sample had lowered verbal ability with the majority also showing impaired short-term and long-term memory. Findings suggested that impaired formation of astrocytes…

  19. Bilirubin is an Endogenous Antioxidant in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziberna, Lovro; Martelanc, Mitja; Franko, Mladen; Passamonti, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Bilirubin is a standard serum biomarker of liver function. Inexplicably, it is inversely correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Given the role of endothelial dysfunction in originating cardiovascular diseases, direct analysis of bilirubin in the vascular endothelium would shed light on these relationships. Hence, we used high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with thermal lens spectrometric detection and diode array detection for the determination of endogenous cellular IXα-bilirubin. To confirm the isomer IXα-bilirubin, we used ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer using an electrospray ionization source, as well as tandem mass spectrometric detection. We measured bilirubin in both arterial and venous rat endothelium (0.9–1.5 pmol mg−1 protein). In the human endothelial Ea.hy926 cell line, we demonstrated that intracellular bilirubin (3–5 pmol mg−1 protein) could be modulated by either extracellular bilirubin uptake, or by up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1, a cellular enzyme related to endogenous bilirubin synthesis. Moreover, we determined intracellular antioxidant activity by bilirubin, with EC50 = 11.4 ± 0.2 nM, in the range of reported values of free serum bilirubin (8.5–13.1 nM). Biliverdin showed similar antioxidant properties as bilirubin. We infer from these observations that intra-endothelial bilirubin oscillates, and may thus be a dynamic factor of the endothelial function. PMID:27381978

  20. Bilirubin-induced inflammatory response, glutamate release, and cell death in rat cortical astrocytes are enhanced in younger cells.

    PubMed

    Falcão, Ana S; Fernandes, Adelaide; Brito, Maria A; Silva, Rui F M; Brites, Dora

    2005-11-01

    Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) encephalopathy is a predominantly early life condition resulting from the impairment of several cellular functions in the brain of severely jaundiced infants. However, only few data exist on the age-dependent effects of UCB and their association with increased vulnerability of premature newborns, particularly in a sepsis condition. We investigated cell death, glutamate efflux, and inflammatory cytokine dynamics after exposure of astrocytes at different stages of differentiation to clinically relevant concentrations of UCB and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Younger astrocytes were more prone to UCB-induced cell death, glutamate efflux, and inflammatory response than older ones. Furthermore, in immature cells, LPS exacerbated UCB effects, such as cell death by necrosis. These findings provide a basis for the increased susceptibility of premature newborns to UCB deleterious effects, namely when associated with sepsis, and underline how crucial the course of cell maturation can be to UCB encephalopathy during moderate to severe neonatal jaundice.

  1. Management of covert hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Waghray, Abhijeet; Waghray, Nisheet; Mullen, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a reversible progressive neuropsychiatric disorder that encompasses a wide clinical spectrum. Covert hepatic encephalopathy is defined as patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy and Grade I encephalopathy by West-Haven Criteria. Terminology such as "sub-clinical", "latent", and "minimal" appear to trivialize the disease and have been replaced by the term covert. The lack of clinical signs means that covert hepatic encephalopathy is rarely recognized or treated outside of clinical trials with options for therapy based on patients with episodic hepatic encephalopathy. This review discusses the current available options for therapy in covert hepatic encephalopathy and focuses on non-absorbable disacharides (lactulose or lactitol), antibiotics (rifaximin), probiotics/synbiotics and l-ornithine-l-aspartate.

  2. Cannabidiol improves brain and liver function in a fulminant hepatic failure-induced model of hepatic encephalopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Avraham, Y; Grigoriadis, NC; Poutahidis, T; Vorobiev, L; Magen, I; Ilan, Y; Mechoulam, R; Berry, EM

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric disorder of complex pathogenesis caused by acute or chronic liver failure. We investigated the effects of cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa with anti-inflammatory properties that activates the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 5-HT1A, on brain and liver functions in a model of hepatic encephalopathy associated with fulminant hepatic failure induced in mice by thioacetamide. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Female Sabra mice were injected with either saline or thioacetamide and were treated with either vehicle or cannabidiol. Neurological and motor functions were evaluated 2 and 3 days, respectively, after induction of hepatic failure, after which brains and livers were removed for histopathological analysis and blood was drawn for analysis of plasma liver enzymes. In a separate group of animals, cognitive function was tested after 8 days and brain 5-HT levels were measured 12 days after induction of hepatic failure. KEY RESULTS Neurological and cognitive functions were severely impaired in thioacetamide-treated mice and were restored by cannabidiol. Similarly, decreased motor activity in thioacetamide-treated mice was partially restored by cannabidiol. Increased plasma levels of ammonia, bilirubin and liver enzymes, as well as enhanced 5-HT levels in thioacetamide-treated mice were normalized following cannabidiol administration. Likewise, astrogliosis in the brains of thioacetamide-treated mice was moderated after cannabidiol treatment. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Cannabidiol restores liver function, normalizes 5-HT levels and improves brain pathology in accordance with normalization of brain function. Therefore, the effects of cannabidiol may result from a combination of its actions in the liver and brain. PMID:21182490

  3. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy after chemotherapy. Survival after treatment with sodium benzoate and sodium phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, M; Werlin, S L; Lauer, S J

    1997-12-01

    A 16-year-old boy had hyperammonemia and encephalopathy develop after high-dose chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He was treated successfully with the ammonia-trapping agents sodium benzoate and sodium phenylacetate.

  4. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is caused by a novel contagion, known to as a prion. Prions are proteins capable of converting a normal cellular protein into a prion, thereby propagating an infection. BSE is the first known prion zoonotic. As such it has attracted broad scientific and, to a r...

  5. KCNQ2 encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Millichap, John J.; Park, Kristen L.; Tsuchida, Tammy; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Carmant, Lionel; Flamini, Robert; Joshi, Nishtha; Levisohn, Paul M.; Marsh, Eric; Nangia, Srishti; Narayanan, Vinodh; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R.; Patterson, Marc C.; Pearl, Phillip L.; Porter, Brenda; Ramsey, Keri; McGinnis, Emily L.; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Tracy, Molly; Tran, Baouyen; Venkatesan, Charu; Weckhuysen, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To advance the understanding of KCNQ2 encephalopathy genotype–phenotype relationships and to begin to assess the potential of selective KCNQ channel openers as targeted treatments. Methods: We retrospectively studied 23 patients with KCNQ2 encephalopathy, including 11 treated with ezogabine (EZO). We analyzed the genotype–phenotype relationships in these and 70 previously described patients. Results: The mean seizure onset age was 1.8 ± 1.6 (SD) days. Of the 20 EEGs obtained within a week of birth, 11 showed burst suppression. When new seizure types appeared in infancy (15 patients), the most common were epileptic spasms (n = 8). At last follow-up, seizures persisted in 9 patients. Development was delayed in all, severely in 14. The KCNQ2 variants identified introduced amino acid missense changes or, in one instance, a single residue deletion. They were clustered in 4 protein subdomains predicted to poison tetrameric channel functions. EZO use (assessed by the treating physicians and parents) was associated with improvement in seizures and/or development in 3 of the 4 treated before 6 months of age, and 2 of the 7 treated later; no serious side effects were observed. Conclusions: KCNQ2 variants cause neonatal-onset epileptic encephalopathy of widely varying severity. Pathogenic variants in epileptic encephalopathy are clustered in “hot spots” known to be critical for channel activity. For variants causing KCNQ2 channel loss of function, EZO appeared well tolerated and potentially beneficial against refractory seizures when started early. Larger, prospective studies are needed to enable better definition of prognostic categories and more robust testing of novel interventions. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that EZO is effective for refractory seizures in patients with epilepsy due to KCNQ2 encephalopathy. PMID:27602407

  6. Bilirubin in coronary artery disease: Cytotoxic or protective?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nancy; Singh, Tavankit; Chaudhary, Rahul; Garg, Sushil K; Sandhu, Gurprataap Singh; Mittal, Varun; Gupta, Rahul; Bodin, Roxana; Sule, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Bilirubin has traditionally been considered a cytotoxic waste product. However, recent studies have shown bilirubin to have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, vasodilatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative functions. These properties potentially confer bilirubin a new role of protection especially in coronary artery disease (CAD), which is a low grade inflammatory process exacerbated by oxidative stress. In fact, recent literature reports an inverse relationship between serum concentration of bilirubin and the presence of CAD. In this article, we review the current literature exploring the association between levels of bilirubin and risk of CAD. We conclude that current evidence is inconclusive regarding the protective effect of bilirubin on CAD. A causal relationship between low serum bilirubin level and increased risk of CAD is not currently established. PMID:27867680

  7. NAD+ Attenuates Bilirubin-Induced Hyperexcitation in the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus by Inhibiting Excitatory Neurotransmission and Neuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Min; Yin, Xin-Lu; Wang, Lu-Yang; Yin, Wei-Hai; Song, Ning-Ying; Shi, Hai-Bo; Li, Chun-Yan; Yin, Shan-Kai

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is an important molecule with extensive biological functions in various cellular processes, including protection against cell injuries. However, little is known regarding the roles of NAD+ in neuronal excitation and excitotoxicity associated with many neurodegenerative disorders and diseases. Using patch-clamp recordings, we studied its potential effects on principal neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), which is particularly vulnerable to bilirubin excitotoxicity. We found that NAD+ effectively decreased the size of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs), increased paired-pulse ratio (PPR) and reversed the effect of bilirubin on eEPSCs, implicating its inhibitory effects on the presynaptic release probability (Pr). Moreover, NAD+ not only decreased the basal frequency of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs), but also reversed bilirubin-induced increases in the frequency of mEPSCs without affecting their amplitude under either condition. Furthermore, we found that NAD+ decreased the frequency of spontaneous firing of VCN neurons as well as bilirubin-induced increases in firing frequency. Whole-cell current-clamp recordings showed that NAD+ could directly decrease the intrinsic excitability of VCN neurons in the presence of synaptic blockers, suggesting NAD+ exerts its actions in both presynaptic and postsynaptic loci. Consistent with these observations, we found that the latency of the first postsynaptic spike triggered by high-frequency train stimulation of presynaptic afferents (i.e., the auditory nerve) was prolonged by NAD+. These results collectively indicate that NAD+ suppresses presynaptic transmitter release and postsynaptic excitability, jointly weakening excitatory neurotransmission. Our findings provide a basis for the exploration of NAD+ for the prevention and treatment of bilirubin encephalopathy and excitotoxicity associated with other neurological disorders. PMID:28217084

  8. Role of human skin in the photodecomposition of bilirubin

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Chiranjiv L.; Murti, Coimbatore R. Krishna; Bajpai, Prakash C.

    1974-01-01

    1. Human skin epithelium and human skin were found to absorb both free bilirubin and serum-bound bilirubin from an aqueous buffered medium. The serum-bound bilirubin thus absorbed was readily released when human skin epithelium or human skin were transferred to media containing no bilirubin. 2. The Km values for serum-bound bilirubin were 1.8×10−3m and 2.2×10−3m respectively for human skin epithelium and human skin; corresponding Km values for free bilirubin were 3.0×10−4m and 5×10−4m. The Vmax. for bound and free bilirubin was of the same magnitude, the apparent Vmax. being 1.0 and 1.66μmol/g of tissue for human skin epithelium and human skin respectively. 3. When human skin that had acquired a yellow tinge by absorbing bilirubin was incubated in a buffered medium and exposed to a mercury-vapour light, the yellow colour disappeared and decomposition products of bilirubin accumulated in the medium. 4. Experiments with [3H]bilirubin indicated that the pigment absorbed by skin was photo-oxidized to products that were soluble in water and the quantity and number of such products increased with the time of exposure of human skin to the light-source. Under similar conditions [3H]bilirubin alone in buffered medium was also oxidized and gave products which by paper chromatography appeared to be different from those released by human skin that had absorbed bilirubin. 5. The results suggest that by virtue of its large surface area human skin can act as a matrix for the degradative action of light on bilirubin. PMID:4464841

  9. [Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) toxic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Signaté, A; Olindo, S; Chausson, N; Cassinoto, C; Edimo Nana, M; Saint Vil, M; Cabre, P; Smadja, D

    2009-03-01

    Ingestion of star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) can induce severe intoxication in subjects with chronic renal failure. Oxalate plays a key role in the neurotoxicity of star fruit. We report the cases of two patients with unknown chronic renal insufficiency who developed severe encephalopathy after ingestion of star fruit. The two patients developed intractable hiccups, vomiting, impaired consciousness and status epilepticus. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging showed cortical and thalamic hyperintense lesions related to epileptic status. They improved after being submitted to continuous hemofiltration which constitutes the most effective treatment during the acute phase.

  10. Fatal rhinocerebral mucormycosis under the shade of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Ataseven, Hilmi; Yüksel, Ilhami; Gültuna, Selcan; Köklü, Seyfettin; Uysal, Serkan; Basar, Omer; Sasmaz, Nurgül

    2010-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an acutely fatal infection that occurs in immuncompromised patients. Cirrhosis is an acquired immune deficiency state and those patients are more prone to develop opportunistic infections. A 42-years-old cirrhotic man was admitted to our gastroenterology clinic with hepatic encephalopathy. Although he recovered from encephalopathy with supportive measurements, he developed paresthesia on the face. He was diagnosed with rhinocerebral mucormycosis and antifungal therapy was administered. Surgical treatment couldn.t be performed because of his bleeding diathesis and poor general condition. He succumbed on the 12th day of his admission.

  11. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in children: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Emeksiz, Serhat; Kutlu, Nurettin Onur; Çaksen, Hüseyin; Alkan, Gülsüm; Yıkmaz, Hülya Şeker; Tokgöz, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is characterized by hypertension, seizure, headache, clouding of consciousness, and visual disturbance, and is diagnosed in the presence of typical lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. We retrospectively evaluated five patients who were diagnosed as having posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and followed up in Meram Medical Faculty, Pediatric Intensive Care and Hematology wards, between January 2010 and January 2014. We reviewed the demographic and clinical data, and neuroimaging findings. The primary diseases of the subjects included acute lymphocytic leukemia (n=2), Henoch-Schönlein purpura (n=1), systemic lupus erythematous (n=1), and acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (n=1). The mean age was 10±4.58 years (range, 5–14 years). Acute elevation of blood pressure was found in all patients (n=5). Initial neurologic manifestations included seizure, clouding of consciousness, headache, and visual disturbance. After the diagnosis was made through clinical evaluations and magnetic resonance imaging, complete clinical recovery was obtained in all patients with the appropriate therapeutic approach. In conclusion, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with encephalopathy and underlying diseases such as nephritis, vasculitis, malignancy accompanied by hypertension, and a history of use of medication. PMID:28123335

  12. Preliminary Development of a Fiber Optic Sensor for Measuring Bilirubin

    PubMed Central

    Babin, Steven M; Sova, Raymond M

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary development of a fiber optic bilirubin sensor is described, where an unclad sensing portion is used to provide evanescent wave interaction of the transmitted light with the chemical environment. By using a wavelength corresponding to a bilirubin absorption peak, the Beer–Lambert Law can be used to relate the concentration of bilirubin surrounding the sensing portion to the amount of absorbed light. Initial testing in vitro suggests that the sensor response is consistent with the results of bulk absorption measurements as well as the Beer–Lambert Law. In addition, it is found that conjugated and unconjugated bilirubin have different peak absorption wavelengths, so that two optical frequencies may potentially be used to measure both types of bilirubin. Future development of this device could provide a means of real-time, point-of-care monitoring of intravenous bilirubin in critical care neonates with hyperbilirubinemia. PMID:25057239

  13. [Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff's psychosis: clinical-pathophysiological correlation, diagnostics and treatment].

    PubMed

    Sivolap, Iu P; Damulin, I V

    2013-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's psychosis are severe unfavorable forms of alcoholic brain damage with poor prognosis. Thiamine deficiency represents a common cause of both diseases. In many cases, Korsakoff's psychosis develops in the outcome of Wernicke's encephalopathy, which, along with the general etiology, lets talk about a single disease - Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, acute (usually reversible) stage of which is Wernicke's encephalopathy and a chronic one (often irreversible) is Korsakoff psychosis. The dramatic paradox of Wernicke's encephalopathy is that in most cases it is difficult to detect, but early diagnosed cases are quite easy to cure. Unrecognized and therefore go untreated Wernicke's encephalopathy is a serious threat to the health and lives of patients, worsens the processes of brain aging and increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease in later life. The basic approach to the treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is long-term parenteral administration of thiamine, often in high doses. As an adjuvant means of therapy memantine is considered.

  14. GABAergic transmission in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Olga A

    2013-08-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE)(1) is a neuropsychiatric disorder caused by chronic or acute liver failure. Nearly thirty years ago a hypothesis was formulated explaining the neuropathology of HE by increased GABAergic tone. Recent progress in the GABAA-receptor (GABAAR) molecular pharmacology and biochemistry as well as the physiology of GABAergic transmission provided better understanding of GABA's role in health and disease. A detailed analysis of neuronal populations and their GABAergic afferents affected in HE is still missing. The slow progress in understanding the pathology of GABAergic transmission in HE is due to the high complexity of brain circuitries controlled by multiple types of GABAergic interneurons and the large variety of GABAAR, which are differently affected by pathological conditions and not yet fully identified. The mechanisms of action of the GABAAR agonist taurine, allosteric positive modulators (inhibitory neurosteroids, anaesthetics, benzodiazepines and histamine) and inhibitors of the GABAAR (excitatory neurosteroids, Ro15-4513) are discussed with respect to HE pathophysiology. Perspectives for GABAergic drugs in the symptomatic treatment of HE are suggested.

  15. Pathophysiology of epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Lado, Fred A; Rubboli, Guido; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Capovilla, Pippo; Avanzini, Giuliano; Moshé, Solomon L

    2013-11-01

    The application of metabolic imaging and genetic analysis, and now the development of appropriate animal models, has generated critical insights into the pathogenesis of epileptic encephalopathies. In this article we present ideas intended to move from the lesions associated with epileptic encephalopathies toward understanding the effects of these lesions on the functioning of the brain, specifically of the cortex. We argue that the effects of focal lesions may be magnified through the interaction between cortical and subcortical structures, and that disruption of subcortical arousal centers that regulate cortex early in life may lead to alterations of intracortical synapses that affect a critical period of cognitive development. Impairment of interneuronal function globally through the action of a genetic lesion similarly causes widespread cortical dysfunction manifesting as increased delta slow waves on electroencephalography (EEG) and as developmental delay or arrest clinically. Finally, prolonged focal epileptic activity during sleep (as occurring in the syndrome of continuous spike-wave in slow sleep, or CSWSS) might interfere with local slow wave activity at the site of the epileptic focus, thereby impairing the neural processes and, possibly, the local plastic changes associated with learning and other cognitive functions. Seizures may certainly add to these pathologic processes, but they are likely not necessary for the development of the cognitive pathology. Nevertheless, although seizures may be either a consequence or symptom of the underlying lesion, their effective treatment can improve outcomes as both clinical and experimental studies may suggest. Understanding their substrates may lead to novel, effective treatments for all aspects of the epileptic encephalopathy phenotype.

  16. SCN2A encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Katherine B.; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Tambunan, Dimira; Mackay, Mark T.; Rodriguez-Casero, Victoria; Webster, Richard; Clark, Damian; Freeman, Jeremy L.; Calvert, Sophie; Olson, Heather E.; Mandelstam, Simone; Poduri, Annapurna; Mefford, Heather C.; Harvey, A. Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objective: De novo SCN2A mutations have recently been associated with severe infantile-onset epilepsies. Herein, we define the phenotypic spectrum of SCN2A encephalopathy. Methods: Twelve patients with an SCN2A epileptic encephalopathy underwent electroclinical phenotyping. Results: Patients were aged 0.7 to 22 years; 3 were deceased. Seizures commenced on day 1–4 in 8, week 2–6 in 2, and after 1 year in 2. Characteristic features included clusters of brief focal seizures with multiple hourly (9 patients), multiple daily (2), or multiple weekly (1) seizures, peaking at maximal frequency within 3 months of onset. Multifocal interictal epileptiform discharges were seen in all. Three of 12 patients had infantile spasms. The epileptic syndrome at presentation was epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS) in 7 and Ohtahara syndrome in 2. Nine patients had improved seizure control with sodium channel blockers including supratherapeutic or high therapeutic phenytoin levels in 5. Eight had severe to profound developmental impairment. Other features included movement disorders (10), axial hypotonia (11) with intermittent or persistent appendicular spasticity, early handedness, and severe gastrointestinal symptoms. Mutations arose de novo in 11 patients; paternal DNA was unavailable in one. Conclusions: Review of our 12 and 34 other reported cases of SCN2A encephalopathy suggests 3 phenotypes: neonatal-infantile–onset groups with severe and intermediate outcomes, and a childhood-onset group. Here, we show that SCN2A is the second most common cause of EIMFS and, importantly, does not always have a poor developmental outcome. Sodium channel blockers, particularly phenytoin, may improve seizure control. PMID:26291284

  17. The levels of bilirubin may be related to an inflammatory condition in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Greabu, M; Olinescu, R; Kummerow, F A; Crocnan, D O

    2001-01-01

    In agreement with previous reports, we found that the bilirubin level is significantly lower in the blood of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) than in age and sex matched controls. However, we found that the level of bilirubin in the blood seemed to be an age-dependent phenomenon and closely related to the activation of leukocytes. In 1,000 cardiac catheterised patients from Urbana, USA suffering from CHD, the level of blood bilirubin was found to be lower than in age and sex-matched controls. The same results were obtained on 300 patients with acute ischemia from three hospitals from Bucharest, Romania. The activation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes increased in the catheterised patients, as well in Romanian patients. An activation of leukocytes triggered by a chronic inflammatory process may increase the lysis of erythrocytes. The erythrocytes of patients with 100% stenosis exhibited a higher rate of in vitro lysis in the presence of activated leukocytes and homocysteine. The increased hemolysis may trigger the activation and removal of the resulting bilirubin from blood. Such a mechanism may depend on the liver clearing function. This function was decreased in catheterized patients over 60 years of age, but had accelerated in younger patients. An individual variation in liver function may explain the widespread bilirubin levels in the blood of patients suffering from CHD.

  18. Wernicke encephalopathy with atypical magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liou, Kuang-Chung; Kuo, Shu-Fan; Chen, Lu-An

    2012-11-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a medical emergency caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Typical clinical manifestations are mental change, ataxia, and ocular abnormalities. Wernicke encephalopathy is an important differential diagnosis in all patients with acute mental change. However, the disorder is greatly underdiagnosed. Clinical suspicion, detailed history taking, and neurologic evaluations are important for early diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently considered the diagnostic method of choice. Typical MRI findings of WE are symmetrical involvement of medial thalamus, mammillary body, and periaqueductal gray matter. Prompt thiamine supplement is important in avoiding unfavorable outcomes. Here, we report a case of alcoholic WE with typical clinical presentation but with atypical MRI. Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images showing symmetrical hyperintensity lesions in dentate nuclei of cerebellum, olivary bodies, and dorsal pons. Although atypical MRI findings are more common in nonalcoholic WE, it can also occur in alcoholic WE. This article is aimed to highlight the potential pitfalls in diagnosing acute mental change, the importance of clinical suspicion, and early treatment in WE.

  19. Brain MRI findings in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wicklund, Meredith R; Knopman, David S

    2013-08-01

    A 71-year-old woman with myelofibrosis on chemotherapy experienced an acute illness with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Two weeks later, she developed an acute confusional state characterized by disorientation and fluctuating alertness with normal speech and language. Her neurologic examination demonstrated an upper motor neuron pattern of right hemiparesis. She reported double vision though ophthalmoparesis was not appreciated. Her gait was normal. While hospitalized, she developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain MRI revealed a small area of restricted diffusion of the left precentral gyrus (figure). She was diagnosed with a stroke with secondary seizures; however, as the confusional state resolved, she developed profound retrograde and anterograde amnesia. Review of the brain MRI showed high T2 signal in the medial thalamus and contrast enhancement of the mamillary bodies; a diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was entertained and she was started on thiamine replacement. The encephalopathy and hemiparesis resolved though she remains severely amnestic.

  20. A Rare Complication Developing After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Wernicke’s Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Solmaz, Soner; Gereklioğlu, Çiğdem; Tan, Meliha; Demir, Şenay; Yeral, Mahmut; Korur, Aslı; Boğa, Can; Özdoğu, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin. Thiamine deficiency can present as a central nervous system disorder known as Wernicke’s encephalopathy, which classically manifests as confusion, ataxia, and ophthalmoplegia. Wernicke’s encephalopathy has rarely been reported following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Herein, we report Wernicke’s encephalopathy in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia who had been receiving prolonged total parenteral nutrition after haploidentical allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported from Turkey in the literature. PMID:25912759

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and interleukin-6 levels in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of children with viral infection-induced encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Morichi, Shinichiro; Yamanaka, Gaku; Ishida, Yu; Oana, Shingo; Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Kawashima, Hisashi

    2014-11-01

    We investigated changes in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and interleukin (IL)-6 levels in pediatric patients with central nervous system (CNS) infections, particularly viral infection-induced encephalopathy. Over a 5-year study period, 24 children hospitalized with encephalopathy were grouped based on their acute encephalopathy type (the excitotoxicity, cytokine storm, and metabolic error types). Children without CNS infections served as controls. In serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples, BDNF and IL-6 levels were increased in all encephalopathy groups, and significant increases were noted in the influenza-associated and cytokine storm encephalopathy groups. Children with sequelae showed higher BDNF and IL-6 levels than those without sequelae. In pediatric patients, changes in serum and CSF BDNF and IL-6 levels may serve as a prognostic index of CNS infections, particularly for the diagnosis of encephalopathy and differentiation of encephalopathy types.

  2. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is not associated with mutations in aquaporin-4.

    PubMed

    Matiello, Marcelo; Muralidharan, Rajanandini; Sun, David; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Weinshenker, Brian G

    2015-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by acute reversible subcortical vasogenic edema that is typically bilateral and self-limiting. It preferentially affects posterior regions of the brain. Clinical manifestations include encephalopathy, seizures, headache, and cortical blindness. PRES may be precipitated by hypertensive crises such as eclampsia and by immunosuppressive agents. The pathophysiology of PRES is incompletely understood. Disordered cerebral autoregulation leading to protein and fluid extravasation is thought to be important.(1) Other theories implicate endothelial dysfunction or vasospasm.(2).

  3. Conjugated bilirubin in neonates with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, M; Rubaltelli, F F; Hammerman, C; Vilei, M T; Leiter, C; Abramov, A; Muraca, M

    1996-05-01

    We used a system capable of measuring conjugated bilirubin and its monoconjugated and diconjugated fractions in serum to assess bilirubin conjugation in 29 glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient, term, male newborn infants and 35 control subjects; all had serum bilirubin levels > or = 256 mumol/L (15 mg/dI). The median value for diconjugated bilirubin was lower in the G6PD-deficient neonates than in control subjects (0.06 (range 0.00 to 1.84) vs 0.21 (range 0.00 to 1.02) mumol/L, p = 0.006). Diglucuronide was undetectable in 11 (38.9%) of the G6PD-deficient infants versus 3 (8.6%) of the control subjects (p = 0.015). These findings imply a partial defect of bilirubin conjugation not previously demonstrated in G6PD-deficient newborn infants.

  4. Conjugated Bilirubin Triggers Anemia by Inducing Erythrocyte Death

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Elisabeth; Gatidis, Sergios; Freise, Noemi F; Bock, Hans; Kubitz, Ralf; Lauermann, Christian; Orth, Hans Martin; Klindt, Caroline; Schuier, Maximilian; Keitel, Verena; Reich, Maria; Liu, Guilai; Schmidt, Sebastian; Xu, Haifeng C; Qadri, Syed M; Herebian, Diran; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Mayatepek, Ertan; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Karl S; Föller, Michael; Lang, Philipp A

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic failure is commonly associated with anemia, which may result from gastrointestinal bleeding, vitamin deficiency, or liver-damaging diseases, such as infection and alcohol intoxication. At least in theory, anemia during hepatic failure may result from accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Here we show that bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice leads to severe anemia despite increased reticulocyte numbers. Bilirubin stimulated suicidal death of human erythrocytes. Mechanistically, bilirubin triggered rapid Ca2+ influx, sphingomyelinase activation, formation of ceramide, and subsequent translocation of phosphatidylserine to the erythrocyte surface. Consistent with our in vitro and in vivo findings, incubation of erythrocytes in serum from patients with liver disease induced suicidal death of erythrocytes in relation to their plasma bilirubin concentration. Consistently, patients with hyperbilirubinemia had significantly lower erythrocyte and significantly higher reticulocyte counts compared to patients with low bilirubin levels. Conclusion: Bilirubin triggers suicidal erythrocyte death, thus contributing to anemia during liver disease. (Hepatology 2015;61:275–284) PMID:25065608

  5. Trans-Cutaneous Bilirubinometery versus Serum Bilirubin in Neonatal Jaundice.

    PubMed

    Mahram, Manoochehr; Oveisi, Sonia; Jaberi, Najmeh

    2015-12-01

    Hyperbilirubinemia is a common problem in neonates and causes serious complications. Thus, serial measurements of bilirubin should be done. This assessment is done through two methods of laboratory measurement in serum sample and transcutaneous bilirubinometer. This descriptive study compared transcutaneous bilirubin assessment and laboratory serum bilirubin. Bilirubin level was assessed among 256 neonates admitted to the Qods Children's Hospital in Qazvin- Iran, because of neonatal indirect jaundice, through two methods of transcutaneous bilirubinometery from two sites of forehead and sternum and laboratory measurement of bilirubin in serum. The cases were non-hemolytic icteric term neonates weighing 2500 gram or more and had not received phototherapy or other treatments. Neonates with hemolytic forms of jaundice, sepsis and suspicious to metabolic disorders were excluded. Assessments by means of KJ-8000 transcutaneous bilirubinometer from two sites of forehead and sternum and through laboratory measurement of serum bilirubin were registered and analyzed. The results of the current study showed that there was a correlation of 0.82 between serum bilirubin and transcutaneous forehead bilirubin assessment and for the used device sensitivity of 0.844; specificity of 0.842, Youden Index of 0.709 and Shortest of 0.042 for a cut-off of 12.4 in bilirubin of participants. Furthermore, Likelihood Ratio positive and negative (LR) were 5.665 and 0.164, respectively and diagnostic Odds Ratio (LR+/LR-) was 34.56. Transcutaneous bilirubinometery can be considered as a reliable tool to assess bilirubin for the screening of neonatal jaundice in term neonates.

  6. Bilirubin conjugates of human bile. Isolation of phenylazo derivatives of bile bilirubin

    PubMed Central

    Kuenzle, Clive C.

    1970-01-01

    A method is presented that allows the isolation of eight different phenylazo derivatives of bile bilirubin. In step I of the isolation procedure, three bilirubin fractions (bilirubin fractions 1, 2 and 3) from human hepatic bile are separated by reverse-phase partition chromatography on silicone-treated Celite with the use of a solvent system prepared from butan-1-ol and 5mm-phosphate buffer, pH6.0. Azo coupling is then performed with diazotized aniline. The three azo pigment mixtures are subjected to step II, in which the above chromatography system is used again. With each azo pigment mixture this step brings about the separation of a non-polar and a polar azo pigment fraction (azo 1A and azo 1B, azo 2A and azo 2B, and azo 3A and azo 3B from bilirubin fractions 1, 2 and 3 respectively). Approximately equal amounts of non-polar and polar pigments are obtained from bilirubin fractions 1 and 2, whereas bilirubin fraction 3 yields azo 3B almost exclusively. In step IIIA the non-polar azo pigment fractions are fractionated further by adsorption chromatography on anhydrous sodium sulphate with the use of chloroform followed by a gradient of ethyl acetate in chloroform. Three azo pigments are thus obtained from both azo 2A (azo 2A1, azo 2A2 and azo 2A3) and azo 3A (azo 3A1, azo 3A2 and azo 3A3). The 2A pigments occur in approximately the following proportions: azo 2A1, 90%; azo 2A2, 10%; azo 2A3, traces. The pigments are purified by crystallization, except for the A3 pigments, which are probably degradation products arising from the corresponding A2 pigments. In step IIIB the polar azo pigment fractions are subjected to reverse-phase partition chromatography on silicone-treated Celite with the use of a solvent system prepared from octan-1-ol–di-isopropyl ether–ethyl acetate–methanol–0.2m-acetic acid (1:2:2:3:4, by vol.). Azo pigment fractions 2B and 3B each yield six azo pigments (azo 2B1 to azo 2B6 and azo 3B1 to azo 3B6 respectively) together with small

  7. Laser Transcutaneous Bilirubin Meter: A New Device For Bilirubin Monitoring In Neonatal Jaundice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Mostafa; Hamza, Mohammad

    1988-06-01

    Neonates with jaundice require monitoring of serum bilirubin which should be repeated at frequent intervals. However, taking blood samples from neonates is not always an easy job, plus being an invasive and traumatising procedure with the additional risk of blood loss. In this paper the authors present the theory and design of a new noninvasive device for transcutaneous bilirubinometry, using a differential absorption laser system. The new technique depends upon illuminating the skin of the neonate with radiation from a two wave-length oscillation laser. The choice of the wavelengths follows the principles of optical bilirubinometry. For obtaining more accurate measurements, different pairs of two wave-lengths are incorporated in the design. The presence of hemoglobin is corrected for by appropriate selection of the laser wavelengths. The new design was tested for accuracy and precision using an argon ion laser. Correlation study between serum bilirubin determination by laser transcutaneous bilirubinometry and by American optical bilirubinometer was highly significant.

  8. Hashimoto Encephalopathy in Case of Progressive Cognitive Impairment; a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tafakhori, Abbas; Siroos, Bahaadin; Ghabaii, Mojdeh; Harirchain, Mohammad Hossein; Tajdini, Masih; Garg, Sushil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare condition characterized by atypical psychiatric and heterogeneous neurological manifestations such as acute cerebral ischemia, seizure, tremors, myoclonus, psychosis, depression, cognitive disorders, and fluctuating loss of consciousness. Here, a case of 28 year-old man was reported who referred to the emergency department (ED) with different acute neurologic disorders and final diagnose of HE. PMID:26495368

  9. The Bilirubin Binding Panel: A Henderson-Hasselbalch Approach to Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Ahlfors, Charles E

    2016-10-01

    Poor plasma bilirubin binding increases the risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity in newborns with hyperbilirubinemia. New laboratory tests may soon make it possible to obtain a complete bilirubin binding panel when evaluating these babies. The 3 measured components of the panel are the plasma total bilirubin concentration (BTotal), which is currently used to guide clinical care; the bilirubin binding capacity (BBC); and the concentration of non-albumin bound or free bilirubin (BFree). The fourth component is the bilirubin-albumin equilibrium dissociation constant, KD, which is calculated from BTotal, BBC, and BFree The bilirubin binding panel is comparable to the panel of components used in the Henderson-Hasselbalch approach to acid-base assessment. Bilirubin binding population parameters (not prospective studies to determine whether the new bilirubin binding panel components are better predictors of bilirubin neurotoxicity than BTotal) are needed to expedite the clinical use of bilirubin binding. At any BTotal, the BFree and the relative risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity increase as the KD/BBC ratio increases (ie, bilirubin binding worsens). Comparing the KD/BBC ratio of newborns with BTotal of concern with that typical for the population helps determine whether the risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity varies significantly from the inherent risk at that BTotal Furthermore, the bilirubin binding panel individualizes care because it helps to determine how aggressive intervention should be at any BTotal, irrespective of whether it is above or below established BTotal guidelines. The bilirubin binding panel may reduce anxiety, costs, unnecessary treatment, and the likelihood of undetected bilirubin neurotoxicity.

  10. Influence of assessment site in measuring transcutaneous bilirubin

    PubMed Central

    da Conceição, Cristiane Maria; Dornaus, Maria Fernanda Pellegrino da Silva; Portella, Maria Aparecida; Deutsch, Alice D'Agostini; Rebello, Celso Moura

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the influence of the site of measurement of transcutaneous bilirubin (forehead or sternum) in reproducibility of results as compared to plasma bilirubin. Methods: A cohort study including 58 term newborns with no hemolytic disease. Transcutaneous measurements were performed on the forehead (halfway between the headline and the glabella, from the left toward the right side, making consecutive determinations, one-centimeter apart) and the sternum (five measurements, from the suprasternal notch to the xiphoid process with consecutive determinations, one-centimeter apart) using Bilicheck® (SpectRx Inc, Norcross, Georgia, USA). The correlation and agreement between both methods and plasma bilirubin were calculated. Results: There was a strong linear correlation between both determinations of serum bilirubin at the forehead and sternum (r=0.704; p<0.01 and r=0.653; p<0.01, respectively). There was correspondence of the mean values of transcutaneous bilirubin measured on the sternum (9.9±2.2mg/dL) compared to plasma levels (10.2±1.7mg/dL), but both differ from the values measured on the forehead (8.6±2.0mg/dL), p<0.05. Conclusion: In newborn term infants with no hemolytic disease, measuring of transcutaneous bilirubin on the sternum had higher accuracy as compared to serum bilirubin measurement on the forehead. PMID:24728239

  11. The Relationship Between Serum Bilirubin Concentration and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mehmet; Demir, Canan; Uyan, Umut; Melek, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated that higher serum bilirubin inhibits the inflammation and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; also there is a relationship between serum bilirubin and cardiovascular disease. However, the relationship between bilirubin and atrial fibrillation (AF) is still unknown. In our study, we compared serum bilirubin, between nonvalvular AF patients and controls. Materials and Method One hundred and two patients with nonvalvular chronic AF without any other cardiovascular disease (mean age 62.51 ± 5.88) were included in our study. One hundred age-matched healthy people with sinus rhythm were accepted as control groups (mean age 61.35 ± 5.44). Routine biochemical parameters and serum bilirubin levels were performed. Results No statistically significant difference was found between two groups in terms of basic characteristics. Total, direct and indirect serum bilirubin levels were significantly lower among persons with AF compared to controls (0.82 ± 0.8 vs. 0.48 ± 0.5, 0.30 ± 0.2 vs. 0.19 ± 0.1 and 0.52 ± 0.5 vs. 0.29 ± 0.3 mg/dL; all P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion As a result, our study revealed a relationship between serum bilirubin and nonvalvular AF.

  12. Brainstem variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Caranci, Ferdinando; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Manzi, Francesca; Pagliano, Pasquale; Cirillo, Sossio

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological condition, generally observed in conjunction with severe and acute hypertension, that involves mainly the posterior head areas (occipital and temporal lobes) and anterior “watershed” areas. In this syndrome it is rare to observe a predominant involvement of the brainstem. We describe the clinical and radiological findings in a patient with brainstem involvement, discussing its pathophysiological features and possible differential diagnosis. PMID:26515750

  13. Brainstem variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Fabio; Caranci, Ferdinando; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Manzi, Francesca; Pagliano, Pasquale; Cirillo, Sossio

    2015-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological condition, generally observed in conjunction with severe and acute hypertension, that involves mainly the posterior head areas (occipital and temporal lobes) and anterior "watershed" areas. In this syndrome it is rare to observe a predominant involvement of the brainstem. We describe the clinical and radiological findings in a patient with brainstem involvement, discussing its pathophysiological features and possible differential diagnosis.

  14. Comparative Neuroprotective Effects of Dexamethasone and Minocycline during Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Gamal, Maha; Abdel Wahab, Zainab; Eshra, Mohamed; Rashed, Laila; Sharawy, Nivin

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Encephalopathy and brain edema are serious complications of acute liver injury and may lead to rapid death of patients. The present study was designed to investigate the role of the inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in the cytotoxic brain oedema and the neuroprotective effects of both minocycline and dexamethasone. Methods. 48 male albino rats were divided into 4 groups: control group, acute liver injury (ALI) group, minocycline pretreated ALI group, and dexamethasone pretreated ALI group. 24 hours after acute liver injury serum ammonia, liver enzymes, brain levels of heme oxygenase-1 gene, iNOS gene expression, nitrite/nitrate, and cytokines were measured. In addition, the grades of encephalopathy and brain water content were assessed. Results. ALI was associated with significant increases in all measured inflammatory mediators, oxidative stress, iNOS gene expression, and nitrite/nitrate. Both minocycline and dexamethasone significantly modulated the inflammatory changes and the oxidative/nitrosative stress associated with ALI. However, only minocycline but not dexamethasone significantly reduced the cytotoxic brain oedema. Conclusion. Both minocycline and dexamethasone could modulate inflammatory and oxidative changes observed in brain after ALI and could be novel preventative therapy for hepatic encephalopathy episodes.

  15. Need for early diagnosis of mental and mobility changes in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wijnia, Jan W; Oudman, Erik; Bresser, Esmay L; Gerridzen, Ineke J; van de Wiel, Albert; Beuman, Carla; Mulder, Cornelis L

    2014-12-01

    Korsakoff syndrome is a chronic form of amnesia resulting from thiamine deficiency. The syndrome can develop from unrecognized or undertreated Wernicke encephalopathy. The intra-individual course of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome has not been studied extensively, nor has the temporal progression of gait disturbances and other symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy. Here we present the detailed history of a patient whose acute symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy were far from stable. We follow his mobility changes and the shifts in his mental status from global confusion and impaired consciousness to more selective cognitive deficits. His Wernicke encephalopathy was missed and left untreated, being labeled as "probable" Korsakoff syndrome. Patients with a history of self-neglect and alcohol abuse, at risk of or suffering with Wernicke encephalopathy, should receive immediate and adequate vitamin replacement. Self-neglecting alcoholics who are bedridden may have severe illness and probably active Wernicke encephalopathy. In these patients, mobility changes, delirium, or impaired consciousness can be an expression of Wernicke encephalopathy, and should be treated to prevent further damage from the neurologic complications of thiamine deficiency.

  16. Transcutaneous bilirubin nomograms in African neonates

    PubMed Central

    Mabogunje, Cecilia A.; Imosemi, Donald O.; Emokpae, Abieyuwa A.

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of transcutaneous bilirubin (TcB) as a screening tool, based on relevant population-specific nomogram, or proxy for total serum bilirubin (TSB) levels in assessing the risk of subsequent hyperbilirubinemia is supported by several clinical guidelines on the management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. However, while TcB has been found to significantly over-estimate TSB in neonates of African-American ancestry, with variations across TcB devices, no nomogram has been specifically reported for this racial group. This study therefore set out to develop TcB nomograms for healthy late pre-term and term black African neonates derived from two widely used bilirubinometers. Methods A retrospective analysis of 12,377 TcB measurements obtained from 6,373 neonates in the first postnatal week, over a period of 48 months using Bilichek and JM-103 bilirubinometers. TcB percentiles were computed from hour-specific TcB values and nomograms developed for each of the screening devices. Predictive ability of the 75th and 95th percentiles to detect significant hyperbilirubinemia was evaluated between 24–96 hours of age. The 95th percentile curve was compared with those from other populations. Results The velocity of TcB rise at 75th and 95th percentiles was generally higher with JM-103 than Bilichek. Both percentiles also peaked at higher TcB levels with JM-103. The 95th percentile for both instruments showed a downward trend as from approximately 114 hours. Both instruments had high negative predictive values across the selected time-epochs and lower discriminatory ability than reported in non-black populations. Conclusions The predictive utility of TcB as a potential screening tool varies across devices in black African neonates with or without risk of significant hyperbilirubinemia, and lower than levels reported in non-black populations. Equipment-specific nomograms should be considered for TcB monitoring in this racial population where TSB is not routinely

  17. A case of Wernicke encephalopathy combined with disulfiram intoxication.

    PubMed

    Tartara, Elena; Fanucchi, Simona; D'Errico, Ignazio; Farina, Lisa M; Casoni, Francesca; Sinforiani, Elena; Micieli, Giuseppe; Costa, Alfredo

    2013-06-01

    There have been several reports of disulfiram intoxication, but little evidence of neurologic conditions resulting from disulfiram-induced brain damage combined with Wernicke encephalopathy-associated lesions. We report a rare patient with both Wernicke encephalopathy and disulfiram intoxication. This 50-year-old woman, who was taking disulfiram for chronic alcohol abuse, presented with an acute confusional state, dysarthria, nystagmus, supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, and paraparesis. Biochemical serum and cerebrospinal fluid analyses were normal. An electromyogram detected a motor polyneuropathy. Cognitive assessment revealed severe impairment of memory, attention, and logical and executive abilities. Magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement showed brain lesions consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy, but also symmetric hyperintensities on T2-weighted images in the globus pallidus. Stopping the disulfiram and treating with hydration, high-dose thiamine supplements, and benzodiazepines significantly improved the patient's consciousness and oculomotor function. A magnetic resonance imaging scan after 1 month of treatment showed complete disappearance of the brain lesions and the hyperintensities in the globus pallidus. After a further month of intensive neurorehabilitation, the patient was able to interact with the medical staff, and her neuropsychological tests showed only mild memory impairment. Patients with alcoholism who present at emergency departments are at high risk for misdiagnosis, especially because there is no specific routine laboratory test for detecting asymptomatic disulfiram intoxication. Although uncommon, the combination of Wernicke encephalopathy and disulfiram intoxication should be suspected in patients with alcoholism. The disorder can be detected through a careful history and prompt clinical evaluation, together with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings.

  18. Wernicke's encephalopathy in a child with high dose thiamine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Won; Yi, Yoon Young; Han, Jung Woo; Kim, Heung Dong; Lee, Joon Soo

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute neurological disorder characterized by mental confusion, oculomotor dysfunction, and ataxia. It has been reported in individuals with alcohol dependence, hyperemesis gravidarum, and prolonged parenteral nutrition without vitamin supplementation. Here we present the case of a 13-year-old male patient with neuroblastoma and a history of poor oral intake and nausea for 3 months. After admission, he showed gait disturbances, nystagmus, and excessive dizziness; his mental state, however, indicated he was alert, which did not fit the classical triad of Wernicke's encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was made only after brain magnetic resonance imaging and serum thiamine level analyses were performed. The patient's symptoms remained after 5 days of treatment with 100-mg thiamine once daily; thus, we increased the dosage to 500 mg 3 times daily, 1,500 mg per day. His symptoms then improved after 20 days of replacement therapy. This case report describes a pediatric patient who was promptly diagnosed with Wernicke's encephalopathy, despite only 2 suspicious symptoms, and who completely recovered after high doses of thiamine were given intravenously. PMID:25550705

  19. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. TSEs have been described in several species including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, tr...

  20. [Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by the use of diet pills and unbalanced diet].

    PubMed

    Tóth, Adrián; Aradi, Gabriella; Várallyay, György; Arányi, Zsuzsanna; Bereczki, Dániel; Vastagh, Ildikó

    2014-03-23

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute, potentially life-threatening, neurological syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency. The disorder is still greatly underdiagnosed and, without prompt treatment, the condition can lead to the chronic form of the disease, Korsakoff's syndrome or even death. In developed countries Wernicke's encephalopathy has been associated with alcoholism, but in recent years there has been an increasing number of non-alcoholic cases. Authors report the case of a 23-year-old woman who developed oculomotor dysfunction, encephalopathy and ataxia as a result of an extreme diet and use of diet pills. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was supported by the resolution of neurological signs after parenteral thiamine replacement. This case is presented because of the rare etiology and diagnostic difficulty, and the latest diagnostic and therapic guidelines are also highlighted.

  1. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Gofton, Teneille E; Young, G Bryan

    2012-10-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a diffuse brain dysfunction that occurs secondary to infection in the body without overt CNS infection. SAE is frequently encountered in critically ill patients in intensive care units, and in up to 70% of patients with severe systemic infection. The severity of SAE can range from mild delirium to deep coma. Seizures and myoclonus are infrequent and cranial nerves are almost always spared, but most severe cases have an associated critical illness neuromyopathy. Development of SAE probably involves a number of mechanisms that are not mutually exclusive and vary from patient to patient. Substantial neurological and psychological morbidities often occur in survivors. Mortality is almost always due to multiorgan failure rather than neurological complications, and is almost 70% in patients with severe SAE. Further research into the pathophysiology, management and prevention of SAE is needed. This Review discusses the epidemiology and clinical presentation of SAE. Recent evidence for SAE pathophysiology is outlined and a diagnostic approach to patients with this syndrome is presented. Lastly, prognosis and management of SAE is discussed.

  2. Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Neera; Duggal, Ashish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a common but poorly understood neurological complication of sepsis. It is characterized by diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection elsewhere in the body without overt CNS infection. The pathophysiology of SAE is complex and multifactorial including a number of intertwined mechanisms such as vascular damage, endothelial activation, breakdown of the blood brain barrier, altered brain signaling, brain inflammation, and apoptosis. Clinical presentation of SAE may range from mild symptoms such as malaise and concentration deficits to deep coma. The evaluation of cognitive dysfunction is made difficult by the absence of any specific investigations or biomarkers and the common use of sedation in critically ill patients. SAE thus remains diagnosis of exclusion which can only be made after ruling out other causes of altered mentation in a febrile, critically ill patient by appropriate investigations. In spite of high mortality rate, management of SAE is limited to treatment of the underlying infection and symptomatic treatment for delirium and seizures. It is important to be aware of this condition because SAE may present in early stages of sepsis, even before the diagnostic criteria for sepsis can be met. This review discusses the diagnostic approach to patients with SAE along with its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis.

  3. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Cotena, Simona; Piazza, Ornella

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is defined as a diffuse or multifocal cerebral dysfunction induced by the systemic response to the infection without clinical or laboratory evidence of direct brain infection. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial. SAE generally occurs early during severe sepsis and precedes multiple-organ failure. The most common clinical feature of SAE is the consciousness alteration which ranges from mildly reduced awareness to unresponsiveness and coma. Diagnosis of SAE is primarily clinical and depends on the exclusion of other possible causes of brain deterioration. Electroencephalography (EEG) is almost sensitive, but it is not specific for SAE. Computed Tomography (CT) head scan generally is negative in case of SAE, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can show brain abnormalities in case of SAE, but they are not specific for this condition. Somatosensitive Evoked Potentials (SEPs) are sensitive markers of developing cerebral dysfunction in sepsis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CBF) analysis is generally normal, a part an inconstant elevation of proteins concentration. S100B and NSE have been proposed like biomarkers for diagnosis of SAE, but the existing data are controversial. SAE is reversible even if survivors of severe sepsis have often long lasting or irreversible cognitive and behavioral sequel; however the presence of SAE can have a negative influence on survival. A specific therapy of SAE does not exist and the outcome depends on a prompt and appropriate treatment of sepsis as whole.

  4. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juneyoung; Padalino, David J; Chin, Lawrence S; Montenegro, Philip; Cantu, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Sports-related concussion has gained increased prominence, in part due to media coverage of several well-known athletes who have died from consequences of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE was first described by Martland in 1928 as a syndrome seen in boxers who had experienced significant head trauma from repeated blows. The classic symptoms of impaired cognition, mood, behavior, and motor skills also have been reported in professional football players, and in 2005, the histopathological findings of CTE were first reported in a former National Football League (NFL) player. These finding were similar to Alzheimer's disease in some ways but differed in critical areas such as a predominance of tau protein deposition over amyloid. The pathophysiology is still unknown but involves a history of repeated concussive and subconcussive blows and then a lag period before CTE symptoms become evident. The involvement of excitotoxic amino acids and abnormal microglial activation remain speculative. Early identification and prevention of this disease by reducing repeated blows to the head has become a critical focus of current research.

  5. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Algahtani, Abdulhadi; Aldarmahi, Ahmad; Hmoud, Mohammed; Marzuk, Yousef; Shirah, Bader

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological syndrome characterized by headache, altered mental status, seizures, or loss of vision. In this study, we report the largest series of PRES coming from Saudi Arabia and explore the etiology, clinical presentation, and outcome. We also report new imaging findings associated with this condition. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of all cases of PRES admitted to King Abdulaziz Medical City, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between the years 2005 and 2015. A neurologist reviewed all charts and analyzed the clinical presentations, etiological factors, and outcomes, and a neuroradiologist reviewed the imaging studies. Only patients with clinical and imaging features consistent with PRES were included in the study. Results: We collected 31 patients who had clinical and radiological features consistent with PRES. Females were more affected than males (18 females and 13 males), and patients’ age ranged from 6 to 95 years, with a mean of 38.3 years. Patients were treated by removing the precipitating causes and treating the underlying conditions. Resolution of neurologic signs occurred within 2 to 3 weeks in all patients. Conclusion: In our opinion, PRES itself is usually a benign condition with complete recovery if the condition is recognized early and managed appropriately. Although clinical signs are nonspecific, the constellation of symptoms including headache, visual problems, seizures, and altered level of consciousness should suggest the possibility of PRES, especially in high-risk group. Abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging are often characteristic and may be the first clue to the diagnosis. PMID:28042366

  6. Canine congenital portosystemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Maddison, J E

    1988-08-01

    The case records of 21 dogs with congenital portosystemic encephalopathy are reviewed. The disorder was most common in Australian cattledogs (blue heelers; 8 cases), Old English sheepdogs (3 cases) and Maltese terriers (3 cases). Extra-hepatic shunts occurred in small breeds, with the exception of 1 cattledog, while intra-hepatic shunts occurred in the medium to large breeds. The most common clinical pathology abnormalities were abnormal ammonia tolerance, mild to moderate increases in plasma alanine aminotransferase or alkaline phosphatase concentrations, decreased total serum protein concentrations, increased fasting ammonia concentrations and ammonium biurate crystalluria. Radiological examination revealed that all the dogs had a small liver. The kidneys were enlarged in 5 of 10 dogs in which kidney size could be estimated. Surgical ligation of an extra-hepatic shunt was successful in 2 of 4 dogs in which it was attempted. Medical management resulted in alleviation of clinical signs in 5 of 8 dogs. The period of successful treatment ranged from a few months to over a year.

  7. Approach to clinical syndrome of jaundice and encephalopathy in tropics.

    PubMed

    Anand, Anil C; Garg, Hitendra K

    2015-03-01

    A large number of patients present with jaundice and encephalopathy in tropical country like India and acute liver failure is the usual cause. Clinical presentation like ALF is also a complication of many tropical infections, and these conditions may mimic ALF but may have subtle differences from ALF. Moreover, what hepatologists see as acute liver failure in tropics is different from what is commonly described in Western Textbooks. Paracetamol overdose, which is possibly the commonest cause of ALF in UK and USA, is hardly ever seen in India. Most common etiology here is viral hepatitis (hepatitis E > hepatitis B> hepatitis A). Apart from ALF, one may also come across subacute hepatic failure (SAHF) as well as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) due to viral hepatitis. Interestingly, a host of other conditions can mimic ALF because clinical presentation in these conditions can be dominated by jaundice and encephalopathy. Malarial hepatopathy is possibly the best-known condition out of these and is not an uncommon manifestation of severe malaria. A similar presentation can also be seen in other common infections in tropics such as dengue fever, typhoid fever, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, amoebic liver abscesses, tuberculosis and other bacterial and fungal infections with or without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) related disease. In many of these conditions, liver failure may not be underlying pathophysiology. Some pregnancy related liver diseases could also present with jaundice and encephalopathy. This review summarizes the commonly seen presentations in tropical country like India, where jaundice and encephalopathy dominate the clinical picture.

  8. Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE): a review.

    PubMed

    Green, Rebecca; Scott, L Keith; Minagar, Alireza; Conrad, Steven

    2004-05-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a poorly understood condition that is associated with severe sepsis and appears to have a negative influence on survival. The incidence of encephalopathy secondary to sepsis is unknown. Amino acid derangements, blood-brain barrier disruption, abnormal neurotransmitters, and direct CNS effect are possible causes of septic encephalopathy. Research has not defined the pathogenesis of SAE.

  9. The clinical syndrome of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Vinod K; Johnson-Hamerman, Lois

    2015-02-01

    Clinicians have hypothesized a spectrum of minor neurologic manifestations, consistent with neuroanatomical reports and collectively termed as a "syndrome of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND)," which can occur in the absence of classical kernicterus. The current review builds on these initial reports with a focus on clinical signs and symptoms that are assessed by standardized tools and manifest from neonatal age to childhood. These clinical manifestations are characterized by the following domains: (i) neuromotor signs; (ii) muscle tone abnormalities; (iii) hyperexcitable neonatal reflexes; (iv) variety of neurobehavior manifestations; (v) speech and language abnormalities; and (vi) evolving array of central processing abnormalities, such as sensorineural audiology and visuomotor dysfunctions. Concerns remain that the most vulnerable infants are likely to acquire BIND, either because their exposure to bilirubin is not identified as severe enough to need treatment or is prolonged but slightly below current threshold levels for intervention. Knowing that a total serum/plasma bilirubin (TB) level is not the most precise indicator of neurotoxicity, the role of expanded biomarkers or a "bilirubin panel" has yet to be validated in prospective studies. Future studies that correlate early "toxic" bilirubin exposure to long-term academic potential of children are needed to explore new insights into bilirubin's effect on the structural and functional maturation of an infant's neural network topology.

  10. Parent Experience of Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, Monica E; Donohue, Pamela K; Parkinson, Charlamaine; Northington, Frances J; Boss, Renee D

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to characterize the parent experience of caring for an infant with neonatal encephalopathy. In this mixed-methods study, we performed semistructured interviews with parents whose infants were enrolled in an existing longitudinal cohort study of therapeutic hypothermia between 2011 and 2014. Thematic saturation was achieved after 20 interviews. Parent experience of caring for a child with neonatal encephalopathy was characterized by 3 principal themes. Theme 1: Many families described cumulative loss and grief throughout the perinatal crisis, critical neonatal course, and subsequent missed developmental milestones. Theme 2: Families experienced entangled infant and broader family interests. Theme 3: Parents evolved into and found meaning in their role as an advocate. These data offer insight into the lived experience of parenting an infant with neonatal encephalopathy. Primary data from parents can serve as a useful framework to guide the development and interpretation of parent-centered outcomes.

  11. Electroencephalography of autoimmune limbic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Peter W; Sutter, Raoul

    2013-10-01

    There is an increasing recognition of autoimmune limbic encephalopathy with the hope for earlier diagnosis and expedited and improved treatment. Although antibody testing remains the definitive clinical diagnostic feature, the presentation of a rapid dementia, behavioral changes, and seizures leads to investigation using cerebral imaging, electroencephalography, and cerebrospinal fluid to confirm the diagnosis and also to exclude similar disorders. The electroencephalographer may be asked to comment on the types of electroencephalography abnormality and provide input toward the diagnosis of limbic encephalopathy. This article reviews the literature on limbic paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic encephalopathies, providing descriptions and examples of the electroencephalography findings. Typically, there are patterns of slow theta and delta activity and different patterns of temporal and frontal epileptic activity.

  12. Cortical blindness in a child with acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kaarthigeyan, K; Vijayalakshmi, A M

    2012-01-01

    The association between hypertensive encephalopathy and cortical blindness in children with acute glomerulonephritis is extremely rare. We report the case of a 9-year old girl who presented with headache, seizures, altered sensorium, hematuria, and transient cortical blindness as a complication of hypertensive encephalopathy which showed complete reversal following normalization of blood pressure and an underlying post-infectious acute glomerulonephritis was revealed.

  13. GNAO1 encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Danti, Federica Rachele; Galosi, Serena; Romani, Marta; Montomoli, Martino; Carss, Keren J.; Raymond, F. Lucy; Parrini, Elena; Bianchini, Claudia; McShane, Tony; Dale, Russell C.; Mohammad, Shekeeb S.; Shah, Ubaid; Mahant, Neil; Ng, Joanne; McTague, Amy; Samanta, Rajib; Vadlamani, Gayatri; Valente, Enza Maria; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Kurian, Manju A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe better the motor phenotype, molecular genetic features, and clinical course of GNAO1-related disease. Methods: We reviewed clinical information, video recordings, and neuroimaging of a newly identified cohort of 7 patients with de novo missense and splice site GNAO1 mutations, detected by next-generation sequencing techniques. Results: Patients first presented in early childhood (median age of presentation 10 months, range 0–48 months), with a wide range of clinical symptoms ranging from severe motor and cognitive impairment with marked choreoathetosis, self-injurious behavior, and epileptic encephalopathy to a milder phenotype, featuring moderate developmental delay associated with complex stereotypies, mainly facial dyskinesia and mild epilepsy. Hyperkinetic movements were often exacerbated by specific triggers, such as voluntary movement, intercurrent illnesses, emotion, and high ambient temperature, leading to hospital admissions. Most patients were resistant to drug intervention, although tetrabenazine was effective in partially controlling dyskinesia for 2/7 patients. Emergency deep brain stimulation (DBS) was life saving in 1 patient, resulting in immediate clinical benefit with complete cessation of violent hyperkinetic movements. Five patients had well-controlled epilepsy and 1 had drug-resistant seizures. Structural brain abnormalities, including mild cerebral atrophy and corpus callosum dysgenesis, were evident in 5 patients. One patient had a diffuse astrocytoma (WHO grade II), surgically removed at age 16. Conclusions: Our findings support the causative role of GNAO1 mutations in an expanded spectrum of early-onset epilepsy and movement disorders, frequently exacerbated by specific triggers and at times associated with self-injurious behavior. Tetrabenazine and DBS were the most useful treatments for dyskinesia. PMID:28357411

  14. The burden of hepatic encephalopathy in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Dávalos Moscol, Milagros; Bustios Sanchez, Carla

    2011-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by changes in cognitive function, behavior, and personality, as well as by transient neurological symptoms and electroencephalographic changes, which occur in the context of acute or chronic liver failure. Cirrhosis is the main disease associated to HE, and it is known that its incidence is increasing worldwide. As a cause of mortality, cirrhosis is ranked 14 worldwide, but 10 in developed countries. It has been demonstrated that the incidence of liver disease is increasing, in part because of the ascending prevalence of NAFLD, HCV, HCC, as well of alcohol consumption. The real incidence of cirrhosis in Latin America is unknown, although in some Latin American countries that provided national data, cirrhosis death rates were between 5 and 17/100,000 for men and 3 and 5/100,000 for women. Disability, quality of life, and social aspects should be considered when assessing the impact of a disease. In this context, preliminary estimates of the global burden of disease attributable to chronic liver disease seem to be substantial. Hepatic encephalopathy, a main complication of liver failure, occurs in 30-45% of patients as overt encephalopathy, but when subclinical or minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is considered, estimates of the incidence of encephalopathy vary from 20 to 60%. In USA, the 2009 NIH Report on the Costs of Digestive Diseases stated that liver disease was the second most costly disease in direct and indirect costs (13.1 billion dollars). Although the economic cost of HE has not been assessed, it is obvious that the economic impact of HE on daily activities of living is extremely high, as the costs of diminished work performance and lost wages are substantial.

  15. Profile of minocycline neuroprotection in bilirubin-induced auditory system dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rice, Ann C; Chiou, Victoria L; Zuckoff, Sarah B; Shapiro, Steven M

    2011-01-12

    Excessive hyperbilirubinemia in human neonates can cause permanent dysfunction of the auditory system, as assessed with brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs). Jaundiced Gunn rat pups (jjs) exhibit similar BAEP abnormalities as hyperbilirubinemic neonates. Sulfadimethoxine (sulfa) administration to jjs, which displaces bilirubin from serum albumin into tissues including brain, exacerbates acute toxicity. Minocycline administered prior to sulfa in jjs protects against BAEP abnormalities. This study evaluates the neuroprotective capabilities of minocycline HCl (50 mg/kg) administered 30 or 120 min after sulfa (200 mg/kg) in 16 days old jjs. BAEPs are recorded at 6 or 24 h post-sulfa. Abnormal BAEP waves exhibit increased latency and decreased amplitude. The sulfa/saline treated jjs exhibited a significantly increased interwave interval between waves I and II (I-II IWI) and significantly decreased amplitudes of waves II and III compared to the saline/saline jjs. The minocycline 30 min post-sulfa (sulfa/mino+30) group was not significantly different from the saline/saline control group, indicating neuroprotection. The minocycline 120 min post-sulfa (sulfa/mino+120) group had a significantly decreased amplitude of wave III at both 6 and 24h. These studies indicate that minocycline has a graded neuroprotective effect when administered after acute bilirubin neurotoxicity.

  16. Acute renal failure associated with liver disease in India: etiology and outcome.

    PubMed

    Sural, S; Sharma, R K; Gupta, A; Sharma, A P; Gulati, S

    2000-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) associated with liver disease is a commonly encountered clinical problem of varied etiology and high mortality. We have prospectively analyzed patients with liver disease and ARF to determine the etiology, clinical spectrum, prognosis and factors affecting the outcome. Other than hepatorenal syndrome patients, out of 221 cases, 66 developed ARF secondary to various liver disease like cirrhosis (n = 29, mortality 8, risk factors-older age p < 0.01, grade III/IV encephalopathy p < 0.05), fulminant hepatic failure (n = 25, mortality 15, risk factor-prolonged prothrombin time p < 0.01), and obstructive jaundice (n = 12, mortality 7, risk factor-sepsis p < 0.01). In these three groups the factors leading to ARF were volume depletion (24), gastrointestinal bleed (28), sepsis (34), drugs (27) [aminoglycosides (9) and NSAID (18)] along with hyperbilirubinemia. Various types of ARF with contemporaneous liver injury were malaria (n = 37, mortality 15, risk factors-higher bilirubin p < 0.001, higher creatinine p < 0.05, anuria p < 0.05 and dialysis dependency p < 0.05), sepsis (n = 36, mortality 22, risk factors-age p < 0.001, higher bilirubin p < 0.01, oliguria p < 0.05), hypovolemia with ischemic hepatic injury (n = 14, mortality 5, risk factors-higher creatinine p < 0.05 and SGPT p < 0.01), acute pancreatitis (n = 12, mortality 4, risk factors-higher bilirubin p < 0.001, higher SGPT p < 0.01, dialysis dependency p < 0.05), rifampicin toxicity (n = 10, no mortality), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (n = 3, no mortality), CuSO4 poisoning (n = 3 mortality 2), post abortal (n = 11, mortality 6, risk factors higher creatinine p < 0.05 and SGPT p < 0.01), ARF following delivery including HELLP syndrome (n = 12, mortality 4, risk factors-higher bilirubin p < 0.01 and SGPT p < 0.01), and of uncertain etiology (n= 14 mortality 4). 133 patients (60.2%), required hemodialysis hemodialfiltration or peritoneal dialysis. ARF associated with liver disease is

  17. HEV infection as an aetiologic factor for acute hepatitis: experience from a tertiary hospital in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Mamun-Al-Mahtab; Rahman, Salimur; Khan, Mobin; Karim, Fazal

    2009-02-01

    Acute hepatitis is seen sporadically round the year in Bangladesh. The incidence of acute viral hepatitis E increases after floods as this allows sewerage contamination of piped and groundwater. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the burden of hepatitis E virus (HEV infection) in Bangladesh. Patients attending the Hepatology Unit III of the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, during June 2004-December 2006, were included in the study. All viral markers were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The study population was divided in four groups. Group 1 included 144 patients with acute viral hepatitis. The inclusion criteria were: nausea and/or vomiting, loss of appetite, serum bilirubin >200 micromol/L, raised serum transaminases, and prothrombin time >3 seconds prolonged beyond control value. In Group 2, there were 31 pregnant women with acute viral hepatitis. All the patients had prodrome, icterus, raised serum bilirubin and raised serum transaminase levels. Group 3 included 23 patients presenting with fulminant hepatic failure. In Group 4, 69 patients with cirrhosis of liver were included. They presented with features of decompensation for the first time. The inclusion criteria were: patients with established cirrhosis with jaundice and/or ascites and/or hepatic encephalopathy. In Group 1, 58.33% of the 144 patients had acute viral hepatitis E. In Group 2, 45.16% of the pregnant women also had acute viral hepatitis E. HEV was responsible for 56.52% cases of fulminant hepatic failure in Group 3. In 21.7% cases in Group 4, decompensation of cirrhosis was due to HEV. Acute viral hepatitis E in the third trimester of pregnancy and HEV-induced fulminant hepatic failure were associated with 80% of mortality despite the best possible care. In this clinical context, acute viral hepatitis E is the leading cause of wide spectrum of liver disease ranging from severe acute viral hepatitis, fulminant hepatic failure, to decompensation of liver in

  18. New insights in bilirubin metabolism and their clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Sticova, Eva; Jirsa, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Bilirubin, a major end product of heme breakdown, is an important constituent of bile, responsible for its characteristic colour. Over recent decades, our understanding of bilirubin metabolism has expanded along with the processes of elimination of other endogenous and exogenous anionic substrates, mediated by the action of multiple transport systems at the sinusoidal and canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. Several inherited disorders characterised by impaired bilirubin conjugation (Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I and type II, Gilbert syndrome) or transport (Dubin-Johnson and Rotor syndrome) result in various degrees of hyperbilirubinemia of either the predominantly unconjugated or predominantly conjugated type. Moreover, disrupted regulation of hepatobiliary transport systems can explain jaundice in many acquired liver disorders. In this review, we discuss the recent data on liver bilirubin handling based on the discovery of the molecular basis of Rotor syndrome. The data show that a substantial fraction of bilirubin conjugates is primarily secreted by MRP3 at the sinusoidal membrane into the blood, from where they are subsequently reuptaken by sinusoidal membrane-bound organic anion transporting polypeptides OATP1B1 and OATP1B3. OATP1B proteins are also responsible for liver clearance of bilirubin conjugated in splanchnic organs, such as the intestine and kidney, and for a number of endogenous compounds, xenobiotics and drugs. Absence of one or both OATP1B proteins thus may have serious impact on toxicity of commonly used drugs cleared by this system such as statins, sartans, methotrexate or rifampicin. The liver-blood cycling of conjugated bilirubin is impaired in cholestatic and parenchymal liver diseases and this impairment most likely contributes to jaundice accompanying these disorders. PMID:24151358

  19. Glyphosate-surfactant herbicide-induced reversible encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, R C; Ghia, D K; Cordato, D J; Beran, R G

    2010-11-01

    Glyphosate-surfactant (GlySH) is a commonly used herbicide that has been used in attempted suicide. Most reports of GlySH toxicity in patients have followed ingestion of the commercial product "Round-up" (Monsanto Ltd; Melbourne, Victoria, Australia), which consists of a mixture of glyphosate (as a isopropylanine salt) and a surfactant (polyoxyethyleneamine). Ingestion of Round-up is reported to cause significant toxicity including nausea, vomiting, oral and abdominal pain. Renal and hepatic impairment and pulmonary oedema may also occur. Impaired consciousness and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae but there are limited data on the central nervous system (CNS) effects of Round-up toxicity. We report a 71-year-old male who attempted suicide with GlySH and developed a prolonged but reversible encephalopathy suggestive of acute CNS toxicity.

  20. Contributions of Microdialysis to New Alternative Therapeutics for Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Sampieri, Aristides; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease. PMID:23921686

  1. Contributions of microdialysis to new alternative therapeutics for hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Sampieri, Aristides Iii; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-08-05

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease.

  2. [Role of rifaximin in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Delgado, Jordi; Miquel, Mireia

    2016-04-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a frequent and serious complication of liver cirrhosis. In addition to correction of the precipitating factors, the most commonly used treatments are non-absorbable disaccharides and rifaximin. Many of the recommendations are based on current clinical practice and there are few randomized controlled trials. Currently, rifaximin should be initiated during an episode of EH if, after 24-48 hours of non-absorbable disaccharide therapy, there is no clinical improvement. In recurrent EH, it is advisable to add rifaximin in patients under non-absorbable disaccharide therapy who develop a new episode. Currently, standard treatment with rifaximin for minimal EH is not recommended. Rifaximin is effective in the acute treatment of overt encephalopathy and in preventing recurrence.

  3. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis misdiagnosed as Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mirabelli-Badenier, M; Biancheri, R; Morana, G; Fornarino, S; Siri, L; Celle, M E; Veneselli, E; Vincent, A; Gaggero, R; Mancardi, M M

    2014-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a well-defined autoimmune disorder. Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a still controversial entity, lacking definite diagnostic criteria. We described a 14-year-old-girl presenting with a clinical picture consistent with the diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis, confirmed by NMDAR antibody testing. Four years earlier, she had presented a similar episode of acute encephalopathy diagnosed as HE. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis and HE share similar clinical features so that the differential diagnosis can be difficult if specific antibodies are not tested. The correct diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis is crucial to plan the appropriate management and follow-up, namely in term of oncological screening, since it can be paraneoplastic in origin. We suggest to re-evaluate the clinical history of all subjects with previous HE diagnosis in order to evaluate the possible diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis and plan the appropriate management of these patients.

  4. Fluorescent protein-based detection of unconjugated bilirubin in newborn serum

    PubMed Central

    Iwatani, Sota; Nakamura, Hajime; Kurokawa, Daisuke; Yamana, Keiji; Nishida, Kosuke; Fukushima, Sachiyo; Koda, Tsubasa; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Nishio, Hisahide; Iijima, Kazumoto; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Morioka, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Increased serum levels of unconjugated bilirubin are associated with the development of brain damage in newborns. In current clinical settings, there are no methods for directly determining serum levels of unconjugated bilirubin. UnaG, a fluorescent protein from Japanese eel muscle that specifically binds to unconjugated bilirubin was used in this study. Linear regression analysis was carried out to compare unconjugated bilirubin levels measured by UnaG and conventional bilirubin oxidase methods. Unconjugated bilirubin levels in the serum of newborns who were untreated or treated with phototherapy were compared. Effects of interfering factors in the serum (conjugated bilirubin, hemoglobin, and lipid) on unconjugated bilirubin concentration measured by the UnaG method were also evaluated. Unconjugated bilirubin levels measured by the UnaG method were highly correlated with those determined by the bilirubin oxidase assay. Unconjugated bilirubin levels determined by bilirubin oxidase and UnaG assays were similar in serum samples containing conjugated bilirubin. The performance of the UnaG assay was unaffected by phototherapy and the presence of serum hemoglobin and lipid emulsion. These results demonstrate the clinical applicability of the UnaG method for direct measurement of unconjugated bilirubin levels in newborn serum. PMID:27324682

  5. Functional polyethersulfone particles for the removal of bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xin; Xiang, Tao; Xie, Yi; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Weifeng; Sun, Shudong; Zhao, Chang-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    In this study, polyethersulfone/poly (glycidyl methacrylate) particles are prepared via in situ cross-linked polymerization coupled with a phase inversion technique. The surfaces of these particles are then further modified by grafting amino groups using tetraethylenepentamine, dethylenetriamine, ethylenediamine, or 1,6-hexanediamine for the removal of bilirubin. The particles are characterized by Flourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. Batch adsorption experiments are performed to verify the adsorption capability, and the effect of bilirubin initial concentration, bovine serum albumin concentration, and solution ionic strength on the adsorption is also investigated. In addition, both adsorption kinetic and isotherm models are applied to analyze the adsorption process of bilirubin, and a particle column is used to further study the bilirubin removal ability.To prove that the method was a universal portal to prepare functional particles, polysulfone, polystyrene, and poly(vinylidene fluoride) based functional particles were also prepared and used for the removal of bilirubin. This study and the results indicated that the particles had a great potential to be used in hemoperfusion treatment for hyperbilirubinemia.

  6. Influence of hemoglobin on non-invasive optical bilirubin sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingying; Gong, Qiliang; Zou, Da; Xu, Kexin

    2012-03-01

    Since the abnormal metabolism of bilirubin could lead to diseases in the human body, especially the jaundice which is harmful to neonates. Traditional invasive measurements are difficult to be accepted by people because of pain and infection. Therefore, the real-time and non-invasive measurement of bilirubin is of great significance. However, the accuracy of currently transcutaneous bilirubinometry(TcB) is generally not high enough, and affected by many factors in the human skin, mostly by hemoglobin. In this talk, absorption spectra of hemoglobin and bilirubin have been collected and analyzed, then the Partial Least Squares (PLS) models have been built. By analyzing and comparing the Correlation and Root Mean Square Error of Prediction(RMSEP), the results show that the Correlation of bilirubin solution model is larger than that of the mixture solution added with hemoglobin, and its RMSEP value is smaller than that of mixture solution. Therefore, hemoglobin has influences on the non-invasive optical bilirubin sensing. In next step, it is necessary to investigate how to eliminate the influence.

  7. Blood-brain interfaces and bilirubin-induced neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Ghersi-Egea, J F; Gazzin, S; Strazielle, N

    2009-01-01

    The endothelium of the brain microvessels and the choroid plexus epithelium form highly specialized cellular barriers referred to as blood-brain interfaces through which molecular exchanges take place between the blood and the neuropil or the cerebrospinal fluid, respectively. Within the brain, the ependyma and the pia-glia limitans modulate exchanges between the neuropil and the cerebrospinal fluid. All these interfaces are key elements of neuroprotection and fulfill trophic functions; both properties are critical to harmonious brain development and maturation. By analogy to hepatic bilirubin detoxification pathways, we review the transport and metabolic mechanisms which in all these interfaces may participate in the regulation of bilirubin cerebral bioavailability in physiologic conditions, both in adult and in developing brain. We specifically address the role of ABC and OATP transporters, glutathione-S-transferases, and the potential involvement of glucuronoconjugation and oxidative metabolic pathways. Regulatory mechanisms are explored which are involved in the induction of these pathways and represent potential pharmacological targets to prevent bilirubin accumulation into the brain. We then review the possible alteration of the neuroprotective and trophic barrier functions in the course of bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunctions resulting from hyperbilirubinemia. Finally, we highlight the role of the blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers in regulating the brain biodisposition of candidate drugs for the treatment or prevention of bilirubin-induced brain injury.

  8. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and hypomagnesemia: A frequent association?

    PubMed

    Chardain, A; Mesnage, V; Alamowitch, S; Bourdain, F; Crozier, S; Lenglet, T; Psimaras, D; Demeret, S; Graveleau, P; Hoang-Xuan, K; Levy, R

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a serious neurological condition encountered in various medical fields. Pathophysiological factor(s) common to PRES cases of apparently unrelated etiologies are yet to be found. Based on the hypothesis that hypomagnesemia might participate in the cascade leading to PRES, our study sought to verify whether hypomagnesemia is frequently associated with PRES regardless of etiology. From a retrospective study of a cohort of 57 patients presenting with PRES of different etiologies, presented here are the findings of 19 patients with available serum magnesium levels (SMLs) during PRES. In the acute phase of PRES, hypomagnesemia was present in all 19 patients in spite of differences in etiology (including immunosuppressive drugs, hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia, systemic lupus erythematosus, iatrogenic etiology and unknown). SMLs were within normal ranges prior to PRES and below normal ranges during the first 48h of PRES, with a significant decrease in SMLs during the acute phase. In this retrospective study, constant hypomagnesemia was observed during the acute phase of PRES regardless of its etiology. These results now require larger studies to assess the particular importance of acute hypomagnesemia in PRES and especially the possible need to treat PRES with magnesium sulfate.

  9. Enhanced removal of bilirubin on molecularly imprinted titania film.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zheng-peng; Yan, Jin-long; Zhang, Chun-jing; Luo, Shu-qiong

    2011-10-01

    Titania film imprinted by bilirubin molecule at the surface of quartz crystal was prepared using molecular imprinting and surface sol-gel process. The molecularly imprinted titania film was characterized by FTIR spectra, and the interaction between bilirubin and imprinted film was investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique. Compared with pure titania film, the molecularly imprinted titania film exhibits a much higher adsorption capacity for the target molecule, and the adsorption kinetic parameter estimated from the in situ frequency measurement is about 1.6×10(8) M(-1), which is ten times higher than that obtained on pure titania film. The photocatalytic measurements indicate that the bilirubin adsorbed on molecularly imprinted titania film can be completely removed under UV illumination. Moreover, our study indicates that the molecularly imprinted titania film possesses a better stability and reusability.

  10. Prognostic Assessment in Patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, Rita; Simón-Talero, Macarena; Córdoba, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of liver failure that is associated with poor prognosis. However, the prognosis is not uniform and depends on the underlying liver disease. Acute liver failure is an uncommon cause of HE that carries bad prognosis but is potentially reversible. There are several prognostic systems that have been specifically developed for selecting patients for liver transplantation. In patients with cirrhosis the prognosis of the episode of HE is usually dictated by the underlying precipitating factor. Acute-on-chronic liver failure is the most severe form of decompensation of cirrhosis, the prognosis depends on the number of associated organ failures. Patients with cirrhosis that have experienced an episode of HE should be considered candidates for liver transplant. The selection depends on the underlying liver function assessed by the Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) index. There is a subgroup that exhibits low MELD and recurrent HE, usually due to the coexistence of large portosystemic shunts. The recurrence of HE is more common in patients that develop progressive deterioration of liver function and hyponatremia. The bouts of HE may cause sequels that have been shown to persist after liver transplant. PMID:22045403

  11. Bilirubin oxidation products, oxidative stress, and intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Clark, J. F.; Loftspring, M.; Wurster, W. L.; Beiler, S.; Beiler, C; Wagner, K. R.; Pyne-Geithman, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Hematoma and perihematomal regions after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are biochemically active environments known to undergo potent oxidizing reactions. We report facile production of bilirubin oxidation products (BOXes) via hemoglobin/Fenton reaction under conditions approximating putative in vivo conditions seen following ICH. Using a mixture of human hemoglobin, physiological buffers, unconjugated solubilized bilirubin, and molecular oxygen and/or hydrogen peroxide, we generated BOXes, confirmed by spectral signature consistent with known BOXes mixtures produced by independent chemical synthesis, as well as HPLC-MS of BOX A and BOX B. Kinetics are straightforward and uncomplicated, having initial rates around 0.002 μM bilirubin per μM hemoglobin per second under normal experimental conditions. In hematomas from porcine ICH model, we observed significant production of BOXes, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase, indicating a potent oxidizing environment. BOX concentrations increased from 0.084 ± 0.01 in fresh blood to 22.24 ± 4.28 in hematoma at 72 h, and were 11.22 ± 1.90 in adjacent white matter (nmol/g). Similar chemical and analytical results are seen in ICH in vivo, indicating the hematoma is undergoing similar potent oxidations. This is the first report of BOXes production using a well-defined biological reaction and in vivo model of same. Following ICH, amounts of unconjugated bilirubin in hematoma can be substantial, as can levels of iron and hemoglobin. Oxidation of unconjugated bilirubin to yield bioactive molecules, such as BOXes, is an important discovery, expanding the role of bilirubin in pathological processes seen after ICH. PMID:19066073

  12. Studies on the molecular significance in the interaction of bilirubin with collagen.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Usharani; Gladstone Christopher, Jayakumar; Chandrasekaran, Bangaru; Jonnalagadda, Raghava Rao; Balachandran, Unni Nair; Kohsaku, Kawakami

    2013-10-01

    The present investigation is aimed to understand the physiological significance of bilirubin interaction with collagen. In human skin, collagen absorbs both free bilirubin and serum bound bilirubin from the human system. Interaction between bilirubin and collagen depends on time, temperature and concentration of bilirubin. There is an increase in the aggregation rate of collagen in the presence of biliruibin. At physiological condition, 125 nM of bilirubin is the maximum concentration absorbed by per mg of collagen molecule. Bilirubin accelerates the lateral growth of collagen fibrils by shifting its rate of nucleation. Moreover, collagen-bilirubin complex exhibit a tendency to undergo adsorption onto the surface of the fibroblast cells, showing detrimental effects on fibroblasts proliferations. Based on the collagen binding assays, the binding of bilirubin to collagen is found to be electrostatic in nature, which confirms binding between the amino acid fragment of α1 (I) region of collagen and carboxyl group of bilirubin. The biotinylated bilirubin derivatives show better binding to α1 (I) chain rather than α2 (I) chains which clearly designates that bilirubin shows greater affinity to α1 chains of collagen. This novel approach directs to reduce the occurrence of bilirubin in hyperbilirubinemia patients.

  13. Veno-occlusive disease of the liver in the absence of elevation in bilirubin in pediatric patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kasiani C; Dandoy, Christopher; El-Bietar, Javier; Davies, Stella M; Jodele, Sonata

    2015-02-01

    Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) of the liver is a well-described and significant complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), with limited successful therapeutic options in severe cases. Prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatment is crucial to restrict the extent of disease. However, a subset of patients may not meet all current diagnostic criteria at presentation, and waiting for these to be met may delay therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 794 HSCT patients treated at our institution between 2003 and 2013, identifying 17 (2.1%) who developed VOD. Of these, 5 (29%) were noted to have an absence of elevated bilirubin at the time of VOD diagnosis and reversal of portal venous flow on ultrasound. Median total and conjugated bilirubin at VOD diagnosis were 1.0 and 0.2 mg/dL, respectively. All 5 patients were subsequently diagnosed with multiorgan failure associated with VOD, including 1 with encephalopathy. Four were treated with intravenous high-dose methylprednisolone (500 mg/m(2) per dose every 12 hours for 6 doses). One patient received defibrotide therapy in addition to steroids and another supportive care alone. VOD resolved in 4 of 5 patients, with median time to resolution of VOD, defined as recovery of all organ function and normalization of bilirubin and portal venous flow, of 8 days. Two patients died later from progressive primary disease and chronic graft-versus-host disease, respectively. We conclude that a high index of suspicion for VOD should be maintained in patients despite lack of bilirubin elevation in the presence of other diagnostic criteria such as hepatomegaly, abdominal pain, ascites, or weight gain. Early ultrasound evaluation in these patients may lead to more timely diagnosis and therapeutic interventions.

  14. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Alper, Gulay

    2012-11-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is an immune-mediated inflammatory and demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, commonly preceded by an infection. It principally involves the white matter tracts of the cerebral hemispheres, brainstem, optic nerves, and spinal cord. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis mainly affects children. Clinically, patients present with multifocal neurologic abnormalities reflecting the widespread involvement in central nervous system. Cerebrospinal fluid may be normal or may show a mild pleocytosis with or without elevated protein levels. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) shows multiple demyelinating lesions. The diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis requires both multifocal involvement and encephalopathy by consensus criteria. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis typically has a monophasic course with a favorable prognosis. Multiphasic forms have been reported, resulting in diagnostic difficulties in distinguishing these cases from multiple sclerosis. In addition, many inflammatory disorders may have a similar presentation with frequent occurrence of encephalopathy and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  15. Preterm Hypoxic–Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gopagondanahalli, Krishna Revanna; Li, Jingang; Fahey, Michael C.; Hunt, Rod W.; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L.; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a recognizable and defined clinical syndrome in term infants that results from a severe or prolonged hypoxic–ischemic episode before or during birth. However, in the preterm infant, defining hypoxic–ischemic injury (HII), its clinical course, monitoring, and outcomes remains complex. Few studies examine preterm HIE, and these are heterogeneous, with variable inclusion criteria and outcomes reported. We examine the available evidence that implies that the incidence of hypoxic–ischemic insult in preterm infants is probably higher than recognized and follows a more complex clinical course, with higher rates of adverse neurological outcomes, compared to term infants. This review aims to elucidate the causes and consequences of preterm hypoxia–ischemia, the subsequent clinical encephalopathy syndrome, diagnostic tools, and outcomes. Finally, we suggest a uniform definition for preterm HIE that may help in identifying infants most at risk of adverse outcomes and amenable to neuroprotective therapies. PMID:27812521

  16. [Wernicke encephalopathy accompanying linitis plastica].

    PubMed

    Soós, Zsuzsanna; Salamon, Mónika; Oláh, Roland; Czégeni, Anna; Salamon, Ferenc; Folyovich, András; Winkler, Gábor

    2014-01-05

    Wernicke encephalopathy (or Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is a rarely diagnosed neurological disorder, which is caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. In the classical form it is characterized by a typical triad (confusion, oculomotor disturbance and ataxia), however, in the majority of the cases only confusion is present. It can be frequently observed in subjects with chronic alcohol consumption, but it may accompany different pathological states of which end stage malignant diseases are the most importants, where confusion may have different backgrounds. The authors present the case of an old male patient with advanced gastric cancer recognised and treated vitamin B1 deficiency, and they draw attention to difficulties of the diagnosis of Wernicke's disease.

  17. Metabolic Causes of Epileptic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Phillip L.

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy can be induced by inborn metabolic defects that may be rare individually but in aggregate represent a substantial clinical portion of child neurology. These may present with various epilepsy phenotypes including refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and generalized epilepsies which in particular include myoclonic seizures. There are varying degrees of treatability, but the outcome if untreated can often be catastrophic. The importance of early recognition cannot be overemphasized. This paper provides an overview of inborn metabolic errors associated with persistent brain disturbances due to highly active clinical or electrographic ictal activity. Selected diseases are organized by the defective molecule or mechanism and categorized as small molecule disorders (involving amino and organic acids, fatty acids, neurotransmitters, urea cycle, vitamers and cofactors, and mitochondria) and large molecule disorders (including lysosomal storage disorders, peroxisomal disorders, glycosylation disorders, and leukodystrophies). Details including key clinical features, salient electrophysiological and neuroradiological findings, biochemical findings, and treatment options are summarized for prominent disorders in each category. PMID:23762547

  18. Neuropathology of a fatal case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kheir, John N; Lawlor, Michael W; Ahn, Edward S; Lehmann, Leslie; Riviello, James J; Silvera, V Michelle; McManus, Michael; Folkerth, Rebecca D

    2010-01-01

    The pathology of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is undefined, since it is rarely fatal and is biopsied in only exceptional circumstances. We describe rapidly progressive PRES following stem cell transplant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. After development of altered mental status, this 8-year-old girl had T2 prolongation of the white matter in a posterior-dominant distribution, eventually developing cerebellar edema, hemorrhage, hydrocephalus, and herniation. Despite surgical and medical management, she died 36 hours later. At autopsy, the occipital and cerebellar white matter and focal occipital cortical gray matter showed a spectrum of microvascular changes, including dilated perivascular spaces containing proteinaceous exudates and macrophages, as well as fibrinoid necrosis and acute hemorrhage, in a distribution corresponding to the neuroimaging abnormalities and reminiscent of those seen in patients with acute hypertensive encephalopathy. Of note, similar microvascular changes were not seen in the kidney or other systemic sites. Thus, the findings indicate a brain-specific microvascular compromise as the substrate of PRES, at least in the rare instance of cases progressing to fatal outcome.

  19. Current Concepts in the Pathophysiology and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) represents a broad continuum of neuropsychological dysfunction in patients with acute or chronic liver disease and/or portosystemic shunting of blood flow. The pathophysiology of this disease is quite complex, as it involves overproduction and reduced metabolism of various neurotoxins, particularly ammonia. Recent hypotheses implicate low-grade cerebral edema as a final common pathway for the pathophysiology of HE. Management of this condition is multifaceted and requires several steps: elimination of precipitating factors; removal of toxins, both by reducing them at their source and by augmenting scavenging pathways; modulation of resident fecal flora; proper nutritional support; and downregulation of systemic and gut-derived inflammation. PMID:21857820

  20. Solar Irradiation of Bilirubin: An Experiment in Photochemical Oxidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay A. E.; Salih, F. M.

    2006-01-01

    An experiment in photochemical oxidation, which deals with bilirubin, a well-known light-sensitive biological compound that is pedagogically ideal for photochemical experiments at tertiary institutes, is presented. The experiment would benefit students in chemistry who eventually branch out into the health sciences or biochemistry.

  1. Nanofibrous polymeric beads from aramid fibers for efficient bilirubin removal.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zihang; Yang, Ye; Luo, Jiyue; Nie, Chuanxiong; Ma, Lang; Cheng, Chong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2016-08-16

    Polymer based hemoperfusion has been developed as an effective therapy to remove the extra bilirubin from patients. However, the currently applied materials suffer from either low removal efficiency or poor blood compatibility. In this study, we report the development of a new class of nanofibrous absorbent that exhibited high bilirubin removal efficiency and good blood compatibility. The Kevlar nanofiber was prepared by dissolving micron-sized Kevlar fiber in proper solvent, and the beads were prepared by dropping Kevlar nanofiber solutions into ethanol. Owing to the nanofiborous structure of the Kevlar nanofiber, the beads displayed porous structures and large specific areas, which would facilitate the adsorption of toxins. In the adsorption test, it was noticed that the beads possessed an adsorption capacity higher than 40 mg g(-1) towards bilirubin. In plasma mimetic solutions, the beads still showed high bilirubin removal efficiency. Furthermore, after incorporating with carbon nanotubes, the beads were found to have increased adsorption capacity for human degradation waste. Moreover, the beads showed excellent blood compatibility in terms of a low hemolysis ratio, prolonged clotting times, suppressed coagulant activation, limited platelet activation, and inhibited blood related inflammatory activation. Additionally, the beads showed good compatibility with endothelial cells. In general, the Kevlar nanofiber beads, which integrated with high adsorption capacity, good blood compatibility and low cytotoxicity, may have great potential for hemoperfusion and some other applications in biomedical fields.

  2. Enzymatic Removal of Bilirubin from Blood: A Potential Treatment for Neonatal Jaundice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavin, Arthur; Sung, Cynthia; Klibanov, Alexander M.; Langer, Robert

    1985-11-01

    Current treatments for severe jaundice can result in major complications. Neonatal jaundice is caused by excessive accumulation of bilirubin in the blood. A small blood filter containing immobilized bilirubin oxidase was developed to reduce serum bilirubin concentrations. When human or rat blood was passed through the enzyme filter, more than 90 percent of the bilirubin was degraded in a single pass. This procedure may have important applications in the clinical treatment of neonatal jaundice.

  3. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome complicating diabetic ketoacidosis; an important treatable complication.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rachel; Redler, Kasey; Witherick, Jonathan; Fuller, Geraint; Mahajan, Tripti; Wakerley, Benjamin R

    2017-03-01

    Development of acute neurological symptoms secondary to cerebral oedema is well described in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and often has a poor prognosis. We present the clinical and radiological data of a 17-yr-old girl who developed cortical blindness, progressive encephalopathy, and seizures caused by posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) that developed after her DKA had resolved. Vasogenic oedema in PRES resolves if the underlying trigger is identified and eliminated. In this case, hypertension was identified as the likely precipitating factor and following treatment her vision and neurological symptoms rapidly improved. We suggest how recent DKA may have contributed to the development of PRES in this patient.

  4. Interaction of bilirubin with Ag and Au ions: green synthesis of bilirubin-stabilized nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Shashi P.; Roy, Mainak; Mukherjee, Poulomi; Tyagi, A. K.; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Adhikari, Soumyakanti

    2012-07-01

    We report a simple green chemistry to synthesize and stabilize monodispersed silver and gold nanoparticles sols by reducing aqueous solution of the respective metal salts in the presence of bilirubin (BR). No additional capping agent was used in the process of stabilization of the nanoparticles. As a completely new finding, we have observed that BR known to be toxic at higher concentration in one hand and conversely an antioxidant at physiological concentration reduces these metal ions to form the respective metal nanoparticles. Moreover, BR and its oxidized products also serve as capping agents to the nanoparticles. The particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. BR and its oxidized products capped nanoparticles are stable for months. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of the silver sol show the plasmon peak of symmetric spherical particles which was further reflected in the TEM images. The sizes of the silver particles were about 5 nm. These silver particles showed reasonably high antibacterial activity in Gram negative wild type E. coli. In the case of interaction of BR with gold ions, we could obtain cubic gold nanoparticles of average sizes 20-25 nm. Possible modes of anchorage of BR and/its oxidized products to silver nanoparticles were demonstrated by surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that in turn demonstrated the feasibility of using these nanoparticles as SERS substrates.

  5. Bilirubin and amyloid-beta peptide induce cytochrome c release through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, C. M.; Solá, S.; Silva, R.; Brites, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of bilirubin encephalopathy and Alzheimer's disease appears to result from accumulation of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) and amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, respectively, which may cause apoptosis. Permeabilization of the mitochondrial membrane, with release of intermembrane proteins, has been strongly implicated in cell death. Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability is one pathway by which ursodeoxycholate (UDC) and tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDC) protect against apoptosis in hepatic and nonhepatic cells. In this study, we further characterize UCB- and Abeta-induced cytotoxicty in isolated neural cells, and investigate membrane perturbation during incubation of isolated mitochondria with both agents. In addition, we evaluate whether the anti-apoptotic drugs UDC and TUDC prevent any changes from occurring. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Primary rat neuron and astrocyte cultures were incubated with UCB or Abeta peptide, either alone or in the presence of UDC. Apoptosis was assessed by DNA fragmentation and nuclear morphological changes. Isolated mitochondria were treated with each toxic, either alone or in combination with UDC, TUDC, or cyclosporine A. Mitochondrial swelling was measured spectrophotometrically and cytochrome c protein levels determined by Western blot. RESULTS: Incubation of neural cells with both UCB and Abeta induced apoptosis (p < 0.01). Coincubation with UDC reduced apoptosis by > 50% (p < 0.05). Both toxins caused membrane permeabilization in isolated mitochondria (p < 0.001); whereas, pretreatment with UDC was protective (p < 0.05). TUDC was even more effective at preventing matrix swelling mediated by Abeta (p < 0.01). UDC and TUDC markedly reduced cytochrome c release associated with mitochondrial permeabilization induced by UCB and Abeta, respectively (p < 0.05). Moreover, cyclosporine A significantly inhibited mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c efflux mediated by UCB (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: UCB and Abeta peptide

  6. The biliverdin-bilirubin antioxidant cycle of cellular protection: Missing a wheel?

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Antony F

    2010-09-01

    Bilirubin reportedly protects cultured cells from the toxicity of a 10,000-fold molar excess of H(2)O(2). A bilirubin-biliverdin cycling mechanism has been proposed to explain this remarkable effect whereby bilirubin reacts with oxyradicals specifically generating biliverdin, which is then reduced back to bilirubin by NADPH/biliverdin reductase. Chemical evidence for this mechanism was formation of biliverdin during incubation of bilirubin-albumin with 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH) in vitro and the assumption that biliverdin was formed by the reaction of peroxyl radicals with bilirubin. This paper describes spectroscopic studies on the reaction of bilirubin with AAPH in the presence and absence of human serum albumin. Reactions were run in air and also under oxygen-depleted and oxygen-saturated solutions, the former to inhibit peroxyl radical formation, the latter to augment it. The results confirm that degradation of bilirubin, rather than dehydrogenation to biliverdin, predominates in the reaction of bilirubin with peroxyl radicals generated by AAPH thermolysis. They also suggest that biliverdin produced in the presence of albumin is not formed by the reaction of bilirubin with alkyl peroxyl radicals, as previously assumed. The observations undermine the plausibility of the bilirubin-biliverdin recycling mechanism proposed to explain the reported hyperprotective effect of bilirubin on mammalian cells exposed to excess H(2)O(2).

  7. Distant Determination of Bilirubin Distribution in Skin by Multi-Spectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saknite, I.; Jakovels, D.; Spigulis, J.

    2011-01-01

    For mapping the bilirubin distribution in bruised skin the multi-spectral imaging technique was employed, which made it possible to observe temporal changes of the bilirubin content in skin photo-types II and III. The obtained results confirm the clinical potential of this technique for skin bilirubin diagnostics.

  8. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy in a child with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency due to a novel combined heterozygous mutations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiandi; Gao, Feng; Hong, Fang; Yu, Huimin; Jiang, Peifang

    2015-03-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is an X-linked disorder of metabolism of the urea cycle. It usually causes hyperammonemic encephalopathy in males during the neonatal to-infantile period, whereas female carriers present with variable manifestations depending on their pattern of random chromosome X inactivation in the liver. Early clinical manifestations of hyperammonemiaare nonspecific often leading to a delay in the diagnosis of OTCD.Unfortunately, delays in initiating treatment often lead to poor neurologic outcomes and overall survival. Presentation of hyperammonemic encephalopathy in children with OTCD is rare, and the mortality and morbidity rates are high. The diagnosis of OTCD and aggressive management of hyperammonemia were of paramount importance for appropriate treatment and successful recovery. Here, we report theclinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in a child with OTCD who presented with acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

  9. Wernicke's encephalopathy: new clinical settings and recent advances in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Sechi, Gianpietro; Serra, Alessandro

    2007-05-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency, which is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. According to autopsy-based studies, the disorder is still greatly underdiagnosed in both adults and children. In this review, we provide an update on the factors and clinical settings that predispose to Wernicke's encephalopathy, and discuss the most recent insights into epidemiology, pathophysiology, genetics, diagnosis, and treatment. To facilitate the diagnosis, we classify the common and rare symptoms at presentation and the late-stage symptoms. We emphasise the optimum dose of parenteral thiamine required for prophylaxis and treatment of Wernicke's encephalopathy and prevention of Korsakoff's syndrome associated with alcohol misuse. A systematic approach helps to ensure that patients receive a prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment.

  10. Susceptibility of European red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) to alimentary challenge with bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dagleish, Mark P; Martin, Stuart; Steele, Philip; Finlayson, Jeanie; Eaton, Samantha L; Sisó, Sílvia; Stewart, Paula; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Hamilton, Scott; Pang, Yvonne; Chianini, Francesca; Reid, Hugh W; Goldmann, Wilfred; González, Lorenzo; Castilla, Joaquín; Jeffrey, Martin

    2015-01-01

    European red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) are susceptible to the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, when challenged intracerebrally but their susceptibility to alimentary challenge, the presumed natural route of transmission, is unknown. To determine this, eighteen deer were challenged via stomach tube with a large dose of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent and clinical signs, gross and histological lesions, presence and distribution of abnormal prion protein and the attack rate recorded. Only a single animal developed clinical disease, and this was acute with both neurological and respiratory signs, at 1726 days post challenge although there was significant (27.6%) weight loss in the preceding 141 days. The clinically affected animal had histological lesions of vacuolation in the neuronal perikaryon and neuropil, typical of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Abnormal prion protein, the diagnostic marker of transmissible encephalopathies, was primarily restricted to the central and peripheral nervous systems although a very small amount was present in tingible body macrophages in the lymphoid patches of the caecum and colon. Serial protein misfolding cyclical amplification, an in vitro ultra-sensitive diagnostic technique, was positive for neurological tissue from the single clinically diseased deer. All other alimentary challenged deer failed to develop clinical disease and were negative for all other investigations. These findings show that transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to European red deer via the alimentary route is possible but the transmission rate is low. Additionally, when deer carcases are subjected to the same regulations that ruminants in Europe with respect to the removal of specified offal from the human food chain, the zoonotic risk of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, the cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, from consumption of venison is probably

  11. Susceptibility of European Red Deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) to Alimentary Challenge with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dagleish, Mark P.; Martin, Stuart; Steele, Philip; Finlayson, Jeanie; Eaton, Samantha L.; Sisó, Sílvia; Stewart, Paula; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Hamilton, Scott; Pang, Yvonne; Chianini, Francesca; Reid, Hugh W.; Goldmann, Wilfred; González, Lorenzo; Castilla, Joaquín; Jeffrey, Martin

    2015-01-01

    European red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) are susceptible to the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, when challenged intracerebrally but their susceptibility to alimentary challenge, the presumed natural route of transmission, is unknown. To determine this, eighteen deer were challenged via stomach tube with a large dose of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent and clinical signs, gross and histological lesions, presence and distribution of abnormal prion protein and the attack rate recorded. Only a single animal developed clinical disease, and this was acute with both neurological and respiratory signs, at 1726 days post challenge although there was significant (27.6%) weight loss in the preceding 141 days. The clinically affected animal had histological lesions of vacuolation in the neuronal perikaryon and neuropil, typical of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Abnormal prion protein, the diagnostic marker of transmissible encephalopathies, was primarily restricted to the central and peripheral nervous systems although a very small amount was present in tingible body macrophages in the lymphoid patches of the caecum and colon. Serial protein misfolding cyclical amplification, an in vitro ultra-sensitive diagnostic technique, was positive for neurological tissue from the single clinically diseased deer. All other alimentary challenged deer failed to develop clinical disease and were negative for all other investigations. These findings show that transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to European red deer via the alimentary route is possible but the transmission rate is low. Additionally, when deer carcases are subjected to the same regulations that ruminants in Europe with respect to the removal of specified offal from the human food chain, the zoonotic risk of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, the cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, from consumption of venison is probably

  12. The mechanisms and treatment of asphyxial encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wassink, Guido; Gunn, Eleanor R.; Drury, Paul P.; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J.

    2013-01-01

    Acute post-asphyxial encephalopathy occurring around the time of birth remains a major cause of death and disability. The recent seminal insight that allows active neuroprotective treatment is that even after profound asphyxia (the “primary” phase), many brain cells show initial recovery from the insult during a short “latent” phase, typically lasting approximately 6 h, only to die hours to days later after a “secondary” deterioration characterized by seizures, cytotoxic edema, and progressive failure of cerebral oxidative metabolism. Although many of these secondary processes are potentially injurious, they appear to be primarily epiphenomena of the “execution” phase of cell death. Animal and human studies designed around this conceptual framework have shown that moderate cerebral hypothermia initiated as early as possible but before the onset of secondary deterioration, and continued for a sufficient duration to allow the secondary deterioration to resolve, has been associated with potent, long-lasting neuroprotection. Recent clinical trials show that while therapeutic hypothermia significantly reduces morbidity and mortality, many babies still die or survive with disabilities. The challenge for the future is to find ways of improving the effectiveness of treatment. In this review, we will dissect the known mechanisms of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in relation to the known effects of hypothermic neuroprotection. PMID:24578682

  13. The why and wherefore of hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Vijay PB; Tognarelli, Joshua M; Massie, Nicolas; Crossey, Mary ME; Cook, Nicola A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric abnormality, which complicates the course of patients with liver disease. It was probably first described by Hippocrates over 2000 years ago, who said that “those whose madness arises from phlegm are quiet and neither shout nor make a disturbance, while those whose madness arises from bile shout, play tricks and will not keep still, but are always up to some mischief ”. He was presumably describing the differences between patients with pneumonia and acute liver failure. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized thousands of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Furthermore, a precise definition of the syndrome is lacking, as are definitive methods of diagnosing this condition. It is important as both patients with cirrhosis and the general population with whom they interact may be affected as a consequence. At a minimum, the individual may be affected by impaired quality of life, impaired ability to work, and slowed reaction times, which are relevant to the population at large if affected individuals operate heavy machinery or drive a car. Pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options are discussed. PMID:26719720

  14. Antibiotics for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Patidar, Kavish R; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2013-06-01

    The treatment of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is complex and therapeutic regimens vary according to the acuity of presentation and the goals of therapy. Most treatments for HE rely on manipulating the intestinal milieu and therefore antibiotics that act on the gut form a key treatment strategy. Prominent antibiotics studied in HE are neomycin, metronidazole, vancomycin and rifaximin. For the management of the acute episode, all antibiotics have been tested. However the limited numbers studied, adverse effects (neomycin oto- and nephrotoxicity, metronidazole neurotoxicity) and potential for resistance emergence (vancomycin-resistant enterococcus) has limited the use of most antibiotics, apart from rifaximin which has the greatest evidence base. Rifaximin has also demonstrated, in conjunction with lactulose, to prevent overt HE recurrence in a multi-center, randomized trial. Despite its cost in the US, rifaximin may prove cost-saving by preventing hospitalizations for overt HE. In minimal/covert HE, rifaximin is the only systematically studied antibiotic. Rifaximin showed improvement in cognition, inflammation, quality-of-life and driving simulator performance but cost-analysis does not favor its use at the current time. Antibiotics, especially rifaximin, have a definite role in the management across the spectrum of HE.

  15. Neuroimaging of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young-Chul; Chanraud, Sandra; Sullivan, Edith V

    2012-06-01

    There is considerable evidence that neuroimaging findings can improve the early diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in clinical settings. The most distinctive neuroimaging finding of acute WE are cytotoxic edema and vasogenic edema, which are represented by bilateral symmetric hyperintensity alterations on T2-weighted MR images in the periphery of the third ventricle, periaqueductal area, mammillary bodies and midbrain tectal plate. An initial bout of WE can result in Korsakoff's syndrome (KS), but repeated bouts in conjunction with its typical comorbidity, chronic alcoholism, can result in signs of tissue degeneration in vulnerable brain regions. Chronic abnormalities identified with neuroimaging enable examination of brain damage in living patients with KS and have expanded the understanding of the neuropsychological deficits resulting from thiamine deficiency, alcohol neurotoxicity, and their comorbidity. Brain structure and functional studies indicate that the interactions involving the thalamus, mammillary bodies, hippocampus, frontal lobes, and cerebellum are crucial for memory formation and executive functions, and the interruption of these circuits by WE and chronic alcoholism can contribute substantially to the neuropsychological deficits in KS.

  16. Hashimoto's encephalopathy in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Erol, Ilknur; Saygi, Semra; Alehan, Füsun

    2011-12-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is an underdiagnosed, steroid-responsive, progressive or relapsing encephalopathy associated with high titers of serum antithyroid antibodies. Although Hashimoto's encephalopathy is well documented in adults, it is rarely observed or studied in children and adolescents. We describe the clinical and laboratory findings of four children (aged 9-15 years) with Hashimoto's encephalopathy. The clinical features of two patients at presentation included epileptic seizures and confusion. The other presenting signs included breath-holding spells, behavioral problems, psychosis, and ataxia (one patient each). During their presentation, three patients were euthyroid, and one was hyperthyroid. All patients manifested increased antithyroid antibodies, and all improved with steroid treatment. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is rarely suspected at presentation. Therefore, greater awareness of its signs by clinicians is necessary for proper diagnoses.

  17. Determination of bilirubin by thermal lens spectrometry and studies of its transport into hepatic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margon, A.; Terdoslavich, M.; Cocolo, A.; Decorti, G.; Passamonti, S.; Franko, M.

    2005-06-01

    The liver is responsible for clearance of bilirubin, the end product of heme catabolism, from the bloodstream. The main aim of our investigation was to determine the role of the carrier protein bilitranslocase in bilirubin uptake into the liver. Our experiments consisted of exposing cell cultures to bilirubin solutions under different conditions and measuring the uptake of bilirubin into the cells. However, since bilirubin is only slightly soluble in aqueous solution (< 70 nM at pH 7.4), we had to use bilirubin concentrations that are far below the limit of detection of the commonly used techniques (e.g. LOD for HPLC with UV-Vis detection \\cong 10 μM). TLS showed up to be a suitable technique for investigation of bilirubin uptake with an LOD of 2 nM. Under basal conditions, bilirubin uptake did not occur. However, increase of cytosolic NADH due to catabolism of specific substrates (e.g. lactate or ethanol) seemed to trigger bilirubin uptake. Furthermore, bilirubin uptake was completely inhibited by addition of specific anti-bilitranslocase antibodies. We can thus infer that, under these conditions, bilitranslocase is the main bilirubin transporter.

  18. Bilirubin exerts pro-angiogenic property through Akt-eNOS-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yasumasa; Hamano, Hirofumi; Satoh, Akiho; Horinouchi, Yuya; Izawa-Ishizawa, Yuki; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Aihara, Ken-Ichi; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2015-11-01

    Low serum bilirubin levels are associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases including peripheral artery disease. Bilirubin is known to exert its property such as antioxidant effect or the enhancement of flow-mediated vasodilation, however, bilirubin action on angiogenesis remains unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanism of bilirubin on angiogenic effect, we first employed C57BL/6J mice with unilateral hindlimb ischemia surgery and divided the mice into two groups (vehicle-treated group and bilirubin-treated group). The analysis of laser speckle blood flow demonstrated the enhancement of blood flow recovery in response to ischemia of mice with bilirubin treatment. The density of capillaries was significantly higher in ischemic-adductor muscles of bilirubin-treated mice. The phosphorylated levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Akt were increased in ischemic skeletal muscles of mice with bilirubin treatment compared with vehicle treatment. In in vitro experiments by using human aortic endothelial cells, bilirubin augmented eNOS and Akt phosphorylation, cell proliferation, cell migration and tube formation. These bilirubin actions on endothelial cell activation were inhibited by LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor. In conclusion, bilirubin promotes angiogenesis through endothelial cells activation via Akt-eNOS-dependent manner.

  19. Antecedents of Neonatal Encephalopathy in the Vermont Oxford Network Encephalopathy Registry

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Peter; Edwards, Erika M.; Horbar, Jeffrey D.; Kenny, Michael J.; Inder, Terrie; Pfister, Robert H.; Raju, Tonse; Soll, Roger F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) is a major predictor of death and long-term neurologic disability, but there are few studies of antecedents of NE. OBJECTIVES: To identify antecedents in a large registry of infants who had NE. METHODS: This was a maternal and infant record review of 4165 singleton neonates, gestational age of ≥36 weeks, meeting criteria for inclusion in the Vermont Oxford Network Neonatal Encephalopathy Registry. RESULTS: Clinically recognized seizures were the most prevalent condition (60%); 49% had a 5-minute Apgar score of ≤3 and 18% had a reduced level of consciousness. An abnormal maternal or fetal condition predated labor in 46%; maternal hypertension (16%) or small for gestational age (16%) were the most frequent risk factors. In 8%, birth defects were identified. The most prevalent birth complication was elevated maternal temperature in labor of ≥37.5°C in 27% of mothers with documented temperatures compared with 2% to 3.2% in controls in population-based studies. Clinical chorioamnionitis, prolonged membrane rupture, and maternal hypothyroidism exceeded rates in published controls. Acute asphyxial indicators were reported in 15% (in 35% if fetal bradycardia included) and inflammatory indicators in 24%. Almost one-half had neither asphyxial nor inflammatory indicators. Although most infants with NE were observably ill since the first minutes of life, only 54% of placentas were submitted for examination. CONCLUSIONS: Clinically recognized asphyxial birth events, indicators of intrauterine exposure to inflammation, fetal growth restriction, and birth defects were each observed in term infants with NE, but much of NE in this large registry remained unexplained. PMID:23071210

  20. The EEG of tropical encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Mallewa, Macpherson; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-10-01

    In addition to encountering most of the conditions treated by clinicians in the West, clinicians in the tropics are faced with unique tropical encephalopathies. These are largely but not entirely infectious in nature. Despite the relatively low cost of EEG technology, it remains unavailable in many low-income tropical settings even at the tertiary care level. Where available, the EEG recordings and interpretation are often of unacceptable quality. Nonetheless, there are existing data on the EEG patterns seen in malaria and a number of tropical viral, bacterial, and parasitic infestations.

  1. [Wernicke encephalopathy in alcoholic patients].

    PubMed

    Chamorro Fernández, A J; Marcos Martín, M; Laso Guzmán, F J

    2011-10-01

    A 67-year old male was brought to the hospital by his family because he had been suffering from somnolence, bradypsychia and gait disturbance for one week. He lived alone, reported an ethanol intake higher than 100-120 g/day. His diet was limited in quality and amount. The physical examination showed stigmata of chronic liver disease. The neurological exam revealed right-side cerebellar tremor, bilateral dysmetria and gait ataxia as well as hyporeflexia in the lower limbs. He was diagnosed of Wernicke encephalopathy. How should this patient be evaluated and treated?

  2. Photodamage of the cells in culture sensitized with bilirubin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlenkova, O. A.; Plavskaya, L. G.; Mikulich, A. V.; Leusenko, I. A.; Tretyakova, A. I.; Plavskii, V. Yu

    2016-08-01

    It has been shown that exposure to radiation of LED sources of light with an emission band maximum at about 465 and 520 nm having substantially identical damaging effects on animal cells in culture, that are in a logarithmic growth phase and preincubated with pigment. Photobiological effect is caused by photodynamic processes involving singlet oxygen generated by triplet excited sensitizer. Mono-exponential type dependence of cell survival on the energy dose indicates that it is bilirubin that acts as a sensitizer but not its photoproducts. The inclusion of bilirubin in the cells, where it is primarily localized in the mitochondria cells, it is accompanied by multiple amplification photochemical stability compared to pigment molecules bound with albumin

  3. In Vitro Determination of Skin Bilirubin Using Chromatic Modulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    bilirubi- nometry: Its role in the assessment of neonatal jaundice ,” Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 30, pp. 1-9, 1997. [4] H. Varley, Practical...serum bilirubin (SB) and a chromatic parameter, namely Hue angle (H). The chromatic TcB results are highly predictive of SB levels in neonatal babies...The proposed chromatic system can be used to make decisions about transfusions or phototherapy in neonates , hence acting as a screening device to

  4. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following a scorpion sting.

    PubMed

    Porcello Marrone, Luiz Carlos; Marrone, Bianca Fontana; Neto, Felipe Kalil; Costa, Francisco Cosme; Thomé, Gustavo Gomes; Aramburu, Martin Brandolt; Schilling, Lucas Porcello; Pascoal, Tharick Ali; Gadonski, Giovani; Huf Marrone, Antônio Carlos; da Costa, Jaderson Costa

    2013-10-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiologic entity not yet understood, that is present with transient neurologic symptoms and particular radiological findings. The most common imaging pattern in PRES is the presence of edema in the white matter of the posterior portions of both cerebral hemispheres. The cause of PRES is unclear. We report a case of 13-year-old male who was stung by a scorpion and developed a severe headache, visual disturbance, and seizures and had the diagnosis of PRES with a good outcome. Numerous factors can trigger this syndrome, most commonly: acute elevation of blood pressure, abnormal renal function, and immunosuppressive therapy. There are many cases described showing the relationship between PRES and eclampsia, transplantation, neoplasia and chemotherapy treatment, systemic infections, renal disease acute, or chronic. However, this is the first case of PRES following a scorpion sting.

  5. Study on dissolution and disintegration of calcium bilirubinate stone.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Suzuki, N; Takahashi, W; Sato, T

    1978-06-01

    When a slice of calcium bilirubinate stone was incubated in a solution of tetrasodium salt of ethylendiamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA.4Na), a potent chelating agent, the solution exhibited a yellow brown tint, which was spectroscopically characteristic of bilirubin. Microscopic examination of the slice revealed dissolution of granules of calcium bilirubinate, leaving behind a reticular matrix of PAS-positive substance. The effect of EDTA.4Na was influenced by pH, being fully effective only at pH 10 or more, and by temperature and concentration as well. Simultaneous application of bile salt enhanced the activity of EDTA.4Na, hydrophilizing the gallstone surface to facilitate chelating reaction and also dissolving minor fatty components of the stone. Heparin at proper concentrations also promoted disintegration of the stone, changing surface potential of its constituent particles to the dispersion-prone charge. The effect of composite EDTA.4Na-bile salt-heparin was thus significantly greater than that of single EDTA.4Na. This mixture is promising for clinical application as a means of direct dissolution of residual gallstones.

  6. Nutritional support in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mizock, B A

    1999-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a syndrome of global cerebral dysfunction resulting from underlying liver disease or portal-systemic shunting. HE can present as one of four syndromes, depending on the rapidity of onset of hepatic failure and the presence or absence of preexisting liver disease. The precise pathogenesis is unknown but likely involves impaired hepatic detoxification of ammonia as well as alterations in brain transport and metabolism of amino acids and amines. The etiology of malnutrition in hepatic failure is multifactorial. Nutritional deficits may be clinically manifest as marasmus or kwashiorkor, or both. Nutritional support in HE is directed toward reducing morbidity related to underlying malnutrition and concurrent disease. However, reaching nutritional goals is often complicated by protein and carbohydrate intolerance. The use of protein restriction in HE is controversial. Modified formulas that are supplemented in branched chain amino acids may be of value in patients who exhibit protein intolerance with standard feeding solutions or in patients who present with advanced degrees of encephalopathy.

  7. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy: A review.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Taylor, Alexandra C; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-10-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of hepatic encephalopathy and can affect up to 80% of patients with liver cirrhosis. By definition, MHE is characterized by cognitive function impairment in the domains of attention, vigilance and integrative function, but obvious clinical manifestation are lacking. MHE has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. The diagnosis can be achieved through neuropsychological testing, recently developed computerized psychometric tests, such as the critical flicker frequency and the inhibitory control tests, as well as neurophysiological procedures. Event related potentials can reveal subtle changes in patients with normal neuropsychological performances. Spectral analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) and quantitative analysis of sleep EEG provide early markers of cerebral dysfunction in cirrhotic patients with MHE. Neuroimaging, in particular MRI, also increasingly reveals diffuse abnormalities in intrinsic brain activity and altered organization of functional connectivity networks. Medical treatment for MHE to date has been focused on reducing serum ammonia levels and includes non-absorbable disaccharides, probiotics or rifaximin. Liver transplantation may not reverse the cognitive deficits associated with MHE. We performed here an updated review on epidemiology, burden and quality of life, neuropsychological testing, neuroimaging, neurophysiology and therapy in subjects with MHE.

  8. Wernicke encephalopathy in alcoholics with diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Antonio J; Marcos-Martin, Miguel; Martin-Polo, Jorge; Garcia-Diez, Luis Carlos; Luna, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is caused by thiamine deficiency in the central nervous system, and is defined by the triad of confusional symptoms, ocular alterations and ataxia. Some other factors may also predispose alcoholic patients to this deficiency. We report two patients with hyperglicaemia and ketoacidosis due to diabetes mellitus decompensation and chronic alcoholism who developed Wernicke encephalopathy before their hospital admission. The outcome was successful after intravenous thiamine administration and insulinotherapy. The presence of Wernicke encephalopathy in alcoholics with diabetic ketoacidosis, suggests that metabolic decompensation is essential in the onset of the disease.

  9. Paroxysmal Amnesia Attacks due to Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nar Senol, Pelin; Bican Demir, Aylin; Bora, Ibrahim; Bakar, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a rare disease which is thought to be autoimmune and steroid responsive. The syndrome is characterized by cognitive impairment, encephalopathy, psychiatric symptoms, and seizures associated with increased level of anti-thyroid antibodies. The exact pathophysiology underlying cerebral involvement is still lesser known. Although symptoms suggest a nonlesional encephalopathy in most of the cases, sometimes the clinical appearance can be subtle and may not respond to immunosuppressants or immunomodulatory agents. Here we report a case who presented with drowsiness and amnestic complaints associated with paroxysmal electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities which could be treated only with an antiepileptic drug. PMID:27034679

  10. Hepatic encephalopathy in a pregnant mare: identification of histopathological changes in the brain of a mare and fetus.

    PubMed

    Johns, I C; Del Piero, F; Wilkins, P A

    2007-08-01

    An 11-year-old Thoroughbred broodmare was evaluated for suspected hepatic dysfunction. Clinical signs of hepatic encephalopathy were evident at admission. Hepatic ultrasonographic evaluation revealed an increase in hepatic size, rounded borders and normal echogenicity. There was no evidence of cholelithiasis or bile duct distention. Increased activity of hepatic enzymes, increased bile acid and bilirubin concentration and an increased ammonia concentration were supportive of a diagnosis of hepatic disease and hepatic encephalopathy. Histopathological evaluation of a liver biopsy specimen was consistent with chronic active hepatitis. The mare was treated with intravenous fluids and antimicrobials, pentoxyfilline, branched-chain amino acids and dietary manipulation. Clinical improvement was observed initially; however, 3 weeks later, deterioration in the mare's condition necessitated euthanasia. Pathological lesions at necropsy were restricted to the liver and brain. The liver was diffusely firm with a prominent reticular pattern on the cut surface. A large choledocholith was present in the main bile duct of the left liver lobe. Histopathological examination of the liver revealed severe fibrosis, with hyperplastic bile ducts and mononuclear and neutrophilic inflammation. Pathological changes consistent with hepatic encephalopathy, (Alzheimer type II cells), were evident in the cerebrum of both the mare and the fetus.

  11. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy: Atypical Pros and Cons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurologic diseases that affect several mammalian species including human beings. Four animal TSE agents have been reported: scrapie of sheep and goats; chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk, and moose; transmissible mink encephalopath...

  12. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: The unknown disease.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Munarriz, P M; Paredes, B; Alén, J F

    2017-04-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a neurodegenerative disease produced by accumulated minor traumatic brain injuries; no definitive premortem diagnosis and no treatments are available for chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Risk factors associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy include playing contact sports, presence of the apolipoprotein E4, and old age. Although it shares certain histopathological findings with Alzheimer disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy has a more specific presentation (hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposited as neurofibrillary tangles, associated with neuropil threads and sometimes with beta-amyloid plaques). Its clinical presentation is insidious; patients show mild cognitive and emotional symptoms before progressing to parkinsonian motor signs and finally dementia. Results from new experimental diagnostic tools are promising, but these tools are not yet available. The mainstay of managing this disease is prevention and early detection of its first symptoms.

  13. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jan-Shun; Chang, Tien-Chun

    2014-11-01

    Both severe thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism may affect brain function and cause a change in consciousness, as seen with a thyroid storm or myxedema coma. However, encephalopathy may also develop in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases independent of actual thyroid function level, and this is known as Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Although most patients are found to have Hashimoto's thyroiditis, less frequently they have Graves' disease. Clinical manifestations include epilepsy, disturbance of consciousness, cognitive impairment, memory loss, myoclonus, hallucinations, stroke-like episodes, tremor, involuntary movements, language impairment, and gait impairment. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a relatively rare disease. As a good response can be obtained with corticosteroid therapy, early diagnosis and treatment is very beneficial for patients. Here we report three patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy with typical manifestations of hallucinations that were associated with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and euthyroid status, respectively. They all showed a dramatic response to methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

  14. Metabolic encephalopathy in Egyptian children.

    PubMed

    Hindawy, A; Gouda, A; El-Ayyadi, A; Megahed, H; Bazaraa, H

    2007-01-01

    Fatty Acid Oxidation disorders represent an expanding group of inborn errors of metabolism. Clinical manifestations include episodic encephalopathy, hypoketotic hypoglycemia, Reye like episodes, hepatic, muscular, cardiac affection and sudden death. Analysis of urinary organic acids and plasma fatty acids of 44 clinically suspected patients by Gas Chromatography Mass spectrometry revealed 4 cases of Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD), 3 cases of Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, 9 cases of multiple defects of acyl-CoA dehydrogenation in addition to 3 patients with other metabolic disorders. Timely detection of these disorders including screening for MCADD can have a favorable impact on the outcome of these patients (Tab. 11, Fig. 3, Ref. 24) Full Text (Free, PDF).

  15. [Cortexin effectiveness in circulatory encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Morozov, V G; Rybnikov, V Iu; Zakutskiĭ, N G

    1999-01-01

    A clinical trial of cortexin, a new peptide bioregulator of cerebral functions, in combined therapy of dyscirculatory encephalopathy (DE) stage I-II was made in 76 patients. They were divided into two groups: a control group of 31 patients on standard therapy and the study group of 45 patients on standard therapy with adjuvant cortexin delivered via nasal electrophoresis (NE). The effect was estimated by clinical symptoms, psychophysiological tests, computed EEG, quantitative parameters of rehabilitation. Cortexin NE produced a positive effect on psychoemotional state, neurological status, intellectual-mnestic and CNS functions. Adjuvant cortexin aroused efficiency of rehabilitation in DE stage I and II by 22.7%. The response of intellectual-mnestic and CNS functions was the highest. Cortexin improves attention, perception, memory, thinking, cortical neurodynamic processes. It is well tolerated and has no side effects. Cortexin is recommended as a drug of choice in combined treatment of patients with DE stage I-II.

  16. Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle or group of muscles), nystagmus (rapid, involuntary eye movement), tremor, muscle atrophy and weakness, dementia, seizures, and ... muscle or group of muscles), nystagmus (rapid, involuntary eye movement), tremor, muscle atrophy and weakness, dementia, seizures, and ...

  17. Cognitive Outcomes After Neonatal Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Seetha; McDonald, Scott A.; Vohr, Betty R.; Hintz, Susan R.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Tyson, Jon E.; Yolton, Kimberly; Das, Abhik; Bara, Rebecca; Hammond, Jane; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the spectrum of cognitive outcomes of children with and without cerebral palsy (CP) after neonatal encephalopathy, evaluate the prognostic value of early developmental testing and report on school services and additional therapies. METHODS: The participants of this study are the school-aged survivors of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network randomized controlled trial of whole-body hypothermia. Children underwent neurologic examinations and neurodevelopmental and cognitive testing with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development–II at 18 to 22 months and the Wechsler intelligence scales and the Neuropsychological Assessment–Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment at 6 to 7 years. Parents were interviewed about functional status and receipt of school and support services. We explored predictors of cognitive outcome by using multiple regression models. RESULTS: Subnormal IQ scores were identified in more than a quarter of the children: 96% of survivors with CP had an IQ <70, 9% of children without CP had an IQ <70, and 31% had an IQ of 70 to 84. Children with a mental developmental index <70 at 18 months had, on average, an adjusted IQ at 6 to 7 years that was 42 points lower than that of those with a mental developmental index >84 (95% confidence interval, −49.3 to −35.0; P < .001). Twenty percent of children with normal IQ and 28% of those with IQ scores of 70 to 84 received special educational support services or were held back ≥1 grade level. CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive impairment remains an important concern for all children with neonatal encephalopathy. PMID:25713280

  18. Association between flavonoid-rich fruit and vegetable consumption and total serum bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Mahoney, Sara E

    2015-03-01

    Emerging work demonstrates that serum bilirubin is a novel biomarker implicated in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. However, we have a limited understanding of the influence of flavonoid-rich fruit and vegetable consumption on bilirubin levels, which was the purpose of this study. Data from the 2003 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination survey were used (n = 1783; 18-85 years of age), with analyses performed in 2014. Total serum bilirubin was measured from a blood sample. Using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), a flavonoid index variable was created summing the frequency of consumption of flavonoid-rich foods. After adjustments, greater consumption of flavonoid-rich fruits and vegetables was positively associated with bilirubin levels. Our findings suggest an association between flavonoid-rich fruit and vegetable consumption and bilirubin levels. If confirmed by prospective and experimental studies, then regular consumption of flavonoid-rich fruits and vegetables should be promoted to increase levels of bilirubin.

  19. Conjugated bilirubin affects cytokine profiles in hepatitis A virus infection by modulating function of signal transducer and activator of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Castro-García, Flor P; Corral-Jara, Karla F; Escobedo-Melendez, Griselda; Sandoval-Hernandez, Monserrat A; Rosenstein, Yvonne; Roman, Sonia; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora A

    2014-12-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is the major cause of acute liver failure in paediatric patients. The clinical spectrum of infection is variable, and liver injury is determined by altered hepatic enzyme function and bilirubin concentration. We recently reported differences in cytokine profiles between distinct HAV-induced clinical courses, and bilirubin has been recognized as a potential immune-modulator. However, how bilirubin may affect cytokine profiles underlying the variability in the course of infection has not been determined. Herein, we used a transcription factor (TF) binding site identification approach to retrospectively analyse cytokine expression in HAV-infected children and to predict the entire set of TFs associated with the expression of specific cytokine profiles. The results suggested that modulation of the activity of signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins (STATs) may play a central role during HAV infection. This led us to compare the degree of STAT phosphorylation in peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBLCs) from paediatric patients with distinct levels of conjugated bilirubin (CB). Low CB levels in sera were associated with increased STAT-1 and STAT-5 phosphorylation. A positive correlation was observed between the serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) content and CB values, whereas higher levels of CB correlated with reduced serum IL-8 values and with a reduction in the proportion of PBLCs positive for STAT-5 phosphorylation. When CB was used to stimulate patients' PBLCs in vitro, the levels of IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α were increased. The data showed that bilirubin plays a role in STAT function and affects cytokine profile expression during HAV infection.

  20. Conjugated bilirubin affects cytokine profiles in hepatitis A virus infection by modulating function of signal transducer and activator of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Castro-García, Flor P; Corral-Jara, Karla F; Escobedo-Melendez, Griselda; Sandoval-Hernandez, Monserrat A; Rosenstein, Yvonne; Roman, Sonia; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora A

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is the major cause of acute liver failure in paediatric patients. The clinical spectrum of infection is variable, and liver injury is determined by altered hepatic enzyme function and bilirubin concentration. We recently reported differences in cytokine profiles between distinct HAV-induced clinical courses, and bilirubin has been recognized as a potential immune-modulator. However, how bilirubin may affect cytokine profiles underlying the variability in the course of infection has not been determined. Herein, we used a transcription factor (TF) binding site identification approach to retrospectively analyse cytokine expression in HAV-infected children and to predict the entire set of TFs associated with the expression of specific cytokine profiles. The results suggested that modulation of the activity of signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins (STATs) may play a central role during HAV infection. This led us to compare the degree of STAT phosphorylation in peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBLCs) from paediatric patients with distinct levels of conjugated bilirubin (CB). Low CB levels in sera were associated with increased STAT-1 and STAT-5 phosphorylation. A positive correlation was observed between the serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) content and CB values, whereas higher levels of CB correlated with reduced serum IL-8 values and with a reduction in the proportion of PBLCs positive for STAT-5 phosphorylation. When CB was used to stimulate patients’ PBLCs in vitro, the levels of IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α were increased. The data showed that bilirubin plays a role in STAT function and affects cytokine profile expression during HAV infection. PMID:24943111

  1. Panitumumab-Associated Encephalopathy after Accidental Intra-arterial Application through Dislocated Central Venous Access Device

    PubMed Central

    Pikija, Slaven; Pilz, Georg; Gschwandtner, Gerald; Rösler, Cornelia; Schlick, Konstantin; Greil, Richard; Sellner, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Acute central nervous system (CNS) toxicity and immune-related side effects are increasingly recognized with the use of monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy. Here, we report a patient who developed of acute-onset encephalopathy and coma, which began shortly after administration of panitumumab for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Echocardiography revealed that the drug had been infused into the left cardiac ventricle via a dislocated central venous line. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging disclosed multiple cortical hyperintensities, which were preferentially located in the frontal lobes. While the neurological condition improved within a few days, the patient died 4 weeks later. It seems likely that the administration of the antibody via the intra-arterial route contributed to the development of this condition. Toxic encephalopathy may be a hitherto unrecognized complication of panitumumab treatment and should be taken into consideration in patients developing CNS symptoms undergoing this therapy. PMID:27872609

  2. Hepatic encephalopathy: An approach to its multiple pathophysiological features

    PubMed Central

    Perazzo, Juan Carlos; Tallis, Silvina; Delfante, Amalia; Souto, Pablo Andrés; Lemberg, Abraham; Eizayaga, Francisco Xavier; Romay, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric complex syndrome, ranging from subtle behavioral abnormalities to deep coma and death. Hepatic encephalopathy emerges as the major complication of acute or chronic liver failure. Multiplicity of factors are involved in its pathophysiology, such as central and neuromuscular neurotransmission disorder, alterations in sleep patterns and cognition, changes in energy metabolism leading to cell injury, an oxidative/nitrosative state and a neuroinflammatory condition. Moreover, in acute HE, a condition of imminent threat of death is present due to a deleterious astrocyte swelling. In chronic HE, changes in calcium signaling, mitochondrial membrane potential and long term potential expression, N-methyl-D-aspartate-cGMP and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors alterations, and changes in the mRNA and protein expression and redistribution in the cerebral blood flow can be observed. The main molecule indicated as responsible for all these changes in HE is ammonia. There is no doubt that ammonia, a neurotoxic molecule, triggers or at least facilitates most of these changes. Ammonia plasma levels are increased two- to three-fold in patients with mild to moderate cirrhotic HE and up to ten-fold in patients with acute liver failure. Hepatic and inter-organ trafficking of ammonia and its metabolite, glutamine (GLN), lead to hyperammonemic conditions. Removal of hepatic ammonia is a differentiated work that includes the hepatocyte, through the urea cycle, converting ammonia into GLN via glutamine synthetase. Under pathological conditions, such as liver damage or liver blood by-pass, the ammonia plasma level starts to rise and the risk of HE developing is high. Knowledge of the pathophysiology of HE is rapidly expanding and identification of focally localized triggers has led the development of new possibilities for HE to be considered. This editorial will focus on issues where, to the best of our knowledge, more research is needed in

  3. Studies on the chemico-biological characteristics of bilirubin binding with collagen.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Usharani; Christopher, Jayakumar Gladstone; Jonnalagadda, Raghava Rao; Chandrasekaran, Bangaru; Balachandran, Unni Nair

    2013-12-01

    The clinical impact of bilirubin on collagen is investigated using various physical, chemical and biological methods. Thermo gravimetric analysis and differential scanning analysis of collagen-bilirubin complex matrices indicate that crosslinking does not alter their thermal behavior of collagen. The polydispersity of collagen-bilirubin complex increases in the reacting medium suggesting that there is an increase in the number of interacting points between them. Based on the zeta potential values, the rate of mobility of interacted complex decreases by inferring the extent of binding compared to the control collagen. Emission intensity begins to increase with increase in concentration of bilirubin which ascribes the conformational changes around the aromatic amino acids in collagen. Binding is indicated by an increase in resonance units and the responses are corrected by subtraction of those obtained for native collagen. Bilirubin showed a higher affinity for collagen at a concentration of about 25 nM/mg. In this study, the association rate has been calculated which depicts the increased affinity of bilirubin to collagen. Affinity for bilirubin to collagen has been found to be 8.89×10(-3) s(-1). The greater part of binding of bilirubin to collagen is found to be electrostatic in nature. The investigation leads to comprehend the affinity of collagen-bilirubin complex during jaundice diseased tissues.

  4. 21 CFR 862.1113 - Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1113 Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system....

  5. 21 CFR 862.1115 - Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1115 Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative)...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1113 - Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1113 Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system....

  7. 21 CFR 862.1113 - Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1113 Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system....

  8. 21 CFR 862.1115 - Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1115 Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative)...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1115 - Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1115 Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative)...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1115 - Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1115 Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative)...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1115 - Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1115 Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative)...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1113 - Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1113 Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system....

  13. 21 CFR 862.1113 - Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1113 Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system....

  14. Bilirubin Increases Insulin Sensitivity by Regulating Cholesterol Metabolism, Adipokines and PPARγ Levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Dong, Huansheng; Zhang, Yong; Cao, Mingjun; Song, Lili; Pan, Qingjie; Bulmer, Andrew; Adams, David B; Dong, Xiao; Wang, Hongjun

    2015-05-28

    Obesity can cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Moderate elevations in bilirubin levels have anti-diabetic effects. This study is aimed at determining the mechanisms by which bilirubin treatment reduces obesity and insulin resistance in a diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. DIO mice were treated with bilirubin or vehicle for 14 days. Body weights, plasma glucose, and insulin tolerance tests were performed prior to, immediately, and 7 weeks post-treatment. Serum lipid, leptin, adiponectin, insulin, total and direct bilirubin levels were measured. Expression of factors involved in adipose metabolism including sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP-1), insulin receptor (IR), and PPARγ in liver were measured by RT-PCR and Western blot. Compared to controls, bilirubin-treated mice exhibited reductions in body weight, blood glucose levels, total cholesterol (TC), leptin, total and direct bilirubin, and increases in adiponectin and expression of SREBP-1, IR, and PPARγ mRNA. The improved metabolic control achieved by bilirubin-treated mice was persistent: at two months after treatment termination, bilirubin-treated DIO mice remained insulin sensitive with lower leptin and higher adiponectin levels, together with increased PPARγ expression. These results indicate that bilirubin regulates cholesterol metabolism, adipokines and PPARγ levels, which likely contribute to increased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in DIO mice.

  15. The kinetics of oxidation of bilirubin and ascorbic acid in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonov, A. V.; Rumyantsev, E. V.; Kochergin, B. A.; Antina, E. V.

    2012-07-01

    The results of a comparative study of the oxidation of bilirubin, ascorbic acid, and their mixture in aqueous solutions under the action of air oxygen and hydrogen peroxide are presented. The observed and true rate constants for the oxidation reactions were determined. It was shown that the oxidation of tetrapyrrole pigment occurred under these conditions bypassing the stage of biliverdin formation to monopyrrole products. Simultaneous oxidation of bilirubin and ascorbic acid was shown to be accompanied by the inhibition of ascorbic acid oxidation by bilirubin, whereas ascorbic acid itself activated the oxidation of bilirubin.

  16. Unconjugated bilirubin mediates heme oxygenase-1-induced vascular benefits in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Li; Tian, Xiao Yu; Liu, Limei; Wong, Wing Tak; Zhang, Yang; Han, Quan-Bin; Ho, Hing-Man; Wang, Nanping; Wong, Siu Ling; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Yu, Jun; Ng, Chi-Fai; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Yu

    2015-05-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts vasoprotective effects. Such benefit in diabetic vasculopathy, however, remains unclear. We hypothesize that bilirubin mediates HO-1-induced vascular benefits in diabetes. Diabetic db/db mice were treated with hemin (HO-1 inducer) for 2 weeks, and aortas were isolated for functional and molecular assays. Nitric oxide (NO) production was measured in cultured endothelial cells. Hemin treatment augmented endothelium-dependent relaxations (EDRs) and elevated Akt and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in db/db mouse aortas, which were reversed by the HO-1 inhibitor SnMP or HO-1 silencing virus. Hemin treatment increased serum bilirubin, and ex vivo bilirubin treatment improved relaxations in diabetic mouse aortas, which was reversed by the Akt inhibitor. Biliverdin reductase silencing virus attenuated the effect of hemin. Chronic bilirubin treatment improved EDRs in db/db mouse aortas. Hemin and bilirubin reversed high glucose-induced reductions in Akt and eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. The effect of hemin but not bilirubin was inhibited by biliverdin reductase silencing virus. Furthermore, bilirubin augmented EDRs in renal arteries from diabetic patients. In summary, HO-1-induced restoration of endothelial function in diabetic mice is most likely mediated by bilirubin, which preserves NO bioavailability through the Akt/eNOS/NO cascade, suggesting bilirubin as a potential therapeutic target for clinical intervention of diabetic vasculopathy.

  17. 21 CFR 862.1110 - Bilirubin (total or direct) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test... or serum. Measurements of the levels of bilirubin, an organic compound formed during the normal...

  18. Recurrent contrast-induced encephalopathy following coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Spina, Roberto; Simon, Neil; Markus, Romesh; Muller, David W M; Kathir, Krishna

    2017-02-01

    Contrast-induced encephalopathy (CIE) is an acute and reversible neurological disturbance associated with the intra-arterial administration of iodinated contrast medium during cardiac catheterisation. It may manifest with encephalopathy, motor and sensory disturbances; vision disturbances, including cortical blindness, ophthalmoplegia, aphasia; and seizures. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier and direct neuronal toxicity are believed to be implicated in the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Symptoms appear soon after contrast administration and resolve completely within 24-48 h. Risk factors may include hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, the administration of large volumes of iodinated contrast, percutaneous coronary intervention or selective angiography of internal mammary grafts and previous adverse reaction to iodinated contrast. On cerebral imaging, CIE may mimic subarachnoid haemorrhage or cerebral ischaemia, but imaging may be normal. Prognosis is excellent with supportive management alone. CIE may recur, but re-challenge with iodinated contrast without adverse effects has been documented. CIE is a diagnosis of exclusion and is an important clinical entity to consider in the differential diagnosis of stroke following cardiac catheterisation. Physicians should be aware of it and consider it prior to initiating thrombolysis.

  19. Bilirubin as an antioxidant: kinetic studies of the reaction of bilirubin with peroxyl radicals in solution, micelles, and lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Gillian L; Barclay, L Ross C

    2004-05-13

    Bilirubin (BR) showed very weak antioxidant activity in a nonpolar medium of styrene or cumene in chlorobenzene. In contrast, BR exhibited strong antioxidant activity in polar media such as aqueous lipid bilayers or SDS micelles/methyl linoleate (pH 7.4), where the rate with peroxyl radicals, k(inh) = 5.0 x 10(4) M(-)(1) s(-)(1), was comparable to that with vitamin E analogues, Trolox, or PMHC. An electron-transfer mechanism accounts for the effect of the medium on the antioxidant properties of BR.

  20. Characterization of copper atoms in bilirubin oxidase by spectroscopic analyses.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Y; Kondo, Y; Kaji, H; Takeda, A; Samejima, T

    1989-10-01

    Bilirubin oxidase [EC 1.3.3.5], purified from the culture medium of Myrothecium verrucaria, was found to contain two blue copper atoms per protein molecule with a molecular weight of ca. 52 kDa. The two copper atoms were estimated to be in the all cupric state by the cuproine colorimetric method and also atomic absorption analysis. We could remove the reduce cuprous ions from the holo enzyme by adding ascorbate, followed by a KCN solution, yielding an apo-enzyme with no activity. The apo-enzyme can be reconstituted with Cu or other divalent cations such as Co, Fe, and Cd, with accompanying recovery of the enzyme activity. The activity recovery depended upon the species of cation employed; Cu being most effective, an almost 100% recovery, and Cd the least, only a 25% recovery. We could obtain information on the copper ions and their coordination structure by spectroscopic analyses of the apo- and reconstituted enzymes, obtaining such as absorption, CD, MCD, and XPS spectra. The bilirubin oxidase catalyzed-reaction was a second order reaction with respect to copper bound with protein. The donor set was of the CuSS*N2 (S = Cys, S* = Met, N = His) type, i.e., the same as in the case of blue copper proteins. On studying the Co-substituted enzyme, it was revealed that the copper site of the enzyme had a 4-coordinated structure.

  1. Bilirubin inhibits iNOS expression and NO production in response to endotoxin in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizheng W; Smith, Darcey L H; Zucker, Stephen D

    2004-08-01

    The inducible isoform of heme oxygenase (HO), HO-1, has been shown to play an important role in attenuating tissue injury. Because HO-1 catalyzes the rate-limiting step in bilirubin synthesis, we examined the hypothesis that bilirubin is a key mediator of HO-1 cytoprotection, employing a rat model of endotoxemia. Bilirubin treatment resulted in improved survival and attenuated liver injury in response to lipopolysaccharide infusion. Serum levels of NO and tumor necrosis factor alpha, key mediators of endotoxemia, and hepatic inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were significantly lower in bilirubin-treated rodents versus control animals. Both intraperitoneal and local administration of bilirubin also was found to ameliorate hindpaw inflammation induced by the injection of lambda-carrageenan. Consistent with in vivo results, bilirubin significantly inhibited iNOS expression and suppressed NO production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. In contrast, bilirubin treatment induced a threefold increase in LPS-mediated prostaglandin synthesis in the absence of significant changes in cyclooxygenase expression or activity, suggesting that bilirubin enhances substrate availability for eicosanoid synthesis. Bilirubin had no effect on LPS-mediated activation of nuclear factor kappaB or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, consistent with a nuclear factor kappaB-independent mechanism of action. Taken together, these data support a cytoprotective role for bilirubin that is mediated, at least in part, through the inhibition of iNOS expression and, potentially, through stimulation of local prostaglandin E2 production. In conclusion, our findings suggest a role for bilirubin in mollifying tissue injury in response to inflammatory stimuli and support the possibility that the phenomenon of "jaundice of sepsis" represents an adaptive physiological response to endotoxemia. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the

  2. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease Note: Javascript is ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) is a progressive neurological disorder of cattle that ...

  3. Bruxism Associated with Anoxic Encephalopathy: Successful Treatment with Baclofen

    PubMed Central

    Janati, A. Bruce; ALGhasab, Naif Saad; ALGhassab, Fahad Saad

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Bruxism is a movement disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth. Etiology of bruxism can be divided into three groups: psychosocial factors, peripheral factors, and pathophysiological factors. Methods. The clinical investigation was conducted at King Khaled Hospital in Hail, Saudi Arabia, in 2012. Results. A 16-year-old Saudi female was brought to the hospital in a comatose state and with generalized convulsive seizures secondary to acute anoxic encephalopathy. In the third week of hospitalization, while still in a state of akinetic mutism, she developed incessant bruxism which responded favorably to a GABA receptor agonist (baclofen). Conclusion. Our data support the hypothesis that bruxism emanates from imbalance or dysregulation of the neurotransmitter system. Larger scale studies will be needed to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:24455317

  4. Contemporary Understanding and Management of Overt and Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    NeSmith, Meghan; Ahn, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a major complication of liver disease that leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Caring for hospitalized patients with HE is becoming more complex, and the economic burden of HE continues to rise. Defining and diagnosing HE, particularly covert HE (CHE), remain challenging. In this article, we review new tools and those currently under development for the diagnosis of CHE and the latest advances in the acute and long-term management of overt HE (OHE) and CHE. In particular, we review the latest data on the use of lactulose and rifaximin for treatment of OHE and summarize the data on adjunctive agents such as sodium benzoate and probiotics. PMID:27182210

  5. Wernicke's encephalopathy following Hyperemesis gravidarum. A report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Kotha, V K; De Souza, A

    2013-02-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) due to causes other than chronic alcohol abuse is an uncommon and often misdiagnosed condition. In the setting of hyperemesis gravidarum, an acute deficiency of thiamine results from body stores being unable to meet increased metabolic demands. The condition produces typical clinical and radiological findings and when diagnosed early and treated promptly has a good prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is sensitive and specific for diagnosis. We describe three patients with hyperemesis gravidarum who developed WE, and highlight a range of clinical and imaging features important for appropriate diagnosis. A high degree of clinical suspicion is essential. Treatment is often empirical pending results of investigation, and consists of parenteral repletion of thiamine stores. Reversal of MRI findings parallels clinical improvement. Neurologic outcomes are usually good, but half the pregnancies complicated by this condition do not produce healthy children.

  6. Neuropsychological characteristics of encephalopathy in Susac's Syndrome - Case report.

    PubMed

    Roessler-Górecka, Magdalena; Mendel, Tadeusz; Wiśniowska, Justyna; Seniów, Joanna

    Susac's Syndrome (SS) is a rare, autoimmune angiopathy characterized by hearing loss, retinal artery occlusions and encephalopathy, which is usually expressed in multifocal neurological signs and symptoms, confusion state and cognitive impairment. There have been few descriptions of neuropsychological assessment of SS. We present a case study of 29-year-old woman who developed full SS. During the post-acute stage of disease, she was admitted to neurorehabilitation ward to improve her cognitive-behavioral and motor functioning. The initial assessment revealed attention, memory and executive dysfunctions, as well as behavioral changes including impulsivity, affective dysregulation and reduced self-awareness of disease deficits. After five weeks recovery process supported by rehabilitation program, improvement was observed, although some cognitive-behavioral deficits were still present in the follow-up assessment.

  7. [Wernicke encephalopathy after subtotal gastrectomy for morbid obesity].

    PubMed

    Gabaudan, C; La-Folie, T; Sagui, E; Soulier, B; Dion, A-M; Richez, P; Brosset, C

    2008-05-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is one of the potential complications of obesity surgery. It is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency often associated with repeated vomiting. The classic triad is frequently reported in these patients (optic neuropathy, ataxia and confusion), associated with uncommon features. Cerebral impairment affects the dorsal medial nucleus of the thalamus and the periaqueductal grey area, appearing on MRI, as hyperintense signals on T2, Flair and Diffusion weighted imaging. Early diagnosis and parenteral thiamine are required to decrease morbidity and mortality. We report a case of WE and Korsakoff's syndrome in a young obese patient after subtotal gastrectomy, who still has substantial sequelae. The contribution of MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging is illustrated. The interest of nutritional supervision in the first weeks and preventive thiamine supplementation in case of repeated vomiting are of particular importance in these risky situations.

  8. Hashimoto's encephalopathy : epidemiology, pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Mocellin, Ramon; Walterfang, Mark; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a term used to describe an encephalopathy of presumed autoimmune origin characterised by high titres of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. In a similar fashion to autoimmune thyroid disease, Hashimoto's encephalopathy is more common in women than in men. It has been reported in paediatric, adult and elderly populations throughout the world. The clinical presentation may involve a relapsing and remitting course and include seizures, stroke-like episodes, cognitive decline, neuropsychiatric symptoms and myoclonus. Thyroid function is usually clinically and biochemically normal.Hashimoto's encephalopathy appears to be a rare disorder, but, as it is responsive to treatment with corticosteroids, it must be considered in cases of 'investigation negative encephalopathies'. Diagnosis is made in the first instance by excluding other toxic, metabolic and infectious causes of encephalopathy with neuroimaging and CSF examination. Neuroimaging findings are often not helpful in clarifying the diagnosis. Common differential diagnoses when these conditions are excluded are Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, rapidly progressive dementias, and paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic limbic encephalitis. In the context of the typical clinical picture, high titres of antithyroid antibodies, in particular antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, are diagnostic. These antibodies, however, can be detected in elevated titres in the healthy general population. Treatment with corticosteroids is almost always successful, although relapse may occur if this treatment is ceased abruptly. Other forms of immunomodulation, such as intravenous immune-globulin and plasma exchange, may also be effective. Despite the link to autoimmune thyroid disease, the aetiology of Hashimoto's encephalopathy is unknown. It is likely that antithyroid antibodies are not pathogenic, but titres can be a marker of treatment response. Pathological findings can suggest an inflammatory process, but features

  9. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and athletes

    PubMed Central

    Mannix, Rebekah; Zafonte, Ross; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Recent case reports have described athletes previously exposed to repetitive head trauma while participating in contact sports who later in life developed mood disorders, headaches, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, difficulties with speech, and aggressive behavior. Postmortem discoveries show that some of these athletes have pathologic findings that are collectively termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Current hypotheses suggest that concussions or perhaps blows to the head that do not cause the signs and symptoms necessary for making the diagnosis of concussion, so-called subconcussive blows, cause both the clinical and pathologic findings. There are, however, some athletes who participate in contact sports who do not develop the findings ascribed to CTE. Furthermore, there are people who have headaches, mood disorders, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, and other clinical problems who have neither been exposed to repeated head trauma nor possessed the pathologic postmortem findings of those currently diagnosed with CTE. The current lack of prospective data and properly designed case-control studies limits the current understanding of CTE, leading to debate about the causes of the neuropathologic findings and the clinical observations. Given the potential for referral and recall bias in available studies, it remains unclear whether or not the pathologic findings made postmortem cause the presumed neurobehavioral sequela and whether the presumed risk factors, such as sports activity, cerebral concussions, and subconcussive blows, are solely causative of the clinical signs and symptoms. This article discusses the current evidence and the associated limitations. PMID:26253448

  10. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and athletes.

    PubMed

    Meehan, William; Mannix, Rebekah; Zafonte, Ross; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-10-27

    Recent case reports have described athletes previously exposed to repetitive head trauma while participating in contact sports who later in life developed mood disorders, headaches, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, difficulties with speech, and aggressive behavior. Postmortem discoveries show that some of these athletes have pathologic findings that are collectively termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Current hypotheses suggest that concussions or perhaps blows to the head that do not cause the signs and symptoms necessary for making the diagnosis of concussion, so-called subconcussive blows, cause both the clinical and pathologic findings. There are, however, some athletes who participate in contact sports who do not develop the findings ascribed to CTE. Furthermore, there are people who have headaches, mood disorders, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, and other clinical problems who have neither been exposed to repeated head trauma nor possessed the pathologic postmortem findings of those currently diagnosed with CTE. The current lack of prospective data and properly designed case-control studies limits the current understanding of CTE, leading to debate about the causes of the neuropathologic findings and the clinical observations. Given the potential for referral and recall bias in available studies, it remains unclear whether or not the pathologic findings made postmortem cause the presumed neurobehavioral sequela and whether the presumed risk factors, such as sports activity, cerebral concussions, and subconcussive blows, are solely causative of the clinical signs and symptoms. This article discusses the current evidence and the associated limitations.

  11. Hepatic encephalopathy therapy: An overview.

    PubMed

    Riggio, Oliviero; Ridola, Lorenzo; Pasquale, Chiara

    2010-04-06

    Type-C hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a severe complication of cirrhosis, which seriously affects quality of life and is strongly related to patient survival. Treatment based on a classical pharmacological approach that is aimed at reducing the production of gut-derived toxins, such as ammonia, is still under debate. Currently, results obtained from clinical trials do not support any specific treatment for HE and our competence in testing old and new treatment modalities by randomized controlled trials with appropriate clinically relevant end-points urgently needs to be improved. On the other hand, patients who are at risk for HE are now identifiable, based on studies on the natural history of the disease. Today, very few studies that are specifically aimed at establishing whether HE may be prevented are available or in progress. Recent studies have looked at non absorbable disaccharides or antibiotics and other treatment modalities, such as the modulation of intestinal flora. In the treatment of severe stage HE, artificial liver supports have been tested with initial positive results but more studies are needed.

  12. Encephalopathy caused by lanthanum carbonate.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Pilar; Cacharro, Luis Maria; Garcia-Cosmes, Pedro; Rosado, Consolacion; Tabernero, Jose Matias

    2011-06-01

    Lanthanum carbonate is a nonaluminum, noncalcium phosphate-binding agent, which is widely used in patients with end-stage chronic kidney disease. Until now, no significant side-effects have been described for the clinical use of lanthanum carbonate, and there are no available clinical data regarding its tissue stores. Here we report the case of a 59-year-old patient who was admitted with confusional syndrome. The patient received 3750 mg of lanthanum carbonate daily. Examinations were carried out, and the etiology of the encephalopathy of the patient could not be singled out. The lanthanum carbonate levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were high, and the syndrome eased after the drug was removed. The results of our study confirm that, in our case, the lanthanum carbonate did cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although lanthanum carbonate seems a safe drug with minimal absorption, this work reveals the problem derived from the increase of serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, and the possibility that it may cross the BBB. Further research is required on the possible pathologies that increase serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, as well as the risks and side-effects derived from its absorption.

  13. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saulle, Michael; Greenwald, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE. PMID:22567320

  14. Clinical system model for monitoring the physiological status of jaundice by extracting bilirubin components from skin diffuse reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Alla S.; Clark, Joseph; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2009-02-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a medical condition which occurs in newborns as a result of an imbalance between the production and elimination of bilirubin. The excess bilirubin in the blood stream diffuses into the surrounding tissue leading to a yellowing of the skin. As the bilirubin levels rise in the blood stream, there is a continuous exchange between the extra vascular bilirubin and bilirubin in the blood stream. Exposure to phototherapy alters the concentration of bilirubin in the vascular and extra vascular regions by causing bilirubin in the skin layers to be broken down. Thus, the relative concentration of extra vascular bilirubin is reduced leading to a diffusion of bilirubin out of the vascular region. Diffuse reflectance spectra from human skin contains physiological and structural information of the skin and nearby tissue. A diffuse reflectance spectrum must be captured before and after blanching in order to isolate the intravascular and extra vascular bilirubin. A new mathematical model is proposed with extra vascular bilirubin concentration taken into consideration along with other optical parameters in defining the diffuse reflectance spectrum from human skin. A nonlinear optimization algorithm has been adopted to extract the optical properties (including bilirubin concentration) from the skin reflectance spectrum. The new system model and nonlinear algorithm have been combined to enable extraction of Bilirubin concentrations within an average error of 10%.

  15. Opsoclonus as a manifestation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Salazar, R; Mehta, C; Zaher, N; Miller, D

    2012-10-01

    We present a 59-year-old male with early manifestation of opsoclonus associated with gait ataxia as a rare clinical presentation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Empiric use of intravenous immunoglobulin followed by intravenous high dose methylprednisolone was initiated with subsequent remittance of opsoclonus, encephalopathy, ataxia, and tremor. Extensive workup for infectious, autoimmune, and paraneoplastic etiologies were undertaken and all studies were negative. Thyroglobulin antibodies (312 U/mL) and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (457 U/mL) were elevated (normal <60 U/mL) with a euthyroid state (thyroid stimulating hormone 3.13 μIU/mL). Three months after intravenous steroid therapy, the concentrations of thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase antibodies were retested and found to have decreased considerably. Thus, with steroid therapy, the patient's opsoclonus and encephalopathy improved. We have presented a patient with a rare case of opsoclonus as the principal presenting feature of Hashimoto's encephalopathy that was incompletely responsive to intravenous immunoglobulin and resolved with corticosteroids. This report underscores the importance for clinical practitioners to maintain a high index of suspicion for Hashimoto's encephalopathy in cases of opsoclonus, especially when accompanied by an atypical presentation.

  16. Living donor liver transplantation for acute liver failure in pediatric patients caused by the ingestion of fireworks containing yellow phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Ates, Mustafa; Dirican, Abuzer; Ozgor, Dincer; Aydin, Cemalettin; Isik, Burak; Ara, Cengiz; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Ayse Selimoglu, M; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2011-11-01

    Yellow phosphorus is a protoplasmic toxicant that targets the liver. The ingestion of fireworks containing yellow phosphorus, either by children who accidentally consume them or by adults who are attempting suicide, often results in death due to acute liver failure (ALF). We present the outcomes of 10 children who ingested fireworks containing yellow phosphorus. There were 6 boys and 4 girls, and their ages ranged from 21 to 60 months. One patient remained stable without liver complications and was discharged. Three patients died of hepatorenal failure and cardiovascular collapse, and living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) was performed for 6 patients. The patients had grade II or III encephalopathy, a mean alanine aminotransferase level of 1148.2 IU/L, a mean aspartate aminotransferase level of 1437.5 IU/L, a mean total bilirubin level of 6.9 mg/dL, a mean international normalized ratio of 6.6, a mean Pediatric End-Stage Liver Disease score of 33.7, and a mean Child-Pugh score of 11.3. Postoperatively, 2 patients had persistent encephalopathy and died on the second or third postoperative day, and 1 patient died of cardiac arrest on the first postoperative day despite a well-functioning graft. The other 3 patients were still alive at a mean of 204 days. In conclusion, the ingestion of fireworks containing yellow phosphorus causes ALF with a high mortality rate. When signs of irreversible ALF are detected, emergency LDLT should be considered as a lifesaving procedure; however, if yellow phosphorus toxicity affects both the brain and the heart in addition to the liver, the mortality rate remains very high despite liver transplantation.

  17. Purification, characterization and decolorization of bilirubin oxidase from Myrothecium verrucaria 3.2190

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Myrothecium verrucaria 3.2190 is a nonligninolytic fungus that produces bilirubin oxidase. Both Myrothecium verrucaria and the extracellular bilirubin oxidase were tested for their ability to decolorize indigo carmine. The biosorption and biodegradation of the dye were detected during the process of...

  18. Albumin-bound bilirubin interacts with nitric oxide by a redox mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Cesare; Bonsignore, Alessia; Capone, Caterina; Di Stasio, Enrico; Pani, Giovambattista

    2006-01-01

    Bilirubin, the final product of heme catabolism, plays a crucial role in the cellular defense against oxidative and nitrosative stress. This study investigated the interaction of albumin-bound bilirubin, the circulating form of the bile pigment, with nitric oxide (NO), a gaseous modulator involved in many physiological functions but able to induce cytotoxicity and cell death if produced in excess. A short-lived endogenous S-nitrosothiol such as S-nitroso-cysteine was used as NO donor. In PBS without chelators, bilirubin was bound to human serum albumin with an apparent affinity of 1.6 +/- 0.2 microM (n = 4). Furthermore, albumin (2-20 microM) dose-dependently increased the half-life of BR (10 microM) exposed to S-nitroso-cysteine (100 microM) of 2.4 +/- 0.4 times (n = 4). Albumin-bound bilirubin was almost completely oxidized by S-nitroso-cysteine-derived NO, and biliverdin was the major product formed; this reaction seemed to be rather specific for albumin-bound bilirubin because when free bilirubin was reacted with S-nitroso-cysteine the formation of biliverdin was significantly lower. Uric acid and reduced glutathione, two well-known plasma antioxidants, at physiological concentrations protected albumin-bound bilirubin from NO-mediated oxidation. Taken together, these data suggest that albumin-bound bilirubin maintains its ability to interact with NO also in the bloodstream counteracting extracellular nitrosative reactions.

  19. Ammonia-induced energy disorders interfere with bilirubin metabolism in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiongye; Wang, Yanfang; Yu, Zujiang; Li, Duolu; Jia, Bin; Li, Jingjing; Guan, Kelei; Zhou, Yubing; Chen, Yanling; Kan, Quancheng

    2014-08-01

    Hyperammonemia and jaundice are the most common clinical symptoms of hepatic failure. Decreasing the level of ammonia in the blood is often accompanied by a reduction in bilirubin in patients with hepatic failure. Previous studies have shown that hyperammonemia can cause bilirubin metabolism disorders, however it is unclear exactly how hyperammonemia interferes with bilirubin metabolism in hepatocytes. The purpose of the current study was to determine the mechanism or mechanisms by which hyperammonemia interferes with bilirubin metabolism in hepatocytes. Cell viability and apoptosis were analyzed in primary hepatocytes that had been exposed to ammonium chloride. Mitochondrial morphology and permeability were observed and analyzed, intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were determined and changes in the expression of enzymes related to bilirubin metabolism were analyzed after ammonia exposure. Hyperammonemia inhibited cell growth, induced apoptosis, damaged the mitochondria and hindered the TCA cycle in hepatocytes. This led to a reduction in energy synthesis, eventually affecting the expression of enzymes related to bilirubin metabolism, which then caused further problems with bilirubin metabolism. These effects were significant, but could be reversed with the addition of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This study demonstrates that ammonia can cause problems with bilirubin metabolism by interfering with energy synthesis.

  20. Relationship of Bilirubin Levels in Infancy to Later Intellectual Development. Interim Report No. 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Rosalyn A.; And Others

    The relationship of bilirubin (a red bile pigment that is sometimes found in the urine and occurs in the blood and tissues in jaundice) in infancy to later intellectual development was investigated in 241 infants with moderately elevated and high bilirubin levels. Ss were administered motor, psycholinguistic, and intelligence tests at age 8…

  1. Effect of bilirubin on triglyceride synthesis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianwei; Lee, Eun Seong; Baek, Seon Ha; Ahn, Shin-Young; Kim, Sejoong; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Chin, Ho Jun

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to elucidate the effect of bilirubin on dyslipidemia and nephropathy in a diabetes mellitus (DM) type I animal model. Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into control, DM, and bilirubin-treated DM (Bil) groups. The Bil group was injected intraperitoneally with 60 mg/kg bilirubin 3 times per week and hepatoma cells were cultured with bilirubin at a concentration of 0.3 mg/dL. The Bil group showed lower serum creatinine levels 5 weeks after diabetes onset. Bilirubin treatment also decreased the amount of mesangial matrix, lowered the expression of renal collagen IV and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and reduced the level of apoptosis in the kidney, compared to the DM group. These changes were accompanied by decreased tissue levels of hydrogen superoxide and NADPH oxidase subunit proteins. Bilirubin decreased serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), free fatty acids, and triglycerides (TGs), as well as the TG content in the liver tissues. Bilirubin suppressed protein expression of LXRα, SREBP-1, SCD-1, and FAS, factors involved in TG synthesis that were elevated in the livers of DM rats and hepatoma cells under high-glucose conditions. In conclusion, bilirubin attenuates renal dysfunction and dyslipidemia in diabetes by suppressing LXRα and SREBP-1 expression and oxidative stress.

  2. Metabolism of bilirubin by human cytochrome P450 2A6

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Bakar, A'edah; Arthur, Dionne M.; Wikman, Anna S.; Rahnasto, Minna; Juvonen, Risto O.; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Raunio, Hannu; Ng, Jack C.; Lang, Matti A.

    2012-05-15

    The mouse cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2A5 has recently been shown to function as hepatic “Bilirubin Oxidase” (Abu-Bakar, A., et al., 2011. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 257, 14–22). To date, no information is available on human CYP isoforms involvement in bilirubin metabolism. In this paper we provide novel evidence for human CYP2A6 metabolising the tetrapyrrole bilirubin. Incubation of bilirubin with recombinant yeast microsomes expressing the CYP2A6 showed that bilirubin inhibited CYP2A6-dependent coumarin 7-hydroxylase activity to almost 100% with an estimated K{sub i} of 2.23 μM. Metabolite screening by a high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry indicated that CYP2A6 oxidised bilirubin to biliverdin and to three other smaller products with m/z values of 301, 315 and 333. Molecular docking analyses indicated that bilirubin and its positively charged intermediate interacted with key amino acid residues at the enzyme's active site. They were stabilised at the site in a conformation favouring biliverdin formation. By contrast, the end product, biliverdin was less fitting to the active site with the critical central methylene bridge distanced from the CYP2A6 haem iron facilitating its release. Furthermore, bilirubin treatment of HepG2 cells increased the CYP2A6 protein and activity levels with no effect on the corresponding mRNA. Co-treatment with cycloheximide (CHX), a protein synthesis inhibitor, resulted in increased half-life of the CYP2A6 compared to cells treated only with CHX. Collectively, the observations indicate that the CYP2A6 may function as human “Bilirubin Oxidase” where bilirubin is potentially a substrate and a regulator of the enzyme. -- Highlights: ► Human CYP2A6 interacts with bilirubin with a high affinity. ► Bilirubin docking to the CYP2A6 active site is more stable than biliverdin docking. ► Recombinant CYP2A6 microsomes metabolised bilirubin to biliverdin. ► Bilirubin increased the hepatic CYP2

  3. [The influence of bilirubin on the mechanogram of isolated, spontaneously beating frog heart].

    PubMed

    Mittelstädt, U; Biester, J; Sandhage, K

    1976-06-08

    It was shown that bilirubin in its unconjugated form does not only harm the central nervous system. Clinical observations indicate that the toxic effect under certain conditions affects also the heart. In a simple experimental model the influence of free bilirubin on the activity of the heart was investigated. In 69 adult frogs the heart was isolated and exposed sequentially to solutions of different bilirubin concentrations while the heart actions were registered. There was no significant change in the activity of the heart under the influence of bilirubin although concentrations were reached which according to the results of other authors harm cell cultures or evoke in the newborn disturbances in various organs. As a possible explanation, the nonsusceptibility of the heart muscle to bilirubin, the short duration of exposure, and the different behavior of newborn and adult organs is discussed.

  4. Metabolism of heme and bilirubin in rat and human small intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, F; Bissell, D M

    1982-01-01

    Formation of heme, bilirubin, and bilirubin conjugates has been examined in mucosal cells isolated from the rat upper small intestine. Intact, viable cells were prepared by enzymatic dissociation using a combined vascular and luminal perfusion and incubated with an isotopically labeled precursor, delta-amino-[2,3-3H]levulinic acid. Labeled heme and bile pigment were formed with kinetics similar to those exhibited by hepatocytes. Moreover, the newly formed bilirubin was converted rapidly to both mono- and diglucuronide conjugates. In addition, cell-free extracts of small intestinal mucosa from rats or humans exhibited a bilirubin-UDP-glucuronyl transferase activity that was qualitatively similar to that present in liver. The data suggest that the small intestinal mucosa normally contributes to bilirubin metabolism. PMID:6806320

  5. Clinical review of genetic epileptic encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Grace J.; Asher, Y. Jane Tavyev; Graham, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Seizures are a frequently encountered finding in patients seen for clinical genetics evaluations. The differential diagnosis for the cause of seizures is quite diverse and complex, and more than half of all epilepsies have been attributed to a genetic cause. Given the complexity of such evaluations, we highlight the more common causes of genetic epileptic encephalopathies and emphasize the usefulness of recent technological advances. The purpose of this review is to serve as a practical guide for clinical geneticists in the evaluation and counseling of patients with genetic epileptic encephalopathies. Common syndromes will be discussed, in addition to specific seizure phenotypes, many of which are refractory to anti-epileptic agents. Divided by etiology, we overview the more common causes of infantile epileptic encephalopathies, channelopathies, syndromic, metabolic, and chromosomal entities. For each condition, we will outline the diagnostic evaluation and discuss effective treatment strategies that should be considered. PMID:22342633

  6. Surgical Treatment of Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fridley, J.; Reddy, G.; Curry, D.; Agadi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric epileptiform encephalopathies are a group of neurologically devastating disorders related to uncontrolled ictal and interictal epileptic activity, with a poor prognosis. Despite the number of pharmacological options for treatment of epilepsy, many of these patients are drug resistant. For these patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, motor and/or neuropsychological deterioration is common. To prevent these secondary consequences, surgery is often considered as either a curative or a palliative option. Magnetic resonance imaging to look for epileptic lesions that may be surgically treated is an essential part of the workup for these patients. Many surgical procedures for the treatment of epileptiform encephalopathies have been reported in the literature. In this paper the evidence for these procedures for the treatment of pediatric epileptiform encephalopathies is reviewed. PMID:24288601

  7. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy: not just delirium

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo; Machado, Fabio Santana; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in intensive care units. Organ dysfunction is triggered by inflammatory insults and tissue hypoperfusion. The brain plays a pivotal role in sepsis, acting as both a mediator of the immune response and a target for the pathologic process. The measurement of brain dysfunction is difficult because there are no specific biomarkers of neuronal injury, and bedside evaluation of cognitive performance is difficult in an intensive care unit. Although sepsis-associated encephalopathy was described decades ago, it has only recently been subjected to scientific scrutiny and is not yet completely understood. The pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy involves direct cellular damage to the brain, mitochondrial and endothelial dysfunction and disturbances in neurotransmission. This review describes the most recent findings in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and focuses on its many presentations. PMID:22012058

  8. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Berdai, Mohamed Adnane; Labib, Smael; Harandou, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was confirmed later by a low thiamine serum level. The patient was discharged home on day 46 with mild ataxia and persistent nystagmus. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum. It should be diagnosed as early as possible to prevent long-term neurological sequela or death. Thiamine supplementation in pregnant women with prolonged vomiting should be initiated, especially before parenteral dextrose infusion. Early thiamine replacement will reduce maternal morbidity and fetal loss rate. PMID:26989522

  9. Experimental Interspecies Transmission Studies of the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies to Cattle: Comparison to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of animals include scrapie of sheep and goats; transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME); chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk and moose; and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) of cattle. Since the emergence of BSE and its pr...

  10. Effects of total bilirubin on the prevalence of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women without potential liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bian, Lu-Qin; Li, Rong-Zhen; Zhang, Zheng-Yun; Jin, Yan-Ji; Kang, Hyung-Wook; Fang, Zhen-Zhu; Park, Youn-Soo; Choi, Yoon-Ho

    2013-11-01

    It is still uncertain whether total bilirubin per se is a risk factor for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and no study has so far examined this important issue. This study was designed to assess the sheer effects of total bilirubin on the prevalence of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women without potential liver disease. In the present study, postmenopausal female subjects without potential liver disease (n = 918) who underwent measurement of bone mineral density were enrolled. Correlation and logistic regression analysis were used to assess the relationship between total bilirubin and other variables. As a result, subjects with osteoporosis had a significantly lower total bilirubin level (P = 0.005). A 0.1 mg/dl increase in total bilirubin was associated with reduced odds ratio of the risk by 38 % for osteoporosis [OR 0.62 (95 % CI 0.52-0.88), P = 0.012] after adjustment for several variables. Total bilirubin was independently associated with BMD [coefficient = 0.41, 95 % CI (0.35-0.47), P < 0.001 for lumbar spine and coefficient = 0.44, 95 % CI (0.36-0.48), P < 0.001 for femur neck]. A positive correlation could be observed with significant difference between total bilirubin and z-score (r = 0.33, P < 0.001 for lumbar spine and r = 0.37, P < 0.001 for femur neck) and total bilirubin was positively correlated with serum calcium (r = 0.13, P < 0.001) as well. Therefore, this study demonstrates an independent inverse association between total bilirubin and the prevalence of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women without potential liver disease. Total bilirubin would be useful as a provisional new risk factor of osteoporosis in such a population.

  11. Inverse Association between Serum Bilirubin Levels and Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Raghuram; Thankappan, Lekha; Andavar, Raghuram; Devisundaram, Sundar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Oxidative stress plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) and serum bilirubin has been shown to have antioxidant properties. Aim To investigate the association between serum bilirubin concentration and DR in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM). Materials and Methods This was a hospital based, cross- sectional study where in 86 patients with Type 2 DM and 30 controls were recruited. The study was conducted at a tertiary care centre in Southern India between January 2014 and December 2014. The presence and the severity of DR were determined by fundus examination and grading of colour fundus photographs using the international clinical disease severity scale for DR. Serum total, direct and indirect bilirubin levels were determined in all subjects and the association between bilirubin levels and severity of DR was studied. Results Among the 86 diabetics, 24 had no retinopathy and 62 had DR of varying grades. The mean total bilirubin level among diabetic subjects (0.52±0.17) and controls (0.51±0.19) were found to be similar. The mean total as well as direct bilirubin levels were found to be lower in patients with retinopathy as compared to no retinopathy group (p<0.001). The severity of DR was inversely proportional to the serum bilirubin levels (p=0.010). Serum total bilirubin was found to have a negative association with glycosylated haemoglobin and served as an independent determinant of DR even after adjusting for risk factors known to be associated with DR (p=0.001). Conclusion Low serum bilirubin levels are significantly associated with increased risk of DR independent of classic risk factors. Serum bilirubin can serve as a useful biomarker in identifying patients at risk for developing proliferative DR. PMID:28384901

  12. Elevated bilirubin levels are associated with a better renal prognosis and ameliorate kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jin Ho; Kim, Yong-Chul; Kim, Jin Hyuk; Lim, Chun Soo; Kim, Yon Su; Yang, Seung Hee; Lee, Jung Pyo

    2017-01-01

    Background Bilirubin has been reported to protect against kidney injury. However, further studies highlighting the beneficial effects of bilirubin on renal fibrosis and chronic renal function decline are necessary. Methods We assessed a prospective cohort with a reference range of total bilirubin levels. The primary outcome was a 30% reduction in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) from baseline, and the secondary outcome was a doubling of the serum creatinine levels, halving of the eGFR and the initiation of dialysis. In addition, experiments with tubular epithelial cells and C57BL/6 mice were performed to investigate the protective effects of bilirubin on kidney fibrosis. Results As a result, 1,080 patients were included in the study cohort. The study group with relative hyperbilirubinemia (total bilirubin 0.8–1.2 mg/dL) showed a better prognosis in terms of the primary outcome (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.19–0.59, P < 0.001) and the secondary outcome (adjusted HR 0.20, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.71, P = 0.01) than that of the control group. Moreover, the bilirubin-treated mice showed less fibrosis in the unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model (P < 0.05). In addition, bilirubin treatment decreased fibronectin expression in tubular epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Conclusions Mildly elevated serum bilirubin levels were associated with better renal prognosis, and bilirubin treatment induced a beneficial effect on renal fibrosis. Therefore, bilirubin could be a potential therapeutic target to delay fibrosis-related kidney disease progression. PMID:28225832

  13. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Thor D.; Alvarez, Victor E.; McKee, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE. PMID:26260277

  14. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Stein, Thor D; Alvarez, Victor E; McKee, Ann C

    2015-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE.

  15. Cell culture models of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Béranger, F; Mangé, A; Solassol, J; Lehmann, S

    2001-11-30

    In this review, we describe the generation and use of cell culture models of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, also known as prion diseases. These models include chronically prion-infected cell lines, as well as cultures expressing variable amounts of wild-type, mutated, or chimeric prion proteins. These cell lines have been widely used to investigate the biology of both the normal and the pathological isoform of the prion protein. They have also contributed to the comprehension of the pathogenic processes occurring in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and in the development of new therapeutic approaches of these diseases.

  16. Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy Impairs Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Swastik; Umapathy, Sridharan; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2015-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the mildest form of the spectrum of neurocognitive impairment in cirrhosis. It is a frequent occurrence in patients of cirrhosis and is detectable only by specialized neurocognitive testing. MHE is a clinically significant disorder which impairs daily functioning, driving performance, work capability and learning ability. It also predisposes to the development of overt hepatic encephalopathy, increased falls and increased mortality. This results in impaired quality of life for the patient as well as significant social and economic burden for health providers and care givers. Early detection and treatment of MHE with ammonia lowering therapy can reverse MHE and improve quality of life. PMID:26041957

  17. Epileptic Encephalopathies in Adults and Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Kural, Zekiye; Ozer, Ali Fahir

    2012-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are motor-mental retardations or cognitive disorders secondary to epileptic seizures or epileptiform activities. Encephalopaties due to brain damage, medications, or systemic diseases are generally not in the scope of this definition, but they may rarely accompany the condition. Appropriate differential diagnosis of epileptic seizures as well as subclinical electroencephalographic discharges are crucial for management of seizures and epileptiform discharges and relative regression of cognitive deterioration in long-term followup. Proper antiepileptic drug, hormonal treatment, or i.v. immunoglobulin choice play major role in prognosis. In this paper, we evaluated the current treatment approaches by reviewing clinical electrophysiological characteristics of epileptic encephalopathies. PMID:23056934

  18. Hyperammonemia Is Associated with Increasing Severity of Both Liver Cirrhosis and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ayub, Maimoona; Khan, Wazir Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hyperammonemia resulting from chronic liver disease (CLD) can potentially challenge and damage any organ system of the body, particularly the brain. However, there is still some controversy regarding the diagnostic or prognostic values of serum ammonia in patients with over hepatic encephalopathy, especially in the setting of acute-on-chronic or chronic liver failure. Moreover, the association of serum ammonia with worsening Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis has not been studied. Objective. This study was conducted to solve the controversy regarding the association between hyperammonemia and cirrhosis, especially hepatic encephalopathy in chronically failed liver. Material and Methods. In this study, 171 cirrhotic patients had their serum ammonia measured and analyzed by SPSS version 16. Chi-squared test and one-way ANOVA were applied. Results. The study had 110 male and 61 female participants. The mean age of all the participants in years was 42.33 ± 7.60. The mean duration (years) of CLD was 10.15 ± 3.53 while the mean Child-Pugh (CP) score was 8.84 ± 3.30. Chronic viral hepatitis alone was responsible for 71.3% of the cases. Moreover, 86.5% of participants had hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The frequency of hyperammonemia was 67.3%, more frequent in males (N = 81, z-score = 2.4, and P < 0.05) than in females (N = 34, z-score = 2.4, and P < 0.05), and had a statistically significant relationship with increasing CP grade of cirrhosis (χ2(2) = 27.46, P < 0.001, Phi = 0.40, and P < 0.001). Furthermore, serum ammonia level was higher in patients with hepatic encephalopathy than in those without it; P < 0.001. Conclusion. Hyperammonemia is associated with both increasing Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:27847646

  19. Rethinking the immune properties of bilirubin in viral hepatitis: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Corral-Jara, Karla F; Trujillo-Ochoa, Jorge L; Realpe, Mauricio; Panduro, Arturo; Roman, Sonia; Fierro, Nora A

    2015-01-01

    Communication between the immune system and metabolic components can be exemplified by the process of heme catabolism. The immunomodulatory functions of the enzymes, substrates and active products related to catabolism of the heme group have been extensively studied. Bilirubin (BR), the final breakdown product of heme, is primarily considered to be a toxic waste product but has recently been considered to be an immunomodulatory metabolite. Through mechanisms that include intracellular signaling and transcriptional control, BR affects those immune cell functions that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. During the pathogenesis of viral hepatitis, the heme degradation pathway is disrupted, resulting in changes to normal BR concentrations. These alterations have been previously studied mainly as a consequence of the infection. However, little is known about the potential immunomodulatory role played by BR in the development of infectious hepatocellular diseases. Differences in BR levels in the context of viral hepatitis are likely to provide important insights into the metabolite-mediated mechanisms controlling the immune responses underlying both the long-term persistence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the resolution of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection during the acute phase. In this review, the cross-talk between heme catabolism and immune function is described in detail. Special emphasis is given to discoveries that hold promise for identifying immunologic features of metabolic products in the resolution of viral diseases. PMID:26719800

  20. Rethinking the immune properties of bilirubin in viral hepatitis: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Corral-Jara, Karla F; Trujillo-Ochoa, Jorge L; Realpe, Mauricio; Panduro, Arturo; Roman, Sonia; Fierro, Nora A

    2015-12-01

    Communication between the immune system and metabolic components can be exemplified by the process of heme catabolism. The immunomodulatory functions of the enzymes, substrates and active products related to catabolism of the heme group have been extensively studied. Bilirubin (BR), the final breakdown product of heme, is primarily considered to be a toxic waste product but has recently been considered to be an immunomodulatory metabolite. Through mechanisms that include intracellular signaling and transcriptional control, BR affects those immune cell functions that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. During the pathogenesis of viral hepatitis, the heme degradation pathway is disrupted, resulting in changes to normal BR concentrations. These alterations have been previously studied mainly as a consequence of the infection. However, little is known about the potential immunomodulatory role played by BR in the development of infectious hepatocellular diseases. Differences in BR levels in the context of viral hepatitis are likely to provide important insights into the metabolite-mediated mechanisms controlling the immune responses underlying both the long-term persistence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the resolution of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection during the acute phase. In this review, the cross-talk between heme catabolism and immune function is described in detail. Special emphasis is given to discoveries that hold promise for identifying immunologic features of metabolic products in the resolution of viral diseases.

  1. Recurarization in a successfully managed case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) for emergency caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Suchita; Tavri, Snehlata; Mohite, Shubha

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiologic syndrome of headache, visual changes, altered mental status and seizures with radiologic findings of posterior cerebral white matter edema. It is seen in hypertensive encephalopathy, renal failure, and autoimmune disorders or in patients on immunosuppressants. We report a case of 24-year-old primigravida who presented at term with sudden onset hypertension, neurological deficits, and an episode of the visual blackout. Magnetic resonance imaging showed features suggestive of PRES. She was posted for emergency lower segment cesarean section. General anesthesia was administered and blood pressure managed with antihypertensives. Postoperatively, she developed acute respiratory depression after prophylactic administration of injection magnesium sulfate. This case highlights that good clinical acumen along with early neuroimaging helps in prompt diagnosis, treatment and prevention of long-term neurological sequelae in PRES and the anesthetic implications of administering magnesium sulfate in the immediate post neuromuscular block reversal phase. PMID:27212776

  2. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with Henoch-Schönlein purpura

    PubMed Central

    Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Incedayi, Mehmet; Mutlu, Hakan; Meral, Cihan

    2013-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a small vessel vasculitis that affects the gastrointestinal and central nervous systems and the kidneys. The disease primarily affects children, but may occur in elderly children with allergic purpura and also in adults. Central nervous system involvement may be the first sign; however, it is rarely encountered. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical syndrome of encephalopathy, headache, visual disturbance and seizures. Its radiological signs can be observed in grey and white matter at the posterior region of the cerebral hemispheres. HSP should be considered in children with PRES in the presence of rash, joint and gastrointestinal symptoms. We reported a 5-year-old patient who developed acute renal failure and PRES by reason of HSP. PMID:23946524

  3. Artificial and bioartificial liver support systems for acute and acute-on-chronic hepatic failure: A meta-analysis and meta-regression.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Li, Xu; Li, Zhiliang; Ma, Xiaochun

    2013-10-01

    Artificial and bioartificial liver support systems (LSSs) appear to be safe and effective in the treatment of acute and acute-on-chronic hepatic failure (AHF and AOCHF); however, individually published studies and previous meta-analyses have revealed inconclusive results. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to derive a more precise estimation of the benefits and disadvantages of artificial and bioartificial LSSs for patients with AHF and AOCHF. A literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Chinese Biomedical (CBM) databases for publications prior to March 1, 2013. Crude relative risks (RRs) or standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using either the fixed effects or random effects models. Nineteen randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included, which comprised a total of 566 patients with AHF and 371 patients with AOCHF. The meta-analysis showed that artificial LSS therapy significantly reduced mortality in patients with AOCHF; however, it had no apparent effect on total mortality in patients with AHF. The results also indicated that the use of bioartificial LSSs was correlated with decreased mortality in patients with AHF. A significant reduction in the bridging to liver transplantation was observed in patients with AOCHF following artificial LSS therapy; however, similar results were not observed in patients with AHF. Patients with AHF and those with AOCHF showed significant reductions in total bilirubin levels following artificial LSS therapy. There were no significantly increased risks of hepatic encephalopathy or bleeding in either the patients with AHF or AOCHF following artificial or bioartificial LSS therapies. Univariate and multivariate meta-regression analyses confirmed that none of the factors explained the heterogeneity. The present meta-analysis indicated that artificial LSSs reduce mortality in patients with AOCHF, while the use of bioartificial LSSs was

  4. Artificial and bioartificial liver support systems for acute and acute-on-chronic hepatic failure: A meta-analysis and meta-regression

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, ZHEN; LI, XU; LI, ZHILIANG; MA, XIAOCHUN

    2013-01-01

    Artificial and bioartificial liver support systems (LSSs) appear to be safe and effective in the treatment of acute and acute-on-chronic hepatic failure (AHF and AOCHF); however, individually published studies and previous meta-analyses have revealed inconclusive results. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to derive a more precise estimation of the benefits and disadvantages of artificial and bioartificial LSSs for patients with AHF and AOCHF. A literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Chinese Biomedical (CBM) databases for publications prior to March 1, 2013. Crude relative risks (RRs) or standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using either the fixed effects or random effects models. Nineteen randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included, which comprised a total of 566 patients with AHF and 371 patients with AOCHF. The meta-analysis showed that artificial LSS therapy significantly reduced mortality in patients with AOCHF; however, it had no apparent effect on total mortality in patients with AHF. The results also indicated that the use of bioartificial LSSs was correlated with decreased mortality in patients with AHF. A significant reduction in the bridging to liver transplantation was observed in patients with AOCHF following artificial LSS therapy; however, similar results were not observed in patients with AHF. Patients with AHF and those with AOCHF showed significant reductions in total bilirubin levels following artificial LSS therapy. There were no significantly increased risks of hepatic encephalopathy or bleeding in either the patients with AHF or AOCHF following artificial or bioartificial LSS therapies. Univariate and multivariate meta-regression analyses confirmed that none of the factors explained the heterogeneity. The present meta-analysis indicated that artificial LSSs reduce mortality in patients with AOCHF, while the use of bioartificial LSSs was

  5. Statins alter the hepatobiliary transport of unconjugated and conjugated bilirubin in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Mónika; Veres, Zsuzsa; Bátai-Konczos, Attila; Kékesi, Orsolya; Kis, Emese; Szabó, Kitti; Jemnitz, Katalin

    2014-09-01

    Several studies have reported that statins occasionally cause impairment of liver functions characterized by elevated serum bilirubin levels, which might be due to altered function of the multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrp2/3). We aimed to study the modulation of the hepatobiliary transport of bilirubin by four statin derivatives, atorvastatin, fluvastatin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes. All statins except pravastatin significantly inhibited the uptake of bilirubin. The biliary efflux of bilirubin conjugates was increased by pravastatin and rosuvastatin concentration dependently. Rosuvastatin stimulated not only the Mrp2 mediated biliary, but the Mrp3 mediated sinusoidal elimination, resulting in decreased intracellular bilirubin accumulation. The significantly induced Mrp2/3 protein levels (ranging from 1.5 to 1.8-fold) accounted for the elevated efflux. Cell polarization, the formation of biliary network was also significantly increased by fluvastatin, pravastatin and rosuvastatin (151%, 216% and 275% of the control, respectively). The simultaneous inhibition of the uptake and the stimulation of the sinusoidal and canalicular elimination may explain, at least in part, the clinical observation of elevated serum bilirubin levels. In conclusion, our results suggest that in spite of the elevated serum bilirubin levels, the altered Mrp2 and Mrp3 functions by statins is probably not associated with hepatotoxic effects.

  6. [Haemolysis and turbidity influence on three analysis methods of quantitative determination of total and conjugated bilirubin on ADVIA 1650].

    PubMed

    Gobert De Paepe, E; Munteanu, G; Schischmanoff, P O; Porquet, D

    2008-01-01

    Plasma bilirubin testing is crucial to prevent the occurrence of neonatal kernicterus. Haemolysis may occur during sampling and interfere with bilirubin determination. Moreover, lipidic infusions may induce plasma lipemia and also interfere with bilirubin measurement. We evaluated the interference of haemolysis and lipemia with three methods of total and direct bilirubin measurement adaptated on an Advia 1650 analyser (Siemens Medical Solutions Diagnostics) : Synermed (Sofibel), Bilirubin 2 (Siemens) and Bilirubin Auto FS (Diasys). The measurement of total bilirubin was little affected by haemolysis with all three methods. The Bilirubin 2 (Siemens) method was the less sensitive to haemolysis even at low bilirubin levels. The measurement of conjugated bilirubin was significantly altered by low heamoglobin concentrations for Bilirubin Auto FS(R) (30 microM or 0,192 g/100 mL haemoglobin) and for Synermed (60 microM or 0,484 g/100 mL haemoglobin). In marked contrast, we found no haemoglobin interference with the Direct Bilirubin 2 reagent which complied with the method validation criteria from the French Society for Biological Chemistry. The lipemia up to 2 g/L of Ivelip did not affect neither the measurement of total bilirubin for all three methods nor the measurement of conjugated bilirubin with the Diasys and Siemens reagents. However, we observed a strong interference starting at 0,5 g/L of Ivelip with the Synermed reagent. Our data suggest that both Siemens and Diasys methods allow to measure accurately total and conjugated bilirubin in hemolytic and lipemic samples, nevertheless, the Siemens methodology is less affected by these interferences.

  7. Understanding Genotypes and Phenotypes in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Ingo; Tayoun, Abou Ahmad N.

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are severe often intractable seizure disorders where epileptiform abnormalities contribute to a progressive disturbance in brain function. Often, epileptic encephalopathies start in childhood and are accompanied by developmental delay and various neurological and non-neurological comorbidities. In recent years, this concept has become virtually synonymous with a group of severe childhood epilepsies including West syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, Dravet syndrome, and several other severe childhood epilepsies for which genetic factors are increasingly recognized. In the last 5 years, the field has seen a virtual explosion of gene discovery, raising the number of bona fide genes and possible candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathies to more than 70 genes, explaining 20-25% of all cases with severe early-onset epilepsies that had otherwise no identifiable causes. This review will focus on the phenotypic variability as a characteristic aspect of genetic epilepsies. For many genetic epilepsies, the phenotypic presentation can be broad, even in patients with identical genetic alterations. Furthermore, patients with different genetic etiologies can have seemingly similar clinical presentations, such as in Dravet syndrome. While most patients carry mutations in SCN1A, similar phenotypes can be seen in patients with mutations in PCDH19, CHD2, SCN8A, or in rare cases GABRA1 and STXBP1. In addition to the genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity, both benign phenotypes and severe encephalopathies have been recognized in an increasing number of genetic epilepsies, raising the question whether these conditions represent a fluid continuum or distinct entities. PMID:27781027

  8. PRIONS AND THE TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter is an invited, scholarly review of the mechanism(s) of TSEs for the 2nd edition of Metabolic Encephalopathies. Each chapter in the book assumes a professional knowledge of neuroscience and biochemistry, and the focus of the book is on the metabolic basis of dise...

  9. Encephalopathy in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Baluarte, H J; Gruskin, A B; Hiner, L B; Foley, C M; Grover, W D

    1977-01-01

    The progressive encephalopathy observed in 5 children with chronic renal failure was clinically similar to the so-called dialysis encephalopathy of adults, except that it was not related to dialysis therapy. Renal osteodystrophy is more prevalent in children than in adults and often more severe. The attempt to control the crippling deformities of renal osteodystrophy in growing children with renal insufficiency has led to the use of large quantities of aluminum containing antacids. The encephalopathy observed in children with chronic renal failure may be related to the oral ingestion of aluminum containing compounds in the presence of persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism. We suggest that alternative methods for the adequate control of serum phosphorus levels should be sought and indications for parathyroidectomy in children reevaluated. During the past 18 mos we have lowered the dose of aluminum containing compounds to 50 to 100 mg/Kg/day in our patients with progressive renal failure and recommend parathyroidectomy. No new cases of the encephalopathy have occurred.

  10. Methanethiol metabolism and its role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Blom, H J; Chamuleau, R A; Rothuizen, J; Deutz, N E; Tangerman, A

    1990-04-01

    The metabolism of methanethiol was studied in rats. Administration of a noncomatogenic dose of methanethiol through inspired air or injection into the upper colon resulted in an elevation of the concentrations of methanethiol mixed disulfides in serum (protein--S--S--CH3 and X--S--S--CH3, X yet unknown) and in urine (X--S--S--CH3). The concentrations of methanethiol mixed disulfides proved to be a relative measure of exposure to methanethiol. The levels of volatile sulfur compounds methanethiol, dimethylsulfide and dimethyldisulfide in the air expired by rats exposed to a noncomatogenic dose of methanethiol through the colon were also elevated. Rats with acute hepatic encephalopathy caused by liver ischemia also showed elevation of methanethiol mixed disulfide levels on challenge of methanethiol through the colon or inspired air, but to a significantly smaller extent than did the corresponding sham-operated rats. This suggests that the liver is at least partly responsible for formation of methanethiol mixed disulfides. No additional toxic effects were observed in the rats with ischemic livers on methanethiol exposition when compared with normal rats, suggesting that the liver does not play an essential role in methanethiol detoxification. Metabolism of methanethiol by blood to sulfate, for example, might be more important. In rats with acute hepatic encephalopathy caused by liver ischemia and in dogs suffering from hepatic encephalopathy resulting from chronic liver disease, large and significant increases in ammonia levels were measured. However, the mean levels of methanethiol mixed disulfides in rats and dogs with hepatic encephalopathy were not different from the mean normal levels in these animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Neuropsychological functioning in Wernicke's encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Behura, Sushree Sangita; Swain, Sarada Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Context: Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is caused by thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency and most commonly found in chronic alcoholism and malnutrition. Clinically, the key features are mental status disturbances (global confusion), oculomotor abnormalities, and gait disturbances (ataxia). Apart from these clinical features, we can find deficits in neuropsychological functioning in patients with WE, which is more prominent after the improvement in the physical conditions. Neuropsychological functioning includes both basic cognitive processes (i.e., attention-concentration) as well as higher order cognitive processes (i.e., memory, executive functioning, reasoning), which is much vital for the maintenance of quality of life of an individual. However, unfortunately, in most of the cases, neuropsychological functioning is ignored by the clinicians. Materials and Methods: In this study four case reports of WE have been presented. The patients were taken from the outdoor department of Mental Health Institute, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha. Neuropsychological functioning was measured by administration of PGIBBD and Quality of Life was measured by WHO-QOL BREF Odia Version. Discussion: As described in the literature, among the three cardinal signs (global confusion, ataxia, and ocular sings), the first two were present in all cases, but nystagmus was present in only two cases. Memory dysfunction was so disabling that the persons were unable to maintain a good Quality of Life and occupational impairment was prominent. There are disturbances in recent, remote memory, immediate recall, delayed recall, and attention and concentration, ultimately creating both physical and mental disability. PGI-BBD findings also suggest the overall impairment in neuropsychological functioning other than memory, that is, executive functioning, visual acuity, and depth perception. Findings of WHO-QOL BREF suggest the impairment of four domains of QOL in all the cases, but the severity

  12. Bilirubin conjugates of human bile. Nuclear-magnetic-resonance, infrared and optical spectra of model compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kuenzle, Clive C.

    1970-01-01

    N.m.r., i.r. and optical spectra of model compounds were recorded. These were to help in elucidating the structures of the phenylazo derivatives of bilirubin conjugates isolated from human bile. Model compounds included commercial and human bile bilirubin, mesobilirubin, bilirubin dimethyl ester, dimethoxybilirubin dimethyl ester and the corresponding phenylazo derivatives. The phenylazo derivative of vinylneoxanthobilirubinic acid was also investigated. All compounds were of the type IXα, and no other isomer could be detected with the spectroscopic methods employed. The compounds crystallize as the lactams, except for dimethoxybilirubin dimethyl ester and its phenylazo derivative, which are held in the lactim ether configuration. With all other compounds no tautomeric forms other than the lactams could be detected, although small proportions of bilirubin must exist as the lactim. Bilirubin does not form a betaine, a structure that has been proposed by von Dobeneck & Brunner (1965) to explain the bathochromic shift of its optical spectrum as compared with the expected position of the absorption maximum at 420nm. However, this shift to 453nm can be explained on the basis of internal hydrogen bonds occurring between the carboxylic protons and the pyrrole rings of bilirubin, as proposed by Fog & Jellum (1963), and new evidence for such a bonding has been accumulated. The bilirubin sulphate described by Watson (1958), which is formed by treatment of bilirubin with concentrated sulphuric acid and acetic anhydride, was also investigated. The main product of this reaction was isolated as its phenylazo derivative, and was shown to be 3,18-di(ethylidene sulphate)-2,7,13,17-tetramethylbiladiene-ac-8,12-dipropionic acid. The reaction leading to this compound is an addition of sulphuric acid to the vinyl side chains of bilirubin according to Markownikoff's rule. PMID:5500301

  13. Serum bilirubin levels are inversely associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Min-Sun; Chung, Goh Eun; Kang, Seung Joo; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Yoon Jun; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Hyo-Suk

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Serum bilirubin exerts antioxidant and cytoprotective effects. In addition, elevated serum bilirubin levels are associated with a decreased risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. However, few studies have evaluated whether serum bilirubin is associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is closely associated with other metabolic diseases. The aim of this study was thus to elucidate the association between serum total bilirubin levels and NAFLD. Methods A cross-sectional study of 17,348 subjects undergoing a routine health check-up was conducted. Subjects positive for hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus, or with other hepatitis history were excluded. NAFLD was diagnosed on the basis of typical ultrasonographic findings and an alcohol consumption of less than 20 g/day. Results The mean age of the subjects was 49 years and 9,076 (52.3%) were men. The prevalence of NAFLD decreased steadily as the serum bilirubin level increased in both men and women (P<0.001 for both). Multivariate regression analysis adjusted for other metabolic risk factors showed that serum bilirubin level was inversely associated with the prevalence of NAFLD [odds ratio (OR)=0.88, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.80-0.97]. Furthermore, there was an inverse, dose-dependent association between NAFLD and serum total bilirubin levels (OR=0.83, 95% CI=0.75-0.93 in the third quartile; OR=0.80, 95% CI=0.71-0.90 in the fourth quartile vs. lowest quartile, P for trend <0.001). Conclusions Serum bilirubin levels were found to be inversely associated with the prevalence of NAFLD independent of known metabolic risk factors. Serum bilirubin might be a protective marker for NAFLD. PMID:23323254

  14. High preoperative bilirubin values protect against reperfusion injury after live donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Spetzler, Vinzent N; Goldaracena, Nicolas; Kaths, Johann M; Marquez, Max; Selzner, Nazia; Cattral, Mark S; Greig, Paul D; Lilly, Les; McGilvray, Ian D; Levy, Gary A; Ghanekar, Anand; Renner, Eberhard L; Grant, David R; Selzner, Markus

    2015-11-01

    Heme Oxygenase-1 and its product biliverdin/bilirubin have been demonstrated to protect against ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). We investigated whether increased preoperative bilirubin values of transplant recipients decrease IRI. Preoperative bilirubin levels of live donor liver recipients were correlated to postoperative liver transaminase as a marker of IRI. Additionally, two recipient groups with pretransplant bilirubin levels >24 μmol/l (n = 348) and ≤24 μmol/l (n = 118) were compared. Post-transplant liver function, complications, length of hospital stay, and patient and graft survival were assessed. Preoperative bilirubin levels were negatively correlated to the postoperative increase in transaminases suggesting a protective effect against IRI. The maximal rise of ALT after transplantation in high versus low bilirubin patients was 288 (-210-2457) U/l vs. 375 (-11-2102) U/l, P = 0.006. Bilirubin remained a significant determining factor in a multivariate linear regression analysis. The MELD score and its individual components as a marker of severity of chronic liver disease were significantly higher in the high versus low bilirubin group (P < 0.001). Despite this, overall complication rate (21.0% vs. 21.2%, P = 0.88), hospital stay [13 (4-260) vs. 14 (6-313) days, P = 0.93), and 1-year graft survival (90.8% vs. 89.0%, P = 0.62) were similar in both groups. High bilirubin levels of liver recipients before live donor transplantation is associated with decreased postoperative IRI.

  15. Relation of Pre-anthracycline Serum Bilirubin Levels to Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction After Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vera, Trinity; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Jordan, Jennifer H; Whitlock, Matthew C; Meléndez, Giselle C; Lamar, Zanetta S; Porosnicu, Mercedes; Bonkovsky, Herbert L; Poole, Leslie B; Hundley, W Gregory

    2015-12-01

    Myocardial injury because of oxidative stress manifesting through reductions in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) may occur after the administration of anthracycline-based chemotherapy (A-bC). We hypothesized that bilirubin, an effective endogenous antioxidant, may attenuate the reduction in LVEF that sometimes occurs after receipt of A-bC. We identified 751 consecutively treated patients with cancer who underwent a pre-A-bC LVEF measurement, exhibited a serum total bilirubin level <2 mg/dl, and then received a post-A-bC LVEF assessment because of symptomatology associated with heart failure. Analysis of variance, Tukey's Studentized range test, and chi-square tests were used to evaluate an association between bilirubin and LVEF changes. The LVEF decreased by 10.7 ± 13.7%, 8.9 ± 11.8%, and 7.7 ± 11.5% in group 1 (bilirubin at baseline ≤0.5 mg/dl), group 2 (bilirubin 0.6 to 0.8 mg/dl), and group 3 (bilirubin 0.9 to 1.9 mg/dl), respectively. More group 1 patients experienced >15% decrease in LVEF compared with those in group 3 (p = 0.039). After adjusting for age, coronary artery disease/myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, hematocrit, and the use of cardioactive medications, higher precancer treatment bilirubin levels and lesser total anthracycline doses were associated with LVEF preservation (p = 0.047 and 0.011, respectively). In patients treated with anthracyclines who subsequently develop symptoms associated with heart failure, pre-anthracycline treatment serum bilirubin levels inversely correlate with subsequent deterioration in post-cancer treatment LVEF. In conclusion, these results suggest that increased levels of circulating serum total bilirubin, an intrinsic antioxidant, may facilitate preservation of LVEF in patients receiving A-bC for cancer.

  16. Enterohepatic circulation of nonconjugated bilirubin in rats fed with human milk

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, E.M.; Whitington, P.F.; Whitington, S.H.; Rivard, W.A.; Given, G. )

    1991-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that enhanced intestinal absorption of bilirubin may contribute to prolonged nonconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in human milk-fed infants, we studied a cross-section of 36 healthy infants and mothers. Milk from mothers and serum from infants were collected at 16.3 +/- 2.4 days. Milk was studied for its effect on the absorption of bilirubin labeled with carbon 14 in rats and compared with buffer and iron-fortified infant formula (Similac With Iron). The percentage of a 1 mg bilirubin dose absorbed by the rat was 25.29 +/- 4.0% when it was administered into the duodenum with buffer, 4.67 +/- 2.4% with Similac formula, and 7.7 +/- 2.9% with human milk. Linear regression analysis, using the infant's serum nonconjugated bilirubin level as the dependent variable and the percentage of (14C)bilirubin absorbed by the rat with the corresponding mother's milk as the independent variable, revealed a significant correlation (r = 0.40; p = 0.016). Inspection of the data suggested that absorptive permissiveness correlated closely with infant serum bilirubin values greater than 24 mumol/L (1.4 mg/dl) (r = 0.55; p = 0.007), whereas in those with bilirubin values less than or equal to 24 mumol/L, there was no apparent correlation. Milk was also analyzed for beta-glucuronidase, nonesterified fatty acids, and the ability to inhibit glucuronosyltransferase activity of rat liver microsomes in vitro, none of which correlated with the infant's serum bilirubin. These data support the theory that enhanced intestinal absorption of bilirubin contributes to the jaundice associated with breast-feeding.

  17. Advances in cirrhosis: Optimizing the management of hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Andy; Perumpail, Ryan B; Kumari, Radhika; Younossi, Zobair M; Wong, Robert J; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a major complication of cirrhosis resulting in significant socioeconomic burden, morbidity, and mortality. HE can be further subdivided into covert HE (CHE) and overt HE (OHE). CHE is a subclinical, less severe manifestation of HE and requires psychometric testing for diagnosis. Due to the time consuming screening process and lack of standardized diagnostic criteria, CHE is frequently underdiagnosed despite its recognized role as a precursor to OHE. Screening for CHE with the availability of the Stroop test has provided a pragmatic method to promptly diagnose CHE. Management of acute OHE involves institution of lactulose, the preferred first-line therapy. In addition, prompt recognition and treatment of precipitating factors is critical as it may result in complete resolution of acute episodes of OHE. Treatment goals include improvement of daily functioning, evaluation for liver transplantation, and prevention of OHE recurrence. For secondary prophylaxis, intolerance to indefinite lactulose therapy may lead to non-adherence and has been identified as a precipitating factor for recurrent OHE. Rifaximin is an effective add-on therapy to lactulose for treatment and prevention of recurrent OHE. Recent studies have demonstrated comparable efficacy of probiotic therapy to lactulose use in both primary prophylaxis and secondary prophylaxis. PMID:26692331

  18. Acute presentations of renal artery stenosis in three patients with a solitary functioning kidney.

    PubMed

    Pun, E; Dowling, R J; Mitchell, P J

    2004-12-01

    Renal artery stenosis can present uncommonly in the acute state as flash pulmonary oedema and hypertensive encephalopathy. We present three such cases in patients with a solitary functioning kidney, with successful management via renal artery angioplasty and stent insertion.

  19. A comparison between transcutaneous and total serum bilirubin in healthy-term greek neonates with clinical jaundice.

    PubMed

    Neocleous, Charalambos; Adramerina, Alkistis; Limnaios, Stefanos; Symeonidis, Symeon; Spanou, Chrysoula; Malakozi, Marina; Mpampalis, Evangelos

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of transcutaneous bilirubin meters has been assessed in newborns from various ethnic backgrounds. However, there are limited data on Greek newborns. Our study examined the accuracy of transcutaneous bilirubin measurements in clinically jaundiced healthy-term Greek newborns, using total serum bilirubin as the reference standard, in order to re-evaluate our local guidelines about neonatal jaundice. Clinically jaundiced newborns requiring total serum bilirubin level estimation were recruited prospectively. 368 pairs of total serum bilirubin/transcutaneous bilirubin measurements were taken in 222 newborns, using a direct spectrophotometric device and the BiliCheck device, respectively. The level of agreement between the obtained transcutaneous bilirubin and total serum bilirubin values was assessed. Our data were analysed using the Stata/SE 12.0 (StataCorp LP, USA) statistical programme. The mean (± SD) TSB was 225.4 ± 25.4 μmol/l and the mean (± SD) TcB was 237.9 ± 21.0 μmol/l. The correlation between the values was poor (Pearson's correlation coefficient 0.439; Lin's concordance coefficient 0.377 [95% CI 0.301 to 0.453]; P<0.001). The Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated that transcutaneous bilirubin measurements tended to overestimate the total serum bilirubin value (mean difference 12.5 ± 24.9 μmol/l), with wide 95% limits of agreement (-36.2 μmol/l to 61.3 μmol/l). Transcutaneous bilirubin values did not correlate well with total serum bilirubin values, being often imprecise in predicting the actual total serum bilirubin levels. This permits us to continue estimating total serum bilirubin in clinically jaundiced newborns according to our local guidelines, in order to safely decide the appropriate care plan.

  20. Physical measurements of Cu{sup 2+}-complexes of bilirubin

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, J.R.; Wu, J.G.; Li, W.H.; Xu, Y.Z.; Xu, D.F.; Shen, G.R.; Soloway, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    Copper is known to form complexes with bilirubin (H{sub 2}BR). Such complexes have received increased attention due to their clinical significance as free-radical scavengers. The purpose of this study was to examine a series of Cu{sup 2+}BR complexes to ascertain the nature of the binding between Cu{sup 2+} and BR. Several physical measurements of the salts were made, such as Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Fourier Transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-R), and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The complexes were prepared by dissolving protonated BR in NaOH, and adding different ratios of aqueous CuCl{sub 2}. At ratios of Cu{sup 2+}:H{sub 2}BR of 1:1 and 2:1, soluble complexes were formed. In solution EPR spectra demonstrated 9 hyperfine peaks, which from the splitting, is indicative of Cu{sup 2+} coordinated to 4 nitrogen atoms coming from 2 molecules of BR.

  1. The effect of bilirubin on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in cumene hydroperoxide-treated erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yeşilkaya, A; Yeğin, A; Ozdem, S; Aksu, T A

    1998-01-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that bilirubin may act as a potent biological chain-breaking antioxidant. To observe the effects of free bilirubin on antioxidant reactions in cumene hydroperoxide-treated erythrocytes (15 g hemoglobin/dl), we added bilirubin at four different concentrations (0.5, 1, 5, and 10 mg/dl). We measured the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance and reduced glutathione levels, and some antioxidant enzyme activities, namely superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance and chemiluminescent signals decreased during the incubation. Superoxide dismutase activities also decreased but not as much as in the control group. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities and reduced glutathione levels increased, but catalase activities remained the same as the control group. Our results suggest that bilirubin--in the concentrations we have used--partially prevented the oxidant effects of cumene hydroperoxide.

  2. Computational chemical analysis of unconjugated bilirubin anions and insights into pKa values clarification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Hissi, Esteban G.; Estrada, Mario R.; Lavecchia, Martín J.; Pis Diez, Reinaldo

    2013-01-01

    The pKa, the negative logarithm of the acid dissociation equilibrium constant, of the carboxylic acid groups of unconjugated bilirubin in water is a discussed issue because there are quite different experimental values reported. Using quantum mechanical calculations we have studied the conformational behavior of unconjugated bilirubin species (in gas phase and in solution modeled implicitly and explicitly) to provide evidence that may clarify pKa values because of its pathophysiological relevance. Our results show that rotation of carboxylate group, which is not restricted, settles it in a suitable place to establish stronger interactions that stabilizes the monoanion and the dianion to be properly solvated, demonstrating that the rationalization used to justify the high pKa values of unconjugated bilirubin is inappropriate. Furthermore, low unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) pKa values were estimated from a linear regression analysis.

  3. pKa and aggregation of bilirubin: titrimetric and ultracentrifugation studies on water-soluble pegylated conjugates of bilirubin and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Boiadjiev, Stefan E; Watters, Kimberly; Wolf, Steven; Lai, Bryon N; Welch, William H; McDonagh, Antony F; Lightner, David A

    2004-12-14

    A water-soluble conjugate (1) with intact carboxyl groups was prepared by addition of poly(ethylene glycol) thiol (MPEG-SH) regiospecifically to the exo vinyl group of bilirubin. (1)H and (13)C NMR and absorbance spectroscopy in CDCl(3) and DMSO-d(6) confirmed the assigned structure and showed that pegylation did not disrupt the hydrogen-bonded ridge-tile conformation of the pigment moiety. Aqueous solutions of 1 were optically clear, but NMR signals were seen only from the MPEG portion and none from the tetrapyrrole, consistent with dissolved assemblies containing aggregated bilirubin cores within mobile polyether chains. On alkalinization (pH >12), signals from the pigment moiety reappeared. Titrimetric measurements on 1 in water showed the pK(a)'s of the two carboxyl groups to be similar (average 6.42). Control studies with pegylated half-esters of succinic, suberic, brassylic, thapsic, and 1,20-eicosanedioic acid showed that pegylation per se has little, if any, effect on carboxyl ionization. However, aggregation increases the apparent pK(a) by approximately 1-2 units. The molecularity of bilirubin in solution was further characterized by ultracentrifugation. Over the pH range 8.5-10 in buffer, bilirubin formed multimers with aggregation numbers ranging from approximately 2-7. Bilirubin is monomeric in DMSO or CHCl(3) at approximately 2 x 10(-)(5) M, but aggregation occurred when the CHCl(3) was contaminated with trace adventitious (perhaps lipoidal) impurities. These observations show that aggregation increases the pK(a)'s of aliphatic carboxylic acids relative to their monomer values in water. They are consistent with earlier (13)C NMR-based estimates of approximately 4.2 and approximately 4.9 for the aqueous pK(a)'s of bilirubin and similar studies of bilirubin in micellar bile-salt solutions. Together with earlier work, they confirm that the pK(a)'s of bilirubin are about normal for aliphatic carboxyls and suggest that the high (>7.5) values occasionally

  4. Qualifying and quantifying minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Marsha Y; Amodio, Piero; Cook, Nicola A; Jackson, Clive D; Kircheis, Gerald; Lauridsen, Mette M; Montagnese, Sara; Schiff, Sami; Weissenborn, Karin

    2016-12-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is the term applied to the neuropsychiatric status of patients with cirrhosis who are unimpaired on clinical examination but show alterations in neuropsychological tests exploring psychomotor speed/executive function and/or in neurophysiological variables. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of this syndrome. As these patients have, by definition, no recognizable clinical features of brain dysfunction, the primary prerequisite for the diagnosis is careful exclusion of clinical symptoms and signs. A large number of psychometric tests/test systems have been evaluated in this patient group. Of these the best known and validated is the Portal Systemic Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES) derived from a test battery of five paper and pencil tests; normative reference data are available in several countries. The electroencephalogram (EEG) has been used to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy since the 1950s but, once popular, the technology is not as accessible now as it once was. The performance characteristics of the EEG are critically dependent on the type of analysis undertaken; spectral analysis has better performance characteristics than visual analysis; evolving analytical techniques may provide better diagnostic information while the advent of portable wireless headsets may facilitate more widespread use. A large number of other diagnostic tools have been validated for the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy including Critical Flicker Frequency, the Inhibitory Control Test, the Stroop test, the Scan package and the Continuous Reaction Time; each has its pros and cons; strengths and weaknesses; protagonists and detractors. Recent AASLD/EASL Practice Guidelines suggest that the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy should be based on the PHES test together with one of the validated alternative techniques or the EEG. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy has a detrimental effect on the well-being of patients and their care

  5. Serum bilirubin levels, UGT1A1 polymorphisms and risk for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Lingenhel, Arno; Kollerits, Barbara; Schwaiger, Johannes P; Hunt, Steven C; Gress, Richard; Hopkins, Paul N; Schoenborn, Veit; Heid, Iris M; Kronenberg, Florian

    2008-12-01

    Low levels of the antioxidative serum bilirubin are associated with vascular aging and an increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). UGT1A1 is the major gene influencing bilirubin concentrations. Therefore, we investigated an association of bilirubin levels and two polymorphisms in the promoter of UGT1A1 (-53(TA-repeat) polymorphism and T-3279G) in 477 patients with premature, familial CAD and 619 age- and sex-matched controls. Bilirubin concentrations were significantly lower in cases than in controls (0.62+/-0.36 vs. 0.76+/-0.41 mg/dl for men, p=1.2 x 10(-10); and 0.42+/-0.29 vs. 0.55+/-0.23 mg/dl, p=1.9 x 10(-9) for women). Both polymorphisms showed a strong association with bilirubin levels with higher levels for homozygote carriers of the minor allele. These associations were most pronounced in male controls and patients (p=5.9 x 10(-26) and p=3.4 x 10(-16), respectively, for the -53(TA-repeat) polymorphism). Logistic regression analysis revealed low bilirubin levels but not the UGT1A1 polymorphisms to be significantly associated with CAD: OR (95% CI) 0.90 (0.86-0.94), p=2.6 x 10(-6) for men and 0.77 (0.68-0.87), p=3.2 x 10(-5) for women, respectively for each 0.1mg/dl increase of bilirubin. These results indicate that it is rather decreased bilirubin levels in general than the changes in the genetic variation of this gene that increase the risk for CAD.

  6. Potential role of conjugated bilirubin and copper in the metabolism of lipid peroxides in bile.

    PubMed Central

    Stocker, R; Ames, B N

    1987-01-01

    Conjugated bilirubin and copper ions at their physiological concentrations in bile may play an important role in hydroperoxide and other detoxification. Conjugated bilirubin may also be an important chain-breaking antioxidant preventing lipid peroxidation. Bilirubin ditaurine (BR-DT), a water-soluble model compound of conjugated bilirubin, completely prevents the peroxyl radical-induced oxidation of phosphatidylcholine in either multilamellar liposomes or micelles. This antioxidant activity is associated with the bilirubin moiety of BR-DT, since taurine alone is inefficient in scavenging peroxyl radicals. The number of peroxyl radicals trapped per molecule of BR-DT is 1.9, compared to 4.7 trapped per molecule of biliverdin, the water-soluble physiological precursor of bilirubin. Peroxyl radical-induced oxidation of BR-DT results in a spectral shift in maximal absorbance toward shorter wavelengths; biliverdin is not formed as a major oxidation product. BR-DT, but neither taurine nor biliverdin, greatly accelerates the cupric ion-catalyzed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxide. In the presence of ferric ion, BR-DT shows no lipid hydroperoxide-degrading activity. Addition of cupric ion to BR-DT results in formation of a complex with spectral features similar to that of a biliverdin-cupric ion complex, indicating that BR-DT and cupric ion undergo redox reactions. PMID:3479781

  7. Quantitative assessment of the multiple processes responsible for bilirubin homeostasis in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, David G; Levitt, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Serum bilirubin measurements are commonly obtained for the evaluation of ill patients and to screen for liver disease in routine physical exams. An enormous research effort has identified the multiple mechanisms involved in the production and metabolism of conjugated (CB) and unconjugated bilirubin (UB). While the qualitative effects of these mechanisms are well understood, their expected quantitative influence on serum bilirubin homeostasis has received less attention. In this review, each of the steps involved in bilirubin production, metabolism, hepatic cell uptake, and excretion is quantitatively examined. We then attempt to predict the expected effect of normal and defective function on serum UB and CB levels in health and disease states including hemolysis, extra- and intrahepatic cholestasis, hepatocellular diseases (eg, cirrhosis, hepatitis), and various congenital defects in bilirubin conjugation and secretion (eg, Gilbert’s, Dubin–Johnson, Crigler–Najjar, Rotor syndromes). Novel aspects of this review include: 1) quantitative estimates of the free and total UB and CB in the plasma, hepatocyte, and bile; 2) detailed discussion of the important implications of the recently recognized role of the hepatic OATP transporters in the maintenance of CB homeostasis; 3) discussion of the differences between the standard diazo assay versus chromatographic measurement of CB and UB; 4) pharmacokinetic implications of the extremely high-affinity albumin binding of UB; 5) role of the enterohepatic circulation in physiologic jaundice of newborn and fasting hyperbilirubinemia; and 6) insights concerning the clinical interpretation of bilirubin measurements. PMID:25214800

  8. Successive determination of urinary bilirubin and creatinine employing simultaneous injection effective mixing flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Ponhong, Kraingkrai; Teshima, Norio; Grudpan, Kate; Vichapong, Jitlada; Motomizu, Shoji; Sakai, Tadao

    2015-02-01

    A novel four-channel simultaneous injection effective mixing flow analysis (SIEMA) system has been assembled for successive determination of bilirubin and creatinine in urinary samples. The chemical variables and physical parameters in the flow system were optimized for the enhancement of successive analytical performances. The interferences from urine matrices on the determination of bilirubin and creatinine were eliminated to dilute urine samples. The calibration graphs with the optimum conditions were achieved to be in 0.024-5.0 mg L(-1) for bilirubin and 2-100 mg L(-1) for creatinine. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) at 3 mg L(-1) of bilirubin and at 50 mg L(-1) of creatinine for 11 runs were 1.5 and 1.0%, respectively. The limits of detections (3σ of blank) for bilirubin and creatinine were 7 µg L(-1) and 0.6 mg L(-1), respectively. The sample throughput for stepwise detection was 22 h(-1). The proposed method was applied to the successive determination of bilirubin and creatinine in urine samples.

  9. Surface-modified anodic aluminum oxide membrane with hydroxyethyl celluloses as a matrix for bilirubin removal.

    PubMed

    Xue, Maoqiang; Ling, Yisheng; Wu, Guisen; Liu, Xin; Ge, Dongtao; Shi, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Microporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes were modified by 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to produce terminal epoxy groups. These were used to covalently link hydroxyethyl celluloses (HEC) to amplify reactive groups of AAO membrane. The hydroxyl groups of HEC-AAO composite membrane were further modified with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether to link arginine as an affinity ligand. The contents of HEC and arginine of arginine-immobilized HEC-AAO membrane were 52.1 and 19.7mg/g membrane, respectively. As biomedical adsorbents, the arginine-immobilized HEC-AAO membranes were tested for bilirubin removal. The non-specific bilirubin adsorption on the unmodified HEC-AAO composite membranes was 0.8mg/g membrane. Higher bilirubin adsorption values, up to 52.6mg/g membrane, were obtained with the arginine-immobilized HEC-AAO membranes. Elution of bilirubin showed desorption ratio was up to 85% using 0.3M NaSCN solution as the desorption agent. Comparisons equilibrium and dynamic capacities showed that dynamic capacities were lower than the equilibrium capacities. In addition, the adsorption mechanism of bilirubin and the effects of temperature, initial concentration of bilirubin, albumin concentration and ionic strength on adsorption were also investigated.

  10. Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0399 TITLE: Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John F...Include area code) October 2015 Annual Report 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy John...encephalopathy (CTE), but the underlying molecular changes remain unclear. Here, biochemical and genetic studies that deepen our understanding of the

  11. Plasma concentrations of endogenous benzodiazepine-receptor ligands in patients with hepatic encephalopathy: a comparative study.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Avila, C A; Shoemaker, W J; Ortega-Soto, H A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder secondary to acute or chronic liver failure. Although the exact causes of HE have not been clarified, enhanced central nervous system inhibition at the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-benzodiazepine receptor complex, mediated by increased levels of endogenous benzodiazepine-receptor ligands (BZRL), has been proposed. Research exploring this hypothesis has yielded contradictory findings. This study evaluated the presence and levels of BZRL in plasma from patients with HE and 3 comparison groups. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. PATIENTS: Twenty-four patients with HE, 10 patients with liver cirrhosis without encephalopathy (LC), 4 patients with uremic encephalopathy (UE), and 9 healthy subjects. INTERVENTIONS: Radio-receptor assay of plasma samples from patients and controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Plasma levels of BZRL. RESULTS: The patients in the HE group had significantly higher plasma BZRL levels than the patients with UE and the healthy subjects, but not than those with LC, in whom these compounds were also detected in significant concentrations. When patients were classified according to the severity of HE, plasma of BZRL showed a modest correlation with stage of severity (r = 0.37). Interestingly, approximately one-third of the patients with HE did not have detectable levels of BZRL. CONCLUSION: Endogenous BZRL may play a role in the pathogenesis of HE, although neuropsychiatric symptoms in HE are difficult to explain in terms of these compounds alone. Images Fig. 1 PMID:9785700

  12. Pathophysiology of septic encephalopathy - an unsolved puzzle

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The exact cellular and molecular mechanisms of sepsis-induced encephalopathy remain elusive. The breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered a focal point in the development of sepsis-induced brain damage. Contributing factors for the compromise of the BBB include cytokines and chemokines, activation of the complement cascade, phagocyte-derived toxic mediators, and bacterial products. To date, we are far from fully understanding the neuropathology that develops as a secondary remote organ injury as a consequence of sepsis. However, recent studies suggest that bacterial proteins may readily cross the functional BBB and trigger an inflammatory response in the subarachnoid space, in absence of a bacterial invasion. A better understanding of the pathophysiological events leading to septic encephalopathy appears crucial to advance the clinical care for this vulnerable patient population. PMID:20565858

  13. Head stereotypies in STXBP1 encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ok; Korff, Christian M; Villaluz, Mel Michel G; Suls, Arvid; Weckhuysen, Sarah; De Jonghe, Peter; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2013-08-01

    STXBP1 encephalopathy is associated with a range of movement disorders. We observed head stereotypies in three patients. These comprised a slow (<1Hz), high-amplitude, horizontal, 'figure-of-eight' pattern, beginning at age 4-6 years and resulting in neck muscle hypertrophy, in two males; a faster (2-3Hz), side-to-side, 'no' movement, starting at the age of 9 years 6 months was observed in one female. Upper limb and truncal stereotypies and vocalization occurred intermittently with the head movements. The stereotypies increased with excitement but settled with concentration and sleep. Head and upper limb stereotypies are valuable clinical clues to the diagnosis of STXBP1 encephalopathy in patients with profound impairments.

  14. [Metabolic encephalopathy secondary to vitamin D intoxication].

    PubMed

    Herrera Martínez, Aura; Viñals Torràs, Montserrat; Muñoz Jiménez, Ma Concepción; Arenas de Larriva, Antonio Pablo; Molina Puerta, Ma José; Manzano García, Gregorio; Gálvez Moreno, Ma Ángeles; Calañas-Continente, Alfonso

    2014-10-25

    The association between vitamin D deficiency and increased risk of, among others, cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases has lead in the last years to an enhanced interest in the usage of supplements to achieve the normalization of plasmatic values at 25(OH) D. Apparently this search for normalization is resulting in an higher incidence on vitamin D intoxication. We present the case of an 81 years old woman with metabolic encephalopathy and renal failure secondary to iatrogenic vitamin D intoxication. Calcium and vitamin D oral supplements were prescribed after an osteoporotic vertebral fracture. The patient improved clinically as well as analytically after receiving treatment with diuretics and hydration. We emphasize the importance of discarding hypercalcemia as a cause of metabolic encephalopathy; moreover we highly recommend keeping vitamin D intoxication in mind as an uncommon although always possible etiology of reversible hypercalcemia and renal failure.

  15. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: A rare proteiform disorder.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Giacomo; Imperiali, Mauro; Agazzi, Pamela; D'Aurizio, Federica; Tozzoli, Renato; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Giovanella, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare not well understood, progressive and relapsing multiform disease, characterized by seizures, movement disorders, subacute cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms and responsiveness to steroid therapy. The disorder is generally associated with thyroid diseases and the most common feature is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Patients are usually euthyroid or mildly hypothyroid at presentation. All age groups can be affected. The pathophysiology is still unclear, especially the link between elevated serum TPOAb and the encephalopathy. Most reported cases occurred in women and girls. Unspecific symptoms, non-pathognomonic laboratory neurophysiology and neuroimaging features make its diagnosis a real challenge for clinicians. The case of a 16 year old boy, with a clinical picture of HE associated with hypothyroidism, demonstrating an excellent response to high dose steroids is presented together with a systematic review of the literature.

  16. Serum total bilirubin levels are negatively correlated with metabolic syndrome in aged Chinese women: a community-based study

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, P.; Sun, D.M.; Wu, D.H.; Li, T.M.; Liu, X.Y.; Liu, H.Y.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated serum total bilirubin levels as a predictor for metabolic syndrome (MetS) and investigated the relationship between serum total bilirubin levels and MetS prevalence. This cross-sectional study included 1728 participants over 65 years of age from Eastern China. Anthropometric data, lifestyle information, and previous medical history were collected. We then measured serum levels of fasting blood-glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and total bilirubin, as well as alanine aminotransferase activity. The prevalence of MetS and each of its individual component were calculated per quartile of total bilirubin level. Logistic regression was used to assess the correlation between serum total bilirubin levels and MetS. Total bilirubin level in the women who did not have MetS was significantly higher than in those who had MetS (P<0.001). Serum total bilirubin quartiles were linearly and negatively correlated with MetS prevalence and hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) in females (P<0.005). Logistic regression showed that serum total bilirubin was an independent predictor of MetS for females (OR: 0.910, 95%CI: 0.863–0.960; P=0.001). The present study suggests that physiological levels of serum total bilirubin might be an independent risk factor for aged Chinese women, and the prevalence of MetS and HTG are negatively correlated to serum total bilirubin levels. PMID:28146216

  17. Higher direct bilirubin levels during mid-pregnancy are associated with lower risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaoqun; Zhong, Chunrong; Zhou, Xuezhen; Chen, Renjuan; Wu, Jiangyue; Wang, Weiye; Li, Xiating; Ding, Huisi; Guo, Yanfang; Gao, Qin; Hu, Xingwen; Xiong, Guoping; Yang, Xuefeng; Hao, Liping; Xiao, Mei; Yang, Nianhong

    2017-01-01

    Bilirubin concentrations have been recently reported to be negatively associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We examined the association between bilirubin concentrations and gestational diabetes mellitus. In a prospective cohort study, 2969 pregnant women were recruited prior to 16 weeks of gestation and were followed up until delivery. The value of bilirubin was tested and oral glucose tolerance test was conducted to screen gestational diabetes mellitus. The relationship between serum bilirubin concentration and gestational weeks was studied by two-piecewise linear regression. A subsample of 1135 participants with serum bilirubin test during 16-18 weeks gestation was conducted to research the association between serum bilirubin levels and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus by logistic regression. Gestational diabetes mellitus developed in 8.5 % of the participants (223 of 2969). Two-piecewise linear regression analyses demonstrated that the levels of bilirubin decreased with gestational week up to the turning point 23 and after that point, levels of bilirubin were increased slightly. In multiple logistic regression analysis, the relative risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus was lower in the highest tertile of direct bilirubin than that in the lowest tertile (RR 0.60; 95 % CI, 0.35-0.89). The results suggested that women with higher serum direct bilirubin levels during the second trimester of pregnancy have lower risk for development of gestational diabetes mellitus.

  18. Medium chain triglycerides and hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M. Hilary; Bolton, C. H.; Morris, J. S.; Read, A. E.

    1974-01-01

    The oral administration of short (C6) and medium (C8 and (C10) chain triglycerides produced no clinical or electroencephalographic changes in patients with cirrhosis of the liver. Arterial ammonia levels were also monitored in these patients and showed no significant change after medium chain triglycerides. It was concluded that medium chain triglycerides, known to be of potential value in the treatment of malabsorption in patients with cirrhosis, are not clinically contraindicated, even in patients with evidence of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:4841275

  19. Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in the Term Infant

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, Ali; Wilson, Mary Ann; Johnston, Michael V.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Hypoxia-ischemia in the perinatal period is an important cause of cerebral palsy and associated disabilities in children. There has been significant research progress in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy over the last two decades and many new molecular mechanisms have been identified. Despite all these advances, therapeutic interventions are still limited. In this review paper, we discuss a number of molecular pathways involved in hypoxia-ischemia, and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:19944838

  20. Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy and Meat Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Hester J. T.; Knight, Richard S. G.

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) comprise a wide-ranging group of neurodegenerative diseases found in animals and humans. They have diverse causes and geographical distributions, but have similar pathological features, transmissibility and, are ultimately, fatal. Central to all TSEs is the presence of an abnormal form of a normal host protein, namely the prion protein. Because of their potential transmissibility, these diseases have wide public health ramifications.

  1. Vitamin-Responsive Epileptic Encephalopathies in Children

    PubMed Central

    Agadi, Satish; Quach, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    Untreated epileptic encephalopathies in children may potentially have disastrous outcomes. Treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) often may not control the seizures, and even if they do, this measure is only symptomatic and not specific. It is especially valuable to identify potential underlying conditions that have specific treatments. Only a few conditions have definitive treatments that can potentially modify the natural course of disease. In this paper, we discuss the few such conditions that are responsive to vitamin or vitamin derivatives. PMID:23984056

  2. Heme Degradation by Heme Oxygenase Protects Mitochondria but Induces ER Stress via Formed Bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Müllebner, Andrea; Moldzio, Rudolf; Redl, Heinz; Kozlov, Andrey V; Duvigneau, J Catharina

    2015-04-30

    Heme oxygenase (HO), in conjunction with biliverdin reductase, degrades heme to carbon monoxide, ferrous iron and bilirubin (BR); the latter is a potent antioxidant. The induced isoform HO-1 has evoked intense research interest, especially because it manifests anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects relieving acute cell stress. The mechanisms by which HO mediates the described effects are not completely clear. However, the degradation of heme, a strong pro-oxidant, and the generation of BR are considered to play key roles. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of BR on vital functions of hepatocytes focusing on mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The affinity of BR to proteins is a known challenge for its exact quantification. We consider two major consequences of this affinity, namely possible analytical errors in the determination of HO activity, and biological effects of BR due to direct interaction with protein function. In order to overcome analytical bias we applied a polynomial correction accounting for the loss of BR due to its adsorption to proteins. To identify potential intracellular targets of BR we used an in vitro approach involving hepatocytes and isolated mitochondria. After verification that the hepatocytes possess HO activity at a similar level as liver tissue by using our improved post-extraction spectroscopic assay, we elucidated the effects of increased HO activity and the formed BR on mitochondrial function and the ER stress response. Our data show that BR may compromise cellular metabolism and proliferation via induction of ER stress. ER and mitochondria respond differently to elevated levels of BR and HO-activity. Mitochondria are susceptible to hemin, but active HO protects them against hemin-induced toxicity. BR at slightly elevated levels induces a stress response at the ER, resulting in a decreased proliferative and metabolic activity of hepatocytes. However, the proteins that are targeted by BR still have

  3. Acetyl-L-carnitine in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Michele

    2013-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication of hepatic cirrhosis. The clinical diagnosis is based on two concurrent types of symptoms: impaired mental status and impaired neuromotor function. Impaired mental status is characterized by deterioration in mental status with psychomotor dysfunction, impaired memory, and increased reaction time, sensory abnormalities, poor concentration, disorientation and coma. Impaired neuromotor function include hyperreflexia, rigidity, myoclonus and asterixis. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy has not been clearly defined. The general consensus is that elevated levels of ammonia and an inflammatory response work in synergy to cause astrocyte to swell and fluid to accumulate in the brain which is thought to explain the symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy. Acetyl-L-carnitine, the short-chain ester of carnitine is endogenously produced within mitochondria and peroxisomes and is involved in the transport of acetyl-moieties across the membranes of these organelles. Acetyl-L-carnitine administration has shown the recovery of neuropsychological activities related to attention/concentration, visual scanning and tracking, psychomotor speed and mental flexibility, language short-term memory, attention, and computing ability. In fact, Acetyl-L-carnitine induces ureagenesis leading to decreased blood and brain ammonia levels. Acetyl-L-carnitine treatment decreases the severity of mental and physical fatigue, depression cognitive impairment and improves health-related quality of life. The aim of this review was to provide an explanation on the possible toxic effects of ammonia in HE and evaluate the potential clinical benefits of ALC.

  4. Extending the KCNQ2 encephalopathy spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Weckhuysen, Sarah; Ivanovic, Vanja; Hendrickx, Rik; Van Coster, Rudy; Hjalgrim, Helle; Møller, Rikke S.; Grønborg, Sabine; Schoonjans, An-Sofie; Ceulemans, Berten; Heavin, Sinead B.; Eltze, Christin; Horvath, Rita; Casara, Gianluca; Pisano, Tiziana; Giordano, Lucio; Rostasy, Kevin; Haberlandt, Edda; Albrecht, Beate; Bevot, Andrea; Benkel, Ira; Syrbe, Steffan; Sheidley, Beth; Guerrini, Renzo; Poduri, Annapurna; Lemke, Johannes R.; Mandelstam, Simone; Scheffer, Ingrid; Angriman, Marco; Striano, Pasquale; Marini, Carla; Suls, Arvid

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of KCNQ2 mutations in patients with neonatal epileptic encephalopathy (NEE), and to expand the phenotypic spectrum of KCNQ2 epileptic encephalopathy. Methods: Eighty-four patients with unexplained NEE were screened for KCNQ2 mutations using classic Sanger sequencing. Clinical data of 6 additional patients with KCNQ2 mutations detected by gene panel were collected. Detailed phenotyping was performed with particular attention to seizure frequency, cognitive outcome, and video-EEG. Results: In the cohort, we identified 9 different heterozygous de novo KCNQ2 missense mutations in 11 of 84 patients (13%). Two of 6 missense mutations detected by gene panel were recurrent and present in patients of the cohort. Seizures at onset typically consisted of tonic posturing often associated with focal clonic jerking, and were accompanied by apnea with desaturation. One patient diagnosed by gene panel had seizure onset at the age of 5 months. Based on seizure frequency at onset and cognitive outcome, we delineated 3 clinical subgroups, expanding the spectrum of KCNQ2 encephalopathy to patients with moderate intellectual disability and/or infrequent seizures at onset. Recurrent mutations lead to relatively homogenous phenotypes. One patient responded favorably to retigabine; 5 patients had a good response to carbamazepine. In 6 patients, seizures with bradycardia were recorded. One patient died of probable sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. Conclusion: KCNQ2 mutations cause approximately 13% of unexplained NEE. Patients present with a wide spectrum of severity and, although rare, infantile epilepsy onset is possible. PMID:24107868

  5. Blood Biomarkers for Evaluation of Perinatal Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Ernest M.; Burd, Irina; Everett, Allen D.; Northington, Frances J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in identification of brain injury after trauma shows many possible blood biomarkers that may help identify the fetus and neonate with encephalopathy. Traumatic brain injury shares many common features with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Trauma has a hypoxic component, and one of the 1st physiologic consequences of moderate-severe traumatic brain injury is apnea. Trauma and hypoxia-ischemia initiate an excitotoxic cascade and free radical injury followed by the inflammatory cascade, producing injury in neurons, glial cells and white matter. Increased excitatory amino acids, lipid peroxidation products, and alteration in microRNAs and inflammatory markers are common to both traumatic brain injury and perinatal encephalopathy. The blood-brain barrier is disrupted in both leading to egress of substances normally only found in the central nervous system. Brain exosomes may represent ideal biomarker containers, as RNA and protein transported within the vesicles are protected from enzymatic degradation. Evaluation of fetal or neonatal brain derived exosomes that cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate peripherally has been referred to as the “liquid brain biopsy.” A multiplex of serum biomarkers could improve upon the current imprecise methods of identifying fetal and neonatal brain injury such as fetal heart rate abnormalities, meconium, cord gases at delivery, and Apgar scores. Quantitative biomarker measurements of perinatal brain injury and recovery could lead to operative delivery only in the presence of significant fetal risk, triage to appropriate therapy after birth and measure the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:27468268

  6. Change in Serum Bilirubin Level as a Predictor of Incident Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, You-Bin; Lee, Seung-Eun; Jun, Ji Eun; Jee, Jae Hwan; Bae, Ji Cheol; Jin, Sang-Man; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    Aim Serum bilirubin level was negatively associated with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in previous cross-sectional studies. However, bilirubin variance preceding the development of MetS has yet to be investigated. We aimed to determine the effect of change in bilirubin concentration on the risk of incident MetS in healthy Korean adults. Methods We conducted a retrospective longitudinal study of subjects who had undergone at least four yearly health check-ups between 2006 and 2012. Of 24,185 total individuals who received annual check-ups, 11,613 non-MetS participants with a baseline bilirubin level not exceeding 34.2 μmol/l were enrolled. We evaluated the association between percent change in bilirubin and risk of incident MetS. Results During 55,407 person-years of follow-up, 2,439 cases of incident MetS developed (21.0%). Baseline serum bilirubin level clearly showed no association with the development of MetS in men but an independent significant inverse association in women which attenuated (hence may be mediated) by elevated homeostatic model assessment index 2 for insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR). However, increased risk for incident MetS was observed in higher percent change in bilirubin quartiles, with hazard ratios of 2.415 (95% CI 2.094–2.785) in men and 2.156 (95% CI 1.738–2.675) in women in the fourth quartile, compared to the lowest quartile, after adjusting for age, smoking status, medication history, alanine aminotransferase, uric acid, estimated glomerular filtration rate, fasting glucose, baseline diabetes mellitus prevalence, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and body mass index. The hazard ratios per one standard deviation increase in percent change in bilirubin as a continuous variable were 1.277 (95% CI 1.229–1.326) in men and 1.366 (95% CI 1.288–1.447) in women. Conclusions Increases in serum bilirubin concentration were positively associated with a higher risk of incident MetS. Serum bilirubin increment might

  7. Genetics Home Reference: acute necrotizing encephalopathy type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... interacts with a protein complex known as the nuclear pore. The nuclear pore is a channel that allows transport of ... transport of proteins and other molecules through the nuclear pore and helps modify proteins coming into or ...

  8. Acute hepatic encephalopathy presenting as cortical laminar necrosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Hee; Roh, Sook Young

    2013-01-01

    We report on a 55-year-old man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis who presented with status epilepticus. Laboratory analysis showed markedly elevated blood ammonia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed widespread cortical signal changes with restricted diffusion, involving both temporo-fronto-parietal cortex, while the perirolandic regions and occipital cortex were uniquely spared. A follow-up brain MRI demonstrated diffuse cortical atrophy with increased signals on T1-weighted images in both the basal ganglia and temporal lobe cortex, representing cortical laminar necrosis. We suggest that the brain lesions, in our case, represent a consequence of toxic effect of ammonia.

  9. Wernicke Encephalopathy and Sleeve Gastrectomy: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lin

    As the number of obese patients increases, as will the number of bariatric procedures. Malabsorptive bariatric procedures have emerged as one of common causes of Wernicke encephalopathy (WE), an acute neuropsychiatric disorder due to thiamine deficiency. However, restrictive procedures such as sleeve gastrectomy (SG) are less prone to cause nutrient deficiencies. WE occurred after SG is an uncommon complication because the main absorptive sites for thiamine are intact after SG. Here, we report a case of WE after SG. With rapid increase in the use of SG for morbid obesity, this case deserves particular attention from clinicians.

  10. Higher plasma bilirubin predicts veno-occlusive disease in early childhood undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwi Suk; Moon, Aree; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young; Choi, Young Hee; Kim, Hyang Sook; Kim, Sang Geon

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the association between plasma bilirubin levels and veno-occlusive disease (VOD) in non-adult patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) during cyclosporine therapy. METHODS: A total of 123 patients taking cyclosporine were evaluated using an electronic medical system at the Seoul National University Children’s Hospital from the years 2004 through 2011. Patients were grouped by age and analyzed for incidence and type of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including VOD. RESULTS: The HSCT patients were divided into three age groups: G#1 ≥ 18; 9 ≤ G#2 ≤ 17; and G#3 ≤ 8 years of age). The majority of transplant donor types were cord blood transplantations. Most prevalent ADRs represented acute graft-vs-host disease (aGVHD) and VOD. Although the incidences of aGVHD did not vary among the groups, the higher frequency ratios of VOD in G#3 suggested that an age of 8 or younger is a risk factor for developing VOD in HSCT patients. After cyclosporine therapy, the trough plasma concentrations of cyclosporine were lower in G#3 than in G#1, indicative of its increased clearance. Moreover, in G#3 only, a maximal total bilirubin level (BILmax) of ≥ 1.4 mg/dL correlated with VOD incidence after cyclosporine therapy. CONCLUSION: HSCT patients 8 years of age or younger are more at risk for developing VOD, diagnosed as hyperbilirubinemia, tender hepatomegaly, and ascites/weight gain after cyclosporine therapy, which may be represented by a criterion of plasma BILmax being ≥ 1.4 mg/dL, suggestive of more sensitive VOD indication in this age group. PMID:27358786

  11. MR Imaging of nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chunjiu; Jin, Lirong; Fei, Guoqiang

    2005-10-01

    We investigated the correlation of MR imaging features with the pathological evolution and prognosis of nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy. A retrospective review and analysis was conducted of 6 cases of nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy, consisting of MR imaging features, clinical characteristics, and outcomes after thiamine administration. One patient died, 1 patient entered a persistent vegetative state, and the others recovered fully from Wernicke encephalopathy within 2 weeks to 1 year after thiamine administration. Typical MR imaging showed areas of increased T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signals symmetrically surrounding the aqueduct and the third ventricle, at the floor of fourth ventricle, in the medial thalami, and in the capita of caudate nuclei. Two patients presenting without coma showed increased T2-weighted and FLAIR signals of the periaqueductal area only. All 4 patients presenting with coma showed increased T2-weighted and FLAIR signals symmetrically in the medial thalami and in the capita of caudate nuclei. Of the 4 patients with coma, 2 patients with deep coma showed increased T2-weighted and FLAIR signals in the medial thalami and caudate nuclei as well as in the frontal and parietal cortices. According to the follow-up results, increased T2-weighted and FLAIR signals in the 4 patients without cortical damage decreased in intensity, consistent with clinical recovery within 2 weeks to 1 year. The patient in a persistent vegetative state exhibited progressive atrophy of the whole brain during the 2 years of the follow-up study. MR imaging is helpful not only to diagnose acute nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy but also to evaluate the pathologic evolution and prognosis of the disorder.

  12. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in alcoholic hepatitis: Hepatic encephalopathy a common theme.

    PubMed

    John, Elizabeth S; Sedhom, Ramy; Dalal, Ishita; Sharma, Ranita

    2017-01-14

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neuro-radiologic diagnosis that has become more widely recognized and reported over the past few decades. As such, there are a number of known risk factors that contribute to the development of this syndrome, including volatile blood pressures, renal failure, cytotoxic drugs, autoimmune disorders, pre-eclampsia, and eclampsia. This report documents the first reported case of PRES in a patient with severe alcoholic hepatitis with hepatic encephalopathy and delves into a molecular pathophysiology of the syndrome.

  13. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in alcoholic hepatitis: Hepatic encephalopathy a common theme

    PubMed Central

    John, Elizabeth S; Sedhom, Ramy; Dalal, Ishita; Sharma, Ranita

    2017-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neuro-radiologic diagnosis that has become more widely recognized and reported over the past few decades. As such, there are a number of known risk factors that contribute to the development of this syndrome, including volatile blood pressures, renal failure, cytotoxic drugs, autoimmune disorders, pre-eclampsia, and eclampsia. This report documents the first reported case of PRES in a patient with severe alcoholic hepatitis with hepatic encephalopathy and delves into a molecular pathophysiology of the syndrome. PMID:28127211

  14. Development of a System Model for Non-Invasive Quantification of Bilirubin in Jaundice Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alla, Suresh K.

    Neonatal jaundice is a medical condition which occurs in newborns as a result of an imbalance between the production and elimination of bilirubin. Excess bilirubin in the blood stream diffuses into the surrounding tissue leading to a yellowing of the skin. An optical system integrated with a signal processing system is used as a platform to noninvasively quantify bilirubin concentration through the measurement of diffuse skin reflectance. Initial studies have lead to the generation of a clinical analytical model for neonatal jaundice which generates spectral reflectance data for jaundiced skin with varying levels of bilirubin concentration in the tissue. The spectral database built using the clinical analytical model is then used as a test database to validate the signal processing system in real time. This evaluation forms the basis for understanding the translation of this research to human trials. The clinical analytical model and signal processing system have been successful validated on three spectral databases. First spectral database is constructed using a porcine model as a surrogate for neonatal skin tissue. Samples of pig skin were soaked in bilirubin solutions of varying concentrations to simulate jaundice skin conditions. The resulting skins samples were analyzed with our skin reflectance systems producing bilirubin concentration values that show a high correlation (R2 = 0.94) to concentration of the bilirubin solution that each porcine tissue sample is soaked in. The second spectral database is the spectral measurements collected on human volunteers to quantify the different chromophores and other physical properties of the tissue such a Hematocrit, Hemoglobin etc. The third spectral database is the spectral data collected at different time periods from the moment a bruise is induced.

  15. Serum total bilirubin levels and coronary heart disease--Causal association or epiphenomenon?

    PubMed

    Kunutsor, Setor K

    2015-12-01

    Observational epidemiological evidence supports a linear inverse and independent association between serum total bilirubin levels and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but whether this association is causal remains to be ascertained. A Mendelian randomization approach was employed to test whether serum total bilirubin is causally linked to CHD. The genetic variant rs6742078--well known to specifically modify levels of serum total bilirubin and accounting for up to 20% of the variance in circulating serum total bilirubin levels--was used as an instrumental variable. In pooled analysis of estimates reported from published genome-wide association studies, every copy of the T allele of rs6742078 was associated with 0.42 standard deviation (SD) higher levels of serum total bilirubin (95% confidence interval, 0.40 to 0.43). Based on combined data from the Coronary Artery Disease Genome wide Replication and Meta-analyses and the Coronary Artery Disease (C4D) Genetics Consortium involving a total of 36,763 CHD cases and 76,997 controls, the odds ratio for CHD per copy of the T allele was 1.01 (95% confidence interval, 0.99 to 1.04). The odds ratio of CHD for a 1 SD genetically elevated serum total bilirubin level was 1.03 (95% confidence interval, 0.98 to 1.09). The current findings casts doubt on a strong causal association of serum total bilirubin levels with CHD. The inverse associations demonstrated in observational studies may be driven by biases such as unmeasured confounding and/or reverse causation. However, further research in large-scale consortia is needed.

  16. Bilirubin modulated cytokines, growth factors and angiogenesis to improve cutaneous wound healing process in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ram, Mahendra; Singh, Vishakha; Kumawat, Sanjay; Kant, Vinay; Tandan, Surendra Kumar; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Bilirubin has shown cutaneous wound healing potential in some preliminary studies. Here we hypothesize that bilirubin facilitates wound healing in diabetic rats by modulating important healing factors/candidates and antioxidant parameters in a time-dependent manner. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by streptozotocin. In all diabetic rats wounds were created under pentobarbitone anesthesia. All the rats were divided into two groups, of which one (control) was treated with ointment base and other with bilirubin ointment (0.3%). Wound closer measurement and tissue collection were done on days 3, 7, 14 and 19 post-wounding. The relative expressions of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α), transforming growth factor- beta1 (TGF-β1()), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interlukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA and proteins and the mRNA of interlukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and matrix metalloprteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined in the wound tissues. CD-31 staining and collagen content were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and picrosirius red staining, respectively. Histopathological changes were assessed by H&E staining. The per cent wound closer was significantly higher from day 7 onwards in bilirubin-treated rats. HIF-1α, VEGF, SDF-1α, TGF-β1, IL-10 mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher on days 3, 7 and 14 in bilirubin-treated rats. The mRNA expression and protein level of TNF-α and the mRNA of IL-1β and MMP-9 were progressively and markedly reduced in bilirubin-treated rats. The collagen deposition and formation of blood vessels were greater in bilirubin-treated rats. Bilirubin markedly facilitated cutaneous wound healing in diabetic rats by modulating growth factors, cytokines, neovasculogenesis and collagen contents to the wound site. Topical application of bilirubin ointment might be of great use in cutaneous wound healing in diabetic patients.

  17. Amine-functionalized PVA-co-PE nanofibrous membrane as affinity membrane with high adsorption capacity for bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Zhifeng; Luo, Mengying; Wang, Yuedan; Liu, Qiongzhen; Chen, Yuanli; Li, Mufang; Wang, Dong

    2017-02-01

    In this study, poly(vinyl alcohol-co-ethylene) (PVA-co-PE) nanofibrous membrane was activated by sodium hydroxide and cyanuric chloride, and then the activated membranes were functionalized by 1,3-propanediamine, hexamethylenediamine and diethylenetriamine to be affinity membranes for bilirubin removal, respectively. The chemical structures and morphologies of membranes were investigated by SEM, FTIR and XPS. And the adsorption ability of different amine-functionalized nanofibrous membranes for bilirubin was characterized. Furthermore, the effects of temperature, initial concentration of bilirubin, NaCl concentration and BSA concentration on the adsorption capacity for bilirubin of diethylenetriamine-functionalized nanofibrous membrane were studied. Results indicated that the adsorption capacity for bilirubin of diethylenetriamine-functionalized nanofibrous membrane could reach 85mg/g membrane when the initial bilirubin concentration was 200mg/L while the adsorption capacity could be increased to 110mg/g membrane if the initial bilirubin concentration was more than 400mg/L. The dynamic adsorption of diethylenetriamine-functionalized nanofibrous membrane showed that the ligands of amine groups on the membrane surface could be used as far as possible by recirculating the plasma with certain flow rates. Therefore, the diethylenetriamine-functionalized PVA-co-PE nanofibrous membrane possessed high adsorption capacity for bilirubin and it can be candidate as affinity membrane for bilirubin removal.

  18. Bilirubin degradation in methanol induced by continuous UV-B irradiation: a UHPLC--ESI-MS study.

    PubMed

    Stanojević, J S; Zvezdanović, J B; Marković, D Z

    2015-04-01

    Degradation of bilirubin in aerobic methanol solution by continuous UV-B irradiation has been investigated in this work. The purpose of this study was to shed more light on bilirubin interaction with the UV-B component of natural sunlight, since bilirubin is a very efficient UV-B absorber located in the skin epidermis. The degradation products have been detected and studied by a combined method of Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-MS). Bilirubin, a toxic pigment which itself is a product of (hemoglobin) degradation in organisms, undergoes its own degradation under aerobic conditions of UV-B continuous irradiation (e.g. photooxidation) that can be partly self-sensitized. Two dipyrrolic structures have been identified as a result of the bilirubin degradation, not including the bilirubin derivative biliverdin whose increase in the irradiated system is synchronous with a time dynamics of bilirubin degradation. It appears that one of dipyrrolic products originates directly from bilirubin and biliverdin molecules, while the other one is probably connected to bilirubin self-sensitized degradation. The precursor role of biliverdin in the degradation process--related to the detected dipyrroles--has not been confirmed.

  19. Efficient voltammetric discrimination of free bilirubin from uric acid and ascorbic acid by a CVD nanographite-based microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Taurino, Irene; Van Hoof, Viviane; Magrez, Arnaud; Forró, László; De Micheli, Giovanni; Carrara, Sandro

    2014-12-01

    We report a novel electrochemical sensor based on nanographite grown on platinum microelectrodes for the determination of bilirubin in the presence of normal concentrations of albumin. The albumin is a protein with an intrinsic ability to bind the bilirubin therefore reducing the concentration of the free electroactive metabolite in human fluids. In addition, the proposed device permits the discrimination of free bilirubin from two interferents, uric acid and ascorbic acid, by the separation of their oxidation peaks in voltammetry. Preliminary measurements in human serum prove that the proposed nanostructured platform can be used to detect bilirubin.

  20. Continuous de novo biosynthesis of haem and its rapid turnover to bilirubin are necessary for cytoprotection against cell damage.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Taka-aki; Mu, Anfeng; Tai, Tran Tien; Kitajima, Sakihito; Taketani, Shigeru

    2015-05-20

    It is well known that haem serves as the prosthetic group of various haemoproteins that function in oxygen transport, respiratory chain, and drug metabolism. However, much less is known about the functions of the catabolites of haem in mammalian cells. Haem is enzymatically degraded to iron, carbon monoxide (CO), and biliverdin, which is then converted to bilirubin. Owing to difficulties in measuring bilirubin, however, the generation and transport of this end product remain unclear despite its clinical importance. Here, we used UnaG, the recently identified bilirubin-binding fluorescent protein, to analyse bilirubin production in a variety of human cell lines. We detected a significant amount of bilirubin with many non-blood cell types, which was sensitive to inhibitors of haem metabolism. These results suggest that there is a basal level of haem synthesis and its conversion into bilirubin. Remarkably, substantial changes were observed in the bilirubin generation when cells were exposed to stress insults. Since the stress-induced cell damage was exacerbated by the pharmacological blockade of haem metabolism but was ameliorated by the addition of biliverdin and bilirubin, it is likely that the de novo synthesis of haem and subsequent conversion to bilirubin play indispensable cytoprotective roles against cell damage.

  1. Evaluation of the zoonotic potential of transmissible mink encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful transmission of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy (TME) to cattle supports the bovine hypothesis to the still controversial origin of TME outbreaks. Human and primate susceptibility to classical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (c-BSE) and the transmissibility of L-type BSE to macaques as...

  2. Typical and atypical cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle, first detected in 1986 in the United Kingdom and subsequently in other countries. It is the most likely cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans, but the origin of BSE has not been eluci...

  3. Comparison of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy Isolates in Raccoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Owing to its susceptibility to various transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) and relatively short incubation times, the raccoon (Procyon lotor) has been suggested as a model for TSE strain differentiation. Transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) is a prion disease of undetermined origin in...

  4. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  5. An amperometric bilirubin biosensor based on a conductive poly-terthiophene-Mn(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Aminur; Lee, Kyung-Sun; Park, Deog-Su; Won, Mi-Sook; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2008-01-18

    An amperometric bilirubin biosensor was fabricated by complexing the Mn(II) ion with a conducting polymer and the final biosensor surface was coated with a thin polyethyleneimine (PEI) film containing an enzyme, ascorbate oxidase (AsOx). The complexation between poly-5,2'-5',2''-terthiophene-3-carboxylic acid (PolyTTCA) and Mn(II) through the formation of Mn-O bond was confirmed by XPS. The PolyTTCA-Mn(II) complex was also characterized using cyclic voltammetry. The PolyTTCA-Mn(II)/PEI-AsOx biosensor specifically detect bilirubin through the mediated electron transfer by the Mn(II) ion. To optimize the experimental condition, various experimental parameters such as pH, temperature, and applied potential were examined. A linear calibration plot for bilirubin was obtained between 0.1 microM and 50 microM with the detection limit of 40+/-3.8 nM. Interferences from other biological compounds, especially ascorbate and dopamine were efficiently minimized by coating the biosensor surface with PEI-AsOx. The bilirubin sensor exhibited good stability and fast response time (<5s). The applicability of this bilirubin sensor was tested in a human serum sample.

  6. Potential Cardiovascular Risk Protection of Bilirubin in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients under Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    do Sameiro-Faria, Maria; Kohlova, Michaela; Ribeiro, Sandra; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Teixeira, Laetitia; Nascimento, Henrique; Reis, Flávio; Miranda, Vasco; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Quintanilha, Alexandre; Belo, Luís; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential cardiovascular risk protection of bilirubin in hemodialysis (HD) patients. An enlarged set of studies were evaluated in 191 HD patients, including hematological study, lipid profile, iron metabolism, nutritional, inflammatory markers, and dialysis adequacy. The TA duplication screening in the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1 A1 (UGT1A1) promoter region was also performed. The UGT1A1 genotype frequencies in HD patients were 49.2%, 42.4%, and 8.4% for 6/6, 6/7, and 7/7 genotypes, respectively. Although no difference was found in UGT1A1 genotype distribution between the three tertiles of bilirubin, significant differences were found with increasing bilirubin levels, namely, a decrease in platelet, leukocyte, and lymphocyte counts, transferrin, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL), ox-LDL/low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, apolipoprotein (Apo) A, Apo B, and interleukin-6 serum levels and a significant increased concentration of hemoglobin, hematocrit, erythrocyte count, iron, transferrin saturation, Apo A/Apo B ratio, adiponectin, and paraoxonase 1 serum levels. After adjustment for age these results remained significant. Our data suggest that higher bilirubin levels are associated with beneficial effects in HD patients, by improving lipid profile and reducing the inflammatory grade, which might contribute to increase in iron availability. These results suggest a potential cardiovascular risk protection of bilirubin in HD patients. PMID:25276769

  7. The association between indirect bilirubin levels and liver fibrosis due to chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Mustafa; Yılmaz, Guldal; Ozenirler, Seren

    2014-08-01

    We proposed to evaluate the association between serum indirect bilirubin levels and liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) genotype 1b. Biopsy proven CHC genotype 1b patients' demographics, clinical and histopathological characteristics were evaluated. Logistic regression analysis was done to evaluate the clinical, laboratory and demographic features of the histologically proven liver fibrosis in CHC patients. A total of 112 biopsy proven CHC genotype 1b patients were enrolled into the study. Liver fibrosis scores were measured by using Ishak fibrosis scores and were divided into two groups; fibrosis scores ≤ 2 were categorized as mild fibrosis, 82 patients (73.2%), whereas fibrosis scores >2 were categorized as advanced fibrosis group, 30 patients (26.8%). Patients with advanced fibrosis had lower indirect bilirubin levels than the mild fibrosis group (0.28 ± 0.02 mg/dl vs. 0.44 ± 0.032 mg/dl, p<0.001, respectively). Indirect bilirubin level was negatively correlated with advanced fibrosis scores (r=-0.416 and p<0.001). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, low indirect bilirubin level was an independent predicting factor of advanced liver fibrosis (OR: 0.001, 95% CI: 0.0-0.005, p<0.001). There is an inverse relationship between indirect bilirubin levels and advanced liver fibrosis caused by CHC genotype 1b.

  8. Bilirubin production in healthy term infants as measured by carbon monoxide in breath.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D K; Vreman, H J; Oh, W; Fanaroff, A A; Wright, L L; Lemons, J A; Verter, J; Shankaran, S; Tyson, J E; Korones, S B

    1994-10-01

    To describe total bilirubin production in healthy term infants, we measured the end-tidal breath CO, corrected for ambient CO (ETCOc), with an automated sampler and electrochemical (EC) CO instrument. For infants of mothers with a negative Coombs' test, the ETCOc was 1.3 +/- 0.7 microL/L (n = 397) and the serum bilirubin on day 3 postpartum was 73 +/- 35 mg/L (n = 381). In contrast, the ETCOc for infants with ABO or Rh incompatibility, a positive direct Coombs' test, and bilirubin > 130 mg/L (n = 9) was significantly higher, 1.8 +/- 0.8 microL/L, than for those who had a positive Coombs' test result but whose bilirubin was < or = 130 mg/L (n = 12), 1.0 +/- 0.5 microL/L (P < 0.05). At 2 to 8 h postpartum seven term babies from mothers with insulin-dependent diabetes had ETCOc of 1.8 +/- 0.7 microL/L, significantly higher than that in the other term infants [1.3 +/- 0.7 microL/L (n = 390), P < 0.04]. Their bilirubin concentration at 72 +/- 12 h was also higher: 121 +/- 45 mg/L (n = 7) vs 73 +/- 34 mg/L (n = 374; P = 0.03). We conclude that ETCOc measurements may be helpful in understanding the mechanisms of jaundice in healthy term infants in a variety of conditions.

  9. Evaluation of region selective bilirubin-induced brain damage as a basis for a pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dal Ben, Matteo; Bottin, Cristina; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Tiribelli, Claudio; Gazzin, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    The neurologic manifestations of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in the central nervous system (CNS) exhibit high variations in the severity and appearance of motor, auditory and cognitive symptoms, which is suggestive of a still unexplained selective topography of bilirubin-induced damage. By applying the organotypic brain culture (OBC: preserving in vitro the cellular complexity, connection and architecture of the in vivo brain) technique to study hyperbilirubinemia, we mapped the regional target of bilirubin-induced damage, demonstrated a multifactorial toxic action of bilirubin, and used this information to evaluate the efficacy of drugs applicable to newborns to protect the brain. OBCs from 8-day-old rat pups showed a 2–13 fold higher sensitivity to bilirubin damage than 2-day-old preparations. The hippocampus, inferior colliculus and cerebral cortex were the only brain regions affected, presenting a mixed inflammatory-oxidative mechanism. Glutamate excitotoxicity was appreciable in only the hippocampus and inferior colliculus. Single drug treatment (indomethacin, curcumin, MgCl2) significantly improved cell viability in all regions, while the combined (cocktail) administration of the three drugs almost completely prevented damage in the most affected area (hippocampus). Our data may supports an innovative (complementary to phototherapy) approach for directly protecting the newborn brain from bilirubin neurotoxicity. PMID:28102362

  10. Imaging in sepsis-associated encephalopathy--insights and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Daniel J; Yamamoto, Adam K; Menon, David K

    2013-10-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) refers to a clinical spectrum of acute neurological dysfunction that arises in the context of sepsis. Although the pathophysiology of SAE is incompletely understood, it is thought to involve endothelial activation, blood-brain barrier leakage, inflammatory cell migration, and neuronal loss with neurotransmitter imbalance. SAE is associated with a high risk of mortality. Imaging studies using MRI and CT have demonstrated changes in the brains of patients with SAE that are also seen in disorders such as stroke. Next-generation imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging and PET, as well as experimental imaging modalities, provide options for early identification of patients with SAE, and could aid in identification of pathophysiological processes that represent possible therapeutic targets. In this Review, we explore the recent literature on imaging in SAE, relating the findings of these studies to pathological data and experimental studies to obtain insights into the pathophysiology of sepsis-associated neurological dysfunction. Furthermore, we suggest how novel imaging technologies can be used for early-stage proof-of-concept and proof-of-mechanism translational studies, which may help to improve diagnosis in SAE.

  11. Modeling Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Way Forward for Future Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Ryan C.; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Logsdon, Aric F.; Robson, Matthew J.; Lee, John M.; Bailes, Julian E.; Dashnaw, Matthew L.; Huber, Jason D.; Petraglia, Anthony L.; Rosen, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the extensive media coverage associated with the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), our fundamental understanding of the disease pathophysiology remains in its infancy. Only recently have scientific laboratories and personnel begun to explore CTE pathophysiology through the use of preclinical models of neurotrauma. Some studies have shown the ability to recapitulate some aspects of CTE in rodent models, through the use of various neuropathological, biochemical, and/or behavioral assays. Many questions related to CTE development, however, remain unanswered. These include the role of impact severity, the time interval between impacts, the age at which impacts occur, and the total number of impacts sustained. Other important variables such as the location of impacts, character of impacts, and effect of environment/lifestyle and genetics also warrant further study. In this work, we attempt to address some of these questions by exploring work previously completed using single- and repetitive-injury paradigms. Despite some models producing some deficits similar to CTE symptoms, it is clear that further studies are required to understand the development of neuropathological and neurobehavioral features consistent with CTE-like features in rodents. Specifically, acute and chronic studies are needed that characterize the development of tau-based pathology. PMID:26579067

  12. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: A rare cause of recurrent encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Raashda Ainuddin; Shaheen, Marwan Yassin; Al-Zaidan, Hamad; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair; Al-Sayed, Moeenaldeen; Rahbeeni, Zuhair; Bakshi, Nasir Ahmed; Kaya, Namik; Aldosary, Mazhor; Al-Owain, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Summary We report an unusual case of recurrent encephalopathy due to acquired hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in a patient with propionic acidemia (PA). PA is an inherited metabolic disorder in which patients often present with encephalopathy and pancytopenia during metabolic decompensation. However, these patients may rarely develop HLH with similar presentation. This case illustrates the need to distinguish HLH induced encephalopathy from the one secondary to metabolic decompensation in these patients, as early diagnosis and treatment of HLH improves prognosis. This case also highlights the importance of considering HLH in patients presenting with unexplained encephalopathy, as early diagnosis and treatment is lifesaving in this otherwise lethal condition. To our knowledge this is the first case report of acquired HLH presenting as recurrent encephalopathy followed by complete recovery, in a metabolically stable patient with PA. PMID:27672548

  13. Clinical and imaging correlates of EEG patterns in hospitalized patients with encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Raoul; Stevens, Robert D; Kaplan, Peter W

    2013-04-01

    To identify the relationship between pathologic electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns, clinical and neuroradiological abnormalities, and outcome in hospitalized patients with acute encephalopathy. This 5-year cohort study was performed at an academic tertiary care center. EEGs in 154 patients with altered mental status were classified according to five predefined patterns: Isolated continuous slowing of background activity (theta, theta/delta, and delta activity) and patterns with slowing background activity with episodic transients [i.e., triphasic waves (TWs) or frontal intermittent delta activity (FIRDA)]. Clinical characteristics, blood tests and neuroimaging were compared among groups. Associations between EEG patterns and structural and non-structural abnormalities were calculated. Glasgow Outcome Score >3 at discharge was defined as favorable and 1-3 as unfavorable outcome. In multivariable analyses, theta was associated with brain atrophy (OR 2.6, p = 0.020), theta/delta with intracerebral hemorrhages (OR 6.8, p = 0.005), FIRDA with past cerebrovascular accidents (OR 2.7, p = 0.004), TWs with liver or multi-organ failure (OR 6, p = 0.004; OR 4, p = 0.039), and delta activity with alcohol/drug abuse with or without intoxication, and HIV infection (OR 3.8, p = 0.003; OR 9, p = 0.004). TWs were associated with death (OR 4.5, p = 0.005); theta/delta with unfavorable outcomes (OR 2.5, p = 0.033), while patients with FIRDA had favorable outcomes (OR 4.8, p = 0.004). In encephalopathic patients, well-defined EEG patterns are associated with specific pathological conditions and outcomes, suggesting that mechanistic hypotheses underlie these abnormal EEG patterns. To clarify the respective contributions of non-structural and structural abnormalities to encephalopathy reflected in specific EEG patterns, prospective studies using continuous EEG monitoring during the acute onset of encephalopathy are needed.

  14. Three-dimensional brain metabolic imaging in patients with toxic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Callender, T.J.; Duhon, D.; Ristovv, M. ); Morrow, L. ); Subramanian, K. )

    1993-02-01

    Thirty-three workers, ages 24 to 63, developed clinical toxic encephalopathy after exposure to neurotoxins and were studied by SPECT brain scans. Five were exposed to pesticides, 13 were acutely exposed to mixtures of solvents, 8 were chronically exposed to mixtures of hazardous wastes that contained organic solvents, 2 were acutely exposed to phosgene and other toxins, and 5 had exposures to hydrogen sulfide. Twenty-nine had neuropsychological testing and all had a medical history and physical. Of the workers who had a clinical diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy, 31 (93.9%) had abnormal SPECT brain scans with the most frequent areas of abnormality being temporal lobes (67.7%), frontal lobes (61.3%), basal ganglia (45.2%), thalamus (29.0%), parietal lobes (12.9%), motorstrip (9.68%), cerebral hemisphere (6.45%), occipital lobes (3.23%), and caudate nucleus (3.23%). Twenty-three out of 29 (79.3%) neuropsychological evaluations were abnormal. Other modalities when performed included the following percentages of abnormals: NCV, 33.3%; CPT sensory nerve testing, 91.3%, vestibular function testing, 71.4%; olfactory testing, 89.2%; sleep EEG analysis, 85.7%; EEG, 8.33%; CT, 7.14%; and MRI brain scans, 28.6%. The complex of symptoms seen in toxic encephalopathy implies dysfunction involving several CNS regions. This series of patients adds to the previous experience of brain metabolic imaging and demonstrates that certain areas of the brain are typically affected despite differences in toxin structure, that these lesions can be globally defined by SPECT/PET brain scans, that these lesions correlate well with clinical and neuropsychological testing, and that such testing is a useful adjunct to previous methods. EEG and structural brain imaging such as CT and MRI are observed to have poor sensitivity in this type of patient. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  15. Clinical Characteristics of Transplant-associated Encephalopathy in Children

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to analyze characteristics of encephalopathy after both hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ pediatric transplantation. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 662 pediatric transplant recipients (201 with liver transplantation [LT], 55 with heart transplantation [HT], and 67 with kidney transplantation [KT], 339 with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation [HSCT]) who received their graft organs at Asan Medical Center between January 2000 and July 2014. Of the 662 patients, 50 (7.6%) experienced encephalopathy after transplantation. The incidence of encephalopathy was significantly different according to the type of organ transplant: LT, 16/201 (8.0%), HT, 13/55 (23.6%), KT, 5/67 (7.5%), and HSCT, 16/339 (4.7%) (P < 0.001). Drug-induced encephalopathy (n = 14) was the most common encephalopathy for all transplant types, but particularly after HSCT. Hypertensive encephalopathy was the most common after KT and HT, whereas metabolic encephalopathy was the most common after LT. The median time to encephalopathy onset also differed according to the transplant type: 5 days after KT (range 0–491 days), 10 days after HT (1–296 days), 49.5 days after HSCT (9–1,405 days), and 39 days after LT (1–1,092 days) (P = 0.018). The mortality rate among patients with encephalopathy was 42.0% (n = 21/50). Only 5 patients died of neurologic complications. Transplant-associated encephalopathy presented different characteristics according to the type of transplant. Specialized diagnostic approach for neurologic complications specific to the type of transplant may improve survival and quality of life in children after transplantation. PMID:28145649

  16. Ifosfamide associated myoclonus-encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Savica, Rodolfo; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Josephs, Keith A

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of movement disorders associated with ifosfamide toxicity. One of the most common adverse events of ifosfamide treatment is central nervous system toxicity. However, little is known about the occurrence of movement disorders associated with ifosfamide toxicity. We performed a retrospective computer search of the electronic medical records database of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN from 1 January 1997-30 June 2010, using a series of search terms to identify all patients that had been treated with ifosfamide for systemic cancer. Among 400 patients that have ever used ifosfamide, we selected those patients that had any neurological complication in their medical records after the use of ifosfamide. Fifty-two had a neurological complication after ifosfamide administration. The most common neurological complication was encephalopathy that was present in 11 cases (21%). The presence of a movement disorder time locked to the administration of ifosfamide was reported in seven cases (13%). Generalized myoclonus was most common, occurring in four patients while postural tremor was documented in the other three. All patients with myoclonus had asterixis. Four of the patients also had encephalopathy. In six patients the movement disorders resolved within 48 h, spontaneously, after the discontinuation of ifosfamide, while in one case resolved in 24 h after the treatment with methylene blue. Our study demonstrates that although encephalopathy is the most common adverse neurological event associated with ifosfamide toxicity, movement disorders, including generalized myoclonus, asterixis, and postural tremors may also occur. Treatment with methylene blue may be further considered as useful to ameliorate the movement disorders.

  17. Reversible cortical blindness: posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Mondal, Kanchan Kumar; Das, Somnath; Gupta, Anindya; Biswas, Jaya; Bhattacharyya, Subir Kumar; Biswas, Gautam

    2010-11-01

    Cortical blindness is defined as visual failure with preserved pupillary reflexes in structurally intact eyes due to bilateral lesions affecting occipital cortex. Bilateral oedema and infarction of the posterior and middle cerebral arterial territory, trauma, glioma and meningioma of the occipital cortex are the main causes of cortical blindness. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) refers to the reversible subtype of cortical blindness and is usually associated with hypertension, diabetes, immunosuppression, puerperium with or without eclampsia. Here, 3 cases of PRES with complete or partial visual recovery following treatment in 6-month follow-up are reported.

  18. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the availability cascade.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen

    2014-09-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in sports has been known for > 85 years, and has experienced a resurgence of interest over the past decade, both in the media and in the scientific community. However, there appears to be a disconnection between the public's perception of CTE and the currently available scientific data. The cognitive bias known as the "availability cascade" has been suggested as a reason to explain this rift in knowledge. This review summarizes and updates the history of CTE in sports, discusses recent epidemiological and autopsy studies, summarizes the evidence base related to CTE in sports, and offers recommendations for future directions.

  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy and Sleepiness: An Interesting Connection?

    PubMed Central

    Montagnese, Sara; Turco, Matteo; Amodio, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Sleep-wake abnormalities in patients with cirrhosis have been traditionally associated with hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In recent years, a certain amount of work has been devoted to the study of this relationship. This has lead to a modified picture, with weakening of the association between HE and poor night sleep, and the emergence of stronger links between HE and excessive daytime sleepiness. This brief review focuses on the evidence in favor of the interpretation of HE as a sleepiness syndrome, and on the diagnostic, therapeutic and social implications of such an interpretation. PMID:26041958

  20. Hashimoto's encephalopathy mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Angela C; Baehring, Joachim M

    2017-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a rare, imprecisely defined autoimmune neurologic syndrome associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis that normally responds to corticosteroids. Here, we describe the case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with subacute cognitive decline and ataxia. Neoplastic, paraneoplastic, infectious, and metabolic etiologies were ruled out. Anti-TPO antibody level was markedly elevated at 966U/mL. After one month of 60mg/day of oral prednisone, she felt back to baseline and her Montreal Cognitive Assessment dramatically improved. Physicians should strongly consider this uncommon diagnosis in patients with rapid cognitive decline and no other clear etiology.

  1. Repetitive Head Impacts and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Alosco, Michael L; Huber, Bertrand R

    2016-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a distinctive neurodegenerative disease that occurs as a result of repetitive head impacts. CTE can only be diagnosed by postmortem neuropathologic examination of brain tissue. CTE is a unique disorder with a pathognomonic lesion that can be reliably distinguished from other neurodegenerative diseases. CTE is associated with violent behaviors, explosivity, loss of control, depression, suicide, memory loss and cognitive changes. There is increasing evidence that CTE affects amateur athletes as well as professional athletes and military veterans. CTE has become a major public health concern.

  2. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome secondary to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Karanbir; Gupta, Rajesh; Kamal, Haris; Silvestri, Nicholas J; Wolfe, Gil I

    2015-03-01

    The appearance of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) after blood transfusion is rare and has only been reported in three patients to our knowledge. We report a fourth patient with PRES secondary to blood transfusion. A 36-year-old woman with a history of menorrhagia presented to the emergency department with severe fatigue. She had a hemoglobin of 1.7 g/dl and received four units of red blood cells over 15 hours. On day 6 post-transfusion she returned with confusion, headache and a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. The MRI of her brain was consistent with PRES. The following day her confusion worsened, repeat MRI of the brain showed new T2-weighted lesions. Over next 10 days her mental status gradually improved close to her baseline. A repeat MRI of the brain showed resolution of the T2-weighted lesions. The clinical presentation, radiological findings and disease progression in our patient was consistent with PRES. Other than the blood transfusions, there were no apparent risk factors for PRES. The prior three patients with post-transfusion PRES have been reported in middle-aged women with uterine fibroids. It is suspected that these patients have a subacute to chronic anemic state due to ongoing menorrhagia. It is interesting to note that no cases of PRES post-transfusion have been reported in the setting of acute blood loss, such as from trauma. It is postulated that an abrupt increase in hemoglobin causes a rapid rise in blood viscosity and loss of hypoxic vasodilation. Subsequent endothelial damage and brain capillary leakage results in PRES. This constellation of changes may not occur after transfusion in patients with more acute blood loss.

  3. Conical intersection in a bilirubin model A possible pathway for phototherapy of neonatal jaundice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zietz, Burkhard; Blomgren, Fredrik

    2006-03-01

    Phototherapy of neonatal jaundice involves Z- E-isomerisation around an exocyclic double bond in bilirubin. Our results of a CASSCF study on dipyrrinone, a bilirubin model, show a conical intersection between the ground and first excited singlet states associated with the Z- E-isomerisation. The conical intersection, located ca. 50 kJ/mol below the Franck-Condon-point, together with the S 1 minimum, ca. 50 kJ/mol below the conical intersection, are able to explain the available time-resolved spectroscopic data (the very short lifetime of the initially excited state and transient 'dark state' intermediate) as well as bilirubin's very low fluorescence quantum yield and the medium-efficient photoisomerisation reaction.

  4. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome--Insight into pathogenesis, clinical variants and treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Granata, Guido; Greco, Antonio; Iannella, Giannicola; Granata, Massimo; Manno, Alessandra; Savastano, Ersilia; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a rare clinicoradiological entity characterized by typical MRI findings located in the occipital and parietal lobes, caused by subcortical vasogenic edema. It was first described as a distinctive syndrome by Hinchey in 1996. Etiopathogenesis is not clear, although it is known that it is an endotheliopathy of the posterior cerebral vasculature leading to failed cerebral autoregulation, posterior edema and encephalopathy. A possible pathological activation of the immune system has been recently hypothesized in its pathogenesis. At clinical onset, the most common manifestations are seizures, headache and visual changes. Besides, tinnitus and acute vertigo have been frequently reported. Symptoms can be reversible but cerebral hemorrhage or ischemia may occur. Diagnosis is based on magnetic resonance imaging, in the presence of acute development of clinical neurologic symptoms and signs and arterial hypertension and/or toxic associated conditions with possible endotheliotoxic effects. Mainstay on the treatment is removal of the underlying cause. Further investigation and developments in endothelial cell function and in neuroimaging of cerebral blood flow are needed and will help to increase our understanding of pathophysiology, possibly suggesting novel therapies.

  5. Acute Pancreatitis, Hepatitis and Bone Erosion in Acute Yellow Phosphorous Compound Poisoning – A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    Kamarthi, Prabhakar; Gopu, Arun Vardharaju; Prasad, Reddy; Srinivasa, Chandrakala

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of acute pancreatitis and hepatitis following ingestion of yellow phosphorous. The condition of the patient progressed to encephalopathy and bony erosion of the nasal septum. Fungal mass was observed in both the nasal cavities by endoscopy. Microbiological investigation revealed the identity of the fungus as Aspergillus flavus and Candida tropicalis. Patient improved with fluconazole treatment. PMID:27504287

  6. Analysis of wavelength-dependent photoisomerization quantum yields in bilirubins by fitting two exciton absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoni, M.; Agati, G.; Troup, G. J.; Pratesi, R.

    2003-09-01

    The absorption spectra of bilirubins were deconvoluted by two Gaussian curves of equal width representing the exciton bands of the non-degenerate molecular system. The two bands were used to study the wavelength dependence of the (4Z, 15Z) rightarrow (4Z, 15E) configurational photoisomerization quantum yield of the bichromophoric bilirubin-IXalpha (BR-IX), the intrinsically asymmetric bile pigment associated with jaundice and the symmetrically substituted bilirubins (bilirubin-IIIalpha and mesobilirubin-XIIIalpha), when they are irradiated in aqueous solution bound to human serum albumin (HSA). The same study was performed for BR-IX in ammoniacal methanol solution (NH4OH/MeOH). The quantum yields of the configurational photoprocesses were fitted with a combination function of the two Gaussian bands normalized to the total absorption, using the proportionality coefficients and a scaling factor as parameters. The decrease of the (4Z, 15Z) rightarrow (4Z, 15E) quantum yield with increasing wavelength, which occurs for wavelengths longer than the most probable Franck-Condon transition of the molecule, did not result in a unique function of the exciton absorptions. In particular we found two ranges corresponding to different exciton interactions with different proportionality coefficients and scaling factors. The wavelength-dependent photoisomerization of bilirubins was described as an abrupt change in quantum yield as soon as the resulting excitation was strongly localized in each chromophore. The change was correlated to a variation of the interaction between the two chromophores when the short-wavelength exciton absorption became vanishingly small. With the help of the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of BR-IX in HSA, a small band was resolved in the bilirubin absorption spectrum, delivering part of the energy required for the (4Z, 15Z) rightarrow (4Z, 15E) photoisomerization of the molecule.

  7. Sensitizing effect of Z,Z-bilirubin IXα and its photoproducts on enzymes in model solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavskii, V. Yu.; Mostovnikov, V. A.; Tret'yakova, A. I.; Mostovnikova, G. R.

    2008-05-01

    In model systems, we have studied side effects which may be induced by light during phototherapy of hyperbilirubinemia (jaundice) in newborn infants, with the aim of reducing the Z,Z-bilirubin IXα (Z,Z-BR IXα) level. We have shown that the sensitizing effect of Z,Z-BR IXα, localized at strong binding sites of the human serum albumin (HSA) macromolecule, is primarily directed at the amino acid residues of the carrier protein and does not involve the molecules of the enzyme (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)) present in the buffer solution. The detected photodynamic damage to LDH is due to sensitization by bilirubin photoisomers, characterized by lower HSA association constants and located (in contrast to native Z,Z-BR IXα) on the surface of the HSA protein globule. Based on study of the spectral characteristics of the photoproducts of Z,Z-BR IXα and comparison of their accumulation kinetics in solution and the enzyme photo-inactivation kinetics, we concluded that the determining role in sensitized damage to LDH is played by lumirubin. The photosensitization effect depends on the wavelength of the radiation used for photoconversion of bilirubin. When (at the beginning of exposure) we make sure that identical numbers of photons are absorbed by the pigment in the different spectral ranges, the side effect is minimal for radiation corresponding to the long-wavelength edge of the bilirubin absorption band. We have shown that for a bilirubin/HSA concentration ratio >2 (when some of the pigment molecules are sorbed on the surface of the protein globule), the bilirubin can act as a photosensitizing agent for the enzyme present in solution. We discuss methods for reducing unfavorable side effects of light on the body of newborn infants during phototherapy of hyperbilirubinemia.

  8. Protein-encapsulated bilirubin: paving the way to a useful probe for singlet oxygen.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Frederico M; Jensen, Jan K; Etzerodt, Michael; Ogilby, Peter R

    2015-04-01

    When dissolved in a bulk solvent, bilirubin efficiently removes singlet molecular oxygen, O2(a(1)Δg), through a combination of chemical reactions and by promoting the O2(a(1)Δg)→O2(X(3)Σg(-)) nonradiative transition to populate the ground state of oxygen. To elucidate how such processes can be exploited in the development of a biologically useful fluorescent probe for O2(a(1)Δg), pertinent photophysical and photochemical parameters of bilirubin encapsulated in a protein were determined. The motivation for studying a protein-encapsulated system reflects the ultimate desire to (a) use genetic engineering to localize the probe at a specific location in a living cell, and (b) provide a controlled environment around the chromophore/fluorophore. Surprisingly, explicit values of oxygen- and O2(a(1)Δg)-dependent parameters that characterize the behavior of a given chromophore/fluorophore encased in a protein are not generally available. To the end of quantifying the effects of such an encasing protein, a recently discovered bilirubin-binding protein isolated from a Japanese eel was used. The data show that this system indeed preferentially responds to O2(a(1)Δg) and not to the superoxide ion. However, this protein not only shields bilirubin such that the rate constants for interaction with O2(a(1)Δg) decrease relative to what is observed in a bulk solvent, but the fraction of the total O2(a(1)Δg)-bilirubin interaction that results in a chemical reaction between O2(a(1)Δg) and bilirubin also decreases appreciably. The rate constants thus obtained provide a useful starting point for the general design and development of reactive protein-encased fluorescent probes for O2(a(1)Δg).

  9. Spectral fluorescence and polarization characteristics of Z,Z-bilirubin IXα

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavskii, V. Yu.; Mostovnikov, V. A.; Mostovnikova, G. R.; Tret'yakova, A. I.

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the spectral fluorescence and polarization characteristics of Z,Z-bilirubin IXα, at room temperature in chloroform and in aqueous buffer medium, within an equilibrium complex with human serum albumin (HSA), and also under low temperature conditions (T = -100°C) in isobutyl alcohol. We have observed a bathochromic shift of the fluorescence spectra, which is most pronounced for the bilirubin-albumin complex. The following are considered as possible reasons for the observed dependence of the position of the fluorescence (fluorescence excitation) spectra on the excitation (detection) wavelength: structural and spectral differences between the chromophores making up the bilirubin molecule; conformational heterogeneity of the pigment in solution; a contribution to the fluorescence from molecules which have not completed the vibrational relaxation process; inhomogeneous orientational broadening of the levels; heterogeneity of the microenvironment of the chromophores in the protein matrix. We show that polarized fluorescence of bilirubin occurs at room temperature, due to the anomalously short fluorescence lifetime τ (picosecond or subpicosecond ranges). Despite such a short τ, the absorption and emission polarization spectra suggest the presence of intramolecular nonradiative singlet-singlet energy transfer when bilirubin is excited to high vibrational sublevels of the S1 state (degree of polarization p = 0.11-0.12). When fluorescence is excited on the long-wavelength slope of the absorption band, no transfer occurs: the degree of polarization (p = 0.46-0.47) is close to the limiting value (p = 0.50). We discuss the question of the role played by exciton interactions between chromophores in the bilirubin molecule when it is excited.

  10. Age-dependent pattern of cerebellar susceptibility to bilirubin neurotoxicity in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, Giulia; Baj, Gabriele; Vodret, Simone; Viviani, Giulia; Bittolo, Tamara; Muro, Andrés F

    2014-09-01

    Neonatal jaundice is caused by high levels of unconjugated bilirubin. It is usually a temporary condition caused by delayed induction of UGT1A1, which conjugates bilirubin in the liver. To reduce bilirubin levels, affected babies are exposed to phototherapy (PT), which converts toxic bilirubin into water-soluble photoisomers that are readily excreted out. However, in some cases uncontrolled hyperbilirubinemia leads to neurotoxicity. To study the mechanisms of bilirubin-induced neurological damage (BIND) in vivo, we generated a mouse model lacking the Ugt1a1 protein and, consequently, mutant mice developed jaundice as early as 36 hours after birth. The mutation was transferred into two genetic backgrounds (C57BL/6 and FVB/NJ). We exposed mutant mice to PT for different periods and analyzed the resulting phenotypes from the molecular, histological and behavioral points of view. Severity of BIND was associated with genetic background, with 50% survival of C57BL/6‑Ugt1(-/-) mutant mice at postnatal day 5 (P5), and of FVB/NJ-Ugt1(-/-) mice at P11. Life-long exposure to PT prevented cerebellar architecture alterations and rescued neuronal damage in FVB/NJ-Ugt1(-/-) but not in C57BL/6-Ugt1(-/-) mice. Survival of FVB/NJ-Ugt1(-/-) mice was directly related to the extent of PT treatment. PT treatment of FVB/NJ-Ugt1(-/-) mice from P0 to P8 did not prevent bilirubin-induced reduction in dendritic arborization and spine density of Purkinje cells. Moreover, PT treatment from P8 to P20 did not rescue BIND accumulated up to P8. However, PT treatment administered in the time-window P0-P15 was sufficient to obtain full rescue of cerebellar damage and motor impairment in FVB/NJ-Ugt1(-/-) mice. The possibility to modulate the severity of the phenotype by PT makes FVB/NJ-Ugt1(-/-) mice an excellent and versatile model to study bilirubin neurotoxicity, the role of modifier genes, alternative therapies and cerebellar development during high bilirubin conditions.

  11. Regression approach to non-invasive determination of bilirubin in neonatal blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.

    2012-07-01

    A statistical ensemble of structural and biophysical parameters of neonatal skin was modeled based on experimental data. Diffuse scattering coefficients of the skin in the visible and infrared regions were calculated by applying a Monte-Carlo method to each realization of the ensemble. The potential accuracy of recovering the bilirubin concentration in dermis (which correlates closely with that in blood) was estimated from spatially resolved spectrometric measurements of diffuse scattering. The possibility to determine noninvasively the bilirubin concentration was shown by measurements of diffuse scattering at λ = 460, 500, and 660 nm at three source-detector separations under conditions of total variability of the skin biophysical parameters.

  12. [Diagnostic significance of electrocortical responses to rhythmic and solitary photic stimuli in patients with hepato-portal encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Erokhina, L G; Ershov, Iu A; Puchinskaia, L M; Gubskiĭ, L V; Lisina, G I

    1976-01-01

    In order to clarify some diagnostical criteria of latent hepato-portal encephalopathy in 57 patients with intrahepatic forms of portal hypertension the authors studied the character of driving response in photorhythmical stimulation. In 9 patients the development of evoked potentials depending upon the significance of the stimula was studied as well. The studies confirmed the prognostical significance of a slowing down the mean frequency of rhythms in the EEG in relation to the development of acute encephalopathy and a certain tendency to the shift in the spectrum of driving responses to low frequency and a worsening of driving responses in slowing down the medium rhythm frequency of EEG. In patients with changed resting activity in the Background EEG there was a drop in the amplitude of late components of evoked potentials.

  13. Neuronal cell death in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Roger F

    2007-12-01

    It is generally assumed that neuronal cell death is minimal in liver failure and is insufficient to account for the neuropsychiatric symptoms characteristic of hepatic encephalopathy. However, contrary to this assumption, neuronal cell damage and death are well documented in liver failure patients, taking the form of several distinct clinical entities namely acquired (non-Wilsonian) hepatocerebral degeneration, cirrhosis-related Parkinsonism, post-shunt myelopathy and cerebellar degeneration. In addition, there is evidence to suggest that liver failure contributes to the severity of neuronal loss in Wernicke's encephalopathy. The long-standing nature of the thalamic and cerebellar lesions, over 80% of which are missed by routine clinical evaluation, together with the probability that they are nutritional in origin, underscores the need for careful nutritional management (adequate dietary protein, Vitamin B(1)) in liver failure patients. Mechanisms identified with the potential to cause neuronal cell death in liver failure include NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity, lactic acidosis, oxidative/nitrosative stress and the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The extent of neuronal damage in liver failure may be attenuated by compensatory mechanisms that include down-regulation of NMDA receptors, hypothermia and the presence of neuroprotective steroids such as allopregnanolone. These findings suggest that some of the purported "sequelae" of liver transplantation (gait ataxia, memory loss, confusion) could reflect preexisting neuropathology.

  14. Wernicke encephalopathy in a patient with liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling; Wei, Zhenman; Chen, Jing; Yan, Lilong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early recognition and diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy is pivotal for the prognosis of this medical emergency, especially in patients with liver failure which predisposes individuals to develop hepatic encephalopathy. For these patients, distinguishing between hepatic encephalopathy and Wernicke encephalopathy is a challenge in real-world clinical practice. A male patient with 21-year medical history of liver cirrhosis presented diarrhea and ascites. One month before this visit, he was noted to have poor appetite and progressive fatigue. After admission, although several major symptoms, including diarrhea, ascites, hyponatremia, and hypoproteinemia, were greatly improved through appropriate treatments, his laboratory indicators were not changed much. His appetite was not reversed at discharge. On the 5th day after discharge, the patient suddenly became reluctant to speak and did not remember the recent happenings. Simultaneously, unsteady gait and strabismus occurred. On the basis of clinical manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging scan results, the patient was diagnosed as Wernicke encephalopathy and these relative symptoms were resolved after intravenous vitamin B1. To our knowledge, this is the second case report of Wernicke encephalopathy developing in a critically ill cirrhotic patient without hepatocellular carcinoma or operative intervention. Wernicke encephalopathy may be underdiagnosed in these patients and this case raises physicians’ awareness of its possible onset. PMID:27399058

  15. [Clinical importance and diagnostic methods of minimal hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Stawicka, Agnieszka; Zbrzeźniak, Justyna; Świderska, Aleksandra; Kilisińska, Natalia; Świderska, Magdalena; Jaroszewicz, Jerzy; Flisiak, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) encompasses a number of neuropsychological and neurophysiological disorders in patients suffering from liver cirrhosis, who do not display abnormalities during a medical interview or physical examination. A negative influence of MHE on the quality of life of patients suffering from liver cirrhosis was confirmed, which include retardation of ability of operating motor vehicles and disruption of multiple health-related areas, as well as functioning in the society. The data on frequency of traffic offences and accidents amongst patients diagnosed with MHE in comparison to patients diagnosed with liver cirrhosis without MHE, as well as healthy persons is alarming. Those patients are unaware of their disorder and retardation of their ability to operate vehicles, therefore it is of utmost importance to define this group. The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (formerly "subclinical" encephalopathy) erroneously suggested the unnecessity of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with liver cirrhosis. Diagnosing MHE is an important predictive factor for occurrence of overt encephalopathy - more than 50% of patients with this diagnosis develop overt encephalopathy during a period of 30 months after. Early diagnosing MHE gives a chance to implement proper treatment which can be a prevention of overt encephalopathy. Due to continuing lack of clinical research there exist no commonly agreed-upon standards for definition, diagnostics, classification and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. This article introduces the newest findings regarding the importance of MHE, scientific recommendations and provides detailed descriptions of the most valuable diagnostic methods.

  16. Harnessing gene expression networks to prioritize candidate epileptic encephalopathy genes.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Karen L; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets.

  17. The role of methanethiol in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Blom, H J; Ferenci, P; Grimm, G; Yap, S H; Tangerman, A

    1991-03-01

    Mixed disulfides of methanethiol represent a relative estimate for an exposure to methanethiol. The concentrations of methanethiol-mixed disulfides, methionine, 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyrate and ammonia were measured in patients with different stages of hepatic encephalopathy, in patients with chronic kidney failure and in healthy subjects. In patients with hepatic encephalopathy, the mean serum concentrations of all these compounds were elevated. However, the elevations of methanethiol-mixed disulfides were small and partly caused by decreased renal function. In addition, the levels of methanethiol-mixed disulfides did not differ significantly between the different grades of hepatic encephalopathy. The concentrations of methanethiol-mixed disulfides were substantially lower than those previously observed in healthy subjects after an oral methionine load or in a patient with a deficiency in methionine adenosyltransferase, the latter without causing encephalopathy. We concluded that the role of methanethiol in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is probably minor, if not insignificant. In the patients with hepatic encephalopathy, a significant correlation was found between the concentrations of methionine and 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyrate and between 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyrate and methanethiol-mixed disulfides, supporting the theory that methanethiol is formed by way of the methionine transamination pathway. Evidence is provided that, besides the methionine transsulfuration pathway, the transamination pathway is also impaired in patients with hepatic encephalopathy.

  18. Association between bilirubin and risk of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease based on a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jianbo; Zhong, Rong; Liu, Cheng; Tang, Yuhan; Gong, Jing; Chang, Jiang; Lou, Jiao; Ke, Juntao; Li, Jiaoyuan; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Ying; Gong, Yajie; Xu, Yanyan; Liu, Peiyi; Yu, Xiao; Xiao, Lin; Du, Min; Yang, Ling; Yuan, Jing; Wang, Youjie; Chen, Weihong; Wei, Sheng; Liang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaomin; He, Meian; Wu, Tangchun; Yao, Ping; Miao, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the association between total, direct, and indirect bilirubin and nonalcoholic fatty live disease (NAFLD) risk given its high prevalence and serious clinical prognosis. Among 27,009 subjects who participated in a healthy screening program from the Dongfeng-Tongji cohort study in 2008, 8189 eligible subjects (aged 35–86 years; males, 43.95%) were ultimately enrolled. The incidence rates of NAFLD in 2013 were compared with respect to baseline bilirubin levels among subjects free of NAFLD, and the effect sizes were estimated by logistic regression analysis. During 5 years follow-up, we observed 1956 cases of newly developed NAFLD with the overall incidence of 23.88%. Direct bilirubin was presented to inversely associate with NAFLD risk. Compared with quartile 1 of direct bilirubin, the multivariable-adjusted ORs (95% CIs) for NAFLD of quartile 2 to 4 were 1.104 (0.867–1.187), 0.843 (0.719–0.989), and 0.768 (0.652–0.905), respectively, P for trend 0.002). Similarly, inverse effects of direct bilirubin on NAFLD incidence were also observed when stratified by sex and BMI. However, no significant associations were found between total, and indirect bilirubin and NAFLD risk. Direct bilirubin reduced NAFLD risk independent of possible confounders among middle-aged and elderly Chinese population, probably based on the endogenous antioxidation of bilirubin. PMID:27484402

  19. Massive Hemolysis Causing Renal Failure in Acute Hepatitis E Infection

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Pragya; Malik, Sarthak; Mallick, Bipadabhanjan; Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute viral hepatitis is usually a self-limiting illness. However, it can lead to complications that can be life-threatening, such as acute liver failure. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the setting of acute viral hepatitis can lead to a massive hemolysis, manifesting as acute kidney injury and markedly raised bilirubin levels; although cases are rare. Here, we report such a case. The patient had a viral hepatitis E infection and presented with kidney injury requiring dialysis. Examination showed very high mixed hyperbilirubinemia due to massive intravascular hemolysis. The patient experienced a long, protracted course of illness, requiring renal replacement therapy with other supportive management, which led to improvement over a period of four weeks. This case highlights the importance of recognizing associated hemolysis in a patient with viral hepatitis who presents with very high bilirubin levels or associated kidney injury. Such patients will require aggressive supportive care with prompt fluid and electrolyte management. PMID:28097104

  20. Legal Responsibilities of Physicians When They Diagnose Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Vierling, John M

    2015-08-01

    Both covert hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) and overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) impair the ability to operate machinery. The legal responsibilities of US physicians who diagnose and treat patients with hepatic encephalopathy vary among states. It is imperative that physicians know the laws regarding reporting in their state. OHE represents a neuropsychiatric impairment that meets general reporting criteria. The medical advisory boards of the states have not identified OHE as a reportable condition. In the absence of validated diagnostic guidelines, physicians are not obligated to perform tests for CHE. There is a need for explicit guidance from professional associations regarding this issue.

  1. Microchip capillary electrophoresis for frontal analysis of free bilirubin and study of its interaction with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhou; Fung, Ying Sing

    2008-05-01

    To meet the need for bedside monitoring of free bilirubin for neonates under critical conditions, a microfluidic chip was fabricated and tested for its coupling with CE/frontal analysis (FA) to determine free bilirubin and study of its binding interaction with HSA, which regulated its concentration in plasma. The poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) multichannel chip was fabricated by CO2 laser ablation and bonded with a fused-silica separation capillary for CE/FA separation with UV detection. The chip was designed to allow a complete assay of four electrophoretic runs using preconditioned channels to speed up the determination of free bilirubin and to deliver quick results for bedside monitoring. Under optimized conditions, the linear working range for free bilirubin was from 10 to 200 micromol with RSDs from 2.1 to 5.0% for n=3, and the LOD at 9 micromol for S/N=3. From a binding study between bilirubin and HSA under FA condition, the second binding constant for bilirubin-HSA was determined as 1.07x10(5) L/mol and the number of binding sites per HSA as 3.46. The results enabled the calculation of free bilirubin for jaundiced infants based on the clinically significant level of total bilirubin, producing a range of 118.3-119.4 micromol/L. The developed method is shown to meet the clinical requirement with additional margin of protection to detect the early rising level of free bilirubin prior to jaundice condition. The low-cost microchip CE/FA device is shown to produce quick results with high potential to deliver a suitable bed-side monitoring method for bilirubin management in neonates.

  2. Circular dichroism study of the interaction between mutagens and bilirubin bound to different binding sites of serum albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, Sergey; Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanová, Marie

    Although recent investigations have shown that bilirubin not only has a negative role in the organism but also exhibits significant antimutagenic properties, the mechanisms of interactions between bilirubin and mutagens are not clear. In this study, interaction between bilirubin bound to different binding sites of mammalian serum albumins with structural analogues of the mutagens 2-aminofluorene, 2,7-diaminofluorene and mutagen 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone were investigated by circular dichroism and absorption spectroscopy. Homological human and bovine serum albumins were used as chiral matrices, which preferentially bind different conformers of bilirubin in the primary binding sites and make it observable by circular dichroism. These molecular systems approximated a real system for the study of mutagens in blood serum. Differences between the interaction of bilirubin bound to primary and to secondary binding sites of serum albumins with mutagens were shown. For bilirubin bound to secondary binding sites with low affinity, partial displacement and the formation of self-associates were observed in all studied mutagens. The associates of bilirubin bound to primary binding sites of serum albumins are formed with 2-aminofluorene and 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone. It was proposed that 2,7-diaminofluorene does not interact with bilirubin bound to primary sites of human and bovine serum albumins due to the spatial hindrance of the albumins binding domains. The spatial arrangement of the bilirubin bound to serum albumin along with the studied mutagens was modelled using ligand docking, which revealed a possibility of an arrangement of the both bilirubin and 2-aminofluorene and 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone in the primary binding site of human serum albumin.

  3. Circular dichroism study of the interaction between mutagens and bilirubin bound to different binding sites of serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Orlov, Sergey; Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanová, Marie

    2014-05-21

    Although recent investigations have shown that bilirubin not only has a negative role in the organism but also exhibits significant antimutagenic properties, the mechanisms of interactions between bilirubin and mutagens are not clear. In this study, interaction between bilirubin bound to different binding sites of mammalian serum albumins with structural analogues of the mutagens 2-aminofluorene, 2,7-diaminofluorene and mutagen 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone were investigated by circular dichroism and absorption spectroscopy. Homological human and bovine serum albumins were used as chiral matrices, which preferentially bind different conformers of bilirubin in the primary binding sites and make it observable by circular dichroism. These molecular systems approximated a real system for the study of mutagens in blood serum. Differences between the interaction of bilirubin bound to primary and to secondary binding sites of serum albumins with mutagens were shown. For bilirubin bound to secondary binding sites with low affinity, partial displacement and the formation of self-associates were observed in all studied mutagens. The associates of bilirubin bound to primary binding sites of serum albumins are formed with 2-aminofluorene and 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone. It was proposed that 2,7-diaminofluorene does not interact with bilirubin bound to primary sites of human and bovine serum albumins due to the spatial hindrance of the albumins binding domains. The spatial arrangement of the bilirubin bound to serum albumin along with the studied mutagens was modelled using ligand docking, which revealed a possibility of an arrangement of the both bilirubin and 2-aminofluorene and 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone in the primary binding site of human serum albumin.

  4. Clinical and Neurologic Manifestation of Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy and Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Basu, P Patrick; Shah, Niraj James

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) shows a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric manifestations. A combined effort with neuropsychological and psychometric evaluation has to be performed to recognize the syndrome, whereas minimal HE (MHE) is largely under-recognized. Subtle symptoms of MHE can only be diagnosed through specialized neuropsychiatric testing. Early diagnosis and treatment may drastically improve the quality of life for many cirrhotic patients. Further research to gain better insight into the pathophysiology and diagnostic accuracy of HE will help determine future management strategies.

  5. Acute viral hepatitis E presenting with haemolytic anaemia and acute renal failure in a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Laxmikant Ramkumarsingh; Aggarwal, Amitesh; Jain, Piyush; Rajpal, Surender; Agarwal, Mukul P

    2015-10-01

    The association of acute hepatitis E viral (HEV) infection with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency leading to extensive intravascular haemolysis is a very rare clinical entity. Here we discuss such a patient, who presented with acute HEV illness, developed severe intravascular haemolysis and unusually high levels of bilirubin, complicated by acute renal failure (ARF), and was later on found to have a deficiency of G6PD. The patient recovered completely with haemodialysis and supportive management.

  6. EKTACHEM bilirubin fraction Bc as a predictor of liver transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Cox, C J; Valdiserri, R O; Zerbe, T R; Genter, J L

    1987-10-01

    Bilirubin fractions Bc and DELTA, not routinely available prior to the EKTACHEM Chemistry Analyzer and its slide methodology, were studied in an outpatient population of liver transplant recipients. A preliminary evaluation by the authors has shown that direct bilirubin (DBILI) levels in the normal range consist almost exclusively of DELTA (protein-bound conjugated bilirubin), while at elevated DBILI levels, an increasing amount of Bc (non-protein-bound conjugated bilirubin) is measured as well. The present study evaluated the clinical significance of Bc in the serum of 80 liver transplant recipients as a means of identifying episodes of rejection. Each patient was classified into rejection or nonrejection categories based on clinical status, liver biopsy results, and/or response to therapy. Eighteen patients were classified as experiencing an episode of rejection during the period of this study. Fourteen of these (77.8%) had Bc levels that ranged from 0.1 to 6.8 mg/dl. Sixty two patients were classified in the nonrejection category. Fourteen (22.6%) of these patients had Bc levels that ranged from 0.1 to 0.6 mg/dl. In our outpatient liver transplant recipients with Bc greater than or equal to 0.1 mg/dl, the relative risk of rejection (% of rejection patients with Bc/% of nonrejection patients with Bc) was 3.44. This value indicates that Bc determination may be a helpful adjunct in the assessment of rejection.

  7. Immune response to lentiviral bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase gene transfer in fetal and neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Seppen, J; van Til, N P; van der Rijt, R; Hiralall, J K; Kunne, C; Elferink, R P J Oude

    2006-04-01

    Gene therapy for inherited disorders might cause an immune response to the therapeutic protein. A solution would be to introduce the gene in the fetal or neonatal period, which should lead to tolerization. Lentiviral vectors mediate long-term gene expression, and are well suited for gene therapy early in development. A model for fetal or neonatal gene therapy is the inherited disorder of bilirubin metabolism, Crigler-Najjar disease (CN). The absence of bilirubin UDP-glucoronyltransferase (UGT1A1) activity in CN patients causes high serum levels of unconjugated bilirubin and brain damage in infancy. CN is attractive for the development of gene therapy because the mutant Gunn rat closely mimics the human disease. Injection of UGT1A1 lentiviral vectors corrected the hyperbilirubinemia for more than a year in rats injected as fetuses and for up to 18 weeks in rats injected the day of birth. UGT1A1 gene transfer was confirmed by the presence of bilirubin glucuronides in bile. All animals injected with UGT1A1 lentiviral vectors developed antibodies to UGT1A1. Animals injected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) lentiviral vectors did not develop antibodies to GFP. Our results indicate that fetal and neonatal gene therapy with immunogenic proteins such as UGT1A1 does not necessarily lead to tolerization.

  8. Deracemization of bilirubin as the marker of the chirality of micellar aggregates.

    PubMed

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Altieri, Barbara; Ceccacci, Francesca; Di Profio, Pietro; Germani, Raimondo; Giansanti, Luisa; Savelli, Gianfranco; Mancini, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    The deracemization of bilirubin in micellar aggregates of structurally correlated chiral surfactants was studied by circular dichroism experiments and exploited as the marker of the expression of chirality of the aggregates. The obtained results suggest that the hydrophobic interactions control the transfer of chirality from the monomers to the aggregates, and that different regions of the same aggregate might feature opposite enantiorecognition capabilities.

  9. 21 CFR 862.1110 - Bilirubin (total or direct) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bilirubin (total or direct) test system. 862.1110 Section 862.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1110 - Bilirubin (total or direct) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bilirubin (total or direct) test system. 862.1110 Section 862.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1110 - Bilirubin (total or direct) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bilirubin (total or direct) test system. 862.1110 Section 862.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1110 - Bilirubin (total or direct) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bilirubin (total or direct) test system. 862.1110 Section 862.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  13. Toxic epidermal necrolysis with severe hyperbilirubinemia: complete re-epithelialization after bilirubin reduction therapies.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Noriaki; Yoneyama, Kei; Togawa, Yaei; Suehiro, Keisuke; Shinkai, Hiroshi; Yokota, Masaya; Matsuda, Kenichi; Oda, Shigeto; Hirasawa, Hiroyuki; Matsue, Hiroyuki

    2010-06-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a life-threatening skin disorder, and its mortality rate is estimated to be approximately 20-30%. It is characterized that more than 30% of the skin surface is eroded, however, skin lesions are usually re-epithelialized within 2-3 weeks. Previously, we reported a fatal case of toxic epidermal necrolysis with hyperbilirubinemia, and more than 60% of body surface areas had been eroded for 9 weeks. For the reason of delayed re-epithelialization, we hypothesized that hyperbilirubinemia was the culprit because bilirubin damaged cultured keratinocytes in vitro. In this case, we had an opportunity to treat another case of toxic epidermal necrolysis with severe hyperbilirubinemia. In order to reduce serum bilirubin levels, we performed bilirubin adsorption therapies, and skin lesions were successfully re-epithelialized within 4 weeks. Though further studies are required, we considered that bilirubin adsorption therapies are worth trying for toxic epidermal necrolysis with hyperbilirubinemia, especially for the cases suffering from delayed re-epithelialization.

  14. Functionalized Magnetic Fe3O4-β-Cyclodextran Nanoparticles for Efficient Removal of Bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Han, Lulu; Chu, Simin; Wei, Houliang; Ren, Jun; Xu, Li; Jia, Lingyun

    2016-06-01

    Bilirubin (BR), as a lipophilic toxin, can binds and deposits in various tissues, especially the brain tissue, leading to hepatic coma and even death. Magnetic nanoparticles adsorbent modified by β-cyclodextran (Fe3O4-β-CD) was developed to remove the BR from the plasma. Fe3O4-β-CD nanoparticles was prepared through Schiff base reaction between the polyethylenimine (PEI)-modified Fe3O4 and aldehyde-functionalized β-CD, and characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Under optimized conditions, the Fe3O4-β-CD adsorbent could adsorb 225.6 mg/g free BR in PBS and reach the adsorption equilibrium within 90 min mainly through hydrophobic interaction; Moreover, the adsorbent displayed better adsorption capability in a dialysis system for BSA-bound bilirubin, plasma bilirubin and total bile acid, and the removal rates of those were 66%, 31% and 41% respectively. Because of the advantages of fast separation and purification process, low preparation cost, good adsorption capability for plasma bilirubin, Fe3O4-β-CD may become an economical and promising absorbent of BR for clinical applications.

  15. Kinetics of oxidation of bilirubin and its protein complex by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonov, A. V.; Rumyantsev, E. V.; Antina, E. V.

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study of oxidation reactions of bilirubin and its complex with albumin was carried out in aqueous solutions under the action of hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen at different pH values. Free radical oxidation of the pigment in both free and bound forms at pH 7.4 was shown not to lead to the formation of biliverdin, but to be associated with the decomposition of the tetrapyrrole chromophore into monopyrrolic products. The effective and true rate constants of the reactions under study were determined. It was assumed that one possible mechanism of the oxidation reaction is associated with the interaction of peroxyl radicals and protons of the NH groups of bilirubin molecules at the limiting stage with the formation of a highly reactive radical intermediate. The binding of bilirubin with albumin was found to result in a considerable reduction in the rate of the oxidation reaction associated with the kinetic manifestation of the protein protection effect. It was found that the autoxidation of bilirubin by molecular oxygen with the formation of biliverdin at the intermediate stage can be observed with an increase in the pH of solutions.

  16. Management of hepatic encephalopathy in the hospital.

    PubMed

    Leise, Michael D; Poterucha, John J; Kamath, Patrick S; Kim, W Ray

    2014-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) develops in up to 50% of patients with cirrhosis and is a feature of decompensated cirrhosis. With the goal of reviewing the evidence for treatment and prevention of overt hepatic encephalopathy, pubmed was searched using search terms hepatic encephalopathy AND treatment, limited to human studies from January 1, 2003, through December 1, 2013, and supplemented by key references. The inpatient incidence of HE is approximately 23,000 annually, and management of these patients is common for internists and subspecialists. Treatment of the hospitalized patient with HE has changed in recent years. Treatment entails 2 phases: induction and maintenance of remission. Most cases of significant HE are precipitated by infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, medications, or other culprits. All patients should be evaluated for secondary triggers of HE, and treatment should be initiated with a nonabsorbable disaccharide (ie, lactulose) in most patients. Rifaximin (off label) can be added in patients not responding to lactulose. Neomycin is a less preferred alternative to rifaximin owing to its adverse effect profile. Other therapies, including zinc, L-ornithine-L-aspartate, and branched-chain amino acids, can be considered for patients not responding to disaccharides and nonabsorbable antibiotics. Large portosystemic shunts may be embolized in patients with medically refractory recurrent or severe HE with otherwise well-compensated cirrhosis. Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System is now available for patients with severe HE who do not respond to medical therapy. It is critically important that patients hospitalized with significant HE continue maintenance therapy at the time of dismissal to prevent further episodes. Patients with a first-time episode of HE can be administered lactulose, and careful instructions should be provided to patients and caregivers about dose titration to achieve 3 bowel movements daily. Patients with recurrent HE episodes

  17. Simple, Reagentless Quantification of Total Bilirubin in Blood Via Microfluidic Phototreatment and Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brandon L; Wyckoff, Sarah L; Haverstick, Doris M; Landers, James P

    2017-03-07

    Total bilirubin (T-Bil) is an important clinical diagnostic marker that is measured frequently by physicians to assist in the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of multiple medical conditions. The work demonstrated here utilizes the 48-year-old mechanism of phototherapy that is commonly implemented in the treatment of infants with exaggerated physiologic and pathologic jaundice but adapts it to the microfluidic level for the ultimate purpose of total bilirubin quantitation. After acquisition of a small volume of blood (<10 μL) and through subsequent separation (plasma + red blood cells), a 3 μL plasma sample was imaged by a portable scanner and analyzed through a custom algorithm for color intensity. After blue light irradiation for 10 min at 470 nm, the sample was reimaged and analyzed. The resulting intensities obtained pre- and postimaging (clearly observed through a color change from yellow to clear) were then utilized to calculate the total bilirubin concentration. A total of 34 blood samples were analyzed with microfluidic photo treatment-image analysis (μPIA) and were found to have a Deming-regression slope of 0.97 (R(2) = 0.960) when compared to the total bilirubin values determined in the clinical laboratory. We demonstrate the implementation of a centrifugal microdevice fabricated through the Print, Cut, and Laminate (PCL) method that accepts eight whole blood samples and provides the capabilities to not only quantitate total bilirubin (Deming-regression slope of 0.95, R(2) = 0.990) but allow future integration with excess plasma sufficient for additional downstream clinical assays. This work will highlight the inexpensive nature of the analysis (absence of caustic, viscous, or additional reagents), the simplicity (does not require any chemical reactions), speed (sample-to-answer in <15 min), insusceptibility to biofouling (no protein matrix effects, hemoglobin interferences, and minimized turbidity), low volume plasma requirement (3 μL), and the

  18. The Role of Bilirubin in Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vítek, Libor

    2012-01-01

    Bilirubin belongs to a phylogenetically old superfamily of tetrapyrrolic compounds, which have multiple biological functions. Although for decades bilirubin was believed to be only a waste product of the heme catabolic pathway at best, and a potentially toxic compound at worst; recent data has convincingly demonstrated that mildly elevated serum bilirubin levels are strongly associated with a lower prevalence of oxidative stress-mediated diseases. Indeed, serum bilirubin has been consistently shown to be negatively correlated to cardiovascular diseases (CVD), as well as to CVD-related diseases and risk factors such as arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. In addition, the clinical data are strongly supported by evidence arising from both in vitro and in vivo experimental studies. This data not only shows the protective effects of bilirubin per se; but additionally, of other products of the heme catabolic pathway such as biliverdin and carbon monoxide, as well as its key enzymes (heme oxygenase and biliverdin reductase); thus, further underlining the biological impacts of this pathway. In this review, detailed information on the experimental and clinical evidence between the heme catabolic pathway and CVD, and those related diseases such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity is provided. All of these pathological conditions represent an important threat to human civilization, being the major killers in developed countries, with a steadily increasing prevalence. Thus, it is extremely important to search for novel markers of these diseases, as well as for novel therapeutic modalities to reverse this unfavorable situation. The heme catabolic pathway seems to fulfill the criteria for both diagnostic purposes as well as for potential therapeutical interventions. PMID:22493581

  19. Lower Serum Bilirubin and Uric Acid Concentrations in Patients with Parkinson's Disease in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiao-Ling; Zhang, Qing-Shan; Sun, Li; Hao, Meng-Wei; Hu, Zhao-Ting

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the correlation between bilirubin and uric acid (UA) concentrations and symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) in Chinese population. A total of 425 PD patients and 460 controls were included in the current study. Patients were diagnosed by a neurologist and assessed using the Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y) scale. Venous blood samples were collected, and bilirubin and UA concentrations were analyzed. Compared to controls, indirect bilirubin (IBIL) and UA concentrations were lower in PD patients (P IBIL = 0.015, P UA = 0.000). Serum IBIL in different age subgroups and H&Y stage subgroups were also lower compared to the control group (P IBIL = 0.000, P UA = 0.000) but were not significantly different among these subgroups. Females in the control group had significantly lower serum IBIL and UA concentrations than males (P IBIL = 0.000, P UA = 0.000) and the PD group (P IBIL = 0.027, P UA = 0.000). In early PD (patients with <2-year medical history and no treatment), serum IBIL and UA concentrations were also lower than the controls (P IBIL = 0.013, P UA = 0.000). Although IBIL concentration was positively correlated with UA concentration in controls (R IBIL = 0.229, P IBIL = 0.004), this positive association was not observed in the PD group (R IBIL = -0.032, P IBIL = 0.724). Decreased levels of serum IBIL and UA were observed in PD patients. It is possible that individuals with decreased serum bilirubin and UA concentrations lack the endogenous defense system to prevent peroxynitrite and other free radicals from damaging and destroying dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra. Our results provide a basis for further investigation into the role of bilirubin in PD.

  20. Selective nonenzymatic bilirubin detection in blood samples using a Nafion/Mn-Cu sensor.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hui-Bog; Won, Mi-Sook; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2014-11-15

    The specific detection of biological organics without the use of an enzyme is challenging, and it is crucial for analytical and clinical chemistry. We report specific nonenzymatic bilirubin detection through the catalytic oxidation of bilirubin molecule on the Nafion/Mn-Cu surface. The catalytic ability, true surface area, morphology, crystallinity, composition, and oxidation state of the sensor surface were assessed using voltammetry, coulometry, XPS, XRD, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), SEM, EDXS, and TOF-SIMS experiments. The results showed that the surface was composed of microporous Mn-Cu bimetallic crystal in flake shape with a large BET surface area (3.635 m(2)g(-1)), where the surface area and crystallinity mainly affected the sensor performance. Product analysis of the catalytic reaction on the sensor probe revealed a specific two-electron oxidation of dipyrromethane moiety to dipyrromethene in the bilirubin molecule. Experimental variables affecting the analysis of bilirubin were optimized in terms of probe composition, temperature, pH, and potential. At the optimized condition, the dynamic range was between 1.2 μM and 0.42 mM, which yielded the equation of ΔI (μA)=(1.03 ± 0.72)+(457.0 ± 4.03) [C] (mM) with 0.999 of correlation coefficient, and the detection limit was 25.0 ± 1.8 nM (n=5, k=3). The stability test, interference effects, and analysis of real clinical samples, human whole blood and certified serum samples were demonstrated to confirm the reliability of the proposed bilirubin sensor.

  1. Increased bilirubin levels in neonates after induction of labour by intravenous prostaglandin E2 or oxytocin.

    PubMed

    Calder, A A; Ounsted, M K; Moar, V A; Turnbull, A C

    1974-12-07

    4 groups of 30 primigravidas and their infants were studied prospectively. No patient with rhesus incompatibility was included in the study. The 4 groups went into labor in the following ways: 1) induced by intravenous oxytocin; 2) induced by intravenous prostagladin (PG)E2; 3) induced by extraamniotic PGE2; and 4) spontaneous labor. Mean infant bilirubin levels on day 5 were significantly higher (p.005 and p.025 respectively) for the 1st 2 groups than for the spontaneous group. Levels for the group whose labor was induced with extraamniotic PGE2 infusion were not significantly different from those in the 1st 2 groups or the spontaneous group. The mean serum-bilirubin level was significantly lower (p.025) after caesarean section than after assisted vaginal delivery. Serum-bilirubin levels were not affected by previous maternal use of oral contraceptives, maternal smoking, or methods of infant feeding. Serum bilirubin levels below 10 mg/100 ml. are considered within the normal phsyiological limits during the neonatal period. Measured by this criteria, 14, 10, 9, and 6 babies in groups 1-4 respectively had abnormally high levels. The difference between groups 1 and 4 was significant at the p.05 level. Mean Apgar scores were significantly lower for the babies whose mothers had induced delivery with extraamniotic PGE2 infusion. These results suggest that the observed hyperbilirubinemia may be due to interruption of pregnancy rather than to any direct drug effect. There is no evidence to suggest that such high bilirubin levels are harmful to the child in the long run.

  2. Brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for hepatic encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Chin-Sing; McConnell, James R.; Chu, Wei-Kom

    1993-08-01

    Liver failure can induce gradations of encephalopathy from mild to stupor to deep coma. The objective of this study is to investigate and quantify the variation of biochemical compounds in the brain in patients with liver failure and encephalopathy, through the use of water- suppressed, localized in-vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (HMRS). The spectral parameters of the compounds quantitated are: N-Acetyl Aspartate (NAA) to Creatine (Cr) ratio, Choline (Cho) to Creatine ratio, Inositol (Ins) to Creatine ratio and Glutamine-Glutamate Amino Acid (AA) to Creatine ratio. The study group consisted of twelve patients with proven advanced chronic liver failure and symptoms of encephalopathy. Comparison has been done with results obtained from five normal subjects without any evidence of encephalopathy or liver diseases.

  3. Another cause of vaccine encephalopathy: a case of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Novy, Jan; Catarino, Claudia B; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Smith, Shelagh M; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Hammond, Peter; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2012-05-01

    Dravet syndrome has been found recently as an important underlying condition in cases of alleged vaccine encephalopathy after pertussis vaccination, where vaccination seemed to have precipitated the occurrence of the disease without modifying the long-term course. We report on a patient diagnosed with Angelman syndrome in her fifth decade, in whom the intellectual disability and epilepsy had been assumed to be caused by a vaccine encephalopathy following smallpox vaccination. Clinical features of Angelman syndrome had faded away. The history of the present patient suggests that genetic conditions other than Dravet syndrome can be associated with an alleged vaccine encephalopathy. A history of vaccine encephalopathy is rare among patients with learning disability and refractory epilepsy (1.4% in our cohort), but it should lead to consideration of a comprehensive genetic work-up if Dravet syndrome is excluded. The early history of the patient, when available, should guide the investigations. Medico-legal aspects are also discussed.

  4. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed.

  5. Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Patient with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Rebecca A; Vu, Trung; Hunter, Alan J

    2006-01-01

    Clinically, we most often associate Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) with an alcohol abusing population. However, it is important to consider other causes of malnutrition and vitamin deficiency as risk factors for the development of this disorder. We present a case of a 51-year-old man with schizophrenia and malnutrition who presented with delirium, ophthalmoplegia, and seizures. He responded rapidly to the administration of IV thiamine. Because of the high rate of mortality and morbidity, WE should be high on the differential of any patient at risk for malnutrition or with ophthalmoplegia, regardless of alcohol history. This is particularly important in psychiatric patients where the syndrome may be masked and thus treatment delayed. PMID:16925799

  6. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Impact on Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Robert; Chin, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a devastating neuropsychological condition afflicting a small percentage of athletes partaking in high-impact sports. The onset of symptoms lags years behind the inciting events. Repetitive minor head injuries are felt to be the main etiology behind CTE. Routine radiographic imaging generally is unremarkable in cases of CTE. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are advanced MRI-based sequences that have shown promise in detecting early radiographic findings that may be reflective of CTE. Progressive neuronal loss is the histopathological hallmark of this neurodegenerative disease. Strategizing earlier detection techniques is paramount in delivering optimal care to athletes afflicted with CTE. PMID:27088064

  7. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid tau in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Frijlink, Daphne W; Tilanus, Joachim J; Roks, Gerwin

    2012-08-08

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) commonly presents with oculomotor abnormalities, gait ataxia and confusion. WE can mimic rapidly progressive dementia syndromes, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is frequently used for diagnosis of several dementia subtypes, predominantly CJD and Alzheimer's disease. The combination of very high CSF tau (tau) and normal phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels is almost exclusively seen in aggressive diseases, such as CJD. The authors present a case of a woman with WE, caused by chronic insufficient dietary intake, with highly elevated CSF tau and normal p-tau. The clinical symptoms and CSF findings raised the suspicion of CJD. However, shortly after immediate treatment with thiamine the patient clinically improved. At follow-up, 2.5 months later, she had made a good recovery. This case of rapidly progressive dementia illustrates that, even in the case of a highly elevated CSF tau, clinicians should be alert for treatable causes such as WE.

  8. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brandon J.; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893

  9. Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sheasgreen, Christopher; Lu, Lucy; Patel, Ameen

    2014-12-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis of the liver. It is also extremely debilitating, with an untreated 3-year survival of only 23 %. While the exact pathophysiology of HE has yet to be elucidated, a number of contributing factors have been described. Abnormal levels and altered metabolism of ammonia play a central role. Recently, inflammation has also been identified as a contributor to HE. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of HE is crucial, as current therapy centers on reduction of the body's ammonia load. Lactulose is the first-line therapy for HE, with some antibiotics recently showing promise for improved outcomes in patients with HE. The role of anti-inflammatory therapies has yet to be evaluated.

  10. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Atluri, Dileep K; Prakash, Ravi; Mullen, Kevin D

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder seen in patients with advanced liver disease or porto-systemic shunts. Based on etiology and severity of HE, the World Congress of Gastroenterology has divided HE into categories and sub-categories. Many user-friendly computer-based neuropsychiatric tests are being validated for diagnosing covert HE. Currently, emphasis is being given to view HE deficits as a continuous spectrum rather than distinct stages. Ammonia is believed to play crucial role in pathogenesis of HE via astrocyte swelling and cerebral edema. However, evidence has been building up which supports the synergistic role of oxidative stress, inflammation and neurosteroids in pathogenesis of HE. At present, treatment of HE aims at decreasing the production and intestinal absorption of ammonia. But as the role of new pathogenetic mechanisms becomes clear, many potential new treatment strategies may become available for clinician. PMID:25755319

  11. Rifaximin, Microbiota Biology, and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Peleman, Cedric; Camilleri, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rifaximin is beneficial in the treatment of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Kang et al. (Clin Transl Gastroenterol 7: e187; doi:10.1038/ctg.2016.44) investigated the effects of rifaximin in a mouse model of MHE-associated microbiota without concomitant liver disease. In addition to some impact on the composition of microbiota, rifaximin altered bacterial functions, ameliorated local and systemic inflammation, and reduced enterocyte glutaminase activity. We discuss these effects as well as the interpretation of the permeability studies, given the potential interaction of dysbiosis with dysfunctional intestinal barrier, leading to systemic inflammation and increased uptake of bacterial metabolites that contribute to MHE in the presence of hepatic dysfunction. PMID:27711069

  12. Leucine metabolism in patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, A.S.; Kassouny, M.E.; Matthews, D.E.; Millikan, W.

    1986-03-01

    A primed continuous infusion of (/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C)leucine was used to determine whether increased oxidation and/or protein synthesis of leucine occurs in patients with cirrhosis. Five controls and patients were equilibrated on a metabolic balance diet (0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)). An additional four patients were equilibrated in the same manner with the same type of diet with a protein level of 0.75 g per kg IBW. Plasma leucine and breath CO/sub 2/ enrichments were measured by mass spectrometry. Protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW. Results indicate that systemic derangements of leucine metabolism are not the cause of Hepatic Encephalopathy.

  13. Wernicke encephalopathy and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, A; Brandel, J P; Grignon, Y; Sazdovitch, V; Seilhean, D; Faucheux, B; Privat, N; Brault, J L; Vital, A; Uro-Coste, E; Pluot, M; Chapon, F; Maurage, C A; Letournel, F; Vespignani, H; Place, G; Degos, C F; Peoc'h, K; Haïk, S; Hauw, J J

    2009-06-01

    We assessed the prevalence of Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) in all 657 cases suspected of Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD) referred from 2001 to 2006 to the French Neuropathology Network of CJD. Clinical, biological and imaging data were reviewed when the diagnosis of WE was made at autopsy. No CJD was found in five cases suspected of sporadic CJD. In these five cases, myoclonus had been observed in four, CSF 14-3-3 protein in two. In 14 other cases, WE was combined with CJD, 13 of which were sporadic. These belonged mainly to the molecular variants of sporadic CJD associated with a long duration of disease. This stresses the necessity of remaining alert to the diagnosis of WE when CJD is suspected.

  14. National Childhood Encephalopathy Study: an interim report.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D L; Ross, E M

    1978-01-01

    Data from the first year of the National Childhood Encephalopathy Study were reviewed to see whether any relation was apparent between pertussis vaccination and brain disease. Three hundred and eighty-seven cases of encephalitis and other specified neurological conditions in which the children were admitted to hospital were reported, of which 267 satisfied the study criteria. Control children were matched for age with the index cases, and medical and immunisation histories were reviewed. Few of the index cases had been vaccinated within 28 days before admission to hospital, so that no close association between vaccination and brain disease existed in most cases. The number of children who had recently been immunised was too small for any statistically useful conclusion to be reached about the risk associated with pertussis vaccine. The study is continuing. PMID:709204

  15. Wernicke's encephalopathy: expanding the diagnostic toolbox.

    PubMed

    Lough, Mary E

    2012-06-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a life threatening neurological disorder that results from thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency. Clinical signs include mental status changes, ataxia, occulomotor changes and nutritional deficiency. The conundrum is that the clinical presentation is highly variable. WE clinical signs, brain imaging, and thiamine blood levels, are reviewed in 53 published case reports from 2001 to 2011; 81 % (43/53) were non-alcohol related. Korsakoff Syndrome or long-term cognitive neurological changes occurred in 28 % (15/53). Seven WE cases (13 %) had a normal magnetic resonance image (MRI). Four WE cases (8 %) had normal or high thiamine blood levels. Neither diagnostic tool can be relied upon exclusively to confirm a diagnosis of WE.

  16. Refining the ammonia hypothesis: a physiology-driven approach to the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tapper, Elliot B; Jiang, Z Gordon; Patwardhan, Vilas R

    2015-05-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is one of the most important complications of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Although the etiology is incompletely understood, it has been linked to ammonia directly and indirectly. Our goal is to review for the clinician the mechanisms behind hyperammonemia and the pathogenesis of HE to explain the rationale for its therapy. We reviewed articles collected through a search of MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Google Scholar between October 1, 1948, and December 8, 2014, and by a manual search of citations within retrieved articles. Search terms included hepatic encephalopathy, ammonia hypothesis, brain and ammonia, liver failure and ammonia, acute-on-chronic liver failure and ammonia, cirrhosis and ammonia, portosytemic shunt, ammonia and lactulose, rifaximin, zinc, and nutrition. Ammonia homeostatsis is a multiorgan process involving the liver, brain, kidneys, and muscle as well as the gastrointestinal tract. Indeed, hyperammonemia may be the first clue to poor functional reserves, malnutrition, and impending multiorgan dysfunction. Furthermore, the neuropathology of ammonia is critically linked to states of systemic inflammation and endotoxemia. Given the complex interplay among ammonia, inflammation, and other factors, ammonia levels have questionable utility in the staging of HE. The use of nonabsorbable disaccharides, antibiotics, and probiotics reduces gut ammoniagenesis and, in the case of antibiotics and probiotics, systemic inflammation. Nutritional support preserves urea cycle function and prevents wasting of skeletal muscle, a significant site of ammonia metabolism. Correction of hypokalemia, hypovolemia, and acidosis further assists in the reduction of ammonia production in the kidney. Finally, early and aggressive treatment of infection, avoidance of sedatives, and modification of portosystemic shunts are also helpful in reducing the neurocognitive effects of hyperammonemia. Refining the

  17. Ifosfamide-induced Encephalopathy Precipitated by Aprepitant: A Rarely Manifested Side Effect of Drug Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kataria, Pritam Sureshchandra; Kendre, Pradip Piraji; Patel, Apurva A.

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) toxicity has been reported in approximately 10%–30% of patients receiving intravenous infusions of ifosfamide. Encephalopathy is a rare but serious CNS adverse reaction in these patients, and although usually transient and reversible, may cause persistent neurological dysfunction or death. Clinical features range from fatigue and confusion to coma and death. Ifosfamide forms backbone of various treatment regimens including curative treatment and palliative chemotherapy regimen. Precipitation of ifosfamide-induced encephalopathy (IIE) by aprepitant has been reported in the literature rarely. Ifosfamide is moderately emetogenic; hence, aprepitant is used to prevent emesis induced by ifosfamide. We here report a case where a patient of recurrent B-cell Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic lymphoma was given aprepitant to prevent ifosfamide-induced emesis. After 24 h of ifosfamide infusion, the patient developed symptoms of encephalopathy, i.e., headache, vomiting, and one episode of seizure which was followed by disoriented behavior. After doing all routine investigations and neuroimaging, the diagnosis of IIE was kept on clinical grounds, and after looking for the various factors, we came across injection fosaprepitant as the precipitating factor. On the clinical grounds, the patient was treated with hydration and injection methylene blue for above complaints, and the patient recovered without any residual deficit within 48–72 h. Hence, in the presence of causative agent, i.e., ifosfamide and precipitating agent injection fosaprepitant with negative imaging and normal laboratory parameters as well as the early and good response to methylene blue, the diagnosis of IIE precipitated by aprepitant was confirmed.

  18. Quantitative Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kasuga, Fumiko

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a progressive neurological disease of cattle affecting the central nervous system and was first diagnosed in the United Kingdom (UK) in 1986 (Wells et al., 1987). This disease is one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) which includes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie in sheep. The causative agent of TSE is considered to be an abnormal form of prion protein. However, the details of its pathogenic mechanism have not been fully identified. Scrapie, which causes neurological symptoms in sheep and goats, has existed in the UK for 200 years (Hoinville, 1996) and spread across the rest of the world in the 1900s (Detwiler & Baylis, 2003). There has been no report so far that scrapie can be transmitted to humans. Initially, BSE was also considered as a disease affecting only animals. However, a variant type of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) was first reported in the UK, and exposure to a BSE agent was suspected (Collinge, Sidle, Meads, Ironside, & Hill, 1996). vCJD is clinically and pathologically different from the sporadic type of CJD, and age at clinical onset of vCJD is younger than sporadic type (Will et al., 1996). Since the UK government announced the possible association between BSE and vCJD in 1996, BSE has become a huge public health concern all over the world. Of particular concern about vCJD, the fatal disease in younger age, distorted consumer confidence in beef safety, and as a result reduced beef consumption has been seen in many BSE-affected countries.

  19. Early progressive encephalopathy in boys and MECP2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kankirawatana, P; Leonard, H; Ellaway, C; Scurlock, J; Mansour, A; Makris, C M; Dure, L S; Friez, M; Lane, J; Kiraly-Borri, C; Fabian, V; Davis, M; Jackson, J; Christodoulou, J; Kaufmann, W E; Ravine, D; Percy, A K

    2006-07-11

    MECP2 mutations mainly occur in females with Rett syndrome. Mutations have been described in 11 boys with progressive encephalopathy: seven of nine with affected sisters and two de novo. The authors report four de novo occurrences: three pathogenic and one potentially pathogenic. Common features include failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, and abnormal motor control. MECP2 mutations should be assessed in boys with progressive encephalopathy and one or more of respiratory insufficiency, abnormal movements or tone, and intractable seizures.

  20. Diagnosis and Management of Epileptic Encephalopathies in Children

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Puneet; Tripathi, Manjari

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies refer to a group of disorders in which the unremitting epileptic activity contributes to severe cognitive and behavioral impairments above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone, and these can worsen over time leading to progressive cerebral dysfunction. Several syndromes have been described based on their electroclinical features (age of onset, seizure type, and EEG pattern). This review briefly describes the clinical evaluation and management of commonly encountered epileptic encephalopathies in children. PMID:23970964

  1. Modification of continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration with single-pass albumin dialysate allows for removal of serum bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Georgescu, Florin; Abell, Bruce; Seneff, Michael G; Kimmel, Paul L

    2005-03-01

    A 53-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital with ischemic colitis and underwent a subtotal colectomy. She developed acute renal failure, severe hyperbilirubinemia, and intense pruritus resistant to medical treatment. Extracorporeal albumin dialysis using a Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS; Gambro Co, Lund, Sweden) has been used to treat liver failure and reduce total serum bilirubin (SB) levels. A trial of extracorporeal albumin dialysis with continuous renal replacement therapy (RRT) was instituted to achieve net removal of SB. A 25% albumin solution was mixed with conventional dialysate to yield a dialysate concentration of 1.85% or 5.0% albumin. The patient underwent 2 continuous RRT sessions using extracorporeal albumin dialysis (1.85% and 5.0% albumin dialysate). Pretreatment and posttreatment SB levels were determined, and total bilirubin concentration (TB) also was measured in each of the collection bags during conventional and albumin dialysis. Pretreatment and posttreatment SB levels were 50.4 mg/dL (862 micromol/L) and 39.0 mg/dL (667 micromol/L) with 1.85% albumin dialysate and 47.1 mg/dL (805 micromol/L) and 39.7 mg/dL (679 micromol/L) with 5.0% albumin dialysate, respectively. The collected dialysate TB level was 0.3 mg/dL (5 micromol/L) during nonalbumin RRT and increased to 1.37 +/- 0.06 mg/dL (23 +/- 1 micromol/L) with 1.85% albumin dialysis. The collected dialysate fluid TB level was 0.3 mg/dL (5 micromol/L) during the nonalbumin RRT and increased to 1.38 +/- 0.15 mg/dL (24 +/- 3 micromol/L) during 5.0% albumin RRT. Single-pass albumin dialysis with continuous RRT cleared SB better than standard continuous RRT. Single-pass albumin dialysis with continuous RRT is feasible and may be a viable alternative in centers that do not have access to MARS therapy. This modality merits additional evaluation for its efficacy in clearing albumin-bound serum toxins.

  2. Rifaximin therapy and hepatic encephalopathy: Pros and cons

    PubMed Central

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Campo, Salvatore MA; Riggio, Oliviero

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is the second most common major complication in cirrhotics and it significantly impacts quality of life. Therapeutic approaches for HE treatment and prevention mainly continue to rely on ammonia-lowering strategies and non-absorbable disaccharides are currently considered the cornerstone therapy. Non-absorbable antibiotics, such as neomycin and paramomycin, are effective in treatment of acute HE episodes but their prolonged use for recurrence prevention is hampered by possible side-effects. To overcome these limitations, rifaximin use has been proposed. Rifaximin has been shown to be not superior to non-absorbable disaccharides for either HE treatment or prevention, with a similar incidence of side-effects. Cirrhosis significantly increases rifaximin absorption and this could be a cause for concern. Following long-term rifaximin therapy, Clostridium difficile colitis has been observed and Candida albicans has been isolated from 20% of patients. In addition, selection of resistant mutants of both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract cannot be definitely ruled out. Electrolyte alterations (sodium and potassium) have been reported during rifaximin therapy, a warning for its long-term use in cirrhotics. Moreover, a potential interference with vitamin K production should be considered which could further impair the already altered clotting status of these patients. The therapeutic cost of rifaximin is markedly higher than non-absorbable disaccharides. While waiting for further safety data, caution should be used to limit the use of rifaximin therapy for a very short-term period in selected HE cirrhotics not responding to non-absorbable disaccharides. PMID:22966484

  3. Rifaximin therapy and hepatic encephalopathy: Pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Campo, Salvatore Ma; Riggio, Oliviero

    2012-08-06

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is the second most common major complication in cirrhotics and it significantly impacts quality of life. Therapeutic approaches for HE treatment and prevention mainly continue to rely on ammonia-lowering strategies and non-absorbable disaccharides are currently considered the cornerstone therapy. Non-absorbable antibiotics, such as neomycin and paramomycin, are effective in treatment of acute HE episodes but their prolonged use for recurrence prevention is hampered by possible side-effects. To overcome these limitations, rifaximin use has been proposed. Rifaximin has been shown to be not superior to non-absorbable disaccharides for either HE treatment or prevention, with a similar incidence of side-effects. Cirrhosis significantly increases rifaximin absorption and this could be a cause for concern. Following long-term rifaximin therapy, Clostridium difficile colitis has been observed and Candida albicans has been isolated from 20% of patients. In addition, selection of resistant mutants of both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract cannot be definitely ruled out. Electrolyte alterations (sodium and potassium) have been reported during rifaximin therapy, a warning for its long-term use in cirrhotics. Moreover, a potential interference with vitamin K production should be considered which could further impair the already altered clotting status of these patients. The therapeutic cost of rifaximin is markedly higher than non-absorbable disaccharides. While waiting for further safety data, caution should be used to limit the use of rifaximin therapy for a very short-term period in selected HE cirrhotics not responding to non-absorbable disaccharides.

  4. Bilirubin clearance and antioxidant activities of ethanol extract of Phyllanthus amarus root in phenylhydrazine-induced neonatal jaundice in mice.

    PubMed

    Maity, Soumya; Nag, Nivedita; Chatterjee, Suchandra; Adhikari, Soumyakanti; Mazumder, Santasree

    2013-09-01

    The ability of ethanol extract of Phyllanthus amarus root (EEPA) to decrease bilirubin level and oxidative stress in phenylhydrazine-induced neonatal jaundice in mice was investigated. Administration of phenylhydrazine (75 mg/kg b.w.) significantly elevated total and unconjugated serum bilirubin level compared to control mice. EEPA (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg b.w., oral) dose-dependently reduced the bilirubin level. EEPA treatment also upregulated hepatic CAR and CYP3A1, accounting for its ability to facilitate bilirubin clearance. A single dose of EEPA (20 mg/kg b.w.) induced higher level of bilirubin clearance than phototherapy, widely used for treating neonatal jaundice. Furthermore, phenylhydrazine administration significantly increased MDA, protein carbonyl, and total thiol content and lowered the GSH level along with superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in erythrocyte compared to the control group. Single administration of EEPA (20 mg/kg b.w.) significantly reversed the trend. Presence of gallic acid, gentisic acid, and ortho-coumaric acid in EEPA was identified by HPLC analysis. Amongst these, the major phenolic constituent, gallic acid, exhibited significant bilirubin-lowering effect. These results suggested that P. amarus may be beneficial in reducing bilirubin level as well as oxidative stress in neonatal jaundice.

  5. Three-dimensionally porous graphene: A high-performance adsorbent for removal of albumin-bonded bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chun Fang; Gao, Qiang; Xia, Kai Sheng; Huang, Zhi Yuan; Han, Bo; Zhou, Cheng Gang

    2017-01-01

    The development of bilirubin adsorbents with high adsorption efficiencies towards albumin-bonded bilirubin is still a considerable challenge. In this work, a three-dimensionally porous graphene (3D-pGR) has been fabricated through a simple carbon dioxide (CO2) activation of thermally exfoliated graphite oxide (EGO). Intriguingly, the resultant 3D-pGR material showed hierarchically micro-meso-macroporous structure, high specific surface area of up to 843m(2)g(-1), and large pore volume as high as 2.71cm(3)g(-1). Besides, the large planar π-configuration structure of 3D-pGR made it possible to compete effectively with albumin for bilirubin binding. Taking advantages of these fantastic characteristics, the 3D-pGR was demonstrated to be extraordinarily efficient for bilirubin removal from a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-rich solution. Under optimized conditions, the maximum adsorption capacity of 3D-pGR for BSA-bonded bilirubin was up to 126.1mgg(-1), which is not only significantly higher than the adsorption capacities of currently available adsorbents towards albumin-bonded bilirubin, but also superior to those of many reported adsorbents towards free bilirubin. In addition, the hemolysis assay of 3D-pGR indicated that this material had negligible hemolysis effect. Findings from this study may open up important new possibilities for removal of protein-bonded toxins.

  6. The effect of bilirubin on the excitability of mitral cells in the olfactory bulb of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Juan; Zhou, Hui-Qun; Ye, Hai-bo; Li, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Wei-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is a common clinical phenomenon observed in various liver diseases. Previous studies have shown a correlation between smell disorders and bilirubin levels in patients with hepatic diseases. Bilirubin is a well-known neurotoxin; however, its effect on neurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB), the first relay in the olfactory system, has not been examined. We investigated the effect of bilirubin (>3 μM) on mitral cells (MCs), the principal output neurons of the MOB. Bilirubin increased the frequency of spontaneous firing and the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). TTX completely blocked sEPSCs in almost all of the cells tested. Bilirubin activity was partially blocked by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepro pionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonists. Furthermore, we found that bilirubin increased the frequency of intrinsic firing independent of synaptic transmission in MCs. Our findings suggest that bilirubin enhances glutamatergic transmission and strengthens intrinsic firing independent of synaptic transmission, all of which cause hyperexcitability in MCs. Our findings provide the basis for further investigation into the mechanisms underlying olfactory dysfunction that are often observed in patients with severe liver disease. PMID:27611599

  7. Application of phenol red as a marker ligand for bilirubin binding site at subdomain IIA on human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Sochacka, Jolanta

    2015-10-01

    The drug-bilirubin interaction for all drugs administered especially to infants with hyperbilirubinemia should be evaluated for their ability to displace bilirubin and vice versa. In order to examine whether phenol red (PhRed) can be used as a marker for bilirubin binding site located in subdomain IIA the interaction between PhRed and human serum albumin (HSA) in buffer solution or in normal and pathological sera solutions with different HSA:bilirubin molar ratio was investigated using absorption/absorption difference spectroscopy and molecular docking method. Six sulfonamides representing the binding site in the subdomain IIA and known to influence the binding of bilirubin were used for the PhRed displacement studies. The absorption spectra for PhRed completely bound to HSA showed significant differences in the spectral characteristic relative to the spectral profile of free PhRed. The intensity of the peak originating from the bivalent anionic form of dye was strongly reduced and the maximum peak position was red-shifted by 12 nm. The binding constant (K) of the bivalent anionic form of PhRed, calculated from absorbance data, was 1.61 · 10(4) L mol(-1). The variations of the absorption and absorption difference spectra of PhRed in the presence of HSA-bilirubin complex were indicative of the inhibition of PhRed binding process by bilirubin. Binding of PhRed carried out in the presence of sulfonamides showed that drugs and PhRed have a common site which also involves bilirubin. In agreement with the results of the spectroscopic analysis and molecular docking it was concluded that PhRed may be applied as a marker in the study of the binding of drugs to high-affinity bilirubin binding site.

  8. Looking to the horizon: the role of bilirubin in the development and prevention of age-related chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Wallner, Marlies; Mölzer, Christine; Gazzin, Silvia; Bulmer, Andrew Cameron; Tiribelli, Claudio; Vitek, Libor

    2015-07-01

    Bilirubin, the principal tetrapyrrole, bile pigment and catabolite of haem, is an emerging biomarker of disease resistance, which may be related to several recently documented biological functions. Initially believed to be toxic in infants, the perception of bilirubin has undergone a transformation: it is now considered to be a molecule that may promote health in adults. Data from the last decade demonstrate that mildly elevated serum bilirubin levels are strongly associated with reduced prevalence of chronic diseases, particularly cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), as well as CVD-related mortality and risk factors. Recent data also link bilirubin to other chronic diseases, including cancer and Type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to all-cause mortality. Therefore, there is evidence to suggest that bilirubin is a biomarker for reduced chronic disease prevalence and a predictor of all-cause mortality, which is of important clinical significance. In the present review, detailed information on the association between bilirubin and all-cause mortality, as well as the pathological conditions of CVD, cancer, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, is provided. The mechanistic background concerning how bilirubin and its metabolism may influence disease prevention and its clinical relevance is also discussed. Given that the search for novel biomarkers of these diseases, as well as for novel therapeutic modalities, is a key research objective for the near future, bilirubin represents a promising candidate, meeting the criteria of a biomarker, and should be considered more carefully in clinical practice as a molecule that might provide insights into disease resistance. Clearly, however, greater molecular insight is warranted to support and strengthen the conclusion that bilirubin can prevent disease, with future research directions also proposed.

  9. Bilirubin activates transcription of HIF-1α in human proximal tubular cells cultured in the physiologic oxygen content.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Gyun; Ahn, Shin-Young; Lee, Eun Seong; Kim, Sejoong; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Chin, Ho Jun

    2014-09-01

    The expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is influenced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Effect of bilirubin on HIF-1 expression in proximal tubular cells was investigated under physiological oxygen concentration, which is relative hypoxic condition mimicking oxygen content in the medulla of renal tissue. The human kidney (HK2) cells were cultured in 5% oxygen with or without bilirubin. HIF-1α protein expression was increased by bilirubin treatment at 0.01-0.2 mg/dL concentration. The messenger RNA expression of HIF-1α was increased by 1.69±0.05 folds in the cells cultured with 0.1 mg/dL bilirubin, compared to the control cells. The inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR, PI3K/AKT, and ERK 1/2 pathways did not attenuate increased HIF-1α expression by bilirubin. HIF-1α expression decreased by 10 µM exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2); scavenger of ROS with or without bilirubin in the HK2 cells increased HIF-1α concentration more than that in the cells without bilirubin. Exogenous H2O2 decreased the phosphorylation of P70S6 kinase, which was completely reversed by bilirubin treatment. Knockdown of NOX4 gene by small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased HIF-1α mRNA expression. In coonclusion, bilirubin enhances HIF-1α transcription as well as the up-regulation of HIF-1α protein translation through the attenuation of ROS and subunits of NADPH oxidase.

  10. Gene therapy with bilirubin-UDP-glucuronosyltransferase in the Gunn rat model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Murphree, S S; Willer, S S; Bolli, R; French, B A

    1998-03-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome type 1 (CN type 1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by nonhemolytic jaundice resulting from mutations to the gene encoding bilirubin-UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UDPGT). The Gunn rat is an accurate animal model of this disease because the bilirubin-UDPGT gene in this strain carries a premature stop codon. The primary objective of this study was to complement this deficiency in vivo using liver-directed gene therapy. The efficiency of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5)-mediated gene transfer to the neonatal rat liver was first assessed by intravenous (i.v.) injection of an Ad5 vector carrying a nuclear-localized LacZ gene. An Ad5 vector expressing the cDNA encoding human bilirubin-UDPGT (Ad5/CMV/hUG-Br1) was then generated and injected i.v. into neonatal Gunn rats. Plasma samples were collected and bilirubin levels were determined at regular intervals. Although the mean level of bilirubin in homozygous Gunn rats 1-2 days after birth was already 14.5-fold higher than that of heterozygous siblings, treatment with Ad5/CMV/hUG-Br1 reduced plasma bilirubin to normal levels within 1 week. Plasma bilirubin in the treated homozygous rats remained normal for 4 weeks before gradually climbing to intermediate levels that were approximately half that of untreated homozygotes by 12 weeks. Administration of Ad5-mediated gene therapy to neonatal Gunn rats effectively complemented the deficiency in bilirubin-UDPGT, resulting in substantial reductions in plasma bilirubin over a 3-month period. The efficacy of Ad5-mediated gene therapy in neonates suggests that this approach might be effective against other hepatic disorders, including autosomal recessive deficiencies in lipid metabolism and vascular homeostasis.

  11. Reversible Encephalopathy due to Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Patient with Bipolar I Disorder: A Cautionary Report

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Neel; Landry, Katherine B.; Fargason, Rachel E.; Birur, Badari

    2017-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is an FDA-approved medication widely prescribed for seizures, migraines, and mixed or manic episodes in bipolar disorder. Hyperammonemia is a rare complication of VPA use, which can result in high morbidity and occasionally fatal encephalopathy. The scant literature on Valproate Induced Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy (VIHE) is characterized by acute onset of decreasing level of consciousness, drowsiness, lethargy which in rare instances can lead to seizures, stupor, coma, and persistent morbidity and cortical damage. Below we describe a case report of a patient with Bipolar I Disorder with no primary evidence of hepatic dysfunction that was initiated on VPA and olanzapine to address manic and psychotic symptoms. This patient subsequently developed elevated ammonia (NH4) levels that led to a reversible encephalopathy. This cautionary case report highlights the potential for a rare but serious complication from VPA, a medication increasingly used in both neurologic and neuropsychiatric settings. It is imperative that clinicians perform a thorough physical, neurological and diagnostic evaluation, routinely check NH4 and VPA levels when prescribing these agents and exercise caution when VPA is concomitantly prescribed with antipsychotics and cytochrome P450 inducing antiepileptic medications. PMID:28138203

  12. Ammonia and amino acid profiles in liver cirrhosis: effects of variables leading to hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Holecek, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Hyperammonemia and severe amino acid imbalances play central role in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the article is demonstrated that the main source of ammonia in cirrhotic subjects is activated breakdown of glutamine (GLN) in enterocytes and the kidneys and the main source of GLN is ammonia detoxification to GLN in the brain and skeletal muscle. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA; valine, leucine, and isoleucine) decrease due to activated GLN synthesis in muscle. Aromatic amino acids (AAA; phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan) and methionine increase due to portosystemic shunts and reduced ability of diseased liver. The effects on aminoacidemia of the following variables that may affect the course of liver disease are discussed: nutritional status, starvation, protein intake, inflammation, acute hepatocellular damage, bleeding from varices, portosystemic shunts, hepatic cancer, and renal failure. It is concluded that (1) neither ammonia nor amino acid concentrations correlate closely with the severity of liver disease; (2) BCAA/AAA ratio could be used as a good index of liver impairment and for early detection of derangements in amino acid metabolism; (3) variables potentially leading to overt encephalopathy exert substantial but uneven effects; and (4) careful monitoring of ammonia and aminoacidemia may discover important break points in the course of liver disease and indicate appropriate therapeutic approach. Of special importance might be isoleucine deficiency in bleeding from varices, arginine deficiency in sepsis, and a marked rise of GLN and ammonia levels that may appear in all events leading to HE.

  13. Wavelength-dependence of the relative rate constants for the main geometric and structural photoisomerization of bilirubin IX alpha bound to human serum albumin. Demonstration of green light at 510 nm as the most effective wavelength in photochemical changes from (ZZ)-bilirubin IX alpha to (EZ)-cyclobilirubin IX alpha via (EZ)-bilirubin.

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, S; Itoh, S; Isobe, K

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics for the quantitatively important reaction: (Formula: see text) that is, the photochemical interconversion between bilirubin and its geometric and structural photoisomers bound to human serum albumin in aqueous solution when various wavelengths of monochromatic light were used, were assayed by h.p.l.c. In order to clarify the wavelength-dependence of the relative rate constants in the individual steps, a light-source with a half-bandwidth of 10 nm was used at increments of 20 nm, in the range from 410 nm to 550 nm. We describe for the first time studies on the wavelength-dependence of rate constants in geometric and structural photoisomerization reactions in vitro of (ZZ)-bilirubin or (EZ)-bilirubin bound to human serum albumin, especially the relative rate constants of cyclization of (EZ)-bilirubin into (EZ)-cyclobilirubin. Because studies in vitro have demonstrated that the wavelengths from 350 to 450 nm are mutagenic, the results obtained indicated that the safest and ideal light-source for phototherapy is green light of 510 nm, which keeps (ZE)-bilirubin concentrations as low as possible, as shown by a maximal value of k2 at 510 nm and a relatively low value of k1 at 510 nm. This light-source still ensures the substantial absorption of (ZZ)-bilirubin, which is the precursor of (EZ)-bilirubin, the intermediate in (EZ)-cyclobilirubin formation and, furthermore, as shown by the maximal value of k5 and a considerable value of k4 at 510 nm, promotes the cyclization of (EZ)-bilirubin derived from (ZZ)-bilirubin even though k3 at 510 nm also shows a peak value. PMID:3790073

  14. Higher Grades and Repeated Recurrence of Hepatic Encephalopathy May Be Related to High Serum Manganese Levels.

    PubMed

    Kobtan, Abdelrahman A; El-Kalla, Ferial S; Soliman, Hanan H; Zakaria, Soha S; Goda, Mohamed A

    2016-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious complication of liver failure. Until now, the precise pathophysiologic mechanisms are not fully determined. It has been demonstrated that manganese plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. Therefore, we studied manganese levels in serum of cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy in relation to grading and recurrence of hepatic encephalopathy. One hundred persons were enrolled in the study, 80 cirrhotic patients with or without encephalopathy and 20 healthy controls. Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed clinically and by laboratory findings. Serum manganese levels were measured in all participants. The grading of hepatic encephalopathy was significantly correlated to the severity of liver dysfunction. The mean serum manganese level was significantly higher in cirrhotic patients than in controls and in cirrhotic patients with encephalopathy than in those without encephalopathy. It was also significantly higher in patients with advanced grading of hepatic encephalopathy. Serum manganese level was positively correlated to number of recurrences of encephalopathy during a 6-month follow-up period. Serum manganese levels were able to predict recurrence of hepatic encephalopathy within 6 months following the episode. Serum manganese levels are positively correlated to the modified Child-Pugh score of cirrhosis as well as grading and number of recurrences of hepatic encephalopathy. Higher manganese levels seem to be related to worsening of the condition, and its measurement may be used as a predictor of repeated recurrences.

  15. Liquor Bilirubin Levels in Normal Pregnancy: A Reassessment of Early Prediction of Haemolytic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Murray, John; Norrie, D. L.; Ruthven, C. R. J

    1970-01-01

    A comparison was made between chemically and spectrophotometrically determined concentrations of total bile pigment in the liquor amnii. For the period 16 to 26 weeks' gestation the upper limit of normal bile pigment to protein ratio was found to be 0·4. Levels above this would be required as an indication for intrauterine transfusion. In 110 cases of isoimmunization of pregnancy these criteria were applied in the diagnosis of severity of the condition. The ratio of the bile pigment to protein was used rather than a simple bile pigment measurement, and found to be valuable. Nevertheless, it is important to emphasize that fallacious high bilirubin readings may arise by using whatever method, particularly owing to bilirubin and other breakdown products of blood contaminating the liquor. PMID:4991485

  16. The antioxidant effect of free bilirubin on cumene-hydroperoxide treated human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Yesilkaya, A; Altinayak, R; Korgun, D K

    2000-07-01

    To examine the antioxidant effect of bilirubin (BR) on leukocyte, we treated leukocytes obtained from healthy subjects with an oxidant and various concentrations of BR. High concentrations of BR decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and catalase activities, increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, but had no effect on glutathione (GSH) concentration. Our results showed that under physiological conditions, BR has an antioxidant effect only in high concentrations.

  17. Decreased neonatal jaundice readmission rate after implementing hyperbilirubinemia guidelines and universal screening for bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Alkalay, Arie L; Bresee, Catherine J; Simmons, Charles F

    2010-09-01

    Readmission rate for neonatal jaundice approximate 10 per 1000 live births. After applying hyperbilirubinemia guidelines and universal screening for bilirubin in term and near-term newborns, the readmission rate declined significantly from 24 to 3.7 per 1000 live births. Decreased readmission rate for neonatal jaundice may reduce kernicterus rate and health care costs. Further studies are necessary to explore these potential benefits.

  18. Association of Low Serum Concentration of Bilirubin with Increased Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    concentrations were decreased in individuals baseline tracing obtained before the subjects reached with CAD, whereas some of the liver-function enzyme age...Angiographic Data lis, IN). After July 1987, dextran sulfate, Mr 50 000 Summary statistics for the two groups are given in (Ciba Corning, Oberlin, OH), was...low serum bilirubin con- activity or increases in iron stores (9). centrations have been associated with good health, and It remains to be seen

  19. Antioxidant potential of bilirubin-accelerated wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ram, Mahendra; Singh, Vishakha; Kumar, Dhirendra; Kumawat, Sanjay; Gopalakrishnan, Anu; Lingaraju, Madhu C; Gupta, Priyanka; Tandan, Surendra Kumar; Kumar, Dinesh

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative injury is markedly responsible for wound complications in diabetes mellitus. The biological actions of bilirubin may be relevant to prevent oxidant-mediated cell death, as bilirubin application at a low concentration scavenges reactive oxygen species. Hence, we hypothesized that topical bilirubin application might improve wound healing in diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in adult male Wistar rats, which were divided into two groups, i.e., diabetic control and diabetic treated. Non-diabetic healthy rats were also taken as healthy control group. Wound area was measured on days 3, 7, 14, and 19 post-wounding. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) were estimated in the granulation tissue. There was a significant increase in percent wound closure in healthy control and diabetic treated rats on days 7, 14, and 19, as compared to diabetic control rats on days 7, 14, and 19. There was significant decrease in MDA levels on days 7, 14, and 19 in diabetic treated rats, as compared to diabetic control rats. Levels of GSH were significantly increased on days 3, 7, 14, and 19 in diabetic treated rats, as compared to diabetic control rats. GPx, SOD, and CAT activities were significantly higher on days 3, 7, and 14 in diabetic treated rats, as compared to diabetic control rats. The findings indicate that bilirubin is effective in reducing the oxidant status in wounds of diabetic rats which might have accelerated wound healing in these rats.

  20. Influence of bilirubin and other antioxidants on nitrergic relaxation in the pig gastric fundus.

    PubMed

    Colpaert, E E; Lefebvre, R A

    2000-03-01

    1. The influence of several antioxidants (bilirubin, urate, ascorbate, alpha-tocopherol, glutathione (GSH), Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the manganese SOD mimic EUK-8) on nitrergic relaxations induced by either exogenous nitric oxide (NO; 10(-5) M) or electrical field stimulation (4 Hz; 10 s and 3 min) was studied in the pig gastric fundus. 2. Ascorbate (5x10(-4) M), alpha-tocopherol (4x10(-4) M), SOD (300 - 1000 u ml(-1)) and EUK-8 (3x10(-4) M) did not influence the relaxations to exogenous NO. In the presence of GSH (5x10(-4) M), the short-lasting relaxation to NO became biphasic, potentiated and prolonged. Urate (4x10(-4) M) and bilirubin (2x10(-4) M) also potentiated the relaxant effect of NO. None of the antioxidants influenced the electrically evoked relaxations. 3. 6-Anilino-5,8-quinolinedione (LY83583; 10(-5) M) had no influence on nitrergic nerve stimulation but nearly abolished the relaxant response to exogenous NO. Urate and GSH completely prevented this inhibitory effect, while it was partially reversed by SOD and bilirubin. Ascorbate, alpha-tocopherol and EUK-8 were without effect. 4. Hydroquinone (10(-4) M) did not affect the electrically induced nitrergic relaxations, but markedly reduced NO-induced relaxations. The inhibition of exogenous NO by hydroquinone was completely prevented by urate and GSH. SOD and ascorbate afforded partial protection, while bilirubin, EUK-8 and alpha-tocopherol were ineffective. 5. Hydroxocobalamin (10(-4) M) inhibited relaxations to NO by 50%, but not the electrically induced responses. Full protection versus this inhibitory effect was obtained with urate, GSH and alpha-tocopherol. 6. These results strengthen the hypothesis that several endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms, enzymatic as well as non-enzymatic, might play a role in the nitrergic neurotransmission process.

  1. Diagnosis of acute cholecystitis using hepatobiliary scan with technetium-99m PIPIDA

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, M.T.; Sheldon, M.I.; dos Remedios, L.V.; Weber, P.M.

    1981-09-01

    Sixty patients were evaluated for acute abdominal pain using technetium-99m PIPIDA hepatobiliary imaging. The sensitivity of the test was 90.6 percent in all patients and the accuracy was 93.3 percent. In the evaluation of acutely ill patients with right upper quadrant pain, fever, nausea and vomiting, hepatobiliary imaging with PIPIDA is the preferred test for diagnosing acute cholecystitis. If the test is positive, disease of the gallbladder and probably acute cholecystitis are present. Early operation can proceed if desirable. If the test is negative and the bilirubin level is less than 5.0 mg/dl, acute cholecystitis is not present. In such cases conservative treatment is appropriate, and follow-up tests should be performed to evaluate the possibility of chronic cholecystitis. When the bilirubin level exceeds 5.0 mg/dl, the test is often indeterminate.

  2. Delta bilirubin: absorption spectra, molar absorptivity, and reactivity in the diazo reaction.

    PubMed

    Doumas, B T; Wu, T W; Jendrzejczak, B

    1987-06-01

    Delta bilirubin (B delta), isolated from serum, has an absorption maximum near 440 nm and a molar absorptivity of 72,000 L mol-1cm-1 in either Tris HCl (0.1 mol/L, pH 8.5) or phosphate (0.13 mol/L, pH 7.4) buffer. This absorptivity exceeds by approximately 50% and 59%, respectively, that of unconjugated bilirubin in the same buffers. This finding suggests that substantial errors can be incurred in direct spectrophotometry of bilirubins in serum. In the total diazo (TBIL) assay (Clin Chem 1985;31:1779-89), the color yield from B delta increases by 10% as the final diazo concentration is increased from 0.27 to 0.81 mmol/L. In the direct (DBIL) assay, if done in HCl (50 mmol/L), B delta yields approximately 15% more color as the diazo concentration is increased from 0.51 to 1.53 mmol/L, whereas in acetate buffer (0.4 mol/L, pH 4.7) the corresponding color yield is 25% greater. However, the absolute color yield for the reaction in HCl exceeds that in acetate buffer. In both the TBIL and the DBIL assay, B delta reacts slowly, nearly complete reaction requiring 10 min. Thus, B delta may be seriously underestimated in diazo (especially DBIL) methods in which short reaction times (20 s to 1 min) are used.

  3. Interference of Bilirubin in the Determination of Magnesium with Methyl Thymol Blue

    PubMed Central

    Maksinovic, Rada; Ketin, Sonja; Biocanin, Rade

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Jaundice is a disease named for the yellow color of the skin. This color is the result of elevated levels of bilirubin in the blood serum. In Roma from Krusevac region in the last few years have seen the emergence of jaundice. Material and methods: In 80 of them (40 suffering and 40 from control group) were performed tests of numerous parameters in the laboratories of the Health Center in Krusevac. Magnesium was determined by spectrophotometry with methyl thymol blue, titanium yellow and blue xylidene. Bilirubin was determined by Jandrešek Grofov’s method. Results: The results were within the expectations, in addition to magnesium which was determined with methyl thymol blue. In all patients suffering from jaundice concentration of magnesium (0.67 ±0.14 mmol/l) statistically was significantly lower than tested of the control group (0.91± 0.059 mmol/). There is no theoretical data to reduce the concentration of magnesium in serum as a result of jaundice. That’s why we determined magnesium both in the control group and in sufferings with two methods as the titanium yellow, and xylidene blew. With these two methods we obtained results that were examined were within normal limits. Conclusion: This has led us to conclude that the determination of bilirubin interferes with magnesium methyl thymol blue. PMID:26244045

  4. Point-of-care device for quantification of bilirubin in skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Alla, Suresh K; Huddle, Adam; Butler, Joshua D; Bowman, Peggy S; Clark, Joseph F; Beyette, Fred R

    2011-03-01

    Steady state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a nondestructive method for obtaining biochemical and physiological information from skin tissue. In medical conditions such as neonatal jaundice excess bilirubin in the blood stream diffuses into the surrounding tissue leading to a yellowing of the skin. Diffuse reflectance measurement of the skin tissue can provide real time assessment of the progression of a disease or a medical condition. Here we present a noninvasive point-of-care system that utilizes diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to quantifying bilirubin from skin reflectance spectra. The device consists of an optical system integrated with a signal processing algorithm. The device is then used as a platform to study two different spectral databases. The first spectral database is a jaundice animal model in which the jaundice reflectance spectra are synthesized from normal skin. The second spectral database is the spectral measurements collected on human volunteers to quantify the different chromophores and other physical properties of the tissue such as Hematocrit, Hemoglobin, etc. The initial trials from each of these spectral databases have laid the foundation to verify the performance of this bilirubin quantification device.

  5. Bilirubin oxidase from Magnaporthe oryzae: an attractive new enzyme for biotechnological applications

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Fabien; Gounel, Sébastien; Kjaergaard, Christian H.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2013-01-01

    A novel bilirubin oxidase (BOD), from the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, has been identified and isolated. The 64-kDa protein containing four coppers was successfully overexpressed in Pichia pastoris and purified to homogeneity in one step. Protein yield is more than 100 mg for 2 L culture, twice that of Myrothecium verrucaria. The kcat/Km ratio for conjugated bilirubin (1,513 mM −1 s−1) is higher than that obtained for the BOD from M. verrucaria expressed in native fungus (980 mM−1 s−1), with the lowest Km measured for any BOD highly desirable for detection of bilirubin in medical samples. In addition, this protein exhibits a half-life for deactivation >300 min at 37 °C, high stability at pH 7, and high tolerance towards urea, making it an ideal candidate for the elaboration of biofuel cells, powering implantable medical devices. Finally, this new BOD is efficient in decolorizing textile dyes such as Remazol brilliant Blue R, making it useful for environmentally friendly industrial applications. PMID:22350257

  6. A spectroscopic study of the wavelength-dependent photoisomerizations of bilirubins bound to human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoni, Marina; Agati, Giovanni; Pratesi, Riccardo; Persico, Maurizio

    2005-12-01

    The wavelength-dependent photoisomerizations of the asymmetric bilirubin BR-IXα and of the symmetric bilirubin-IIIα (BR-III) and mesobilirubin-XIIIα (MBR-XIII) bound to human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous solution were analysed with the help of an exciton coupling model. The modelling was based on the absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectra (bisignate Cotton effect). Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) of the free BR-IX molecule suggested the presence of two main bands of exciton coupling character in the blue region of the spectrum, and other weaker bands of charge transfer character at longer wavelengths. These peculiarities were taken into account to fit the photoisomerization quantum yields in the blue-green region as functions of the wavelength, obtaining the bandshape of the exciton coupling bands from the experimental CD spectra. The other excitons were extracted from the decomposition of the band resulting from the difference between the absorption spectrum and the sum (normalized-to-absorption) of the two CD excitons. We expressed photoisomerization quantum yields in terms of the sum of the contributions to photon absorption deriving from all the exciton states normalized to total absorption. For all the reversible photoprocesses of bilirubins and for the irreversible one of BR-IXα in HSA (i.e. lumirubin formation), we give reliable mean values of the individual state excitation probabilities and photoisomerization efficiencies in the pigment protein complex.

  7. Atypical presentation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Clinical and radiological characteristics in eclamptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Aracki-Trenkić, Aleksandra; Stojanov, Dragan; Trenkić, Milan; Radovanović, Zoran; Ignjatović, Jelena; Ristić, Saša; Trenkić-Bozinović, Marija

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an obstetric emergency frequently occurring in a pregnant or puerperal woman, manifested with an acute headache, consciousness impairment, seizures, and visual deficits and is associated with white matter changes predominantly affecting the posterior parietal and occipital lobes of the brain. Apart from the above-described typical location of the changes, the most common atypical location involves the brain stem and basal ganglia. Since magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more sensitive and specific imaging technique compared to computerized tomography, establishing the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with PRES is based mainly on MRI findings. It is particularly important not to exclude PRES as a possible diagnosis when we have the appropriate clinical presentation accompanied by the atypical radiological findings, since this clinical-radiological syndrome can often be manifested with an atypical MRI image. PMID:27322924

  8. Is it time to target gut dysbiosis and immune dysfunction in the therapy of hepatic encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Shawcross, Debbie L

    2015-05-01

    The development of overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in a patient with cirrhosis confers a damning prognosis with a 1-year mortality approaching 64%. This complex neuropsychiatric syndrome arises as a consequence of a dysfunctional gut-liver-brain axis. HE has been largely neglected over the past 30 years, with the reliance on therapies aimed at lowering ammonia production or increasing metabolism following the seminal observation that the hepatic urea cycle is the major mammalian ammonia detoxification pathway and is key in the pathogenesis of HE. The relationship with ammonia is more clear-cut in acute liver failure; but in cirrhosis, it has become apparent that inflammation is a key driver and that a disrupted microbiome resulting in gut dysbiosis, bacterial overgrowth and translocation, systemic endotoxemia and immune dysfunction may be more important drivers. Therefore, it is important to re-focus our efforts into developing therapies that modulate the disrupted microbiome or alleviating its downstream consequences.

  9. Outcome After Therapeutic Hypothermia in Term Neonates with Encephalopathy and a Syndromic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mrelashvili, Anna; Bonifacio, Sonia L.; Rogers, Elizabeth E.; Shimotake, Thomas K.; Glass, Hannah C.

    2015-01-01

    The large randomized, controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) excluded neonates with congenital disorders. The objective of this study was to report our experience using hypothermia in neonates with signs of HIE and a syndromic disorder or brain anomaly. Subjects were identified from a database of neonates admitted to the Neuro-Intensive Care Nursery at University of California, San Francisco. Of 169 patients fulfilling criteria for hypothermia, eight (5%) had a syndromic disorder, and were cooled as per guidelines for non-syndromic neonates. Perinatal characteristics of infants with and without syndromic disorder were not significantly different. Overall outcome was poor: 38% had evidence of acute HI injury, 3 subjects died, two survivors had low developmental quotient (DQ 25). The risk versus benefit of therapeutic hypothermia for HIE among neonates with congenital brain malformations or syndromic diagnoses is uncertain. PMID:25762585

  10. Neuromyelitis Optica in Pregnancy Complicated by Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome, Eclampsia and Fetal Death

    PubMed Central

    Igel, Catherine; Garretto, Diana; Robbins, Matthew S; Swerdlow, Michael; Judge, Nancy; Dayal, Ashlesha

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a demyelinating syndrome characterized by optic neuritis and acute myelitis with poor recovery and a progressive course. We report a poor outcome complicated by posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and eclampsia and review available literature and current evidence for anticipation of adverse fetal and maternal effects. After a pregnancy complicated by multiple admissions for painful NMO exacerbations, a primiparous patient with seropositive NMO presented at 31 + 3/7 weeks with eclampsia, HELLP and subsequent fetal death. MRI confirmed PRES. NMO may be associated with eclampsia and leads to adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Posited mechanisms include antibody-mediated placental damage and a heightened risk of eclampsia-associated PRES. Further characterization of the course of NMO and its relationship with pregnancy outcomes in larger series would be invaluable. PMID:25584107

  11. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following Roux en Y gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Azra

    2015-01-01

    Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE) is a serious neurological disorder characterized by a classical triad of acute mental confusion, ataxia, and opthalmoplegia due to thiamine deficiency. It was initially described in chronic alcoholics; however, any condition resulting in poor nutritional status places the patient at risk of WE. Bariatric surgery is now considered as an emergent cause of WE. The number of bariatric surgery is increasing for morbid obesity. We present a case of a 40-year-old male who presented with confusion and difficulty in maintaining the balance while walking 3 months after Roux en Y gastric bypass surgery. Diagnosis of WE was made on clinical ground and confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, which showed bilateral hyperintense signals in paramedian thalami. Parenteral thiamine replacement was started, and patient showed complete recovery. PMID:26620994

  12. Concise review of current concepts on nomenclature and pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Savlan, Ilona; Liakina, Valentina; Valantinas, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric complication of liver cirrhosis the symptoms of which may vary from imperceptible to severe, invaliding, and even lethal. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is also important because of its tendency to impair patients' cognitive functions and quality of life. The polyetiological pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is intensively studied. A general consensus exists that not only excess of ammonia but also inflammatory, oxidative, and other processes are significant in the development of hepatic encephalopathy.

  13. The Neuropathology of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Kiernan, Patrick T.; Alvarez, Victor E.

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Most instances of CTE occur in association with the play of sports, but CTE has also been reported in association with blast injuries and other neurotrauma. Symptoms of CTE include behavioral and mood changes, memory loss, cognitive impairment and dementia. Like many other neurodegenerative diseases, CTE is diagnosed with certainty only by neuropathological examination of brain tissue. CTE is a tauopathy characterized by the deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein as neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles and neurites in striking clusters around small blood vessels of the cortex, typically at the sulcal depths. Severely affected cases show p-tau pathology throughout the brain. Abnormalities in phosphorylated 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein are found in most cases of CTE; beta-amyloid is identified in 43%, associated with age. Given the importance of sports participation and physical exercise to physical and psychological health as well as disease resilience, it is critical to identify the genetic risk factors for CTE as well as to understand how other variables, such as stress, age at exposure, gender, substance abuse and other exposures, contribute to the development of CTE. PMID:25904048

  14. The neuropathology of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Stein, Thor D; Kiernan, Patrick T; Alvarez, Victor E

    2015-05-01

    Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Most instances of CTE occur in association with the play of sports, but CTE has also been reported in association with blast injuries and other neurotrauma. Symptoms of CTE include behavioral and mood changes, memory loss, cognitive impairment and dementia. Like many other neurodegenerative diseases, CTE is diagnosed with certainty only by neuropathological examination of brain tissue. CTE is a tauopathy characterized by the deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein as neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles and neurites in striking clusters around small blood vessels of the cortex, typically at the sulcal depths. Severely affected cases show p-tau pathology throughout the brain. Abnormalities in phosphorylated 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein are found in most cases of CTE; beta-amyloid is identified in 43%, associated with age. Given the importance of sports participation and physical exercise to physical and psychological health as well as disease resilience, it is critical to identify the genetic risk factors for CTE as well as to understand how other variables, such as stress, age at exposure, gender, substance abuse and other exposures, contribute to the development of CTE.

  15. Effect of Blue Light on the Electronic and Structural Properties of Bilirubin Isomers: Insights into the Photoisomerization and Photooxidation Processes.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Lucas C; Savedra, Ranylson M L; Silva, Mariana M; Ferreira, Giovana R; Bianchi, Rodrigo F; Siqueira, Melissa F

    2015-08-27

    The central process of neonatal phototherapy by employing blue light has been attributed to the configurational conversion of (4Z,15Z)-bilirubin to (4Z,15E). Indeed, photoisomerization is the early photochemical event during this procedure. However, in this paper, we show that the bilirubin solutions under continuous blue light exposure undergo a photooxidation process. To ascertain the role of this photodegradation in the phototherapy, we evaluated UV–visible absorption spectra obtained from bilirubin solutions in CHCl3, milli-Q water, and physiological saline, as well as FTIR spectroscopy for bilirubin in CHCl3. These analyses also showed that the first 2 h of phototherapy are the most relevant period. In addition, quantum molecular modeling using B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and ZINDO/S-CIS was performed to evaluate the electronic and structural properties of four bilirubin isomers, showing that the (4Z,15E)-bilirubin isomer is the most polar configuration. Therefore, it can be more soluble in aqueous environments than the other configurations. This clarifies why this is the faster isomer excreted during the phototherapy.

  16. Effect of bilirubin concentration on the risk of diabetic complications: A meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo; Wu, Xiaomei; Bi, Yifei; Yang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes can affect many parts of the body and is associated with serious complications. Oxidative stress is a major contributor in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications and bilirubin has been shown to have antioxidant effects. The number of studies on the effect of bilirubin on the risk of diabetic complications has increased, but the results are inconsistent. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to determine the relationship between bilirubin concentration and the risk of diabetic complications, and to investigate if there was a dose-response relationship. We carried out an extensive search in multiple databases. A fixed or random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled estimates. We conducted a dose-response meta-analysis to analyze the association between these estimates. A total of 132,240 subjects from 27 included studies were analyzed in our meta-analysis. A negative nonlinear association between bilirubin concentration and the risk of diabetic complications was identified (OR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.73–0.81), with a nonlinear association. We also found that there was a negative association between bilirubin concentration and the risk of diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that bilirubin may play a protective role in the occurrence of diabetic complications. PMID:28134328

  17. Mildly elevated serum total bilirubin levels are negatively associated with carotid atherosclerosis among elderly persons with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Ryuichi; Ninomiya, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Yoichi; Kasai, Yoshihisa; Kusunoki, Tomo; Ohtsuka, Nobuyuki; Kumagi, Teru; Abe, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is strongly associated with several mechanisms of tissue damage such as oxidative stress. Serum bilirubin may have a beneficial role in preventing oxidative changes in cardiovascular disease (CVD). Limited information is available on whether serum bilirubin is an independent confounding factor for carotid atherosclerosis among elderly persons with type 2 diabetes. The study subjects were 169 men aged 79 ± 8 (mean ± SD) years and 205 women aged 81 ± 8 years that were enrolled consecutively from patients in the medical department. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque were derived via B-mode ultrasonography. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that serum total bilirubin (β = -0.160) was significantly associated with carotid IMT. Compared to subjects with a serum total bilirubin of tertile-1 (0.13-0.58 mg/dL), the multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of carotid IMT ≥1.0 mm including plaque and carotid plaque was 0.46 (0.23-0.93) and 0.32 (0.17-0.60) in the Tertile-3 group (0.87-1.93 mg/dL), respectively. Next, data were further stratified by gender, age, smoking status, medication and prevalence of CVD. There were no significant differences in serum total bilirubin levels between selected subgroups. Our data demonstrated a negative association between serum total bilirubin and carotid atherosclerosis among elderly persons with type 2 diabetes.

  18. Does corticosteroid treatment cause prolonged recovery and increased total bilirubin level in severe ADAMTS-13-deficient TTP patient?

    PubMed

    Sayiner, Zeynel Abidin; Acik, Didar Yanardag; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Subari, Salih; Mete, Ayse Ozlem; Dai, M Sinan

    2015-10-01

    A 41-year-old female patient complaining of fatigue, headache, mild confusion, and rush on her lower extremities was admitted to our emergency department. Laboratory tests revealed that he had anemia, thrombocytopenia, and increased levels of indirect bilirubin and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) in blood tests. Direct and indirect Coombs tests were negative, and fragmented erythrocytes were observed in peripheral blood smears. The patient was diagnosed with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). The best supportive care was provided. Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) and 1 mg/kg methylprednisolone treatments were administered. On the 10th day of treatment, LDH level and fragmented red blood cells in peripheral blood smear were decreased, but his direct and indirect bilirubin levels increased despite the fact that he was treated with 1 mg/kg methylprednisolone and TPE. The patient had severe ADAMTS-13 deficiency. After discontinued steroids treatment, his bilirubin level normalized within 4 days. On the 4th day after bilirubin level normalized, vincristine treatment was administered. TPE was also continued. There was no consensus about the optimal schedule for discontinuing plasmapheresis therapy, and also we observed total bilirubin level improvement with discontinued corticosteroid treatment. In this case, corticosteroid treatment was linked with the increase of total bilirubin level in severe ADAMTS-13-deficient TTP patient.

  19. Usefulness of serum bilirubin levels as a biomarker for long-term clinical outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Choi, Dong-Hyun; Lim, Leejin; Lee, Young-Min; Kang, Joon Tae; Chae, Seung Seok; Ki, Young-Jae; Song, Heesang; Koh, Young-Youp

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of serum total bilirubin on the development of adverse outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) besides high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) and N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Serum total bilirubin, hs-cTnT, and NT-proBNP were analyzed in 372 patients who underwent PCI. The primary endpoint was cardiac death. There were 21 events of cardiac death during a mean of 25.8 months of follow-up. When the serum total bilirubin cut-off level (median value) was set to 0.58 mg/dL using the receiver operating characteristic curve, the sensitivity was 95.2 % and the specificity was 51.0 % for differentiating between the group with cardiac death and the group without cardiac death. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the lower serum total bilirubin group (<0.58 mg/dL) had a significantly higher cardiac death rate than the higher serum total bilirubin group (≥0.58 mg/dL) (10.4 vs. 0.6 %, log-rank: P = 0.0001). In conclusion, low serum total bilirubin is a predictive marker for cardiac death after PCI.

  20. High serum total bilirubin as a protective factor against hip bone loss in healthy middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom-Jun; Koh, Jung-Min; Ahn, Seong Hee; Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Eun Hee; Bae, Sung Jin; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Choe, Jae Won; Kim, Ghi Su

    2013-06-01

    Bilirubin is known to have a physiologic role as an antioxidant that efficiently scavenges peroxyl radicals and suppresses oxidation, and oxidative stress has detrimental effects on bone metabolism. In the present study, we performed a 3-year longitudinal study of healthy middle-aged men, investigating the association between serum total bilirubin concentrations and annualized changes in bone mineral density (BMD). The study enrolled a total of 917 Korean men aged 40 years or older who had undergone comprehensive routine health examinations with an average follow-up interval of 3 years. BMD at proximal femur sites was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry using the same equipment at baseline and follow-up. The overall mean annualized rates of bone loss at the total femur, femoral neck, and trochanter were -0.25 %/year, -0.34 %/year, and -0.44 %/year, respectively. After adjustment for potential confounders, the rates of bone loss at all proximal femur sites were significantly attenuated in a dose-response fashion across increasing bilirubin concentrations (P = 0.006-0.046). Moreover, compared to subjects in the lowest bilirubin quartile category, those in the highest bilirubin quartile category showed significantly less bone loss at all proximal femur sites after adjustment for confounding factors (P = 0.010-0.048). This study provides the first clinical evidence that serum total bilirubin could be a protective marker against future bone loss, especially in subjects without liver diseases.

  1. Calcineurin Inhibitors Associated Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Turun; Rao, Zhengsheng; Tan, Qiling; Qiu, Yang; Liu, Jinpeng; Huang, Zhongli; Wang, Xianding; Lin, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare neurologic side effect of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) with poorly understood clinical features. We report cases of 2 patients with PRES developing after kidney transplantation and summarize PRES clinical features through a literature review. The 1st case was a 28-year-old man who received a kidney transplant from a deceased donor. Initial immunosuppressive therapy consisted of tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil/prednisolone. He developed headache and blurred vision with visual field loss15 days after transplantation and generalized seizures 4 days later. The 2nd case was a 34-year-old man who received a living kidney transplant. His initial immunosuppressive therapy comprised tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil/prednisolone. Two months after transplantation, he developed seizures. Both patients were diagnosed with PRES based on neurological symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings; they recovered after switching from tacrolimus to either a cyclosporine or a lower tacrolimus dose. CNI-associated PRES is an acute neurological syndrome with seizures, encephalopathy, visual abnormalities, headache, focal neurological deficits, and nausea/vomiting. It is always accompanied by hypertension. A fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signal MRI scan typically shows reversible subcortical white matter changes in the posterior cerebral hemisphere that usually occur within the 1st month after transplantation. CNI-associated PRES has a generally favorable prognosis with early diagnosis and prompt treatment including alternating or discontinuing CNIs and blood pressure control. CNI-associated PRES should be considered in patients exhibiting acute neurological symptoms after transplantation. Early diagnosis and immediate treatment are critical for a favorable prognosis. PMID:27057842

  2. Electroencephalogram of Age-Dependent Epileptic Encephalopathies in Infancy and Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Kisiel, Lily C.; Nickels, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy syndromes are disorders in which the epileptiform abnormalities are thought to contribute to a progressive cerebral dysfunction. Characteristic electroencephalogram findings have an important diagnostic value in classification of epileptic encephalopathy syndromes. In this paper, we focus on electroencephalogram findings of childhood epileptic encephalopathy syndromes and provide sample illustrations. PMID:24024028

  3. 77 FR 29914 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products AGENCY... live bovines and products derived from bovines with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This... with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Comments on the proposed rule were required to......

  4. [Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM): its diagnostic criteria and therapy].

    PubMed

    Hara, Toshiro

    2013-05-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated central nervous system disorder in an individual with genetic susceptibility. It is characterized by acute or subacute onset of multifocal neurologic deficits with encephalopathy, often following a viral illness or vaccination. Since ADEM is diverse in its clinical features, the diagnostic criteria of ADEM require the exclusion of other etiologies. In this review, I will explain the diagnostic algorism and criteria, and therapy of ADEM.

  5. Bilirubin conjugates in bile of man and rat in the normal state and in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Fevery, J.; Damme, B. Van; Michiels, R.; Groote, J. De; Heirwegh, K. P. M.

    1972-01-01

    Conjugates of bilirubin were studied in normal bile of man and rat, and in bile of liver patients. In general human bile was obtained by duodenal intubation. In addition T-tube bile was examined in patients operated on for mechanical obstruction. The bile pigment compositions of duodenal and T-tube bile were similar in two patients where comparison was possible. Obstruction of the bile duct in rats was used as an animal model for obstructive jaundice. Diazotized ethyl anthranilate was used for determination of total conjugated bile pigment and for thin-layer chromatography (t.l.c.) analysis of the derived azopigments. The available t.l.c. procedures are versatile and allow rapid and quantitative analysis. A variety of conjugated azopigments can be distinguished. With chloroform, negligible amounts of unconjugated bilirubin are extracted from bile of man. Therefore, the percentage of monoconjugated bile pigments present in the initial bile sample can be calculated from the percentage of azodipyrrole found after diazotization. Normal bile from man and rat yields similar azopigment patterns. The dominant component is azopigment-δ (azodipyrrole β-D-monoglucuronoside). Small amounts of azopigments with complex conjugating structures (γ-azopigments) are present in both cases. Human bile further yields small amounts of azopigments containing xylose or glucose (called azopigments-α2 and -α3, respectively). Monoconjugated bilirubin (estimated from the percentage of azodipyrrole) amounts of 22% of total bile pigments in human bile and to 39% in murine bile. In both, the bulk of bile pigment is bilirubin diglucuronoside. From bile of patients with acquired liver diseases a new azopigment group (β-azopigment) was derived. The γ-azopigment group was increased; the δ-azopigment group (containing azodipyrrole β-D-monoglucuronoside) was decreased. No differentiation was possible between intra- and extrahepatic cholestasis. The percentage of β-azopigment showed a positive

  6. Fundamental immunological problems associated with "transmissible spongiform encephalopathies".

    PubMed

    Ebringer, Alan; Rashid, Taha; Wilson, Clyde

    2015-02-01

    "Bovine spongiform encephalopathy", "scrapie", as well as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and kuru belong to a group of related neurological conditions termed "transmissible spongiform encephalopathies". These diseases are based on the LD50 measurement whereby saline brain homogenates are injected into experimental animals and when 50% of them develop symptoms, this is considered as transmission of the disease, but the gold standard for diagnosis is autopsy examination. However, an untenable assumption is being made in that saline brain homogenates do not cause tissue damage but it is known since the time of Pasteur, that they give rise to "post-rabies vaccination allergic encephalomyelitis". This is the fundamental flaw in the diagnosis of these diseases. A way forward, however, is to examine infectious agents, such as Acinetobacter which show molecular mimicry with myelin and elevated levels of antibodies to this microbe are found in multiple sclerosis patients and animals affected by "bovine spongiform encephalopathy".

  7. Covert and Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Patidar, Kavish R; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-11-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is part of a spectrum of neurocognitive changes in cirrhosis. HE is divided into 2 broad categories based on severity: covert hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) and overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE). CHE has a significant impact on a patient's quality of life, driving performance, and recently has been associated with increased hospitalizations and death. Likewise, OHE is associated with increased rates of hospitalizations and mortality, and poor quality of life. Given its significant burden on patients, care takers, and the health care system, early diagnosis and management are imperative. In addition, focus also should be directed on patient and family member education on the disease progression and adherence to medications. Treatment strategies include the use of nonabsorbable disaccharides, antibiotics (ie, rifaximin), and, potentially, probiotics. Other therapies currently under further investigation include L-ornithine-L-aspartate, ornithine phenylacetate, glycerol phenylbutyrate, molecular adsorbent recirculating system, and albumin infusion.

  8. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: four cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Gul Mert, Gülen; Horoz, Ozden Ozgur; Herguner, M Ozlem; Incecik, Faruk; Yildizdas, R Dincer; Onenli Mungan, Neslihan; Yuksel, Bilgin; Altunbasak, Sakir

    2014-04-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a rare clinically heterogenous condition consisting of encephalopathy, seizures and variable neurological and psychiatric manifestations, accompanied by high titres of serum antithyroid antibodies. We described the clinical and laboratory findings of four children (aged 8-17 years) with Hashimoto's encephalopathy. The clinical features of three patients at presentation included refractory epilepsy, and confusion, and one patient presented with behavioral and cognitive changes. During their presentation, two of them were in euthyroid, and the others were in hypothyroid status. All patients manifested increased antithyroid antibodies. Two patients improved with steroid treatment. The others responded to plasmapheresis instead of corticosteroid treatment. Physicians' awareness of this complication is of great importance because most patients respond dramatically to the treatment.

  9. Intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy for children with epileptic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pera, Maria Carmela; Randazzo, Giovanna; Masnada, Silvia; Dontin, Serena Donetti; De Giorgis, Valentina; Balottin, Umberto; Veggiotti, Pierangelo

    2015-01-01

    Summary The aim of this retrospective study of children affected by epileptic encephalopathy was to evaluate seizure frequency, electroencephalographic pattern and neuropsychological status, before and after intravenous methylprednisolone therapy. Eleven children with epileptic encephalopathy were administered one cycle of intravenous methylprednisolone (15–30 mg/kg/day for three consecutive days, once a month for four months) in addition to constant dosages of their regular antiepileptic drugs. The treatment resulted in statistically significant reductions of generalized slow spike-and-wave discharges (p<0.0028) and seizure frequency (p<0.013), which persisted even after methylprednisolone pulse therapy was stopped. A globally positive outcome was noted in 9/11 patients (81.8%). This methylprednisolone treatment regimen did not cause significant or persistent adverse effects. We suggest that children with epileptic encephalopathy without an underlying structural lesion could be the best candidates for intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy. PMID:26910177

  10. [Minimal hepatic encephalopathy: characteristics, diagnosis and clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Torre Delgadillo, Aldo; Guerrero-Hernández, Ignacio; Uribe, Misael

    2006-01-01

    The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to the subtle changes in cognitive function, electrophysiological parameters, cerebral neurochemical/neurotransmitter homeostasis, cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and fluid homeostasis that can be observed in patients with cirrhosis who have no clinical evidence of hepatic encephalopathy; the prevalence is as high as 84% in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. This cirrhosis complication is generally not perceived by physician, and diagnosis can only be made by neuropsychological tests and other especial measurements like evoked potentials and image studies like positron emission tomography. Diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy may have prognostic and therapeutic implications in cirrhotic patients. The present review pretends to explore the clinic, therapeutic, diagnosis and prognostic aspects of this complication.

  11. Valproate-induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy with normal liver function.

    PubMed

    Rath, Amitav; Naryanan, T Jaishree; Chowdhary, G V S; Murthy, J M K

    2005-06-01

    Hyperammonemic encephalopathy with normal liver function is an uncommon serious adverse effect of valproate therapy. We retrospectively analyzed the case records of 5 patients of epilepsy on valproate with hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Of the 5 patients, 3 were on monotherapy. The mean valproate dose was 1250 mg/day and the duration of therapy ranged between 4 and 90 days. Alteration in the sensorium was the presenting clinical feature. The risk factors included high initial dose (2), long-term valproate therapy (1), and long-term valproate therapy with concomitant topiramate (1). There was good correlation between the fall in serum ammonia levels and clinical improvement. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy should be suspected in patients on valproate with altered sensorium. Response to treatment is rewarding.

  12. Transient elevation of serum bilirubin (a heme oxygenase-1 metabolite) level in hemorrhagic stroke: bilirubin is a marker of oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Dohi, K; Mochizuki, Y; Satoh, K; Jimbo, H; Hayashi, M; Toyoda, I; Ikeda, Y; Abe, T; Aruga, T

    2003-01-01

    Bilirubin (Bil) is the end product of heme catabolism. The production of Bil reflects heme oxygenase-1 expression in response to oxidative stress in various diseases. To assess the role of Bil as a marker of oxidative stress in cases of brain damage, we measured serum Bil concentrations in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. Serum levels of total Bil were measured in 20 subarachnoid hemorrhage patients with symptomatic vasospasms and in 23 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage; concentrations were measured every day for 14 consecutive days. Serum Bil levels were significantly elevated in the early phases in both groups. Moreover, transient elevation was observed on the day prior to the observation of clinical manifestations of symptomatic vasospasm after SAH. Bil, known to be a powerful antioxidant, was induced after hemorrhagic stroke, reflecting the intensity of oxidative stress. Plasma Bil concentrations might serve as a useful marker of oxidative stress in hemorrhagic stroke patients.

  13. Molecular chaperones and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Cong; Ju, Wei-na; Jin, Hang; Sun, Xin; Zhao, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a disease that occurs when the brain is subjected to hypoxia, resulting in neuronal death and neurological deficits, with a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury include excitatory amino acid release, cellular proteolysis, reactive oxygen species generation, nitric oxide synthesis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular changes in HIE include protein misfolding, aggregation, and destruction of organelles. The apoptotic pathways activated by ischemia and hypoxia include the mitochondrial pathway, the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced pathway. Numerous treatments for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury caused by HIE have been developed over the last half century. Hypothermia, xenon gas treatment, the use of melatonin and erythropoietin, and hypoxic-ischemic preconditioning have proven effective in HIE patients. Molecular chaperones are proteins ubiquitously present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A large number of molecular chaperones are induced after brain ischemia and hypoxia, among which the heat shock proteins are the most important. Heat shock proteins not only maintain protein homeostasis; they also exert anti-apoptotic effects. Heat shock proteins maintain protein homeostasis by helping to transport proteins to their target destinations, assisting in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, regulating the degradation of misfolded proteins, inhibiting the aggregation of proteins, and by controlling the refolding of misfolded proteins. In addition, heat shock proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects by interacting with various signaling pathways to block the activation of downstream effectors in numerous apoptotic pathways, including the intrinsic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum-stress mediated pathway and the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway. Molecular chaperones play a key role in neuroprotection in HIE. In this review, we

  14. Gut Microbiota: Its Role in Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rahul; Saraswat, Vivek A.; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia, a key factor in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), is predominantly derived from urea breakdown by urease producing large intestinal bacteria and from small intestine and kidneys, where the enzyme glutaminases releases ammonia from circulating glutamine. Non-culture techniques like pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid are used to characterize fecal microbiota. Fecal microbiota in patients with cirrhosis have been shown to alter with increasing Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) and Model for End stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores, and with development of covert or overt HE. Cirrhosis dysbiosis ratio (CDR), the ratio of autochthonous/good bacteria (e.g. Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae and Clostridiales) to non-autochthonous/pathogenic bacteria (e.g. Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcaceae), is significantly higher in controls and patients with compensated cirrhosis than patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Although their stool microbiota do not differ, sigmoid colonic mucosal microbiota in liver cirrhosis patients with and without HE, are different. Linkage of pathogenic colonic mucosal bacteria with poor cognition and inflammation suggests that important processes at the mucosal interface, such as bacterial translocation and immune dysfunction, are involved in the pathogenesis of HE. Fecal microbiome composition does not change significantly when HE is treated with lactulose or when HE recurs after lactulose withdrawal. Despite improving cognition and endotoxemia as well as shifting positive correlation of pathogenic bacteria with metabolites, linked to ammonia, aromatic amino acids and oxidative stress, to a negative correlation, rifaximin changes gut microbiome composition only modestly. These observations suggest that the beneficial effects of lactulose and rifaximin could be associated with a change in microbial metabolic function as well as an improvement in dysbiosis. PMID:26041954

  15. Wernicke encephalopathy complicating lymphoma therapy: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Boniol, Scott; Boyd, Molly; Koreth, Rachel; Burton, Gary V

    2007-07-01

    Thiamine deficiency can occur in any disease that results in inadequate intake or excessive loss of vitamin B1. In addition to increased thiamine consumption secondary to high cell turnover, cancer patients frequently have reduced oral intake as a direct result of their cancer or from cancer treatments. However, Wernicke encephalopathy (cerebral Beriberi), a clinical manifestation of thiamine deficiency, has rarely been associated with cancer patients. We report a case of Wernicke encephalopathy in a nonalcoholic patient with lymphoma. Although thiamine deficiency rarely potentiates clinical sequelae in cancer patients, it is important to recognize the risk and the clinical signs and manifestations so that prompt therapy can be initiated to reverse morbidity.

  16. Reversible encephalopathy associated with tacrolimus in pediatric renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Parvex, P; Pinsk, M; Bell, L E; O'Gorman, A M; Patenaude, Y G; Gupta, I R

    2001-07-01

    Neurological complications post transplant have been described with the use of calcineurin inhibitors. Although tacrolimus may be a better immunosuppressant than cyclosporine, its neurological side effects may be worse. Two children, living-related kidney transplant recipients, were treated with antibody induction, mycophenolate mofetil, prednisone, and tacrolimus. Soon after transplant, they each developed an encephalopathy, which when visualized by magnetic resonance imaging showed that it affected both white and grey matter of the brain. Although the encephalopathy was associated with the use of tacrolimus, there was a complete neurological recovery without cessation of the drug.

  17. [Value of MRI findings in Gayet-Wernicke encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Lenz, V; Vargas, M I; Bin, J F; Bogorin, A; Grebici-Guessoum, M; Jacques, C; Marin, H; Zöllner, G; Dietemann, J L

    2002-09-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is related to thiamine deficiency. We report the MRI findings in four patients with visualization of bilateral and symmetrical hyperintense foci on T2W and FLAIR images involving the periaqueductal gray matter, the mamillary bodies and around the third ventricle. Diffusion weighted images obtained in two patients demonstrated mild hypersignal in the same areas. Contrast enhancement within the mamillary bodies was noted in one patient. Follow-up MRI obtained in three patients showed rapid regression of signal abnormalities without correlation with good clinical outcome.

  18. Should We Treat Minimal/Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy, and with What?

    PubMed

    Henderson, Phillip K; Herrera, Jorge L

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy exists along a continuum from abnormal neuropsychiatric testing in the absence of clinical findings to varying degrees of detectable clinical findings. The International Society for Hepatic Encephalopathy and Nitrogen Metabolism has endorsed the term "covert" to encompass minimal hepatic encephalopathy and grade I overt hepatic encephalopathy. Covert hepatic encephalopathy has been associated with poor quality of life, decreased employment, increased falls, and increased traffic accidents that significantly impact quality of life and health care expenditures. Probiotics, nonabsorbable dissacharides, rifaximin, and l-ornithine-l-aspartate have been evaluated with varying levels of success. Because of the lack of universally accepted diagnostic tools, optimal timing of testing and treatment remains controversial.

  19. Evaluation and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Current Status and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Suraweera, Duminda; Sundaram, Vinay; Saab, Sammy

    2016-07-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations often seen in patients with liver injury or rarely in patients with portosystemic shunting without liver injury. It can be divided into minimal (covert) hepatic encephalopathy and overt hepatic encephalopathy, depending on the severity. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy have compromised clinical outcomes, decreased quality of life, and increased healthcare utilization, often resulting in a heavy financial and personal burden on caregivers. The diagnosis remains largely clinical, with the exclusion of possible other causes for the altered mental status. Current treatment strategies include nonabsorbable disaccharides and antibiotics. This review will focus on the diagnosis, management and clinical impact of hepatic encephalopathy.

  20. Evaluation and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Suraweera, Duminda; Sundaram, Vinay; Saab, Sammy

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations often seen in patients with liver injury or rarely in patients with portosystemic shunting without liver injury. It can be divided into minimal (covert) hepatic encephalopathy and overt hepatic encephalopathy, depending on the severity. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy have compromised clinical outcomes, decreased quality of life, and increased healthcare utilization, often resulting in a heavy financial and personal burden on caregivers. The diagnosis remains largely clinical, with the exclusion of possible other causes for the altered mental status. Current treatment strategies include nonabsorbable disaccharides and antibiotics. This review will focus on the diagnosis, management and clinical impact of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:27377741