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Sample records for acute bleeding oesophageal

  1. Somatostatin plus isosorbide 5-mononitrate versus somatostatin in the control of acute gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding: a double blind, randomised, placebo controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Junquera, F; Lopez-Talavera, J; Mearin, F; Saperas, E; Videla, S; Armengol, J; Esteban, R; Malagelada, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Variceal bleeding is a severe complication of portal hypertension. Somatostatin reduces portal pressure by decreasing splanchnic blood flow, and nitrates by diminishing intrahepatic resistance. Experimental studies have shown that the combination of somatostatin and nitrates has an additive effect in decreasing portal pressure.
AIM—To compare the therapeutic efficacy of either intravenous infusion of somatostatin plus oral isosorbide 5-mononitrate or somatostatin alone in gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding associated with liver cirrhosis.
METHODS—A unicentre, double blind, placebo controlled, clinical trial was conducted. Sixty patients bleeding from oesophageal or gastric varices were randomised to receive intravenous infusion of somatostatin (250 µg/hour) plus oral isosorbide 5-mononitrate (40 mg/12 hours) (group I) or somatostatin infusion plus placebo (group II) for 72 hours.
RESULTS—The two groups of patients had similar clinical, endoscopic, and haematological characteristics. Control of bleeding was achieved in 18 out of 30 patients (60%) in group I and 26 out of 30 patients (87%) in group II (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in mean transfusion requirements between the two groups: 2.6 (2.2) v 1.8 (1.6) respectively; means (SD). Mortality and side effects were similar in the two groups, but development of ascites was higher in group I (30%) than in group II (7%) (p<0.05).
CONCLUSION—In cirrhotic patients with acute gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding, addition of isosorbide 5-mononitrate to somatostatin does not improve therapeutic efficacy, induces more adverse effects, and should not be used.


Keywords: gastro-oesophageal bleeding; haemorrhage; portal hypertension; clinical trial; isosorbide 5-mononitrate; somatostatin PMID:10601068

  2. Acute oesophageal necrosis (black oesophagus).

    PubMed

    Galtés, Ignasi; Gallego, María Ángeles; Esgueva, Raquel; Martin-Fumadó, Carles

    2016-03-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to hospital after being found unconscious in his home. He had a history of alcoholism, multiple drug addictions, and type I diabetes mellitus. At admission, he had hyperglycaemia (550 mg/dL) with glucosuria and ketone bodies in the urine, along with septic shock refractory to bilateral alveolar infiltrates and severe respiratory failure. The patient died 24 hours post admission due to multiple organ failure, with diabetic ketoacidosis decompensated by possible respiratory infection in a patient with polytoxicomania. The autopsy confirmed the presence of acute bilateral bronchopneumonia, chronic pancreatitis, severe hepatic steatosis, and generalized congestive changes. At the oesophagus, acute oesophageal necrosis was evident. PMID:26949146

  3. Bleeding oesophageal varices associated with anabolic steroid use in an athlete.

    PubMed Central

    Winwood, P. J.; Robertson, D. A.; Wright, R.

    1990-01-01

    A 30 year old bodybuilder who had been taking anabolic steroids for 18 months presented with bleeding oesophageal varices. Serious liver disease secondary to anabolic steroids including peliosis hepatis, nodular hyperplasia and malignant change is well recognized. We report what is, to our knowledge, the first case of bleeding oesophageal varices associated with the use of anabolic steroids. PMID:2099434

  4. A fourfold increase of oesophageal variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients with a history of oesophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tseng, Chih-Wei; Tsai, Chih-Chun; Lay, Chorng-Jang; Tsai, Chen-Chi

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Large, recent population-based data for evaluating the predictors of oesophageal variceal bleeding (OVB) among cirrhotic patients is still lacking. This study aimed to determine the cumulative incidence of OVB among cirrhotic patients and identify the predictors of OVB occurrence. METHODS Patient information on 38,172 cirrhotic patients without a history of OVB, who were discharged between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2007, was obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database for this study. All patients were followed up for three years. Death was the competing risk when calculating the cumulative incidences and hazard ratios (HRs) of OVB. RESULTS OVB was present in 2,609 patients (OVB group) and absent in 35,563 patients (non-OVB group) at hospitalisation. During the three-year follow-up period, the cumulative incidence of OVB was 44.5% and 11.3% in the OVB and non-OVB group, respectively (p < 0.001). Modified Cox regression analysis showed that the HR of OVB history was 4.42 for OVB occurrence (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.13–4.74). Other predictors for OVB occurrence included hepatocellular carcinoma (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.09–1.24), young age (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.98–0.98), ascites (HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.37–1.56), alcohol-related disorders (HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.12–1.28), peptic ulcer bleeding (HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.13–1.41) and diabetes mellitus (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.06–1.23). CONCLUSION Cirrhotic patients have a fourfold increased risk of future OVB following the first incidence of OVB. PMID:26768323

  5. [The acute bleeding rectal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Hansen, H

    1985-06-14

    An acute bleeding rectal ulcer was the solitary condition in four patients. The cause of such an ulcer, which always results in heavy arterial bleeding, remains unknown. The source of bleeding is demonstrated by rectoscopy which may at times be difficult because of the large amount of blood in the rectum and the hidden position of the small ulcer. Sclerosing or circumferential suturing of the ulcer provides immediate cessation of bleeding and cure.

  6. Modified Sugiura Operation for Idiopathic Portal Hypertension with Bleeding Oesophageal Varices. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Schettini, A-V; Pinheiro, R S; Pescatore, P; Lerut, J

    2015-01-01

    A case of a 36 years old man presenting massive upper GI bleeding due to oesophageal varices developed in the context of an idiopathic portal cavernoma and extensive porto-splenic thrombosis is discussed. He underwent a successful modified Sugiura operation (oesophago-gastric devascularisation and splenectomy [OGDS]) completed with interventional endoscopic treatment of residual oesophageal varices. The benefit of the modified Sugiura procedure proposed for the treatment of upper GI variceal bleeding developed in the context of splanchnic venous thrombosis is discussed. The procedure is a valid therapy in the treatment of symptomatic extra-hepatic hypertension when other options are inapplicable. PMID:26158259

  7. Intractable oesophageal variceal bleeding caused by splenic arteriovenous fistula: treatment by transcatheter arterial embolization

    PubMed Central

    Hung, C; Tseng, J; Lui, K; Wan, Y; Tsai, C; Shem, C; Wu, C

    1999-01-01

    We describe a rare case of splenic arteriovenous fistula and venous aneurysm which developed after splenectomy in a 40-year-old woman who presented with epigastralgia, watery diarrhoea, repeated haematemesis and melaena caused by hyperkinetic status of the portal system and bleeding of oesophageal varices. It was diagnosed by computed tomography and angiography, and obliterated with giant Gianturco steel coils.


Keywords: splenic arteriovenous fistula; gastrointestinal bleeding; transcatheter arterial embolization PMID:10435172

  8. A case of acute oesophageal necrosis (AEN) in a hypothermic patient. The grave prognosis of the black oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Salem, George A; Ahluwalia, Sumit; Guild, Ralph T

    2015-01-01

    Acute oesophageal necrosis, also known as black oesophagus, is a rare, and potentially lethal syndrome which is often diagnosed incidentally during upper endoscopy for evaluation of upper gastrointestinal bleed. It is characterised by diffuse circumferential black mucosal discolouration in the distal oesophagus secondary to necrosis that may extend proximally to involve variable length of the oesophagus. One theory of pathogenesis is that the relatively low perfusion state in the distal areas of the oesophagus makes it susceptible to mucosal injury. We present a case of acute oesophageal necrosis in a 62year-old lady with history of alcoholic cirrhosis who presented with haematemesis and severe hypothermia, and was eventually found to have acute oesophageal necrosis.

  9. [Bleeding oesophageal varices in a seven-year-old boy supposedly as a late complication to neonatal umbilical venous catheter].

    PubMed

    Rogvi, Rasmus Á; Møller, Fie Gregersen; Bergström, Anita; Ifaoui, Inge Bøtker; Jørgensen, Marianna Hørby

    2016-05-30

    A seven-year-old boy was admitted with haematemesis. The boy was originally born at 27 weeks' gestational age. His neonatal period had been complicated by sepsis, for which he was treated with antibiotics through an umbilical venous catheter (UVC). A gastroscopy showed grade III oesophageal varices with bleeding. He was examined thoroughly for other causes of portal hypertension, but none were found. Portal hypertension caused by UVC in the neonatal period is a rare but very serious complication to neonatal UVC.

  10. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

  11. Endovascular Management of Acute Bleeding Arterioenteric Fistulas

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, Henrik Mellander, Stefan; Snygg, Johan; Loenn, Lars

    2008-05-15

    . Patients with cancer may only need treatment for the acute bleeding episode, and an endovascular approach has the advantage of low morbidity.

  12. Erosive oesophagitis revealing acute zinc deficiency during parenteral nutrition. A case report.

    PubMed

    Amoussou-Guenou, D; Boland, B; Rousseau, C; Lambert, M; Marbaix, E; Bourlond, J; Stein, F

    1989-01-01

    We report a case of acute zinc deficiency which occurred during parenteral nutrition in a patient with anorexia nervosa and which was characterized by a painful erosive oesophagitis preceding the typical oro-cutaneous symptoms. We also discuss the interpretation of plasma and urine zinc levels, the predisposing role of total parenteral alimentation and the specific therapeutic implications. PMID:2518587

  13. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome as a result of spontaneous bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Chenicheri; Jarrahnejad, Payam; Balakrishnan, Anila; Huettner, William C

    2008-01-01

    Acute carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common compression neuropathy of the upper extremity following trauma. A rare occurence of spontaneous bleeding into the carpal tunnel, presenting as acute carpal tunnel syndrome, is presented. PMID:19721797

  14. Porcine survival model to simulate acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings.

    PubMed

    Prosst, Ruediger L; Schurr, Marc O; Schostek, Sebastian; Krautwald, Martina; Gottwald, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The existing animal models used for the simulation of acute gastrointestinal bleedings are usually non-survival models. We developed and evaluated a new porcine model (domestic pig, German Landrace) in which the animal remains alive and survives the artificial bleeding without any cardiovascular impairment. This consists of a bleeding catheter which is implanted into the stomach, then subcutaneously tunnelled from the abdomen to the neck where it is exteriorized and fixed with sutures. Using the injection of porcine blood, controllable and reproducible acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding can be simulated while maintaining normal gastrointestinal motility and physiology. Depending on the volume of blood applied through the gastric catheter, the bleeding intensity can be varied from traces of blood to a massive haemorrhage. This porcine model could be valuable, e.g. for testing the efficacy of new bleeding diagnostics in large animals before human use. PMID:26306615

  15. Porcine survival model to simulate acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings.

    PubMed

    Prosst, Ruediger L; Schurr, Marc O; Schostek, Sebastian; Krautwald, Martina; Gottwald, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The existing animal models used for the simulation of acute gastrointestinal bleedings are usually non-survival models. We developed and evaluated a new porcine model (domestic pig, German Landrace) in which the animal remains alive and survives the artificial bleeding without any cardiovascular impairment. This consists of a bleeding catheter which is implanted into the stomach, then subcutaneously tunnelled from the abdomen to the neck where it is exteriorized and fixed with sutures. Using the injection of porcine blood, controllable and reproducible acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding can be simulated while maintaining normal gastrointestinal motility and physiology. Depending on the volume of blood applied through the gastric catheter, the bleeding intensity can be varied from traces of blood to a massive haemorrhage. This porcine model could be valuable, e.g. for testing the efficacy of new bleeding diagnostics in large animals before human use.

  16. [Bleeding complications in acute myeloblastic leukemia (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sutor, A H

    1979-03-01

    Bleeding is common in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). At the time of diagnosis, the danger of bleeding cannot be predicted by laboratory means. However, the following factors represent increased risks: Promyeloblastic leukemia, high blast count, low fibrinogen, low plasminogen. From coagulation studies performed at the time of bleeding complications, the pathomechanism leading to bleeding complications usually cannot be detected. The question whether impairment of production, consumption coagulopathy, or primary fibrinolysis causes the bleeding complications can only be answered by controlling frequently clinical and hemostatic criteria, which include the thrombocytic stystem as well as plasmatic coagulation and fibrinolysis. At the present time, the therapy of bleeding complications in AML is symptomatic. It consists of transfusion with thrombocytes or fresh whole blood, respectively. Coagulation factor concentrates should only be given in combination with Heparin to prevent the deterioration of consumption coagulopathy.

  17. Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    Blood loss; Open injury bleeding ... be spread if infected blood gets into an open wound, even a small one. Although puncture wounds ... have symptoms such as: Blood coming from an open wound Bruising Bleeding can also cause shock, which ...

  18. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors. A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996–2000), T2 (2001–2005), and T3 (2006–2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate. Our results showed that more patients were <65 years (75.6%) and of male sex (78.5%). Patients were mostly from teaching hospitals (90.8%) with high hospital volume (50.9%) and high doctor service load (51.1%). The prevalence of acute esophageal variceal bleeding and mean length of hospital stay decreased over the years (P < 0.001), but the overall medical expenses increased (P < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that older age, female sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score >1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high

  19. Effect of Ramadan fasting on acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Amine, El Mekkaoui; Kaoutar, Saâda; Ihssane, Mellouki; Adil, Ibrahimi; Dafr-Allah, Benajah

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prolonged fasting may precipitate or exacerbate gastrointestinal complaints. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between Ramadan fasting and acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB), and to assess characteristics of those occurred in the holly month. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was conducted for all patients, who underwent endoscopy for AUGIB in Ramadan (R) and the month before Ramadan (BR). Epidemiological, clinical and etiological characteristics and outcome of patients having AUGIB were compared between the two periods from 2001 to 2010. Results: Two hundred and ninety-one patients had endoscopy for AUGIB during the two periods study. There was an increasing trend in the overall number of patients in Ramadan period (n = 132, 45.4% versus n = 159, 54.6%), especially with duodenal ulcer (n = 48, 37.2% versus n = 81, 62.8%). The most frequent etiology was peptic ulcer but it was more observed in group R than in group BR (46.2% versus 57.9%, P = 0.04), especially duodenal ulcer (36.4% versus 50.3%, P = 0.01); this finding persisted in multivariable modeling (adjusted odds ratio: 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.69, P = 0.03). In contrast, there was a decreasing trend in rate of variceal bleeding from BR period (26.5%) to R period (18.9%; P = 0.11). Regarding the outcome, there were no significant differences between the two periods of the study: Recurrent bleeding (10.6% versus 7.5%, P = 0.36) and mortality rate (5.3% versus 4.4%, P = 0.7). Conclusion: The most frequent etiology of AUGIB was peptic ulcer during Ramadan. However, Ramadan fasting did not influence the outcome of the patients. Prophylactic measures should be taken for people with risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. PMID:23930121

  20. Management of acute variceal bleeding using hemostatic powder

    PubMed Central

    El-Mikkawy, Ahmed; Abdalla, Haitham; Mostafa, Ibrahim; Devière, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives This study aimed to test the safety and efficacy of Hemospray® for emergency control of acute variceal bleeding (AVB) due to portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. Patients and methods This single-arm, prospective trial, conducted at two hospitals in Belgium and Egypt, included patients admitted to the emergency room with hematemesis and/or melena and known or suspected liver cirrhosis. All patients received urgent hemodynamic stabilization, octreotide (50 mcg bolus then 25 mcg/hour for 24 hours) and intravenous ceftriaxone (1 g/hour). Endoscopy to confirm AVB and Hemospray® application (if indicated) was performed within six hours of admission. Patients were kept under observation for 24 hours and underwent second endoscopy and definitive therapy (band ligation and/or cyanoacrylate injection in cases of gastric varices) the next day. Results Thirty-eight patients were admitted for suspected AVB, and 30 of these had confirmed AVB (70% male; mean age 59.5 years (range, 32.0–73 years)). Child-Pugh class C liver disease was present in 53.4%. Esophageal varices were observed in 83.4% of patients, gastric varices in 10%, and duodenal varices in 6.6%. Spurting bleeding at the time of endoscopy was observed in 43.4%. One patient developed hematemesis six hours after Hemospray® application and underwent emergency endoscopic band ligation. No major adverse events or mortalities were observed during 15-day follow-up. Conclusion Hemospray® application was safe and effective at short-term follow-up for emergency treatment of AVB in cirrhotic patients. PMID:26137303

  1. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in cirrhosis: clinical and endoscopic correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Terés, J; Bordas, J M; Bru, C; Diaz, F; Bruguera, M; Rodes, J

    1976-01-01

    The clinical data of 180 episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 168 patients with cirrhosis of the liver are examined. The source of bleeding had been determined by early endoscopy in all cases. In men under the age of 50 years, and without symptoms of liver failure, bleeding was due to ruptured gastro-oesophageal varices in 84% of cases. Severe liver failure was associated with acute lesions of gastric mucosa in many cases. No presumptive diagnosis of the source of haemorrhage could be based on the examination of other clinical data (presence of ascites, mode of presentation and pattern of bleeding, history of ulcer disease, alcoholism, and previous medication. PMID:1083824

  2. Endovascular Management of Acute Enteric Bleeding from Pancreas Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Semiz-Oysu, Aslihan; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2007-04-15

    Arterioenteric fistula is a rare but serious complication of enteric drained pancreas transplant, which may lead to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. We present 3 patients with failed enteric drained pancreas transplants and massive gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to arterioenteric fistula. One patient was treated by embolization and the 2 others by stent graft placement. Bleeding was successfully controlled in all cases, at follow up of 5 days, 8 months, and 12 months, respectively. One patient died 24 days after embolization, of unknown causes.

  3. Is tranexamic acid effective for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Avilés, Carolina; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-12-07

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding constitutes a medical-surgical emergency given its important associated morbidity and mortality. The antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid might help stopping bleeding, but controversy remains about its role in this setting. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including eight randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded tranexamic acid probably decreases rebleeding and mortality, without increasing thromboembolic adverse effects in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  4. Is tranexamic acid effective for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Avilés, Carolina; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding constitutes a medical-surgical emergency given its important associated morbidity and mortality. The antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid might help stopping bleeding, but controversy remains about its role in this setting. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including eight randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded tranexamic acid probably decreases rebleeding and mortality, without increasing thromboembolic adverse effects in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26730585

  5. Transcatheter arterial embolization for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Indications, techniques and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Loffroy, R; Favelier, S; Pottecher, P; Estivalet, L; Genson, P Y; Gehin, S; Cercueil, J P; Krausé, D

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, transcatheter arterial embolization has become the first-line therapy for the management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic hemostasis. Advances in catheter-based techniques and newer embolic agents, as well as recognition of the effectiveness of minimally invasive treatment options, have expanded the role of interventional radiology in the treatment of bleeding for a variety of indications. Transcatheter arterial embolization is a fast, safe, and effective minimally invasive alternative to surgery, when endoscopic treatment fails to control acute bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract. This article describes the role of arterial embolization in the management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding and summarizes the literature evidence on the outcomes of endovascular therapy in such a setting.

  6. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with AIDS: a relatively uncommon condition associated with reduced survival.

    PubMed Central

    Parente, F; Cernuschi, M; Valsecchi, L; Rizzardini, G; Musicco, M; Lazzarin, A; Bianchi Porro, G

    1991-01-01

    To determine the cumulative incidence of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding and its effect upon survival in patients with AIDS, 453 consecutive AIDS patients diagnosed in our hospital between June 1985 and March 1989 were followed for a median period of six months (maximum 42 months). The cumulative probability of acute gastrointestinal bleeding was 3% at six months and 6% at 14 months. This event was associated with significantly reduced survival. Independent risk factors for bleeding were: severe thrombocytopenia at the time of diagnosis and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma as the first clinical manifestation of AIDS. The potential causes of bleeding were investigated in all cases by emergency endoscopy or by necropsy examination in those patients whose clinical condition precluded the procedure. In nine of 15 patients, bleeding was due to lesions specifically associated with AIDS, but in the remainder the source of bleeding was not a direct consequence of HIV infection. We conclude that acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding rarely complicates the course of AIDS, but its occurrence is associated with decreased survival. As many of the causes are potentially treatable, a complete diagnostic approach is indicated in these patients, except those who are terminally ill. PMID:1916503

  7. An Unusual Cause of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Acute Esophageal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tokala, Madhusudhan R.; Dhillon, Sonu; Pisoh, Watcoun-Nchinda; Walayat, Saqib; Vanar, Vishwas; Puli, Srinivas R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also called “black esophagus,” is a condition characterized by circumferential necrosis of the esophagus with universal distal involvement and variable proximal extension with clear demarcation at the gastroesophageal junction. It is an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is recognized with distinct and striking mucosal findings on endoscopy. The patients are usually older and are critically ill with shared comorbidities, which include atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic renal insufficiency, and malnutrition. Alcoholism and substance abuse could be seen in younger patients. Patients usually have systemic hypotension along with upper abdominal pain in the background of clinical presentation of hematemesis and melena. The endoscopic findings confirm the diagnosis and biopsy is not always necessary unless clinically indicated in atypical presentations. Herein we present two cases with distinct clinical presentation and discuss the endoscopic findings along with a review of the published literature on the management of AEN. PMID:27642529

  8. An Unusual Cause of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Acute Esophageal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tokala, Madhusudhan R.; Dhillon, Sonu; Pisoh, Watcoun-Nchinda; Walayat, Saqib; Vanar, Vishwas; Puli, Srinivas R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also called “black esophagus,” is a condition characterized by circumferential necrosis of the esophagus with universal distal involvement and variable proximal extension with clear demarcation at the gastroesophageal junction. It is an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is recognized with distinct and striking mucosal findings on endoscopy. The patients are usually older and are critically ill with shared comorbidities, which include atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic renal insufficiency, and malnutrition. Alcoholism and substance abuse could be seen in younger patients. Patients usually have systemic hypotension along with upper abdominal pain in the background of clinical presentation of hematemesis and melena. The endoscopic findings confirm the diagnosis and biopsy is not always necessary unless clinically indicated in atypical presentations. Herein we present two cases with distinct clinical presentation and discuss the endoscopic findings along with a review of the published literature on the management of AEN.

  9. An Unusual Cause of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Acute Esophageal Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kalva, Nikhil R; Tokala, Madhusudhan R; Dhillon, Sonu; Pisoh, Watcoun-Nchinda; Walayat, Saqib; Vanar, Vishwas; Puli, Srinivas R

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also called "black esophagus," is a condition characterized by circumferential necrosis of the esophagus with universal distal involvement and variable proximal extension with clear demarcation at the gastroesophageal junction. It is an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is recognized with distinct and striking mucosal findings on endoscopy. The patients are usually older and are critically ill with shared comorbidities, which include atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic renal insufficiency, and malnutrition. Alcoholism and substance abuse could be seen in younger patients. Patients usually have systemic hypotension along with upper abdominal pain in the background of clinical presentation of hematemesis and melena. The endoscopic findings confirm the diagnosis and biopsy is not always necessary unless clinically indicated in atypical presentations. Herein we present two cases with distinct clinical presentation and discuss the endoscopic findings along with a review of the published literature on the management of AEN. PMID:27642529

  10. Telemetric real-time sensor for the detection of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Schostek, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Melanie; Keller, Jan; Fode, Mario; Melbert, Michael; Schurr, Marc O; Gottwald, Thomas; Prosst, Ruediger L

    2016-04-15

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings from ulcers or esophago-gastric varices are life threatening medical conditions which require immediate endoscopic therapy. Despite successful endoscopic hemostasis, there is a significant risk of rebleeding often requiring close surveillance of these patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Any time delay to recognize bleeding may lead to a high blood loss and increases the risk of death. A novel telemetric real-time bleeding sensor can help indicate blood in the stomach: the sensor is swallowed to detect active bleeding or is anchored endoscopically on the gastrointestinal wall close to the potential bleeding source. By telemetric communication with an extra-corporeal receiver, information about the bleeding status is displayed. In this study the novel sensor, which measures characteristic optical properties of blood, has been evaluated in an ex-vivo setting to assess its clinical applicability and usability. Human venous blood of different concentrations, various fluids, and liquid food were tested. The LED-based sensor was able to reliably distinguish between concentrated blood and other liquids, especially red-colored fluids. In addition, the spectrometric quality of the small sensor (size: 6.5mm in diameter, 25.5mm in length) was comparable to a much larger and technically more complex laboratory spectrophotometer. The experimental data confirm the capability of a miniaturized sensor to identify concentrated blood, which could help in the very near future the detection of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and to survey high-risk patients for rebleeding.

  11. Bleeding risk stratification in an era of aggressive management of acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Assi, Emad; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; García-Acuña, José María; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Major bleeding is currently one of the most common non-cardiac complications observed in the treatment of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Hemorrhagic complications occur with a frequency of 1% to 10% during treatment for ACS. In fact, bleeding events are the most common extrinsic complication associated with ACS therapy. The identification of clinical characteristics and particularities of the antithrombin therapy associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic complications would make it possible to adopt prevention strategies, especially among those exposed to greater risk. The international societies of cardiology renewed emphasis on bleeding risk stratification in order to decide strategy and therapy for patients with ACS. With this review, we performed an update about the ACS bleeding risk scores most frequently used in daily clinical practice. PMID:25429326

  12. Performance of five different bleeding-prediction scores in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Klok, F A; Niemann, C; Dellas, C; Hasenfuß, G; Konstantinides, S; Lankeit, M

    2016-02-01

    Bleeding-prediction scores may help guiding management of patients with pulmonary embolism (PE), although no such score has been validated. We aimed to externally validate and compare two bleeding-prediction scores for venous thromboembolism to three scores developed for patients with atrial fibrillation in a real-world cohort of PE patients. We performed a prospective observational cohort study in 448 consecutive PE patients who were treated with heparins followed by vitamin-K-antagonists. The Kuijer, RIETE, HEMORR2HAGES, HAS-BLED and ATRIA scores were assessed at baseline. All patients were followed for the occurrence of major bleeding over a 30-day period. The accuracies of both the overall, original 3-level and newly defined optimal 2-level outcome of the scores were evaluated and compared, both for the 30-day period as well as for bleeding occurring in versus after the first week of treatment. 20 of 448 patients suffered major bleeding resulting in a cumulative incidence of 4.5 % (95 % CI 2.5-6.5). The predictive power of all five scores for bleeding was poor (c-statistics 0.57-0.64), both for the 3-level and 2-level score outcomes. No individual score was found to be superior. The HAS-BLED score had a good c-statistic for bleedings occurring after the first week of treatment (0.75, 95 % CI 0.47-1.0). Current available scoring systems have insufficient accuracy to predict overall anticoagulation-associated bleeding in patients treated for acute PE. To optimally target bleeding-prevention strategies, the development of a high quality PE-specific risk score is urgently needed. PMID:26091712

  13. Discharge hemoglobin and outcome in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Eun Sun; Chun, Hoon Jai; Hwang, Young-Jae; Lee, Jae Hyung; Kang, Seung Hun; Yoo, In Kyung; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Many patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding present with anemia and frequently require red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. A restrictive transfusion strategy and a low hemoglobin (Hb) threshold for transfusion had been shown to produce acceptable outcomes in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, most patients are discharged with mild anemia owing to the restricted volume of packed RBCs (pRBCs). We investigated whether discharge Hb influences the outcome in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding who had received pRBCs during hospitalization between January 2012 and January 2014. Patients with variceal bleeding, malignant lesion, stroke, or cardiovascular disease were excluded. We divided the patients into 2 groups, low (8 g/dL ≤ Hb < 10 g/dL) and high (Hb ≥ 10 [g/dL]) discharge Hb, and compared the clinical course and Hb changes between these groups. Results: A total of 102 patients met the inclusion criteria. Fifty patients were discharged with Hb levels < 10 g/dL, whereas 52 were discharged with Hb levels > 10 g/dL. Patients in the low Hb group had a lower consumption of pRBCs and shorter hospital stay than did those in the high Hb group. The Hb levels were not fully recovered at outpatient follow-up until 7 days after discharge; however, most patients showed Hb recovery at 45 days after discharge. The rate of rebleeding after discharge was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Conclusions: In patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, a discharge Hb between 8 and 10 g/dL was linked to favorable outcomes on outpatient follow-up. Most patients recovered from anemia without any critical complication within 45 days after discharge. PMID:27540574

  14. Eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Bancil, Aaron S; Hewett, Rhys; Hayat, Jamal O; Poullis, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disorder of the oesophagus, characterized by symptoms of dysphagia or food bolus obstruction. Diagnosis is supported by typical histological findings. This article covers pertinent aspects of the disease, pathogenic explanations and treatment options. PMID:27388380

  15. Are higher doses of proton pump inhibitors better in acute peptic bleeding?

    PubMed

    Villalón, Alejandro; Olmos, Roberto; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-06-24

    Although there is broad consensus about the benefits of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper peptic bleeding, there is still controversy over their optimal dosing. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 27 randomized trials addressing this question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded high-dose proton pump inhibitors probably result in little or no difference in re-bleeding rate or mortality. The risk/benefit and cost/benefit balance probably favor use of low-doses.

  16. Are higher doses of proton pump inhibitors better in acute peptic bleeding?

    PubMed

    Villalón, Alejandro; Olmos, Roberto; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Although there is broad consensus about the benefits of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper peptic bleeding, there is still controversy over their optimal dosing. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 27 randomized trials addressing this question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded high-dose proton pump inhibitors probably result in little or no difference in re-bleeding rate or mortality. The risk/benefit and cost/benefit balance probably favor use of low-doses. PMID:27390875

  17. Management of acute perioperative myocardial infarction: a case report of concomitant acute myocardial infarction and tumor bleeding in the transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Feng; Gao, Wen-Qian; Li, Yuan-Xin; Feng, Quan-Zhou; Zhu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction complicated by bleeding colon tumor is problematic with regard to management, and appropriate balance of antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy and hemostasis or surgery is crucial for effective treatment. Here, we present a case of concomitant acute myocardial infarction and bleeding tumor in the transverse colon, and share our experience of successfully balancing anticoagulation therapy and hemostasis. PMID:26937182

  18. Diagnosis and management of acute complications in patients with colon cancer: bleeding, obstruction, and perforation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Among the colorectal cancers, the incidence of colon cancer has obviously increased. As a result, the actual incidence of colon cancer has exceeded that of rectal cancer, which dramatically changed the long-existing epidemiological profile. The acute complications of colon cancer include bleeding, obstruction, and perforation, which were among the common acute abdominal surgical conditions. The rapid and accurate diagnosis of these acute complications was very important, and laparoscopic techniques can be applied in abdominal surgery for management of the complications. PMID:25035661

  19. Clinical outcome of transcatheter arterial embolization with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate for control of acute gastrointestinal tract bleeding.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun Jung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Hwa Jung; Kim, Jinoo; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Gwon, Dong Il

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of trans-catheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA), with or without other embolic materials for acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal tract bleeding, and to determine the factors associated with clinical outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS. TAE using NBCA only or in conjunction with other materials was performed for 102 patients (80 male and 22 female patients; mean age, 61.3 years) with acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal tract bleeding. Technical success, clinical success, and clinical factors, including age, sex, bleeding tendency, endoscopic attempts at hemostasis, number of transfusions, and bleeding causes (i.e., cancer vs noncancer), were retrospectively evaluated. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate clinical factors and their ability to predict patient outcomes. Survival curves were obtained using Kaplan-Meier analyses and log-rank tests. RESULTS. There were 36 patients with cancer-related bleeding and 66 with non-cancer-related bleeding. Overall technical and clinical success rates were 100% (102/102) and 76.5% (78/102), respectively. Procedure-related complications included bowel infarction, which was noted in two patients. Recurrent bleeding and bleeding-related 30-day mortality rates were 15.7% (16/102) and 8.8% (9/102), respectively. Cancer-related bleeding increased clinical failure significantly (p = 0.003) and bleeding-related 30-day mortality with marginal significance (p = 0.05). Overall survival was poorer in patients with cancer-related bleeding. CONCLUSION. TAE with NBCA with or without other embolic agents showed high technical and clinical effectiveness in the management of acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal tract bleeding. Cancer-related bleeding was the only factor related to clinical failure, and possibly related to bleeding-related 30-day mortality.

  20. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  1. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-11-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  2. Over-the-scope clip placement is effective rescue therapy for severe acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Matthew; Gutierrez, Juan P.; Neumann, Helmut; Wilcox, C. Mel; Burski, Chad; Mönkemüller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aim: The novel over-the-scope clip (OTSC) allows for excellent apposition of tissue, potentially permitting hemostasis to be achieved in various types of gastrointestinal lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness and safety of OTSCs for endoscopic hemostasis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in whom traditional endoscopic methods had failed. Patients and methods: A retrospective case series of all patients who underwent placement of an OTSC for severe recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding over a 14-month period was studied. Outcome data for the procedure included achievement of primary hemostasis, episodes of recurrent bleeding, and complications. Results: Twelve consecutive patients (67 % men; mean age 59, range 29 – 86) with ongoing upper gastrointestinal bleeding despite previous endoscopic management were included. They had a mean ASA score of 3 (range 2 – 4), a mean hemoglobin of 7.2 g/dL (range 5.2 – 9.1), and shock was present in 75 % of patients. They had all received packed red blood cells (mean 5.1 units, range 2 – 12). The etiology of bleeding was: duodenal ulcer (n = 6), gastric ulcer (n = 2) Dieulafoy lesion (n = 2), anastomotic ulceration (n = 1), Mallory – Weiss tear (n = 1). Hemostasis was achieved in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients 1 day and 7 days after OTSC placement. There were no complications associated with OTSC application. Conclusions: OTSC use represents an effective, easily performed, and safe endoscopic therapy for various causes of severe acute gastrointestinal bleeding when conventional endoscopic techniques have failed. This therapy should be added to the armamentarium of therapeutic endoscopists. PMID:26134611

  3. Early lactate clearance for predicting active bleeding in critically ill patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wada, Tomoki; Hagiwara, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Tatsuki; Yahagi, Naoki; Kimura, Akio

    2016-08-01

    Not all patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require emergency endoscopy. Lactate clearance has been suggested as a parameter for predicting patient outcomes in various critical care settings. This study investigates whether lactate clearance can predict active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB. This single-center, retrospective, observational study included critically ill patients with UGIB who met all of the following criteria: admission to the emergency department (ED) from April 2011 to August 2014; had blood samples for lactate evaluation at least twice during the ED stay; and had emergency endoscopy within 6 h of ED presentation. The main outcome was active bleeding detected with emergency endoscopy. Classification and regression tree (CART) analyses were performed using variables associated with active bleeding to derive a prediction rule for active bleeding in critically ill UGIB patients. A total of 154 patients with UGIB were analyzed, and 31.2 % (48/154) had active bleeding. In the univariate analysis, lactate clearance was significantly lower in patients with active bleeding than in those without active bleeding (13 vs. 29 %, P < 0.001). Using the CART analysis, a prediction rule for active bleeding is derived, and includes three variables: lactate clearance; platelet count; and systolic blood pressure at ED presentation. The rule has 97.9 % (95 % CI 90.2-99.6 %) sensitivity with 32.1 % (28.6-32.9 %) specificity. Lactate clearance may be associated with active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB, and may be clinically useful as a component of a prediction rule for active bleeding.

  4. Omeprazole versus placebo for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: randomised double blind controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Daneshmend, T. K.; Hawkey, C. J.; Langman, M. J.; Logan, R. F.; Long, R. G.; Walt, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the possible therapeutic role of omeprazole, a powerful proton pump inhibitor, in unselected patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. DESIGN--Double blind placebo controlled parallel group study. Active treatment was omeprazole 80 mg intravenously immediately, then three doses of 40 mg intravenously at eight hourly intervals, then 40 mg orally at 12 hourly intervals. Treatment was started within 12 hours of admission and given for four days or until surgery, discharge, or death. SETTING--The medical wards of University and City Hospitals, Nottingham. SUBJECTS--1147 consecutive patients aged 18 years or more admitted over 40 months with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Mortality from all causes; rate of rebleeding, transfusion requirements, and operation rate; effect of treatment on endoscopic appearances at initial endoscopy. RESULTS--Of 1147 patients included in the intention to treat analysis, 569 received placebo and 578 omeprazole. No significant differences were found between the placebo and omeprazole groups for rates of transfusion (302 (53%) placebo v 298 (52%) omeprazole), rebleeding (100 (18%) v 85 (15%)), operation (63 (11%) v 62 (11%)), and death (30 (5.3%) v 40 (6.9%)). However, there was an unexpected but significant reduction in endoscopic signs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients treated with omeprazole compared with those treated with placebo (236 (45%) placebo v 176 (33%) omeprazole; p less than 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS--Omeprazole failed to reduce mortality, rebleeding, or transfusion requirements, although the reduction in endoscopic signs of bleeding suggests that inhibition of acid may be capable of influencing intragastric bleeding. Our data do not justify the routine use of acid inhibiting drugs in the management of haematemesis and melaena. PMID:1737157

  5. Cyanoacrylate Injection Versus Band Ligation in the Endoscopic Management of Acute Gastric Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Weiguang; Ren, Yutang; Bai, Yang; Liu, Side; Zhang, Qiang; Zhi, Fachao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The evidence for optimal endoscopic management of bleeding gastric varices is lacking. The clinical outcome is controversial in trials comparing cyanoacrylate injection and band ligation. To help guide endoscopic decisions regarding acute gastric variceal bleeding, a meta-analysis was conducted. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ScienceDirect were searched for all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) containing the 2 interventions. The main outcomes evaluated in the meta-analysis were active bleeding control, blood transfusion, rebleeding, recurrence of varices, complications, and survival. Three RCTs were identified, which included 194 patients with active gastric variceal bleeding from Taiwan and Romania. Active bleeding control was achieved in 46 of 49 (93.9%) patients in the cyanoacrylate injection group, compared with 35 of 44 (79.5%) in the band ligation group (P = 0.032), for a pooled odds ratio of 4.44 (95% confidence interval, 1.14–17.30). Rebleeding rate was comparable in type 2 gastroesophageal varices (GOV2) between the 2 interventions (35.7% vs 34.8%, P = 0.895), but cyanoacrylate injection seemed superior for reducing rebleeding rate in type 1 gastroesophageal varices (GOV1, 26.1% vs 47.7%, P = 0.035) and type 1 isolated gastric varices (IGV1, 17.6% vs 85.7%, P = 0.015). Cyanoacrylate injection was also superior in controlling recurrence of gastric varices to band ligation (36.0% vs 66.0%, P = 0.002). There was no difference in complications or mortality between the 2 interventions. The major limitation of this meta-analysis is the small number of studies/patients included. Compared with band ligation, injection cyanocrylate have an advantage in the control of acute gastric variceal bleeding, also with lower recurrence rate and rebleeding (except GOV2). The limited amount of studies included attenuates the strength of this meta-analysis; therefore, more high-quality RCTs are needed. PMID

  6. Efficacy of FEIBA for acute bleeding and surgical haemostasis in haemophilia A patients with inhibitors: a multicentre registry in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Zülfikar, B; Aydogan, G; Salcioglu, Z; Oner, A F; Kavakli, K; Gursel, T; Zülfikar, H

    2012-05-01

    Long used in established industrialized nations to treat patients with haemophilia and inhibitors, factor eight inhibitor bypassing activity (FEIBA) has, in recent years, been introduced into more geographically diverse settings. Data are needed on how successfully FEIBA therapy has been implemented in new regions. To determine the efficacy and safety of FEIBA for the treatment of acute bleeding and surgical haemostasis in a newly industrialized country. A multicentre registry of haemophilia A patients with inhibitors receiving FEIBA treatment was established in Turkey. With a standardized case report form, data were collected retrospectively on: patient demographics; characteristics of acute bleeding episodes and surgical interventions; FEIBA regimen; and treatment outcomes. Thirty-seven patients received a total of 112 FEIBA treatment courses, 90 for acute bleeding and 22 for surgical haemostasis. The median FEIBA dose per infusion for acute bleeding was 50 IU kg(-1), and for surgery was 100 IU kg(-1). For both acute joint and muscle/soft tissue bleeding and in surgery, haemostasis was attained in a median of two FEIBA infusions. FEIBA was judged effective in 92% of treatment courses for acute bleeding, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 85-97%. Rates of haemostatic efficacy did not differ significantly between anatomical sites of acute bleeding. The haemostatic efficacy rate of FEIBA in surgery was 86% (CI, 65-97%). No thromboembolic complications or other adverse events occurred during any treatment course. FEIBA has been successfully integrated into clinical practice in Turkey, with rates of haemostatic efficacy comparable to those reported in countries with a longer history of FEIBA usage.

  7. [SYSTEMIC CYTOKINOTHERAPY, USING BETALEUKIN IN A COMPLEX TREATMENT OF AN ACUTE GASTRODUODENAL ULCER BLEEDING].

    PubMed

    Gadjiyev, J N; Allakhverdiyev, V A; Sushkov, S V; Gadjiyev, N J; Yagubova, V I; Lavinskaya, E V

    2016-03-01

    Results of surgical treatment for an acute ulcer gastroduodenal bleeding in 120 patients, ageing 16-75 yrs old, were analyzed. In 20 of them a gastric ulcer was a cause of bleeding, while in 84--a duodenal ulcer, and in 16--a coexistent gastroduodenal ulcer. The bleeding activity was estimated in accordance to J. Forrest classification. In 57 patients (a comparison group) preoperatively and postoperatively a complex of a standard basal conservative therapy without immunocorrection was conducted, and in 63 (the main group)--a systemic cytokinotherapy (SCKTH), using betaleukin, was applied postoperatively additionally in a complex of therapy. A content of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD19+, IgA, IgM, IgG was estimated in dynamics, as well as circulating immune complexes, phagocytic index, phagocytic number. There was established, that a dysbalance depth in the immune status have had depended upon the blood loss severity. The SCKTH application is pathogenetically substantiated, it promotes the immune status normalization, as well as a more favorable course of postoperative period and the results of treatment improvement. PMID:27514085

  8. [SYSTEMIC CYTOKINOTHERAPY, USING BETALEUKIN IN A COMPLEX TREATMENT OF AN ACUTE GASTRODUODENAL ULCER BLEEDING].

    PubMed

    Gadjiyev, J N; Allakhverdiyev, V A; Sushkov, S V; Gadjiyev, N J; Yagubova, V I; Lavinskaya, E V

    2016-03-01

    Results of surgical treatment for an acute ulcer gastroduodenal bleeding in 120 patients, ageing 16-75 yrs old, were analyzed. In 20 of them a gastric ulcer was a cause of bleeding, while in 84--a duodenal ulcer, and in 16--a coexistent gastroduodenal ulcer. The bleeding activity was estimated in accordance to J. Forrest classification. In 57 patients (a comparison group) preoperatively and postoperatively a complex of a standard basal conservative therapy without immunocorrection was conducted, and in 63 (the main group)--a systemic cytokinotherapy (SCKTH), using betaleukin, was applied postoperatively additionally in a complex of therapy. A content of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD19+, IgA, IgM, IgG was estimated in dynamics, as well as circulating immune complexes, phagocytic index, phagocytic number. There was established, that a dysbalance depth in the immune status have had depended upon the blood loss severity. The SCKTH application is pathogenetically substantiated, it promotes the immune status normalization, as well as a more favorable course of postoperative period and the results of treatment improvement.

  9. Acute Upper Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding in Morocco: What Have Changed?

    PubMed Central

    Timraz, A.; Khannoussi, W.; Ajana, F. Z.; Essamri, W.; Benelbarhdadi, I.; Afifi, R.; Benazzouz, M.; Essaid, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In the present study, we aimed to investigate epidemiological, clinical, and etiological characteristics of acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2008. It concerned all cases of acute upper gastroduodenal bleeding benefited from an urgent gastro-intestinal endoscopy in our department in Morocco. Characteristics of patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender, medical history, presenting symptoms, results of rectal and clinical examinations, and endoscopy findings. Results. 1389 cases were registered. As 66% of the patients were male, 34% were female. Mean age was 49. 12% of patients had a history of previous hemorrhage, and 26% had a history of NSAID and aspirin use. Endoscopy was performed in 96%. The gastroduodenal ulcer was the main etiology in 38%, followed by gastritis and duodenitis in 32.5%. Conclusion. AUGIB is still a frequent pathology, threatening patients' life. NSAID and aspirin are still the major risk factors. Their impact due to peptic ulcer remains stable in our country. PMID:21991509

  10. Andexanet Alfa for Acute Major Bleeding Associated with Factor Xa Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Stuart J; Milling, Truman J; Eikelboom, John W; Gibson, C Michael; Curnutte, John T; Gold, Alex; Bronson, Michele D; Lu, Genmin; Conley, Pamela B; Verhamme, Peter; Schmidt, Jeannot; Middeldorp, Saskia; Cohen, Alexander T; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Albaladejo, Pierre; Lopez-Sendon, Jose; Goodman, Shelly; Leeds, Janet; Wiens, Brian L; Siegal, Deborah M; Zotova, Elena; Meeks, Brandi; Nakamya, Juliet; Lim, W Ting; Crowther, Mark

    2016-09-22

    Background Andexanet alfa (andexanet) is a recombinant modified human factor Xa decoy protein that has been shown to reverse the inhibition of factor Xa in healthy volunteers. Methods In this multicenter, prospective, open-label, single-group study, we evaluated 67 patients who had acute major bleeding within 18 hours after the administration of a factor Xa inhibitor. The patients all received a bolus of andexanet followed by a 2-hour infusion of the drug. Patients were evaluated for changes in measures of anti-factor Xa activity and were assessed for clinical hemostatic efficacy during a 12-hour period. All the patients were subsequently followed for 30 days. The efficacy population of 47 patients had a baseline value for anti-factor Xa activity of at least 75 ng per milliliter (or ≥0.5 IU per milliliter for those receiving enoxaparin) and had confirmed bleeding severity at adjudication. Results The mean age of the patients was 77 years; most of the patients had substantial cardiovascular disease. Bleeding was predominantly gastrointestinal or intracranial. The mean (±SD) time from emergency department presentation to the administration of the andexanet bolus was 4.8±1.8 hours. After the bolus administration, the median anti-factor Xa activity decreased by 89% (95% confidence interval [CI], 58 to 94) from baseline among patients receiving rivaroxaban and by 93% (95% CI, 87 to 94) among patients receiving apixaban. These levels remained similar during the 2-hour infusion. Four hours after the end of the infusion, there was a relative decrease from baseline of 39% in the measure of anti-factor Xa activity among patients receiving rivaroxaban and of 30% among those receiving apixaban. Twelve hours after the andexanet infusion, clinical hemostasis was adjudicated as excellent or good in 37 of 47 patients in the efficacy analysis (79%; 95% CI, 64 to 89). Thrombotic events occurred in 12 of 67 patients (18%) during the 30-day follow-up. Conclusions On the basis of a

  11. Study protocol: first nationwide comparative audit of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Oakland, Kathryn; Guy, Richard; Uberoi, Raman; Seeney, Frances; Collins, Gary; Grant-Casey, John; Mortensen, Neil; Murphy, Mike; Jairath, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is a common indication for emergency hospitalisation worldwide. In contrast to upper GIB, patient characteristics, modes of investigation, transfusion, treatment and outcomes are poorly described. There are minimal clinical guidelines to inform care pathways and the use of endoscopy, including (diagnostic and therapeutic yields), interventional radiology and surgery are poorly defined. As a result, there is potential for wide variation in practice and clinical outcomes. Methods and analysis The UK Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Audit is a large nationwide audit of adult patients acutely admitted with LGIB or those who develop LGIB while hospitalised for another reason. Consecutive, unselected presentations with LGIB will be enrolled prospectively over a 2-month period at the end of 2015 and detailed data will be collected on patient characteristics, comorbidities, use of anticoagulants, transfusion, timing and modalities of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, clinical outcome, length of stay and mortality. These will be audited against predefined minimum standards of care for LGIB. It is anticipated that over 80% of all acute hospitals in England and some hospitals in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will participate. Data will be collected on the availability and organisation of care, provision of diagnostic and therapeutic GI endoscopy, interventional radiology, surgery and transfusion protocols. Ethics and dissemination This audit will be conducted as part of the national comparative audit programme of blood transfusion through collaboration with specialists in gastroenterology, surgery and interventional radiology. Individual reports will be provided to each participant site as well as an overall report and disseminated through specialist societies. Results will also be published in peer-reviewed journals. The study has been funded by National Health Services (NHS) Blood and Transplant and the

  12. Risk of bleeding associated with combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and antiplatelet therapy following acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Labos, Christopher; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Nedjar, Hacene; Turecki, Gustavo; Rahme, Elham

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients prescribed antiplatelet treatment to prevent recurrent acute myocardial infarction are often also given a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) to treat coexisting depression. Use of either treatment may increase the risk of bleeding. We assessed the risk of bleeding among patients taking both medications following acute myocardial infarction. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using hospital discharge abstracts, physician billing information, medication reimbursement claims and demographic data from provincial health services administrative databases. We included patients 50 years of age or older who were discharged from hospital with antiplatelet therapy following acute myocardial infarction between January 1998 and March 2007. Patients were followed until admission to hospital due to a bleeding episode, admission to hospital due to recurrent acute myocardial infarction, death or the end of the study period. Results: The 27 058 patients in the cohort received the following medications at discharge: acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) (n = 14 426); clopidogrel (n = 2467), ASA and clopidogrel (n = 9475); ASA and an SSRI (n = 406); ASA, clopidogrel and an SSRI (n = 239); or clopidogrel and an SSRI (n = 45). Compared with ASA use alone, the combined use of an SSRI with antiplatelet therapy was associated with an increased risk of bleeding (ASA and SSRI: hazard ratio [HR] 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08–1.87; ASA, clopidogrel and SSRI: HR 2.35, 95% CI 1.61–3.42). Compared with dual antiplatelet therapy alone (ASA and clopidogrel), combined use of an SSRI and dual antiplatelet therapy was associated with an increased risk of bleeding (HR 1.57, 95% CI 1.07–2.32). Interpretation: Patients taking an SSRI together with ASA or dual antiplatelet therapy following acute myocardial infarction were at increased risk of bleeding. PMID:21948719

  13. A Therapeutic Dose of Ketoprofen Causes Acute Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Erosions, and Ulcers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shientag, Lisa J; Wheeler, Suzanne M; Garlick, David S; Maranda, Louise S

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative treatment of several rats in our facility with ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) resulted in blood loss, peritonitis, and death within a day to a little more than a week after surgery that was not related to the gastrointestinal tract. Published reports have established the 5-mg/kg dose as safe and effective for rats. Because ketoprofen is a nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug that can damage the gastrointestinal tract, the putative diagnosis for these morbidities and mortalities was gastrointestinal toxicity caused by ketoprofen (5 mg/kg). We conducted a prospective study evaluating the effect of this therapeutic dose of ketoprofen on the rat gastrointestinal tract within 24 h. Ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) was administered to one group of rats that then received gas anesthesia for 30 min and to another group without subsequent anesthesia. A third group was injected with saline followed by 30 min of gas anesthesia. Our primary hypothesis was that noteworthy gastrointestinal bleeding and lesions would occur in both groups treated with ketoprofen but not in rats that received saline and anesthesia. Our results showed marked gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and small intestinal ulcers in the ketoprofen-treated rats and minimal damages in the saline-treated group. The combination of ketoprofen and anesthesia resulted in worse clinical signs than did ketoprofen alone. We conclude that a single 5-mg/kg dose of ketoprofen causes acute mucosal damage to the rat small intestine. PMID:23294892

  14. Acute Uterine Bleeding Unrelated to Pregnancy: A Southern California Permanente Medical Group Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Malcolm G

    2013-01-01

    Acute uterine bleeding unrelated to pregnancy has been defined as bleeding “sufficient in volume as to, in the opinion of the treating clinician, require urgent or emergent intervention.” The Southern California Permanente Medical Group updated its guidelines for the management of this condition on the basis of the best available evidence, as identified in a systematic review of the available literature. Given the paucity of studies evaluating this condition, the guidelines, by necessity, include recommendations largely based on opinion or other sources such as case series that are, in general, categorized as low-quality evidence. Medical interventions with single or combined gonadal steroidal agents administered parenterally or orally show promise, but more high-quality studies are needed to better define the appropriate drugs, dose, and administrative scheduling. There is also some evidence that intrauterine tamponade may be useful in at least selected cases. Special attention must be paid to both diagnosing and treating inherited disorders of hemostasis, such as von Willebrand disease, that may otherwise be underdiagnosed in both adolescent and adult women. PMID:24355890

  15. Acute management and secondary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding: A western Canadian survey

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Justin; Wong, Winnie; Zandieh, Iman; Leung, Yvette; Lee, Samuel S; Ramji, Alnoor; Yoshida, Eric M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis. Guidelines have been published in 1997; however, variability in the acute management and prevention of EVB rebleeding may occur. METHODS: Gastroenterologists in the provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan were sent a self-reporting questionnaire. RESULTS: The response rate was 70.4% (86 of 122). Intravenous octreotide was recommended by 93% for EVB patients but the duration was variable. The preferred timing for endoscopy in suspected acute EVB was within 12 h in 75.6% of respondents and within 24 h in 24.6% of respondents. Most (52.3%) gastroenterologists do not routinely use antibiotic prophylaxis in acute EVB patients. The preferred duration of antibiotic therapy was less than three days (35.7%), three to seven days (44.6%), seven to 10 days (10.7%) and throughout hospitalization (8.9%). Methods of secondary prophylaxis included repeat endoscopic therapy (93%) and beta-blocker therapy (84.9%). Most gastroenterologists (80.2%) routinely attempted to titrate beta-blockers to a heart rate of 55 beats/min or a 25% reduction from baseline. The most common form of secondary prophylaxis was a combination of endoscopic and pharmacological therapy (70.9%). CONCLUSIONS: Variability exists in some areas of EVB treatment, especially in areas for which evidence was lacking at the time of the last guideline publication. Gastroenterologists varied in the use of prophylactic antibiotics for acute EVB. More gastroenterologists used combination secondary prophylaxis in the form of band ligation eradication and beta-blocker therapy rather than either treatment alone. Future guidelines may be needed to address these practice differences. PMID:16955150

  16. Promoting the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeds among junior doctors: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Saunsbury, Emma; Allison, Emma; Colleypriest, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Though they are knowledgeable, foundation year one (FY1) doctors can lack skills and confidence in acute situations due to inexperience. This was witnessed when a new FY1 on call attended an acute upper gastrointestinal bleed (UGIB), a common emergency with a 10% in hospital mortality rate. We aimed to improve FY1s' ability to manage these critical patients through simulation based teaching, before and after the introduction of an algorithm summarising current guidelines. After assessing the FY1s' perceived level of confidence in managing UGIBs, they individually attended a simulation session which evaluated specific aspects of their assessment and management plans. Immediate debriefing and subsequent teaching sessions reinforced learning points, with an algorithm instituted as an aide mémoire to improve efficiency. A repeat simulation session assessed improvements in both subjective confidence and objective management targets. All FY1s expressed improved confidence in managing patients with UGIBs. There were improvements across the board in their assessment and management, notably: verbalisation of concern for hypotension increased to 100% (from 60%), two points of intravenous access requested in 100% of cases (from 53%), and a 76 second reduction in time to call for senior support. Collectively, these individual aspects led to improved patient care. Effective management of acute patients is best learnt through exposure, and simulation based teaching provides a safe but powerful modality to aid transition from textbook theory to ward situations. Algorithms can streamline care and hasten the stabilisation of patients. This project reinforces generic competencies that FY1s can translate to their management of not only UGIBs, but many acute presentations, providing a convincing argument for broader simulation use in FY1 teaching.

  17. Promoting the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeds among junior doctors: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Saunsbury, Emma; Allison, Emma; Colleypriest, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Though they are knowledgeable, foundation year one (FY1) doctors can lack skills and confidence in acute situations due to inexperience. This was witnessed when a new FY1 on call attended an acute upper gastrointestinal bleed (UGIB), a common emergency with a 10% in hospital mortality rate. We aimed to improve FY1s' ability to manage these critical patients through simulation based teaching, before and after the introduction of an algorithm summarising current guidelines. After assessing the FY1s' perceived level of confidence in managing UGIBs, they individually attended a simulation session which evaluated specific aspects of their assessment and management plans. Immediate debriefing and subsequent teaching sessions reinforced learning points, with an algorithm instituted as an aide mémoire to improve efficiency. A repeat simulation session assessed improvements in both subjective confidence and objective management targets. All FY1s expressed improved confidence in managing patients with UGIBs. There were improvements across the board in their assessment and management, notably: verbalisation of concern for hypotension increased to 100% (from 60%), two points of intravenous access requested in 100% of cases (from 53%), and a 76 second reduction in time to call for senior support. Collectively, these individual aspects led to improved patient care. Effective management of acute patients is best learnt through exposure, and simulation based teaching provides a safe but powerful modality to aid transition from textbook theory to ward situations. Algorithms can streamline care and hasten the stabilisation of patients. This project reinforces generic competencies that FY1s can translate to their management of not only UGIBs, but many acute presentations, providing a convincing argument for broader simulation use in FY1 teaching. PMID:26732056

  18. Bleeding Risk during Treatment of Acute Thrombotic Events with Subcutaneous LMWH Compared to Intravenous Unfractionated Heparin; A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Costantino, Giorgio; Ceriani, Elisa; Rusconi, Anna Maria; Podda, Gian Marco; Montano, Nicola; Duca, Piergiorgio; Cattaneo, Marco; Casazza, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Background Low Molecular Weight Heparins (LMWH) are at least as effective antithrombotic drugs as Unfractionated Heparin (UFH). However, it is still unclear whether the safety profiles of LMWH and UFH differ. We performed a systematic review to compare the bleeding risk of fixed dose subcutaneous LMWH and adjusted dose UFH for treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) or acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Major bleeding was the primary end point. Methods Electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library) were searched up to May 2010 with no language restrictions. Randomized controlled trials in which subcutaneous LMWH were compared to intravenous UFH for the treatment of acute thrombotic events were selected. Two reviewers independently screened studies and extracted data on study design, study quality, incidence of major bleeding, patients’ characteristics, type, dose and number of daily administrations of LMWH, co-treatments, study end points and efficacy outcome. Pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using the random effects model. Results Twenty-seven studies were included. A total of 14,002 patients received UFH and 14,635 patients LMWH. Overall, no difference in major bleeding was observed between LMWH patients and UFH (OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.60–1.04). In patients with VTE LMWH appeared safer than UFH, (OR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.47–1.00). Conclusion The results of our systematic review suggest that the use of LMWH in the treatment of VTE might be associated with a reduction in major bleeding compared with UFH. The choice of which heparin to use to minimize bleeding risk must be based on the single patient, taking into account the bleeding profile of different heparins in different settings. PMID:22984525

  19. Scintigraphic demonstration of acute gastrointestinal bleeding caused by gallbladder carcinoma eroding the colon

    SciTech Connect

    Czerniak, A.; Zwas, S.T.; Rabau, M.Y.; Avigad, I.; Borag, B.; Wolfstein, I.

    1985-08-01

    Massive lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by gallbladder carcinoma eroding into the colonic wall was demonstrated accurately by Tc-99m RBCs. In addition, retrograde bleeding into the gallbladder was also identified while arteriography did not show contrast extravasation. This case supports the use of Tc-99m RBCs over Tc-99m sulfur colloid for more accurate localization of lower GI bleeding.

  20. Managing a Rivaroxaban Bleed: Understanding the Difficulties in Acute Reversal of the New Oral Anticoagulants through a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Robby; Mckay, Paulina

    2014-01-01

    With the arrival of a new generation of oral anticoagulants significant burdens associated with warfarin's use on both the patient and the healthcare system have been alleviated. Nevertheless, a shortfall exists in regard to an agent or protocol for reversal of these new anticoagulants in the setting of an acute bleed. Our case of a patient presenting to the hospital with a vaginal bleed while on rivaroxaban highlights the difficulty in management without a clear protocol or agent for reversal of anticoagulation. PMID:25478253

  1. Endoscopic management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding in children: Time for a radical rethink.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Mike; Belsha, Dalia

    2016-02-01

    Currently we are no nearer than 10 or 20years ago providing a safe, adequate, and effective round-the-clock endoscopic services for acute life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding in children. Preventable deaths are occurring still, and it is a tragedy. This is owing to a number of factors which require urgent attention. Skill-mix and the ability of available endoscopists in the UK are woeful. Manpower is spread too thinly and not concentrated in centers of excellence, which is necessary given the relative rarity of the presentation. Adult gastroenterologists are increasingly reticent regarding their help in increasingly litigious times. Recent work on identification of those children likely to require urgent endoscopic intervention has mirrored scoring systems that have been present in adult circles for many years and may allow appropriate and timely intervention. Recent technical developments such as that of Hemospray® may lower the threshold of competency in dealing with this problem endoscopically, thus allowing lives to be saved. Educational courses, mannequin and animal model training are important but so will be appropriate credentialing of individuals for this skill-set. Assessment of competency will become the norm and guidelines on a national level in each country mandatory if we are to move this problem from the "too difficult" to the "achieved". It is an urgent problem and is one of the last emergencies in pediatrics that is conducted poorly. This cannot and should not be allowed to continue unchallenged.

  2. Acute Middle Gastrointestinal Bleeding Risk Associated with NSAIDs, Antithrombotic Drugs, and PPIs: A Multicenter Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Niikura, Ryota; Yamada, Atsuo; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Shimbo, Takuro; Kobayashi, Yuka; Okamoto, Makoto; Mitsuno, Yuzo; Ogura, Keiji; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Akiyama, Junichi; Uemura, Naomi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Middle gastrointestinal bleeding (MGIB) risk has not been fully investigated due to its extremely rare occurrence and the need for multiple endoscopies to exclude upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This study investigated whether MGIB is associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), low-dose aspirin (LDA), thienopyridines, anticoagulants, and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), and whether PPI use affects the interactions between MGIB and antithrombotic drugs. Methods In this multicenter, hospital-based, case-control study, 400 patients underwent upper and lower endoscopy, 80 had acute overt MGIB and 320 had no bleeding and were matched for age and sex as controls (1:4). MGIB was additionally evaluated by capsule and/or double-balloon endoscopy, after excluding upper and lower GI bleeding. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) for MGIB risk were calculated using conditional logistic regression. To estimate the propensity score, we employed a logistic regression model for PPI use. Results In patients with MGIB, mean hemoglobin level was 9.4 g/dL, and 28 patients (35%) received blood transfusions. Factors significantly associated with MGIB were chronic kidney disease (p<0.001), liver cirrhosis (p = 0.034), NSAIDs (p<0.001), thienopyridines (p<0.001), anticoagulants (p = 0.002), and PPIs (p<0.001). After adjusting for these factors, NSAIDs (AOR, 2.5; p = 0.018), thienopyridines (AOR, 3.2; p = 0.015), anticoagulants (AOR, 4.3; p = 0.028), and PPIs (AOR; 2.0; p = 0.021) were independently associated with MGIB. After adjusting for propensity score, the use of PPIs remained an independent risk factors for MGIB (AOR, 1.94; p = 0.034). No significant interactions were observed between PPIs and NSAIDs (AOR, 0.7; p = 0.637), LDA (AOR, 0.3; p = 0.112), thienopyridine (AOR, 0.7, p = 0.671), or anticoagulants (AOR, 0.5; p = 0.545). Conclusions One-third of patients with acute small intestinal bleeding required blood transfusion. NSAIDs

  3. Oesophageal function before, during, and after healing of erosive oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, F; Ferrarini, F; Longanesi, A; Angeloni, M; Ragazzini, M; Miglioli, M; Barbara, L

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the relationship between oesophageal motor abnormalities and oesophagitis, we carried out four hour studies of oesophageal motility and 24 hour pH measurements in fasting and fed conditions in eight patients before, during (pH only), and after medical healing of erosive oesophagitis. Gastrooesophageal acid reflux decreased (ns) during the treatment, but tended to return to basal values at the end. Oesophageal body motility was unchanged after healing, while the lower oesophageal sphincter basal tone was significantly increased at the end of the study in the postcibal period. The results suggest that the impairment of the sphincter tone in reflux oesophagitis is secondary to the presence of the oesophageal lesions. Macroscopic healing is not paralleled by improved major pathogenic factors of the disease, however--that is, acid reflux and oesophageal body motility. PMID:3345925

  4. Evaluation of technetium-99m DTPA for localization of site of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Mahajan, K.K.; Ericsson, S.; Nawaz, K.; Owunwanne, A.; Kouris, K.; Higazy, E.; Awdeh, M.

    1986-11-01

    Intravenous Tc-99m DTPA was evaluated in 34 patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Active bleeding was detected in 25 patients: nine in the stomach, 12 in the duodenum, and four from esophageal varices. No active bleeding was seen in nine patients (two gastric ulcers and seven duodenal ulcers). Results were correlated with endoscopic and/or surgical findings. All completely correlated except: 1) one case of esophageal varices in which there was disagreement on the site, 2) three cases of duodenal ulcers that were not bleeding on endoscopy but showed mild oozing on delayed images and 3) one case of gastric ulcer, in which no bleeding was detected in the Tc-99m DTPA study, but was found to be bleeding at surgery 24 hours later. The Tc-99m DTPA study is a reliable method for localization of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with an agreement ratio of 85%. This method also can be used safely for follow-up of patients with intermittent bleeding. It is less invasive than endoscopy, is easily repeatable, and has the same accuracy.

  5. Acute bleeding varices: a five-year prospective evaluation of tamponade and sclerotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Terblanche, J; Yakoob, H I; Bornman, P C; Stiegmann, G V; Bane, R; Jonker, M; Wright, J; Kirsch, R

    1981-01-01

    In a five-year study of massive upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, 143 patients had esophageal varices diagnosed on emergency endoscopic examination. Seventy-one patients had active bleeding from varices and required Sengstaken tube tamponade during at least one hospital admission. The remaining patients included 33 with variceal bleeding which had stopped and 39 who were bleeding from another source. Sixty-six of the former group of 71 patients were referred for emergency injection sclerotherapy. These 66 patients were followed prospectively to August 1980, and had 137 episodes of endoscopically proven variceal bleeding requiring Sengstaken tube control followed by injection sclerotherapy during 93 separate hospital admissions. Definitive control of hemorrhage was achieved in 95% the patients admitted to the hospital (single injection 70%; two or three injections 22%). The death rate per hospital admission was 28%. No patient died of continued variceal bleeding, and exsanguinating variceal hemorrhage no longer poses a major problem at our hospital. The combined use of initial Sengstaken tube tamponade followed by injection sclerotherapy has simplified emergency treatment in the group of patients who continue to bleed actively from esophageal varices, despite initial conservative treatment. Images Fig. 1. PMID:7025770

  6. Embolization of Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Resistant to Endoscopic Treatment: Results and Predictors of Recurrent Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric Rao, Pramod; Ota, Shinichi; Lin Mingde; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2010-12-15

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage is a frequent complication associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of UGI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, but the differential diagnosis is diverse and includes tumors; ischemia; gastritis; arteriovenous malformations, such as Dieulafoy lesions; Mallory-Weiss tears; trauma; and iatrogenic causes. Aggressive treatment with early endoscopic hemostasis is essential for a favorable outcome. However, severe bleeding despite conservative medical treatment or endoscopic intervention occurs in 5-10% of patients, requiring surgery or transcatheter arterial embolization. Surgical intervention is usually an expeditious and gratifying endeavor, but it can be associated with high operative mortality rates. Endovascular management using superselective catheterization of the culprit vessel, < sandwich> occlusion, or blind embolization has emerged as an alternative to emergent operative intervention for high-risk patients and is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Indeed, many published studies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and its high technical and clinical success rates, which range from 69 to 100% and from 63 to 97%, respectively, even if the choice of the best embolic agent among coils, cyanaocrylate glue, gelatin sponge, or calibrated particles remains a matter of debate. However, factors influencing clinical outcome, especially predictors of early rebleeding, are poorly understood, and few studies have addressed this issue. This review of the literature will attempt to define the role of embolotherapy for acute nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage that fails to respond to endoscopic hemostasis and to summarize data on factors predicting angiographic and embolization failure.

  7. Band ligation vs. N-Butyl-2-cyanoacrylate injection in acute gastric variceal bleeding: a prospective follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Tantau, Marcel; Crisan, Dana; Popa, Daniel; Vesa, Stefan; Tantau, Alina

    BACKGROUND. Treatment of gastric varices (GV) implies a number of several difficulties and sometimes entails complications. The best endoscopic success rate was attributed until now to the use of tissue adhesives(N-Butyl-2-Cyanoacrylate) and band ligation. AIM. To assess the therapeutic efficacy and safety of cyanoacrylate injection compared to band ligation in patients with acute GV hemorrhage. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Thirty-seven patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from GV were included in the study, treated with cyanoacrylate injection (GVO)-19 patients or band ligations (GVL)-18 patients. They were followed up for overall results, complications and survival rate. RESULTS. The mean age of the study group was 60.22 ± 9.34 years, with a male/female ratio of 21:16. The mean follow-up period was 427.26 ± 214.16 days in the GVO group and 406.21 ± 213.23 days in the GVL group (p = 0.76). Initial hemostasis was achieved in all patients treated with cyanoacrylate and in 88.88% from the GVL group (p = 0.43). Rebleeding occurred in 72.22% of the GVL group and in 31.57% of the GVO patients (p = 0.03). Patients in the GVO group had a significantly larger rebleeding-free period(p = 0.006). No difference was found in survival rates(p = 0.75). The Child Class (p = 0.003 for Class C) and treatment method (p = 0.01) were independently associated with the rate of rebleeding. No differences were found regarding the rate of complications. CONCLUSION. The use of cyanoacrylate in acute GV bleeding had better results when compared with band ligation in terms of controlling the hemorrhage and recurrence of bleeding. The overall survival rate was not influenced by the method used for the treatment of complicated GV.

  8. Oesophageal food impaction in achalasia treated with Coca-Cola and nifedipine.

    PubMed

    Koumi, Andriani; Panos, Marios Zenon

    2010-01-01

    Achalasia is characterised by the loss of peristaltic movement in the distal oesophagus and failure of the lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation, which results in impaired oesophageal emptying. We report a case of a 92-year-old frail woman with a history of achalasia, who presented with acute oesophageal obstruction due to impaction of a large amount of food material. She was treated successfully with nifedipine, in combination with Coca-Cola (original product, not sugar free), so avoiding the risks associated with repeated endoscopic intubation and piecemeal removal of the oesophageal content.

  9. Oesophagus side effects related to the treatment of oesophageal cancer or radiotherapy of other thoracic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Adebahr, Sonja; Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Nestle, Ursula; Brunner, Thomas B

    2016-08-01

    The oesophagus as a serial organ located in the central chest is frequent subject to "incidental" dose application in radiotherapy for several thoracic malignancies including oesophageal cancer itself. Especially due to the radiosensitive mucosa severe radiotherapy induced sequelae can occur, acute oesophagitis and strictures as late toxicity being the most frequent side-effects. In this review we focus on oesophageal side effects derived from treatment of gastrointestinal cancer and secondly provide an overview on oesophageal toxicity from conventional and stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy to the thoracic area in general. Available data on pathogenesis, frequency, onset, and severity of oesophageal side effects are summarized. Whereas for conventional radiotherapy the associations of applied doses to certain volumes of the oesophagus are well described, the tolerance dose to the mediastinal structures for hypofractionated therapy is unknown. The review provides available attempts to predict the risk of oesophageal side effects from dosimetric parameters of SBRT. PMID:27644905

  10. New oral anticoagulants: clinical indications, monitoring and treatment of acute bleeding complications.

    PubMed

    Fenger-Eriksen, C; Münster, A-M; Grove, E L

    2014-07-01

    New oral anticoagulants like the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran (Pradaxa®), and factor Xa-inhibitors, rivaroxaban (Xarelto®) and apixaban (Eliquis®) are available for prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic disease. They are emerging alternatives to warfarin and provide equal or better clinical outcome together with reduced need for routine monitoring. Methods for measuring drug concentrations are available, although a correlation between plasma drug concentrations and the risk of bleeding has not been firmly established. Standard laboratory measures like prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time are not sensitive enough to detect thrombin or factor Xa inhibition provided by new oral anticoagulants. Thus, these standard tests may only be used as a crude estimation of the actual anticoagulation status. Further challenges regarding patients receiving new oral anticoagulants who presents with major bleeding or need for emergency surgery pose a unique problem. No established agents are clinically available to reverse the anticoagulant effect, although preclinical data report prothrombin complex concentrate as more efficient than fresh frozen plasma or other prohaemostatic agents. This review summaries current knowledge on approved new oral anticoagulants and discusses clinical aspects of monitoring, with particular focus on the management of the bleeding patient.

  11. Oesophageal inflammatory paediatric chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    Aherne, Thomas; Cullen, Paul; Mortell, Alan; McGuinness, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Paediatric chylothoraces are rare, particularly outside the operative setting. Cases of spontaneous chylothorax are often demanding diagnostically and frequently associated with patient morbidity. We present a challenging case of paediatric chylothorax associated with inflammatory oesophageal perforation likely related to foreign body ingestion. PMID:24920516

  12. The HAS-BLED Score Identifies Patients with Acute Venous Thromboembolism at High Risk of Major Bleeding Complications during the First Six Months of Anticoagulant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kooiman, Judith; van Hagen, Nadja; Iglesias del Sol, Antonio; Planken, Erwin V.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; van der Meer, Felix J. M.; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.; Klok, Frederikus A.; Huisman, Menno V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The HAS-BLED score enables a risk estimate of major bleeds in patients with atrial fibrillation on vitamin K-antagonists (VKA) treatment, but has not been validated for patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE). We analyzed whether the HAS-BLED score accurately identifies patients at high risk of major bleeds during VKA treatment for acute VTE. Methods Medical records of 537 patients with acute VTE (primary diagnosis pulmonary embolism in 223, deep vein thrombosis in 314) starting VKA treatment between 2006-2007 were searched for items on the HAS-BLED score and the occurrence of major bleeds during the first 180 days of follow-up. The hazard ratio (HR) for the occurrence of major bleeds comparing non-high with high-risk patients as defined by a HAS-BLED score ≥ 3 points was calculated using Cox-regression analysis. Results Major bleeds occurred in 11/537 patients (2.0%, 5.2/100 person years, 95% CI 2.8-9.2). Cumulative incidences of major bleeds were 1.3% (95% CI 0.1-2.5) in the non-high (HAS-BLED < 3) and 9.6% (95%CI 2.2-17.0) in the high-risk group (HAS-BLED ≥ 3), (p <0.0001 by Log-Rank test), with a HR of 8.7 (95% CI 2.7-28.4). Of the items in the HAS-BLED score, abnormal renal function (HR 10.8, 95% CI 1.9-61.7) and a history of bleeding events (HR 10.4, 95% CI 2.5-42.5) were independent predictors of major bleeds during follow-up. Conclusion Acute VTE patients with a HAS-BLED score ≥ 3 points are at increased risk of major bleeding. These results warrant for correction of the potentially reversible risk factors for major bleeding and careful International Normalized Ratio monitoring in acute VTE patients with a high HAS-BLED score. PMID:25905638

  13. Lactic Acidosis Induced by Linezolid Mimics Symptoms of an Acute Intracranial Bleed: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Zuccarini, Nichole Suzzanne; Yousuf, Tariq; Wozniczka, Daniel; Rauf, Anis Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is common and most often associated with disturbed acid-base balance. Rarely, it can be a life-threatening medication side effect. Hence, determining the etiology of lactic acidosis early in patients is paramount in choosing the correct therapeutic intervention. Although lactic acidosis as an adverse drug reaction of linezolid is a well-recognized and documented clinical entity, the occurrence of such mimicking an acute intracranial bleed has not been reported to our knowledge. The following case is presented as an example of such an occurrence. A 67-year-old woman presented to the emergency department for lethargy, nausea and syncope. The head CT did not demonstrate any bleeding or mass effect, but lab results were significant for elevated lactic acid. The patient recently underwent left total hip replacement surgery, which was complicated by a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. She received 6 weeks of oral linezolid therapy. And upon learning that key part of her history, the linezolid was discontinued. Her lactic acid rapidly normalized and she was discharged home. Several publications demonstrate that linezolid induces lactic acidosis by disrupting crucial mitochondrial functions. It is essential that clinicians are aware that linezolid can cause lactic acidosis. And, the important reminder is that adverse drug reactions can often mimic common diseases. If it is not recognized early, ominous clinical consequences may occur. In conclusion, linezolid should be suspected and included in the differential diagnosis if lactic acidosis exists with an uncommon clinical picture. PMID:27635182

  14. Lactic Acidosis Induced by Linezolid Mimics Symptoms of an Acute Intracranial Bleed: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Zuccarini, Nichole Suzzanne; Yousuf, Tariq; Wozniczka, Daniel; Rauf, Anis Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is common and most often associated with disturbed acid-base balance. Rarely, it can be a life-threatening medication side effect. Hence, determining the etiology of lactic acidosis early in patients is paramount in choosing the correct therapeutic intervention. Although lactic acidosis as an adverse drug reaction of linezolid is a well-recognized and documented clinical entity, the occurrence of such mimicking an acute intracranial bleed has not been reported to our knowledge. The following case is presented as an example of such an occurrence. A 67-year-old woman presented to the emergency department for lethargy, nausea and syncope. The head CT did not demonstrate any bleeding or mass effect, but lab results were significant for elevated lactic acid. The patient recently underwent left total hip replacement surgery, which was complicated by a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. She received 6 weeks of oral linezolid therapy. And upon learning that key part of her history, the linezolid was discontinued. Her lactic acid rapidly normalized and she was discharged home. Several publications demonstrate that linezolid induces lactic acidosis by disrupting crucial mitochondrial functions. It is essential that clinicians are aware that linezolid can cause lactic acidosis. And, the important reminder is that adverse drug reactions can often mimic common diseases. If it is not recognized early, ominous clinical consequences may occur. In conclusion, linezolid should be suspected and included in the differential diagnosis if lactic acidosis exists with an uncommon clinical picture.

  15. Lactic Acidosis Induced by Linezolid Mimics Symptoms of an Acute Intracranial Bleed: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Zuccarini, Nichole Suzzanne; Yousuf, Tariq; Wozniczka, Daniel; Rauf, Anis Abdul

    2016-10-01

    Lactic acidosis is common and most often associated with disturbed acid-base balance. Rarely, it can be a life-threatening medication side effect. Hence, determining the etiology of lactic acidosis early in patients is paramount in choosing the correct therapeutic intervention. Although lactic acidosis as an adverse drug reaction of linezolid is a well-recognized and documented clinical entity, the occurrence of such mimicking an acute intracranial bleed has not been reported to our knowledge. The following case is presented as an example of such an occurrence. A 67-year-old woman presented to the emergency department for lethargy, nausea and syncope. The head CT did not demonstrate any bleeding or mass effect, but lab results were significant for elevated lactic acid. The patient recently underwent left total hip replacement surgery, which was complicated by a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. She received 6 weeks of oral linezolid therapy. And upon learning that key part of her history, the linezolid was discontinued. Her lactic acid rapidly normalized and she was discharged home. Several publications demonstrate that linezolid induces lactic acidosis by disrupting crucial mitochondrial functions. It is essential that clinicians are aware that linezolid can cause lactic acidosis. And, the important reminder is that adverse drug reactions can often mimic common diseases. If it is not recognized early, ominous clinical consequences may occur. In conclusion, linezolid should be suspected and included in the differential diagnosis if lactic acidosis exists with an uncommon clinical picture. PMID:27635182

  16. Tylosis with oesophageal cancer: Diagnosis, management and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Anthony; Risk, Janet M; Maruthappu, Thiviyani; Kelsell, David P

    2015-01-01

    -added infection, particularly tinea pedis. More specific treatment for the thick skin is available in the form of oral retinoids, which are very effective but commonly produce side effects, including nasal excoriation and bleeding, hypercholesterolaemia, and abnormal liver function tests. Genetic counselling can be offered to patients and family members once a family history has been established. The prognosis of tylosis with oesophageal cancer is difficult to determine due to the limited number of affected individuals. In the last 40 years of surveillance, five out of six cases of squamous oesophageal cancer in the Liverpool family were detected endoscopically and were surgically removed. Four of five patients had stage 1 disease at presentation and remain alive and well more than 8 years later. This suggests that the presence of a screening program improves prognosis for these patients. PMID:26419362

  17. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... amounts of bleeding that occur over a long period of time can lead to problems such as anemia or low blood counts. Once a bleeding site is found, many therapies are available to stop the bleeding or treat the cause.

  18. Bleeding diathesis and hemophilias.

    PubMed

    Amin, Chirag; Sharathkumar, Anjali; Griest, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Patients with hemophilia and other congenital bleeding disorders are at risk for development of central nervous system (CNS) hemorrhage and can present with acute or chronic neurologic symptoms. These disorders are generally caused by qualitative or quantitative deficiency of components of hemostasis such as coagulation proteins, von Willebrand factor, or platelets. Rapid diagnosis and specific medical management such as coagulation factor replacement therapy are mandatory to minimize the morbidity and mortality of CNS bleeding. Therefore, the objective of this chapter is to introduce neurologists to the physiology of hemostasis and to provide an overview of the clinical presentation, and management of inherited bleeding disorders that can potentially present with CNS bleeding. Since hemophilia is the most common bleeding disorder encountered in clinical practice, more emphasis is placed on management of hemophilia. Additionally, neurologic manifestations related to the bleeding diathesis in patients with hemophilia are elaborated. PMID:24365370

  19. iPad-based primary 2D reading of CT angiography examinations of patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding: preliminary experience

    PubMed Central

    Neri, E; Bargellini, I; Scalise, P; Calcagni, F; Mantarro, A; D'Ippolito, G; Bartolozzi, C

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the iPad (Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) for two-dimensional (2D) reading of CT angiography (CTA) studies performed for suspected acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. Methods: 24 CTA examinations of patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding confirmed (19/24, 79.2%) or ruled out (5/24, 20.8%) by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were retrospectively reviewed by three independent readers on a commercial picture archiving communication system (PACS) workstation and on an iPad with Retina Display® 64 GB (Apple Inc.). The time needed to complete reading of every CTA examination was recorded, as well as the rate of detection of arterial bleeding and identification of suspected bleeding arteries on both devices. Results: Overall, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values for bleeding detection were not significantly different while using the iPad and workstation (0.774 vs 0.847, 0.947 vs 0.895, 0.6 vs 0.8, 0.9 vs 0.944 and 0.750 vs 0.667, respectively; p > 0.05). In DSA-positive cases, the iPad and workstation allowed correct identification of the bleeding source in 17/19 cases (89.5%) and 15/19 cases (78.9%), respectively (p > 0.05). Finally, the time needed to complete reading of every CTA study was significantly shorter using the iPad (169 ± 74 vs 222 ± 70 s, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Compared with a conventional PACS workstation, iPad-based preliminary 2D reading of CTA studies has comparable diagnostic accuracy for detection of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and can be significantly faster. Advances in knowledge: The iPad could be used by on-call interventional radiologists for immediate decision on percutaneous embolization in patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25652643

  20. Acute promyelocytic leukemia presenting as pulmonary thromboembolism: Not all APLs bleed

    PubMed Central

    Vaid, Ashok K; Batra, Sandeep; Karanth, Suman S; Gupta, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) presenting as pulmonary thromboembolism being misdiagnosed as community-acquired pneumonia. Thrombotic phenomenon in APL are poorly understood and grossly underreported. In our case, following no response to standard antibiotic treatment, the patient was further investigated and detected to have an acute pulmonary thromboembolism following right lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Though, complete blood picture revealed only mild hyperleukocytosis, bone marrow biopsy and aspiration revealed 60% blasts and a positive t (15,17)(q22,12) and PML retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) fusion protein on molecular cytogenetics. He was diagnosed as APL and received treatment with all-transretinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) and therapeutic anticoagulation PMID:26629469

  1. Daytime gastro-oesophageal reflux is important in oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    de Caestecker, J S; Blackwell, J N; Pryde, A; Heading, R C

    1987-05-01

    Fifty two patients were studied to investigate the patterns of gastro-oesophageal reflux during ambulatory pH monitoring and the relationship of reflux to presence and severity of oesophagitis. Twenty nine had evidence of oesophagitis which was graded according to severity. Acid exposure (pH less than 4) was calculated in each case for the total study period, the recumbent and upright periods, and the three hour period after the evening meal. Exposure in the upright period correlated closet (r=0.92: p less than 0.001) with that during the total period. Recumbent exposure correlated with both upright and postprandial exposure (p less than 0.001). Acid exposure during all four periods correlated significantly with the severity of oesophagitis, but postprandial acid exposure correlated best and recumbent acid exposure least well. Although acid clearance in the total, recumbent and upright periods correlated with oesophagitis, postprandial clearance showed the closest relationship. Thus the magnitude of daytime reflux, especially postprandial reflux and acid clearance, is more closely related than nocturnal reflux to oesophagitis. The results do not support the contention that night time reflux is inherently more injurious than daytime reflux to the oesophageal mucosa.

  2. Cisapride for gastro-oesophageal reflux and peptic oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Cucchiara, S; Staiano, A; Capozzi, C; Di Lorenzo, C; Boccieri, A; Auricchio, S

    1987-01-01

    Twenty children (age range 75 days-47 months) with reflux oesophagitis entered a random double blind trial in which they received either Cisapride (Janssen Pharmaceutical Ltd), a new prokinetic agent, or an identical placebo syrup. Diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux was made by measurement of intraluminal oesophageal pH combined with manometry. Oesophagitis was assessed in all patients by histological examination of mucosal specimens taken during oesophagogastroduodenoscopy. Manometry, pH test, and endoscopy with biopsy examination were repeated at the end of the treatment period. Seventeen patients completed the trial, eight of whom were taking the drug and nine the placebo. Mean total clinical score and post-prandial reflux time (% of reflux) significantly improved in patients in the group given Cisapride but not in the group given placebo. Furthermore, there was a significant improvement of the histological oesophagitis score only in the children in the group given Cisapride, whereas placebo was ineffective. It is concluded that Cisapride is a useful agent both for the relief of symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux and for the healing of peptic oesophagitis in infancy. PMID:3300570

  3. Personal view: to treat or not to treat? Helicobacter pylori and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease - an alternative hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Axon, A T R

    2004-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes acute on chronic gastritis and is responsible for most peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. However, recent papers have suggested that it may protect against gastro-oesophageal reflux, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal cancer. Furthermore, the rapid increase in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, Barrett's oesophagus and adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus in the developed world has been attributed by some to the falling prevalence of H. pylori. These considerations have led to the suggestion that H. pylori infection should not necessarily be treated, especially in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Conversely, data from prospective randomized studies have shown that H. pylori eradication does not cause gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in patients with duodenal ulcer or in the normal population, nor does it worsen the outcome of pre-existing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Therefore, although H. pylori is negatively associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, its eradication does not induce the disease. A hypothesis is presented suggesting that the increased prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a result of rising acid secretion in the general population, which, in turn, is a consequence of the increased linear height (a predictor of acid secretion). The greater acid secretion could also explain the decline in the prevalence of H. pylori and perhaps account for the inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. These considerations are explored in discussing whether H. pylori infection should be treated in infected patients presenting with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

  4. [Bleeding gastric ulcers and acute hepatitis: 2 simultaneous adverse reactions due to nimesulide in a case].

    PubMed

    Tejos, S; Torrejón, N; Reyes, H; Meneses, M

    2000-12-01

    A 66 year-old obese woman with arthrosis, self-medicated with oral nimesulide, 200 mg daily. After 6 weeks she developed nausea, jaundice and dark urine. Two weeks later she had recurrent hematemesis and was hospitalized. Besides obesity and anemia her physical examination was unremarkable. An upper GI endoscopy revealed 3 acute gastric ulcers and a 4th one in the pyloric channel. Abdominal ultrasonogram showed a slightly enlarged liver with diffuse reduction in ecogenicity; the gallbladder and biliary tract were normal. Blood tests demonstrated a conjugated hyperbilirubinemia (maximal total value: 18.4 mg/dl), ALAT 960 U/l, ASAT 850 U/l, GGT 420 U/l, alkaline phosphatases mildly elevated, pro-time 49% and albumin 2.7 mg/dl. Serum markers for hepatitis A, B and C viruses were negative. ANA, AMA, anti-SmA, were negative. Ceruloplasmin was normal. A liver biopsy showed bridging necrosis and other signs of acute toxic liver damage. Gastric ulcers healed after conventional treatment and hepatitis subsided after 2 months leaving no signs of chronic liver damage. The diagnosis of toxic hepatitis due to nimesulide was supported by the time-course of drug usage, sex, age, absence of other causes of liver disease, a compatible liver biopsy and the improvement after drug withdrawal. Peptic ulcers or toxic hepatitis have been previously described as independent adverse reactions in patients taking nimesulide or other NSAIDs but their simultaneous occurrence in a single patient is a unique event that deserves to be reported.

  5. Use of Recombinant Factor VIIa in a Pediatric Patient With Initial Presentation of Refractory Acute Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Severe Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gurion, Reut; Siu, Anita; Weiss, Aaron R.; Masterson, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Severe bleeding in acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is rare but can cause significant complications to the patient. Here we report the case of a pediatric patient with acute ITP and hematuria refractory to anti-D immune globulin, high dose intravenous immunoglobulin G, and high dose steroids. Her hematuria was successfully treated with recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa). While further investigation on the use of rFVIIa in ITP is warranted, this case report contributes to the pediatric literature for its use during the course of an initial presentation of ITP with hemorrhagic complications. PMID:23258971

  6. Investigation of non-cardiac chest pain — which oesophageal test?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, R J E; Collins, B J; Spence, R A J; Crookes, P F; Campbell, N P S; Adgey, A A J

    1986-01-01

    Five different tests were used to evaluate oesophageal function in 22 patients who presented to a cardiac unit with acute chest pain but whose cardiological investigations were negative. Eight patients had an abnormality on oesophagoscopy, 10 had an abnormal pH monitoring study, six had a positive acid infusion test, 10 had an abnormal manometric study and six had an abnormal oseophageal transit scintiscan. Concordance for the three tests of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease was low at 28%, and for the two tests of oesophageal motility only 55%. Only two patients had normal results in all five tests. PMID:3739062

  7. Embolization for Acute Small-Bowel Bleeding from the Collateral Artery of the Superior Mesenteric Left Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery Associated with Narrowing of the Bilateral Common External Iliac Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shimohira, Masashi Ogino, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Nishikawa, Hiroko; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-03-15

    We present a case of acute small-bowel bleeding from the collateral artery of the superior mesenteric-left deep circumflex iliac artery that was successfully managed by transarterial coil embolization.

  8. Bleeding Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as clotting factors. If you have a bleeding disorder, you either do not have enough platelets or ... they don't work the way they should. Bleeding disorders can be the result of other diseases, such ...

  9. Effects of dialysis modality on blood loss, bleeding complications and transfusion requirements in critically ill patients with dialysis-dependent acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pschowski, R; Briegel, S; Von Haehling, S; Doehner, W; Bender, T O; Pape, U F; Hasper, D; Jörress, A; Schefold, J C

    2015-11-01

    Blood loss and bleeding complications may often be observed in critically ill patients on renal replacement therapies (RRT). Here we investigate procedural (i.e. RRT-related) and non-procedural blood loss as well as transfusion requirements in regard to the chosen mode of dialysis (i.e. intermittent haemodialysis [IHD] versus continuous veno-venous haemofiltration [CVVH]). Two hundred and fifty-two patients (122 CVVH, 159 male; aged 61.5±13.9 years) with dialysis-dependent acute renal failure were analysed in a sub-analysis of the prospective randomised controlled clinical trial-CONVINT-comparing IHD and CVVH. Bleeding complications including severity of bleeding and RRT-related blood loss were assessed. We observed that 3.6% of patients died related to severe bleeding episodes (between group P=0.94). Major all-cause bleeding complications were observed in 23% IHD versus 26% of CVVH group patients (P=0.95). Under CVVH, the rate of RRT-related blood loss events (57.4% versus 30.4%, P=0.01) and mean total blood volume lost was increased (222.3±291.9 versus 112.5±222.7 ml per patient, P <0.001). Overall, transfusion rates did not differ between the study groups. In patients with sepsis, transfusion rates of all blood products were significantly higher when compared to cardiogenic shock (all P <0.01) or other conditions. In conclusion, procedural and non-procedural blood loss may often be observed in critically ill patients on RRT. In CVVH-treated patients, procedural blood loss was increased but overall transfusion rates remained unchanged. Our data show that IHD and CVVH may be regarded as equivalent approaches in critically ill patients with dialysis-dependent acute renal failure in this regard.

  10. The effect of pinaverium bromide (LA 1717) on the lower oesophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Wöltje, M; Huchzermeyer, H

    1982-01-01

    An acute, double-blind study was carried out in 8 healthy male volunteers to investigate any effect of a new antispasmodic, pinaverium bromide, compared with placebo on the lower oesophageal sphincter. Manometric measurements showed no significant differences in resting pressures either after placebo or a therapeutic dose (200 mg) of pinaverium bromide, suggesting that the active drug does not cause any impairment of function of the lower oesophageal sphincter. PMID:7128186

  11. Disease associations in eosinophilic oesophagitis and oesophageal eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Lucendo, Alfredo J

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic infiltration into oesophageal tissue, typical of eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE), has been described in several other conditions, including infections, hypersensitivity, and other autoimmune disorders. Since its description, EoE has been associated with an increasing number of diseases also characterized by tissue infiltration, including eosinophilic gastroenteritis and Crohn's disease. While an association between EoE and coeliac disease was previously reported, it is not supported by recent research. In contrast, EoE seems to be common in patients with a history of congenital oesophageal atresia, leading to hypotheses linking both disorders. The prevalence of EoE has also been shown to be eight times higher in patients with connective tissue disorders (CTDs), which has led to the proposal of an EoE-CTD phenotype, although this requires further assessment. This paper reviews the evidence of EoE's associations with several disorders, defining the common bases from an epidemiological, clinical, molecular and genetic perspective whenever possible.

  12. Trouble with Bleeding: Risk Factors for Acute Hepatitis C among HIV-Positive Gay Men from Germany—A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Axel J.; Rockstroh, Jürgen K.; Vogel, Martin; An der Heiden, Matthias; Baillot, Armin; Krznaric, Ivanka; Radun, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To identify risk factors for hepatitis C among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), focusing on potential sexual, nosocomial, and other non-sexual determinants. Background Outbreaks of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among HIV-positive MSM have been reported by clinicians in post-industrialized countries since 2000. The sexual acquisition of HCV by gay men who are HIV positive is not, however, fully understood. Methods Between 2006 and 2008, a case-control study was embedded into a behavioural survey of MSM in Germany. Cases were HIV-positive and acutely HCV-co-infected, with no history of injection drug use. HIV-positive MSM without known HCV infection, matched for age group, served as controls. The HCV-serostatus of controls was assessed by serological testing of dried blood specimens. Univariable and multivariable regression analyses were used to identify factors independently associated with HCV-co-infection. Results 34 cases and 67 controls were included. Sex-associated rectal bleeding, receptive fisting and snorting cocaine/amphetamines, combined with group sex, were independently associated with case status. Among cases, surgical interventions overlapped with sex-associated rectal bleeding. Conclusions Sexual practices leading to rectal bleeding, and snorting drugs in settings of increased HCV-prevalence are risk factors for acute hepatitis C. We suggest that sharing snorting equipment as well as sharing sexual partners might be modes of sexual transmission. Condoms and gloves may not provide adequate protection if they are contaminated with blood. Public health interventions for HIV-positive gay men should address the role of blood in sexual risk behaviour. Further research is needed into the interplay of proctosurgery and sex-associated rectal bleeding. PMID:21408083

  13. Platelet Count and Major Bleeding in Patients Receiving Vitamin K Antagonists for Acute Venous Thromboembolism, Findings From Real World Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi-Pierfranceschi, Matteo; Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Cattabiani, Chiara; Guida, Anna; Pagán, Barbara; Morales, Maria del Valle; Salgado, Estuardo; Suriñach, José Maria; Tolosa, Carles; Monreal, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The outcome of patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) and abnormal platelet count (PlC) at baseline has not been consistently studied. In real-world clinical practice, a number of patients with abnormal PlC receive vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) to treat acute VTE despite their higher risk of bleeding. We used the Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad TromboEmbólica registry database to compare the rate of major bleeding in patients receiving VKA for long-term therapy of acute VTE according to PlC levels at baseline. Patients were categorized as having very low (<100,000/μL), low (100,000–150,000/μL), normal (150,000–300,000/μL), high (300,000–450,000/μL), or very high (>450,000/μL) PlC at baseline. Of 55,369 patients recruited as of January 2015, 37,000 (67%) received long-term therapy with VKA. Of these, 611 patients (1.6%) had very low PlC, 4006 (10.8%) had low PlC, 25,598 (69%) had normal PlC, 5801 (15.6%) had high PlC, and 984 (2.6%) had very high PlC at baseline. During the course of VKA therapy (mean, 192 days), there were no differences in the duration or intensity (as measured by international normalized ratio levels) of treatment between subgroups. The rate of major bleeding was 3.6%, 2.1%, 1.9%, 2.1%, and 3.7%, respectively, and the rate of fatal bleeding was 0.98%, 0.17%, 0.29%, 0.34%, and 0.50%, respectively. Patients with very low or very high PlC levels were more likely to have severe comorbidities. We found a nonlinear “U-shaped” relationship between PlC at baseline and major bleeding during therapy with VKA for VTE. Consistent alteration of PlC values at baseline suggested a greater frailty. PMID:26632687

  14. Culprit for recurrent acute gastrointestinal massive bleeding: "Small bowel Dieulafoy's lesions" - a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sathyamurthy, Anjana; Winn, Jessica N; Ibdah, Jamal A; Tahan, Veysel

    2016-08-15

    A Dieulafoy's lesion is a dilated, aberrant, submucosal vessel that erodes the overlying epithelium without evidence of a primary ulcer or erosion. It can be located anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract. We describe a case of massive gastrointestinal bleeding from Dieulafoy's lesions in the duodenum. Etiology and precipitating events of a Dieulafoy's lesion are not well known. Bleeding can range from being self-limited to massive life- threatening. Endoscopic hemostasis can be achieved with a combination of therapeutic modalities. The endoscopic management includes sclerosant injection, heater probe, laser therapy, electrocautery, cyanoacrylate glue, banding, and clipping. Endoscopic tattooing can be helpful to locate the lesion for further endoscopic re-treatment or intraoperative wedge resection. Therapeutic options for re-bleeding lesions comprise of repeated endoscopic hemostasis, angiographic embolization or surgical wedge resection of the lesions. We present a 63-year-old Caucasian male with active bleeding from the two small bowel Dieulafoy's lesions, which was successfully controlled with epinephrine injection and clip applications. PMID:27574568

  15. Oesophageal tone in patients with achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, M; Mearin, F; Vasconez, C; Armengol, J; Malagelada, J

    1997-01-01

    Background—The diagnosis and classification of oesophageal motility disorders is currently based on assessment of the phasic contractile activity of the oesophagus. Tonic muscular contraction of the oesophageal body (oesophageal tone) has not been well characterised. 
Aim—To quantify oesophageal tonic activity in healthy subjects and in patients with achalasia. 
Patients—Oesophageal tone was measured in 14 patients with untreated achalasia and in 14 healthy subjects. In eight patients with achalasia, oesophageal tone was again measured one month after either endoscopic or surgical treatment. 
Methods—Tonic wall activity was quantified by means of a flaccid intraoesophageal bag, 5 cm long and of 120 ml maximal capacity, which was placed and maintained 5 cm above the lower oesophageal sphincter and connected to an external electronic barostat. The experimental design included measurement of oesophageal basal tone and compliance as well as the oesophageal tone response to a nitric oxide donor (0.5 ml amyl nitrite inhalation). 
Results—Oesophageal basal tone, expressed as the intrabag (intraoesophageal) volume at a minimal distending pressure (2 mm Hg), did not differ significantly between patients with achalasia and healthy controls (6.6 (2.5) ml versus 4.1 (0.8) ml, respectively). Oesophageal compliance (volume/pressure relation during intraoesophageal distension) was significantly increased in achalasia (oesophageal extension ratio: 3.2 (0.4) ml/mm Hg versus 1.9 (0.2) ml/mm Hg; p< 0.01). Amyl nitrite inhalation induced oesophageal relaxation both in patients and in controls, but the magnitude of relaxation was greater in the latter (intrabag volume increase: 15.3 (2.4) ml versus 36.2 (7.1) ml; p<0.01). 
Conclusion—In patients with achalasia, oesophageal tonic activity, and not only phasic activity, is impaired. Although oesophageal compliance is increased, residual oesophageal tone is maintained so that a significant relaxant response may occur

  16. Bleeding gums

    MedlinePlus

    ... line. This will lead to a condition called gingivitis , or inflamed gums. Plaque that is not removed ... Livingstone; 2009:chap 60. Read More Bleeding disorders Gingivitis Periodontitis Update Date 2/25/2014 Updated by: ...

  17. Bleeding Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause bleeding, such as endometriosis (EN-doh-MEE-tree-OH-suhss) Large bruises from a minor bump ... 8573 National Hemophilia Foundation Phone: 800-424-2634 World Federation of Hemophilia Phone: 514-875-7944 Return ...

  18. Bleeding time

    MedlinePlus

    A blood pressure cuff is inflated around your upper arm. While the cuff is on your arm, the health care provider makes two ... a tiny amount of bleeding. The blood pressure cuff is immediately deflated. Blotting paper is touched to ...

  19. Emergency Portacaval Shunt Versus Rescue Portacaval Shunt in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Emergency Treatment of Acutely Bleeding Esophageal Varices in Cirrhosis—Part 3

    PubMed Central

    Isenberg, Jon I.; Wheeler, Henry O.; Haynes, Kevin S.; Jinich-Brook, Horacio; Rapier, Roderick; Vaida, Florin; Hye, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Emergency treatment of bleeding esophageal varices in cirrhosis is of singular importance because of the high mortality rate. Emergency portacaval shunt is rarely used today because of the belief, unsubstantiated by long-term randomized trials, that it causes frequent portal-systemic encephalopathy and liver failure. Consequently, portacaval shunt has been relegated solely to salvage therapy when endoscopic and pharmacologic therapies have failed. Question: Is the regimen of endoscopic sclerotherapy with rescue portacaval shunt for failure to control bleeding varices superior to emergency portacaval shunt? A unique opportunity to answer this question was provided by a randomized controlled trial of endoscopic sclerotherapy versus emergency portacaval shunt conducted from 1988 to 2005. Methods Unselected consecutive cirrhotic patients with acute bleeding esophageal varices were randomized to endoscopic sclerotherapy (n = 106) or emergency portacaval shunt (n = 105). Diagnostic workup was completed and treatment was initiated within 8 h. Failure of endoscopic sclerotherapy was defined by strict criteria and treated by rescue portacaval shunt (n = 50) whenever possible. Ninety-six percent of patients had more than 10 years of follow-up or until death. Results Comparison of emergency portacaval shunt and endoscopic sclerotherapy followed by rescue portacaval shunt showed the following differences in measurements of outcomes: (1) survival after 5 years (72% versus 22%), 10 years (46% versus 16%), and 15 years (46% versus 0%); (2) median post-shunt survival (6.18 versus 1.99 years); (3) mean requirements of packed red blood cell units (17.85 versus 27.80); (4) incidence of recurrent portal-systemic encephalopathy (15% versus 43%); (5) 5-year change in Child’s class showing improvement (59% versus 19%) or worsening (8% versus 44%); (6) mean quality of life points in which lower is better (13.89 versus 27.89); and (7) mean cost of care per

  20. Composition of gastro-oesophageal refluxate.

    PubMed Central

    Gotley, D C; Morgan, A P; Ball, D; Owen, R W; Cooper, M J

    1991-01-01

    Fifty two patients with abnormal acid gastro-oesophageal reflux were studied by simultaneous oesophageal pH monitoring and continuous aspiration for 16 hours. Aspirates (from discrete two hour periods) were analysed for volume, pH, bile acids (conjugated and unconjugated), trypsin, and pepsin. The results were compared with pH changes and degree of oesophagitis. Patients with oesophagitis had greater acid reflux than those without, but patients with stricture and Barrett's oesophagus had similar acid reflux to those with uncomplicated erosive oesophagitis. Pepsin concentrations were highest in patients with stricture and Barrett's oesophagus particularly during nocturnal periods. Conjugated bile acids were detected in 75% of patients, mainly during the night, but only 2% of aspirates contained concentrations likely to be cytotoxic. Unconjugated bile acids were not detected, and trypsin was seldom found. Reflux oesophagitis is caused by acid and pepsin. Bile acids and trypsin are probably unimportant. PMID:1955160

  1. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  2. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  3. Relation between oesophageal acid exposure and healing of oesophagitis with omeprazole in patients with severe reflux oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, R H; Dent, J; Narielvala, F; Mackinnon, A M

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS--Reducing oesophageal acid exposure by suppressing acid secretion with omeprazole is highly effective in healing reflux oesophagitis. Some patients with severe oesophagitis, fail to heal and whether this results from inadequate acid suppression or other factors is unclear. The aim of this study, was to investigate the relation between oesophageal acid exposure and healing in patients with severe reflux oesophagitis treated with omeprazole. METHODS--Sixty one patients with grade 3 or 4 ulcerative oesophagitis were treated for eight weeks with omeprazole 20 mg every morning. Those patients unhealed at eight weeks were treated with 40 mg every morning for a further eight weeks. Endoscopy and 24 hour oesophageal pH monitoring were performed before treatment and at the end of each treatment phase while receiving treatment. RESULTS--Thirty per cent of patients failed to heal with the 20 mg dose. Unhealed patients had greater total 24 hour oesophageal acid exposure before treatment, and while receiving treatment also had greater acid exposure and a smaller reduction in acid exposure than did patients who healed. Forty seven per cent of the unhealed patients also failed to heal with the 40 mg dose. These patients had similar levels of acid exposure before treatment to those who healed, but had greater acid exposure while receiving treatment, particularly at night when supine. CONCLUSIONS--Patients with severe ulcerative oesophagitis who are refractory to omeprazole have greater oesophageal acid exposure while receiving treatment than responding patients. This is due to a reduced responsiveness to acid suppression, and is likely to be an important factor underlying the failure of the oesophagitis to heal. PMID:8707107

  4. LIVER TRANSPLANTATION IN A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF EMERGENCY TREATMENT OF ACUTELY BLEEDING ESOPHAGEAL VARICES IN CIRRHOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Orloff, Marshall J.; Isenberg, Jon I.; Wheeler, Henry O.; Haynes, Kevin S.; Jinich-Brook, Horacio; Rapier, Roderick; Vaida, Florin; Hye, Robert J.; Orloff, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Bleeding esophageal varices (BEV) in cirrhosis has been considered an indication for liver transplantation (LT). This issue was examined in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of unselected, consecutive patients with advanced cirrhosis and BEV that compared endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) (n=106) to emergency direct portacaval shunt (EPCS) (n=105). Methods Diagnostic workup and treatment were initiated within 8 hours. Patients were evaluated for LT on admission and repeatedly thereafter. 96% underwent over 10 years of regular follow-up. The analysis was supplemented by 1300 unrandomized cirrhotic patients who previously underwent portacaval shunt (PCS) with 100% follow-up. Results In the RCT, long-term bleeding control was 100% following EPCS, only 20% following EST. 3, 5, 10, and 15-year survival rates were 75%, 73%, 46%, and 46% following EPCS, compared to 44%, 21%, 9%, and 9% following EST (p<0.001). Only 13 RCT patients (6%) were ultimately referred for LT mainly because of progressive liver failure; only 7 (3%) were approved for LT and only 4 (2%) underwent LT. 1- and 5-year LT survival rates were 0.68% and 0, compared to 81% and 73% after EPCS. In the 1300 unrandomized PCS patients. 50 (3.8%) were referred and 19 (1.5%) underwent LT. Five-year survival rate was 53% compared to 72% for all 1300 patients. Conclusions If bleeding is permanently controlled, as occurred invariably following EPCS, cirrhotic patients with BEV seldom require LT. PCS is effective first-line and long-term treatment. Should LT be required in patients with PCS, although technically more demanding, numerous studies have shown that PCS does not increase mortality or complications. EST is not effective emergency or long-term therapy. PMID:21168637

  5. [Eosinophilic oesophagitis in bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Mikhaleva, L M; Barkhina, T G; Golovanova, V E; Shchegoleva, N N; Gracheva, N A

    2012-01-01

    Combination of bronchial asthma and gastrointestinal pathology is frequently encountered in clinical practice. Clinical symptoms of this condition are highly diversified and gastrointestinal diseases play an important role in exacerbation of bronchial asthma. The prevalence of allergic diseases has recently become rampant. Eosinophilic oesophagitis is worth of special attention because its histological criteria, unlike clinical ones, are well defined. They include chronic immune antigen-mediated inflammatory oesophageal disease with pronounced intraepithelial eosinophilic infiltration and clinical symptoms resulting from oesophageal dysfunction that resemble manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease but fail to respond to antireflux and antacid therapy. Many specific and practical aspects of the problem remain to be elucidated. The poor awareness of clinicians of this disease hampers its adequate diagnostics and treatment. In order to revise and optimize the former diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm., an interdisciplinary expert group was set up in 2010 constituted by specialists of the American College of Gastroenterology, American Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology, and Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition. Results of the work of this group together with the literature data on eosinophilic esopahgitis are discussed in the present review. PMID:23516863

  6. Computed tomographic staging of traumatic epidural bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-09-01

    The computed tomographic findings in 45 patients with post-traumatic epidural hemotomas are subdivided into three categories (acute, subacute, and chronic) and correlated with the severity of bleeding, clot formation, and clot resorption. Active epidural bleeding may be identified in acute cases.

  7. Colon interposition for oesophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Pascal A; Gilardoni, Adrian; Trousse, Delphine; D'Journo, Xavier B; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Doddoli, Christophe; Giudicelli, Roger; Fuentes, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The choice of the colon as an oesophageal substitute results primarily from the unavailability of the stomach. However, given its durability and function, colon interposition keeps elective indications in patients with benign or malignant oesophageal disease who are potential candidates for long survival. The choice of the colonic portion used for oesophageal reconstruction depends on the required length of the graft, and the encountered colonic vascular anatomy, the last being characterised by the near-invariability of the left colonic vessels, in contrast to the vascular pattern of the right side of the colon. Accordingly, the transverse colon with all or part of the ascending colon is the substitute of choice, positioned in the isoperistaltic direction, and supplied either from the left colic vessels for long grafts or middle colic vessels for shorter grafts. Technical key points are: full mobilisation of the entire colon, identification of the main colonic vessels and collaterals, and a prolonged clamping test to ensure the permeability of the chosen nourishing pedicle. Transposition through the posterior mediastinum in the oesophageal bed is the shortest one and thereby offers the best functional results. When the oesophageal bed is not available, the retrosternal route is the preferred alternative option. The food bolus travelling mainly by gravity makes straightness of the conduit of paramount importance. The proximal anastomosis is a single-layer hand-fashioned end-to-end anastomosis to prevent narrowing. When the stomach is available, the distal anastomosis is best performed at the posterior part of the antrum for the reasons of pedicle positioning and reflux prevention, and a gastric drainage procedure is added when the oesophagus and vagus nerves have been removed. In the other cases, a Roux-en-Y jejunal loop is preferable to prevent bile reflux into the colon. Additional procedures include re-establishment of the colonic continuity, a careful closure of

  8. Oesophageal perforation following perioperative transoesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Massey, S R; Pitsis, A; Mehta, D; Callaway, M

    2000-05-01

    Transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) is being used more often by cardiothoracic anaesthetists for the perioperative management of cardiac problems. Reports of iatrogenic oesophageal perforation by instrumentation of the oesophagus are increasing. Although TOE is considered safe, it may be more risky during surgery, because the probe is passed and manipulated in an anaesthetized patient. It may be in place for several hours so the risk of mucosal pressure and thermal damage is increased. Patients on cardiopulmonary bypass are also fully anticoagulated. We describe a case of oesophageal perforation following insertion of the TOE probe in a patient with gross cardiomegaly. Oesophageal distortion by cardiac enlargement may increase the risk of oesophageal perforation. Difficulty in passage of the TOE probe should be regarded with suspicion and withdrawal should be contemplated because the symptoms of oesophageal perforation are often delayed and non-specific. Delay in investigation, diagnosis and treatment will increase morbidity and mortality.

  9. Oesophageal perforation following perioperative transoesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Massey, S R; Pitsis, A; Mehta, D; Callaway, M

    2000-05-01

    Transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) is being used more often by cardiothoracic anaesthetists for the perioperative management of cardiac problems. Reports of iatrogenic oesophageal perforation by instrumentation of the oesophagus are increasing. Although TOE is considered safe, it may be more risky during surgery, because the probe is passed and manipulated in an anaesthetized patient. It may be in place for several hours so the risk of mucosal pressure and thermal damage is increased. Patients on cardiopulmonary bypass are also fully anticoagulated. We describe a case of oesophageal perforation following insertion of the TOE probe in a patient with gross cardiomegaly. Oesophageal distortion by cardiac enlargement may increase the risk of oesophageal perforation. Difficulty in passage of the TOE probe should be regarded with suspicion and withdrawal should be contemplated because the symptoms of oesophageal perforation are often delayed and non-specific. Delay in investigation, diagnosis and treatment will increase morbidity and mortality. PMID:10844846

  10. Associations of major bleeding and myocardial infarction with the incidence and timing of mortality in patients presenting with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes: a risk model from the ACUITY trial

    PubMed Central

    Mehran, Roxana; Pocock, Stuart J.; Stone, Gregg W.; Clayton, Tim C.; Dangas, George D.; Feit, Frederick; Manoukian, Steven V.; Nikolsky, Eugenia; Lansky, Alexandra J.; Kirtane, Ajay; White, Harvey D.; Colombo, Antonio; Ware, James H.; Moses, Jeffrey W.; Ohman, E. Magnus

    2009-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the associations of myocardial infarction (MI) and major bleeding with 1-year mortality. Both MI and major bleeding predict 1-year mortality in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, the risk of each of these events on the magnitude and timing of mortality has not been well studied. Methods and Results A multivariable Cox regression model was developed relating 13 independent baseline predictors to 1-year mortality for 13 819 patients with moderate and high-risk ACS enrolled in the Acute Catheterization and Urgent Intervention Triage strategy trial. After adjustment for baseline predictors, Cox models with major bleeding and recurrent MI as time-updated covariates estimated the effect of these events on mortality hazard over time. Within 30 days of randomization, 705 patients (5.1%) had an MI, 645 (4.7%) had a major bleed; 524 (3.8%) died within a year. The occurrence of an MI was associated with a hazard ratio of 3.1 compared with patients not yet having an MI, after adjustment for baseline predictors. However, MI within 30 days markedly increased the mortality risk for the first 2 days after the event (adjusted hazard ratio of 17.6), but this risk declined rapidly post-infarct (hazard ratio of 1.4 beyond 1 month after the MI event). In contrast, major bleeding had a prolonged association with mortality risk (hazard ratio of 3.5) which remained fairly steady over time throughout 1 year. Conclusion After accounting for baseline predictors of mortality, major bleeds and MI have similar overall strength of association with mortality in the first year after ACS. MI is correlated with a dramatic increase in short-term risk, whereas major bleeding correlates with a more prolonged mortality risk. PMID:19351691

  11. Uncommon, undeclared oesophageal foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Akenroye, M I; Osukoya, A T

    2012-01-01

    We report two cases of unusual and undeclared oesophageal foreign bodies. A small double-rounded calabash or bottle gourd Lagenaria siceraria, stuffed with traditional medicine designed to acquire spiritual power. A whole tricotyledonous kola nut Cola nitida also designed to make medicine to gain love from a woman after passing it out in stool. Each case presented with a sudden onset of total dysphagia and history of ingestion of foreign bodies was not volunteered by any despite direct questioning. Plain radiograph of the neck and chest in either case did not reveal presence of foreign body. Both were successfully removed through rigid oesophagoscopy. PMID:22718184

  12. Early diagnosis of oesophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bird-Lieberman, E L; Fitzgerald, R C

    2009-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus are cancers that develop from distinct epithelial sub-types; however, they are both related to chronic inflammation of differing aetiologies. Inflammation leads to somatically inherited genetic mutations altering control of the cell cycle, DNA replication and apoptosis, which together result in autonomous and uncontrolled proliferation. These cancers have often metastasised to lymph nodes and distant organs before symptomatic presentation and therefore carry a poor prognosis. It is therefore vital to diagnose oesophageal cancer at an early stage, before the development of symptoms, when treatment can dramatically improve prognosis. Understanding the pathogenesis of these cancers is vital to guide early diagnostic strategies. PMID:19513070

  13. Factors Associated with Outcome in Patients with Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Tertiary Referral Center in Northern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Fatemeh; Norouzi, Alireza; Tavassoli, Samaneh; Baradaran, Abdolvahab; Roshandel, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a major healthcare problem and is the most frequent gastrointestinal reason for admission to hospital. We aimed to investigate the prognosis of patients with UGIB referred to a referral hospital in northern Iran in 2013. METHODS All patients with UGIB who admitted to Sayyad Shirazi Hospital, in Gorgan, northern Iran, in 2013 were enrolled. The patients’ demographic data as well as data about admission, diseases, drug history, and patients’ prognosis were collected by structured questionnaire using information in hospital files. The relationships between different factors with the proportion of mortality and recurrence were assessed using Chi-square test. RESULTS In total, 168 patients were enrolled of whom 109 (64.9%) were male. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 59.4 (18.2) years. Mortality and recurrence occurred in 23.2% and 34.5% of the subjects, respectively. We found significant relationships between older age and diagnosis of malignancy with mortality (p =0.03 and p <0.01) and recurrence (p<0.01 and p <0.01). CONCLUSION We found relatively high rates of mortality and recurrence among patients with UGIB. Our results suggested older age and diagnosis of malignancy as the most important indicators of mortality and recurrence in such patients. Considering these factors in clinical settings may result in better and more effective management of patients with UGIB.

  14. Use of recombinant activated factor VII for acute bleeding episodes in acquired hemophilia: final analysis from the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society Registry acquired hemophilia study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Alice D.; Kessler, Craig M.; Al-Mondhiry, Hamid A.B.; Gut, Robert Z.; Cooper, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society Registry was used to monitor the postapproval use and safety of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa). The objective of this article is to evaluate the data from the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society Registry related to rFVIIa-treated bleeding episodes in patients with acquired hemophilia. For each rFVIIa-treated bleeding episode, the initial dose, total dose, average infused dose, number of doses, and treatment duration were calculated. Efficacy was assessed on a three-point scale. Out of the 166 registered patients with acquired hemophilia, 110 patients were treated for 237 bleeding episodes (139 rFVIIa treated); the majority (70%) were in patients older than 60 years. The most frequently reported bleeding locations were subcutaneous (40%) and mucosal (32%). Subcutaneous bleeding episodes were more commonly reported in women (55% vs. 40% men) and white patients (44 vs. 27% black). Of the 139 rFVIIa-treated bleeding episodes, rFVIIa was used as first-line treatment in 127 bleeding episodes. The median initial dose was 90 μg/kg; the median total dose per episode was 333.5 μg/kg. Physician-rated efficacy of rFVIIa for each bleeding episode was reported as ‘bleeding stopped’ in 85% of bleeding episodes, ‘bleeding slowed’ in 11% of bleeding episodes, ‘no improvement’ in 4% of bleeding episodes, and was not documented in 1 bleeding episode. One thromboembolic event was reported; transient neurologic symptoms were reported in a 31-year-old postpartum patient after 110 doses of rFVIIa. Adequate hemostasis was provided for most rFVIIa-treated bleeding episodes at doses largely conforming to the package insert. No major safety concerns were reported. PMID:26761583

  15. Analysis of Dosimetric Parameters Associated With Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Gemcitabine-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Akira; Shibuya, Keiko; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To identify the dosimetric parameters associated with gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from 40 patients were analyzed retrospectively. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of conventional fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy and weekly gemcitabine. Treatment-related acute GI toxicity and upper GI bleeding (UGB) were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 4.0. The dosimetric parameters (mean dose, maximal absolute dose which covers 2 cm{sup 3} of the organ, and absolute volume receiving 10-50 Gy [V{sub 10-50}]) of the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and a composite structure of the stomach and duodenum (StoDuo) were obtained. The planning target volume was also obtained. Univariate analyses were performed to identify the predictive factors for the risk of grade 2 or greater acute GI toxicity and grade 3 or greater UGB, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 15.7 months (range, 4-37). The actual incidence of acute GI toxicity was 33%. The estimated incidence of UGB at 1 year was 20%. Regarding acute GI toxicity, a V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach was the best predictor, and the actual incidence in patients with V{sub 50} <16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach vs. those with V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} was 9% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.001). Regarding UGB, V{sub 50} of {>=}33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo was the best predictor, and the estimated incidence at 1 year in patients with V{sub 50} <33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo vs. those with V{sub 50} {>=}33 cm{sup 3} was 0% vs. 44%, respectively (p = 0.002). The dosimetric parameters correlated highly with one another. Conclusion: The irradiated absolute volume of the stomach and duodenum are important for the risk of acute GI toxicity and UGB. These results could be helpful in escalating the radiation doses using novel

  16. Human papillomavirus in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Loke, S L; Ma, L; Wong, M; Srivastava, G; Lo, I; Bird, C C

    1990-01-01

    Thirty seven cases of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma were studied by applying DNA slot blot analysis and in situ hybridisation using type specific probes for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18. Cases of condyloma accuminata, cervical carcinoma, and laryngeal papilloma were used as controls. Blocks including areas of invasive carcinoma, intraepithelial neoplasia, and normal epithelium were studied in each case. No HPV genome was detectable in any of the oesophageal cases. It is concluded that these types of HPV do not have an association with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Images PMID:2175754

  17. Successful use of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt to control severe refractory oesophageal variceal haemorrhage in a poor risk patient.

    PubMed Central

    Beales, I. L.; Jackson, J. E.; Rudolf, M.; Arnold, J.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a 44 year old man with a severe gastrointestinal haemorrhage from oesophageal varices. Bleeding could not be controlled with conservative therapy and sclerotherapy. He was successfully treated with a radiologically guided transjugular intrahepatic stent shunt at a time when his condition was too poor to attempt an open surgical procedure. PMID:8121873

  18. Tumour marker detection in oesophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mealy, K; Feely, J; Reid, I; McSweeney, J; Walsh, T; Hennessy, T P

    1996-10-01

    Levels of the tumour markers CEA, CA 19-9, CA 125 and SCC were measured in 58 patients presenting with oesophageal carcinoma and compared with levels in patients with benign oesophageal disease and levels in normal volunteers. CEA and CA 19-9 were significantly increased in the patients with oesophageal cancer, however, individual sensitivity for CEA, CA 19-9, CA 125 and SCC was only 28, 34, 10, and 32%, respectively. The combined sensitivity of all markers was 64% and specificity was 80%. There was no difference in combined tumour marker sensitivity between squamous or adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus. No consistent change in marker levels occurred with treatment, and tumour marker levels could not be significantly correlated with stage of disease or short-term survival. These results indicate that tumour marker sensitivity is too low for oesophageal cancer screening and has poor prognostic significance in those undergoing treatment.

  19. Red Blood Cell Transfusions and Iron Therapy for Patients Presenting with Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Survey of Canadian Gastroenterologists and Hepatologists

    PubMed Central

    Fortinsky, Kyle J.; Razik, Roshan; Spiegle, Gillian; Gallinger, Zane R.; Grover, Samir C.; Pavenski, Katerina; Weizman, Adam V.; Kwapisz, Lukasz; Mehta, Sangeeta; Gray, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. There is limited data evaluating physician transfusion practices in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). Methods. A web-based survey was sent to 500 gastroenterologists and hepatologists across Canada. The survey included clinical vignettes where physicians were asked to choose transfusion thresholds. Results. The response rate was 41% (N = 203). The reported hemoglobin (Hgb) transfusion trigger differed by up to 50 g/L. Transfusions were more liberal in hemodynamically unstable patients compared to stable patients (mean Hgb of 86.7 g/L versus 71.0 g/L; p < 0.001). Many clinicians (24%) reported transfusing a hemodynamically unstable patient at a Hgb threshold of 100 g/L and the majority (57%) are transfusing two units of RBCs as initial management. Patients with coronary artery disease (mean Hgb of 84.0 g/L versus 71.0 g/L; p < 0.01) or cirrhosis (mean Hgb of 74.4 g/L versus 71.0 g/L; p < 0.01) were transfused more liberally than healthy patients. Fewer than 15% would prescribe iron to patients with UGIB who are anemic upon discharge. Conclusions. The transfusion practices of gastroenterologists in the management of UGIB vary widely and more high-quality evidence is needed to help assess the efficacy and safety of selected transfusion thresholds in varying patients presenting with UGIB. PMID:27446847

  20. Association of Oesophageal Varices and Splanchnic Vein Thromboses in Patients with JAK2-Positive Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Presentation of Two Cases and Data from a Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Link, Cornelia S.; Platzbecker, Uwe; Kroschinsky, Frank; Pannach, Sven; Thiede, Christian; Platzek, Ivan; Ehninger, Gerhard; Schuler, Markus K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oesophageal varices and gastrointestinal bleeding are common complications of liver cirrhosis. More rarely, oesophageal varices occur in patients with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension that results from thromboses of portal or splanchnic veins. Case Report We describe 2 young men who initially presented with varices as a result of portal vein thromboses. In the clinical follow-up, both were tested positive for a JAK2 mutation and consequently diagnosed with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). In an attempt to characterise the frequency of gastrointestinal complications in patients with JAK2-positive MPNs, we retrospectively analysed all known affected patients from our clinic for the diagnosis of portal vein thromboses and oesophageal varices. Strikingly, 48% of those who had received an oesophagogastroduodenoscopy had detectable oesophageal or gastric varices, and 82% of those suffered from portal or splanchnic vein thromboses. Conclusion While the association between JAK2, myeloproliferative disease and thrombotic events is well established, patients with idiopathic oesophageal varices are not regularly tested for JAK2 mutations. However, the occurrence of oesophageal varices may be the first presenting symptom of a MPN with a JAK2 mutation, and affected patients may profit from a close haematological monitoring to assure the early detection of developing MPN. PMID:23898274

  1. The oesophageal string test: a novel, minimally invasive method measures mucosal inflammation in eosinophilic oesophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kagalwalla, Amir F; Lee, James J; Alumkal, Preeth; Maybruck, Brian T; Fillon, Sophie; Masterson, Joanne C; Ochkur, Sergei; Protheroe, Cheryl; Moore, Wendy; Pan, Zhaoxing; Amsden, Katie; Robinson, Zachary; Capocelli, Kelley; Mukkada, Vince; Atkins, Dan; Fleischer, David; Hosford, Lindsay; Kwatia, Mark A; Schroeder, Shauna; Kelly, Caleb; Lovell, Mark; Melin-Aldana, Hector; Ackerman, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Objective Eosinophil predominant inflammation characterises histological features of eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE). Endoscopy with biopsy is currently the only method to assess oesophageal mucosal inflammation in EoE. We hypothesised that measurements of luminal eosinophil-derived proteins would correlate with oesophageal mucosal inflammation in children with EoE. Design The Enterotest diagnostic device was used to develop an oesophageal string test (EST) as a minimally invasive clinical device. EST samples and oesophageal mucosal biopsies were obtained from children undergoing upper endoscopy for clinically defined indications. Eosinophil-derived proteins including eosinophil secondary granule proteins (major basic protein-1, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, eosinophil cationic protein, eosinophil peroxidase) and Charcot–Leyden crystal protein/galectin-10 were measured by ELISA in luminal effluents eluted from ESTs and extracts of mucosal biopsies. Results ESTs were performed in 41 children with active EoE (n=14), EoE in remission (n=8), gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (n=4) and controls with normal oesophagus (n=15). EST measurement of eosinophil-derived protein biomarkers significantly distinguished between children with active EoE, treated EoE in remission, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and normal oesophagus. Levels of luminal eosinophil-derived proteins in EST samples significantly correlated with peak and mean oesophageal eosinophils/high power field (HPF), eosinophil peroxidase indices and levels of the same eosinophil-derived proteins in extracts of oesophageal biopsies. Conclusions The presence of eosinophil-derived proteins in luminal secretions is reflective of mucosal inflammation in children with EoE. The EST is a novel, minimally invasive device for measuring oesophageal eosinophilic inflammation in children with EoE. PMID:22895393

  2. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  3. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... air. This produces pressure against the bleeding veins (balloon tamponade). Once the bleeding is stopped, other varices can be treated with medicines and medical procedures to prevent future bleeding, including: Drugs called ...

  4. Review article: supra-oesophageal manifestations of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and the role of night-time gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Fass, R; Achem, S R; Harding, S; Mittal, R K; Quigley, E

    2004-12-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been associated with a variety of supra-oesophageal symptoms, including asthma, laryngitis, hoarseness, chronic cough, frequent throat clearing and globus pharyngeus. GERD may be overlooked as the underlying mechanism for these symptoms because typical GERD symptoms may be absent, despite abnormal oesophageal acid exposure. Two basic mechanisms linking GERD with laryngeal symptoms have been proposed: direct contact of gastric acid with the upper airway, in some cases due to micro-aspiration, and a vagovagal reflex triggered by acidification of the distal portion of the oesophagus. Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER) during sleep is believed to be an important mechanism for the development of supra-oesophageal complications of GERD, such as asthma and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Several physiological changes during sleep, including prolonged oesophageal acid contact time, decreased upper oesophageal sphincter pressure, increased gastric acid secretion, decreased salivation, decreased swallowing and a decrease in conscious perception of acid, render an individual more susceptible to reflux-induced injury. Supra-oesophageal symptoms often improve in response to aggressive acid-suppressive therapy. However, many unanswered questions remain regarding the appropriate approach to diagnosis and treatment of patients with GERD-related supra-oesophageal symptoms. In this article we review the relationship between supra-oesophageal symptoms and GERD and, where possible, highlight the evidence supporting the role of night-time reflux as a contributing factor to these symptoms. PMID:15527462

  5. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  6. The bioavailability of medetomidine in eight sheep following oesophageal administration.

    PubMed

    Hyndman, Timothy H; Musk, Gabrielle C; Murdoch, Fraser R; Maker, Garth L; Whittem, Ted

    2015-12-01

    There is sound evidence that medetomidine is an effective analgesic for acute pain in sheep. In this study, 15 μg kg(-1) of medetomidine was administered intravenously, and into the oesophagus, in a cross-over study, using eight sheep. Following intravenous administration, medetomidine could be detected in the plasma of these sheep for 120-180 min but following oesophageal administration, medetomidine could not be detected in the plasma of any sheep at any of 17 time points over four days. It is suspected that this is due to high first pass metabolism in the liver. Consequently, we conclude that future studies investigating the use of analgesics in orally-administered osmotic pumps in sheep should consider higher doses of medetomidine (e.g. >100 μg kg(-1)), further investigations into the barriers of medetomidine bioavailability from the sheep gut, liver-bypass drug delivery systems, or other α2-adrenergic agonists (e.g. clonidine or xylazine).

  7. Gastro-oesophageal reflux in mechanically ventilated patients: effects of an oesophageal balloon.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Levi, M; Félez, M; Martínez-Miralles, E; Solsona, J F; Blanco, M L; Broquetas, J M; Torres, A

    2003-08-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) and bronchoaspiration of gastric content are risk factors linked with ventilator-associated pneumonia. This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of a nasogastric tube (NGT) incorporating a low-pressure oesophageal balloon on GOR and bronchoaspiration in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Fourteen patients were studied in a semi-recumbent position for 2 consecutive days. Inflation or deflation of the oesophageal balloon was randomised. Samples of blood, gastric content, and oropharyngeal and bronchial secretions were taken every 2 h over a period of 8 h. A radioactively labelled nutritional solution was continuously administered through the NGT. The magnitude of both the GOR and bronchoaspiration was measured by radioactivity counting of oropharyngeal and bronchial secretion samples, respectively. Inflation of the oesophageal balloon resulted in a significant decrease of both GOR and bronchoaspiration of gastric content. This protective effect was statistically significant from 4 h following inflation throughout the duration of the study. This study demonstrates that an inflated oesophageal balloon delays and decreases gastro-oesophageal and bronchial aspiration of gastric content in patients carrying a nasogastric tube and receiving enteral nutrition during mechanical ventilation. Although the method was found to be safe when applied for 8 h, longer times should be considered with caution. PMID:12952272

  8. Eosinophilic oesophagitis: a novel treatment using Montelukast

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, S E A; Lewis, C J; Bronder, C S; Morris, C D; Armstrong, G R; Whittam, J

    2003-01-01

    Background: Eosinophilic oesophagitis is a rarely diagnosed condition involving eosinophil infiltration of the oesophageal mucosa and creating significant symptoms of dysphagia. Failure to diagnose this disorder relates to reluctance to biopsy an apparently normal oesophagus. This is essential for histological diagnosis. To date, treatment success has been achieved only with corticosteroids. We describe here the use of an eosinophil stabilising agent Montelukast for the symptomatic relief of these patients. Patients and methods: Twelve patients have been identified with this condition in our unit since 1995, after thorough investigation of their dysphagia. We commenced eight of these patients on the leukotriene receptor antagonist Montelukast to symptomatically improve their swallowing while avoiding the use of long term corticosteroids. Results: Many of these patients had been previously misdiagnosed, and therefore inappropriately and unsuccessfully treated for an extensive period prior to referral to our unit. All patients were unresponsive to acid suppression therapy alone but showed improvement in their swallowing on Montelukast. Six of eight reported complete subjective improvement, five patients remaining completely asymptomatic on a maintenance regimen. Conclusions: Eosinophilic oesophagitis is a disease that is often misdiagnosed due to lack of awareness and reluctance of clinicians to biopsy an apparently normal oesophagus in dysphagic patients, and therefore obtain a histological diagnosis. Investigation of these patients adds further evidence to this condition being a separate pathological state from gastro-oesophageal reflux and eosinophilic enteritis. Montelukast has been found to be of significant help in the symptomatic control of these patients while avoiding long term corticosteroids use. PMID:12524397

  9. Culprit for recurrent acute gastrointestinal massive bleeding: “Small bowel Dieulafoy’s lesions” - a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Sathyamurthy, Anjana; Winn, Jessica N; Ibdah, Jamal A; Tahan, Veysel

    2016-01-01

    A Dieulafoy's lesion is a dilated, aberrant, submucosal vessel that erodes the overlying epithelium without evidence of a primary ulcer or erosion. It can be located anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract. We describe a case of massive gastrointestinal bleeding from Dieulafoy’s lesions in the duodenum. Etiology and precipitating events of a Dieulafoy’s lesion are not well known. Bleeding can range from being self-limited to massive life- threatening. Endoscopic hemostasis can be achieved with a combination of therapeutic modalities. The endoscopic management includes sclerosant injection, heater probe, laser therapy, electrocautery, cyanoacrylate glue, banding, and clipping. Endoscopic tattooing can be helpful to locate the lesion for further endoscopic re-treatment or intraoperative wedge resection. Therapeutic options for re-bleeding lesions comprise of repeated endoscopic hemostasis, angiographic embolization or surgical wedge resection of the lesions. We present a 63-year-old Caucasian male with active bleeding from the two small bowel Dieulafoy’s lesions, which was successfully controlled with epinephrine injection and clip applications. PMID:27574568

  10. Evaluation and management of congenital bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Rahul; Cabey, Whitney

    2014-08-01

    Patients presenting to the emergency department with acute bleeding and a history of clotting or platelet disorder present a unique challenge to the emergency physician. The severity of bleeding presentation is based on mechanism as well as factor levels: patients with factor levels greater than 5% can respond to most minor hemostatic challenges, whereas those with factor levels less than 1% bleed with minor trauma or even spontaneously. Treatment should be initiated in consultation with the patient's hematologist using medications and specific factor replacement, except in rare, life-threatening, resource-poor situations, when cryoprecipitate or activated prothrombin complex may be considerations.

  11. Vaginal bleeding - hormonal

    MedlinePlus

    ... in heavy menstrual bleeding: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Obstet Gynecol . 2009;113:1104-16. PMID: ... Mirena) for heavy menstrual bleeding: systematic review and meta-analysis of data from individual patients. BMJ . 2010 ...

  12. The oesophageal microbiome: an unexplored link in obesity-associated oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Morris, Margaret J

    2016-10-01

    The influence of diets rich in saturated fats and simple sugars on the intestinal microbiota plays a central role in obesity. Being overweight or obese predisposes individuals to several diseases including oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC), which develops through a cascade of events starting with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, progressing to Barrett's oesophagus (BO), and then OAC. A range of mechanisms for the increased risk of OAC in obese individuals have been proposed; however, a role for the oesophageal microbiota has been largely ignored. This is despite the fact that it is clear that the composition of the oesophageal microbiota shifts with the development of OAC. Given the well-established impact that unhealthy diets have on the intestinal microbiota, it is plausible that exposure to unhealthy foods, and the ensuing obesity, would result in an imbalance in the oesophageal microbiota. It is also likely that these changes may mimic the changes observed in the intestinal microbiota (i.e. increase in short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) producers and bile acid biosynthesis). The modulation of SCFAs and bile acids in the oesophagus by diet could promote the transdifferentiation from squamous to intestinal-like columnar cells observed in BO, given that intestinal cells proliferate in the presence of SCFAs. PMID:27465078

  13. Corpus luteum hemorrhage in women with bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Ron; Brenner, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Bleeding into the corpus luteum following ovulation rarely has clinical significance in healthy women, but may lead to life-threatening hemorrhage in women with congenital or acquired bleeding disorders. Women who are at an increased risk for corpus luteum hemorrhage (CLH) can be divided in two categories; first, those taking anticoagulants because of a thrombotic disorder; and second, women with congenital bleeding disorders. The management and prevention of CLH is still unsettled and the literature dealing with this problem is based on case reports only. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment options of an acute bleeding event and prevention modalities of CLH in women with bleeding disorders.

  14. Oesophageal trauma: incidence, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed Central

    Triggiani, E; Belsey, R

    1977-01-01

    The clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and surgical treatment of 110 cases of oesophageal trauma, admitted under the care of one surgical team between 1949 and 1973, are reviewed. The importance of early diagnosis and an aggressive surgical approach in the management of a potentially lethal situation are stressed. In our opinion, spontaneous rupture of the oesophagus, instrumental perforation, open and closed traumatic lesions, and postoperative anastomotic leaks are, as far as diagnosis and management are concerned, different aspects of the same desperate surgical problem. Oesophageal trauma is accompanied by a high morbidity and mortality rate if diagnosis and treatment are delayed. Perforations of the cervical oesophagus may be treated conservatively. Intrathoracic perforations demand an aggressive surgical appraoch; only exteriorisation followed by reconstruction at a later date offers a reasonable chance to save the life of the patient and ultimately restore continuity. PMID:882938

  15. Effects of Acute Bleeding Followed by Hydroxyethyl Starch 130/0.4 or a Crystalloid on Propofol Concentrations, Cerebral Oxygenation, and Electroencephalographic and Haemodynamic Variables in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Venâncio, Carlos; Souza, Almir P.; Ferreira, Luísa Maria; Branco, Paula Sério; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Amorim, Pedro; Ferreira, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Bleeding changes the haemodynamics, compromising organ perfusion. In this study, the effects of bleeding followed by replacement with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) or lactated Ringer's (LR) on cerebral oxygenation and electroencephalogram-derived parameters were investigated. Twelve young pigs under propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia were bled 30 mL/kg and, after a 20-minute waiting period, volume replacement was performed with HES (GHES; N = 6) or LR (GRL; N = 6). Bleeding caused a decrease of more than 50% in mean arterial pressure (P < 0.01) and a decrease in cerebral oximetry (P = 0.039), bispectral index, and electroencephalogram total power (P = 0.04 and P < 0.01, resp.), while propofol plasma concentrations increased (P < 0.01). Both solutions restored the haemodynamics and cerebral oxygenation similarly and were accompanied by an increase in electroencephalogram total power. No differences between groups were found. However, one hour after the end of the volume replacement, the cardiac output (P = 0.03) and the cerebral oxygenation (P = 0.008) decreased in the GLR and were significantly lower than in GHES (P = 0.02). Volume replacement with HES 130/0.4 was capable of maintaining the cardiac output and cerebral oxygenation during a longer period than LR and caused a decrease in the propofol plasma concentrations. PMID:24971192

  16. Hiatus Hernia Repair with Bilateral Oesophageal Fixation.

    PubMed

    Mendis, Rajith; Cheung, Caran; Martin, David

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite advances in surgical repair of hiatus hernias, there remains a high radiological recurrence rate. We performed a novel technique incorporating bilateral oesophageal fixation and evaluated outcomes, principally symptom improvement and hernia recurrence. Methods. A retrospective study was performed on a prospective database of patients undergoing hiatus hernia repair with bilateral oesophageal fixation. Retrospective and prospective quality of life (QOL), PPI usage, and patient satisfaction data were obtained. Hernia recurrence was assessed by either barium swallow or gastroscopy. Results. 87 patients were identified in the database with a minimum of 3 months followup. There were significant improvements in QOL scores including GERD HRQL (29.13 to 4.38, P < 0.01), Visick (3 to 1), and RSI (17.45 to 5, P < 0.01). PPI usage decreased from a median of daily to none, and there was high patient satisfaction (94%). 57 patients were assessed for recurrence with either gastroscopy or barium swallow, and one patient had evidence of recurrence on barium swallow at 45 months postoperatively. There was an 8% complication rate and no mortality or oesophageal perforation. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that our technique is both safe and effective in symptom control, and our recurrence investigations demonstrate at least short term durability. PMID:26065030

  17. [The management of corrosive oesophagitis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lallemant, Y; Gehanno, P; Flieder, J; Barrier, M; Martin, M

    1978-06-01

    Regardless of the treatment used against corrosive oesophagitis, the laryngologist must play a role from the beginning and throughout the course. The fibroblasts and collagen fibres which results are the natural agents of healing but, at the same time, are responsible for virtually inexorable stenosis if the corrosion has passed through to the muscular layers. Infection is constant and contributes to stenosis. The effectiveness of antibiotics is certain. They must be used from the beginning and continued for as long as necessary. As far as fibroiss is concerned, dilatations remain the basic treatment, their application requiring great experience and much patience and tenacity. Replacement surgery is attractive. It comes up against the stenosing perioesophageal inflammatory process which tends to die down in time but remains active for a long period. The nENT specialist must therefore pay careful attention from the very end of the postoperative period onwards. The gravity of oesophageal burns justifies intensification of preventive measures. Since it impossible to complete eliminate corrosive oesophagitis, efforts must be directed towards the discovery of substances capable of inhibiting collagen synthesis. Corticosteroids used in the treatment of shock do not prevent stenosis. In the laboratory, B.A.P.N. has shown its effectiveness in the rat. Also in the rat, particularly difficult experiments are in progress using penicillinamine. Although such methods have as yet to be extended to human clinical use, there are nevertheless grounds for hope. PMID:742792

  18. Cachexia in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Anandavadivelan, Poorna; Lagergren, Pernilla

    2016-03-01

    Oesophageal cancer is a debilitating disease with a poor prognosis, and weight loss owing to malnutrition prevails in the majority of patients. Cachexia, a multifactorial syndrome characterized by the loss of fat and skeletal muscle mass and systemic inflammation arising from complex host-tumour interactions is a major contributor to malnutrition, which is a determinant of tolerance to treatment and survival. In patients with oesophageal cancer, cachexia is further compounded by eating difficulties owing to the stage and location of the tumour, and the effects of neoadjuvant therapy. Treatment with curative intent involves exceptionally extensive and invasive surgery, and the subsequent anatomical changes often lead to eating difficulties and severe postoperative malnutrition. Thus, screening for cachexia by means of percentage weight loss and BMI during the cancer trajectory and survivorship periods is imperative. Additionally, markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein), dysphagia and appetite loss should be assessed at diagnosis. Routine assessments of body composition are also necessary in patients with oesophageal cancer to enable assessment of skeletal muscle loss, which might be masked by sarcopenic obesity in these patients. A need exists for clinical trials examining the effectiveness of therapeutic and physical-activity-based interventions in mitigating muscle loss and counteracting cachexia in these patients. PMID:26573424

  19. The use of Coca-Cola in the management of bolus obstruction in benign oesophageal stricture.

    PubMed

    Karanjia, N D; Rees, M

    1993-03-01

    Oesophageal stricture is a complication of oesophageal reflux and may itself be complicated by bolus obstruction. We reviewed the records of patients presenting with dysphagia and who were found to have benign oesophageal strictures. We studied the outcome of bolus obstruction in 13 episodes affecting eight patients. In six episodes Coca-Cola was administered on the day before endoscopy, and in all these patients the bolus had cleared. In seven episodes nothing was administered before endoscopy, and in all seven a bolus was evident at endoscopy. In five of these seven the bolus was removed piecemeal and in each of these instances the endoscope had to be passed between two and five times. In the remaining two instances the procedure was abandoned and the patients returned to the ward for the administration of Coca-Cola. At subsequent endoscopy these patients were found to be clear of any bolus. These results suggest that the administration of Coca-Cola (or other aerated drinks) may clear a bolus in the acutely obstructed oesophagus.

  20. The use of Coca-Cola in the management of bolus obstruction in benign oesophageal stricture.

    PubMed

    Karanjia, N D; Rees, M

    1993-03-01

    Oesophageal stricture is a complication of oesophageal reflux and may itself be complicated by bolus obstruction. We reviewed the records of patients presenting with dysphagia and who were found to have benign oesophageal strictures. We studied the outcome of bolus obstruction in 13 episodes affecting eight patients. In six episodes Coca-Cola was administered on the day before endoscopy, and in all these patients the bolus had cleared. In seven episodes nothing was administered before endoscopy, and in all seven a bolus was evident at endoscopy. In five of these seven the bolus was removed piecemeal and in each of these instances the endoscope had to be passed between two and five times. In the remaining two instances the procedure was abandoned and the patients returned to the ward for the administration of Coca-Cola. At subsequent endoscopy these patients were found to be clear of any bolus. These results suggest that the administration of Coca-Cola (or other aerated drinks) may clear a bolus in the acutely obstructed oesophagus. PMID:8476194

  1. Acoustic Markers of Syllabic Stress in Spanish Excellent Oesophageal Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuenca, Maria Heliodora; Barrio, Marina M.; Anaya, Pablo; Establier, Carmelo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to explore the use by Spanish excellent oesophageal speakers of acoustic cues to mark syllabic stress. The speech material has consisted of five pairs of disyllabic words which only differed in stress position. Total 44 oesophageal and 9 laryngeal speakers were recorded and a computerised designed "ad hoc"…

  2. Passive smoking and risk of oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Duan, L; Wu, A H; Sullivan-Halley, J; Bernstein, L

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have examined the association between passive smoking and the risk of oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas. In a population-based case–control study with 2474 participants in Los Angeles County, there was no evidence that passive smoking had any appreciable effect on oesophageal or gastric adenocarcinomas. PMID:19352383

  3. NSAID-induced pyloric stenosis leading to oesophageal intramucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Tey, Kai Rou; Kemmerly, Thomas; Banerjee, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    We describe a rare case of a 75-year-old woman with significant non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use who presented with haematemesis. Upper endoscopy revealed a large (9 cm) intramucosal dissection of the oesophagus without extension into the gastro-oesophageal junction and a severely narrowed pylorus. We postulate that she developed pyloric stenosis due to peptic ulcer disease from chronic NSAID use. This then led to gastro-oesophageal reflux. Undigested pills in the refluxate had contacted oesophageal mucosa, leading to pill-induced oesophageal injury. This, along with vomiting, is postulated to have led to the oesophageal intramucosal dissection. She improved with conservative medical management with a clear liquid diet and proton pump inhibitors, and a follow-up upper endoscopy 1 week later showed recovery of the previously seen intramucosal dissection. PMID:27199442

  4. Oesophageal transit of marshmallow after the Angelchik procedure.

    PubMed

    Robertson, C S; Smart, H; Amar, S S; Morris, D L

    1989-03-01

    The oesophageal transit time of half a marshmallow was measured radiologically in 17 controls, 28 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux pre-operatively, 36 patients soon after implantation of the Angelchik prosthesis (2-9 weeks) and in 23 patients later postoperatively (9-48 months). Sixteen postoperative patients also underwent oesophageal manometry. All control and pre-operative patients had a marshmallow transit time of less than 1 min; 67 per cent of the early postoperative patients had prolonged transit and 70 per cent of the late tests were similarly abnormal. Prolonged oesophageal transit as measured by marshmallow swallow correlated well with symptoms of solid food dysphagia. Most, but not all, patients with an abnormal marshmallow swallow had abnormal manometric findings. The oesophageal transit of solid food is significantly slowed after the Angelchik procedure and this is not a transient postoperative phenomenon.

  5. Bleeding and cupping.

    PubMed Central

    Turk, J. L.; Allen, E.

    1983-01-01

    Bleeding and cupping have been used in medicine since ancient times in the treatment of fevers and local inflammatory disorders. Local bleeding, by 'wet cupping', was effected by a scarificator or by leeches. John Hunter recommended venesection in moderation but preferred leeches for local bleeding. Bleeding as an accepted therapeutic practice went out of vogue in the middle of the nineteenth century as a result of the introduction of modern scientific methods. Dry cupping and the use of leeches, as counter irritants, persisted until the middle of this century. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6338802

  6. Appearances are Deceptive - Passing a Nasogastric Tube does Not Always Rule Out Oesophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Thomas, Niranjan

    2016-04-01

    Oesophageal atresia/trachea-Oesophageal fistula is commonly diagnosed in the newborn period by inability to pass a nasogastric tube (NGT). We present the instance of a newborn baby where the diagnosis of oesophageal atresia was delayed because of an apparent successful passage of nasogastric tube to the stomach. Failure to reinsert the NGT raised the suspicion of oesophageal atresia which was confirmed by contrast study showing blind upper oesophageal pouch.

  7. [The pewter bleeding bowls].

    PubMed

    Renner, Claude

    2004-01-01

    In the late seventeenth century, then along the eighteen and nineteenth centuries the amount of the bloodlettings was measured by means of three pewter bleeding bowls that held three ounces of blood, about 300 millilitres. In the middle of the nineteenth century new and large bleeding bowls with metric graduations were manufactured only by the Parisian potters.

  8. [The pewter bleeding bowls].

    PubMed

    Renner, Claude

    2004-01-01

    In the late seventeenth century, then along the eighteen and nineteenth centuries the amount of the bloodlettings was measured by means of three pewter bleeding bowls that held three ounces of blood, about 300 millilitres. In the middle of the nineteenth century new and large bleeding bowls with metric graduations were manufactured only by the Parisian potters. PMID:15359483

  9. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  10. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  11. Outcomes of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in relation to timing of endoscopy and the experience of endoscopist: a tertiary center experience

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Noor; Rehman, Amer; Swinscoe, Mark Thomas; Mundre, Pradeep; Rembacken, Bjorn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted out of hours or at the weekends may have an excess mortality rate. The literature reports around this are conflicting. Aims and methods: We aimed to analyze the outcomes of emergency endoscopies performed out of hours and over the weekends in our center. We retrospectively analyzed data from April 2008 to June 2012. Results: A total of 507 ‘high risk’ emergency gastroscopies were carried out over the study period for various indications. Patients who died within 30 days of the index procedure [22 % (114 /510)] had a significantly higher Rockall score (7.6 vs. 6.0, P < 0.0001), a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) status (3.5 vs. 2.7, P < 0.001), and a lower systolic blood pressure (BP) at the time of the examination (94.8 vs 103, P = 0.025). These patients were significantly older (77.7 vs. 67.5 years, P = 0.006), and required more blood transfusion (5.9 versus 3.8 units). Emergency out-of-hours endoscopy was not associated with an increased risk of death [relative risk (RR) 1.09, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.12 – 1.95]. Whether the examination was carried out by a senior specialist registrar (senior trainee) or a consultant made no difference to the survival of the patient (RR 0.98, CI 0.77 – 1.32). Conclusion: Higher pre-endoscopy Rockall score and ASA status contributed significantly to the 30-day mortality following upper gastrointestinal bleeding, whereas lower BP tended towards significance. Outcomes did not vary with the time of the endoscopy nor was there any difference between a consultant and a senior specialist registrar led service. PMID:27004244

  12. Oesophageal cancer among the Turkomans of northeast Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saidi, F; Sepehr, A; Fahimi, S; Farahvash, M J; Salehian, P; Esmailzadeh, A; Keshoofy, M; Pirmoazen, N; Yazdanbod, M; Roshan, M K

    2000-01-01

    A Caspian Littoral Cancer Registry survey in the early 1970s established northern Iran as one of the highest oesophageal cancer incidence regions of the world. To verify this, an oesophageal cancer survey was carried out between 1995 and 1997 in the Turkoman Plain at the southeastern corner of the Caspian Sea. Oesophageal balloon cytology screening was carried out on 4192 asymptomatic adults above age 30 years in one town and three adjoining villages with a total population of 20 392 people at risk. Oesophagoscopy was performed on 183 patients with abnormal cytological findings. The discovery of two asymptomatic small squamous cell cancers and one ‘carcinoma- suspect’ implied a prevalence ranging from 47.7 per 100 000 to 71.5 per 100 000. During a 1-year active surveillance, 14 patients were found with clinically advanced oesophageal squamous cell cancer, yielding age-standardized incidence rates of 144.09 per 100 000 for men and 48.82 per 100 000 for women. The very high frequency of oesophageal cancer reported for northern Iran 25 years ago stands confirmed. Differences in incidence rates, then and now, can be attributed to survey methods used and diagnostic criteria applied, but not to socioeconomic factors, which have remained relatively stable. Oesophageal balloon cytology is a practical method of mass screening for oesophageal cancer in Iran. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027442

  13. Microdeletion 22q11 and oesophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Digilio, M. C.; Marino, B.; Bagolan, P.; Giannotti, A.; Dallapiccola, B.

    1999-01-01

    Oesophageal atresia (OA) is a congenital defect associated with additional malformations in 30-70% of the cases. In particular, OA is a component of the VACTERL association. Since some major features of the VACTERL association, including conotruncal heart defect, radial aplasia, and anal atresia, have been found in patients with microdeletion 22q11.2 (del(22q11.2)), we have screened for del(22q11.2) by fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) in 15 syndromic patients with OA. Del(22q11.2) was detected in one of them, presenting with OA, tetralogy of Fallot, anal atresia, neonatal hypocalcaemia, and subtle facial anomalies resembling those of velocardiofacial syndrome. The occurrence of del(22q11.2) in our series of patients with OA is low (1/15), but this chromosomal anomaly should be included among causative factors of malformation complexes with OA. In addition, clinical variability of del(22q11.2) syndrome is further corroborated with inclusion of OA in the list of the findings associated with the deletion.


Keywords: microdeletion 22q11; oesophageal atresia; VACTERL association; velocardiofacial syndrome PMID:10051013

  14. Cytochrome P450 expression in oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, G I; Shaw, D; Weaver, R J; McKay, J A; Ewen, S W; Melvin, W T; Burke, M D

    1994-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes play a central part in the metabolism of carcinogens and anti-cancer drugs. The expression, cellular localisation, and distribution of different forms of P450 and the functionally associated enzymes epoxide hydrolase and glutathione S-transferases have been investigated in oesophageal cancer and non-neoplastic oesophageal tissue using immunohistochemistry. Expression of the different enzymes was confined to epithelial cells in both non-neoplastic samples and tumour samples except the CYP3A was also identified in mast cells and glutathione S-transferase pi was present in chronic inflammatory cells. CYP1A was present in a small percentage of non-neoplastic samples but both CYP2C and CYP3A were absent. Epoxide hydrolase was present in half of the non-neoplastic samples and the different classes of glutathione S-transferase were present in a low number of samples. In carcinomas CYP1A, CYP3A, epoxide hydrolase, and glutathione S-transferase pi were expressed in at least 60% of samples. The expression of glutathione S-transferases alpha and mu were significantly less in adenocarcinoma compared with squamous carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8200549

  15. An improved method for oesophageal intubation.

    PubMed Central

    Bramhall, S. R.; Veitch, P. S.; Gourevitch, D.; Wicks, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a method of inserting an Atkinson tube using a flexible upper gastrointestinal endoscope which does not require the use of X-ray screening. A retrospective review of 50 patients intubated by this technique has been undertaken and the results presented. Of the lesions, 40% were squamous cell carcinoma and 40% adenocarcinoma, with 84% being situated in the lower third of the oesophagus; 94% of patients only required one intubation. The two major complications of the procedure are tube displacement and oesophageal leak; a tube displacement rate of 13% was recorded, comparable with other series. Eleven patients (20.8%) were found to have an oesophageal leak, but this resulted in death in only three patients (6%). The reasons for these figures are explained. An operative mortality rate of 12% is comparable with series using other methods. The authors conclude that this method of intubation is as safe as Atkinson's original method but has the advantage that X-ray screening is not required. PMID:7686732

  16. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit ...

  17. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J C

    1995-11-01

    Physicians who care for female patients cannot avoid the frequent complaint of abnormal uterine bleeding. Knowledge of the disorders that cause this problem can prevent serious consequences in many patients and improve the quality of life for many others. The availability of noninvasive and minimally invasive diagnostic studies and minimally invasive surgical treatment has revolutionized management of abnormal uterine bleeding. Similar to any other disorder, the extent to which a physician manages abnormal uterine bleeding depends on his or her own level of comfort. When limitations of either diagnostic or therapeutic capability are encountered, consultation and referral should be used to the best interest of patients.

  18. Hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis: an unusual location of uremic bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Chun; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2009-09-01

    Hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis is a rare but potentially fatal disease. An increased bleeding tendency is present in both acute and chronic renal failure with impaired platelet function. We herein present a case of hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis in a hemodialysis patient who suffered from acute abdomen and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The pathogenesis may have been associated with ischemia and reperfusion injury, eventually leading to necrosis of the gallbladder wall. Abdominal ultrasound can aid in diagnosis. Biliary colic, jaundice, and melena are the typical symptoms of hemorrhagic cholecystitis, particularly in a patient with unexplained gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:19762317

  19. BLEED-Myocardial Infarction Score: Predicting mid-term post-discharge bleeding events

    PubMed Central

    Barra, Sérgio; Providência, Rui; Caetano, Francisca; Almeida, Inês; Paiva, Luís; Dinis, Paulo; Leitão Marques, António

    2013-01-01

    did not die during follow-up: Area Under the Curve 0.703, Hosmer-Lemeshow test P value 0.547, Brier score 0.060; low-risk (BLEED-MI score 0-3) event rate: 1.2%; intermediate risk (score 4-6) event rate: 5.6%; high risk (score ≥ 7) event rate: 12.5%. CONCLUSION: A new bedside prediction-scoring model for post-discharge mid-term bleeding has been derived and preliminarily validated. This is the first score designed to predict mid- term hemorrhagic risk in patients discharged following admission for acute MI. This model should be externally validated in larger cohorts of patients before its potential implementation. PMID:23802048

  20. Left ventricular function and oesophageal function in patients with angina pectoris and normal coronary angiograms.

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, P M; Brooks, N H; Colgan, S; Bennett, D H; Whorwell, P J; Bray, C L; Ward, C; Jones, P E

    1987-01-01

    Left ventricular function and oesophageal function (including oesophageal manometry and pH monitoring) were investigated and a psychiatric assessment carried out in 63 patients with angina pectoris and normal coronary angiograms. Twenty two (35%) patients had regional abnormalities of left ventricular wall motion (group A). Thirty six (57%) patients had an oesophageal abnormality (group B); 19 patients had gastro-oesophageal reflux and abnormal oesophageal motility, five had gastro-oesophageal reflux alone, and 12 had abnormal oesophageal motility alone. Only four had regional abnormalities of the left ventricular wall and abnormal oesophageal function. In nine (14%) patients left ventricular and oesophageal function were normal (group C). Psychiatric morbidity was significantly less common in group A than in groups B and C and was similar in group B and group C. A definite abnormality of left ventricular function, oesophageal function, or psychiatric morbidity is present in a high proportion of patients with angina pectoris and normal coronary angiograms and in some instances this may lead to specific treatment. If quantitative assessment of left ventricular function is normal, oesophageal investigations should be performed. Endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract may demonstrate oesophageal disease, but, if findings are normal, oesophageal manometry and ambulatory oesophageal pH monitoring (including during treadmill exercise testing) should be carried out. PMID:3663421

  1. Vaginal bleeding in pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 9 , bleeding may be a sign of: The placenta separating from the inner wall of the uterus ... the baby is born ( abruptio placentae ) Miscarriage The placenta is covering all or part of the opening ...

  2. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever or significant rectal bleeding. Laser or infrared coagulation and sclerotherapy (injection of medicine directly into the ... or if symptoms persist despite rubber band ligation, coagulation or sclerotherapy. What are anal fissures? Tears that ...

  3. GI bleeding - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100162.htm GI bleeding - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... colon, and finally, the rectum and anus. The GI tract is a long, hollow, muscular tube through ...

  4. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  5. Discovery of New Molecular Subtypes in Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Rupert; Schuster, Tibor; Feith, Marcus; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Malinowsky, Katharina; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2011-01-01

    A large number of patients suffering from oesophageal adenocarcinomas do not respond to conventional chemotherapy; therefore, it is necessary to identify new predictive biomarkers and patient signatures to improve patient outcomes and therapy selections. We analysed 87 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) oesophageal adenocarcinoma tissue samples with a reverse phase protein array (RPPA) to examine the expression of 17 cancer-related signalling molecules. Protein expression levels were analysed by unsupervised hierarchical clustering and correlated with clinicopathological parameters and overall patient survival. Proteomic analyses revealed a new, very promising molecular subtype of oesophageal adenocarcinoma patients characterised by low levels of the HSP27 family proteins and high expression of those of the HER family with positive lymph nodes, distant metastases and short overall survival. After confirmation in other independent studies, our results could be the foundation for the development of a Her2-targeted treatment option for this new patient subgroup of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21966358

  6. Discovery of new molecular subtypes in oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Berg, Daniela; Wolff, Claudia; Langer, Rupert; Schuster, Tibor; Feith, Marcus; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Malinowsky, Katharina; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2011-01-01

    A large number of patients suffering from oesophageal adenocarcinomas do not respond to conventional chemotherapy; therefore, it is necessary to identify new predictive biomarkers and patient signatures to improve patient outcomes and therapy selections. We analysed 87 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) oesophageal adenocarcinoma tissue samples with a reverse phase protein array (RPPA) to examine the expression of 17 cancer-related signalling molecules. Protein expression levels were analysed by unsupervised hierarchical clustering and correlated with clinicopathological parameters and overall patient survival. Proteomic analyses revealed a new, very promising molecular subtype of oesophageal adenocarcinoma patients characterised by low levels of the HSP27 family proteins and high expression of those of the HER family with positive lymph nodes, distant metastases and short overall survival. After confirmation in other independent studies, our results could be the foundation for the development of a Her2-targeted treatment option for this new patient subgroup of oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

  7. Acoustic markers of syllabic stress in Spanish excellent oesophageal speakers.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, María Heliodora; Barrio, Marina M; Anaya, Pablo; Establier, Carmelo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to explore the use by Spanish excellent oesophageal speakers of acoustic cues to mark syllabic stress. The speech material has consisted of five pairs of disyllabic words which only differed in stress position. Total 44 oesophageal and 9 laryngeal speakers were recorded and a computerised designed ad hoc perceptual test was run in order to assess the accurate realisation of stress. The items produced by eight excellent oesophageal speakers with highest accuracy levels in the perception experiment were analysed acoustically with Praat, to be compared with the laryngeal control group. Measures of duration, fundamental frequency, spectral balance and overall intensity were taken for each target vowel and syllable. Results revealed that Spanish excellent oesophageal speakers were able to retain appropriate acoustic relations between stressed and unstressed syllables. Although spectral balance revealed as a strong cue for syllabic stress in the two voicing modes, a different hierarchy of acoustic cues in each voicing mode was found.

  8. Outpatient experience with oesophageal endoscopic dilation.

    PubMed

    Jani, P G; Mburugu, P G

    1998-07-01

    Between March 1990 and August 1997, outpatient endoscopic balloon dilation was performed for oesophageal strictures which developed secondary to malignancies, peptic strictures, post surgical narrowing, achalasia cardia, corrosive ingestion and other causes. A total of 169 dilations were performed in the 92 cases with an average of 1.8 dilation/case (Range 1 to 8). Dilation was possible in all 92 cases without the need for fluoroscopic monitoring. Twenty three (13.6%) of the dilations were performed using pneumatic balloon while in 146(86.4%) cases wire guided metal olives were used. There were nine minor complications which were treated with medication on an outpatient basis and four major complications which required inpatient care. Three of these had perforation of the oesophagus and one died. One other patient developed aspiration pneumonia and subsequently died.

  9. Coronary flow reserve and oesophageal dysfunction in syndrome X.

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, A.; Mullins, P. A.; Gill, R.; Taylor, G.; Petch, M. C.; Schofield, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    The relative prevalence of abnormalities of coronary flow reserve and oesophageal function was ascertained in 32 syndrome X patients with typical angina chest pain, a positive exercise test, and normal coronary arteries. Coronary flow reserve in response to a hyperaemic dose of papaverine was measured using an intracoronary Doppler catheter positioned in the left anterior descending coronary artery. An abnormal coronary flow reserve was defined as being < 3.0. Patients were investigated for oesophageal dysfunction by manometry and 24-hour pH monitoring. Thirteen patients had an impaired coronary flow reserve (group 1) and 19 patients had a normal flow reserve (group 2). Eight of the 13 group 1 patients (62%) and 13 of the 19 group 2 patients (68%, p = NS) had evidence of oesophageal dysfunction on either manometry or pH studies. Therefore, a total of 26 (81%) syndrome X patients had either an abnormality of coronary flow reserve or oesophageal dysfunction suggesting that chest pain in these patients may be due to myocardial ischaemia or oesophageal dysfunction, thus confirming the heterogeneous nature of this syndrome. The prevalence of oesophageal abnormalities was independent of any abnormalities of coronary flow reserve. PMID:8871460

  10. Rectal bleeding induced by Dipyridamole.

    PubMed

    Bayer, I; Kyzer, S; Creter, D; Lewinski, U H

    1986-02-01

    Nineteen patients treated continuously with Dipyridamole were evaluated for rectal bleeding. Thirteen suffered from overt rectal bleeding and six served as controls. Hemorrhoids were found in all patients. Contact bleeding was found in 16. The bleeding continued despite rubber band ligation, and stopped only on withdrawal of the drug. PMID:3484697

  11. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Small Bowel Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Lauren B; Fidler, Jeff L; Cave, David R; Leighton, Jonathan A

    2015-09-01

    Bleeding from the small intestine remains a relatively uncommon event, accounting for ~5-10% of all patients presenting with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given advances in small bowel imaging with video capsule endoscopy (VCE), deep enteroscopy, and radiographic imaging, the cause of bleeding in the small bowel can now be identified in most patients. The term small bowel bleeding is therefore proposed as a replacement for the previous classification of obscure GI bleeding (OGIB). We recommend that the term OGIB should be reserved for patients in whom a source of bleeding cannot be identified anywhere in the GI tract. A source of small bowel bleeding should be considered in patients with GI bleeding after performance of a normal upper and lower endoscopic examination. Second-look examinations using upper endoscopy, push enteroscopy, and/or colonoscopy can be performed if indicated before small bowel evaluation. VCE should be considered a first-line procedure for small bowel investigation. Any method of deep enteroscopy can be used when endoscopic evaluation and therapy are required. VCE should be performed before deep enteroscopy if there is no contraindication. Computed tomographic enterography should be performed in patients with suspected obstruction before VCE or after negative VCE examinations. When there is acute overt hemorrhage in the unstable patient, angiography should be performed emergently. In patients with occult hemorrhage or stable patients with active overt bleeding, multiphasic computed tomography should be performed after VCE or CTE to identify the source of bleeding and to guide further management. If a source of bleeding is identified in the small bowel that is associated with significant ongoing anemia and/or active bleeding, the patient should be managed with endoscopic therapy. Conservative management is recommended for patients without a source found after small bowel investigation, whereas repeat diagnostic investigations are recommended

  12. Multiple bleeds in haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Aronstam, A; Painter, M J; Eddey, J V

    1979-01-01

    One hundred and eighty-one bleeding episodes involving two sites simultaneously were noted during a survey of 4935 bleeding episodes, an incidence of 3.7%. Elbows, knees and ankles were the commonest sites involved in double bleeds, while the thigh, upper arm and elbow were the commonest sites involved in the double bleeds needing most transfusions. The overall transfusion requirements were less than for single bleeds. The frequency of multiple bleeds correlated significantly with the overall bleeding frequency, but not with the number of days under observation.

  13. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia associated with oesophageal atresia and tracheo-oesophageal fistula in a low birth weight infant

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Haium, Abdul Alim; Sim, Siam Wee; Ong, Lin Yin; Rajadurai, Victor Samuel

    2013-01-01

    The cooccurrence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and oesophageal atresia with distal tracheo-oesophageal fistula is very rare and carries high mortality. Very few anecdotal case reports and one case series have been reported in the literature. We report a case of a late preterm, low birth weight infant with this rare association who was successfully managed by staged surgical approach and had good outcome. PMID:23964045

  14. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Kuala Lumpur Hospital, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, M N; Ismail, A R; Barras, C D; Tan, W J

    2000-12-01

    Despite advancements in endoscopy and pharmacology in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease the overall mortality has remained constant at 10% for the past four decades. The aim of this study was to determine the age, gender, racial distribution, incidence and causes of endoscopically diagnosed cases of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding to summarise treatments undertaken and to report their outcome. A prospective study of UGI bleeding in 128 patients was performed in two surgical wards of Kuala Lumpur Hospital, involving both elective and emergency admissions. The study group comprised of 113 (88.2%) males and 15 (11.7%) females. The mean age was 51.9 years (range 14 to 85 years) and 37.5% (48 of 128 patients) were older than 60 years. The Indian race was over-represented in all disease categories. Smoking (50.1%), alcohol consumption (37.5%), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (17.2%), traditional remedies (5.5%), anti-coagulants (2.3%) and steroids (0.8%) were among the risk factors reported. Common presenting symptoms and signs included malaena (68.8%), haematemesis (59.4%) and fresh per rectal bleeding (33.6%). The commonest causes of UGI bleeding were duodenal ulcer (32%), gastric ulcer (29.7%), erosions (duodenal and gastric) (21.9%), oesophageal varices (10.9%) and malignancy (3.9%). UGI bleeding was treated non-surgically in 90.6% of cases. Blood transfusions were required in 62.6% (67/107) of peptic ulcer disease patients. Surgical intervention for bleeding peptic ulcer occurred in around 10% of cases and involved under-running of the bleeding vessel in most high risk duodenal and gastric ulcer patients. The overall mortality from bleeding peptic ulcer disease was 4.7%. Six patients died from torrential UGI haemorrhage soon after presentation, without the establishment of a cause. Active resuscitative protocols, early endoscopy, more aggressive interventional therapy, early surgery by more senior surgeons, increasing intensive care unit

  15. [Spontaneous renal bleeding in haemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, J H M; van Buren, M; van Overhagen, H

    2008-08-01

    In three women on chronic haemodialysis because of end-stage renal disease who were 40, 59, and 73 years of age respectively, spontaneous renal bleeding was diagnosed. The first two patients presented with acute flank pain and signs of sudden blood loss, the third one had chronic abdominal pain and anaemia. A CT scan demonstrated perirenal bleeding in all three patients and expansion into the retroperitoneal space in the first and third patient. In the latter two patients, acquired renal cysts had been visible during earlier abdominal ultrasound. None of the patients had severe hypertension, but all of them had received medication enhancing bleeding tendency, such as nadroparin, which was administered during haemodialysis. The first and the last patient were treated conservatively and survived. The second patient was haemodynamically unstable and underwent embolisation to stop the bleeding. She died in hospital after fifteen days due to the complications of a cardiac arrest. Abdominal CT or ultrasound is the technique of choice to evaluate patients with end-stage renal disease with loin pain or bleeding. Most of the time, conservative treatment suffices.

  16. Late presentation of gastric tube ulcer perforation after oesophageal atresia repair.

    PubMed

    Hazebroek, Eric J; Hazebroek, Frans W J; Leibman, Steven; Smith, Garett S

    2008-07-01

    Ulcer formation in intrathoracic grafts after oesophageal replacement is considered an infrequent complication of the procedure. We present a rare case of a gastric tube ulcer with perforation, more than 30 years after gastric tube interposition for oesophageal atresia.

  17. The effect of gravity on oesophageal peristalsis in humans.

    PubMed

    Allen, M L; Zamani, S; Dimarino, A J

    1997-06-01

    Many mammalian species including non-human primates consume water in a body position not aided by gravity and it has been conjectured that oesophageal peristalsis overcomes gravity in humans. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of gravity on oesophageal peristalsis in humans in response to water swallows. Six females (30-43 years old) and six males (27-46 years old) without oesophageal symptoms underwent oesophageal motility testing with intraluminal microtransducers placed 5, 7.5, 10 and 15 cm above the lower oesophageal sphincter. Subjects received ten 5 mL water swallows every 30 sec in the supine, standing, and head down (30 degrees) prone positions which were counterbalanced. Oesophageal contractile pressure (115, 98, 126 mmHg), duration (3.5, 3.0, 3.7 sec), onset velocity (4.7, 4.9, 4.7 cm sec-1), peak velocity (5.1, 4.8, 4.1 cm sec-1), average upstroke (dP/dT) (78, 75, 84 mmHg sec-1), or maximum upstroke (132, 120, 141 mmHg sec-1) were not significantly different among the head down prone, upright and supine positions, respectively. The frequency of abnormal contractile activity was statistically different among the positions. More abnormal contractions (i.e. simultaneous, retrograde, non-transmitted) occurred in the upright position (26%) when compared to either the supine (12%, P = 0.005) or head down prone (13%, P = 0.013) positions. The oesophagus tends to function normally to water swallows when unassisted by gravity. Oesophageal peristaltic dysfunction to water swallows may be more pronounced when assisted by the force of gravity.

  18. Tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: calculation of dose based on estimated patient weight can increase the risk of cerebral bleeding.

    PubMed

    García-Pastor, Andrés; Díaz-Otero, Fernando; Funes-Molina, Carmen; Benito-Conde, Beatriz; Grandes-Velasco, Sandra; Sobrino-García, Pilar; Vázquez-Alén, Pilar; Fernández-Bullido, Yolanda; Villanueva-Osorio, Jose Antonio; Gil-Núñez, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    A dose of 0.9 mg/kg of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) has proven to be beneficial in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Dosing of t-PA based on estimated patient weight (PW) increases the likelihood of errors. Our objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of estimated PW and assess the effectiveness and safety of the actual applied dose (AAD) of t-PA. We performed a prospective single-center study of AIS patients treated with t-PA from May 2010 to December 2011. Dose was calculated according to estimated PW. Patients were weighed during the 24 h following treatment with t-PA. Estimation errors and AAD were calculated. Actual PW was measured in 97 of the 108 included patients. PW estimation errors were recorded in 22.7 % and were more frequent when weight was estimated by stroke unit staff (44 %). Only 11 % of patients misreported their own weight. Mean AAD was significantly higher in patients who had intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) after t-PA than in patients who did not (0.96 vs. 0.92 mg/kg; p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis showed an increased risk of ICH for each 10 % increase in t-PA dose above the optimal dose of 0.90 mg/kg (OR 3.10; 95 % CI 1.14-8.39; p = 0.026). No effects of t-PA misdosing were observed on symptomatic ICH, functional outcome or mortality. Estimated PW is frequently inaccurate and leads to t-PA dosing errors. Increasing doses of t-PA above 0.90 mg/kg may increase the risk of ICH. Standardized weighing methods before t-PA is administered should be considered.

  19. Rare Jejunal Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Christman, Emily; Hassell, Lewis A.; Kastens, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) secondary to jejunal diverticulosis (JD) is very rare. Delay in establishing a diagnosis is common and GIB from JD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We report an illustrative case diagnosed by push enteroscopy and managed with surgery. PMID:27800518

  20. Simultaneous tracheal and oesophageal pH monitoring during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Hue, V; Leclerc, F; Gottrand, F; Martinot, A; Crunelle, V; Riou, Y; Deschildre, A; Fourier, C; Turck, D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To simultaneously record tracheal and oesophageal pH in mechanically ventilated children to determine: (1) the feasibility and safety of the method; (2) the incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) and pulmonary contamination; and (3) their associated risk factors. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Paediatric intensive care unit in a university hospital. PATIENTS: Twenty mechanically ventilated children (mean age 6.7 years) who met the following inclusion criteria: endotracheal tube with an internal diameter of 4 mm or more (cuffed or uncuffed), mechanical ventilation for an acute disease, no treatment with antiacids, prokinetics, or H2-receptor blockers, and no nasogastric or orogastric tube. METHODS: The tracheal antimony pH probe was positioned 1 cm below the distal end of the endotracheal tube. The oesophageal antimony pH probe was positioned at the lower third of the oesophagus. pH was recorded on a double channel recorder and analysed with EsopHogram 5.01 software and by examination of the trace. The following definitions were used: GOR index, percentage of time pH < 4; pathological GOR, GOR index > 4.8%; tracheal reflux, fall in tracheal pH < 4, 4.5, or 5, or a decrease of one unit from baseline, in both cases preceded by an episode of GOR. The results were analysed statistically by Fisher's exact and the Kruskal-Wallis test. RESULTS: The procedure was well tolerated and the median duration of analysable recording was 6 hours (range 5-22.6). Pathological GOR was observed in eight (40%) children. GOR was more frequent with an uncuffed endotracheal tube than with a cuffed one (p = 0.01). Tracheal reflux (pH < 4) was observed in four children (20%) without clinical evidence of pulmonary aspiration. Episodes of tracheal reflux were associated with a GOR index > 10% (p < 0.01) and were more frequent with a maximal inspiratory pressure of < 25 cm H2O (p = 0.03), but were not related to the indication for mechanical ventilation, whether the

  1. The epidemiology of tracheo-oesophageal fistula and oesophageal atresia in Europe. EUROCAT Working Group.

    PubMed Central

    Depaepe, A; Dolk, H; Lechat, M F

    1993-01-01

    The total prevalence rate of tracheo-oesophageal fistula and oesophageal atresia in 15 EUROCAT registries covering 1,546,889 births during 1980-8 was 2.86 per 10,000. There was a decreasing prevalence rate over time (3.5 per 10,000 in 1980-2, 2.7 in 1983-5, 2.5 in 1986-8). Ten per cent of cases were associated with chromosomal anomalies and of the remaining cases, half were multiply malformed. Sixty two per cent of cases were males. There was a significantly increased risk for mothers of less than 20 years of age (odds ratio compared with mothers of 25-29 = 1.82, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 2.67). There were no apparent epidemiological differences between isolated and multiply malformed cases in secular trend, sex ratio, or maternal age. Both isolated and multiply malformed cases tended to be premature and small for gestational age. There was variation between centres in survival of affected liveborn children up to 1 year of age. PMID:8333763

  2. [Oesophageal diseases: gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett's disease, achalasia and eosinophilic oesophagitis].

    PubMed

    Calvet, Xavier

    2015-09-01

    The most important novel findings presented on oesophageal disease in DDW 2015 were the following: 1) GERD: a) hypervigilance seems to be a key pathogenic factor in reflux symptoms refractory to PPI; b) post-reflux swallowing-induced peristaltic waves could be an excellent diagnostic criterion for GERD; c) laryngeal pH-metry is not useful in the diagnosis of extra-oesophageal symptoms; d) the recommendation of weight loss adequately recorded in the clinical reports of patients with GERD and obesity or overweight is an excellent quality indicator and is associated with better outcomes. 2) Barrett's oesophagus: a) persistent low-grade dysplasia in more than one endoscopy and a diagnosis of "indefinite for dysplasia" are associated with a high risk of neoplastic progression; b) narrow-band imaging allows areas of dysplasia on Barrett's oesophagus to be identified with high sensitivity and specificity; c) initial endoscopy fails to identify a high percentage of advanced neoplasms in Barrett's oesophagus. Early re-endoscopy should be considered; d) endoscopists specialized in Barret's oesophagus obtain a much higher yield in the diagnosis of advanced lesions. Patients at high risk-men, older patients, smokers and those with long-segment Barrett's oesophagus-could benefit from follow-up in a referral center. 3) Achalasia: POEM seems safe and effective, independently from patient characteristics (age, comorbidity) and the technical variations used. 4) Eosinophilic esophagitis: topical budesonide and exclusion diets are reasonably effective in PPI non-responders. PMID:26520196

  3. Endoscopic Carbon Dioxide Laser Photocoagulation Of Bleeding Canine Gastric Ulcers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Dov; Ron, Nimrod; Orgad, Uri; Katzir, Abraham

    1987-04-01

    This is the first report which describes carbon dioxide laser photocoagulation of upper gastrointestinal bleeding via a flexible endoscope, using an infrared transmitting siver nalide fiber. Various laser parameters were checked to determine the optimal conditions for hemostasis. Both the acute effects of laser irradiation on tissue and the chronic effects on healing process were examined. Preliminary results indicate that carbon dioxide laser beam can successfully photocoagulate moderately bleeding ulcers.

  4. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  5. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  6. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  7. Endoscopic treatment of gastric varices bleeding with the use of n-butyl-2 cyanoacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Kobryń, Konrad; Paluszkiewicz, Rafał; Krawczyk, Marek; Wróblewski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oesophageal varices and gastric varices are naturally-formed, pathological portosystemic shunts that occur in patients with portal hypertension. Gastric varices are responsible for about 10% of variceal bleeding; however, they are also the cause of massive haemorrhage, often with dramatic progress. Aim To assess the results of endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding from oesophageal and gastric varices using tissue glue Histoacryl. Material and methods From January 2013 to May 2015 170 patients underwent a total of 244 obliterations with the administration of tissue glue due to gastroesophageal varices. We analysed 35 patients who received urgent endoscopic intervention due to life-threatening gastric variceal bleeding. Results Thirty-five patients underwent 47 endoscopic procedures of haemorrhage management. Immediate haemostasis was achieved in 32 (91.4%) patients. In 3 (8.6%) cases endoscopy failed. In 2 patients a Linton tube was applied before secondary endoscopy. A single trans jugular portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was performed. Permanent haemostasis during the first endoscopy was achieved in 26 (74%) patients. Six (17%) patients presented recurrent bleeding 1–4 days following the initial treatment. Three patients had a splenic artery embolisation performed. One of the embolised patients required surgery, and a splenectomy was carried out. Conclusions If this kind of therapy is unavailable at the time, it is advised that one of the conventional methods of controlling bleeding is used, introducing basic life support and transporting the patient to a specialist centre with adequate endoscopic facilities, radiological possibilities of endovascular intervention, and surgical treatment of liver transplantation. PMID:26759632

  8. Somatic movement and oesophageal motility during isoflurane anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mather, C; Raftery, S; Prys-Roberts, C

    1992-07-01

    The quantal responses for somatic movement, and spontaneous and provoked lower oesophageal contractions (motility) were noted at the time of incision in 72 patients aged 40-65 yr, receiving varying concentrations of isoflurane. Probit analysis of the alveolar concentration of isoflurane required to prevent somatic movement revealed an MAC or EC50 (95% confidence limits) of 1.00 (0.82-1.17)% and EC95 of 2.16 (1.69-3.89)%. The EC50 of isoflurane to suppress spontaneous lower oesophageal contractions was 1.27 (1.12-1.43)%, and the EC95 2.13 (1.78-3.22)%. The EC50 for provoked lower oesophageal contractions was 1.31 (0.93-3.48)% and the EC95 was 6.18% (unable to compute confidence limits).

  9. The management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Keung, Charlotte; Hebbard, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY If there are no features of serious disease, suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease can be initially managed with a trial of a proton pump inhibitor for 4–8 weeks. This should be taken 30–60 minutes before food for optimal effect. Once symptoms are controlled, attempt to withdraw acid suppression therapy. If symptoms recur, use the minimum dose that controls symptoms. Patients who have severe erosive oesophagitis, scleroderma oesophagus or Barrett’s oesophagus require long-term treatment with a proton pump inhibitor. Lifestyle modification strategies can help gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Weight loss has the strongest evidence for efficacy. Further investigation and a specialist referral are required if there is no response to proton pump inhibitor therapy. Atypical symptoms or signs of serious disease also need investigation. PMID:27041798

  10. The management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Keung, Charlotte; Hebbard, Geoffrey

    2016-02-01

    If there are no features of serious disease, suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease can be initially managed with a trial of a proton pump inhibitor for 4-8 weeks. This should be taken 30-60 minutes before food for optimal effect. Once symptoms are controlled, attempt to withdraw acid suppression therapy. If symptoms recur, use the minimum dose that controls symptoms. Patients who have severe erosive oesophagitis, scleroderma oesophagus or Barrett's oesophagus require long-term treatment with a proton pump inhibitor. Lifestyle modification strategies can help gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Weight loss has the strongest evidence for efficacy. Further investigation and a specialist referral are required if there is no response to proton pump inhibitor therapy. Atypical symptoms or signs of serious disease also need investigation. PMID:27041798

  11. The Angelchik prosthesis for gastro-oesophageal reflux: symptomatic and objective assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, R. M.; Temple, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with intractable gastro-oesophageal reflux were treated by insertion of the Angelchik antireflux prosthesis. Good symptomatic relief was achieved in over 80% of patients reviewed up to 28 months after operation and there was marked resolution of oesophagitis as seen on endoscopy. Oesophageal manometry and pH studies performed preoperatively and at 3 and 12 months after operation, showed a significant increase in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure with decreased acid reflux. Some technical problems were encountered, but the prosthesis is potentially a simple and effective means of controlling gastro-oesophageal reflux. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4051424

  12. Optimal subband Kalman filter for normal and oesophageal speech enhancement.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Rizwan; García Zapirain, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the single channel speech enhancement system using subband Kalman filtering by estimating optimal Autoregressive (AR) coefficients and variance for speech and noise, using Weighted Linear Prediction (WLP) and Noise Weighting Function (NWF). The system is applied for normal and Oesophageal speech signals. The method is evaluated by Perceptual Evaluation of Speech Quality (PESQ) score and Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) improvement for normal speech and Harmonic to Noise Ratio (HNR) for Oesophageal Speech (OES). Compared with previous systems, the normal speech indicates 30% increase in PESQ score, 4 dB SNR improvement and OES shows 3 dB HNR improvement. PMID:25227070

  13. Airborne occupational exposures and risk of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, C; Plato, N; Johansson, A L V; Nyrén, O; Lagergren, J

    2006-01-01

    Background The reasons for the increasing incidence of and strong male predominance in patients with oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma remain unclear. The authors hypothesised that airborne occupational exposures in male dominated industries might contribute. Methods In a nationwide Swedish population based case control study, 189 and 262 cases of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma respectively, 167 cases of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 820 frequency matched controls underwent personal interviews. Based on each study participant's lifetime occupational history the authors assessed cumulative airborne occupational exposure for 10 agents, analysed individually and combined, by a deterministic additive model including probability, frequency, and intensity. Furthermore, occupations and industries of longest duration were analysed. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios (OR), with 95% confidence intervals (CI), using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders. Results Tendencies of positive associations were found between high exposure to pesticides and risk of oesophageal (OR 2.3 (95% CI 0.9 to 5.7)) and cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.1 (95% CI 1.0 to 4.6)). Among workers highly exposed to particular agents, a tendency of an increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma was found. There was a twofold increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma among concrete and construction workers (OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.1 to 4.2)) and a nearly fourfold increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma among workers within the motor vehicle industry (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 10.4)). An increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 12.5)), and a tendency of an increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.8 (95% CI 0.9 to 8.5)), were identified among hotel and restaurant workers. Conclusions Specific airborne occupational exposures do not seem to be of major importance in the aetiology of oesophageal or

  14. The ionic components of normal human oesophageal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, D; Milne, G; Curtis, M; Nicholson, G

    1979-11-01

    The distribution of cations and anions in normal human oesophageal epithelium has been investigated with the pyroantimonate and silver-osmium tetroxide techniques. There is a discontinuous distribution of both ions in the intercellular space. The ions are associated with various organelles, as has already been described in the literature. Specifically, in the oesophageal epithelium, there are a few deposits of pyroantimonate and occasional silver in the membrane coating granules, but here is no apparent relationship of either ion with the tonofilaments or glycogen particles. The superficial cells are leaky and contain fewer ions than the deeper functional layer cells.

  15. Optimal subband Kalman filter for normal and oesophageal speech enhancement.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Rizwan; García Zapirain, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the single channel speech enhancement system using subband Kalman filtering by estimating optimal Autoregressive (AR) coefficients and variance for speech and noise, using Weighted Linear Prediction (WLP) and Noise Weighting Function (NWF). The system is applied for normal and Oesophageal speech signals. The method is evaluated by Perceptual Evaluation of Speech Quality (PESQ) score and Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) improvement for normal speech and Harmonic to Noise Ratio (HNR) for Oesophageal Speech (OES). Compared with previous systems, the normal speech indicates 30% increase in PESQ score, 4 dB SNR improvement and OES shows 3 dB HNR improvement.

  16. Cefoperazone Induced Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Katukuri, Goutham Reddy; Maddala, Raja Naga Mahesh; Ramamoorthi, Kusugodlu; Hande, Manjunatha

    2016-08-01

    Cefoperazone is a beta-lactam antibiotic which is frequently used in treating a variety of gram positive and gram negative infections. The chemical structure of cefoperazone contains a side chain of N-methylthiotetrazole which can inhibit vitamin K metabolism resulting in hypoprothombinemia. We report a case of cefoperazone induced coagulopathy manifesting as gastrointestinal bleeding. A Naranjo assessment score of 5 was obtained, indicating a probable relationship between the patient's coagulation function disorder and her use of the suspect drug. PMID:27656491

  17. Central nervous system bleeding in patients with rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Siboni, S M; Zanon, E; Sottilotta, G; Consonni, D; Castaman, G; Mikovic, D; Biondo, F; Tagliaferri, A; Iorio, A; Mannucci, P M; Peyvandi, F

    2012-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) bleeding is one of the most severe and debilitating manifestations occurring in patients with rare bleeding disorders (RBDs). The aim of this study was to retrospectively collect data on patients affected with RBDs who had CNS bleeding, to establish incidence of recurrence, death rate, neurological sequences, most frequent location, type of bleeding and efficacy of treatments. Results pertained to 36 CNS bleeding episodes in 24 patients with severe deficiency except one with moderate factor VII (FVII) deficiency. Six patients (25%) experienced a recurrence and two had more than one recurrence. Seven patients (29%) had an early onset of CNS bleeding before the first 2 years of life, others (71%) later in life. In 76% of cases, CNS bleeding was spontaneous. CNS bleeding was intracerebral in 19 cases (53%), extracerebral in 10 (28%) and both intracerebral and extracerebral in two cases (6%). Neurosurgery was performed in 11 cases, in association with replacement therapy in seven cases. Seizures were noted in four patients. Residual psychomotor abnormalities were seen in two patients. No death was recorded. To prevent recurrence, 17/24 patients (71%) were put on secondary prophylaxis. In conclusion, recurrence of CNS bleeding was confirmed to be relatively frequent in patients with severe FV, FX, FVII and FXIII deficiencies. Most patients were managed with replacement therapy alone, surgery being reserved for those with worsening neurological conditions. Our results indicate that some RBDs require early prophylactic treatment to prevent CNS bleeding. Optimal dosage and frequency of treatment need further evaluation.

  18. Management of bleeding following major trauma: a European guideline

    PubMed Central

    Spahn, Donat R; Cerny, Vladimir; Coats, Timothy J; Duranteau, Jacques; Fernández-Mondéjar, Enrique; Gordini, Giovanni; Stahel, Philip F; Hunt, Beverley J; Komadina, Radko; Neugebauer, Edmund; Ozier, Yves; Riddez, Louis; Schultz, Arthur; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Rossaint, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Evidence-based recommendations can be made with respect to many aspects of the acute management of the bleeding trauma patient, which when implemented may lead to improved patient outcomes. Methods The multidisciplinary Task Force for Advanced Bleeding Care in Trauma was formed in 2005 with the aim of developing guidelines for the management of bleeding following severe injury. Recommendations were formulated using a nominal group process and the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) hierarchy of evidence and were based on a systematic review of published literature. Results Key recommendations include the following: The time elapsed between injury and operation should be minimised for patients in need of urgent surgical bleeding control, and patients presenting with haemorrhagic shock and an identified source of bleeding should undergo immediate surgical bleeding control unless initial resuscitation measures are successful. A damage control surgical approach is essential in the severely injured patient. Pelvic ring disruptions should be closed and stabilised, followed by appropriate angiographic embolisation or surgical bleeding control, including packing. Patients presenting with haemorrhagic shock and an unidentified source of bleeding should undergo immediate further assessment as appropriate using focused sonography, computed tomography, serum lactate, and/or base deficit measurements. This guideline also reviews appropriate physiological targets and suggested use and dosing of blood products, pharmacological agents, and coagulation factor replacement in the bleeding trauma patient. Conclusion A multidisciplinary approach to the management of the bleeding trauma patient will help create circumstances in which optimal care can be provided. By their very nature, these guidelines reflect the current state-of-the-art and will need to be updated and revised as important new evidence becomes available. PMID:17298665

  19. Role of endoscopic clipping in the treatment of oesophageal perforations

    PubMed Central

    Lázár, György; Paszt, Attila; Mán, Eszter

    2016-01-01

    With advances in endoscopic technologies, endoscopic clips have been used widely and successfully in the treatment of various types of oesophageal perforations, anastomosis leakages and fistulas. Our aim was to summarize the experience with two types of clips: The through-the-scope (TTS) clip and the over-the-scope clip (OTSC). We summarized the results of oesophageal perforation closure with endoscopic clips. We processed the data from 38 articles and 127 patients using PubMed search. Based on evidence thus far, it can be stated that both clips can be used in the treatment of early (< 24 h), iatrogenic, spontaneous oesophageal perforations in the case of limited injury or contamination. TTS clips are efficacious in the treatment of 10 mm lesions, while bigger (< 20 mm) lesions can be treated successfully with OTSC clips, whose effectiveness is similar to that of surgical treatment. However, the clinical success rate is significantly lower in the case of fistulas and in the treatment of anastomosis insufficiency. Tough prospective randomized multicentre trials, which produce the largest amount of evidence, are still missing. Based on experience so far, endoscopic clips represent a possible therapeutic alternative to surgery in the treatment of oesophageal perforations under well-defined conditions. PMID:26788259

  20. Gastric volvulus and associated gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, M; Burge, D M; Griffiths, D M

    1995-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1994, 10 neurologically normal children between 2 and 24 months were diagnosed as having gastric volvulus with associated gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR). The common features at presentation were episodic colicky abdominal pain, non-bilious vomiting, upper abdominal distension, haematemesis, and failure to thrive. Anterior gastropexy and conservative management of GOR was curative. Images Figure 2 PMID:8554369

  1. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Is Urgent Colonoscopy Necessary for All Hematochezia?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is defined as acute or chronic abnormal blood loss distal to the ligament of Treitz. The incidence of LGIB is only one fifth of that of the upper gastrointestinal tract and is estimated to be 21 to 27 cases per 100,000 adults per year. Acute bleeding is arbitrarily defined as bleeding of <3 days' duration resulting in instability of vital signs, anemia, and/or need for blood transfusion. Chronic bleeding is defined as slow blood loss over a period of several days or longer presenting with symptoms of occult fecal blood, intermittent melena, or scant hematochezia. Bleeding means that the amounts of blood in the feces are too small to be seen but detectable by chemical tests. LGIB is usually chronic and stops spontaneously. Bleeding stop (80%), but male gender and older patients suffer from more severe LGIB. The optimal timing of colonoscopic intervention for LGIB remains uncertain. Urgent colonoscopy may serve to decrease hospital stay. However, urgent colonoscopy is difficult to control, and showed no evidence of improving clinical outcomes or lowering costs as compared with routine elective colonoscopy. PMID:24143306

  2. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Lucy; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common and debilitating condition with high direct and indirect costs. AUB frequently co-exists with fibroids, but the relationship between the two remains incompletely understood and in many women the identification of fibroids may be incidental to a menstrual bleeding complaint. A structured approach for establishing the cause using the Fédération International de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform treatment options. Office hysteroscopy and increasing sophisticated imaging will assist provision of robust evidence for the underlying cause. Increased availability of medical options has expanded the choice for women and many will no longer need to recourse to potentially complicated surgery. Treatment must remain individualised and encompass the impact of pressure symptoms, desire for retention of fertility and contraceptive needs, as well as address the management of AUB in order to achieve improved quality of life. PMID:26803558

  3. Location of the lower oesophageal sphincter and the squamous columnar mucosal junction in 109 healthy controls and 778 patients with different degrees of endoscopic oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Csendes, A; Maluenda, F; Braghetto, I; Csendes, P; Henriquez, A; Quesada, M S

    1993-01-01

    In this study the location of the lower oesophageal sphincter measured by manometry and the location of the squamous columnar junction measured by endoscopy were determined in 109 healthy controls and 778 patients with different degrees of endoscopic oesophagitis. No significant differences in the prevalence and severity of the heartburn and regurgitation were observed when different degrees of oesophagitis were compared but dysphagia was more common and severe in patients with complicated Barrett's oesophagus (p < 0.001). This group also showed a male predominance and older age compared with other groups. The total length of the oesophagus, measured by the location of the distal end of the lower oesophageal sphincter was similar in all patients; however, the location of the squamous columnar junction extended more proximally and was related to the increasing severity of endoscopic oesophagitis. The manometric defects at the cardia were more frequent in severe oesophagitis (p < 0.001). These results suggest that, during the course of oesophagitis, the squamous columnar junction is displaced proximally. This displacement is limited to the mucosa, however, and does not involve the muscular layer, because the lower oesophageal sphincter undergoes no dislocation. PMID:8432446

  4. Does postoperative ventilation have an effect on the integrity of the anastomosis in repaired oesophageal atresia?

    PubMed

    Beasley, S W

    1999-04-01

    Several authors have claimed that the use of postoperative ventilation or graded withdrawal of respiratory support reduces the incidence of anastomotic complications after repair of oesophageal atresia, particularly where the gap between the oesophageal ends has been extensive or where the anastomosis has been constructed under tension. Careful review of their data reveals little objective evidence to either support or refute this contention. Many institutions are achieving low leakage rates following oesophageal anastomosis in oesophageal atresia, but to date there has been no controlled study to show that the use of neck flexion, muscle paralysis, intubation and assisted ventilation postoperatively influences the integrity of the anastomosis. The sequence of observations that led to the presumed relationship between postoperative ventilation and oesophageal leak is reviewed. It would appear that the effect of postoperative ventilation and paralysis on the oesophageal anastomosis is yet to be determined. PMID:10365344

  5. Persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Daphne; How, Choon How; Ang, Tiing Leong

    2016-01-01

    About one-third of patients with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) do not respond symptomatically to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Many of these patients do not suffer from GERD, but may have underlying functional heartburn or atypical chest pain. Other causes of failure to respond to PPIs include inadequate acid suppression, non-acid reflux, oesophageal hypersensitivity, oesophageal dysmotility and psychological comorbidities. Functional oesophageal tests can exclude cardiac and structural causes, as well as help to confi rm or exclude GERD. The use of PPIs should only be continued in the presence of acid reflux or oesophageal hypersensitivity for acid reflux-related events that is proven on functional oesophageal tests. PMID:27779277

  6. Morphometric assessment of reflux oesophagitis in fibreoptic biopsy specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, L R; Dent, J; Whitehead, R

    1985-01-01

    The oesophageal epithelium of patients with reflux oesophagitis has been studied by means of computer aided morphometry. Measurements of histological features were made on biopsies from six cases before and after treatment. The size and elongation of the nuclei and their variation, the number of nuclei per unit length or per unit sectioned area, and the size and number of nucleoli per nucleus were measured for two zones of the epithelium, the base layer and the intermediate layer, which were independent of section orientation. The measurements were analysed using discriminant analysis. Significant discrimination was found between the two groups. The most important parameters were the number of intermediate layer nuclei per sectioned square millimetre, the mean intermediate layer nuclear area, and the number of nuclei per millimetre of base epithelium. These parameters are consistent with increased cell turnover of the non-ulcerated epithelium before treatment. Images PMID:3968208

  7. Tracheo-oesophageal fistula in a patient with chronic sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Darr, A; Mohamed, S; Eaton, D; Kalkat, M S

    2015-10-01

    Sarcoidosis is a common multisystem granulomatous condition of unknown aetiology, predominantly involving the respiratory system. Tracheal stenosis has been described but we believe that we present the first case of a tracheo-oesophageal fistula secondary to chronic sarcoidosis. A 57-year-old woman with sarcoidosis, a known tracheal stricture and a Polyflex(®) stent in situ presented with stridor. Bronchoscopy confirmed in-stent stenosis, by exuberant granulation tissue. The stent was removed and the granulation tissue was resected accordingly. Postoperatively, the patient was noticed to have an incessant cough and video fluoroscopy raised the suspicion of a tracheo-oesophageal fistula. A repeat bronchoscopy demonstrated marked granulation tissue, accompanied by a fistulous connection with the oesophagus at the mid-lower [middle of the lower] third of the trachea. Three Polyflex(®) stents were sited across the entire length of the trachea. Sarcoidosis presents with varying clinical manifestations and disease progression. Tracheal involvement appears to be a rare phenomenon and usually results in stenosis. To date, there has been little or no documented literature describing the formation of a tracheo-oesophageal fistula resulting from sarcoidosis. Early reports documented the presence of sarcoidosis induced weakening in the tracheal wall, a process termed tracheal dystonia. Weaknesses are more apparent in the membranous aspect of the trachea. Despite the rare nature of such pathology, this case report highlights the need to consider the presence of a tracheo-oesophageal fistula in sarcoidosis patients presenting with repeat aspiration in the absence of an alternate pathology.

  8. Oesophageal and diaphragmatic activity during sucking in lambs.

    PubMed

    Harding, R; Titchen, D A

    1981-12-01

    1. Buccal, pharyngeal, oesophageal and diaphragmatic movements during swallowing of saliva and sucking from a bottle were studied in lambs by recording electromyograms (e.m.g.s) from the mylohyoid, thyrohyoid and thyroarytenoid muscles, cervical and caudal thoracic oesophagus and vertebral and costal regions of the diaphragm. Buccal and pleural pressure recordings were also made.2. Swallows of saliva characteristically involved contraction of the mylohyoid followed sequentially by contraction of the thyrohyoid, cervical, and finally, caudal thoracic oesophagus.3. Sucking (indicated by the mylohyoid e.m.g.s and buccal pressure) was initially at rates up to 6 sec(-1), sustained at up to 4 sec(-1) for 30-45 sec and, once established, accompanied by swallows in a 1:1 association with sucking.4. Respiration ceased during the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. At the time the primary contraction (of swallowing) involved the caudal thoracic oesophagus vertebral fibres of the diaphragm forming the hiatus oesophageus became quiescent, although costal fibres continued to contribute to inspiration.5. During sucking, respiration was shallow and rapid, with diaphragm contractions sandwiched between swallows.6. Towards the end of an episode of sucking, contractions of the diaphragm became more intense and occurred in groups with pressure changes corresponding to both individual contractions and the grouped activity.7. Primary oesophageal contractions occurred only after single swallows or at the end of a series of swallows.8. During periods when sucking and swallowing were frequent, short episodes of oesophageal contraction occurred, each being between thyrohyoid contractions.9. Recording from contiguous sites of the caudal thoracic oesophagus confirmed a caudally progressive character of those short contractions of the oesophagus observed during sucking.10. Factors contributing to these changes in oesophageal activity and consequences of altered diaphragmatic activity in sucking

  9. Best evidence topic report. Proteolytic enzymes for oesophageal meat impaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason; Anderson, Ross

    2005-02-01

    A short cut review was carried out to establish whether proteolytic enzymes are effective at resolving oesophageal meat impaction. Altogether 98 papers were found using the reported search, of which three presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these best papers are tabulated. A clinical bottom line is stated. PMID:15662066

  10. [Metastatic adenocarcinoma in preputium of a patient with oesophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Christina Lindkvist; Rathenborg, Per Zier

    2015-03-23

    Secondary or acquired phimosis usually occurs as part of a benign disease. We present a case of secondary phimosis caused by metastasis from a newly diagnosed oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The patient presented with clinical suspicion of infection in the preputial space, but histopathology revealed dilated lymphatic vessels with peripheral embolisms of epithelial tumour cells. This case report emphasizes the importance of establishing the cause of secondary phimosis by histopath-ological examination for possible malignancy. PMID:25822817

  11. Management of bleeding in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Chee, Y E; Liu, S E; Irwin, M G

    2016-09-01

    Management of acute coagulopathy and blood loss during major vascular procedures poses a significant haemostatic challenge to anaesthetists. The acute coagulopathy is multifactorial in origin with tissue injury and hypotension as the precipitating factors, followed by dilution, hypothermia, acidemia, hyperfibrinolysis and systemic inflammatory response, all acting as a self-perpetuating spiral of events. The problem is confounded by the high prevalence of antithrombotic agent use in these patients and intraoperative heparin administration. Trials specifically examining bleeding management in vascular surgery are lacking, and much of the literature and guidelines are derived from studies on patients with trauma. In general, it is recommended to adopt permissive hypotension with a restrictive fluid strategy, using a combination of crystalloid and colloid solutions up to one litre during the initial resuscitation, after which blood products should be administered. A restrictive transfusion trigger for red cells remains the mainstay of treatment except for the high-risk patients, where the trigger should be individualized. Transfusion of blood components should be initiated by clinical evidence of coagulopathy such as diffuse microvascular bleeding, and then guided by either laboratory or point-of-care coagulation testing. Prophylactic antifibrinolytic use is recommended for all surgery where excessive bleeding is anticipated. Fibrinogen and prothrombin complex concentrates administration are recommended during massive transfusion, whereas rFVIIa should be reserved until all means have failed. While debates over the ideal resuscitative strategy continue, the approach to vascular haemostasis should be scientific, rational, and structured. As far as possible, therapy should be monitored and goal directed. PMID:27566811

  12. Impact of the inflammatory microenvironment on T-cell phenotype in the progression from reflux oesophagitis to Barrett oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Maria E; Conroy, Melissa J; Clarke, Niamh E; Gilmartin, Niamh T; O'Sullivan, Katie E; Feighery, Ronan; MacCarthy, Finbar; O'Toole, Dermot; Ravi, Narayanasamy; Reynolds, John V; O'Sullivan, Jacintha; Lysaght, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC), arising from reflux-induced Barrett oesophagus (BO), is increasing dramatically. T-cells have recently been implicated in the initiation of oesophagitis; however, their role in the progression from oesophagitis to BO and OAC has not been fully elucidated. Previous studies have examined the secreted cytokines from oesophageal tissue during disease progression but this study is the first to examine the activation phenotype and the inflammatory profile of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells in human oesophagitis, BO and OAC tissue. Results demonstrated significantly higher levels of IL-4 producing CD4(+) T-cells and secreted levels of IL-6, confirming a Th2 phenotype in BO. In OAC tissue, both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were secreted, with significantly higher levels of IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-10 compared with normal oesophageal tissue. In addition, CD4(+) T-cells infiltrating OAC tissue displayed a decreased activation profile, with significantly lower CD45RO and CD69 expression compared with normal tissue. Data from this study suggest that factors in the tissue microenvironment may alter T-cell phenotype and function early during oesophageal disease progression and may represent targets for immune intervention.

  13. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Approach to abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-age women Differential diagnosis of genital tract bleeding in women Postmenopausal uterine bleeding The following organizations also provide reliable health information. ● National Library of Medicine ( www.nlm.nih.gov/ ...

  14. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often ...

  15. Accuracy of digital mRNA profiling of oesophageal biopsies as a novel diagnostic approach to eosinophilic oesophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Lexmond, Willem S.; Hu, Lan; Pardo, Michael; Heinz, Nicole; Rooney, Katharine; LaRosa, Jessica; Dehlink, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Background Quantification of tissue eosinophils remains the golden standard in diagnosing eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE), but this approach suffers from poor specificity. It has been recognized that histopathological changes that occur in patients with EoE are associated with a disease-specific tissue transcriptome. Objective We hypothesized that digital mRNA profiling targeted at a set of EoE-specific and Th2 inflammatory genes in oesophageal biopsies could help differentiate patients with EoE from those with reflux oesophagitis (RE) or normal tissue histology (NH). Methods The mRNA expression levels of 79 target genes were defined in both proximal and distal biopsies of 196 patients with nCounter® (Nanostring) technology. According to clinicopathological diagnosis, these patients were grouped in a training set (35 EoE, 30 RE, 30 NH) for building of a three-class prediction model using the random forest method, and a blinded predictive set (n=47) for model validation. Results A diagnostic model built on ten differentially expressed genes was able to differentiate with 100% sensitivity and specificity between conditions in the training set. In a blinded predictive set, this model was able to correctly predict EoE in 14 out of 18 patients in distal (sensitivity 78%, 95% CI 52%-93%) and 16 out of 18 patients in proximal biopsies (sensitivity 89%, 95% CI 64%-98%), without false positive diagnosis of EoE in RE or NH patients (specificity 100%, 95% CI 85%-100%). Sensitivity was increased to 94% (95% CI 71%-100%) when either the best predictive distal or proximal biopsy was used. Conclusion & Clinical Relevance We conclude that mRNA profiling of oesophageal tissue is an accurate diagnostic strategy in detecting EoE. PMID:25728460

  16. Bleeding Characteristics of Geothermal Wells

    SciTech Connect

    James, Russell; Gould, Tom

    1987-01-20

    Discharging small flows (order of 1 t/h) from wells is known as bleeding and is to relieve the build-up of gas pressure at the wellhead and to arrest corrosion in the bore. First tests over a range of bleeding flows indicate it as a fruitful subject for study in that temperature and pressure measurements at the wellhead can indicate the well enthalpy and the non-condensible gas content of the production system. Because of environmental restrictions on testing with large discharges in the future, bleeding may soon be the only valid alternative for proving a well’s potential. 1 tab., 4 figs., 6 refs.

  17. [Management of bleeding and coagulopathy following major trauma].

    PubMed

    Etxaniz, A; Pita, E

    2016-05-01

    Bleeding is the most common preventable cause of death in trauma patients. Acute traumatic coagulopathy is a specific condition with a different pathophysiology from other causes of the massive bleeding. An early identification of the coagulopathy is fundamental to implementing rapid treatment. There have been many changes in the management of massive hemorrhage, for example, the administration of the tranexamic acid and the use of balanced transfusion ratio. This review presents these practical points, some of them with scientific evidence, in order to achieve a beneficial effect for patient outcomes. PMID:26164470

  18. The use of hemospray in portal hypertensive bleeding; a case series.

    PubMed

    Smith, L A; Morris, A J; Stanley, A J

    2014-02-01

    Hemospray is a haemostatic agent licensed for endoscopic haemostasis of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) in Europe and Canada. Hemospray has been shown to be safe and effective in achieving haemostasis in bleeding peptic ulcers in a prospective clinical study and several further case series have described the use of hemospray in other non-variceal causes of gastrointestinal bleeding. Portal hypertensive gastropathy and colopathy are common in patients with portal hypertension. As hemospray is an easy to apply, non-contact method, which can cover large areas of mucosa, it may be of benefit in acute non-variceal portal hypertensive bleeding. We present data from the first four consecutive patients presenting to our institution with acute haemorrhage secondary to non-variceal diffuse portal hypertensive bleeding treated with hemospray.

  19. The Association of Gum Bleeding with Respiratory Health in a Population Based Study from Northern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Real, Francisco; Pérez Barrionuevo, Laura; Franklin, Karl; Lindberg, Eva; Bertelsen, Randi Jacobsen; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Forsberg, Bertil; Gislason, Thorarinn; Jögi, Rain; Johannessen, Ane; Omenaas, Ernst; Saure, Eirunn; Schlünssen, Vivi; Skorge, Trude Duelien; Torén, Kjell; Pérez Saavedra, Antonio; Svanes, Øistein; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug

    2016-01-01

    Background There is little knowledge about how oral and respiratory health is interrelated even though the mucosa of the oral cavity and airways constitutes a continuum and the exposures to these are partly similar. Aims To investigate whether gum bleeding is related to asthma, respiratory symptoms and self-reported COPD. Methods A postal questionnaire including questions about respiratory and oral health was sent to general population samples in seven Northern European centres. In 13,409 responders, gum bleeding when brushing teeth was reported always/often by 4% and sometimes by 20%. Logistic regressions accounted for age, smoking, educational level, centre and gender. Effects of BMI, cardio-metabolic diseases, early life factors, gastro-oesophageal reflux, dental hygiene, nasal congestion, and asthma medication were addressed. Results Gum bleeding always/often was significantly associated with ≥3 asthma symptoms (OR 2.58, 95% CI 2.10–3.18), asthma (1.62 [1.23–2.14]) and self-reported COPD (2.02 [1.28–3.18]). There was a dose-response relationship between respiratory outcomes and gum bleeding frequency (≥3 symptoms: gum bleeding sometimes 1.42 [1.25–1.60], often/always 2.58 [2.10–3.18]), and there was no heterogeneity between centres (pheterogeneity = 0.49). None of the investigated risk factors explained the associations. The observed associations were significantly stronger among current smokers (pinteraction = 0.004). Conclusions A consistent link between gum bleeding and obstructive airways disease was observed, not explained by common risk factors or metabolic factors. We speculate that oral pathogens might have unfavourable impact on the airways, and that the direct continuity of the mucosa of the oral cavity and the airways reflects a pathway that might provide novel opportunities for interventions. PMID:26808490

  20. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal bleeding normally occurs during a woman's menstrual cycle, when she gets her period. Every woman's period is different. Most women have cycles between 24 and 34 days apart. It usually lasts ...

  1. MedlinePlus: Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... looks like coffee grounds Black or tarry stool Dark blood mixed with stool Signs of bleeding in ... lower digestive tract include Black or tarry stool Dark blood mixed with stool Stool mixed or coated ...

  2. Bleeding varices: 1. Emergency management.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S S; Warren, W D; Galambos, J T; Millikan, W J

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the emergency management of bleeding varices is to stop the hemorrhage nonoperatively if possible, avoiding emergency shunt surgery, an operation that has a higher mortality than elective shunt surgery. Patients with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage should undergo endoscopy immediately to verify the diagnosis of bleeding varices. They can then be categorized according to whether they stop bleeding spontaneously (group 1), continue to bleed slowly (group 2) or continue to bleed rapidly (group 3). Group 1 patients are discussed in the second part of this two-part series. Group 2 patients are initially treated with vasopressin given intravenously; those who fail to respond should undergo emergency angiography and receive vasopressin intra-arterially. If this fails, patients at low surgical risk should undergo urgent shunt surgery; those at high risk do better with endoscopic sclerotherapy. Group 3 patients are also given an intravenous infusion of vasopressin. Patients at low surgical risk who continue to bleed then receive tamponade with a Sengstaken--Blakemore tube. If this fails, they undergo emergency creation of an H-shaped mesocaval shunt. Patients at high surgical risk who fail to respond to vasopressin given intravenously are next treated intra-arterially. If this fails they are given either endoscopic or transhepatic sclerotherapy. PMID:7006779

  3. Does body posture affect the incidence and mechanism of gastro-oesophageal reflux?

    PubMed

    Freidin, N; Mittal, R K; McCallum, R W

    1991-02-01

    We studied eight patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease to compare the frequency and mechanism of reflux in the upright and supine positions. Simultaneous oesophageal manometry and pH studies were performed on two separate days in each subject in the fasting and postprandial periods. The frequency of reflux tended to be higher in the upright position. The most prevalent mechanism of reflux in either position was transient relaxation of the lower oesophageal sphincter. The frequency of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation was higher in the upright than in the supine position. There was no difference in the total reflux time, acid clearance time, and number of reflux episodes lasting longer than five minutes in the two positions. We suggest that daytime reflux (upright) may be as important as night time (supine) reflux in the pathogenesis of reflux oesophagitis and needs to be considered when treating patients with reflux disease.

  4. [The bubble-blowing neonate: a red flag for oesophageal atresia].

    PubMed

    Zwaan, Esther; Meij-de Vries, Annebeth; van Deutekom, Arend W; van der Steeg, Alida F W; Sleeboom, Christien; Heij, Hugo A

    2013-01-01

    When a newborn develops feeding difficulties, is blowing bubbles or has excessive saliva, it is important to consider the diagnosis of oesophageal atresia. Prenatal detection of oesophageal atresia is difficult. Postnatal bubble blowing, resulting from the inability to swallow excessive oropharyngeal secretions, is pathognomonic. These symptoms should trigger the midwife or physician to consider this diagnosis. We present three cases to illustrate the difficulties of early recognition and the consequences of a late detection of this condition. The first and third cases show that a delayed diagnosis of oesophageal atresia can lead to dangerous situations. Our second case illustrates that not every poorly drinking neonate has oesophageal atresia, and that this diagnosis may be rejected if the physician is able to pass a nasogastric tube. In every neonate who is unable to drink, we advise attempting to pass a nasogastric tube and taking a chest x-ray to distinguish between oesophageal atresia and other causes of feeding problems.

  5. Dietary magnesium, calcium:magnesium ratio and risk of reflux oesophagitis, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qi; Cantwell, Marie M; Murray, Liam J; Zheng, Wei; Anderson, Lesley A; Coleman, Helen G

    2016-01-28

    Evidence suggests a role of Mg and the ratio of Ca:Mg intakes in the prevention of colonic carcinogenesis. The association between these nutrients and oesophageal adenocarcinoma - a tumour with increasing incidence in developed countries and poor survival rates - has yet to be explored. The aim of this investigation was to explore the association between Mg intake and related nutrients and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor conditions, Barrett's oesophagus and reflux oesophagitis. This analysis included cases of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (n 218), Barrett's oesophagus (n 212), reflux oesophagitis (n 208) and population-based controls (n 252) recruited between 2002 and 2005 throughout the island of Ireland. All the subjects completed a 101-item FFQ. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was applied to determine odds of disease according to dietary intakes of Mg, Ca and Ca:Mg ratio. After adjustment for potential confounders, individuals consuming the highest amounts of Mg from foods had significant reductions in the odds of reflux oesophagitis (OR 0·31; 95 % CI 0·11, 0·87) and Barrett's oesophagus (OR 0·29; 95 % CI 0·12, 0·71) compared with individuals consuming the lowest amounts of Mg. The protective effect of Mg was more apparent in the context of a low Ca:Mg intake ratio. No significant associations were observed for Mg intake and oesophageal adenocarcinoma risk (OR 0·77; 95 % CI 0·30, 1·99 comparing the highest and the lowest tertiles of consumption). In conclusion, dietary Mg intakes were inversely associated with reflux oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus risk in this Irish population.

  6. Rare and unusual bleeding manifestations in congenital bleeding disorders: an annotated review.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Antonio; Vettore, Silvia; Ruzzon, Elisabetta; Marinis, Giulia Berti de; Fabris, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Epistaxis, superficial and deep hematomas, hemarthrosis, gastrointestinal bleeding, hematuria represent the most frequent hemorrhagic events in congenital coagulation disorders. Occasionally, bleeding manifestations occur in unusual sites or are peculiar. A clotting defect may alter the clinical aspect of skin conditions or infections (hemorrhagic scabies or varicella). Hemobilia may occur as a complication of transjugular liver biopsy in hemophilia or Bernard-Soulier syndrome. Hemarthrosis of small joints of feet and hands occur in patients with hemophilia treated with protease inhibitors. Intramedullary hematomas of long bones have been described in α2-plasmin inhibitor or fibrinogen deficiencies. Spleen fracture with consequent hemoperitoneum has been reported in patients with fibrinogen deficiency. Rectus muscle sheath hematoma may occur in patients with factor VII (FVII)or FX deficiency. Acute or subacute intestinal obstruction may be caused by intramural wall hematomas in hemophilia and von Willebrand (vW)-disease. Physicians should always keep in mind that a congenital hemorrhagic disorder may cause bleeding in any tissue of the body and therefore alter the normal clinical features of a given disease.

  7. Ultrastructural features of eosinophilic oesophagitis: impact of treatment on desmosomes

    PubMed Central

    Capocelli, Kelley E; Fernando, Shahan D; Menard-Katcher, Calies; Furuta, Glenn T; Masterson, Joanne C; Wartchow, Eric P

    2015-01-01

    Aims A growing body of evidence suggests a role for altered epithelial barrier function in the pathophysiology of eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE), but few have described the epithelial structure during inflammation. The purpose of this study was to define ultrastructural features of active, inactive EoE and control subject’s oesophageal epithelia. Methods We prospectively enrolled patients undergoing diagnostic upper endoscopy for evaluation of EoE. Mucosal pinch biopsies were obtained from the distal oesophagus and processed for routine histology and electron microscopic assessment. Clinical features of enrolled subjects were analysed and subjects were divided into four groups: normal, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), inactive EoE and active EoE. Representative photomicrographs of the basal and superficial epithelia were reviewed for abnormalities. Desmosomes were quantified on the surface of epithelia three to four prickle-cell layers above the basal layer. Results Twenty-nine paediatric cases (ages 2–18 years) were enrolled in the study. We observed a significant decrease in the number of desmosomes per cell (DPC) of subjects with active EoE compared with inactive EoE, GERD and normal epithelia. With respect to DPC, no significant differences were found between inactive EoE compared with GERD or normal subjects. Additional ultrastructural features observed included epithelial microplicae and evidence of eosinophil transmigration, degranulation, and sombrero formation. Conclusions Consistent with clinical and molecular findings, our ultrastructural data provide support for an altered oesophageal barrier in paediatric cases with active EoE, which may improve following treatment. PMID:25359789

  8. Acquired Tracheo-oesophageal Fistula: A Challenging Complication of Tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Priyanka; Bhatia, Pradeep Kumar; Biyani, Ghansham; Paliwal, Bharat; Sharma, Vandana

    2015-10-01

    Acquired tracheo-oesophageal fistula (TEF) after tracheostomy is a life threatening complication and can occur in about 1% of cases of tracheostomy. Percutaneous tracheostomy was performed in intensive care unit on a 40 years male patient for long-term mechanical ventilation. Subsequently patient developed TEF as the complication of tracheostomy. He was initially managed with endoscopically inserted self expanding plastic stent but later on required surgery for definitive repair. The problems associated with acquired TEF and its management are discussed hereby. PMID:26522209

  9. Hemophilic bleeding evaluated by blood pool scanning.

    PubMed

    Green, D; Spies, S M; Rana, N A; Milgram, J W; Mintzer, R

    1981-06-30

    The technique of blood pool scanning was used to examine 15 hemophilic subjects. Employing an in vivo method for erythrocyte labeling with Technetium-99 m, a dynamic perfusion sequence is obtained using a scintillation camera positioned over the area to be examined. This demonstrates the vascularity of the tissue. Subsequently, equilibrium blood pool images of the area are obtained and analyzed with a densitometer to assess relative regional blood volume. In patients who were not bleeding but had chronic arthropathy, vascularity was not increased, and the blood volume of comparable joints was similar. By contrast, marked increases in vascularity and image density were observed in studies of acutely bleeding joints. Chronic hemarthroses were associated with persistent, but less marked increases in joint perfusion. Transient increases in joint vascularity were demonstrated after insertion of knee prostheses. In a patient with a thigh hematoma, the dimensions of the hemorrhage were clearly delineated. Since only a tracer dose of nuclide is infused intravenously, there are no allergic reactions or other side effects of the procedure. Blood pool scanning is a safe, non-invasive technique that augments clinical and radiographic evaluations, and provides a new dimension in the assessment of the hemophilic patient. PMID:6269248

  10. Management of bleeding following major trauma: an updated European guideline

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Evidence-based recommendations are needed to guide the acute management of the bleeding trauma patient, which when implemented may improve patient outcomes. Methods The multidisciplinary Task Force for Advanced Bleeding Care in Trauma was formed in 2005 with the aim of developing a guideline for the management of bleeding following severe injury. This document presents an updated version of the guideline published by the group in 2007. Recommendations were formulated using a nominal group process, the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) hierarchy of evidence and based on a systematic review of published literature. Results Key changes encompassed in this version of the guideline include new recommendations on coagulation support and monitoring and the appropriate use of local haemostatic measures, tourniquets, calcium and desmopressin in the bleeding trauma patient. The remaining recommendations have been reevaluated and graded based on literature published since the last edition of the guideline. Consideration was also given to changes in clinical practice that have taken place during this time period as a result of both new evidence and changes in the general availability of relevant agents and technologies. Conclusions This guideline provides an evidence-based multidisciplinary approach to the management of critically injured bleeding trauma patients. PMID:20370902

  11. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding.

  12. Endoscopic therapy of oesophageal strictures in children – a multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Woynarowski, Marek; Landowski, Piotr; Wilk, Robert; Daukszewicz, Adam; Toporowska-Kowalska, Ewa; Albrecht, Piotr; Ignys, Iwona; Czkwianianc, Elżbieta; Jarocka-Cyrta, Elżbieta; Korczowski, Bartosz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oesophageal strictures are rare in children but may require endoscopic dilation. Aim To gather information on centres performing endoscopic oesophageal dilation in Poland. Material and methods The data were obtained from questionnaires concerning the relevant data mailed to 22 paediatric endoscopy centres. Completed questionnaires were received from 11 centres. Results In 2010 the 11 Polish paediatric endoscopy centres performed a total of 10,650 endoscopic procedures. This included 347 oesophageal dilations in 106 paediatric patients aged from 1 month to 18 years. The numbers of patients treated at individual centres ranged from 2 to 40. The indications for oesophageal dilation were as follows: postoperative strictures in 68 children, oesophageal burns in 17 children, postinflammatory strictures in 14 children, achalasia in 4 children, and strictures caused by a foreign body in 3 children. Rigid guidewire dilators were used in the majority of procedures (271), rigid dilators without a guidewire in 32 procedures, and balloon dilators in 45 procedures. A total of 203 procedures were conducted under fluoroscopic guidance, and 144 without the use of fluoroscopy. The number of dilating sessions performed in individual children varied from 1 to 6 and more. Conclusions Oesophageal dilation constituted a minor proportion of all paediatric endoscopic procedures. The majority of children requiring dilation were patients up to 3 years of age with postoperative oesophageal strictures. In the majority of the centres rigid guidewire dilators were used, and in one third of the procedures these dilators were introduced without fluoroscopic guidance.

  13. Endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; McCarty, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    Diverticular hemorrhage is the most common reason for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) with substantial cost of hospitalization and a median length of hospital stay of 3 days. Bleeding usually is self-limited in 70-80% of cases but early rebleeding is not an uncommon problem that can be reduced with proper endoscopic therapies. Colonoscopy is recommended as first-line diagnostic and therapeutic approach. In the vast majority of patients diverticular hemorrhage can be readily managed by interventional endotherapy including injection, heat cautery, clip placement, and ligation to achieve endoscopic hemostasis. This review will serve to highlight the various interventions available to endoscopists with specific emphasis on superior modalities in the endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

  14. Endoscopic Management of Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; McCarty, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Diverticular hemorrhage is the most common reason for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) with substantial cost of hospitalization and a median length of hospital stay of 3 days. Bleeding usually is self-limited in 70–80% of cases but early rebleeding is not an uncommon problem that can be reduced with proper endoscopic therapies. Colonoscopy is recommended as first-line diagnostic and therapeutic approach. In the vast majority of patients diverticular hemorrhage can be readily managed by interventional endotherapy including injection, heat cautery, clip placement, and ligation to achieve endoscopic hemostasis. This review will serve to highlight the various interventions available to endoscopists with specific emphasis on superior modalities in the endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding. PMID:25548554

  15. [Direct oral anticoagulant associated bleeding].

    PubMed

    Godier, A; Martin, A-C; Rosencher, N; Susen, S

    2016-07-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are recommended for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, they are associated with hemorrhagic complications. Management of DOAC-induced bleeding remains challenging. Activated or non-activated prothrombin concentrates are proposed, although their efficacy to reverse DOAC is uncertain. Therapeutic options also include antidotes: idarucizumab, antidote for dabigatran, has been approved for use whereas andexanet alpha, antidote for anti-Xa agents, and aripazine, antidote for all DOAC, are under development. Other options include hemodialysis for the treatment of dabigatran-associated bleeding and administration of oral charcoal if recent DOAC ingestion. DOAC plasma concentration measurement is necessary to guide DOAC reversal. We propose an update on DOAC-associated bleeding, integrating the availability of dabigatran antidote and the critical place of DOAC concentration measurements. PMID:27297642

  16. [Direct oral anticoagulant associated bleeding].

    PubMed

    Godier, A; Martin, A-C; Rosencher, N; Susen, S

    2016-07-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are recommended for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, they are associated with hemorrhagic complications. Management of DOAC-induced bleeding remains challenging. Activated or non-activated prothrombin concentrates are proposed, although their efficacy to reverse DOAC is uncertain. Therapeutic options also include antidotes: idarucizumab, antidote for dabigatran, has been approved for use whereas andexanet alpha, antidote for anti-Xa agents, and aripazine, antidote for all DOAC, are under development. Other options include hemodialysis for the treatment of dabigatran-associated bleeding and administration of oral charcoal if recent DOAC ingestion. DOAC plasma concentration measurement is necessary to guide DOAC reversal. We propose an update on DOAC-associated bleeding, integrating the availability of dabigatran antidote and the critical place of DOAC concentration measurements.

  17. Oesophageal and gastric cancer in Scotland 1960-90.

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, A.; Sharp, L.; Macfarlane, G. J.; Muir, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    In Scotland over the last 31 years the incidence of gastric cancer has significantly declined by 0.6% per annum in males and 1.1% in females. In contrast, for oesophageal cancer, incidence rates have risen significantly by 3.0% and 2.0% per annum in males and females respectively. Increasing incidence of both adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas of the oesophagus in men and squamous and recently adenocarcinomas in women has been observed. This cannot be entirely accounted for by a growth in the proportion of histologically verified (HV) tumours over time. The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the stomach increased over the study period, most likely because of increasing proportions of HV tumours and improved diagnostic precision. Areas with high levels of deprivation in Scotland are strongly associated with high rates of oesophageal cancer in men, and of gastric cancer in both men and women. All these observations are discussed in the context of current knowledge of risk factors for these diseases. PMID:7841063

  18. A patient with isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency presenting with repetitive oesophageal ulcer and stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Tamiya, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Akihisa; Mano, Shinya; Kamoshida, Toshiro; Hirai, Shinji; Chikatsu, Noriko; Oka, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency (IAD) is a potentially fatal condition that is difficult to diagnose. The authors diagnosed IAD in a patient who presented with recurrent oesophageal ulceration resulting in oesophageal stenosis. The recurrent oesophageal ulcers were due to frequent nausea and vomiting that were the presenting digestive symptoms of adrenal insufficiency. Severe hypoglycaemia during this patient's course suggested the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency. This case is educational because digestive symptoms are the most common symptoms in patients with adrenal insufficiency, but the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency in such patients is not easy. PMID:22802481

  19. Scintigraphic diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99/. mu. Tc-labeled blood-pool agents

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiak, J.; Nielsen, S.; Munck, O.

    1981-11-01

    Abdominal scintigraphy with /sup 99/..mu..Tc-labeled albumin or red blood cells was used in 68 patients to localize gastrointestinal bleeding or confirm that it had stopped. Acute, active bleeding was identified in 33 patients; characteristic patterns of bleeding from the stomach, biliary passages, small intestine, and colon are shown. Sensitivity was 0.86 (95% confidence limits, 0.57-0.98) and specificity was 1.0 (95% confidence limits, 0.82-1.0) in 33 patients who had scintigraphy and endoscopy performed in succession. Abdominal scintigraphy appears to be a valuable supplement to conventional diagnostic methods. In upper gastrointestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be considered when endoscopy fails. In lower intestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be the method of choice.

  20. Thrombosis in rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, Arlette

    2012-04-01

    Inherited deficiencies of blood coagulation factors are usually associated with lifelong bleeding tendency. In addition to Haemophilias A and B and von Willebrand disease, congenital deficiencies of such factors as fibrinogen, prothrombin (FII)), FV, FVII, FX, FXI, FXIII, and combined deficiencies occur and can lead to a diversity of clinical conditions. Paradoxically, for some of these disorders associated with significant bleeding tendency there are reports of thrombotic events, both arterial and venous. Thrombosis in hemophilia patients has a multifactorial pathogenesis and the main conditions associated with this complication are the use of long-term central venous catheters, intensive replacement therapy usually in the setting of surgical procedures, the use of bypassing agents or the coexistence of acquired or inherited prothrombotic risk factors. Regarding other rare bleeding disorders, thrombotic phenomena has been described particularly in patients with afibrinogenemia, FXI and FVII deficiency and the events can occur even in young patients, in the presence of concomitant risk factors or spontaneously. Replacement therapy must be individualized and should take into account past history of haemostatic challenges, family history of bleeding and thrombosis, just like the level of factor. For mild deficiencies when patients are asymptomatic the use of antithrombotic prophylaxis must be considered with or without concomitant use of replacement therapy. In patients with history of thrombosis it may be helpful to perform a thrombophilia screening to exclude coexisting prothrombotic defects and for all patients it is recommended to control known cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  1. Variceal bleeding caused by oesophageal varices: A manifestation of hepatocellular carcinoma in a 17-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Saadia Sasha; Sanmuganathan, Samuel N

    2015-01-01

    The authors present the rare case of a 17-year-old girl referred to the medical assessment unit following a large upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. On further evaluation, she was found to have a primary hepatocellular carcinoma with extensive metastases. In our patient, the tumour was deemed incurable by resection, liver transplantation or percutaneous treatment. She underwent palliative chemotherapy and passed away 11 months following presentation. PMID:27489703

  2. Traumatic bleeding of spinal angiolipoma presenting with subacute paraparesis--a case report and histopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Vijay; Carey, Martyn; Shad, Amjad

    2010-12-01

    Spinal angiolipoma is a rare benign tumour. It usually presents as a slowly progressive compressive lesion. Bleeding in this tumour is extremely rare and is spontaneous and acute. This is the first reported case of post-traumatic bleeding from a spinal angiolipoma, who developed subacute progressive paraparesis. The pathological definition of this rare entity is not well established. Histologically it is distinct from cutaneous angiolipoma.

  3. A Very Rare Cause of a Relapsing Para-Oesophageal Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Wespi, Simon Peter; Frei, Remus; Sulz, Michael Christian

    2016-01-01

    Oesophageal involvement in Crohn's disease (CD) is uncommon and most often accompanied by involvement of more distal parts. Its presentation is mostly non-specific, and therefore a diagnosis, especially in isolated oesophageal disease, is difficult. We present the case of a 42-year-old male patient who was referred to our gastroenterology department because of a para-oesophageal abscess. Under antibiotic treatment the abscess healed, but despite great diagnostic efforts, its aetiology remained unclear. Three years later the patient was hospitalized again because of an abscess at the same site. Endoscopy showed disseminated ulcerations of the lower oesophagus, raising suspicion of CD. After excluding other possible causes, we made the diagnosis of isolated CD of the oesophagus. We review the available literature on this topic and discuss the clinical presentation, symptoms, endoscopic findings, and histology as well as treatment of oesophageal CD. PMID:27403115

  4. Influence of age and disease state in nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug associated gastric bleeding.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, J G; Pritchard, M H

    1988-04-01

    In our study of 552 acute admissions for gastrointestinal hemorrhage, 18% were found to be taking nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) at the time of the bleed; 49% of these were found at endoscopy to have a gastric or prepyloric lesion, compared with 20% of the non-NSAID control group. Prescription data was used to calculate the risk added by age and disease state to the NSAID associated bleeding. We found that patients with chronic inflammatory disease had 2-3 times the expected bleeding incidence, but while there was a definite trend towards an age related risk in older patients, this was not statistically significant.

  5. Ramucirumab for advanced gastric cancer or gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Young, Kate; Smyth, Elizabeth; Chau, Ian

    2015-11-01

    Ramucirumab, a fully humanized monoclonal antibody directed against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, is the first targeted agent to have demonstrated an improvement in survival, as a single agent or in combination, in a molecularly unselected population in gastro-oesophageal cancer. Now that second-line treatment is routinely considered for patients with advanced gastro-oesophageal cancer, ramucirumab, with its favourable toxicity profile compared with cytotoxic treatment, provides a valuable additional treatment option.

  6. [Bleeding peptic ulcers--how can recurrent bleeding be prevented?].

    PubMed

    Labenz, J; Tillenburg, B; Peitz, U; Stolte, M; Börsch, G

    1995-01-01

    Bleeding is the most frequent complication of peptic ulcer disease. Patients with a previous ulcer hemorrhage have a high risk for future bleeding episodes. Therefore, treatment aiming at ulcer prophylaxis is mandatory. Helicobacter pylori infection, acid/pepsin and intake of Aspirin or NSAIDs are the main causal factors involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease. Ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can be cured by gastric acid suppression (e.g. omeprazole) and prevented by withdrawal of the ulcerogenic substances or co-medication with omeprazole or misoprostol. Acid and Helicobacter pylori are necessary, albeit by themselves not sufficient factors in the causal web of the formerly idiopathic, gastritis-associated peptic ulcer disease of the stomach and the duodenum. Maintenance therapy with antisecretory drugs results in a marked decrease of ulcer recurrences and probably further ulcer complications after an index bleeding, but a definite cure of the ulcer disease is not feasible in the majority of patients. The proportion of patients remaining in remission is dependent on the degree of gastric acid suppression. Therefore, potent antisecretory drugs such as the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole should be used if a physician decides to initiate a long-term maintenance therapy. Several studies have demonstrated beyond doubt that cure of Helicobacter pylori eradication resulted in a stable remission of gastric and duodenal ulcer disease. In addition, a true reinfection after apparent eradication of the bacteria has been rarely observed in adults.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Non-linear associations between laryngo-pharyngeal symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: clues from artificial intelligence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, E

    2006-01-01

    Summary The relationship between the different symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease remain markedly obscure due to the high underlying non-linearity and the lack of studies focusing on the problem. Aim of this study was to evaluate the hidden relationships between the triad of symptoms related to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease using advanced mathematical techniques, borrowed from the artificial intelligence field, in a cohort of patients with oesophagitis. A total of 388 patients (from 60 centres) with endoscopic evidence of oesophagitis were recruited. The severity of oesophagitis was scored by means of the Savary-Miller classification. PST algorithm was employed. This study shows that laryngo-pharyngeal symptoms related to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are correlated even if in a non-linear way. PMID:17345935

  8. Mediastinitis by Actinomyces meyeri after oesophageal stent placement.

    PubMed

    Branquinho, Diogo Ferreira; Andrade, Daniel Ramos; Almeida, Nuno; Sofia, Carlos

    2014-06-05

    Actinomyces meyeri is a Gram-positive anaerobic forming bacterium of the genus Actinomyces, part of the oral cavity's flora, and its classification remains an unresolved issue. It is an extremely rare cause of disease, occurring in middle-aged immunocompetent patients and frequently misdiagnosed as malignancy or lung abscess. A 56-year-old man diagnosed with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma had an endoscopically placed stent to palliate his dysphagia. Two weeks later he presented with thoracalgia and fever, interpreted as a common lung infection. Owing to lack of improvement, additional examinations were undertaken revealing mediastinum involvement. Unlike the good prognosis usually associated with this infection, the patient eventually died, reflecting the aggressive nature of his underlying condition. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mediastinitis by A. meyeri, supporting the described propensity of this agent to disseminate, particularly to the thoracic cavity, although probably in this case with an iatrogenic contribution.

  9. Bleeding events with dabigatran or warfarin in patients with venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Ammar; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Kakkar, Ajay; Kearon, Clive; Eriksson, Henry; Kreuzer, Jörg; Feuring, Martin; Hantel, Stephan; Friedman, Jeffrey; Schellong, Sebastian; Schulman, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Dabigatran was as effective as warfarin for the acute treatment of venous thromboembolism in the RE-COVER and RE-COVER II trials. We compared the incidence of bleeding with dabigatran versus warfarin in pooled data from these studies. The localisation, bleeding severity, and the impact of key factors on the incidence of bleeding, were compared between the dabigatran and warfarin treatment group. Altogether, 2553 patients received dabigatran and 2554 warfarin, each for a mean of 164 days. The incidence of any bleeding event was significantly lower with dabigatran (hazard ratio [HR] 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61-0.79), as was the incidence of the composite of MBEs and clinically relevant non-major bleeding events (HR 0.62; 95% CI, 0.50-0.76). The incidence of major bleeding events (MBEs) was also significantly lower with dabigatran in the double-dummy phase (HR, 0.60; 95%CI, 0.36-0.99) but not statistically different between the two treatment arms when the entire treatment period is considered (HR 0.73 95% CI, 0.48-1.11). Increasing age, reduced renal function, Asian ethnicity, and concomitant antiplatelet therapy were associated with higher bleeding rates in both treatment groups. The reduction in bleeding with dabigatran compared to warfarin was consistent among the subgroups and with a similar pattern for intracranial, and urogenital major bleeding. In conclusion, treatment of venous thromboembolism with dabigatran is associated with a lower risk of bleeding compared to warfarin. This reduction did not differ with respect to the location of bleeding or among predefined subgroups.

  10. Comparative in vitro study of oesophageal adhesiveness of different commercial formulations containing alendronate.

    PubMed

    Shakweh, Monjed; Bravo-Osuna, Irene; Ponchel, Gilles

    2007-08-01

    Cases of oesophageal irritation have been reported in patients ingesting alendronate with little liquid or reclining shortly after taking the medication. Pill-induced oesophagitis principally occurs because of adherence of ingested tablets to the epithelial surface. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the oesophageal bioadhesive characteristics of alendronate generics marketed in Europe, the proprietary Fosamax((R)), one negative and two positive polymer controls. A texture analyser was used for qualitative analysis and to determine the maximal detachment force and the adhesion work developed by each formulation on porcine oesophageal mucosa. Fosamax showed few or no bioadhesive characteristics, but the detachment of few tablets powder particles in some of the experiments does not preclude the potential risk of oesophageal lesions. The 10-mg generic Teva tablets had bioadhesive characteristics similar to a positive control. Other generic formulations (Alenat, Stada, Aliud, Ratiopharm showed "cleavage" rupture, leaving a large piece of the tablet mass attached to the mucosa. The bioadhesive characteristics seem to be related to the inactive ingredients: the presence of adhesive polymers such as HPC or very active disintegration agents, such as sodium croscarmellose. The demonstrated differences in adhesiveness suggest that differences in oesophageal tolerance between Fosamax tablets and generics of sodium alendronate may exist. PMID:17576054

  11. Transcriptional profiling of the oesophageal gland region of male worms of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Nawaratna, Sujeevi S K; Gobert, Geoffrey N; Willis, Charlene; Chuah, Candy; McManus, Donald P; Jones, Malcolm K

    2014-09-01

    The intestinal tract of schistosomes opens at the mouth and leads into the foregut or oesophageal region that is lined with syncytium continuous with the apical cytoplasm of the tegument. The oesophagus is surrounded by a specialised gland, the oesophageal gland. This gland releases materials into the lumen of the oesophagus and the region is thought to initiate the lysis of erythrocytes and neutralisation of immune effectors of the host. The oesophageal region is present in the early invasive schistosomulum, a stage potentially targetable by anti-schistosome vaccines. We used a 44k oligonucleotide microarray to identify highly up-regulated genes in microdissected frozen sections of the oesophageal gland of male worms of S. mansoni. We show that 122 genes were up-regulated 2-fold or higher in the oesophageal gland compared with a whole male worm tissue control. The enriched genes included several associated with lipid metabolism and transmembrane transport as well as some micro-exon genes. Since the oesophageal gland is important in the initiation of digestion and the fact that it develops early after invasion of the mammalian host, further study of selected highly up-regulated functionally important genes in this tissue may reveal new anti-schistosome intervention targets for schistosomiasis control. PMID:25149559

  12. Review article: quality-of-life issues in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Quigley, E M M; Hungin, A P S

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore issues relating to quality of life in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, examining the range of generic and disease-specific instruments available, their applicability and limitations and to overview the effect of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease on quality of life. Whereas instruments have been developed to assist researchers, there is a paucity of reliable instruments for pragmatic use in the clinical setting. The situation is complicated because there is not necessarily a direct correlation between endoscopic findings and symptom severity and non-erosive reflux disease is now recognized as an important manifestation of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. However, quality-of-life instruments are useful in evaluating the impact of therapies and interventions, although these are limited, particularly in surgical interventions. Impaired quality of life now forms part of a definition of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, the impact of which goes beyond the symptoms alone. While the symptoms themselves have a negative effect on sufferers' lives, there are secondary effects caused by impaired physical, emotional and social functioning on productivity. Non-gastrointestinal problems caused by gastro-oesophageal reflux disease also impair quality of life. There is an ongoing need to develop instruments which truly measure the impact of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and which are readily interpretable to the individual patient and clinician.

  13. Predictors of re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mu-Hsien; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Lee, Ching-Song; Liu, Nai-Jen; Sung, Kai-Feng; Cheng, Hao-Tsai

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To predict the re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) bleeding. METHODS: Over a 15-year period, data from 161 patients with delayed post-ES bleeding were retrospectively collected from a single medical center. To identify risk factors for re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis, parameters before, during and after the procedure of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were analyzed. These included age, gender, blood biochemistry, co-morbidities, endoscopic diagnosis, presence of peri-ampullary diverticulum, occurrence of immediate post-ES bleeding, use of needle knife precut sphincterotomy, severity of delayed bleeding, endoscopic features on delayed bleeding, and type of endoscopic therapy. RESULTS: A total of 35 patients (21.7%) had re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Univariate analysis revealed that malignant biliary stricture, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL, initial bleeding severity, and bleeding diathesis were significant predictors of re-bleeding. By multivariate analysis, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL and initial bleeding severity remained significant predictors. Re-bleeding was controlled by endoscopic therapy in a single (n = 23) or multiple (range, 2-7; n = 6) sessions in 29 of the 35 patients (82.9%). Four patients required transarterial embolization and one went for surgery. These five patients had severe bleeding when delayed post-ES bleeding occurred. One patient with decompensated liver cirrhosis died from re-bleeding. CONCLUSION: Re-bleeding occurs in approximately one-fifth of patients after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Severity of initial bleeding and serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL are predictors of re-bleeding. PMID:27003996

  14. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    primarily aims at better management of hemostasis in case of emergency surgery or other interventions and acute bleeding events. PMID:26886396

  15. Clinical and pH-metric characteristics of gastro-oesophageal reflux secondary to cows' milk protein allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Cavataio, F; Iacono, G; Montalto, G; Soresi, M; Tumminello, M; Carroccio, A

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: The primary aim was to assess whether there were differences in symptoms, laboratory data, and oesophageal pH-metry between infants with primary gastro-oesophageal reflux and those with reflux secondary to cows' milk protein allergy (CMPA). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 96 infants (mean(SD) age 7.8(2.0) months) with either primary gastro-oesophageal reflux, reflux with CMPA, CMPA only, or none of these (controls) were studied. Symptoms, immunochemical data, and oesophageal pH were compared between the four groups and the effect of a cows' milk protein-free diet on the severity of symptoms was also assessed. RESULTS: 14 out of 47(30%) infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux had CMPA. These infants had similar symptoms to those with primary gastro-oesophageal reflux but higher concentrations of total IgE and circulating eosinophils (p < 0.005) and IgG anti-beta lactoglobulin (p < 0.003). A progressive constant reduction in oesophageal pH at the end of a feed, which continued up to the next feed, was seen in 12 out of 14 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux secondary to CMPA and in 24 of 25 infants with CMPA only. No infants with primary gastro-oesophageal reflux and none of the controls had this pattern. A cows' milk protein-free diet was associated with a significant improvement in symptoms only in infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux with CMPA. CONCLUSION: A characteristic oesophageal pH pattern is useful in distinguishing infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux associated with CMPA. PMID:8813871

  16. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F.; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 66 Final Diagnosis: Calciphylaxis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Hemodialysis • blood transfusions Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. Case Report: A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding. PMID:26572938

  17. Research on Supersonic Inlet Bleed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Vyas, Manan A.; Slater, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Phase I data results of the Fundamental Inlet Bleed Experiments project at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are presented which include flow coefficient results for two single-hole boundary-layer bleed configurations. The bleed configurations tested are round holes at inclination angles of 90deg and 20deg both having length-to-diameter ratios of 2.0. Results were obtained at freestream Mach numbers of 1.33, 1.62, 1.98, 2.46, and 2.92 and unit Reynolds numbers of 0.984, 1.89, and 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Approach boundary-layer data are presented for each flow condition and the flow coefficient results are compared to existing multi-hole data obtained under similar conditions. For the 90deg hole, the single and multi-hole distributions agree fairly well with the exception that under supercritical operation, the multi-hole data chokes at higher flow coefficient levels. This behavior is also observed for the 20deg hole but to a lesser extent. The 20deg hole also shows a markedly different characteristic at subcritical operation. Also presented are preliminary results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of both configurations at the Mach 1.33 and a unit Reynolds number of 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Comparison of the results shows the agreement to be very good.

  18. Standards for oesophageal manometry. A position statement from the Gruppo Italiano di Studio Motilità Apparato Digerente (GISMAD).

    PubMed

    Passaretti, S; Zaninotto, G; Di Martino, N; Leo, P; Costantini, M; Baldi, F

    2000-01-01

    Manometry is an important tool in the diagnosis of oesophageal motility, disorders, but proper instruments and methods are needed to obtain useful clinical information. The authors reviewed the minimal technical requirements, operative aspects, which information the final report should contain as well as indications and contraindications of the text itself. Technical requirements: At least a three-channel, multiple-lumen catheter perfused with a pneumo-hydraulic capillary infusion system which ensures deltaP/deltaT>150-200 mmHg/sec.; data should be recorded at a sampling rate of > or =8 Hz to study the oesophageal body and lower oesophageal sphincter; lower oesophageal sphincter tonic (pressure) and phasic activity (relaxations) and oesophageal body amplitude and peristaltic activity should be recorded. The final report must contain the patient's details, the indication for the test and a manometric diagnosis. Indications for manometry: Dysphagia (after ruling out any organic pathology); non- cardiac chest pain (after ruling out any cardiopulmonary involvement); systemic collagenosis (to investigate oesophageal involvement); gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (if surgery is planned). Contraindications are limited to: pharyngeal or upper oesophageal obstructions, oesophageal bullous disorder, cardiac conditions in which vagal stimulation may not be tolerated, severe coagulopathy and patient non-compliance.

  19. Bleeding esophageal varices: treatment with vasopressin, transhepatic embolization and selective splenorenal shunting.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, W C; Nabseth, D C; Widrich, W C; Bush, H L; O'Hara, E T; Robbins, A H

    1982-01-01

    The fate of 359 consecutive alcoholic cirrhotic male patients with bleeding esophageal varices was determined through chart review and personal interview. Three historical periods (1966-70; 1971-75; 1976-80) were defined based on availability of different therapeutic modalities. Management of acutely bleeding varices by conservative, nonsurgical means, including embolization, was preferable to emergency surgery when considering 30-day mortality rates. Percutaneous transhepatic embolization of esophagogastric varices significantly improved the rate of control of hemorrhage and 30-day survival over previously employed nonsurgical methods. The combination of nonsurgical management of acute variceal hemorrhage followed by selective distal splenorenal shunting resulted in maximum salvage of the alcoholic cirrhotic patient. PMID:6978109

  20. Resuscitation of Polytrauma Patients: The Management of Massive Skeletal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Guerado, Enrique; Bertrand, Maria Luisa; Valdes, Luis; Cruz, Encarnacion; Cano, Juan Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The term ‘severely injured patient’ is often synonymous of polytrauma patient, multiply-injured patient or, in some settings, polyfractured patient. Together with brain trauma, copious bleeding is the most severe complication of polytrauma. Consequently hypotension develop. Then, the perfusion of organs may be compromised, with the risk of organ failure. Treatment of chest bleeding after trauma is essential and is mainly addressed via surgical manoeuvres. As in the case of lesions to the pelvis, abdomen or extremities, this approach demonstrates the application of damage control (DC). The introduction of sonography has dramatically changed the diagnosis and prognosis of abdominal bleeding. In stable patients, a contrast CT-scan should be performed before any x-ray projection, because, in an emergency situation, spinal or pelvic fractures be missed by conventional radiological studies. Fractures or dislocation of the pelvis causing enlargement of the pelvic cavity, provoked by an anteroposterior trauma, and in particular cases presenting vertical instability, are the most severe types and require fast stabilisation by closing the pelvic ring diameter to normal dimensions and by stabilising the vertical shear. Controversy still exists about whether angiography or packing should be used as the first choice to address active bleeding after pelvic ring closure. Pelvic angiography plays a significant complementary role to pelvic packing for final haemorrhage control. Apart from pelvic trauma, fracture of the femur is the only fracture provoking acute life-threatening bleeding. If possible, femur fractures should be immobilised immediately, either by external fixation or by a sheet wrap around both extremities. PMID:26312112

  1. Massive Bleeding and Massive Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Meißner, Andreas; Schlenke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Massive bleeding in trauma patients is a serious challenge for all clinicians, and an interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach is warranted within a limited time frame. Massive transfusion usually is defined as the transfusion of more than 10 units of packed red blood cells (RBCs) within 24 h or a corresponding blood loss of more than 1- to 1.5-fold of the body's entire blood volume. Especially male trauma patients experience this life-threatening condition within their productive years of life. An important parameter for clinical outcome is to succeed in stopping the bleeding preferentially within the first 12 h of hospital admission. Additional coagulopathy in the initial phase is induced by trauma itself and aggravated by consumption and dilution of clotting factors. Although different aspects have to be taken into consideration when viewing at bleedings induced by trauma compared to those caused by major surgery, the basic strategy is similar. Here, we will focus on trauma-induced massive hemorrhage. Currently there are no definite, worldwide accepted algorithms for blood transfusion and strategies for optimal coagulation management. There is increasing evidence that a higher ratio of plasma and RBCs (e.g. 1:1) endorsed by platelet transfusion might result in a superior survival of patients at risk for trauma-induced coagulopathy. Several strategies have been evolved in the military environment, although not all strategies should be transferred unproven to civilian practice, e.g. the transfusion of whole blood. Several agents have been proposed to support the restoration of coagulation. Some have been used for years without any doubt on their benefit-to-risk profile, whereas great enthusiasm of other products has been discouraged by inefficacy in terms of blood transfusion requirements and mortality or significant severe side effects. This review surveys current literature on fluid resuscitation, blood transfusion, and hemostatic agents currently

  2. Prevention of acrylonitrile-induced gastrointestinal bleeding by sulfhydryl compounds, atropine and cimetidine

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanayem, B.I.; Ahmed, A.E.

    1986-07-01

    We have recently demonstrated that acrylonitrile (VCN) causes acute gastric hemorrhage and mucosal erosions. The current studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of the sulfhydryl-containing compounds, cysteine and cysteamine, the cholinergic blocking agent atropine and the histamine H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine on the VCN-induced gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in rats. Our data shows that pretreatment with L-cysteine, cysteamine, atropine or cimetidine has significantly protected rats against the VCN-induced GI bleeding. A possible mechanism of the VCN-induced GI bleeding may involve the interaction of VCN with critical sulfhydryl groups that, in turn, causes alteration of acetylcholine muscarinic receptors to lead to gastric hemorrhagic lesions and bleeding.

  3. Bleeding Risk, Management and Outcome in Patients Receiving Non-VKA Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs).

    PubMed

    Werth, Sebastian; Breslin, Tomás; NiAinle, Fionnuala; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Modern direct-acting anticoagulants are rapidly replacing vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in the management of millions of patients worldwide who require anticoagulation. These drugs include agents that inhibit activated factor X (FXa) (such as apixaban and rivaroxaban) or thrombin (such as dabigatran), and are collectively known today as non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Since bleeding is the most common and most dangerous side effect of long-term anticoagulation, and because NOACs have very different mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics compared with VKA, physicians are naturally concerned about the lack of experience regarding frequency, management and outcome of NOAC-associated bleeding in daily care. This review appraises trial and registry (or "real-world") data pertaining to bleeding complications in patients taking NOACs and VKA and provides practical recommendations for the management of acute bleeding situations. PMID:25940651

  4. Solitary tubercular caecal ulcer causing massive lower gastrointestinal bleed: a formidable diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Ram, Duvuru; Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Ali, Sheik Manwar

    2014-03-06

    Gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhage is a common surgical emergency accounting for approximately 1% of acute hospital admissions. Lower GI bleed is less common and less severe than upper GI bleed and is usually caused by diverticulosis, neoplasms, angiodysplasia and inflammatory bowel disease. A 51-year-old man presented with massive lower GI bleed. He had no history of tuberculosis. He underwent colonoscopy and an isolated caecal ulcer was noted. Segmental ileocaecal resection was performed and no specific cause was identifiable on histopathology. PCR was performed on this specimen and it was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This case reports the unusual presentation of tuberculosis as solitary caecal ulcer with massive lower GI bleed and highlights the role of PCR as an adjuvant diagnostic tool for its diagnosis when characteristic histopathological findings are absent.

  5. Nasogastric tube as protection for recurrent oesophageal stricture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Woynarowski, Marek; Dądalski, Maciej; Wojno, Violetta; Teisseyre, Mikołaj; Szymczak, Marek; Chyżyńska, Anna; Hurkała, Leszek; Płowiecki, Emil; Kmiotek, Jakub

    2014-04-28

    This report presents the case of an 8.5-year-old boy with Down syndrome after experiencing extensive caustic injury to the oesophagus and stomach resulting from the accidental ingestion of concentrated sulphuric acid. The patient had undergone 32 unsuccessful endoscopic oesophageal stricture dilatations and stenting procedures performed over a period of 15 mo following the accident. Surgical reconstruction of the oesophagus was not possible due to previous gastric and cardiac surgeries for congenital conditions. Before referring the patient for salivary fistula surgery, the patient received a nasogastric tube with perforations located above the upper margin of the oesophageal stenosis for the passage of saliva and fluid. The tube was well tolerated and improved swallowing; however the backflow of gastric contents caused recurrent infections of the respiratory tract. To overcome these problems, we developed a double lumen, varying diameter, perforated tube for protection of the oesophageal closure. This nasogastric tube was found to be safe and decreased the need for hospitalization and further endoscopic procedures. This newly developed tube can thus be considered as a treatment option for patients with recurrent oesophageal stenosis and contraindications for surgical oesophageal reconstruction.

  6. Endoscopic dilation of complete oesophageal obstructions with a combined antegrade-retrograde rendezvous technique

    PubMed Central

    Bertolini, Reto; Meyenberger, Christa; Putora, Paul Martin; Albrecht, Franziska; Broglie, Martina Anja; Stoeckli, Sandro J; Sulz, Michael Christian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopic rendezvous technique for complete oesophageal obstruction and the swallowing outcome. METHODS: This single-centre case series includes consecutive patients who were unable to swallow due to complete oesophageal obstruction and underwent combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopic dilation (CARD) within the last 10 years. The patients’ demographic characteristics, clinical parameters, endoscopic therapy, adverse events, and outcomes were obtained retrospectively. Technical success was defined as effective restoration of oesophageal patency. Swallowing success was defined as either percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG)-tube independency and/or relevant improvement of oral food intake, as assessed by the functional oral intake scale (FOIS) (≥ level 3). RESULTS: The cohort consisted of six patients [five males; mean age 71 years (range, 54-74)]. All but one patient had undergone radiotherapy for head and neck or oesophageal cancer. Technical success was achieved in five out of six patients. After discharge, repeated dilations were performed in all five patients. During follow-up (median 27 mo, range, 2-115), three patients remained PEG-tube dependent. Three of four patients achieved relevant improvement of swallowing (two patients: FOIS 6, one patient: FOIS 7). One patient developed mediastinal emphysema following CARD, without a need for surgery. CONCLUSION: The CARD technique is safe and a viable alternative to high-risk blind antegrade dilation in patients with complete proximal oesophageal obstruction. Although only half of the patients remained PEG-tube independent, the majority improved their ability to swallow. PMID:26900299

  7. Combined endoscopic laser therapy and brachytherapy for palliation of oesophageal carcinoma: a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, P; Whitton, V; Moghissi, K

    1992-01-01

    Palliative treatment for oesophageal malignancy aims to maximise symptom relief with minimal disturbance to the patient. Twenty one patients with oesophageal carcinoma were studied prospectively to assess the combined efficacy of laser and brachytherapy in the palliation of oesophageal carcinoma, 20 were unsuitable for resectional surgery because of tumour extent and one patient underwent the treatment protocol after myocardial infarction, for symptom relief before resection. Two patients died at hospital and the remaining 19 survived from 9 to 455 days (mean 140 days). All patients tolerated the procedure well and improvement in swallowing was noted in 19 who survived the procedure--an improvement that was maintained until their death. However, five patients required oesophageal dilatation after the initial treatment. Results were not affected by the histology of the tumour. In summary, combined endoscopic laser and brachytherapy is effective palliation for oesophageal carcinoma and may be particularly appropriate in those patients with cervical and upper thoracic tumours in whom intubation may be unsatisfactory. Images Figure 1 PMID:1374728

  8. Oesophageal motility disorders in infected immigrants with Chagas disease in a non-endemic European area

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Lluís; Vallès, Xavier; Morales, Betty; Garcia-Diaz, M Immaculada; Pedro-Botet, M Luisa; Serra, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Background Immigration-related new diseases pose a growing challenge for healthcare services in receptor countries. Following Latin American migration, Chagas disease has inevitably appeared in Europe. Aim To determine the prevalence and characteristics of oesophageal motility disorders in immigrants infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, using high resolution oesophageal manometry (HREM). Methods In all newly-diagnosed cases with chronic Chagas infection referring upper digestive symptoms, a protocolized clinical evaluation and complementary tests including barium oesophagogram and HREM were carried out. As control group, 14 healthy subjects from the same endemic areas were studied with HREM. Results We included 61 patients (46 female, 15 male; age range 26–63 years). Only seven patients (11%) had a minor alteration on barium oesophagogram. By contrast, 23 (37%) patients showed an alteration in oesophageal manometry, mainly minor motility disorders (34%). Only one healthy control (7%) had a minor motility disorder at HREM (p = 0.029 vs. patients). Conclusions Oesophageal motor disorders in infected immigrants with Chagas disease are common, and mainly characterized by a minor motility disorder that is not detected by barium oesophagogram. Hence, as well as barium oesophagogram examination, HREM should be considered, to assess oesophageal damage in this specific group of patients. PMID:27536373

  9. Dietary Proportions of Carbohydrates, Fat, and Protein and Risk of Oesophageal Cancer by Histological Type

    PubMed Central

    Lagergren, Katarina; Lindam, Anna; Lagergren, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary habits influence the risk of cancer of the oesophagus and oesophago-gastric junction, but the role of proportions of the main dietary macronutrients carbohydrates, fats and proteins is uncertain. Methods Data was derived from a nationwide Swedish population-based case-control study conducted in 1995–1997, in which case ascertainment was rapid, and all cases were uniformly classified. Information on the subjects' history of dietary intake was collected in personal interviews. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression, with adjustment for potentially confounding factors. Results Included were 189 oesophageal adenocarcinomas, 262 oesophago-gastric adenocarcinomas, 167 oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas, and 820 control subjects. Regarding oesophageal or oesophago-gastric junctional adenocarcinoma, a high dietary proportion of carbohydrates decreased the risk (OR 0.50, CI 0.34–0.73), and a high portion of fat increased the risk (OR 1.96, CI 1.34–2.87), while a high proportion of protein did not influence the risk (OR 1. 08, 95% CI 0.75–1.56). Regarding oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, the single macronutrients did not influence the risk statistically significantly. Conclusions A diet with a low proportion of carbohydrates and a high proportion of fat might increase the risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:23349988

  10. Fruit and vegetable consumption in the prevention of oesophageal and cardia cancers.

    PubMed

    Terry, P; Lagergren, J; Hansen, H; Wolk, A; Nyrén, O

    2001-08-01

    The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus has increased rapidly in recent decades. In order to appreciate the potential for prevention by means of dietary modification, we estimated the aetiological fractions and the increments in absolute risk attributable to low intake of fruit and vegetables for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus and for adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction. We conducted a nationwide population-based case-control study in Sweden, with participation of 608 cases and 815 controls. We used unconditional logistic regression to estimate relative risks, from which we calculated aetiological fractions. Individuals in the highest exposure quartile (median 4.8 servings/day) versus the lowest (median 1.5 servings/day) showed approximately 50% lower risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma and 40% lower risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, but no risk reduction for gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Approximately 20% of oesophageal adenocarcinoma, and likewise squamous cell carcinoma, in Sweden was attributed to consuming less than three servings of fruit and vegetables per day. A very large number of individuals (over 25,000) would need to increase their fruit and vegetable consumption moderately in order to prevent one oesophageal cancer per year. Moderate relative risk reductions translate into weak absolute risk reductions for oesophageal cancers in Sweden.

  11. Review article: gastro-oesophageal reflux disease--the health economic implications.

    PubMed

    Mason, J; Hungin, A P S

    2005-08-01

    For the vast majority of patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease appropriate care involves the management of symptoms with lifestyle advice and drugs. However, there is dissension about the appropriate use of endoscopy, whether drugs should be stepped up or down according to potency, how long drugs should be used for, the role of lifestyle advice, and, related to this, the role of patients' lifestyle choices. This exploration of the economics of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease reviews its cost burden to the UK, assesses published economic models for their strengths and weaknesses and examines current recommendations for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease management from a socioeconomic perspective. Drugs prescribed predominantly for dyspepsia cost the UK National Health Service a projected pound sterling 625 million in 2004, 7% of the primary care prescribing budget. When general practitioners consultations, endoscopies, over-the-counter sales and sickness absences are included the UK cost rises to pound sterling 1.5 billion: approximately half of this cost can be ascribed to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Emphasis upon regular review and stepping down treatment (while maintaining adequate symptom relief) is both clinically appropriate and resource efficient. Other cost-effectiveness issues largely lack objective answers because investment in treatment for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease depends upon how much more, at the margin, society wishes to invest for further but diminishing symptom relief.

  12. Endoscopic Obliteration for Bleeding Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, J.J. J.; Gajda, A.G. G.; Kamiński, P. Ł.; Lembas, L.; Bielecki, K.

    1997-01-01

    A group of 133 patients treated for bleeding peptic ulcer in our Department, is reviewed. Within several hours of admission, all patients underwent upper gastrointestinal tract gastroscopy and obliteration of the bleeding ulcer. Bleeding gastric ulcers were found in 41 patients, and duodenal ulcers in 92 patients. Patients were classified according to the Forrest scale: IA – 11 patients, IB – 49 patients, IIA – 35 patients, lIB – 40 patients. In 126 (94.7%) patients the bleeding was stopped, and 7 required urgent surgery: 3 patients with gastric ulcer underwent gastrectomy, and 4 with duodenal ulcer – truncal vagotomy with pyloroplasty and had the bleeding site underpinned. Fifty-five patients underwent elective surgery: gastrectomy and vagotomy (18 patients with gastric ulcer), highly selective vagotomy (25 patients with duodenal ulcer) and truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty (12 patients with duodenal ulcer). None of the patients was observed to have recurrent bleeding. PMID:18493453

  13. Inherited bleeding syndromes in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Mondhiry, H A

    1977-06-30

    This paper presents data on the occurence and pattern of inherited bleeding syndromes (IBS) in Iraq, a hitherto unexplored problem. During the first fourteen months of a prospective on-going study at a major university center, 116 patients from 62 families were diagnosed as having IBS. All patients were referred because of moderate to severe bleeding diatheses. They included 62 haemophiliacs 32 patients with von Willebrand's disease (VWD), 9 with Christmas disease (CD), 6 with afibrinogenemia, 1 with prothrombin deficiency, and 6 were thought to have platelet dysfunction. 32 other bleeders (16 hemophiliacs, 14 VWD, and 2 CD) were also recognized among the pedigrees studied but were not available for full investigations. The clinical and laboratory features of the patients observed in Iraq do not seem to be significantly different from those of patients in Western Europe or North America. Although the absolute incidence and relative distribution of these disorders in the entire population cannot yet be determined, the rate of occurence per segment population is likely to be high, most likely due to the high rate of consanguinity and large number of births per family, phenomena still prevalent in this country.

  14. Problems in family practice. Rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Graham, J

    1978-07-01

    The diagnosis and management of rectal bleeding problems varies with the urgency of the situation, the age of the patient, and the applicability of available diagnostic methods. Every instance of rectal bleeding is a problem that demands investigation by endoscopic, radiographic, and laboratory means. A physician can be misled by the patient's understatement or underobservance of bleeding. A good history obtained as quickly as possible in urgent circumstances and in great detail under more relaxed circumstances is of immeasurable diagnostic value.

  15. Doxycycline induced oesophageal ulcers in a navy ship crewmember.

    PubMed

    Rottenstreich, Misgav; Rottenstreich, Moshe; Shapira, Shachar

    2015-01-01

    A healthy 25-year-old crewmember of a navy ship was diagnosed with suspected pneumonia and prescribed 100 mg twice a day of doxycycline for 10 days. During the 7th day of treatment the patient joined his navy ship to sail aboard and 2 days later, immediately after taking the doxycycline capsule, he felt a forceful pain in the median chest which was followed with odynophagia of both solid foods and liquids. The patient adhered to the administration guidelines of the doxycycline, except drinking 330 mL of beer, 3 h before taking the capsule. A working diagnosis of atypical chest pain, possibly due to oesophagitis, was made. The patient was advised to fast and rest and treatment with intravenously (IV) H2-receptor antagonist, clear fluids and analgesics was started. Later on, due to lack of improvement in the patient's status and the potential risk of future deterioration, a decision was made to evacuate the patient to a hospital. Gastroscopy, revealed 3 ulcers in the mid-oesophagus and the patient was hospitalised for treated of IV antacids and fluids with gradual improvement. This case emphasizes the limitation of diagnosing and treating a common side effect in the middle of the sea and the potential risk in taking medications with alcohol.

  16. Genetic progression of Barrett's oesophagus to oesophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gregson, Eleanor M; Bornschein, Jan; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's oesophagus (BE) is the premalignant condition associated with the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). Diagnostically, p53 immunohistochemistry remains the only biomarker recommended clinically to aid histopathological diagnosis. The emerging mutational profile of BE is one of highly heterogeneous lesions at the genomic level with many mutations already occurring in non-dysplastic tissue. As well as point mutations, larger scale copy-number changes appear to have a key role in the progression to OAC and clinically applicable assays for the reliable detection of aneuploidy will be important to incorporate into future clinical management of patients. For some patients, the transition to malignancy may occur rapidly through a genome-doubling event or chromosomal catastrophe, termed chromothripsis, and detecting these patients may prove especially difficult. Given the heterogeneous nature of this disease, sampling methods to overcome inherent bias from endoscopic biopsies coupled with the development of more objective biomarkers than the current reliance on histopathology will be required for risk stratification. The aim of this approach will be to spare low-risk patients unnecessary procedures, as well as to provide endoscopic therapy to the patients at highest risk, thereby avoiding the burden of incurable metastatic disease. PMID:27441494

  17. Golestan cohort study of oesophageal cancer: feasibility and first results

    PubMed Central

    Pourshams, A; Saadatian-Elahi, M; Nouraie, M; Malekshah, A F; Rakhshani, N; Salahi, R; Yoonessi, A; Semnani, S; Islami, F; Sotoudeh, M; Fahimi, S; Sadjadi, A R; Nasrollahzadeh, D; Aghcheli, K; Kamangar, F; Abnet, C C; Saidi, F; Sewram, V; Strickland, P T; Dawsey, S M; Brennan, P; Boffetta, P; Malekzadeh, R

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the incidence of oesophageal cancer (EC) in the Golestan province of North-East Iran, we invited 1349 rural and urban inhabitants of Golestan province aged 35–80 to undergo extensive lifestyle interviews and to provide biological samples. The interview was repeated on a subset of 130 participants to assess reliability of questionnaire and medical information. Temperature at which tea was consumed was measured on two occasions by 110 subjects. Samples of rice, wheat and sorghum were tested for fumonisin contamination. An active follow-up was carried out after 6 and 12 months. A total of 1057 subjects (610 women and 447 men) participated in this feasibility study (78.4% participation rate). Cigarette smoking, opium and alcohol use were reported by 163 (13.8%), 93 (8.8%) and 39 (3.7%) subjects, respectively. Tobacco smoking was correlated with urinary cotinine (κ=0.74). Most questionnaire data had κ >0.7 in repeat measurements; tea temperature measurement was reliable (κ=0.71). No fumonisins were detected in the samples analysed. During the follow-up six subjects were lost (0.6%), two subjects developed EC (one dead, one alive); in all, 13 subjects died (with cause of death known for 11, 84.6%). Conducting a cohort study in Golestan is feasible with reliable information obtained for suspected risk factors; participants can be followed up for EC incidence and mortality. PMID:15597107

  18. Serendipity in scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Goergen, T.G.

    1983-09-01

    A retrospective review of 80 scintigraphic bleeding studies performed with Tc-99m sulfur colloid or Tc-99m labeled red blood cells showed five cases where there were abnormal findings not related to bleeding. In some cases, the abnormalities were initially confused with bleeding or could obscure an area of bleeding, while in other cases, the abnormalities represented additional clinical information. These included bone marrow replacement related to tumor and radiation therapy, hyperemia related to a uterine leiomyoma and a diverticular abscess, and a dilated abdominal aorta (aneurysm). Recognition of such abnormalities should prevent an erroneous diagnosis and the additional information may be of clinical value.

  19. Influence of variceal bleeding on natural history of ACLF and management options.

    PubMed

    Al-Mahtab, Mamun; Akbar, Sheikh Mohammad Fazle; Garg, Hitendra

    2016-05-01

    Patients with diagnosed and undiagnosed chronic liver diseases experience one or more acute assaults of a hepatic nature and develop a downhill course of liver diseases, a condition regarded as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). It is a medical emergency, the prognosis of ACLF is extremely bad and considerable numbers of patients with ACLF die even after diagnosis and receiving conservative treatment. ACLF is characterized by jaundice, coagulopathy, ascites and encephalopathy. ACLF patients are very sick and associated with different hemodynamic profiles and have very high 3-month mortality. As these groups of patients have high baseline hepatic venous pressure gradients, the chances of variceal bleed are also high, and the impact is also greater in comparison to stable cirrhosis; however, evidence is lacking to substantiate such effects. The aim of this review is to discuss the natural course of variceal bleeding in ACLF patients and to develop insights into the management of variceal bleeding in ACLF.

  20. Lower oesophageal sphincter response to pentagastrin in chagasic patients with megaoesophagus and megacolon.

    PubMed Central

    Padovan, W; Godoy, R A; Dantas, R O; Meneghelli, U G; Oliveira, R B; Troncon, L E

    1980-01-01

    Intraluminal manometric studies were performed in 14 chagasic patients with megaoesophagus, 10 chagasic patients with megacolon, and 15 control subjects. Basal lower oesophageal sphincter pressure was 20.27+/-1.16 mmHg (mean+/-SEM) in controls as compared wtih 15.16+/-1.53 mmHg in chagasics with megaoesophagus and 14.38+/-1.50 mmHg in chagasics with megacolon. Dose-response studies to intravenous pentagastrin showed that the chagasic patients exhibited a lower sensitivity to the stimulant than did the controls, as demonstrated by shifting of the dose-response curve to the right and higher individual values of the dose for half maximal contraction (D50). No difference was noted between the calculated maximal contraction (Vmax) of oesophageal sphincter of controls and chagasics. These data are compatible with the hypothesis of an interaction between pentagastrin and cholinergic nervous excitation on oesophageal sphincteric smooth muscle. PMID:6769753

  1. Ultrasonographic examination of the oesophageal groove reflex in young calves under various feeding conditions.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    The oesophageal groove reflex was examined in 6 milk-fed Holstein Friesian calves once weekly during the first 17 weeks of life. Additionally, the effect of different feeding methods (bucket, different nipple positions and openings), different milk temperatures (20, 30, 39, 45°C) and milk replacer concentrations (100, 125, 150 grams/litre of water) on oesophageal groove closure was investigated. The reticulum and abomasum were examined ultrasonographically using a 5.0-MHz convex transducer before, during and after feeding, and the oesophageal groove reflex was considered to be functional when milk was seen entering the abomasum during feeding. The reflex was consistently induced throughout the study period in all calves at all examinations and under all experimental conditions. However, it should not be assumed that feeding technique can be neglected in unweaned calves because suboptimal feeding management has been linked to various digestive disorders. PMID:26753366

  2. Severe viral oesophagitis, pharyngitis, and stomatitis as antecedents of ileocecal Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Waluga, Marek; Budzyńska, Agnieszka; Kajor, Maciej; Hartleb, Marek

    2015-01-01

    We present a 22-year-old male who developed a severe erosive oesophagitis extending to the pharynx and oral cavity without obvious risk factors. Endoscopic image suggested viral aetiology that could not be confirmed by routine serological diagnostics of infections with cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and Herpes simplex virus. The histopathological evaluation also gave no definite clues to the aetiology of the inflammation. Treatment with acyclovir was ineffective, but gancyclovir therapy caused spectacular clinical improvement and healing of erosions. Two months later the patient presented febrile diarrhoea that was a symptom of ileocecal Crohn's disease proven by endoscopy, enterography, and histopathology. It is the first report of severe viral oesophagitis preceding clinical manifestation of Crohn's disease. This observation warrants further study towards the viral aetiology of oral, pharyngeal, and oesophageal erosions, frequently associated with Crohn's disease. PMID:25960815

  3. Challenges in Anaesthetic management of a child for thoracoscopic assisted oesophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Chandrakala, K R; Nagaraj, Bindu; Bhagya, D V; Chandrika, Y R

    2016-02-01

    The loss of oesophageal length or obliteration of oesophageal lumen due to stricture acquired by accidental caustic ingestion is more common in children that may require major operative reconstruction. A number of procedures have been developed for anatomic replacement of oesophagus of which thoracoscopic assisted gastric transposition has shown the best outcome in children. This demands an extensive pre-operative evaluation, preparation and anaesthetic management since this is challenging and prolonged procedure done under one lung ventilation (OLV). Though it is a minimally invasive procedure, providing OLV and management of complications associated with it are the anaesthetic challenges among these children. We report anaesthetic management of an 8-year-old boy with oesophageal stricture following corrosive injury posted for thoracoscopic assisted gastric transposition. PMID:27013752

  4. Challenges in Anaesthetic management of a child for thoracoscopic assisted oesophageal replacement

    PubMed Central

    Chandrakala, KR; Nagaraj, Bindu; Bhagya, DV; Chandrika, YR

    2016-01-01

    The loss of oesophageal length or obliteration of oesophageal lumen due to stricture acquired by accidental caustic ingestion is more common in children that may require major operative reconstruction. A number of procedures have been developed for anatomic replacement of oesophagus of which thoracoscopic assisted gastric transposition has shown the best outcome in children. This demands an extensive pre-operative evaluation, preparation and anaesthetic management since this is challenging and prolonged procedure done under one lung ventilation (OLV). Though it is a minimally invasive procedure, providing OLV and management of complications associated with it are the anaesthetic challenges among these children. We report anaesthetic management of an 8-year-old boy with oesophageal stricture following corrosive injury posted for thoracoscopic assisted gastric transposition. PMID:27013752

  5. Ultrasonographic examination of the oesophageal groove reflex in young calves under various feeding conditions.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    The oesophageal groove reflex was examined in 6 milk-fed Holstein Friesian calves once weekly during the first 17 weeks of life. Additionally, the effect of different feeding methods (bucket, different nipple positions and openings), different milk temperatures (20, 30, 39, 45°C) and milk replacer concentrations (100, 125, 150 grams/litre of water) on oesophageal groove closure was investigated. The reticulum and abomasum were examined ultrasonographically using a 5.0-MHz convex transducer before, during and after feeding, and the oesophageal groove reflex was considered to be functional when milk was seen entering the abomasum during feeding. The reflex was consistently induced throughout the study period in all calves at all examinations and under all experimental conditions. However, it should not be assumed that feeding technique can be neglected in unweaned calves because suboptimal feeding management has been linked to various digestive disorders.

  6. Rare case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Xie, Xiang-Jun; Geng, Chang-Xin; Zhan, Shu-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a prototypic esophageal motility disorder with complications including aspiration-pneumonia, esophagitis, esophageal-tracheal fistula, spontaneous rupture of the esophagus, and squamous cell carcinoma. However, achalasia is rarely associated with esophageal stones and ulcer formation that lead to upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Here, we report the case of a 61-year-old woman who was admitted to our department after vomiting blood for six hours. Physical examination revealed that the patient had severe anemia and mild palpitation in the upper abdomen. CT revealed lower esophageal dilatation and esophageal wall thickening, and an emergency upper endoscopy showed that the esophagus was substantially expanded by a dark round stone, with multiple ulcers on the esophageal wall and a slit in the cardiac mucosa with a large clot attached. The patient’s history included ingestion of 1 kg hawthorn three days prior. The acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding was caused by Mallory-Weiss syndrome associated with achalasia and an esophageal stone. For patients with achalasia, preventing excessive ingestion of tannins is crucial to avoid complications such as bleeding and rupture. PMID:25789307

  7. Factors Associated With Major Bleeding Events

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Shaun G.; Wojdyla, Daniel M.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; White, Harvey D.; Paolini, John F.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Patel, Manesh R.; Sherwood, Matthew W.; Becker, Richard C.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Hacke, Werner; Singer, Daniel E.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Breithardt, Gunter; Fox, Keith A. A.; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to report additional safety results from the ROCKET AF (Rivaroxaban Once-daily oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation). Background The ROCKET AF trial demonstrated similar risks of stroke/systemic embolism and major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding (principal safety endpoint) with rivaroxaban and warfarin. Methods The risk of the principal safety and component bleeding endpoints with rivaroxaban versus warfarin were compared, and factors associated with major bleeding were examined in a multivariable model. Results The principal safety endpoint was similar in the rivaroxaban and warfarin groups (14.9 vs. 14.5 events/100 patient-years; hazard ratio: 1.03; 95% confidence interval: 0.96 to 1.11). Major bleeding risk increased with age, but there were no differences between treatments in each age category (<65, 65 to 74, ≥75 years; pinteraction = 0.59). Compared with those without (n = 13,455), patients with a major bleed (n = 781) were more likely to be older, current/prior smokers, have prior gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, mild anemia, and a lower calculated creatinine clearance and less likely to be female or have a prior stroke/transient ischemic attack. Increasing age, baseline diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥90 mm Hg, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were independently associated with major bleeding risk; female sex and DBP <90 mm Hg were associated with a decreased risk. Conclusions Rivaroxaban and warfarin had similar risk for major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding. Age, sex, DBP, prior GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were associated with the risk of major bleeding. (An Efficacy and Safety Study of Rivaroxaban With Warfarin for the Prevention of Stroke and Non-Central Nervous System Systemic Embolism in Patients With Non

  8. Intake of whole grains and incidence of oesophageal cancer in the HELGA Cohort.

    PubMed

    Skeie, Guri; Braaten, Tonje; Olsen, Anja; Kyrø, Cecilie; Tjønneland, Anne; Landberg, Rikard; Nilsson, Lena Maria; Wennberg, Maria; Overvad, Kim; Åsli, Lene Angell; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Lund, Eiliv

    2016-04-01

    Few prospective studies have investigated the association between whole-grain consumption and incidence of oesophageal cancer. In the Scandinavian countries, consumption of whole grains is high and the incidence of oesophageal cancer comparably low. The aim of this paper was to study the associations between consumption of whole grains, whole-grain products and oesophageal cancer, including its two major histological subtypes. The HELGA cohort is a prospective cohort study consisting of three sub-cohorts in Norway, Sweden and Denmark. Information regarding whole-grain consumption was collected through country-specific food frequency questionnaires. Cancer cases were identified through national cancer registries. Cox proportional hazards ratios were calculated in order to assess the associations between whole grains and oesophageal cancer risk. The analytical cohort had 113,993 members, including 112 cases, and median follow-up time was 11 years. When comparing the highest tertile of intake with the lowest, the oesophageal cancer risk was approximately 45 % lower (adjusted HR 0.55, 95 % CI 0.31-0.97 for whole grains, HR 0.51, 95 % CI 0.30-0.88 for whole-grain products). Inverse associations were also found in continuous analyses. Whole-grain wheat was the only grain associated with lower risk (HR 0.32, 95 % CI 0.16-0.63 highest vs. lowest tertile). Among whole-grain products, the results were less clear, but protective associations were seen for the sum of whole-grain products, and whole-grain bread. Lower risk was seen in both histological subtypes, but particularly for squamous cell carcinomas. In this study, whole-grain consumption, particularly whole-grain wheat, was inversely associated with risk of oesophageal cancer.

  9. Outcomes at One-Year Post Anastomosis from a National Cohort of Infants with Oesophageal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Allin, Benjamin; Knight, Marian; Johnson, Paul; Burge, David

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims We aimed to provide a contemporaneous assessment of outcomes at one-year post oesophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula (OA-TOF) repair, focussing particularly on post-operative complications. It is generally accepted that oesophageal stricture is the most common complication and causes significant morbidity. We also aimed to assess the efficacy of prophylactic anti-reflux medication (PARM) in reducing stricture formation. Method A prospective, multi-centre cohort study of all infants live-born with oesophageal atresia in the United Kingdom and Ireland in 2008/9 was performed, recording clinical management and outcomes at one year. The effect of PARM on stricture formation in infants with the type-c anomaly was assessed using logistic regression analysis. Results 151 infants were live-born with oesophageal atresia in the defined reporting period, 126 of whom had the type-c anomaly. One-year follow-up information was returned for 105 infants (70%); the mortality rate was 8.6% (95% CI 4.7–14.3%). Post-operative complications included anastomotic leak (5.4%), recurrent fistula (3.3%) and oesophageal stricture (39%). Seventy-six (60%) of those with type-c anomaly were alive at one-year with returned follow-up, 57(75%) of whom had received PARM. Of these, 24 (42%) developed a stricture, compared to 4 (21%) of those who had not received PARM (adjusted odds ratio 2.60, 95% CI 0.71–9.46, p = 0.147). Conclusions This study provides a benchmark for current outcomes and complication rates following OA-TOF repair, with oesophageal stricture causing significant morbidity. The use of PARM appeared ineffective in preventing strictures. This study creates enough doubt about the efficacy of PARM in preventing stricture formation to warrant further investigation of its use with a randomised controlled trial. PMID:25153838

  10. Life-threatening upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastric Dieulafoy's lesion: Successful minimally-invasive management.

    PubMed

    Bondade, Nikhil; Bhandari, Suryaprakash; Rao, Prashant; Shah, Rahul; Bothara, Vishal; Maydeo, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Dieulafoy's lesion (DL) is a relatively rare, but potentially life-threatening condition. It accounts for 1-2% of acute gastrointestinal bleedings. Its serious nature makes it necessary for early diagnosis and treatment. This is a case report of a patient who presented with life-threatening haematemesis due to gastric Dieulafoy's that was successfully treated laparoscopically after failed endotherapy. PMID:27251825

  11. Life-threatening upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastric Dieulafoy's lesion: Successful minimally-invasive management

    PubMed Central

    Bondade, Nikhil; Bhandari, Suryaprakash; Rao, Prashant; Shah, Rahul; Bothara, Vishal; Maydeo, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Dieulafoy's lesion (DL) is a relatively rare, but potentially life-threatening condition. It accounts for 1-2% of acute gastrointestinal bleedings. Its serious nature makes it necessary for early diagnosis and treatment. This is a case report of a patient who presented with life-threatening haematemesis due to gastric Dieulafoy's that was successfully treated laparoscopically after failed endotherapy. PMID:27251825

  12. A First Comparative Study of Oesophageal and Voice Prosthesis Speech Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carello, Massimiliana; Magnano, Mauro

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate and to compare the acoustic properties of oesophageal voice and voice prosthesis speech production. A group of 14 Italian laryngectomized patients were considered: 7 with oesophageal voice and 7 with tracheoesophageal voice (with phonatory valve). For each patient the spectrogram obtained with the phonation of vowel /a/ (frequency intensity, jitter, shimmer, noise to harmonic ratio) and the maximum phonation time were recorded and analyzed. For the patients with the valve, the tracheostoma pressure, at the time of phonation, was measured in order to obtain important information about the "in vivo" pressure necessary to open the phonatory valve to enable speech.

  13. Risk of oesophageal cancer among patients previously hospitalised with eating disorder

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, David H.; Nowell, Siân L.; Clark, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that the risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma might be increased in patients with a history of eating disorders due to acidic damage to oesophageal mucosa caused by self-induced vomiting practiced as a method of weight control. Eating disorders have also been associated with risk factors for squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus, including alcohol use disorders, as well as smoking and nutritional deficiencies, which have been associated with both main sub-types of oesophageal cancer. There have been several case reports of oesophageal cancer (both main sub-types) arising in patients with a history of eating disorders. Methods We used linked records of hospitalisation, cancer registration and mortality in Scotland spanning 1981–2012 to investigate the risk of oesophageal cancer among patients with a prior history of hospitalisation with eating disorder. The cohort was restricted to patients aged ≥10 years and <60 years at the date of first admission with eating disorder. Disregarding the first year of follow-up, we calculated indirectly standardised incidence ratios using the general population as the reference group to generate expected numbers of cases (based on age-, sex-, socio-economic deprivation category-, and calendar period-specific rates of disease). Results After exclusions, the cohort consisted of 3617 individuals contributing 52,455 person-years at risk. The median duration of follow-up was 13.9 years. Seven oesophageal cancers were identified, as compared with 1.14 expected, yielding a standardised incidence ratio of 6.1 (95% confidence interval: 2.5–12.6). All were squamous cell carcinomas arising in females with a prior history of anorexia nervosa. Conclusions Patients hospitalised previously with eating disorders are at increased risk of developing oesophageal cancer. Confounding by established risk factors (alcohol, smoking, and nutritional deficiency) seems a more likely explanation than acidic damage

  14. The changing spectrum of treatment for variceal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Rikkers, L F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the impact of endoscopic therapy, liver transplantation, and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) on patient selection and outcome of surgical treatment for this complication of portal hypertension, as reflected in a single surgeon's 18-year experience with operations for variceal hemorrhage. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Definitive treatment of patients who bleed from portal hypertension has been progressively altered during the past 2 decades during which endoscopic therapy, liver transplantation, and TIPS have successively become available as alternative treatment options to operative portosystemic shunts and devascularization procedures. METHODS: Two hundred sixty-three consecutive patients who were surgically treated for portal hypertensive bleeding between 1978 and 1996 were reviewed retrospectively. Four Eras separated by the dates when endoscopic therapy (January 1981), liver transplantation (July 1985), and TIPS (January 1993) became available in our institution were analyzed. Throughout all four Eras, a selective operative approach, using the distal splenorenal shunt (DSRS), nonselective shunts, and esophagogastric devascularization, was taken. The most common indications for nonselective shunts and esophagogastric devascularization were medically intractable ascites and splanchnic venous thrombosis, respectively. Most other patients received a DSRS. RESULTS: The risk status (Child's class) of patients undergoing surgery progressively improved (p = 0.001) throughout the 4 Eras, whereas the need for emergency surgery declined (p = 0.002). The percentage of nonselective shunts performed decreased because better options to manage acute bleeding episodes (sclerotherapy, TIPS) and advanced liver disease complicated by ascites (liver transplantation, TIPS) became available (p = 0.009). In all Eras, the operative mortality rate was directly related to Child's class (A, 2.7%; B, 7.5%; and C, 26

  15. Acquired bleeding disorders in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The hemostatic balance changes with advancing age which may be due to factors such as platelet activation, increase of certain clotting factor proteins, slowing of the fibrinolytic system, and modification of the endothelium and blood flow. Generally, this predisposes the elderly to thrombosis rather than bleeding. It often necessitates antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, which can cause significant bleeding problems in an aging population. Additionally, changing renal function, modification in immune regulation, and a multitude of other disease processes, can give rise to acquired bleeding disorders. Bleeding can prove difficult to treat in a dynamic environment and in a population that may have underlying thrombotic risk factors.This article discusses some specific challenges of acquired bleeding arising in the elderly. The use of anticoagulation and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications is prevalent in the treatment of the elderly and predisposes them to increased bleeding risk as their physiology changes. When prescribing and monitoring these therapies, it is exceedingly important to weigh thrombotic versus bleeding risks. There are additional rare acquired bleeding disorders that predominantly affect the elderly. One of them is acquired hemophilia, which is an autoimmune disorder arising from antibodies against factor VIII. The treatment challenge rests in the use of hemostatic agents in a population that is already at increased risk for thrombotic complications. Another rare disorder of intensifying interest, acquired von Willebrand syndrome, has a multitude of etiologic mechanisms. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology is essential in making a treatment decision for this disorder.

  16. Recurrent Midgut Bleeding due to Jejunal Angioleiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Mityushin, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Angioleiomyoma being a type of true smooth muscle gastrointestinal tumors can lead to serious life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with recurrent midgut bleeding. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed highly vascular small bowel neoplasm. The patient underwent laparotomy with bowel resection and recovered uneventfully. Histopathology revealed jejunal angioleiomyoma. PMID:27668116

  17. Recurrent Midgut Bleeding due to Jejunal Angioleiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Gachabayov, Mahir; Mityushin, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Angioleiomyoma being a type of true smooth muscle gastrointestinal tumors can lead to serious life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with recurrent midgut bleeding. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed highly vascular small bowel neoplasm. The patient underwent laparotomy with bowel resection and recovered uneventfully. Histopathology revealed jejunal angioleiomyoma. PMID:27668116

  18. Recurrent Midgut Bleeding due to Jejunal Angioleiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Mityushin, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Angioleiomyoma being a type of true smooth muscle gastrointestinal tumors can lead to serious life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with recurrent midgut bleeding. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed highly vascular small bowel neoplasm. The patient underwent laparotomy with bowel resection and recovered uneventfully. Histopathology revealed jejunal angioleiomyoma.

  19. Obstetric management of adolescents with bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    James, Andra H

    2010-12-01

    Adolescents with bleeding disorders who become pregnant must contend with the dual challenges of their bleeding disorder and their pregnancy. Adolescents are more likely to terminate a pregnancy than adult women, and when they do carry a pregnancy, they are more likely to deliver prematurely. Otherwise, they are at risk for the same complications that adult women with bleeding disorders experience, particularly bleeding complications postpartum. Since one half to two thirds of adolescent pregnancies are unplanned, issues related to reproduction should be addressed during routine visits with the pediatrician, hematologist or gynecologist. Girls who are at risk of being carriers for hemophilia A and B, severe von Willebrand disease, and other severe bleeding disorders should have their bleeding disorder status determined before they become pregnant. During pregnancy, a plan should be established to ensure that both mother and fetus deliver safely. Young women at risk for severe bleeding or at risk of having a severely affected infant should be referred for prenatal care and delivery to a center where, in addition to specialists in high-risk obstetrics, there is a hemophilia treatment center or a hematologist with expertise in hemostasis. Prior to delivery or any invasive procedures, young women at risk for severe bleeding should receive prophylaxis. Since administration of desmopressin may result in hyponatremia, whenever available, virally inactivated or recombinant clotting factor concentrates should be used for replacement as opposed to fresh frozen plasma or cryoprecipitate.

  20. Africa’s oesophageal cancer corridor - do hot beverages contribute?

    PubMed Central

    Munishi, Michael Oresto; Hanisch, Rachel; Mapunda, Oscar; Ndyetabura, Theonest; Ndaro, Arnold; Schüz, Joachim; Kibiki, Gibson; McCormack, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hot beverage consumption has been linked to oesophageal squamous cell cancer (EC) but its contribution to the poorly-understood East African EC corridor is not known. Methods In a cross-sectional study of general-population residents in Kilimanjaro, North Tanzania, tea drinking temperatures and times were measured. Using linear regression models, we compared drinking temperatures to those in previous studies, by socio-demographic factors and tea type (“milky tea” which can be 50% or more milk and water boiled together vs “black tea” which has no milk). Results Participants started drinking at a mean of 70.6°C (standard deviation 3.9, n=188), which exceeds that in all previous studies (p≤0.01 for each). Tea type, gender and age were associated with drinking temperatures. After mutual adjustment for each other, milky tea drinkers drank their tea 1.9°C (95% confidence interval: 0.9, 2.9) hotter than drinkers of black tea, largely because black tea cooled twice as fast as milky tea. Men commenced drinking tea 0.9°C (−0.2, 2.1) hotter than women did, and finished their cups 30 (−9, 69) seconds faster. 70% and 39% of milky and black tea drinkers, respectively, reported a history of tongue burning. Conclusions Hot tea consumption, especially milky tea, may be an important and modifiable risk factor for EC in Tanzania. The contribution of this habit to EC risk needs to be evaluated in this setting, jointly with that of the many risk factors acting synergistically in this multi-factorial disease. PMID:26245249

  1. New advances in lower gastrointestinal bleeding management with embolotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Urbano, Josè; De Marchi, Giuseppe; Micieli, Camilla; Duka, Ejona; Iacobellis, Francesca; Fontana, Federico; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2016-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Embolization is currently proposed as the first step in the treatment of acute, life-threatening LGIB, when endoscopic approach is not possible or is unsuccessful. Like most procedures performed in emergency setting, time represents a significant factor influencing outcome. Modern tools permit identifying and reaching the bleeding site faster than two-dimensional angiography. Non-selective cone-beam CT arteriography can identify a damaged vessel. Moreover, sophisticated software able to detect the vessel may facilitate direct placement of a microcatheter into the culprit vessel without the need for sequential angiography. A further important aspect is the use of an appropriate technique of embolization and a safe and effective embolic agent. Current evidence shows the use of detachable coils (with or without a triaxial system) and liquid embolics has proven advantages compared with other embolic agents. The present article analyses these modern tools, making embolization of acute LGIB safer and more effective.

  2. Comparison of different methods for endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding canine esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D M; Silpa, M L; Tapia, J I; Beilin, D B; Machicado, G A

    1983-06-01

    Despite advances in the therapy of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage, morbidity and mortality remain high. Continued severe variceal hemorrhage remains a major clinical problem in poor risk patients who cannot tolerate emergency surgery for hemostasis. Several endoscopic hemostatic methods might be effective for variceal hemostasis, but they have not been systematically evaluated. Using a reproducible canine model of esophageal varices, several hemostatic modalities were tested and compared to determine which were most effective in stopping variceal bleeding. Methods tested were endoscopic sclerotherapy, organ laser, neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, monopolar electro-coagulation, bipolar electrocoagulation, ferromagnetic tamponade, and endoscopic heater probe. Both neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy provided reliable hemostasis in acutely bleeding canine varices. Large heater probe controlled bleeding 50% of the time, and all the other methods stopped bleeding in less than half the trials. Rebleeding after balloon inflation proximal to the coagulated bleeding site did not occur with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser or endoscopic sclerotherapy-treated varices but did occur with the other methods. The principal differences between neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy were the ease of application of neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, the higher frequency of esophageal ulcers or erosions with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, and the lack of variceal obliteration with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. PMID:6341157

  3. Comparison of different methods for endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding canine esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D M; Silpa, M L; Tapia, J I; Beilin, D B; Machicado, G A

    1983-06-01

    Despite advances in the therapy of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage, morbidity and mortality remain high. Continued severe variceal hemorrhage remains a major clinical problem in poor risk patients who cannot tolerate emergency surgery for hemostasis. Several endoscopic hemostatic methods might be effective for variceal hemostasis, but they have not been systematically evaluated. Using a reproducible canine model of esophageal varices, several hemostatic modalities were tested and compared to determine which were most effective in stopping variceal bleeding. Methods tested were endoscopic sclerotherapy, organ laser, neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, monopolar electro-coagulation, bipolar electrocoagulation, ferromagnetic tamponade, and endoscopic heater probe. Both neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy provided reliable hemostasis in acutely bleeding canine varices. Large heater probe controlled bleeding 50% of the time, and all the other methods stopped bleeding in less than half the trials. Rebleeding after balloon inflation proximal to the coagulated bleeding site did not occur with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser or endoscopic sclerotherapy-treated varices but did occur with the other methods. The principal differences between neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy were the ease of application of neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, the higher frequency of esophageal ulcers or erosions with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, and the lack of variceal obliteration with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser.

  4. Exertional gastro-oesophageal reflux: a mechanism for symptoms in patients with angina pectoris and normal coronary angiograms.

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, P M; Bennett, D H; Whorwell, P J; Brooks, N H; Bray, C L; Ward, C; Jones, P E

    1987-01-01

    During 24 hour oesophageal pH monitoring 52 patients who had angina pectoris and normal coronary angiograms underwent exercise testing, as far as their symptoms allowed, on a treadmill to determine whether gastro-oesophageal reflux occurred during exertion. In 11 patients the 24 hour oesophageal pH score was abnormally high; 10 of these showed exertional gastro-oesophageal reflux, and in nine this was associated with their usual chest pain. A further 13 patients had a normal 24 hour pH score but had exertional reflux coincident with chest pain during exercise testing. The mean lower oesophageal sphincter pressure in both of these groups of patients was appreciably lower than that in 28 patients who had a normal 24 hour pH score and no exertional reflux. These findings suggest that exertional gastro-oesophageal reflux accounts for the symptoms of a large proportion of patients who have angina pectoris and normal coronary angiograms and that oesophageal pH monitoring during exercise testing on a treadmill enables this group of patients to be identified. PMID:3111585

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea. PMID:27695173

  6. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea.

  7. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Balén, Marco; Plumé, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325 (Hemospray®), EndoClot™ polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper®. Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a second-line treatment, and they seem to be especially indicated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area. PMID:25133029

  8. Early oesophageal cancer: results of a European multicentre survey. Group Européen pour l'Etude des Maladies de l'Oesophage.

    PubMed

    Bonavina, L

    1995-01-01

    Early oesophageal cancer has been extensively studied in Far-Eastern countries, where its prevalence is high. A multicentre survey was conducted within the Groupe Européen pour l'Etude des Maladies de l'Oesophage to analyse results of surgical treatment in patients with disease staged as pTis-T1 N0 M0 according to the tumour node metastasis classification. Of 9743 patients with squamous cell oesophageal carcinoma observed since 1980, 4663 underwent resection; 253 (5.4 per cent) of these fulfilled the criteria for inclusion in the study. The overall mortality rate was 9.1 per cent (23 patients), and was higher after transthoracic than transhiatal oesophagectomy (10.7 versus 6 per cent, P not significant). Pathological examination showed an intraepithelial tumour in 46 patients (18.2 per cent), intramucosal carcinoma in 64 (25.3 per cent) and a submucosal lesion in 143 (56.5 per cent). The overall 5-year survival rate for patients with intraepithelial, intramucosal and submucosal tumours was 92.8, 72.8 and 44.3 per cent respectively. The 5-year survival rate was higher after transthoracic than transhiatal oesophagectomy (66 versus 52 per cent). No survival advantage was observed after either operation in patients with mucosal tumours. Of 21 patients with recurrent disease, 20 had a submucosal lesion. The 5-year survival rate in patients with submucosal tumour was higher after transthoracic than transhiatal oesophagectomy (54.2 versus 25.5 per cent).

  9. Posture and gastro-oesophageal reflux: a case for left lateral positioning

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, J.; McCloud, P.; Cameron, D.

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 4 November 1996
 AIM—Prone posture is often recommended for symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux in young infants, but prone positioning has been associated with sudden infant death. The aim of this study was thus to establish the optimal alternative posture for reducing reflux.
METHODS—24 infants (< 5 months) with symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux were studied prospectively with 48 h pH monitoring. They were randomly assigned to one of the 24 permutations of the four positions (supine, prone, right, left). During the first 24 hours the infant was held horizontally, and then the permutation was repeated at 30 degrees head elevation, giving a total of eight study segments for each infant. Data were edited to remove all time when the infants were not in the prescribed positions. Results were evaluated using analysis of covariance.
RESULTS—Gastro-oesophageal reflux expressed as reflux index (mean % (SEM)) was significantly less in the prone and left lateral positions (6.72 (1.06) and 7.69 (1.03) respectively) than in the supine and right lateral positions (15.33 (2.33) and 12.02 (1.38); p < 0.001). Head elevation did not affect any variables significantly.
CONCLUSIONS—Head elevation may not always be of clinical value. The left lateral position is a suitable alternative to prone for the postural management of infants with symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux.

 PMID:9135268

  10. Relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux and airway diseases: the airway reflux paradigm.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Galván, Adalberto; Hart, Simon P; Morice, Alyn H

    2011-04-01

    Our understanding of the relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux and respiratory disease has recently undergone important changes. The previous paradigm of airway reflux as synonymous with the classic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) causing heartburn has been overturned. Numerous epidemiological studies have shown a highly significant association of the acid, liquid, and gaseous reflux of GORD with conditions such as laryngeal diseases, chronic rhinosinusitis, treatment resistant asthma, COPD and even idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, it has become clear from studies on cough hypersensitivity syndrome that much reflux of importance in the airways has been missed, since it is either non- or weakly acid and gaseous in composition. The evidence for such a relationship relies on the clinical history pointing to symptom associations with known precipitants of reflux. The tools for the diagnosis of extra-oesophageal reflux, in contrast to the oesophageal reflux of GORD, lack sensitivity and reproducibility. Unfortunately, methodology for detecting such reflux is only just becoming available and much additional work is required to properly delineate its role. PMID:21459504

  11. TAK1-regulated expression of BIRC3 predicts resistance to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in oesophageal adenocarcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Piro, G; Giacopuzzi, S; Bencivenga, M; Carbone, C; Verlato, G; Frizziero, M; Zanotto, M; Mina, M M; Merz, V; Santoro, R; Zanoni, A; De Manzoni, G; Tortora, G; Melisi, D

    2015-01-01

    Background: About 20% of resectable oesophageal carcinoma is resistant to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Here we hypothesised that the expression of the antiapoptotic gene Baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat containing (BIRC)3 induced by the transforming growth factor β activated kinase 1 (TAK1) might be responsible for the resistance to the proapoptotic effect of chemoradiotherapy in oesophageal carcinoma. Methods: TAK1 kinase activity was inhibited in FLO-1 and KYAE-1 oesophageal adenocarcinoma cells using (5Z)-7-oxozeaenol. The BIRC3 mRNA expression was measured by qRT–PCR in 65 pretreatment frozen biopsies from patients receiving preoperatively docetaxel, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and concurrent radiotherapy. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses were performed to determine the performance of BIRC3 expression levels in distinguishing patients with sensitive or resistant carcinoma. Results: In vitro, (5Z)-7-oxozeaenol significantly reduced BIRC3 expression in FLO-1 and KYAE-1 cells. Exposure to chemotherapeutic agents or radiotherapy plus (5Z)-7-oxozeaenol resulted in a strong synergistic antiapoptotic effect. In patients, median expression of BIRC3 was significantly (P<0.0001) higher in adenocarcinoma than in the more sensitive squamous cell carcinoma subtype. The BIRC3 expression significantly discriminated patients with sensitive or resistant adenocarcinoma (AUC-ROC=0.7773 and 0.8074 by size-based pathological response or Mandard's tumour regression grade classifications, respectively). Conclusions: The BIRC3 expression might be a valid biomarker for predicting patients with oesophageal adenocarcinoma that could most likely benefit from preoperative chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26291056

  12. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in oesophageal diseases; correlation with transforming growth factor alpha expression.

    PubMed Central

    Jankowski, J; McMenemin, R; Yu, C; Hopwood, D; Wormsley, K G

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to correlate mucosal proliferation in Barrett's oesophagus with expression of a growth promoting peptide, transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha). Oesophageal mucosa was studied from 50 patients with oesophageal disease who had been treated by oesophagectomy. Histological analysis showed a range of oesophageal pathology - 18 patients had gastric type Barrett's mucosa, 18 had intestinal type Barrett's mucosa, and 14 had oesophageal adenocarcinomas. Sections were stained immunohistochemically for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (an index of cellular proliferation) and TGF alpha. PCNA immunostaining was seen mainly in the basal cells of the neck/foveolar epithelial compartment of the glands in Barrett's oesophagus. However, in mucosa with high grade dysplasia, the proliferative compartment extended upwards into the superficial layers of the glands. At least 2000 cells were counted in each patient to determine the proportion with PCNA immunoreactivity (PCNA labelling index). The labelling index was highest in adenocarcinoma (25%) and in Barrett's intestinal type mucosa with high grade dysplasia (26%) compared with intestinal type mucosa with no significant dysplasia (20%) and Barrett's gastric type mucosa (12%). There was a significant positive correlation between PCNA labelling indices and TGF alpha expression in Barrett's mucosa (p less than 0.01). In glands showing high grade dysplasia, TGF alpha immunoreactivity was seen in the same regions of the glands as PCNA immunoreactivity, indicating the possibility of involvement of TGF alpha in (pre) neoplastic proliferation in Barrett's oesophagus. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:1351861

  13. Oesophageal chemoreceptors of blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, sense chemical deterrents and can block ingestion of food.

    PubMed

    Aggio, Juan F; Tieu, Ryan; Wei, Amy; Derby, Charles D

    2012-05-15

    Decapod crustaceans such as blue crabs possess a variety of chemoreceptors that control different stages of the feeding process. All these chemoreceptors are putative targets for feeding deterrents that cause animals to avoid or reject otherwise palatable food. As a first step towards characterizing the chemoreceptors that mediate the effect of deterrents, we used a behavioral approach to investigate their precise location. Data presented here demonstrate that chemoreceptors located on the antennules, pereiopods and mouthparts do not mediate the food-rejection effects of a variety of deterrents, both natural and artificial to crabs. Crabs always searched for deterrent-laced food and took it to their oral region. The deterrent effect was manifested as either rejection or extensive manipulation, but in both cases crabs bit the food. The biting behavior is relevant because the introduction of food into the oral cavity ensured that the deterrents gained access to the oesophageal taste receptors, and so we conclude that they are the ones mediating rejection. Additional support comes from the fact that a variety of deterrent compounds evoked oesophageal dilatation, which is mediated by oesophageal receptors and has been linked to food rejection. Further, there is a positive correlation between a compound's ability to elicit rejection and its ability to evoke oesophageal dilatation. The fact that deterrents do not act at a distance is in accordance with the limited solubility of most known feeding deterrents, and likely influences predator-prey interactions and their outcome: prey organisms will be attacked and bitten before deterrents become relevant.

  14. Oesophageal contractility during total i.v. anaesthesia with and without glycopyrronium.

    PubMed

    Raftery, S; Enever, G; Prys-Roberts, C

    1991-05-01

    Somatic movement and spontaneous and provoked oesophageal contractions were noted at time of incision in 51 patients receiving total i.v. anaesthesia with alfentanil and propofol. Probit analysis of the dose of propofol required to prevent spontaneous movement revealed an ED50 (95% confidence limits) of 2.5 (1.8-2.9) mg kg(-1) h(-1) and ED95 of 4.7 (4.0-7.5) mg kg(-1) h(-1). Corresponding venous blood concentrations gave an EC50 of 1.2 (0.4-1.6) micrograms ml(-1) and an EC95 of 4.0 (2.8-18.5) micrograms ml(-1). ED50 of propofol for preventing spontaneous oesophageal contraction was 3.0 (1.9-3.6) mg kg(-1) h(-1). ED95 was 6.9 (5.0-27.3) mg kg(-1) h(-1); EC50 for oesophageal contractions was 1.7 (0.7-2.3) micrograms ml(-1) and EC95 was 5.9 (3.7-70.6) micrograms ml(-1). Another group of 10 patients were given glycopyrronium 5 micrograms kg(-1) at induction; oesophageal contractility was significantly reduced in this group. PMID:2031816

  15. Current Evaluation of Upper Oesophageal Sphincter Opening in Dysphagia Practice: An International SLT Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Julie; Walshe, Margaret; McMahon, Barry P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assessment of adequate upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) opening during swallowing is an integral component of dysphagia evaluation. Aims: To ascertain speech and language therapists' (SLTs) satisfaction with current methods for assessing UOS function in people with dysphagia and to identify challenges encountered by SLTs with UOS…

  16. Proteinase-activated receptors 1 and 2 mediate contraction of human oesophageal muscularis mucosae.

    PubMed

    Chang, B-S; Chang, J-C; Huang, S-C

    2010-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors 1 and 2 mediate contraction of the human gallbladder. In the present study, we investigated effects mediated by proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) in the human oesophagus by measuring contraction of muscularis mucosae strips isolated from the human oesophagus. Both PAR(1) agonists (thrombin, SFLLRN-NH(2) and TFLLR-NH(2)) and PAR(2) agonists (trypsin, 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH(2) and SLIGKV-NH(2)) caused concentration-dependent contraction. In contrast, PAR(1) and PAR(2) control peptides did not cause contraction. The existence of PAR(1) and PAR(2) in the human oesophageal muscularis mucosae was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. On the other hand, PAR(4) agonists, GYPGKF-NH(2), GYPGQV-NH(2) and AYPGKF-NH(2), did not cause contraction or relaxation in resting or carbachol-contracted muscularis mucosae strips, suggesting that PAR(4) is not involved in human oesophageal motility. The contractile responses to SFLLRN-NH(2) and trypsin in the human oesophagus were insensitive to atropine and tetrodotoxin, indicating that the contractile response was not neurally mediated. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PAR(1) and PAR(2) but not PAR(4) mediate contraction in human oesophageal muscularis mucosae. PAR(1) and PAR(2) may influence human oesophageal motility. PMID:19694963

  17. Oesophageal cancer incidence in the United States by race, sex, and histologic type, 1977–2005

    PubMed Central

    Cook, M B; Chow, W-H; Devesa, S S

    2009-01-01

    Background: In the United States, the rates and temporal trends of oesophageal cancer overall and for the two predominant histologic types – adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) – differ between Blacks and Whites, but little is known with regard to the patterns among Asians/Pacific Islanders or Hispanics. Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results programme data, we analysed oesophageal cancer incidence patterns by race, sex, and histologic type for the period 1977–2005. Results: Total oesophageal cancer incidence has been increasing among Whites only; the rates among all other race groups have declined. Moreover, rates among White men surpassed those among Blacks in 2004. Oesophageal SCC rates have been decreasing among virtually all racial/ethnic groups; rates among Hispanic and Asian/Pacific Islander men have been intermediate to those of Blacks and Whites, with rates among women being lower than those among Blacks or Whites. The ADC rates among Hispanic men may be rising, akin to the historical trends among Whites and Blacks. The sex ratios for these cancers also varied markedly. Conclusions: These observations may provide clues for aetiological research. PMID:19672254

  18. Bursts of non-deglutitive simultaneous contractions may be a normal oesophageal motility pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, J; Annese, V; Vantrappen, G

    1993-01-01

    The frequency and characteristics of non-deglutitive motor activity of the human oesophagus and its relation to motility patterns in the antrum and upper small intestine were studied in 25 fasted healthy subjects. Motility of the oesophagus, antrum, and upper small intestine was recorded by means of a manometric perfused catheter system. The most striking non-deglutitive motility pattern consisted of repetitive bursts of non-sequential pressure peaks occurring in the smooth muscle portion of the oesophagus. The mean number of pressure peaks per burst was 2.7 (SD 2) waves with a mean amplitude of 19.5 (SD 9.9) mm Hg and a duration of 3.09 (SD 0.22) seconds. The highest amplitude was 80 mm Hg and the longest burst consisted of 13 repetitive waves. The bursts were recorded up to a distance of 15-20 cm above the lower oesophageal sphincter. Ninety five per cent of the bursts occurred during a 15 minute period before the onset of phase 3 of the migrating motor complex in the antral or upper small intestinal area, or during the lower oesophageal sphincter component of the migrating motor complex. In conclusion, spontaneous bursts of non-sequential pressure peaks occurred in the smooth muscle part of the human oesophagus in relation to phase 3 of the migrating motor complex. They represent the oesophageal body component of phase 3 of the migrating motor complex and are not a sign of oesophageal motor abnormalities. PMID:8174946

  19. Intraluminal brachytherapy in oesophageal cancer: defining its role and introducing the technique

    PubMed Central

    Strnad, Vratislav

    2014-01-01

    Intraluminal brachytherapy plays an important role in the treatment of oesophageal tumours. This article aims to define this role in the curative as well as in the palliative treatment settings drawing on data from the literature, and also emphasizing its potential for harm when used inexpertly. It also provides a short introduction to practical aspects of the treatment procedure and treatment planning. PMID:25097567

  20. Alkaline oesophageal reflux--an artefact due to oxygen corrosion of antimony pH electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, F; Gustafsson, U; Tibbling, L

    1992-12-01

    Antimony electrodes are widely used for gastro-oesophageal pH monitoring. They are also sensitive to oxygen, however, especially at low PO2 levels, which are known to shift recorded values in the alkaline direction. This study, which compares antimony and glass electrodes for oesophageal pH monitoring in six adults, shows that values recorded by antimony electrodes are 2.1 +/- 0.8 pH units (mean +/- SD) higher than by glass electrodes (p < 0.001; n = 7642). A further 52 patients with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux were investigated by 24-h pH monitoring by means of antimony electrodes. In these patients the oesophageal pH was higher than 8.0 for 7% of the time (range, 0-60%). The alkaline periods recorded with antimony electrodes were all protracted in time, smoothly increasing from a neutral pH, and did not correspond to a sudden increase in pH, which would be expected if alkaline reflux had occurred. It is concluded that high pH values obtained by antimony electrodes are due to the oxygen sensitivity of the electrodes. The diagnosis of alkaline reflux seems to be valid only when pH monitoring is performed with glass electrodes or when values obtained with antimony electrodes are adjusted for the influence of the oxygen tension in the oesophagus. PMID:1475627

  1. Episodic cervical dystonia associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux. A case of adult-onset Sandifer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shahnawaz, M; van der Westhuizen, L R; Gledhill, R F

    2001-12-01

    Sandifer syndrome is a dystonic movement disorder described in children with severe gastro-oesophageal reflux. We now report a patient who had the features of Sandifer syndrome first developing in adult life. Onset of dystonic episodes followed closely the occurrence of a Bell's palsy, while symptoms of peptic oesophagitis had been present for several months beforehand. Successful symptomatic treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux was accompanied by cessation of the dystonic episodes. Possible pathophysiological mechanisms of the abnormal movements in Sandifer syndrome are discussed. PMID:11714563

  2. Biochemical analysis of the stress protein response in human oesophageal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, D; Moitra, S; Vojtesek, B; Johnston, D; Dillon, J; Hupp, T

    1997-01-01

    Background—The oesophageal epithelium is exposed routinely to noxious agents in the environment, including gastric acid, thermal stress, and chemical toxins. These epithelial cells have presumably evolved effective protective mechanisms to withstand tissue damage and repair injured cells. Heat shock protein or stress protein responses play a central role in protecting distinct cell types from different types of injury. 
Aim—To determine (i) whether biochemical analysis of stress protein responses in pinch biopsy specimens from human oesophageal epithelium is feasible; (ii) whether undue stresses are imposed on cells by the act of sample collection, thus precluding analysis of stress responses; and (iii) if amenable to experimentation, the type of heat shock protein (Hsp) response that operates in the human oesophageal epithelium. 
Methods—Tissue from the human oesophagus comprised predominantly of squamous epithelium was acquired within two hours of biopsy and subjected to an in vitro heat shock. Soluble tissue cell lysates derived from untreated or heat shocked samples were examined using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for changes in: (i) the pattern of general protein synthesis by labelling epithelial cells with 35S-methionine and (ii) the levels of soluble Hsp70 protein and related isoforms using immunochemical protein blots. 
Results—A single pinch biopsy specimen is sufficient to extract and analyse specific sets of polypeptides in the oesophageal epithelium. After ex vivo heat shock, a classic inhibition of general protein synthesis is observed and correlates with the increased synthesis of two major proteins of molecular weight of 60 and 70 kDa. Notably, cells from unheated controls exhibit a "stressed" biochemical state 22 hours after incubation at 37°C, as shown by inhibition of general protein synthesis and increased synthesis of the 70 kDa protein. These data indicate that only freshly acquired specimens are suitable for

  3. Congenital and acquired bleeding disorders in infancy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sally Elizabeth; Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B

    2015-11-01

    The diagnosis of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders in infants requires an understanding of developmental haemostasis and the effect on laboratory testing. A systematic approach to bleeding in neonates will aid clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment, which may be caused by a wide variety of diseases. The clinical setting will help to direct the diagnostic pathway. This review will focus on the presentation and diagnosis of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders, including platelet disorders. Current research in this field is ongoing, including investigation into neonatal platelets and their different functionalities, platelet transfusion thresholds and how changes in coagulation factors may be linked to other homeostatic mechanisms.

  4. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    DOEpatents

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  5. Direct Percutaneous Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Sailen G.; Castle, Erik P.; Kriegshauser, J. Scott; Huettl, Eric A.

    2010-02-15

    Stomal variceal bleeding can develop in patients with underlying cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Most patients are best treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation because this addresses the underlying problem of portal hypertension. However, some patients are not good candidates for TIPS creation because they have end-stage liver disease or encephalopathy. We describe such a patient who presented with recurrent bleeding stomal varices, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. The patient had bleeding-free survival for 1 month before death from unrelated causes.

  6. Endoscopic Management of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is one of the most common reasons for hospitalization and a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently developed endoscopic devices and supporting apparatuses can achieve endoscopic hemostasis with greater safety and efficiency. With these advancements in technology and technique, gastroenterologists should have no concerns regarding the management of acute upper GI bleeding, provided that they are well prepared and trained. However, when endoscopic hemostasis fails, endoscopy should not be continued. Rather, endoscopists should refer patients to radiologists and surgeons without any delay for evaluation regarding the appropriateness of emergency interventional radiology or surgery. PMID:25844335

  7. Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Timing of Endoscopy and Ways to Improve Endoscopic Visualization.

    PubMed

    Khamaysi, Iyad; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-07-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy is the cornerstone of diagnosis and management of patients presenting with acute UGI bleeding. Once hemodynamically resuscitated, early endoscopy (performed within 24 hours of patient presentation) ensures accurate identification of the bleeding source, facilitates risk stratification based on endoscopic stigmata, and allows endotherapy to be delivered where indicated. Moreover, the preendoscopy use of a prokinetic agent (eg, i.v. erythromycin), especially in patients with a suspected high probability of having blood or clots in the stomach before undergoing endoscopy, may result in improved endoscopic visualization, a higher diagnostic yield, and less need for repeat endoscopy.

  8. TRAIL regulates MID1, TSLP, inflammation and remodelling in experimental eosinophilic oesophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Collison, Adam; Sokulsky, Leon A.; Sherrill, Joseph D.; Nightingale, Scott; MClinEpid; Hatchwell, Luke; Talley, Nicholas J.; Walker, Marjorie M.; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Mattes, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic Oesophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory disorder of the oesophagus defined by eosinophil infiltration and tissue remodelling with resulting symptoms of oesophageal dysfunction. Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) promotes inflammation by upregulation of the E3 ubiquitin-ligase midline-1 (MID1), which binds to and deactivates the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2Ac) resulting in increased NF-κB activation. Objective To elucidate the role of TRAIL in EoE. Methods We used Aspergillus fumigatus(Asp F) to induce EoE in TRAIL sufficient (wildtype) and deficient (−/−) mice and targeted MID1 in the oesophagus with small interfering (si) RNA. We also treated mice with recombinant TSLP and TRAIL. Results TRAIL deficiency and MID1 silencing employing siRNA reduced oesophageal eosinophil and mast cell numbers and protected from oesophageal circumference enlargement, muscularis externa thickening and collagen deposition. MID1 expression and NF-κB activation were reduced in TRAIL−/− mice, while PP2Ac levels were increased compared to wildtype controls. This was associated with reduced expression of CCL24, CCL11, CCL20, IL-5, IL-13, IL-25, TGF-β and TSLP. Treatment with TSLP reconstituted hallmark features of EoE in TRAIL−/− mice and recombinant TRAIL induced oesophageal TSLP expression in vivo in the absence of allergen. Post hoc analysis of gene array data demonstrated a significant upregulation of TRAIL and MID1 in a cohort of children with EoE as compared to diseased controls. Conclusion TRAIL regulates MID1 and TSLP, inflammation, fibrosis, smooth muscle hypertrophy and expression of inflammatory effector chemokines and cytokines in experimental EoE. PMID:25981737

  9. Knockdown of LRP/LR Induces Apoptosis in Breast and Oesophageal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Khumalo, Thandokuhle; Ferreira, Eloise; Jovanovic, Katarina; Veale, Rob B; Weiss, Stefan F T

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a global burden due to high incidence and mortality rates and is ranked the second most diagnosed disease amongst non-communicable diseases in South Africa. A high expression level of the 37kDa/67kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) is one characteristic of cancer cells. This receptor is implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer cells by supporting tumor angiogenesis, metastasis and especially for this study, the evasion of apoptosis. In the current study, the role of LRP/LR on cellular viability of breast MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and WHCO1 oesophageal cancer cells was investigated. Western blot analysis revealed that total LRP expression levels of MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and WHCO1 were significantly downregulated by targeting LRP mRNA using siRNA-LAMR1. This knockdown of LRP/LR resulted in a significant decrease of viability in the breast and oesophageal cancer cells as determined by an MTT assay. Transfection of MDA-MB 231 cells with esiRNA-RPSA directed against a different region of the LRP mRNA had similar effects on LRP/LR expression and cell viability compared to siRNA-LAMR1, excluding an off-target effect of siRNA-LAMR1. This reduction in cellular viability is as a consequence of apoptosis induction as indicated by the exposure of the phosphatidylserine protein on the surface of breast MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and oesophageal WHCO1 cancer cells, respectively, detected by an Annexin-V/FITC assay as well as nuclear morphological changes observed post-staining with Hoechst. These observations indicate that LRP/LR is crucial for the maintenance of cellular viability of breast and oesophageal cancer cells and recommend siRNA technology targeting LRP expression as a possible novel alternative technique for breast and oesophageal cancer treatment. PMID:26427016

  10. Knockdown of LRP/LR Induces Apoptosis in Breast and Oesophageal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, Katarina; Veale, Rob B.; Weiss, Stefan F. T.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a global burden due to high incidence and mortality rates and is ranked the second most diagnosed disease amongst non-communicable diseases in South Africa. A high expression level of the 37kDa/67kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) is one characteristic of cancer cells. This receptor is implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer cells by supporting tumor angiogenesis, metastasis and especially for this study, the evasion of apoptosis. In the current study, the role of LRP/LR on cellular viability of breast MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and WHCO1 oesophageal cancer cells was investigated. Western blot analysis revealed that total LRP expression levels of MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and WHCO1 were significantly downregulated by targeting LRP mRNA using siRNA-LAMR1. This knockdown of LRP/LR resulted in a significant decrease of viability in the breast and oesophageal cancer cells as determined by an MTT assay. Transfection of MDA-MB 231 cells with esiRNA-RPSA directed against a different region of the LRP mRNA had similar effects on LRP/LR expression and cell viability compared to siRNA-LAMR1, excluding an off-target effect of siRNA-LAMR1. This reduction in cellular viability is as a consequence of apoptosis induction as indicated by the exposure of the phosphatidylserine protein on the surface of breast MCF-7, MDA-MB 231 and oesophageal WHCO1 cancer cells, respectively, detected by an Annexin-V/FITC assay as well as nuclear morphological changes observed post-staining with Hoechst. These observations indicate that LRP/LR is crucial for the maintenance of cellular viability of breast and oesophageal cancer cells and recommend siRNA technology targeting LRP expression as a possible novel alternative technique for breast and oesophageal cancer treatment. PMID:26427016

  11. Molecular identification of Candida species isolated from gastro-oesophageal candidiasis in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Rasoul; Abdi, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this investigation is identification of Candida strains isolated from patients with gastro-oesophageal candidiasis in Tehran, Iran. Background: Gastro-oesophageal candidiasis is a rare infection and appears mainly in debilitated or immunocompromised patients. Colonization by Candida spp. may occur in this region and the organism can remain for several months or years in the absence of inflammation. The main infection symptom is the presence of white plaques in gastro-oesophageal surface. C. albicans remains the most prevalent Candida spp. identified in gastrointestinal candidiasis. Regarding differences in susceptibilities to antifungal drugs among Candida spp., identification of isolates to the species level is significant to quick and appropriate therapy. Patients and methods: A total of 398 patients underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy during February 2012 to October 2014 were included in the present study. Histological sections from all endoscopic gastric and oesophageal biopsies were prepared, stained with Periodic acid–Schiff (PAS), and examined for the presence of fungal elements. Part of the biopsy sample was sub-cultured on sabouraud glucose agar. The genomic DNA of each strain was extracted using FTA® Elute MicroCards. Molecular identification of Candida isolates was performed by PCR-RFLP technique with the restriction enzyme HpaII. Results: Twenty-one out of 398 cases (5.2%) were found to have gastro-oesophageal candidiasis. Candida albicans was the main strain isolated from clinical samples (90.5%), followed by C. glabrata (4.7%), and C. parapsilosis (4.7%). Conclusion: Due to varying antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp. careful species designation for clinical isolates of Candida was recommended by a rapid and meticulous method like PCR-RFLP. PMID:26468349

  12. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation.

  13. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation. PMID:27405681

  14. Intradural chordoma presenting with intratumoral bleeding.

    PubMed

    Vellutini, Eduardo de Arnaldo Silva; de Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes

    2016-03-01

    Intradural clival chordomas are very rare, and only 29 cases have been reported to our knowledge. They arise purely intradurally without bone or dural involvement and may differ from classic clival chordomas in physiopathology and management. We present a 28-year-old woman who presented with intradural clival chordoma and tumoral bleeding. After initial gross macroscopic surgical resection, she presented with tumor recurrence after 2 years, again with intratumoral bleeding. Although usually considered to have a more favorable prognosis in comparison to typical chordomas, intradural chordomas appear to behave as typical chordomas. Intratumoral bleeding may be a sign of an aggressive lesion and risk of recurrence. We highlight the differential diagnosis of intrinsic posterior fossa bleeding, especially in young patients. Intradural chordomas may be underdiagnosed and incorrectly treated as other types of parenchymal hemorrhage.

  15. CLSM bleed water reduction test results

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.; Rajendran, N.

    1997-04-21

    Previous testing by BSRI/SRTC/Raytheon indicated that the CLSM specified for the Tank 20 closure generates about 6 gallons (23 liters) of bleed water per cubic yard of material (0.76 m3).1 This amount to about 10 percent of the total mixing water. HLWE requested that the CLSM mix be optimized to reduce bleed water while maintaining flow. Elimination of bleed water from the CLSM mix specified for High-Level Waste Tank Closure will result in waste minimization, time savings and cost savings. Over thirty mixes were formulated and evaluated at the on-site Raytheon Test Laboratory. Improved low bleed water CLSM mixes were identified. Results are documented in this report.

  16. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop AUB. Some illnesses (like thyroid disease or polycystic ovary syndrome ) can mess with the body's hormones. Problems like ... sex. Doctors ask these questions because conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome and some STDs can cause abnormal bleeding. If ...

  17. Engine bleed air reduction in DC-10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    An 0.8 percent fuel savings was achieved by a reduction in engine bleed air through the use of cabin air recirculation. The recirculation system was evaluated in revenue service on a DC-10. The cabin remained comfortable with reductions in cabin fresh air (engine bleed air) as much as 50 percent. Flight test verified the predicted fuel saving of 0.8 percent.

  18. Management of patients with ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laine, Loren; Jensen, Dennis M

    2012-03-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the step-wise management of patients with overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status is first assessed, and resuscitation initiated as needed. Patients are risk-stratified based on features such as hemodynamic status, comorbidities, age, and laboratory tests. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin is considered to increase diagnostic yield at first endoscopy. Pre-endoscopic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) may be considered to decrease the need for endoscopic therapy but does not improve clinical outcomes. Upper endoscopy is generally performed within 24h. The endoscopic features of ulcers direct further management. Patients with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessels receive endoscopic therapy (e.g., bipolar electrocoagulation, heater probe, sclerosant, clips) and those with an adherent clot may receive endoscopic therapy; these patients then receive intravenous PPI with a bolus followed by continuous infusion. Patients with flat spots or clean-based ulcers do not require endoscopic therapy or intensive PPI therapy. Recurrent bleeding after endoscopic therapy is treated with a second endoscopic treatment; if bleeding persists or recurs, treatment with surgery or interventional radiology is undertaken. Prevention of recurrent bleeding is based on the etiology of the bleeding ulcer. H. pylori is eradicated and after cure is documented anti-ulcer therapy is generally not given. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are stopped; if they must be resumed low-dose COX-2-selective NSAID plus PPI is used. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin should start PPI and generally re-institute aspirin soon after bleeding ceases (within 7 days and ideally 1-3 days). Patients with idiopathic ulcers receive long-term anti-ulcer therapy. PMID:22310222

  19. Management of patients with ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laine, Loren; Jensen, Dennis M

    2012-03-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the step-wise management of patients with overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status is first assessed, and resuscitation initiated as needed. Patients are risk-stratified based on features such as hemodynamic status, comorbidities, age, and laboratory tests. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin is considered to increase diagnostic yield at first endoscopy. Pre-endoscopic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) may be considered to decrease the need for endoscopic therapy but does not improve clinical outcomes. Upper endoscopy is generally performed within 24h. The endoscopic features of ulcers direct further management. Patients with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessels receive endoscopic therapy (e.g., bipolar electrocoagulation, heater probe, sclerosant, clips) and those with an adherent clot may receive endoscopic therapy; these patients then receive intravenous PPI with a bolus followed by continuous infusion. Patients with flat spots or clean-based ulcers do not require endoscopic therapy or intensive PPI therapy. Recurrent bleeding after endoscopic therapy is treated with a second endoscopic treatment; if bleeding persists or recurs, treatment with surgery or interventional radiology is undertaken. Prevention of recurrent bleeding is based on the etiology of the bleeding ulcer. H. pylori is eradicated and after cure is documented anti-ulcer therapy is generally not given. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are stopped; if they must be resumed low-dose COX-2-selective NSAID plus PPI is used. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin should start PPI and generally re-institute aspirin soon after bleeding ceases (within 7 days and ideally 1-3 days). Patients with idiopathic ulcers receive long-term anti-ulcer therapy.

  20. Cough-induced Tracheobronchial Mucosal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hira, Harmanjit Singh

    2011-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with moderate hemoptysis. It was preceded by a severe bout of cough. Flexible bronchoscopy showed diffuse tracheobronchial mucosal petechiae and bleeding. The patient was not suffering with any coagulopathies. He did not receive antiplatelet drugs. Hemoptysis resolved with cough suppressant. Subsequent bronchoscopy revealed the complete resolution of petechiae. The mechanism of bleeding after the bout of coughing is discussed. PMID:23169019

  1. Incidental oesophageal leiomyoma during laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: finding the unexpected does not affect outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jain, Mishank; Atherton, Laura; Acharya, Vikas; Sengupta, Neel; Barreca, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Most bariatric procedures are now performed laparoscopically. Here, we describe a case of incidental oesophageal leiomyoma found during laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB). To our knowledge, this is the first such case reported. Our patient was admitted for an elective LRYGB. She had no upper gastrointestinal symptoms, and therefore did not undergo preoperative oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD). During surgery, a hiatus hernia and an incidental oesophageal leiomyoma were found and treated with hernia repair and enucleation. The end outcome was unaffected. We were able to concomitantly treat the unexpected finding of an oesophageal leiomyoma and a hiatus hernia during the LRYGB. The routine use of OGD prior to bariatric surgery is still controversial. While surgeons should be prepared for unexpected pathologies, when performing laparoscopic bariatric surgery, a routine OGD prior to LRYGB is probably not necessary in asymptomatic patients. Laparoscopic enucleation of oesophageal leiomyoma during LRYGB is feasible and safe. PMID:25994827

  2. [Remote results of conservative and operative treatment of patients with duodenal ulcer complicated by bleeding].

    PubMed

    Iefremov, V V

    2013-08-01

    Analyzed long-term outcomes of 690 patients with duodenal ulcer, complicated by bleeding in Kyiv City Centre gastrointestinal bleeding for the periods 1994-1996 (control group) and 2004-2008 (main group). In the late period of patients who were found giperhlorgidry (moderate and severe), increased by 1.4 tImes, indicating a higher voltage continuous acid production In the main group. With the introduction of modern circuits Helicobacter therapy incidence of H. pylori reduced by half. Improving modern tactical approaches to conservative treatment helped to reduce the frequency of relapses in duodenal ulcer remote period by 2.2 times, acute bleeding--in 1.9 times, increase the frequency of excellent results--in 2.8 times.

  3. Non-cardiac, non-oesophageal chest pain: the relevance of psychological factors

    PubMed Central

    Ho, K; Kang, J; Yeo, B; Ng, W

    1998-01-01

    Background—No cause has been determined for chest pain that is neither cardiac nor oesophageal in origin. 
Aims—To compare the prevalence of lifetime psychiatric disorders and current psychological distress in three consecutive series of patients with chronic chest or abdominal pain. 
Patients—Thirty nine patients with non-cardiac chest pain and no abnormality on oesophagogastroduodenoscopy, oesophageal manometry, and 24 hour pH monitoring; 22 patients with non-cardiac chest pain having endoscopic abnormality, oesophageal dysmotility, and/or pathological reflux; and 36 patients with biliary colic. 
Methods—The Diagnostic Interview Schedule and the 28 item General Health Questionnaire were administered to all patients. 
Results—Patients with non-cardiac chest pain and no upper gastrointestinal disease had a higher proportion of panic disorder (15%), obsessive-compulsive disorder (21%), and major depressive episodes (28%) than patients with gallstone disease (0%, p<0.02; 3%, p<0.02; and 8%, p<0.05, respectively). In contrast, there were no differences between patients with non-cardiac chest pain and upper gastrointestinal disease and patients with gallstone disease in any of the DSM-111 defined lifetime psychiatric diagnoses. Using the General Health Questionnaire, 49% of patients with non-cardiac chest pain without upper gastrointestinal disease scored above the cut off point (that is, more than 4), which was considered indicative of non-psychotic psychiatric disturbance, whereas only 14% of patients with gallstones did so (p<0.005). The proportions of such cases were however similar between patients with non-cardiac chest pain and upper gastrointestinal disease (27%) and patients with gallstones. 
Conclusions—Psychological factors may play a role in the pathogenesis of chest pain that is neither cardiac nor oesophagogastric in origin. Keywords: chest pain;  oesophageal manometry;  gastro-oesophageal reflux disease;  oesophageal p

  4. Africa’s Oesophageal Cancer Corridor: Geographic Variations in Incidence Correlate with Certain Micronutrient Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Schaafsma, Torin; Wakefield, Jon; Hanisch, Rachel; Bray, Freddie; Schüz, Joachim; Joy, Edward J. M.; Watts, Michael J.; McCormack, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Background The aetiology of Africa’s easterly-lying corridor of squamous cell oesophageal cancer is poorly understood. Micronutrient deficiencies have been implicated in this cancer in other areas of the world, but their role in Africa is unclear. Without prospective cohorts, timely insights can instead be gained through ecological studies. Methods Across Africa we assessed associations between a country’s oesophageal cancer incidence rate and food balance sheet-derived estimates of mean national dietary supplies of 7 nutrients: calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), iodine (I), magnesium (Mg), selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn). We included 32 countries which had estimates of dietary nutrient supplies and of better-quality GLOBCAN 2012 cancer incidence rates. Bayesian hierarchical Poisson lognormal models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios for oesophageal cancer associated with each nutrient, adjusted for age, gender, energy intake, phytate, smoking and alcohol consumption, as well as their 95% posterior credible intervals (CI). Adult dietary deficiencies were quantified using an estimated average requirements (EAR) cut-point approach. Results Adjusted incidence rate ratios for oesophageal cancer associated with a doubling of mean nutrient supply were: for Fe 0.49 (95% CI: 0.29–0.82); Mg 0.58 (0.31–1.08); Se 0.40 (0.18–0.90); and Zn 0.29 (0.11–0.74). There were no associations with Ca, Cu and I. Mean national nutrient supplies exceeded adult EARs for Mg and Fe in most countries. For Se, mean supplies were less than EARs (both sexes) in 7 of the 10 highest oesophageal cancer ranking countries, compared to 23% of remaining countries. For Zn, mean supplies were less than the male EARs in 8 of these 10 highest ranking countries compared to in 36% of other countries. Conclusions Ecological associations are consistent with the potential role of Se and/or Zn deficiencies in squamous cell oesophageal cancer in Africa. Individual-level analytical studies are

  5. Utility of the Shock Index and Other Risk-Scoring Tools in Patients with Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Ratra, Atul; Rassameehiran, Supannee; Parupudi, Sreeram; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-03-01

    Patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding frequently require hospitalization and have a mortality rate that ranges from 6% to 14%. These patients need rapid clinical assessment to determine the urgency of endoscopy and the need for endoscopic treatment. Risk-scoring tools, such as the Rockall score and the Glasgow-Blatchford score, are commonly used in this assessment. These tools clearly help identify high-risk patients but do not necessarily have good predictive value in identifying important outcomes. Their diagnostic accuracy in identifying rebleeding and mortality ranges from poor to fair. The shock index (heart rate divided by systolic blood pressure) provides an integrated assessment of the cardiovascular status. It can be easily calculated during the initial evaluation of patients and monitoring after treatment. The shock index has been used in a few studies in patients with acute GI bleeding, including studies to determine which patients need emergency endoscopy, to predict complications after corrosive ingestions, to identify delayed hemorrhage following pancreatic surgery, and to evaluate the utility of angiograms to identify sites of GI bleeding. Not all studies have found the shock index to be useful in patients with GI bleeding, however. This may reflect the unpredictable natural history of various etiologies of GI bleeding, comorbidity that may influence blood pressure and/or heart rate, and inadequate data acquisition. The shock index needs more formal study in patients with GI bleeding admitted to medical intensive care units. Important considerations include the initial response to resuscitation, persistent bleeding following initial treatment, and rebleeding following a period of stabilization. In addition, it needs correlation with other risk-scoring tools. PMID:26954657

  6. Balancing ischaemia and bleeding risks with novel oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Baber, Usman; Mastoris, Ioannis; Mehran, Roxana

    2014-12-01

    Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) have long been the standard of care for treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE), and thromboprophylaxis in atrial fibrillation (AF). Despite their efficacy, their use requires frequent monitoring and is complicated by drug-drug interactions and the need to maintain a narrow therapeutic window. Since 2009, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), including the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and the direct factor Xa inhibitors apixaban, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, have become alternative options to VKAs owing to their predictable and safe pharmacological profiles. The overall clinical effect of these drugs, which is a balance between ischaemic benefit and bleeding harm, varies according to the clinical scenario. As adjunctive therapy to dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with acute coronary syndrome, NOACs are associated with incremental bleeding risks and modest benefits. For treatment of VTE, NOACs have a safer profile than VKAs and a similar efficacy. In thromboprophylaxis in AF, NOACs are associated with the greatest benefits by reducing both ischaemic events and haemorrhagic complications and might reduce mortality compared with VKAs. The role of NOACs continues to evolve as these drugs are evaluated in different patient populations, including those with renal impairment or with AF and undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:25367652

  7. [Mid-gastrointestinal bleeding - endoscopy sheds light in the darkness].

    PubMed

    May, A

    2014-08-01

    Mid-gastrointestinal bleeding is defined as a bleeding of the small bowel and is the most common indication for small bowel endoscopy. Intraoperative enteroscopy has been regarded as gold standard for a long time. With the introduction of different endoscopy techniques, they play now the central role, whereas intraoperative enteroscopy has become a reserve method for selected patients. Actually, there are, beside capsule endoscopy, five non-surgical, flexible enteroscopy techniques available. In Germany and Europe balloon-assisted enteroscopy (double balloon and single balloon enteroscopy) is mainly used. Double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) is the "oldest" flexible enteroscopy technique and has become established throughout the world for diagnostic and therapeutic examinations of the small bowel. The majority of the studies have been performed with DBE and it provides the highest rate of complete enteroscopy. Nevertheless, technical improvements to make enteroscopy easier and faster are still required. In patients with chronic MGI or problematic situations capsule endoscopy is an ideal screening option. In case of acute MGI the flexible enteroscopy techniques should be preferred because of the high diagnostic yield combined with the possibility of endoscopic therapeutic interventions. In difficult cases with unsuccessful enteroscopy, CT angiography and conventional angiography with the option of embolisation had proved their value.

  8. An Unsusual Case of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Guru, Pramod Kumar; Iyer, Vivek N.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 81 Final Diagnosis: Gastrointestinal amyloidosis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage • hypotension Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endoscopy Specialty: Criitcal Care Medicine Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Amyloidosis is a multisystem disease, and can present with multitude of nonspecific symptoms. Gastrointestinal amyloidosis is common, and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in these patients has a wide differential diagnosis. The present case features the distinctive endoscopic finding of submucosal hematoma as a clue to immunoglobin light chain (AL) amyloid involvement of the gastrointestinal tract. Case Report: An 81-year-old woman with AL amyloidosis was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) for evaluation of GI bleeding. Prior to the bleeding episode, the patient had undergone paracentesis for management of her ascites related to restrictive cardiomyopathy. Initial evaluation was negative for any intra-abdominal catastrophe related to her recent paracentesis. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was negative for any source of bleeding. However, colonoscopy showed a ruptured submucosal hematoma, which is a rare but classical finding in patients with amyloidosis. The patient was managed conservatively and did not have any further episodes of bleeding in the hospital. She unfortunately died due to her primary illness 6 weeks after discharge from the hospital. Conclusions: The finding of submucosal hematoma on endoscopy is a rare but sentinel sign for amyloidosis involvement in the GI tract. PMID:26979633

  9. Bleeding and clotting in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Dittus, Christopher; Streiff, Michael; Ansell, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a relatively common inherited vascular disorder that was first described in 1864, and is notable for epistaxis, telangiectasia, and arterial venous malformations. While genetic tests are available, the diagnosis remains clinical, and is based on the Curacao criteria. Patients with HHT are at increased risk for both bleeding and clotting events. Because of these competing complications, hematologists are often faced with difficult clinical decisions. While the majority of management decisions revolve around bleeding complications, it is not infrequent for these patients to require anticoagulation for thrombosis. Any anticoagulation recommendations must take into account the bleeding risks associated with HHT. Recent reviews have found that HHT patients can be safely anticoagulated, with the most frequent complication being worsened epistaxis. Large clinical trials have shown that factor IIa and Xa inhibitors have less intracranial bleeding than warfarin, and basic coagulation research has provided a possible mechanism. This article describes the anticoagulation dilemma posed when a 62-year-old female patient with a history of bleeding events associated with HHT was diagnosed with a pulmonary embolism. The subsequent discussion focuses on the approach to anticoagulation in the HHT patient, and addresses the role of the new oral anticoagulants. PMID:25879004

  10. Prevention and management of treatment-induced pharyngo-oesophageal stricture.

    PubMed

    Prisman, Eitan; Miles, Brett A; Genden, Eric M

    2013-08-01

    Pharyngo-oesophageal stricture (PES) is a serious complication that occurs in up to a third of patients treated with external beam radiotherapy or combined chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer. This entity is under-reported and as a result, our understanding of the pathophysiology and prevention of this complication is restricted. This Review presents the knowledge so far on radiation-related and non-radiation-related risk factors for PES, including tumour stage and subsite, patient age, and comorbidities. The interventions to decrease this toxicity are discussed, including early detection of PES, initiation of an oral diet, and protection of swallowing structures from high-dose radiation. We discuss various treatment options, including swallowing exercises and manoeuvres, endoscopic dilatations, and for advanced cases, oesophageal reconstruction. Study of the subset of patients who develop this toxicity and early recognition and intervention of this pathological change in future trials will help to optimise treatment of these patients. PMID:23896277

  11. Iatrogenic oesophageal perforation during placement of an endoscopic vacuum therapy device

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, Edwin; Patel, Anant; Hindmarsh, Andrew; Sujendran, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is increasingly being used as a means of managing perforations or anastomotic leaks of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Published outcomes are favourable, with few mentions of complications or morbidity. We present a case in which the management of a gastric perforation with endoscopic vacuum therapy was complicated by cervical oesophageal perforation. The case highlights the risks of such endoscopic therapeutic procedures and is the first report in the literature to describe significant visceral injury during placement of a VAC device for upper GI perforation. Iatrogenic oesophageal perforation is an inherent risk to upper GI endoscopy and the risk increases in therapeutic endoscopic procedures. Complications may be reduced by management under a multidisciplinary team in a centre with specialist upper GI services. There is no doubt that the endoscopic VAC approach is becoming established practice, and training in its use must reflect its increasingly widespread adoption. PMID:27470015

  12. Growth and development after oesophageal atresia surgery: Need for long-term multidisciplinary follow-up.

    PubMed

    IJsselstijn, Hanneke; Gischler, Saskia J; Toussaint, Leontien; Spoel, Marjolein; Zijp, Monique H M van der Cammen-van; Tibboel, Dick

    2016-06-01

    Survival rates in oesophageal atresia patients have reached over 90%. In long-term follow-up studies the focus has shifted from purely surgical or gastrointestinal evaluation to a multidisciplinary approach. We reviewed the literature on the long-term morbidity of these patients and discuss mainly issues of physical growth and neurodevelopment. We conclude that growth problems - both stunting and wasting - are frequently seen, but that sufficient longitudinal data are lacking. Therefore, it is unclear whether catch-up growth into adolescence and adulthood occurs. Data on determinants of growth retardation are also lacking in current literature. Studies on neurodevelopment beyond preschool age are scarce but oesophageal atresia patients seem at risk for academic problems and motor function delay. Many factors contribute to the susceptibility to growth and development problems and we propose a multidisciplinary follow-up schedule into adulthood future care which may help improve quality of life.

  13. An unusual case of an oesophageal foreign body presenting as torticollis.

    PubMed

    Walton, J M; Darr, A; George, A

    2016-03-01

    Oesophageal foreign bodies (FBs) are commonly encountered in an otolaryngology setting. The majority of such cases remain in the paediatric population, where obtaining an accurate history of events is challenging. Oesophageal FBs present in a variety of ways other than dysphagia, which may result in delayed presentation, diagnosis and subsequent treatment. Where an ingested FB is a battery, early removal is advocated owing to the potential for significant complications, a problem highlighted by a patient safety alert issued by NHS England. A common paediatric presentation, torticollis has a multitude of potential underlying causes. We present an unusual case of torticollis in a two-year old girl, subsequently revealed to be caused by an ingested button battery.

  14. Computer-assisted documentation and analysis of wound healing of the nasal and oesophageal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Weber, R; Keerl, R; Jaspersen, D; Huppmann, A; Schick, B; Draf, W

    1996-11-01

    Our aim was to analyse the dynamics of healing processes in the nose and oesophagus by videoendoscopic examination and reconstruction of the natural dynamics and continuity of a process using modern computer technology and so-called morphing software. Thirteen patients were followed-up for six months after sinus surgery and three weeks after oesophagitis. Four overlapping and meshing phases of wound healing following sinus surgery with significant interindividual differences. Topical budesonide shortened the duration of wound healing phases. Healing of oesophagitis occurred approximately symmetrically from the wound edges to the centre with constant velocity. Computer-assisted morphing enables dynamic analysing of mucosal processes under the following preconditions: Availability of a valid imaging method for documentation and measurement with the generation of congruent images. The process under analysis must run without sudden leaps and there must be adequate choice of timing of single measurement procedures.

  15. What is happening? The evolving role of the blood bank in the management of the bleeding patient: The impact of TEG as an early diagnostic predictor for bleeding.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Aurora; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2014-12-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding and treatment of coagulopathy, the management of the bleeding patient remains as a major challenge. Traditionally, the main task of the blood bank has been to guarantee the supply of high quality blood and blood components/products to the hospital. Decisions regarding the use of blood components have always been the clinicians' responsibility, with little active involvement of the transfusion service. In the last years, many hospitals have implemented the use of "acute transfusion packages" for massively bleeding patients and point-of-care (POC) instruments such as TEG and RoTEM for monitoring coagulation status in this patient group. This, in addition to the implementation of patient blood management programs in the hospitals, has led to an increasing involvement of transfusion medicine specialists in transfusion decision making, especially regarding strategies for monitoring and treatment of the massively bleeding patient. This new trend may contribute to a more optimal management and monitoring of the bleeding patient, as POC testing may be used as an early predictor for blood usage. The blood bank should optimise the use of POC testing to provide accurate information in a cost-effective way.

  16. Gastrointestinal bleeding as presentation of small bowel metastases of malignant melanoma: Is surgery a good choice?

    PubMed Central

    Conversano, Angelica; Macina, Simona; Indellicato, Rocco; Lacavalla, Domenico; D’Abbicco, Dario

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Melanoma shows a particular predilection in involving small intestine both in a single site and in multiple localization and acute or chronic gastrointestinal bleedings are often the first sign of tumour. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report two cases of GI metastases of malignant melanoma, one presented with only a big mass that cause intestinal obstruction and the other with a tumour spread throughout the small intestine that produce enterorrhagia. DISCUSSION Diagnosis and follow-up are very difficult: CT scan, PET-CT scan and capsule endoscopy should be complementary for the assessment of patients with GI symptoms and melanoma history. CONCLUSION What is the role of surgery? Several studies suggest metastasectomy to achieve both R0 results and palliative resolutions of acute symptoms, such as obstruction, pain, and bleeding. PMID:25262323

  17. PTCH1 mutation is a frequent event in oesophageal basaloid squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsuyoshi; Mitomi, Hiroyuki; Imamhasan, Abdukadir; Hayashi, Takuo; Kurisaki-Arakawa, Aiko; Mitani, Keiko; Takahashi, Michiko; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Yao, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC) is a rare and poorly differentiated variant of typical squamous cell carcinoma, and is characterised in part by activation of the Wnt signalling pathway. We previously demonstrated that constitutive activation of the Wnt signalling pathway by epigenetic silencing of secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (SFRP4) is observed in this tumour. Increasing evidence shows that the Wnt signalling pathway cross-talks with other developmental pathways, including the Hedgehog (HH) pathway. The HH pathway is stimulated by inactivating mutations of PTCH1, which have a well-described oncogenic role in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin. We employed polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing to detect inactivating mutations of PTCH1 using archival tissue samples of 30 oesophageal BSCCs. The frequency of PTCH1 mutation was compared to that of Wnt component genes that we reported previously. We found PTCH1 mutations in 53.3% (16/30) of cases, revealing T1195S as a hotspot mutation. This frequency is quite high for cancers other than BCC of the skin, and PTCH1 mutations were almost mutually exclusive with mutations in APC, Axin1 and Axin2. Considering the fact that activation of Wnt signalling via down-regulation of APC and SFRP5 due to promoter methylation is observed in BCC of the skin, Wnt signalling activation in oesophageal BSCC might be a secondary effect of the PTCH1-inactivating mutations. These findings suggest that the HH and Wnt pathways coordinately contribute to tumourigenesis in oesophageal BSCC. Furthermore, this study provides a potential therapeutic application for HH pathway inhibitors in oesophageal BSCC with highly malignant potential. PMID:25395299

  18. The Effects of Ankaferd Blood Stopper on the Recovery Process in an Experimental Oesophageal Perforation Model

    PubMed Central

    Sarıkaş, Necla Gürbüz; Korkmaz, Tanzer; Kahramansoy, Nurettin; Kılıçgün, Ali; Boran, Çetin; Boztaş, Güledal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oesophageal perforation is a life-threatening pathology that is generally treated conservatively; however, surgical procedures are frequently performed. A topical haemostatic agent, Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS), also has beneficial wound-healing effects. Aims: This study aimed to determine the effects of ABS following experimental oesophageal perforations. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: The experimental rats were classified into 6 groups (with 7 rats in each group). Pairs of groups (primary repair alone and primary repair + ABS) were terminated in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd weeks following injury. The oesophageal perforations, which were 8–10 mm in length, were created using a nasogastric tube. The perforation sites were repaired with a 6-0 polyglactine thread in the primary repair groups. Additionally, ABS was sprayed over the perforation site in the treatment groups. Each oesophagus was evaluated histopathologically. Results: There were fewer microabscesses and areas of necrosis in the ABS groups compared with the primary repair groups. The histopathological evaluation revealed that the ABS groups had less inflammation and more re-epithelisation compared to the primary repair groups (p=0.002 and p=0.003, respectively). Fibrosis in the ABS groups was moderate in the 2nd week and mild in the 3rd week. Comparing the groups with respect to the time intervals, only the 1st week groups showed a significant difference in terms of re-epithelialisation (p=0.044). Conclusion: Topical ABS application on the repaired experimental oesophageal perforation regions led to positive wound-healing effects compared with the rats that were administered the primary repair alone. PMID:25759779

  19. Absence of Helicobacter pylori is not protective against peptic ulcer bleeding in elderly on offending agents: lessons from an exceptionally low prevalence population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Yeh; Noridah, Nordin; Syed Hassan, Syed Abdul Aziz; Menon, Jayaram

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is exceptionally rare in population from the north-eastern region of Peninsular Malaysia. This provides us an opportunity to contemplate the future without H. pylori in acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods. All cases in the GI registry with GI bleeding between 2003 and 2006 were reviewed. Cases with confirmed non-variceal aetiology were analysed. Rockall score > 5 was considered high risk for bleeding and primary outcomes studied were in-hospital mortality, recurrent bleeding and need for surgery. Results. The incidence of non-variceal upper GI bleeding was 2.2/100,000 person-years. Peptic ulcer bleeding was the most common aetiology (1.8/100,000 person-years). In-hospital mortality (3.6%), recurrent bleeding (9.6%) and need for surgery (4.0%) were uncommon in this population with a largely low risk score (85.2% with score ≤5). Elderly were at greater risk for bleeding (mean 68.5 years, P = 0.01) especially in the presence of duodenal ulcers (P = 0.04) despite gastric ulcers being more common. NSAIDs, aspirin and co-morbidities were the main risk factors. Conclusions. The absence of H. pylori infection may not reduce the risk of peptic ulcer bleeding in the presence of risk factors especially offending drugs in the elderly.

  20. Lymphadenectomy and risk of reoperation or mortality shortly after surgery for oesophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lagergren, Jesper; Mattsson, Fredrik; Davies, Andrew; Lindblad, Mats; Lagergren, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic role of lymphadenectomy during surgery for oesophageal cancer is questioned. We aimed to test whether higher lymph node harvest increases the risk of early postoperative reoperation or mortality. A population-based cohort study including almost all patients who underwent resection for oesophageal cancer in Sweden in 1987–2010. Data were collected from medical records and well-established nationwide Swedish registries. The exposures were number of removed lymph nodes (primary) and number of node metastases (secondary). The main study outcome was reoperation/mortality within 30 days of primary surgery. Relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Poisson regression, adjusted for age, sex, co-morbidity, neoadjuvant therapy, tumour stage, tumour histology, surgeon volume, and calendar period. Among 1,820 participants, the risk of reoperation/mortality did not increase with greater lymph node harvest (RR = 0.98, 95%CI 0.96–1.00, discrete variable) or with greater number of removed metastatic nodes (RR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.95–1.05, discrete variable). Similarly, in stratified analyses within pre-defined categories of tumor stage, surgeon volume and calendar period, increased number of removed nodes or node metastases did not increase the risk of reoperation/mortality. Lymphadenectomy during oesophageal cancer surgery is a safe procedure in the short term perspective. PMID:27796333

  1. Protective role of ALDH2 against acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in oesophageal squamous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Amanuma, Yusuke; Ohashi, Shinya; Itatani, Yoshiro; Tsurumaki, Mihoko; Matsuda, Shun; Kikuchi, Osamu; Nakai, Yukie; Miyamoto, Shin'ichi; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Whelan, Kelly A; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Chiba, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Tomonari; Muto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Acetaldehyde is an ethanol-derived definite carcinogen that causes oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a key enzyme that eliminates acetaldehyde, and impairment of ALDH2 increases the risk of ESCC. ALDH2 is produced in various tissues including the liver, heart, and kidney, but the generation and functional roles of ALDH2 in the oesophagus remain elusive. Here, we report that ethanol drinking increased ALDH2 production in the oesophagus of wild-type mice. Notably, levels of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage represented by N(2)-ethylidene-2'-deoxyguanosine were higher in the oesophagus of Aldh2-knockout mice than in wild-type mice upon ethanol consumption. In vitro experiments revealed that acetaldehyde induced ALDH2 production in both mouse and human oesophageal keratinocytes. Furthermore, the N(2)-ethylidene-2'-deoxyguanosine levels increased in both Aldh2-knockout mouse keratinocytes and ALDH2-knockdown human keratinocytes treated with acetaldehyde. Conversely, forced production of ALDH2 sharply diminished the N(2)-ethylidene-2'-deoxyguanosine levels. Our findings provide new insight into the preventive role of oesophageal ALDH2 against acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage. PMID:26374466

  2. Assessment of a custom-built Raman spectroscopic probe for diagnosis of early oesophageal neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almond, L. Max; Hutchings, Jo; Kendall, Catherine; Day, John C. C.; Stevens, Oliver A. C.; Lloyd, Gavin R.; Shepherd, Neil A.; Barr, Hugh; Stone, Nick

    2012-08-01

    We evaluate the potential of a custom-built fiber-optic Raman probe, suitable for in vivo use, to differentiate between benign, metaplastic (Barrett's oesophagus), and neoplastic (dysplastic and malignant) oesophageal tissue ex vivo on short timescales. We measured 337 Raman spectra (λex=830 nm Pex=60 mW t=1 s) using a confocal probe from fresh (298) and snap-frozen (39) oesophageal tissue collected during surgery or endoscopy from 28 patients. Spectra were correlated with histopathology and used to construct a multivariate classification model which was tested using leave one tissue site out cross-validation in order to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the probe system. The Raman probe system was able to differentiate, when tested with leave one site out cross-validation, between normal squamous oesophagus, Barrett's oesophagus and neoplasia with sensitivities of (838% to 6%) and specificities of (89% to 99%). Analysis of a two group model to differentiate Barrett's oesophagus and neoplasia demonstrated a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 87% for classification of neoplastic disease. This fiber-optic Raman system can provide rapid, objective, and accurate diagnosis of oesophageal pathology ex vivo. The confocal design of this probe enables superficial mucosal abnormalities (metaplasia and dysplasia) to be classified in clinically applicable timescales paving the way for an in vivo trial.

  3. Oesophageal Doppler cardiac output monitoring: a longstanding tool with evolving indications and applications.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, Douglas A; Roche, Anthony M

    2014-12-01

    Much work has been done over the years to assess cardiac output and better grasp haemodynamic profiles of patients in critical care and during major surgery. Pulmonary artery catheterization has long been considered as the standard of care, especially in critical care environments, however this dogma has been challenged over the last 10-15 years. This has led to a greater focus on alternate, lesser invasive technologies. This review focuses on the scientific and clinical outcomes basis of oesophageal Doppler monitoring. The science underpinning Doppler shift assessment of velocity stretches back over 100 years, whereas the clinical applicability, and specifically clinical outcomes improvement can be attributed to the last 20 years. Oesophageal Doppler monitoring (ODM), and its associated protocol-guided fluid administration, has been shown to reduce complications, length of stay, and overall healthcare cost when incorporated into perioperative fluid management algorithms. However, more recent advances in enhanced recovery after surgery programs have led to similar improvements, leading the clinician to consider the role of Oesophageal Doppler Monitor to be more focused in high-risk surgery and/or the high-risk patient.

  4. [Function of oesophagus and gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Höhne, S; Wachter, R; Merkel, N; Hesse, V; Finke, R

    2014-04-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER) has a special meaning for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Twelve voluntary patients with CF up to the age of 25 underwent an oesophageal manometry and a 24-hour impedance-pH monitoring. These patients were without symptoms of GER. The examination proved an acid GER in 42 %. In the total population the frequency is ≤ 10 %. In 11 of 12 patients a pathologically low pressure of the lower oesophageal sphincter (LES) was found. No significant correlations between the DeMeester score and the pressure of the LES, the reflux and respiratory symptomatology, the lung function as well as the quality of life could be proven. However, there was a significant correlation between the DeMeester score and the acid clearance time. 37 % of the registered cough pushes were related to a GER, of which 78 % were associated with an acid GER. Therefore, coughing in patients with CF must not necessarily be caused by the underlying disease. The timely detection of a pathological GER in patients with CF, but without symptoms of GER, and its prompt therapy could protect the lung function. PMID:24718938

  5. Influence of different intragastric stimuli on triggering of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation in the dog.

    PubMed

    Stakeberg, J; Lehmann, A

    1999-04-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux in the dog is mainly caused by transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation (TLOSR), the major stimulus for which is distension of the stomach. The possibility that liquid and/or acid sensors in the proximal stomach reduce the incidence and/or shorten the duration of TLOSR was addressed in the present study. Manometric recordings of the pharynx, oesophagus, lower oesophageal sphincter and stomach were made in awake dogs equipped with an oesophagostomy. TLOSRs were induced by insufflation of air or infusion of liquid nutrients with varying pH. Intragastric distension with air provoked TLOSRs with a significantly shorter duration than those seen after distension with liquid (4.3 +/- 0.5 vs 9.6 +/- 0.3 sec; P < 0.05). There were fewer TLOSRs at high intragastric pH (pH 5.0: 3.1 +/- 0.5/90 min) than at low pH (pH 1.5: 5.5 +/- 0.9/90 min, P < 0.05). Successfully propagated peristalsis following a TLOSR was more common after stimulation with liquid than with air. It can be concluded that there are H(+)-sensing mechanisms in the stomach which stimulate triggering of TLOSR. In addition, the reduced duration of TLOSR during air insufflation shows that the physical state of the distending stimulus can affect the patterning of TLOSR.

  6. Protective role of ALDH2 against acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in oesophageal squamous epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Amanuma, Yusuke; Ohashi, Shinya; Itatani, Yoshiro; Tsurumaki, Mihoko; Matsuda, Shun; Kikuchi, Osamu; Nakai, Yukie; Miyamoto, Shin’ichi; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Whelan, Kelly A.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Chiba, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Tomonari; Muto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Acetaldehyde is an ethanol-derived definite carcinogen that causes oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a key enzyme that eliminates acetaldehyde, and impairment of ALDH2 increases the risk of ESCC. ALDH2 is produced in various tissues including the liver, heart, and kidney, but the generation and functional roles of ALDH2 in the oesophagus remain elusive. Here, we report that ethanol drinking increased ALDH2 production in the oesophagus of wild-type mice. Notably, levels of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage represented by N2-ethylidene-2′-deoxyguanosine were higher in the oesophagus of Aldh2-knockout mice than in wild-type mice upon ethanol consumption. In vitro experiments revealed that acetaldehyde induced ALDH2 production in both mouse and human oesophageal keratinocytes. Furthermore, the N2-ethylidene-2′-deoxyguanosine levels increased in both Aldh2-knockout mouse keratinocytes and ALDH2-knockdown human keratinocytes treated with acetaldehyde. Conversely, forced production of ALDH2 sharply diminished the N2-ethylidene-2′-deoxyguanosine levels. Our findings provide new insight into the preventive role of oesophageal ALDH2 against acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage. PMID:26374466

  7. Diagnosis of Bleeding Meckel's Diverticulum in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung Noh; Jang, Hyun Joo; Ye, Byong Duk; Jeon, Seong Ran; Im, Jong Pil; Cha, Jae Myung; Kim, Seong-Eun; Park, Soo Jung; Kim, Eun Ran; Chang, Dong Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Various modalities have been used to diagnose Meckel's diverticulum (MD) in practice, but with their diagnostic accuracy deemed to be unsatisfactory for clinical practice. Moreover, the usefulness of these modalities has not been evaluated for the diagnosis of bleeding MD in adults, due to the relative rarity of this condition. Therefore, the aim of our multicenter study was to determine the most accurate modality for the preoperative diagnosis of bleeding MD in adults. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of the diagnostic accuracy for small bowel bleeding associated with MD of different modalities in patients ≥18 years old who underwent assessment for MD, with confirmation at the time of explorative surgery. Diagnostic accuracy of the different modalities was evaluated against the diagnosis obtained using technetium-99m pertechnetate scintigraphy (also known as Meckel's scan), considered to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of bleeding MD in pediatrics. Results Thirty-five adults were identified with bleeding in MD over the study period, between 2005 and 2012. Among these patients, only 24 (68.6%) were diagnosed with MD preoperatively. The mean (95% confidence interval) diagnostic accuracy of selected modalities was as follows: Meckel’s scan, 21.4% (5.7%-51.2%); capsule endoscopy, 35.7% (14.0%-64.4%); balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BAE), 85.0% (61.1%-96.0%); angiography, 0.0% (0.0%-80.2%); computed tomography, 31.8% (14.7%-54.9%); and small-bowel follow-through, 62.5% (25.9%-90.0%). The diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for BAE than for Meckel’s scan (P = 0.001). Conclusions Among available diagnostic modalities, BAE provides the highest accuracy for the diagnosis of bleeding MD in adults and, therefore, should be considered as the preferred modality for preoperative diagnosis. PMID:27626641

  8. Successful Management of Neobladder Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Dinesh; Chatterjee, Kshitij; Osborne, Scott; Kakkera, Krishna; Deas, Steven; Li, Ruizong; Erbland, Marcia

    2016-10-01

    Hematuria from a neobladder can occur due to a variety of pathologies including tumors, stones, and fistulas. Variceal bleeding in a neobladder is a very rare condition with only one case reported in literature. We present a case of a patient with cirrhosis and portal hypertension and an ileocolic orthotopic neobladder presenting with hematuria. Computed tomographic angiography showed dilated varices around the neobladder which were successfully embolized. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report case of variceal bleeding in a neobladder successfully managed with the combination of TIPS (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) procedure and embolization.

  9. The Approach to Occult Gastrointestinal Bleed.

    PubMed

    Naut, Edgar R

    2016-09-01

    Occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not visible and may present with a positive fecal occult blood test or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure bleeding can be overt or occult, with no source identified despite an appropriate diagnostic workup. A stepwise approach to this evaluation after negative upper and lower endoscopy has been shown to be cost effective. This includes repeat endoscopies if warranted, followed by video capsule endoscopy (VCE) if no obstruction is present. If the VCE is positive then specific endoscopic intervention may be possible. If negative, patients may undergo either repeat testing or watchful waiting with iron supplements.

  10. [Epidemiology of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Gaudong Mbethe, G L; Mounguengui, D; Ondounda, M; Magne, C; Bignoumbra, R; Ntsoumou, S; Moussavou Kombila, J-B; Nzenze, J R

    2014-01-01

    The department of internal medicine of the military hospital of Gabon managed 92 cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from April 2009 to November 2011. The frequency of these hemorrhages in the department was 8.2%; they occurred most often in adults aged 30-40 years and 50-60 years, and mainly men (74%). Erosive-ulcerative lesions (65.2%) were the leading causes of hemorrhage, followed by esophageal varices (15.2%). These results underline the importance of preventive measures for the control of this bleeding.

  11. Persistent Bleeding Following a Stapled Hemorrhoidopexy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Taek; Lee, Jae-Bum; Kim, Mi Jung; Lee, Doo-Seok; Youk, Eui-Gon; Kim, Do-Sun; Lee, Doo-Han

    2016-01-01

    A stapled hemorrhoidopexy (SH) is widely used for treatment of patients with grades III and IV hemorrhoids. The SH is easy to perform, is associated with less pain and allows early return to normal activities. However, complications, whether severe or not, have been reported. Here, we present the case of a female patient with persistent bleeding after a SH. The bleeding was caused by the formation of granulation tissue at the stapler line, diagnosed with sigmoidoscopy, and successfully treated via transanal excision (TAE) under spinal anesthesia. The biopsy showed inflammatory granulation tissue. After the TAE, her symptom was completely gone. PMID:27437395

  12. Mild bleeding disorders: review of 120 patients.

    PubMed

    Bolton-Maggs, P; Wilkinson, L S

    1984-01-01

    Of 120 patients presenting with mild bleeding disorders, 63 were found to have a definite coagulopathy. The commonest disorders were haemophilia, Christmas disease and von Willebrand's disease (vWd), the latter being predominant. Diagnosis led to prophylactic treatment prior to surgery in 18 patients with prevention of excessive haemorrhage. Three patients who had received blood products developed hepatitis. DDAVP (desamino-cys-1-8-D-arginine vasopressin) is the treatment of choice in suitable mildly affected patients with haemophilia A and vWd. Examination of blood group distribution suggests an excess of group O among patients with bleeding disorders, especially those with vWd.

  13. Comparison of end-tidal carbon dioxide, oxygen saturation and clinical signs for the detection of oesophageal intubation.

    PubMed

    Vaghadia, H; Jenkins, L C; Ford, R W

    1989-09-01

    The reliability of various methods for detecting oesophageal intubation was assessed by means of a single blind study in rats. Both oesophagus and trachea were simultaneously intubated. The presence or absence of various clinical signs was noted during tracheal or oesophageal ventilation and arterial blood gases and end-tidal CO2 were measured. Oesophageal ventilation for one minute was associated with significant decreases (P less than 0.001) in pH, PaO2 and SaO2 and a significant (P less than 0.001) increase in PaCO2. Although mean PaO2 decreased by 70 per cent and mean SaO2 decreased by 31 per cent, 43 percent of rats failed to demonstrate a decrease in SaO2 below 85 per cent. Oxygen saturation was the least reliable method for detecting oesophageal intubation (sensitivity = 0.5, specificity = 0.9, positive predictive value (PPV) = 0.8). Chest movement was the most reliable clinical sign for detecting oesophageal intubation (sensitivity = 0.9, specificity = 1.0, PPV = 1.0). Oesophageal rattle was the second most reliable clinical sign (PPV = 0.9). Moisture condensation in the tracheal tube (PPV = 1.0) and abdominal distension (PPV = 0.9) were judged to be the least reliable because each had a high false negative rate of 0.3. The most reliable method for the early detection of oesophageal intubation in rats was end-tidal, CO2 (sensitivity 1.0, specificity = 1.0, PPV = 1.0). In addition, end-tidal CO2 when used in conjunction with the four clinical signs improved the reliability of these signs. PMID:2507183

  14. Voice prosthesis insertion after endoscopic balloon-catheter dilatation in case of a stenotic hypopharyngo-oesophageal junction.

    PubMed

    Móricz, Péter; Gerlinger, Imre; Solt, Jeno; Somogyvári, Krisztina; Pytel, József

    2007-12-01

    Stenosis of the hypopharyngo-oesophageal junction can be a rare complication of laryngectomy and/or partial pharyngectomy and makes the insertion of voice prosthesis extremely difficult. This study describes the authors' experiences gained by endoscopic balloon-catheter dilatation of hypopharyngo-oesophageal stenoses prior to implantation of voice prostheses in four cases. In two patients a single balloon-catheter dilatation resulted in wide enough pharyngo-oesophageal lumen on the long run. The average prosthesis wearing-times were 6.8 months in case 1 and 4.6 months in case 2, corresponding to the published literature data. In case 3, repeated dilatation of the pharyngo-oesophageal transition had proved to be unsuccessful despite taking every effort with the endoscopic balloon-catheter method. Having excised the stenotic segment, reconstruction with pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) was indicated. Eighteen months later, a repeated restenosis was observed and a free jejunal flap needed to be performed as a final solution. In case 4, the insertion was carried out into a previously dilated jejunal free flap, which became gradually ischemic and stenotic since the major head-and neck procedure was carried out that resulted in prosthesis rejection after just 1 week. The authors emphasize that correct indication of pedicled and free flaps in head and neck reconstruction is a prerequisite from the aspect of prevention of pharyngo-oesophageal strictures. Endoscopic balloon-catheter dilatation is a safe and established method for dilatating hypopharyngo-oesophageal stenoses of different origin. The procedure provides maximum patient benefit with minimal trauma and morbidity; moreover, facilitates insertion of voice prostheses. However, a single balloon-catheter dilatation cannot always result in wide enough oesophageal lumen on the long run (case 3). Insertion of a voice prosthesis into a previously dilated ischemic jejunal segment is challenging and avoidable due

  15. Evaluation for bleeding disorders in suspected child abuse.

    PubMed

    Anderst, James D; Carpenter, Shannon L; Abshire, Thomas C

    2013-04-01

    Bruising or bleeding in a child can raise the concern for child abuse. Assessing whether the findings are the result of trauma and/or whether the child has a bleeding disorder is critical. Many bleeding disorders are rare, and not every child with bruising/bleeding concerning for abuse requires an evaluation for bleeding disorders. In some instances, however, bleeding disorders can present in a manner similar to child abuse. The history and clinical evaluation can be used to determine the necessity of an evaluation for a possible bleeding disorder, and prevalence and known clinical presentations of individual bleeding disorders can be used to guide the extent of the laboratory testing. This clinical report provides guidance to pediatricians and other clinicians regarding the evaluation for bleeding disorders when child abuse is suspected.

  16. Evaluation for bleeding disorders in suspected child abuse.

    PubMed

    Anderst, James D; Carpenter, Shannon L; Abshire, Thomas C

    2013-04-01

    Bruising or bleeding in a child can raise the concern for child abuse. Assessing whether the findings are the result of trauma and/or whether the child has a bleeding disorder is critical. Many bleeding disorders are rare, and not every child with bruising/bleeding concerning for abuse requires an evaluation for bleeding disorders. In some instances, however, bleeding disorders can present in a manner similar to child abuse. The history and clinical evaluation can be used to determine the necessity of an evaluation for a possible bleeding disorder, and prevalence and known clinical presentations of individual bleeding disorders can be used to guide the extent of the laboratory testing. This clinical report provides guidance to pediatricians and other clinicians regarding the evaluation for bleeding disorders when child abuse is suspected. PMID:23530182

  17. [Rare bleeding disorders and invasive procedures].

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, F; Schved, J-F; Giansily-Blaizot, M; Samama, C-M; de Moerloose, P

    2013-03-01

    Rare inherited bleeding disorders include fibrinogen disorders, and deficiencies of factors II (prothrombin), V, VII, X, XI, XIII, and combined V+VIII, and combined vitamin K-dependent factors, with general population prevalence rates between 1/500,000 and 1/2,000,000. These inherited disorders, transmitted as autosomal recessive traits, are characterized by a heterogeneous clinical presentation (asymptomatic, mild, moderate or severe bleeding tendency); this variability is more important for deficiencies with factor levels ranging from 5 to 50%. Individual bleeding risk assessment before an invasive procedure or during peri-partum period remains difficult, although an essential step to decide whether a substitution with clotting factor is necessary or not. Because there is a poor correlation between factor activity levels and the severity of bleeding symptoms, factor correction before an invasive procedure should not be based on factor level only, but physicians must also take into account the patient phenotype as well as the haemorrhagic risk of the procedure.

  18. Arterial hypertension: A neglected risk for bleeding.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Birgit; Mehran, Roxana

    2016-08-01

    The impact of arterial hypertension, one of the most common comorbidities in CAD patients, on bleeding risk after PCI must not be underestimated. More rigorous control of blood pressure during PCI procedure, radial artery access and alternative anticoagulant strategy may be considered in these patients. Further investigation in a more contemporary setting of PCI procedure is warranted. PMID:27530190

  19. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C J; Kuo, C H; Chen, P C; Changcheng, C S

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-six virologically and serologically confirmed Dengue patients with signs of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding (13.1%) were studied during the 1987 outbreak in southern Taiwan. Within a 1-yr period from 1987 to 1988 in Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, there were 198 patients with Dengue fever confirmed. Viral isolation and serological studies indicated that type I Dengue was the cause. There was no evidence of sequential secondary infection among them. The 26 patients were evaluated gastroduodenoscopically. Most of the Dengue patients who developed upper gastrointestinal bleeding had gastric ulcers or duodenal ulcers; superficial and hemorrhagic gastritis are the other relevant endoscopic findings. Thirteen patients (50%) had a past history of peptic ulcer symptoms, whereas the other 13 did not. Dengue infection is a precipitating factor in inducing peptic ulcer bleeding because of hemostatic derangements. Supportive therapy and blood transfusions alone were adequate treatment, except for one patient who required surgery due to massive bleeding of a duodenal ulcer. No mortality was observed in this study.

  20. Predictive Factors and Management of Rectal Bleeding Side Effects Following Prostate Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Jeremy G.; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To report on the incidence, nature, and management of rectal toxicities following individual or combination brachytherapy following treatment for prostate cancer over a 17-year period. We also report the patient and treatment factors predisposing to acute ≥grade 2 proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 2752 patients were treated for prostate cancer between October 1990 and April 2007 with either low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with androgen depletion therapy (ADT) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and were followed for a median of 5.86 years (minimum 1.0 years; maximum 19.19 years). We investigated the 10-year incidence, nature, and treatment of acute and chronic rectal toxicities following BT. Using univariate, and multivariate analyses, we determined the treatment and comorbidity factors predisposing to rectal toxicities. We also outline the most common and effective management for these toxicities. Results: Actuarial risk of ≥grade 2 rectal bleeding was 6.4%, though notably only 0.9% of all patients required medical intervention to manage this toxicity. The majority of rectal bleeding episodes (72%) occurred within the first 3 years following placement of BT seeds. Of the 27 patients requiring management for their rectal bleeding, 18 underwent formalin treatment and nine underwent cauterization. Post-hoc univariate statistical analysis revealed that coronary artery disease (CAD), biologically effective dose, rectal volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (RV100), and treatment modality predict the likelihood of grade ≥2 rectal bleeding. Only CAD, treatment type, and RV100 fit a Cox regression multivariate model. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy is very well tolerated and rectal bleeding toxicities are either self-resolving or effectively managed by medical intervention. Treatment planning incorporating adjuvant ADT while minimizing RV100 has yielded the best toxicity-free survival following

  1. Gastrointestinal bleeding from vascular malformations: Is octreotide effective to rescue difficult-to-treat patients?

    PubMed

    Iannone, Andrea; Principi, Mariabeatrice; Barone, Michele; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Ierardi, Enzo; Di Leo, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    Gastrointestinal vascular malformations are responsible for 2-8% of all cases of bleeding and 30-40% of all obscure hemorrhages, being the most frequent cause of occult bleeding in older people. The aim of this review was to provide an up-to-date report about the use of octreotide in bleeding from both hereditary and acquired vascular malformations of the gastrointestinal tract. A systematic literature search was performed, using the keywords "gastrointestinal vascular malformation", "octreotide", "angiodysplasia", "portal hypertensive gastropathy", "gastric antral vascular ectasia", and "hereditary vascular malformations". The first line therapy of acute/chronic bleeding from digestive vascular malformations is endoscopy, followed by angiographic embolization and surgical resection when this is unsuccessful. In the setting of difficult-to-treat patients, octreotide has been proposed as an alternative therapeutic strategy. Studies reported in the literature show a high efficacy and safety of octreotide, but described only a small number of enrolled patients, heterogeneous therapeutic schedules and short-term follow-up, with the exception of acute bleeding from esophageal varices. As a consequence, the use of octreotide is not approved in this setting and it is currently still prescribed as an off-label drug. Studies in larger populations are needed to confirm the promising results observed in the small case series reports, so as to provide physicians with a treatment option for patients without available alternatives. Octreotide could also determine a strong decrease in the management costs of these clinical conditions, and especially, could dramatically reduce hospital admission costs. PMID:27595456

  2. Preoperative endoscopy may reduce the need for revisional surgery for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Madhok, B M; Carr, W R J; McCormack, C; Boyle, M; Jennings, N; Schroeder, N; Balupuri, S; Small, P K

    2016-08-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a safe and effective bariatric operation, but postoperative reflux symptoms can sometimes necessitate revisional surgery. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the preferred operation in morbidly obese patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. In 2011, we introduced preoperative endoscopy to assess for hiatus hernia or evidence of oesophagitis in conjunction with an assessment of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms for all patients undergoing bariatric surgery with a view to avoid sleeve gastrectomy for these patients. A prospectively maintained database was used to identify patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy before and after we changed the unit policy. The need for revisional surgery in patients with troublesome gastro-oesophageal reflux disease was examined. Prior to 2011, 130 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy, and 11 (8.5%) of them required conversion to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for symptomatic reflux disease. Following the policy change, 284 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy, and to date, only five (1.8%) have required revisional surgery (p = 0.001). Baseline demographics were comparable between the groups, and average follow-up period was 47 and 33 months, respectively, for each group. Preoperative endoscopy and a detailed clinical history regarding gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms may improve patient selection for sleeve gastrectomy. Avoiding sleeve gastrectomy in patients with reflux disease and/or hiatus hernia may reduce the incidence of revisional surgery. PMID:27400631

  3. Results of the WIRK prospective, non-interventional observational study of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in patients with congenital haemophilia with inhibitors and other bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Birschmann, I; Klamroth, R; Eichler, H; Schenk, J; Kirchmaier, C M; Halimeh, S

    2013-09-01

    Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) has been available for the treatment of acute bleeding and for prevention of bleeding during surgery and invasive procedures in patients with congenital haemophilia with inhibitors (CHwI) and acquired haemophilia since 1996. The study objective was to assess the efficacy and safety of rFVIIa in patients with CHwI, acquired haemophilia, congenital FVII deficiency and Glanzmann's thrombasthenia, in a real-life clinical setting. There were no specific inclusion or exclusion criteria; participation was offered to all German haemophilia centres known to use rFVIIa to treat patients with the above indications. Data on rFVIIa use and efficacy for the treatment of acute bleeding episodes and invasive procedures were recorded. Adverse drug reactions and recurrent bleeding episodes were also monitored. In total, 64 patients (50.0% women) received rFVIIa treatment. Patients experienced 281 evaluable bleeding episodes and underwent 44 invasive procedures. In 252 of 281 (89.7%) bleeding episodes, a stop (66.5%) or a significant reduction (23.1%) in bleeding was observed. No bleeding complications were reported for 42 of 44 (95.5%) invasive procedures covered with rFVIIa. A clear positive association was observed between early initiation of rFVIIa treatment for acute bleeding and efficacy. The total cumulative dose and number of injections were 468.3 ± 545.8 μg kg(-1) and 3.6 ± 4.6 respectively. No drug-related adverse events were reported. rFVIIa use in Germany provided effective haemostatic cover without associated adverse events in the management of acute bleeds and invasive procedures across a range of bleeding disorders.

  4. The ORBIT bleeding score: a simple bedside score to assess bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Emily C.; Simon, DaJuanicia N.; Thomas, Laine E.; Hylek, Elaine M.; Gersh, Bernard J.; Ansell, Jack E.; Kowey, Peter R.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Chang, Paul; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Pencina, Michael J.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Peterson, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic decisions in atrial fibrillation (AF) are often influenced by assessment of bleeding risk. However, existing bleeding risk scores have limitations. Objectives We sought to develop and validate a novel bleeding risk score using routinely available clinical information to predict major bleeding in a large, community-based AF population. Methods We analysed data from Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (ORBIT-AF), a prospective registry that enrolled incident and prevalent AF patients at 176 US sites. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we identified factors independently associated with major bleeding among patients taking oral anticoagulation (OAC) over a median follow-up of 2 years (interquartile range = 1.6–2.5). We also created a numerical bedside risk score that included the five most predictive risk factors weighted according to their strength of association with major bleeding. The predictive performance of the full model, the simple five-item score, and two existing risk scores (hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function, stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile INR, elderly, drugs/alcohol concomitantly, HAS-BLED, and anticoagulation and risk factors in atrial fibrillation, ATRIA) were then assessed in both the ORBIT-AF cohort and a separate clinical trial population, Rivaroxaban Once-daily oral direct factor Xa inhibition compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and embolism trial in atrial fibrillation (ROCKET-AF). Results Among 7411 ORBIT-AF patients taking OAC, the rate of major bleeding was 4.0/100 person-years. The full continuous model (12 variables) and five-factor ORBIT risk score (older age [75+ years], reduced haemoglobin/haematocrit/history of anaemia, bleeding history, insufficient kidney function, and treatment with antiplatelet) both had good ability to identify those who bled vs. not (C-index 0.69 and 0.67, respectively). These scores both had

  5. Signs and Symptoms of a Bleeding Disorder in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Blood Disorders Signs and Symptoms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Bleeding Disorders Download and print this fact sheet » Signs and symptoms of a bleeding disorder: I have ...

  6. Thromboelastography identifies children with rare bleeding disorders and predicts bleeding phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zia, A N; Chitlur, M; Rajpurkar, M; Ozgonenel, B; Lusher, J; Callaghan, J H; Callaghan, M U

    2015-01-01

    Rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) comprise 3-5% of all congenital bleeding disorders. They can evade typical coagulation screening tests and there is a poor correlation between laboratory results and bleeding phenotype. Thromboelastography (TEG) measures coagulation globally in whole blood samples. The aims of this study were to evaluate the utility of TEG as an adjunct to the routine screening tests employed for the diagnosis of RBDs and to correlate TEG results with the bleeding phenotype in RBDs. TEG parameters and clot kinetics were compared to bleeding phenotypes (asymptomatic, mild, moderate and severe) in 26 RBD patients and 30 normal controls. Clot kinetics correlated strongly with RBDs and with the severity of bleeding phenotype with mean maximum rate of thrombus generation (MRTG) 15.4 mm min(-1) in controls vs. 6.0 in RBDs (P < 0.0001, Wilcoxin). The mean MRTG was 7.7 in mildly symptomatic, 5.5 in moderately symptomatic and 4.1 in severely symptomatic patients (P < 0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis). Disorders that are often missed by conventional screening tests, dysfibrinogenaemia and platelet disorders displayed a distinctive TEG curve with markedly decreased maximum amplitude (MA) and low MRTG values. Factor XIII and PAI deficient patients displayed increased fibrinolysis in addition to low MRTGs. All patients with RBDs, but none of the normal controls, had abnormal clot kinetics suggesting that TEG may be an effective screening test for RBDs.

  7. Injection and Cautery Methods for Nonvariceal Bleeding Control.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Cristina; Rotondano, Gianluca; Marmo, Riccardo

    2015-07-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding remains one of the most common challenges faced by gastroenterologists and endoscopists in daily clinical practice. Endoscopic management of nonvariceal bleeding has been shown to improve clinical outcomes, with significant reduction of recurrent bleeding, need for surgery, and mortality. Early upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is recommended in all patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding within 24 hours of presentation, although appropriate resuscitation, stabilization of hemodynamic parameters, and optimization of comorbidity before endoscopy are essential. PMID:26142035

  8. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... contamination following any probable failure of the turbocharger or its lubrication system. (b) The...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... contamination following any probable failure of the turbocharger or its lubrication system. (b) The...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... contamination following any probable failure of the turbocharger or its lubrication system. (b) The...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... contamination following any probable failure of the turbocharger or its lubrication system. (b) The...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... contamination following any probable failure of the turbocharger or its lubrication system. (b) The...

  18. Volcano-like intermittent bleeding activity for seven years from an arterio-enteric fistula on a kidney graft site after pancreas-kidney transplantation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction We report the first case of a patient who underwent simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplantation and who then suffered from repeated episodes of severe gastrointestinal bleeding over a period of seven years. Locating the site of gastrointestinal bleeding is a challenging task. This case illustrates that detection of an arterio-enteric fistula can be very difficult, especially in technically-challenging situations such as cases of severe intra-abdominal adhesions. It is important to consider the possibility of arterio-enteric fistulas in cases of intermittent bleeding episodes, especially in transplant patients. Case presentation A 40-year-old Caucasian man received a combined pancreas-kidney transplantation as a result of complications from diabetes mellitus type I. Thereafter, he suffered from intermittent clinically-relevant episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding. Repeat endoscopic, surgical, scintigraphic, and angiographic investigations during his episodes of acute bleeding could not locate the bleeding site. He finally died in hemorrhagic shock due to arterio-enteric bleeding at the kidney graft site, which was diagnosed post-mortem. Conclusions In accordance with the literature, we suggest considering the removal of any rejected transplant organs in situations where arterio-enteric fistulas seem likely but cannot be excluded by repeat conventional or computed tomography-angiographic methods. Arterio-enteric fistulas may intermittently bleed over many years. PMID:21059222

  19. Gastrointestinal bleeding and anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs: systematic search for clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Gutermann, Irit Kaye; Niggemeier, Verena; Zimmerli, Lukas U; Holzer, Barbara M; Battegay, Edouard; Scharl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a frequently encountered and very serious problem in emergency room patients who are currently being treated with anticoagulant or antiplatelet medications. There is, however, a lack of clinical practice guidelines about how to respond to these situations. The goal of this study was to find published articles that contain specific information about how to safely adjust anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy when GI bleeding occurs.The investigators initiated a global search on the PubMed and Google websites for published information about GI bleeding in the presence of anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy. After eliminating duplicate entries, the medical articles that remained were screened to narrow the sets of articles to those that met specific criteria. Articles that most closely matched study criteria were analyzed in detail and compared to determine how many actual guidelines exist and are useful.We could provide only minimal information about appropriate therapeutic strategies because no articles provided sufficient specific advice about how to respond to situations involving acute GI bleeding and concurrent use of anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs. Only 4 articles provided enough detail to be of any use in an emergency situation.Clinical practice guidelines and also clinical trials for GI hemorrhaging should be expanded to state in which situations the use of anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs should be suspended and the medications should later be resumed, and they should state the level of risk for any particular action.

  20. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Chait, Maxwell M

    2010-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is an important worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The incidence of LGIB increases with age and corresponds to the increased incidence of specific gastrointestinal diseases that have worldwide regional variation, co-morbid diseases and polypharmacy. The evaluation and treatment of patients is adjusted to the rate and severity of hemorrhage and the clinical status of the patient and may be complicated by the presence of visual, auditory and cognitive impairment due to age and co-morbid disease. Bleeding may be chronic and mild or severe and life threatening, requiring endoscopic, radiologic or surgical intervention. Colonoscopy provides the best method for evaluation and treatment of patients with LGIB. There will be a successful outcome of LGIB in the majority of elderly patients with appropriate evaluation and management. PMID:21160742

  1. Duodenal bleeding from metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rangasamy, Priya; Versland, Mark

    2011-04-20

    Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested.

  2. Uterine artery embolization for heavy menstrual bleeding.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jonathan; Christie, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Uterine artery embolization (UAE) as a treatment option for fibroids was first reported by Ravina in 1995. Although rapidly adopted by enthusiasts, many were skeptical and its introduction varied widely across the globe. It was not until randomized controlled trials and registries were published and national guidance statements issued that UAE was accepted as a safe and proven treatment for fibroids. The technique is now established as one of the treatment options to be discussed with patients as an alternative to surgery for fibroid-associated heavy menstrual bleeding. Research is on-going to evaluate the relative merits of UAE compared with other medical and surgical treatment options for heavy menstrual bleeding, particularly for women wishing to maintain their fertility. PMID:26756068

  3. Duodenal Bleeding from Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rangasamy, Priya; Versland, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested. PMID:21577373

  4. Cancer procoagulant as a marker in monitoring the therapy in cases of oesophageal, stomach and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kozuszko, B; Skrzydlewska, E; Snarska, J; Kozłowski, M; Zalewski, B; Skrzydlewski, Z

    2001-01-01

    Cancer procoagulant activity in the blood serum of patients with oesophagal, gastric and colorectal cancer was evaluated before and after the tumour removal. Cancer procoagulant activity was significantly higher before the operation in comparison to the control group and was reduced after a total operative procedure, whereas it was kept on a high level after a non-radical procedure or in cases of metastases. Examination results point to the possibility of using the evaluation of cancer procoagulant activity in monitoring the course of treatment of patients with oesophagal, gastric and colorectal cancer.

  5. The Evaluation of Rectal Bleeding in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Elizabeth; Nicolaidis, Christina; Helfand, Mark

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Though primary care patients commonly present with rectal bleeding, the optimal evaluation strategy remains unknown. OBJECTIVE To compare the cost-effectiveness of four diagnostic strategies in the evaluation of rectal bleeding. DESIGN Cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov decision model. DATA SOURCES Systematic review of the literature, Medicare reimbursement data, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Cancer Registry. TARGET POPULATION Patients over age 40 with otherwise asymptomatic rectal bleeding. TIME HORIZON The patient's lifetime. PERSPECTIVE Modified societal perspective. INTERVENTIONS Watchful waiting, flexible sigmoidoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy followed by air contrast barium enema (FS+ACBE), and colonoscopy. OUTCOME MEASURES Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. RESULTS OF BASE-CASE ANALYSIS The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for colonoscopy compared with flexible sigmoidoscopy was $5,480 per quality-adjusted year of life saved (QALY). Watchful waiting and FS+ACBE were more expensive and less effective than colonoscopy. RESULTS OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSES The cost of colonoscopy was reduced to $1,686 per QALY when age at entry was changed to 45. Watchful waiting became the least expensive strategy when community procedure charges replaced Medicare costs, when age at entry was maximized to 80, or when the prevalence of polyps was lowered to 7%, but the remaining strategies provided greater life expectancy at relatively low cost. The strategy of FS+ACBE remained more expensive and less effective in all analyses. In the remaining sensitivity analyses, the incremental cost-effectiveness of colonoscopy compared with flexible sigmoidoscopy never rose above $34,000. CONCLUSIONS Colonoscopy is a cost-effective method to evaluate otherwise asymptomatic rectal bleeding, with a low cost per QALY compared to other strategies. PMID:15693933

  6. Neurenteric Cyst Presenting with Bleeding Per Rectum

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Taruna; Rattan, Kamal Nain

    2016-01-01

    Neurenteric cyst in the thoracic cavity may produce a myriad of clinical features. We report a 7-month-old girl who presented with significant bleeding per rectum. On imaging, a mediastinal cystic structure with air-fluid levels was evident with cervico-thoracic vertebral anomalies. The cyst was excised and histopathology showed intestinal mucosal lining with heterotopic pancreatic tissue confirming the diagnosis of neurenteric cyst.

  7. Neurenteric Cyst Presenting with Bleeding Per Rectum.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Taruna; Parmar, Padam; Rattan, Kamal Nain

    2016-01-01

    Neurenteric cyst in the thoracic cavity may produce a myriad of clinical features. We report a 7-month-old girl who presented with significant bleeding per rectum. On imaging, a mediastinal cystic structure with air-fluid levels was evident with cervico-thoracic vertebral anomalies. The cyst was excised and histopathology showed intestinal mucosal lining with heterotopic pancreatic tissue confirming the diagnosis of neurenteric cyst. PMID:27672582

  8. Neurenteric Cyst Presenting with Bleeding Per Rectum.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Taruna; Parmar, Padam; Rattan, Kamal Nain

    2016-01-01

    Neurenteric cyst in the thoracic cavity may produce a myriad of clinical features. We report a 7-month-old girl who presented with significant bleeding per rectum. On imaging, a mediastinal cystic structure with air-fluid levels was evident with cervico-thoracic vertebral anomalies. The cyst was excised and histopathology showed intestinal mucosal lining with heterotopic pancreatic tissue confirming the diagnosis of neurenteric cyst.

  9. Neurenteric Cyst Presenting with Bleeding Per Rectum

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Taruna; Rattan, Kamal Nain

    2016-01-01

    Neurenteric cyst in the thoracic cavity may produce a myriad of clinical features. We report a 7-month-old girl who presented with significant bleeding per rectum. On imaging, a mediastinal cystic structure with air-fluid levels was evident with cervico-thoracic vertebral anomalies. The cyst was excised and histopathology showed intestinal mucosal lining with heterotopic pancreatic tissue confirming the diagnosis of neurenteric cyst. PMID:27672582

  10. Thalidomide in angiodysplasia-related bleeding.

    PubMed

    Boey, J P; Hahn, U; Sagheer, S; McRae, S J

    2015-09-01

    Gastrointestinal haemorrhage from angiodysplastic lesions is not only difficult to identify, but often refractory to endoscopic intervention. Patients often require substantial transfusion support. Thalidomide has emerged as a promising medical strategy in angiodysplasia-related bleeding. We present our experience and report the findings from a review of the literature. Despite its side-effect profile, thalidomide remains the therapeutic modality with the best evidence in this difficult clinical scenario.

  11. Design and clinical results from a fibre optic manometry catheter for oesophageal motility studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkwright, J. W.; Doe, S. N.; Smith, M. C.; Blenman, N. G.; Underhill, I. D.; Maunder, S. A.; Glasscock, J. A.; Lim, B.; Szczesniak, M. M.; Dinning, P. G.; Cook, I. J.

    2008-04-01

    We report the design and operation of an optical fibre manometry catheter for measuring variation in pressure in the oesophagus during peristalsis. Catheters of this kind are used to help diagnose oesophageal disorders by recording the muscular contractions of the oesophageal wall in patients having difficulty swallowing. Traditional oesophageal catheters consist of an array of recording sites enabling pressure measurement from multiple locations along the the oesophagus. However, these catheters tend to be bulky or complex to operate whereas our optical equivalent uses a series of Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) pressure sensors on a single fibre; significantly reducing complexity and allowing the catheter diameter to be minimised. The data from each FBG was recorded using a solid state spectrometer in which the reflected peaks each covered a number of pixels of the spectrometer. This has enabled the FBG peaks to be tracked in wavelength with sub-nanometre precision resulting in pressure sensitivities of less than 1mmHg. Results from a clinical trial carried out on 10 healthy subjects will be presented. For the trial, each subject was simultaneously intubated with the optical catheter and a commercially available solid-state catheter. Back-to-back readings were taken from both devices during a series of controlled water swallows. Ten swallows were recorded with the catheters sensors positioned in proximal, mid, and distal regions of the oesophagus and the data analysed statistically. The fibre optic device accurately picked up the dynamic variations in pressure, and can react at least as fast as the solid state device.

  12. Treating gastro-oesophageal reflux disease during pregnancy and lactation: what are the safest therapy options?

    PubMed

    Broussard, C N; Richter, J E

    1998-10-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux and heartburn are reported by 45 to 85% of women during pregnancy. Typically, the heartburn of pregnancy is new onset and is precipitated by the hormonal effects of estrogen and progesterone on lower oesophageal sphincter function. In mild cases, the patient should be reassured that reflux is commonly encountered during a normal pregnancy: lifestyle and dietary modifications may be all that are required. In a pregnant woman with moderate to severe reflux symptoms, the physician must discuss with the patient the benefits versus the risks of using drug therapy. Medications used for treating gastro-oesophageal reflux are not routinely or vigorously tested in randomised, controlled trials in women who are pregnant because of ethical and medico-legal concerns. Safety data are based on animal studies, human case reports and cohort studies as offered by physicians, pharmaceutical companies and regulatory authorities. If drug therapy is required, first-line therapy should consist of nonsystemically absorbed medications, including antacids or sucralfate, which offer little, if any, risk to the fetus. Systemic therapy with histamine H2 receptor antagonists (avoiding nizatidine) or prokinetic drugs (metoclopramide, cisapride) should be reserved for patients with more severe symptoms. Proton pump inhibitors are not recommended during pregnancy except for severe intractable cases of gastrooesophageal reflux or possibly prior to anaesthesia during labour and delivery. In these rare situations, animal teratogenicity studies suggests that lansoprazole may be the best choice. Use of the least possible amount of systemic drug needed to ameliorate the patient's symptoms is clearly the best for therapy. If reflux symptoms are intractable or atypical, endoscopy can safely be performed with conscious sedation and careful monitoring the mother and fetus.

  13. Gastro-oesophageal reflux and gastric aspiration in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Edoardo; Carbone, Roberto; Marabotto, Elisa; Furnari, Manuele; Sconfienza, Luca; Ghio, Massimo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to characterise gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). 40 consecutive IPF patients underwent pulmonary high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan and impedance-pH monitoring while off antisecretory therapy. The presence of pulmonary fibrosis was assessed using validated HRCT scores. Reflux features included distal oesophageal acid exposure, number of acid/weakly acidic reflux episodes and their proximal migration. 40 consecutive patients with interstitial lung disease other than IPF (non-IPF patients) and 50 healthy volunteers were also enrolled. IPF patients had significantly higher (p<0.01) oesophageal acid exposure (median (interquartile range (IQR)) 9.25 (4.7-15.4)% versus 3.3 (1.4-7.4)% versus 0.7 (0.2-4.2)%, number of acid (median (IQR) 45 (23-55) versus 32 (19-44) versus 18 (10-31)), weakly acidic (median (IQR) 34 (19-43) versus 21 (11-33) versus 18 (15-28)) and proximal reflux (median (IQR) 51 (26.5-65.5) versus 20 (9.5-34.5) versus 9 (5-20)) events compared to non-IPF patients and healthy volunteers, respectively. Pulmonary fibrosis HRCT scores correlated well with reflux episodes in both the distal (r(2)=0.567) and proximal (r(2)=0.6323) oesophagus. Patients with IPF had more bile acids and pepsin (p<0.03) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) (62% and 67%, respectively) and saliva (61% and 68%, respectively) than non-IPF patients (25% and 25% in BALF, and 33% and 36%, respectively, in saliva) and controls (0% and 0% in BALF and saliva, respectively). Acid GOR is common in IPF, but weakly acidic GOR may also occur. Patients with IPF had a risk of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. Outcome studies with intense antireflux therapy are needed.

  14. The role of endoscopy in pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Markus; Geiß, Andrea; Greiner, Peter; Wellner, Ulrich; Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Bausch, Dirk; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents accounts for up to 20 % of referrals to gastroenterologists. Detailed management guidelines exist for gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they do not encompass children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients and to determine an investigative management algorithm accounting for the specifics of children and adolescents. Patients and methods: Pediatric patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to our endoscopy unit from 2001 to 2009 (n = 154) were identified. Retrospective statistical and neural network analysis was used to assess outcome and to determine an investigative management algorithm. Results: The source of bleeding could be identified in 81 % (n = 124/154). Gastrointestinal bleeding was predominantly lower gastrointestinal bleeding (66 %, n = 101); upper gastrointestinal bleeding was much less common (14 %, n = 21). Hematochezia was observed in 94 % of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 95 of 101). Hematemesis (67 %, n = 14 of 21) and melena (48 %, n = 10 of 21) were associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The sensitivity and specificity of a neural network to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 98 % and 63.6 %, respectively and to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 75 % and 96 % respectively. The sensitivity and specifity of hematochezia alone to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 94.2 % and 85.7 %, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for hematemesis and melena to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 82.6 % and 94 %, respectively. We then developed an investigative management algorithm based on the presence of hematochezia and hematemesis or melena. Conclusions: Hematochezia should prompt colonoscopy and hematemesis or melena should prompt esophagogastroduodenoscopy. If no

  15. The role of endoscopy in pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Markus; Geiß, Andrea; Greiner, Peter; Wellner, Ulrich; Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Bausch, Dirk; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents accounts for up to 20 % of referrals to gastroenterologists. Detailed management guidelines exist for gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they do not encompass children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients and to determine an investigative management algorithm accounting for the specifics of children and adolescents. Patients and methods: Pediatric patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to our endoscopy unit from 2001 to 2009 (n = 154) were identified. Retrospective statistical and neural network analysis was used to assess outcome and to determine an investigative management algorithm. Results: The source of bleeding could be identified in 81 % (n = 124/154). Gastrointestinal bleeding was predominantly lower gastrointestinal bleeding (66 %, n = 101); upper gastrointestinal bleeding was much less common (14 %, n = 21). Hematochezia was observed in 94 % of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 95 of 101). Hematemesis (67 %, n = 14 of 21) and melena (48 %, n = 10 of 21) were associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The sensitivity and specificity of a neural network to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 98 % and 63.6 %, respectively and to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 75 % and 96 % respectively. The sensitivity and specifity of hematochezia alone to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 94.2 % and 85.7 %, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for hematemesis and melena to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 82.6 % and 94 %, respectively. We then developed an investigative management algorithm based on the presence of hematochezia and hematemesis or melena. Conclusions: Hematochezia should prompt colonoscopy and hematemesis or melena should prompt esophagogastroduodenoscopy. If no

  16. Single session treatment for bleeding hemorrhoids

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, S.J.; Rypins, E.B.; Houck, J.; Thrower, S.

    1987-12-01

    Fifty consecutive outpatients with bleeding internal hemorrhoids were prospectively treated with a single application of rubber band ligation or infrared coagulation. Complete follow-up observation was obtained in 48 patients (23 underwent rubber band ligation and 25 underwent infrared coagulation). At one month after treatment, 22 patients who underwent rubber band ligation and 16 who underwent infrared coagulation, were symptomatically improved (p less than 0.05). At six months, 15 patients who had undergone rubber band ligation and ten who had infrared coagulation treatment, remained improved (p less than 0.05). There was no statistical difference in the discomfort experienced by either group during or after the procedure as determined by a self-assessment scale. Two patients who underwent rubber band ligation experienced complications--a thrombosed external hemorrhoid developed in one patient and another had delayed rectal bleeding. Although associated with occasional complications after treatment, rubber band ligation is more effective than in infrared coagulation for single session treatment of bleeding internal hemorrhoids.

  17. Occurrence of thrombosis in rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Saez, Arlette

    2013-09-01

    Paradoxically, there are reports of thrombotic events for some rare bleeding disorders associated with significant bleeding tendency. Afibrinogenemia, factor (F) VII, or FXI deficiencies are those most commonly associated with venous or arterial thrombosis. Pathogenesis is multifactorial and the main conditions associated with this complication relate to the coexistence of inherited or acquired thrombotic risk factors linked to certain specific characteristics of the underlying defect. Patients with afibrinogenemia can develop severe, spontaneous, or recurrent thromboembolic disease. Up to 20% of congenital dysfibrinogenemia patients show predisposition to thrombosis. Thrombotic episodes, particularly deep vein thrombosis, have been reported in 3 to 4% FVII deficient patients, even those who were severely affected. These events have been reported either after infusion of plasma derived FXI concentrate or recombinant activated FVII in FXI deficient patients. So, in addition to factor level, replacement therapy must be individualized and should take into account past personal or family history of bleeding and thrombosis, and other prothrombotic risk factors. Treatment of thrombosis represents a challenge. For mild factor deficiencies, antithrombotic prophylaxis must be considered with or without concomitant use of replacement therapy. For all patients, it is also recommended to control known cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  18. Bile reflux gastritis and Barrett's oesophagus: further evidence of a role for duodenogastro-oesophageal reflux?

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, M; Neville, P; Mapstone, N; Moayyedi, P; Axon, A

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—There is increasing evidence that reflux of bile plays a part in the pathogenesis of Barrett's oesophagus. Bile injury to the gastric mucosa results in a "chemical" gastritis in which oedema and intestinal metaplasia are prominent.
AIM—To determine if patients with Barrett's oesophagus have more bile related changes in antral mucosa than patients with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) or non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD).
PATIENTS AND METHODS—Patients were identified by a retrospective search of pathology records and those with a clinically confirmed diagnosis of either Barrett's oesophagus or reflux oesophagitis who had oesophageal and gastric biopsies taken at the same endoscopy and had no evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection entered the study. Control biopsies were taken from H pylori negative NUD patients. Antral biopsies were examined "blind" to clinical group and graded for a series of histological features from which the "reflux gastritis score" (RGS) and "bile reflux index" (BRI) could be calculated. The reproducibility of these histological scores was tested by a second pathologist.
RESULTS—There were 100 patients with Barrett's, 61 with GORD, and 50 with NUD. The RGSs did not differ between groups. BRI values in the Barrett's group were significantly higher than those in GORD subjects (p=0.014) which in turn were higher than those in NUD patients (p=0.037). Similarly, the frequency of high BRI values (>14) was significantly greater in the Barrett's group (29/100; 29%) than in the GORD (9/61; 14.8%) or NUD (4/50; 8%) group. However, agreement on BRI values was "poor", indicating limited applicability of this approach.
CONCLUSION—Patients with Barrett's oesophagus have more evidence of bile related gastritis than subjects with uncomplicated GORD or NUD. The presence of bile in the refluxate could be a factor in both the development of "specialised" intestinal metaplasia and malignancy in the oesophagus

  19. Enhancement of Spanish Oesophageal Speech vowels using coherent subband modulator Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Rizwan; Zapirain, Begoña García

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an Oesophageal Speech (OES) enhancement method, based on Kalman filtering. The Kalman filter is applied to modulators of OES frequency subbands instead of the fullband signal. The OES frequency subbands are decomposed into modulators and carriers components using coherent demodulation. In comparison with fullband Kalman filtering and pole stabilization, the proposed technique shows better results. The system performance is evaluated objectively and subjectively using the Harmonic to Noise Ratio (HNR) and Mean Opinion Score (MOS) respectively. Results have shown that Kalman filter in subband modulators processing is robust and efficient, improving the HNR by 4 to 5 dB for all Spanish vowels.

  20. Approach to the diagnosis and management of common bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Rydz, Natalia; James, Paula D

    2012-10-01

    Mild mucocutaneous bleeding symptoms are common in the general population. Differentiating normal from pathological bleeding complaints begins with a detailed bleeding history that assesses: the pattern (primary versus secondary hemostasis), the severity, and the onset (congenital versus acquired) of bleeding. Bleeding assessment tools have been developed to aid in determining whether bleeding symptoms are outside of the normal range. Although the clinical pattern of bleeding and family history directs laboratory investigations, von Willebrand disease, the most common and best characterized of the primary hemostatic disorders, is often the first diagnosis to be considered. Clinical management focuses on the particular symptoms experienced by the patient. Medical interventions include replacement of the factor that is deficient or defective, or indirect treatments, such as antifibrinolytics (tranexamic acid), desmopression, and hormone-based therapy (e.g., oral contraceptive pill for menorrhagia).

  1. Patterns of bleeding in adolescents with severe haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Aronstam, A; Rainsford, S G; Painter, M J

    1979-02-17

    Eighty-two boys with severe haemophilia A who spent some time at Lord Mayor Treloar College during 1973-7 were studied. All episodes of bleeding that occurred during term time were recorded, along with the number of transfusions. The bleeding frequency among these boys, most of them aged 10-17 years, increased steadily from 8,31 episodes/100 days in 1973 to 12,63 episodes/100 days in 1977. At the same time there was a steady fall in bleeding frequency with age. Altogether 24% of bleeding episodes were into the elbow joint, 22% into the knee, and 15% into the ankle. As the boys grew older the proportion of bleeding episodes in the legs declined and that in the arms increased. The overall results reflect the fact that special schools now see only the severest cases of haemophilia. The pattern of bleeding during adolescence suggests that concepts of management of arm bleeding need modifying.

  2. Patterns of bleeding in adolescents with severe haemophilia A.

    PubMed Central

    Aronstam, A; Rainsford, S G; Painter, M J

    1979-01-01

    Eighty-two boys with severe haemophilia A who spent some time at Lord Mayor Treloar College during 1973-7 were studied. All episodes of bleeding that occurred during term time were recorded, along with the number of transfusions. The bleeding frequency among these boys, most of them aged 10-17 years, increased steadily from 8,31 episodes/100 days in 1973 to 12,63 episodes/100 days in 1977. At the same time there was a steady fall in bleeding frequency with age. Altogether 24% of bleeding episodes were into the elbow joint, 22% into the knee, and 15% into the ankle. As the boys grew older the proportion of bleeding episodes in the legs declined and that in the arms increased. The overall results reflect the fact that special schools now see only the severest cases of haemophilia. The pattern of bleeding during adolescence suggests that concepts of management of arm bleeding need modifying. PMID:427411

  3. The positive feedback of estradiol on gonadotropin secretion in women with perimenopausal dysfunctional uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Cano, A; Gimeno, F; Fuente, T; Parrilla, J J; Abad, L

    1986-09-01

    The functionality of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis was explored in 27 women with perimenopausal dysfunctional uterine bleeding. The positive feedback effect of estradiol on LH and FSH was studied by the estrogen challenge test, which was performed by a single i.m. injection of estradiol benzoate. An early decline of both LH and FSH was followed by an increase of LH, mainly due to the cases in which the estrogen test was positive. FSH remained low through the whole period tested. The results were compared with those found in 5 normal menstruating women. The frequency of positive estrogen tests, defined by an acute estradiol-induced discharge of LH, was lower in the perimenopausal patients (P less than 0.025). The results of the tests used in our study showed an impairment of the positive feedback system in the perimenopausal-dysfunctional-bleeding group.

  4. Haemosuccus pancreaticus, an uncommon cause of upper gastro intestinal bleeding: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amir Ali; Charon, Jean Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Haemosuccus Pancreaticus is defined as upper gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding from the ampula of vater via the pancreatic duct. It is most commonly associated with pancreatic inflammation, erosion of the pancrease by aneurysm or pseudo-aneurysm of the splenic artery. We report a 69 year old man with previous history of acute pancreatitis who was admitted with recurrent haematemesis. Initial upper GI endocopy was normal, while admitted, he collapse with abdominal pain and hypotension. He was resuscitated with blood and intravenous fluid. Repeat upper GI endocopy showed fresh blood in the duodenum, but no active bleeding site was demonstrated. An urgent coeliac axis CT angiogram was done which showed an splenic artery pseudo-aneurysm, which was successfully embolized. Patient is well 9 months after the procedure. This case highlights the importance of considering coeliac axis CT angiogram as part of investigation for obscure GI bleeding. PMID:26060169

  5. Haemosuccus pancreaticus, an uncommon cause of upper gastro intestinal bleeding: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amir Ali; Charon, Jean Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Haemosuccus Pancreaticus is defined as upper gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding from the ampula of vater via the pancreatic duct. It is most commonly associated with pancreatic inflammation, erosion of the pancrease by aneurysm or pseudo-aneurysm of the splenic artery. We report a 69 year old man with previous history of acute pancreatitis who was admitted with recurrent haematemesis. Initial upper GI endocopy was normal, while admitted, he collapse with abdominal pain and hypotension. He was resuscitated with blood and intravenous fluid. Repeat upper GI endocopy showed fresh blood in the duodenum, but no active bleeding site was demonstrated. An urgent coeliac axis CT angiogram was done which showed an splenic artery pseudo-aneurysm, which was successfully embolized. Patient is well 9 months after the procedure. This case highlights the importance of considering coeliac axis CT angiogram as part of investigation for obscure GI bleeding.

  6. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao

    2013-05-02

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n = 7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n = 2), pancreatic injury (n = 1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n = 1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.5 ± 7.3 to 2.9 ± 1.4 mmHg after the procedure (P < 0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 3–34) months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications.

  7. Usefulness of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in the Management of Bleeding Ectopic Varices in Cirrhotic Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, V.; Joly, L.; Perreault, P.; Bouchard, L.; Lafortune, M.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in the control of bleeding from ectopic varices. Methods. From 1995 to 2004, 24 cirrhotic patients, bleeding from ectopic varices, mean age 54.5 years (range 15-76 years), were treated by TIPS. The etiology of cirrhosis was alcoholic in 13 patients and nonalcoholic in 11 patients. The location of the varices was duodenal (n = 5), stomal (n = 8), ileocolic (n = 6), anorectal (n = 3), umbilical (n = 1), and peritoneal (n 1). Results. TIPS controlled the bleeding in all patients and induced a decrease in the portacaval gradient from 19.7 {+-} 5.4 to 6.4 {+-} 3.1 mmHg. Postoperative complications included self-limited intra-abdominal bleeding (n = 2), self-limited hemobilia (n = 1), acute thrombosis of the shunt (n = 1), and bile leak treated by a covered stent (n = 1). Median follow-up was 592 days (range 28-2482 days). Rebleeding occurred in 6 patients. In 2 cases rebleeding was observed despite a post-TIPS portacaval gradient lower than 12 mmHg and was controlled by variceal embolization; 1 patient underwent surgical portacaval shunt and never rebled; in 3 patients rebleeding was related to TIPS stenosis and treated with shunt dilatation with addition of a new stent. The cumulative rate of rebleeding was 23% and 31% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 80% and 76%, respectively. Conclusion. The present series demonstrates that bleeding from ectopic varices, a challenging clinical problem, can be managed safely by TIPS placement with low rebleeding and good survival rates.

  8. Effects of bleed-hole geometry and plenum pressure on three-dimensional shock-wave/boundary-layer/bleed interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyu, Wei J.; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Shih, Tom I.-P.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate 3D shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions on a flat plate with bleed through one or more circular holes that vent into a plenum. This study was focused on how bleed-hole geometry and pressure ratio across bleed holes affect the bleed rate and the physics of the flow in the vicinity of the holes. The aspects of the bleed-hole geometry investigated include angle of bleed hole and the number of bleed holes. The plenum/freestream pressure ratios investigated range from 0.3 to 1.7. This study is based on the ensemble-averaged, 'full compressible' Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations closed by the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model. Solutions to the ensemble-averaged N-S equations were obtained by an implicit finite-volume method using the partially-split, two-factored algorithm of Steger on an overlapping Chimera grid.

  9. Pickled vegetables and the risk of oesophageal cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Islami, F; Ren, J-S; Taylor, P R; Kamangar, F

    2009-01-01

    Background: Ecological and experimental studies have suggested a relationship between Asian pickled vegetable consumption and oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), but the results of epidemiological studies investigating the association have been inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis of observational studies of this association to evaluate the existing evidence. Methods: We searched the PubMed, ISI-Web of Science, J-EAST, IndMed, Vip Chinese Periodical, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases for all studies published in English or Chinese languages. Pooled results for all studies combined and for several study subgroups were computed. Results: A total of 34 studies were included in this analysis. The overall random effects odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for pickled vegetable consumption was 2.08 (1.66–2.60), but the results were heterogeneous across studies. After excluding the three most influential studies, the respective numbers were 2.32 (1.92–2.81). Similar to the overall association, the majority of subgroup analyses showed a statistically significant association between consuming pickled vegetables and OSCC risk. There were only three prospective studies. Conclusion: Our results suggest a potential two-fold increased risk of oesophageal cancer associated with the intake of pickled vegetables. However, because the majority of data was from retrospective studies and there was a high heterogeneity in the results, further well-designed prospective studies are warranted. PMID:19862003

  10. Retrospective cohort study of an enhanced recovery programme in oesophageal and gastric cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Gatenby, P A C; Shaw, C; Hine, C; Scholtes, S; Koutra, M; Andrew, H; Hacking, M; Allum, W H

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Enhanced recovery programmes have been established in some areas of elective surgery. This study applied enhanced recovery principles to elective oesophageal and gastric cancer surgery. Methods An enhanced recovery programme for patients undergoing open oesophagogastrectomy, total and subtotal gastrectomy for oesophageal and gastric malignancy was designed. A retrospective cohort study compared length of stay on the critical care unit (CCU), total length of inpatient stay, rates of complications and in-hospital mortality prior to (35 patients) and following (27 patients) implementation. Results In the cohort study, the median total length of stay was reduced by 3 days following oesophagogastrectomy and total gastrectomy. The median length of stay on the CCU remained the same for all patients. The rates of complications and mortality were the same. Conclusions The standardised protocol reduced the median overall length of stay but did not reduce CCU stay. Enhanced recovery principles can be applied to patients undergoing major oesophagogastrectomy and total gastrectomy as long as they have minimal or reversible co-morbidity. PMID:26414360

  11. Authentication and characterisation of a new oesophageal adenocarcinoma cell line: MFD-1

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Edwin; Hayden, Annette; Birts, Charles; Britton, Edward; Cowie, Andrew; Pickard, Karen; Mellone, Massimiliano; Choh, Clarisa; Derouet, Mathieu; Duriez, Patrick; Noble, Fergus; White, Michael J.; Primrose, John N.; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew; Thomas, Gareth J.; Ang, Yeng; Sharrocks, Andrew D.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.; Underwood, Timothy J.; MacRae, Shona; Grehan, Nicola; Abdullahi, Zarah; de la Rue, Rachel; Noorani, Ayesha; Elliott, Rachael Fels; de Silva, Nadeera; Bornschein, Jan; O’Donovan, Maria; Contino, Gianmarco; Yang, Tsun-Po; Chettouh, Hamza; Crawte, Jason; Nutzinger, Barbara; Edwards, Paul A. W.; Smith, Laura; Miremadi, Ahmad; Malhotra, Shalini; Cluroe, Alison; Hardwick, Richard; Davies, Jim; Ford, Hugo; Gilligan, David; Safranek, Peter; Hindmarsh, Andy; Sujendran, Vijayendran; Carroll, Nick; Turkington, Richard; Hayes, Stephen J.; Ang, Yeng; Preston, Shaun R.; Oakes, Sarah; Bagwan, Izhar; Save, Vicki; Skipworth, Richard J. E.; Hupp, Ted R.; O’Neill, J. Robert; Tucker, Olga; Taniere, Philippe; Owsley, Jack; Crichton, Charles; Schusterreiter, Christian; Barr, Hugh; Shepherd, Neil; Old, Oliver; Lagergren, Jesper; Gossage, James; Davies, Andrew; Chang, Fuju; Zylstra, Janine; Sanders, Grant; Berrisford, Richard; Harden, Catherine; Bunting, David; Lewis, Mike; Cheong, Ed; Kumar, Bhaskar; Parsons, Simon L.; Soomro, Irshad; Kaye, Philip; Saunders, John; Lovat, Laurence; Haidry, Rehan; Eneh, Victor; Igali, Laszlo; Welch, Ian; Scott, Michael; Sothi, Shamila; Suortamo, Sari; Lishman, Suzy; Beardsmore, Duncan; Anderson, Charlotte; Smith, Mike L.; Secrier, Maria; Eldridge, Matthew D.; Bower, Lawrence; Achilleos, Achilleas; Lynch, Andy G.; Tavare, Simon

    2016-01-01

    New biological tools are required to understand the functional significance of genetic events revealed by whole genome sequencing (WGS) studies in oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). The MFD-1 cell line was isolated from a 55-year-old male with OAC without recombinant-DNA transformation. Somatic genetic variations from MFD-1, tumour, normal oesophagus, and leucocytes were analysed with SNP6. WGS was performed in tumour and leucocytes. RNAseq was performed in MFD-1, and two classic OAC cell lines FLO1 and OE33. Transposase-accessible chromatin sequencing (ATAC-seq) was performed in MFD-1, OE33, and non-neoplastic HET1A cells. Functional studies were performed. MFD-1 had a high SNP genotype concordance with matched germline/tumour. Parental tumour and MFD-1 carried four somatically acquired mutations in three recurrent mutated genes in OAC: TP53, ABCB1 and SEMA5A, not present in FLO-1 or OE33. MFD-1 displayed high expression of epithelial and glandular markers and a unique fingerprint of open chromatin. MFD-1 was tumorigenic in SCID mouse and proliferative and invasive in 3D cultures. The clinical utility of whole genome sequencing projects will be delivered using accurate model systems to develop molecular-phenotype therapeutics. We have described the first such system to arise from the oesophageal International Cancer Genome Consortium project. PMID:27600491

  12. Feeding behaviour of free-ranging penguins determined by oesophageal temperature.

    PubMed

    Charrassin, J B; Kato, A; Handrich, Y; Sato, K; Naito, Y; Ancel, A; Bost, C A; Gauthier-Clerc, M; Ropert-Coudert, Y; Le Maho, Y

    2001-01-22

    Sea birds play a major role in marine food webs, and it is important to determine when and how much they feed at sea. A major advance has been made by using the drop in stomach temperature after ingestion of ectothermic prey. This method is less sensitive when birds eat small prey or when the stomach is full. Moreover, in diving birds, independently of food ingestion, there are fluctuations in the lower abdominal temperature during the dives. Using oesophageal temperature, we present here a new method for detecting the timing of prey ingestion in free-ranging sea birds, and, to our knowledge, report the first data obtained on king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus). In birds ashore, which were hand-fed 2-15 g pieces of fish, all meal ingestions were detected with a sensor in the upper oesophagus. Detection was poorer with sensors at increasing distances from the beak. At sea, slow temperature drops in the upper oesophagus and stomach characterized a diving effect per se. For the upper oesophagus only, abrupt temperature variations were superimposed, therefore indicating prey ingestions. We determined the depths at which these occurred. Combining the changes in oesophageal temperatures of marine predators with their diving pattern opens new perspectives for understanding their foraging strategy, and, after validation with concurrent applications of classical techniques of prey survey, for assessing the distribution of their prey. PMID:11209884

  13. Oesophageal cancer in Zulu men, South Africa: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Van Rensburg, S. J.; Bradshaw, E. S.; Bradshaw, D.; Rose, E. F.

    1985-01-01

    The high rate of oesophageal cancer amongst southern African blacks has also been recorded amongst the Zulus. Data embracing a wide spectrum of factors pertaining to socio-economic status, nutrition, exposure to carcinogens, tobacco and alcohol usage and traditional health practices were obtained from 211 hospitalized oesophageal cancer patients and compared with hospital population controls matched for age and urban-rural background. Stepwise logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age effects showed that four of the many factors could adequately model the odds of being a cancer case. They were the daily consumption of purchased maize meal (relative risk (RR) 5.7) currently smoking commercial cigarettes (RR 2.6), pipe smoking (RR 2.1), and a reduction of risk in those using butter or margarine daily (RR 0.51). Further significant differences (P less than 0.05) in 12 other factors suggest that those with rural assets but an ability to earn a modest income external to the subsistence economy are at highest risk. They represent a transitional state of Westernisation which is characterised by excessive smoking habits and a diet having a low vitamin and mineral density. These results provide further evidence for the need to combat smoking and for a program of nutrient enrichment of maize meal. PMID:3970816

  14. Authentication and characterisation of a new oesophageal adenocarcinoma cell line: MFD-1.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Edwin; Hayden, Annette; Birts, Charles; Britton, Edward; Cowie, Andrew; Pickard, Karen; Mellone, Massimiliano; Choh, Clarisa; Derouet, Mathieu; Duriez, Patrick; Noble, Fergus; White, Michael J; Primrose, John N; Strefford, Jonathan C; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew; Thomas, Gareth J; Ang, Yeng; Sharrocks, Andrew D; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; Underwood, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    New biological tools are required to understand the functional significance of genetic events revealed by whole genome sequencing (WGS) studies in oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). The MFD-1 cell line was isolated from a 55-year-old male with OAC without recombinant-DNA transformation. Somatic genetic variations from MFD-1, tumour, normal oesophagus, and leucocytes were analysed with SNP6. WGS was performed in tumour and leucocytes. RNAseq was performed in MFD-1, and two classic OAC cell lines FLO1 and OE33. Transposase-accessible chromatin sequencing (ATAC-seq) was performed in MFD-1, OE33, and non-neoplastic HET1A cells. Functional studies were performed. MFD-1 had a high SNP genotype concordance with matched germline/tumour. Parental tumour and MFD-1 carried four somatically acquired mutations in three recurrent mutated genes in OAC: TP53, ABCB1 and SEMA5A, not present in FLO-1 or OE33. MFD-1 displayed high expression of epithelial and glandular markers and a unique fingerprint of open chromatin. MFD-1 was tumorigenic in SCID mouse and proliferative and invasive in 3D cultures. The clinical utility of whole genome sequencing projects will be delivered using accurate model systems to develop molecular-phenotype therapeutics. We have described the first such system to arise from the oesophageal International Cancer Genome Consortium project. PMID:27600491

  15. Incidental diagnosis of an H-type tracheo-oesophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Peter; McVea, Steven; Flannigan, Christopher; Bali, Sanjeev

    2016-06-29

    A 6-day-old term neonate who was intubated on day 1 of life for apnoeic episodes, was transferred to the regional paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) for specialist opinion following 3 failed extubations in the neonatal unit. Escherichia coli congenital pneumonia was diagnosed and the child discharged to the local hospital. Chest radiographs and inflammatory markers were in keeping with infection. However, ongoing difficulties with secretions necessitated readmission to the PICU, following a significant cyanotic episode associated with coughing. On arrival at the PICU, a large leak around the endotracheal tube (ETT) was noted. On direct laryngoscopy, the ETT was found correctly positioned, through the cords, but air was noted to be coming back from the oesophagus. Advancing the ETT towards the carina terminated the leak and raised the suspicion of a tracheo-oesophageal fistula. An H-type tracheo-oesophageal fistula was confirmed on bronchoscopy. An uneventful fistula repair was performed and the baby discharged from the PICU on day 23 of life.

  16. Prospective study of serum B vitamins levels and oesophageal and gastric cancers in China

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiansong; Murphy, Gwen; Fan, Jinhu; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Taylor, Philip R.; Selhub, Jacob; Qiao, Youlin; Abnet, Christian C.

    2016-01-01

    B vitamins play an essential role in DNA synthesis and methylation, and may protect against oesophageal and gastric cancers. In this case-cohort study, subjects were enrolled from the General Population Nutrition Intervention Trial in Linxian, China. Subjects included 498 oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs), 255 gastric cardia adenocarcinomas (GCAs), and an age- and sex-matched sub-cohort of 947 individuals. Baseline serum riboflavin, pyridoxal phosphate (PLP), folate, vitamin B12, and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) were measured for all subjects. We estimated the associations with Cox proportional hazard models, with adjustment for potential confounders. Compared to those in the lowest quartile of serum riboflavin, those in the highest had a 44% lower risk of OSCC (HR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.41 to 0.75). Serum vitamin B12 as a continuous variable was observed to be significantly inversely associated with OSCC (HR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.89 to 1.01, P for score test = 0.041). Higher serum FMN levels were significantly associated with increased risk of OSCC (HR: 1.08, 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.16) and GCA (HR: 1.09, 95% CI: 1.00 to 1.20). Our study prompted that B vitamins have the potential role as chemopreventive agents for upper gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:27748414

  17. Changing Trends in Oesophageal Endoscopy: A Systematic Review of Transnasal Oesophagoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sabirin, Junainah; Abd Rahman, Maharita; Rajan, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The safety, efficacy, and economic implications of using transnasal oesophagoscopy (TNE) are compared with conventional rigid or flexible oesophagoscopy for oesophageal disorders in otorhinolaryngology (ORL) clinics in this systematic review. Eleven electronic databases were searched for articles on transnasal oesophagoscopy. A total of 67 relevant titles were identified and 39 abstracts were screened of which 17 full- text articles were included in this report. There was fair level of evidence to suggest that TNE was effective for screening examination in patients with dysphagia, globus pharyngeus, and reflux symptoms and for detection of metachronous oesophageal carcinoma. TNE can also be used to biopsy suspicious lesions in the upper aerodigestive tract, placement of wireless pH capsule, transnasal balloon dilation of the oesophagus, secondary tracheoesophageal puncture, and management of foreign bodies. TNE was well tolerated and can be safely performed in an office setting with topical anaesthesia. Complications associated with TNE were mild and uncommon. There was evidence to suggest potential cost savings by performing TNE in the office setting compared with conventional investigation and examination for dysphagia. TNE may lead to a change in practice from investigation and treatment in the operating theatre or day care center to an office-based practice. PMID:23984101

  18. The prevalence of dental erosion in Nigerian patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Oginni, Adeleke O; Agbakwuru, Elugwaraonu A; Ndububa, Dennis A

    2005-01-01

    Background In various people of the Western world, gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) has been reported to be a common problem. Various studies have also assessed the relationship between GOR and dental erosion. The authors are not aware of such studies in Nigerians. It is therefore the aims of the present study to estimate the prevalence of GOR; to estimate the prevalence of dental erosion in patients with GORD; to document the oral findings in patients diagnosed with GORD and to compare these findings with previous studies elsewhere. Methods A total of 225 subjects comprising of 100 volunteers and 125 patients diagnosed with GORD were involved in this study. History of gastric juice regurgitation and heartburn were recorded. Oral examination to quantify loss of tooth structure was done using the tooth wear index (TWI) designed by Smith and Knight (1984). Results Twenty patients with GORD presented with dental erosion in the maxillary anterior teeth with TWI scores ranging from 1–3. The prevalence of erosion was found to be statistically significant between GORD patients (16%) and control (5%) (p < 0.05), but not significant between endoscopic diagnostic groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion The present study supports the consideration of dental erosion as the extra-oesophageal manifestation of GORD. However the association between GORD and burning mouth sensation needs more investigation. PMID:15740613

  19. Oesophageal cancer in Golestan Province, a high-incidence area in northern Iran - a review.

    PubMed

    Islami, Farhad; Kamangar, Farin; Nasrollahzadeh, Dariush; Møller, Henrik; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2009-12-01

    Golestan Province, located in the south-east littoral of the Caspian Sea in northern Iran, has one of the highest rates of oesophageal cancer (OC) in the world. We review the epidemiologic studies that have investigated the epidemiologic patterns and causes of OC in this area and provide some suggestions for further studies. Oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) constitutes over 90% of all OC cases in Golestan. In retrospective studies, cigarettes and hookah smoking, nass use (a chewing tobacco product), opium consumption, hot tea drinking, poor oral health, low intake of fresh fruit and vegetables, and low socioeconomic status have been associated with higher risk of OSCC in Golestan. However, the association of tobacco with OSCC in this area is not as strong as that seen in Western countries. Alcohol is consumed by a very small percentage of the population and is not a risk factor for OSCC in this area. Other factors, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitroso compounds, drinking water contaminants, infections, food contamination with mycotoxins, and genetic factors merit further investigation as risk factors for OSCC in Golestan. An ongoing cohort study in this area is an important resource for studying some of these factors and also for confirming the previously found associations. PMID:19800783

  20. Epithelial cells in bone marrow of oesophageal cancer patients: a significant prognostic factor in multivariate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thorban, S; Rosenberg, R; Busch, R; Roder, R J

    2000-01-01

    The detection of epithelial cells in bone marrow, blood or lymph nodes indicates a disseminatory potential of solid tumours. 225 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus were prospectively studied. Prior to any therapy, cytokeratin-positive (CK) cells in bone marrow were immunocytochemically detected in 75 patients with the monoclonal anti-epithelial-cell antibody A45-B/B3 and correlated with established histopathologic and patient-specific prognosis factors. The prognosis factors were assessed by multivariate analysis. Twenty-nine of 75 (38.7%) patients with oesophageal cancer showed CK-positive cells in bone marrow. The analyses of the mean and median overall survival time showed a significant difference between patients with and without epithelial cells in bone marrow (P< 0.001). Multivariate analysis in the total patient population and in patients with curative resection of the primary tumour confirmed the curative resection rate and the bone marrow status as the strongest independent prognostic factors, besides the T-category. The detection of epithelial cells in bone marrow of oesophageal cancer patients is a substantial prognostic factor proved by multivariate analysis and is helpful for exact preoperative staging, as well as monitoring of neoadjuvant therapy. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10883665

  1. Dietary patterns and oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X; Wang, X; Lin, S; Yuan, J; Yu, I T-S

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objective: Dietary patterns, which represent a complex integration of food and nutrients, have been used to explore the association between dietary factors and the risk of oesophageal cancer. However, the association remains unclear. This systematic review was performed to evaluate the relationship between dietary patterns and oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) by pooling available data from existing studies. Methods: Pertinent articles published up to the end of 2013 were systematically searched and retrieved. The most common dietary patterns with high loadings of foods/nutrients were selected. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were derived by comparing the highest with the lowest categories of dietary pattern scores and by using a random-effect model. Heterogeneity was tested using I2 statistic. Results: From nine available case–control studies, in which smoking and other confounding factors were considered, three most common dietary patterns were selected: western pattern, healthy pattern, and drinker/alcohol pattern. Healthy pattern was significantly associated with a decreased risk of ESCC (OR=0.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.23, 0.49); drinker/alcohol pattern was related to a significantly increased risk (OR=2.34, 95% CI: 1.22, 3.45), while no significant association with western pattern was observed (OR=1.29, 95% CI: 0.83, 1.75). Conclusions: Based on available studies, though limited in number, this meta-analysis suggests that some dietary patterns may be associated with the risk of ESCC. PMID:24714753

  2. Predicting the response of localised oesophageal cancer to neo-adjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Gillham, Charles M; Reynolds, John; Hollywood, Donal

    2007-01-01

    Background A complete pathological response to neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation for oesophageal cancer is associated with favourable survival. However, such a benefit is seen in the minority. If one could identify, at diagnosis, those patients who were unlikely to respond unnecessary toxicity could be avoided and alternative treatment can be considered. The aim of this review was to highlight predictive markers currently assessed and evaluate their clinical utility. Methods A systematic search of Pubmed and Google Scholar was performed using the following keywords; "neo-adjuvant", "oesophageal", "trimodality", "chemotherapy", "radiotherapy", "chemoradiation" and "predict". The original manuscripts were sourced for further articles of relevance. Results Conventional indices including tumour stage and grade seem unable to predict histological response. Immuno-histochemical markers have been extensively studied, but none has made its way into routine clinical practice. Global gene expression from fresh pre-treatment tissue using cDNA microarray has only recently been assessed, but shows considerable promise. Molecular imaging using FDG-PET seems to be able to predict response after neo-adjuvant chemoradiation has finished, but there is a paucity of data when such imaging is performed earlier. Conclusion Currently there are no clinically useful predictors of response based on standard pathological assessment and immunohistochemistry. Genomics, proteomics and molecular imaging may hold promise. PMID:17716369

  3. Differential clonal evolution in oesophageal cancers in response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, John M.; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Makino, Seiko; Rayner, Emily; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Cross, William; Kovac, Michal; Ulahannan, Danny; Palles, Claire; Gillies, Richard S.; MacGregor, Thomas P.; Church, David; Maynard, Nicholas D.; Buffa, Francesca; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Graham, Trevor A.; Wang, Lai-Mun; Sharma, Ricky A.; Middleton, Mark; Tomlinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    How chemotherapy affects carcinoma genomes is largely unknown. Here we report whole-exome and deep sequencing of 30 paired oesophageal adenocarcinomas sampled before and after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Most, but not all, good responders pass through genetic bottlenecks, a feature associated with higher mutation burden pre-treatment. Some poor responders pass through bottlenecks, but re-grow by the time of surgical resection, suggesting a missed therapeutic opportunity. Cancers often show major changes in driver mutation presence or frequency after treatment, owing to outgrowth persistence or loss of sub-clones, copy number changes, polyclonality and/or spatial genetic heterogeneity. Post-therapy mutation spectrum shifts are also common, particularly C>A and TT>CT changes in good responders or bottleneckers. Post-treatment samples may also acquire mutations in known cancer driver genes (for example, SF3B1, TAF1 and CCND2) that are absent from the paired pre-treatment sample. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy can rapidly and profoundly affect the oesophageal adenocarcinoma genome. Monitoring molecular changes during treatment may be clinically useful. PMID:27045317

  4. Feeding behaviour of free-ranging penguins determined by oesophageal temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Charrassin, J B; Kato, A; Handrich, Y; Sato, K; Naito, Y; Ancel, A; Bost, C A; Gauthier-Clerc, M; Ropert-Coudert, Y; Le Maho, Y

    2001-01-01

    Sea birds play a major role in marine food webs, and it is important to determine when and how much they feed at sea. A major advance has been made by using the drop in stomach temperature after ingestion of ectothermic prey. This method is less sensitive when birds eat small prey or when the stomach is full. Moreover, in diving birds, independently of food ingestion, there are fluctuations in the lower abdominal temperature during the dives. Using oesophageal temperature, we present here a new method for detecting the timing of prey ingestion in free-ranging sea birds, and, to our knowledge, report the first data obtained on king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus). In birds ashore, which were hand-fed 2-15 g pieces of fish, all meal ingestions were detected with a sensor in the upper oesophagus. Detection was poorer with sensors at increasing distances from the beak. At sea, slow temperature drops in the upper oesophagus and stomach characterized a diving effect per se. For the upper oesophagus only, abrupt temperature variations were superimposed, therefore indicating prey ingestions. We determined the depths at which these occurred. Combining the changes in oesophageal temperatures of marine predators with their diving pattern opens new perspectives for understanding their foraging strategy, and, after validation with concurrent applications of classical techniques of prey survey, for assessing the distribution of their prey. PMID:11209884

  5. Opposing effects of bile acids deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid on signal transduction pathways in oesophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Reynolds, John V

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was reported to reduce bile acid toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying its cytoprotective effects are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of UDCA on the modulation of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced signal transduction in oesophageal cancer cells. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity was assessed using a gel shift assay. NF-κB activation and translocation was performed using an ELISA-based assay and immunofluorescence analysis. COX-2 expression was analysed by western blotting and COX-2 promoter activity was assessed by luciferase assay. DCA induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in SKGT-4 and OE33 cells. UDCA pretreatment inhibited DCA-induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and NF-κB translocation. This inhibitory effect was coupled with a blockade of IκB-α degradation and inhibition of phosphorylation of IKK-α/β and ERK1/2. Moreover, UDCA pretreatment inhibited COX-2 upregulation. Using transient transfection of the COX-2 promoter, UDCA pretreatment abrogated DCA-induced COX-2 promoter activation. In addition, UDCA protected oesophageal cells from the apoptotic effects of deoxycholate. Our findings indicate that UDCA inhibits DCA-induced signalling pathways in oesophageal cancer cells. These data indicate a possible mechanistic role for the chemopreventive actions of UDCA in oesophageal carcinogenesis.

  6. Telomerase activity of the Lugol-stained and -unstained squamous epithelia in the process of oesophageal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Inai, M; Kano, M; Shimada, Y; Sakurai, T; Chiba, T; Imamura, M

    2001-09-28

    Up-regulation of telomerase has been reported in many cancers. Our aim was to characterize telomerase activity in various states of the oesophagus to facilitate better understanding of carcinogenesis of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. During endoscopic examinations, we obtained 45 Lugol-stained normal epithelia, 31 Lugol-unstained epithelia (14 oesophagitis, 7 mild dysplasia, 5 severe dysplasia and 5 intramucosal cancer) and 9 advanced cancer. Telomerase activity was semi-quantified by a telomeric repeat amplification protocol using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA was examined by in situ hybridization. In the Lugol-stained normal epithelia, telomerase activity increased in proportion to the increase of severity of the accompanying lesions, with a rank order of advanced cancer, intramucosal cancer, mild dysplasia and oesophagitis. In the Lugol-unstained lesions and advanced cancer, telomerase activity was highest in advanced cancer. Up-regulation of telomerase in normal squamous epithelium may be a marker of progression of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  7. Lymphadenectomy and health-related quality of life after oesophageal cancer surgery: a nationwide, population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Schandl, Anna; Johar, Asif; Lagergren, Jesper; Lagergren, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to clarify whether more extensive surgical lymph node resection during oesophageal cancer surgery influences patients' health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Setting This was a nationwide Swedish population-based study. Participants A total of 616 patients who underwent curatively intended oesophageal cancer surgery in 2001–2005 were followed up at 6 months and 5 years after surgery. Outcome measures HRQOL was assessed with the validated European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the oesophageal cancer-specific module (EORTC QLQ-OES18). The number of removed lymph nodes in relation to HRQOL was analysed using multivariable linear regression, providing mean score differences in HRQOL scores with 95% CIs. The results were adjusted for age, comorbidity, body mass index, tumour stage, tumour histology, postoperative complications and surgeon volume. Results The study included 382 and 136 patients who completed the EORTC questionnaires at 6 months and 5 years following surgery, respectively. In general, HRQOL remained stable over time, with only improvements in role function and appetite loss. A larger number of removed lymph nodes did not decrease the HRQOL measure at 6 months or 5 years after surgery. Conclusions More extensive lymphadenectomy during oesophageal cancer surgery might not decrease patients' short-term or long-term HRQOL, but larger studies are needed to establish this potential lack of association. PMID:27566643

  8. Endoscopic hemostasis state of the art - Nonvariceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Goelder, Stefan Karl; Brueckner, Juliane; Messmann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    New endoscopic techniques for hemostasis in nonvariceal bleeding were introduced and known methods further improved. Hemospray and Endoclot are two new compounds for topical treatment of bleeding. Initial studies in this area have shown a good hemostatic effect, especially in active large scale oozing bleeding, e.g., tumor bleedings. For further evaluation larger prospective studies comparing the substanced with other methods of endoscopic hemostasis are needed. For localized active arterial bleeding primary injection therapy in the area of ​​bleeding as well as in the four adjacent quadrants offers a good method to reduce bleeding activity. The injection is technically easy to learn and practicable. After bleeding activity is reduced the bleeding source can be localized more clearly for clip application. Today many different through-the-scope (TTS) clips are available. The ability to close and reopen a clip can aid towards good positioning at the bleeding site. Even more important is the rotatability of a clip before application. Often multiple TTS clips are required for secure closure of a bleeding vessel. One model has the ability to use three clips in series without changing the applicator. Severe arterial bleeding from vessels larger than 2 mm is often unmanageable with these conventional methods. Here is the over-the-scope-clip system another newly available method. It is similar to the ligation of esophageal varices and involves aspiration of tissue into a transparent cap before closure of the clip. Thus a greater vascular occlusion pressure can be achieved and larger vessels can be treated endoscopically. Patients with severe arterial bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract have a very high rate of recurrence after initial endoscopic treatment. These patients should always be managed in an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologist and surgeons. PMID:26962402

  9. Devil's claw root: ulcers and gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    Harpagophytum procumbens, or devil's claw, is an African plant whose root is used to relieve minor joint symptoms. Several cases of gastrointestinal bleeding associated with the use of devil's claw root have been reported. A systematic review of the adverse effects of devil's claw root in about 20 randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials showed mainly gastrointestinal effects: gastralgia and dyspepsia. In practice, devil's claw root exposes patients to the risk of sometimes serious upper gastrointestinal disorders, yet has no established efficacy beyond a placebo effect. It is best avoided. PMID:24600731

  10. Acquired hemophilia A as a cause of recurrent bleeding into the pleural cavity - case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wojtyś, Małgorzata; Żuk, Ewa; Alchimowicz, Jacek; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2014-09-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a coagulation disorder caused by autoantibodies against blood coagulation factor VIII. The first sign of this disease is often massive bleeding, which can affect patients after routine procedures. The parameter which indicates the presence of this condition is isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The present article describes a case of a 32-year-old man with acute interstitial pneumonia and pleural effusion, in whom a massive hemothorax appeared after thoracocentesis; active bleeding was observed after the introduction of a chest tube. The patient was operated on, and no pinpoint bleeding was discovered during the procedure. Active bleeding was still taking place postoperatively. The patient underwent another operation after 6 days. Once more, no pinpoint bleeding was found. Prolonged APTT was observed. The activity of blood coagulation factor VIII was 3.04%. The presence of antibodies against factor VIII was confirmed, and acquired hemophilia was diagnosed. The article also includes an analysis of the literature on acquired hemophilia.

  11. Acquired hemophilia A as a cause of recurrent bleeding into the pleural cavity – case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Żuk, Ewa; Alchimowicz, Jacek; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a coagulation disorder caused by autoantibodies against blood coagulation factor VIII. The first sign of this disease is often massive bleeding, which can affect patients after routine procedures. The parameter which indicates the presence of this condition is isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The present article describes a case of a 32-year-old man with acute interstitial pneumonia and pleural effusion, in whom a massive hemothorax appeared after thoracocentesis; active bleeding was observed after the introduction of a chest tube. The patient was operated on, and no pinpoint bleeding was discovered during the procedure. Active bleeding was still taking place postoperatively. The patient underwent another operation after 6 days. Once more, no pinpoint bleeding was found. Prolonged APTT was observed. The activity of blood coagulation factor VIII was 3.04%. The presence of antibodies against factor VIII was confirmed, and acquired hemophilia was diagnosed. The article also includes an analysis of the literature on acquired hemophilia. PMID:26336444

  12. Long-Term Costs of Ischemic Stroke and Major Bleeding Events among Medicare Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Mercaldi, Catherine J; Siu, Kimberly; Sander, Stephen D; Walker, David R; Wu, You; Li, Qian; Wu, Ning

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Acute healthcare utilization of stroke and bleeding has been previously examined among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). The long-term cost of such outcomes over several years is not well understood. Methods. Using 1999-2009 Medicare medical and enrollment data, we identified incident NVAF patients without history of stroke or bleeding. Patients were followed from the first occurrence of ischemic stroke, major bleeding, or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) resulting in hospitalization. Those with events were matched with 1-5 NVAF patients without events. Total incremental costs of events were calculated as the difference between costs for patients with events and matched controls for up to 3 years. Results. Among the 25,465 patients who experienced events, 94.5% were successfully matched. In the first year after event, average incremental costs were $32,900 for ischemic stroke, $23,414 for major bleeding, and $47,640 for ICH. At 3 years after these events, costs remained elevated by $3,156-$5,400 per annum. Conclusion. While the costs of stroke and bleeding among patients with NVAF are most dramatic in the first year, utilization remained elevated at 3 years. Cost consequences extend beyond the initial year after these events and should be accounted for when assessing the cost-effectiveness of treatment regimens for stroke prevention.

  13. Pulsatile exposure to simulated reflux leads to changes in gene expression in a 3D model of oesophageal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Green, Nicola H; Nicholls, Zoe; Heath, Paul R; Cooper-Knock, Jonathan; Corfe, Bernard M; MacNeil, Sheila; Bury, Jonathan P

    2014-06-01

    Oesophageal exposure to duodenogastroesophageal refluxate is implicated in the development of Barrett's metaplasia (BM), with increased risk of progression to oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The literature proposes that reflux exposure activates NF-κB, driving the aberrant expression of intestine-specific caudal-related homeobox (CDX) genes. However, early events in the pathogenesis of BM from normal epithelium are poorly understood. To investigate this, our study subjected a 3D model of the normal human oesophageal mucosa to repeated, pulsatile exposure to specific bile components and examined changes in gene expression. Initial 2D experiments with a range of bile salts observed that taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC) impacted upon NF-κB activation without causing cell death. Informed by this, the 3D oesophageal model was repeatedly exposed to TCDC in the presence and absence of acid, and the epithelial cells underwent gene expression profiling. We identified ~300 differentially expressed genes following each treatment, with a large and significant overlap between treatments. Enrichment analysis (Broad GSEA, DAVID and Metacore™; GeneGo Inc) identified multiple gene sets related to cell signalling, inflammation, proliferation, differentiation and cell adhesion. Specifically NF-κB activation, Wnt signalling, cell adhesion and targets for the transcription factors PTF1A and HNF4α were highlighted. Our data suggest that HNF4α isoform switching may be an early event in Barrett's pathogenesis. CDX1/2 targets were, however, not enriched, suggesting that although CDX1/2 activation reportedly plays a role in BM development, it may not be an initial event. Our findings highlight new areas for investigation in the earliest stages of BM pathogenesis of oesophageal diseases and new potential therapeutic targets.

  14. Massive Bleeding as the First Clinical Manifestation of Metastatic Prostate Cancer due to Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation with Enhanced Fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, João Madeira; Victorino, Rui M. M.; Meneses Santos, João

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is the most frequent coagulation disorder associated with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. However, DIC with enhanced fibrinolysis as an initial presentation of prostate cancer is extremely rare. The appropriate treatment to control bleeding in these situations is challenging, controversial, and based on isolated case reports in the literature. A 66-year-old male presented at the emergency department with acute severe spontaneous ecchymoses localized to the limbs, laterocervical hematoma, and hemothorax. Prostate specific antigen level was 385 μg/L, bone scintigraphy revealed multiple bone metastases, and prostate biopsy confirmed adenocarcinoma (Gleason 9; 4 + 5). Laboratory investigation showed a pattern of enhanced fibrinolysis rather than the more common intravascular coagulation mechanism. Epsilon aminocaproic acid in monotherapy was initiated with a clear and rapid control of bleeding manifestations. This rare case of massive bleeding due to DIC with enhanced fibrinolysis as the first manifestation of prostate cancer suggests that in selected cases where the acute bleeding dyscrasia is clearly associated with a dominant fibrinolysis mechanism it is possible to use an approach of monotherapy with antifibrinolytics. PMID:27803823

  15. Common management issues in pediatric patients with mild bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Sarah H

    2012-10-01

    Type 1 von Willebrand disease and mild platelet function defects are among the most common disorders seen by pediatric hematologists. The management and prevention of bleeding in these patients can be challenging, as there are limited published data to guide clinical practice, and a complete lack of randomized clinical trials. Desmopressin (DDAVP) and antifibrinolytics are the mainstays of treatment in these patients, yet the optimal dosing and timing of these agents to prevent or resolve bleeding, while minimizing adverse side effects, is sometimes unclear. DDAVP-induced hyponatremia is a particularly under-recognized complication in children with bleeding disorders who undergo surgery. Clinicians need to be aware of local measures that are equally important in treating problems such as epistaxis and surgical bleeding. This review will discuss the published literature and provide practical suggestions regarding four common management issues in the care of children and adolescents with mild bleeding disorders: epistaxis, heavy menstrual bleeding, dental extractions, and tonsillectomy.

  16. Enteral alimentation and gastrointestinal bleeding in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Pingleton, S K; Hadzima, S K

    1983-01-01

    The incidence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in mechanically ventilated ICU patients receiving enteral alimentation was reviewed and compared to bleeding occurring in ventilated patients receiving prophylactic antacids or cimetidine. Of 250 patients admitted to our ICU during a 1-yr time period, 43 ventilated patients were studied. Patients in each group were comparable with respect to age, respiratory diagnosis, number of GI hemorrhage risk factors, and number of ventilator, ICU, and hospital days. Twenty-one patients had evidence of GI bleeding. Fourteen of 20 patients receiving antacids and 7 of 9 patients receiving cimetidine had evidence of GI bleeding. No bleeding occurred in 14 patients receiving enteral alimentation. Complications of enteral alimentation were few and none required discontinuation of enteral alimentation. Our preliminary data suggest the role of enteral alimentation in critically ill patients may include not only protection against malnutrition but also protection against GI bleeding.

  17. Ultrasound assessment of the endometrium for irregular vaginal bleeding.

    PubMed

    McFarlin, Barbara L

    2006-01-01

    Irregular vaginal bleeding is a common symptom of women seeking gynecologic care. Etiologies of irregular vaginal bleeding can be classified into the following categories: pregnancy related (retained products of conception, threatened or missed abortion, or ectopic pregnancy), hormonal (disorders of ovulation, menopause, or hormonal contraceptive use), structural (polyps, myomas, or arteriovenous malformation), neoplasm (endometrial cancer), and infection (endometritis). After the history and physical examination, the initial evaluation of irregular vaginal bleeding has traditionally involved an endometrial biopsy. Transvaginal ultrasound has revolutionized the evaluation of the gynecologic ultrasound examination by providing a minimally invasive means to determine the etiology for the bleeding. Transvaginal ultrasound assessment of the endometrial cavity allows treatment to be tailored to the specific cause of irregular vaginal bleeding, thus saving women time, money, and exposure to unnecessary interventions. The purpose of this article is to give the clinician critical information regarding the capabilities of ultrasound to evaluate women with irregular vaginal bleeding.

  18. Bleeding and other presentations in Thai patients with dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2004-10-01

    Dengue infection is a major public health problem, affecting the general population in Southeast Asia. Hematologic aberrations in dengue infection include atypical lymphocytosis, coagulopathy, and predominant thrombocytopenia. Bleeding and other presentations in 30 Thai patients with dengue infection during an endemic season (2003) are presented. A review of the clinical presentation of these patients was performed. All had fever as a chief complaint. The three most common complaints were fever (100%), vomiting (90%), and cough (90%), respectively. Concerning bleeding, only eight cases (26.6%) had signs of bleeding. Those manifestations included petechiae (seven cases, 23.3%) and melena (one case, 3.3%). Skin bleeding (petechiae) due to thrombocytopenia is the most common bleeding manifestation in dengue infection. However, physicians should not overlook bleeding from other less common sites such as the gastrointestinal tract and genitourinary tract.

  19. [EMERGENCY TREATMENT OF BLEEDING IN PATIENTS TAKING WARFARIN].

    PubMed

    Prasolov, N V; Shulutko, E M; Bulanov, A Yu; Yatskov, K V; Shcherbakov, O V

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists (AVK) is an effective treatment and prevention of thrombosis. One of the major disadvantages of the AVK is a risk for serious bleeding. Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC), fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and vitamin K1 are available for control of these situations. The experience of special team ofthe Scientific Center for Hematology was the basis for presented retrospective study. Three regimens of warfarin-related bleeding were compared: PCC+ VK for several bleeding, FFP+ VK for different clinical situations and VKfor light bleeding. PCC showed himself as effective and safe hemostatic agent. Transfusions of FFP were sometimes not effective, sometimes led to TACO. Supplementation of vitamin K1 for patients of I and II groups provided more stable control of hemostasis. In III group VK vas effective to stop bleeding. Two impotent sings for conclusion: necessary of laboratory monitoring, TEG first of all; individual balance of hemostasis base of bleeding or thrombotic risks.

  20. Bioengineering factor Xa to treat bleeding.

    PubMed

    Camire, Rodney M

    2016-05-01

    There is a clinical need to develop safe and rapid therapeutic strategies to control bleeding arising from a host of emergent situations. Over the past several years our laboratory has developed novel zymogen-like FXa variants and tested their safety and efficacy using hemophilia as a model system. The variants have a spectrum of properties resulting from an amino acid change at the N-terminus of the heavy chain that alters a critical conformational change. These properties, which include resistance to plasma protease inhibitors, low activity in the absence of FVa, and rescue of low activity upon incorporation in prothrombinase, yield remarkably effective pro-hemostatic agents. The FVa-dependent restoration of activity is a key aspect to their efficacy and also contributes to localizing the variants to the site of vascular injury. While pre-clinical data support their use in the setting of hemophilia, they have the potential to act as rapid pro-hemostatic agents for the treatment of a range of bleeding conditions. This review will discuss the biochemical properties of these FXa zymogen-like variants and their in vivo characterization. PMID:27207419

  1. [Albumin and artificial colloids for massive bleeding].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and massive bleeding has to be counteracted by efficient volume restoration against rapid loss of intravascular volume. There are two phases of volume management for massive bleeding, uncontrolled phase and controlled phase. During initial uncontrolled phase, rapid infusion of crystalloid with RCC (red cell concentrate) is the first choice of volume management to prevent shock and profound decline of hemoglobin level. After shifting to the next controlled phase, artificial colloids and RCC become the next choice for efficient volume restoration. Although albumin has not been proven to improve prognosis in clinical studies, anti-inflammatory effect could be expected. Albumin infusion may be followed in this phase, and also albumin concentrate may be beneficial to reduce subsequent tissue edema due to massive infusion of crystalloid and artificial colloid. A new generation of hydroxyethyl starch is a promising blood substitute, designed with minimum side effect. Although renal damage especially in septic patient and coagulation disorder are theoretically suspected, beneficial effect as volume expansion overwhelms these stochastic side effects. Since the side effect depends on the dose and how much it remains in the body, a purposeful use during volume expansion phase should be recommended.

  2. Rare bleeding disorders in children: identification and primary care management.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Suchitra S

    2013-11-01

    Bleeding symptoms are common in healthy children but occasionally may indicate an underlying congenital or acquired bleeding diathesis. The rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) comprise inherited deficiencies of coagulation factors I (congenital fibrinogen deficiencies), II, V, VII, X, XI, and XIII and combined factor deficiencies, most notably of factors V and VIII and of vitamin K-dependent factors. These disorders often manifest during childhood and may present with recurrent or even serious or life-threatening bleeding episodes, particularly during the neonatal period. Accordingly, primary care and other nonhematologist pediatric providers should be familiar with the clinical presentation and initial evaluation of these rare disorders. Bleeding manifestations generally vary within the same RBD and may be indistinguishable from 1 RBD to another or from other more common bleeding disorders. Serious bleeding events such as intracranial hemorrhage may be heralded by less serious bleeding symptoms. The results of initial coagulation studies, especially prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time, are often helpful in narrowing down the potential factor deficiency, with factor XIII deficiency being an exception. Consultation with a hematologist is advised to facilitate accurate diagnosis and to ensure proper management and follow-up. The approach to bleeding episodes and invasive procedures is individualized and depends on the severity, frequency, and, in the case of procedures, likelihood of bleeding. Prophylaxis may be appropriate in children with recurrent serious bleeding and specifically after life-threatening bleeding episodes. When available, specific purified plasma-derived or recombinant factor concentrates, rather than fresh frozen plasma or cryoprecipitate, are the treatment of choice.

  3. The Safety of Thoracentesis in Patients with Uncorrected Bleeding Risk

    PubMed Central

    Argento, A. Christine; Murphy, Terrence E.; Araujo, Katy L. B.; Pisani, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thoracentesis is commonly performed to evaluate pleural effusions. Many medications (warfarin, heparin, clopidogrel) or physiological factors (elevated International Normalized Ratio [INR], thrombocytopenia, uremia) increase the risk for bleeding. Frequently these medications are withheld or transfusions are performed to normalize physiological parameters before a procedure. The safety of performing thoracentesis without correction of these bleeding risks has not been prospectively evaluated. Methods: This prospective observational cohort study enrolled 312 patients who underwent thoracentesis. All patients were evaluated for the presence of risk factors for bleeding. Hematocrit levels were obtained pre- and postprocedure, and the occurrence of postprocedural hemothorax was evaluated. Measurements and Main Results: Thoracenteses were performed in 312 patients, 42% of whom had a risk for bleeding. Elevated INR, secondary to liver disease or warfarin, and renal disease were the two most common etiologies for bleeding risk, although many patients had multiple potential bleeding risks. There was no significant difference in pre- and postprocedural hematocrit levels in patients with a bleeding risk when compared with patients with no bleeding risk. No patient developed a hemothorax as a result of the thoracentesis. Conclusions: This single-center, observational study suggests that thoracentesis may be safely performed without prior correction of coagulopathy, thrombocytopenia, or medication-induced bleeding risk. This may reduce the morbidity associated with transfusions or withholding of medications. PMID:23952852

  4. Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Risk of Abnormal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Sharma, Eesha

    2016-09-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) increase the risk of abnormal bleeding by lowering platelet serotonin and hence the efficiency of platelet-driven hemostasis; by increasing gastric acidity and possibly gastric ulceration; and by other mechanisms. The upper gastrointestinal tract is the commonest site of SRI-related abnormal bleeding; bleeding at this location may be increased by concurrent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy and by treatment with antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs. Bleeding at this location may be reduced by concurrent administration of acid-suppressing drugs. PMID:27514297

  5. Abnormal Bleeding During Menopause Hormone Therapy: Insights for Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros, Sebastião Freitas; Yamamoto, Márcia Marly Winck; Barbosa, Jacklyne Silva

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to review the involved mechanisms and propose actions for controlling/treating abnormal uterine bleeding during climacteric hormone therapy. Methods A systemic search of the databases SciELO, MEDLINE, and Pubmed was performed for identifying relevant publications on normal endometrial bleeding, abnormal uterine bleeding, and hormone therapy bleeding. Results Before starting hormone therapy, it is essential to exclude any abnormal organic condition, identify women at higher risk for bleeding, and adapt the regimen to suit eachwoman’s characteristics. Abnormal bleeding with progesterone/progestogen only, combined sequential, or combined continuous regimens may be corrected by changing the progestogen, adjusting the progestogen or estrogen/progestogen doses, or even switching the initial regimen to other formulation. Conclusion To diminish the occurrence of abnormal bleeding during hormone therapy (HT), it is important to tailor the regimen to the needs of individual women and identify those with higher risk of bleeding. The use of new agents as adjuvant therapies for decreasing abnormal bleeding in women on HT awaits future studies. PMID:24665210

  6. Clinical Evaluation of Bleeding and Bruising in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Neutze, Dana; Roque, Jodi

    2016-02-15

    Bleeding and bruising are common symptoms in the primary care setting. The patient history can help determine whether the bruising or bleeding is abnormal. The International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis has developed a bleeding assessment tool that can be used to indicate possible pathology. A family history of bleeding problems may suggest a hereditary coagulation defect. Such a history is especially important in children who may not have experienced a major bleeding episode. Medication review can identify pharmacologic causes of the bleeding or bruising. Physical examination findings such as mucocutaneous bleeding suggest that the underlying condition is caused by platelet dysfunction, whereas hemarthroses or hematomas are more common in coagulopathy. If the history and physical examination findings suggest a bleeding diathesis, initial laboratory testing includes a complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, prothrombin time (PT), and partial thromboplastin time (PTT). A normal PT and PTT indicate a platelet disorder, the most common of which is von Willebrand disease. A normal PT and prolonged PTT signal a deficit in the intrinsic pathway, and a mixing study should be performed. A vitamin K challenge is indicated in patients with an abnormal PT and normal PTT. A workup for liver failure is warranted in patients with prolonged PT and PTT. If initial testing does not reveal an etiology in a patient with a high suspicion for a bleeding disorder, the patient should be referred to a hematologist for additional evaluation. PMID:26926815

  7. Photocoagulation in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Wlodzimierz; Paczkowski, Pawel M.

    1996-03-01

    The authors present their experience in the endoscopic laser photocoagulation of bleeding peptic ulcer. From 1991 to June 1995, 203 patients admitted for UGI bleeding from peptic ulcer have been treated by this method. The source of bleeding was confirmed by endoscopy. The patients were divided into two groups: actively bleeding peptic ulcer (group IA and IB according to Forrest's classification) and ulcer with stigmata of recent bleeding (group IIA/IIB). The former group consisted of 106 patients, among whom over 40 percent (45 patients) presented signs of hypovolemic shock on admission. Nd:YAG laser (Surgical Laser Technologies) was used in a continuous mode with a contact (8 - 20 watts) or non-contact (over 50 watts) method of coagulation. In actively bleeding patients photocoagulation resulted in stopping the hemorrhage in 95 (90%). Recurrent bleeding occurred in 16 cases; in 9 of them it was stopped by repeated photocoagulation. In this group 18 patients required surgical intervention. The mortality was of 10.3% (11 patients). In 97 patients with recent bleeding stigmata photocoagulation provoked heavy hemorrhage in 3 (in 2 cases stopped by prolonged coagulation). In 9 of the remaining 94 patients recurrent bleeding occurred. Nine patients required surgical intervention. Mortality in this group was of 6%.

  8. Low hemoglobin levels are associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Hasegawa, Rumiko; Shirai, Yoshinori; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding can be fatal. Blood test variables were reviewed in search of threshold values to detect the presence of occult upper GI bleeding. The records of 1,023 patients who underwent endoscopy at the National Hospital Organization Shimoshizu Hospital from October 2014, to September 2015, were retrospectively reviewed. Of those, 95 had upper GI bleeding. One-way analysis of variance was applied to blood test variables comparing patients with and without upper GI bleeding. Logistic regression analysis was applied to detect the association of blood test parameters with upper GI bleeding, and receiver-operator characteristics were applied to establish threshold values. White blood cell count (WBC), platelet (Plt) count, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were higher, and hemoglobin (Hb) and albumin (Alb) levels were lower in patients with upper GI bleeding. Logistic regression analysis showed that low Hb was significantly associated with upper GI bleeding and a Hb value of 10.8 g/dl was established as the threshold for the diagnosis. In patients with upper GI bleeding, WBC, Plt count, and BUN levels were higher and Hb and Alb levels were reduced. Hb at 10.8 g/dl was established as a threshold value to detect upper GI bleeding. PMID:27588176

  9. Modeling of Fixed-Exit Porous Bleed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Saunders, John D.

    2008-01-01

    A model has been developed to simulate a fixed-exit porous bleed system for supersonic inlets. The fixed-exit model allows the amount of bleed flow to vary according to local flow conditions and fixed-exit characteristics of the bleed system. This variation is important for the control of shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions within the inlet. The model computes the bleed plenum static pressure rather than requiring its specification. The model was implemented in the Wind-US computational fluid dynamics code. The model was then verified and validated against experimental data for bleed on a flat plate with and without an impinging oblique shock and for bleed in a Mach 3.0 axisymmetric, mixed-compression inlet. The model was able to accurately correlate the plenum pressures with bleed rates and simulate the effect of the bleed on the downstream boundary layer. Further, the model provided a realistic simulation of the initiation of inlet unstart. The results provide the most in-depth examination to date of bleed models for use in the simulation of supersonic inlets. The results also highlight the limitations of the models and aspects that require further research.

  10. An update on pediatric bleeding disorders: bleeding scores, benign joint hypermobility, and platelet function testing in the evaluation of the child with bleeding symptoms.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Sarah H

    2012-05-01

    Evaluating a child with symptoms of easy bruising and/or bleeding remains a challenge in pediatric hematology, and there is no "one size fits all" approach. This review focuses on recent research in three elements of the evaluation of a child with a suspected bleeding disorder. We will first discuss the development of the standardized Pediatric Bleeding Questionnaire, and its applications in research and clinical settings. We will then discuss the relationship between benign hypermobility syndromes and hemostasis, and the importance of including a Beighton Score in the physical examination of any child presenting with unusual bruising or bleeding. While prolonged bleeding times and abnormal platelet aggregation are common findings in children with benign hypermobility, normal coagulation studies do not exclude the presence of a connective tissue disorder in a child presenting with easy bleeding and joint hypermobility on examination. Finally, we will discuss the current state of knowledge regarding the laboratory evaluation of platelet function in children. Platelet function disorders are among the most common inherited bleeding disorders. However, testing for such disorders is time-consuming and requires a step-wise approach. We will review the indications for and limitations of the most commonly utilized platelet function laboratory studies.

  11. Optimizing human apyrase to treat arterial thrombosis and limit reperfusion injury without increasing bleeding risk.

    PubMed

    Moeckel, Douglas; Jeong, Soon Soeg; Sun, Xiaofeng; Broekman, M Johan; Nguyen, Annie; Drosopoulos, Joan H F; Marcus, Aaron J; Robson, Simon C; Chen, Ridong; Abendschein, Dana

    2014-08-01

    In patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing reperfusion therapy to restore blood flow through blocked arteries, simultaneous inhibition of platelet P2Y12 receptors with the current standard of care neither completely prevents recurrent thrombosis nor provides satisfactory protection against reperfusion injury. Additionally, these antiplatelet drugs increase the risk of bleeding. To devise a different strategy, we engineered and optimized the apyrase activity of human nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-3 (CD39L3) to enhance scavenging of extracellular adenosine diphosphate, a predominant ligand of P2Y12 receptors. The resulting recombinant protein, APT102, exhibited greater than four times higher adenosine diphosphatase activity and a 50 times longer plasma half-life than did native apyrase. Treatment with APT102 before coronary fibrinolysis with intravenous recombinant human tissue-type plasminogen activator in conscious dogs completely prevented thrombotic reocclusion and significantly decreased infarction size by 81% without increasing bleeding time. In contrast, clopidogrel did not prevent coronary reocclusion and increased bleeding time. In a murine model of myocardial reperfusion injury caused by transient coronary artery occlusion, APT102 also decreased infarct size by 51%, whereas clopidogrel was not effective. These preclinical data suggest that APT102 should be tested for its ability to safely and effectively maximize the benefits of myocardial reperfusion therapy in patients with arterial thrombosis.

  12. Acute necrotising ulcerative gingivitis in an immunocompromised young adult.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jessie; Kent, Paul; Lennon, Joshua M; Logan, Latania K

    2015-01-01

    Acute necrotising ulcerative gingivitis is an acute onset disease characterised by ulceration, necrosis, pain and bleeding in gingival surfaces. It is predominantly seen in severely malnourished children and young adults with advanced HIV infection. We present a unique presentation in a young adult with high-grade osteogenic sarcoma.

  13. Heller's cardiomyotomy compared with pneumatic dilatation for treatment of oesophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, J; Kiviniemi, H; Laitinen, S

    1991-01-01

    The records of 30 patients treated for oesophageal achalasia between 1976 and 1988 were analysed retrospectively. Early and late results were collected to compare the safety and efficacy of Heller's myotomy (n = 13) and pneumatic dilatation (n = 17). Unsatisfactory immediate postoperative results were found in 4 of 13 of the patients who had undergone myotomy (31%) and in 4 of the 17 patients treated by pneumatic dilatation (24%). More patients had improved swallowing during the first postoperative year after myotomy, but this difference ceased with time. The severity of the symptoms affected the results, and dilatations that had to be repeated more than twice were ineffective. We conclude that pneumatic dilatation is as safe as Heller's myotomy, and that although the early results are significantly better after myotomy, the late results are similar.

  14. Endoscopic removal of impacted oesophageal foreign body: A case report and a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Obateru, Olusegun A; Durowaye, Matthew O; Olokoba, Abdulfatai B; Olaniyi, Olufemi K

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body (FB) impaction in the oesophagus is fairly common in paediatric Gastroenterology practice. This study aims to describe a case of an unusually impacted button lithium battery, in the mid-oesophagus of a 7-year-old child that was confirmed, and removed during oesophagogastroduodenoscopy. A 7-year-old male child, presented at the Emergency Paediatric Unit of our hospital with a history of ingestion of a button-like metallic object. A plain soft tissue X-ray of the neck and chest, however, revealed a dense round object located at the sternal angle of Louis. The object was dislodged and identified as a flat lithium battery after an oesophagogastroduodenoscopy, carried out under general anaesthesia using a flexible forward-viewing video gastroscope. The button battery was subsequently passed in faeces. Endoscopic removal of impacted oesophageal FBs under general anaesthesia is an effective and safe procedure in children in experienced hands. PMID:27251523

  15. Medical management of heavy menstrual bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Maybin, Jacqueline A; Critchley, Hilary OD

    2016-01-01

    Women with benign heavy menstrual bleeding have the choice of a number of medical treatment options to reduce their blood loss and improve quality of life. The role of the clinician is to provide information to facilitate women in making an appropriate choice. Unfortunately, many options can be associated with hormonal side effects, prevention of fertility and lack of efficacy, leading to discontinuation and progression to surgical interventions. Herein, we discuss the various options currently available to women, including antifibrinolytics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory preparations, oral contraceptive pills and oral, injectable and intrauterine progestogens. In addition, we describe the more novel option of selective progesterone receptor modulators and their current benefits and limitations. PMID:26695687

  16. The effect of HCl infusion in the lower part of the oesophagus on the pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter pressure in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Wallin, L; Boesby, S; Madsen, T

    1978-01-01

    A measuring unit combined with a perfused catheter has been developed for measurement of the pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter pressure. The system is able to register pressure measurements using either intermittent or continuous withdrawal of the catheter, at the same flow rate (0.5 ml/min). Repeated measurements of pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter pressure have been made on eight healthy volunteers. No differences were found in the sphincter pressures measured by the continuous and the intermittent withdrawal techniques (p greater than 0.10); the coefficient of variation was 0.18 for both techniques. The pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter pressure was measured during infusion of 0.1 N HCl (5 ml/min) 5 cm proximally to the gastro-oesophageal sphincter. There was an increase in the pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter pressure after 1 min of infusion (p less than 0.05). Measurements after 5 min and 10 min were no different from the initial value; thus a fall was observed between the first and the fifth minute (p less than 0.05). The observed rise in sphincter pressure may be explained as a response acting to prevent gastro-oesophageal reflux from entering the pharynx.

  17. Diaphragmatic hernia following oesophagectomy for oesophageal cancer – Are we too radical?

    PubMed Central

    Argenti, F.; Luhmann, A.; Dolan, R.; Wilson, M.; Podda, M.; Patil, P.; Shimi, S.; Alijani, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Diaphragmatic herniation (DH) of abdominal contents into the thorax after oesophageal resection is a recognised and serious complication of surgery. While differences in pressure between the abdominal and thoracic cavities are important, the size of the hiatal defect is something that can be influenced surgically. As with all oncological surgery, safe resection margins are essential without adversely affecting necessary anatomical structure and function. However very little has been published looking at the extent of the hiatal resection. We aim to present a case series of patients who developed DH herniation post operatively in order to raise discussion about the ideal extent of surgical resection required. Methods We present a series of cases of two male and one female who had oesophagectomies for moderately and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the lower oesophagus who developed post-operative DH. We then conducted a detailed literature review using Medline, Pubmed and Google Scholar to identify existing guidance to avoid this complication with particular emphasis on the extent of hiatal resection. Discussion Extended incision and partial resection of the diaphragm are associated with an increased risk of postoperative DH formation. However, these more extensive excisions can ensure clear surgical margins. Post-operative herniation can be an early or late complication of surgery and despite the clear importance of hiatal resection only one paper has been published on this subject which recommends a more limited resection than was carried out in our cases. Conclusion This case series investigated the recommended extent of hiatal dissection in oesophageal surgery. Currently there is no clear guidance available on this subject and further studies are needed to ascertain the optimum resection margin that results in the best balance of oncological parameters vs. post operative morbidity. PMID:27158485

  18. Systematic review and meta-analysis of immunohistochemical prognostic biomarkers in resected oesophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    McCormick Matthews, L H; Noble, F; Tod, J; Jaynes, E; Harris, S; Primrose, J N; Ottensmeier, C; Thomas, G J; Underwood, T J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) is one of the fastest rising malignancies with continued poor prognosis. Many studies have proposed novel biomarkers but, to date, no immunohistochemical markers of survival after oesophageal resection have entered clinical practice. Here, we systematically review and meta-analyse the published literature, to identify potential biomarkers. Methods: Relevant articles were identified via Ovid medline 1946–2013. For inclusion, studies had to conform to REporting recommendations for tumor MARKer (REMARK) prognostic study criteria. The primary end-point was a pooled hazard ratio (HR) and variance, summarising the effect of marker expression on prognosis. Results: A total of 3059 articles were identified. After exclusion of irrelevant titles and abstracts, 214 articles were reviewed in full. Nine molecules had been examined in more than one study (CD3, CD8, COX-2, EGFR, HER2, Ki67, LgR5, p53 and VEGF) and were meta-analysed. Markers with largest survival effects were COX-2 (HR=2.47, confidence interval (CI)=1.15–3.79), CD3 (HR=0.51, 95% CI=0.32–0.70), CD8 (HR=0.55, CI=0.31–0.80) and EGFR (HR=1.65, 95% CI=1.14–2.16). Discussion: Current methods have not delivered clinically useful molecular prognostic biomarkers in OAC. We have highlighted the paucity of good-quality robust studies in this field. A genome-to-protein approach would be better suited for the development and subsequent validation of biomarkers. Large collaborative projects with standardised methodology will be required to generate clinically useful biomarkers. PMID:26110972

  19. Cancer-associated fibroblasts predict poor outcome and promote periostin-dependent invasion in oesophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Timothy J; Hayden, Annette L; Derouet, Mathieu; Garcia, Edwin; Noble, Fergus; White, Michael J; Thirdborough, Steve; Mead, Abbie; Clemons, Nicholas; Mellone, Massimiliano; Uzoho, Chudy; Primrose, John N; Blaydes, Jeremy P; Thomas, Gareth J

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play an important role in tumour development and progression. In this study we investigated the functional role of CAFs in oesophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). We used immunochemistry to analyse a cohort of 183 EAC patients for CAF markers related to disease mortality. We characterized CAFs and normal oesophageal fibroblasts (NOFs) using western blotting, immunofluorescence and gel contraction. Transwell assays, 3D organotypic culture and xenograft models were used to examine the effects on EAC cell function and to dissect molecular mechanisms regulating invasion. Most EACs (93%) contained CAFs with a myofibroblastic (α-SMA-positive) phenotype, which correlated significantly with poor survival [p = 0.016; HR 7. 1 (1.7–29.4)]. Primary CAFs isolated from EACs have a contractile, myofibroblastic phenotype and promote EAC cell invasion in vitro (Transwell assays, p ≤ 0.05; organotypic culture, p < 0.001) and in vivo (p ≤ 0.05). In vitro, this pro-invasive effect is modulated through the matricellular protein periostin. Periostin is secreted by CAFs and acts as a ligand for EAC cell integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5, promoting activation of the PI3kinase–Akt pathway. In patient samples, periostin expression at the tumour cell–stromal interface correlates with poor overall and disease-free survival. Our study highlights the importance of the tumour stroma in EAC progression. Paracrine interaction between CAF-secreted periostin and EAC-expressed integrins results in PI3 kinase–Akt activation and increased tumour cell invasion. Most EACs contain a myofibroblastic CAF-rich stroma; this may explain the aggressive, highly infiltrative nature of the disease, and suggests that stromal targeting may produce therapeutic benefit in EAC patients. PMID:25345775

  20. Effect of cisapride on delayed gastric emptying in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed Central

    Maddern, G J; Jamieson, G G; Myers, J C; Collins, P J

    1991-01-01

    Some patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease have delayed gastric emptying. This study investigates the effect of cisapride on gastric emptying in 34 patients with proved reflux and delayed gastric emptying of solids. They were enrolled in a double blind controlled crossover study. Placebo or cisapride (10 mg) tablets were given three times a day for three days followed by further assessment of gastric emptying. The protocol was repeated with the crossover tablet. Gastric emptying was assessed by a dual radionuclide technique. The percentage of a solid meal remaining in the stomach at 100 minutes (% R100 minutes) and the time taken for 50% of the liquid to empty (T50 minutes) were calculated and analysed by the Wilcoxon matched pairs signed ranks test and expressed as medians (ranges). For gastric emptying of solids the initial % R100 minutes (70 (60-100)%) was not significantly different from placebo (71 (35-100)%). After cisapride treatment a significant acceleration (p less than 0.001) in gastric emptying occurred (% R100 minutes, 50.5 (28-93)%). Similarly with gastric emptying of liquids, the initial T50 minute value was 26.5 (12-82) minutes, after placebo the value was 28 (11-81) minutes, but this was significantly accelerated with cisapride (p less than 0.03) to 22.5 (6-61) minutes. The acceleration in gastric emptying occurred in the proximal portion of the stomach for gastric emptying of both solids and liquids suggesting that this is the principal site of action of cisapride. We conclude that cisapride significantly accelerates gastric emptying of both solids and liquids in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and delayed gastric emptying. PMID:2040466

  1. Clinical response to chemotherapy in oesophageal adenocarcinoma patients is linked to defects in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Aichler, Michaela; Elsner, Mareike; Ludyga, Natalie; Feuchtinger, Annette; Zangen, Verena; Maier, Stefan K; Balluff, Benjamin; Schöne, Cédrik; Hierber, Ludwig; Braselmann, Herbert; Meding, Stephan; Rauser, Sandra; Zischka, Hans; Aubele, Michaela; Schmitt, Manfred; Feith, Marcus; Hauck, Stefanie M; Ueffing, Marius; Langer, Rupert; Kuster, Bernhard; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Höfler, Heinz; Walch, Axel K

    2013-08-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs kill cancer cells, but it is unclear why this happens in responding patients but not in non-responders. Proteomic profiles of patients with oesophageal adenocarcinoma may be helpful in predicting response and selecting more effective treatment strategies. In this study, pretherapeutic oesophageal adenocarcinoma biopsies were analysed for proteomic changes associated with response to chemotherapy by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry. Resulting candidate proteins were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and investigated for functional relevance in vitro. Clinical impact was validated in pretherapeutic biopsies from an independent patient cohort. Studies on the incidence of these defects in other solid tumours were included. We discovered that clinical response to cisplatin correlated with pre-existing defects in the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes of cancer cells, caused by loss of specific cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunits. Knockdown of a COX protein altered chemosensitivity in vitro, increasing the propensity of cancer cells to undergo cell death following cisplatin treatment. In an independent validation, patients with reduced COX protein expression prior to treatment exhibited favourable clinical outcomes to chemotherapy, whereas tumours with unchanged COX expression were chemoresistant. In conclusion, previously undiscovered pre-existing defects in mitochondrial respiratory complexes cause cancer cells to become chemosensitive: mitochondrial defects lower the cells' threshold for undergoing cell death in response to cisplatin. By contrast, cancer cells with intact mitochondrial respiratory complexes are chemoresistant and have a high threshold for cisplatin-induced cell death. This connection between mitochondrial respiration and chemosensitivity is relevant to anticancer therapeutics that target the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

  2. Hormone replacement therapy is associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oestrogen and progestogen have the potential to influence gastro-intestinal motility; both are key components of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Results of observational studies in women taking HRT rely on self-reporting of gastro-oesophageal symptoms and the aetiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) remains unclear. This study investigated the association between HRT and GORD in menopausal women using validated general practice records. Methods 51,182 menopausal women were identified using the UK General Practice Research Database between 1995–2004. Of these, 8,831 were matched with and without hormone use. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for GORD and proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) use in hormone and non-hormone users, adjusting for age, co-morbidities, and co-pharmacy. Results In unadjusted analysis, all forms of hormone use (oestrogen-only, tibolone, combined HRT and progestogen) were statistically significantly associated with GORD. In adjusted models, this association remained statistically significant for oestrogen-only treatment (OR 1.49; 1.18–1.89). Unadjusted analysis showed a statistically significant association between PPI use and oestrogen-only and combined HRT treatment. When adjusted for covariates, oestrogen-only treatment was significant (OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.03–1.74). Findings from the adjusted model demonstrated the greater use of PPI by progestogen users (OR 1.50; 1.01–2.22). Conclusions This first large cohort study of the association between GORD and HRT found a statistically significant association between oestrogen-only hormone and GORD and PPI use. This should be further investigated using prospective follow-up to validate the strength of association and describe its clinical significance. PMID:22642788

  3. Factors affecting the survival of patients with oesophageal carcinoma under radiotherapy in the north of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hajian-Tilaki, K O

    2001-01-01

    Factors relevant to the survival of patients with oesophageal cancer under radiotherapy have been studied in northern Iran where its incidence is high. We conducted an analytical study using a historical cohort and information from the medical charts of patients with oesophageal cancer. Out of 523 patients referred to the Shahid Rajaii radiotherapy centre in Babolsar from 1992 to 1996, we followed 230 patients for whom an address was available in 1998. The frequency of prognostic factors among those not contacted was very similar to those included in the study. The data were analysed using survival analysis by the nonparametric method of Kaplan Meier and the Cox regression model to determine risk ratios (RR) of prognostic factors. Survival rates were 42% at 1 year, 21% at 2 years, and 8% at 5 years after diagnosis. Patients aged 50–64 were found to have poorer survival compared with those less than 50 (RR = 1.73, P = 0.03); the risk ratio for ages f = 65 was 1.88 (P = 0.03). Females had significantly better survival than males (RR = 0.71, P = 0.02). For each 100 rads dose of radiotherapy, the risk ratio was significantly decreased by 1% (RR = 0.99, P = 0.05); for each session of radiotherapy, the risk ratio was significantly decreased by 4% (RR = 0.96, P = 0.0001); for each square centimetre size of surface under radiotherapy, the risk ratio significantly increased (RR = 1.002, P = 0.04). We did not observe a significant difference on survival by histology, anatomical location of tumours, or type of treatment (P > 0.05). Prognosis is extremely poor. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11742486

  4. Bypass surgery for unresectable oesophageal cancer: early and late results in 124 cases.

    PubMed

    Mannell, A; Becker, P J; Nissenbaum, M

    1988-03-01

    The early and late results of bypass surgery in 124 patients with unresectable oesophageal cancer are reported. Patients were grouped according to the extent of disease: group A, tumour localized to the oesophagus where severe pulmonary disease contra-indicated oesophagectomy (n = 9); group B, tumour less than or equal to 10 cm in length with mediastinal invasion (n = 81); group C, tumour greater than 10 cm in length with mediastinal invasion and/or fixed malignant lymph nodes (n = 33). Extent of disease was not recorded in one patient. The operative mortality was 4 per cent but 9 other patients died in hospital (hospital mortality, 11 per cent). Mortality was increased in patients undergoing colon bypass and in those with a large tumour load but these differences failed to reach statistical significance. The most frequent complication was neck sepsis, secondary to leakage from the proximal end of the excluded oesophagus. Eighty-nine per cent of the survivors could eat a normal, unrestricted diet on discharge and eighty-two per cent of survivors had complete and lasting relief from dysphagia. Median survival after bypass was 5 months but survival was significantly improved by radiotherapy to the tumour (P less than 0.001). Gastric bypass with radiotherapy is indicated in patients with extra-oesophageal spread of malignancy and in patients with tumours localized to the oesophagus who are unfit for resection. Bypass surgery may be contra-indicated in patients with a primary tumour greater than 10 cm in length and/or fixed lymph node metastases because mortality is increased and survival after operation is short.

  5. Serum ghrelin is inversely associated with risk of subsequent oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Gwen; Kamangar, Farin; Albanes, Demetrius; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Taylor, Philip R.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Abnet, Christian C.; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Freedman, Neal D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Oesophageal cancers rank as the eighth most common cancer and the sixth most common cause of cancer death, worldwide. Gastric atrophy, as determined by a low serum pepsinogen I/II ratio, may be associated with an increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Ghrelin, a hormone which, like pepsinogen, is produced in the fundic glands of the stomach, may be a sensitive and specific marker of gastric atrophy, but its association with OSCC is not known. Methods To examine the relationship between baseline serum ghrelin concentration and subsequent risk of OSCC, we conducted a nested case-control study within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study. 82 cases of OSCC were matched (1:1) by age and date of blood draw to controls from the ATBC study. Serum ghrelin was measured by radioimmunoassay. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. Results For those individuals in the lowest quartile of serum ghrelin, compared to those in the highest, the multivariate odds ratio of subsequent OSCC was 6.83 (95% CI: 1.46, 31.84). These associations were dose dependent (P for trend = 0.005 for both), and independent of the effects of low pepsinogen I/II ratio (a marker of gastric fundic atrophy) and Helicobacter pylori infection. The significance of these associations remained even for individuals developing OSCC up to 10 years after baseline ghrelin measurement, though they become attenuated after 10 years. Conclusion Lower baseline concentrations of serum ghrelin were associated with an increase in risk of OSCC. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding in other populations and to explore the role of ghrelin in the aetiology of OSCC. PMID:22180062

  6. Tea drinking habits and oesophageal cancer in a high risk area in northern Iran: population based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Nasrollahzadeh, Dariush; Kamangar, Farin; Fahimi, Saman; Shakeri, Ramin; Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Merat, Shahin; Vahedi, Homayoon; Semnani, Shahryar; Abnet, Christian C; Brennan, Paul; Møller, Henrik; Saidi, Farrokh; Dawsey, Sanford M

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between tea drinking habits in Golestan province, northern Iran, and risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Design Population based case-control study. In addition, patterns of tea drinking and temperature at which tea was drunk were measured among healthy participants in a cohort study. Setting Golestan province, northern Iran, an area with a high incidence of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Participants 300 histologically proved cases of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma and 571 matched neighbourhood controls in the case-control study and 48 582 participants in the cohort study. Main outcome measure Odds ratio of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma associated with drinking hot tea. Results Nearly all (98%) of the cohort participants drank black tea regularly, with a mean volume consumed of over one litre a day. 39.0% of participants drank their tea at temperatures less than 60°C, 38.9% at 60-64°C, and 22.0% at 65°C or higher. A moderate agreement was found between reported tea drinking temperature and actual temperature measurements (weighted κ 0.49). The results of the case-control study showed that compared with drinking lukewarm or warm tea, drinking hot tea (odds ratio 2.07, 95% confidence interval 1.28 to 3.35) or very hot tea (8.16, 3.93 to 16.9) was associated with an increased risk of oesophageal cancer. Likewise, compared with drinking tea four or more minutes after being poured, drinking tea 2-3 minutes after pouring (2.49, 1.62 to 3.83) or less than two minutes after pouring (5.41, 2.63 to 11.1) was associated with a significantly increased risk. A strong agreement was found between responses to the questions on temperature at which tea was drunk and interval from tea being poured to being drunk (weighted κ 0.68). Conclusion Drinking hot tea, a habit common in Golestan province, was strongly associated with a higher risk of oesophageal cancer. PMID:19325180

  7. Tumour expression of leptin is associated with chemotherapy resistance and therapy-independent prognosis in gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Bain, G H; Collie-Duguid, E; Murray, G I; Gilbert, F J; Denison, A; Mckiddie, F; Ahearn, T; Fleming, I; Leeds, J; Phull, P; Park, K; Nanthakumaran, S; Grabsch, H I; Tan, P; Welch, A; Schweiger, L; Dahle-Smith, A; Urquhart, G; Finegan, M; Petty, R D

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cytotoxic chemotherapy remains the main systemic therapy for gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma, but resistance to chemotherapy is common, resulting in ineffective and often toxic treatment for patients. Predictive biomarkers for chemotherapy response would increase the probability of successful therapy, but none are currently recommended for clinical use. We used global gene expression profiling of tumour biopsies to identify novel predictive biomarkers for cytotoxic chemotherapy. Methods: Tumour biopsies from patients (n=14) with TNM stage IB–IV gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinomas receiving platinum-based combination chemotherapy were used as a discovery cohort and profiled with Affymetrix ST1.0 Exon Genechips. An independent cohort of patients (n=154) treated with surgery with or without neoadjuvant platinum combination chemotherapy and gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines (n=22) were used for qualification of gene expression profiling results by immunohistochemistry. A cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cell line, AGS Cis5, and the oesophageal adenocarcinoma cell line, OE33, were used for in vitro validation investigations. Results: We identified 520 genes with differential expression (Mann–Whitney U, P<0.020) between radiological responding and nonresponding patients. Gene enrichment analysis (DAVID v6.7) was used on this list of 520 genes to identify pathways associated with response and identified the adipocytokine signalling pathway, with higher leptin mRNA associated with lack of radiological response (P=0.011). Similarly, in the independent cohort (n=154), higher leptin protein expression by immunohistochemistry in the tumour cells was associated with lack of histopathological response (P=0.007). Higher leptin protein expression by immunohistochemistry was also associated with improved survival in the absence of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and patients with low leptin protein-expressing tumours had improved survival when treated by neoadjuvant

  8. [Mallory-Weiss syndrome in acute poisoning with non-caustic substances].

    PubMed

    Sinev, Iu V; Luzhnikov, E A; Sordiia, D G

    1990-09-01

    The authors presented the results of diagnostic and therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy in the Mallory-Weiss syndrome observed in patients with acute ++non-caustic poisoning. Altogether 47 patients were investigated for suspected gastrointestinal bleeding. The Mallory-Weiss syndrome was detected in 20 (42.5%) patients. Therapeutic endoscopic intervention was performed in 5 cases of this syndrome to stop bleeding.

  9. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  10. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  11. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  12. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  13. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  14. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system. The engine must supply bleed air without adverse effect on the engine, excluding reduced thrust or...

  15. Impact of inherited bleeding disorders on pregnancy and postpartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Shirin; Moghaddam-Banaem, Lida; Ekhtesari, Fatemeh; Ala, Fereydoun A

    2012-10-01

    Inherited bleeding disorders are caused by various genetic defects in the proteins involved in haemostasis. Female patients or carriers are faced with the risk of haemorrhage throughout life. During pregnancy and postpartum, this complication affects the health of either the mother or the baby, or both. This retrospective cohort study was designed to assess the occurrence of obstetric bleeding in the three trimesters of pregnancy, along with primary and secondary postpartum haemorrhage among 100 women with inherited bleeding disorders. A questionnaire was designed in order to collect historical data. The patients were evaluated in three groups: haemophilia carriers, von Willebrand disease (VWD) and rare bleeding disorders. In comparison with normal women, significantly severe bleeding was observed among patients in all of the five stages. VWD patients showed a higher frequency of bleeding in first trimester but the rate of miscarriage was lower. Haemophilia carriers were threatened with bleeding complications during the prenatal period, but they also had the highest frequency of postpartum haemorrhage. Based on our results, vaginal bleeding is a serious threat in all three patient groups, especially during the first trimester of pregnancy and in the postpartum period.

  16. Hemosuccus Pancreaticus: A Mysterious Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Mandaliya, Rohan; Krevsky, Benjamin; Sankineni, Abhinav; Walp, Kiley; Chen, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Hemosuccus pancreaticus (bleeding from the pancreatic duct into the gastrointestinal tract via the ampulla of Vater) is a rare, potentially life-threatening and obscure cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. It is caused by rupture of the psuedoaneurysm of a peripancreatic vessel into pancreatic duct or pancreatic psuedocyst in the context of pancreatitis or pancreatic tumors. It can pose a significant diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma due to its anatomical location and that bleeding into the duodenum is intermittent and cannot be easily diagnosed by endoscopy. A 61-year-old female with HIV and alcoholism presented with 3 weeks of intermittent abdominal pain and melena. Examination revealed hypotension with pallor and mild epigastric tenderness. She was found to have severe anemia and a high serum lipase. It was decided to perform a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan that demonstrated a hemorrhagic pancreatic pseudocyst with possible active bleeding into the cyst. An emergent angiogram showed a large pseudoaneurysm of the pancreaticoduodenal artery that was successfully embolized. Subsequent endoscopy showed blood near ampulla of Vater confirming the diagnosis of hemosuccus pancreaticus. Thus the bleeding pseudocyst was communicating with pancreatic duct. The patient had no further episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemosuccus pancreaticus should be considered in patients with intermittent crescendo-decrescendo abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding and a high serum lipase. Contrast-enhanced CT scan can be an excellent initial diagnostic modality and can lead to prompt angiography for embolization of the bleeding pseudoaneurysm and can eliminate the need for surgery.

  17. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  18. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  19. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  20. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....