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Sample records for acute bleeding oesophageal

  1. Somatostatin plus isosorbide 5-mononitrate versus somatostatin in the control of acute gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding: a double blind, randomised, placebo controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Junquera, F; Lopez-Talavera, J; Mearin, F; Saperas, E; Videla, S; Armengol, J; Esteban, R; Malagelada, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Variceal bleeding is a severe complication of portal hypertension. Somatostatin reduces portal pressure by decreasing splanchnic blood flow, and nitrates by diminishing intrahepatic resistance. Experimental studies have shown that the combination of somatostatin and nitrates has an additive effect in decreasing portal pressure.
AIM—To compare the therapeutic efficacy of either intravenous infusion of somatostatin plus oral isosorbide 5-mononitrate or somatostatin alone in gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding associated with liver cirrhosis.
METHODS—A unicentre, double blind, placebo controlled, clinical trial was conducted. Sixty patients bleeding from oesophageal or gastric varices were randomised to receive intravenous infusion of somatostatin (250 µg/hour) plus oral isosorbide 5-mononitrate (40 mg/12 hours) (group I) or somatostatin infusion plus placebo (group II) for 72 hours.
RESULTS—The two groups of patients had similar clinical, endoscopic, and haematological characteristics. Control of bleeding was achieved in 18 out of 30 patients (60%) in group I and 26 out of 30 patients (87%) in group II (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in mean transfusion requirements between the two groups: 2.6 (2.2) v 1.8 (1.6) respectively; means (SD). Mortality and side effects were similar in the two groups, but development of ascites was higher in group I (30%) than in group II (7%) (p<0.05).
CONCLUSION—In cirrhotic patients with acute gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding, addition of isosorbide 5-mononitrate to somatostatin does not improve therapeutic efficacy, induces more adverse effects, and should not be used.


Keywords: gastro-oesophageal bleeding; haemorrhage; portal hypertension; clinical trial; isosorbide 5-mononitrate; somatostatin PMID:10601068

  2. Acute oesophageal necrosis (black oesophagus).

    PubMed

    Galtés, Ignasi; Gallego, María Ángeles; Esgueva, Raquel; Martin-Fumadó, Carles

    2016-03-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to hospital after being found unconscious in his home. He had a history of alcoholism, multiple drug addictions, and type I diabetes mellitus. At admission, he had hyperglycaemia (550 mg/dL) with glucosuria and ketone bodies in the urine, along with septic shock refractory to bilateral alveolar infiltrates and severe respiratory failure. The patient died 24 hours post admission due to multiple organ failure, with diabetic ketoacidosis decompensated by possible respiratory infection in a patient with polytoxicomania. The autopsy confirmed the presence of acute bilateral bronchopneumonia, chronic pancreatitis, severe hepatic steatosis, and generalized congestive changes. At the oesophagus, acute oesophageal necrosis was evident.

  3. Bleeding oesophageal varices with long term follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, R A; Johnston, G W; Odling-Smee, G W; Rodgers, H W

    1984-01-01

    Complete long term follow up was obtained in 27 children who had bled from oesophageal varices. Most presented with haematemesis or melaena at an average age of 5.2 years in the portal vein thrombosis group (20 children) and 9.5 years in the intrahepatic group (7 children). All had splenomegaly. Only 6 of 20 children with portal vein thrombosis had a possible precipitating factor. A total of 182 admissions for bleeding are reported, in 68 of which injection sclerotherapy was used to control bleeding. Control rate with injection sclerotherapy was 97%. Shunts performed below age 10 years were associated with a high thrombosis rate. A conservative approach to bleeding varices in children is recommended with transfusion, pitressin, and injection sclerotherapy. Oesophageal transection may have a role in the emergency management of the few children in whom bleeding is not controlled by injection sclerotherapy. PMID:6609683

  4. Bleeding oesophageal varices associated with anabolic steroid use in an athlete.

    PubMed Central

    Winwood, P. J.; Robertson, D. A.; Wright, R.

    1990-01-01

    A 30 year old bodybuilder who had been taking anabolic steroids for 18 months presented with bleeding oesophageal varices. Serious liver disease secondary to anabolic steroids including peliosis hepatis, nodular hyperplasia and malignant change is well recognized. We report what is, to our knowledge, the first case of bleeding oesophageal varices associated with the use of anabolic steroids. PMID:2099434

  5. Incidence of large oesophageal varices in patients with cirrhosis: application to prophylaxis of first bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Calès, P; Desmorat, H; Vinel, J P; Caucanas, J P; Ravaud, A; Gerin, P; Brouet, P; Pascal, J P

    1990-01-01

    Because several studies have suggested that beta blockers are effective in the prophylaxis of first variceal bleeding in cirrhosis, screening for oesophageal varices might be appropriate. We prospectively studied 84 cirrhotic patients without obvious evidence of large oesophageal varices and previous bleeding during a mean follow up of 16 months. At entry to the study 41 patients had no oesophageal varices and in 43 these were grade 1. The subsequent percentages of patients without large oesophageal varices were 74% at one year and 52% at two years. Univariate analysis showed that a longer duration of cirrhosis (p less than 0.05) and grade 1 oesophageal varices at entry (p less than 0.001) were predictive factors for the occurrence of large oesophageal varices, whereas, multivariate analysis showed that the initial size of the oesophageal varices (p less than 0.001), a high initial Child-Pugh score, and a smaller improvement in Child-Pugh score during the study were independent risk factors. Among patients with grades 0 and 1 oesophageal varices at the start of the study the proportions with large oesophageal varices at two years were 31% and 70% respectively. We have calculated that, accepting a maximum risk of first bleeding of 10% without prophylactic treatment, a patient without oesophageal varices should be screened endoscopically every other year, while a patient with grade 1 disease should benefit from one annual upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. PMID:2253916

  6. Somatostatin v placebo in bleeding oesophageal varices: randomised trial and meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Gøtzsche, P. C.; Gjørup, I.; Bonnén, H.; Brahe, N. E.; Becker, U.; Burcharth, F.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study whether somatostatin or its derivative octreotide is more effective than placebo for treating bleeding oesophageal varices. METHODS--Randomised, double blind trial and meta-analysis with blinded analysis of data and writing of manuscripts. SETTING--Departments of medical and surgical gastroenterology in Copenhagen. SUBJECTS--Patients suspected of bleeding from oesophageal varices and of having cirrhosis of the liver. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Survival, number of blood transfusions, and use of Sengstaken-Blakemore tube. RESULTS--86 patients were randomised; in each group 16 died within six weeks (95% confidence interval for difference in mortality--19% to 22%). There were no differences between those treated with somatostatin or placebo in median number of blood transfusions (8 v 5, P = 0.07, 0 to 4 transfusions) or in numbers of patients who needed balloon tamponade (16 v 13, P = 0.54, -11% to 28%). In a meta-analysis of three trials involving 290 patients somatostatin had no effect on survival compared with placebo (P = 0.59, odds ratio 1.16; 0.67 to 2.01). For blood transfusions and use of balloon tamponade there was heterogeneity between the trials with no convincing evidence in favour of somatostatin. No placebo controlled trials have been performed with octreotide. CONCLUSION--Within the limited power of this study and meta-analysis we were unable to show a clinical benefit of somatostatin in the emergency treatment of bleeding oesophageal varices. PMID:7787594

  7. A case of acute oesophageal necrosis (AEN) in a hypothermic patient. The grave prognosis of the black oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Salem, George A; Ahluwalia, Sumit; Guild, Ralph T

    2015-01-01

    Acute oesophageal necrosis, also known as black oesophagus, is a rare, and potentially lethal syndrome which is often diagnosed incidentally during upper endoscopy for evaluation of upper gastrointestinal bleed. It is characterised by diffuse circumferential black mucosal discolouration in the distal oesophagus secondary to necrosis that may extend proximally to involve variable length of the oesophagus. One theory of pathogenesis is that the relatively low perfusion state in the distal areas of the oesophagus makes it susceptible to mucosal injury. We present a case of acute oesophageal necrosis in a 62year-old lady with history of alcoholic cirrhosis who presented with haematemesis and severe hypothermia, and was eventually found to have acute oesophageal necrosis.

  8. Effect of an acute intraluminal administration of capsaicin on oesophageal motor pattern in GORD patients with ineffective oesophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Grossi, L; Cappello, G; Marzio, L

    2006-08-01

    Ineffective oesophageal motility (IOM) is a functional disorder affecting about 50% of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients. This disease in a severe form limits the clearing ability of the oesophagus and is considered one of the predictive factors for poorer GORD resolution. Capsaicin, the active compound of red pepper, exerts a prokinetic effect on oesophageal motility in healthy subjects by increasing the amplitude of body waves, even if no evidence exists on its possible role in situations of reduced motility. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of an acute administration of capsaicin on the oesophageal motor pattern in a group of GORD patients affected by severe IOM. Twelve GORD patients with severe IOM received an intra-oesophageal administration of 2 mL of a red pepper-olive oil mixture and 2 mL of olive oil alone serving as a control during a stationary manometry. The motor patterns of the oesophageal body and lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) were analysed at baseline and after the infusion of the two stimuli. The administration of capsaicin induced a significant improvement in oesophageal body contractility when compared with baseline. The velocity of propagation of waves and the LOS basal tone remained unchanged. The motor pattern was unaltered by the administration of olive oil alone. An acute administration of capsaicin seems to improve the motor performance of the oesophageal body in patients with ineffective motility. Whether this could represent the basis for further therapeutic approaches of GORD patients needs further study.

  9. An update on the management of acute esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Lourdes; Tandon, Puneeta; Abraldes, Juan G

    2017-01-01

    The mortality rate in acute variceal haemorrhage remains high (around 15%). Treatment is based on the combined use of vasoactive drugs, endoscopic band ligation, and prophylactic antibiotics. Effective resuscitation (haemostasis, volume management) is essential to prevent complications. Treatment failure is best managed by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Balloon tamponade or specifically designed covered oesophageal stents can be used as a bridge to definitive therapy in unstable patients. Early, pre-emptive TIPS should be the first choice in patients at high risk of treatment failure (Child-Pugh B with active bleeding or Child-Pugh C<14). This article reviews the most recent advances in the management of variceal bleeding and discusses the recent recommendations of the Baveno VI consensus conference.

  10. Managing acute upper GI bleeding, preventing recurrences.

    PubMed

    Albeldawi, Mazen; Qadeer, Mohammed A; Vargo, John J

    2010-02-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is common and potentially life-threatening and needs a prompt assessment and aggressive medical management. All patients need to undergo endoscopy to diagnose, assess, and possibly treat any underlying lesion. In addition, patients found to have bleeding ulcers should receive a proton pump inhibitor, the dosage and duration of treatment depending on the endoscopic findings and clinical factors.

  11. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

  12. Microcoil Embolization for Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    D'Othee, Bertrand Janne Surapaneni, Padmaja; Rabkin, Dmitry; Nasser, Imad; Clouse, Melvin

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To assess outcomes after microcoil embolization for active lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods. We retrospectively studied all consecutive patients in whom microcoil embolization was attempted to treat acute lower GI bleeding over 88 months. Baseline, procedural, and outcome parameters were recorded following current Society of Interventional Radiology guidelines. Outcomes included technical success, clinical success (rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (>30 days), and major and minor complication rates. Follow-up consisted of clinical, endoscopic, and pathologic data. Results. Nineteen patients (13 men, 6 women; mean age {+-} 95% confidence interval = 70 {+-} 6 years) requiring blood transfusion (10 {+-} 3 units) had angiography-proven bleeding distal to the marginal artery. Main comorbidities were malignancy (42%), coagulopathy (28%), and renal failure (26%). Bleeding was located in the small bowel (n = 5), colon (n 13) or rectum (n = 1). Technical success was obtained in 17 patients (89%); 2 patients could not be embolized due to vessel tortuosity and stenoses. Clinical follow-up length was 145 {+-} 75 days. Clinical success was complete in 13 (68%), partial in 3 (16%), and failed in 2 patients (11%). Delayed rebleeding (3 patients, 27%) was always due to a different lesion in another bowel segment (0 late rebleeding in embolized area). Two patients experienced colonic ischemia (11%) and underwent uneventful colectomy. Two minor complications were noted. Conclusion. Microcoil embolization for active lower GI bleeding is safe and effective in most patients, with high technical and clinical success rates, no procedure-related mortality, and a low risk of bowel ischemia and late rebleeding.

  13. Endovascular Management of Acute Bleeding Arterioenteric Fistulas

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, Henrik Mellander, Stefan; Snygg, Johan; Loenn, Lars

    2008-05-15

    . Patients with cancer may only need treatment for the acute bleeding episode, and an endovascular approach has the advantage of low morbidity.

  14. Management of acute variceal bleeding: emphasis on endoscopic therapy.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Andrés

    2010-05-01

    Acute variceal bleeding is one of the most serious and feared complications of patients with portal hypertension. The most common cause of portal hypertension is advanced liver disease. Patients with esophageal and gastric varices may bleed because of a progressive increase in portal pressure that causes them to grow and finally rupture. This article will review the current management strategies for acute variceal bleeding with emphasis on endoscopic therapy for the acute episode.

  15. Association of oesophageal radiation dose volume metrics, neutropenia and acute radiation oesophagitis in patients receiving chemoradiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Everitt, Sarah; Duffy, Mary; Bressel, Mathias; McInnes, Belinda; Russell, Christine; Sevitt, Tim; Ball, David

    2016-02-11

    The relationship between oesophageal radiation dose volume metrics and dysphagia in patients having chemoradiation (CRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is well established. There is also some evidence that neutropenia is a factor contributing to the severity of oesophagitis. We retrospectively analysed acute radiation oesophagitis (ARO) rates and severity in patients with NSCLC who received concurrent chemotherapy and high dose radiation therapy (CRT). We investigated if there was an association between grade of ARO, neutropenia and radiation dose volume metrics. Patients with NSCLC having concurrent CRT who had RT dose and toxicity data available were eligible. Exclusion criteria included previous thoracic RT, treatment interruptions and non-standard dose regimens. RT dosimetrics included maximum and mean oesophageal dose, oesophagus dose volume and length data. Fifty four patients were eligible for analysis. 42 (78 %) patients received 60 Gy. Forty four (81 %) patients received carboplatin based chemotherapy. Forty eight (89 %) patients experienced ARO ≥ grade 1 (95 % CI: 78 % to 95 %). ARO grade was associated with mean dose (rs = 0.27, p = 0.049), V20 (rs = 0.31, p = 0.024) and whole oesophageal circumference receiving 20 Gy (rs = 0.32 p = 0.019). In patients who received these doses, V20 (n = 51, rs = 0.36, p = 0.011), V35 (n = 43, rs = 0.34, p = 0.027) and V60 (n = 25, rs = 0.59, P = 0.002) were associated with RO grade. Eleven of 25 (44 %) patients with ARO ≥ grade 2 also had ≥ grade 2 acute neutropenia compared with 5 of 29 (17 %) patients with RO grade 0 or 1 (p = 0.035). In addition to oesophageal dose-volume metrics, neutropenia may also be a risk factor for higher grades of ARO.

  16. Analysing the role of COX-2 in acute oesophagitis and in melatonin-exerted protection against experimental reflux oesophagitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pratibha; Singh, Neetu; Palit, Gautam

    2011-12-01

    Cyclooxygenase(COX)-2 is implicated in variety of pathophysiological processes, although its role in acute reflux oesophagitis is debatable. This study was designed to evaluate the role of COX-2 during oesophagitis and in melatonin-elicited protection in rats. Reflux oesophagitis was induced in rats by ligating the pyloric end and the limiting ridge of the stomach for 5 h. Celecoxib (COX-2 blocker; 10 mg/kg), 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandinE(2) (dmPGE(2); a synthetic analogue of PGE(2) ; 10 µg/kg), melatonin (20 and 40 mg/kg) and omeprazole (10 mg/kg) were given intra-peritoneally 45 min before induction of oesophagitis in rats. Alterations in COX-1 and 2 gene expression and protein levels level were analysed via RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Mucosal PGE(2) level and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were measured using an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kit and spectrophotometrically, respectively. COX-2 over-expression during reflux oesophagitis promotes inflammation of the oesophagus as celecoxib pretreatment significantly reduced tissue damage and MPO activity in rats with reflux oesophagitis (RE-rats). By contrast, dmPGE(2) pretreatment significantly exacerbated tissue injury and simultaneously increased COX-2 expression, PGE(2) levels and MPO activity in RE-rats. Further, melatonin pretreatment significantly reduced the tissue injury, COX-2 over-expression, PGE(2) level and MPO activity in RE-rats. Melatonin offered more potent suppression of COX-2, PGE(2) and MPO activity than the proton-pump inhibitor omeprazole; however, both reduced the lesion injury to a similar extent. Melatonin at a dose of 20 mg/kg failed to inhibit significantly the dmPGE(2) -induced tissue damage, COX-2 expression, PGE(2) level and MPO activity in RE-rats while at a higher dose of 40 mg/kg it significantly attenuated these changes. Our results suggest that COX-2 plays an important pro-inflammatory role during acute reflux oesophagitis in rats and its inhibition contributes

  17. Management of GI emergencies: peptic ulcer acute bleeding.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sunny H; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2013-10-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a common medical emergency. Management of acute ulcer bleeding requires prompt assessment for risk stratification, evaluation for early endoscopy, initiation of pharmacotherapy and treatment of co-morbid diseases. Tremendous advances in endoscopic technique and pharmacotherapy in the past few decades have reduced recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality of the disease. Strategies to minimize recurrence have been defined for various types of peptic ulcers. This article reviews the current management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Low air temperature increases the risk of oesophageal variceal bleeding: a population and hospital-based case-crossover study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Chieh; Chen, Yung-Tai; Chen, Ping-Hsien; Su, Chien-Wei; Huang, Wei-Ming; Yang, Tsung-Chieh; Li, Szu-Yuan; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Hou, Ming-Chih

    2016-06-01

    Studies concerning seasonal variations and the impact of air temperature on oesophageal variceal bleeding have yielded conflicting results. We aimed to explore the impact of air temperature on the occurrence of variceal bleeding. A case-crossover study design was employed, and two cohorts were used, including the NHI-EVB cohort from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan from 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2010, and the VGH-EVB cohort from the Taipei Veterans General Hospital, from 4 May 2002 to 31 December 2010. A conditional logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In total, 2542 cases from the NHI-EVB cohort and 220 cases from the VGH-EVB cohort were analysed. Our analysis showed that low air temperature (LAT) increased the risk of variceal bleeding regardless of age, sex, decompensated cirrhosis, Child-Pugh classification, aetiology of liver disease and concomitant hepatocellular carcinoma; the lag effect was also observed. The ORs per 5°C decrease in daily mean air temperature were 1.144 (95% CI, 1.060-1.235) for the NHI-EVB cohort and 1.307 (95% CI: 1.031-1.658) for the VGH-EVB cohort. Oesophageal variceal bleeding in patients with small varices, end-stage liver disease score ≧15 or those using non-selective beta blockers was not influenced by air temperature. Patients have higher risk of oesophageal variceal bleeding at low air temperature regardless of age, sex, aetiology of cirrhosis, Child-Pugh classification, decompensated cirrhosis and concomitant hepatocellular carcinoma and can be protected by use non-selective beta blockers. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Oesophagitis dissecans superficialis: an acute, benign phenomenon associated with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Cesar, W G G; Barrios, M M; Maruta, C W; Aoki, V; Santi, G G

    2009-12-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune dermatosis that may evolve to severely compromise the skin and/or mucosa. Autoantibodies directed against epithelial cadherins, such as desmogleins 1 and 3, lead to acantholysis and culminate in blister formation. Involvement of the oral mucosa is common, but other squamous stratified epithelia may also be the target of the autoimmune aggression. We report a woman with PV that was in partial remission, who developed an unusual acute phenomenon, known as oesophagitis dissecans superficialis.

  20. Management of Patients with Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Strate, Lisa L.; Gralnek, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the management of patients with acute overt lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Hemodynamic status should be initially assessed with intravascular volume resuscitation started as needed. Risk stratification based upon clinical parameters should be performed to help distinguish patients at high and low-risk of adverse outcomes. Hematochezia associated with hemodynamic instability may be indicative of an upper GI bleeding source and thus warrants an upper endoscopy. In the majority of patients, colonoscopy should be the initial diagnostic procedure and should be performed within 24 hours of patient presentation after adequate colon preparation. Endoscopic hemostasis therapy should be provided to patients with high risk endoscopic stigmata of bleeding including active bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel, or adherent clot. The endoscopic hemostasis modality used (mechanical, thermal, injection or combination) is most often guided by the etiology of bleeding, access to the bleeding site, and endoscopist experience with the various hemostasis modalities. Repeat colonoscopy, with endoscopic hemostasis performed if indicated, should be considered for patients with evidence of recurrent bleeding. Radiographic interventions (tagged red blood cell scintigraphy, CT angiography, angiography) should be considered in high-risk patients with ongoing bleeding who do not respond adequately to resuscitation, and who are unlikely to tolerate bowel preparation and colonoscopy. Strategies to prevent recurrent bleeding should be considered. NSAID use should be avoided in patients with a history of acute lower GI bleeding particularly if secondary to diverticulosis or angioectasia. In patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin (secondary prophylaxis), aspirin should not be discontinued. The exact timing depends on the severity of bleeding, perceived adequacy of hemostasis and the risk of a thromboembolic event. Surgery

  1. Acute diquat poisoning with intracerebral bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, S; Wilks, M; Coupe, M

    2001-01-01

    A case of severe diquat poisoning complicated by the development of aggressive behaviour, oliguric renal failure, and intracerebral bleeding is described. The patient was successfully managed and made a complete recovery. In this paper special attention has been given to the major clinical differences between diquat and paraquat intoxication.


Keywords: poisoning; diquat; paraquat PMID:11320278

  2. Multidetector CT angiography for acute gastrointestinal bleeding: technique and findings.

    PubMed

    Artigas, José M; Martí, Milagros; Soto, Jorge A; Esteban, Helena; Pinilla, Inmaculada; Guillén, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common reason for emergency department admissions and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Factors that complicate its clinical management include patient debility due to comorbidities; intermittence of hemorrhage; and multiple sites of simultaneous bleeding. Its management, therefore, must be multidisciplinary and include emergency physicians, gastroenterologists, and surgeons, as well as radiologists for diagnostic imaging and interventional therapy. Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding is usually managed endoscopically, with radiologic intervention reserved as an alternative to be used if endoscopic therapy fails. Endoscopy is often less successful in the management of acute lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, where colonoscopy may be more effective. The merits of performing bowel cleansing before colonoscopy in such cases might be offset by the resultant increase in response time and should be weighed carefully against the deficits in visualization and diagnostic accuracy that would result from performing colonoscopy without bowel preparation. In recent years, multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography has gained acceptance as a first-line option for the diagnosis and management of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding. In selected cases of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding, CT angiography also provides accurate information about the presence or absence of active bleeding, its source, and its cause. This information helps shorten the total diagnostic time and minimizes or eliminates the need for more expensive and more invasive procedures. © RSNA, 2013.

  3. Management of anticoagulation in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, Franco; Dentali, Francesco; Repici, Alessandro; Amato, Arnaldo; Paggi, Silvia; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Dumonceau, Jean Marc

    2015-08-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding represents the most common adverse event associated with the use of oral anticoagulant therapy. Due to increasing prescription of anticoagulants worldwide, gastroenterologists are more and more called to deal with bleeding patients taking these medications. Their management is challenging because several issues have to be taken into account, such as the severity of bleeding, the intensity of anticoagulation, the patient's thrombotic risk and endoscopy findings. The recent introduction into the marketplace of new direct oral anticoagulants, for whom specific reversal agents are still lacking, further contributes to make the decision-making process even more demanding. Available evidence on this topic is limited and practice guidelines by gastroenterology societies only marginally address key issues for clinicians, including when and how to reverse coagulopathy, the optimal timing of endoscopy and when and how to resume anticoagulation thereafter. The present paper reviews the evidence in the literature and provides practical algorithms to support clinicians in the management of patients on anticoagulants who present with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  4. [Fiberendoscopic injection therapy of bleeding gastrointestinal lesions (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Liehr, H; Brunswig, D; Gallenkamp, H; Seez, P; Zilly, W

    1979-06-01

    In 28 patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding emergency fiberendoscopy was combined with aethoxysclerole (1%) injection of the bleeding lesion with purpose to controll haemorrhage. In 61% of 31 proceudres done in patients with oesophageal varices (n = 19) haemorrhage was controlled, and in further 16% deminuation of bleeding intensity was noted. In the remaining cases (n = 7) the procedure was ineffective. Only patients with Child C liver cirrhosis having oesophageal varices stages III and IV finally died because of uncontrolled haemorrhage. In 9 patients with bleeding from other lesions (gastric erosions and ulcers, Mallory-Weiss-Syndrome, erosio simplex Dieulafoy) haemorrhage was controlled in 8 patients. The method is practicable and efficient, but does not determine better the final outcome of patients with livercirrhosis Child C having oesophageal varices stages III and IV. In other cases tube treatment was avoided. The operation lethality within the series was 1,5%.

  5. Challenges in the management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lau, James Y W; Barkun, Alan; Fan, Dai-ming; Kuipers, Ernst J; Yang, Yun-sheng; Chan, Francis K L

    2013-06-08

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency worldwide, a major cause of which are bleeding peptic ulcers. Endoscopic treatment and acid suppression with proton-pump inhibitors are cornerstones in the management of the disease, and both treatments have been shown to reduce mortality. The role of emergency surgery continues to diminish. In specialised centres, radiological intervention is increasingly used in patients with severe and recurrent bleeding who do not respond to endoscopic treatment. Despite these advances, mortality from the disorder has remained at around 10%. The disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities who use antiplatelet agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and anticoagulants. The management of such patients, especially those at high cardiothrombotic risk who are on anticoagulants, is a challenge for clinicians. We summarise the published scientific literature about the management of patients with bleeding peptic ulcers, identify directions for future clinical research, and suggest how mortality can be reduced. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy of intraoperative, single-bolus corticosteroid administration to prevent postoperative acute respiratory failure after oesophageal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Yong; Lee, Hyun-Sung; Jang, Hee-Jin; Joo, Jungnam; Zo, Jae Ill

    2012-10-01

    Respiratory failure from acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pneumonia are the major cause of morbidity and mortality following an oesophagectomy for oesophageal cancer. This study was performed to investigate whether an intraoperative corticosteroid can attenuate postoperative respiratory failure. Between November 2005 and December 2008, 234 consecutive patients who underwent an oesophagectomy for oesophageal cancer were reviewed. A 125-mg dose of methylprednisolone was administered after performing the anastomosis. ALI, ARDS and pneumonia occurring before postoperative day (POD) 7 were regarded as acute respiratory failure. The mean age was 64.2 ± 8.7 years. One hundred and fifty-one patients were in the control group and 83 patients in the steroid group. Patients' characteristics were comparable. The incidence of acute respiratory failure was lower in the steroid group (P = 0.037). The incidences of anastomotic leakage and wound dehiscence were not different (P = 0.57 and P = 1.0). The C-reactive protein level on POD 2 was lower in the steroid group (P < 0.005). Multivariate analysis indicates that the intraoperative steroid was a protective factor against acute respiratory failure (P = 0.046, OR = 0.206). Intraoperative corticosteroid administration was associated with a decreased risk of acute respiratory failure following an oesophagectomy. The laboratory data suggest that corticosteroids may attenuate the stress-induced inflammatory responses after surgery.

  7. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors. A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996–2000), T2 (2001–2005), and T3 (2006–2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate. Our results showed that more patients were <65 years (75.6%) and of male sex (78.5%). Patients were mostly from teaching hospitals (90.8%) with high hospital volume (50.9%) and high doctor service load (51.1%). The prevalence of acute esophageal variceal bleeding and mean length of hospital stay decreased over the years (P < 0.001), but the overall medical expenses increased (P < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that older age, female sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score >1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high

  8. Transient Acute Hydrocephalus After Spontaneous Intracranial Bleeding in Adults.

    PubMed

    Hou, Kun; Zhu, Xiaobo; Sun, Yang; Gao, Xianfeng; Zhao, Jinchuan; Zhang, Yang; Li, Guichen

    2017-04-01

    Acute hydrocephalus (AH) is commonly encountered after spontaneous or traumatic intracranial bleeding in adults. In the setting of AH, external ventricular drainage is usually proposed as the urgent management. But in rare occasions, AH could be transient and resolve spontaneously without invasive management. Although its actual incidence might be higher, only a few case reports on transient AH (TAH) after spontaneous intracranial bleeding in adults have been reported. A retrospective review of the medical records of the patients admitted for spontaneous intracranial bleeding was performed at the neurosurgical department of our institution. We also performed a systematic PubMed search of the published studies written in English for patients developing TAH after spontaneous intracranial bleeding. In all there were 10 patients (5 women) including 5 cases in our case series. The time interval from hemorrhagic ictus to AH ranged from 7 hours to 9 days; although the time interval from AH to evident resolution ranged from 50 minutes to 9 days. No patient experienced recurrence of AH or shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in the long term. The osmotic and hydrostatic state in the microvessels, lymphatic pathways for the drainage of the interstitial fluid and cerebrospinal fluid, and aquaporins on the astrocytes of the patients might have important roles in the genesis and resolution of TAH. The difficulty at present is to differentiate the patients who would experience TAH from those needing surgical interventions. If surgical intervention could not be carried out temporarily, vigilant monitoring and osmotic diuretics are proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... back into place. Cover the injury with a moist cloth or bandage. Apply only very gentle pressure ... the vomit (looks bright red, or brown like coffee-grounds) Vaginal bleeding (heavier than usual or after ...

  10. Acute gingival bleeding as a complication of falciparum malaria: a case report.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saif; Zia, Afaf; Gupta, N D; Bey, Afshan

    2012-05-01

    Acute gingival bleeding can occasionally be the only sign of systemic bleeding problems. The diagnosis and management of such conditions may challenge the skills of the dentist. The present report describes a case of severe, prolonged gingival bleeding in a 54-year-old woman as a consequence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection. Specific highlights are focused on the management of the patient with emphasis on early diagnosis of the disease so as to improve the prognosis. This case report also stresses that medical intervention to correct the underlying aberration of hemostasis is necessary for local dental measures to successfully stop bleeding. Acute gingival bleeding as a complication of systemic disease can be challenging to manage unless the underlying systemic cause is diagnosed. Therefore, the dentist must be aware of various systemic conditions that can lead to gingival bleeding. The present case report describes a patient with acute gingival bleeding secondary to Plasmodium falciparum infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Modern management of acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hegade, Vinod S; Sood, Ruchit; Mohammed, Noor; Moreea, Sulleman

    2013-10-01

    An acute upper gastrointestinal bleed (AUGIB) often represents a life-threatening event and is recognised universally as a common cause of emergency hospitalisation. Large observational studies have improved our understanding of the disease characteristics and its impact on mortality but despite significant advancement in endoscopic management, mortality remains high, particularly in elderly patients and those with multiple comorbidities. Skilled assessment, risk stratification and prompt resuscitation are essential parts of patient care, with endoscopy playing a key role in the definitive management. A successful outcome partly relies on the clinician's familiarity with current guidelines and recommendations, including the National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines published in 2012. Validated risk stratification scores, such as the Blatchford and Rockall score, facilitate early discharge of low-risk patients as well as help in identifying those needing early endoscopic intervention. Major advances in therapeutic endoscopy, including more recently, the development of non-toxic proprietary powders (Hemospray and EndoClot), have resulted in the development of effective treatments of bleeding lesions, reduction in rebleeding rates and the need for emergency surgery. The role of proton-pump inhibitor therapy prior to endoscopy and the level of optimum red cell transfusion in the setting of AUGIB remain fields that require further research.

  12. Survival of patients with cirrhosis and acute peptic ulcer bleeding compared with variceal bleeding using current first-line therapies.

    PubMed

    Ardevol, Alba; Ibañez-Sanz, Gemma; Profitos, Joaquim; Aracil, Carles; Castellvi, Josep M; Alvarado, Edilmar; Cachero, Alba; Horta, Diana; Miñana, Josep; Gomez-Pastrana, Bárbara; Pavel, Oana; Dueñas, Eva; Casas, Meritxell; Planella, Montserrat; Castellote J, Jose; Villanueva, Candid

    2017-07-17

    The presence of cirrhosis increases the mortality of patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). Both acute variceal bleeding (AVB) and PUB are associated with substantial mortality in cirrhosis. This multicenter cohort study was performed to assess whether the mortality of cirrhotic patients with PUB is different from that of those with AVB. Patients with cirrhosis and acute gastrointestinal bleeding were consecutively included and treated with somatostatin and PPI infusion from admission and with antibiotic prophylaxis. Emergency endoscopy with endoscopic therapy was performed within the first 6-hours. 646 patients with AVB and 144 with PUB were included. There were baseline differences between groups, such as use of gastro-erosive drugs or β-blockers. Child-Pugh and MELD scores were similar. Further bleeding was more frequent in AVB-group than in those PUB-group (18% vs 10%; OR= 0.50, 95%CI= 0.29-0.88). However, mortality risk at 45-day was similar in both groups (19% in AVB-group vs 17% in PUB-group; OR= 0.85, 95% CI= 0.55-1.33, P= 0.48). Different parameters, such as Child-Pugh score, AKI, ACLF or presence of shock or bacterial infection, but not the cause of bleeding, were related to the risk of death. Only 2% of PUB-group vs 3% of AVB-group died with uncontrolled bleeding (P= 0.39), while the majority of patients in either group died from liver failure or due to other comorbidities. Using current first-line-therapy, patients with cirrhosis and acute peptic ulcer bleeding have a similar survival than those with variceal bleeding. The risk of further bleeding is higher in patients with variceal hemorrhage. However, few patients in both groups died from uncontrolled bleeding, while the cause of death was usually related to liver failure or co-morbidities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  13. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in cirrhosis: clinical and endoscopic correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Terés, J; Bordas, J M; Bru, C; Diaz, F; Bruguera, M; Rodes, J

    1976-01-01

    The clinical data of 180 episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 168 patients with cirrhosis of the liver are examined. The source of bleeding had been determined by early endoscopy in all cases. In men under the age of 50 years, and without symptoms of liver failure, bleeding was due to ruptured gastro-oesophageal varices in 84% of cases. Severe liver failure was associated with acute lesions of gastric mucosa in many cases. No presumptive diagnosis of the source of haemorrhage could be based on the examination of other clinical data (presence of ascites, mode of presentation and pattern of bleeding, history of ulcer disease, alcoholism, and previous medication. PMID:1083824

  14. Use of Ulipristal Acetate for the Management of Fibroid-Related Acute Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Arendas, Kristina; Leyland, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    Episodes of acute abnormal uterine bleeding related to uterine fibroids can cause significant morbidity. Traditional management with high-dose hormonal regimens may not be as effective when used in women with fibroids. A 32-year-old woman with a 12 cm uterine fibroid presented with an episode of acute abnormal uterine bleeding requiring blood transfusion. In lieu of using a hormonal maintenance regimen after the bleeding had stabilized, the patient was treated with ulipristal acetate 5 mg daily for three months. Amenorrhea was induced rapidly and the patient had no further episodes of acute excessive uterine bleeding. She subsequently underwent a laparoscopic myomectomy with a satisfactory outcome. Ulipristal acetate has been shown to induce amenorrhea rapidly in women with uterine fibroids, and it can be a useful treatment in the emergency management of fibroid-related acute abnormal uterine bleeding. Copyright © 2016 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Management of acute variceal bleeding using hemostatic powder

    PubMed Central

    El-Mikkawy, Ahmed; Abdalla, Haitham; Mostafa, Ibrahim; Devière, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives This study aimed to test the safety and efficacy of Hemospray® for emergency control of acute variceal bleeding (AVB) due to portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. Patients and methods This single-arm, prospective trial, conducted at two hospitals in Belgium and Egypt, included patients admitted to the emergency room with hematemesis and/or melena and known or suspected liver cirrhosis. All patients received urgent hemodynamic stabilization, octreotide (50 mcg bolus then 25 mcg/hour for 24 hours) and intravenous ceftriaxone (1 g/hour). Endoscopy to confirm AVB and Hemospray® application (if indicated) was performed within six hours of admission. Patients were kept under observation for 24 hours and underwent second endoscopy and definitive therapy (band ligation and/or cyanoacrylate injection in cases of gastric varices) the next day. Results Thirty-eight patients were admitted for suspected AVB, and 30 of these had confirmed AVB (70% male; mean age 59.5 years (range, 32.0–73 years)). Child-Pugh class C liver disease was present in 53.4%. Esophageal varices were observed in 83.4% of patients, gastric varices in 10%, and duodenal varices in 6.6%. Spurting bleeding at the time of endoscopy was observed in 43.4%. One patient developed hematemesis six hours after Hemospray® application and underwent emergency endoscopic band ligation. No major adverse events or mortalities were observed during 15-day follow-up. Conclusion Hemospray® application was safe and effective at short-term follow-up for emergency treatment of AVB in cirrhotic patients. PMID:26137303

  16. Oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Elizabeth C; Lagergren, Jesper; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; Lordick, Florian; Shah, Manish A; Lagergren, Pernilla; Cunningham, David

    2017-07-27

    Oesophageal cancer is the sixth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide and is therefore a major global health challenge. The two major subtypes of oesophageal cancer are oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC), which are epidemiologically and biologically distinct. OSCC accounts for 90% of all cases of oesophageal cancer globally and is highly prevalent in the East, East Africa and South America. OAC is more common in developed countries than in developing countries. Preneoplastic lesions are identifiable for both OSCC and OAC; these are frequently amenable to endoscopic ablative therapies. Most patients with oesophageal cancer require extensive treatment, including chemotherapy, chemoradiotherapy and/or surgical resection. Patients with advanced or metastatic oesophageal cancer are treated with palliative chemotherapy; those who are human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive may also benefit from trastuzumab treatment. Immuno-oncology therapies have also shown promising early results in OSCC and OAC. In this Primer, we review state-of-the-art knowledge on the biology and treatment of oesophageal cancer, including screening, endoscopic ablative therapies and emerging molecular targets, and we discuss best practices in chemotherapy, chemoradiotherapy, surgery and the maintenance of patient quality of life.

  17. Endovascular Management of Acute Enteric Bleeding from Pancreas Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Semiz-Oysu, Aslihan; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2007-04-15

    Arterioenteric fistula is a rare but serious complication of enteric drained pancreas transplant, which may lead to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. We present 3 patients with failed enteric drained pancreas transplants and massive gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to arterioenteric fistula. One patient was treated by embolization and the 2 others by stent graft placement. Bleeding was successfully controlled in all cases, at follow up of 5 days, 8 months, and 12 months, respectively. One patient died 24 days after embolization, of unknown causes.

  18. Management of acute bleeding in a patient with congenital afibrinogenaemia.

    PubMed

    Vakalopoulou, S; Rizopoulou, D; Zafiriadou, E; Perifanis, V; Tziomalos, K; Lefkou, E; Hill, M; Dolan, G; Garipidou, V

    2006-11-01

    Congenital afibrinogenaemia is a rare bleeding disorder characterized by absence of fibrinogen and varying bleeding tendency. Treatment with fibrinogen concentrates is considered to be the best choice for afibrinogenaemic patients who experience bleeding. We report the case of a 22-year-old Greek patient who presented with large muscular haematomas and was treated with fibrinogen concentrates. The efficacy of this treatment and the problems that arose during his hospitalization are being discussed.

  19. New Trends in Acute Management of Colonic Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Grassi, Veronica; Cavaliere, Davide; Renzi, Claudio; Tabola, Renata; Poli, Giulia; Avenia, Stefano; Farinella, Eleonora; Arezzo, Alberto; Vettoretto, Nereo; D’Andrea, Vito; Binda, Gian Andrea; Fingerhut, Abe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colonic diverticular disease is the most common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. In the past, this condition was usually managed with urgent colectomy. Recently, the development of endoscopy and interventional radiology has led to a change in the management of colonic diverticular bleeding. The aim of this systematic review is to define the best treatment for colonic diverticular bleeding. A systematic bibliographic research was performed on the online databases for studies (randomized controlled trials [RCTs], observational trials, case series, and case reports) published between 2005 and 2014, concerning patients admitted with a diagnosis of diverticular bleeding according to the PRISMA methodology. The outcomes of interest were: diagnosis of diverticulosis as source of bleeding; incidence of self-limiting diverticular bleeding; management of non self-limiting bleeding (endoscopy, angiography, surgery); and recurrent diverticular bleeding. Fourteen studies were retrieved for analysis. No RCTs were found. Eleven non-randomized clinical controlled trials (NRCCTs) were included in this systematic review. In all studies, the definitive diagnosis of diverticular bleeding was always made by urgent colonoscopy. The colonic diverticular bleeding stopped spontaneously in over 80% of the patients, but a re-bleeding was not rare. Recently, interventional endoscopy and angiography became the first-line approach, thus relegating emergency colectomy to patients presenting with hemodynamic instability or as a second-line treatment after failure or complications of hemostasis with less invasive treatments. Colonoscopy is effective to diagnose diverticular bleeding. Nowadays, interventional endoscopy and angiographic treatment have gained a leading role and colectomy should only be entertained in case of failure of the former. PMID:26554768

  20. Implications of bleeding in acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phuong-Anh; Pham, Phuong-Thu; Pham, Phuong-Chi; Miller, Jeffrey M; Pham, Phuong-Mai; Pham, Son V

    2011-01-01

    The advent of potent antiplatelet and antithrombotic agents over the past decade has resulted in significant improvement in reducing ischemic events in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, the use of antiplatelet and antithrombotic combination therapy, often in the settings of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), has led to an increase in the risk of bleeding. In patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction treated with antithrombotic agents, bleeding has been reported to occur in 0.4%–10% of patients, whereas in patients undergoing PCI, periprocedural bleeding occurs in 2.2%–14% of cases. Until recently, bleeding was considered an intrinsic risk of antithrombotic therapy, and efforts to reduce bleeding have received little attention. There have been increasing data demonstrating that bleeding is associated with adverse outcomes, including myocardial infarction, stroke, and death. Therefore, it is imperative to optimize patient outcomes by adopting pharmacological and nonpharmacological strategies to minimize bleeding while maximizing treatment efficacy. In this paper, we present a review of the bleeding classifications used in large-scale clinical trials in patients with ACS and those undergoing PCI treated with antiplatelets and antithrombotic agents, adverse outcomes, particularly mortality associated with bleeding complications, and suggested predictive risk factors. Potential mechanisms of the association between bleeding and mortality and strategies to reduce bleeding complications are also discussed. PMID:21915172

  1. Surgery in the acute management of bleeding peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Lau, J Y; Chung, S C

    2000-06-01

    The management of bleeding peptic ulcers is an increasing challenge in an ageing population. Endoscopic therapy reduces the need for emergency surgery in bleeding peptic ulcers, and ulcers that fail endoscopic therapy are often 'difficult' ulcers, highly demanding for most gastric surgeons. Mortality in patients requiring eventual salvage surgery is high. Planned urgent surgery is preferable to emergency surgery in elderly patients. Initial endoscopic control offers an opportunity for selecting high-risk ulcers for early surgery. Such a logical approach has, however, not been supported by evidence in the literature. At surgery, an aggressive approach is recommended. Post-operative bleeding is more common after lesser surgery, and this complication is often fatal. When re-bleeding occurs, a selective approach is suggested as emergency surgery carries with it a substantial mortality. Large chronic ulcers with exigent bleeding are less likely to respond to endoscopic re-treatment. Expedient surgery is advised for these patients. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  2. Is tranexamic acid effective for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Avilés, Carolina; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-12-07

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding constitutes a medical-surgical emergency given its important associated morbidity and mortality. The antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid might help stopping bleeding, but controversy remains about its role in this setting. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including eight randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded tranexamic acid probably decreases rebleeding and mortality, without increasing thromboembolic adverse effects in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  3. Efficacy of bleeding risk scores in elderly patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Solé, Albert; Formiga, Francesc; Lorente, Victoria; Sánchez-Salado, José C; Sánchez-Elvira, Guillermo; Roura, Gerard; Sánchez-Prieto, Remedios; Vila, Maria; Moliner, Pedro; Cequier, Angel

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of acute coronary syndromes is high in the elderly population. Bleeding is associated with a poorer prognosis in this clinical setting. The available bleeding risk scores have not been validated specifically in the elderly. Our aim was to assess predictive ability of the most important bleeding risk scores in patients with acute coronary syndrome aged ≥ 75 years. We prospectively included consecutive acute coronary syndromes patients. Baseline characteristics, laboratory findings, and hemodynamic data were collected. In-hospital bleeding was defined according to CRUSADE, Mehran, ACTION, and BARC definitions. CRUSADE, Mehran, and ACTION bleeding risk scores were calculated for each patient. The ability of these scores to predict major bleeding was assessed by binary logistic regression, receiver operating characteristic curves, and area under the curves. We included 2036 patients, with mean age of 62.1 years; 369 patients (18.1%) were ≥ 75 years. Older patients had higher bleeding risk (CRUSADE, 42 vs 22; Mehran, 25 vs 15; ACTION, 36 vs 28; P<.001) and a slightly higher incidence of major bleeding events (CRUSADE bleeding, 5.1% vs 3.8%; P=.250). The predictive ability of these 3 scores was lower in the elderly (area under the curve, CRUSADE: 0.63 in older patients, 0.81 in young patients; P=.027; Mehran: 0.67 in older patients, 0.73 in younger patients; P=.340; 0.58 in older patients, 0.75 in younger patients; P=.041). Current bleeding risk scores showed poorer predictive performance in elderly patients with acute coronary syndromes than in younger patients. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Prognostic Significance of Bleeding Location and Severity Among Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Vavalle, John P.; Clare, Robert; Chiswell, Karen; Rao, Sunil V.; Petersen, John L.; Kleiman, Neal S.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Wang, Tracy Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine if there is an association between bleed location and clinical outcomes in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) patients. Background The prognostic significance of bleeding location among ACS patients undergoing cardiac catheterization is not well known. Methods We analyzed in-hospital bleeding events among 9,978 patients randomized in the SYNERGY (Superior Yield of the New Strategy of Enoxaparin, Revascularization, and Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa Inhibitors) study. Bleeding events were categorized by location as access site, systemic, surgical, or superficial, and severity was graded using the GUSTO (Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries) definition. We assessed the association of each bleeding location and severity with 6-month risk of death or myocardial infarction using a multicovariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazard model. Results A total of 4,900 bleeding events were identified among 3,694 ACS patients with in-hospital bleeding. Among 4,679 GUSTO mild/moderate bleeding events, only surgical and systemic bleeds were associated with an increased risk of 6-month death or myocardial infarction (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 2.52 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.16 to 2.94, and 1.40 [95% CI: 1.16 to 1.69], respectively). Mild/moderate superficial and access-site bleeds were not associated with downstream risk (adjusted HR: 1.17 [95% CI: 0.97 to 1.40], and 0.96 [95% CI: 0.82 to 1.12], respectively). Among 221 GUSTO severe bleeds, surgical bleeds were associated with the highest risk (HR: 5.27 [95% CI: 3.80 to 7.29]), followed by systemic (HR: 4.48 [95% CI: 2.98 to 6.72]), and finally access-site bleeds (HR: 3.57 [95% CI: 2.35 to 5.40]). Conclusions Among ACS patients who develop in-hospital bleeding, systemic and surgical bleeding are associated with the highest risks of adverse outcomes regardless of bleeding severity. Although the most frequent among bleeds, GUSTO mild/moderate access-site bleeding is not

  5. Prognostic significance of bleeding location and severity among patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Vavalle, John P; Clare, Robert; Chiswell, Karen; Rao, Sunil V; Petersen, John L; Kleiman, Neal S; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Wang, Tracy Y

    2013-07-01

    This study sought to determine if there is an association between bleed location and clinical outcomes in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) patients. The prognostic significance of bleeding location among ACS patients undergoing cardiac catheterization is not well known. We analyzed in-hospital bleeding events among 9,978 patients randomized in the SYNERGY (Superior Yield of the New Strategy of Enoxaparin, Revascularization, and Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa Inhibitors) study. Bleeding events were categorized by location as access site, systemic, surgical, or superficial, and severity was graded using the GUSTO (Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries) definition. We assessed the association of each bleeding location and severity with 6-month risk of death or myocardial infarction using a multicovariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazard model. A total of 4,900 bleeding events were identified among 3,694 ACS patients with in-hospital bleeding. Among 4,679 GUSTO mild/moderate bleeding events, only surgical and systemic bleeds were associated with an increased risk of 6-month death or myocardial infarction (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 2.52 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.16 to 2.94, and 1.40 [95% CI: 1.16 to 1.69], respectively). Mild/moderate superficial and access-site bleeds were not associated with downstream risk (adjusted HR: 1.17 [95% CI: 0.97 to 1.40], and 0.96 [95% CI: 0.82 to 1.12], respectively). Among 221 GUSTO severe bleeds, surgical bleeds were associated with the highest risk (HR: 5.27 [95% CI: 3.80 to 7.29]), followed by systemic (HR: 4.48 [95% CI: 2.98 to 6.72]), and finally access-site bleeds (HR: 3.57 [95% CI: 2.35 to 5.40]). Among ACS patients who develop in-hospital bleeding, systemic and surgical bleeding are associated with the highest risks of adverse outcomes regardless of bleeding severity. Although the most frequent among bleeds, GUSTO mild/moderate access-site bleeding is not associated with increased risk. These data underscore

  6. Risk of falls and bleeding in elderly patients with acute venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Kämpfen, P; Méan, M; Limacher, A; Righini, M; Jaeger, K; Beer, H-J; Osterwalder, J; Frauchiger, B; Matter, C M; Kucher, N; Cornuz, J; Banyai, M; Egloff, M; Aschwanden, M; Bounameaux, H; Rodondi, N; Aujesky, D

    2014-10-01

    Whether or not a high risk of falls increases the risk of bleeding in patients receiving anticoagulants remains a matter of debate. We conducted a prospective cohort study involving 991 patients ≥ 65 years of age who received anticoagulants for acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) at nine Swiss hospitals between September 2009 and September 2012. The study outcomes were as follows: the time to a first major episode of bleeding; and clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding. We determined the associations between the risk of falls and the time to a first episode of bleeding using competing risk regression, accounting for death as a competing event. We adjusted for known bleeding risk factors and anticoagulation as a time-varying covariate. Four hundred fifty-eight of 991 patients (46%) were at high risk of falls. The mean duration of follow-up was 16.7 months. Patients at high risk of falls had a higher incidence of major bleeding (9.6 vs. 6.6 events/100 patient-years; P = 0.05) and a significantly higher incidence of clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding (16.7 vs. 8.3 events/100 patient-years; P < 0.001) than patients at low risk of falls. After adjustment, a high risk of falls was associated with clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding [subhazard ratio (SHR) = 1.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.23-2.46], but not with major bleeding (SHR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.83-1.86). In elderly patients who receive anticoagulants because of VTE, a high risk of falls is significantly associated with clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding, but not with major bleeding. Whether or not a high risk of falls is a reason against providing anticoagulation beyond 3 months should be based on patient preferences and the risk of VTE recurrence. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  7. Usefulness of CT angiography in diagnosing acute gastrointestinal bleeding: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lian-Ming; Xu, Jian-Rong; Yin, Yan; Qu, Xin-Hua

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) angiography in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. METHODS: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cancerlit, Cochrane Library database, Sciencedirect, Springerlink and Scopus, from January 1995 to December 2009, were searched for studies evaluating the accuracy of CT angiography in diagnosing acute GI bleeding. Studies were included if they compared CT angiography to a reference standard of upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy, angiography or surgery in the diagnosis of acute GI bleeding. Meta-analysis methods were used to pool sensitivity and specificity and to construct summary receiver-operating characteristic. RESULTS: A total of 9 studies with 198 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Data were used to form 2 × 2 tables. CT angiography showed pooled sensitivity of 89% (95% CI: 82%-94%) and specificity of 85% (95% CI: 74%-92%), without showing significant heterogeneity (χ2 = 12.5, P = 0.13) and (χ2 = 22.95, P = 0.003), respectively. Summary receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.9297. CONCLUSION: CT angiography is an accurate, cost-effective tool in the diagnosis of acute GI bleeding and can show the precise location of bleeding, thereby directing further management. PMID:20712058

  8. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Recent Trends from the Fukuoka Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Toshiyasu; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Matsuo, Ryu; Hata, Jun; Kuroda, Junya; Ago, Tetsuro; Sugimori, Hiroshi; Inoue, Tooru; Kitazono, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a potentially serious complication of acute stroke, but its incidence appears to be decreasing. The aim of this study was to elucidate the etiology of GI bleeding and its impact on clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke in recent years. Methods Using the database of the Fukuoka Stroke Registry, 6,529 patients with acute ischemic stroke registered between June 2007 and December 2012 were included in this study. We recorded clinical data including any previous history of peptic ulcer, prestroke drug history including the use of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, steroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and poststroke treatment with suppressing gastric acidity. GI bleeding was defined as any episode of hematemesis or melena on admission or during hospitalization. The cause and origin of bleeding were diagnosed endoscopically. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for GI bleeding and its influence on deteriorating neurologic function, death, and poor outcome. Results GI bleeding occurred in 89 patients (1.4%) under the condition that 66% of the total patients received acid-suppressing agents after admission. Multivariate analysis revealed that GI bleeding was associated with the absence of dyslipidemia (p = 0.03), a previous history of peptic ulcer (p < 0.001), and the severity of baseline neurologic deficit (p = 0.002) but not with antiplatelet drugs, anticoagulants, and NSAIDs. The source was the upper GI tract in 51% of the cases; causes included peptic ulceration (28%) and malignancies (12%), and other or unidentified causes accounted for 60%. GI bleeding mostly occurred within 1 week after stroke onset. Hemoglobin concentration fell by a median value of 2.5 g/dl in patients with GI bleeding. Among them, 28 patients underwent blood transfusion (31.5%). After adjustment for confounding factors, GI bleeding was independently associated with neurologic

  9. An Unusual Cause of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Acute Esophageal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tokala, Madhusudhan R.; Dhillon, Sonu; Pisoh, Watcoun-Nchinda; Walayat, Saqib; Vanar, Vishwas; Puli, Srinivas R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also called “black esophagus,” is a condition characterized by circumferential necrosis of the esophagus with universal distal involvement and variable proximal extension with clear demarcation at the gastroesophageal junction. It is an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is recognized with distinct and striking mucosal findings on endoscopy. The patients are usually older and are critically ill with shared comorbidities, which include atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic renal insufficiency, and malnutrition. Alcoholism and substance abuse could be seen in younger patients. Patients usually have systemic hypotension along with upper abdominal pain in the background of clinical presentation of hematemesis and melena. The endoscopic findings confirm the diagnosis and biopsy is not always necessary unless clinically indicated in atypical presentations. Herein we present two cases with distinct clinical presentation and discuss the endoscopic findings along with a review of the published literature on the management of AEN. PMID:27642529

  10. Para-oesophageal and parahiatal hernias in an Asian acute care tertiary hospital: an underappreciated surgical condition

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Ye Xin; Ong, Lester Wei Lin; Lee, June; Wong, Andrew Siang Yih

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The prevalence of hiatal hernias and para-oesophageal hernias (PEHs) is lower in Asian populations than in Western populations. Progressive herniation can result in giant PEHs, which are associated with significant morbidity. This article presents the experience of an Asian acute care tertiary hospital in the management of giant PEH and parahiatal hernia. METHODS Surgical records dated between January 2003 and January 2013 from the Department of Surgery, Changi General Hospital, Singapore, were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS Ten patients underwent surgical repair for giant PEH or parahiatal hernia during the study period. Open surgery was performed for four patients with giant PEH who presented emergently, while elective laparoscopic repair was performed for six patients with either giant PEH or parahiatal hernia (which were preoperatively diagnosed as PEH). Anterior 180° partial fundoplication was performed in eight patients, and mesh reinforcement was used in six patients. The electively repaired patients had minimal or no symptoms during presentation. Gastric volvulus was observed in five patients. There were no cases of mortality. The median follow-up duration was 16.3 months. There were no cases of mesh erosion, complaints of dysphagia or recurrence of PEH in all patients. CONCLUSION Giant PEH and parahiatal hernia are underdiagnosed in Asia. Most patients with giant PEH or parahiatal hernia are asymptomatic; they often present emergently or are incidentally diagnosed. Although surgical outcomes are favourable even with a delayed diagnosis, there should be greater emphasis on early diagnosis and elective repair of these hernias. PMID:26778633

  11. Early detection of arterial bleeding in acute pelvic trauma.

    PubMed

    Stephen, D J; Kreder, H J; Day, A C; McKee, M D; Schemitsch, E H; ElMaraghy, A; Hamilton, P; McLellan, B

    1999-10-01

    To determine the accuracy of intravenous contrast-enhanced computerized tomography (CECT) in the detection of potentially life-threatening retroperitoneal hemorrhage in patients sustaining pelvic fractures, acetabular fractures or both. Retrospective review of sequential patients identified over a 1-year period by using a prospectively collected trauma database at two Level I trauma centers. A group of patients admitted to one of two Level I trauma centers with pelvic or acetabular injuries between September 1, 1995, and September 30, 1996, was identified by using a prospectively collected trauma database. From this cohort, we selected those individuals who had undergone intravenous CECT scanning within 24 hours after admission and who had an Abbreviated Injury Score more than 3 because of their pelvic injury. Those individuals who required arterial embolization for uncontrolled hemodynamic shock were categorized as having "significant arterial bleeding" attributable to their pelvic injury. Individuals who regained hemodynamic ,stability without embolization were categorized as having "no significant arterial bleeding." Two observers who were blinded to clinical information and the results of angiography reviewed all injury radiographs and computed tomographic scans. The presence or absence of contrast extravasation on intravenous CECT was recorded. Each case was then categorized into a 2 x 2 table depending on the presence of contrast extravasation on CECT and the need for arterial embolization to determine the accuracy of the "contrast extravasation sign." Of the 192 eligible patients, 111 met the inclusion criteria. Eleven patients required an angiogram for ongoing hemodynamic instability. The sensitivity of extravasation on contrast enhanced computed tomography representing a significant arterial bleeding was 80%, and the specificity was 98%. The predictive value of a positive contrast "extravasation sign" was 80%, whereas the predictive value of a negative

  12. Bleeding risk stratification in an era of aggressive management of acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Assi, Emad; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; García-Acuña, José María; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Major bleeding is currently one of the most common non-cardiac complications observed in the treatment of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Hemorrhagic complications occur with a frequency of 1% to 10% during treatment for ACS. In fact, bleeding events are the most common extrinsic complication associated with ACS therapy. The identification of clinical characteristics and particularities of the antithrombin therapy associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic complications would make it possible to adopt prevention strategies, especially among those exposed to greater risk. The international societies of cardiology renewed emphasis on bleeding risk stratification in order to decide strategy and therapy for patients with ACS. With this review, we performed an update about the ACS bleeding risk scores most frequently used in daily clinical practice. PMID:25429326

  13. Extramedullary Relapse of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Presenting as Abnormal Uterine Bleeding: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Diana T; Kutny, Matthew A; Chewning, Joseph H; Arbuckle, Janeen L

    2017-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy. Relapse of ALL occurs in 15%-20% of patients, with 2%-6% occurring exclusively in extramedullary sites. Relapse of ALL in gynecologic organs is extremely rare. We present a case of a 12-year-old girl with a history of ALL who was referred to the pediatric gynecology clinic with abnormal uterine bleeding. She was determined to have an extramedullary uterine relapse of her ALL. Abnormal uterine bleeding in the setting of childhood malignancy is a frequent reason for consultation to pediatric and adolescent gynecology services. This bleeding is commonly attributed to thrombocytopenia due to bone marrow suppressive chemotherapeutic agents. However, as shown in this report, abnormal uterine bleeding might be a manifestation of an extramedullary relapse. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Standardized reporting of bleeding complications for clinical investigations in acute coronary syndromes: a proposal from the academic bleeding consensus (ABC) multidisciplinary working group.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sunil V; Eikelboom, John; Steg, Ph Gabriel; Lincoff, A Michael; Weintraub, William S; Bassand, Jean-Pierre; Rao, A Koneti; Gibson, C Michael; Petersen, John L; Mehran, Roxana; Manoukian, Steven V; Charnigo, Richard; Lee, Kerry L; Moscucci, Mauro; Harrington, Robert A

    2009-12-01

    Clinical trials of antithrombotic agents for the treatment of ACS routinely assess bleeding as a safety endpoint, but variation in bleeding definitions makes comparison of the relative safety of these agents difficult. The ABC Multidisciplinary Working Group, an informal working group comprising clinical researchers and representatives from the US Food and Drug Administration, the National Institutes of Health, and the pharmaceutical industry, sought to develop a consensus approach to measuring the incidence and severity of bleeding complications during clinical trials of acute coronary syndromes (ACS). A meeting of the ABC was convened in April 2008 in Washington, DC, with the goal of developing a consensus approach to measuring the incidence and severity of hemorrhagic complications during clinical trials of ACS. Relevant literature on bleeding was reviewed through a series of short lectures and intensive group discussion. Using existing evidence on bleeding and outcomes as well as clinical judgment, criteria for the assessment of bleeding were developed through expert consensus. This consensus statement divides bleeding-related data elements into three categories: essential, recommended, and optional. The ABC Group recommendations for collection and reporting of bleeding complications provide a framework for consistency in the collection of information on hemorrhagic complications in trials of ACS. Widespread adoption of the statement recommendations will facilitate understanding of the mechanisms of adverse outcomes after bleeding and comparisons of the relative safety of antithrombotic agents, as well as the interpretation of safety results from future studies.

  15. Balancing the risk of spontaneous ischemic and major bleeding events in acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ducrocq, Gregory; Schulte, Phillip J; Budaj, Andrzej; Cornel, Jan H; Held, Claes; Himmelmann, Anders; Husted, Steen; Storey, Robert F; Cannon, Christopher P; Becker, Richard C; James, Stefan K; Katus, Hugo A; Lopes, Renato D; Sorbets, Emmanuel; Wallentin, Lars; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2017-04-01

    Evaluation of antithrombotic treatments for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) requires balancing ischemic and bleeding risks to assess net benefit. We sought to compare the relative effects of ischemic and bleeding events on mortality. In the PLATelet inhibition and patient Outcomes (PLATO) trial, we compared spontaneous ischemic events (myocardial infarction or stroke) with spontaneous major bleeding events (PLATO major, Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction [TIMI] major, Global Utilization of Streptokinase and Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Occluded Coronary Arteries [GUSTO] severe) with respect to risk of mortality using time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models. The comparison was performed using ratio of hazard ratios for mortality increase after ischemic vs bleeding events. A total of 822 patients (4.4%) had ≥1 spontaneous ischemic event; 485 patients (2.6%), ≥1 spontaneous PLATO major bleed, 282 (1.5%), ≥1 spontaneous TIMI major bleed; and 207 (1.1%), ≥1 spontaneous severe GUSTO bleed. In patients who had both events, bleeding occurred first in most patients. Regardless of classification, major bleeding events were associated with increased short- and long-term mortality that were not significantly different from the increase associated with spontaneous ischemic events: ratio of hazard ratios (95% CIs) for short- and long-term mortality after spontaneous ischemic vs bleeding events: 1.46 (0.98-2.19) and 0.92 (0.52-1.62) (PLATO major); 1.26 (0.80-1.96) and 1.19 (0.58-2.24) (TIMI major), 0.72 (0.47-1.10) and 0.83 (0.38-1.79) (GUSTO severe) (all P>0.05) CONCLUSIONS: In patients with ACS on dual antiplatelet therapy, spontaneous major bleeding events seem "prognostically equivalent" to spontaneous ischemic complications. This result allows quantitative comparisons between both actual and predicted bleeding and ischemic risks. Our findings help to better define net clinical benefit of antithrombotic treatments and more accurately estimate mortality

  16. Discharge hemoglobin and outcome in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Eun Sun; Chun, Hoon Jai; Hwang, Young-Jae; Lee, Jae Hyung; Kang, Seung Hun; Yoo, In Kyung; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Many patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding present with anemia and frequently require red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. A restrictive transfusion strategy and a low hemoglobin (Hb) threshold for transfusion had been shown to produce acceptable outcomes in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, most patients are discharged with mild anemia owing to the restricted volume of packed RBCs (pRBCs). We investigated whether discharge Hb influences the outcome in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding who had received pRBCs during hospitalization between January 2012 and January 2014. Patients with variceal bleeding, malignant lesion, stroke, or cardiovascular disease were excluded. We divided the patients into 2 groups, low (8 g/dL ≤ Hb < 10 g/dL) and high (Hb ≥ 10 [g/dL]) discharge Hb, and compared the clinical course and Hb changes between these groups. Results: A total of 102 patients met the inclusion criteria. Fifty patients were discharged with Hb levels < 10 g/dL, whereas 52 were discharged with Hb levels > 10 g/dL. Patients in the low Hb group had a lower consumption of pRBCs and shorter hospital stay than did those in the high Hb group. The Hb levels were not fully recovered at outpatient follow-up until 7 days after discharge; however, most patients showed Hb recovery at 45 days after discharge. The rate of rebleeding after discharge was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Conclusions: In patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, a discharge Hb between 8 and 10 g/dL was linked to favorable outcomes on outpatient follow-up. Most patients recovered from anemia without any critical complication within 45 days after discharge. PMID:27540574

  17. Classification of Bleeding Events: Comparison of ECASS III (European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study) and the New Heidelberg Bleeding Classification.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Ulf; Möhlenbruch, Markus Alfred; Herweh, Christian; Ulfert, Christian; Bendszus, Martin; Pfaff, Johannes

    2017-07-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) after acute ischemic stroke treatments represents a feared complication with possible prognostic implications. In recent years, ICHs were commonly classified according to the ECASS (European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study). To improve the clinical applicability and relevance, the new Heidelberg Bleeding Classification (HBC) has been proposed in 2015. Here, we compared the ECASS and HBC classification with regard to observed events and prognostic relevance. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively compiled database of patients with acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation who received mechanical thrombectomy between February 2011 and March 2016 was performed. Presence of ICH after mechanical thrombectomy was evaluated on postinterventional computed tomographic imaging. ICHs were specified according to both ECASS III and HBC classification and analyzed with regard to their symptoms and outcome. ICHs were observed in 156 of 768 patients (20.3%). Using ECASS III classification, 101 ICHs could be unambiguously assigned, of which 28 (27.7%; 3.6% of all treated patients) were symptomatic ICHs. Using HBC, 55 additional ICHs could be categorized. Of these total 156 ICHs, 29 (18.6%; 3.8% of all treated patients) were classified as symptomatic according to HBC. Classification of ICH by ECASS III and HBC criteria show distinct differences. These differences warrant special attention during interpretation and comparison of scientific publications. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Acute and massive bleeding from placenta previa and infants' brain damage.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Ken; Tokunaga, Shuichi; Furukawa, Seishi; Sameshima, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Among the causes of third trimester bleeding, the impact of placenta previa on cerebral palsy is not well known. To clarify the effect of maternal bleeding from placenta previa on cerebral palsy, and in particular when and how it occurs. A descriptive study. Sixty infants born to mothers with placenta previa in our regional population-based study of 160,000 deliveries from 1998 to 2012. Premature deliveries occurring at<26 weeks of gestation and placenta accreta were excluded. Prevalence of cystic periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) and cerebral palsy (CP). Five infants had PVL and 4 of these infants developed CP (1/40,000 deliveries). Acute and massive bleeding (>500g within 8h) occurred at around 30-31 weeks of gestation, and was severe enough to deliver the fetus. None of the 5 infants with PVL underwent antenatal corticosteroid treatment, and 1 infant had mild neonatal hypocapnia with a PaCO2 <25mmHg. However, none of the 5 PVL infants showed umbilical arterial acidemia with pH<7.2, an abnormal fetal heart rate monitoring pattern, or neonatal hypotension. Our descriptive study showed that acute and massive bleeding from placenta previa at around 30 weeks of gestation may be a risk factor for CP, and requires careful neonatal follow-up. The underlying process connecting massive placental bleeding and PVL requires further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Predictors of Active Extravasation and Complications after Conventional Angiography for Acute Intraabdominal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Haber, Zachary M; Charles, Hearns W; Erinjeri, Joseph P; Deipolyi, Amy R

    2017-04-18

    Conventional angiography is used to evaluate and treat possible sources of intraabdominal bleeding, though it may cause complications such as contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). The study's purpose was to identify factors predicting active extravasation and complications during angiography for acute intraabdominal bleeding. All conventional angiograms for acute bleeding (January 2013-June 2015) were reviewed retrospectively, including 75 angiograms for intraabdominal bleeding in 70 patients. Demographics, comorbidities, vital signs, complications within one month, and change in hematocrit (ΔHct) and fluids and blood products administered over the 24 h prior to angiography were recorded. Of 75 exams, 20 (27%) demonstrated extravasation. ΔHct was the only independent predictor of extravasation (p = 0.017), with larger ΔHct (-17%) in patients with versus those without extravasation (-1%) (p = 0.01). CIN was the most common complication, occurring in 10 of 66 angiograms (15%). Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was the only independent predictor (p = 0.03); 67% of patients with GFR < 30, 29% of patients with GFR 30-60, and 8% of patients with GFR > 60 developed CIN. For patients with intraabdominal bleeding, greater ΔHct decrease over 24 h before angiography predicts active extravasation. Pre-existing renal impairment predicts CIN. Patients with large hematocrit declines should be triaged for rapid angiography, though benefits can be weighed with the risk of renal impairment.

  20. Acute and delayed bleeding requiring embolization after image-guided liver biopsy in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan A; Brody, Lynn A; Maybody, Majid; Erinjeri, Joseph P; Wang, Xiaodong; Wimmer, Thomas; Silk, Mikhail; Petre, Elena N; Solomon, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    To report incidence of acute versus delayed presentations of bleeding requiring embolization after focal liver biopsy, in correlation with angiographic findings and treatment success rates. The available literature will be reviewed as well. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant institutional review board approved retrospective review of 2180 consecutive patients undergoing 2335 targeted liver biopsies at a tertiary-care cancer center. Hepatic arterial embolization episodes within 30days from biopsy were identified via radiology PACS. Electronic medical record review was performed for indication of embolization and postembolization clinical course. The incidence of postbiopsy bleeding requiring embolization was 0.5% (12/2335 biopsies). In those with bleeding, 1/12 (8%) had no hepatic arterial findings at angiography. Angiographic hepatic arterial findings resolved after embolization in 11/11 patients (100% technical success). Bleeding ceased after embolization in 10/12 patients (83% clinical success). Complications were seen in 2/12 (17%) patients: cholecystitis and hepatic infarct, respectively. Delayed presentation of bleeding (defined as >24h postbiopsy) occurred in 5/12 (42%) patients; the longest latency was 12days. The overall incidence of bleeding requiring embolization in our population was 0.5%. This complication rate compares favorably to the 0-4.2% (median: 0.29%) rate quoted in the available, heterogeneous, literature on this topic. Delayed presentation occurred in almost half of patients. Arterial embolization carries excellent technical and clinical success rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Does anemia affect the predictive ability of bleeding risk scores in patients with acute coronary syndromes?

    PubMed

    Garay, Alberto; Ariza-Solé, Albert; Formiga, Francesc; Lorente, Victoria; Sánchez-Salado, José C; Salazar-Mendiguchía, Joel; Roura, Gerard; Muntané, Guillem; Alegre, Oriol; Fuentes, Lara; Gómez-Hospital, Joan A; Cequier, Angel

    2016-12-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), and is associated with higher risk for both bleeding and ischemic complications. We aimed to assess the predictive ability of bleeding risk scores (Can Rapid risk stratification of Unstable angina patients Suppress ADverse outcomes with Early implementation of the ACC/AHA guidelines [CRUSADE], Mehran and Acute Coronary Treatment and Intervention Outcomes Network [ACTION]) in ACS patients with anemia. All consecutive ACS patients were prospectively included. The primary outcome was in-hospital major bleeding according to the CRUSADE, Mehran and ACTION definitions. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin <130 g/l in men and <120 g/l in women. The predictive ability of the bleeding risk scores was assessed by binary logistic regression, calculating receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and their corresponding area under the curve (AUC). We included 2255 patients, mean age 62.4 years. Anemia was present in 550 patients (24.4%). Patients with anemia had a significantly higher prevalence of comorbidities. The three bleeding risk scores adequately predicted major bleeding in the whole cohort. No significant differences were observed regarding the predictive ability of each of the scores in patients with and without anemia (CRUSADE: AUC 0.73 without anemia vs. 0.74 with anemia, p=0.913; ACTION: AUC 0.68 without anemia vs. 0.73 with anemia, p=0.353; Mehran: AUC 0.69 without anemia vs. 0.61 with anemia, p=0.210). Only the Mehran score showed significantly lower predictive ability in patients with hemoglobin <11 g/dl (AUC 0.51, p=0.044). Anemia was a common comorbidity in patients with ACS from our series. Currently available bleeding risk scores showed an adequate predictive ability in patients with mild anemia. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Low skeletal muscle mass predicts early mortality in cirrhotic patients with acute variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Ishizu, Yoji; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Kuzuya, Teiji; Honda, Takashi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi

    2017-10-01

    Low skeletal muscle mass adversely affects outcomes in cirrhotic patients; however, its affect in patients with acute variceal bleeding remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of low skeletal muscle mass on outcomes in patients with cirrhosis and acute variceal bleeding. We evaluated 122 patients to identify factors associated with two outcomes: failure to control bleeding, defined as either rebleeding or death within 5 d, and 6-wk mortality. Skeletal muscle mass was estimated by calculating the psoas muscle area at the third lumbar vertebra on computed tomographic images. Forty-two patients had low skeletal muscle mass. Fifteen patients had failure to control bleeding and 32 patients died within 6 wk. Six of the patients with low skeletal muscle mass and nine without low skeletal muscle mass had failure to control bleeding; these proportions did not differ significantly (P = 0.628). Fifteen of the patients (35.7%) with low skeletal muscle mass died within 6 wk; this proportion was marginally higher than the 17 (21.3%) without low skeletal muscle mass who died within 6 wk (P = 0.084). On multivariate analysis, presence of low skeletal muscle mass (odds ratio [OR], 4.69; P = 0.024), nonalcoholic etiology (OR, 10.3; P = 0.024), higher international normalized ratio of prothrombin time (OR, 41.4; P < 0.001), and rebleeding within 6 wk (OR, 27; P < 0.001) were associated with 6-wk mortality. Low skeletal muscle mass is an independent predictor of 6-wk mortality in cirrhotic patients with acute variceal bleeding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of ACUITY and CRUSADE Scores in Predicting Major Bleeding during Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Correia, Luis C L; Ferreira, Felipe; Kalil, Felipe; Silva, André; Pereira, Luisa; Carvalhal, Manuela; Cerqueira, Maurício; Lopes, Fernanda; Sá, Nicole de; Noya-Rabelo, Márcia

    2015-07-01

    The ACUITY and CRUSADE scores are validated models for prediction of major bleeding events in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, the comparative performances of these scores are not known. To compare the accuracy of ACUITY and CRUSADE in predicting major bleeding events during ACS. This study included 519 patients consecutively admitted for unstable angina, non-ST-elevation or ST-elevation myocardial infarction. The scores were calculated based on admission data. We considered major bleeding events during hospitalization and not related to cardiac surgery, according to the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) criteria (type 3 or 5: hemodynamic instability, need for transfusion, drop in hemoglobin ≥ 3 g, and intracranial, intraocular or fatal bleeding). Major bleeding was observed in 31 patients (23 caused by femoral puncture, 5 digestive, 3 in other sites), an incidence of 6%. While both scores were associated with bleeding, ACUITY demonstrated better C-statistics (0.73, 95% CI = 0.63 - 0.82) as compared with CRUSADE (0.62, 95% CI = 0.53 - 0.71; p = 0.04). The best performance of ACUITY was also reflected by a net reclassification improvement of + 0.19 (p = 0.02) over CRUSADE’s definition of low or high risk. Exploratory analysis suggested that the presence of the variables ‘age’ and ‘type of ACS’ in ACUITY was the main reason for its superiority. The ACUITY Score is a better predictor of major bleeding when compared with the CRUSADE Score in patients hospitalized for ACS.

  4. Are higher doses of proton pump inhibitors better in acute peptic bleeding?

    PubMed

    Villalón, Alejandro; Olmos, Roberto; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-06-24

    Although there is broad consensus about the benefits of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper peptic bleeding, there is still controversy over their optimal dosing. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 27 randomized trials addressing this question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded high-dose proton pump inhibitors probably result in little or no difference in re-bleeding rate or mortality. The risk/benefit and cost/benefit balance probably favor use of low-doses.

  5. [Antisecretory therapy as a component of hemostasis in acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleedings].

    PubMed

    Gostishchev, V K; Evseev, M A

    2005-01-01

    Results of antisecretory therapy (pyrenzepin, H(2)-blockers, inhibitors of proton pump, octreotid) in 962 patients with acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleedings (AGDUB) were analyzed over 14-years period. Antisecretory treatment in AGDUB has principally different goals and potential depending on risk of bleeding's recurrence and morphological changes in tissue of gastroduodenal ulcer. Antisecretory therapy is the main treatment in high risk of AGDUB recurrence or before urgent surgery. Intravenous infusion of omeprazol has demonstrated the highest clinical efficacy due to maximal inhibition of gastric secretion and absence of negative influences on oxygen regimen in tissue of ulcer.

  6. Management of acute perioperative myocardial infarction: a case report of concomitant acute myocardial infarction and tumor bleeding in the transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Feng; Gao, Wen-Qian; Li, Yuan-Xin; Feng, Quan-Zhou; Zhu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction complicated by bleeding colon tumor is problematic with regard to management, and appropriate balance of antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy and hemostasis or surgery is crucial for effective treatment. Here, we present a case of concomitant acute myocardial infarction and bleeding tumor in the transverse colon, and share our experience of successfully balancing anticoagulation therapy and hemostasis. PMID:26937182

  7. Anti-inflammatory drugs and variceal bleeding: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    De Ledinghen, V; Heresbach, D; Fourdan, O; Bernard, P; Liebaert-Bories, M; Nousbaum, J; Gourlaouen, A; Becker, M; Ribard, D; Ingrand, P; Silvain, C; Beauchant, M

    1999-01-01

    Background—Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can have severe gastrointestinal effects and cause peptic ulcers to bleed. Acute bleeding from oesophageal varices is a major complication of cirrhosis of the liver. 
Aims—To investigate the role, using a case-control study, of NSAIDs in first bleeding episodes associated with oesophageal or cardial varices in cirrhotic patients. 
Patients/Methods—A structured interview was conducted of 125cirrhotic patients with bleeding mainly related to oesophageal varices and 75 cirrhotic controls with oesophageal varices who had never bled. 
Results—Cirrhotic patients who were admitted for bleeding related to portal hypertension were more likely to have used NSAIDs during the week before the index day (31 of 125 (25%)) than the cirrhotic controls (eight of 75 (11%); odds ratio = 2.8, p = 0.016). Use of aspirin alone or combined with other NSAIDs was also more prevalent in the cases (21 of 125 (17%)) than in the controls (three of 75 (4%); odds ratio = 4.9, p = 0.007). Logistic regression analysis showed that NSAID use (p = 0.022, odds ratio = 2.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.8 to 4.7) and variceal size (p<0.001, odds ratio = 4.0, 95% confidence interval = 1.4 to 11.5) were the only variables independently associated with the risk of bleeding. 
Conclusions—Aspirin, used alone or combined with other NSAIDs, was associated with a first variceal bleeding episode in patients with cirrhosis. Given the life threatening nature of this complication, the possible benefit of this treatment should be weighed against the risk shown here. No firm conclusions could be drawn on non-aspirin NSAIDs used alone. 

 Keywords: portal hypertension; non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; variceal bleeding; aspirin; cirrhosis PMID:9895389

  8. Comparison between endoscopic sclerotherapy and band ligation for hemostasis of acute variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Gustavo Oliveira; Maluf-Filho, Fauze; Matuguma, Sérgio Eiji; Hondo, Fábio Yuji; Ide, Edson; Melo, Jeane Martins; Cheng, Spencer; Sakai, Paulo

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To compare band ligation (BL) with endoscopic sclerotherapy (SCL) in patients admitted to an emergency unit for esophageal variceal rupture. METHODS: A prospective, randomized, single-center study without crossover was conducted. After endoscopic diagnosis of esophageal variceal rupture, patients were randomized into groups for SCL or BL treatment. Sclerotherapy was performed by ethanolamine oleate intravascular injection both above and below the rupture point, with a maximum volume of 20 mL. For BL patients, banding at the rupture point was attempted, followed by ligation of all variceal tissue of the distal esophagus. Primary outcomes for both groups were initial failure of bleeding control (5 d), early re-bleeding (5 d to 6 wk), and complications, including mortality. From May 2005 to May 2007, 100 patients with variceal bleeding were enrolled in the study: 50 SCL and 50 BL patients. No differences between groups were observed across gender, age, Child-Pugh status, presence of shock at admission, mean hemoglobin levels, and variceal size. RESULTS: No differences were found between groups for bleeding control, early re-bleeding rates, complications, or mortality. After 6 wk, 36 (80%) SCL and 33 (77%) EBL patients were alive and free of bleeding. A statistically significant association between Child-Pugh status and mortality was found, with 16% mortality in Child A and B patients and 84% mortality in Child C patients (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: Despite the limited number of patients included, our results suggest that SCL and BL are equally efficient for the control of acute variceal bleeding. PMID:21772940

  9. Telemetric real-time sensor for the detection of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Schostek, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Melanie; Keller, Jan; Fode, Mario; Melbert, Michael; Schurr, Marc O; Gottwald, Thomas; Prosst, Ruediger L

    2016-04-15

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings from ulcers or esophago-gastric varices are life threatening medical conditions which require immediate endoscopic therapy. Despite successful endoscopic hemostasis, there is a significant risk of rebleeding often requiring close surveillance of these patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Any time delay to recognize bleeding may lead to a high blood loss and increases the risk of death. A novel telemetric real-time bleeding sensor can help indicate blood in the stomach: the sensor is swallowed to detect active bleeding or is anchored endoscopically on the gastrointestinal wall close to the potential bleeding source. By telemetric communication with an extra-corporeal receiver, information about the bleeding status is displayed. In this study the novel sensor, which measures characteristic optical properties of blood, has been evaluated in an ex-vivo setting to assess its clinical applicability and usability. Human venous blood of different concentrations, various fluids, and liquid food were tested. The LED-based sensor was able to reliably distinguish between concentrated blood and other liquids, especially red-colored fluids. In addition, the spectrometric quality of the small sensor (size: 6.5mm in diameter, 25.5mm in length) was comparable to a much larger and technically more complex laboratory spectrophotometer. The experimental data confirm the capability of a miniaturized sensor to identify concentrated blood, which could help in the very near future the detection of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and to survey high-risk patients for rebleeding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  11. Emergency Oesophagectomy for Oesophageal Perforation after Chemoradiotherapy for Oesophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Solymosi, N; Dubecz, A; Posada Gonzalez, M; Stadlhuber, RJ; Ofner, D; Stein, HJ

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oesophageal perforation following chemoradiotherapy for oesophageal cancer is a devastating condition but there have been no studies investigating the role of emergency oesophagectomy for this life threatening situation. Methods This retrospective study comprised all cases of emergency oesophagectomy for oesophageal perforation after chemoradiotherapy for oesophageal carcinoma at a major centre for oesophageal surgery in Germany between 2004 and 2013. Results A total of 13 patients (mean age: 58.9 years) were identified. During the same time period, 356 elective oesophagectomies were performed. Tumour entities were squamous cell carcinoma (n=12) and adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus (n=1). Alcoholism (odds ratio [OR]: 25.79, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.70–121.70, p<0.0001) and chronic pulmonary disease (OR: 3.76, 95% CI: 1.06–14.96, p=0.027) were more common among the emergency cases. Oesophageal rupture was caused by perforation of an oesophageal stent (10 cases) or perforation during implantation of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube (3 cases). Emergency oesophagectomy was carried out either as discontinuity resection (10/13) or oesophagectomy with immediate reconstruction (3/13). Compared with the elective cases, patients undergoing emergency oesophagectomy had significantly higher odds for sustaining perioperative sepsis (OR: 4.42, 95% CI: 1.23–16.45, p=0.01), acute renal failure (OR: 6.49, 95% CI: 1.57–24.15, p=0.005) and pneumonia (OR: 24.33, 95% CI: 3.52–1,046.65, p<0.0001). Furthermore, slow respiratory weaning was more common and there was a significantly higher tracheostomy rate (OR: 4.64, 95% CI: 1.14–16.98, p=0.02). Oesophageal discontinuity was eventually reversed in eight patients. Emergency oesophagectomy patients had odds that were three times higher for fatal outcome (OR: 3.59, 95% CI: 0.77–13.64, p=0.05). The overall mortality was 4/13. The remaining nine patients had a mean survival of 25.1 months (range: 5

  12. Pros and cons of colonoscopy in management of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lhewa, Dekey Y; Strate, Lisa L

    2012-01-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is a frequent gastrointestinal cause of hospitalization, particularly in the elderly, and its incidence appears to be on the rise. Endoscopic and radiographic measures are available for the evaluation and treatment of LGIB including flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, angiography, radionuclide scintigraphy and multi-detector row computed tomography. Although no modality has emerged as the gold standard in the management of LGIB, colonoscopy is the current preferred initial test for the majority of the patients presenting with hematochezia felt to be from a colon source. Colonoscopy has the ability to diagnose all sources of bleeding from the colon and, unlike the radiologic modalities, does not require active bleeding at the time of the examination. In addition, therapeutic interventions such as cautery and endoclips can be applied to achieve hemostasis and prevent recurrent bleeding. Studies suggest that colonoscopy, particularly when performed early in the hospitalization, can decrease hospital length of stay, rebleeding and the need for surgery. However, results from available small trials are conflicting and larger, multicenter studies are needed. Compared to other management options, colonoscopy is a safe procedure with complications reported in less than 2% of patients, including those undergoing urgent examinations. The requirement of bowel preparation (typically 4 or more liters of polyethylene glycol), the logistical complexity of coordinating after-hours colonoscopy, and the low prevalence of stigmata of hemorrhage complicate the use of colonoscopy for LGIB, particularly in urgent situations. This review discusses the above advantages and disadvantages of colonoscopy in the management of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding in further detail. PMID:22468081

  13. Treatment of Acute Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in Adolescents: What Are Providers Doing in Various Specialties?

    PubMed

    Huguelet, Patricia S; Buyers, Eliza M; Lange-Liss, Jill H; Scott, Stephen M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether variability exists in the management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) in adolescents between pediatric Emergency Department (ED) physicians, pediatric gynecologists, and adolescent medicine specialists. Retrospective chart review. Tertiary care medical center ED. We included girls aged 9-22 years who presented from July 2008 to June 2014 with the complaint of acute AUB. Patients were identified using the International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision codes for heavy menstrual bleeding, AUB, and irregular menses. Exclusion criteria included pregnancy and current use of hormonal therapy. One hundred fifty patients were included. Among those evaluated, 61% (n = 92) were prescribed hormonal medication to stop their bleeding by providers from the ED, Adolescent Medicine, or Pediatric Gynecology. ED physicians prescribed mostly single-dose and multidose taper combined oral contraceptive pills (85%; n = 24), compared with Adolescent Medicine (54%, n = 7), and Gynecology (28%, n = 13). Pediatric gynecologists were more likely than ED physicians to treat patients with norethindrone acetate, either alone or in combination with a single dose combined oral contraceptive pill (61%, n = 33 vs 7%, n = 2; P < .001). Variations in treatment strategies for adolescents who present with acute AUB exist among pediatric specialties, which reflects a lack of standardized care for adolescents. Prospective evaluation of the shortest interval to cessation of bleeding, side effects, and patient satisfaction are valuable next steps. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Increased Serum Activity of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 in Patients with Acute Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh Sang; Jung, Hyuk Sang; Bae, Kyung Sook; Jung, Young Kul; Kim, Yeon Suk; Choi, Duck Joo; Kim, Yun Soo

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and -9 can degrade essential components of vascular integrity. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between those MMPs and variceal bleeding (VB). Methods Fifteen controls, 12 patients with acute ulcer bleeding (UB) group, 37 patients with varix (V group), and 35 patients with acute VB group were enrolled. Serum was obtained to measure MMP-2 and -9 activity by zymogram protease assays. Results The activity levels of these compounds were compared with the controls' median value. The median MMP-9 activity was 1.0 in controls, 1.05 in the UB group, 0.43 in the V group, and 0.96 in the VB group. The level of MMP-9 activity was higher in the VB group than in the V group (p<0.001). In the VB group, there was a signifi cant decrease in MMP-9 activity over time after bleeding (p<0.001). The median MMP-2 activity level was 1.0 in controls, 1.01 in the UB group, 1.50 in the V group, and 1.55 in the VB group. The level of MMP-2 activity was similar in the VB and V groups. Conclusions The level of MMP-9 activity increased in association with VB. The role of MMP-9 in the pathogenesis of VB should be verified. PMID:22570756

  15. Is urgent CT angiography necessary in cases of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Díaz, A Martín; Rodríguez, L Fernández; de Gracia, M Martí

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding usually presents as hematochezia, rectal bleeding or melena and represents 1-2% of the medical appointments in the Emergency Services. Mortality reaches the 30-40% and it is highly related with the severity and associated comorbidity. Most clinical practice guidelines include colonoscopy at some point in the diagnostic and therapeutic process (urgent for severe cases and ambulatory for mild ones) and look for predictors of severity. In the last years, there have been numerous studies where is clear the relevance and complementarity of advanced diagnostic imaging techniques, gradually incorporated as an alternative or second step in severe cases. Therefore, we have made a review of current scientific evidence to establish a clinical prediction rule for optimal indication of CT angiography in these patients. However, future studies providing greater robustness and level of evidence are necessary. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Early Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding in a Neonate Associated with Maternal Acute Fatty Liver of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Arya, Shreyas; Richardson, Carol J; Jain, Sunil; Swischuck, Leonard E

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) is a rare but potentially fatal condition occurring in the third trimester or early postpartum period. It is characterized by microvesicular fatty infiltration of the liver. Clinically, the three most prominent derangements in women with AFLP are hepatic dysfunction, renal insufficiency, and impaired coagulation. AFLP is associated with an increased incidence of morbidity and mortality in neonates, though the exact cause for this remains unclear. Deficiency of vitamin K in patients with liver disease has been widely reported. Case Description We present a unique case of severe intracranial bleeding because of the early vitamin K deficiency in a neonate whose mother had AFLP along with accompanying renal insufficiency. Conclusion We suggest that monitoring infants born to mothers with AFLP, for vitamin K deficiency bleeding will help reduce morbidity and mortality in these infants.

  17. A new progestogen-only medical therapy for outpatient management of acute, abnormal uterine bleeding: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ammerman, Stacy R; Nelson, Anita L

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study short-term efficacy and feasibility of a new progestogen-only treatment for outpatient management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding. This was a prospective, single-arm, pilot clinical trial of a progestogen-only bridging treatment for acute abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant, premenopausal women in the Gynecologic Urgent Care Clinic at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. Subjects were administered a depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate 150 mg intramuscular injection and given medroxyprogesterone acetate 20 mg to be taken orally every 8 hours for 3 days. The primary outcome measures included a percentage of women who stopped bleeding in 5 days, time to bleeding cessation, reduction in numbers of pads used, side effects, and patient satisfaction. All 48 women stopped bleeding within 5 days; 4 women had spotting only at the time of their last contact during the 5 day follow-up. Mean time to bleeding cessation was 2.6 days. Side effects were infrequent and patient satisfaction was high. Injection of depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate 150 mg intramuscularly combined with 3 days of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate 20 mg every 8 hours for 9 doses is an effective outpatient therapy for acute abnormal uterine bleeding. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Red cell distribution width and additive risk prediction for major bleeding in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Marianela; López-Cuenca, Angel; Marín, Francisco; Flores-Blanco, Pedro J; García Narbon, Andrea; de las Heras-Gómez, Ignacio; Sánchez-Galian, María J; Valdés-Chávarri, Mariano; Januzzi, James L; Manzano-Fernández, Sergio

    2014-10-01

    Red cell distribution width has been linked to an increased risk for in-hospital bleeding in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. However, its usefulness for predicting bleeding complications beyond the hospitalization period remains unknown. Our aim was to evaluate the complementary value of red cell distribution width and the CRUSADE scale to predict long-term bleeding risk in these patients. Red cell distribution width was measured at admission in 293 patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. All patients were clinically followed up and major bleeding events were recorded (defined according to Bleeding Academic Research Consortium Definition criteria). During a follow-up of 782 days [interquartile range, 510-1112 days], events occurred in 30 (10.2%) patients. Quartile analyses showed an abrupt increase in major bleedings at the fourth red cell distribution width quartile (> 14.9%; P=.001). After multivariate adjustment, red cell distribution width >14.9% was associated with higher risk of events (hazard ratio=2.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-6.10; P=.02). Patients with values ≤ 14.9% and a CRUSADE score ≤ 40 had the lowest events rate, while patients with values >14.9% and a CRUSADE score >40 points (high and very high risk) had the highest rate of bleeding (log rank test, P<.001). Further, the addition of red cell distribution width to the CRUSADE score for the prediction of major bleeding had a significant integrated discrimination improvement of 5.2% (P<.001) and a net reclassification improvement of 10% (P=.001). In non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome patients, elevated red cell distribution width is predictive of increased major bleeding risk and provides additional information to the CRUSADE scale. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Adjusted blood requirement index as indicator of failure to control acute variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Duvnjak, Marko; Barsić, Neven; Tomasić, Vedran; Virović Jukić, Lucija; Lerotić, Ivan; Pavić, Tajana

    2006-06-01

    To estimate the clinical value of adjusted blood requirement index (ABRI) in relation to other criteria for failure of variceal bleeding control proposed at Baveno consensus workshops and to evaluate ABRI as an early predictor of occurrence of other Baveno criteria and identification of possible predictors of unfavorable ABRI. We retrospectively analyzed the data on 60 patients admitted to the hospital due to acute variceal bleeding. Number of treatment failures according to Baveno II-III and Baveno IV definitions and criteria was compared. We tested the ABRI's predictability of other Baveno IV and Baveno II-III criteria. Logistic regression analysis was performed to ascertain independent variables that predict ABRI> or =0.75. Failure to control variceal bleeding occurred in 40 of 60 patients according to Baveno II-III criteria, and in 35 of 60 patients according to Baveno IV criteria. Excluding the criterion of "transfusion of 2 units of blood or more (over and above the previous transfusions)" and ABRI criterion, failure to control variceal bleeding was observed in 17 and 14 of 60 patients, respectively. Congruence of ABRI with other criteria was present in about two-thirds of the cases. ABRI> or =0.75 was associated with increased risk of positive other Baveno criteria, particularly modified Baveno II-III (odds ratio [OR] 4.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-15.05) and Baveno IV without ABRI (OR 4.37; 95% CI, 1.04-18.28). Independent predictors of ABRI> or =0.75 identified in logistic regression analysis were male sex (P<0.001) and higher hematocrit values (P=0.004). We found low congruence between ABRI and other Baveno criteria and the incidence of treatment failure in our study was higher than the previously reported frequencies of early rebleeding. It seems that criteria related to the quantity of blood transfusions are not reliable indicators of treatment failure.

  20. Adjusted Blood Requirement Index as Indicator of Failure to Control Acute Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Duvnjak, Marko; Baršić, Neven; Tomašić, Vedran; Virović Jukić, Lucija; Lerotić, Ivan; Pavić, Tajana

    2006-01-01

    Aim To estimate the clinical value of adjusted blood requirement index (ABRI) in relation to other criteria for failure of variceal bleeding control proposed at Baveno consensus workshops and to evaluate ABRI as an early predictor of occurrence of other Baveno criteria and identification of possible predictors of unfavorable ABRI. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the data on 60 patients admitted to the hospital due to acute variceal bleeding. Number of treatment failures according to Baveno II-III and Baveno IV definitions and criteria was compared. We tested the ABRI’s predictability of other Baveno IV and Baveno II-III criteria. Logistic regression analysis was performed to ascertain independent variables that predict ABRI≥0.75. Results Failure to control variceal bleeding occurred in 40 of 60 patients according to Baveno II-III criteria, and in 35 of 60 patients according to Baveno IV criteria. Excluding the criterion of “transfusion of 2 units of blood or more (over and above the previous transfusions)” and ABRI criterion, failure to control variceal bleeding was observed in 17 and 14 of 60 patients, respectively. Congruence of ABRI with other criteria was present in about two-thirds of the cases. ABRI≥0.75 was associated with increased risk of positive other Baveno criteria, particularly modified Baveno II-III (odds ratio [OR] 4.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-15.05) and Baveno IV without ABRI (OR 4.37; 95% CI, 1.04-18.28). Independent predictors of ABRI≥0.75 identified in logistic regression analysis were male sex (P<0.001) and higher hematocrit values (P=0.004). Conclusion We found low congruence between ABRI and other Baveno criteria and the incidence of treatment failure in our study was higher than the previously reported frequencies of early rebleeding. It seems that criteria related to the quantity of blood transfusions are not reliable indicators of treatment failure. PMID:16758517

  1. Interventions for treating acute bleeding episodes in people with acquired hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Zhou, Ruiqing; Duan, Xin; Long, Dan; Yang, Songtao

    2014-08-28

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). In most cases, bleeding episodes are spontaneous and severe at presentation. The optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial. To determine the efficacy of hemostatic therapies for acute bleeds in people with acquired hemophilia A; and to compare different forms of therapy for these bleeds. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 4) and MEDLINE (Ovid) (1948 to 30 April 2014). We searched the conference proceedings of the: American Society of Hematology; European Hematology Association; International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH); and the European Association for Haemophilia and Allied Disorders (EAHAD) (from 2000 to 30 April 2014). In addition to this we searched clinical trials registers. All randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials of hemostatic therapies for people with acquired hemophilia A, with no restrictions on gender, age or ethnicity. No trials matching the selection criteria were eligible for inclusion. No trials matching the selection criteria were eligible for inclusion. No randomised clinical trials of hemostatic therapies for acquired hemophilia A were found. Thus, we are not able to draw any conclusions or make any recommendations on the optimal hemostatic therapies for acquired hemophilia A based on the highest quality of evidence. GIven that carrying out randomized controlled trials in this field is a complex task, the authors suggest that, while planning randomised controlled trials in which patients can be enrolled, clinicians treating the disease continue to base their choices on alternative, lower quality sources of evidence, which hopefully, in the future, will also be appraised and incorporated in a Cochrane Review.

  2. Self-Expanding Metal Stent (SEMS): an innovative rescue therapy for refractory acute variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Changela, Kinesh; Ona, Mel A; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2014-12-01

    Acute variceal bleeding (AVB) is a life-threatening complication of liver cirrhosis or less commonly splenic vein thrombosis. Pharmacological and endoscopic interventions are cornerstones in the management of variceal bleeding but may fail in 10 - 15 % of patients. Rescue therapy with balloon tamponade (BT) or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) may be required to control refractory acute variceal bleeding effectively but with some limitations. The self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) is a covered, removable tool that can be deployed in the lower esophagus under endoscopic guidance as a rescue therapy to achieve hemostasis for refractory AVB. To evaluate the technical feasibility, efficacy, and safety of SEMS as a rescue therapy for AVB. In this review article, we have performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series describing SEMS as a rescue therapy for AVB. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, limitations, and complications are discussed. At present, 103 cases have been described in the literature. Studies have reported 97.08 % technical success rates in deployment of SEMS. Most of the stents were intact for 4 - 14 days with no major complications reported. Stent extraction had a success rate of 100 %. Successful hemostasis was achieved in 96 % of cases with only 3.12 % found to have rebleeding after placement of SEMS. Stent migration, which was the most common complication, was observed in 21 % of patients. SEMS is a safe and effective alternative approach as a rescue therapy for refractory AVB.

  3. Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in US patients hospitalized with acute esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Njei, Basile; McCarty, Thomas R; Laine, Loren

    2017-04-01

    Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) used as preventive therapy prior to recurrent bleeding has been recommended in patients presenting with acute esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) who are at high risk of further bleeding and death. We investigated the impact of early TIPS on outcomes of US patients hospitalized with EVB from 2000 to 2010. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample database was queried to identify patients with EVB and decompensated cirrhosis (because early TIPS is recommended only in high-risk patients). The primary outcome was in-hospital death, and secondary outcomes included rebleeding and hepatic encephalopathy. Early preventive TIPS was defined by placement within 3 days of hospitalization for acute EVB after one session of endoscopic therapy. Rescue TIPS was defined as TIPS after two interventions for EVB. The study included 142 539 patients. From 2000 to 2010, the age-adjusted in-hospital mortality rate decreased 37.2% from 656 per 100 000 to 412 per 100 000 (P <0.01), while early and rescue TIPS increased (0.22% to 0.70%; P < 0.01 and 1.1% to 6.1%; P < 0.01). On multivariate analysis, as compared with no TIPS, early TIPS was associated with decreased inpatient mortality (risk ratio [RR] = 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-0.90) and rebleeding (RR = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.45-0.71) without an increase in hepatic encephalopathy (RR = 1.01; 95% CI, 0.93-1.11). Early preventive TIPS in patients with EVB and decompensated cirrhosis was associated with significant in-hospital reductions in rebleeding and mortality without a significant increase in encephalopathy in "real-world" US clinical practice. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Risk comparison of bleeding and ischemic perioperative complications after acute and elective orthopedic surgery in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Džupa, V; Waldauf, P; Moťovská, Z; Widimský, P; Ondráková, M; Bartoška, R; Ježek, M; Lena, T; Popelka, O; Krbec, M

    2016-07-01

    The study objective was to ascertain the incidence of bleeding and ischemic complications related to acute and planned orthopedic surgery in patients with known cardiovascular diseases. The study conducted between 2010 and 2013 enrolled 477 patients (289 women, 188 men) with a diagnosed cardiovascular disease or a history of thromboembolic event. Aside from gender, age, height and weight, the study observed other anamnestic data and perioperative laboratory test results that may impact on a bleeding or ischemic event. Two hundred seventy-two (57 %) patients had acute surgery, and 205 (43 %) patients had elective surgery. Complications arose in 55 (11.6 %) patients, 32 (6.9 %) had bleeding complications, 19 (4.0 %) ischemic complications, and both complications were experienced by 4 (0.8 %) patients. Bleeding developed in 14 (5.1 %) patients who had acute surgery, and in 22 (10.7 %) who had elective surgery. Twenty-two (8.1 %) patients having acute surgery and one (0.1 %) undergoing elective surgery suffered from ischemic complications. The incidence of bleeding complications was significantly higher in elective surgery (p = 0.026, OR 2.22), and when adjusted (general anaesthesia, gender, and use of warfarin), the difference was even higher (p = 0.015, OR 2.44), whereas the occurrence of ischemic complications was significantly higher in acute surgery (p = 0.005, OR 18.0), and when adjusted (age), the difference remained significant (p = 0.044, OR 8.3). The study noted a significantly higher incidence of bleeding complications in elective orthopedic surgery when compared with acute surgery. Conversely, the incidence of ischemic complications was significantly higher in patients having acute orthopedic surgery when compared with those operated on electively.

  5. Acute Upper Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding in Morocco: What Have Changed?

    PubMed Central

    Timraz, A.; Khannoussi, W.; Ajana, F. Z.; Essamri, W.; Benelbarhdadi, I.; Afifi, R.; Benazzouz, M.; Essaid, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In the present study, we aimed to investigate epidemiological, clinical, and etiological characteristics of acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2008. It concerned all cases of acute upper gastroduodenal bleeding benefited from an urgent gastro-intestinal endoscopy in our department in Morocco. Characteristics of patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender, medical history, presenting symptoms, results of rectal and clinical examinations, and endoscopy findings. Results. 1389 cases were registered. As 66% of the patients were male, 34% were female. Mean age was 49. 12% of patients had a history of previous hemorrhage, and 26% had a history of NSAID and aspirin use. Endoscopy was performed in 96%. The gastroduodenal ulcer was the main etiology in 38%, followed by gastritis and duodenitis in 32.5%. Conclusion. AUGIB is still a frequent pathology, threatening patients' life. NSAID and aspirin are still the major risk factors. Their impact due to peptic ulcer remains stable in our country. PMID:21991509

  6. Spontaneous Intramural Oesophageal Haematoma in a Patient with Uncontrolled Hypertension: An Unusual Chest Pain Aetiology

    PubMed Central

    Cooray, Samantha; Caruana, Clifford; Davies, Andrew R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Spontaneous intramural oesophageal haematoma is a rare condition that usually occurs secondary to an acute or chronic coagulation disorder. The presenting complaint is often with retrosternal chest pain and most patients are initially investigated to exclude more common causes in the differential diagnosis, such as acute coronary syndromes. Severe life-threatening bleeding or perforation seldom, if ever, arises. Case Presentation. We present a case of spontaneous oesophageal haematoma which appears to have developed gradually in a 69-year-old female with uncontrolled hypertension and antiplatelet medication use. The diagnosis was made on computed tomography imaging and was further evaluated with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Management was conservative and a follow-up endoscopy two weeks later showed almost complete resolution of the lesion. Discussion. Spontaneous oesophageal haematomas are very rare and usually result in the separation of the mucosal layer from the underlying muscle, presenting with chest pain, haematemesis, and dysphagia. Usually the diagnosis is one of exclusion, based on computed tomography imaging and endoscopy. Conservative management is almost always successful. PMID:28316858

  7. Study protocol: first nationwide comparative audit of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Oakland, Kathryn; Guy, Richard; Uberoi, Raman; Seeney, Frances; Collins, Gary; Grant-Casey, John; Mortensen, Neil; Murphy, Mike; Jairath, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is a common indication for emergency hospitalisation worldwide. In contrast to upper GIB, patient characteristics, modes of investigation, transfusion, treatment and outcomes are poorly described. There are minimal clinical guidelines to inform care pathways and the use of endoscopy, including (diagnostic and therapeutic yields), interventional radiology and surgery are poorly defined. As a result, there is potential for wide variation in practice and clinical outcomes. Methods and analysis The UK Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Audit is a large nationwide audit of adult patients acutely admitted with LGIB or those who develop LGIB while hospitalised for another reason. Consecutive, unselected presentations with LGIB will be enrolled prospectively over a 2-month period at the end of 2015 and detailed data will be collected on patient characteristics, comorbidities, use of anticoagulants, transfusion, timing and modalities of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, clinical outcome, length of stay and mortality. These will be audited against predefined minimum standards of care for LGIB. It is anticipated that over 80% of all acute hospitals in England and some hospitals in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will participate. Data will be collected on the availability and organisation of care, provision of diagnostic and therapeutic GI endoscopy, interventional radiology, surgery and transfusion protocols. Ethics and dissemination This audit will be conducted as part of the national comparative audit programme of blood transfusion through collaboration with specialists in gastroenterology, surgery and interventional radiology. Individual reports will be provided to each participant site as well as an overall report and disseminated through specialist societies. Results will also be published in peer-reviewed journals. The study has been funded by National Health Services (NHS) Blood and Transplant and the

  8. A swine model of acute thrombocytopenia with prolonged bleeding time produced by busulfan

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Tomoyuki; Kono, Shota; Ohnuki, Takahiro; Hishikawa, Shuji; Kunita, Satoshi; Hanazono, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of thrombocytopenia are indispensable for evaluating the in vivo efficacy of hemostatic agents, cryopreserved platelets, and artificial platelets, but no large animal models are available. In this study, we generated a swine model of acute thrombocytopenia with prolonged bleeding times by administering the chemotherapeutic drug busulfan. First, we tested multiple doses of busulfan (4, 6, and 8 mg/kg) in pigs, and found that 6 mg/kg of busulfan is an optimal dose for producing a safe and moderate thrombocytopenia, with a platelet count of less than 30,000/µl. The pigs administered 6 mg/kg of busulfan (n=8) reached half their initial counts at day 7, counts below 30,000/µl at day 12, and their nadirs at day 15 (on average). The minimal platelet count was 14,000/µl. With this dose of busulfan (6 mg/kg), bleeding times were significantly prolonged in addition to the decrease in platelet counts (r=−0.63, P<0.01), while there were no cases of apparent hemorrhage. White blood cell counts were maintained at over 5,000/µl, and there were no infections or other adverse events including anemia or appetite or body weight loss. All pigs were sacrificed on day 16, with subsequent examination showing a significant reduction in cellularity and colony-forming units in the bone marrow, indicating that thrombocytopenia was the result of myelosuppression. In summary, administration with 6 mg/kg of busulfan induces safe and moderate thrombocytopenia with a prolonged bleeding time in swine. PMID:27333841

  9. Short-term bleeding events observed with clopidogrel loading in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lester Y; Albright, Karen C; Boehme, Amelia K; Tarsia, Joseph; Shah, Kamal R; Siegler, James E; Jones, Erica M; Pletsch, Gayle R; Beasley, Timothy M; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2013-10-01

    The Fast Assessment of Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack to Prevent Early Recurrence trial raised concern that loading doses of clopidogrel may increase hemorrhagic complications. We investigated if similar rates of hemorrhage occur in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) of varying severity. Patients meeting inclusion criteria were divided into 2 groups: the LOAD group and non-LOAD group. The LOAD group was defined as patients who were administered a loading dose of 300 mg or more of clopidogrel with or without aspirin within 24 hours of admission. The non-LOAD group was devised using propensity score (PS): 55 patients who received a loading dose of clopidogrel of 300 mg or more were matched on PS to 55 patients who did not receive loading doses. These patients were taken from a pool of 341 consecutive ischemic patients ineligible for intravenous or intra-arterial fibrinolysis, 162 of whom received a clopidogrel loading dose and the remainder of whom did not. The frequency of hemorrhage was compared between the 2 groups using Student t test and chi-square. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between loading dose and serious bleeding events (symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage [sICH] or transfusion for systemic bleeding). AIS patients (N = 596) were screened during the 31-month period of this retrospective study. Of this sample, 170 patients were excluded: 149 patients were excluded because they were treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV t-PA) alone, 11 were excluded because they were treated with IV t-PA combined with intra-arterial therapy (IAT), and 10 were excluded for treatment with IAT alone. An additional 85 patients were excluded because they were not admitted to the stroke service or because they had an in-hospital stroke. Baseline characteristics of the groups were well matched. There were no significant differences in the rates of sICH, transfusion, hemorrhagic transformation, or systemic bleeding

  10. Acute uterine bleeding unrelated to pregnancy: a Southern California Permanente Medical Group practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Munro, Malcolm G

    2013-01-01

    Acute uterine bleeding unrelated to pregnancy has been defined as bleeding "sufficient in volume as to, in the opinion of the treating clinician, require urgent or emergent intervention." The Southern California Permanente Medical Group updated its guidelines for the management of this condition on the basis of the best available evidence, as identified in a systematic review of the available literature. Given the paucity of studies evaluating this condition, the guidelines, by necessity, include recommendations largely based on opinion or other sources such as case series that are, in general, categorized as low-quality evidence. Medical interventions with single or combined gonadal steroidal agents administered parenterally or orally show promise, but more high-quality studies are needed to better define the appropriate drugs, dose, and administrative scheduling. There is also some evidence that intrauterine tamponade may be useful in at least selected cases. Special attention must be paid to both diagnosing and treating inherited disorders of hemostasis, such as von Willebrand disease, that may otherwise be underdiagnosed in both adolescent and adult women.

  11. A therapeutic dose of ketoprofen causes acute gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Shientag, Lisa J; Wheeler, Suzanne M; Garlick, David S; Maranda, Louise S

    2012-11-01

    Perioperative treatment of several rats in our facility with ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) resulted in blood loss, peritonitis, and death within a day to a little more than a week after surgery that was not related to the gastrointestinal tract. Published reports have established the 5-mg/kg dose as safe and effective for rats. Because ketoprofen is a nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug that can damage the gastrointestinal tract, the putative diagnosis for these morbidities and mortalities was gastrointestinal toxicity caused by ketoprofen (5 mg/kg). We conducted a prospective study evaluating the effect of this therapeutic dose of ketoprofen on the rat gastrointestinal tract within 24 h. Ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) was administered to one group of rats that then received gas anesthesia for 30 min and to another group without subsequent anesthesia. A third group was injected with saline followed by 30 min of gas anesthesia. Our primary hypothesis was that noteworthy gastrointestinal bleeding and lesions would occur in both groups treated with ketoprofen but not in rats that received saline and anesthesia. Our results showed marked gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and small intestinal ulcers in the ketoprofen-treated rats and minimal damages in the saline-treated group. The combination of ketoprofen and anesthesia resulted in worse clinical signs than did ketoprofen alone. We conclude that a single 5-mg/kg dose of ketoprofen causes acute mucosal damage to the rat small intestine.

  12. Acute Uterine Bleeding Unrelated to Pregnancy: A Southern California Permanente Medical Group Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Malcolm G

    2013-01-01

    Acute uterine bleeding unrelated to pregnancy has been defined as bleeding “sufficient in volume as to, in the opinion of the treating clinician, require urgent or emergent intervention.” The Southern California Permanente Medical Group updated its guidelines for the management of this condition on the basis of the best available evidence, as identified in a systematic review of the available literature. Given the paucity of studies evaluating this condition, the guidelines, by necessity, include recommendations largely based on opinion or other sources such as case series that are, in general, categorized as low-quality evidence. Medical interventions with single or combined gonadal steroidal agents administered parenterally or orally show promise, but more high-quality studies are needed to better define the appropriate drugs, dose, and administrative scheduling. There is also some evidence that intrauterine tamponade may be useful in at least selected cases. Special attention must be paid to both diagnosing and treating inherited disorders of hemostasis, such as von Willebrand disease, that may otherwise be underdiagnosed in both adolescent and adult women. PMID:24355890

  13. A Therapeutic Dose of Ketoprofen Causes Acute Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Erosions, and Ulcers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shientag, Lisa J; Wheeler, Suzanne M; Garlick, David S; Maranda, Louise S

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative treatment of several rats in our facility with ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) resulted in blood loss, peritonitis, and death within a day to a little more than a week after surgery that was not related to the gastrointestinal tract. Published reports have established the 5-mg/kg dose as safe and effective for rats. Because ketoprofen is a nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug that can damage the gastrointestinal tract, the putative diagnosis for these morbidities and mortalities was gastrointestinal toxicity caused by ketoprofen (5 mg/kg). We conducted a prospective study evaluating the effect of this therapeutic dose of ketoprofen on the rat gastrointestinal tract within 24 h. Ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) was administered to one group of rats that then received gas anesthesia for 30 min and to another group without subsequent anesthesia. A third group was injected with saline followed by 30 min of gas anesthesia. Our primary hypothesis was that noteworthy gastrointestinal bleeding and lesions would occur in both groups treated with ketoprofen but not in rats that received saline and anesthesia. Our results showed marked gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and small intestinal ulcers in the ketoprofen-treated rats and minimal damages in the saline-treated group. The combination of ketoprofen and anesthesia resulted in worse clinical signs than did ketoprofen alone. We conclude that a single 5-mg/kg dose of ketoprofen causes acute mucosal damage to the rat small intestine. PMID:23294892

  14. Predictive variables for major bleeding events in patients presenting with documented acute venous thromboembolism. Findings from the RIETE Registry.

    PubMed

    Ruíz-Giménez, Nuria; Suárez, Carmen; González, Rocío; Nieto, José Antonio; Todolí, José Antonio; Samperiz, Angel Luis; Monreal, Manuel

    2008-07-01

    A score that can accurately determine the risk of major bleeding during anticoagulant therapy may help to make decisions on anticoagulant use. RIETE is an ongoing registry of consecutive patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE). We composed a score to predict the risk for major bleeding within three months of anticoagulant therapy. Of 19,274 patients enrolled, 13,057 (67%) were randomly assigned to the derivation sample, 6,572 to the validation sample. In the derivation sample 314 (2.4%) patients bled (fatal bleeding, 105). On multivariate analysis, age >75 years, recent bleeding, cancer, creatinine levels >1.2 mg/dl, anemia, or pulmonary embolism at baseline were independently associated with an increased risk for major bleeding. A score was composed assigning 2 points to recent bleeding, 1.5 to abnormal creatinine levels or anemia, 1 point to the remaining variables. In the derivation sample 2,654 (20%) patients scored 0 points (low risk); 9,645 (74%) 1-4 points (intermediate); 758 (5.8%) >4 points (high risk). The incidences of major bleeding were: 0.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.1-0.6), 2.6% (95% CI: 2.3-2.9), and 7.3% (95% CI: 5.6-9.3), respectively. The likelihood ratio test was: 0.14 (95% CI: 0.07-0.27) for patients at low risk;2.96 (95% CI: 2.18-4.02) for those at high risk. In the validation sample the incidence of major bleeding was: 0.1%, 2.8%, and 6.2%, respectively. In conclusion, a risk score based on six variables documented at entry can identify VTE patients at low, intermediate, or high risk for major bleeding during the first three months of therapy.

  15. Promoting the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeds among junior doctors: a quality improvement project

    PubMed Central

    Saunsbury, Emma; Allison, Emma; colleypriest, ben

    2015-01-01

    Though they are knowledgeable, foundation year one (FY1) doctors can lack skills and confidence in acute situations due to inexperience. This was witnessed when a new FY1 on call attended an acute upper gastrointestinal bleed (UGIB), a common emergency with a 10% in hospital mortality rate. We aimed to improve FY1s’ ability to manage these critical patients through simulation based teaching, before and after the introduction of an algorithm summarising current guidelines. After assessing the FY1s’ perceived level of confidence in managing UGIBs, they individually attended a simulation session which evaluated specific aspects of their assessment and management plans. Immediate debriefing and subsequent teaching sessions reinforced learning points, with an algorithm instituted as an aide mémoire to improve efficiency. A repeat simulation session assessed improvements in both subjective confidence and objective management targets. All FY1s expressed improved confidence in managing patients with UGIBs. There were improvements across the board in their assessment and management, notably: verbalisation of concern for hypotension increased to 100% (from 60%), two points of intravenous access requested in 100% of cases (from 53%), and a 76 second reduction in time to call for senior support. Collectively, these individual aspects led to improved patient care. Effective management of acute patients is best learnt through exposure, and simulation based teaching provides a safe but powerful modality to aid transition from textbook theory to ward situations. Algorithms can streamline care and hasten the stabilisation of patients. This project reinforces generic competencies that FY1s can translate to their management of not only UGIBs, but many acute presentations, providing a convincing argument for broader simulation use in FY1 teaching. PMID:26732056

  16. Promoting the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeds among junior doctors: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Saunsbury, Emma; Allison, Emma; Colleypriest, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Though they are knowledgeable, foundation year one (FY1) doctors can lack skills and confidence in acute situations due to inexperience. This was witnessed when a new FY1 on call attended an acute upper gastrointestinal bleed (UGIB), a common emergency with a 10% in hospital mortality rate. We aimed to improve FY1s' ability to manage these critical patients through simulation based teaching, before and after the introduction of an algorithm summarising current guidelines. After assessing the FY1s' perceived level of confidence in managing UGIBs, they individually attended a simulation session which evaluated specific aspects of their assessment and management plans. Immediate debriefing and subsequent teaching sessions reinforced learning points, with an algorithm instituted as an aide mémoire to improve efficiency. A repeat simulation session assessed improvements in both subjective confidence and objective management targets. All FY1s expressed improved confidence in managing patients with UGIBs. There were improvements across the board in their assessment and management, notably: verbalisation of concern for hypotension increased to 100% (from 60%), two points of intravenous access requested in 100% of cases (from 53%), and a 76 second reduction in time to call for senior support. Collectively, these individual aspects led to improved patient care. Effective management of acute patients is best learnt through exposure, and simulation based teaching provides a safe but powerful modality to aid transition from textbook theory to ward situations. Algorithms can streamline care and hasten the stabilisation of patients. This project reinforces generic competencies that FY1s can translate to their management of not only UGIBs, but many acute presentations, providing a convincing argument for broader simulation use in FY1 teaching.

  17. Bleeding Risk during Treatment of Acute Thrombotic Events with Subcutaneous LMWH Compared to Intravenous Unfractionated Heparin; A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Costantino, Giorgio; Ceriani, Elisa; Rusconi, Anna Maria; Podda, Gian Marco; Montano, Nicola; Duca, Piergiorgio; Cattaneo, Marco; Casazza, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Background Low Molecular Weight Heparins (LMWH) are at least as effective antithrombotic drugs as Unfractionated Heparin (UFH). However, it is still unclear whether the safety profiles of LMWH and UFH differ. We performed a systematic review to compare the bleeding risk of fixed dose subcutaneous LMWH and adjusted dose UFH for treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) or acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Major bleeding was the primary end point. Methods Electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library) were searched up to May 2010 with no language restrictions. Randomized controlled trials in which subcutaneous LMWH were compared to intravenous UFH for the treatment of acute thrombotic events were selected. Two reviewers independently screened studies and extracted data on study design, study quality, incidence of major bleeding, patients’ characteristics, type, dose and number of daily administrations of LMWH, co-treatments, study end points and efficacy outcome. Pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using the random effects model. Results Twenty-seven studies were included. A total of 14,002 patients received UFH and 14,635 patients LMWH. Overall, no difference in major bleeding was observed between LMWH patients and UFH (OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.60–1.04). In patients with VTE LMWH appeared safer than UFH, (OR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.47–1.00). Conclusion The results of our systematic review suggest that the use of LMWH in the treatment of VTE might be associated with a reduction in major bleeding compared with UFH. The choice of which heparin to use to minimize bleeding risk must be based on the single patient, taking into account the bleeding profile of different heparins in different settings. PMID:22984525

  18. Scintigraphic demonstration of acute gastrointestinal bleeding caused by gallbladder carcinoma eroding the colon

    SciTech Connect

    Czerniak, A.; Zwas, S.T.; Rabau, M.Y.; Avigad, I.; Borag, B.; Wolfstein, I.

    1985-08-01

    Massive lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by gallbladder carcinoma eroding into the colonic wall was demonstrated accurately by Tc-99m RBCs. In addition, retrograde bleeding into the gallbladder was also identified while arteriography did not show contrast extravasation. This case supports the use of Tc-99m RBCs over Tc-99m sulfur colloid for more accurate localization of lower GI bleeding.

  19. Pathology of oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Aoife; Sheahan, Kieran

    2012-05-01

    Endoscopic oesophageal biopsies are common in daily pathology practice. Inflammation and damage of the oesophageal mucosa is known as oesophagitis and is common worldwide. A variety of physical, chemical and infectious agents cause oesophagitis. The oesophagus has a limited range of responses to a wide variety of injuries, and so histopathological features of different diseases often overlap. The pathologist is reliant on the endoscopist for the 'macroscopic description' of the oesophagus. Access to the endoscopic images enhances the pathologist's overall interpretation of the case. Correlating clinical, endoscopic and microscopic findings may be crucial in arriving at the correct diagnosis. In this review, we present clinicopathological descriptions of the major types of oesophagitis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  20. Breakthrough disseminated zygomycosis induced massive gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia receiving micafungin.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kei; Sugawara, Yumiko; Sekine, Takao; Nakase, Kazunori; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2014-11-01

    A 69-year-old man, who had been receiving prednisolone for 11 months for treatment of interstitial pneumonia, was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. During induction therapy, he developed severe pneumonia. Although meropenem and micafungin were started, he died of circulatory failure owing to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Autopsy specimens obtained from the stomach revealed fungal hyphae, which had invaded diffusely into submucosal vessels and caused the massive gastric bleeding. The same hyphae were also observed in both lungs. A diagnosis of disseminated zygomycosis was confirmed by its characteristic histopathological findings. Because zygomycetes are spontaneously resistant to the newer antifungal agents, such as voriconazole or micafungin, it seems likely that the prevalence of zygomycosis as a breakthrough infection may increase in the future. Zygomycosis is a rare, but life-threatening, deep fungal infection that appears in immunologically or metabolically compromised hosts. Its manifestations are clinically similar to those of invasive aspergillosis. In addition to the well-established epidemiology of zygomycosis, this case suggests the following new characteristics. (1) Although the gastrointestinal manifestation of zygomycosis is relatively rare, it is observed more frequently than invasive aspergillosis. (2) Gastrointestinal zygomycosis occasionally leads to the development of necrotic ulcers and may induce hemorrhagic shock.(3) We should be cautious of an occurrence of breakthrough zygomycosis when we use echinocandins for patients with known risk factors, especially steroid use and neutropenia. (4) For patients who are receiving broad-spectrum antibiotics and echinocandins, who are negative for culture studies and aspergillus antigen, and who present with unresolved fever, it is important to make a prompt clinical diagnosis of zygomycosis.

  1. Observations on oesophageal length.

    PubMed Central

    Kalloor, G J; Deshpande, A H; Collis, J L

    1976-01-01

    The subject of oesophageal length is discussed. The great variations in the length of the oesophagus in individual patients is noted, and the practical use of its recognition in oesophageal surgery is stressed. An apprasial of the various methods available for this measurement is made; this includes the use of external chest measurement, endoscopic measurement, and the measurement of the level of the electrical mucosal potential change. Correlative studies of these various methods are made, and these show a very high degree of significance. These studies involved simultaneous measurement of external and internal oesophageal length in 26 patients without a hiatal hernia or gastro-oesophageal length in 26 patients without a hiatal hernia or gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms, 42 patients with sliding type hiatal hernia, and 17 patients with a peptic stricture in association with hiatal hernia. The method of measuring oesophageal length by the use of the external chest measurement, that is, the distance between the lower incisor teeth and the xiphisternum, measured with the neck fully extended and the patient lying supine, is described in detail, its practical application in oesophageal surgery is illustrated, and its validity tested by internal measurements. The findings of this study demonstrate that the external chest measurement provides a mean of assessing the true static length of the oesophagus, corrected for the size of the individual. Images PMID:941114

  2. Oesophageal function before, during, and after healing of erosive oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, F; Ferrarini, F; Longanesi, A; Angeloni, M; Ragazzini, M; Miglioli, M; Barbara, L

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the relationship between oesophageal motor abnormalities and oesophagitis, we carried out four hour studies of oesophageal motility and 24 hour pH measurements in fasting and fed conditions in eight patients before, during (pH only), and after medical healing of erosive oesophagitis. Gastrooesophageal acid reflux decreased (ns) during the treatment, but tended to return to basal values at the end. Oesophageal body motility was unchanged after healing, while the lower oesophageal sphincter basal tone was significantly increased at the end of the study in the postcibal period. The results suggest that the impairment of the sphincter tone in reflux oesophagitis is secondary to the presence of the oesophageal lesions. Macroscopic healing is not paralleled by improved major pathogenic factors of the disease, however--that is, acid reflux and oesophageal body motility. PMID:3345925

  3. Clinical and Economic Impact of a Multisciplinary Intervention to Reduce Bleeding Risk in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Lorenzo-Pinto, Ana; Herranz-Alonso, Ana; Cuéllar-Basterrechea, Begoña; Bellón-Cano, José María; Sanjurjo-Sáez, María; Bueno, Héctor

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the clinical and economic impact of a multidisciplinary program to reduce bleeding events in patients with acute coronary syndrome through optimization of antithrombotic therapy. We designed a preintervention (PRE) and postintervention (POST) quasi-experimental study using a retrospective analysis of 2 cohorts. The first cohort was analyzed to detect correctable measures contributing to bleeding (PRE). Afterward, a quality improvement intervention with a bundle of recommendations was implemented. Finally, a second cohort of patients was evaluated to investigate the impact of the measures on bleeding reduction (POST). The impact on health outcomes was evaluated through comparison of the percentage of in-hospital bleeding events and 30-day readmissions between the 2 cohorts. The economic analysis took into account the costs associated with the implementation of the program and the cost-savings associated with the prevention of bleeding events and 30-day readmissions. A total of 677 patients were included (377 in PRE and 300 in POST). The total bleeding rate was reduced after the implementation of the bundled intervention by 29.2% (31.6% in POST vs 22.3% in PRE; OR, 0.62; 95%CI, 0.44-0.88) while 30-day readmission rates were 7.7% in PRE and 5% in POST (P=.20). The estimated avoided cost was €95 113.6 per year, meaning that €10.1 would be obtained in return for each euro invested during the first year and €36.3 during the following years. This multidisciplinary program has proven to be effective in reducing bleeding events and is economically attractive. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Review article: oesophageal dilation in adults with eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Bohm, M E; Richter, J E

    2011-04-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the oesophagus, characterised by the proton pump inhibitor-refractory accumulation of eosinophils in the oesophageal epithelium (>15 intraepithelial eosinophils/high powered field). Adults present with solid food dysphagia and recurrent food impactions. Oesophageal remodelling produces the characteristic endoscopic feature of adult eosinophilic oesophagitis including strictures, rings and a narrow calibre oesophagus. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of oesophageal dilation as the initial therapy for adults with eosinophilic oesophagitis. Medline search from 1975 to November 2010 for all reports of the treatment of patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis using search words: eosinophilic oesophagitis treatment, dilation and eosinophilic oesophagitis, steroids and eosinophilic oesophagitis. Our systematic review found that 92% of patients treated with oesophageal dilation had improvement in their dysphagia symptoms for up to 1-2 years. Three case series clearly showed clinical resolution of dysphagia symptoms, independent of the degree of eosinophil infiltration, which was unchanged after dilation. Postprocedure pain for several days is common, due to some degree of mucosal tear, but true perforation very rare (<0.1%). Oesophageal dilation is an acceptable option for healthy adult eosinophilic oesophagitis patients with anatomic narrowing, possibly followed by a course of topical steroids to reduce inflammation and retard remodelling. Future studies should include a head-to-head comparison of topical steroids and oesophageal dilation, bougie vs through-the-scope balloon dilation and maintenance topical steroids compared with on-demand treatment. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the UK: patient characteristics, diagnoses and outcomes in the 2007 UK audit.

    PubMed

    Hearnshaw, Sarah A; Logan, Richard F A; Lowe, Derek; Travis, Simon P L; Murphy, Mike F; Palmer, Kelvin R

    2011-10-01

    To describe the patient characteristics, diagnoses and clinical outcomes of patients presenting with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) in the 2007 UK Audit. Multi-centre survey. All UK hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB. All adults (>16 years) presenting in or to UK hospitals with AUGIB between 1 May and 30 June 2007. Data on 6750 patients (median age 68 years) was collected from 208 participating hospitals. New admissions (n=5550) were younger (median age 65 years) than inpatients (n=1107, median age 71 years), with less co-morbidity (any co-morbidity 46% vs 71%, respectively). At presentation 9% (599/6750) had known cirrhosis, 26% a history of alcohol excess, 11% were taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and 28% aspirin. Peptic ulcer disease accounted for 36% of AUGIB and bleeding varices 11%. In 13% there was evidence of further bleeding after the first endoscopy. 1.9% underwent surgery and 1.2% interventional radiology for AUGIB. Median length of stay was 5 days. Overall mortality in hospital was 10% (675/6750, 95% CI 9.3 to 10.7), 7% in new admissions and 26% among inpatients. Mortality was highest in those with variceal bleeding (15%) and with malignancy (17%). AUGIB continues to result in substantial mortality although it appears to be lower than in 1993. Mortality is particularly high among inpatients and those bleeding from varices or upper gastrointestinal malignancy. Surgical or radiological interventions are little used currently.

  6. Characteristics and outcomes of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding after therapeutic endoscopy in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai; Pausawasdi, Nonthalee; Laosanguaneak, Nuttiya; Bubthamala, Jakkrapan; Tanwandee, Tawesak; Leelakusolvong, Somchai

    2011-08-28

    To characterize the effects of age on clinical presentations and endoscopic diagnoses and to determine outcomes after endoscopic therapy among patients aged ≥ 65 years admitted for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) compared with those aged < 65 years. Medical records and an endoscopy data-base of 526 consecutive patients with overt UGIB ad-mitted during 2007-2009 were reviewed. The initial presentations and clinical course within 30 d after endoscopy were obtained. A total of 235 patients aged ≥ 65 years constituted the elderly population (mean age of 74.2 ± 6.7 years, 63% male). Compared to young patients, the elderly patients were more likely to present with melena (53% vs 30%, respectively; P < 0.001), have comorbidities (69% vs 54%, respectively; P < 0.001), and receive antiplatelet agents (39% vs 10%, respectively; P < 0.001). Interestingly, hemodynamic instability was observed less in this group (49% vs 68%, respectively; P < 0.001). Peptic ulcer was the leading cause of UGIB in the elderly patients, followed by varices and gastropathy. The elderly and young patients had a similar clinical course with regard to the utilization of endoscopic therapy, requirement for transfusion, duration of hospital stay, need for surgery [relative risk (RR), 0.31; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.03-2.75; P = 0.26], rebleeding (RR, 1.44; 95% CI, 0.92-2.25; P = 0.11), and mortality (RR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.57-2.11; P = 0.77). In Cox's regression analysis, hemodynamic instability at presentation, background of liver cirrhosis or disseminated malignancy, transfusion requirement, and development of rebleeding were significantly associated with 30-d mortality. Despite multiple comorbidities and the concomitant use of antiplatelets in the elderly patients, advanced age does not appear to influence adverse outcomes of acute UGIB after therapeutic endoscopy.

  7. Endoscopic management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding in children: Time for a radical rethink.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Mike; Belsha, Dalia

    2016-02-01

    Currently we are no nearer than 10 or 20years ago providing a safe, adequate, and effective round-the-clock endoscopic services for acute life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding in children. Preventable deaths are occurring still, and it is a tragedy. This is owing to a number of factors which require urgent attention. Skill-mix and the ability of available endoscopists in the UK are woeful. Manpower is spread too thinly and not concentrated in centers of excellence, which is necessary given the relative rarity of the presentation. Adult gastroenterologists are increasingly reticent regarding their help in increasingly litigious times. Recent work on identification of those children likely to require urgent endoscopic intervention has mirrored scoring systems that have been present in adult circles for many years and may allow appropriate and timely intervention. Recent technical developments such as that of Hemospray® may lower the threshold of competency in dealing with this problem endoscopically, thus allowing lives to be saved. Educational courses, mannequin and animal model training are important but so will be appropriate credentialing of individuals for this skill-set. Assessment of competency will become the norm and guidelines on a national level in each country mandatory if we are to move this problem from the "too difficult" to the "achieved". It is an urgent problem and is one of the last emergencies in pediatrics that is conducted poorly. This cannot and should not be allowed to continue unchallenged.

  8. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding following aortic valve replacement in a patient with Heyde's sindrome. Case report.

    PubMed

    De Palma, G D; Salvatori, F; Masone, S; Simeoli, I; Rega, M; Celiento, M; Persico, G

    2007-09-01

    A 58-year old man was admitted to the hospital because of melena. He had a 1-year history of mechanical aortic valve replacement and coronary stent placement because of myocardial infarction and he was taking warfarin and clopidogrel. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy were negative for bleeding. Capsule endoscopy showed bleeding diffuse angiodysplasia of the small bowel. The patient was treated with octreotide 20 mg, at monthly interval. After 25 months there had been no recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding. The case suggests that mechanical valve replacement may not prevent gastrointestinal bleeding in Heyde syndrome and that octreotide treatment should be considered in these cases.

  9. Acute Middle Gastrointestinal Bleeding Risk Associated with NSAIDs, Antithrombotic Drugs, and PPIs: A Multicenter Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Niikura, Ryota; Yamada, Atsuo; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Shimbo, Takuro; Kobayashi, Yuka; Okamoto, Makoto; Mitsuno, Yuzo; Ogura, Keiji; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Akiyama, Junichi; Uemura, Naomi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Middle gastrointestinal bleeding (MGIB) risk has not been fully investigated due to its extremely rare occurrence and the need for multiple endoscopies to exclude upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This study investigated whether MGIB is associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), low-dose aspirin (LDA), thienopyridines, anticoagulants, and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), and whether PPI use affects the interactions between MGIB and antithrombotic drugs. Methods In this multicenter, hospital-based, case-control study, 400 patients underwent upper and lower endoscopy, 80 had acute overt MGIB and 320 had no bleeding and were matched for age and sex as controls (1:4). MGIB was additionally evaluated by capsule and/or double-balloon endoscopy, after excluding upper and lower GI bleeding. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) for MGIB risk were calculated using conditional logistic regression. To estimate the propensity score, we employed a logistic regression model for PPI use. Results In patients with MGIB, mean hemoglobin level was 9.4 g/dL, and 28 patients (35%) received blood transfusions. Factors significantly associated with MGIB were chronic kidney disease (p<0.001), liver cirrhosis (p = 0.034), NSAIDs (p<0.001), thienopyridines (p<0.001), anticoagulants (p = 0.002), and PPIs (p<0.001). After adjusting for these factors, NSAIDs (AOR, 2.5; p = 0.018), thienopyridines (AOR, 3.2; p = 0.015), anticoagulants (AOR, 4.3; p = 0.028), and PPIs (AOR; 2.0; p = 0.021) were independently associated with MGIB. After adjusting for propensity score, the use of PPIs remained an independent risk factors for MGIB (AOR, 1.94; p = 0.034). No significant interactions were observed between PPIs and NSAIDs (AOR, 0.7; p = 0.637), LDA (AOR, 0.3; p = 0.112), thienopyridine (AOR, 0.7, p = 0.671), or anticoagulants (AOR, 0.5; p = 0.545). Conclusions One-third of patients with acute small intestinal bleeding required blood transfusion. NSAIDs

  10. Embryology of oesophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Ioannides, Adonis S.; Copp, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Oesophageal atresia (OA) and tracheo-oesophageal fistula (TOF) are important human birth defects of unknown aetiology. The embryogenesis of OA/TOF remains poorly understood mirroring the lack of clarity of the mechanisms of normal tracheo-oesophageal development. The development of rat and mouse models of OA/TOF has allowed the parallel study of both normal and abnormal embryogenesis. Although controversies persist, the fundamental morphogenetic process appears to be a rearrangement of the proximal foregut into separate respiratory (ventral) and gastrointestinal (dorsal) tubes. This process depends on the precise temporal and spatial pattern of expression of a number of foregut patterning genes. Disturbance of this pattern disrupts foregut separation and underlies the development of tracheo-oesophageal malformations. PMID:19103415

  11. Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (2015, Nanchang, China).

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Li, Zhao Shen

    2016-02-01

    Acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (ANVUGIB) is one of the most common medical emergencies in China and worldwide. In 2009, we published the "Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding" for the patients in China; however, during the past years numerous studies on the diagnosis and treatment of ANVUGIB have been conducted, and the management of ANVUGIB needs to be updated. The guidelines were updated after the databases including PubMed, Embase and CNKI were searched to retrieve the clinical trials on the management of ANVUGIB. The clinical trials were evaluated for high-quality evidence, and the advances in definitions, diagnosis, etiology, severity evaluation, treatment and prognosis of ANVUGIB were carefully reviewed, the recommendations were then proposed. After several rounds of discussions and revisions among the national experts of digestive endoscopy, gastroenterology, radiology and intensive care, the 2015 version of "Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding" was successfully developed by the Chinese Journal of Internal Medicine, National Medical Journal of China, Chinese Journal of Digestion and Chinese Journal of Digestive Endoscopy. It shall be noted that although much progress has been made, the clinical management of ANVUGIB still needs further improvement and refinement, and high-quality randomized trials are required in the future. © 2016 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Evaluation of technetium-99m DTPA for localization of site of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Mahajan, K.K.; Ericsson, S.; Nawaz, K.; Owunwanne, A.; Kouris, K.; Higazy, E.; Awdeh, M.

    1986-11-01

    Intravenous Tc-99m DTPA was evaluated in 34 patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Active bleeding was detected in 25 patients: nine in the stomach, 12 in the duodenum, and four from esophageal varices. No active bleeding was seen in nine patients (two gastric ulcers and seven duodenal ulcers). Results were correlated with endoscopic and/or surgical findings. All completely correlated except: 1) one case of esophageal varices in which there was disagreement on the site, 2) three cases of duodenal ulcers that were not bleeding on endoscopy but showed mild oozing on delayed images and 3) one case of gastric ulcer, in which no bleeding was detected in the Tc-99m DTPA study, but was found to be bleeding at surgery 24 hours later. The Tc-99m DTPA study is a reliable method for localization of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with an agreement ratio of 85%. This method also can be used safely for follow-up of patients with intermittent bleeding. It is less invasive than endoscopy, is easily repeatable, and has the same accuracy.

  13. Early Spontaneous Abdominal Bleeding is associated with Poor Outcome in Moderate to Severe Acute Pancreatitis Patients: A Propensity Matched Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yizhe; Zhou, Jing; Li, Gang; Tong, Zhihui; Dong, Jie; Pan, Yiyuan; Ke, Lu; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal bleeding is a lethal complication in acute pancreatitis (AP) and it is commonly described as a late event. However, spontaneous intra-abdominal bleeding could occur very early but no study focusing on this phenomenon was published yet. In this study, 1137 AP patients were retrospectively screened and 24 subjects suffering early spontaneous bleeding (ESB) were selected. Meanwhile, a 1:1 well-balanced cohort of non-bleeding patients was generated by propensity score match. The clinical characteristics of these patients were compared and a multiple regression analysis was performed to assess the risk factors for ESB. Besides, patients with massive post-intervention bleeding (PIB) were collected for additional comparison. ESB patients suffered significantly worse outcome than the matched cohort evidenced by dramatically higher mortality than the non-bleeding patients and even the PIB group (54.2% versus 20.8%, P = 0.017; 54.2% versus 31.0%, P = 0.049). The regression analysis demonstrated computer tomography severity index (CTSI; OR, 3.34; 95% CI, 1.995–5.59, P < 0.001) and creatinine (OR, 1.008; 95% CI, 1.004–1.012, P < 0.001) were associated with the occurrence of ESB. In conclusion, ESB is a rare but dangerous complication of moderate-to-severe AP and may result in high mortality. CTSI and creatinine are independent risk factors for the development of ESB. PMID:28225011

  14. The assessment of oesophagitis in hiatus hernia patients

    PubMed Central

    Ward, A. S.; Wright, D. H.; Collis, J. Leigh

    1970-01-01

    The incidence of oesophagitis has been determined in 108 patients with sliding hiatus hernias using endoscopic, histological, and radiological criteria. Particular consideration has been given to the relationship between inflammatory disease and clinical symptoms. All the patients were attending a thoracic surgical clinic and the spectrum of disease encountered was fairly severe; over half of the cases had established strictures when first seen. The incidence of oesophagitis based on endoscopic evidence was 76·9%, while inflammatory change was noted on biopsy in 56·2% and at barium swallow in 58·3% of the patients. Oesophagoscopy proved to be the most satisfactory method of assessment; biopsy specimens were either inadequate or correlated poorly with other criteria while barium swallow was of diagnostic value only in severe oesophagitis. The main symptoms were pain, heartburn with regurgitation, dysphagia, and bleeding. Dysphagia was common due to the preponderance of patients with strictures, while obvious bleeding was very uncommon. Endoscopic oesophagitis was found in 75% of the patients with specific retrosternal pain and in 60% of those with heartburn and regurgitation. The inability to equate heartburn with oesophagitis is emphasized. The incidence of inflammatory change in patients with dysphagia was 87·2%; nearly all the cases in this group showed stricture formation. PMID:5489179

  15. Similar rebleeding rate in 3-day and 7-day intravenous ceftriaxone prophylaxis for patients with acute variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzong-Hsi; Huang, Chung-Tsui; Lin, Chien-Chu; Chung, Chen-Shuan; Lin, Cheng-Kuan; Tsai, Kuang-Chau

    2016-07-01

    Although prophylactic antibiotics have been recommended for cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the duration of its use remains an inconclusive issue. We designed this study to investigate the duration of antibiotic prophylaxis for cirrhotic patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding. We enrolled those patients suffering from acute esophageal variceal bleeding and receiving band ligation. They were randomly allocated to two groups to receive prophylactic antibiotics; Group I: receiving intravenous ceftriaxone 500 mg every 12 hours for 3 days, and Group II: same regimen for 7 days. We used rebleeding rate within 14 days as the primary end point and also evaluated the survival rate within 28 days and the amount of transfusion during admission. There were 38 patients in Group I and 33 patients in Group II that completed the study course for analysis. Overall, there was no significant difference in the baseline characteristics between these two groups. There were three patients both in Group I and Group II who developed rebleeding within 14 days (8% vs. 9%, p > 0.99). There was also no difference between Group I and Group II in transfusion amount (2.71 ± 2.84 units vs. 3.18 ± 4.07, p = 0.839) and survival rate in 28 days (100 vs. 97%, p = 0.465). Our small scale study demonstrated that there was no difference in the rebleeding rate between 3-day and 7-day ceftriaxone prophylaxis for cirrhotic patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding. There was also no difference in 28 day survival rate between these two groups. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Using an ‘action set’ for the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Charles; Hamilton, Mark; Epstein, Owen; Negus, Rupert; Peachey, Tim; Kaul, Arvind; O’Beirne, James

    2013-01-01

    Background: We studied the management of patients with acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding (AUGIB) at the Royal Free Hospital. The aim was to compare our performance with the national standard and determine ways of improving the delivery of care in accordance with the recently published ‘Scope for improvement’ report. Methods: We randomly selected patients who presented with haematemesis, melaena, or both, and had an oesophageogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) between April and October 2009. We developed local guidelines and presented our findings in various forums. We collaborated with the British Medical Journal’s Evidence Centre and Cerner Millennium electronic patient record system to create an electronic ‘Action Set’ for the management of patients presenting with AUGIB. We re-audited using the same standard and target. Results: With the action set, documentation of pre-OGD Rockall scores increased significantly (p ≤ 0.0001). The differences in the calculation and documentation of post-OGD full Rockall scores were also significant between the two audit loops (p = 0.007). Patients who inappropriately received proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) before endoscopy were reduced from 73.8% to 33% (p = 0.02). Patients receiving PPIs after OGD were also reduced from 66% to 50% (p = 0.01). Discharges of patients whose full Rockall score was less than or equal to two increased from 40% to 100% (p = 0.43). Conclusion: The use of the Action Set improved calculation and documentation of risk scores and facilitated earlier hospital discharge for low-risk patients. Significant improvements were also seen in inappropriate use of PPIs. Actions sets can improve guideline adherence and can potentially promote cost-cutting and improve health economics. PMID:24179478

  17. The surgical management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a 12-year experience.

    PubMed

    Clarke, M G; Bunting, D; Smart, N J; Lowes, J; Mitchell, S J

    2010-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a common reason for admission to gastroenterologists, with only 2% of patients requiring surgical intervention. The aim of this study was to review the surgical management of patients with non-variceal AUGIB in a single institution over a 12-year period and compare practice with recognised regional and national standards. Data was collected retrospectively for all patients undergoing surgery for AUGIB between September 1995 and September 2007. Audit standards included the local hospital protocol, British Society of Gastroenterology Endoscopy Committee guidelines and the UK Comparative Audit of AUGIB and the Use of Blood. 53 patients were identified, of which 41 case notes were available. Mean (range) age of the patients was 75.8 (45-92) years. 56% had pre-existing cardiorespiratory comorbidity and 63% were taking anti-inflammatory drugs. Pre-operative Rockall score was >or=7 in 46% and ASA score was >or=3 in 65% of patients. 56% of operations were performed by the registrar, compared with 20% reported nationally. All cases after 2004 were performed by the consultant. No operations were performed after midnight beyond 1999. 23 (56%) patients suffered post-operative complications compared with 55% reported nationally; cardiorespiratory (n = 16), wound infection (n = 7) and rebleed (n = 6). 37% required intensive care support and median length of hospital stay was 13 days. In-hospital mortality rate was 10%, compared with 30% reported nationally and this increased with rising Rockall, Blatchford, APACHE-2, P-POSSUM and Charlson scores. These findings highlight the high rate of morbidity and mortality associated with surgical treatment for AUGIB. The small volume of cases and reduction in registrar operating raises training issues. An integrated approach with greater use of interventional radiology is likely to play a greater role in the future. Copyright 2010 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  18. The utility of upper endoscopy in patients with concomitant upper gastrointestinal bleeding and acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sauyu; Konstance, Richard; Jollis, James; Fisher, Deborah A

    2006-12-01

    Patients who present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in the setting of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) may have suffered an UGIB that subsequently led to an AMI or endured an AMI and subsequently suffered a UGIB as a consequence of anticoagulation. We hypothesized that patients in the former group bled from more severe upper tract lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate predictors for endoscopic therapy in patients who suffer a concomitant UGIB and AMI. Retrospective, single center medical record abstraction of hospital admissions from January 1, 1996-December 31, 2002. During the study period, 183 patients underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) within 7 days of suffering an AMI and UGIB (AMI group N=105, UGIB group N=78). A higher proportion of patients in the UGIB group (41%) was found to have high-risk UGI lesions requiring endoscopic treatment compared to patients in the AMI group (17%; P < 0.004). UGIB as the inciting event and patients suffering from hematemesis and hemodynamic instability were significantly associated with requiring endoscopic therapy. Although predominantly diagnostic, endoscopic findings in the AMI group did alter the decision to perform cardiac catheterization in 43% of patients. Severe complications occurred in 1% (95% confidence interval, 0%-4%) of patients. We conclude that in patients suffering from concomitant UGIB and AMI, urgent endoscopy was most beneficial in patients with UGIB as the initial event and those presenting with hematemesis and hemodynamic instability. In patients without these clinical features, urgent endoscopy may be delayed, unless cardiac management decisions are dependent on endoscopic findings.

  19. Combined endovascular treatment of aorto-oesophageal fistula with mediastinitis

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Pascal; Pequignot, Aurélien; De Temmerman, Pierre; De Dominicis, Florence

    2013-01-01

    False aortic aneurysm is an uncommon complication after oesophageal perforation and results in a high rate of mortality. A 63-year-old patient presented with acute chest pain. Biochemical tests (cardiac enzymes) and electrocardiogram were normal. A thoracic and abdominal CT scan was performed, and showed a foreign body in the posterior mediastinum, with mediastinal cellulitis and a false aortic aneurysm. Surgical endovascular management was performed, with stenting of the thoracic aorta and oesophageal exploration. PMID:23042800

  20. Simultaneous tracheal and oesophageal pH measurements in asthmatic patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed Central

    Jack, C. I.; Calverley, P. M.; Donnelly, R. J.; Tran, J.; Russell, G.; Hind, C. R.; Evans, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--An association between asthma and gastro-oesophageal reflux is well recognised but the underlying mechanism is unclear. One suggestion is that gastric juice is aspirated into the tracheal and upper airways but detection of these events is difficult and involves radioisotopic studies. A new method of making direct measurements of tracheal and oesophageal pH over a 24 hour period is described, together with its application to patients with asthma. METHODS--The technique involves insertion of simultaneous tracheal and oesophageal pH probes under general anaesthesia. Continuous monitoring of pH over a 24 hour period is possible, permitting comparison with peak flow readings during wakefulness and at night should the patient be disturbed. Representative data from four patients with asthma (mean FEV1 62% predicted) and symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux, together with data from three non-asthmatics, is presented. RESULTS--Thirty seven episodes of gastro-oesophageal reflux lasting more than five minutes were recorded. Of these, five were closely followed by a fall in tracheal pH from a mean (SE) of 7.1 (0.2) to 4.1 (0.4) and a fall in peak expiratory flow (PEFR) of 84 (16) l/min. When gastro-oesophageal reflux occurred without tracheal aspiration the fall in PEFR was 8 (4) l/min. CONCLUSIONS--This new technique was well tolerated and allowed quantitation of the number, duration, and timing of episodes of tracheal micro-aspiration. Unlike acid reflux without aspiration, these events appear to be related to significant acute changes in lung function in asthmatic patients. Further studies with this new method may elucidate the role of gastro-oesophageal reflux in asthma. Images PMID:7701464

  1. Systematic reviews of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Leontiadis, G I; Sreedharan, A; Dorward, S; Barton, P; Delaney, B; Howden, C W; Orhewere, M; Gisbert, J; Sharma, V K; Rostom, A; Moayyedi, P; Forman, D

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in the prevention and treatment of acute upper gastrointestinal (UGI) haemorrhage, as well as to compare this with H2-receptor antagonist (H2RA), Helicobacter pylori eradication (in infected patients) or no therapy, for the prevention of first and/or subsequent bleeds among patients who continue to use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Also to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of PPI therapy, compared with other treatments, for the prevention of subsequent bleeds in patients who had previously experienced peptic ulcer (PU) bleeding. Electronic databases and major conference proceedings were searched up to February 2006. Data were collected from the systematic reviews addressing each research objective. These were then entered into an economic model to compare the costs and quality-adjusted life-days of alternative management strategies over a 28-day period for patients who have had UGI bleeding. A Markov model with a Monte Carlo simulation used data from the systematic reviews to identify the most cost-effective treatment strategy for the prevention of UGI bleeding (first and subsequent) among NSAID users using an outcome of costs per quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) over a lifetime from age 50 years. PPI treatment initiated after endoscopic diagnosis of PU bleeding significantly reduced re-bleeding and surgery compared with placebo or H2RA. Although there was no evidence of an overall effect of PPI treatment on all-cause mortality, PPIs significantly reduced mortality in subgroups when studies conducted in Asia were examined in isolation or when the analysis was confined to patients with high-risk endoscopic findings. PPI treatment initiated prior to endoscopy in UGI bleeding significantly reduced the proportion of patients with stigmata of recent haemorrhage (SRH) at index endoscopy compared with placebo or H2RA, but there was no evidence that PPI

  2. Effect of acute bleeding on daily quality of life assessments in patients with congenital hemophilia with inhibitors and their families: observations from the dosing observational study in hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Ellis J; Recht, Michael; Sabio, Hernan; Saxena, Kapil; Solem, Caitlyn T; Pickard, A Simon; Gut, Robert Z; Cooper, David L

    2012-01-01

    Quality-of-life (QOL) assessments in frequently bleeding patients with congenital hemophilia with inhibitors and their families are confounded by preexisting arthropathy and family circumstances. Periodic QOL assessments typically made on nonbleed days may not provide complete reflections of the burden on patients/families. To evaluate the impact of bleeding episodes on patients/caregivers/families and the association between monthly QOL scores and patients' average diary experiences. Frequently bleeding inhibitor patients (≥four bleeds in 3 months), or their caregivers, provided daily assessment of EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire and EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire visual analogue scale, pain (11-point Likert scale), and family anxiety/stress/activity change over 3 to 6 months. QOL scores were stratified by bleed/nonbleed days. Patient QOL assessments were recorded by 37 of the 39 enrolled patients/caregivers (3771 of 3777 eligible dairy days, 472 bleed/3299 nonbleed days). Median (range) diary duration was 91 (66-180) days, with 8.2% (0%-72.2%) bleed days. Mean health scores were significantly worse on bleed days than on nonbleed days (P < 0.0001 for all): EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire index, 0.66 versus 0.82; visual analogue scale health, 69.7 versus 77.4; and pain score, 4.1 versus 1.8. Bleed days also had higher (P < 0.001) proportions of days with abnormalities in family anxiety/stress (42% vs. 30%) and family activity changes (34% vs. 21%). Assessing the impact of hemophilia with inhibitors on patient/family QOL typically includes periodic (likely nonbleed day) evaluations reflecting baseline abnormalities. Daily assessment, however, indicated that frequent acute bleeds impair QOL beyond patient's nonbleed day baseline. New approaches are required to assess the cumulative impact of frequent acute bleeds on patients and their families. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR

  3. Early Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Vietnamese Patients with Acute Peptic Ulcer Bleeding: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Quach, Duc Trong; Luu, Mai Ngoc; To, Thuy-HuongThi; Bui, Quy Nhuan; Tran, Tuan Anh; Tran, Binh Duy; Vo, Minh-Cong Hong; Tanaka, Shinji; Uemura, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To investigate H. pylori infection rate and evaluate a combined set of tests for H. pylori diagnosis in Vietnamese patients with acute peptic ulcer bleeding (PUD). Methods. Consecutive patients with acute PUB were enrolled prospectively. Rapid urease test (RUT) with 3 biopsies was carried out randomly. Patients without RUT or with negative RUT received urea breath test (UBT) and serological and urinary H. pylori antibody tests. H. pylori was considered positive if RUT or any noninvasive test was positive. Patients were divided into group A (RUT plus noninvasive tests) and group B (only noninvasive tests). Results. The overall H. pylori infection rate was 94.2% (161/171). Groups A and B had no differences in demographic characteristics, bleeding severity, endoscopic findings, and proton pump inhibitor use. H. pylori-positive rate in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (98.2% versus 86.7%, p = 0.004). The positive rate of RUT was similar at each biopsy site but significantly increased if RUT results from 2 or 3 sites were combined (p < 0.05). Conclusions. H. pylori infection rate in Vietnamese patients with acute PUB is high. RUT is an excellent test if at least 2 biopsies are taken. PMID:28133477

  4. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding: A 15-year nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-07-01

    Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors.A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996-2000), T2 (2001-2005), and T3 (2006-2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate.Our results showed that more patients were <65 years (75.6%) and of male sex (78.5%). Patients were mostly from teaching hospitals (90.8%) with high hospital volume (50.9%) and high doctor service load (51.1%). The prevalence of acute esophageal variceal bleeding and mean length of hospital stay decreased over the years (P < 0.001), but the overall medical expenses increased (P < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that older age, female sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score >1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality.Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were

  5. Hypertension and Life-Threatening Bleeding in Children with Relapsed Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Treated with FLT3 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz Karapınar, Deniz; Karadaş, Nihal; Önder Siviş, Zühal; Balkan, Can; Kavaklı, Kaan; Aydınok, Yeşim

    2015-09-01

    Experiences with new multikinase inhibitors are limited, especially in children. In this report we summarize our experience with 2 patients with relapsed acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), one with FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3-internal tandem duplication mutation and the other with a single base mutation (D835Y). Both patients received sorafenib, one for 19 days and the other for 42 days, with clofarabine-including chemotherapy. One additionally received sunitinib for a total of 20 days. Both patients developed severe pancytopenia, hypertension, life-threatening bleedings from the gastrointestinal system, and, finally, intrapulmonary hemorrhage. Although both reached severe aplasia of the bone marrow without blastic infiltration, death occurred with neutropenic sepsis.

  6. Comparing Adrenaline with Tranexamic Acid to Control Acute Endobronchial Bleeding: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fekri, Mitra Samareh; Hashemi-Bajgani, Seyed Mehdy; Shafahi, Ahmad; Zarshenas, Rozita

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hemoptysis occurs due to either pulmonary diseases or bronchoscopy interventions. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of the endobronchial instillation of adrenaline with that of tranexamic acid. Methods: Fifty patients were randomly selected as 2 double-blinded sample groups (n=25). In these patients, bleeding could not be controlled with cold saline lavage during bronchoscopy and they, therefore, required prescription of another medicine. Adrenaline (1 mg) in one group and tranexamic acid (500 mg) in the other group were diluted in 20 mL of normal saline and instilled through the bronchoscope. This technique was repeated 3 times at 90-second intervals, if necessary. In the case of persistent bleeding, 90 seconds after the last dose, a second medicine was given for bleeding control. Observation of clot through the bronchoscope meant that the bleeding had stopped. The efficacy of tranexamic acid and adrenaline was evaluated and then compared using the Mann–Whitney test. Results: The time of bleeding control had no significant difference between tranexamic acid and adrenaline (P=0.908). Another analysis was done to evaluate bleeding control with a second medicine; the results showed that 1 (4%) patient in the tranexamic acid and 8 (32%) in the adrenaline group needed the second medicine and there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (P=0.609). Conclusion: Our results suggested that tranexamic acid by endobronchial instillation was as efficient as adrenaline in controlling hemoptysis and required less frequent use of a second medicine. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014120220188 PMID:28360438

  7. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to Kaposi sarcoma as initial presentation of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Sara A; Stawicki, Stanislaw P A; Forbes, Rachel C; Papadimos, Thomas J; Lindsey, David E

    2013-12-01

    Despite our decades of experience with Kaposi Sarcoma its true nature remains elusive. This angioproliferative disease of the vascular endothelium has a propensity to involve visceral organs in the immunocompromised population. There are four variants of the disease and each has its own pathogenesis and evolution. While the common sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding are familiar to surgeons and critical care physicians, here we present the exceedingly rare report of upper gastrointestinal bleeding attributable to this malady, explore its successful management, and review the various forms of Kaposi Sarcoma including the strategies in regard to their management.

  8. ACUTE UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING SECONDARY TO KAPOSI SARCOMA AS INITIAL PRESENTATION OF HIV INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Sara A.; Stawicki, Stanislaw P.A.; Forbes, Rachel C.; Papadimos, Thomas J.; Lindsey, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Despite our decades of experience with Kaposi Sarcoma its true nature remains elusive. This angioproliferative disease of the vascular endothelium has a propensity to involve visceral organs in the immunocompromised population. There are four variants of the disease and each has its own pathogenesis and evolution. While the common sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding are familiar to surgeons and critical care physicians, here we present the exceedingly rare report of upper gastrointestinal bleeding attributable to this malady, explore its successful management, and review the various forms of Kaposi Sarcoma including the strategies in regard to their management. PMID:24369327

  9. Oesophageal food impaction in achalasia treated with Coca-Cola and nifedipine

    PubMed Central

    Koumi, Andriani; Panos, Marios Zenon

    2010-01-01

    Achalasia is characterised by the loss of peristaltic movement in the distal oesophagus and failure of the lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation, which results in impaired oesophageal emptying. We report a case of a 92-year-old frail woman with a history of achalasia, who presented with acute oesophageal obstruction due to impaction of a large amount of food material. She was treated successfully with nifedipine, in combination with Coca-Cola (original product, not sugar free), so avoiding the risks associated with repeated endoscopic intubation and piecemeal removal of the oesophageal content. PMID:22242073

  10. Oesophageal food impaction in achalasia treated with Coca-Cola and nifedipine.

    PubMed

    Koumi, Andriani; Panos, Marios Zenon

    2010-01-01

    Achalasia is characterised by the loss of peristaltic movement in the distal oesophagus and failure of the lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation, which results in impaired oesophageal emptying. We report a case of a 92-year-old frail woman with a history of achalasia, who presented with acute oesophageal obstruction due to impaction of a large amount of food material. She was treated successfully with nifedipine, in combination with Coca-Cola (original product, not sugar free), so avoiding the risks associated with repeated endoscopic intubation and piecemeal removal of the oesophageal content.

  11. Oesophagus side effects related to the treatment of oesophageal cancer or radiotherapy of other thoracic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Adebahr, Sonja; Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Nestle, Ursula; Brunner, Thomas B

    2016-08-01

    The oesophagus as a serial organ located in the central chest is frequent subject to "incidental" dose application in radiotherapy for several thoracic malignancies including oesophageal cancer itself. Especially due to the radiosensitive mucosa severe radiotherapy induced sequelae can occur, acute oesophagitis and strictures as late toxicity being the most frequent side-effects. In this review we focus on oesophageal side effects derived from treatment of gastrointestinal cancer and secondly provide an overview on oesophageal toxicity from conventional and stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy to the thoracic area in general. Available data on pathogenesis, frequency, onset, and severity of oesophageal side effects are summarized. Whereas for conventional radiotherapy the associations of applied doses to certain volumes of the oesophagus are well described, the tolerance dose to the mediastinal structures for hypofractionated therapy is unknown. The review provides available attempts to predict the risk of oesophageal side effects from dosimetric parameters of SBRT.

  12. Natural history of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease without oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Pace, F; Santalucia, F; Bianchi Porro, G

    1991-01-01

    This retrospective study was undertaken to characterise the clinical course and reflux pattern of patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux without evidence of oesophagitis. We investigated 33 patients (12 women, 21 men; mean age 36 years) with typical symptoms, a negative oesophagoscopy, and a 24 hour oesophageal pH-metry indicative of pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux. All patients received antacids or prokinetic drugs or both for three to six months. Nineteen of 33 patients still had symptoms at the end of treatment, of whom five had developed erosive changes of the oesophageal mucosa. The other 14 discontinued treatment and remained asymptomatic during a six month follow up period. Comparison of the pretreatment pH-metry data of the 19 symptomatic patients and the 14 asymptomatic patients showed no differences in the pattern of gastro-oesophageal reflux in the two groups. We conclude that in a substantial proportion of patients with pathological reflux without oesophagitis symptoms may persist and mucosal lesions may develop during conventional treatment without any apparent change in the reflux. Patients who developed endoscopic oesophagitis did not have a more severe pretreatment pattern of gastro-oesophageal reflux when compared with those who did not develop oesophageal mucosal damage. PMID:1885063

  13. Restrictive vs liberal blood transfusion for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: rationale and protocol for a cluster randomized feasibility trial.

    PubMed

    Jairath, Vipul; Kahan, Brennan C; Gray, Alasdair; Doré, Caroline J; Mora, Ana; Dyer, Claire; Stokes, Elizabeth A; Llewelyn, Charlotte; Bailey, Adam A; Dallal, Helen; Everett, Simon M; James, Martin W; Stanley, Adrian J; Church, Nicholas; Darwent, Melanie; Greenaway, John; Le Jeune, Ivan; Reckless, Ian; Campbell, Helen E; Meredith, Sarah; Palmer, Kelvin R; Logan, Richard F A; Travis, Simon P L; Walsh, Timothy S; Murphy, Michael F

    2013-07-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is the commonest reason for hospitalization with hemorrhage in the UK and the leading indication for transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs). Observational studies suggest an association between more liberal RBC transfusion and adverse patient outcomes, and a recent randomised trial reported increased further bleeding and mortality with a liberal transfusion policy. TRIGGER (Transfusion in Gastrointestinal Bleeding) is a pragmatic, cluster randomized trial which aims to evaluate the feasibility and safety of implementing a restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion policy in adult patients admitted with AUGIB. The trial will take place in 6 UK hospitals, and each centre will be randomly allocated to a transfusion policy. Clinicians throughout each hospital will manage all eligible patients according to the transfusion policy for the 6-month trial recruitment period. In the restrictive centers, patients become eligible for RBC transfusion when their hemoglobin is <8 g/dL. In the liberal centers patients become eligible for transfusion once their hemoglobin is <10 g/dL. All clinicians will have the discretion to transfuse outside of the policy but will be asked to document the reasons for doing so. Feasibility outcome measures include protocol adherence, recruitment rate, and evidence of selection bias. Clinical outcome measures include further bleeding, mortality, thromboembolic events, and infections. Quality of life will be measured using the EuroQol EQ-5D at day 28, and the costs associated with hospitalization for AUGIB in the UK will be estimated. Consent will be sought from participants or their representatives according to patient capacity for use of routine hospital data and day 28 follow up. The study has ethical approval for conduct in England and Scotland. Results will be analysed according to a pre-defined statistical analysis plan and disseminated in peer reviewed publications to relevant stakeholders. The

  14. Lower oesophageal web

    PubMed Central

    Björk, Viking Olov; Charonis, Constantin G.

    1967-01-01

    A patient with a `congenital' oesophageal web was suffering from dysphagia and was treated surgically. A review is made of a few similar, well-documented cases. An effort is made to compare the clinical and pathological characteristics of the lesion and to discuss its pathogenesis. Images PMID:6033383

  15. Successful treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome after hysterectomy for life-threatening atonic bleeding by inhaled nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Ayaka; Hashiba, Eiji; Otomo, Noriaki; Muraoka, Masatoshi; Kimura, Futoshi; Hirota, Kazuyoshi

    2011-10-01

    We report a case of a 33-year-old female who developed severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) after emergency hysterectomy for life-threatening atonic bleeding. A marked decline in pulmonary oxygenation was observed during the surgery, which led to a diagnosis of ARDS. Following admission to the intensive care unit, hypoxia became critical, with a PaO(2)/F(I)O(2) value of 52 even after recruitment maneuvers. Inhaled nitric oxide (NO 10 ppm) was administered to the patient as a rescue treatment, resulting in a gradual but dramatic improvement in pulmonary oxygenation. Although several randomized trials have failed to confirm the beneficial effects of NO on morbidity in patients with ARDS, NO administration is worth consideration as treatment prior to invasive treatments, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, for patients with acute lung injury/ARDS.

  16. The "Prometeo" study: online collection of clinical data and outcome of Italian patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Del Piano, Mario; Bianco, Maria Antonia; Cipolletta, Livio; Zambelli, Alessandro; Chilovi, Fausto; Di Matteo, Giovanni; Pagliarulo, Michela; Ballarè, Marco; Rotondano, Gianluca

    2013-04-01

    To implement an online, prospective collection of clinical data and outcome of patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in Italy ("Prometeo" study). Epidemiology, clinical features, and outcomes of nonvariceal UGIB are mainly known by retrospective studies and are probably changing. Data were collected by 13 Gastrointestinal Units in Italy from June 2006 to June 2007 (phase 1) and from December 2008 to December 2009 (phase 2): an interim analysis of data was performed between the 2 phases to optimize the online database. All the patients consecutively admitted for acute nonvariceal UGIB were enrolled. Demographic and clinical data were collected, a diagnostic endoscopy performed, with endoscopic hemostasis if indicated. One thousand four hundred thirteen patients (M=932, mean age±SD=66.5±15.8; F=481, mean age±SD=74.2±14.6) were enrolled. Comorbidities were present in 83%. 52.4% were treated with acetyl salicylic acid or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): only 13.9% had an effective gastroprotection. Previous episodes of UGIB were present in 13.3%. Transfusion were needed in 43.9%. Shock was present in 9.3%. Endoscopic diagnosis was made in 93.2%: peptic lesions were the main cause of bleeding (duodenal ulcer 36.2%, gastric ulcer 29.6%, gastric/duodenal erosions 10.9%). At endoscopy, Helicobacter pylori was searched in 37.2%, and found positive in 51.3% of tested cases. Early rebleeding was observed in 5.4%: surgery was required in 14.3% of them. Bleeding-related death occurred in 4.0%: at multivariate analysis, the risk of death was correlated with female sex [odds ratio (OR=2.19, P=0.0089)], presence of neoplasia (OR=2.70, P=0.0057) or multiple comorbidities (OR=5.04, P=0.0280), shock at admission (OR=4.55, P=0.0001), and early rebleeding (OR=1.47, P=0.004). Prometeo database has provided an up-to-date picture of acute nonvariceal UGIB in Italy: patients are elderly, predominantly males, and with important

  17. Acute lower gastroenteric bleeding retrospective analysis (the ALGEBRA study): an analysis of the triage, management and outcomes of patients with acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Brackman, Matthew R; Gushchin, Vadim V; Smith, Lee; Demory, Michelle; Kirkpatrick, John R; Stahl, Thomas

    2003-02-01

    Many algorithms have been developed for patients with acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage (ALGIH). Their clinical usefulness is not readily apparent. It is important first to observe patterns in admission, triage, and management to formulate hypotheses as to how outcomes might be affected. We reviewed patient charts with the diagnosis of gastrointestinal hemorrhage from June 1998 to January 2001. Patients with ALGIH were entered into a database. We defined patients as having ALGIH if presentation included melena or hematochezia. Patients with hematemesis, bloody nasogastric aspirate, or occult fecal blood were excluded. Observations were made on 420 patients. Seventy-six per cent of patients were admitted to the medical service. Lower endoscopy was the first diagnostic method in 33 per cent. Medical management comprised 52 per cent of first management strategies. Surgeons used angiography (3% vs 1%) or surgery (25% vs 5%) more than other services. Fourteen per cent of patients managed with endoscopy, 16 per cent medically, 17 per cent with surgery, and 67 per cent with interventional radiology required two or more subsequent packed red blood cell transfusions. Mean admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 9.2 whereas that for those with mortality was 13.5. We conclude that the construction of a database will allow for formation and testing of hypotheses in managing ALGIH.

  18. Impact of bivalirudin on mortality and bleeding complications in acute coronary syndrome patients undergoing invasive revascularization : A real world experience.

    PubMed

    Rohla, Miklos; Tentzeris, Ioannis; Freynhofer, Matthias K; Farhan, Serdar; Jarai, Rudolf; Egger, Florian; Weiss, Thomas W; Wojta, Johann; Geppert, Alexander; Kastrati, Adnan; Stone, Gregg W; Huber, Kurt

    2016-12-01

    In a retrospective analysis of a prospective single center registry we compared the use of bivalirudin, unfractionated heparin (UFH) monotherapy, UFH + abciximab in 1240 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing stent implantation. Bivalirudin was associated with tendentially reduced in-hospital minor or major bleeding rates compared to UFH monotherapy (5.9 % vs. 9.4 % adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.82, 95 % confidence interval CI 0.45-1.51, p = 0.53) and compared to the pooled UFH group (5.9 % vs. 11.9 %, adjusted OR 0.62, 95 % CI 0.36-1.08, p = 0.09) but with significantly lower bleeding hazards compared to UFH + abciximab (5.9 % vs. 16 %, adjusted OR 0.41, 95 % CI 0.22-0.78, p < 0.01). After 3 years of follow-up, adjusted cardiovascular mortality rates were similar between all groups, particularly between bivalirudin vs. UFH monotherapy (hazard ratio HR 1.12, 95 % CI 0.58-2.16, p = 0.73) and vs. UFH + abciximab (HR 0.91, 95 % CI 0.40-2.10, p = 0.83). Acute or subacute stent thrombosis occurred at a rate of 0.8 % with no significant differences between the groups. This retrospective analysis in a real world situation of medium to high-risk ACS patients undergoing invasive revascularization confirmed the results of most large-scale randomized trials by demonstrating reduced bleeding rates in favor of bivalirudin vs. UFH + GPI but with no significant differences between treatment strategies for long-term all-cause and cardiovascular mortality.

  19. Embolization of Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Resistant to Endoscopic Treatment: Results and Predictors of Recurrent Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric Rao, Pramod; Ota, Shinichi; Lin Mingde; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2010-12-15

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage is a frequent complication associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of UGI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, but the differential diagnosis is diverse and includes tumors; ischemia; gastritis; arteriovenous malformations, such as Dieulafoy lesions; Mallory-Weiss tears; trauma; and iatrogenic causes. Aggressive treatment with early endoscopic hemostasis is essential for a favorable outcome. However, severe bleeding despite conservative medical treatment or endoscopic intervention occurs in 5-10% of patients, requiring surgery or transcatheter arterial embolization. Surgical intervention is usually an expeditious and gratifying endeavor, but it can be associated with high operative mortality rates. Endovascular management using superselective catheterization of the culprit vessel, < sandwich> occlusion, or blind embolization has emerged as an alternative to emergent operative intervention for high-risk patients and is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Indeed, many published studies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and its high technical and clinical success rates, which range from 69 to 100% and from 63 to 97%, respectively, even if the choice of the best embolic agent among coils, cyanaocrylate glue, gelatin sponge, or calibrated particles remains a matter of debate. However, factors influencing clinical outcome, especially predictors of early rebleeding, are poorly understood, and few studies have addressed this issue. This review of the literature will attempt to define the role of embolotherapy for acute nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage that fails to respond to endoscopic hemostasis and to summarize data on factors predicting angiographic and embolization failure.

  20. Refrigerated platelets for the treatment of acute bleeding: a review of the literature and reexamination of current standards.

    PubMed

    Pidcoke, Heather F; Spinella, Philip C; Ramasubramanian, Anand K; Strandenes, Geir; Hervig, Tor; Ness, Paul M; Cap, Andrew P

    2014-05-01

    This review is a synopsis of the decisions that shaped global policy on platelet (PLT) storage temperature and a focused appraisal of the literature on which those discussions were based. We hypothesize that choices were centered on optimization of preventive PLT transfusion strategies, possibly to the detriment of the therapeutic needs of acutely bleeding patients. Refrigerated PLTs are a better hemostatic product, and they are safer in that they are less prone to bacterial contamination. They were abandoned during the 1970s because of the belief that clinically effective PLTs should both be hemostatically functional and survive in circulation for several days as indicated for prophylactic transfusion; however, clinical practice may be changing. Data from two randomized controlled trials bring into question the concept that stable autologous stem cell transplant patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia should continue to receive prophylactic transfusions. At the same time, new findings regarding the efficacy of cold PLTs and their potential role in treating acute bleeding have revived the debate regarding optimal PLT storage temperature. In summary, a "one-size-fits-all" strategy for PLT storage may not be adequate, and a reexamination of whether cold-stored PLTs should be offered as a widely available therapeutic product may be indicated.

  1. Oesophageal epithelial innervation in health and reflux oesophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Newton, M; Kamm, M; Soediono, P; Milner, P; Burnham, W; Burnstock, G

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The response of the oesophagus to refluxed gastric contents is likely to depend on intact neural mechanisms in the oesophageal mucosa. The epithelial innervation has not been systematically evaluated in health or reflux disease. 
AIMS—To study oesophageal epithelial innervation in controls, and also inflamed and non-inflamed mucosa in patients with reflux oesophagitis and healed oesophagitis. 
PATIENTS—Ten controls, nine patients with reflux oesophagitis, and five patients with healed oesophagitis. 
METHODS—Oesophageal epithelial biopsy specimens were obtained at endoscopy. The distribution of the neuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP), and the neuropeptides calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP), and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Density of innervation was assessed by the proportion of papillae in each oesophageal epithelial biopsy specimen containing immunoreactive fibres (found in the subepithelium and epithelial papillae, but not penetrating the epithelium). 
RESULTS—The proportion of papillae positive for PGP immunoreactive nerve fibres was significantly increased in inflamed tissue when compared with controls, and non-inflamed and healed tissue. There was also a significant increase in VIP immunoreactive fibres within epithelial papillae. Other neuropeptides showed no proportional changes in inflammation. 
CONCLUSIONS—Epithelial biopsy specimens can be used to assess innervation in the oesophagus. The innervation of the oesophageal mucosa is not altered in non-inflamed tissue of patients with oesophagitis but alters in response to inflammation, where there is a selective increase (about three- to fourfold) in VIP containing nerves. 

 Keywords: gastro-oesophageal reflux; reflux oesophagitis; innervation; neuropeptides; inflammation PMID:10026314

  2. Risk for Major Bleeding in Patients Receiving Ticagrelor Compared With Aspirin After Transient Ischemic Attack or Acute Ischemic Stroke in the SOCRATES Study (Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Treated With Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient Outcomes).

    PubMed

    Easton, J Donald; Aunes, Maria; Albers, Gregory W; Amarenco, Pierre; Bokelund-Singh, Sara; Denison, Hans; Evans, Scott R; Held, Peter; Jahreskog, Marianne; Jonasson, Jenny; Minematsu, Kazuo; Molina, Carlos A; Wang, Yongjun; Wong, K S Lawrence; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2017-09-05

    Patients with minor acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack are at high risk for subsequent stroke, and more potent antiplatelet therapy in the acute setting is needed. However, the potential benefit of more intense antiplatelet therapy must be assessed in relation to the risk for major bleeding. The SOCRATES trial (Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Treated With Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient Outcomes) was the first trial with ticagrelor in patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack in which the efficacy and safety of ticagrelor were compared with those of aspirin. The main safety objective was assessment of PLATO (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes)-defined major bleeds on treatment, with special focus on intracranial hemorrhage (ICrH). An independent adjudication committee blinded to study treatment classified bleeds according to the PLATO, TIMI (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction), and GUSTO (Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries) definitions. The definitions of ICrH and major bleeding excluded cerebral microbleeds and asymptomatic hemorrhagic transformations of cerebral infarctions so that the definitions better discriminated important events in the acute stroke population. A total of 13 130 of 13 199 randomized patients received at least 1 dose of study drug and were included in the safety analysis set. PLATO major bleeds occurred in 31 patients (0.5%) on ticagrelor and 38 patients (0.6%) on aspirin (hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-1.34). The most common locations of major bleeds were intracranial and gastrointestinal. ICrH was reported in 12 patients (0.2%) on ticagrelor and 18 patients (0.3%) on aspirin. Thirteen of all 30 ICrHs (4 on ticagrelor and 9 on aspirin) were hemorrhagic strokes, and 4 (2 in each group) were symptomatic hemorrhagic transformations of brain infarctions. The ICrHs were spontaneous in 6 and 13, traumatic in 3 and 3, and procedural in 3 and 2

  3. Second look endoscopy in acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Philip Wai Yan

    2013-12-01

    Bleeding peptic ulcer remained an important cause of hospitalization worldwide. Primary endoscopic hemostasis achieved more than 90% of initial hemostasis for bleeding peptic ulcer. Recurrent bleeding amounted to 15% after therapeutic endoscopy, and rebleeding is an important risk factor to peptic ulcer related mortality. Routine second look endoscopy was one of the strategies targeted at prevention of rebleeding. The objective of second look endoscopy was to treat persistent stigmata of recent hemorrhage before rebleeding. Three meta-analyses showed that performance of routine second look endoscopy significantly reduced ulcer rebleeding especially when the endoscopic therapy was performed with thermal coagulation. Two cost-effectiveness analyses, however, demonstrated that selective instead of routine second look endoscopy is the most cost-effective approach to prevent ulcer rebleeding. While international consensus and guidelines did not recommend routine performance of second look endoscopy for prevention of ulcer rebleeding, further research should focus on identification of patients with high risk of rebleeding and investigate the effect of selective second look endoscopy in prevention of rebleeding among these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Eosinophilic oesophagitis: an otolaryngologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Gnanasekaran, T; Gnanasekaran, S; Wood, J M; Friedland, P

    2017-06-02

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis is a diagnosis that is being made more frequently in the assessment of dysphagia in both adults and children. It is unclear whether this is a result of increased prevalence or improved diagnostic methods. Children present commonly to paediatric institutions with foreign body impaction. Research indicates that food impaction may predispose to eosinophilic oesophagitis. This article presents eosinophilic oesophagitis from an otolaryngologist's point of view. It details the clinical features present in the disease as well as how it is diagnosed and managed. It illustrates early signs of eosinophilic oesophagitis so that primary physicians and emergency physicians know when to refer on to otolaryngologists.

  5. Eosinophilic oesophagitis: an Irish experience.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Sarah; Kelly, Orlaith B; Breslin, Niall; Ryan, Barbara M; O'Connor, Humphrey J; Swan, Niall; O'Morain, Colm A

    2011-11-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis is a recently recognized oesophageal disorder characterized by a combination of clinical and endoscopic features as well as the histological finding on oesophageal biopsy of greater than 15 eosinophils per high powered field. Recent reports suggest eosinophilic oesophagitis is increasing in incidence and this increase cannot be fully explained by increased recognition of the disorder. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the incidence of eosinophilic oesophagitis within the catchment area of a tertiary referral hospital in southwest Dublin, Ireland. The histopathology database at the Adelaide and Meath Hospital was used to identify all oesophageal biopsies obtained between January 2000 and July 2008 reported to show evidence of oesophagitis. Biopsy samples with greater than 15 eosinophils per high powered field in at least two fields were highlighted as possible eosinophilic oesophagitis. The oesophageal biopsies of patients identified in this way were reviewed by a histopathologist with a special expertise in gastroenterology for features suggestive of eosinophilic oesophagitis. Twenty-five thousand three hundred and sixty-five upper gastrointestinal endoscopies were performed between January 2000 and July 2008. A total of 11 072 sets of oesophageal biopsies were taken and 1364 (12.3%) of these revealed evidence of oesophagitis. Only 13 (0.1%) patients had oesophageal biopsies showing greater than 15 eosinophils per high powered field. The median age of this patient group was 23 years (interquartile range 10.5-50.5 years), with 46% of patients under 18 years at the time of diagnosis. The male to female ratio was 5.5 : 1 compared with 1.1 : 1 in the oesophagitis group as a whole, (P=0.002). There was no significant association between endoscopic findings or presenting complaints and the average number of eosinophils per high powered field. The average number of biopsies taken in patients with endoscopic findings suggestive of

  6. Prevalence, management, and outcomes of patients with coagulopathy after acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Jairath, Vipul; Kahan, Brennan C; Stanworth, Simon J; Logan, Richard F A; Hearnshaw, Sarah A; Travis, Simon P L; Palmer, Kelvin R; Murphy, Michael F

    2013-05-01

    Coagulopathy after major hemorrhage has been found to be an independent risk factor for mortality after traumatic bleeding. It is unclear whether similar associations are present in other causes of major hemorrhage. We describe the prevalence, use of plasma, and outcomes of patients with coagulopathy after acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB). This study was a multicenter UK national audit. Data were collected prospectively on consecutive admissions with upper gastrointestinal bleeding over a 2-month period to 212 UK hospitals. Coagulopathy was defined as an international normalized ratio (INR) of at least 1.5. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between coagulopathy and patient-related outcome measures of mortality, rebleeding, and need for surgery and/or radiologic intervention. A total of 4478 patients were included in the study. Coagulopathy was present in 16.4% (444/2709) of patients in whom an INR was recorded. Patients with coagulopathy were more likely to present with hemodynamic shock (45% vs. 36%), have a higher clinical Rockall score (4 vs. 2), receive red blood cell transfusion (79% vs. 48%) and have high-risk stigmata of hemorrhage at endoscopy (34% vs. 25%). After adjustment for confounders the presence of a coagulopathy was associated with a fivefold increased in the odds of mortality (odds ratio, 5.63; 95% confidence interval, 3.09-10.27; p < 0.001). Only 35% of patients with coagulopathy received fresh-frozen plasma transfusion. Coagulopathy was prevalent in 16% of patients after NVUGIB and independently associated with more than a fivefold increase in the odds of in-hospital mortality. Wide variation in plasma use exists indicates clinical uncertainty regarding optimal practice. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  7. Palliation in oesophageal neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Bancewicz, J.

    1999-01-01

    Oesophageal cancer is an increasingly common disease in the UK. Sadly, the overall results of treatment remain poor with overall 5 year survival of approximately 10%. More than 50% of patients receive purely palliative care from the outset. Of those having potentially curative treatment, 40% will not survive the first year and 70% will not survive 5 years. Good quality palliation is, therefore, required for the majority of patients. PMID:10655890

  8. Role of Interventional Radiology in the Emergent Management of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Navuluri, Rakesh; Patel, Jay; Kang, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require inpatient admission annually in the United States. When medical management and endoscopic therapy are inadequate, endovascular intervention can be lifesaving. These emergent situations highlight the importance of immediate competence of the interventional radiologist in the preangiographic evaluation as well as the endovascular treatment of UGIB. We describe a case of UGIB managed with endovascular embolization and detail the angiographic techniques used. The case description is followed by a detailed discussion of the treatment approach to UGIB, with attention to both nonvariceal and variceal algorithms. PMID:23997408

  9. Early Recurrence and Cerebral Bleeding in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke and Atrial Fibrillation: Effect of Anticoagulation and Its Timing: The RAF Study.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Falocci, Nicola; Caso, Valeria; Becattini, Cecilia; Marcheselli, Simona; Rueckert, Christina; Pezzini, Alessandro; Poli, Loris; Padovani, Alessandro; Csiba, Laszló; Szabó, Lilla; Sohn, Sung-Il; Tassinari, Tiziana; Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H; Michel, Patrik; Cordier, Maria; Vanacker, Peter; Remillard, Suzette; Alberti, Andrea; Venti, Michele; Scoditti, Umberto; Denti, Licia; Orlandi, Giovanni; Chiti, Alberto; Gialdini, Gino; Bovi, Paolo; Carletti, Monica; Rigatelli, Alberto; Putaala, Jukka; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Masotti, Luca; Lorenzini, Gianni; Tassi, Rossana; Guideri, Francesca; Martini, Giuseppe; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Vadikolias, Kostantinos; Liantinioti, Chrissoula; Corea, Francesco; Del Sette, Massimo; Ageno, Walter; De Lodovici, Maria Luisa; Bono, Giorgio; Baldi, Antonio; D'Anna, Sebastiano; Sacco, Simona; Carolei, Antonio; Tiseo, Cindy; Acciarresi, Monica; D'Amore, Cataldo; Imberti, Davide; Zabzuni, Dorjan; Doronin, Boris; Volodina, Vera; Consoli, Domenico; Galati, Franco; Pieroni, Alessio; Toni, Danilo; Monaco, Serena; Baronello, Mario Maimone; Barlinn, Kristian; Pallesen, Lars-Peder; Kepplinger, Jessica; Bodechtel, Ulf; Gerber, Johannes; Deleu, Dirk; Melikyan, Gayane; Ibrahim, Faisal; Akhtar, Naveed; Mosconi, Maria Giulia; Bubba, Valentina; Silvestri, Ilenia; Lees, Kennedy R

    2015-08-01

    The best time for administering anticoagulation therapy in acute cardioembolic stroke remains unclear. This prospective cohort study of patients with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation, evaluated (1) the risk of recurrent ischemic event and severe bleeding; (2) the risk factors for recurrence and bleeding; and (3) the risks of recurrence and bleeding associated with anticoagulant therapy and its starting time after the acute stroke. The primary outcome of this multicenter study was the composite of stroke, transient ischemic attack, symptomatic systemic embolism, symptomatic cerebral bleeding and major extracranial bleeding within 90 days from acute stroke. Of the 1029 patients enrolled, 123 had 128 events (12.6%): 77 (7.6%) ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack or systemic embolism, 37 (3.6%) symptomatic cerebral bleeding, and 14 (1.4%) major extracranial bleeding. At 90 days, 50% of the patients were either deceased or disabled (modified Rankin score ≥3), and 10.9% were deceased. High CHA2DS2-VASc score, high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, large ischemic lesion and type of anticoagulant were predictive factors for primary study outcome. At adjusted Cox regression analysis, initiating anticoagulants 4 to 14 days from stroke onset was associated with a significant reduction in primary study outcome, compared with initiating treatment before 4 or after 14 days: hazard ratio 0.53 (95% confidence interval 0.30-0.93). About 7% of the patients treated with oral anticoagulants alone had an outcome event compared with 16.8% and 12.3% of the patients treated with low molecular weight heparins alone or followed by oral anticoagulants, respectively (P=0.003). Acute stroke in atrial fibrillation patients is associated with high rates of ischemic recurrence and major bleeding at 90 days. This study has observed that high CHA2DS2-VASc score, high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, large ischemic lesions, and type of anticoagulant administered

  10. Impact of INR monitoring, reversal agent use, heparin bridging, and anticoagulant interruption on rebleeding and thromboembolism in acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Moriyasu, Shiori; Shimbo, Takuro; Okubo, Hidetaka; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Yokoi, Chizu; Yanase, Mikio; Akiyama, Junichi; Uemura, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulant management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) during the pre-endoscopic period has not been fully addressed in American, European, or Asian guidelines. This study sought to evaluate the risks of rebleeding and thromboembolism in anticoagulated patients with acute GIB. Baseline, endoscopy, and outcome data were reviewed for 314 patients with acute GIB: 157 anticoagulant users and 157 age-, sex-, and important risk-matched non-users. Data were also compared between direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) and warfarin users. Between anticoagulant users and non-users, of whom 70% underwent early endoscopy, no endoscopy-related adverse events or significant differences were found in the rate of endoscopic therapy need, transfusion need, rebleeding, or thromboembolism. Rebleeding was associated with shock, comorbidities, low platelet count and albumin level, and low-dose aspirin use but not HAS-BLED score, any endoscopic results, heparin bridge, or international normalized ratio (INR) ≥ 2.5. Risks for thromboembolism were INR ≥ 2.5, difference in onset and pre-endoscopic INR, reversal agent use, and anticoagulant interruption but not CHA2DS2-VASc score, any endoscopic results, or heparin bridge. In patients without reversal agent use, heparin bridge, or anticoagulant interruption, there was only one rebleeding event and no thromboembolic events. Warfarin users had a significantly higher transfusion need than DOACs users. Endoscopy appears to be safe for anticoagulant users with acute GIB compared with non-users. Patient background factors were associated with rebleeding, whereas anticoagulant management factors (e.g. INR correction, reversal agent use, and drug interruption) were associated with thromboembolism. Early intervention without reversal agent use, heparin bridge, or anticoagulant interruption may be warranted for acute GIB.

  11. Pathophysiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    De Giorgi, F; Palmiero, M; Esposito, I; Mosca, F; Cuomo, R

    2006-01-01

    Summary Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a condition in which the reflux of gastric contents into the oesophagus provokes symptoms or complications and impairs quality of life. Typical symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are heartburn and regurgitation but gastro-oesophageal reflux disease has also been related to extra-oesophageal manifestations, such as asthma, chronic cough and laryngitis. The pathogenesis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is multifactorial, involving transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations and other lower oesophageal sphincter pressure abnormalities. As a result, reflux of acid, bile, pepsin and pancreatic enzymes occurs, leading to oesophageal mucosal injury. Other factors contributing to the pathophysiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease include hiatal hernia, impaired oesophageal clearance, delayed gastric emptying and impaired mucosal defensive factors. Hiatal hernia contributes to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease by promoting lower oesophageal sphincter dysfunction. Impaired oesophageal clearance is responsible for prolonged acid exposure of the mucosa. Delayed gastric emptying, resulting in gastric distension, can significantly increase the rate of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations, contributing to postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. The mucosal defensive factors play an important role against development of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, by neutralizing the backdiffusion of hydrogen ion into the oesophageal tissue. While the pathogenesis of oesophageal symptoms is now well known, the mechanisms underlying extra-oesophageal airway manifestations are still poorly understood. Two hypotheses have been proposed: direct contact of gastric acid with the upper airway and a vago-vagal reflex elicited by acidification of the distal oesophagus, leading to bronchospasm. In conclusion, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease can be considered as the result of a complex interplay of factors

  12. Outcome of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with coronary artery disease: A matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Thanapirom, Kessarin; Ridtitid, Wiriyaporn; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Thungsuk, Rattikorn; Noophun, Phadet; Wongjitrat, Chatchawan; Luangjaru, Somchai; Vedkijkul, Padet; Lertkupinit, Comson; Poonsab, Swangphong; Ratanachu-Ek, Thawee; Hansomburana, Piyathida; Pornthisarn, Bubpha; Thongbai, Thirada; Mahachai, Varocha; Treeprasertsuk, Sombat

    2016-01-01

    The risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) increases in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) due to the frequent use of antiplatelets. There is some data reporting on treatment outcomes in CAD patients presenting with UGIB. We aim to determine the clinical characteristics and outcomes of UGIB in patients with CAD, compared with non-CAD patients. We conducted a prospective multi-center cohort study (THAI UGIB-2010) that enrolled 981 consecutive hospitalized patients with acute UGIB. A matched case-control analysis using this database, which was collected from 11 tertiary referral hospitals in Thailand between January 2010 and September 2011, was performed. Of 981 hospitalized patients with UGIB, there were 61 CAD patients and 244 gender-matched non-CAD patients (ratio 1:4). UGIB patients with CAD were significantly older, and had more frequently used antiplatelets and warfarin than in non-CAD patients. Compared with non-CAD, the CAD patients had significantly higher Glasgow-Blatchford score, full and pre-endoscopic Rockall score and full. Peptic ulcer in CAD patients was identified more often than in non-CAD patients. UGIB patients with CAD and non-CAD had similar outcomes with regard to mortality rate, re-bleeding, surgery, embolization, and packed erythrocyte transfusion. However, CAD patients had longer duration of hospital stays than non-CAD patients. Two CAD patients died from cardiac arrest after endoscopy, whereas three non-CAD patients died from pneumonia and acute renal failure during their hospitalization. In Thailand, patients presenting with UGIB, concomitant CAD did not affect clinical outcome of treatment, compared with non-CAD patients, except for longer hospital stay.

  13. Drug treatment of eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Sarah; Kelly, Orlaith B; O'Morain, Colm A

    2012-11-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis is a clinicopathological disease characterized by oesophageal eosinophilia and gastrointestinal symptoms. Currently, the optimal treatment regimens remain unclear. The pathogenesis of eosinophilic oesophagitis appears to involve immune dysregulation, while acid reflux may have a secondary role; the mainstays in treatment are aimed principally at these dual processes. While a trial of a PPI is worthwhile it is likely that PPI therapy is treating concurrent acid reflux rather than true eosinophilic oesophagitis. Dietary elimination with elemental feed is safe but poorly tolerated. Swallowed topical steroids are the mainstay of commercially available therapies. Both fluticasone and budesonide have been proven to be beneficial both symptomatically and in reducing oesophageal eosinophil counts in the short and medium term. Basic studies have determined a role for IL-5 in oesophageal remodelling in eosinophilic esophagitis. Initial clinical studies have shown single or multiple infusions of monoclonal antibody to IL-5 to be well tolerated and to cause a long-term decrease in both peripheral and sputum eosinophil count in these eosinophil driven conditions. At present, swallowed corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment for patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis in patients failing PPI therapy. Studies have been heterogenous in their diagnostic criteria for eosinophilic oesophagitis and in the definition of response to therapy, making comparison of results difficult.

  14. Lansoprazole for maintenance of remission of erosive oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Freston, James W; Jackson, Robert L; Huang, Bidan; Ballard, E David

    2002-01-01

    oesophagitis before acute healing. Among symptomatic patients with heartburn, lansoprazole provides rapid and effective relief of daytime and night-time heartburn and prevents relapse of symptoms. Lansoprazole has a wide margin of safety and is well tolerated when administered as monotherapy in short- and long-term clinical trials. Taken together these data suggest that proton pump inhibitor therapy represents the preferred and ideal long-term management strategy for the patient with erosive oesophagitis. Lansoprazole is a well-established member of this class of agents and, as such, has an extensive body of literature that supports its safety, tolerability and clinical efficacy in preventing relapse in these patients.

  15. Determination of correlation of Adjusted Blood Requirement Index with outcome in patients presenting with acute variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Naheed; Zuberi, Bader Faiyaz; Hasan, Syed Riazul; Kumar, Raj; Afsar, Salahuddin

    2009-05-21

    To determine the correlation of Adjusted Blood Requirement Index (ABRI) with the 7th day outcome in patients presenting with acute variceal bleeding. All patients presenting with acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) were included. Patients with previous band ligation, sclerotherapy, gastrointestinal or hepatic malignancies were excluded. Patients were managed as per standard protocol for AVH with terlipressin and band ligation. ABRI scores were calculated using the formula outcome of alive or expired up to the 7th day after treatment. The correlation between ABRI and mortality was estimated and a receiver operative characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted. A total of 113 patients (76 male; 37 female) were included. On assessment, 18 were in Child's Pugh Class A, 82 in Class B and 13 were in Class C. The median number of blood units transfused +/- inter-quartile range was 3.0 +/- 2.0. The median +/- inter-quartile range for ABRI was 1.3 +/- 1.1. The ROC curve of ABRI for expiry showed a significantly large area of 0.848 (P < 0.0001; 95% CI: 0.75-0.95). A significant correlation of log transformation of ABRI with an outcome of mortality was present (P < 0.0001). ABRI correlates strongly with mortality.

  16. Seasonal variation in detection of oesophageal eosinophilia and eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, E T; Shah, N D; Hoffman, K; Sonnenberg, A; Genta, R M; Dellon, E S

    2015-08-01

    Seasonal variation has been reported in diagnosis of eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE), but results are not consistent across studies and there are no national-level data in the USA. To determine if there is seasonal variation in diagnosis of oesophageal eosinophilia and EoE in the USA, while accounting for factors such as climate zone and geographic variation. This was a cross-sectional study using a USA national pathology database. Patients with oesophageal eosinophilia (≥15 eosinophils per high-power field) comprised the primary case definition and were compared to those with normal oesophageal biopsies. We calculated the crude and adjusted odds of oesophageal eosinophilia by season, as well as by day of the year. Sensitivity analyses were performed using more restrictive case definitions of EoE, and after stratification by climate zone. Exactly, 14 524 cases with oesophageal eosinophilia and 90 459 normal controls were analysed. The adjusted odds of oesophageal eosinophilia were higher in the late spring and summer months, with the highest odds in July (aOR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.03-1.24). These findings persisted with increasing levels of oesophageal eosinophilia, as well as across EoE case definitions. Seasonal variation was strongest in temperate and cold climates, and peak diagnosis varied by climate zone. There is a mild but consistent seasonal variation in the diagnosis of oesophageal eosinophilia and EoE, with cases more frequently diagnosed during summer months. These findings take into account climate and geographic differences, suggesting that aeroallergens may contribute to disease development or flare. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. iPad-based primary 2D reading of CT angiography examinations of patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Faggioni, L; Neri, E; Bargellini, I; Scalise, P; Calcagni, F; Mantarro, A; D'Ippolito, G; Bartolozzi, C

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the iPad (Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) for two-dimensional (2D) reading of CT angiography (CTA) studies performed for suspected acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. 24 CTA examinations of patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding confirmed (19/24, 79.2%) or ruled out (5/24, 20.8%) by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were retrospectively reviewed by three independent readers on a commercial picture archiving communication system (PACS) workstation and on an iPad with Retina Display® 64 GB (Apple Inc.). The time needed to complete reading of every CTA examination was recorded, as well as the rate of detection of arterial bleeding and identification of suspected bleeding arteries on both devices. Overall, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values for bleeding detection were not significantly different while using the iPad and workstation (0.774 vs 0.847, 0.947 vs 0.895, 0.6 vs 0.8, 0.9 vs 0.944 and 0.750 vs 0.667, respectively; p > 0.05). In DSA-positive cases, the iPad and workstation allowed correct identification of the bleeding source in 17/19 cases (89.5%) and 15/19 cases (78.9%), respectively (p > 0.05). Finally, the time needed to complete reading of every CTA study was significantly shorter using the iPad (169 ± 74 vs 222 ± 70 s, respectively; p < 0.01). Compared with a conventional PACS workstation, iPad-based preliminary 2D reading of CTA studies has comparable diagnostic accuracy for detection of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and can be significantly faster. The iPad could be used by on-call interventional radiologists for immediate decision on percutaneous embolization in patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  18. Adherence to guidelines: A national audit of the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The REASON registry

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yidan; Barkun, Alan N; Martel, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess process of care in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) using a national cohort, and to identify predictors of adherence to ‘best practice’ standards. METHODS: Consecutive charts of patients hospitalized for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding across 21 Canadian hospitals were reviewed. Data regarding initial presentation, endoscopic management and outcomes were collected. Results were compared with ‘best practice’ using established guidelines on NVUGIB. Adherence was quantified and independent predictors were evaluated using multivariable analysis. RESULTS: Overall, 2020 patients (89.4% NVUGIB, variceal in 10.6%) were included (mean [± SD] age 66.3±16.4 years; 38.4% female). Endoscopy was performed in 1612 patients: 1533 with NVUGIB had endoscopic lesions (63.1% ulcers; high-risk stigmata in 47.8%). Early endoscopy was performed in 65.6% and an assistant was present in 83.5%. Only 64.5% of patients with high-risk stigmata received endoscopic hemostasis; 9.8% of patients exhibiting low-risk stigmata also did. Intravenous proton pump inhibitor was administered after endoscopic hemostasis in 95.7%. Rebleeding and mortality rates were 10.5% and 9.4%, respectively. Multivariable analysis revealed that low American Society of Anesthesiologists score patients had fewer assistants present during endoscopy (OR 0.63 [95% CI 0.48 to 0.83), a hemoglobin level <70 g/L predicted inappropriate high-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor use in patients with low-risk stigmata, and endoscopies performed during regular hours were associated with longer delays from presentation (OR 0.33 [95% CI 0.24 to 0.47]). CONCLUSION: There was variability between the process of care and ‘best practice’ in NVUGIB. Certain patient and situational characteristics may influence guideline adherence. Dissemination initiatives must identify and focus on such considerations to improve quality of care. PMID:25314356

  19. [Early evaluation of anaemia in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding: venous blood gas analysis compared to conventional laboratory].

    PubMed

    Benítez Cantero, José Manuel; Jurado García, Juan; Ruiz Cuesta, Patricia; González Galilea, Angel; Muñoz García-Borruel, María; García Sánchez, Valle; Gálvez Calderón, Carmen

    2013-10-19

    Evaluation of patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGB) requires early clinical evaluation and analysis. The aim of this study is to evaluate early concordance of hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (HTC) levels determined by conventional venous blood gas analysis (VBG) and by conventional Laboratory in Emergencies (LAB). Observational and prospective study of patients admitted in the Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage Unit with both high and low AGB. Demographic and clinical variables and simultaneous venous blood samples were obtained to determine Hb and HTC by VBG and LAB. Concordance in both methods was analysed by intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. One hundred and thirty-two patients were included: 87 (65.9%) males, average age 66.8 years. VBG overestimated Hb in 0.49 g/dl (95% confidence interval: 0.21-0.76) with respect to LAB. Concordance was very high in Hb (ICC 0.931) and high in HTC (0.899), with the Bland-Altman graphs showing both concordance and overestimation of Hb levels determined by VBG. In 19 patients (14.39%), Hb by VBG exceeded in more than 1g/dL the final determination obtained by LAB. Early determination of Hb and HTC in patients with AGB by VBG provides reliable results in the initial evaluation of anaemia. VBG systematically overestimates Hb values by less than 0.5 g/dl, and therefore clinical and hemodynamic evaluation of the bleeding patient should prevail over analytical results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Adherence to guidelines: a national audit of the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The REASON registry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Barkun, Alan N; Martel, Myriam

    2014-10-01

    To assess process of care in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) using a national cohort, and to identify predictors of adherence to 'best practice' standards. Consecutive charts of patients hospitalized for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding across 21 Canadian hospitals were reviewed. Data regarding initial presentation, endoscopic management and outcomes were collected. Results were compared with 'best practice' using established guidelines on NVUGIB. Adherence was quantified and independent predictors were evaluated using multivariable analysis. Overall, 2020 patients (89.4% NVUGIB, variceal in 10.6%) were included (mean [± SD] age 66.3±16.4 years; 38.4% female). Endoscopy was performed in 1612 patients: 1533 with NVUGIB had endoscopic lesions (63.1% ulcers; high-risk stigmata in 47.8%). Early endoscopy was performed in 65.6% and an assistant was present in 83.5%. Only 64.5% of patients with high-risk stigmata received endoscopic hemostasis; 9.8% of patients exhibiting low-risk stigmata also did. Intravenous proton pump inhibitor was administered after endoscopic hemostasis in 95.7%. Rebleeding and mortality rates were 10.5% and 9.4%, respectively. Multivariable analysis revealed that low American Society of Anesthesiologists score patients had fewer assistants present during endoscopy (OR 0.63 [95% CI 0.48 to 0.83), a hemoglobin level <70 g⁄L predicted inappropriate high-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor use in patients with low-risk stigmata, and endoscopies performed during regular hours were associated with longer delays from presentation (OR 0.33 [95% CI 0.24 to 0.47]). There was variability between the process of care and 'best practice' in NVUGIB. Certain patient and situational characteristics may influence guideline adherence. Dissemination initiatives must identify and focus on such considerations to improve quality of care.

  1. Use of endoscopy for management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the UK: results of a nationwide audit.

    PubMed

    Hearnshaw, Sarah A; Logan, Richard F A; Lowe, Derek; Travis, Simon P L; Murphy, Mike F; Palmer, Kelvin R

    2010-08-01

    To examine the use of endoscopy in the UK for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) and compare with published standards. To assess the organisation of endoscopy services for AUGIB in the UK. To examine the relationship between outcomes and out of hours (OOH) service provision. Multi-centre cross sectional clinical audit. All UK hospitals accepting admissions with AUGIB. All adults (>or=16 yrs) presenting with AUGIB between 1st May and 30th June 2007. Collection A custom designed web-based reporting tool was used to collect data on patient characteristics, comorbidity and haemodynamic status at presentation to calculate the Rockall score, use and timing of endoscopy, treatment including endoscopic, rebleeding and in-hospital mortality. A mailed questionnaire was used to collect data on facilities and service organisation. Data on 6750 patients (median age 68 years) were analysed from 208 hospitals. 74% underwent inpatient endoscopy; of these 50% took place within 24 h of presentation, 82% during normal working hours and 3% between midnight and 8 am. Of patients deemed high-risk (pre-endoscopy Rockall score >or=5) only 55% were endoscoped within 24 h and 14% waited >or=72 h for endoscopy. Lesions with a high risk of rebleeding were present in 28% of patients of whom 74% received endoscopic therapy. Further bleeding was evident in 13% and mortality in those endoscoped was 7.4% (95% CI 6.7% to 8.1%). In 52% of hospitals a consultant led out of hours (OOH) endoscopy rota existed; in these hospitals 20% of first endoscopies were performed OOH compared with 13% in those with no OOH rota and endoscopic therapy was more likely to be administered (25% vs 21% in hospitals with no OOH rota). The risk adjusted mortality ratio was higher (1.21, p=0.10, (95%CI 0.96 to 1.51)) in hospitals without such rotas. This audit has found continuing delays in performing endoscopy after AUGIB and underutilisation of standard endoscopic therapy particularly for variceal bleeding. In

  2. Acute promyelocytic leukemia presenting as pulmonary thromboembolism: Not all APLs bleed

    PubMed Central

    Vaid, Ashok K; Batra, Sandeep; Karanth, Suman S; Gupta, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) presenting as pulmonary thromboembolism being misdiagnosed as community-acquired pneumonia. Thrombotic phenomenon in APL are poorly understood and grossly underreported. In our case, following no response to standard antibiotic treatment, the patient was further investigated and detected to have an acute pulmonary thromboembolism following right lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Though, complete blood picture revealed only mild hyperleukocytosis, bone marrow biopsy and aspiration revealed 60% blasts and a positive t (15,17)(q22,12) and PML retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) fusion protein on molecular cytogenetics. He was diagnosed as APL and received treatment with all-transretinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) and therapeutic anticoagulation PMID:26629469

  3. A case of acute subdural hematoma due to bleeding from metastatic chondrosarcoma of the skull

    PubMed Central

    Kosugi, Kenzo; Takahashi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hikaru; Tamura, Ryota; Ohara, Kentaro; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intra or peritumoral hemorrhage of brain and skull tumors sometimes presents as stroke. Skull metastasis of chondrosarcoma is relatively rare, and furthermore, a case of intratumoural hemorrhage of skull metastasis of chondrosarcoma has not been reported. Case Description: A 73-year-old man underwent right lower leg amputation in the past because of chondrosarcoma and was operated for a skull metastasis. He presented with a sudden headache, and head computed tomography revealed a right acute subdural hematoma (SDH) adjacent to the recurrent skull metastatic tumor. The removal of the SDH and tumor resection were performed emergently. The intraoperative findings included metastatic invasion beyond the dura mater to as deep as the subdural space, and the histological diagnosis was metastatic chondrosarcoma. His postoperative course was uneventful. Conclusion: In the event of subdural invasion of a metastatic lesion, intratumoral hemorrhage may induce acute SDH, as in the present case. Similar to our case, most previous reports of intracranial chondrosarcoma hemorrhage have had an unclear etiology. Despite the rarity of this event, a patient with a history of malignancy presenting with nontraumatic acute SDH should be examined for the intratumoral hemorrhage of skull metastasis in the differential diagnosis. PMID:28303203

  4. Diagnostic and therapeutic treatment modalities for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Oakland, Kathryn; Isherwood, Jennifer; Lahiff, Conor; Goldsmith, Petra; Desborough, Michael; Colman, Katherine S; Guy, Richard; Uberoi, Raman; Murphy, Michael F; East, James E; Hopewell, Sally; Jairath, Vipul

    2017-10-01

     Investigations for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) include flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, computed tomographic angiography (CTA), and angiography. All may be used to direct endoscopic, radiological or surgical treatment, although their optimal use is unknown. The aims of this study were to determine the diagnostic and therapeutic yields of endoscopy, CTA, and angiography for managing LGIB, and their influence on rebleeding, transfusion, and hospital stay.  A systematic search of MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and CENTRAL was undertaken to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and nonrandomized studies of intervention (NRSIs) published between 2000 and 12 November 2015 in patients hospitalized with LGIB. Separate meta-analyses were conducted, presented as pooled odds (ORs) or risk ratios (RR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs).  Two RCTs and 13 NRSIs were included, none of which examined flexible sigmoidoscopy, or compared endotherapy with embolization, or investigated the timing of CTA or angiography. Two NRSIs (57 - 223 participants) comparing colonoscopy and CTA were of insufficient quality for synthesis but showed no difference in diagnostic yields between the two interventions. One RCT and 4 NRSIs (779 participants) compared early colonoscopy (< 24 hours) with colonoscopy performed later; meta-analysis of the NRSIs demonstrated higher diagnostic and therapeutic yields with early colonoscopy (OR 1.86, 95 %CI 1.12 to 2.86, P  = 0.004 and OR 3.08, 95 %CI 1.93 to 4.90, P  < 0.001, respectively) and reduced length of stay (mean difference 2.64 days, 95 %CI 1.54 to 3.73), but no difference in transfusion or rebleeding.  In LGIB there is a paucity of high-quality evidence, although the limited studies on the timing of colonoscopy suggest increased rates of diagnosis and therapy with early colonoscopy.

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae oesophagitis in a patient with oesophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kliemann, Dimas Alexandre; Antonello, Vicente Sperb; Severo, Luis Carlos; Pasqualotto, Alessandro Comarú

    2011-07-04

    Saccharomyces species are emerging opportunistic fungal pathogens that can cause bloodstream infections in humans. These infections have often been associated with the ingestion of probiotics. Saccharomyces oesophagitis is a rare condition which has been described so far in only two publications. Here we report the case of a patient who was diagnosed with Saccharomyces oesophagitis. The clinical picture was indistinguishable from that of Candida oesophagitis. The Saccharomyces isolate was shown to be susceptible to fluconazole by both CLSI M27-A and disk diffusion methods. In contrast to cases of fungaemia, Saccharomyces oesophagitis does not seem to follow probiotic use. Due to the potential for antifungal resistance among emerging fungal pathogens, proper mycological identification at the species level is essential.

  6. Recombinant factor VIIa in the management of surgery and acute bleeding episodes in children with haemophilia and high-responding inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Owen P

    2002-01-01

    The development of inhibitors to therapeutic factor concentrates in children with haemophilia A or B is a troublesome complication of factor replacement therapy. Immune tolerance protocols have been developed to eliminate the inhibitors, and these are successful in approximately 80% of children. However, acute bleeding episodes require treatment with a factor (F)VIII or FIX bypassing agent to prevent an anamnestic rise in the inhibitor level before starting immune tolerance. In addition, central venous access is necessary to help parents administer frequent, high dose factor concentrate. In view of the benefits of rFVIIa seen in adults, a study has been carried out on the use of this agent as haemostatic cover in children with severe FVIII or FIX deficiency with high responding inhibitors. Information was obtained retrospectively from the National Children's Hospital, Dublin and Great Ormond Street Hospital, London. Twelve children aged 1-16 years were treated successfully with rFVIIa to prevent surgical bleeding in 20 surgical procedures. Minor post-operative haematomata developed in 2 of 20 cases after regular rFVIIa therapy had been discontinued. In both cases, resolution of bleeding occurred after a short course of rFVIIa. Three children experienced a total of six life- or limb-threatening bleeds. All bleeding episodes resolved with regular rFVIIa treatment, although topical fibrin glue was needed in one child with a frenulum tear. The rFVIIa therapy was well tolerated and there was no evidence of any treatment-related complications. In conclusion, rFVIIa is the treatment of choice for the management of surgery and acute life- or limb-threatening bleeding in children with haemophilia and high responding inhibitors. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Oesophageal acidification does not increase lower oesophageal sphincter pressure.

    PubMed

    Helm, J F; Massey, B T; Martin, C J; Dodds, W J; Hogan, W J; Arndorfer, R C

    1990-03-01

    We studied the effect of distal oesophageal acidification on lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) pressure in normal human volunteers and in cats. The distal oesophagus was acidified by intraluminal injection of 0.1N HCl (pH 1.2). The LOS pressure was recorded by a sleeve device while pharyngeal and oesophageal pressures were monitored by nonperfused, water filled catheters. In normal human subjects, distal oesophageal acidification did not elicit a change in LOS pressure. In anaesthetised cats, injection of acid into the distal oesophagus elicited immediate LOS relaxation followed by a secondary peristaltic sequence. With propagation of the peristaltic sequence into the LOS, the LOS pressure abruptly increased 20-100 mmHg and gradually returned to the preinjection value over 15-180 s. In the one instance in which we were able to acidify the distal oesophagus without evoking secondary peristalsis, the LOS pressure did not change. Injection of saline into the distal oesophagus evoked a response in the LOS and oesophageal body that was indistinguishable from that seen with acid. We conclude that contrary to common belief, distal oesophageal acidification itself does not affect LOS pressure in man or the cat.

  8. Oesophageal angioleiomyosarcoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Teo, Lesley H W; Cahalan, Stephen D; Benigni, Livia; Halfacree, Zoe

    2014-10-01

    A female spayed domestic longhair cat aged 3 years and 9 months was referred for investigation of regurgitation and weight loss of 2 months' duration. Thoracic radiographs revealed a soft tissue mass within the cranial mediastinum causing focal oesophageal dilation. Computed tomography confirmed a contrast-enhancing mass located cranial to the heart base, possibly originating from the oesophagus. Exploratory thoracotomy revealed an intramural soft tissue mass within the ventral oesophageal wall. Surgical excision of the mass and reconstruction of the oesophagus around an oesophageal tube was performed successfully. Histopathological examination of the mass was compatible with a spindle cell tumour with a prominent vasoformative component. Immunohistochemistry was positive for α-smooth muscle actin and von Willebrand factor protein, and negative for CD117/c-kit protein. Both histopathological and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the diagnosis of an angioleiomyosarcoma. The cat was clinically well 6 months postoperatively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an oesophageal angioleiomyosarcoma in a cat.

  9. [Bleeding gastric ulcers and acute hepatitis: 2 simultaneous adverse reactions due to nimesulide in a case].

    PubMed

    Tejos, S; Torrejón, N; Reyes, H; Meneses, M

    2000-12-01

    A 66 year-old obese woman with arthrosis, self-medicated with oral nimesulide, 200 mg daily. After 6 weeks she developed nausea, jaundice and dark urine. Two weeks later she had recurrent hematemesis and was hospitalized. Besides obesity and anemia her physical examination was unremarkable. An upper GI endoscopy revealed 3 acute gastric ulcers and a 4th one in the pyloric channel. Abdominal ultrasonogram showed a slightly enlarged liver with diffuse reduction in ecogenicity; the gallbladder and biliary tract were normal. Blood tests demonstrated a conjugated hyperbilirubinemia (maximal total value: 18.4 mg/dl), ALAT 960 U/l, ASAT 850 U/l, GGT 420 U/l, alkaline phosphatases mildly elevated, pro-time 49% and albumin 2.7 mg/dl. Serum markers for hepatitis A, B and C viruses were negative. ANA, AMA, anti-SmA, were negative. Ceruloplasmin was normal. A liver biopsy showed bridging necrosis and other signs of acute toxic liver damage. Gastric ulcers healed after conventional treatment and hepatitis subsided after 2 months leaving no signs of chronic liver damage. The diagnosis of toxic hepatitis due to nimesulide was supported by the time-course of drug usage, sex, age, absence of other causes of liver disease, a compatible liver biopsy and the improvement after drug withdrawal. Peptic ulcers or toxic hepatitis have been previously described as independent adverse reactions in patients taking nimesulide or other NSAIDs but their simultaneous occurrence in a single patient is a unique event that deserves to be reported.

  10. Effect of local anaesthetic wound infiltration on acute pain and bleeding after primary total hip arthroplasty: the EDIPO randomised controlled study.

    PubMed

    Villatte, Guillaume; Engels, Emilien; Erivan, Roger; Mulliez, Aurélien; Caumon, Nicolas; Boisgard, Stéphane; Descamps, Stéphane

    2016-11-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is considered a painful procedure with significant blood loss. The aim of the this study was to determine whether local infiltration analgaesia (LIA) (with long-acting local anaesthetics and epinephrine) during THA could reduce acute postoperative pain, improve early recovery and reduce per- and postoperative bleeding. One hundred and fifty patients scheduled for primary THA were randomised into two groups. The treatment group received LIA (ropivacaine with epinephrine), whereas the control group had no infiltration. Pain intensity was measured with a visual analogue scale (VAS) for the duration of hospital stay and analgaesic consumption. Length of hospital stay, time to get out of bed alone and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) Index at 3, 6 and 12 months were recorded to evaluate recovery. Per- and postoperative bleeding were evaluated using direct and indirect criteria (operative blood loss, haemoglobin, estimation of uncompensated blood loss and red blood cell transfusion). Patients with LIA had significantly less pain during the first 24 h (p = 0.04). No significant differences were found in terms of analgaesic consumption (p = 0.57), early and delayed recovery or bleeding between groups. Operative wound infiltration of LIA reduced acute pain after primary THA but did not improve recovery or influence per- and postoperative bleeding.

  11. Acute alcohol intoxication, diffuse axonal injury and intraventricular bleeding in patients with isolated blunt traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Hidetoshi; Shinoda, Masaki; Fujii, Motoharu; Takahashi, Osamu; Murakata, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    The influence of blood alcohol level (BAL) on outcome remains unclear. This study investigated the relationships between BAL, type and number of diffuse axonal injury (DAI), intraventricular bleeding (IVB) and 6-month outcome. This study reviewed 419 patients with isolated blunt traumatic brain injury. First, it compared clinical and radiological characteristics between patients with good recovery and disability. Second, it compared BAL among DAI lesions. Third, it evaluated the correlation between the BAL and severity of IVB, number of DAI and corpus callosum injury lesions. Regardless of BAL, older age, male gender, severe Glasgow Coma Scale score (<9), abnormal pupil, IVB and lesion on genu of corpus callosum were significantly related to disability. There were no significant differences between the BAL and lesions of DAI. Simple regression analysis revealed that there were no significant correlation between BAL and severity of IVB, number of DAI and corpus callosum injury lesions. Acute alcohol intoxication was not associated with type and number of DAI lesion, IVB and disability. This study suggested that a specific type of traumatic lesion, specifically lesion on genu of corpus callosum and IVB, might be more vital for outcome.

  12. Timing or Dosing of Intravenous Proton Pump Inhibitors in Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Has Low Impact on Costs.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Adam, Viviane; Teich, Vanessa; Barkun, Alan

    2016-10-01

    High-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) post endoscopy are recommended in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), as they improve outcomes of patients with high-risk lesions. Determine the budget impact of using different PPI regimens in treating non-variceal UGIB, including pre- and post-endoscopic use, continuous infusion (high dose), and intermittent bolus (twice daily) dosing. A budget impact analysis using a decision model informed with data from the literature adopting a US third party payer's perspective with a 30-day time horizon was used to determine the total cost per patient (US$2014) presenting with acute UGIB. The base-case employing high-dose pre- and post-endoscopic IV PPI was compared with using only post-endoscopic PPI. For each, continuous or intermittent dosing regimens were assessed with associated incremental costs. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. The overall cost per patient is $11,399 when high-dose IV PPIs are initiated before endoscopy. The incremental costs are all inferior in alternate-case scenarios: $106 less if only post-endoscopic high-dose IVs are used; with intermittent IV bolus dosing, the savings are $223 if used both pre and post endoscopy and $191 if only administered post endoscopy. Subgroup analysis suggests cost savings in patients with clean-base ulcers who are discharged early after endoscopy. Results are robust to sensitivity analysis. The incremental costs of using different IV PPI regimens are modest compared with total per patient costs.

  13. Investigation of non-cardiac chest pain — which oesophageal test?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, R J E; Collins, B J; Spence, R A J; Crookes, P F; Campbell, N P S; Adgey, A A J

    1986-01-01

    Five different tests were used to evaluate oesophageal function in 22 patients who presented to a cardiac unit with acute chest pain but whose cardiological investigations were negative. Eight patients had an abnormality on oesophagoscopy, 10 had an abnormal pH monitoring study, six had a positive acid infusion test, 10 had an abnormal manometric study and six had an abnormal oseophageal transit scintiscan. Concordance for the three tests of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease was low at 28%, and for the two tests of oesophageal motility only 55%. Only two patients had normal results in all five tests. PMID:3739062

  14. Prediction of Early Recurrent Thromboembolic Event and Major Bleeding in Patients With Acute Stroke and Atrial Fibrillation by a Risk Stratification Schema: The ALESSA Score Study.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Caso, Valeria; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Furie, Karen L; Tadi, Prasanna; Becattini, Cecilia; Falocci, Nicola; Zedde, Marialuisa; Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H; Lees, Kennedy R; Alberti, Andrea; Venti, Michele; Acciarresi, Monica; D'Amore, Cataldo; Mosconi, Maria Giulia; Cimini, Ludovica Anna; Procopio, Antonio; Bovi, Paolo; Carletti, Monica; Rigatelli, Alberto; Cappellari, Manuel; Putaala, Jukka; Tomppo, Liisa; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Bandini, Fabio; Marcheselli, Simona; Pezzini, Alessandro; Poli, Loris; Padovani, Alessandro; Masotti, Luca; Vannucchi, Vieri; Sohn, Sung-Il; Lorenzini, Gianni; Tassi, Rossana; Guideri, Francesca; Acampa, Maurizio; Martini, Giuseppe; Ntaios, George; Karagkiozi, Efstathia; Athanasakis, George; Makaritsis, Kostantinos; Vadikolias, Kostantinos; Liantinioti, Chrysoula; Chondrogianni, Maria; Mumoli, Nicola; Consoli, Domenico; Galati, Franco; Sacco, Simona; Carolei, Antonio; Tiseo, Cindy; Corea, Francesco; Ageno, Walter; Bellesini, Marta; Colombo, Giovanna; Silvestrelli, Giorgio; Ciccone, Alfonso; Scoditti, Umberto; Denti, Licia; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Maccarrone, Miriam; Orlandi, Giovanni; Giannini, Nicola; Gialdini, Gino; Tassinari, Tiziana; De Lodovici, Maria Luisa; Bono, Giorgio; Rueckert, Christina; Baldi, Antonio; D'Anna, Sebastiano; Toni, Danilo; Letteri, Federica; Giuntini, Martina; Lotti, Enrico Maria; Flomin, Yuriy; Pieroni, Alessio; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Karapanayiotides, Theodore; Monaco, Serena; Baronello, Mario Maimone; Csiba, Laszló; Szabó, Lilla; Chiti, Alberto; Giorli, Elisa; Del Sette, Massimo; Imberti, Davide; Zabzuni, Dorjan; Doronin, Boris; Volodina, Vera; Michel, Patrik; Vanacker, Peter; Barlinn, Kristian; Pallesen, Lars-Peder; Kepplinger, Jessica; Bodechtel, Ulf; Gerber, Johannes; Deleu, Dirk; Melikyan, Gayane; Ibrahim, Faisal; Akhtar, Naveed; Gourbali, Vanessa; Yaghi, Shadi

    2017-03-01

    This study was designed to derive and validate a score to predict early ischemic events and major bleedings after an acute ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. The derivation cohort consisted of 854 patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation included in prospective series between January 2012 and March 2014. Older age (hazard ratio 1.06 for each additional year; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.11) and severe atrial enlargement (hazard ratio, 2.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.87) were predictors for ischemic outcome events (stroke, transient ischemic attack, and systemic embolism) at 90 days from acute stroke. Small lesions (≤1.5 cm) were inversely correlated with both major bleeding (hazard ratio, 0.39; P=0.03) and ischemic outcome events (hazard ratio, 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.30-1.00). We assigned to age ≥80 years 2 points and between 70 and 79 years 1 point; ischemic index lesion >1.5 cm, 1 point; severe atrial enlargement, 1 point (ALESSA score). A logistic regression with the receiver-operating characteristic graph procedure (C statistic) showed an area under the curve of 0.697 (0.632-0.763; P=0.0001) for ischemic outcome events and 0.585 (0.493-0.678; P=0.10) for major bleedings. The validation cohort consisted of 994 patients included in prospective series between April 2014 and June 2016. Logistic regression with the receiver-operating characteristic graph procedure showed an area under the curve of 0.646 (0.529-0.763; P=0.009) for ischemic outcome events and 0.407 (0.275-0.540; P=0.14) for hemorrhagic outcome events. In acute stroke patients with atrial fibrillation, high ALESSA scores were associated with a high risk of ischemic events but not of major bleedings. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Use of Recombinant Factor VIIa in a Pediatric Patient With Initial Presentation of Refractory Acute Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Severe Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gurion, Reut; Siu, Anita; Weiss, Aaron R.; Masterson, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Severe bleeding in acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is rare but can cause significant complications to the patient. Here we report the case of a pediatric patient with acute ITP and hematuria refractory to anti-D immune globulin, high dose intravenous immunoglobulin G, and high dose steroids. Her hematuria was successfully treated with recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa). While further investigation on the use of rFVIIa in ITP is warranted, this case report contributes to the pediatric literature for its use during the course of an initial presentation of ITP with hemorrhagic complications. PMID:23258971

  16. Embolization for Acute Small-Bowel Bleeding from the Collateral Artery of the Superior Mesenteric Left Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery Associated with Narrowing of the Bilateral Common External Iliac Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shimohira, Masashi Ogino, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Nishikawa, Hiroko; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-03-15

    We present a case of acute small-bowel bleeding from the collateral artery of the superior mesenteric-left deep circumflex iliac artery that was successfully managed by transarterial coil embolization.

  17. Necrotising Candida oesophagitis after thoracic radiotherapy: significance of oesophageal wall oedema on CT.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hirotake; Sueyama, Hiroo; Fukuda, Takanori; Ota, Kyuma

    2015-07-01

    Although oesophageal candidiasis is usually a superficial mucosal infection, necrotising Candida oesophagitis has been reported to cause oesophageal perforation or lung abscess. We report the case of an elderly Japanese man presenting with painless dysphagia after thoracic radiotherapy for oesophageal cancer. Non-contrast CT demonstrated segmental and oedematous thickening of the oesophageal wall. Endoscopy revealed white plaques on the oesophageal mucosa. The patient's oesophagitis responded to systemic antifungal therapy, and did not lead to oesophageal perforation. He died of recurrent oesophageal cancer several months later. The importance of severe radiation-induced oesophagitis without pain, our pathophysiological hypothesis on the local oedema caused by Candida infection and the usefulness of CT in evaluating abnormal thickening of the gastrointestinal tract are discussed separately in the article. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Effects of dialysis modality on blood loss, bleeding complications and transfusion requirements in critically ill patients with dialysis-dependent acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pschowski, R; Briegel, S; Von Haehling, S; Doehner, W; Bender, T O; Pape, U F; Hasper, D; Jörress, A; Schefold, J C

    2015-11-01

    Blood loss and bleeding complications may often be observed in critically ill patients on renal replacement therapies (RRT). Here we investigate procedural (i.e. RRT-related) and non-procedural blood loss as well as transfusion requirements in regard to the chosen mode of dialysis (i.e. intermittent haemodialysis [IHD] versus continuous veno-venous haemofiltration [CVVH]). Two hundred and fifty-two patients (122 CVVH, 159 male; aged 61.5±13.9 years) with dialysis-dependent acute renal failure were analysed in a sub-analysis of the prospective randomised controlled clinical trial-CONVINT-comparing IHD and CVVH. Bleeding complications including severity of bleeding and RRT-related blood loss were assessed. We observed that 3.6% of patients died related to severe bleeding episodes (between group P=0.94). Major all-cause bleeding complications were observed in 23% IHD versus 26% of CVVH group patients (P=0.95). Under CVVH, the rate of RRT-related blood loss events (57.4% versus 30.4%, P=0.01) and mean total blood volume lost was increased (222.3±291.9 versus 112.5±222.7 ml per patient, P <0.001). Overall, transfusion rates did not differ between the study groups. In patients with sepsis, transfusion rates of all blood products were significantly higher when compared to cardiogenic shock (all P <0.01) or other conditions. In conclusion, procedural and non-procedural blood loss may often be observed in critically ill patients on RRT. In CVVH-treated patients, procedural blood loss was increased but overall transfusion rates remained unchanged. Our data show that IHD and CVVH may be regarded as equivalent approaches in critically ill patients with dialysis-dependent acute renal failure in this regard.

  19. Paediatric eosinophilic oesophagitis presenting to the otolaryngologist.

    PubMed

    Harris, R; Mitton, S; Chong, S; Daya, H

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of eosinophilic oesophagitis is increasing. A Pubmed search for 'eosinophilic oesophagitis' and 'eosinophilic esophagitis' yielded 345 publications since 1976. Only seven were in otolaryngology journals.1-7 Patients typically present with dysphagia, vomiting, dyspepsia or food impaction and are therefore usually referred to a paediatric gastroenterologist; otolaryngologists are not usually involved in management. A missed diagnosis may result in oesophageal stricture. Two patients, aged two and four years, were referred to the paediatric otolaryngology department with intermittent upper oesophageal food impaction. A paediatric gastroenterologist was involved in the investigation. Histological examination of oesophageal biopsies demonstrated changes consistent with eosinophilic oesophagitis. Both patients were expediently diagnosed, investigated and managed. A diagnosis of eosinophilic oesophagitis must be considered in patients presenting with food bolus impaction. Early involvement of a paediatric gastroenterology team in the diagnosis is recommended in children presenting with oesophageal symptoms, in order to avoid delayed diagnosis.

  20. Bleeding Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... as clotting factors. If you have a bleeding disorder, you either do not have enough platelets or ... don't work the way they should. Bleeding disorders can be the result of other diseases, such ...

  1. Bleeding gums

    MedlinePlus

    ... periodontal exam. DO NOT use tobacco, since it makes bleeding gums worse. Control gum bleeding by applying pressure directly on the gums with a gauze pad soaked in ice water. If you have been diagnosed with a ...

  2. Assessing upper gastrointestinal bleeding in adults.

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Gabrielle; Kruger, Danielle

    2014-09-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring accurate, prompt, and appropriate patient evaluation and management. Clinicians of all specialties must know the best practices for preventing and managing upper GI bleeding. This article focuses on assessing and managing adults with acute nonvariceal upper GI bleeding.

  3. [Incidence and predictive factors of iron deficiency anemia after acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding without portal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Planella de Rubinat, Montserrat; Teixidó Amorós, Montserrat; Ballester Clau, Raquel; Trujillano Cabello, Javier; Ibarz Escuer, Mercedes; Reñé Espinet, Josep Maria

    2015-11-01

    There are few studies on iron deficiency anemia (IDA) after non-variceal acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients without portal hypertension. To define the incidence of IDA after UGIB, to characterize the predictive factors for IDA and to design algorithms that could help physicians identify those patients who could benefit from iron therapy. We registered 391 patients with UGIB between April 2007 and May 2009. Patients with portal hypertension and those with clinical or/and biological conditions that could affect the ferrokinetic pattern were excluded. Blood analyses were performed, including ferric parameters upon admission, on the 5th day, and on the 30th day after the hemorrhage episode. We used a multiple logistic regression model and a classification and regression tree model. A total of 124 patients were included, of which 76 (61.3%) developed IDA 30 days after UGIB. The predictive variables were age >75 years (P=.037; OR 3.9; 95% CI: 1.3-11.6), initial urea level >80mg/dL (P=.027; OR 2.9; 95% CI: 1.1-7.6), initial ferritin level ≤65ng/dL (P=.002; OR 7.6; 95% CI: 2.9-18.5), initial hemoglobin level ≤100g/L (P=.003; OR 3.2; 95% CI: 1.3-8.0), hemoglobin level on the 5th day ≤100g/L (P<.001; OR 14.9; 95% CI: 3.6-61.1) and the value of the transferrin saturation index on the 5th day <10% (p<0.001; OR 7.2; 95% CI: 2.6-20.3). Most patients with UGIB developed IDA 30 days after the episode. Identification of the predictive factors for IDA may help to establish guidelines for the administration of iron therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  4. How do patients and professionals differentiate between intra-articular joint bleeds and acute flare-ups of arthropathy in patients with haemophilia?

    PubMed

    Timmer, M A; Pisters, M F; de Kleijn, P; Veenhof, C; Laros-van Gorkom, B A P; Kruip, M J H A; de Bie, R A; Schutgens, R E G

    2016-05-01

    The overlap in symptoms between joint bleeds and flare-ups of haemophilia arthropathy (HA) creates difficulties in differentiating between the two conditions. Diagnosis of haemarthrosis is currently empirically made based upon clinical presentations. However, no standard diagnostic criteria are available. To offer appropriate treatment, rapid and accurate diagnosis is essential. Additionally, adequate differentiation can decrease health costs significantly. The aim of this study was to identify signs and symptoms to differentiate between an intra-articular joint bleed and an acute flare-up of HA in patients with haemophilia and make an initial proposal of items to include in a diagnostic criteria set. Six focus group interviews with a total of 13 patients and 15 professionals were carried out. The focus groups were structured following the Nominal Group Technique (NGT). The most important signs and symptoms used to differentiate between joint bleeds and HA were (i) course of the symptoms, (ii) cause of the complaints, (iii) joint history, (iv) type of pain and (v) degree of impairments in range of motion. This qualitative study provides insight into signs and symptoms that are currently used to differentiate between joint bleeds and flare-ups of HA. Results of this study can be used to develop a valid and standardized clinical diagnostic criteria set to differentiate between these two conditions. Further research is necessary to validate the signs and symptoms found in this study. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Efficacy of octreotide and sclerotherapy in the treatment of acute variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients. A prospective, multicentric, and randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bildozola, M; Kravetz, D; Argonz, J; Romero, G; Suarez, A; Jmelnitzky, A; Fainberg, M; Fassio, E; Berreta, J; Romero, G; Landeira, G; Martinez, H; Bosco, A; Guevara, M; Valero, J; Chopita, N; Berenstein, G; Terg, R

    2000-04-01

    Sclerotherapy is the most widely used method for treatment of acute variceal bleeding. Previous reports have suggested that octreotide infusion is as effective as sclerotherapy. Our aim was to investigate the efficacy and safety of octreotide in comparison with sclerotherapy in controlling variceal bleeding. Seventy-six cirrhotic patients were randomized to receive either sclerotherapy (n = 37) or octreotide (n = 39) infusion of 50 microg/h intravenously for 48 h after a bolus of 100 microg, followed by subcutaneous injection of 100 microg/8 h for an additional 72 h. The two groups were similar in base-line data. A similar initial control of bleeding was obtained in 94.6% for sclerotherapy and 84.6% for octreotide (NS). No difference was observed between sclerotherapy and octreotide in rebleeding (23% versus 33%) and treatment failure (22% versus 36%, respectively). Furthermore, the overall success of treatment was 78% for sclerotherapy and 64% for octreotide. No significant difference in mortality was observed between treatments (eight patients for octreotide and three patients for sclerotherapy, NS). These results show that both treatments present a very high and similar initial and final control of bleeding. However, there is a trend that could be clinically important towards better results in the patients treated with sclerotherapy.

  6. Lymphocytic oesophagitis, eosinophilic oesophagitis and compound lymphocytic-eosinophilic oesophagitis I: histological and immunohistochemical findings.

    PubMed

    Rubio, C A; Ichiya, T; Schmidt, P T

    2017-03-01

    To report four histological-immunohistochemical oesophagitis phenotypes. Oesophageal biopsies from 311 patients were stained with H&E and with CD3, a T cell marker. Additional immunohistochemical stains (n=413) were performed in 77 cases. Four histological-immunohistochemical oesophagitis phenotypes were recorded: lymphocytic oesophagitis (LyE, ≥40 CD3+ lymphocytes/HPF in CD3 immunostain), eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE, ≥15 eosinophils/HPF in H&E stain), lymphocytic infiltration (≤39 CD3+/HPF) and compound lymphocytic oesophagitis-eosinophilic oesophagitis (Co LyE-EoE). At index biopsy, 28.3% (n=88) had LyE, 21.2% (n=66) EoE, 10.6% (n=33) Co LyE-EoE and 39.9% (n=124) lymphocytic infiltration. A persistent oesophagitis phenotype was found in 42.5% (37/87) in the first follow-up biopsy, in 34.4% (21/61) in the second follow-up biopsy and in 48.1% (26/54) in the third follow-up biopsy. Using βF1 immunostain, two different surface T cell receptors were detected in LyE and Co Lye-EoE: one having ≥40 βF1+/HPF (βF1+ high) and the other having <39 βF1+/HPF (βF1+ low). Based on the literature regarding the significance of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) in the initiation of EoE, we submit that the IEL phenotypes in LyE might differ from those found in EoE as they were unable to elicit the same eosinophilic response. Recent studies disclosed that group 2 innate lymphocytes (ILC2s), enriched in EoE, remain undetected in CD3 immunostain as they lack surface markers for T, B, natural killer (NK) or NK T cells. If ILC2s also participate in the lymphocytic infiltration of EoE, then the frequency of cases with Co LyE-EoE here reported might have been much higher. The four oesophagitis phenotypes described are easy to recognise, provided that the dual staining procedure (H&E-CD3) is implemented. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Octreotide in variceal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, A K

    1994-01-01

    Bleeding from oesophageal varices has a high death rate. Injection sclerotherapy is the most appropriate treatment but facilities for this are not always available. Balloon tamponade and vasoactive therapy may be used as stop gap measures. Somatostatin and octreotide are therapeutic candidates for the treatment of variceal bleeding and there are several trials that have compared somatostatin and octreotide with other treatments for this condition. The results of these trials are summarised and discussed. A meta analysis of the group of trials of placebo or H2 antagonists v somatostatin or octreotide showed a significant advantage of somatostatin or octreotide in terms of efficacy, but no difference in mortality. The trials discussed seem to show that somatostatin and octreotide are at least as effective as other treatments, with the benefit of fewer adverse effects, and thus represent the best vasoactive agents. Additionally, they may have a role as adjuvant treatment to emergency sclerotherapy for active bleeders and this must be further investigated. PMID:8206396

  8. Association among leukocyte count, mortality, and bleeding in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (from the Acute Catheterization and Urgent Intervention Triage StrategY [ACUITY] trial).

    PubMed

    Palmerini, Tullio; Généreux, Philippe; Mehran, Roxana; Dangas, George; Caixeta, Adriano; Riva, Diego Della; Mariani, Andrea; Xu, Ke; Stone, Gregg W

    2013-05-01

    Although inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes, the extent of inflammation is not routinely assessed, and its prognostic implications in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome have not been investigated in depth. We analyzed the prognostic implications of an elevated white blood cell count (WBCc) in patients with moderate and high-risk non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome undergoing an early invasive strategy in the large-scale Acute Catheterization and Urgent Intervention Triage StrategY trial. The WBCc at admission was available for 13,678 of 13,819 patients (98.9%). The patients in the upper tertile of the WBCc had an increased risk of 30-day major bleeding, 1-year mortality, and definite/probable stent thrombosis compared to those in the mid or lower tertiles. On multivariate analysis, the WBCc was an independent predictor of 30-day major bleeding and 1-year cardiac, noncardiac, and all-cause mortality. The association between the WBCc and cardiac mortality was present in multiple prespecified subgroups, with no significant interaction between the WBCc and age, gender, diabetes, smoking, renal dysfunction, elevated baseline biomarkers, antithrombotic therapy, revascularization, and Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction risk score. The WBCc remained an independent predictor of mortality after adjusting for bleeding, C-reactive protein level, and angiographic variables, including left ventricular ejection fraction, Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction flow, and number of diseased vessels. The WBCc significantly improved the prognostic accuracy of the Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction risk score, with a net reclassification improvement of 11% (p <0.0001). In conclusion, in patients with moderate- and high-risk non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome, an elevated admission WBCc was an independent predictor of 30-day major bleeding, and 1-year cardiac, noncardiac, and all

  9. Trouble with Bleeding: Risk Factors for Acute Hepatitis C among HIV-Positive Gay Men from Germany—A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Axel J.; Rockstroh, Jürgen K.; Vogel, Martin; An der Heiden, Matthias; Baillot, Armin; Krznaric, Ivanka; Radun, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To identify risk factors for hepatitis C among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), focusing on potential sexual, nosocomial, and other non-sexual determinants. Background Outbreaks of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among HIV-positive MSM have been reported by clinicians in post-industrialized countries since 2000. The sexual acquisition of HCV by gay men who are HIV positive is not, however, fully understood. Methods Between 2006 and 2008, a case-control study was embedded into a behavioural survey of MSM in Germany. Cases were HIV-positive and acutely HCV-co-infected, with no history of injection drug use. HIV-positive MSM without known HCV infection, matched for age group, served as controls. The HCV-serostatus of controls was assessed by serological testing of dried blood specimens. Univariable and multivariable regression analyses were used to identify factors independently associated with HCV-co-infection. Results 34 cases and 67 controls were included. Sex-associated rectal bleeding, receptive fisting and snorting cocaine/amphetamines, combined with group sex, were independently associated with case status. Among cases, surgical interventions overlapped with sex-associated rectal bleeding. Conclusions Sexual practices leading to rectal bleeding, and snorting drugs in settings of increased HCV-prevalence are risk factors for acute hepatitis C. We suggest that sharing snorting equipment as well as sharing sexual partners might be modes of sexual transmission. Condoms and gloves may not provide adequate protection if they are contaminated with blood. Public health interventions for HIV-positive gay men should address the role of blood in sexual risk behaviour. Further research is needed into the interplay of proctosurgery and sex-associated rectal bleeding. PMID:21408083

  10. Cyanoacrylate Injection Versus Band Ligation in the Endoscopic Management of Acute Gastric Variceal Bleeding: Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Studies Based on the PRISMA Statement.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Weiguang; Ren, Yutang; Bai, Yang; Liu, Side; Zhang, Qiang; Zhi, Fachao

    2015-10-01

    The evidence for optimal endoscopic management of bleeding gastric varices is lacking. The clinical outcome is controversial in trials comparing cyanoacrylate injection and band ligation. To help guide endoscopic decisions regarding acute gastric variceal bleeding, a meta-analysis was conducted.Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ScienceDirect were searched for all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) containing the 2 interventions. The main outcomes evaluated in the meta-analysis were active bleeding control, blood transfusion, rebleeding, recurrence of varices, complications, and survival.Three RCTs were identified, which included 194 patients with active gastric variceal bleeding from Taiwan and Romania. Active bleeding control was achieved in 46 of 49 (93.9%) patients in the cyanoacrylate injection group, compared with 35 of 44 (79.5%) in the band ligation group (P = 0.032), for a pooled odds ratio of 4.44 (95% confidence interval, 1.14-17.30). Rebleeding rate was comparable in type 2 gastroesophageal varices (GOV2) between the 2 interventions (35.7% vs 34.8%, P = 0.895), but cyanoacrylate injection seemed superior for reducing rebleeding rate in type 1 gastroesophageal varices (GOV1, 26.1% vs 47.7%, P = 0.035) and type 1 isolated gastric varices (IGV1, 17.6% vs 85.7%, P = 0.015). Cyanoacrylate injection was also superior in controlling recurrence of gastric varices to band ligation (36.0% vs 66.0%, P = 0.002). There was no difference in complications or mortality between the 2 interventions. The major limitation of this meta-analysis is the small number of studies/patients included.Compared with band ligation, injection cyanocrylate have an advantage in the control of acute gastric variceal bleeding, also with lower recurrence rate and rebleeding (except GOV2). The limited amount of studies included attenuates the strength of this meta-analysis; therefore, more high-quality RCTs are needed.

  11. Platelet Count and Major Bleeding in Patients Receiving Vitamin K Antagonists for Acute Venous Thromboembolism, Findings From Real World Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi-Pierfranceschi, Matteo; Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Cattabiani, Chiara; Guida, Anna; Pagán, Barbara; Morales, Maria del Valle; Salgado, Estuardo; Suriñach, José Maria; Tolosa, Carles; Monreal, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The outcome of patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) and abnormal platelet count (PlC) at baseline has not been consistently studied. In real-world clinical practice, a number of patients with abnormal PlC receive vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) to treat acute VTE despite their higher risk of bleeding. We used the Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad TromboEmbólica registry database to compare the rate of major bleeding in patients receiving VKA for long-term therapy of acute VTE according to PlC levels at baseline. Patients were categorized as having very low (<100,000/μL), low (100,000–150,000/μL), normal (150,000–300,000/μL), high (300,000–450,000/μL), or very high (>450,000/μL) PlC at baseline. Of 55,369 patients recruited as of January 2015, 37,000 (67%) received long-term therapy with VKA. Of these, 611 patients (1.6%) had very low PlC, 4006 (10.8%) had low PlC, 25,598 (69%) had normal PlC, 5801 (15.6%) had high PlC, and 984 (2.6%) had very high PlC at baseline. During the course of VKA therapy (mean, 192 days), there were no differences in the duration or intensity (as measured by international normalized ratio levels) of treatment between subgroups. The rate of major bleeding was 3.6%, 2.1%, 1.9%, 2.1%, and 3.7%, respectively, and the rate of fatal bleeding was 0.98%, 0.17%, 0.29%, 0.34%, and 0.50%, respectively. Patients with very low or very high PlC levels were more likely to have severe comorbidities. We found a nonlinear “U-shaped” relationship between PlC at baseline and major bleeding during therapy with VKA for VTE. Consistent alteration of PlC values at baseline suggested a greater frailty. PMID:26632687

  12. Characteristics of oesophageal bolus transport in patients with mild oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Gerson R; Winograd, Ron; Lemme, Eponina M; Lammert, Frank; Silny, Jiri; Matern, Siegfried; Nguyen, Huan N

    2005-03-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) frequently have oesophageal motility disturbance. However, detailed data about bolus transport characteristics in these patients are still lacking. In the present study the new technology of concurrent impedance manometry was applied for characterization of oesophageal motor function in patients with mild GORD. Oesophageal motility testing was performed in 25 patients with mild GORD (group 1) as compared to 25 healthy subjects (group 2) employing the technique of concurrent impedancometry and manometry. Oesophageal motility as well as patterns and parameters of bolus transport after the swallowing of saline or yogurt were analysed. According to manometry the velocity of the contraction wave was similar in both groups. Mid-distal contraction amplitude in group 1 was still in the normal range but significantly lower than in group 2 (57.4+/-4.5 mmHg vs 91.4+/-7.5 mmHg for saline, and 47+/-4.1 vs 80.7+/-9.4 mmHg for yogurt). According to impedance measurements, bolus transport was significantly slower (3.6+/-0.1 vs 4.0+/-0.1 cm/s for saline and 3.0+/-0.1 vs 3.2+/-0.1 cm/s for yogurt), and post-deglutitive impedance was significantly lower in group 1: 2110 omega+/-116 omega versus 2542 omega+/-152 omega (P<0.01) with saline and 1862 omega+/-108 omega versus 2348 omega+/-148 omega with yogurt (P<0.01). GORD patients showed several pathological bolus transport patterns, which were not observed in healthy subjects. Gastroesophageal liquid reflux was observed between the swallows. In patients with mild GORD concurrent impedancometry and manometry is sufficiently sensitive for the detection of minor oesophageal dysmotility. Several pathological features have been characterized including delayed bolus transport, impaired propulsive volume clearance, pathological transport patterns and pathological reflux patterns.

  13. Acute thrombosis of a transplanted renal artery after gastric ulcer bleeding in a patient with a long-term well-functioning renal allograft

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chung-Kuan; Leu, Jyh-Gang; Wei, Cheng-Chun; Hsieh, Shih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Acute thrombosis of a transplanted renal artery is a serious vascular complication following renal allograft transplantation, which usually occurs within the first month after transplantation and often results in graft loss. It rarely occurs beyond the first month, except in a rejected kidney or in a kidney with high-grade transplant renal artery stenosis. Result: A 65-year-old male with a history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, pulmonary tuberculosis, and end-stage renal disease was previously treated with hemodialysis (HD). He received a kidney transplant and had a well-functioning graft for 2 years. He presented to our emergency department with gastric ulcer bleeding and received treatment involving an endoscopic submucosal epinephrine injection, a proton pump inhibitor, and blood transfusions. Nine days later, he complained of sudden lower abdominal pain and had acute anuric kidney failure. Renal ultrasonography revealed an absence of blood flow to the allograft kidney. Renal artery angiogram demonstrated complete occlusion of the transplanted renal artery. After thrombectomy and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) with stent placement, 60% stenosis of the proximal renal artery with distal perfusion was noted. However, his graft function did not improve, and he received HD again. Histopathology of the transplanted kidney revealed ischemic tubular nephropathy with focal infarction without rejection. Conclusion: This is the first case of acute thrombosis of the transplanted renal artery following gastric ulcer bleeding in a patient with a long-term well-functioning graft kidney. PMID:27472705

  14. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Benetti-Pinto, Cristina Laguna; Rosa-E-Silva, Ana Carolina Japur de Sá; Yela, Daniela Angerame; Soares Júnior, José Maria

    2017-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is a frequent condition in Gynecology. It may impact physical, emotional sexual and professional aspects of the lives of women, impairing their quality of life. In cases of acute and severe bleeding, women may need urgent treatment with volumetric replacement and prescription of hemostatic substances. In some specific cases with more intense and prolonged bleeding, surgical treatment may be necessary. The objective of this chapter is to describe the main evidence on the treatment of women with abnormal uterine bleeding, both acute and chronic. Didactically, the treatment options were based on the current International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) classification system (PALM-COEIN). The etiologies of PALM-COEIN are: uterine Polyp (P), Adenomyosis (A), Leiomyoma (L), precursor and Malignant lesions of the uterine body (M), Coagulopathies (C), Ovulatory dysfunction (O), Endometrial dysfunction (E), Iatrogenic (I), and Not yet classified (N). The articles were selected according to the recommendation grades of the PubMed, Cochrane and Embase databases, and those in which the main objective was the reduction of uterine menstrual bleeding were included. Only studies written in English were included. All editorial or complete papers that were not consistent with abnormal uterine bleeding, or studies in animal models, were excluded. The main objective of the treatment is the reduction of menstrual flow and morbidity and the improvement of quality of life. It is important to emphasize that the treatment in the acute phase aims to hemodynamically stabilize the patient and stop excessive bleeding, while the treatment in the chronic phase is based on correcting menstrual dysfunction according to its etiology and clinical manifestations. The treatment may be surgical or pharmacological, and the latter is based mainly on hormonal therapy, anti-inflammatory drugs and antifibrinolytics. Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro

  15. Single vs double antiplatelet therapy in acute coronary syndrome: Predictors of bleeding after coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Tarzia, Vincenzo; Bortolussi, Giacomo; Buratto, Edward; Paolini, Carla; Dal Lin, Carlo; Rizzoli, Giulio; Bottio, Tomaso; Gerosa, Gino

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the contribution of anti-platelet therapy and derangements of pre-operative classical coagulation and thromboelastometry parameters to major bleeding post-coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). METHODS: Two groups of CABG patients were studied: Group A, treated with aspirin alone (n = 50), and Group B treated with aspirin and clopidogrel (n = 50). Both had similar preoperative, clinical, biologic characteristics and operative management. Classic coagulation parameters and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) profiles were determined preoperatively for both groups and the same heparin treatment was administered. ROTEM profiles (INTEM and EXTEM assays) were analyzed, both for traditional parameters, and thrombin generation potential, expressed by area-under-curve (AUC). RESULTS: There was no significant difference between rates of major bleeding between patients treated with aspirin alone, compared with those treated with aspirin and clopidogrel (12% vs 16%, P = 0.77). In the 14 cases of major bleeding, pre-operative classic coagulation and traditional ROTEM parameters were comparable. Conversely we observed that the AUC in the EXTEM test was significantly lower in bleeders (5030 ± 1115 Ohm*min) than non-bleeders (6568 ± 548 Ohm*min) (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: We observed that patients with a low AUC value were at a significantly higher risk of bleeding compared to patients with higher AUC, regardless of antiplatelet treatment. This suggests that thrombin generation potential, irrespective of the degree of platelet inhibition, correlates with surgical bleeding. PMID:26413234

  16. Oesophageal tone in patients with achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, M; Mearin, F; Vasconez, C; Armengol, J; Malagelada, J

    1997-01-01

    Background—The diagnosis and classification of oesophageal motility disorders is currently based on assessment of the phasic contractile activity of the oesophagus. Tonic muscular contraction of the oesophageal body (oesophageal tone) has not been well characterised. 
Aim—To quantify oesophageal tonic activity in healthy subjects and in patients with achalasia. 
Patients—Oesophageal tone was measured in 14 patients with untreated achalasia and in 14 healthy subjects. In eight patients with achalasia, oesophageal tone was again measured one month after either endoscopic or surgical treatment. 
Methods—Tonic wall activity was quantified by means of a flaccid intraoesophageal bag, 5 cm long and of 120 ml maximal capacity, which was placed and maintained 5 cm above the lower oesophageal sphincter and connected to an external electronic barostat. The experimental design included measurement of oesophageal basal tone and compliance as well as the oesophageal tone response to a nitric oxide donor (0.5 ml amyl nitrite inhalation). 
Results—Oesophageal basal tone, expressed as the intrabag (intraoesophageal) volume at a minimal distending pressure (2 mm Hg), did not differ significantly between patients with achalasia and healthy controls (6.6 (2.5) ml versus 4.1 (0.8) ml, respectively). Oesophageal compliance (volume/pressure relation during intraoesophageal distension) was significantly increased in achalasia (oesophageal extension ratio: 3.2 (0.4) ml/mm Hg versus 1.9 (0.2) ml/mm Hg; p< 0.01). Amyl nitrite inhalation induced oesophageal relaxation both in patients and in controls, but the magnitude of relaxation was greater in the latter (intrabag volume increase: 15.3 (2.4) ml versus 36.2 (7.1) ml; p<0.01). 
Conclusion—In patients with achalasia, oesophageal tonic activity, and not only phasic activity, is impaired. Although oesophageal compliance is increased, residual oesophageal tone is maintained so that a significant relaxant response may occur

  17. Eosinophilic oesophagitis: from physiopathology to treatment.

    PubMed

    Roman, Sabine; Savarino, Edoardo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Mion, François

    2013-11-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the oesophageal mucosa. Food and aero-allergens are involved in its pathogenesis. Dysphagia and food impaction are the dominant symptoms in adult with eosinophilic oesophagitis. However, a wide range of symptoms has been noticed such as chest pain or gastro-oesophageal reflux disease-like symptoms. Upper gastro-intestinal endoscopy and oesophageal biopsies are crucial for the diagnosis of eosinophilic oesophagitis. Endoscopy might be normal or reveal typical patterns such as rings, furrows, exudates, oedema, and stricture. Two to four biopsies should be performed both in the distal and in the proximal oesophagus, and 15 eosinophils per high power field within the oesophageal epithelium are the minimal threshold to diagnose eosinophilic oesophagitis. Allergy testing is recommended, although its impact to orient treatment remains to be demonstrated. Eosinophilic oesophagitis treatment includes medical treatment, diet and endoscopic dilation. Proton pump inhibitors are the first-line therapy as some eosinophilic oesophagitis phenotypes respond well to proton pump inhibitors. Topical viscous corticosteroids or diet elimination are the treatment of choice. There is no clear evidence in the literature to prefer one to the other. Finally endoscopic dilation should be considered in case of persistent symptomatic stenosis despite medical therapy. Copyright © 2013 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Marek, T A

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains one of the most important emergencies in gastroenterology. Despite this, only about 100 abstracts concerning gastrointestinal bleeding (excluding bleeding complicating endoscopic procedures) were presented at this year's Digestive Disease Week (DDW; 7-10 May 2011; Chicago, Illinois, USA), accounting for less than 2% of all presented lectures and posters. It seems that the number of such abstracts has been decreasing over recent years. This may be due in part to the high level of medical care already achieved, especially in the areas of pharmacotherapy and endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review of gastrointestinal bleeding, priority has been given to large epidemiological studies reflecting "real life," and abstracts dealing more or less directly with endoscopic management. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Comparison of bleeding complications and 3-year survival with low-molecular-weight heparin versus unfractionated heparin for acute myocardial infarction: the FAST-MI registry.

    PubMed

    Puymirat, Étienne; Aissaoui, Nadia; Silvain, Johanne; Bonello, Laurent; Cuisset, Thomas; Motreff, Pascal; Bataille, Vincent; Durand, Eric; Cottin, Yves; Simon, Tabassome; Danchin, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Recent clinical studies suggest that low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) could be an effective and safe alternative to unfractionated heparin (UFH) for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). To assess the impact of anticoagulant choice (LMWV vs UFH) on bleeding, the need for blood transfusion and 3-year clinical outcomes in AMI patients from the FAST-MI registry. FAST-MI was a nationwide registry compiled in France over 1 month in 2005, which included consecutive AMI patients admitted to an intensive care unit less than 48 hours from symptom onset in 223 participating centres. A total of 2854 patients treated with heparins were included. The risks of major bleeding or transfusion (3.0% vs 7.0%) and in-hospital death (3.2% vs 9.2%) were lower with LMWH compared with UFH, a difference that persisted after multivariable adjustment (odds ratio [OR] 0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34-0.76 and OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.37-0.76, respectively). Three-year survival, and stroke and reinfarction-free survival risks were also higher with LMWH compared with UFH (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.73, 95% CI 0.61-0.87 and HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.62-0.85, respectively). In two cohorts of patients matched on propensity score for receiving LMWH and with similar baseline characteristics (834 patients per group), major bleeding and transfusion rates were lower while the 3-year survival rate was significantly higher in patients receiving LMWH. Our data suggest that the use of LMWH in AMI patients may have a better benefit/risk profile than UFH, in terms of bleeding, need for transfusion and long-term survival. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Early TIPS versus endoscopic therapy for secondary prophylaxis after management of acute esophageal variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Halabi, Shadi Al; Sawas, Tarek; Sadat, Besher; Jandali, Aiyah; Halabi, Hadi Al; Halabi, Fadi Al; Kapoor, Baljendra; Carey, William D

    2016-09-01

    American College of Gastroenterology and American Association for the Study of Liver Disease guidelines recommend endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment for esophageal variceal bleed. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement is reserved for cases of therapeutic failure. Several studies have suggested improved prevention of rebleeding and improved survival without excess hepatic encephalopathy in patients who receive TIPS within the first 5 days after bleeding (early TIPS). In this meta-analysis, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of early TIPS versus endoscopic therapy for secondary prophylaxis after acute esophageal variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients. Pubmed, Medline, Embase, ClinicalTrials.gov, and ISI Web of Science were searched for randomized controlled trials that compared early TIPS to endoscopic therapy. The primary outcome was mortality at 1 year; secondary outcomes were rebleeding and hepatic encephalopathy at 1 year. Nine randomized controlled trials involving 608 cirrhotic patients were identified. Early TIPS was associated with a significant risk reduction in 1-year mortality (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.49-0.96; P = 0.03) and 1-year incidence of variceal rebleeding (RR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.20-0.40; P < 0.001) without significant heterogeneity among studies (I(2)  = 30% and 47%, respectively). No significant difference in the incidence of hepatic encephalopathy at 1 year was observed (RR, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.72-2.56; P = 0.34); however, there was significant heterogeneity among studies (I(2)  = 68%). TIPS placed within 5 days after a major esophageal variceal hemorrhage is superior to endoscopic treatment in reducing subsequent bleeding. Early TIPS placement is also associated with superior 1-year survival without significantly increasing the incidence of hepatic encephalopathy. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Refrigerated Platelets for the Treatment of Acute Bleeding: A Review of the Literature and Reexamination of Current Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    adults taking aspirin demonstrated that 4C-PLTs had significantly improved bleeding times in contrast to those at RT, which had little or delayed effects...1974. 20. Valeri CR: Circulation and hemostatic effectiveness of platelets stored at 4 C or 22 C: studies in aspirin -treated normal volunteers

  2. Autophagy mediates epithelial cytoprotection in eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Kelly A; Merves, Jamie F; Giroux, Veronique; Tanaka, Koji; Guo, Andy; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna M; Benitez, Alain J; Dods, Kara; Que, Jianwen; Masterson, Joanne C; Fernando, Shahan D; Godwin, Bridget C; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Chikwava, Kudakwashe; Ruchelli, Eduardo D; Hamilton, Kathryn E; Muir, Amanda B; Wang, Mei-Lun; Furuta, Glenn T; Falk, Gary W; Spergel, Jonathan M; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    The influence of eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE)-associated inflammation upon oesophageal epithelial biology remains poorly understood. We investigated the functional role of autophagy in oesophageal epithelial cells (keratinocytes) exposed to the inflammatory EoE milieu. Functional consequences of genetic or pharmacological autophagy inhibition were assessed in endoscopic oesophageal biopsies, human oesophageal keratinocytes, single cell-derived ex vivo murine oesophageal organoids as well as a murine model recapitulating EoE-like inflammation and basal cell hyperplasia. Gene expression, morphological and functional characterisation of autophagy and oxidative stress were performed by transmission electron microscopy, immunostaining, immunoblotting, live cell imaging and flow cytometry. EoE-relevant inflammatory conditions promoted autophagy and basal cell hyperplasia in three independent murine EoE models and oesophageal organoids. Inhibition of autophagic flux via chloroquine treatment augmented basal cell hyperplasia in these model systems. Oesophageal keratinocytes stimulated with EoE-relevant cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-13 exhibited activation of autophagic flux in a reactive oxygen species-dependent manner. Autophagy inhibition via chloroquine treatment or depletion of Beclin-1 or ATG-7, augmented oxidative stress induced by EoE-relevant stimuli in murine EoE, oesophageal organoids and human oesophageal keratinocytes. Oesophageal epithelia of paediatric EoE patients with active inflammation displayed increased autophagic vesicle content compared with normal and EoE remission subjects. Functional flow cytometric analysis revealed autophagic flux in human oesophageal biopsies. Our findings reveal for the first time that autophagy may function as a cytoprotective mechanism to maintain epithelial redox balance and homeostasis under EoE inflammation-associated stress, providing mechanistic insights into the role of autophagy in

  3. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Eosinophilic oesophagitis: a systematic review for otolaryngologists.

    PubMed

    Bahgat, M; Dawe, N; Flood, L

    2015-12-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis is a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated oesophageal disease, only recently, but increasingly, recognised in the world literature. It is diagnosed and managed primarily by medical gastroenterologists and allergy specialists, and is a distinct disease entity, affecting both children and adults. Few studies have been published in otolaryngology journals, although otolaryngologists will encounter patients with undiagnosed eosinophilic oesophagitis. Patients may present with dysphagia, bolus obstruction or with other ENT disorders, such as atopic rhinitis, reflecting the underlying systemic allergic disorder. This paper systematically reviews the evidence base published on the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of eosinophilic oesophagitis, particularly as it relates to otolaryngology practice.

  5. Esophageal balloon tamponade versus esophageal stent in controlling acute refractory variceal bleeding: A multicenter randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Escorsell, Àngels; Pavel, Oana; Cárdenas, Andrés; Morillas, Rosa; Llop, Elba; Villanueva, Càndid; Garcia-Pagán, Juan C; Bosch, Jaime

    2016-06-01

    Balloon tamponade is recommended only as a "bridge" to definitive therapy in patients with cirrhosis and massive or refractory esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB), but is frequently associated with rebleeding and severe complications. Preliminary, noncontrolled data suggest that a self-expandable, esophageal covered metal stent (SX-ELLA Danis; Ella-CS, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic) may be an effective and safer alternative to balloon tamponade. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial aimed at comparing esophageal stent versus balloon tamponade in patients with cirrhosis and EVB refractory to medical and endoscopic treatment. Primary endpoint was success of therapy, defined as survival at day 15 with control of bleeding and without serious adverse events (SAEs). Twenty-eight patients were randomized to Sengstaken-Blakemore tube (n = 15) or SX-ELLA Danis stent (n = 13). Patients were comparable in severity of liver failure, active bleeding at endoscopy, and initial therapy. Success of therapy was more frequent in the esophageal stent than in balloon tamponade group (66% vs. 20%; P = 0.025). Moreover, control of bleeding was higher (85% vs. 47%; P = 0.037) and transfusional requirements (2 vs 6 PRBC; P = 0.08) and SAEs lower (15% vs. 47%; P = 0.077) in the esophageal stent group. TIPS was used more frequently in the tamponade group (4 vs. 10; P = 0.12). There were no significant differences in 6-week survival (54% vs. 40%; P = 0.46). Esophageal stents have greater efficacy with less SAEs than balloon tamponade in the control of EVB in treatment failures. Our findings favor the use of esophageal stents in patients with EVB uncontrolled with medical and endoscopic treatment. (Hepatology 2016;63:1957-1967). © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  6. Emergency portacaval shunt versus rescue portacaval shunt in a randomized controlled trial of emergency treatment of acutely bleeding esophageal varices in cirrhosis--part 3.

    PubMed

    Orloff, Marshall J; Isenberg, Jon I; Wheeler, Henry O; Haynes, Kevin S; Jinich-Brook, Horacio; Rapier, Roderick; Vaida, Florin; Hye, Robert J

    2010-11-01

    Emergency treatment of bleeding esophageal varices in cirrhosis is of singular importance because of the high mortality rate. Emergency portacaval shunt is rarely used today because of the belief, unsubstantiated by long-term randomized trials, that it causes frequent portal-systemic encephalopathy and liver failure. Consequently, portacaval shunt has been relegated solely to salvage therapy when endoscopic and pharmacologic therapies have failed. Is the regimen of endoscopic sclerotherapy with rescue portacaval shunt for failure to control bleeding varices superior to emergency portacaval shunt? A unique opportunity to answer this question was provided by a randomized controlled trial of endoscopic sclerotherapy versus emergency portacaval shunt conducted from 1988 to 2005. Unselected consecutive cirrhotic patients with acute bleeding esophageal varices were randomized to endoscopic sclerotherapy (n = 106) or emergency portacaval shunt (n = 105). Diagnostic workup was completed and treatment was initiated within 8 h. Failure of endoscopic sclerotherapy was defined by strict criteria and treated by rescue portacaval shunt (n = 50) whenever possible. Ninety-six percent of patients had more than 10 years of follow-up or until death. Comparison of emergency portacaval shunt and endoscopic sclerotherapy followed by rescue portacaval shunt showed the following differences in measurements of outcomes: (1) survival after 5 years (72% versus 22%), 10 years (46% versus 16%), and 15 years (46% versus 0%); (2) median post-shunt survival (6.18 versus 1.99 years); (3) mean requirements of packed red blood cell units (17.85 versus 27.80); (4) incidence of recurrent portal-systemic encephalopathy (15% versus 43%); (5) 5-year change in Child's class showing improvement (59% versus 19%) or worsening (8% versus 44%); (6) mean quality of life points in which lower is better (13.89 versus 27.89); and (7) mean cost of care per year ($39,200 versus $216,700). These differences were

  7. [Treating severe acute anemia due to vaginal bleeding in the Jehovah's Witness: a report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Gredilla, E; Pérez-Ferrer, A; Canser, E; Alonso, E; Martínez Serrano, B; Gilsanz, F

    2009-12-01

    For reasons of religious belief, Jehova's Witnesses do not accept blood transfusions or the infusion of blood products. In situations in which severe, life-threatening anemia develops, patient refusal to receive a transfusion can create serious ethical and legal problems. The principle of patient autonomy, which implies the freedom to accept or reject treatment, comes into conflict with the physician's obligation to safeguard the patient's life using all means possible. We report 2 cases of severe anemia in Jehova's Witnesses. One was due to menorrhagia and the other to postpartum bleeding. The physician should be aware of alternatives to infusion of blood products and know how to cope with an unexpected critical event in these patients. The measures we took were effective in our patients. In the case of menorrhagia, hormone treatment is effective when the woman wishes to preserve the ability to conceive and avoid surgery (endometrial ablation and hysterectomy). In postpartum bleeding refractory to conservative treatment, selective embolization of bleeding vessels may make it unnecessary to resort to more aggressive treatment, such as obstetric hysterectomy.

  8. Allergic mechanisms of Eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Leung, John; Beukema, Koen Robert; Shen, Alice Hangzhou

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is characterized by oesophageal dysfunction and oesophageal eosinophilia refractory to proton-pump-inhibitor treatment. EoE is a food allergy, as elimination of food trigger(s) abrogates the disease, while trigger reintroduction causes recurrence. The allergic mechanism of EoE involves both IgE and non-IgE processes. There is a break in oral tolerance, the immune mechanism allowing enteric exposure to food and micro-organisms without causing deleterious immune responses. Changes in life-style, alterations in gut flora and use of antibiotics may be increasing disease prevalence. Mouse models of EoE and human studies revealed the role of regulatory T-cells and iNKT-cells in the pathogenesis. Th2-cytokines like IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, and other cytokines like TGFβ and TSLP are involved, but perhaps no one cytokine is critically important for driving the disease. Control of EoE may require a pharmaceutical approach that blocks more than one target in the Th2-inflammatory pathway.

  9. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  10. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  11. Prevalence of oesophageal eosinophils and eosinophilic oesophagitis in adults: the population-based Kalixanda study.

    PubMed

    Ronkainen, Jukka; Talley, Nicholas J; Aro, Pertti; Storskrubb, Tom; Johansson, Sven-Erik; Lind, Tore; Bolling-Sternevald, Elisabeth; Vieth, Michael; Stolte, Manfred; Walker, Marjorie M; Agréus, Lars

    2007-05-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis may be increasing but the prevalence in the general population remains unknown. Our aim was to assess this and the presence of eosinophils in the distal oesophageal epithelium in the community. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in a random sample (n = 1000) of the adult Swedish population (mean age 54 years, 49% men). Oesophageal biopsy samples were obtained from 2 cm above, and at, the Z-line. Any eosinophil infiltration of the epithelium was defined as "eosinophils present". Definite eosinophilic oesophagitis was defined as > or =20, probable as 15-19, and possible as 5-14 eosinophils/high-power field (HPF, at magnification x 40) in oesophageal biopsy specimens. Eosinophils were present in 48 subjects (4.8%, 95% CI 3.5 to 6.1%, mean age 54 years, 63% men), in 54% without troublesome reflux symptoms. Definite eosinophilic oesophagitis was present in four subjects (0.4%, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.8%, mean age 51 years, 75% men) and probable eosinophilic oesophagitis in seven subjects (0.7%, 95% CI 0.2 to 1.2%, mean age 58 years, 43% men). Erosive oesophagitis (OR = 2.99, 95% CI 1.58 to 5.66) and absence of dyspepsia (OR = 0.23, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.75) and Helicobacter pylori infection (OR = 0.41, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.92) were independent predictors for "eosinophils present". Definite eosinophilic oesophagitis was associated with dysphagia (2/66 vs 2/926, p = 0.025), and probable eosinophilic oesophagitis with narrowing of the oesophageal lumen (2/15 vs 5/978, p = 0.005). Oesophageal eosinophils were present in nearly 5% of the general population; approximately 1% had definite or probable eosinophilic oesophagitis. Oesophageal eosinophils may be a manifestation of reflux disease in adults, but the condition is as likely to be asymptomatic and go unrecognised.

  12. Effects of clopidogrel on mortality, cardiovascular and bleeding outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease - data from Taiwan acute coronary syndrome full spectrum registry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Lai, Wen-Ter; Hsin, Ho-Tsung; Li, Ai-Hsien; Wang, Chun-Li; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Chang, Shu-Chen

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of clopidogrel is inconclusive in the chronic kidney disease (CKD) population with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Furthermore, CKD patients are prone to bleeding with antiplatelet therapy. We investigated the efficacy and safety of clopidogrel in patients with ACS and CKD. In a Taiwan national-wide registry, 2819 ACS patients were enrolled. CKD is defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of less than 60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). The primary endpoints are the combined outcomes of death, non-fatal myocardial infarction and stroke at 12 months. Overall 949 (33.7%) patients had CKD and 2660 (94.36%) patients received clopidogrel treatment. CKD is associated with increased risk of the primary endpoint at 12 months (HR 2.39, 95% CI 1.82 to 3.15, p<0.01). Clopidogrel use is associated with reduced risk of the primary endpoint at 12 months (HR 0.42, 95% CI: 0.29-0.60, p<0.01). Cox regression analysis showed that clopidogrel reduced death and primary endpoints for CKD population (HR 0.35, 95% CI: 0.21-0.61 and HR 0.48, 95% CI: 0.30-0.77, respectively, both p<0.01). Patients with clopidogrel(-)/CKD(-), clopidogrel(+)/CKD(+) and clopidogrel(-)/CKD(+) have 2.4, 3.0 and 10.4 fold risk to have primary endpoints compared with those receiving clopidogrel treatment without CKD (all p<0.01). Clopidogrel treatment was not associated with increased in-hospital Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) bleeding in CKD population. Clopidogrel could decrease mortality and improve cardiovascular outcomes without increasing risk of bleeding in ACS patients with CKD.

  13. Correlation between eosinophilic oesophagitis and aeroallergens.

    PubMed

    Moawad, F J; Veerappan, G R; Lake, J M; Maydonovitch, C L; Haymore, B R; Kosisky, S E; Wong, R K H

    2010-02-15

    Aeroallergens have been implicated in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic oesophagitis. To determine whether a seasonal variation exists in the diagnoses of eosinophilic oesophagitis and whether there is a correlation with seasonal pollen count. A retrospective review was performed from January 2006 to November 2008 to identify eosinophilic oesophagitis patients. Cases were classified by endoscopic date. Daily pollen counts for grass, trees and weeds were obtained from a certified counting station. Per cent of eosinophilic oesophagitis cases were collated seasonally and compared with mean pollen counts for grass, trees and weeds during the same time period. A total of 127 eosinophilic oesophagitis cases were identified (median age 41, range 19-92 years, 84% men). The highest percentage of cases (33.0%; Binomial P = 0.022) was diagnosed in the spring, while the least percentage (16%; Binomial P = 0.0.010) occurred in the winter. There was a significant association between per cent eosinophilic oesophagitis cases diagnosed seasonally and mean grass pollen count (r(s) = 1.000, P < 0.01), but not with trees (r(s) = 0.400, P = 0.600) or weeds (r(s) = 0.800, P = 0.200). A seasonal variation was seen in the diagnosis of eosinophilic oesophagitis which correlated with pollen counts. These findings have important implications regarding the pathogenesis of eosinophilic oesophagitis, suggesting a potential role for aeroallergens.

  14. Integrated genomic characterization of oesophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    2017-01-12

    Oesophageal cancers are prominent worldwide; however, there are few targeted therapies and survival rates for these cancers remain dismal. Here we performed a comprehensive molecular analysis of 164 carcinomas of the oesophagus derived from Western and Eastern populations. Beyond known histopathological and epidemiologic distinctions, molecular features differentiated oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas from oesophageal adenocarcinomas. Oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas resembled squamous carcinomas of other organs more than they did oesophageal adenocarcinomas. Our analyses identified three molecular subclasses of oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas, but none showed evidence for an aetiological role of human papillomavirus. Squamous cell carcinomas showed frequent genomic amplifications of CCND1 and SOX2 and/or TP63, whereas ERBB2, VEGFA and GATA4 and GATA6 were more commonly amplified in adenocarcinomas. Oesophageal adenocarcinomas strongly resembled the chromosomally unstable variant of gastric adenocarcinoma, suggesting that these cancers could be considered a single disease entity. However, some molecular features, including DNA hypermethylation, occurred disproportionally in oesophageal adenocarcinomas. These data provide a framework to facilitate more rational categorization of these tumours and a foundation for new therapies.

  15. Herpes simplex virus oesophagitis in a pregnant woman.

    PubMed

    Remmelts, H H F; van den Brink, J-W; Laan, R; Bac, D-J

    2011-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) oesophagitis is well described in immunocompromised patients. In immunocompetent individuals HSV oesophagitis is rare. We present a case of HSV oesophagitis in a pregnant woman. A possible explanation for HSV oesophagitis during pregnancy is the decreased cellular immunity, leading to an increased frequency and severity of viral infections. Antiviral therapy is advocated in pregnancy.

  16. Impedance characteristics of normal oesophageal motor function.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huan N; Domingues, Gerson R; Winograd, Ron; Koppitz, Patrick; Lammert, Frank; Silny, Jiri; Matern, Siegfried

    2003-07-01

    To obtain detailed data about the correlation between oesophageal peristalsis and bolus transport for clinical oesophageal motility testing. Oesophageal motility testing was performed in 25 healthy subjects by using the newly developed technique of concurrent impedancometry and manometry. Parameters of oesophageal motility and bolus transport as well as the correlation between transit and motility were analysed after swallowing saline or yogurt. Detailed data about bolus transport and oesophageal motility could be obtained during a single investigation step. Air was observed in front of the bolus in 76% of the swallows. Resting baseline impedance was significantly higher in the oesophagus than in the stomach (2832+/-118 Omega vs 688+/-119 Omega). The deglutitive impedance gradient was 222+/-26 Omega for saline and 482+/-38 Omega for yogurt. Bolus propagation velocity and bolus transit time as impedance parameters of bolus transport discriminated fluid from semisolid bolus (4.0+/-0.1 cm/s vs 3.2+/-0.1 cm/s and 9.9+/-0.2 s vs 11.5+/-0.2 s, for saline vs yogurt), while contraction wave amplitude as a manometry parameter of oesophageal motor function did not (91.4+/-7.5 mmHg vs 80.7+/-9.4 mmHg, for saline vs yogurt). There was a poor correlation between bolus propagation velocity and contraction wave amplitude. Impedance parameters of normal oesophageal motor function have been characterized. Impedancometry and manometry provide different but complementary data about oesophageal motor function. Concurrent impedancometry and manometry allows detailed monitoring of oesophageal motility and bolus transit, which may open new perspectives for comprehensive oesophageal motility testing.

  17. Uncommon, undeclared oesophageal foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Akenroye, M I; Osukoya, A T

    2012-01-01

    We report two cases of unusual and undeclared oesophageal foreign bodies. A small double-rounded calabash or bottle gourd Lagenaria siceraria, stuffed with traditional medicine designed to acquire spiritual power. A whole tricotyledonous kola nut Cola nitida also designed to make medicine to gain love from a woman after passing it out in stool. Each case presented with a sudden onset of total dysphagia and history of ingestion of foreign bodies was not volunteered by any despite direct questioning. Plain radiograph of the neck and chest in either case did not reveal presence of foreign body. Both were successfully removed through rigid oesophagoscopy.

  18. Association between an increase in blood urea nitrogen at 24 hours and worse outcomes in acute nonvariceal upper GI bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Navin L; Claggett, Brian L; Cohen, Aaron J; Nayor, Jennifer; Saltzman, John R

    2017-04-02

    An increase in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) at 24 hours is a solitary and significant predictor of mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis, which may predict worse outcomes in the similarly resuscitation-requiring condition of acute nonvariceal upper GI bleeding (UGIB). The aim of our study was to assess whether an increase in BUN at 24 hours is predictive of worse clinical outcomes in acute nonvariceal UGIB. A retrospective cohort study including patients admitted to an academic hospital from 2004 to 2014 was conducted. An increase in BUN was defined as an increase in BUN at 24 hours of hospitalization compared with BUN at presentation. The primary outcome was a composite of inpatient death, inpatient rebleeding, need for surgical or radiologic intervention, or endoscopic reintervention. Associations between BUN change and outcomes were assessed via the Pearson χ(2) test and the Fisher exact test and via logistic regression for adjusted analyses. There were 357 patients included in the analysis with a mean age of 64 years; 54% were men. The mean change in BUN was -10.1 mg/dL (standard deviation, 12.7 mg/dL). Patients with an increased BUN (n = 37 [10%]) were significantly more likely to experience the composite outcome (22% vs 9%, P = .014), including an increased risk of inpatient death (8% vs 1%, P = .004), compared with patients with a decreased or unchanged BUN (n = 320 [90%]). In a logistic regression model adjusting for the AIMS65 score, an increase in BUN was independently associated with an increased risk for the composite outcome (odds ratio, 2.75; P = .026). Increasing BUN at 24 hours likely reflects under resuscitation and is a predictor of worse outcomes in patients with acute nonvariceal UGIB. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of topical oesophageal acidification on human salivary and oesophageal alkali secretion.

    PubMed

    Brown, C M; Snowdon, C F; Slee, B; Sandle, L N; Rees, W D

    1995-05-01

    Recent human studies suggest that oesophageal HCO3- secretion, in conjunction with salivary HCO3- secretion and secondary oesophageal peristalsis, is important for the protection of oesophageal mucosa from refluxed gastric contents. This study evaluated simultaneously the responsiveness of oesophageal and salivary HCO3- secretion to oesophageal acidification in eight healthy subjects. A 10 cm segment of oesophagus was perfused at a constant rate of 5 ml/min with a specially designed tube assembly. Saline was used initially, and then 10 mM and 100 mM HCl. The perfusates contained 3H-polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a concentration marker to determine volumes. Corrections were applied for a small degree of contamination by swallowed saliva and refluxed gastric alkali. Oesophageal perfusion with 10 mM HCl did not cause symptoms (nausea and heartburn), but tripled the oesophageal HCO3- output from a baseline of 51 mumol/10 cm/10 min (p = 0.021), while doubling the rate of salivary HCO3- secretion from a median basal value of 140 mumol/10 min (p = 0.021). Oesophageal perfusion with 100 mM HCl was associated with symptoms of nausea and heartburn in all subjects. The median oesophageal HCO3- output increased 32 fold to 1659 mumol/10 cm/10 min (interquartile range 569 to 3373; p = 0.036), and salivary HCO3- secretion approximately tripled from basal values (p = 0.036). In conclusion, oesophageal acidification stimulates both salivary and oesophageal HCO3- secretion, responses which may be protective to the oesophageal epithelium.

  20. The effects of tegaserod (HTF 919) on oesophageal acid exposure in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Kahrilas, P J; Quigley, E M; Castell, D O; Spechler, S J

    2000-11-01

    Tegaserod (HTF 919), a 5-HT4 receptor partial agonist, has prokinetic effects that might be useful in decreasing acid reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). To investigate the potential clinical utility of tegaserod in GERD, a five-period crossover study (balanced Latin square) was designed to evaluate the efficacy of 4 b.d. doses of tegaserod vs. placebo. Four-hour manometry (1 h fasting and 3 h postprandial) with continuous recording of lower oesophageal sphincter pressure and distal oesophageal pH, was performed at the end of each 2-week treatment period in 19 patients with mild-to-moderate GERD. Recordings were scored for mean lower oesophageal sphincter pressure, number of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations, and distal oesophageal acid exposure. Tegaserod (1 mg/day and 4 mg/day) caused a more than 50% decrease in acid exposure in the postprandial period in patients with abnormal acid exposure, although only the 1 mg/day tegaserod treatment elicited statistically significant decreasing (P < 0.05) for the entire treatment group (percentage time for which pH < 4: placebo=13%; 1 mg/day dose=5%; 4 mg/day dose=8%). A decreased number of reflux episodes was demonstrated with both the 1 mg/day and 4 mg/day tegaserod doses. There was no apparent effect on mean lower oesophageal sphincter pressure, whilst transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations frequency decreased in the 1-2.5 h post-dose. Tegaserod in a dose of 1 mg/day causes a significant decrease in postprandial oesophageal acid exposure. The reduction in oesophageal acid exposure with tegaserod treatment may result from enhanced oesophageal acid clearance, improved gastric emptying, and/or reduced transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations.

  1. Lymphocytic Oesophagitis Preliminary Ultrastructural Observations.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Carlos A; Villnow, Elisabeth; Schmidt, Peter T

    2016-05-01

    Lymphocytic oesophagitis (LyE) is a newly described entity characterized by a high number of intraepithelial lymphocytes/ high power field (≥40 CD3+IELs/HPF) in the oesophageal epithelium. The aim of the study was to investigate possible ultrastructural changes taking place in LyE at the transmission electron microscopic (TEM) level. Oesopageal biopsies from seven patients were investigated: four were consecutive patients with LyE, one with reflux oesopagitis, one with eosinophilic oesopagitis (EoE) and one with histologically normal squamous epithelium. In LyE, marked intercellular oedema (spongiosis) and a gamut of regressive changes were found in squamous cells, ranging from cytoplasmic oedema and vacuolization, to total cell disintegration. IELs also showed regressive changes ranging from ballooned, oedematous cytoplasm to signs of intracytoplasmatic disintegration. Besides hampered cell nutrition conveyed by spongiosis, putative noxious molecules contained in the intercellular spongiotic oedema might account for the dramatic TEM alterations found in LyE. The present findings provide, for the first time, "inside information" on the ultrastructural alterations taking place in LyE, both in squamous cells and in IELs. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Joint bleeding in factor VIII deficient mice causes an acute loss of trabecular bone and calcification of joint soft tissues which is prevented with aggressive factor replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Anthony G.; Sun, Junjiang; Hannah, William B.; Livingston, Eric W.; Heymann, Dominique; Bateman, Ted A.; Monahan, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While chronic degenerative arthropathy is the main morbidity of hemophilia, a very high prevalance of low bone density is also seen in men and boys with hemophilia. The current study investigates bone degradation in the knee joint of hemophilic mice resulting from hemarthrosis and the efficacy of aggressive treatment with factor VIII in the period surrounding injury to prevent bone pathology. Methods Skeletally mature factor VIII knock-out mice were subjected to knee joint hemorrhage induced by puncture of the left knee joint capsule. Mice received either intravenous Factor VIII treatment or placebo immediately prior to injury and at hours 4, 24, 48, 72 and 96 after hemorrhage. Mice were euthanized two-weeks after injury and the joint morphology and loss of bone in the proximal tibia was assessed using microCT imaging. Results Quantitative microCT imaging of the knee joint found acute bone loss at the proximal tibia following injury including loss of trabecular bone volumetric density and bone mineral density, as well as trabecular connectivity density, number, and thickness. Unexpectedly, joint injury also resulted in calcification of the joint soft tissues including the tendons, ligaments, menisci, and cartilage. Treatment with factor VIII prevented this bone and soft tissue degeneration. Conclusion Knee joint hemorrhage resulted in acute changes of adjacent bone including loss of bone density and mineralization of joint soft tissues. The rapid calcification and loss of bone has implications for the initiation and progression of osteoarthritic degradation following joint bleeding. PMID:24712867

  3. Smoking and Gastro-oesophageal Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Stanciu, C.; Bennett, John R.

    1972-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal sphincter pressure and intraoesophageal pH has been studied in 25 chronic smokers who complained of heartburn. Smoking a cigarette invariably caused a fall in sphincter pressure, and pH measurements showed an increased tendency for reflux to occur while smoking. When lower oesophageal pH was measured overnight one-third of all reflux episodes occurred while the patients were smoking, and reflux was seen during the smoking of two-thirds of all the cigarettes consumed. It is concluded that cigarette smoking is a common reversible cause of gastro-oesophageal reflux. PMID:5076250

  4. Does sclerotherapy of remnant little oesophageal varices after endoscopic ligation have impact on the reduction of recurrent varices? Prospective study.

    PubMed

    Grgov, Sasa; Stamenković, Perica

    2011-01-01

    Endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is superior to endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) of oesophageal varices, however, EBL is associated with a higher rate of variceal recurrences. To examine whether the reduction of recurrent varices can be achieved by additional sclerotherapy of remnant little varices after ligation. Forty-eight patients with liver cirrhosis who had previously bled from oesophageal varices were examined. Endoscopic therapy was performed in order to prevent recurrent variceal bleeding. I group: in 23 patients ligation of oesophageal varices with multi band ligation device was applied (EBL group). II group: in 25 patients sclerotherapy using polydocanol or absolute alcohol was applied after reducing the size of varices using ligation (EBL and EIS group). There was no statistically significant difference between the examined groups of patients in relation to the number of sessions for variceal eradication, recurrence of variceal bleeding, deterioration of portal gastropathy and mortality in the observed period from 18.8 +/- 18.6 months (EBL group) and 22.2 +/- 26.2 months (EBL and EIS group). Variceal recurrence was verified in 21.7% of patients of the EBL group and 16% of the EBL and EIS group, but the difference was not statistically important. Several complications, such as dysphagia and chest pain, were statistically more frequent in the EBL and EIS group of patients. The combined method of ligation and extra sclerosing of remnant small oesophageal varices after ligation does not have advantage in relation to the ligation alone.

  5. Analysis of Dosimetric Parameters Associated With Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Gemcitabine-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Akira; Shibuya, Keiko; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To identify the dosimetric parameters associated with gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from 40 patients were analyzed retrospectively. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of conventional fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy and weekly gemcitabine. Treatment-related acute GI toxicity and upper GI bleeding (UGB) were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 4.0. The dosimetric parameters (mean dose, maximal absolute dose which covers 2 cm{sup 3} of the organ, and absolute volume receiving 10-50 Gy [V{sub 10-50}]) of the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and a composite structure of the stomach and duodenum (StoDuo) were obtained. The planning target volume was also obtained. Univariate analyses were performed to identify the predictive factors for the risk of grade 2 or greater acute GI toxicity and grade 3 or greater UGB, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 15.7 months (range, 4-37). The actual incidence of acute GI toxicity was 33%. The estimated incidence of UGB at 1 year was 20%. Regarding acute GI toxicity, a V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach was the best predictor, and the actual incidence in patients with V{sub 50} <16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach vs. those with V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} was 9% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.001). Regarding UGB, V{sub 50} of {>=}33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo was the best predictor, and the estimated incidence at 1 year in patients with V{sub 50} <33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo vs. those with V{sub 50} {>=}33 cm{sup 3} was 0% vs. 44%, respectively (p = 0.002). The dosimetric parameters correlated highly with one another. Conclusion: The irradiated absolute volume of the stomach and duodenum are important for the risk of acute GI toxicity and UGB. These results could be helpful in escalating the radiation doses using novel

  6. Outcomes following acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in relation to time to endoscopy: results from a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Jairath, V; Kahan, B C; Logan, R F A; Hearnshaw, S A; Doré, C J; Travis, S P L; Murphy, M F; Palmer, K R

    2012-08-01

    Despite the established efficacy of therapeutic endoscopy, the optimum timeframe for performing endoscopy in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) remains unclear. The aim of the current audit study was to examine the relationship between time to endoscopy and clinical outcomes in patients presenting with NVUGIB. This study was a prospective national audit performed in 212 UK hospitals. Regression models examined the relationship between time to endoscopy and mortality, rebleeding, need for surgery, and length of hospital stay. In 4478 patients, earlier endoscopy ( < 12 hours) was not associated with a lower mortality or need for surgery compared with later ( > 24 hours) endoscopy (odds ratio [OR] for mortality 0.98, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.88 - 1.09 for endoscopy > 24 hours vs. < 12 hours; P = 0.70). In patients receiving therapeutic endoscopy, there was a nonsignificant trend towards an increase in rebleeding associated with later endoscopy (OR 1.13, 95 %CI 0.97 - 1.32 for endoscopy > 24 hours vs. < 12 hours), with the converse seen in patients not requiring therapeutic endoscopy (OR 0.83, 95 %CI 0.73 - 0.95 for endoscopy > 24 hours vs. < 12 hours; interaction P = 0.003). Later endoscopy ( > 24 hours) was associated with an increase in risk-adjusted length of hospital stay (1.7 days longer, 95 %CI 1.39 - 1.99 vs. < 12 hours; P < 0.001). Earlier endoscopy was not associated with a reduction in mortality or need for surgery. However, it was associated with an increased efficiency of care and potentially improved control of hemorrhage in higher risk patients, supporting the routine use of early endoscopy unless specific contraindications exist. These results may help inform the debate about emergency endoscopy service provision. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Sirenomelia with oesophageal atresia: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Pragati Aditya; Ghodke, Ratnaprabha Kundlikrao; Kandalkar, Bhuvaneshwari Mahendra

    2014-02-01

    We are reporting a rare case of sirenomelia with oesophageal atresia. Sirenomelia is a lethal sporadic defect of which lower gastrointestinal tract anomalies are characteristic findings. Respiratory and upper gastrointestinal tract malformations like oesophageal atresia occur in about 20-35% of cases. Though its occurrence has been described, it has been reported only rarely. This report aims at describing this uncommon association along with its histological features.

  8. Causal diagrams, gastroesophageal reflux and erosive oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Eyal

    2013-10-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux and its consequences have inspired numerous research questions in recent years: are non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and erosive oesophagitis phenotypic expressions of gastroesophageal reflux disease? Why do patients with NERD not respond to treatment as well as patients with erosive oesophagitis? What is the natural history of NERD? Causal diagrams, coupled with conditional probabilities, offer clear and surprising answers. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Long-gap oesophageal atresia: comparison of delayed primary anastomosis and oesophageal replacement with gastric tube.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui Qing; Hawley, Alisa; Doak, Joe; Nightingale, Michael G; Hutson, John M

    2014-12-01

    Long-gap oesophageal atresia (LGOA) causes significant early and long-term morbidity. We conducted a retrospective 25-year review comparing outcomes of delayed primary anastomosis versus oesophageal replacement with greater curvature gastric tube. Records of 44 consecutive patients undergoing LGOA repair (1986-2010) were obtained from OA database with ethics approval and were analysed for complication and long-term outcomes. Analysis was conducted using Student's t-test for quantitative and Fisher exact test for qualitative data. Thirty (68%) patients underwent delayed primary anastomosis and 14 (32%) had oesophageal replacement. Oesophageal replacement patients had longer gaps (mean 5.5 vertebrae, range 4-9) compared to delayed primary anastomosis (mean 3.9, range 2-6) (p=0.004), but no difference in perioperative complications (p=0.2) (Table 1). Oesophageal replacement had more long-term complications (86%) compared to delayed primary anastomosis (30%) (p=0.005). Almost all patients (>90%) experienced gastro-oesophageal reflux and 21 delayed primary anastomosis patients (70%) underwent fundoplication. 60% of delayed primary anastomosis and 64.3% of oesophageal replacement patients had continued gastrointestinal symptoms years after repair. Our experience indicates that LGOA can be repaired safely using both methods, with no deaths and similar perioperative risk, but high long-term morbidity mandates long-term follow-up of these patients. Delayed primary anastomosis has a better long-term outcome compared to oesophageal replacement with gastric tube. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Presence of intraepithelial food antigen in patients with active eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Marietta, E V; Geno, D M; Smyrk, T C; Becker, A; Alexander, J A; Camilleri, M; Murray, J A; Katzka, D A

    2017-02-01

    Although eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is putatively mediated by an abnormal response to food antigen, the oesophagus is considered relatively impermeable to large molecules. To assess whether food antigens penetrate the oesophageal mucosa in patients with EoE. Anti-gliadin staining was performed in three groups: active EoE, inactive EoE and EoE patients on a low or gluten free diet. To appraise the specificity of our results, we also performed gliadin staining on six patients without oesophageal disease who were consuming gluten. The groups with EoE on gluten also underwent endoscopic infusion with gluten containing soy sauce and repeat biopsies during the endoscopy. We measured eosinophil density, dilated intercellular spaces (on a 0-4+ scale) and gliadin in oesophageal mucosa by immunofluorescence. Patients with active EoE had significantly greater epithelial density of anti-gliadin staining when compared to inactive EoE (P < 0.0065) and gluten-free patients (P < 0.0008) at baseline and after soy infusion. Gliadin was not detected in non-EoE control patients. The distribution of gliadin was both cytoplasmic and nuclear. There was good correlation of dilated intercellular spaces grade and total gliadin staining intensity (r = 0.577, P = 0.0077). Acute oesophageal perfusion of a commercial gliadin-rich soy sauce did not lead to an increase in gliadin staining in active or inactive EoE. These findings suggest, although do not prove, that antigen penetration in active eosinophilic oesophagitis might be facilitated by impairment of epithelial integrity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Association of Oesophageal Varices and Splanchnic Vein Thromboses in Patients with JAK2-Positive Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Presentation of Two Cases and Data from a Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Link, Cornelia S.; Platzbecker, Uwe; Kroschinsky, Frank; Pannach, Sven; Thiede, Christian; Platzek, Ivan; Ehninger, Gerhard; Schuler, Markus K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oesophageal varices and gastrointestinal bleeding are common complications of liver cirrhosis. More rarely, oesophageal varices occur in patients with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension that results from thromboses of portal or splanchnic veins. Case Report We describe 2 young men who initially presented with varices as a result of portal vein thromboses. In the clinical follow-up, both were tested positive for a JAK2 mutation and consequently diagnosed with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). In an attempt to characterise the frequency of gastrointestinal complications in patients with JAK2-positive MPNs, we retrospectively analysed all known affected patients from our clinic for the diagnosis of portal vein thromboses and oesophageal varices. Strikingly, 48% of those who had received an oesophagogastroduodenoscopy had detectable oesophageal or gastric varices, and 82% of those suffered from portal or splanchnic vein thromboses. Conclusion While the association between JAK2, myeloproliferative disease and thrombotic events is well established, patients with idiopathic oesophageal varices are not regularly tested for JAK2 mutations. However, the occurrence of oesophageal varices may be the first presenting symptom of a MPN with a JAK2 mutation, and affected patients may profit from a close haematological monitoring to assure the early detection of developing MPN. PMID:23898274

  12. The oesophageal string test: a novel, minimally invasive method measures mucosal inflammation in eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Glenn T; Kagalwalla, Amir F; Lee, James J; Alumkal, Preeth; Maybruck, Brian T; Fillon, Sophie; Masterson, Joanne C; Ochkur, Sergei; Protheroe, Cheryl; Moore, Wendy; Pan, Zhaoxing; Amsden, Katie; Robinson, Zachary; Capocelli, Kelley; Mukkada, Vince; Atkins, Dan; Fleischer, David; Hosford, Lindsay; Kwatia, Mark A; Schroeder, Shauna; Kelly, Caleb; Lovell, Mark; Melin-Aldana, Hector; Ackerman, Steven J

    2013-10-01

    Eosinophil predominant inflammation characterises histological features of eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE). Endoscopy with biopsy is currently the only method to assess oesophageal mucosal inflammation in EoE. We hypothesised that measurements of luminal eosinophil-derived proteins would correlate with oesophageal mucosal inflammation in children with EoE. The Enterotest diagnostic device was used to develop an oesophageal string test (EST) as a minimally invasive clinical device. EST samples and oesophageal mucosal biopsies were obtained from children undergoing upper endoscopy for clinically defined indications. Eosinophil-derived proteins including eosinophil secondary granule proteins (major basic protein-1, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, eosinophil cationic protein, eosinophil peroxidase) and Charcot-Leyden crystal protein/galectin-10 were measured by ELISA in luminal effluents eluted from ESTs and extracts of mucosal biopsies. ESTs were performed in 41 children with active EoE (n=14), EoE in remission (n=8), gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (n=4) and controls with normal oesophagus (n=15). EST measurement of eosinophil-derived protein biomarkers significantly distinguished between children with active EoE, treated EoE in remission, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and normal oesophagus. Levels of luminal eosinophil-derived proteins in EST samples significantly correlated with peak and mean oesophageal eosinophils/high power field (HPF), eosinophil peroxidase indices and levels of the same eosinophil-derived proteins in extracts of oesophageal biopsies. The presence of eosinophil-derived proteins in luminal secretions is reflective of mucosal inflammation in children with EoE. The EST is a novel, minimally invasive device for measuring oesophageal eosinophilic inflammation in children with EoE.

  13. Acid hypersensitivity in patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Krarup, Anne Lund; Villadsen, Gerda Elisabeth; Mejlgaard, Else; Olesen, Søren Schou; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Funch-Jensen, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Painful symptoms are prevalent in patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis but experimental data are sparse. The aim of this study was to compare the pain response to experimental oesophageal stimulation in 14 patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis and 15 healthy volunteers. A multimodal probe was placed in the oesophagus. The participants were subjected to mechanical, thermal and electrical pain stimuli followed by perfusion with 0.1 M HCl. Pain scores, referred pain areas and evoked brain potentials to electrical stimulation of the oesophagus were recorded. Patients tolerated significantly less acid perfused in the oesophagus (median 123 versus 200 ml; P = 0.02) and felt the burning sensation evoked by the acid earlier (median 2.0 versus 5.0 min; P = 0.01). Eight patients had coexisting gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Six patients had pure eosinophilic oesophagitis, and this group felt the acid earlier than those with concomitant reflux or the healthy volunteers (median 0.8 versus 2.0 and 5.0 min; P = 0.03). There were no differences between patients and controls in the responses to mechanical or thermal stimulation (P > 0.4). Furthermore, no differences were found for the proxies of central nervous system sensitization (response to electrical stimulations, referred pain areas or evoked brain potentials; P > 0.1). Patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis are hypersensitive to acid perfused in the oesophagus, and pathophysiologic findings are likely confined to the peripheral tissue. Reflux from physiological acid may play a role in the symptoms of eosinophilic oesophagitis.

  14. Radiation-induced oesophagitis in lung cancer patients. Is susceptibility for neutropenia a risk factor?

    PubMed

    De Ruysscher, D; Van Meerbeeck, J; Vandecasteele, K; Oberije, C; Pijls, M; Dingemans, A M C; Reymen, B; van Baardwijk, A; Wanders, R; Lammering, G; Lambin, P; De Neve, W

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced oesophagitis is a major side effect of concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. A strong association between neutropenia and oesophagitis was previously shown, but external validation and further elucidation of the possible mechanisms are lacking. A total of 119 patients were included at two institutions. The concurrent group comprised 34 SCLC patients treated with concurrent carboplatin and etoposide, and concurrent chest irradiation, and 36 NSCLC patients with concurrent cisplatin and etoposide, and concurrent radiotherapy, while the sequential group comprised 49 NSCLC patients received sequential cisplatin and gemcitabine, and radiotherapy. Severe neutropenia was very frequent during concurrent chemoradiation (grade: 4 41.4%) and during induction chemotherapy in sequentially treated patients (grade 4: 30.6%), but not during radiotherapy (only 4% grade 1). In the concurrent group, the odds ratios of grade 3 oesophagitis vs. neutropenia were the following: grade 2 vs. grade 0/1: 5.60 (95% CI 1.55-20.26), p = 0.009; grade 3 vs. grade 0/1: 10.40 (95% CI 3.19-33.95); p = 0.0001; grade 4 vs. grade 0/1: 12.60 (95% CI 4.36-36.43); p < 0.00001. There was no correlation between the occurrence of neutropenia during induction chemotherapy and acute oesophagitis during or after radiotherapy alone. In the univariate analysis, total radiation dose (p < 0.001), overall treatment time of radiotherapy (p < 0.001), mean oesophageal dose (p = 0.038) and neutropenia (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with the development of oesophagitis. In a multivariate analysis, only neutropenia remained significant (p = 0.023). We confirm that neutropenia is independently correlated with oesophagitis in concurrent chemoradiation, but that the susceptibility for chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is not associated with radiation-induced oesophagitis. Further studies focusing on the underlying mechanisms are thus warranted.

  15. Auxetic oesophageal stents: structure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Ali, Murtaza Najabat; Busfield, James J C; Rehman, Ihtesham U

    2014-02-01

    Oesophageal cancer is the ninth leading cause of malignant cancer death and its prognosis remains poor, ranking as the sixth most frequent cause of death in the world. This research work aims to adopt an Auxetic (rotating-squares) geometry device, that had previously been examined theoretically and analysed by Grima and Evans (J Mater Sci Lett 19(17):1563-1565, 2000), to produce a novel Auxetic oesophageal stent and stent-grafts relevant to the palliative treatment of oesophageal cancer and also for the prevention of dysphagia. This paper discusses the manufacture of a small diameter Auxetic oesophageal stent and stent-graft. The oral deployment of such an Auxetic stent would be simplest if a commercial balloon dilatational catheter was used as this obviates the need for an expensive dedicated delivery system. A novel manufacturing route was employed in this research to develop both Auxetic films and Auxetic oesophageal stents, which ranged from conventional subtractive techniques to a new additive manufacturing method. Polyurethane was selected as a material for the fabrication of Auxetic films and Auxetic oesophageal stents because of its good biocompatibility and non-toxicological properties. The Auxetic films were later used for the fabrication of seamed Auxetic oesophageal stents. The flexible polyurethane tubular grafts were also attached to the inner luminal side of the seamless Auxetic oesophageal stents, in order to prevent tumour in-growth. Scanning electron microscopy was used to conduct surface morphology study by using different Auxetic specimens developed from different conventional and new additive manufacturing techniques. Tensile testing of the Auxetic films was performed to characterise their mechanical properties. The stent expansion tests of the Auxetic stents were done to analyse the longitudinal extension and radial expansion of the Auxetic stent at a range of radial pressures applied by the balloon catheter, and to also identify the pressure

  16. Eosinophilic oesophagitis: clinical presentation and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bystrom, Jonas; O'Shea, Nuala R

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory disorder of the oesophagus which has become increasingly recognised over recent years, although it remains underdiagnosed in many centres. It is characterised histologically by a significant eosinophilic infiltration of the oesophageal mucosa (>15 eosinophils per high powered field), and clinically with features of oesophageal dysfunction such a dysphagia, food impaction, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) resistant dyspepsia. Fibrosis and oesophageal remodelling may occur and lead to oesophageal strictures. An allergic predisposition is common in the EoE population, which appears to be primarily food antigen driven in children and aeroallergen driven in adults. Evidence suggests that the pathogenesis of EoE is due to a dysregulated immunological response to an environmental allergen, resulting in a T helper type 2 (Th2) inflammatory disease and remodelling of the oesophagus in genetically susceptible individuals. Allergen elimination and anti-inflammatory therapy with corticosteroids are currently the mainstay of treatment; however, an increasing number of studies are now focused on targeting different stages in the disease pathogenesis. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms resulting in EoE will allow us to improve the therapeutic options available. PMID:24647582

  17. Review article: oesophageal spasm - diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Tutuian, R; Castell, D O

    2006-05-15

    Oesophageal spasm is a common empiric diagnosis clinically applied to patients with unexplained chest pain. In contrast it is an uncommon manometric abnormality found in patients presenting with chest pain and/or dysphagia and diagnosed by >or=20% simultaneous oesophageal contractions during standardized motility testing. Using Medline we searched for diagnostic criteria and treatment options for oesophageal spasm. While the aetiology of this condition is unclear, studies suggest the culprit being a defect in the nitric oxide pathway. Well-known radiographic patterns have low sensitivities and specificities to identify intermittent simultaneous contractions. Recognizing that simultaneous contractions may result from gastro-oesophageal reflux this diagnosis should be investigated or treated first. Studies have documented improvements with proton-pump inhibitors, nitrates, calcium-channel blockers and tricyclic antidepressants or serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Small case series reported benefits after botulinium toxin injections, dilatations and myotomies. Uncertainties persist regarding the optimal management of oesophageal spasm and recommendations are based on controlled studies with small numbers of patients or on case series. Acid suppression, muscle relaxants and visceral analgetics should be tried first. Botulinium toxin injections should be reserved for patients who do not respond. Pneumatic dilatations or myotomies represent rather heroic approaches for non-responding patients.

  18. Systematic comparison of conventional oesophageal manometry with oesophageal motility while eating bread.

    PubMed

    Howard, P J; Maher, L; Pryde, A; Heading, R C

    1991-11-01

    Conventional oesophageal manometry is seldom accompanied by symptoms and may indeed be normal in patients with a history of dysphagia. We have recently shown that oesophageal manometry during eating may be helpful in the evaluation of patients with dysphagia but there has been little systematic comparison of fed oesophageal motor patterns with conventional clinical manometry. Oesophageal manometry in response to water swallows and during eating was therefore examined in 58 consecutive patients who had been referred for clinical oesophageal function studies. The patients were divided into three groups according to the percentage of peristaltic activity during conventional manometry: group 1 (n = 21) had 100% peristalsis; group 2 (n = 29) had 1-99% peristalsis and group 3 (n = 8) were aperistaltic. All the patients in group 3 had achalasia and remained aperistaltic during eating, however, was less than with water swallows in both group 1 (53% compared with 100%) and group 2 (49% compared with 82.3%) patients. Synchronous contractions and non-conducted swallows were correspondingly increased during eating. Although there was a significant correlation between the amplitude of peristaltic contractions with water and bread in groups 1 and 2, mean peristaltic amplitudes were less with bread than with water swallows. The data show that there are substantial differences in the distal oesophageal motility patterns produced by water swallows and by eating. Conventional manometry with water swallows does not allow prediction of the fed oesophageal motility pattern, except in patients with achalasia.

  19. Oesophageal signet ring cell carcinoma as complication of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Turner, K O; Genta, R M; Sonnenberg, A

    2015-11-01

    Signet ring cell carcinoma occurs as a histological variant of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. In a cross-sectional study, to pursue the hypothesis that oesophageal signet ring cell cancers constitute a complication of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. In a large national database of histopathology records, we accumulated 91 802 patients with Barrett's oesophagus (BE), 2817 with oesophageal nonsignet ring adenocarcinoma (EAC) and 278 with oesophageal signet ring cell carcinoma (SRC). The three groups were compared with respect to their clinical and demographic characteristics, as well as socio-economic risk factors (associated with patients' place of residence). About 9% of all oesophageal adenocarcinomas harboured features of signet ring cell carcinoma. Patients with oesophageal adenocarcinoma and signet ring cell carcinoma were characterised by almost identical epidemiological patterns. Patients with either cancer type were slightly older than those with Barrett's oesophagus (EAC 68.0, SRC 66.7 vs. BE 63.7 years), and both showed a striking male predominance (EAC and SRC 85% vs. BE 67%). Both cancer types were associated with a similar set of alarm symptoms, such as dysphagia, pain and weight loss. The distribution by race (Whites vs. Blacks) and socio-economic parameters, such as levels of college education and family income, were similar among the three groups of patients. Signet ring cell carcinoma is a rare variant of oesophageal adenocarcinoma with similar epidemiological characteristics. The reasons why a minority of reflux patients progress to develop signet ring cell carcinoma, rather than the usual type of oesophageal adenocarcinoma, remain unknown. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... air. This produces pressure against the bleeding veins (balloon tamponade). Once the bleeding is stopped, other varices can be treated with medicines and medical procedures to prevent future bleeding, including: Drugs called ...

  1. Feasibility of continuous, catheter-directed thrombolysis using low-dose urokinase in combination with low molecular-weight heparin for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis in patients at risk of bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoping; Shi, Wangyin; He, Xu; Lou, Wensheng; Chen, Liang; Gu, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the feasibility of catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) using continuous infusion of low-dose urokinase in combination with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis. This retrospective analysis included patients with symptomatic acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis who received CDT using continuous infusion of low-dose urokinase in combination with LMWH within the past four years. Urokinase was administered at 1×104 U/h and 2×104 U/h in patients at high-risk and low-risk of bleeding, respectively. Measurements included urokinase dosage, duration, clinical outcomes and CDT-related complications. A total of 46 patients were included (high-risk, n=17; low-risk, n=29). In the high-risk patients, 64.7% experienced dissolution of ≥50% thrombi after a median CDT duration of 8 days (range, 6–10 days) and median total urokinase dose of 1.92×106 units (range, 1.44–2.4×106 units). In the low-risk patients, 82.8% achieved dissolution of ≥50% thrombi after a median CDT duration of 7 days (range, 4–10 days) and a median total urokinase dose of 3.36×106 units (range, 1.92–4.80×106 units). Remission of clinical symptoms after CDT was achieved in 15 (88.2%) and 28 (96.6%) cases in high-risk and low-risk patients, respectively. No treatment-associated pulmonary embolism or major bleeding was observed. Three (6.5%) subjects (high-risk, n=1; low-risk, n=2) experienced minor bleeding. In conclusion, continuous infusion of low-dose urokinase via CDT in combination with LMWH is effective and safe for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis in patients with one or more risk factor for bleeding. PMID:28352362

  2. Oesophageal adenocarcinoma: the new epidemic in men?

    PubMed

    Rutegård, Martin; Lagergren, Pernilla; Nordenstedt, Helena; Lagergren, Jesper

    2011-07-01

    The last decades have witnessed an unprecedented rise in the incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. This rise has mainly affected men, and current male-to-female sex ratio estimates range from 7-10 to 1. Major risk factors for oesophageal adenocarcinoma are gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and obesity, especially in combination. The prevalence of these risk factors has increased during the last decades, but there does not seem to be a marked differential distribution among men and women. However, reflux among men is more often associated with erosive reflux disease than it is among women. There is also evidence that male-type obesity, with a prominent abdominal distribution of fat, confers a greater risk increase for oesophageal adenocarcinoma than the female equivalent. Due to the marked male predominance and the finding that women tend to develop specialized intestinal metaplasia (Barrett's oesophagus) and adenocarcinoma at a later age than men, interest has been directed towards a potential aetiological role of reproductive factors and sex hormones. Breastfeeding has been found to be a protective factor for the development of adenocarcinoma, while no association has hitherto been established with other reproductive factors. Taken together, the male predominance in the incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma may partly be explained by the differential effect of the major risk factors reflux disease and obesity, but the mechanisms whereby this occurs need to be elucidated. Moreover, the association with breastfeeding indicates a need for extensive epidemiological studies to clarify a possible role of sex hormonal influence in the aetiology of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... periods; Intermenstrual bleeding; Spotting; Metrorrhagia Images Female reproductive anatomy Bleeding between periods Uterus References Bulun SE. The physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: ...

  4. Mechanisms of gastro-oesophageal reflux in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cucchiara, S; Santamaria, F; Andreotti, M R; Minella, R; Ercolini, P; Oggero, V; de Ritis, G

    1991-01-01

    Abnormal degrees of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) were detected by 24 hour intraoesophageal pH measurement in 12 of 14 children (mean age 7.9 years; range 5 months-16 years) affected by cystic fibrosis and complaining of symptoms suggesting GOR. These patients underwent combined recording of distal oesophageal motility and intraluminal pH in order to investigate mechanisms of GOR. Inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation was the most common mechanism of reflux in all patients. Other mechanisms (appropriate relaxation or lowered pressure of the lower oesophageal sphincter, increased intragastric pressure) were detected less frequently. Frequency of inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations was significantly higher in patients with cystic fibrosis than in other study groups (symptomatic GOR, GOR disease complicated by respiratory complaints). Inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations occurred with the same frequency in patients with cystic fibrosis and in a group of children with GOR disease complicated by oesophagitis. Abnormalities of distal oesophageal contractions such as decreased amplitude or uncoordinated waves were also recorded in cystic fibrosis patients. Seven patients with cystic fibrosis completed a therapeutic trial for eight weeks consisting of postural treatment and oral cisapride, a new prokinetic drug. The oesophageal acid exposure improved in only three patients. We conclude that pathologic GOR is commonly associated with cystic fibrosis. The predominant reflux mechanism in these patients is a transient inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation rather than a low steady state basal lower oesophageal sphincter pressure. PMID:2039253

  5. Diagnosing oesophagitis in children: how discriminative is histology?

    PubMed

    Karabulut, Y Y; Savaş, B; Kansu, A; Kurşun, N; Ensari, A

    2013-09-01

    We set out to evaluate the discriminatory value of currently available histologic criteria in the differential diagnosis of reflux oesophagitis and eosinophilic oesophagitis in children. We evaluated the oesophageal biopsies of 145 children and selected 28 demonstrative cases of clinically confirmed eosinophilic oesophagitis (n = 7), and reflux oesophagitis (n = 11) with a control group with normal histology (n = 10). Histological assessment was performed for the presence of papillary elongation, dilatation of intercellular spaces, basal cell hyperplasia and the number of intraepithelial eosinophils, lymphocytes and neutrophils. Among 28 children, there were 3 boys and 4 girls in eosinophilic oesophagitis group, 8 boys and 3 girls in reflux group, and 5 boys and 5 girls in normal group. The mean age was 10,4 years. Basal cell hyperplasia was observed in 12 cases while papillary elongation was found in 25, and dilated intercellular spaces were present in 20 cases. Lymphocyte and neutrophil counts were significantly higher in reflux group when compared to eosinophilic oesophagitis and normal group. Eosinophil counts were significantly higher in eosinophilic group. Results of the present study suggest that, basal cell hyperplasia, papillary elongation, and dilated intercellular spaces all seem to be markers of oesophagitis regardless of the underlying pathology and etiology, thereby, highlighting their rather nonspecific nature in the differential diagnosis of various types of oesophagitis. The additional information on inflammatory cell counts may help to distinguish reflux oesophagitis from other causes of oesophagitis including EoO.

  6. Oesophageal narrowing on barium oesophagram is more common in adult patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis than PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Podboy, A; Katzka, D A; Enders, F; Larson, J J; Geno, D; Kryzer, L; Alexander, J

    2016-06-01

    To date there have been no clear features that aid in differentiating patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) from PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). However, barium swallow roentgenography is a more sensitive and specific measure to detect subtle fibrostenotic remodeling changes present in EoE. We aim to characterise any clinical, endoscopic, histiological or barium roentgenographic differences between EoE and PPI-REE. To characterise any clinical, endoscopic, histiological or barium roentgenographic differences between EoE and PPI-REE. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis on data collected from a tertiary referral centre population from 2010 to 2015. Data from 66 patients with EoE and 28 patients with PPI-REE were analysed. Cases were adults who met consensus guidelines for EOE, and had a barium swallow study within 6 months of the index endoscopy. Clinical, endoscopic, histiological and barium swallow findings were collected. Patients with EoE reported similar characteristics as PPI-REE patients, except EoE patients were younger (35.6 vs. 46.6 years; P = 0.011), had earlier symptom onset (29.0 vs. 38.0 years; P = 0.026), and smaller oesophageal diameters on barium swallow (19.5 mm vs. 20; P = 0.042). Patients with EoE were more likely to have distal strictures (EoE 77% vs. 25%; P = 0.02) and, importantly, a greater likelihood of small calibre oesophagus (51.5% vs. 17.9%; P = 0.002). Moreover, EoE patients had a higher probability of developing small calibre oesophagus after 20 years of symptoms (72.3% vs. 30.2%; P = 0.074) compared to PPI-REE patients. When compared with eosinophilic oesophagitis, PPI-REE patients demonstrate findings that suggest PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia to be a later onset, less aggressive form of oesophageal stricturing disease than eosinophilic oesophagitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  8. Modelling Factors Causing Mortality in Oesophageal VaricesPatients in King Abdul Aziz University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bahlas, Sami

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study is to reach a model defining factors precipitating short survival in patients with oesophageal varices and improving the understanding of such factors. Models would help to prioritize the clinical goals and intervention for saving the lives of patients. Methods Retrospective analysis of all patients admitted to King Abdul Aziz University Hospital who had been diagnosed with oesophageal varices. The patients’ demographics, disease history, physical examination, viral infections, parasitic infections, blood pictures, cancer biomarkers, liver enzymes and bleeding details were collected, tested for correlation with mortality to formulate a model. Results A total of 148 patients were included in this study. 37 clinical variables were studied only 15 factors were found to have a statistical significance. These factors were PT (RC=0.17338 P-value 0.00011), APTT (RC=0.07916, P-value 0.00002), haemoglobin level (RC=-0.44748, P-value <0.0001), WBC (RC = 0.22255, P-value 0.00001), serum albumin level (RC=-0.12953, P-value 0.00001), serum creatinine (RC=0.01483, P-value 0.00002), at least one incidence of encephalopathy (RC=1.80500, P-value 0.00014), total bilirubin (RC=0.01371, P-value 0.00016), direct bilirubin (RC=0.01298, P-value 0.00357, serum AST (RC=0.00914, P-value 0.00462), presence of at least bleeding event (RC=1.03373, P-value 0.00613), ascites grade I (RC=-1.57435, P-value 0.00967), SBP (RC=1.47216, P-value 0.01581), platelets count (RC=0.00398, P-value 0.03476) and oesophageal varices (RC = -1.42139, P-value 0.03673). Only 5 factors were likely to affect the mortality status. These factors were encephalopathy, spontaneous SBP, bleeding, ascites and grade of oesophageal varices. Six models were then formulated. Conclusion These models should be retested in larger study groups to test their reliability in order to use them as surrogate end point in future clinical studies. PMID:22224185

  9. Palliative pulsion intubation in oesophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Angorn, I. B.; Hegarty, M. M.

    1979-01-01

    Peroral pulsion intubation for the palliation of dysphagia due to oesophageal carcinoma was performed on 652 patients. The mortality was 16%, failure rate 3%, and hospital stay 3 days. Advanced disease and the presence of oesophagorespiratory fistula is not a contraindication to intubation. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:90475

  10. Disordered oesophageal motility in thyrotoxic myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Sweatman, M. C.; Chambers, L.

    1985-01-01

    Dysphagia is an uncommon feature of thyrotoxic myopathy, and is usually associated with other signs of bulbar weakness, such as dysarthria and nasal regurgitation. We report a case of thyrotoxicosis presenting with dysphagia due to diminished oesophageal motility associated with significant hypercalcaemia; both abnormalities resolved rapidly following treatment. PMID:4022894

  11. The molecular mechanisms of oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    McCabe, M L; Dlamini, Z

    2005-07-01

    Apoptosis is a process of programmed cell death, which is as essential as cell growth, for the maintenance of homeostasis. When these processes loose integration such as cancer, then uncontrolled cell growth occurs. Cancer of the oesophagus ranks as the ninth most common malignancy in the world, and recent evidence shows that its incidence is increasing. Prognosis of this disease is poor, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. Unraveling the mechanisms or developing animal models for oesophageal carcinoma have thus far not been successful. It is believed that oesophageal cancer has an intricate molecular mechanism of evading apoptosis by the down-regulation of Bax, up-regulation of Bcl-2, Bcl-xl and Survivin, mutation of p53 and alteration in Fas expression. A great deal of research has been performed in order to determine the key genes that initiate and promote the growth of oesophageal cancer. This review focuses on apoptosis and candidate genes linked to the development of oesophageal cancer, which it is hoped may provide diagnostic and therapeutic tools, and potential therapeutic strategies for the management of this carcinoma.

  12. Preoperative use of enoxaparin compared with unfractionated heparin increases the incidence of re-exploration for postoperative bleeding after open-heart surgery in patients who present with an acute coronary syndrome: clinical investigation and reports.

    PubMed

    Jones, Heath U; Muhlestein, Joseph B; Jones, Kent W; Bair, Tami L; Lavasani, Farangis; Sohrevardi, Mahtab; Horne, Benjamin D; Doty, Donald; Lappe, Donald L

    2002-09-24

    Enoxaparin has become an attractive therapy for use during acute coronary syndrome (ACS) because of its potential superior efficacy over unfractionated heparin (UFH), its longer activity, and its subcutaneous route of administration. However, because a significant number of patients presenting with ACS may be sent directly to open heart surgery while still on anticoagulation, it is important to understand any potential bleeding risks that may be associated with the use of enoxaparin under these circumstances. From 1998 to 2001, 1159 consecutive patients presenting with an acute coronary syndrome who received either UFH (n=1008) or enoxaparin (n=151) before proceeding to open heart surgery for urgent therapy during the same hospitalization were included in this study. Incidence of perioperative bleeding as evidenced by the units of blood products (packed red blood cells or platelets) transfused or the need for surgical re-exploration for postoperative bleeding was recorded. Average age was 65+/-11 and 67+/-11 years for patients receiving UFH and enoxaparin, respectively (P=0.005). Seventy-five percent of those receiving UFH and 64% of those receiving enoxaparin (P<0.005) were males. After discharge, the incidence of rehospitalization for hemorrhage requiring return to surgery for re-exploration was 7.9% in the enoxaparin group and 3.7% in the UFH group (adjusted hazard ratio=2.6, P=0.03). The use of blood products did not differ between groups (UFH=2.7+/-6.5 U and enoxaparin=2.3+/-4.5 U; P=NS). The preoperative use of enoxaparin compared with UFH in patients presenting with an ACS who undergo open-heart surgery during the same hospitalization is associated with a significantly increased incidence of re-exploration for postoperative bleeding. Further study is needed to understand the mechanism of this phenomenon and to develop appropriate guidelines to address this potentially important issue.

  13. Resection for oesophageal cancer - complications and survival.

    PubMed

    Grøtting, Marie Sæthre; Løberg, Else Marit; Johannessen, Hans-Olaf; Johnson, Egil

    2016-05-01

    BACKGROUND Surgery is considered necessary to achieve a cure for oesophageal cancer. Minimally invasive oesophageal resection is increasingly performed with the aim of reducing the number of complications compared with open surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate postoperative complications, mortality and long-term survival following hybrid oesophageal resection by laparoscopy and thoracotomy.MATERIAL AND METHOD Patients with oesophageal cancer who underwent hybrid resection with curative intent at Oslo University Hospital Ullevål from 1 November 2007 to 1 June 2013 were included (n = 109). Complications were graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and survival figures were recorded.RESULTS Median age was 65 years, 79 % were men. Altogether 118 complications were recorded in 70 patients (64.2 %). Distribution of complications was 1.8 % for stage I, 29.4 % for stage II, 22.1 % for stage III and 11.0 % for stage IV. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 4.6 %. There was no postoperative mortality. The proportion of R0 resections with microscopic radicality was 91 % (n = 100). For the entire patient population, the estimated 5-year survival rate was 48 % (95 % CI 36 - 60 %), for R0 resection 51 % (38 - 63 %) and for R1-2 resection 0 %. Estimated median survival with R0-2, R0 and R1-2 resection was 55, 55 and 10 months (0 - 28 months), respectively. R status and stage had a significant bearing on survival.INTERPRETATION There was a low percentage of serious complications, no mortality and few anastomotic leakages after hybrid resection for oesophageal cancer. The 5-year survival rate was good.

  14. Costs and quality of life associated with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the UK: cohort analysis of patients in a cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, H E; Stokes, E A; Bargo, D; Logan, R F; Mora, A; Hodge, R; Gray, A; James, M W; Stanley, A J; Everett, S M; Bailey, A A; Dallal, H; Greenaway, J; Dyer, C; Llewelyn, C; Walsh, T S; Travis, S P L; Murphy, M F; Jairath, V

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Data on costs associated with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) are scarce. We provide estimates of UK healthcare costs, indirect costs and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for patients presenting to hospital with AUGIB. Setting Six UK university hospitals with >20 AUGIB admissions per month, >400 adult beds, 24 h endoscopy, and on-site access to intensive care and surgery. Participants 936 patients aged ≥18 years, admitted with AUGIB, and enrolled between August 2012 and March 2013 in the TRIGGER trial of AUGIB comparing restrictive versus liberal red blood cell (RBC) transfusion thresholds. Primary and secondary outcome measures Healthcare resource use during hospitalisation and postdischarge up to 28  days, unpaid informal care, time away from paid employment and HRQoL using the EuroQol EQ-5D at 28  days were measured prospectively. National unit costs were used to value resource use. Initial in-hospital treatment costs were upscaled to a UK level. Results Mean initial in-hospital costs were £2458 (SE=£216) per patient. Inpatient bed days, endoscopy and RBC transfusions were key cost drivers. Postdischarge healthcare costs were £391 (£44) per patient. One-third of patients received unpaid informal care and the quarter in paid employment required time away from work. Mean HRQoL for survivors was 0.74. Annual initial inhospital treatment cost for all AUGIB cases in the UK was estimated to be £155.5 million, with exploratory analyses of the incremental costs of treating hospitalised patients developing AUGIB generating figures of between £143 million and £168 million. Conclusions AUGIB is a large burden for UK hospitals with inpatient stay, endoscopy and RBC transfusions as the main cost drivers. It is anticipated that this work will enable quantification of the impact of cost reduction strategies in AUGIB and will inform economic analyses of novel or existing interventions for AUGIB. Trial registration number ISRCTN

  15. Costs and quality of life associated with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the UK: cohort analysis of patients in a cluster randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Campbell, H E; Stokes, E A; Bargo, D; Logan, R F; Mora, A; Hodge, R; Gray, A; James, M W; Stanley, A J; Everett, S M; Bailey, A A; Dallal, H; Greenaway, J; Dyer, C; Llewelyn, C; Walsh, T S; Travis, S P L; Murphy, M F; Jairath, V

    2015-04-29

    Data on costs associated with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) are scarce. We provide estimates of UK healthcare costs, indirect costs and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for patients presenting to hospital with AUGIB. Six UK university hospitals with >20 AUGIB admissions per month, >400 adult beds, 24 h endoscopy, and on-site access to intensive care and surgery. 936 patients aged ≥18 years, admitted with AUGIB, and enrolled between August 2012 and March 2013 in the TRIGGER trial of AUGIB comparing restrictive versus liberal red blood cell (RBC) transfusion thresholds. Healthcare resource use during hospitalisation and postdischarge up to 28  days, unpaid informal care, time away from paid employment and HRQoL using the EuroQol EQ-5D at 28  days were measured prospectively. National unit costs were used to value resource use. Initial in-hospital treatment costs were upscaled to a UK level. Mean initial in-hospital costs were £2458 (SE=£216) per patient. Inpatient bed days, endoscopy and RBC transfusions were key cost drivers. Postdischarge healthcare costs were £391 (£44) per patient. One-third of patients received unpaid informal care and the quarter in paid employment required time away from work. Mean HRQoL for survivors was 0.74. Annual initial inhospital treatment cost for all AUGIB cases in the UK was estimated to be £155.5 million, with exploratory analyses of the incremental costs of treating hospitalised patients developing AUGIB generating figures of between £143 million and £168 million. AUGIB is a large burden for UK hospitals with inpatient stay, endoscopy and RBC transfusions as the main cost drivers. It is anticipated that this work will enable quantification of the impact of cost reduction strategies in AUGIB and will inform economic analyses of novel or existing interventions for AUGIB. ISRCTN85757829 and NCT02105532. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  16. Morphometric evaluation of oesophageal wall in patients with nutcracker oesophagus and ineffective oesophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Park, H; Lim, J H; Choi, S H; Park, C; Lee, S I; Conklin, J L

    2008-08-01

    The pathogenesis of nutcracker oesophagus (NE) and ineffective oesophageal motility (IEM) is unclear. Damage to the enteric nervous system or smooth muscle can cause oesophageal dysmotility. We tested the hypothesis that NE and IEM are associated with abnormal muscular or neural constituents of the oesophageal wall. Oesophageal manometry was performed in patients prior to total gastrectomy for gastric cancer. The oesophageal manometries were categorized as normal (n = 7), NE (n = 13), or IEM (n = 5). Histologic examination of oesophageal tissue obtained during surgery was performed after haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and trichrome staining. Oesophageal innervation was examined after immunostaining for protein gene product-9.5 (PGP-9.5), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). There were no significant differences in inner circular smooth muscle thickness or degree of fibrosis among the three groups. Severe muscle fibre loss was found in four of five patients with IEM. The density of PGP-9.5-reactive neural structures was not different among the three groups. The density of ChAT immunostaining in the myenteric plexus (MP) was significantly greater in patients with NE (P < 0.05) and the density of nNOS immunostaining in the circular muscle (CM) was significantly greater in IEM patients (P < 0.05). The ChAT/nNOS ratio in both MP and CM was significantly greater in NE patients. NE may result from an imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory innervation of the oesophagus, because more than normal numbers of ChAT-positive myenteric neurones are seen in NE. Myopathy and/or increased number of nNOS neurones may contribute to the hypocontractile motor activity of IEM.

  17. Erythromycin enhances oesophageal motility in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Chrysos, E; Tzovaras, G; Epanomeritakis, E; Tsiaoussis, J; Vrachasotakis, N; Vassilakis, J S; Xynos, E

    2001-02-01

    Intravenous (i.v.) erythromycin enhances gastric emptying and oesophageal motility in both healthy and disease situations, acting either as a motilin or acetylcholine agonist. The purpose of the present paper was to investigate any possible effect of i.v. erythromycin on oesophageal motility in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR). In 15 patients with GOR (proven on 24-h ambulatory oesophageal pH measurement), standard oesophageal manometry was performed after i.v. injection of placebo and 200 mg erythromycin, in a random blind fashion. Erythromycin significantly increased lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) pressure from 17 +/- 5 to 41 +/- 10 mmHg (P < 0.001), without affecting the postdeglutition relaxation of LOS. Erythromycin also increased the amplitude (from 79 +/- 34 to 97 +/- 40 mmHg; P < 0.001), duration (from 3.4 +/- 0.6 to 3.8 +/- 0.6 s; P = 0.005), velocity (from 3.1 +/- 0.8 to 3.5 +/- 1.15 cm/s; P = 0.0047) and strength (from 149 +/- 84 to 201 +/- 103 mmHg.s; P < 0.001) of peristalsis at 5 cm proximal to the LOS. Similarly, the drug increased the amplitude of peristalsis at 10 and 15 cm proximal to the LOS (from 70 +/- 39 to 77.4 +/- 37 mmHg; P = 0.049 and from 36 +/- 20 to 49 +/- 36 mmHg; P = 0.004, respectively) and the duration of peristalsis at the same levels (from 3.1 +/- 0.6 to 3.3 +/- 0.5 s; P = 0.011, and from 2.7 +/- 0.6 to 3 +/- 0.5 s; P = 0.003, respectively). Intravenously administered erythromycin improves impaired oesophageal motility in patients with GOR. This observation might be of clinical use.

  18. Non-invasive (and minimally invasive) diagnosis of oesophageal varices.

    PubMed

    de Franchis, Roberto

    2008-10-01

    Current guidelines recommend screening all cirrhotic patients by endoscopy, to identify patients at risk of bleeding who should undergo prophylactic treatment. However, since the prevalence of varices in cirrhotic patients is variable, universal screening would imply a large number of unnecessary endoscopies and a heavy burden for endoscopy units. In addition, compliance to screening programs may be hampered by the perceived unpleasantness of endoscopy. Predicting the presence of oesophageal varices by non-invasive means might increase compliance and would permit to restrict the performance of endoscopy to those patients with a high probability of having varices. Over the years, several studies have addressed this issue by assessing the potential of biochemical, clinical and ultrasound parameters, transient elastography, CT scanning and video capsule endoscopy. The platelet count/spleen diameter ratio, CT scanning and video capsule endoscopy have shown promising performance characteristics, although none of them is equivalent to EGD. These methods are perceived by patients as preferable to endoscopy and thus might increase adherence to screening programs. Whether this will compensate for the lower sensitivity of these alternative techniques, and ultimately improve the outcomes if more patients undergo screening, is the crucial question that will have to be answered in the future.

  19. Treatment modalities for bleeding esophagogastric varices.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Yoshioka, Masato; Hirakata, Atsushi; Kawano, Youichi; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Ueda, Junji; Uchida, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Bleeding from esophageal varices (EVs) or gastric varices (GVs) is a catastrophic complication of chronic liver disease. In this paper, we review the management of bleeding EVs and GVs. DIAGNOSIS OF EVS AND GVS: The grading system for esophagogastric varices proposed by the Japan Society for Portal Hypertension classifies GVs into those involving the cardia (Lg-c), the fundus (Lg-f), and both the cardia and the fundus (Lg-cf). In this review, we divide GVs into 2 categories: Lg-c (cardiac varices: CVs) and Lg-cf or Lg-f (fundal varices: FVs). TREATMENT MODALITIES FOR EVS AND GVS: Treatment modalities for EVs and GVs include placement of a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube, pharmacologic therapy, surgery, interventional radiology, and endoscopic treatment. MANAGEMENT OF BLEEDING EVS AND GVS: In Japan, endoscopic treatment has recently become the therapy of choice for bleeding EVs or GVs. In other countries, especially the United States, vasoactive drugs and endoscopic treatment are routinely used to manage variceal hemorrhage. BLEEDING EVS: Endoscopic variceal ligation is useful for controlling bleeding from EVs. However, confirmation of ligation precisely at the site of bleeding is usually difficult in patients with massive variceal bleeding. The site of acute bleeding can generally be identified by means of water instillation and suction. Ligation is then performed at the bleeding point. If endoscopic hemostasis is unsuccessful, a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube is used as a temporary bridge to other treatments. Transportal obliteration is useful for blocking variceal blood flow. BLEEDING GVS: Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy with a tissue adhesive, such as N-butyl-cyanoacrylate or isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate, is effective for acute bleeding from GVs. However, bleeding from the GV injection site and rebleeding from the rupture point have been reported in patients receiving endoscopic injection sclerotherapy. If endoscopic hemostasis is unsuccessful, a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube

  20. Candida oesophagitis with hepatitis C virus: an uncommon association.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, Javed; Jafri, Wasim; Hussainy, Akbar S

    2003-06-01

    Candida oesophagitis is an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining illness. We report a 28-year-old woman who presented with Candida oesophagitis with underlying chronic hepatitis C. The patient presented with anorexia and weakness and was noted to have raised serum transaminases. Upper-gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed Candida oesophagitis involving the whole oesophagus. Oesophageal biopsy demonstrated changes consistent with Candida oesophagitis. Serology was positive for hepatitis C antibodies, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) genotyped hepatitis C virus (HCV) as genotype 3. Liver biopsy revealed chronic hepatitis with moderately active portal inflammation. A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) test was non-reactive for types 1 and 2. The development of Candida oesophagitis in a patient with chronic HCV infection demands prompt consideration of general debility and immunosuppression as effects of HCV that led to an occurrence of opportunistic infection. Evaluation of this case provides insight into various mechanisms of immune suppression associated with HCV infection.

  1. The oesophageal microbiome: an unexplored link in obesity-associated oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Morris, Margaret J

    2016-10-01

    The influence of diets rich in saturated fats and simple sugars on the intestinal microbiota plays a central role in obesity. Being overweight or obese predisposes individuals to several diseases including oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC), which develops through a cascade of events starting with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, progressing to Barrett's oesophagus (BO), and then OAC. A range of mechanisms for the increased risk of OAC in obese individuals have been proposed; however, a role for the oesophageal microbiota has been largely ignored. This is despite the fact that it is clear that the composition of the oesophageal microbiota shifts with the development of OAC. Given the well-established impact that unhealthy diets have on the intestinal microbiota, it is plausible that exposure to unhealthy foods, and the ensuing obesity, would result in an imbalance in the oesophageal microbiota. It is also likely that these changes may mimic the changes observed in the intestinal microbiota (i.e. increase in short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) producers and bile acid biosynthesis). The modulation of SCFAs and bile acids in the oesophagus by diet could promote the transdifferentiation from squamous to intestinal-like columnar cells observed in BO, given that intestinal cells proliferate in the presence of SCFAs. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Late results of oesophageal and oesophagogastric resection in the treatment of oesophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ward, A. S.; Collis, J. Leigh

    1971-01-01

    Oesophageal resection with oesophagogastric anastomosis is said to be followed by severe oesophagitis. Little is known, however, of the late results of this technique in patients with oesophageal carcinoma and the present communication records our experience with 23 long-term survivors. Except for one patient with recurrent carcinoma, all were in good health and taking a normal diet. Loss of weight, which is a normal sequel to oesophagogastric resection, was prevented by inserting two extra meals a day. Anaemia was not a problem and there was no evidence of vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. None of the patients had any symptoms of oesophagitis, though all exhibited free reflux on recumbency. After operation patients are advised to sleep propped up and to avoid stooping or lying flat. These measures are thought to be largely responsible for the absence of oesophagitis in our series. Five patients were achlorhydric and 10 hypochlorhydric in response to intravenous pentagastrin (6 μg/kg per hour). Mean basal output was 0·6 mEq/hour and mean maximal output 8·8 mEq/hour. PMID:5101265

  3. Infective oesophagitis: epidemiology, cause, diagnosis and treatment options.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Ashli

    2015-12-01

    This review summarizes recent literature pertaining to infectious oesophagitis. Infectious oesophagitis is an uncommon condition of the oesophagus caused by viral, bacterial or fungal agents. A compromised immune system is the most important risk factor for the development of infectious oesophagitis and HIV or AIDS and solid organ transplant patients are particularly at risk. Common symptoms of infectious oesophagitis include odynophagia and dysphagia, but it can be difficult to distinguish infectious oesophagitis from other causes of oesophagitis based on patient symptoms alone. Definitive diagnosis requires esophagoscopy with biopsy for histologic and microbiologic evaluation. Endoscopic findings differ based on cause. Overall, Candida albicans is the most common cause of infectious oesophagitis. Treatment of infectious oesophagitis is based on host immune status, the severity of infection and risk of complications. When seemingly adequate treatment is unsuccessful, alternative diagnoses should be entertained and additional biopsies and/or diagnostics obtained. Recent research in infectious oesophagitis involves identifying preventive strategies for at-risk populations. Prevention may include use of probiotics, prophylactic medications and/or treatment of underlying immune dysfunction and could be important for susceptible individuals.

  4. Functional oesophagoscopy: endoscopic evaluation of the oesophageal phase of deglutition.

    PubMed

    Belafsky, P C; Rees, C J

    2009-09-01

    The anatomy and function of the oropharynx and larynx during deglutition can be assessed using the flexible endoscope, but this evaluation does not provide information on the oesophagus. Guided observation of oesophageal swallowing enables extended dysphagia evaluation. To assess the diagnostic utility of guided observation of oesophageal swallowing in the evaluation of dysphagia. Retrospective case series. Procedures for guided observation of oesophageal swallowing were reviewed for oesophageal findings and compared with fluoroscopy and manometry. Twenty-one patients underwent guided observation of oesophageal swallowing and concurrent videofluoroscopy and/or manometry. No complications of the former procedure occurred. The results of guided observation of oesophageal swallowing concurred with those of fluoroscopy in 15/21 cases (71 per cent) and with those of manometry in five of six (83 per cent) cases. Guided observation of oesophageal swallowing revealed anatomic pathology contributing to dysphagia in 15/21 (71 per cent) patients. The procedure identified pathology not detected by fluoroscopy and manometry in 13/21 (62 per cent) patients. Guided observation of oesophageal swallowing appears to be a safe diagnostic tool with which to evaluate the oesophageal phase of deglutition.

  5. Comparison of bleeding complications and one-year survival of low molecular weight heparin versus unfractioned heparin for acute myocardial infarction in elderly patients. The FAST-MI registry.

    PubMed

    Puymirat, Etienne; Aïssaoui, Nadia; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Chaib, Aurès; Bonnet, Jean-Louis; Bataille, Vincent; Drouet, Elodie; Mulak, Geneviève; Ferrières, Jean; Blanchard, Didier; Simon, Tabassome; Danchin, Nicolas

    2013-06-05

    There are limited data on the safety and efficacy of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) in elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We aimed to compare LMWH with unfractioned heparin (UFH) in the management of AMI in elderly patients. FAST-MI is a nationwide registry carried out over a 1-month period in 2005, including consecutive patients with AMI admitted to intensive care unit <48 h from symptom onset in 223 participating centers. We assessed the impact of LMWH on bleeding, the need for blood transfusion and one-year survival in elderly patients (≥ 75 years). 963 patients treated with heparin were included (mean age 82 ± 5 years; 51% women; 42.5% ST-elevation myocardial infarction). Major bleeding (2.4% vs. 6.1%, P=0.004) and blood transfusions (4.6% vs. 9.7%, P=0.002) were significantly less frequent with LMWH compared with the UFH, a difference that persisted after multivariate adjustment (OR=0.41, 95% CI: 0.20-0.83 and OR=0.49, 95% CI: 0.28-0.85, respectively). One-year survival and stroke and reinfarction-free survival were also significantly higher with LMWH compared with UFH (OR=0.66, 95% CI: 0.50-0.85 and OR=0.71, 95% CI: 0.56-0.91, respectively). In two cohorts of patients matched on a propensity score for getting LMWH and with similar baseline characteristics (328 patients per group), major bleeding and transfusion were significantly lower while one-year survival was significantly higher in patients receiving LMWH. The present data show that in elderly patients admitted for AMI, use of LMWH is associated with less bleeding, less need for transfusion, and higher survival, compared with the use of UFH. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of gastrointestinal bleeding by radionuclide scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Luna, E.; Kingsley, S.; Prince, M.; Herrera, N.

    1984-01-01

    Scanning with Technetium /sup 99m/ labeled autologous red blood cells was performed in 59 patients with clinical suspicion of acute and/or intermittent, chronic gastrointestinal bleeding. In 36 patients (61%), a definite site of bleeding could be demonstrated. A strong correlation with other modalities such as upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy, contrast angiography, and surgical exploration was found. Overall sensitivity of the procedure was 91%; specificity 100% and accuracy 93.3%. It is suggested that radionuclide scintigraphy provides a completely noninvasive, simple, and sensitive procedure which may be routinely used for the detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  7. Oesophageal trauma: incidence, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed Central

    Triggiani, E; Belsey, R

    1977-01-01

    The clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and surgical treatment of 110 cases of oesophageal trauma, admitted under the care of one surgical team between 1949 and 1973, are reviewed. The importance of early diagnosis and an aggressive surgical approach in the management of a potentially lethal situation are stressed. In our opinion, spontaneous rupture of the oesophagus, instrumental perforation, open and closed traumatic lesions, and postoperative anastomotic leaks are, as far as diagnosis and management are concerned, different aspects of the same desperate surgical problem. Oesophageal trauma is accompanied by a high morbidity and mortality rate if diagnosis and treatment are delayed. Perforations of the cervical oesophagus may be treated conservatively. Intrathoracic perforations demand an aggressive surgical appraoch; only exteriorisation followed by reconstruction at a later date offers a reasonable chance to save the life of the patient and ultimately restore continuity. PMID:882938

  8. Long-term outcome of transendoscopic oesophageal mass ablation in dogs with Spirocerca lupi-associated oesophageal sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Shipov, A; Kelmer, G; Lavy, E; Milgram, J; Aroch, I; Segev, G

    2015-10-10

    Oesophageal sarcoma is a potential sequel of Spirocerca lupi infection. Oesophageal mass excision can be performed by open chest surgery. The objectives of this observational study were to evaluate the feasibility, short-term morbidity and long-term outcome of transendoscopic oesophageal mass ablation in dogs with spirocercosis-associated oesophageal neoplasia. A 9 mm video-endoscope and laser or electrocauterisation were used to debulk the oesophageal mass. Long-term follow-up was done by telephonic interviews. Fifteen dogs were included. The median tumour size was 5 cm (range 3.5-9). The median procedure time was 75 minutes (range 35-165) and was deemed successful in 12/15 dogs (80 per cent). Recovery was uneventful in all dogs. Immediate complications included oesophageal damage (two dogs) oesophageal perforation (one dog) and a focal thermal damage (one dog). The median hospitalisation time of all dogs was less than one day, with all but two discharged on the procedure day. The median survival time, available in nine dogs that were followed, was 202 days (range 51-691). Four of these dogs (44 per cent) survived more than six months, of which three survived more than one year. In conclusion, transendoscopic oesophageal mass ablation might be considered an alternative, palliative procedure for open-chest oesophageal surgery. It has comparable long-term survival, lower morbidity, short hospitalisation time and relatively low cost. British Veterinary Association.

  9. Effects of dietary nitrate on oesophageal motor function and gastro-oesophageal acid exposure in healthy volunteers and reflux patients.

    PubMed

    Bove, M; Lundell, L; Ny, L; Casselbrant, A; Fändriks, L; Pettersson, A; Ruth, M

    2003-01-01

    High concentrations of nitric oxide (NO), derived from dietary nitrite in an acid environment, have been demonstrated in the gastric fundus and in the oesophagus. The aim of this study was to investigate whether luminal NO can influence oesophageal smooth muscle performance, lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) function or gastric and oesophageal acid exposure. Eleven healthy volunteers and 9 patients with chronic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) received a diet deprived of nitrate/nitrite but supplemented with placebo or potassium nitrate for 4 days in a randomised order. On day 4 in each trial period, manometry was performed including a sleeve sensor registration of the LOS followed by a simultaneous 24-hour intra-gastric and oesophageal pH registration. Nitrate supplementation increased the proportion of effective peristalsis when analysed for the entire study population. No other significant effects of dietary nitrate were found on oesophageal motor variables, on the sphincter resting tone or on the number or duration of transient sphincter relaxations. No effect was found on either gastric acidity or gastro-oesophageal reflux variables. Major reflux symptoms were not influenced by nitrate administration. Dietary nitrate did not significantly affect oesophageal motor or LOS function, gastro-oesophageal acid reflux or reflux symptomatology either in healthy volunteers or in GORD patients. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Poor awareness of symptoms of oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tentzeris, Vasileios; Lake, Blossom; Cherian, Thomas; Milligan, James; Sigurdsson, Audun

    2011-01-01

    Oesophageal cancer presents as advanced disease; in the majority of patients the symptoms are present for many months prior to diagnosis. Dysphagia has been described as the key to an early diagnosis of oesophageal cancer. This study aims to assess the public perception of the importance of this symptom. Ninety-six patients completed a questionnaire. This evaluated patient understanding of symptoms of dysphagia compared to the finding of a breast lump, haemoptysis, chest pain and loss of weight concerning urgency, probable cause of symptoms and treatment required. Sixty-five patients (71%) would visit their GP within 24 h of finding a breast lump or suffering from haemoptysis (82%) or having chest pain (82%). Forty-seven patients (51%) who experienced dysphagia would seek medical advice after one week and further 18 (19%) after one month (P<0.0001). Only eight patients (10%) associated dysphagia with cancer compared to 53 patients (57%) with the finding of a breast lump (P<0.031). This study concludes that there is poor understanding of the main symptoms of oesophageal cancer. New health campaigns are needed if the cancer is to be detected at an earlier and potentially curable stage.

  11. Oesophageal food bolus impaction in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Mitrović, Slobodan M; Karan, Sasa; Karan, Jelena Vucković; Vucinić, Predrag

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of food bolus impaction in the esophagus is based on the data obtained from the patient, clinical examination, radiographic diagnosis, and endoscopy. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of possible factors causing oesophageal impaction of food boluses in elderly people. This retrospective study included six male and eight female patients treated at the Department of Ear, Nose, and Throat Disease in Novi Sad. Post-corrosive oesophageal stricture was diagnosed in 28.57% of patients and non-corrosive stricture was found in 21.43%. Total tooth loss was recorded in 64.29% of patients and 14.29% of patients had partial tooth loss. An impacted food bolus was located at a distance of 15-25 cm or 30-40 cm distance from the upper incisors in 42.86% of the study sample. The impaction of food boluses in the esophagus is significantly higher in women, usually after 76 years of age. There is a positive correlation between the presence of oesophageal stricture and recurrence of food bolus impaction. Partial and total tooth loss is present in a high percentage but there is no correlation with the food bolus impaction. Impaction of food bolus was equally found in the upper and lower third of the oesophagus and it was usually meat. Radiographic diagnosis should precede each esophagoscopy. Esophagoscopy with rigid oesophagoscope is a reliable method for the extraction of a bolus of food from the oesophagus in elderly patients.

  12. Bleeding during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... throwing up blood or your vomit looks like coffee grounds Long or heavy periods (women) Headaches that do not go away or are very bad Blurry or double vision Abdominal pains Alternative Names Cancer treatment - bleeding; Chemotherapy - bleeding; Radiation - bleeding; Bone marrow ...

  13. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  14. Low birthweight babies with oesophageal atresia or tracheo-oesophageal fistula.

    PubMed Central

    Cozzi, F; Wilkinson, A W

    1975-01-01

    Of 142 patients of known gestation with oesophageal atresia or tracheo-oesophageal fistula, 21% were preterm with a mean weight of 2 kg, 19% were small-for-dates with a mean weight of 2.23 kg, and the remaining 60% were born at term and weighed more than 2.5 kg. There were almost five times as many preterm and almost eight times as many small-for-date infants as in a normal population. Respiratory distress syndrome and additional severe congenital anomalies were commoner in babies of short gestational age, and pneumonia was more common in small-for-dates babies. PMID:1236568

  15. Why Do Patients Bleed?

    PubMed Central

    Curnow, Jennifer; Pasalic, Leonardo; Favaloro, Emmanuel J.

    2016-01-01

    Patients undergoing surgical procedures can bleed for a variety of reasons. Assuming that the surgical procedure has progressed well and that the surgeon can exclude surgical reasons for the unexpected bleeding, then the bleeding may be due to structural (anatomical) anomalies or disorders, recent drug intake, or disorders of hemostasis, which may be acquired or congenital. The current review aims to provide an overview of reasons that patients bleed in the perioperative setting, and it also provides guidance on how to screen for these conditions, through consideration of appropriate patient history and examination prior to surgical intervention, as well as guidance on investigating and managing the cause of unexpected bleeding. PMID:28824979

  16. The use of Coca-Cola in the management of bolus obstruction in benign oesophageal stricture.

    PubMed Central

    Karanjia, N. D.; Rees, M.

    1993-01-01

    Oesophageal stricture is a complication of oesophageal reflux and may itself be complicated by bolus obstruction. We reviewed the records of patients presenting with dysphagia and who were found to have benign oesophageal strictures. We studied the outcome of bolus obstruction in 13 episodes affecting eight patients. In six episodes Coca-Cola was administered on the day before endoscopy, and in all these patients the bolus had cleared. In seven episodes nothing was administered before endoscopy, and in all seven a bolus was evident at endoscopy. In five of these seven the bolus was removed piecemeal and in each of these instances the endoscope had to be passed between two and five times. In the remaining two instances the procedure was abandoned and the patients returned to the ward for the administration of Coca-Cola. At subsequent endoscopy these patients were found to be clear of any bolus. These results suggest that the administration of Coca-Cola (or other aerated drinks) may clear a bolus in the acutely obstructed oesophagus. PMID:8476194

  17. Effects of Acute Bleeding Followed by Hydroxyethyl Starch 130/0.4 or a Crystalloid on Propofol Concentrations, Cerebral Oxygenation, and Electroencephalographic and Haemodynamic Variables in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Venâncio, Carlos; Souza, Almir P.; Ferreira, Luísa Maria; Branco, Paula Sério; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Amorim, Pedro; Ferreira, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Bleeding changes the haemodynamics, compromising organ perfusion. In this study, the effects of bleeding followed by replacement with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) or lactated Ringer's (LR) on cerebral oxygenation and electroencephalogram-derived parameters were investigated. Twelve young pigs under propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia were bled 30 mL/kg and, after a 20-minute waiting period, volume replacement was performed with HES (GHES; N = 6) or LR (GRL; N = 6). Bleeding caused a decrease of more than 50% in mean arterial pressure (P < 0.01) and a decrease in cerebral oximetry (P = 0.039), bispectral index, and electroencephalogram total power (P = 0.04 and P < 0.01, resp.), while propofol plasma concentrations increased (P < 0.01). Both solutions restored the haemodynamics and cerebral oxygenation similarly and were accompanied by an increase in electroencephalogram total power. No differences between groups were found. However, one hour after the end of the volume replacement, the cardiac output (P = 0.03) and the cerebral oxygenation (P = 0.008) decreased in the GLR and were significantly lower than in GHES (P = 0.02). Volume replacement with HES 130/0.4 was capable of maintaining the cardiac output and cerebral oxygenation during a longer period than LR and caused a decrease in the propofol plasma concentrations. PMID:24971192

  18. Acoustic Markers of Syllabic Stress in Spanish Excellent Oesophageal Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuenca, Maria Heliodora; Barrio, Marina M.; Anaya, Pablo; Establier, Carmelo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to explore the use by Spanish excellent oesophageal speakers of acoustic cues to mark syllabic stress. The speech material has consisted of five pairs of disyllabic words which only differed in stress position. Total 44 oesophageal and 9 laryngeal speakers were recorded and a computerised designed "ad…

  19. Acoustic Markers of Syllabic Stress in Spanish Excellent Oesophageal Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuenca, Maria Heliodora; Barrio, Marina M.; Anaya, Pablo; Establier, Carmelo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to explore the use by Spanish excellent oesophageal speakers of acoustic cues to mark syllabic stress. The speech material has consisted of five pairs of disyllabic words which only differed in stress position. Total 44 oesophageal and 9 laryngeal speakers were recorded and a computerised designed "ad…

  20. GATA6 expression in Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Kirill; Honing, Judith; Meijer, Coby; Boersma-van Ek, Wytske; Peters, Frans T M; van den Berg, Anke; Karrenbeld, Arend; Plukker, John T M; Kruyt, Frank A E; Kleibeuker, Jan H

    2015-01-01

    Barrett's oesophagus can progress towards oesophageal adenocarcinoma through a metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The transcription factor GATA6 is known to be involved in columnar differentiation and proliferation, and GATA6 gene amplification was recently linked with poor survival in oesophageal adenocarcinoma. To study the expression of GATA6 during Barrett's oesophagus development and malignant transformation. To determine the prognostic value of GATA6 in oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Two retrospective cohorts were derived from the pathological archive of the University Medical Center Groningen. The first cohort contained 130 tissue samples of normal squamous epithelium, metaplasia, dysplasia and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The second cohort consisted of a tissue microarray containing tissue from 92 oesophageal adenocarcinoma patients. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine GATA6 protein expression and to correlate GATA6 expression in oesophageal adenocarcinoma with overall and disease-free survival. The percentage of GATA6-positive cells was low in squamous epithelium (10%) but increased progressively in Barrett's oesophagus (30%, P < 0.001) and high-grade dysplasia (82%, P = 0.005). GATA6 expression was not associated with overall or disease-free survival in oesophageal adenocarcinoma patients (P = 0.599 and P = 0.700 respectively). GATA6 expression is progressively increased during Barrett's oesophagus development and its malignant transformation. However, no prognostic value of GATA6 expression could be found in oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Smoking and drinking cessation and the risk of oesophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bosetti, C; Franceschi, S; Levi, F; Negri, E; Talamini, R; Vecchia, C La

    2000-01-01

    In a case–control study from Italy and Switzerland with 404 oesophageal cancer cases and 1070 hospital controls, the risk of oesophageal cancer declined with time since cessation of smoking or drinking, and was significantly reduced (odds ratio = 0.11) 10 or more years after cessation of both habits. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10944613

  2. Angiography in gastrointestinal bleeding in children

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerovitz, M.F.; Fellows, K.E.

    1984-10-01

    Twenty-seven children aged 1 day to 16 years studied arteriographically for acute or chronic gastrointestinal bleeding were reviewed. Children with known esophageal varices and portal hypertension were excluded. Final diagnoses were made in 25 patients by means of surgery, endoscopy, biopsy, laboratory data, and clinical follow-up. Of these 25 cases, arteriography gave a correct diagnosis in 64% and was falsely negative in 36%. The common causes of bleeding in this study were gastric and duodenal ulcers, gastritis, vascular malformations, and typhlitis. Transcatheter therapy was attempted in six acute bleeders, with success in three (50%).

  3. Suspected clindamycin-associated oesophageal injury in cats: five cases.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Julia A; Swift, Nigel; Foster, Darren J; Barrs, Vanessa R D

    2006-12-01

    The clinical findings, treatment and outcome of suspected clindamycin-associated oesophageal injury in five cats are reported. All cats were treated with one 75 mg clindamycin capsule twice daily (dose range 12-19 mg/kg). Capsules were administered without food or a water bolus. Dysphagia, regurgitation, choking or gagging were seen 3-9 days after starting clindamycin. On oesophagoscopy, three cats had oesophagitis, one of which progressed to stricture formation. Two cats had an oesophageal stricture at first presentation. This is the first report of suspected clindamycin-associated oesophageal injury in cats. It serves to further alert practitioners to the potential for drug-induced oesophageal disorders (DIOD) in cats treated with oral medications and to urge prevention by promoting a change in dosing practices.

  4. FGF9-induced proliferative response to eosinophilic inflammation in oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Mulder, D J; Pacheco, I; Hurlbut, D J; Mak, N; Furuta, G T; MacLeod, R J; Justinich, C J

    2009-02-01

    Oesophagitis is characterised by basal cell hyperplasia and activated eosinophils, which release mediators including major basic protein (MBP). MBP and its mimetic polyarginine activate the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) on oesophageal epithelium. Fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) is implicated in epithelial homeostasis and proliferative response to injury, but has not been characterised in the oesophagus. To characterise FGF9 in oesophageal epithelium and oesophagitis, as the result of MBP activation of the CaSR. Human oesophageal epithelial cells (HET-1A) were used to compare affects of calcium, polyarginine and MBP-peptide on FGF9. HET-1A were transfected with interfering RNA (siRNA(CaSR)). FGF9, FGF receptors 2 and 3, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, BMP-4 and noggin mRNA expression were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. FGF9 was measured from HET-1A and from normal, gastro-oesophageal reflux and eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) patient biopsies using ELISA and immunohistochemistry. HET-1A proliferation was studied using bromodeoxyuridine and MTT. FGF9 was secreted by HET-1A cells treated with polyarginine and MBP-peptide, but not calcium. This effect was abrogated by siRNA(CaSR). FGF9 receptor mRNA was present. HET-1A cells proliferated following rhFGF9, but not MBP-peptide treatment, and rhFGF9 altered transcription of downstream proliferation-related genes (noggin, BMP-2 and BMP-4). FGF9 was increased in biopsies from patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis, which correlated with basal hyperplasia. Eosinophil-released MBP acts on the CaSR to increase FGF9 in oesophageal epithelial cells, leading to proliferation. Increased FGF9 is found in biopsies of EoE patients and may play a role in the pathogenesis of oesophagitis.

  5. FGF9-induced proliferative response to eosinophilic inflammation in oesophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, D J; Pacheco, I; Hurlbut, D J; Mak, N; Furuta, G T; MacLeod, R J; Justinich, C J

    2009-01-01

    Background: Oesophagitis is characterised by basal cell hyperplasia and activated eosinophils, which release mediators including major basic protein (MBP). MBP and its mimetic polyarginine activate the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) on oesophageal epithelium. Fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) is implicated in epithelial homeostasis and proliferative response to injury, but has not been characterised in the oesophagus. Objective: To characterise FGF9 in oesophageal epithelium and oesophagitis, as the result of MBP activation of the CaSR. Methods: Human oesophageal epithelial cells (HET-1A) were used to compare affects of calcium, polyarginine and MBP-peptide on FGF9. HET-1A were transfected with interfering RNA (siRNACaSR). FGF9, FGF receptors 2 and 3, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, BMP-4 and noggin mRNA expression were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. FGF9 was measured from HET-1A and from normal, gastro-oesophageal reflux and eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) patient biopsies using ELISA and immunohistochemistry. HET-1A proliferation was studied using bromodeoxyuridine and MTT. Results: FGF9 was secreted by HET-1A cells treated with polyarginine and MBP-peptide, but not calcium. This effect was abrogated by siRNACaSR. FGF9 receptor mRNA was present. HET-1A cells proliferated following rhFGF9, but not MBP-peptide treatment, and rhFGF9 altered transcription of downstream proliferation-related genes (noggin, BMP-2 and BMP-4). FGF9 was increased in biopsies from patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis, which correlated with basal hyperplasia. Conclusion: Eosinophil-released MBP acts on the CaSR to increase FGF9 in oesophageal epithelial cells, leading to proliferation. Increased FGF9 is found in biopsies of EoE patients and may play a role in the pathogenesis of oesophagitis. PMID:18978176

  6. Oesophageal eosinophilia in children with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Ari, Anne; Morgenstern, Sara; Chodick, Gabriel; Matar, Manar; Silbermintz, Ari; Assa, Amit; Mozer-Glassberg, Yael; Rinawi, Firas; Nachmias-Friedler, Vered; Shamir, Raanan; Zevit, Noam

    2017-09-01

    An association between coeliac disease (CD) and eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE)/oesophageal eosinophilia (EE) has been suggested. We sought to characterise children with CD+EE in-depth and assess the contribution of each condition to the clinical presentation and treatment response. Medical records of children with both CD+EE, or isolated EoE diagnosed between 2000 and 2014, were retrospectively reviewed and compared with patients with isolated CD or epigastric pain. Frequency of EE was calculated from endoscopy results of patients with suspected CD or epigastric pain between 2011 and 2014. Missing data were obtained via a telephone questionnaire. Single large, tertiary paediatric centre. 17 CD+EE, 46 EoE, 302 isolated CD and 247 epigastric pain. The patients with CD+EE shared characteristics of both individual conditions. While age at diagnosis, family history of autoimmunity/CD and anaemia were similar to patients with CD, other characteristics such as male gender, personal/family history of atopy, peripheral eosinophilia and oesophageal white papules were more similar to patients with EoE. Combined patients (CD+EE) tended to present with CD-associated symptoms; the majority (63%) later developed typical EoE symptoms. Only a minority (21%) of combined patients had EE that resolved after a gluten-free diet; another 21% had normalisation of EE upon proton pump inhibitor treatment. The remainder required EoE-specific treatment. Patients with CD found to have EE share characteristics with both isolated CD and EoE. It appears that these are two coexisting entities presenting in the same patient rather than eosinophilia associated with CD, and therefore, interventions separately addressing each condition may be considered. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Appearances are Deceptive - Passing a Nasogastric Tube does Not Always Rule Out Oesophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Thomas, Niranjan

    2016-04-01

    Oesophageal atresia/trachea-Oesophageal fistula is commonly diagnosed in the newborn period by inability to pass a nasogastric tube (NGT). We present the instance of a newborn baby where the diagnosis of oesophageal atresia was delayed because of an apparent successful passage of nasogastric tube to the stomach. Failure to reinsert the NGT raised the suspicion of oesophageal atresia which was confirmed by contrast study showing blind upper oesophageal pouch.

  8. The importance of process issues as predictors of time to endoscopy in patients with acute upper-GI bleeding using the RUGBE data.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Eduardo B; Lam, Eric; Martel, Myriam; Bensoussan, Karen; Barkun, Alan N

    2006-09-01

    Early endoscopy has been shown to improve outcomes and optimize cost-effectiveness in nonvariceal upper-GI bleeding (NVUGIB). However, there is little information regarding clinical and process determinants that affect the time from onset of bleeding to performance of the endoscopy. The aim of this study was to identify factors that predict time to endoscopy in patients with new onset NVUGIB. Linear regression models were constructed with time between triage (outpatients) or onset of bleeding (inpatients) and the performance of endoscopy. The RUGBE is a nationwide, multicenter database collected for the purpose of obtaining descriptive data on patients with NVUGIB. The study population consisted of 1500 patients (89.6%) who underwent gastroscopy within 48 hours. Median time to endoscopy was 12 hours (95% CI 11.0, 13.0). Endoscopy after working hours (regression coefficient [beta] -3.52; 95% CI -5.47, -1.58), availability of an endoscopy nurse on-call for the procedure (beta -2.48; 95% CI -3.83, -1.14), and admission to a hospital unit were associated with a shorter interval to endoscopy. In contrast, the presence of chest pain (beta 3.65; 95% CI 1.64, 5.67) or dyspnea (beta 2.79; 95% CI 1.10, 4.48), absence of gross blood on rectal examination (beta 2.20; 95% CI 0.69, 3.71), and inpatient status at onset of bleeding (beta 14.6; 95% CI 8.70, 20.4) were independent predictors of a delayed endoscopy. Subgroup analysis showed that actual time intervals as well as independent predictors of time until endoscopy differed between inpatients and outpatients. Retrospective analysis. The timing of endoscopy in patients with NVUGIB is dependent on both clinical and process parameters, which differ between inpatient and outpatient settings. They bear implications with regards to shaping practice and deciding on resource allocation in order to facilitate an early endoscopy, which is currently recommended for improved patient outcomes.

  9. [Early oesophageal cancer: epidemiology diagnosis and management].

    PubMed

    Koessler, T; Bichard, P; Puppa, G; Lepilliez, V; Roth, A; Cacheux, W

    2015-05-20

    In Europe, oesophageal cancers are diagnosed at an early stage in less than 10% of the cases. They are superficial tumours whose invasion is limited to the mucosae and the submucosa. Synchronous node invasion is the most important prognosis factor. Oesophagectomy is the benchmark treatment. Nowadays, endoscopic resection is a validated curative therapeutic alternative. Accurate endoscopic evaluation using chemical or virtual colouring as well as an echoendoscopy, followed by an expert pathological review, must be conducted beforehand. It can be realised for good prognosis tumours after evaluation of the synchronous node invasion or its risk. After completion, regular endoscopic follow-ups are compulsory to detect local relapse.

  10. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with renal failure under hemodialysis treatment: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Can, Özgür; Koç, Gözde; Ocak, Sema Berk; Akbay, Nursel; Ahishali, Emel; Canbakan, Mustafa; Şahin, Gülizar Manga; Apaydin, Süheyla

    2017-05-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality for patients who need hemodialysis treatment. Our aim was to evaluate patients who needed hemodialysis and presented with bleeding during their hospital stay (uremic bleeding patients). Factors that increased the risk of bleeding and death were evaluated. Additionally, uremic bleeding patients were compared to non-uremic bleeding patients regarding gastrointestinal findings. Fifty-one uremic bleeding patients were compared to two control groups which included uremic (hemodialysis dependent and non-bleeding) and non-uremic (no renal insufficiency and bleeding) patients. NSAIDs and anti-ulcer drug usage were more common in uremic bleeding and in uremic non-bleeding groups, respectively. Dialysis vintage was longer in uremic bleeding group. Comparison of uremic bleeding and non-bleeding uremic patients regarding the usage of ACEI or ARB drugs yielded non-significant results. Acute kidney injury, lower plasma albumin level and high CRP level were significantly increased the risk of mortality in uremic bleeding patients. Hospital stay more than 1 week was the only strong factor for mortality when multivariate analysis was performed. Gastroduodenal and duodenal ulcers were significantly detected in uremic bleeding and non-uremic bleeding patients; respectively. Hemodialysis patients presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding should be evaluated regarding use of prescriptions and efforts should be done in order to shorten their hospital stay and decrease their mortality. Effect of ACEI or ARB drugs should also be evaluated in future studies.

  11. Bacteraemia due to Parvimonas micra, a commensal pathogen, in a patient with an oesophageal tumour.

    PubMed

    García Carretero, Rafael; Luna-Heredia, Esther; Olid-Velilla, Monica; Vazquez-Gomez, Oscar

    2016-11-18

    A man aged 53 years was admitted to our hospital due to general malaise, fever and chills for the past 24 hours. He had a history of chronic alcoholic liver disease. The blood tests showed leucocytosis with neutrophilia, lactic acidosis and acute-phase reactants. The blood cultures were positive for Parvimonas micra, an anaerobic pathogen which is part of the flora of the oral cavity. There was no evidence of abscess formation in either the examination or the imaging tests, but in the work-up that followed, a gastroscopy showed a stenotic oesophageal mass that turned out to be an invasive squamous cell carcinoma.

  12. Surgical correction of gastro-oesophageal intussusception with bilateral incisional gastropexy in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Murphy, L A; Nakamura, R K; Miller, J M

    2015-10-01

    Three dogs presented for evaluation of acute onset tachypnoea and dyspnoea following episodes of vomiting and/or regurgitation. Thoracic radiographs were suggestive of a gastro-oesophageal intussusception in all three dogs; one dog also showed evidence of aspiration pneumonia. All three dogs underwent surgical correction with a bilateral incisional gastropexy. All dogs recovered from anaesthesia uneventfully and were discharged from the hospital 3 days after presentation. Persistent megaoesophagus was evident in all three dogs, and they are being chronically managed with a strict feeding regime and pro-motility agents.

  13. Bleeding and cupping.

    PubMed Central

    Turk, J. L.; Allen, E.

    1983-01-01

    Bleeding and cupping have been used in medicine since ancient times in the treatment of fevers and local inflammatory disorders. Local bleeding, by 'wet cupping', was effected by a scarificator or by leeches. John Hunter recommended venesection in moderation but preferred leeches for local bleeding. Bleeding as an accepted therapeutic practice went out of vogue in the middle of the nineteenth century as a result of the introduction of modern scientific methods. Dry cupping and the use of leeches, as counter irritants, persisted until the middle of this century. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6338802

  14. Chemical gastro-oesophagitis, upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage and gastroscopic findings following Dettol poisoning.

    PubMed

    Chan, T Y; Sung, J J; Critchley, J A

    1995-01-01

    1. Dettol liquid (chloroxylenol 4.8%, pine oil, isopropyl alcohol), a household disinfectant, has a corrosive action on the gastrointestinal mucosa when swallowed. The incidence of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage and gastroscopic findings following Dettol poisoning was studied in 89 patients. 2. Five patients (5.6%) developed minor haematemesis, in the form of coffee-coloured or blood-stained vomitus. One patient had a gastroscopy performed on the day after admission, showing signs of chemical burns in the oesophagus and stomach. Gastroscopy was performed in one other patient on day 11 to rule out oesophageal stricture; the patient was normal. All patients completely recovered. 3. The data from this study suggest that upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage following Dettol poisoning tends to be mild and self-limiting. Gastroscopy, which may increase the risk of aspiration in patients with impaired consciousness, is not required unless other causes of gastrointestinal bleeding are suspected.

  15. Oesophageal perforation caused by screw displacement 16 months following anterior cervical spine fixation

    PubMed Central

    Leaver, Nicholas; Colby, Alexandra; Appleton, Nathan; Vimalachandran, Dale

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cervical spine plating is a standard procedure for fixing unstable vertebral fractures. Following surgery, oesophageal perforation has an incidence of 0.25% and this is usually hours following surgery, due to over prominent screws or friction between the oesophagus and the plate. Instrumentation failure of these plates months or years following surgery is very rare but potentially life-threatening. We report a case of microcytic anaemia which was investigated by oesophagogastroduodenoscopy, and subsequently found that a screw from the anterior plate had lifted off and perforated the oesophagus. This is very rare, but emphasises an important lesson. Anyone presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding or infectious signs, with a history of cervical spine plating should be investigated immediately for instrumentation failure as it brings a high mortality. PMID:25796082

  16. Fasting for haemostasis in children with gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shuang-Hong; Guo, Qin; Liu, Guan J; Wan, Chaomin

    2016-05-19

    Gastrointestinal bleeding refers to loss of blood from any site of the digestive tract. In paediatric clinical practice, it is usually a complaint of children attending the emergency department as a symptom of diseases such as ulcers, gastric or oesophageal varices, gastritis, Mallory-Weiss tears, anorectal fissures, allergic colitis, infectious colitis, intussusception, Henoch-Schonlein purpura, and Meckel's diverticulum; it also occurs with high incidence in critically ill children hospitalised in intensive care units and is caused by stress-induced gastropathy. No matter what the cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, fasting is believed to be necessary due to the fear that eating may affect haemostasis or aggravate bleeding. To assess the effects and safety of fasting for haemostasis in gastrointestinal bleeding in children. We searched EBM Reviews - the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (May 2016), Ovid MEDLINE(R) (1946 to 3 May 2016), EMBASE (1980 to 2016 Week 18), Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) (1978 to 3 May 2016), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (1979 to 3 May 2016), VIP Database (1989 to 4 May 2016) and Wanfang Data (1990 to 4 May 2016). We used no restrictions on language or study setting and limited searches in CNKI and Wanfang Data to the medical field. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs in children with gastrointestinal bleeding that compared fasting with feeding. Two review authors independently screened the literature search results, and there were no disagreements. We identified no RCTs or quasi-RCTs that compared the effects and safety of fasting with feeding for haemostasis in children with gastrointestinal bleeding. No study fulfilled the criteria for considering studies for our review. There is currently no information available from RCTs or quasi-RCTs to support or refute the use of fasting for haemostasis in children with gastrointestinal bleeding.

  17. Oesophageal cancer among the Turkomans of northeast Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saidi, F; Sepehr, A; Fahimi, S; Farahvash, M J; Salehian, P; Esmailzadeh, A; Keshoofy, M; Pirmoazen, N; Yazdanbod, M; Roshan, M K

    2000-01-01

    A Caspian Littoral Cancer Registry survey in the early 1970s established northern Iran as one of the highest oesophageal cancer incidence regions of the world. To verify this, an oesophageal cancer survey was carried out between 1995 and 1997 in the Turkoman Plain at the southeastern corner of the Caspian Sea. Oesophageal balloon cytology screening was carried out on 4192 asymptomatic adults above age 30 years in one town and three adjoining villages with a total population of 20 392 people at risk. Oesophagoscopy was performed on 183 patients with abnormal cytological findings. The discovery of two asymptomatic small squamous cell cancers and one ‘carcinoma- suspect’ implied a prevalence ranging from 47.7 per 100 000 to 71.5 per 100 000. During a 1-year active surveillance, 14 patients were found with clinically advanced oesophageal squamous cell cancer, yielding age-standardized incidence rates of 144.09 per 100 000 for men and 48.82 per 100 000 for women. The very high frequency of oesophageal cancer reported for northern Iran 25 years ago stands confirmed. Differences in incidence rates, then and now, can be attributed to survey methods used and diagnostic criteria applied, but not to socioeconomic factors, which have remained relatively stable. Oesophageal balloon cytology is a practical method of mass screening for oesophageal cancer in Iran. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027442

  18. Oesophageal and gastric motor activity in patients with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, A; Bergmann, H; Abatzi, T A; Schneider, C; Wiesnagrotzki, S; Höbart, J; Steiner-Mittelbach, G; Gaupmann, G; Kugi, A; Stacher-Janotta, G

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies showed that symptoms of oesophageal motor disorders can be misinterpreted as indicating anorexia nervosa and that in primary anorexia nervosa gastric motility is frequently impaired. We investigated in 32 women with bulimia nervosa whether symptoms of oesophageal motor disorders could be obscured by or be mistaken as forming part of bulimic behaviour, and whether impaired gastric motility was frequent as well. Oesophageal motility was normal in 18 of 26 patients studied, another four had incomplete lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation. Two patients had vigorous achalasia and each one achalasia and diffuse oesophageal spasm, all of whom experienced two types of vomiting: one self-induced and one involuntary, in which the vomit was non-acidic and tasted as the preceding meal. Gastric emptying of a semisolid meal was studied in all patients except of the eight with oesophageal motor abnormalities. Emptying was significantly slower than in healthy controls and grossly delayed in nine of 24 patients. Antral contraction amplitudes were lower and increased less postcibally than in controls. In conclusion (i) bulimic behaviour can obscure symptoms of oesophageal motor disorders and (ii) gastric emptying is frequently delayed in bulimia nervosa. PMID:2323585

  19. The pharyngeal mucosa is not involved in eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Bove, M; Tegtmeyer, B; Persson, S; Bergquist, H

    2009-09-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis is thought to be an isolated oesophageal disease associated with biopsy-verified eosinophilia of the squamous cell epithelium of the oesophagus. Food- or aeroallergens have been suggested to be the cause of eosinophilic oesophagitis; however, as these allergens pass through the pharynx sharing the same squamous cell epithelium, eosinophilic infiltration could be expected also here. Whether this is true or not has hitherto not been clarified. To find out whether eosinophilia is present also within the pharyngeal epithelium in patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis. In all, 10 patients (median age 34, range 15-70) with biopsy-verified eosinophilic oesophagitis [peak count >20 eosinophils per high power field (hpf)] were biopsied also in the pharynx. The biopsies underwent histopathological examination and at each level, the peak number of eosinophils per hpf was counted. None of the patients examined was found to have eosinophilia within the squamous cell epithelium of the pharynx (median peak count 0, range 0-1). The pronounced eosinophilic infiltration in eosinophilic oesophagitis appears to be an isolated oesophageal phenomenon not shared by the adjoining organ sites and in particular, not by the pharynx. This may have implications for future research.

  20. Control of belching by the lower oesophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Wyman, J B; Dent, J; Heddle, R; Dodds, W J; Toouli, J; Downton, J

    1990-06-01

    The mechanism that controls venting of gas from the stomach into the oesophagus was studied manometrically in 14 healthy subjects. The stomach was distended abruptly with one litre of carbon dioxide. Gas reflux was characterised by an abrupt increase in basal oesophageal body pressure to intragastric pressure. Reflux of gas from the stomach into the oesophagus occurred during transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations that generally had a pattern distinctly different from swallow-induced lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation. Thus, at the onset of an episode of gas reflux lower oesophageal sphincter pressure had relaxed to 3 mmHg, or less, in 96% of instances. After gas loading of the stomach the prevalence of gas reflux was significantly less when the subjects were supine (1.2/10 min) than when they were sitting (6.8/10 min) (p less than 0.001). The lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations associated with most episodes of gas reflux had a distinctive pattern that resembled those of the lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations associated with acid gastro-oesophageal reflux.

  1. Cytochrome P450 expression in oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, G I; Shaw, D; Weaver, R J; McKay, J A; Ewen, S W; Melvin, W T; Burke, M D

    1994-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes play a central part in the metabolism of carcinogens and anti-cancer drugs. The expression, cellular localisation, and distribution of different forms of P450 and the functionally associated enzymes epoxide hydrolase and glutathione S-transferases have been investigated in oesophageal cancer and non-neoplastic oesophageal tissue using immunohistochemistry. Expression of the different enzymes was confined to epithelial cells in both non-neoplastic samples and tumour samples except the CYP3A was also identified in mast cells and glutathione S-transferase pi was present in chronic inflammatory cells. CYP1A was present in a small percentage of non-neoplastic samples but both CYP2C and CYP3A were absent. Epoxide hydrolase was present in half of the non-neoplastic samples and the different classes of glutathione S-transferase were present in a low number of samples. In carcinomas CYP1A, CYP3A, epoxide hydrolase, and glutathione S-transferase pi were expressed in at least 60% of samples. The expression of glutathione S-transferases alpha and mu were significantly less in adenocarcinoma compared with squamous carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8200549

  2. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  3. [The pewter bleeding bowls].

    PubMed

    Renner, Claude

    2004-01-01

    In the late seventeenth century, then along the eighteen and nineteenth centuries the amount of the bloodlettings was measured by means of three pewter bleeding bowls that held three ounces of blood, about 300 millilitres. In the middle of the nineteenth century new and large bleeding bowls with metric graduations were manufactured only by the Parisian potters.

  4. Advances in gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2016-09-01

    The main innovations of the latest meeting of the Gastroenterological Association (2016) concerning upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the clinician's perspective can be summarised as follows: a) The Glasgow-Blatchford scale has the best accuracy in predicting the need for surgical intervention and hospital mortality; b) Prognostic scales for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are also useful for lower gastrointestinal bleeding; c) Preliminary data suggest that treatment with hemospray does not seem to be superior to current standard treatment in controlling active peptic ulcer bleeding; d) Either famotidine or a proton pump inhibitor may be effective in preventing haemorrhagic recurrence in patients taking aspirin, but this finding needs to be confirmed in further studies; e) There was confirmation of the need to re-introduce antiplatelet therapy as early as possible in patients with antiplatelet-associated gastrointestinal bleeding in order to prevent cardiovascular mortality; f) Routine clinical practice suggests that gastrointestinal or cardiovascular complications with celecoxib or traditional NSAIDs are very low; g) Dabigatran is associated with an increased incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with apixaban or warfarin. At least half of the episodes are located in the lower gastrointestinal tract; h) Implant devices for external ventricular circulatory support are associated with early gastrointestinal bleeding in up to one third of patients; the bleeding is often secondary to arteriovenous malformations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  6. [Variceal upper digestive bleeding--an ever new complication in liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Prelipcean, Cristina Cijevschi; Sporea, I; Mihai, Cătălina; Gogălniceanu, P; Drug, V L

    2007-01-01

    Variceal bleeding in liver cirrhosis is a medical emergency with a high mortality. The therapeutic options in patients with portal hypertension are: treatment of acute bleeding from varices, prevention of the first bleeding episode and prevention of rebleeding. Treatment of acute bleeding from varices includes: blood volume restitution, use of antibiotics for preventing bacterial infections, vasoactive drug therapy (terlipressin, somatostatin, vapreotide, octreotide), endoscopic band ligation for acute esophageal bleeding and endoscopic therapy with tissue adhesive (cyanoacrylate) for acute gastric variceal bleeding. Endoscopic treatments are best used in association with pharmacological therapy. In primary prophylaxis non-selective beta- blocker therapy and endoscopic band ligation are useful. Beta blockers, band ligation or both should be used for prevention of recurrent bleeding. In patients who fail endoscopic and pharmacological treatment for prevention of rebleeding TIPS and transplantation should be considered.

  7. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  8. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  9. Proton Pump Inhibitor-Responsive Oesophageal Eosinophilia: An Entity Challenging Current Diagnostic Criteria for Eosinophilic Oesophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Infante, Javier; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Cheng, Edaire; Dellon, Evan S.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Gupta, Sandeep K.; Hirano, Ikuo; Katzka, David A.; Moawad, Fouad J.; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Schoepfer, Alain; Spechler, Stuart; Wen, Ting; Straumann, Alex; Lucendo, Alfredo J.

    2016-01-01

    Consensus diagnostic recommendations to distinguish gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) from eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) by response to a trial of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) unexpectedly uncovered an entity called “PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia” (PPI-REE). PPI-REE refers to patients with clinical and histologic features of EoE that remit with PPI treatment. Recent and evolving evidence, mostly from adults, shows that PPI-REE and EoE patients at baseline are clinically, endoscopically and histologically indistinguishable, and have significant overlap in terms of features of Th2 immune-mediated inflammation and gene expression. Furthermore, PPI therapy restores oesophageal mucosal integrity, reduces Th2 inflammation and reverses the abnormal gene expression signature in PPI-REE patients, similar to the effects of topical steroids in EoE patients. Additionally, recent series have reported that EoE patients responsive to diet/topical steroids may also achieve remission on PPI therapy. This mounting evidence supports the concept that PPI-REE represents a continuum of the same immunologic mechanisms that underlie EoE. Accordingly, it seems counterintuitive to differentiate PPI-REE from EoE based on a differential response to PPI therapy when their phenotypic, molecular, mechanistic, and therapeutic features cannot be reliably distinguished. For patients with symptoms and histologic features of EoE, it is reasonable to consider PPI therapy not as a diagnostic test, but as a therapeutic agent. Due to its safety profile, ease of administration and high response rates (up to 50%), PPI can be considered a first-line treatment, before diet and topical steroids. The reasons why some EoE patients respond to PPI, while others do not, remain to be elucidated. PMID:26685124

  10. Oesophageal disease: gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett's oesophagus, achalasia and eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Calvet, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    The most interesting conclusions and/or advances presented at Digestive Disease Week 2016 were the following: a) gastroesophageal reflux disease: proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease is frequently associated with poor treatment adherence, psychiatric comorbidities and functional gastrointestinal disorders. These possible entities should be investigated in all cases of proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease; b) Barrett's oesophagus: the efficacy of screening remains unclear; however, new minimally-invasive techniques such as the cytosponge allow more effective detection, both of Barrett's oesophagus and Barrett's oesophagus-associated dysplasia or neoplasia; c) achalasia: evidence indicates that peroral endoscopic myotomy is as effective as surgery and is a safer alternative; d) eosinophilic oesophagitis: high-dose proton pump inhibitors are required to rule out proton pump inhibitor-responsive eosinophilic oesophagitis; montelukast is not clearly effective in the treatment of eosinophilic oesophagitis, although moderate efficacy cannot be ruled out. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit ...

  12. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit ...

  13. Ambulatory oesophageal bile reflux monitoring in Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, M T; Lawlor, P; Byrne, P J; Walsh, T N; Hennessy, T P

    1995-05-01

    Bile reflux has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Barrett's oesophagus but evaluation remains difficult. Bilitec 2000 is an ambulatory system that detects bilirubin based on its spectrophotometric properties. Oesophageal bile exposure was evaluated in three groups of patients. Group 1 (n = 11) were normal controls, group 2 (n = 13) were patients with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux and group 3 (n = 12) were patients with Barrett's oesophagus. Bile reflux was greater in patients with Barrett's mucosa than in controls or those with uncomplicated reflux. This difference was seen in the supine and interdigestive periods. The percentage of time at which gastric pH was greater than 4 and oesophageal pH was above 7 did not differ between the groups. Bilitec 2000 detects greater bile reflux in patients with Barrett's oesophagus. No corresponding gastric or oesophageal alkaline shift is found. This ambulatory bile reflux monitoring system may be a useful tool in clinical practice.

  14. Acoustic markers of syllabic stress in Spanish excellent oesophageal speakers.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, María Heliodora; Barrio, Marina M; Anaya, Pablo; Establier, Carmelo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to explore the use by Spanish excellent oesophageal speakers of acoustic cues to mark syllabic stress. The speech material has consisted of five pairs of disyllabic words which only differed in stress position. Total 44 oesophageal and 9 laryngeal speakers were recorded and a computerised designed ad hoc perceptual test was run in order to assess the accurate realisation of stress. The items produced by eight excellent oesophageal speakers with highest accuracy levels in the perception experiment were analysed acoustically with Praat, to be compared with the laryngeal control group. Measures of duration, fundamental frequency, spectral balance and overall intensity were taken for each target vowel and syllable. Results revealed that Spanish excellent oesophageal speakers were able to retain appropriate acoustic relations between stressed and unstressed syllables. Although spectral balance revealed as a strong cue for syllabic stress in the two voicing modes, a different hierarchy of acoustic cues in each voicing mode was found.

  15. The role of obesity in oesophageal cancer development.

    PubMed

    Long, Elizabeth; Beales, Ian L P

    2014-11-01

    The incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma has increased dramatically in the developed world in the last half century. Over approximately the same period there has been an increase in the prevalence of obesity. Multiple epidemiological studies and meta-analyses have confirmed that obesity, especially abdominal, visceral obesity, is a risk factor for gastro-oesophageal reflux, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Although visceral obesity enhances gastro-oesophageal reflux, the available data also show that visceral obesity increases the risk of Barrett's oesophagus and adenocarcinoma via reflux-independent mechanisms. Several possible mechanisms could link obesity with the risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma in addition to mechanical effects increasing reflux. These include reduced gastric Helicobacter pylori infection, altered intestinal microbiome, factors related to lifestyle, the metabolic syndrome and associated low-grade inflammation induced by obesity and the secretion of mediators by adipocytes which may directly influence the oesophageal epithelium. Of these adipocyte-derived mediators, increased leptin levels have been independently associated with progression to oesophageal adenocarcinoma and in laboratory studies leptin enhances malignant behaviours in cell lines. Adiponectin is also secreted by adipocytes and levels decline with obesity: decreased serum adiponectin levels are associated with malignant progression in Barrett's oesophagus and experimentally adiponectin exerts anticancer effects in Barrett's cell lines and inhibits growth factor signalling. At present there are no proven chemopreventative interventions that may reduce the incidence of obesity-associated oesophageal cancer: observational studies suggest that the combined use of a statin and aspirin or another cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor is associated with a significantly reduced cancer incidence in patients with Barrett's oesophagus.

  16. The role of obesity in oesophageal cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Long, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma has increased dramatically in the developed world in the last half century. Over approximately the same period there has been an increase in the prevalence of obesity. Multiple epidemiological studies and meta-analyses have confirmed that obesity, especially abdominal, visceral obesity, is a risk factor for gastro-oesophageal reflux, Barrett’s oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Although visceral obesity enhances gastro-oesophageal reflux, the available data also show that visceral obesity increases the risk of Barrett’s oesophagus and adenocarcinoma via reflux-independent mechanisms. Several possible mechanisms could link obesity with the risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma in addition to mechanical effects increasing reflux. These include reduced gastric Helicobacter pylori infection, altered intestinal microbiome, factors related to lifestyle, the metabolic syndrome and associated low-grade inflammation induced by obesity and the secretion of mediators by adipocytes which may directly influence the oesophageal epithelium. Of these adipocyte-derived mediators, increased leptin levels have been independently associated with progression to oesophageal adenocarcinoma and in laboratory studies leptin enhances malignant behaviours in cell lines. Adiponectin is also secreted by adipocytes and levels decline with obesity: decreased serum adiponectin levels are associated with malignant progression in Barrett’s oesophagus and experimentally adiponectin exerts anticancer effects in Barrett’s cell lines and inhibits growth factor signalling. At present there are no proven chemopreventative interventions that may reduce the incidence of obesity-associated oesophageal cancer: observational studies suggest that the combined use of a statin and aspirin or another cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor is associated with a significantly reduced cancer incidence in patients with Barrett’s oesophagus. PMID:25364384

  17. Evaluation of Helicobacter pylori in reflux oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed Central

    Newton, M; Bryan, R; Burnham, W R; Kamm, M A

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the major pathophysiological abnormalities in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is thought to involve transient lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) relaxations. One component of the neural mechanism controlling the LOS appears to be a reflex are whose afferent limb originates in the gastric fundus. As inflammation is known to be associated with neural activation an investigation was made to determine whether gastric infection with H pylori is altered in prevalence or distribution in patients with reflux disease. METHODS: Five groups of subjects referred for endoscopy-group 1: 25 controls (asymptomatic individuals with anaemia and normal endoscopy); group 2: 36 subjects with erosive oesophagitis alone (Savary-Millar grades I-III); group 3: 16 subjects with duodenal ulcer alone; group 4: 15 subjects with oesophagitis with duodenal ulcer; group 5: 16 subjects with Barrett's oesophagus. No patients were receiving acid suppressants or antibiotics. An antral biopsy specimen was taken for a rapid urease test, and two biopsy specimens were taken from the antrum, fundus, and oesophagus (inflamed and non-inflamed) for histological evidence of inflammation and presence of H pylori using a Giemsa stain. RESULTS: Nine (36%) controls had H pylori. Patients with duodenal ulcer alone had a significantly higher incidence of colonisation by H pylori than other groups (duodenal ulcer 15 (94%); oesophagitis 13 (36%); oesophagitis+duodenal ulcer 6 (40%); Barrett's oesophagus 4 (25%)). H pylori was not more common in oesophagitis. When H pylori colonised the gastric antrum it was usually found in the gastric fundus. There was no difference in anatomical distribution of H pylori in the different patient groups. In Barrett's oesophagus H pylori was found in two of 16 in the metaplastic epithelium. CONCLUSION: H pylori is not more common and its distribution does not differ in those with oesophagitis compared with control subjects, and is therefore unlikely

  18. Oesophageal cancer in women: tobacco, alcohol, nutritional and hormonal factors

    PubMed Central

    Gallus, S; Bosetti, C; Franceschi, S; Levi, F; Simonato, L; Negri, E; Vecchia, C La

    2001-01-01

    We analysed 3 case–control studies from Italy and Switzerland including 114 women with squamous cell oesophageal cancer and 425 controls. The multivariate odds ratio was 4.5 for heavy smoking and 5.4 for heavy alcohol drinking. Fruit intake, vegetable intake, oral contraceptive and HRT use were inversely related to oesophageal cancer. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11487262

  19. Infrequent microsatellite instability in oesophageal cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Muzeau, F.; Fléjou, J. F.; Belghiti, J.; Thomas, G.; Hamelin, R.

    1997-01-01

    Alterations of microsatellites have been found at relatively high frequency in hereditary and sporadic colorectal cancer and gastric and pancreatic cancers and at lower frequency in some other cancers. We determined the frequency of instability at 39 poly-CA microsatellite loci in 20 squamous cell carcinomas and 26 Barrett's adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus. None of the tumours presented instability for a high percentage of the tested loci. Four squamous cell carcinomas and six Barrett's adenocarcinomas showed microsatellite instability at one locus, and three Barrett's adenocarcinomas showed microsatellite instability at two loci. The presence of few loci showing microsatellite instability could be due to an instability background. We conclude that genetic defects in the DNA mismatch repair system do not play an important role in oesophageal cancers. Images Figure 1 PMID:9155055

  20. Distinguishing GERD from eosinophilic oesophagitis: concepts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Kia, Leila; Hirano, Ikuo

    2015-07-01

    Over the past three decades, the detection of oesophageal mucosal eosinophils has transitioned from a biomarker of GERD to a diagnostic criterion for eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE). In GERD, oesophageal eosinophils are considered part of the chronic inflammatory response to acid reflux, whereas the marked eosinophilia in EoE is viewed as a central feature of the immune response to ingested food and/or environmental antigen stimulation. Descriptions of a considerable subset of patients with symptomatic, endoscopic and histological findings of EoE that resolve with PPI therapy has led to confusion and controversy regarding the distinction of EoE from GERD. Study findings indicate that PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE) more closely resembles EoE than GERD, both from a clinical and immunological aspect. Although responsiveness to PPI therapy should not be utilized to exclude EoE, PPI therapy is effective at reducing oesophageal eosinophilia in ∼40% of patients, and PPI therapy is both a safe and practical initial step in the management of patients with oesophageal eosinophilia. Ongoing studies elucidating the mechanism behind PPI-REE will improve our understanding and management of EoE. In this Review, the mechanisms and evidence that underlie the controversy in the distinction between GERD and EoE are evaluated.

  1. Distinguishing GERD from eosinophilic oesophagitis: concepts and controversies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the detection of oesophageal mucosal eosinophils has transitioned from a biomarker of GERD to a diagnostic criterion for eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE). In GERD, oesophageal eosinophils are considered part of the chronic inflammatory response to acid reflux, whereas the marked eosinophilia in EoE is viewed as a central feature of the immune response to ingested food and/or environmental antigen stimulation. Descriptions of a considerable subset of patients with symptomatic, endoscopic and histological findings of EoE that resolve with PPI therapy has led to confusion and controversy regarding the distinction of EoE from GERD. Study findings indicate that PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE) more closely resembles EoE than GERD, both from a clinical and immunological aspect. Although responsiveness to PPI therapy should not be utilized to exclude EoE, PPI therapy is effective at reducing oesophageal eosinophilia in ~40% of patients, and PPI therapy is both a safe and practical initial step in the management of patients with oesophageal eosinophilia. Ongoing studies elucidating the mechanism behind PPI-REE will improve our understanding and management of EoE. In this Review, the mechanisms and evidence that underlie the controversy in the distinction between GERD and EoE are evaluated. PMID:25986303

  2. The effect of smoking on the stressed template bleeding time.

    PubMed

    Davis, R F; Davis, J W

    1983-06-01

    Tobacco cigarette smoking is known to affect platelet function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cigarette smoking acutely shortens the bleeding time of healthy men. The mean initial stressed template bleeding time of 12 nonsmokers (9.0 minutes) was not significantly different from that of nine habitual smokers (9.2 minutes) who were asked to abstain from smoking for 12 hours before determination of the bleeding time. The mean bleeding time was the same immediately before and after the 21 men smoked two filtered tobacco cigarettes in 20 minutes. Separate analyses showed that the mean bleeding time of neither the nonsmokers nor the habitual smokers changed significantly after experimental smoking. We conclude that smoking two cigarettes has no effect on the stressed template bleeding time of healthy men.

  3. Role of endoscopy in early oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mannath, Jayan; Ragunath, Krish

    2016-12-01

    Incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma has increased exponentially in the West over the past few decades. Following detection of advanced cancers, 5-year survival rates remain bleak, making identification of early neoplasia, which has a better outcome, important. Detection of subtle oesophageal lesions during endoscopy can be challenging, and advanced imaging techniques might improve their detection. High-definition endoscopy has become a standard in most endoscopy centres, and this technology probably provides better delineation of mucosal features than standard-definition endoscopy. Various image enhancement techniques are now available with the development of new electronics and software systems. Image enhancement with chromoendoscopy using dyes has been a cost-effective option for many years, yet these techniques have been replaced in some contexts by electronic chromoendoscopy, which can be used with the press of a button. However, Lugol's chromoendoscopy remains the gold standard to identify squamous dysplasia. Identification and characterization of subtle neoplastic lesions could help to target biopsies and perform endoscopic resection for better local staging and definitive therapy. In vivo histology with techniques such as confocal endomicroscopy could make endotherapy feasible within a shorter timescale than when relying on histology on tissue samples. Once early neoplasia is identified, treatments include endoscopic resection, endoscopic submucosal dissection or various ablative techniques. Endotherapy has the advantage of being a less invasive technique than oesophagectomy, and is associated with lower mortality and morbidity. Endoscopic ablation therapies have evolved over the past few years, with radiofrequency ablation showing the best results in terms of success rates and complications in Barrett dysplasia.

  4. [Fat, spices and gastro-oesophageal reflux].

    PubMed

    v Schönfeld, J; Evans, D F

    2007-02-01

    In spite of poor evidence, many patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux are advised to avoid fat and spices. We therefore measured gastro-oesophageal reflux after fatty and spicy meals. During three 24-h pH monitoring sessions, eight volunteers ate two identical, low fat and mild beef stews, or a hot and fatty Indian curry for lunch. Meals for dinner were the beef stew, the hot Indian curry or a mild curry. Day-time acid exposure was significantly longer after the hot curry (7.5 % [1.4 - 27.1]) than after the beef stews (2.3 % [0.4 - 9.8] and 2.5 % [0.7 - 15.7]). Night-time acid exposure was also significantly shorter after the beef stew (1.3 % [0 - 9]) than after the mild curry (2.9 % [0 - 19.1]) or the hot curry (4.6 % [0.2 - 22.5]). Within two hours postprandially, reflux was not different between the meals. The number of episodes, however, that occurred more than two hours after lunch was significantly lower after the beef stews (4 [2 - 14] and 4.5 [2 - 10]) than after the hot curry (9 [5 - 16]). The same phenomenon was observed after beef stew (0.5 [0 - 2]), mild curry (2 [0 - 4]) and hot curry (2 [1 - 9]) for dinner. We conclude that meals high in fat can provoke reflux, possibly through delayed gastric emptying. Additional spices, however, do not further increase reflux.

  5. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia associated with oesophageal atresia and tracheo-oesophageal fistula in a low birth weight infant

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Haium, Abdul Alim; Sim, Siam Wee; Ong, Lin Yin; Rajadurai, Victor Samuel

    2013-01-01

    The cooccurrence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and oesophageal atresia with distal tracheo-oesophageal fistula is very rare and carries high mortality. Very few anecdotal case reports and one case series have been reported in the literature. We report a case of a late preterm, low birth weight infant with this rare association who was successfully managed by staged surgical approach and had good outcome. PMID:23964045

  6. Gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms, oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus in the general population: the Loiano-Monghidoro study.

    PubMed

    Zagari, R M; Fuccio, L; Wallander, M-A; Johansson, S; Fiocca, R; Casanova, S; Farahmand, B Y; Winchester, C C; Roda, E; Bazzoli, F

    2008-10-01

    Existing endoscopy-based data on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in the general population are scarce. This study aimed to evaluate typical symptoms and complications of GORD, and their associated risk factors, in a representative sample of the Italian population. 1533 adults from two Italian villages were approached to undergo symptom assessment using a validated questionnaire and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Data were obtained from 1033 individuals (67.4% response rate). The prevalence of reflux symptoms was 44.3%; 23.7% of the population experienced such symptoms on at least 2 days per week (frequent symptoms). The prevalence rates of oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus in the population were 11.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Both frequent (relative risk (RR) 2.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7 to 3.9) and infrequent (RR 1.9; 95% CI 1.2 to 3.0) reflux symptoms were associated with the presence of oesophagitis. No reflux symptoms were reported by 32.8% of individuals with oesophagitis and 46.2% of those with Barrett's oesophagus. Hiatus hernia was associated with frequent reflux symptoms and oesophagitis, and was present in 76.9% of those with Barrett's oesophagus. We found no association between body mass index and reflux symptoms or oesophagitis. GORD is common in Italy, but the prevalence of Barrett's oesophagus in the community is lower than has been reported in selected populations. Both frequent and infrequent reflux symptoms are associated with an increased risk of oesophagitis. Individuals with oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus often have no reflux symptoms.

  7. [Bleeding risk in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Benamer, H; Meftout, B; Chevalier, B

    2010-12-01

    Coronary reperfusion of acute coronary syndromes with ST segment elevation requires medical treatment involving potential thrombolysis as well as very potent anticoagulant and antiplatelet medications. In such a therapeutic setting, the risk of bleeding complications may be high and should be taken into account accordingly. An accurate definition of these bleeding complications is crucial in order to compare all currently available treatments and strategies appropriately. The heterogeneous definitions often published in the literature make any valid interpretations of the results very difficult. These bleeding complications, which affect negatively the outcome of patients undergoing treatment should be adequately anticipated in our treatment strategies. An exhaustive knowledge of the bleeding risk factors is necessary in order to adjust the treatment modalities. The occurrence of bleeding may be related to the vascular approach used for cardiac catheterization. In this respect, the superiority of the radial approach has been widely demonstrated. In addition, certain instances of bleeding are not related to the vascular approach, such as digestive and neurological bleeding which can have very severe consequences. Consequently, it is necessary to adapt treatments with heterogeneous potential for bleeding to individual bleeding risk factors, which may be quantified by scores measuring the bleeding risk. Finally, treatment combinations must often be carefully tailored to the characteristics of each individual patient. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  8. Evaluation of the magnitude of gastro-oesophageal reflux in Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed Central

    Parrilla, P; Ortiz, A; Martinez de Haro, L F; Aguayo, J L; Ramirez, P

    1990-01-01

    A manometric study to determine the role of gastro-oesophageal reflux in Barrett's oesophagus was performed on 20 patients with Barrett's oesophagus and 53 patients with reflux oesophagitis without Barrett's oesophagus (25 with mild oesophagitis and 28 with severe oesophagitis). For the same reason, the 20 patients with Barrett's oesophagus also underwent 24 hour continuous oesophageal pH monitoring, and the results obtained were compared with those of 20 oesophagitis patients without Barrett's oesophagus (10 with mild oesophagitis and 10 with severe oesophagitis). The manometric results show that the motor changes found in the Barrett's group are specific but similar to the motor dysfunction associated with reflux oesophagitis. Motor anomalies are probably related more to the inflammatory process in the oesophageal wall than to the metaplastic changes themselves. The pH monitoring results show that while reflux in the Barrett's oesophagus patients was greater overall than in the oesophagitis group without Barrett's oesophagus, the changes are similar when the results are compared with the severe oesophagitis group. In conclusion there are other factors besides gastro-oesophageal reflux involved in the pathogenesis of Barrett's oesophagus. PMID:2210462

  9. GI bleeding - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100162.htm GI bleeding - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... colon, and finally, the rectum and anus. The GI tract is a long, hollow, muscular tube through ...

  10. Bleeding into the skin

    MedlinePlus

    Protect aging skin. Avoid trauma such as bumping or pulling on skin areas. For a cut or scrape, use direct pressure to stop the bleeding. If you have a drug reaction, ask your provider about stopping the drug. Otherwise, follow ...

  11. Severe Bleeding: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... remove the gauze or bandage. If the bleeding seeps through the gauze or other cloth on the ... up blood Bruising A tender or swollen stomach Cold, clammy skin Thirst Fractures Shock, indicated by a ...

  12. Heavy Menstrual Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... to pregnancy, such as ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage . Pelvic inflammatory disease also can cause heavy menstrual bleeding. Sometimes, the ... A physical examination of a woman’s reproductive organs. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: An infection of the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ...

  13. Emerging aspects of oesophageal and gastro-oesophageal junction cancer histopathology – an update for the surgical oncologist

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Ewen A; Pritchard, Susan A; Mapstone, Nicholas P; Welch, Ian M

    2006-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus and gastro-oesophageal junction are rapidly increasing in incidence and have a well described sequence of carcinogenesis: the Barrett's metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence. During recent years there have been changes in the knowledge surrounding disease progression, cancer management and histopathology specimen reporting. Tumours around the gastro-oesophageal junction (GOJ) pose several specific challenges. Numerous difficulties arise when the existing TNM staging systems for gastric and oesophageal cancers are applied to GOJ tumours. The issues facing the current TNM staging and GOJ tumour classification systems are reviewed in this article. Recent evidence regarding the importance of several histopathologically derived prognostic factors, such as circumferential resection margin status and lymph node metastases, have implications for specimen reporting. With the rising use of multimodal treatments for oesophageal cancer it is important that the response of the tumour to this therapy is carefully documented pathologically. In addition, several controversial and novel areas such as endoscopic mucosal resection, lymph node micrometastases and the sentinel node concept are being studied. We aim to review these aspects, with special relevance to oesophageal and gastro-oesophageal cancer specimen reporting, to update the surgical oncologist with an interest in upper gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:17118194

  14. Symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux, abnormal oesophageal acid exposure, and mucosal acid sensitivity are three separate, though related, aspects of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, P J; Maher, L; Pryde, A; Heading, R C

    1991-01-01

    The Bernstein test has been used as a test of oesophageal acid sensitivity for over 30 years but its clinical value has been challenged by the advent of ambulatory pH monitoring. Furthermore, the relation between mucosal acid sensitivity, symptomatic reflux, and abnormal oesophageal acid exposure time is unclear. This study examined the relation between these three parameters in patients referred for pH monitoring with unexplained chest pain or heartburn. Fifty consecutive patients were studied - nine with non-cardiac chest pain and 41 with a history of heartburn. Symptomatic reflux was defined as a greater than or equal to 50% temporal association between pain episodes and reflux events (pH less than 4) during pH monitoring. A positive acid perfusion test (in which the patient's usual symptoms were evoked by acid, though not saline) had a 100% sensitivity, 73% specificity, and 81% accuracy for the detection of symptomatic reflux. All 10 patients with symptomatic reflux during pH monitoring had evidence of mucosal acid sensitivity. A negative acid perfusion test made symptomatic reflux unlikely. However, symptomatic reflux or a positive acid perfusion test, or both, were found in some patients with a normal oesophageal acid exposure time during pH monitoring. Mucosal acid sensitivity, abnormal oesophageal acid exposure time, and symptomatic reflux should be regarded as separate, though related aspects of reflux disease. The Bernstein test is simple, safe, and easily performed. A positive test helps to identify an oesophageal cause of symptoms, particularly in patients in whom other aspects of 'gastro-oesophageal reflux disease' are absent, or who do not have symptoms during pH monitoring. PMID:1864528

  15. Systematic review: the effects of carbonated beverages on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T; Gerson, L; Hershcovici, T; Stave, C; Fass, R

    2010-03-01

    Carbonated beverages have unique properties that may potentially exacerbate gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), such as high acidity and carbonation. Cessation of carbonated beverage consumption is commonly recommended as part of lifestyle modifications for patients with GERD. To evaluate the relationship of carbonated beverages with oesophageal pH, oesophageal motility, oesophageal damage, GERD symptoms and GERD complications. A systematic review. Carbonated beverage consumption results in a very short decline in intra-oesophageal pH. In addition, carbonated beverages may lead to a transient reduction in lower oesophageal sphincter basal pressure. There is no evidence that carbonated beverages directly cause oesophageal damage. Carbonated beverages have not been consistently shown to cause GERD-related symptoms. Furthermore, there is no evidence that these popular drinks lead to GERD complications or oesophageal cancer. Based on the currently available literature, it appears that there is no direct evidence that carbonated beverages promote or exacerbate GERD.

  16. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Small Bowel Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Lauren B; Fidler, Jeff L; Cave, David R; Leighton, Jonathan A

    2015-09-01

    Bleeding from the small intestine remains a relatively uncommon event, accounting for ~5-10% of all patients presenting with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given advances in small bowel imaging with video capsule endoscopy (VCE), deep enteroscopy, and radiographic imaging, the cause of bleeding in the small bowel can now be identified in most patients. The term small bowel bleeding is therefore proposed as a replacement for the previous classification of obscure GI bleeding (OGIB). We recommend that the term OGIB should be reserved for patients in whom a source of bleeding cannot be identified anywhere in the GI tract. A source of small bowel bleeding should be considered in patients with GI bleeding after performance of a normal upper and lower endoscopic examination. Second-look examinations using upper endoscopy, push enteroscopy, and/or colonoscopy can be performed if indicated before small bowel evaluation. VCE should be considered a first-line procedure for small bowel investigation. Any method of deep enteroscopy can be used when endoscopic evaluation and therapy are required. VCE should be performed before deep enteroscopy if there is no contraindication. Computed tomographic enterography should be performed in patients with suspected obstruction before VCE or after negative VCE examinations. When there is acute overt hemorrhage in the unstable patient, angiography should be performed emergently. In patients with occult hemorrhage or stable patients with active overt bleeding, multiphasic computed tomography should be performed after VCE or CTE to identify the source of bleeding and to guide further management. If a source of bleeding is identified in the small bowel that is associated with significant ongoing anemia and/or active bleeding, the patient should be managed with endoscopic therapy. Conservative management is recommended for patients without a source found after small bowel investigation, whereas repeat diagnostic investigations are recommended

  17. Oesophageal cancer survival in Europe: a EUROCARE-4 study.

    PubMed

    Gavin, A T; Francisci, S; Foschi, R; Donnelly, D W; Lemmens, V; Brenner, H; Anderson, L A

    2012-12-01

    Oesophageal cancer survival is poor with variation across Europe. No pan-European studies of survival differences by oesophageal cancer subtype exist. This study investigates rates and trends in oesophageal cancer survival across Europe. Data for primary malignant oesophageal cancer diagnosed in 1995-1999 and followed up to the end of 2003 was obtained from 66 cancer registries in 24 European countries. Relative survival was calculated using the Hakulinen approach. Staging data were available from 19 registries. Survival by region, gender, age, morphology and stage was investigated. Cohort analysis and the period approach were applied to investigate survival trends from 1988 to 2002 for 31 registries in 17 countries. In total 51,499 cases of oesophageal cancer diagnosed 1995-1999 were analysed. Overall, European 1- and 5-year survival rates were 33.4% (95% CI 32.9-33.9%) and 9.8% (95% CI 9.4-10.1%), respectively. Males, older patients and patients with late stage disease had poorer 1- and 5-year relative survival. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma had poorer 1-year relative survival. Regional variation in survival was observed with Central Europe above and Eastern Europe below the European pool. Survival for distant stage disease was similar across Europe while survival rates for localised disease were below the European pool in Eastern and Southern Europe. Improvement in European 1-year relative survival was reported (p=0.016). Oesophageal cancer survival was poor across Europe. Persistent regional variations in 1-year survival point to a need for a high resolution study of diagnostic and treatment practices of oesophageal cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Proton pump inhibitor-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia: an entity challenging current diagnostic criteria for eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Molina-Infante, Javier; Bredenoord, Albert J; Cheng, Edaire; Dellon, Evan S; Furuta, Glenn T; Gupta, Sandeep K; Hirano, Ikuo; Katzka, David A; Moawad, Fouad J; Rothenberg, Marc E; Schoepfer, Alain; Spechler, Stuart J; Wen, Ting; Straumann, Alex; Lucendo, Alfredo J

    2016-03-01

    Consensus diagnostic recommendations to distinguish GORD from eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) by response to a trial of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) unexpectedly uncovered an entity called 'PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia' (PPI-REE). PPI-REE refers to patients with clinical and histological features of EoE that remit with PPI treatment. Recent and evolving evidence, mostly from adults, shows that patients with PPI-REE and patients with EoE at baseline are clinically, endoscopically and histologically indistinguishable and have a significant overlap in terms of features of Th2 immune-mediated inflammation and gene expression. Furthermore, PPI therapy restores oesophageal mucosal integrity, reduces Th2 inflammation and reverses the abnormal gene expression signature in patients with PPI-REE, similar to the effects of topical steroids in patients with EoE. Additionally, recent series have reported that patients with EoE responsive to diet/topical steroids may also achieve remission on PPI therapy. This mounting evidence supports the concept that PPI-REE represents a continuum of the same immunological mechanisms that underlie EoE. Accordingly, it seems counterintuitive to differentiate PPI-REE from EoE based on a differential response to PPI therapy when their phenotypic, molecular, mechanistic and therapeutic features cannot be reliably distinguished. For patients with symptoms and histological features of EoE, it is reasonable to consider PPI therapy not as a diagnostic test, but as a therapeutic agent. Due to its safety profile, ease of administration and high response rates (up to 50%), PPI can be considered a first-line treatment before diet and topical steroids. The reasons why some patients with EoE respond to PPI, while others do not, remain to be elucidated. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. TRALI Syndrome Complicated by Retroperitoneal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay A; Zeltsman, David

    2011-09-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is an underdiagnosed and underreported syndrome which by itself is the third leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. The incidence of TRALI is reported to be 1 in 2000 to 5000 transfusions. When combined with uncontrollable bleeding, survival is unachievable. We report the case of a 25-year-old man, who underwent open heart surgery as an infant to correct his congenital heart disease in association with right pulmonary artery atresia. He presented with hemoptysis secondary to aspergilloma and required a pneumonectomy of the nonfunctional right lung. During pneumolysis, significant bleeding occurred from the superior vena cava. The patient required a blood transfusion and was placed on cardiopulmonary bypass to control the bleeding. Simultaneous occurrence of severe pulmonary edema and retroperitoneal bleeding were noted. Approximately 8 L of frothy edema fluid were drained from the only functional left lung starting ~15 minutes after the transfusion and lasting for several hours until the end of the case. It most likely represented TRALI syndrome. Increasing abdominal girth and poor volume return to the pump were consistent with and pathognomonic for retroperitoneal bleeding. Though primary surgical bleeding in the chest was controlled successfully and a pneumonectomy performed without further difficulty, we were unable to separate the patient from cardiopulmonary bypass due to the inability to oxygenate. As a result, we could not reverse the anti-coagulation which potentially exacerbated the retroperitoneal bleeding. After multiple unsuccessful attempts the patient succumbed. This ill-fated case demonstrates the quandary of obtaining vascular access for emergency cardiopulmonary bypass while in the right thoracotomy position. It may be beneficial to have both the femoral artery and vein cannulated before positioning a patient in a lateral decubitus position. In addition, early direct access to the right atrium

  20. [Clinical analysis of gastrointestinal bleeding after cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui-ming; Wu, Ruo-bin; Yang, Hong-wei; Zheng, Shao-yi; Fan, Rui-xin; Lu, Cong; Zhang, Jing-fang

    2005-05-15

    To explore early diagnosis, treatment and prevention of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding after cardiac surgery. In the last 13 years, cases complicated with GI bleeding after cardiac surgeries were analyzed retrospectively. Fourty-four GI bleeding occurred post-operatively in (6 +/- 3) d. The mortality was 23% (10/44). Thirty-eight were located in upper GI tract, of them 26 underwent conservative therapy while 4 died of other than GI bleeding cause; six underwent laparotomy while 1 and 3 died of septicemia and multi-organ failure respectively; six underwent gastric endoscopic hemostasis by electrocautery or clipping the bleeding vessel while all survived. Six were located in lower GI tract, and 2 of them underwent laparotomy without finding bleeding section and died of multi-organ failure. By multivariable logistic regression analysis, deaths were highly related to the post-operative ventilator-dependence, acute renal insufficiency, intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) assisting and laparotomy. The mortality of GI bleeding after cardiac surgeries is very high, early gastrointestinal endoscopic examination and minimally invasive intervention can treat this complication more effectively. GI bleeding must be prevented whenever complicating post-operative ventilator-dependence, acute renal insufficiency, and IABP assisting after cardiac surgery.

  1. Gastric microbiota is altered in oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus and further modified by proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Amir, Itay; Konikoff, Fred M; Oppenheim, Michal; Gophna, Uri; Half, Elizabeth E

    2014-09-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux can cause inflammation, metaplasia, dysplasia and cancer of the oesophagus. Despite the increased use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to treat reflux, the incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma has increased rapidly in Europe and in the United States in the last 25 years. The reasons for this increase remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to determine whether the microbiota of the gastric refluxate and oesophageal biopsies differs between patients with heartburn and normal-appearing oesophageal mucosa versus patients with abnormal oesophageal mucosa [oesophagitis or Barrett's oesophagus (BE)] and to elucidate the effect of PPIs on the bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Significant differences in the composition of gastric fluid bacteria were found between patients with heartburn and normal oesophageal tissue versus patients with oesophagitis or BE, but in the oesophagus-associated microbiota differences were relatively modest. Notably, increased levels of Enterobacteriaceae were observed in the gastric fluid of oesophagitis and BE patients. In addition, treatment with PPIs had dramatic effects on microbial communities both in the gastric fluids and the oesophageal tissue. In conclusion, gastric fluid microbiota is modified in patients with oesophagitis and BE compared with heartburn patients with normal biopsies. Furthermore, PPI treatment markedly alters gastric and oesophageal microbial populations. Determining whether the changes in bacterial composition caused by PPIs are beneficial or harmful will require further investigation. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Haemophilus ducreyi detection by polymerase chain reaction in oesophageal lesions of HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Borges, M C; Colares, J K B; Lima, D M; Fonseca, B A L

    2009-04-01

    HIV patients frequently have opportunistic oesophageal infections. We report Haemophilus ducreyi genetic material detected by polymerase chain reaction in biopsies of oesophageal lesions in three HIV-1-infected patients. This finding may be an indication of its aetiopathological role in oesophageal lesions of HIV patients.

  3. [Thoracic pain of oesophageal origin. Diagnostic management and treatment].

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Jean-Ariel; Caumes, Jean-Luc; Richecoeur, Martial; Lipovac, Anne-Sylvie

    2003-12-20

    FROM AN ETIOLOGICAL POINT OF VIEW: Thoracic pain is a frequent symptom. Before confirming the oesophageal origin of the pain, a coronary disease must be excluded. Two principle causes are source of thoracic pain of oesophageal origin: gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and oesophageal motility abnormalities. THE DIAGNOSTIC APPROACH: This must include the questioning of the patient and the usual paraclinical examinations. To confirm the diagnosis, these examinations must establish a chronological relationship between the symptoms and the abnormalities. For economic reasons, following a normal gastroscopy, there is a tendency to propose an empirical proton pump inhibitor (PPI) test rather than a 24 hour pH-metry antireflux as first line. The improvement or even the disappearance of the symptoms confirms the diagnosis; long-term treatment with a double dose of PPI should therefore be envisaged. The pH-metry with search for results should be proposed to the non-responders and to patients with atypical reflux manifestations. Dysphagia and odynophagia suggest an oesophageal motility disorder that basal manometry should confirm. A chronological relationship is rarely revealed, but the sensitivity of the pH-meter can be enhanced by provocation tests. REGARDING TREATMENT: Other than achalasia, treatment of the other spastic-like motor disorders is not well codified. Diltiazem is efficient. Some patients exhibit a hyperalgic oesophagus. The physiopathological mechanisms are still theoretical. Low dose tricyclic antidepressors and psychological management are useful.

  4. Practice patterns for the evaluation and treatment of eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Peery, A F; Shaheen, N J; Dellon, E S

    2010-12-01

    Although consensus guidelines for eosinophilic oesophagitis have been published, it remains unclear whether gastroenterologists follow these recommendations. To assess academic and community practice patterns for the evaluation and treatment of eosinophilic oesophagitis and to compare these practices with current guidelines. This was a prospective study of academic and community gastroenterologists using a self-administered online survey. A total of 60% (34 of 57) of academic and 29% (38 of 133) of community gastroenterologists completed the survey. Only 24% of academic and 3% of community gastroenterologists follow consensus guidelines to diagnose eosinophilic oesophagitis (P = 0.007). A proton pump inhibitor trial or negative pH study prior to diagnosis was required by just 25% of all gastroenterologists. A majority (60%) do not use the recommended threshold of 15 eosinophils per high powered field to diagnosis eosinophilic oesophagitis. Half (51%) mistakenly require a positive endoscopic finding. For first-line treatment, about half of the gastroenterologists surveyed treat with a swallowed topical steroid (53% academic, 56% community; P = N.S.), consistent with the guidelines. There is variability in practice patterns for both diagnosis and treatment of eosinophilic oesophagitis. Ongoing education and research concerning diagnosis and treatment are needed. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Idiopathic omental bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Henry, D; Satgunam, S

    2012-01-01

    Omental bleeding without any evidence of trauma, aneurysms, or other pathology has been rarely described in the literature. We report a case of a 24 year-old female on aspirin/acetaminophen/caffeine for migraines who presented with abdominal pain and tachycardia. Computed tomography angiography revealed active extravasation in the right lower quadrant. During exploratory laparotomy, a small bleeding artery within the greater omentum was suture ligated, and two liters of fresh and clotted blood were evacuated. The patient recovered successfully. We review the diagnosis and management of this rare condition. PMID:24960788

  6. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding & Intussusception.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Benjamin E; Moses, Willieford

    2017-02-01

    Relatively uncommon compared with the adult population, lower gastrointestinal bleeding in children requires expeditious evaluation and management because of the variety of causes ranging from benign to life-threatening conditions. The causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) vary with patient age. This review focuses on the differential diagnosis and management of LGIB in children. Because intussusception is one of the most common sources of LGIB, particular attention will be given to its diagnosis and management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Distal thoracic oesophageal perforation secondary to blunt trauma: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Dirk C; Tandon, Ruchi; Mason, Robert C

    2007-01-01

    Background Traumatic perforation of the distal oesophagus due to blunt trauma is a very rare condition and is still associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. This is further exacerbated by delayed diagnosis and management as symptoms and signs are often masked by or ascribed to more common blunt thoracic injuries. Case report We present a case of a distal oesophageal perforation, secondary to a fall from a third storey window, which was masked by concomitant thoracic injuries and missed on both computed tomography imaging and laparotomy. The delay in his diagnosis significantly worsened the patient's recovery by allowing the development of an overwhelming chest sepsis that contributed to his death. Conclusion Early identification of an intrathoracic oesophageal perforation requires deliberate consideration and is essential to ensure a favorable outcome. Treatment should be individualised taking into account the nature of the oesophageal defect, time elapsed from injury and the patient's general condition. PMID:17374175

  8. Oesophageal dysfunction in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Tsianos, E B; Chiras, C D; Drosos, A A; Moutsopoulos, H M

    1985-01-01

    Oesophageal motility was studied in 22 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome and 20 normal volunteers. Oesophageal dysfunction was detected in eight of the 22 patients (36.4%) with primary Sjögren's syndrome. No abnormalities were detected in the normal subjects. Individual analysis of the oesophageal motility studies showed different patterns of oesophageal dysfunction; aperistalsis (three patients), triphasic tertiary contractions (two patients), frequent non-peristaltic contractions (two patients), and low contractions (one patient). These oesophageal abnormalities did not correlate with the parotid flow rate, the degree of inflammatory infiltrate of the minor salivary glands, the extraglandular manifestations, or the presence of autoantibodies. Images PMID:4037887

  9. The Angelchik prosthesis for gastro-oesophageal reflux: symptomatic and objective assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, R. M.; Temple, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with intractable gastro-oesophageal reflux were treated by insertion of the Angelchik antireflux prosthesis. Good symptomatic relief was achieved in over 80% of patients reviewed up to 28 months after operation and there was marked resolution of oesophagitis as seen on endoscopy. Oesophageal manometry and pH studies performed preoperatively and at 3 and 12 months after operation, showed a significant increase in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure with decreased acid reflux. Some technical problems were encountered, but the prosthesis is potentially a simple and effective means of controlling gastro-oesophageal reflux. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4051424

  10. Increased risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma among upstream petroleum workers

    PubMed Central

    Kirkeleit, Jorunn; Riise, Trond; Bjørge, Tone; Moen, Bente E; Bråtveit, Magne; Christiani, David C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate cancer risk, particularly oesophageal cancer, among male upstream petroleum workers offshore potentially exposed to various carcinogenic agents. Methods Using the Norwegian Registry of Employers and Employees, 24 765 male offshore workers registered from 1981 to 2003 was compared with 283 002 male referents from the general working population matched by age and community of residence. The historical cohort was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway and the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Results Male offshore workers had excess risk of oesophageal cancer (RR 2.6, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.8) compared with the reference population. Only the adenocarcinoma type had a significantly increased risk (RR 2.7, 95% CI 1.0 to 7.0), mainly because of an increased risk among upstream operators (RR 4.3, 95% CI 1.3 to 14.5). Upstream operators did not have significant excess of respiratory system or colon cancer or mortality from any other lifestyle-related diseases investigated. Conclusion We found a fourfold excess risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma among male workers assumed to have had the most extensive contact with crude oil. Due to the small number of cases, and a lack of detailed data on occupational exposure and lifestyle factors associated with oesophageal adenocarcinoma, the results must be interpreted with caution. Nevertheless, given the low risk of lifestyle-related cancers and causes of death in this working group, the results add to the observations in other low-powered studies on oesophageal cancer, further suggesting that factors related to the petroleum stream or carcinogenic agents used in the production process might be associated with risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:19858535

  11. The burden of oesophageal cancer in Central and South America.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Enrique; Sierra, Monica S; Musetti, Carina; Forman, David

    2016-09-01

    Oesophageal cancer shows marked geographic variations and is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. We described the burden of this malignancy in Central and South America. Regional and national level incidence data were obtained from 48 population-based cancer registries in 13 countries. Mortality data were obtained from the WHO mortality database. Incidence of oesophageal cancer by histological subtype were available from high-quality population-based cancer registries. Males had higher incidence and mortality rates than females (male-to-female ratios: 2-6:1 and 2-5:1). In 2003-2007, the highest rates were in Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina and Chile. Mortality rates followed the incidence patterns. Incidence of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was higher than adenocarcinoma (AC), except in females from Cuenca (Ecuador). SCC and AC incidence were higher in males than females, except in the Region of Antofagasta and Valdivia (Chile), Manizales (Colombia) and Cuenca (Ecuador). Incidence and mortality rates tended to decline in Argentina, Chile, Brazil (incidence) and Costa Rica from 1997 to 2008. The geographic variation and sex disparity in oesophageal cancer across Central and South America may reflect differences in the prevalence of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption which highlights the need to implement and/or strengthen tobacco and alcohol control policies. Maté consumption, obesity, diet and Helicobacter pylori infection may also explain the variation in oesophageal cancer rates but these relationships should be evaluated. Continuous monitoring of oesophageal cancer rates is necessary to provide the basis for cancer prevention and control in the region. Copyright © 2015 International Agency for Research on Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. [Colon cancer after colon interposition for oesophageal replacement].

    PubMed

    Sikorszki, László; Horváth, Ors Péter; Papp, András; Cseke, László; Pavlovics, Gábor

    2010-08-01

    The authors report the case of a colon adenocarcinoma developed on the neck at the anastomosis of the skin tube and colon 44 years following a corrosive oesophageal injury. This patient suffered a moderately severe oesophageal, stomach and laryngeal injuries due to drinking hydrochloric acid 44 years ago. He underwent serial laryngoplasties, then needed a tracheostomy, oesophagectomy, pyloroplasty and ileocolon transposition. An antethoracal oesophagus formation was performed with ileocolon and skin tube amendment. 44 years later an ulcerated adenocarcinoma developed in the transposed colon, which was resected and the ability to swallow was reinstated by the transplantation of an isolated jejunal segment using microvascular anastomosis.

  13. [Gastro-oesophageal reflux--what if physiological? (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weiser, H F; Pace, F; Lepsien, G; Müller-Lissner, S A; Blum, A L; Siewert, J R

    1982-03-12

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux was examined by taped long-term pH monitoring in 31 healthy subjects (16 men, 15 women; average age 28 years). The following was found: (1) reflux during the day is normal in health subjects, occurring predominantly after meals; (2) healthy persons have practically no reflux at night, after reaching the phase of deep sleep, the decisive difference between the healthy subject and those with reflux concerning the sleep phase, during which the patient with reflux has significantly increased reflux; (3) gastro-oesophageal reflux during the night is dependent upon depth of sleep, while position-dependent reflux was not observed.

  14. Idiopathic giant oesophageal ulcer and leucopoenia after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    van Boekel, G A J; Volbeda, M; van den Hoogen, M W F; Hilbrands, L B; Berden, J H M

    2012-10-01

    A 45-year-old male recipient of a renal allograft was admitted because of a giant oesophageal ulcer coinciding with leucopoenia. An extensive workup revealed no explanation for the ulcer and leucopoenia. Our final diagnosis by exclusion was an idiopathic giant oesophageal ulcer and late-onset neutropenia as consequences of rituximab induction therapy given during the transplant procedure. The patient fully recovered after treatment with prednisone. However, after four months, the ulcer and leucopoenia recurred and again successfully responded to treatment with prednisone.

  15. Optimal subband Kalman filter for normal and oesophageal speech enhancement.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Rizwan; García Zapirain, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the single channel speech enhancement system using subband Kalman filtering by estimating optimal Autoregressive (AR) coefficients and variance for speech and noise, using Weighted Linear Prediction (WLP) and Noise Weighting Function (NWF). The system is applied for normal and Oesophageal speech signals. The method is evaluated by Perceptual Evaluation of Speech Quality (PESQ) score and Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) improvement for normal speech and Harmonic to Noise Ratio (HNR) for Oesophageal Speech (OES). Compared with previous systems, the normal speech indicates 30% increase in PESQ score, 4 dB SNR improvement and OES shows 3 dB HNR improvement.

  16. Airborne occupational exposures and risk of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, C; Plato, N; Johansson, A L V; Nyrén, O; Lagergren, J

    2006-01-01

    Background The reasons for the increasing incidence of and strong male predominance in patients with oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma remain unclear. The authors hypothesised that airborne occupational exposures in male dominated industries might contribute. Methods In a nationwide Swedish population based case control study, 189 and 262 cases of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma respectively, 167 cases of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 820 frequency matched controls underwent personal interviews. Based on each study participant's lifetime occupational history the authors assessed cumulative airborne occupational exposure for 10 agents, analysed individually and combined, by a deterministic additive model including probability, frequency, and intensity. Furthermore, occupations and industries of longest duration were analysed. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios (OR), with 95% confidence intervals (CI), using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders. Results Tendencies of positive associations were found between high exposure to pesticides and risk of oesophageal (OR 2.3 (95% CI 0.9 to 5.7)) and cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.1 (95% CI 1.0 to 4.6)). Among workers highly exposed to particular agents, a tendency of an increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma was found. There was a twofold increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma among concrete and construction workers (OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.1 to 4.2)) and a nearly fourfold increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma among workers within the motor vehicle industry (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 10.4)). An increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 12.5)), and a tendency of an increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.8 (95% CI 0.9 to 8.5)), were identified among hotel and restaurant workers. Conclusions Specific airborne occupational exposures do not seem to be of major importance in the aetiology of oesophageal or

  17. Airborne occupational exposures and risk of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jansson, C; Plato, N; Johansson, A L V; Nyrén, O; Lagergren, J

    2006-02-01

    The reasons for the increasing incidence of and strong male predominance in patients with oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma remain unclear. The authors hypothesised that airborne occupational exposures in male dominated industries might contribute. In a nationwide Swedish population based case control study, 189 and 262 cases of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma respectively, 167 cases of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 820 frequency matched controls underwent personal interviews. Based on each study participant's lifetime occupational history the authors assessed cumulative airborne occupational exposure for 10 agents, analysed individually and combined, by a deterministic additive model including probability, frequency, and intensity. Furthermore, occupations and industries of longest duration were analysed. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios (OR), with 95% confidence intervals (CI), using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders. Tendencies of positive associations were found between high exposure to pesticides and risk of oesophageal (OR 2.3 (95% CI 0.9 to 5.7)) and cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.1 (95% CI 1.0 to 4.6)). Among workers highly exposed to particular agents, a tendency of an increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma was found. There was a twofold increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma among concrete and construction workers (OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.1 to 4.2)) and a nearly fourfold increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma among workers within the motor vehicle industry (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 10.4)). An increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 12.5)), and a tendency of an increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.8 (95% CI 0.9 to 8.5)), were identified among hotel and restaurant workers. Specific airborne occupational exposures do not seem to be of major importance in the aetiology of oesophageal or cardia adenocarcinoma and are unlikely to

  18. Small Bowel Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the small bowel, known as the jejunum. X-ray studies X-ray studies are sometimes used in people with bleeding ... that can be seen by standard or specialized x-ray studies, such as tumors. There are three x- ...

  19. Rare Jejunal Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Christman, Emily; Hassell, Lewis A.; Kastens, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) secondary to jejunal diverticulosis (JD) is very rare. Delay in establishing a diagnosis is common and GIB from JD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We report an illustrative case diagnosed by push enteroscopy and managed with surgery. PMID:27800518

  20. Heavy menstrual bleeding.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-10-05

    Essential facts Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is defined as excessive menstrual blood loss that interferes with a woman's physical, emotional, social or material quality of life. In England and Wales, around 80,000 women a year will be referred for the first time to secondary care, with 30,000 requiring surgical treatment.

  1. Comparison of intravenous edrophonium and oesophageal acid perfusion during oesophageal manometry in patients with non-cardiac chest pain.

    PubMed Central

    De Caestecker, J S; Pryde, A; Heading, R C

    1988-01-01

    Sixty consecutive patients referred for evaluation of non-cardiac chest pain had oesophageal manometry. Motility was assessed basally, after edrophonium 80 micrograms/kg iv and during oesophageal perfusion with 0.1 N HCl at 6 and 14 ml/min for eight and seven minutes respectively. A positive response, defined as symptom reproduction with or without abnormal motility, was present in 21 patients (35%) after acid perfusion and 12 (20%) after edrophonium. Eleven of the 12 patients responding to edrophonium also responded to acid perfusion, including most of the patients with primary motility disorders. Significantly greater increases in peristaltic duration, but not amplitude, were recorded after edrophonium (p less than 0.01) and acid perfusion (p less than 0.05) in positive responders, compared with non-responders. Results indicate that acid perfusion during oesophageal manometry may be a more useful stress test than edrophonium and that the mechanism of symptom production may be similar. PMID:3410328

  2. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  3. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  4. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  5. Bleeding Meckel's diverticulum diagnosis: an unusual indication for computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Danzer, D; Gervaz, P; Platon, A; Poletti, P A

    2003-01-01

    Despite the wide use of modern investigation techniques, the diagnosis of complications related to Meckel's diverticulum (MD) remains difficult. Arteriography is commonly indicated for acute bleeding, and radionuclide scans may help in identifying the site of intestinal hemorrhage. In contrast, computed tomography (CT) is usually considered little use in the diagnosis of bleeding MD. We present the case of a young patient with massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage, in whom the diagnosis of MD bleeding was preoperatively made with contrast-enhanced CT after two negatives arteriographies.

  6. Bleeding complications associated with anticoagulant therapy in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Nieto, José Antonio; Ruíz-Gamietea, Angeles; López-Jiménez, Luciano; García-Bragado, Ferran; Quintavalla, Roberto; Monreal, Manuel

    2010-04-01

    Cancer patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) have an increased incidence of bleeding complications while on anticoagulant therapy. RIETE is an ongoing registry of consecutive patients with acute VTE. We tried to identify which cancer patients are at a higher risk for major bleeding. Up to May 2009, 4,709 patients with active cancer had been enrolled in RIETE registry. During the first 3 months of anticoagulant therapy, 200 (4.2%) patients developed major bleeding. Then, 38 (0.8%) further patients bled beyond the first 90 days of therapy, 3 bled after withholding anticoagulant therapy. The most common sites of bleeding were the gastrointestinal tract (118 patients, 49%), genitourinary system (43 patients, 18%) and the brain (27 patients, 11%). In all, 160 patients (66%) died within 30 days after bleeding: 88 (55%) died of bleeding, 3 (1.9%) died of recurrent pulmonary embolism. Major bleeding is a frequent and severe complication in cancer patients with VTE, even beyond the third month. One third of the patients who bled died due the bleeding event.

  7. Psychosocial factors and their association with reflux oesophagitis, Barrett’s oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Denver, Paul; Donnelly, Michael; Murray, Liam J; Anderson, Lesley A

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of psychological characteristics as risk factors for oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC), as well as the reflux-mediated precursor pathway. METHODS: An all-Ireland population-based case-control study recruited 230 reflux oesophagitis (RO), 224 Barrett’s oesophagus (BO) and 227 OAC patients and 260 controls. Each case/control group completed measures of stress, depression, self-efficacy, self-esteem, repression and social support. A comparative analysis was undertaken using polytomous logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Compared to controls, OAC patients were almost half as likely to report high stress levels over their lifetime (P = 0.010, OR 0.51; 95%CI: 0.29-0.90) and 36% less likely to report having experienced depression (OR 0.64; 95%CI: 0.42-0.98). RO patients reported significantly higher stress than controls particularly during middle- and senior-years (P for trends < 0.001). RO patients were 37% less likely to report having been highly emotionally repressed (OR 0.63; 95%CI: 0.41-0.95). All case groups (OAC, RO and BO) were more likely than controls to report having had substantial amounts of social support (OR 2.84; 95%CI: 1.63-4.97; OR 1.97; 95%CI: 1.13-3.44 and OR 1.83; 95%CI: 1.03-3.24, respectively). CONCLUSION: The improved psychological profile of OAC patients may be explained by response shift. The role of psychological factors in the development of OAC requires further investigation. PMID:23555165

  8. [Oesophageal diseases: gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett's disease, achalasia and eosinophilic oesophagitis].

    PubMed

    Calvet, Xavier

    2015-09-01

    The most important novel findings presented on oesophageal disease in DDW 2015 were the following: 1) GERD: a) hypervigilance seems to be a key pathogenic factor in reflux symptoms refractory to PPI; b) post-reflux swallowing-induced peristaltic waves could be an excellent diagnostic criterion for GERD; c) laryngeal pH-metry is not useful in the diagnosis of extra-oesophageal symptoms; d) the recommendation of weight loss adequately recorded in the clinical reports of patients with GERD and obesity or overweight is an excellent quality indicator and is associated with better outcomes. 2) Barrett's oesophagus: a) persistent low-grade dysplasia in more than one endoscopy and a diagnosis of "indefinite for dysplasia" are associated with a high risk of neoplastic progression; b) narrow-band imaging allows areas of dysplasia on Barrett's oesophagus to be identified with high sensitivity and specificity; c) initial endoscopy fails to identify a high percentage of advanced neoplasms in Barrett's oesophagus. Early re-endoscopy should be considered; d) endoscopists specialized in Barret's oesophagus obtain a much higher yield in the diagnosis of advanced lesions. Patients at high risk-men, older patients, smokers and those with long-segment Barrett's oesophagus-could benefit from follow-up in a referral center. 3) Achalasia: POEM seems safe and effective, independently from patient characteristics (age, comorbidity) and the technical variations used. 4) Eosinophilic esophagitis: topical budesonide and exclusion diets are reasonably effective in PPI non-responders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Treatment and prevention of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving antiplatelet therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasumasa; Sato, Yoshinori; Ozawa, Sun-ichiro; Ishigooka, Shinya; Yamashita, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is the standard of care for the secondary prevention of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic stroke, especially after coronary intervention. However, this therapy is associated with bleeding complications such as gastrointestinal bleeding, which is one of the most common life-threatening complications. Early endoscopy is recommended for most patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. After successful endoscopic hemostasis, immediate resumption of antiplatelet therapy with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) is recommended to prevent further ischemic events. PPI prophylaxis during antiplatelet therapy reduces the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The potential negative metabolic interaction between PPIs and clopidogrel is still unclear. PMID:25685721

  10. Perforating oesophageal carcinoma presenting as necrotizing fasciitis of the neck.

    PubMed

    Francque, S M; Van Laer, C; Struyf, N; Vermeulen, P; Corthouts, B; Jorens, P G

    2001-10-01

    A patient with a history of schizophrenia was admitted to our hospital in an already severe stage of necrotizing fasciitis of the neck, complicated with mediastinitis and gangrene. Later on, he also developed a vena cava superior syndrome and sepsis. In the few cases and small series described in the literature, necrotizing fasciitis of the neck is usually associated with surgery or trauma. Less frequently, an orodental or pharyngeal infection, often innocuous, is the underlying cause. None of these causes could be identified in our patient. Initially, on computer-assisted tomography (CT) scan, a tracheal rupture was suspected, but this diagnosis could not be confirmed on bronchoscopic examination. On gastroscopy, a stenotic oesophageal segment was discovered. Biopsy of this segment showed a poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The patient died in sepsis. Autopsy confirmed the presence of a large proximal oesophageal tumour with perforation. As far as we know, no case of a necrotizing fasciitis of the neck caused by perforation of a formerly unknown oesophageal carcinoma has been reported. Even mediastinitis, with or without gangrene, is rarely associated with oesophageal cancer, and in the few cases reported it is always due to fistulization after surgery.

  11. [Laparoscopic management of oesophageal epiphrenic diverticulum: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ceretti, Andrea Pisani; Carzaniga, Pierluigi

    2005-01-01

    Epiphrenic diverticuli are rare pulsion "pseudodiverticuli" of the distal oesophagus that are commonly associated with oesophageal motility disorders. Surgical treatment is usually reserved for patients with symptoms. Traditionally, patients are treated with diverticulectomy, myotomy and fundoplication via a left thoracotomy. The aim of this study was to describe the laparoscopic technique and review the international literature on this minimally invasive approach. We report the case of a 66-year-old woman with a 1-year history of retrosternal pain, regurgitation and weight loss caused by an oesophageal epiphrenic diverticulum. The patient underwent barium oesophagography and oesophagogastroduodenoscopy. The oesophageal diverticulum measured 5 cm. We treated the condition with a laparoscopic oesophageal diverticulectomy, Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication with intraoperative endoscopy. The operative time was 210 minutes. The postoperative course was complicated by a suspected leakage from the staple line, which was not subsequently confirmed. The patient is now totally asymptomatic after 3 months. Laparoscopy offers good access to the distal oesophagus and the inferior mediastinum. Resection of the diverticulum, treatment of the motor disorder and prevention of postoperative reflux can be obtained with this approach. It should be considered as an alternative to the traditional transthoracic approach and may eventually become the standard technique.

  12. Quality of life measurement in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Blazeby, J M; Williams, M H; Brookes, S T; Alderson, D; Farndon, J R

    1995-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) measurement may aid decision making in the treatment of patients with oesophageal cancer but must be clinically valid to be useful. This study considered if the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire, the QLQ-C30, showed differing results in two clinically distinct groups of patients with oesophageal cancer and also investigated the correlation between dysphagia grade and various scales of QOL. Patients treated by oesophagectomy reported significantly better physical, emotional, cognitive, and global health scores than those in the palliative treatment group. Patients who received palliative treatment had significantly worse pain, fatigue, appetite loss, constipation, and dysphagia. The correlations between dysphagia grade and each of the QOL scales and items in both groups of patients were poor. This questionnaire differentiates clearly between the two clinically distinct groups of patients, but to be an entirely appropriate indicator of QOL in patients with oesophageal cancer, an additional specific oesophageal module including a dysphagia scale is required. PMID:7489936

  13. Apparent diffusion coefficient correlation with oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Okazumi, Shinichi; Hayano, Kohichi; Satoh, Asami; Saitoh, Hiroshige; Shimada, Hideaki; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Kazama, Toshiki; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2012-06-01

    Because diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can predict the prognosis of patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), we hypothesised that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values might be correlated with the collagen content and tumour angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between ADC values of ESCC before treatment and oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis. Seventeen patients with ESCC were enrolled. The ADC values were calculated from the DWI score. Seventeen patients who had undergone oesophagectomy were analysed for tumour stroma, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD34. Tissue collagen was stained with azocarmine and aniline blue to quantitatively analyse the extracellular matrix in cancer stroma. Tissues were stained with VEGF and CD34 to analyse the angiogenesis. The ADC values decreased with stromal collagen growth. We found a negative correlation between the tumour ADC and the amount of stromal collagen (r = -0.729, P = 0.001), i.e. the ADC values decreased with growth of VEGF. We also found a negative correlation between the ADC of the tumours and the amount of VEGF (r = 0.538, P = 0.026). Our results indicated that the ADC value may be a novel prognostic factor and contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. • Magnetic resonance apparent diffusion coefficient values inversely indicate tumour stromal collagen • There is also negative correlation between ADCs and vascular endothelial growth factor • ADC values may contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer.

  14. Role of endoscopic clipping in the treatment of oesophageal perforations

    PubMed Central

    Lázár, György; Paszt, Attila; Mán, Eszter

    2016-01-01

    With advances in endoscopic technologies, endoscopic clips have been used widely and successfully in the treatment of various types of oesophageal perforations, anastomosis leakages and fistulas. Our aim was to summarize the experience with two types of clips: The through-the-scope (TTS) clip and the over-the-scope clip (OTSC). We summarized the results of oesophageal perforation closure with endoscopic clips. We processed the data from 38 articles and 127 patients using PubMed search. Based on evidence thus far, it can be stated that both clips can be used in the treatment of early (< 24 h), iatrogenic, spontaneous oesophageal perforations in the case of limited injury or contamination. TTS clips are efficacious in the treatment of 10 mm lesions, while bigger (< 20 mm) lesions can be treated successfully with OTSC clips, whose effectiveness is similar to that of surgical treatment. However, the clinical success rate is significantly lower in the case of fistulas and in the treatment of anastomosis insufficiency. Tough prospective randomized multicentre trials, which produce the largest amount of evidence, are still missing. Based on experience so far, endoscopic clips represent a possible therapeutic alternative to surgery in the treatment of oesophageal perforations under well-defined conditions. PMID:26788259

  15. Mechanism of association between BMI and dysfunction of the gastro-oesophageal barrier in patients with normal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Robertson, Elaine V; Fletcher, Jonathan; Jones, Gareth-Rhys; Lee, Yeong Yeh; Wirz, Angela A; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2012-03-01

    The association between body mass index (BMI) and gastro-oesophageal pressure gradient (GOPG) is incompletely understood. We examined the association between BMI and gastro-oesophageal (GO) barrier function and the effect of mechanically increasing intra-abdominal pressure on GO physiology. (A) 103 dyspeptic patients with normal endoscopy underwent 24 h pH-metry and upper gastrointestinal manometry. Relationships between BMI and acid reflux, intragastric pressure (IGP), GOPG and lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) pressure were calculated using bivariate correlations. (B) In 18 healthy volunteers, the effects of increasing IGP by abdominal belt on GO manometry were studied. (A) There was a linear correlation between BMI and oesophageal acid exposure in erect (R=0.35, p<0.001) and supine (R=0.40, p<0.001) positions. BMI was strongly associated with IGP (inspiration: R=0.66, p<0.001; expiration: R=0.78, p<0.001) and inspiratory GOPG (R=0.50, p<0.001). There were a positive correlation between BMI and inspiratory LOS pressure relative to atmospheric pressure (R=0.29, p=0.016) and a negative correlation with LOS pressure relative to IGP on expiration (R=-0.25, p=0.018). Logistic regression models using all significant manometric variables and relevant interactions revealed marked decline in the magnitude and significance of relationship between BMI and oesophageal acid exposure in supine (from OR 1.12 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.22), p=0.009, to 1.00 (0.86 to 1.17), p=0.999) and upright positions (from 1.11 (1.02 to 1.20), p=0.020, to 1.03 (0.89 to 1.18), p=0.717). (B) Application of the constricting abdominal belt produced similar manometric changes to those associated with increased BMI. However, the belt did not reproduce the reduced LOS pressure relative to IGP. The association between reflux and BMI may be largely explained by effects of increased intra-abdominal pressure. However, the reduced LOS pressure associated with BMI may be mediated by another mechanism or effects of

  16. Impact of gastro-oesophageal reflux on microRNA expression, location and function.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cameron M; Michael, Michael Z; Watson, David I; Tan, Grace; Astill, David St J; Hummel, Richard; Hussey, Damian J

    2013-01-08

    Ulceration of the oesophageal squamous mucosa (ulcerative oesophagitis) is a pathological manifestation of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, and is a major risk factor for the development of Barrett's oesophagus. Barrett's oesophagus is characterised by replacement of reflux-damaged oesophageal squamous epithelium with a columnar intestinal-like epithelium. We previously reported discovery of microRNAs that are differentially expressed between oesophageal squamous mucosa and Barrett's oesophagus mucosa. Now, to better understand early steps in the initiation of Barrett's oesophagus, we assessed the expression, location and function of these microRNAs in oesophageal squamous mucosa from individuals with ulcerative oesophagitis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to compare miR-21, 143, 145, 194, 203, 205 and 215 expression levels in oesophageal mucosa from individuals without pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux to individuals with ulcerative oesophagitis. Correlations between microRNA expression and messenger RNA differentiation markers BMP-4, CK8 and CK14 were analyzed. The cellular localisation of microRNAs within the oesophageal mucosa was determined using in-situ hybridisation. microRNA involvement in proliferation and apoptosis was assessed following transfection of a human squamous oesophageal mucosal cell line (Het-1A). miR-143, miR-145 and miR-205 levels were significantly higher in gastro-oesophageal reflux compared with controls. Elevated miR-143 expression correlated with BMP-4 and CK8 expression, and elevated miR-205 expression correlated negatively with CK14 expression. Endogenous miR-143, miR-145 and miR-205 expression was localised to the basal layer of the oesophageal epithelium. Transfection of miR-143, 145 and 205 mimics into Het-1A cells resulted in increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation. Elevated miR-143, miR-145 and miR-205 expression was observed in oesophageal squamous mucosa of individuals with ulcerative oesophagitis. These mi

  17. Obesity and weight gain as risk factors for erosive oesophagitis in men.

    PubMed

    Nam, S Y; Choi, I J; Nam, B H; Park, K W; Kim, C G

    2009-05-01

    Although obesity and weight gain increase the risk for symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, their association with erosive oesophagitis is still unclear in the male population. To evaluate, in men, the association of body mass index (BMI) and weight gain with endoscopically proven erosive oesophagitis. A total of 8571 Korean men in a comprehensive screening cohort were enrolled. Effects of BMI and abdominal obesity on erosive oesophagitis were estimated with odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using logistic regression analysis. We also evaluated the association between erosive oesophagitis and BMI change after 1-3 years. The prevalence of erosive oesophagitis was 6.4% (552/8571). In univariate analysis, the ORs for erosive oesophagitis increased as BMI or waist circumference increased (P for trend <0.001, both). In multivariate analysis, OR for erosive oesophagitis increased as BMI increased (P for trend = 0.002), while the significance of waist circumference was attenuated (P for trend = 0.13). Increase in BMI (>or=1 kg/m2) was associated with persistence of erosive oesophagitis (OR = 2.83, 95% CI: 1.01-7.92, P = 0.04) and new development of the disease (OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 1.38-3.28, P = 0.001) compared with BMI change less than 1 kg/m2. Elevated BMI and weight gain have a significant association with erosive oesophagitis.

  18. Upregulation of Twist in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma is associated with neoplastic transformation and distant metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Hiu‐Fung; Chan, Yuen‐Piu; Wong, Michelle Lok‐Yee; Kwok, Wei‐Kei; Chan, Ka‐Kui; Lee, Pin‐Yin; Srivastava, Gopesh; Law, Simon Ying‐Kit; Wong, Yong‐Chuan; Wang, Xianghong; Chan, Kwok‐Wah

    2007-01-01

    Background The antiapoptotic and epithelial–mesenchymal transition activities of Twist have been implicated in the neoplastic transformation and the development of metastasis, respectively. Upregulation of Twist, described in several types of human cancer, also acts as a prognostic marker of poor outcome. Aim To investigate Twist expression in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and its prognostic value in a Chinese cohort of patients with oesophageal SCC. Methods Twist expression in primary oesophageal SCC of 87 Chinese patients was investigated by immunohistochemical staining. Twist protein level in one immortalised normal oesophageal epithelial cell line and six oesophageal SCC cell lines was measured by western blot analysis. Twist mRNA level in 30 pairs of frozen specimens of primary oesophageal SCC and non‐neoplastic oesophageal epithelium from the upper resection margin of corresponding oesophagectomy specimen was also determined by semiquantitative reverse transcription‐PCR. Results It was found that Twist was upregulated in oesophageal SCC cell lines, and its mRNA and protein levels were both increased in oesophageal SCC and the non‐neoplastic oesophageal epithelium (p<0.001). In addition, a high level of Twist expression in oesophageal SCC was significantly associated with a greater risk for the patient of developing distant metastasis within 1 year of oesophagectomy (OR 3.462, 95% CI 1.201 to 9.978; p = 0.022). Conclusions Our results suggest that upregulation of Twist plays a role in the neoplastic transformation to oesophageal SCC and subsequent development of distant metastasis. Twist may serve as a useful prognostic marker for predicting the development of distant metastasis in oesophageal SCC. PMID:16822877

  19. Oxidative stress is more important than acid in the pathogenesis of reflux oesophagitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Oh, T; Lee, J; Ahn, B; Cho, H; Kim, W; Kim, Y; Surh, Y; Cho, S; Lee, K; Hahm, K

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Although antisecretory medications such as histamine type II receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors have been used to treat reflux oesophagitis, a considerable number of patients do not achieve complete mucosal healing or suffer from either sustained symptoms or ensuing complications, suggesting other damaging factors or impaired mucosal resistance are also involved in the pathogenesis of reflux oesophagitis.
AIMS—The present study was designed to evaluate oxidative stress as the major pathogenic factor of reflux oesophagitis and to determine the usefulness of antioxidants in the treatment of reflux oesophagitis.
MATERIALS AND METHODS—Reflux oesophagitis was induced by insertion of a 3 mm calibre ring into the duodenum, 1 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz, in Sprague-Dawley rats.
RESULTS—DA-9601, a novel antioxidant substance, significantly attenuated the gross and histopathological scores of reflux oesophagitis compared with those treated with ranitidine alone or reflux oesophagitis controls in a dose dependent manner. Only scattered erosions were observed in the antioxidant pretreated group but acid suppression by ranitidine was not effective in decreasing the severity of reflux oesophagitis. Significantly increased amounts of malondialdehyde (MDA), increased nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activation, and depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) were observed in experimentally induced reflux oesophagitis. DA-9601 pretreatment attenuated the decrement in mucosal GSH levels and decreased MDA formation significantly. DA-9601 treatment caused significant reductions in activation of NFκB transcription factor, especially the p50 subunit, in accordance with the significantly higher levels of inhibitory protein of NFκB expression.
CONCLUSION—Reflux oesophagitis caused considerable levels of oxidative stress in the oesophageal mucosa and antioxidant treatment should be considered as supplementary therapy in the prevention or treatment

  20. Ambulatory 24-h oesophageal impedance-pH recordings: reliability of automatic analysis for gastro-oesophageal reflux assessment.

    PubMed

    Roman, S; Bruley des Varannes, S; Pouderoux, P; Chaput, U; Mion, F; Galmiche, J-P; Zerbib, F

    2006-11-01

    Oesophageal pH-impedance monitoring allows detection of acid and non-acid gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) events. Visual analysis of impedance recording requires expertise. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of an automated analysis for GOR assessment. Seventy-three patients with suspected GORD underwent 24-h oesophageal pH-impedance monitoring. Recordings analysis was performed visually (V) and automatically using Autoscan function (AS) of Bioview software. A symptom index (SI) > or =50% was considered for a significant association between symptoms and reflux events. AS analysis detected more reflux events, especially non-acid, liquid, pure gas and proximal events. Detection of oesophageal acid exposure and acid reflux events was similar with both analyses. Agreement between V and AS analysis was good (Kendall's coefficient W > 0.750, P < 0.01) for all parameters. During pH-impedance studies, 65 patients reported symptoms. As compared to visual analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of a positive SI determined by AS were respectively 85.7% and 80% for all reflux events, 100% and 98% for acid reflux and 33% and 87.5% for non-acid reflux. Despite good agreement with visual analysis, automatic analysis overestimates the number of non-acid reflux events. Visual analysis remains the gold standard to detect an association between symptoms and non-acid reflux events.

  1. Value of Adjusted Blood Requirement Index in determining failure to control bleed in patients with variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Abid, Shahab; Khalid, Abdullah B; Awan, Safia; Shah, Hasnain A; Hamid, Saeed; Jafri, Wasim

    2015-03-01

    Variceal bleeding is a serious complication in patients with cirrhosis. Among the criteria that were proposed in Baveno conferences, the Adjusted Blood Requirement Index (ABRI) has not been validated prospectively in clinical practice. We therefore aim to evaluate the measurement of ABRI as a marker of failure to control bleeding and to evaluate the consistency of ABRI in relation to other criteria of failure to control variceal bleeding. All patients with variceal bleeding who presented to Aga Khan University Hospital from January 2010 to December 2012 who were administered transfusion of packed red blood cells were included after obtaining informed consent. All patients were managed as per the standard protocol with intravenous terlipressin along with band ligation and injection of cyanoacrylate in cases of esophageal and fundal varices, respectively. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were measured every 6 h for 48 h and then every 12 h until 5 days of index bleed in each patient. Packed cells were transfused if hemoglobin decreased below 8 g/dl. The number of blood units transfused, change in hemoglobin values, and ABRI were calculated after each unit of blood transfusion till 120 h. In patients in whom bleed could not be controlled, an ABRI value of 0.75 or more was compared with other Baveno IV-based parameters that define failure to control variceal bleeding. During the study period, 137 eligible patients with variceal bleed were admitted. The mean age of the patients was 52±12 years. The majority of patients (50.4%) were in Child-Pugh class B, followed by 38% in Child-Pugh class C. According to the Baveno IV criteria, overall failure to control acute variceal bleeding occurred in 52 (37.9%) patients. Excluding ABRI, failure to control bleeding was found in 22/137 (16%) patients, whereas ABRI-based criteria showed that in 34/137 (24.8%) patients, bleeding could not be controlled. There were only four (2.9%) patients with variceal bleeding in whom ABRI and

  2. Impact of oesophagitis classification in evaluating healing of erosive oesophagitis after therapy with proton pump inhibitors: a pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Yaghoobi, Mohammad; Padol, Sara; Yuan, Yuhong; Hunt, Richard H

    2010-05-01

    The results of clinical trials with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are usually based on the Hetzel-Dent (HD), Savary-Miller (SM), or Los Angeles (LA) classifications to describe the severity and assess the healing of erosive oesophagitis. However, it is not known whether these classifications are comparable. The aim of this study was to review systematically the literature to compare the healing rates of erosive oesophagitis with PPIs in clinical trials assessed by the HD, SM, or LA classifications. A recursive, English language literature search in PubMed and Cochrane databases to December 2006 was performed. Double-blind randomized control trials comparing a PPI with another PPI, an H2-RA or placebo using endoscopic assessment of the healing of oesophagitis by the HD, SM or LA, or their modified classifications at 4 or 8 weeks, were included in the study. The healing rates on treatment with the same PPI(s), and same endoscopic grade(s) were pooled and compared between different classifications using Fisher's exact test or chi2 test where appropriate. Forty-seven studies from 965 potential citations met inclusion criteria. Seventy-eight PPI arms were identified, with 27 using HD, 29 using SM, and 22 using LA for five marketed PPIs. There was insufficient data for rabeprazole and esomeprazole (week 4 only) to compare because they were evaluated by only one classification. When data from all PPIs were pooled, regardless of baseline oesophagitis grades, the LA healing rate was significantly higher than SM and HD at both 4 and 8 weeks (74, 71, and 68% at 4 weeks and 89, 84, and 83% at 8 weeks, respectively). The distribution of different grades in study population was available only for pantoprazole where it was not significantly different between LA and SM subgroups. When analyzing data for PPI and dose, the LA classification showed a higher healing rate for omeprazole 20 mg/day and pantoprazole 40 mg/day (significant at 8 weeks), whereas healing by SM classification

  3. Management of bleeding following major trauma: a European guideline

    PubMed Central

    Spahn, Donat R; Cerny, Vladimir; Coats, Timothy J; Duranteau, Jacques; Fernández-Mondéjar, Enrique; Gordini, Giovanni; Stahel, Philip F; Hunt, Beverley J; Komadina, Radko; Neugebauer, Edmund; Ozier, Yves; Riddez, Louis; Schultz, Arthur; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Rossaint, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Evidence-based recommendations can be made with respect to many aspects of the acute management of the bleeding trauma patient, which when implemented may lead to improved patient outcomes. Methods The multidisciplinary Task Force for Advanced Bleeding Care in Trauma was formed in 2005 with the aim of developing guidelines for the management of bleeding following severe injury. Recommendations were formulated using a nominal group process and the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) hierarchy of evidence and were based on a systematic review of published literature. Results Key recommendations include the following: The time elapsed between injury and operation should be minimised for patients in need of urgent surgical bleeding control, and patients presenting with haemorrhagic shock and an identified source of bleeding should undergo immediate surgical bleeding control unless initial resuscitation measures are successful. A damage control surgical approach is essential in the severely injured patient. Pelvic ring disruptions should be closed and stabilised, followed by appropriate angiographic embolisation or surgical bleeding control, including packing. Patients presenting with haemorrhagic shock and an unidentified source of bleeding should undergo immediate further assessment as appropriate using focused sonography, computed tomography, serum lactate, and/or base deficit measurements. This guideline also reviews appropriate physiological targets and suggested use and dosing of blood products, pharmacological agents, and coagulation factor replacement in the bleeding trauma patient. Conclusion A multidisciplinary approach to the management of the bleeding trauma patient will help create circumstances in which optimal care can be provided. By their very nature, these guidelines reflect the current state-of-the-art and will need to be updated and revised as important new evidence becomes available. PMID:17298665

  4. Ambulatory measurement of oesophageal function: clinical use of a new pH and motility recording system.

    PubMed

    Barham, C P; Gotley, D C; Miller, R; Mills, A; Alderson, D

    1992-10-01

    Conventional oesophageal manometric studies are open to criticism in that they take place on fasted immobile subjects in the artificial setting of a motility laboratory. A new 24-h pH and motility recording system combined with computerized data analysis was used to study patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and oesophageal motor abnormalities under ambulant conditions. Acid reflux episodes were found to be precipitated by a variety of events with recognizable pressure patterns. Acid clearance abnormalities were demonstrated in patients with erosive oesophagitis but were confined to those with abnormal oesophageal motor function. Improved diagnostic accuracy was demonstrated in the recognition of oesophageal motor disorders.

  5. Persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Daphne; How, Choon How; Ang, Tiing Leong

    2016-01-01

    About one-third of patients with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) do not respond symptomatically to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Many of these patients do not suffer from GERD, but may have underlying functional heartburn or atypical chest pain. Other causes of failure to respond to PPIs include inadequate acid suppression, non-acid reflux, oesophageal hypersensitivity, oesophageal dysmotility and psychological comorbidities. Functional oesophageal tests can exclude cardiac and structural causes, as well as help to confi rm or exclude GERD. The use of PPIs should only be continued in the presence of acid reflux or oesophageal hypersensitivity for acid reflux-related events that is proven on functional oesophageal tests. PMID:27779277

  6. Does dimethicone increase the efficacy of antacids in the treatment of reflux oesophagitis?

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, A L; Atkinson, M

    1986-10-01

    Dimethicone is a common additive to antacids, although its value in the treatment of reflux oesophagitis is unproven. Its efficacy was assessed by comparing the effect of a dimethicone-containing antacid gel (Asilone Gel) with a simple antacid gel in a double-blind trial in 45 patients with reflux oesophagitis. Thirty-eight patients completed the eight-week course of therapy. Antacid therapy alone resulted in a significant improvement of both symptoms and oesophagitis in gastro-oesophageal reflux. The inclusion of dimethicone in the antacid gel preparation did not confer any benefit in terms of symptomatic assessment but did confer a small advantage with regard to objective markers of oesophageal inflammation, suggesting that a dimethicone-containing antacid is of value in the treatment of symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux.

  7. [Isolated and syndromic forms of oesophageal atresia - genetic aspects and counselling].

    PubMed

    Smigiel, Robert; Karpiński, Paweł; Patkowski, Dariusz

    2009-01-01

    Oesophageal atresia is a congenital developmental defect of alimentary tract concerning the interruption of oesophagus with or without connection with the trachea. The incidence of oesophageal atresia is 1:3000-3500 of live-born infants. Associated anomalies occur in 50% of patients (syndromic cases). In the rest of the patients with oesophageal atresia these anomalies are isolated (non-syndromic cases). The knowledge of dysmorphic syndromes with oesophageal defects, allows us to diagnose the complex genetic syndromes and to implement the correct treatment and correct genetic counselling concerning the etiology, natural course of the disease, prognosis and possible complications as well as determining the recurrence risk of the disease in the family. The authors describe the chosen embryological, epidemiological and genetic aspects of congenital oesophageal atresia. The clinical aspects, genetic counselling as well as the genetic basis of chosen genetic syndromes with oesophageal atresia are also described in this article.

  8. Association between Oesophageal Diverticula and Leiomyomas: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhry, Muhammad; Lorenzi, Bruno; Kadirkamanathan, Sritharan; Charalabopoulos, Alexandros

    2016-01-01

    We report two rare cases of female patients presenting with oesophageal leiomyoma associated with oesophageal diverticulum, both of whom were surgically managed. Oesophageal leiomyoma and oesophageal diverticulum are uncommon as separate entities and rare as combined disease presentation. Clinicians need to be aware of the rare combination of the two entities and need to be able to exclude the presence of a tumour (benign or malignant) within a diverticulum and so plan the optimum treatment. Herein, we present two cases of oesophageal leiomyoma within oesophageal diverticulum and we try to elucidate the association between the two. To date, there is no consensus whether a diverticulum is secondary to a leiomyoma or, on the contrary, a leiomyoma arises within a diverticulum. PMID:27885346

  9. Barrett’s oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma: time for a new synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Brian J.; Li, Xiaohong; Galipeau, Patricia C.; Vaughan, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The public health importance of Barrett’s oesophagus lies in its association with oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma has risen at an alarming rate over the past four decades in many regions of the Western world and there are indications that the incidence of this disease is on the rise in Asian populations where it has been rare. Much has been learned of host and environmental risk factors that affect the incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma and data indicate that patients with Barrett’s oesophagus rarely develop oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Given that 95% of oesophageal adenocarcinoma arise in individuals without a prior diagnosis of Barrett’s oesophagus, what strategies can be used to reduce late diagnosis of oesophageal adenocarcinoma? PMID:20094044

  10. Detection of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.; McKusick, K.A.; Froelich, J.W.; Callahan, R.J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1982-04-01

    Using a modified in vivo /sup 99m/Tc red cell labeling technique, gastrointestinal bleeding scintigraphy was performed in 100 patients with GI bleeding. Sixty-two patients with melena or bright red blood per rectum had positive scintiscans. In comparison to results of angiography, endoscopy, surgery and contrast radiography, radionuclide scintigraphy correctly located the site of bleeding in 83% of patients. The procedures could be performed over a 24 hr period which increased the sensitivity of the test since 85% of the scintiscans were positive at one hr or greater after the onset of imaging. The procedure was more sensitive than angiography in detecting sources of GI bleeding. We conclude that GI bleeding scintigraphy /sup 99m/Tc-red cells in an accurate and effective method to detect upper and lower GI bleeding in patients with acute intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding.

  11. [Prevention and management of anastomotic bleeding after laparoscopic anterior resection of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Chen, Weijie; Lin, Guole

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, the laparoscopic anterior rectal cancer resection is increasingly applied in clinical practice, however, laparoscopic operations and stapling techniques can bring a series of related complications. The anastomotic bleeding is one of the early complications in laparoscopic anterior rectal cancer resections. If the continuous anastomotic bleeding is not diagnosed or managed in time, it could lead to serious consequences, such as secondary surgery and shock. Therefore, the diagnosis and treatment of anastomotic bleeding is meaningful. This paper investigates the reasons of anastomotic bleeding after laparoscopic anterior resection of rectal cancer, and introduces related preventions and treatments. Conservative treatment can be used first for small or delayed bleeding. As for acute bleeding from low anastomosis, transanal suture hemostasis can be considered. When the bleeding comes from high anastomosis and is massive and active, laparoscopic or open surgery must be performed immediately.

  12. Vitamin D, calcium and dairy intake, and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor conditions.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, Helen G; Murray, Liam J; Anderson, Lesley A; Cantwell, Marie M

    2011-09-01

    Evidence is accumulating that vitamin D may be protective against carcinogenesis, although exceptions have been observed for some digestive tract neoplasms. The aim of the present study was to explore the association between dietary vitamin D and related nutrients and the risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor conditions, Barrett's oesophagus and reflux oesophagitis. In an all-Ireland case-control study conducted between March 2002 and July 2005, 218 oesophageal adenocarcinoma patients, 212 Barrett's oesophagus patients, 208 reflux oesophagitis patients and 252 population-based controls completed a 101-item FFQ, and provided lifestyle and demographic information. Multiple logistic regression analysis was applied to examine the association between dietary intake and disease risk. Oesophageal adenocarcinoma risk was significantly greater for individuals with the highest compared with the lowest tertile of vitamin D intake (OR 1·99, 95 % CI 1·03, 3·86; P for trend = 0·02). The direct association could not be attributed to a particular vitamin D food source. Vitamin D intake was unrelated to Barrett's oesophagus and reflux oesophagitis risk. No significant associations were observed for Ca or dairy intake and oesophageal adenocarcinoma, Barrett's oesophagus or reflux oesophagitis development. High vitamin D intake may increase oesophageal adenocarcinoma risk but is not related to reflux oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus. Ca and dairy product intake did not influence the development of these oesophageal lesions. These findings suggest that there may be population subgroups at an increased risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma if advice to improve vitamin D intake from foods is implemented. Limited work has been conducted in this area, and further research is required.

  13. Toxic bile acids in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: influence of gastric acidity

    PubMed Central

    Nehra, D; Howell, P; Williams, C; Pye, J; Beynon, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Bile acid toxicity has been shown in the gastric, colonic, and hepatic tissues; the effect on oesophageal mucosa is less well known. 
AIMS—To determine the spectrum of bile acids refluxing in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and its relation to oesophageal pH using a new technique of combined oesophageal aspiration and pH monitoring. 
METHODS—Ten asymptomatic subjects and 30 patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (minimal mucosal injury, erosive oesophagitis (grade 2 or 3 Savary-Miller), Barrett's oesophagus/stricture; n=10 in each group) underwent 15 hour continuous oesophageal aspiration with simultaneous pH monitoring. Bile acid assay of the oesophageal samples was performed using modified high performance liquid chromatography. 
RESULTS—The peak bile acid concentration and DeMeester acid scores were significantly higher in the patients with oesophagitis (median bile acid concentration 124 µmol/l; acid score 20.2) and Barrett's oesophagus/stricture (181 µmol/l; 43.3) than patients with minimal injury (14 µmol/l; 12.5) or controls (0 µmol/l; 11.1). The predominant bile acids detected were cholic, taurocholic, and glycocholic acids but there was a significantly greater proportion of secondary bile acids, deoxycholic and taurodeoxycholic acids, in patients with erosive oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus/stricture. Although bile acid reflux episodes occurred at variable pH, a temporal relation existed between reflux of taurine conjugates and oesophageal acid exposure (r=0.58, p=0.009). 
CONCLUSION—Toxic secondary bile acid fractions have been detected in patients with extensive mucosal damage. Mixed reflux is more harmful than acid reflux alone with possible toxic synergism existing between the taurine conjugates and acid. 

 Keywords: bile acids; reflux oesophagitis; Barrett's oesophagus PMID:10205192

  14. Oesophageal function assessed by high-resolution manometry in patients with diabetes and inadequate glycaemic control.

    PubMed

    Roman, S; Marjoux, S; Thivolet, C; Mion, F

    2014-11-01

    To describe oesophageal function in people with diabetes and poor glycaemic control using oesophageal high-resolution manometry and to compare the result between control subjects and patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. The results of oesophageal high-resolution manometry and a gastric emptying test were reviewed in 20 patients with diabetes. The high-resolution manometry protocol consisted of 5-ml swallows of water and multiple swallows of water. Oesophageal motility disorders were classified according to the Chicago classification system. The occurence of multiphasic contractions and intragastric and intrabolus pressures were measured. High-resolution manometry results were compared between 10 control subjects and 20 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Data were expressed as medians and compared using Mann-Whitney and chi-squared tests. Oesophageal motility disorders were similarly distributed between the groups. Multiphasic contractions occurred more frequently in patients with diabetes than in those with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (60 vs 20% per patient; P<0.01) and were not observed in control subjects. Gastric emptying was delayed in six patients with diabetes and did not correlate with symptoms or oesophageal motility disorders. Intrabolus pressure was higher in patients with diabetes and gastroparesis than in those without (17 vs 10 mmHg; P=0.02) and correlated with intragastric pressure (r=0.46, P<0.01). During multiple swallows of water, oesophageal contractile activity was incompletely inhibited in 83% of patients with diabetes and gastroparesis vs 9% without (P<0.01). Oesophageal function and gastric emptying were not influenced by fasting glycaemia. Patients with gastroparesis might present with impaired inhibition of contractile activity during multiple swallows of water. Increased intrabolus pressure is suggestive of delayed oesophageal clearance as a consequence of gastroparesis. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine

  15. A Case of Intramural Oesophageal Dissection Secondary to Nasogastric Tube Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Richard; Ahmed, Ahmed R; Menzies, Donald

    2008-01-01

    Intramural oesophageal dissection is a rare disorder, caused by the interposition of a divisive force between the mucosal and muscular layers of the oesophagus, leading to their separation. We present a case of intramural oesophageal dissection, secondary to the accidental iatrogenic intramural insertion of a nasogastric tube. We discuss the aetiologies, presentation, investigation and treatment of intramural oesophageal dissection, and make recommendations on the management of suspected oesophageal perforation with prophylactic nasogastric tube insertion. We also discuss other complications associated with nasogastric tube insertion, and how these may be avoided. PMID:18831861

  16. An unusual approach for the treatment of oesophageal perforation: Laparoscopic-endoscopic cooperative surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cayci, Haci Murat; Erdoğdu, Umut Eren; Dilektasli, Evren; Turkoglu, Mehmet Akif; Firat, Deniz; Cantay, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Boerhaave syndrome describes a transmural oesophageal rupture that develops following a spontaneous, sudden intraluminal pressure increase (i.e. vomiting, cough). It has a high rate of mortality and morbidity because of its proximity to the mediastinum and pleura. Perforation localisation and treatment initiation time affect the morbidity and mortality. In this article, we aim to present our successful laparoscopic-endoscopic cooperative surgery in a 59-year-old female who was referred to our clinic with a diagnosis of spontaneous lower oesophageal perforation. Laparoscopy and a simultaneous oesophageal stent application may be assumed as an effective alternative to conventional surgical approaches in cases of spontaneous lower oesophageal perforation. PMID:27251836

  17. Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma: how does acid interfere with cell proliferation and differentiation?

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R C

    2005-03-01

    Acid, a principal component of gastro-oesophageal refluxate, may contribute to the development and malignant progression of Barrett's oesophagus. Oesophageal pH monitoring studies have demonstrated that patients with Barrett's oesophagus have severe and chronic acid reflux. However, there is overlap between the amount of acid exposure in patients with oesophagitis compared with patients with Barrett's oesophagus. This suggests that factors other than acid may be important in the aberrant oesophageal cell differentiation process that leads to the development of the metaplastic Barrett's mucosa. The other factors important in the aetiology of Barrett's oesophagus are poorly understood but probably include both genetic and environmental factors.

  18. African American ethnicity is not associated with development of Barrett's oesophagus after erosive oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Alkaddour, Ahmad; McGaw, Camille; Hritani, Rama; Palacio, Carlos; Nakshabendi, Rahman; Munoz, Juan Carlos; Vega, Kenneth J

    2015-10-01

    Barrett's oesophagus is the primary risk factor for oesophageal adenocarcinoma; erosive oesophagitis is considered an intermediate step with Barrett's oesophagus development potential upon healing. Barrett's oesophagus occurs in 9-19% following erosive oesophagitis but minimal data exists in African Americans. The study aim was to determine if ethnicity is associated with Barrett's oesophagus formation following erosive oesophagitis. Retrospective review of endoscopies from September 2007 to December 2012 was performed. Inclusion criteria were erosive oesophagitis on index endoscopy, repeat endoscopy ≥6 weeks later and non-Hispanic white or African American ethnicity. Barrett's oesophagus frequency following erosive oesophagitis by ethnicity was compared. A total of 14,303 patients underwent endoscopy during the study period; 1636 had erosive oesophagitis. Repeat endoscopy was performed on 125 non-Hispanic white or African American patients ≥6 weeks from the index procedure. Barrett's oesophagus occurred in 8% of non-Hispanic whites while no African American developed it on repeat endoscopy following erosive oesophagitis (p=0.029). No significant difference was seen between ethnic groups in any clinical parameter assessed. African American ethnicity appears to result in decreased Barrett's oesophagus formation following erosive oesophagitis. Further investigation to demonstrate factors resulting in decreased Barrett's oesophagus formation among African Americans should be performed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. The aetiology, management and clinical outcome of upper gastrointestinal bleeding among patients admitted at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre in Moshi, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Suba, Mwanahawa; Ayana, Segni Mekonnen; Mtabho, Charles M; Kibiki, Gibson S

    2010-10-01

    Upper gastro-intestinal (GI) bleeding is a life-threatening emergency that results in high morbidity and mortality and therefore requires admission to hospital for urgent diagnosis and management. The aim of this study was to determine the causes of upper GI bleeding and clinical outcome of patients admitted to medical department with the diagnosis of upper GI bleeding. A retrospective study of records of all upper GI bleeding patients who were admitted to medical department, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC) from January 2007 to December 2008 was conducted. A total of 130 patients (13-96 years old) were enrolled in the study, whereby 73 (56.2%) were males. The causes of bleeding, all endoscopically diagnosed included oesophageal varices in 55 (42.3%) cases, followed by duodenal ulcers 20 (15.4%), hemorrhagic/erosive gastritis 10 (7.7%), gastric ulcer 6 (4.6%) and Mallory Weiss tear 2 (1.5%). No cause was identified in the remaining 27 % of cases. Conservative medical therapy alone was carried out in 52.3% of the patients. Endoscopic therapy was used in 61 (46.9%) of patients. Only 2 (1.5%) patients underwent surgical intervention. The overall mortality at discharge was 17%, while 107 (82%) patients were discharged improved. In conclusion, the commonest causes of upper GI bleeding are oesophageal varices and duodenal ulcer. Most cases of upper GI bleeding were successfully treated with pharmacologic and endoscopic treatment. The high mortality may be influenced by delayed presentation to health facilities, and comorbidities. There is a need for strengthening preventive programmes and conducting studies to identify predictors of outcome of upper GI bleeding to develop evidence based management protocols.

  20. Morphometric assessment of reflux oesophagitis in fibreoptic biopsy specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, L R; Dent, J; Whitehead, R

    1985-01-01

    The oesophageal epithelium of patients with reflux oesophagitis has been studied by means of computer aided morphometry. Measurements of histological features were made on biopsies from six cases before and after treatment. The size and elongation of the nuclei and their variation, the number of nuclei per unit length or per unit sectioned area, and the size and number of nucleoli per nucleus were measured for two zones of the epithelium, the base layer and the intermediate layer, which were independent of section orientation. The measurements were analysed using discriminant analysis. Significant discrimination was found between the two groups. The most important parameters were the number of intermediate layer nuclei per sectioned square millimetre, the mean intermediate layer nuclear area, and the number of nuclei per millimetre of base epithelium. These parameters are consistent with increased cell turnover of the non-ulcerated epithelium before treatment. Images PMID:3968208

  1. Effect of coffee on human lower oesophageal function.

    PubMed

    Salmon, P R; Fedail, S S; Wurzner, H P; Harvey, R F; Read, A E

    1981-01-01

    The effect of coffee on lower oesophageal sphincter pressure (LOSP) and intraoesophageal pH was assessed in 10 healthy volunteers, in the fasting state and after a standard Lundh test meal. LOSP was measured by the rapid pull-through technique. Coffee with or without milk has no significant effect on LOSP in the fasting subject. The Lundh meal alone (mean drop = 2.01 cm H2O), or when coffee with (mean drop = 1.80 cm H2O) or without milk (mean drop = 3.47 cm H2O) was taken after it, produced a significant drop in LOSP. Heartburn following coffee does not appear to be due to an effect of coffee on the lower oesophageal sphincter but is more likely due to the effect of a previous meal on sphincter pressure with associated acid reflux.

  2. Factors associated with oesophageal cancer in Soweto, South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Segal, I.; Reinach, S. G.; de Beer, M.

    1988-01-01

    Cancer of the oesophagus was a rare disease in the South African black population until the last few decades. Increases in incidence have occurred and at present it is the commonest cancer in black men in many parts of South Africa. A case-control study of 200 oesophageal cancer patients and 391 hospital controls has been carried out in order to determine the risk factors in the urban black population of Soweto. The results indicate that the cancer patients were long-term urban residents from a very low socio-economic group. The association between smoking pipe tobacco and oesophageal cancer previously noted in South Africa is confirmed. In addition, consumption of traditional beer was found to be a major risk factor. PMID:3219281

  3. Incidental detection of a bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumor on Tc-99m red blood cell scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Bhattacharya, Anish; Gupta, Vikas; Singh, Rajinder; Radotra, Bishan Dass; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2012-10-01

    The role of 99m-technetium labeled red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy in acute gastro-intestinal bleed is well-established. The authors report a case of a bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) incidentally discovered on Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy.

  4. Noncardiac surgery and bleeding after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    To, Andrew C Y; Armstrong, Guy; Zeng, Irene; Webster, Mark W I

    2009-06-01

    The decision on whether to implant a drug-eluting or bare-metal stent during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) depends in part on the perceived likelihood of the patient developing late stent thrombosis. Noncardiac surgery and bleeding are associated with discontinuation of dual antiplatelet therapy and with increased stent thrombosis. We assessed the incidence of and predictors for subsequent noncardiac surgery and bleeding episodes in patients who had undergone PCI. Hospital discharge coding data were used to identify all adult patients undergoing public hospital PCI in New Zealand from 1996 to 2001. Hospital admissions during the ensuing 5 years were analyzed for noncardiac surgery and bleeding episodes. Eleven thousand one hundred fifty-one patients (age, 62+/-11 years; 30% women) underwent PCI, mainly for an acute coronary syndrome (73%). During the 5-year follow-up, 26% of the population underwent at least 1 noncardiac surgical procedure (23% orthopedic, 20% abdominal, 12% urologic, 10% vascular, 35% others) and 8.6% had at least 1 bleeding episode either requiring or occurring during hospitalization. Of those, half were gastrointestinal, and one quarter of bleeding events required blood transfusion. The main clinical predictors of noncardiac surgery were advanced age, previous noncardiac surgery, osteoarthritis, and peripheral vascular disease. A previous bleeding admission and age were the strongest predictors of subsequent bleeding. Noncardiac surgery is required frequently after PCI, whereas bleeding is less common. Before implanting a drug-eluting or bare-metal stent, individual patient risk stratification by the interventional cardiologist should include assessment of whether there is an increased likelihood of needing noncardiac surgery or developing bleeding.

  5. Cough · 3: Chronic cough and gastro-oesophageal reflux

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, G; Pistolesi, M

    2003-01-01

    The pathogenesis and clinical features of gastro-oesophageal reflux related cough are complex and the diagnostic tests available are of limited reliability. Treatment needs to be tailored to the specific needs of individual patients and other possible causes of chronic cough should be investigated. Treatment should only be considered to have failed when cough persists after administration of proton pump inhibitors at an adequate dosage for a sufficient length of time. PMID:14645983

  6. Impact of the inflammatory microenvironment on T-cell phenotype in the progression from reflux oesophagitis to Barrett oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Maria E; Conroy, Melissa J; Clarke, Niamh E; Gilmartin, Niamh T; O'Sullivan, Katie E; Feighery, Ronan; MacCarthy, Finbar; O'Toole, Dermot; Ravi, Narayanasamy; Reynolds, John V; O'Sullivan, Jacintha; Lysaght, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC), arising from reflux-induced Barrett oesophagus (BO), is increasing dramatically. T-cells have recently been implicated in the initiation of oesophagitis; however, their role in the progression from oesophagitis to BO and OAC has not been fully elucidated. Previous studies have examined the secreted cytokines from oesophageal tissue during disease progression but this study is the first to examine the activation phenotype and the inflammatory profile of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells in human oesophagitis, BO and OAC tissue. Results demonstrated significantly higher levels of IL-4 producing CD4(+) T-cells and secreted levels of IL-6, confirming a Th2 phenotype in BO. In OAC tissue, both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were secreted, with significantly higher levels of IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-10 compared with normal oesophageal tissue. In addition, CD4(+) T-cells infiltrating OAC tissue displayed a decreased activation profile, with significantly lower CD45RO and CD69 expression compared with normal tissue. Data from this study suggest that factors in the tissue microenvironment may alter T-cell phenotype and function early during oesophageal disease progression and may represent targets for immune intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Potential mechanism for Calvados-related oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Linderborg, Klas; Joly, Jean Pierre; Visapää, Jukka-Pekka; Salaspuro, Mikko

    2008-02-01

    The old Normandian habit of consumption of hot Calvados is associated with an increased risk of oesophageal cancer compared to other alcoholic beverages. The role of alcohol consumption in the risk of oesophageal cancer is well established. The first metabolite of alcohol, acetaldehyde is a potential local carcinogen in humans. Accordingly, different acetaldehyde concentrations in different beverages could account for some of the variations in cancer risk with regard to the type of alcoholic beverage. Eighteen samples of farm-made Calvados were collected in Normandy. Samples of commercially available beverages were purchased, including factory-made Calvados, other spirits, wines, beer and cider. The samples were analysed gas-chromatically for acetaldehyde and ethanol concentrations. All results are expressed as mean+/-SD. The mean acetaldehyde concentration of all Calvados samples (1781+/-861 microM, n =25) differed highly significantly (p<0.001) from that of all wine samples (275+/-236 microM), from all other spirits samples (1251+/-1155 microM, p<0.05), and from all beer and cider samples (233+/-281 microM, p<0.001). Farm-made Calvados and farm-made cognac had the highest mean acetaldehyde concentration of the measured beverages. The high concentration of acetaldehyde combined with possible effects of the high temperature at which Calvados is consumed could account for the increased risk of Calvados-related oesophageal cancer.

  8. Surgical treatment of para-oesophageal hiatal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, M. L.; Duffy, J. P.; Beggs, F. D.; Salama, F. D.; Knowles, K. R.; Morgan, W. E.

    2001-01-01

    The development of laparoscopic antireflux surgery has stimulated interest in laparoscopic para-oesophageal hiatal hernia repair. This review of our practice over 10 years using a standard transthoracic technique was undertaken to establish the safety and effectiveness of the open technique to allow comparison. Sixty patients with para-oesophageal hiatal hernia were operated on between 1989 and 1999. There were 38 women and 22 men with a median age of 69.5 years. There were 47 elective and 13 emergency presentations. Operation consisted of a left thoracotomy, hernia reduction and crural repair. An antireflux procedure was added in selected patients. There were no deaths among the elective cases and one among the emergency cases. Median follow-up time was 19 months. There was one recurrence (1.5%). Seven patients (12%) required a single oesophagoscopy and dilatation up to 2 years postoperatively but have been asymptomatic since. Two patients (3%) developed symptomatic reflux which has been well controlled on proton-pump inhibitors. Transthoracic para-oesophageal hernia repair can be safely performed with minimal recurrence. PMID:11777134

  9. Endoluminal gastroplication in children with significant gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, M; Fritscher-Ravens, A; Hall, S; Afzal, N; Ashwood, P; Swain, C P

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To describe paediatric experience, and to assess complications and therapeutic effectiveness of the use of endoluminal gastroplication in children with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) refractory to, or dependent on, proton pump inhibitors. Methods: Seventeen (five male) consecutive children/adolescents (median (range) age 12.4 (6.1–15.9) years, median (range) weight 46.0 (16.5–87.5) kg) with GORD either dependent for more than 12 months on proton pump inhibitors or non-responsive to medical treatment underwent endoscopic gastroplication using a flexible endoscopic sewing device (EndoCinch). Three plications were placed in gastric tissue below the lower oesophageal sphincter. Drug dose requirement, pH measurements, daily symptom severity and frequency, and validated reflux (QOLRAD) and general gastrointestinal (GSRS) quality of life scores were compared before and after endoscopic gastroplication. Results: All patients showed post-treatment improvement in symptom severity, frequency, and quality of life scores (p<0.0001). Three patients with recurrent symptomatic GORD had a repeat procedure within six weeks and did well subsequently. At up to 33 months of follow up (median 23), 14/17 patients remained off all antireflux medications, and 14/17 had maintained their symptomatic improvement. All pH parameters improved and had returned to normal values in 14/16 patients post-treatment and in 6/9 after one year of follow-up: in particular the reflux index had decreased from a median of 16.6% (0.9–67%) to 2.5% (0.7–15.7%) (p<0.0001) six weeks and 4.3% (2.2–20.6) (p<0.02) 12 months post-procedure. The only complication observed was gastric bleeding in one patient due to previously undiagnosed coagulopathy, which spontaneously resolved. Conclusions: Endoluminal gastroplication is an effective and safe procedure in children/adolescents with significant GORD refractory to, or dependent on, medical anti-GORD therapy. PMID:15542508

  10. Lower oesophageal sphincter hypersensitivity to opioid receptor stimulation in patients with idiopathic achalasia.

    PubMed Central

    Penagini, R; Bartesaghi, B; Zannini, P; Negri, G; Bianchi, P A

    1993-01-01

    Impairment of non-cholinergic innervation of the lower oesophageal sphincter has been suggested in idiopathic achalasia. As opioid nerves are present in the lower oesophageal sphincter and opioid peptides affect lower oesophageal sphincter motility, the effect of an opioid agonist, morphine (100 micrograms/kg iv), and an opioid blocker, naloxone (80 micrograms/kg iv), on lower oesophageal sphincter motor function was assessed in 10 healthy subjects and in 10 patients with untreated idiopathic achalasia on separate days and in randomised order. In addition, in six of the patients, naloxone 0.8 mg iv was injected 60 minutes after morphine and recordings continued for a further five minutes. Lower oesophageal sphincter pressure was monitored by a sleeve device. In the healthy subjects morphine decreased (p < 0.01) resting lower oesophageal sphincter pressure by 4 (1) mm Hg (23 (8)%). In the achalasia patients the effect was more marked, lower oesophageal sphincter pressure being reduced (p < 0.01) by 11 (2) mm Hg (46 (8)%). Naloxone reversed lower oesophageal sphincter pressure to basal. Both absolute and percentage decreases after morphine were significantly greater (p < 0.05) in the achalasia patients than in the healthy subjects. Swallow induced lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) by morphine in the healthy subjects but not in the achalasia patients. Naloxone had no effect on resting lower oesophageal sphincter pressure or swallow induced relaxation in either healthy subjects or achalasia patients. In conclusion achalasia patients are hypersensitive to the effect of morphine on resting lower oesophageal sphincter pressure. This finding is unlikely to be the result of a denervation process involving opioid nerves. PMID:8381758

  11. Is it possible to diagnose infectious oesophagitis without seeing the causative organism? A histopathological study.

    PubMed

    Demir, Derya; Doğanavşargil, Başak; Sarsık, Banu; Sezak, Murat; Tunçyürek, Müge

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the utility of using histological changes to diagnose infectious oesophagitis when causative organisms cannot be seen. Sixty-seven endoscopic biopsy specimens (51 Candida, 9 herpes simplex virus, 4 tuberculosis, and 3 cytomegalovirus oesophagitis) collected from 2000-2010 that matched the investigative criteria were included in the study. Cases were re-evaluated for histological changes observed in oesophagitis, and the findings were statistically compared using nonparametric tests. Thirty-nine cases occurred in male patients, and 28 occurred in female patients; the mean age of the patients was 51±20.1 years (range, 5-94 years). All cases showed lymphocytic and neutrophilic infiltration; while 27 (40.3%) showed eosinophilic infiltration. The density of lymphocytes and eosinophils were 8.43±6 and 1.07±1.62 per high power field, respectively, and these rates were higher in tuberculosis oesophagitis cases. Lamina propria infiltration was present in herpes simplex virus and Candida oesophagitis. Dense neutrophilic infiltration (>50/high power field) was noted in herpes simplex virus oesophagitis. Candida colonization was observed in 82% of cases with eosinophilic infiltration, and 80% of cases with erosion. Ulceration was present in all tuberculosis oesophagitis cases (p<0.001). Basal cell hyperplasia, papillary elongation, and dilated intercellular spaces were seen in all cases except for 2 Candida oesophagitis cases. Lamina propria fibrosis was especially noted in cytomegalovirus oesophagitis cases. It is not possible to distinguish infectious oesophagitis from other subtypes, especially reflux oesophagitis, if the causative organism is not detected. Clinicopathological correlation and control with repeat targeted biopsies are essential for diagnosis.

  12. Impairment of chemical clearance is relevant to the pathogenesis of refractory reflux oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Frazzoni, Marzio; Bertani, Helga; Manta, Raffaele; Mirante, Vincenzo Giorgio; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Conigliaro, Rita; Melotti, Gianluigi

    2014-07-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux oesophagitis has been scarcely studied. To assess impedance-pH parameters relevant to the pathogenesis of refractory reflux oesophagitis. Cases referred for heartburn/regurgitation refractory to high-dosage proton pump inhibitors between January 2008 and December 2012 were reviewed and subdivided into refractory oesophagitis (29 patients, 72% males, median age 50 years), healed oesophagitis (18 patients, 67% males, median age 54 years), and non-erosive reflux disease (49 patients, 53% males, median age 42 years). On-therapy impedance-pH tracings were blindly re-analysed by one observer to assess gastric and oesophageal acid exposure time and chemical clearance as expressed by the post-reflux swallow-induced peristaltic wave index. The median gastric and oesophageal acid exposure time did not differ among the three groups (35%, 34%, 41% and 1.2%, 0.7%, 0.8%, respectively; P>0.05 for all comparisons). A normal oesophageal acid exposure time was found in two thirds of patients with refractory oesophagitis. The post-reflux swallow-induced peristaltic wave index was significantly lower in refractory oesophagitis (16%) than in healed oesophagitis (30%) and non-erosive reflux disease (29%) (P=0.003). Refractory reflux oesophagitis is characterized by impairment of chemical clearance. Adequate acid suppression is found in the majority of patients who would likely not benefit from further proton pump inhibitor dose escalation. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Accuracy of digital mRNA profiling of oesophageal biopsies as a novel diagnostic approach to eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Lexmond, Willem S; Hu, Lan; Pardo, Michael; Heinz, Nicole; Rooney, Katharine; LaRosa, Jessica; Dehlink, Eleonora; Fiebiger, Edda; Nurko, Samuel

    2015-08-01

    Quantification of tissue eosinophils remains the golden standard in diagnosing eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE), but this approach suffers from poor specificity. It has been recognized that histopathological changes that occur in patients with EoE are associated with a disease-specific tissue transcriptome. We hypothesized that digital mRNA profiling targeted at a set of EoE-specific and Th2 inflammatory genes in oesophageal biopsies could help differentiate patients with EoE from those with reflux oesophagitis (RE) or normal tissue histology (NH). The mRNA expression levels of 79 target genes were defined in both proximal and distal biopsies of 196 patients with nCounter® (Nanostring) technology. According to clinicopathological diagnosis, these patients were grouped in a training set (35 EoE, 30 RE, 30 NH) for building of a three-class prediction model using the random forest method, and a blinded predictive set (n = 47) for model validation. A diagnostic model built on ten differentially expressed genes was able to differentiate with 100% sensitivity and specificity between conditions in the training set. In a blinded predictive set, this model was able to correctly predict EoE in 14 of 18 patients in distal (sensitivity 78%, 95% CI 52-93%) and 16 of 18 patients in proximal biopsies (sensitivity 89%, 95% CI 64-98%), without false-positive diagnosis of EoE in RE or NH patients (specificity 100%, 95% CI 85-100%). Sensitivity was increased to 94% (95% CI 71-100%) when either the best predictive distal or proximal biopsy was used. We conclude that mRNA profiling of oesophageal tissue is an accurate diagnostic strategy in detecting EoE. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep the blood from soaking your clothes. What Causes Bleeding Later in Pregnancy? When labor begins, the cervix starts to open up more, or dilate. You may notice a small amount of blood mixed in with normal vaginal discharge, or mucus. Mid- or late-term bleeding may also be caused by: Having sex ( ...

  15. Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. CURRENTOPINION Acute traumatic coagulopathy ...bleeding. The recognition of acute traumatic coagulopathy as a distinct clinical entity characterized by early coagulation dysfunction, arising prior to...traumatic coagulopathy . Recent findings We focus on recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of acute traumatic coagulopathy , particularly

  16. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy with Volumetric-modulated Arc Therapy for Medium-distal Oesophageal and Gastro-oesophageal Junction Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Angelo; Iftode, Cristina; Cozzi, Luca; Ascolese, Anna Maria; Battista, Serena; Cavina, Raffaele; Clerici, Elena; Comito, Tiziana; D'Agostino, Giuseppe R; De Rose, Fiorenza; Franzese, Ciro; Garassino, Isabella; Romario, Uberto Fumagalli; Navarria, Pierina; Rosati, Riccardo; Spaggiari, Paola; Tomatis, Stefano; Scorsetti, Marta

    2015-07-01

    to appraise the role of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in the neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy management of advanced medium and distal oesophageal cancer in terms of toxicity and response to treatment. Thirty patients were treated according to the neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery versus surgery-alone trial scheme with VMAT radiation therapy. Patients presented mainly T3-T4 stage (80%) and N1-2 (96.6%) disease. The chemotherapy scheme consisted of 3-5 cycles, while a radiotherapy course of 41.4 Gy in 23 fractions was administered to all patients. The median age of patients was 65 years, and there was a predominance of males (80%), smokers or ex-smokers (90%) and modest alcohol habit (80% negative). Primary tumor localisation was in the medium and distal third of the oesophagus in 57% of the cases, the rest being in the gastro-oesophageal junction. Modest toxicity profiles were observed, with limited incidence of grade 2-3 events. Partial or complete response was observed in more than 90% of the cases (radiological/metabolic) and was confirmed after surgical intervention (67% partial or complete and 27% stable response). Tumor down-staging was recorded in 67% of patients and nodal down-staging in 50%. VMAT was applied in the context of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for the treatment of medium and distal oesophageal carcinoma with satisfactory results in terms of tolerance and toxicity. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. POSTMENOPAUSAL BLEEDING OF NONMALIGNANT ORIGIN

    PubMed Central

    Bomze, Edward J.

    1954-01-01

    A study was made of the medical records of 102 patients hospitalized because of postmenopausal bleeding. Diagnostic procedures used included vaginal examination, Papanicolaou smears, curettage and cervical biopsy. The major associated pathological conditions (possibly etiological factors) in the series were chronic cervicitis, fibromyoma of the uterus, endometrial polyps, cervical polyps and adenomyosis of the uterus. Sclerosis of the uterine vessels was suggested as another possible cause of this type of bleeding. Neither the amount and type of bleeding nor the pattern of associated symptoms were of diagnostic value. A history of hormonal therapy prior to the onset of bleeding is not sufficient evidence to establish that as the cause of the bleeding and the patient should be as completely investigated as if this history were not present. In over 61 per cent of cases in this series, uterine curettage with or without cervical biopsy, cauterization, conization or trachelorrhaphy, was the only treatment required for both diagnosis and therapy. PMID:13182624

  18. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... movement due to disease or injury to the cerebellum in the brain. ... of acute cerebellar ataxia include: Abscess of the cerebellum Alcohol, medications, and insecticides Bleeding into the cerebellum ...

  19. Detachable endoloop vs. elastic band ligation for bleeding esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Naga, Mazen Ibrahim; Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Foda, Ayman Ragaei; Gomaa, Mohamed Saeed; Fouad, Ayman Mohamed; Masoud, Amgad Gerges; El-din, Hazem Hossam

    2004-06-01

    Variceal bleeding is a serious complication with a mortality rate that ranges from 20% to 50%. Patients who have variceal hemorrhage usually are treated by endoscopic injection sclerotherapy or elastic band ligation to eradicate the varices. Endoloop ligation is a newly developed technique for achieving hemostasis and variceal eradication. This study compared endoloop ligation with elastic band ligation in patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding. Fifty patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding were recruited: 25 were treated by elastic band ligation and 25 by endoloop ligation. Although the number of patients in whom bleeding recurred during a follow-up period of 6 months was smaller in the endoloop group (12%) vs. the band group (28%), this difference was not statistically significant. Furthermore, no statistically significant difference was found between the two groups with respect to the number of patients in whom variceal eradication was achieved, the number of treatment sessions required for variceal eradication, or the frequency of variceal recurrence. The total cost for variceal obliteration by endoloop ligation was 342 dollars per patient, whereas, the total cost of variceal eradication by elastic band ligation was 356 dollars per patient. The endoloop had certain technical advantages over band application: a better field of vision, tighter application, good results with junctional varices, and a lack of strain exerted by the device on the endoscope. Endoloop ligation is a promising new technique for management of patients with bleeding esophageal varices.

  20. Multiple stomas for recurrent life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Jérémie H; Parc, Yann; Bennis, Malika; Carbonnel, Nicolas; Mourra, Najat; Tiret, Emmanuel; Parc, Rolland

    2008-11-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage is an uncommon and severe symptom. The overall mortality rate ranges from 5 to 12 percent and can approach 40 percent for persistent or recurring bleedings. We report a case of a patient with severe recurrent lower bleeding in whom, despite several repeated explorations and a blind subtotal colectomy, no lesion could be found. Multiple (n = 4) leveled stomas of the small bowel with succus entericus reinfusion were required to localize and treat the cause of the bleeding. This case report is followed by a review of the literature of the management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

  1. Late Surgical Bleeding Following Total Artificial Heart Implantation.

    PubMed

    Hermsen, Joshua L; Smith, Jason W; Pal, Jay D; Mahr, Claudius; Masri, S Carolina; Dardas, Todd F; Cheng, Richard K; Mokadam, Nahush A

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical circulatory support for heart failure, including the Total Artificial Heart (TAH, Syncardia, Tucson, AZ, USA) has increased in recent years. This report describes bleeding complications associated with the device. A single institution prospectively maintained quality improvement database was reviewed encompassing the first year of clinical experience with the TAH. Patients who underwent TAH implantation were identified, and a review of complications and outcomes was undertaken. Ten patients underwent TAH implant. Four patients experienced delayed postoperative bleeding. In three patients the manifestation of bleeding was tamponade and evidenced by TAH decreased cardiac output. In two patients, at postoperative days 31 and 137, there was a partial disruption of the aortic anastomosis along the outer curvature with pseudoaneurysm formation. Both were repaired by primary suture closure, without use of cardiopulmonary bypass. There was no mortality attributable to bleeding. TAH patients are at risk for delayed postoperative bleeding, often manifest as an acute decrease in cardiac output. Due to pulsatility and high dP/dT, bleeding from the aortic anastomosis should be considered in the differential of a patient with low flow and/or tamponade. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The effect of omeprazole on oesophageal pH in dogs during anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Panti, A; Bennett, R C; Corletto, F; Brearley, J; Jeffery, N; Jeffrey, N; Mellanby, R J

    2009-10-01

    Intra-operative, gastro-oesophageal reflux may be associated with post-anaesthestic complications such as oesophagitis and oesophageal stricture in dogs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of preoperative administration of omeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, on oesophageal pH in anaesthetised dogs. Forty-seven dogs undergoing elective pelvic limb orthopaedic surgery were enrolled into the study. These were randomly allocated to treatment group (n=22) or control group (n=25). The treatment group received one dose of omeprazole (1 mg/kg po) at least 4 h before anaesthesia. All dogs were anaesthetised by the same standardised protocol. A pH probe was inserted into the distal oesophagus after induction of anaesthesia and oesophageal pH was continuously monitored. In the treatment group, four animals (18 per cent) showed a sudden decrease in oesophageal pH (<4). In the control group the same phenomenon was detected in 13 animals (52 per cent). Gastro-oesophageal reflux occurred more frequently in the control group compared with the omeprazole group (odds ratio 4.7, 95 per cent C.I. 1.1 to 24.7, P=0.032). This study suggests that the preoperative administration of omeprazole is effective in reducing the incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux during anaesthesia in dogs.

  3. Proximal stomach function in obesity with normal or abnormal oesophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Iovino, P; Angrisani, L; Galloro, G; Consalvo, D; Tremolaterra, F; Pascariello, A; Ciacci, C

    2006-06-01

    There is an increased prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux and symptoms in obese patients. Information about the proximal stomach in obese patients with reflux is lacking. Gastric volume and compliance are similar between obese and lean subjects. To study the proximal stomach function and perception in obese patients with normal or abnormal oesophageal acid exposure, thirty-one obese patients, with normal or abnormal oesophageal acid exposure, underwent medical evaluation of oesophageal and gastrointestinal symptoms by a questionnaire and measurement of proximal stomach function and perception by an electronic barostat and a standardized questionnaire. Nineteen obese patients had abnormal oesophageal acid exposure. The percentage of total time with pH <4 is significantly related to the presence of hiatal hernia, the oesophageal intensity-frequency symptom score and gender, i.e. higher percentage in men. The perception cumulative score was significantly different between patients with normal and abnormal oesophageal acid exposure after adjusting for covariates (gender, body mass index, age, minimal distending pressure, gastric tone and gastric compliance). Gastric tone and compliance were significantly related to the perception cumulative score. In conclusion, patients with abnormal oesophageal acid exposure have increased gastric perception. A significant relation among gastric tone, gastric compliance and upper gastrointestinal sensations was shown.

  4. Oesophageal transport of solid dosage forms depends on body position, swallowing volume and pharyngeal propulsion velocity.

    PubMed

    Osmanoglou, E; Van Der Voort, I R; Fach, K; Kosch, O; Bach, D; Hartmann, V; Strenzke, A; Weitschies, W; Wiedenmann, B; Trahms, L; Mönnikes, H

    2004-10-01

    Knowledge about transit of solid dosage forms (SDF) in the gastrointestinal tract is incomplete. Detection of magnetically marked capsules (MMC) via superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) allows monitoring of oesophageal transport of SDF with high tempospatial resolution. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of body position, volume at swallowing, and oesophageal motility on orogastric transport of SDF. In 360 measurements we determined tempospatial characteristics of orogastric transit of SDFs by a SQUID device in six volunteers. They swallowed MMCs with various amounts of water in upright and supine position with and without simultaneous oesophageal manometry. Orogastric transit time, oesophageal transport velocity and rate of oesophageal retention of SDF depend on swallowing volume and body position at all experimental conditions. At 50 mL water bolus and in upright position, the retention rate depends on the pharyngeal propulsion velocity, and the transport velocity of MMCs in the oesophageal body are faster than the propulsive oesophageal contractions. Body position, swallowing volume and pharyngeal propulsion velocity markedly influence the oesophageal transport of SDF. They should be taken in upright body position with at least 50 mL of water to minimize entrapment in the oesophagus.

  5. Vaginal Bleeding: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bleeding (American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (Beyond the Basics) (UpToDate) Abnormal ... College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists) - PDF Also in Spanish Vaginal Bleeding (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ...

  6. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often ...

  7. Incidence and risk factors for life-threatening bleeding after allogeneic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Labrador, Jorge; López-Corral, Lucia; Vazquez, Lourdes; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermin; Guerrero, Carmen; Sánchez-Barba, Mercedes; Lozano, Francisco S; Alberca, Ignacio; Del Cañizo, María C; Caballero, Dolores; González-Porras, Jose R

    2015-06-01

    Bleeding is a frequent complication after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and may affect survival. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for life-threatening bleeding after HSCT by retrospective evaluation of 491 allogeneic HSCT recipients. With a median follow-up of 33 months, 126 out of 491 allogeneic HSCT recipients experienced a haemorrhagic event (25·7%) and 46 patients developed a life-threatening bleeding episode (9·4%). Pulmonary and gastrointestinal bleeding were the most common sites for life-threatening bleeding, followed by central nervous system. In multivariate analyses, the presence of severe thrombocytopenia after day +28 and the development of grade III-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) retained their association with life-threatening bleeding events. The overall survival at 3 years among patients without bleeding was 67·1% for only 17·1% for patients with life-threatening bleeding (P < 0·001). In conclusion, life-threatening bleeding is a common complication after allogeneic HSCT. Prolonged severe thrombocytopenia, acute grade III-IV GVHD and TMA were associated with its development.

  8. Surgical resolution of an oesophageal duplication cyst causing regurgitation in a domestic shorthair cat.

    PubMed

    Doran, Ivan Cp; Dawson, Lou J; Costa, Marta

    2015-01-01

    An 18-month-old female domestic shorthair cat was referred for investigation of a 6 month period of regurgitation. Contrast radiography indicated an intramural oesophageal structure. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of the area retrieved viscous fluid containing high numbers of squamous epithelial cells. Computed tomography disclosed a thin-walled contrast-enhancing structure containing non-enhancing homogenous contents. Exploratory thoracotomy confirmed an intramural cystic oesophageal structure, which was resected. Histopathological analysis of the resected tissue demonstrated an intramural oesophageal duplication cyst. A 12 month follow-up period has seen complete resolution of the cat's clinical signs. This is the first report of successful oesophageal duplication cyst removal in a cat. Oesophageal duplication cysts should be included on the differential list for dysphagia and regurgitation in cats. Complete surgical removal in this cat carried a good long-term outcome.

  9. The Association of Gum Bleeding with Respiratory Health in a Population Based Study from Northern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Real, Francisco; Pérez Barrionuevo, Laura; Franklin, Karl; Lindberg, Eva; Bertelsen, Randi Jacobsen; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Forsberg, Bertil; Gislason, Thorarinn; Jögi, Rain; Johannessen, Ane; Omenaas, Ernst; Saure, Eirunn; Schlünssen, Vivi; Skorge, Trude Duelien; Torén, Kjell; Pérez Saavedra, Antonio; Svanes, Øistein; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug

    2016-01-01

    Background There is little knowledge about how oral and respiratory health is interrelated even though the mucosa of the oral cavity and airways constitutes a continuum and the exposures to these are partly similar. Aims To investigate whether gum bleeding is related to asthma, respiratory symptoms and self-reported COPD. Methods A postal questionnaire including questions about respiratory and oral health was sent to general population samples in seven Northern European centres. In 13,409 responders, gum bleeding when brushing teeth was reported always/often by 4% and sometimes by 20%. Logistic regressions accounted for age, smoking, educational level, centre and gender. Effects of BMI, cardio-metabolic diseases, early life factors, gastro-oesophageal reflux, dental hygiene, nasal congestion, and asthma medication were addressed. Results Gum bleeding always/often was significantly associated with ≥3 asthma symptoms (OR 2.58, 95% CI 2.10–3.18), asthma (1.62 [1.23–2.14]) and self-reported COPD (2.02 [1.28–3.18]). There was a dose-response relationship between respiratory outcomes and gum bleeding frequency (≥3 symptoms: gum bleeding sometimes 1.42 [1.25–1.60], often/always 2.58 [2.10–3.18]), and there was no heterogeneity between centres (pheterogeneity = 0.49). None of the investigated risk factors explained the associations. The observed associations were significantly stronger among current smokers (pinteraction = 0.004). Conclusions A consistent link between gum bleeding and obstructive airways disease was observed, not explained by common risk factors or metabolic factors. We speculate that oral pathogens might have unfavourable impact on the airways, and that the direct continuity of the mucosa of the oral cavity and the airways reflects a pathway that might provide novel opportunities for interventions. PMID:26808490

  10. The Association of Gum Bleeding with Respiratory Health in a Population Based Study from Northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Gómez Real, Francisco; Pérez Barrionuevo, Laura; Franklin, Karl; Lindberg, Eva; Bertelsen, Randi Jacobsen; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Forsberg, Bertil; Gislason, Thorarinn; Jögi, Rain; Johannessen, Ane; Omenaas, Ernst; Saure, Eirunn; Schlünssen, Vivi; Skorge, Trude Duelien; Torén, Kjell; Pérez Saavedra, Antonio; Svanes, Øistein; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug; Janson, Christer; Svanes, Cecilie

    2016-01-01

    There is little knowledge about how oral and respiratory health is interrelated even though the mucosa of the oral cavity and airways constitutes a continuum and the exposures to these are partly similar. To investigate whether gum bleeding is related to asthma, respiratory symptoms and self-reported COPD. A postal questionnaire including questions about respiratory and oral health was sent to general population samples in seven Northern European centres. In 13,409 responders, gum bleeding when brushing teeth was reported always/often by 4% and sometimes by 20%. Logistic regressions accounted for age, smoking, educational level, centre and gender. Effects of BMI, cardio-metabolic diseases, early life factors, gastro-oesophageal reflux, dental hygiene, nasal congestion, and asthma medication were addressed. Gum bleeding always/often was significantly associated with ≥ 3 asthma symptoms (OR 2.58, 95% CI 2.10-3.18), asthma (1.62 [1.23-2.14]) and self-reported COPD (2.02 [1.28-3.18]). There was a dose-response relationship between respiratory outcomes and gum bleeding frequency (≥ 3 symptoms: gum bleeding sometimes 1.42 [1.25-1.60], often/always 2.58 [2.10-3.18]), and there was no heterogeneity between centres (p(heterogeneity) = 0.49). None of the investigated risk factors explained the associations. The observed associations were significantly stronger among current smokers (p(interaction) = 0.004). A consistent link between gum bleeding and obstructive airways disease was observed, not explained by common risk factors or metabolic factors. We speculate that oral pathogens might have unfavourable impact on the airways, and that the direct continuity of the mucosa of the oral cavity and the airways reflects a pathway that might provide novel opportunities for interventions.

  11. New clinical paradigms for treating and preventing antiplatelet gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Neena S

    2017-11-01

    To quantify antiplatelet-related gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), characterize patients at greatest risk and summarize risk-management strategies emphasizing evolving knowledge in acute management of antiplatelet-related bleeding. New paradigms for acute management of antiplatelet-related GIB exist in the domains of resuscitation and the transfusion of blood products, strategic use of proton pump therapy and identification and eradication of Helicobacter pylori. This review will also highlight the importance of prompt resumption of cardiac aspirin and dual antiplatelet therapy following endoscopic hemostasis to minimize the risk of future cardiac events. This review will provide pragmatic strategies for the management of acute antiplatelet-related GIB. Emerging areas of clinical knowledge will be addressed and knowledge gaps requiring further research to inform clinical practice will be highlighted.

  12. A no bleed implant.

    PubMed

    Ersek, R A; Navarro, J A; Nemeth, D Z; Sas, G

    1993-01-01

    Breast implants have evolved from the original saline-filled, smooth-surfaced silicone rubber bag to silicone gel-filled smooth-walled sacs to a combination of a silicone gel-filled bag within a saline-filled sac, and, most recently, a reversed, double-lumen implant with a saline bag inside of a gel-filled bag. Texture-surfaced implants were first used in 1970 when the standard silicone gel-filled implant was covered with a polyurethane foam. Because of concerns about the degradation products of this foam, they were removed from the market in 1991. In 1975 double-lumen silicone textured implants were developed, followed by silicone gel-filled textured implants. In 1990 a new radiolucent, biocompatible gel was produced that reduced the problem of radioopacity of silicone implants. Because of the gel's sufficiently low coefficient of friction, leakage caused by fold flaw fracture may also be decreased. We present a case where this new biocompatible gel implant was repositioned after four months. The resulting scar capsule in this soft breast was thin [< 0.002 cm (0.008 in.)] and evenly textured as a mirror image of the textured silicone surface. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray defraction spectrophotometry revealed no silicone bleed.

  13. Fatal bleeding in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy for venous thromboembolism: findings from the RIETE registry.

    PubMed

    Nieto, J A; Solano, R; Ruiz-Ribó, M D; Ruiz-Gimenez, N; Prandoni, P; Kearon, C; Monreal, M

    2010-06-01

    Fatal bleeding is a serious consequence of anticoagulant therapy, but factors associated with fatal bleeding during the first 3 months of treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) are uncertain. Using data from RIETE, an ongoing registry of consecutive patients with acute VTE, we assessed risk factors for fatal bleeding among all patients. We then used this information to derive a clinical model that would stratify a patient's risk of fatal bleeding during the first 3 months of treatment. Of 24 395 patients, 546 (2.24%) had a major bleed and 135 (0.55%) had a fatal bleed. The gastrointestinal tract was the most common site (40% of fatal bleeds), followed by intracranial bleeding (25%). Fatal bleeding was independently associated with the following factors at the time of VTE diagnosis: age >75 years (OR, 2.16), metastatic cancer (OR, 3.80), immobility > or = 4 days (OR, 1.99), a major bleed within the past 30 days (OR, 2.64), an abnormal prothrombin time (OR, 2.09), a platelet count < 100 x 10(9) L(-1) (OR, 2.23), creatinine clearance < 30 mL min(-1) (OR, 2.27), anemia (OR, 1.54), and distal deep vein thrombosis (OR, 0.39). INR at the time of bleeding is not known. A clinical prediction rule for risk of fatal bleeding that included nine baseline factors was derived. Fatal bleeding occurred in 0.16% (95% CI, 0.11-0.23) of the low-risk, 1.06% (95% CI, 0.85-1.30) of the moderate-risk, and 4.24% (95% CI, 2.76-6.27) of the high-risk category. Patient characteristics and laboratory variables can identify patients at high risk for fatal bleeding during treatment of VTE.

  14. MANAGEMENT OF BLEEDING AND OPEN WOUNDS IN ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Hoogenboom, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Bleeding or open wounds of the integumentary system occur frequently in athletics. Integumentary wounds vary from minor scrapes, blisters, and small punctures to more serious lacerations and arterial wounds that could threaten the life of the athlete. The Sports physical therapist (PT) must realize that integumentary wounds and subsequent bleeding can occur in many sports, and assessment and care of such trauma is an essential skill. The purpose of this “On the Sidelines” clinical commentary is to review types of integumentary wounds that may occur in sport and their acute management. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:22666650

  15. Management of bleeding and open wounds in athletes.

    PubMed

    Hoogenboom, Barbara J; Smith, Danny

    2012-06-01

    Bleeding or open wounds of the integumentary system occur frequently in athletics. Integumentary wounds vary from minor scrapes, blisters, and small punctures to more serious lacerations and arterial wounds that could threaten the life of the athlete. The Sports physical therapist (PT) must realize that integumentary wounds and subsequent bleeding can occur in many sports, and assessment and care of such trauma is an essential skill. The purpose of this "On the Sidelines" clinical commentary is to review types of integumentary wounds that may occur in sport and their acute management. 5.

  16. [Management of bleeding and coagulopathy following major trauma].

    PubMed

    Etxaniz, A; Pita, E

    2016-05-01

    Bleeding is the most common preventable cause of death in trauma patients. Acute traumatic coagulopathy is a specific condition with a different pathophysiology from other causes of the massive bleeding. An early identification of the coagulopathy is fundamental to implementing rapid treatment. There have been many changes in the management of massive hemorrhage, for example, the administration of the tranexamic acid and the use of balanced transfusion ratio. This review presents these practical points, some of them with scientific evidence, in order to achieve a beneficial effect for patient outcomes.

  17. Incidence and management of oesophageal ruptures following fluoroscopic balloon dilatation in children with benign strictures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-Zhong; Song, Ho-Young; Park, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Pyeong Hwa; Kim, Seong-Chul

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the incidence and management of oesophageal ruptures following fluoroscopic balloon dilatation (FBD) in children with benign oesophageal strictures. Sixty-two children with benign oesophageal strictures underwent FBDs. Oesophageal rupture was categorized as intramural (type 1), transmural (type 2), or transmural with free leakage (type 3). The possible risk factors for oesophageal ruptures were analyzed. One hundred and twenty-nine FBDs were performed in these patients. The oesophageal rupture rate was 17.1 % (22/129). The majority (21/22) of ruptures were type 1 and type 2, both were treated conservatively. Only one patient had a type 3 rupture and underwent oesophagoesophagostomy. The patient gender, age, and the length and cause of the stricture showed no significant effect on the rupture (P > 0.05). However, for the patients ≤2 years old, the initial balloon with a diameter ≥10 mm showed a higher oesophageal rupture rate than those <10 mm during the first session (P = 0.03). Although the oesophageal rupture rate in children was 17.1 %, the type 3 rupture rate was 0.8 %, which usually requires aggressive treatment. For children ≤2 years old, the initial balloon diameter should be <10 mm in the first session for decreasing the risk of oesophageal rupture. • The oesophageal rupture rate following balloon dilatation in children was 17.1 %. • The incidence of transmural rupture with free leakage is very low. • Only transmural rupture with free leakage needs aggressive treatment. • For children ≤2 years, the initial balloon diameter should be <10 mm.

  18. Dietary magnesium, calcium:magnesium ratio and risk of reflux oesophagitis, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qi; Cantwell, Marie M; Murray, Liam J; Zheng, Wei; Anderson, Lesley A; Coleman, Helen G

    2016-01-28

    Evidence suggests a role of Mg and the ratio of Ca:Mg intakes in the prevention of colonic carcinogenesis. The association between these nutrients and oesophageal adenocarcinoma - a tumour with increasing incidence in developed countries and poor survival rates - has yet to be explored. The aim of this investigation was to explore the association between Mg intake and related nutrients and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor conditions, Barrett's oesophagus and reflux oesophagitis. This analysis included cases of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (n 218), Barrett's oesophagus (n 212), reflux oesophagitis (n 208) and population-based controls (n 252) recruited between 2002 and 2005 throughout the island of Ireland. All the subjects completed a 101-item FFQ. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was applied to determine odds of disease according to dietary intakes of Mg, Ca and Ca:Mg ratio. After adjustment for potential confounders, individuals consuming the highest amounts of Mg from foods had significant reductions in the odds of reflux oesophagitis (OR 0·31; 95 % CI 0·11, 0·87) and Barrett's oesophagus (OR 0·29; 95 % CI 0·12, 0·71) compared with individuals consuming the lowest amounts of Mg. The protective effect of Mg was more apparent in the context of a low Ca:Mg intake ratio. No significant associations were observed for Mg intake and oesophageal adenocarcinoma risk (OR 0·77; 95 % CI 0·30, 1·99 comparing the highest and the lowest tertiles of consumption). In conclusion, dietary Mg intakes were inversely associated with reflux oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus risk in this Irish population.

  19. Dietary inflammatory index and risk of reflux oesophagitis, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Shivappa, Nitin; Hebert, James R; Anderson, Lesley A; Shrubsole, Martha J; Murray, Liam J; Getty, Lauren B; Coleman, Helen G

    2017-05-01

    The dietary inflammatory index (DIITM) is a novel composite score based on a range of nutrients and foods known to be associated with inflammation. DII scores have been linked to the risk of a number of cancers, including oesophageal squamous cell cancer and oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). Given that OAC stems from acid reflux and that the oesophageal epithelium undergoes a metaplasia-dysplasia transition from the resulting inflammation, it is plausible that a high DII score (indicating a pro-inflammatory diet) may exacerbate risk of OAC and its precursor conditions. The aim of this analytical study was to explore the association between energy-adjusted dietary inflammatory index (E-DIITM) in relation to risk of reflux oesophagitis, Barrett's oesophagus and OAC. Between 2002 and 2005, reflux oesophagitis (n 219), Barrett's oesophagus (n 220) and OAC (n 224) patients, and population-based controls (n 256), were recruited to the Factors influencing the Barrett's Adenocarcinoma Relationship study in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. E-DII scores were derived from a 101-item FFQ. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was applied to determine odds of oesophageal lesions according to E-DII intakes, adjusting for potential confounders. High E-DII scores were associated with borderline increase in odds of reflux oesophagitis (OR 1·87; 95 % CI 0·93, 3·73), and significantly increased odds of Barrett's oesophagus (OR 2·05; 95 % CI 1·22, 3·47), and OAC (OR 2·29; 95 % CI 1·32, 3·96), when comparing the highest with the lowest tertiles of E-DII scores. In conclusion, a pro-inflammatory diet may exacerbate the risk of the inflammation-metaplasia-adenocarcinoma pathway in oesophageal carcinogenesis.

  20. Menstrual bleeding after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth; Larsen, Signe Holm; Wilkens, Helena; Jakobsen, Anja; Pedersen, Thais Almeida Lins

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether open-heart surgery with the use of extracorporeal circulation has an impact on menstrual bleeding. The menstrual bleeding pattern was registered in fertile women undergoing open-heart surgery in 2010-12. Haematocrit and 24-h postoperative bleeding were compared with those of men undergoing cardiac surgery. Women (n = 22), with mean age of 36 (range 17-60) years, were operated on and hospitalized for 4-5 postoperative days. The mean preoperative haematocrit was 40% (range 32-60%), and mean haematocrit at discharge was 32% (range 26-37%). Mean postoperative bleeding in the first 24 h was 312 (range 50-1442) ml. They underwent surgery for atrial septal defect (n = 5), composite graft/David procedure (n = 4), pulmonary or aortic valve replacement (n = 6), myxoma (n = 2), mitral valvuloplasty (n = 2), ascending aortic aneurysm (n = 1), aortic coarctation (n = 1) and total cavopulmonary connection (n = 1). Unplanned menstrual bleeding (lasting 2-5 days) was detected in 13 (60%) patients. Of them, 4 were 1-7 days early, 4 were 8-14 days early, 3 were 1-7 days late and 2 had menstruation despite having had menstrual bleeding within the last 2 weeks. None had unusually large or long-lasting menstrual bleeding. Ten women took oral contraceptives, 8 of whom had unexpected menstrual bleeding during admission. Men (n = 22), with a mean age of 35 (range 17-54) years, had mean bleeding of 331 (range 160-796) ml postoperatively, which was not statistically significantly different from the women's. The mean preoperative haematocrit was 40% (range 29-49%) among men, while haematocrit at discharge was 32% (28-41), not significantly different from that seen in the female subgroup. Menstrual bleeding patterns are disturbed by open-heart surgery in the majority of fertile women. Nevertheless, the unexpected menstrual bleeding is neither particularly long-lasting nor of large quantity, and the postoperative surgical bleeding is unaffected. We recommend that

  1. Risk Factors and Outcome for Massive Intra-Abdominal Bleeding Among Patients With Infected Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Jingzhu; Ke, Lu; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Gang; Jiang, Wei; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of acute bleeding is reported to be 13.5% in patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. However, of all the bleeding events, intra-abdominal bleeding was less studied in the literature and its risk factors have not been well defined yet. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the risk factors for massive intra-abdominal bleeding among the patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis and assessed the outcome of these patients. Both univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were applied for evaluating risk factors for intra-abdominal bleeding using 33 indices, including age, sex, etiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), APACHE II score, etc. Outcome assessments such as mortality, hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) durations, and cost were also compared between patients with or without intra-abdominal bleeding. Acute kidney injury (AKI) (odds ratio [OR]: 7.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.53–22.52, P < 0.001) and number of operation (OR: 8.84, 95% CI: 2.01–38.86, P = 0.004) were 2 predictors for massive intra-abdominal bleeding in the patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In addition, AP patients with intra-abdominal bleeding also showed significantly higher mortality rate, prolonged hospital and ICU durations, more complications and invasive treatments, as well as increased cost. Our study revealed that AKI and multiple operations were 2 critical factors increasing the risk of intra-abdominal bleeding among patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis. Additionally, massive intra-abdominal bleeding was also associated with poor prognosis. PMID:26181564

  2. Risk Factors and Outcome for Massive Intra-Abdominal Bleeding Among Patients With Infected Necrotizing Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Jingzhu; Ke, Lu; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Gang; Jiang, Wei; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of acute bleeding is reported to be 13.5% in patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. However, of all the bleeding events, intra-abdominal bleeding was less studied in the literature and its risk factors have not been well defined yet. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the risk factors for massive intra-abdominal bleeding among the patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis and assessed the outcome of these patients. Both univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were applied for evaluating risk factors for intra-abdominal bleeding using 33 indices, including age, sex, etiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), APACHE II score, etc. Outcome assessments such as mortality, hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) durations, and cost were also compared between patients with or without intra-abdominal bleeding. Acute kidney injury (AKI) (odds ratio [OR]: 7.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.53-22.52, P < 0.001) and number of operation (OR: 8.84, 95% CI: 2.01-38.86, P = 0.004) were 2 predictors for massive intra-abdominal bleeding in the patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In addition, AP patients with intra-abdominal bleeding also showed significantly higher mortality rate, prolonged hospital and ICU durations, more complications and invasive treatments, as well as increased cost. Our study revealed that AKI and multiple operations were 2 critical factors increasing the risk of intra-abdominal bleeding among patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis. Additionally, massive intra-abdominal bleeding was also associated with poor prognosis.

  3. Clinical approach to the patient with unexpected bleeding.

    PubMed

    Teitel, J M

    2000-10-01

    Bleeding can be considered unexpected if it is disproportionate to the intensity of the haemostatic stress in a patient with no known haemorrhagic disorder or if it occurs in a patient in whom a bleeding disorder has been characterized but is adequately treated. A thorough history usually allows the clinician to predict reasonably accurately whether the patient is likely to have a systemic haemostatic defect (and if so whether it is congenital or acquired), or whether the bleeding likely has a purely anatomical basis. The nature of bleeding is instructive with respect to preliminary categorization. Thus, mucocutaneous bleeding suggests defects of primary haemostasis (disordered platelet-vascular interactions). Bleeding into deeper structures is more suggestive of coagulation defects leading to impaired fibrin clot formation, and delayed bleeding after primary haemostasis is characteristic of hyperfibrinolysis. Localized bleeding suggests an anatomical cause, although an underlying haemostatic defect may coexist. Where bleeding is so acutely threatening as to require urgent intervention, diagnosis and treatment must proceed simultaneously. In the case of minor haemorrhage (not threatening to life or limb) it may be preferable to defer therapy while the nature of the bleeding disorder is methodically investigated. Initial laboratory evaluation is guided by the preliminary clinical impression. The amount of blood loss can be inferred from the haematocrit or haemoglobin concentration, and the platelet count will quickly identify cases in which thrombocytopenia is the likely cause of bleeding. In the latter instance, examination of the red cell morphology, leucocyte differential, and mean platelet volume may allow the aetiological mechanism to be presumptively identified as hypoproliferative or consumptive. With regard to coagulation testing, the activated PTT, prothrombin time, and thrombin time usually constitute an adequate battery of screening tests, unless the

  4. The medical management of abnormal uterine bleeding in reproductive-aged women.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Linda D; Gueye, Ndeye-Aicha

    2016-01-01

    In the treatment of women with abnormal uterine bleeding, once a thorough history, physical examination, and indicated imaging studies are performed and all significant structural causes are excluded, medical management is the first-line approach. Determining the acuity of the bleeding, the patient's medical history, assessing risk factors, and establishing a diagnosis will individualize their medical regimen. In acute abnormal uterine bleeding with a normal uterus, parenteral estrogen, a multidose combined oral contraceptive regimen, a multidose progestin-only regimen, and tranexamic acid are all viable options, given the appropriate clinical scenario. Heavy menstrual bleeding can be treated with a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, combined oral contraceptives, continuous oral progestins, and tranexamic acid with high efficacy. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs may be utilized with hormonal methods and tranexamic acid to decrease menstrual bleeding. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are indicated in patients with leiomyoma and abnormal uterine bleeding in preparation for surgical interventions. In women with inherited bleeding disorders all hormonal methods as well as tranexamic acid can be used to treat abnormal uterine bleeding. Women on anticoagulation therapy should consider using progestin-only methods as well as a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist to treat their heavy menstrual bleeding. Given these myriad options for medical treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding, many patients may avoid surgical intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Differences in bleeding behavior after endoscopic band ligation: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is generally accepted as the treatment of choice for bleeding from esophageal varices. It is also used for secondary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal hemorrhage. However, there is no data or guidelines concerning endoscopic control of ligation ulcers. We conducted a retrospective study of EBL procedures analyzing bleeding complications after EBL. Methods We retrospectively analyzed data from patients who underwent EBL. We analyzed several data points, including indication for the procedure, bleeding events and the time interval between EBL and bleeding. Results 255 patients and 387 ligation sessions were included in the analysis. We observed an overall bleeding rate after EBL of 7.8%. Bleeding events after elective treatment (3.9%) were significantly lower than those after treatment for acute variceal hemorrhage (12.1%). The number of bleeding events from ligation ulcers and variceal rebleeding was 14 and 15, respectively. The bleeding rate from the ligation site in the group who underwent emergency ligation was 7.1% and 0.5% in the group who underwent elective ligation. Incidence of variceal rebleeding did not vary significantly. Seventy-five percent of all bleeding episodes after elective treatment occurred within four days after EBL. 20/22 of bleeding events after emergency ligation occured within 11 days after treatment. Elective EBL has a lower risk of bleeding from treatment-induced ulceration than emergency ligation. Conclusions Patients who underwent EBL for treatment of acute variceal bleeding should be kept under medical surveillance for 11 days. After elective EBL, it may be reasonable to restrict the period of surveillance to four days or even perform the procedure in an out-patient setting. PMID:20074379

  6. Differences in bleeding behavior after endoscopic band ligation: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Petrasch, Florian; Grothaus, Johannes; Mössner, Joachim; Schiefke, Ingolf; Hoffmeister, Albrecht

    2010-01-15

    Endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is generally accepted as the treatment of choice for bleeding from esophageal varices. It is also used for secondary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal hemorrhage. However, there is no data or guidelines concerning endoscopic control of ligation ulcers. We conducted a retrospective study of EBL procedures analyzing bleeding complications after EBL. We retrospectively analyzed data from patients who underwent EBL. We analyzed several data points, including indication for the procedure, bleeding events and the time interval between EBL and bleeding. 255 patients and 387 ligation sessions were included in the analysis. We observed an overall bleeding rate after EBL of 7.8%. Bleeding events after elective treatment (3.9%) were significantly lower than those after treatment for acute variceal hemorrhage (12.1%). The number of bleeding events from ligation ulcers and variceal rebleeding was 14 and 15, respectively. The bleeding rate from the ligation site in the group who underwent emergency ligation was 7.1% and 0.5% in the group who underwent elective ligation. Incidence of variceal rebleeding did not vary significantly. Seventy-five percent of all bleeding episodes after elective treatment occurred within four days after EBL. 20/22 of bleeding events after emergency ligation occurred within 11 days after treatment. Elective EBL has a lower risk of bleeding from treatment-induced ulceration than emergency ligation. Patients who underwent EBL for treatment of acute variceal bleeding should be kept under medical surveillance for 11 days. After elective EBL, it may be reasonable to restrict the period of surveillance to four days or even perform the procedure in an out-patient setting.

  7. Gastric hypersensitivity induced by oesophageal acid infusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    van den Elzen, B D J; Tytgat, G N J; Boeckxstaens, G E E

    2009-02-01

    Distal oesophageal acid exposure has been shown to increase visceral sensitivity of the proximal oesophagus via central sensitization. Here we evaluated whether acidification of the distal oesophagus also affects the sensorimotor function of the proximal stomach. A gastric barostat study combined with a 30-min acid (HCl 0.15 mol L(-1)) or saline infusion in the distal oesophagus was performed in 18 healthy volunteers. Gastric and cutaneous sensitivity was assessed before and up to 2 h after the start of infusion. Directly after acid infusion, but not after saline, the threshold for discomfort decreased (-6.4 +/- 1.7 vs 0.4 +/- 0.4 mmHg; P = 0.028) and distension-induced symptoms increased significantly compared with the baseline (122 +/- 49% vs -3 +/- 9%). Cutaneous sensitivity remained unaffected by acid infusion. In contrast, when the infused liquid was aspirated 3 cm more distally, at the level of the lower oesophageal sphincter, the effect of acid infusion on gastric sensitivity was abolished and the increase in distension-induced symptoms was reduced (61 +/- 24%). Distal oesophageal acid infusion induces visceral hypersensitivity without affecting somatic sensitivity arguing against a similar mechanism of central sensitization as observed in non-cardiac chest pain. As reduction of the acid load to the stomach prevented this effect, our findings indicate that either gastric and/or duodenal acidification is involved. It should be emphasized though that aspiration from distal oesophagus may have attenuated the effect by reducing the acid-exposed area or by reducing the contact time.

  8. Individual patient oesophageal cancer 3D models for tailored treatment

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, John H.; Onion, David; Collier, Pamela; Dorrington, Matthew S.; Argent, Richard H.; Clarke, Philip A.; Reece-Smith, Alex M.; Parsons, Simon L.; Grabowska, Anna M.

    2017-01-01

    Background A model to predict chemotherapy response would provide a marked clinical benefit, enabling tailored treatment of oesophageal cancer, where less than half of patients respond to the routinely administered chemotherapy. Methods Cancer cells were established from tumour biopsies taken from individual patients about to undergo neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A 3D-tumour growth assay (3D-TGA) was developed, in which cancer cells were grown with or without supporting mesenchymal cells, then subjected to chemo-sensitivity testing using the standard chemotherapy administered in clinic, and a novel emerging HDAC inhibitor, Panobinostat. RESULTS Individual patients cancer cells could be expanded and screened within a clinically applicable timescale of 3 weeks. Incorporating mesenchymal support within the 3D-TGA significantly enhanced both the growth and drug resistance profiles of the patients cancer cells. The ex vivo drug response in the presence, but not absence, of mesenchymal cells accurately reflected clinical chemo-sensitivity, as measured by tumour regression grade. Combination with Panobinostat enhanced response and proved efficacious in otherwise chemo-resistant tumours. Conclusions This novel method of establishing individual patient oesophageal cancers in the laboratory, from small endoscopic biopsies, enables clinically-relevant chemo-sensitivity testing, and reduces use of animals by providing more refined in vitro models for pre-screening of drugs. The 3D-TGA accurately predicted chemo-sensitivity in patients, and could be developed to guide tailored patient treatment. The incorporation of mesenchymal cells as the stromal cell component of the tumour micro-environment had a significant effect upon enhancing chemotherapy drug resistance in oesophageal cancer, and could prove a useful target for future drug development. PMID:27736801

  9. Ablation of Barrett's oesophagus: towards improved outcomes for oesophageal cancer?

    PubMed

    Mayne, George C; Bright, Tim; Hussey, Damian J; Watson, David I

    2012-09-01

    Barrett's oesophagus is the major risk factor for the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The management of Barrett's oesophagus entails treating reflux symptoms with acid-suppressing medication or surgery (fundoplication). However, neither form of anti-reflux therapy produces predictable regression, or prevents cancer development. Patients with Barrett's oesophagus usually undergo endoscopic surveillance, which aims to identify dysplastic changes or cancer at its earliest stage, when treatment outcomes should be better. Alternative endoscopic interventions are now available and are suggested for the treatment of early cancer and prevention of progression of Barrett's oesophagus to cancer. Such treatments could minimize the risks associated with oesophagectomy. The current status of these interventions is reviewed. Various endoscopic interventions have been described, but with long-term outcomes uncertain, they remain somewhat controversial. Radiofrequency ablation of dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus might reduce the risk of cancer progression, although cancer development has been reported after this treatment. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) allows a 1.5-2 cm diameter piece of oesophageal mucosa to be removed. This provides better pathology for diagnosis and staging, and if the lesion is confined to the mucosa and fully excised, EMR can be curative. The combination of EMR and radiofrequency ablation has been used for multifocal lesions, but long-term outcomes are unknown. The new endoscopic interventions for Barrett's oesophagus and early oesophageal cancer have the potential to improve clinical outcomes, although evidence that confirms superiority over oesphagectomy is limited. Longer-term outcome data and data from larger cohorts are required to confirm the appropriateness of these procedures. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  10. Evaluation of oesophageal transit velocity using the improved Demons technique.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Michele N; Xavier, Fernando E B; Secaf, Marie; Troncon, Luiz E A; de Oliveira, Ricardo B; Moraes, Eder R

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to compute oesophageal transit velocity in a direct and automatized manner by the registration of scintigraphy images. A total of 36 images from nine healthy volunteers were processed. Four dynamic image series per volunteer were acquired after a minimum 8 h fast. Each acquisition was made following the ingestion of 5 ml saline labelled with about 26 MBq (700 µCi) technetium-99m phytate in a single swallow. Between the acquisitions, another two swallows of 5 ml saline were performed to clear the oesophagus. The composite acquired files were made of 240 frames of anterior and posterior views. Each frame is the accumulate count for 250 ms.At the end of acquisitions, the images were corrected for radioactive decay, the geometric mean was computed between the anterior and posterior views and the registration of a set of subsequent images was performed. Utilizing the improved Demons technique, we obtained from the deformation field the regional resultant velocity, which is directly related to the oesophagus transit velocity. The mean regional resulting velocities decreases progressively from the proximal to the distal oesophageal portions and, at the proximal portion, is virtually identical to the primary peristaltic pump typical velocity. Comparison between this parameter and 'time-activity' curves reveals consistency in velocities obtained using both methods, for the proximal portion. Application of the improved Demons technique, as an easy and automated method to evaluate velocities of oesophageal bolus transit, is feasible and seems to yield consistent data, particularly for the proximal oesophagus.

  11. Side Effects: Bleeding and Bruising

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and targeted therapy, can increase patients’ risk of bleeding and bruising, also called thrombocytopenia. Learn about steps to take if you are at increased risk of a low platelet count.

  12. Vagal control of lower oesophageal sphincter motility in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Gonella, J.; Niel, J. P.; Roman, C.

    1977-01-01

    1. The effects of vagal efferent fibre stimulation on the smooth muscle of the lower oesophageal sphincter have been studied on the anaesthetized animal and on the isolated and perfused organ. 2. In both muscle layers (longitudinal and circular) vagal stimulation elicits two types of electromyographic (e.m.g.) potentials: (a) excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.s) where there is a depolarization of the smooth muscle fibres. E.j.p.s can give rise to spike potentials inducing a contraction of the sphincter; (b) inhibitory junction potentials (i.j.p.s) where there is hyperpolarization of the smooth muscle fibres, often followed by a transient depolarization which may initiate spikes (post-inhibitory rebound). 3. Pure i.j.p.s are observed after atropine treatment which suppresses e.j.p.s. Under these conditions, a long lasting vagal stimulation induces a long duration hyperpolarization concomitant with an opening of the lower oesophageal sphincter followed after the cessation of stimulation by a powerful rebound leading to a strong contraction which closes the sphincter. 4. Several arguments, pharmacological (action of acetylcholine (ACh), atropine and hexamethonium) and physiological (threshold and latency of responses) lead to the following conclusions. Preganglionic vagal fibres are cholinergic and they activate (a) intramural excitatory cholinergic neurones; (b) intramural non-adrenergic inhibitory neurones (purinergic neurones). Preganglionic fibres leading to inhibition have a higher threshold than those leading to excitation. Both excitatory and inhibitory pathways are interconnected inside the intramural network. In particular, activation of intramural inhibitory neurones, by relaxing the oesophagus orally to the lower oesophageal sphincter, inhibits intramural excitatory neurones and subsequently blocks vagal excitatory responses. 5. Two functions may be attributed to the vagal extrinsic innervation: (a) closure of the lower oesophageal sphincter by

  13. Hysterectomy for heavy menstrual bleeding.

    PubMed

    van der Meij, Eva; Emanuel, Mark Hans

    2016-01-01

    Hysterectomy is the most frequently performed major surgical intervention in gynecology. Although surgically removing the uterus is invasive, it represents the most definitive treatment option for heavy menstrual bleeding. In this article, we will discuss the indications for hysterectomy as a treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding, the different approaches to perform the hysterectomy, the complications which may occur during and after this procedure and finally the outcomes in comparison with other treatment options.

  14. The use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPS) in the management of portal hypertensive bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lo, Gin-Ho

    2014-08-01

    Acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage is a terrible complication of portal hypertension and. rebleeding is very common in survivors of acute variceal bleeding. Traditional medical management options include the use of vasoconstrictor, balloon tamponade, and endoscopic therapy. Though endoscopic therapy has achieved successful hemostasis in the majority of acute variceal bleeding episodes, the outcome is usually dismal when such therapy fails. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPS) was invented to decompress portal hypertension, but is now widely used in Western countries to treat patients with refractory variceal hemorrhage or refractory ascites. By contrast, TIPS has not been commonly used in Asia. In this article, I have reviewed the role of TIPS in the management of portal hypertensive bleeding, which will hopefully be useful for clinicians facing variceal bleeding that is not amenable to endoscopic therapies. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Bleeding varices: 1. Emergency management.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S S; Warren, W D; Galambos, J T; Millikan, W J

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the emergency management of bleeding varices is to stop the hemorrhage nonoperatively if possible, avoiding emergency shunt surgery, an operation that has a higher mortality than elective shunt surgery. Patients with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage should undergo endoscopy immediately to verify the diagnosis of bleeding varices. They can then be categorized according to whether they stop bleeding spontaneously (group 1), continue to bleed slowly (group 2) or continue to bleed rapidly (group 3). Group 1 patients are discussed in the second part of this two-part series. Group 2 patients are initially treated with vasopressin given intravenously; those who fail to respond should undergo emergency angiography and receive vasopressin intra-arterially. If this fails, patients at low surgical risk should undergo urgent shunt surgery; those at high risk do better with endoscopic sclerotherapy. Group 3 patients are also given an intravenous infusion of vasopressin. Patients at low surgical risk who continue to bleed then receive tamponade with a Sengstaken--Blakemore tube. If this fails, they undergo emergency creation of an H-shaped mesocaval shunt. Patients at high surgical risk who fail to respond to vasopressin given intravenously are next treated intra-arterially. If this fails they are given either endoscopic or transhepatic sclerotherapy. PMID:7006779

  16. Altered bleeding time associated with ibuprofen and zidovudine use.

    PubMed

    Pieper, B; Smitherman, H C

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a patient who was HIV-positive, had a massive venous ulcer, and developed a prolonged bleeding time with marked blood loss from the ulcer. The patient underwent a workup to rule out possible causes for this prolonged bleeding time; all studies were negative. A review of his history identified that he was self-medicating with ibuprofen while taking zidovudine. A potentiated effect of these two medications on the bleeding time has been reported in the literature. This case illustrates the importance of revisiting a patient's history while working up an acute problem as well as clinically monitoring for blood loss if a person takes ibuprofen and zidovudine.

  17. Bedside Bleeding Control, Review Paper and Proposed Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Simman, Richard; Reynolds, David; Saad, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Bleeding is a common occurrence in practice, but occasionally it may be challenging issue to overcome. It can come from numerous sources such as, trauma, during or post-surgical intervention, disorders of platelet and coagulation factors and increased fibrinolysis, wounds and cancers. This paper was inspired from our experience with a patient admitted to a local long term acute care facility with a large fungating right breast cancerous wound. During her hospital stay spontaneous bleeding from her breast cancerous mass was encountered and became more frequent and significant over the period of her stay. Different hemostatic technologies were used to control her bleeding. We felt that it was important to share our experience with our colleagues to help with potential similar situation that they may face. PMID:24527382

  18. Oesophageal cancer mortality: relationship with alcohol intake and cigarette smoking in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Cayuela, A; Vioque, J; Bolumar, F

    1991-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim of the study was to explore temporal changes in mortality from oesophageal cancer that could be related to tobacco and alcohol consumption. DESIGN--The study used mortality trends from oesophageal cancer over the period 1951-1985. In addition, available trends on per capita consumption of alcohol and cigarettes are also presented. SETTING--Data for this study were derived from Spain's National Institute for Statistics. MAIN RESULTS--Age standardised mortality rates from oesophageal cancer have increased significantly among men in Spain from 1951 to 1985 (p less than 0.01). Mortality rates in women have not changed significantly during the same period, although there is evidence of a certain decrease in recent years. Trends of per capita cigarette consumption from 1957 to 1982 related positively with oesophageal cancer mortality among men, whereas no significant relationship was observed in women. Trends of beer, spirits, and total alcohol consumption were also positively correlated with oesophageal cancer mortality in men. Among women, a weaker relationship was found. Wine consumption showed no relationship with oesophageal cancer mortality either in men or women. CONCLUSIONS--These results are similar to those found in other studies, supporting a role of alcohol (spirits and beer) and cigarette consumption in causation of oesophageal cancer. No relationship was observed with wine consumption. PMID:1795145

  19. Risk factors for Barrett’s oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma: Results from the FINBAR study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Lesley A; Watson, RG Peter; Murphy, Seamus J; Johnston, Brian T; Comber, Harry; Mc Guigan, Jim; Reynolds, John V; Murray, Liam J

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate risk factors associated with Barrett’s oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. METHODS: This all-Ireland population-based case-control study recruited 224 Barrett’s oesophagus patients, 227 oesophageal adenocarcinoma patients and 260 controls. All participants underwent a structured interview with information obtained about potential lifestyle and environmental risk factors. RESULTS: Gastro-oesophageal reflux was associated with Barrett’s [OR 12.0 (95% CI 7.64-18.7)] and oesophageal adenocarcinoma [OR 3.48 (95% CI 2.25-5.41)]. Oesophageal adenocarcinoma patients were more likely than controls to be ex- or current smokers [OR 1.72 (95% CI 1.06-2.81) and OR 4.84 (95% CI 2.72-8.61) respectively] and to have a high body mass index [OR 2.69 (95% CI 1.62-4.46)]. No significant associations were observed between these risk factors and Barrett's oesophagus. Fruit but not vegetables were negatively associated with oesophageal adenocarcinoma [OR 0.50 (95% CI 0.30-0.86)]. CONCLUSION: A high body mass index, a diet low in fruit and cigarette smoking may be involved in the progression from Barrett’s oesophagus to oesophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:17461453

  20. Oesophageal and gastric motility disorders in patients categorised as having primary anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    Stacher, G; Kiss, A; Wiesnagrotzki, S; Bergmann, H; Höbart, J; Schneider, C

    1986-01-01

    Gastrointestinal motor function in patients with primary anorexia nervosa has rarely been investigated. We studied oesophageal motor activity in 30 consecutive patients meeting standard diagnostic criteria for primary anorexia nervosa (Feighner et al; DSM III). Seven were found to suffer from achalasia instead of primary anorexia nervosa, one from diffuse oesophageal spasm and one from severe gastro-oesophageal reflux and upper oesophageal sphincter hypertonicity, while partly non-propulsive and repetitive high amplitude, long duration contractions prevailed in the lower oesophagus of another six. In four patients with oesophageal dysmotility not responding to therapy and in 12 of 15 patients with normal oesophageal manometry, gastric emptying of a semisolid meal was studied. Emptying was normal in only three but markedly delayed in 13 cases (half emptying times 97-330 min, median: 147 min, as compared with 21-119 min, median: 47 min, in 24 healthy controls). In eight patients, the effects of domperidone 10 mg iv and placebo were compared under random double blind conditions. Half emptying times were shortened significantly (p less than 0.01) by domperidone. Conclusions: symptoms of disordered upper gastrointestinal motor activity may be mistaken as indicating primary anorexia nervosa; clinical evaluation of patients with presumed primary anorexia nervosa should rule out the possibility that disordered oesophageal motor activity underlies the symptoms; delayed gastric emptying is a frequent feature in primary anorexia nervosa and might be returned to normal with domperidone. PMID:3781322