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Sample records for acute burn injury

  1. Acute Kidney Injury Predicts Mortality after Charcoal Burning Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chin; Tseng, Yi-Chia; Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Yang, Huang-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jen-Fen; Lin, Wey-Ran; Wang, I-Kuan; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-01-01

    A paucity of literature exists on risk factors for mortality in charcoal burning suicide. In this observational study, we analyzed the data of 126 patients with charcoal burning suicide that seen between 2002 and 2013. Patients were grouped according to status of renal damage as acute kidney injury (N = 49) or non-acute kidney injury (N = 77). It was found that patients with acute kidney injury suffered severer complications such as respiratory failure (P = 0.002), myocardial injury (P = 0.049), hepatic injury (P < 0.001), rhabdomyolysis (P = 0.045) and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (P = 0.028) than patients without acute kidney injury. Moreover, patients with acute kidney injury suffered longer hospitalization duration (16.9 ± 18.3 versus 10.7 ± 10.9, P = 0.002) and had higher mortality rate (8.2% versus 0%, P = 0.011) than patients without injury. In a multivariate Cox regression model, it was demonstrated that serum creatinine level (P = 0.019) and heart rate (P = 0.022) were significant risk factors for mortality. Finally, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with acute kidney injury suffered lower cumulative survival than without injury (P = 0.016). In summary, the overall mortality rate of charcoal burning suicide population was 3.2%, and acute kidney injury was a powerful predictor of mortality. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27430168

  2. L-arginine attenuates acute lung injury after smoke inhalation and burn injury in sheep.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kazunori; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Yu, Yong-Ming; Traber, Lillian D; Cox, Robert A; Hawkins, Hal K; Tompkins, Ronald G; Herndon, David; Traber, Daniel L

    2007-10-01

    Thermal injury results in reduced plasma levels of arginine (Arg). With reduced Arg availability, NOS produces superoxide instead of NO. We hypothesized that Arg supplementation after burn and smoke inhalation (B + S) injury would attenuate the acute insult to the lungs and, thus, protect pulmonary function. Seventeen Suffolk ewes (n = 17) were randomly divided into three groups: (1) sham injury group (n = 6), (2) B + S injury plus saline treatment (n = 6), and (3) B + S injury plus L-ARG infusion at 57 mg.kg(-1).h(-1) (n = 5). Burn and smoke inhalation injury was induced by standardized procedures, including a 40% area full thickness flame burn combined with 48 breaths of smoke from burning cottons. All animals were immediately resuscitated by Ringer solution and supported by mechanical ventilation for 48 h, during which various variables of pulmonary function were monitored. The results demonstrated that Arg treatment attenuated the decline of plasma Arg concentration after B + S injury. A higher plasma Arg concentration was associated with a less decline in Pao2/Fio2 ratio and a reduced extent of airway obstruction after B + S injury. Histopathological examinations also indicated a remarkably reduced histopathological scores associated with B + S injury. Nitrotyrosine stain in lung tissue was positive after B + S injury, but was significantly reduced in the group with Arg. Therefore, L-Arg supplementation improved gas exchange and pulmonary function in ovine after B + S injury via its, at least in part, effect on reduction of oxidative stress through the peroxynitrite pathway.

  3. The Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) Criteria Applied in Burns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    and reported the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss of function, end-stage renal disease ) criteria in 2004.4 Since this report, the RIFLE criteria...end-stage renal disease , or did not have burn injury and/or inhala- tion injury. If a patient was re-admitted, only the first hospitalization was...and creatinine continued to trend upward, then we backcalculated using the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) equation assuming a baseline

  4. Bone loss during the acute stage following burn injury.

    PubMed

    Leblebici, Berrin; Sezgin, Nurzen; Ulusan, Serife Nur; Tarim, Akin M; Akman, M Nafiz; Haberal, Mehmet A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of burn injury on bone metabolism and bone densitometry in the early period. Twenty-one patients with >25% total body surface area (TBSA) burns and 20 healthy controls participated. TBSA burned, ambulation, and functional status were recorded. After 30 days, we measured bone mineral densities of the L1-L4 vertebrae, the left distal forearm, and the left proximal femur in the patients. At 1 and 4 weeks after the burn, changes in bone turnover were assessed in patients by changes in deoxypyridinoline levels in the urine and osteocalcin in the serum and compared with the values of control group. In patients, Z-scores < -1 were found in 71.42% of left distal forearm, 23.80% of left proximal femur, and in 42.85% of L1-L4 vertebrae measurements. No significant correlations existed between Z-scores and TBSA, Functional Ambulation Scale, or Functional Independent Measure. When compared with controls, there was no statistically significant decrease of osteocalcin (a marker of bone formation) levels in patients 1 and 4 weeks after burn injury. However, when compared with controls, a statistically significant difference was found regarding deoxypyridinoline (a marker for bone resorption) in patients 1 and 4 weeks after burn injury (P < .001 and P < .001, respectively). Decreases in bone mineral density occurred during the first month following burn injury, which seemed to be linked with increases in bone resorption during this period. No correlation existed between reduction in bone mineral density and functional status.

  5. Melatonin prevents acute kidney injury in severely burned rats via the activation of SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Zhi; He, Ting; Gao, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yang; Liu, Jia-Qi; Han, Shi-Chao; Li, Yan; Shi, Ji-Hong; Han, Jun-Tao; Tao, Ke; Xie, Song-Tao; Wang, Hong-Tao; Hu, Da-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after severe burns. Melatonin has been reported to protect against multiple organ injuries by increasing the expression of SIRT1, a silent information regulator that regulates stress responses, inflammation, cellular senescence and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of melatonin on renal tissues of burned rats and the role of SIRT1 involving the effects. Rat severely burned model was established, with or without the administration of melatonin and SIRT1 inhibitor. The renal function and histological manifestations were determined to evaluate the severity of kidney injury. The levels of acetylated-p53 (Ac-p53), acetylated-p65 (Ac-p65), NF-κB, acetylated-forkhead box O1 (Ac-FoxO1), Bcl-2 and Bax were analyzed to study the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggested that severe burns could induce acute kidney injury, which could be partially reversed by melatonin. Melatonin attenuated oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis accompanied by the increased expression of SIRT1. The protective effects of melatonin were abrogated by the inhibition of SIRT1. In conclusion, we demonstrate that melatonin improves severe burn-induced AKI via the activation of SIRT1 signaling. PMID:27599451

  6. Circulating Microvesicles Are Elevated Acutely following Major Burns Injury and Associated with Clinical Severity

    PubMed Central

    Tirlapur, Nikhil; Katbeh, Umar; Singh, Suveer; Handy, Jonathan M.; Takata, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Microvesicles are cell-derived signaling particles emerging as important mediators and biomarkers of systemic inflammation, but their production in severe burn injury patients has not been described. In this pilot investigation, we measured circulating microvesicle levels following severe burns, with severe sepsis patients as a comparator group. We hypothesized that levels of circulating vascular cell-derived microvesicles are elevated acutely following burns injury, mirroring clinical severity due to the early onset and prevalence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in these patients. Blood samples were obtained from patients with moderate to severe thermal injury burns, with severe sepsis, and from healthy volunteers. Circulating microvesicles derived from total leukocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, and endothelial cells were quantified in plasma by flow cytometry. All circulating microvesicle subpopulations were elevated in burns patients on day of admission (day 0) compared to healthy volunteers (leukocyte-microvesicles: 3.5-fold, p = 0.005; granulocyte-microvesicles: 12.8-fold, p<0.0001; monocyte-microvesicles: 20.4-fold, p<0.0001; endothelial- microvesicles: 9.6-fold, p = 0.01), but decreased significantly by day 2. Microvesicle levels were increased with severe sepsis, but less consistently between patients. Leukocyte- and granulocyte-derived microvesicles on day 0 correlated with clinical assessment scores and were higher in burns ICU non-survivors compared to survivors (leukocyte MVs 4.6 fold, p = 0.002; granulocyte MVs 4.8 fold, p = 0.003). Mortality prediction analysis of area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.92 (p = 0.01) for total leukocyte microvesicles and 0.85 (p = 0.04) for granulocyte microvesicles. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, acute increases in circulating microvesicles following burns injury in patients and point to their potential role in propagation of sterile SIRS-related pathophysiology

  7. Early and Late Acute Kidney Injury in Severely Burned Patients

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Wojciech; Kawecki, Marek; Surowiecka-Pastewka, Agnieszka; Klimm, Wojciech; Szamotulska, Katarzyna; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated factors influencing early and late occurrence of AKI in severely burned patients and assessed the relationship between time of occurrence of AKI and mortality of AKI patients. Material/Methods Renal function was evaluated at 3 time points: at admission, at the critical point or middle point of hospitalization, and at the endpoint for which death or a discharge from the center was considered. AKI criteria were: decrease in GFR of less than 60 ml/min at admission, decrease in GFR of more than 75% compared to baseline, and decrease in the daily diuresis of less than 500 ml/24 h. Results At admission, 15.1% of the patients had eGFR <60 ml/min. AKI occurred in 38.5% of cases. The occurrence of AKI was associated with: elderly age (p<0.001), female sex (p=0.017), overweight and obesity (p=0.055); extent and depth of burns, respiratory failure, low protein concentration (for all p<0.001), low blood pressure (p=0.014), and high WBC (p=0.010). Early AKI was detected in 28% of patients. Mortality was 100% with the initial GFR ≥60, 100% with the initial GFR <60 and early deterioration of renal function, 80% with the initial GFR <60 and late worsening, and 60% with the initial GFR <60 and no worsening. Late AKI was observed in 10% of patients and mortality in this group was 79.2%. Mortality in the entire group with AKI was 88.0% versus 24.5%. Conclusions The frequent occurrence of AKI, especially early, worsens the prognosis for survival. Assessment of renal function should be included in the prognostic scales for burned patients. PMID:27746455

  8. BURN-INDUCED ACUTE LUNG INJURY REQUIRES A FUNCTIONAL TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 4

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzaniak, Michael; Cheadle, Gerald; Peterson, Carrie; Loomis, William; Putnam, James; Wolf, Paul; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian; Bansal, Vishal; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-01-01

    The role of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a component of the innate immune system, in the development of burn-induced acute lung injury (ALI) has not been completely defined. Recent data suggested that an intact TLR4 plays a major role in the development of organ injury in sterile inflammation. We hypothesized that burn-induced ALI is a TLR4-dependent process. Male C57BL/6J (TLR4 wild-type [WT]) and C57BL/10ScN (TLR4 knockout [KO]) mice were subjected to a 30% total body surface area steam burn. Animals were killed at 6 and 24 h after the insult. Lung specimens were harvested for histological examination after hematoxylin-eosin staining. In addition, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 immunostaining was performed. Lung MPO was measured by an enzymatic assay. Total lung keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant (IL-8) content was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot was performed to quantify phosphorylated IκBα, phosphorylated nuclear factor κB p65 (NF-κBp65), and high mobility group box 1 expression. Acute lung injury, characterized by thickening of the alveolar-capillary membrane, hyaline membrane formation, intraalveolar hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration, was seen in WT but not KO animals at 24 h. Myeloperoxidase and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 immunostaining of KO animals was also similar to sham but elevated in WT animals. In addition, a reduction in MPO enzymatic activity was observed in KO mice as well as a reduction in IL-8 levels compared with their WT counterparts. Burn-induced ALI develops within 24 h after the initial thermal insult in our model. Toll-like receptor 4 KO animals were clearly protected and had a much less severe lung injury. Our data suggest that burn-induced ALI is a TLR4-dependent process. PMID:21330948

  9. Aerosolized alpha-tocopherol ameliorates acute lung injury following combined burn and smoke inhalation injury in sheep.

    PubMed

    Morita, Naoki; Traber, Maret G; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Westphal, Martin; Murakami, Kazunori; Leonard, Scott W; Cox, Robert A; Hawkins, Hal K; Herndon, David; Traber, Lillian D; Traber, Daniel L

    2006-03-01

    Victims of fire accidents who sustain both thermal injury to the skin and smoke inhalation have gross evidence of oxidant injury. Therefore, we hypothesized that delivery of vitamin E, an oxygen superoxide scavenger, directly into the airway would attenuate acute lung injury postburn and smoke inhalation. Sheep (N = 17 female, 35 +/- 5 kg) were divided into 3 groups: (1) injured, then nebulized with vitamin E (B&S, Vitamin E, n = 6); (2) injured, nebulized with saline (B&S, Saline, n = 6); and (3) not injured, not treated (Sham, n = 5). While under deep anesthesia with isoflurane, the sheep were subjected to a flame burn (40% total body surface area, 3rd degree) and inhalation injury (48 breaths of cotton smoke, <40 degrees C). All groups were resuscitated with Ringer lactate solution (4 mL/kg/%burn/24 h) and placed on a ventilator [positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) = 5 cm H2O, tidal volume = 15 mL/kg] for 48 h. B&S injury halved the lung alpha-tocopherol concentrations (0.9 +/- 0.1 nmol/g) compared with sham-injured animals (1.5 +/- 0.3), whereas vitamin E treatment elevated the lung alpha-tocopherol concentrations (7.40 +/- 2.61) in the injured animals. B&S injury decreased pulmonary gas exchange (PaO2/FiO2 ratios) from 517 +/- 15 at baseline to 329 +/- 49 at 24 h and to 149 +/- 32 at 48 h compared with sham ratios of 477 +/- 14, 536 +/- 48, and 609 +/- 49, respectively. Vitamin E treatment resulted in a significant improvement of pulmonary gas exchange; ratios were 415 +/- 34 and 283 +/- 42 at 24 and 48 h, respectively. Vitamin E nebulization therapy improved the clinical responses to burn and smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury.

  10. Efferent vagal nerve stimulation attenuates acute lung injury following burn: The importance of the gut-lung axis

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzaniak, Michael J.; Peterson, Carrie Y.; Cheadle, Gerald; Loomis, William; Wolf, Paul; Kennedy, Vince; Putnam, James G.; Bansal, Vishal; Eliceiri, Brian; Baird, Andrew; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess acute lung injury when protection to the gut mucosal barrier offered by vagus nerve stimulation is eliminated by an abdominal vagotomy. Methods Male balb/c mice were subjected to 30% total body surface area steam burn with and without electrical stimulation to the right cervical vagus nerve. A cohort of animals were subjected to abdominal vagotomy. Lung histology, myeloperoxidase and ICAM-1 immune staining, myeloperoxidase enzymatic assay, and tissue KC levels were analyzed 24 hours after burn. Additionally, lung IkB-α, NF-kB immunoblots, and NF-kB-DNA binding measured by photon emission analysis using NF-kB-luc transgenic mice were performed. Results Six hours post burn, phosphorylation of both NF-kB p65 and IkB-α were observed. Increased photon emission signal was seen in the lungs of NF-kB-luc transgenic animals. Vagal nerve stimulation blunted NF-kB activation similar to sham animals whereas abdominal vagotomy eliminated the anti-inflammatory effect. After burn, MPO positive cells and ICAM-1 expression in the lung endothelium was increased, and lung histology demonstrated significant injury at 24 hours. Vagal nerve stimulation markedly decreased neutrophil infiltration as demonstrated by MPO immune staining and enzyme activity. Vagal stimulation also markedly attenuated acute lung injury at 24 hours. The protective effects of vagal nerve stimulation were reversed by performing an abdominal vagotomy. Conclusion Vagal nerve stimulation is an effective strategy to protect against acute lung injury following burn. Moreover, the protective effects of vagal nerve stimulation in the prevention of acute lung injury are eliminated by performing an abdominal vagotomy. These results establish the importance of the gut-lung axis after burn in the genesis of acute lung injury. PMID:21783215

  11. Parecoxib Reduces Systemic Inflammation and Acute Lung Injury in Burned Animals with Delayed Fluid Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Si Jack; Wu, Jian; Lu, Jia; Moochhala, Shabbir M.

    2014-01-01

    Burn injuries result in the release of proinflammatory mediators causing both local and systemic inflammation. Multiple organ dysfunctions secondary to systemic inflammation after severe burn contribute to adverse outcome, with the lungs being the first organ to fail. In this study, we evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of Parecoxib, a parenteral COX-2 inhibitor, in a delayed fluid resuscitation burned rat model. Anaesthetized Sprague Dawley rats were inflicted with 45% total body surface area full-thickness scald burns and subsequently subjected to delayed resuscitation with Hartmann's solution. Parecoxib (0.1, 1.0, and 10 mg/kg) was delivered intramuscularly 20 min after injury followed by 12 h interval and the rats were sacrificed at 6 h, 24 h, and 48 h. Burn rats developed elevated blood cytokines, transaminase, creatinine, and increased lung MPO levels. Animals treated with 1 mg/kg Parecoxib showed significantly reduced plasma level of CINC-1, IL-6, PGEM, and lung MPO. Treatment of 1 mg/kg Parecoxib is shown to mitigate systemic and lung inflammation without significantly affecting other organs. At present, no specific therapeutic agent is available to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response secondary to burn injury. The results suggest that Parecoxib may have the potential to be used both as an analgesic and ameliorate the effects of lung injury following burn. PMID:24579056

  12. Continuous Venovenous Hemofiltration in Severely Burned Patients with Acute Kidney Injury: A Cohort Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    FiO2: fraction of inspired oxygen; IHD: intermittent hemodialysis ; IQR: interquartile range; ISS: injury severity score; MODS: multiple organ...were compared. Definitions During the period after November 2005 our staff intensivists utilized the RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-stage...for acute renal fail- ure which included: fluid resuscitation, minimization of nephro- toxic agents, and utilization of hemodialysis if classic

  13. Assessment of biochemical markers in the early post-burn period for predicting acute kidney injury and mortality in patients with major burn injury: comparison of serum creatinine, serum cystatin-C, plasma and urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The reported mortality rates range from 28% to 100% in burn patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI) and from 50% to 100% among such patients treated with renal replacement therapy. Recently, the serum cystatin C and plasma and urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) levels have been introduced as early biomarkers for AKI; the levels of these biomarkers are known to increase 24 to 48 hours before the serum creatinine levels increase. In this study, we aimed to estimate the diagnostic utility of the cystatin C and plasma and urine NGAL levels in the early post-burn period as biomarkers for predicting AKI and mortality in patients with major burn injuries. Methods From May 2011 to July 2012, 90 consecutive patients with a burn wound area comprising ≥ 20% of the total body surface area (TBSA) were enrolled in this study. Whole blood and urine samples were obtained for measuring the serum creatinine, serum cystatin C, and urine and plasma NGAL levels at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after admission. Receiver operating characteristic curve, area under the curve, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the predictive values of these biomarkers for AKI and mortality. Results In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, all variables, including age, percentage TBSA burned, sex, inhalation injury, and serum creatinine levels, serum cystatin C levels, and plasma and urine NGAL levels were independently associated with AKI development. Moreover, age, sex, percentage TBSA burned, and plasma and urine NGAL levels were independently associated with mortality. However, inhalation injury and the serum creatinine and cystatin C levels were not independently associated with mortality. Conclusions Massively burned patients who maintained high plasma and urine NGAL levels until 12 hours after admission were at the risk of developing early AKI and early mortality with burn shock. However, the plasma and urine

  14. Noninvasive carbon dioxide monitoring in a porcine model of acute lung injury due to smoke inhalation and burns.

    PubMed

    Belenkiy, Slava; Ivey, Katherine M; Batchinsky, Andriy I; Langer, Thomas; Necsoiu, Corina; Baker, William; Salinas, José; Cancio, Leopoldo C

    2013-06-01

    In critically ill intubated patients, assessment of adequacy of ventilation relies on measuring partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2), which requires invasive arterial blood gas analysis. Alternative noninvasive technologies include transcutaneous CO2 (tPCO2) and end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) monitoring. We evaluated accuracy of tPCO2 and EtCO2 monitoring in a porcine model of acute lung injury (ALI) due to smoke inhalation and burns. Eight anesthetized Yorkshire pigs underwent mechanical ventilation, wood-bark smoke inhalation injury, and 40% total body surface area thermal injury. tPCO2 was measured with a SenTec system (SenTec AG, Therwil, Switzerland) and EtCO2 with a Capnostream-20 (Oridion Medical, Jerusalem, Israel). These values were compared with PaCO2 measurements from an arterial blood gas analyzer. Paired measurements of EtCO2-PaCO2 (n = 276) and tPCO2-PaCO2 (n = 250) were recorded in the PaCO2 range of 25 to 85 mmHg. Overlapping data sets were analyzed based on respiratory and hemodynamic status of animals. Acute lung injury was defined as PaO2/FIO2 ≤ 300 mmHg; hemodynamic instability was defined as mean arterial pressure ≤ 60 mmHg. Before ALI, EtCO2 demonstrated moderate correlation with PaCO2 (R = 0.45; P < 0.0001), which deteriorated after onset of ALI (R = 0.12; P < 0.0001). Before ALI, tPCO2 demonstrated moderate correlation (R = 0.51, P < 0.0001), which was sustained after onset of ALI (R = 0.78; P < 0.0001). During hemodynamic stability, EtCO2 demonstrated moderate correlation with PaCO2 (R = 0.44; P < 0.0001). During hemodynamic instability, EtCO2 did not correlate with PaCO2 (R = 0.03; P = 0.29). tPCO2 monitoring demonstrated strong correlation with PaCO2 during hemodynamic stability (R = 0.80, P < 0.0001), which deteriorated under hemodynamically unstable conditions (R = 0.39; P < 0.0001). Noninvasive carbon dioxide monitors are acceptable for monitoring trends in PaCO2 under conditions of hemodynamic and pulmonary stability. Under

  15. The efficacy of acute administration of pamidronate on the conservation of bone mass following severe burn injury in children: a double-blind, randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gordon L; Wimalawansa, Sunil J; Kulkarni, Gayathri; Sherrard, Donald J; Sanford, Arthur P; Herndon, David N

    2005-06-01

    Bone loss is a known complication of severe burn injury. It is, in part, due to increased endogenous glucocorticoids that contribute to the reduction in bone formation and osteoblast differentiation, hypercalciuria secondary to hypoparathyroidism, and vitamin D deficiency. In this study we attempted to prevent post-burn bone loss by acute intravenous administration of the bisphosphonate pamidronate. We enrolled 43 children, with burns of > 40% total body surface area, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, administering the study drug within 10 days of burn injury and again 1 week later. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed prior to drug therapy, at hospital discharge and at 6 months post-burn. Urine specimens were obtained at baseline and discharge for determination of calcium and free deoxypyridinoline. Blood was obtained along with the urine specimens for measurement of intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and ionized calcium (Ca) levels. Following doxycycline labeling, intra-operative iliac crest bone biopsies were obtained, and bone histomorphometry was determined. At time of discharge there were no differences in total body bone mineral content (BMC), but lumbar spine BMC was significantly higher in the pamidronate group (P < 0.005). By 6 months post-burn the differences in lumbar spine BMC persisted, but, now, total body BMC was significantly higher in the pamidronate group (P < 0.05). Bone histomorphometry and levels of urine Ca and free deoxypyridinoline failed to show significant increases in bone formation or decreases in bone resorption. Pamidronate did not exacerbate the hypocalcemia in burn patients. In summary, acute intravenous pamidronate administration following burns may help to preserve bone mass, perhaps by inhibiting the glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteocytes.

  16. Acute Stress Symptoms in Young Children with Burns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Frederick J.; Saxe, Glenn; Ronfeldt, Heidi; Drake, Jennifer E.; Burns, Jennifer; Edgren, Christy; Sheridan, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms are a focus of much research with older children, but little research has been conducted with young children, who account for about 50% of all pediatric burn injuries. This is a 3-year study of 12- to 48-month-old acutely burned children to assess acute traumatic stress outcomes. The aims were to…

  17. Cardiac output after burn injury.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, J. M.; Shakespeare, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    Cardiac output after burn injury has been measured by the non-invasive method of impedance plethysmography. An initial study of 143 normal subjects was undertaken in order to investigate variations in cardiac output with age. Fifteen patients were monitored during resuscitation after extensive burns. Fourteen patients showed a depression of stroke volume below the lower limits of the normal range, derived from the initial study on normal people. PMID:6691694

  18. LA50 in burn injuries

    PubMed Central

    Seyed-Forootan, K.; Karimi, H.; Motevalian, S.A.; Momeni, M.; Safari, R.; Ghadarjani, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Burn injuries put a huge financial burden on patients and healthcare systems. They are the 8th leading cause of mortality and the 13th most common cause of morbidity in our country. We used data from our Burn Registry Program to evaluate risk factors for mortality and lethal area fifty percent (LA50) in all burn patients admitted over two years. We used multiple logistic regressions to identify risk factors for mortality. LA50 is a reliable aggregate index for hospital care quality and a good measure for comparing results, also with those of other countries. 28,690 burn patients sought medical attention in the Emergency Department, and 1721 of them were admitted. Male to female ratio was 1,75:1. 514 patients were under 15 years old. Median age was 25 (range: 3 months – 93 years). Overall, probability of death was 8.4%. LA50 was 62.31% (CI 95%: 56.57-70.02) for patients aged 15 and over and 72.52% (CI 95%: 61.01-100) for those under 15. In the final model, we found that Adjusted OR was significant for age, female sex, TBSA and inhalation injury (P < 0.05). LA50 values showed that children tolerate more extensive burns. Female sex, burn size, age and inhalation injury were the main risk factors for death. Authorities should pay special attention to these variables, especially in prevention programs, to reduce mortality and improve patient outcome. Children have better outcome than adults given equal burn size. Suicide rates are higher for women than men in our country PMID:27857645

  19. LA50 in burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Seyed-Forootan, K; Karimi, H; Motevalian, S A; Momeni, M; Safari, R; Ghadarjani, M

    2016-03-31

    Burn injuries put a huge financial burden on patients and healthcare systems. They are the 8th leading cause of mortality and the 13th most common cause of morbidity in our country. We used data from our Burn Registry Program to evaluate risk factors for mortality and lethal area fifty percent (LA50) in all burn patients admitted over two years. We used multiple logistic regressions to identify risk factors for mortality. LA50 is a reliable aggregate index for hospital care quality and a good measure for comparing results, also with those of other countries. 28,690 burn patients sought medical attention in the Emergency Department, and 1721 of them were admitted. Male to female ratio was 1,75:1. 514 patients were under 15 years old. Median age was 25 (range: 3 months - 93 years). Overall, probability of death was 8.4%. LA50 was 62.31% (CI 95%: 56.57-70.02) for patients aged 15 and over and 72.52% (CI 95%: 61.01-100) for those under 15. In the final model, we found that Adjusted OR was significant for age, female sex, TBSA and inhalation injury (P < 0.05). LA50 values showed that children tolerate more extensive burns. Female sex, burn size, age and inhalation injury were the main risk factors for death. Authorities should pay special attention to these variables, especially in prevention programs, to reduce mortality and improve patient outcome. Children have better outcome than adults given equal burn size. Suicide rates are higher for women than men in our country.

  20. Characterization of burn injuries using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbab, M. Hassan; Dickey, Trevor C.; Winebrenner, Dale P.; Chen, Antao; Mourad, Pierre D.

    2011-03-01

    The accuracy rates of the clinical assessment techniques used in grading burn injuries remain significantly low for partial thickness burns. In this paper, we present experimental results from terahertz characterization of 2nd and 3rd degree burn wounds induced on a rat model. Reflection measurements were obtained from the surface of both burned and normal skin using pulsed terahertz spectroscopy. Signal processing techniques are described for interpretation of the acquired terahertz waveform and differentiation of burn wounds. Furthermore, the progression of burn injuries is shown by comparison between acute characterization and 72-hours survival studies. While the water content of healthy and desiccated skin has been considered as a source of terahertz signal contrast, it is demonstrated that other biological effects such as formation of post-burn interstitial edema as well as the density of the discrete scattering structures in the skin (such as hair follicles, sweat glands, etc.) play a significant role in the terahertz response of the burn wounds.

  1. Exercise following burn injury.

    PubMed

    de Lateur, Barbara J; Shore, Wendy S

    2011-05-01

    Fatigue is a major barrier to recovery for burned individuals. Studies indicate that a slow return to normal or near-normal muscle strength is the natural course of recovery. With no special interventions, other than the "usual care" tailored to the needs of the individual, postburn patients will make gradual improvement in strength and aerobic capacity. Using the principle of initial condition (the worse the initial condition, the greater the response to exercise intervention) the authors outline an augmented exercise program that should result in a robust improvement in aerobic capacity.

  2. Noninvasive Carbon Dioxide Monitoring in a Porcine Model of Acute Lung Injury Due to Smoke Inhalation and Burns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    critically ill intubated patients, assessment of adequacy of ventilation relies on measuring partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2), which...recorded in the PaCO2 range of 25 to 85 mmHg. Overlapping data sets were analyzed based on respiratory and hemodynamic status of animals. Acute lung injury...instability, we recorded the frequency of changes in the respiratory rate (as set on the ventilator ) and in the FIO2. We defined hemo dynamic instability as

  3. Predictors of insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors 24 to 36 months post-burn

    PubMed Central

    Chondronikola, Maria; Meyer, Walter J.; Sidossis, Labros S.; Ojeda, Sylvia; Huddleston, Joanna; Stevens, Pamela; Børsheim, Elisabet; Suman, Oscar E.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Herndon, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Burn injury is a dramatic event with acute and chronic consequences including insulin resistance. However, factors associated with insulin resistance have not been previously investigated. Purpose To identify factors associated with long-term insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors. Methods The study sample consisted of 61 pediatric burn injury survivors 24 to 36 months after the burn injury, who underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. To assess insulin resistance, we calculated the area under the curve for glucose and insulin. The diagnostic criteria of the American Diabetes Association were used to define individuals with impaired glucose metabolism. Additional data collected include body composition, anthropometric measurements, burn characteristics and demographic information. The data were analyzed using multivariate linear regression analysis. Results Approximately 12% of the patients met the criteria for impaired glucose metabolism. After adjusting for possible confounders, burn size, age and percent body fat were associated with the area under the curve for glucose (p<0.05 for all). Time post-burn and lean mass were inversely associated with the area under the curve for glucose (p<0.05 for both). Similarly, older age predicted higher insulin area under the curve. Conclusion A significant proportion of pediatric injury survivors suffer from glucose abnormalities 24–36 months post-burn. Burn size, time post-burn, age, lean mass and adiposity are significant predictors of insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors. Clinical evaluation and screening for abnormal glucose metabolism should be emphasized in patients with large burns, older age and survivors with high body fat. PMID:24918945

  4. Civilian blast-related burn injuries

    PubMed Central

    Patel, J.N.; Tan, A.; Dziewulski, P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary There is limited English literature describing the experience of a civilian hospital managing blast-related burn injuries. As the largest regional burn unit, we reviewed our cases with the aim of identifying means to improve current management. A 6-year retrospective analysis of all patients coded as sustaining blast-related burns was conducted through the unit’s burns database. Medical case notes were reviewed for information on burn demographics, management and outcomes. 42 patients were identified. Male to female ratio was 37:5. Age range was 12-84 years, (mean=33 years). Total body surface area (%TBSA) burn ranged from 0.25% to 60%, (median=1%). The most common burn injury was flame (31/42, 73.8%). Gas explosions were the most common mechanism of injury (19 cases; 45.2%). 7/42 cases (16.7%) had full ATLS management pre-transfer to the burns unit. The Injury Severity Score (ISS) ranged from 0-43 (median=2). 17/42 (40.4%) patients required admission. 37/36 (88.1%) patients were managed conservatively of which 1 patient later required surgery due to deeper burns. 5/42 (11.9%) patients required surgical management at presentation and these were noted to be burns with >15% TBSA requiring resuscitation. One case required emergency escharotomies and finger amputations. All patients survived their burn injuries. Blast-related burn injuries are generally uncommon in the civilian setting. Following proper assessment, most of these cases can be deemed as minor injuries and managed conservatively. Improvement in burns management education and training at local emergency departments would provide efficient patient care and avoid unnecessary referrals to a burns unit. PMID:27857651

  5. Micronutrients after burn injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Nordlund, Megan J; Pham, Tam N; Gibran, Nicole S

    2014-01-01

    Supplementation of micronutrients after burn injury is common practice in order to fight oxidative stress, support the immune system, and optimize wound healing. Assessing micronutrient status after burn injury is difficult because of hemodilution in the resuscitation phase, redistribution of nutrients from the serum to other organs, and decreases in carrier proteins such as albumin. Although there are many preclinical data, there are limited studies in burn patients. Promising research is being conducted on combinations of micronutrients, especially via the intravenous route.

  6. Acute kidney injury during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Van Hook, James W

    2014-12-01

    Acute kidney injury complicates the care of a relatively small number of pregnant and postpartum women. Several pregnancy-related disorders such as preeclampsia and thrombotic microangiopathies may produce acute kidney injury. Prerenal azotemia is another common cause of acute kidney injury in pregnancy. This manuscript will review pregnancy-associated acute kidney injury from a renal functional perspective. Pathophysiology of acute kidney injury will be reviewed. Specific conditions causing acute kidney injury and treatments will be compared.

  7. [Acute radiation injury].

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsutomu

    2012-03-01

    Cell death due to DNA damage by ionizing radiation causes acute radiation injury of tissues and organs. Frequency and severity of the injuries increase according to dose increase, when the dose becomes more than threshold dose. The threshold dose of acute human radiation death is 1 Gy and LD50 of human is 4 Gy. Human dies due to the cerebrovascular syndrome, the gastrointestinal syndrome or the hematopoetic syndrome, when he received more than 20 Gy, 10-20 Gy or 3-8 Gy to his total body, respectively. Any tissue or organ, including embryo and fetus, does not show the acute injury, when it received less than 100 mSv. Acute injuries are usually reversible, and late injuries are sometimes irreversible.

  8. Burn Injuries: Causes, Consequences, Knowledge, Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healer, Cheryl V.; And Others

    This report covers Phase I of the Burn Injury Education Demonstration Project, a four-phased project designed to explore the feasibility of using educational intervention strategies to increase knowledge and appropriate behaviors and attitudes to reduce the number and severity of burns. Phase I involved a comprehensive needs assessment conducted…

  9. [Acute respiratory insufficiency in burn patients from smoke inhalation].

    PubMed

    Gartner, R; Griffe, O; Captier, G; Selloumi, D; Otman, S; Brabet, M; Baro, B

    2002-03-01

    Respiratory injuries by smoke inhalation are one of the most frequent reasons for acute respiratory failure in burn victims. They are most often of chemical origin and are responsible of a 20 to 70% increase of the mortality compared to the mortality of patients with similar burn injuries, but without inhalation lesions. They are often associated to a certain degree to other factors of acute respiratory failure: superior air way obstruction by oedema in face and neck burns, thoracic expansion hindrance due to thoracic burns, lung trauma lesions by blast injury. The generalized inflammatory reaction due to the extent of burns and an initial inadequate resuscitation are worsening factors. The inflammatory process may be responsible of lung injuries similar to those induced by smoke inhalation, even when there is no inhalation. The treatment remains symptomatic and based on the oxygen therapy, mechanical ventilation, prevention of infections and maintain of homeostasis by hydroelectrolytic adequate resuscitation. The nitric oxyde associated to the almitrin allows in a certain number of cases to minimize intra pulmonary shunting and to normalize the VA/O ratio. The development of treatments allowing to modulate inflammatory mediators may lead to news therapies in the future.

  10. Burn injuries caused by air bag deployment.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, D; Noah, E M; Fuchs, P; Pallua, N

    2001-03-01

    Automobile air bags have gained acceptance as an effective measure to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with motor vehicle accidents. As more cars have become equipped with them, new problems have been encountered that are directly attributable to the deployment of the bag itself. An increasing variety of associated injuries has been reported, including minor burns. We present two automobile drivers who were involved in front-impact crashes with air bag inflation. They sustained superficial and partial-thickness burns related to the deployment. The evaluation of these cases shows mechanisms involved in burn injuries caused by the air bag system. Most of the burns are chemical and usually attributed to sodium hydroxide in the aerosol created during deployment. Also direct thermal burns from high-temperature gases or indirect injuries due to the melting of clothing, as well as friction burns from physical contact are possible. However, the inherent risks of air bag-related burns are still outweighed by the benefits of preventing potentially life-threatening injuries.

  11. Infectious Complications After Burn Injury,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    and burn wound Epidemiology of infection sepsis’ through the use of effective topical antimicrobial agents and timely excision and grafting have...and early closure of the burn woundthe epidemiology of infection have occurred, resulting in have become standard practice; at the same time, the a...airway and gastrointestinal tract. vasive wound infection , endocarditis , or suppurative Perioperative antibiotic use. thrombophlebitis are common causes

  12. Pharmacological Sparing of Protein in Burn Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-10

    protein breakdown rates and factors other than insulin resistance are responsible for stimulating the net protein catabolism of severe burn injury and...suggest that the " insulin resistance " of sepsis may be different from that of severe trauma uncompli- cated by infection, we further tested the effect of...suggesting that factors other than insulin resistance were responsible for mediating the deranged protein metabolism of burns and sepsis. From studies by

  13. [Acute Kidney Injury].

    PubMed

    Brix, Silke; Stahl, Rolf

    2017-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important part of renal diseases and a common clinical problem. AKI is an acute decline in renal function. Due to a lack of therapeutic options, prevention and optimal management of patients with AKI are the most important strategies. Although seldom the sole cause of patients' death, AKI is associated with a significant increase in mortality. Our objective is to draw the attention towards the prevention of AKI of non-renal causes.

  14. Exercise behaviors after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Jennifer; Li, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate exercise behaviors in adult burn survivors and to identify barriers to exercise in this population. A two-page questionnaire developed by the authors was administered on a single occasion to adults attending the ambulatory burns clinic at a metropolitan hospital. Data from 68 adult burn survivors were analyzed. Within this cohort, 59% of subjects reported exercising several times per week or more and the remaining 41% exercised once per week or less. There was no correlation among exercise frequency and age, TBSA, or hospital length of stay. Walking was the most common type of exercise, and subjects reported lower compliance with stretching and strengthening exercises. Physical condition and motivation were identified as the main barriers to exercise. Although this preliminary study reveals that a higher proportion of burn survivors engage in exercise compared with their healthy counterparts, a substantial number are exercising just once per week or less, below the recommended guidelines to improve physical fitness. Physical and occupational therapists play an important role in providing exercise prescription and education, as well as addressing barriers to exercise in burn survivors. The potential for further research into physical activity across all domains of life using a validated questionnaire is identified.

  15. Acute injuries in orienteerers.

    PubMed

    Kujala, U M; Nylund, T; Taimela, S

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the type and severeity of acute injuries occurring in Finnish orienteerers in 1987 to 1991. The study is based on the orienteering license insurance records accounting for 2189 orienteering injuries during 69268 person-years of exposure in active orienteerers. Of these orienteerers, 73.0% were male; 73.5% (N = 1608) of all injuries occurred in males, so the injury rate was similar in males and females. The rate was highest in orienteerers 20 to 24 years of age and lowest in children. Injuries occurred most commonly during May to September (78.9% or all injuries), the months which include the orienteering competition season, and were more common during competitions (59.8%) than during training. A high number of the injuries occurred during weekends (58.9% of injuries) including 68.1% of all competition injuries and 44.9% of all training injuries. The lower limbs were involved in 1611 (73.6%) of cases, the ankle (28.7%) and the knee (23.2%) being the two most common injury locations. Sprains, strains and contusions were the most common injuries. Wounds were proportionally more common in males than in females while ankle sprains were more common in females. Fractures, seven open and 94 closed, accounted for 4.6% of injuries; they were most common in the hand/wrist/forearm (N = 44) and ankle (N = 16), and were more frequent during competition (62.3%) than during training. The most important areas for preventive measures seem to be the ankle and the knee.

  16. Burn injury secondary to air bag deployment.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Ingrid; Mancini, Luca Livio; Guizzardi, Marco; Monti, Marcello

    2002-02-01

    The efficacy of air bags has been proven in diminishing the rate of fatalities and severity of injury in motor vehicle crashes. Unfortunately, as with any developing technology, new problems have been encountered that are directly attributable to the deployment of the air bag itself. Most air bag-related injuries are minor and, surprisingly, more than 7% are burns typically involving the upper extremity or head or neck. Fortunately, these are superficial burns that usually require only expectant therapy, but a high degree of suspicion in these circumstances is needed to make the proper diagnosis.

  17. 1082: Prevalence of Kidney Injury in Burn Patients Requiring Fluid Resuscitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    DEC 2014 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 1082: Prevalence of Kidney Injury in Burn Patients Requiring Fluid...measurements in one of the patients and never elevated in the other. There were no instances of acute kidney injury in either patient. Conclusions:The use...1082 PREVALENCE OF KIDNEY INJURY IN BURN PATIENTS REQUIRING FLUID RESUSCITATION Jose Salinas1, J Waters2, Craig Fenrich1, Maria Serio-Melvin1, John

  18. Economical Burden of Burn Injuries in a Developing Country.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Noor-Ahmad; Karimi, Hamid; Motevalian, Seyed Abbas; Momeni, Mahnoush

    2017-03-06

    Burn injuries have economical impacts on patients in several ways. Understanding the charges of burn treatment is very important for patients, families, governmental authorities, and insurance companies. During the protocol of their treatment, they may be admitted several times for treatment of acute burn and then for reconstructive treatments of burn's complications. Calculating the hospital burn charges can serve as an objective criteria for authorities to plan for a sufficient budget for acute burn treatment, for additional management for chronic complications, and as a guide for planning preventive and public educational programs. The authors used data of their burn registry program. During more than 3 years, the authors had 912 patients with multiple admissions for burns. All of hospital costs during several admissions were recorded. Men were 71% and women were 29% of the patients. Burns caused by flame were the most frequent (50.1%) followed by scald (34.0%). Mean hospital stay was 14.1 days (range, 0-64 days). Patients with TBSA equal to or less than 10% were 38.8%, TBSA between 11 and 22% were 29.1%, and TBSA more than 23% were 32.1%. Those who were admitted for 30 days or less were 34.1%, those between 31 and 131 days were 32.7%, and those with more than 132 days of admission were 33.2%. Mean hospital cost for all patients during the 3 years was about $2766 (range, from $143 to $33,566; median = 1586.93; SE = 93.84). The patients were admitted for treatment of acute burns and later admitted for reconstruction of the burn sequels. Total number of admissions was up to six times (median = 2). About 66.27% of the total charges were the cost of first admission, 19.39% the cost of second admission, 7.34% the cost of third admission, 3.56% for fourth admission, 2.3% for fifth admission, and 1.15% for last or sixth admission. The authors conducted a multiple linear regression test. Male sex, TBSA, length of stay, and number of admissions were significantly related

  19. Functioning, Disability, and Social Adaptation Six Months After Burn Injury.

    PubMed

    Palmu, Raimo; Partonen, Timo; Suominen, Kirsi; Vuola, Jyrki; Isometsä, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Major injuries commonly cause long-standing functional impairment. The authors investigated the levels of and predictors for functioning, disability, and social adaptation 6 months after a burn injury. The overall level of functioning at 6 months postburn was assessed among 87 (81%) of the 107 consecutive acute adult burn patients (mean TBSA 9.7%) admitted to the Helsinki Burn Centre during an 18-month period. Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS) was used to evaluate functioning overall, and Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) to assess the domains of working capacity, social life, and family life. Social Adaptation Self-Evaluation Scale (SASS) was used to measure social adaptation. Structured clinical interview was used to assess mental disorders at baseline and 6 months after injury. The mean SOFAS score was 69.7 (SD = 20.8), indicating some impairment in social and occupational functioning. The strongest independent predictors of SOFAS were mental disorders during follow-up (P < .001), particularly major depressive disorder (P < .001) and delirium (P = .016), but also length of stay (P = .004) and hand burn (P = .012). Concerning disability (SDS), the authors found mild impairment in all three domains, the most in SDS work (mean 3.59, SD = 3.46). The strongest predictor of SDS was major depressive disorder during follow-up (P < .001) and of SASS personality disorders (P = .007). Six months after a burn injury, some difficulties in social and occupational functioning remained. Level of functioning was predicted strongly and consistently by mental disorders, particularly depression. Length of stay and hand burns also predicted functioning, more in a clinician's evaluation (SOFAS) than in self-reported measures (SDS and SASS).

  20. A Comparison of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Outcomes Between Military and Civilian Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    MILITARY MEDICINE, 180, 3:56, 2015 A Comparison of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Outcomes Between Military and Civilian Burn Patients J Alan...Chung, MC USA*‡ ABSTRACT Background: The objective of this report was to compare the prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and...Development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common complication of burn injury and is associated with poor outcomes. Previous reports using

  1. Use of Topical PC-NSAIDs to Treat Burn Injury and Pain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0016 TITLE: Use of Topical PC-NSAIDs to Treat Burn Injury and Pain PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lenard Lichtenberger...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Use of Topical PC-NSAIDs to Treat Burn Injury and Pain 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-2-0016 5c. PROGRAM...for continued development of Indo-PC for treatment of acute pain caused by 2nd degree burn wounds. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Burn, phospholipid, NSAID

  2. Work-related burn injuries in Ontario, Canada: A follow-up 10-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Clouatre, Elsa; Gomez, Manuel; Banfield, Joanne M; Jeschke, Marc G

    2013-09-01

    Work-related burn injuries contribute to a quarter of all burns in the USA. In 2009, the provincial Workplace Safety and Insurance Board reported 64,824 work-related injuries that resulted in time lost, 1188 injuries (2%) were a result of burns. There were two previous studies performed at a regional burn centre (1984-1990 and 1998-2000) that examined incidence and characteristics of work-related burns. There was no significant change between these two groups. The purpose of this study was to identify the recent pattern of work-related burns from 2001 to 2010 and to compare it to the previous studies. During the study period, 1427 patients were admitted for an acute injury to the regional burn centre. Of these, 330 were due to a work-related incident (23%). The mean age of patients was 40.5±11.9 years, 95% were male. The mean total body surface area burn was 11.9±16.2%. The most common mechanism of injury was flame (32.7%) followed by electrical (27%) and scald (19.7%), inhalation injury was present in 4.8% of patients and the mortality was 1.8%. Our study shows a significant decrease in the incidence in work-related burns treated at the regional burn centre (23.1% vs. 28.2% vs. 30.2%, p<0.01), flame burns have now become the leading cause of injury, there was a significant reduction in inhalation injury (4.8% vs. 23% vs. 14.8%, p<0.00001), and mortality over time (1.8% vs. 4% vs. 6.7% p=0.02). These findings strongly suggest a change in the cause of work-related burns, improvement in burn care, and that prevention strategies may have been more effective.

  3. Blood Gases as an Indicator of Inhalation Injury and Prognosis in Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Megahed, M.A.; Ghareeb, F.; Kishk, T.; El-Barah, A.; Abou-Gereda, H.; El-Fol, H.; El-Sisy, A.; Omran, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Inhalation injury greatly increases the incidence of respiratory failure and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. It is also the cause of most early deaths in burn victims. The aim of our research was to study the incidence, early diagnosis, complications, and management of inhalation injury and to discuss the relation between inhalation injury and death in burn patients.This study included 130 burn patients with inhalation injury admitted to Menoufiya University Hospital Burn Center, Egypt, from January 2004 to April 2008 (61 males and 69 females). We found that the presence of inhalation injury, increasing burn size, and advancing age were all associated with increased mortality (p < 0.01). The incidence of inhalation injury in our study was 46.3% (130 patients were identified as having inhalation injury out of 281). The overall mortality for patients with inhalation injury was 41.5% (54 patients out of 130) compared with 7.2% (11 patients out of 151) for patients without inhalation injury. These statistical data make it clear that inhalation injury is an important factor for the prediction of mortality in burn patients. Approximately 80% of fire-related deaths are due not to the burn injury to the airway but to the inhalation of toxic products, especially carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide gases. Inhalation injury is generally caused by thermal burns, mostly confined to the upper airways.Major airway, pulmonary, and systemic complications may occur in cases of inhalation injury and thus increase the incidence of burn patient mortality PMID:21991136

  4. [Metabolism and nutritional support after burn injury].

    PubMed

    Mishima, S; Deitch, E A

    1998-01-01

    The nutritional status of the burn patient plays a major role in the ability to ward off an infectious challenge. The immune and inflammatory systems can be modulated by nutritional support, and therefore this article focuses on the nutritional support after burn injury. The hypermetabolic response that occurs after burn injury is characterized by a greater magnitude than that observed after any other form of trauma. The hypothesis that gut-or wound-derived bacterial translocation is one of the major triggers of the hypermetabolic response has attracted attention recently. The first set of goals of nutritional support is to prevent starvation and nutrient deficiencies, and the second is to provide the correct amount of nutrients prevent injury-related adverse physiologic complications. The route and timing of nutritional support are most important. Enteral alimentation appears to preserve the host immune function and to attenuate the hypermetabolic response by preserving the intestinal mucosal barrier. Immediate enteral feeding is superior to delayed enteral feeding, even though only limited amounts of enterally administered nutrients are absorbed during the early days postburn.

  5. Firefighter burn injuries: predictable patterns influenced by turnout gear.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Steven A; Patel, Jignesh H; Lentz, Christopher W; Bell, Derek E

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100 firefighters suffer fatal injuries annually and tens of thousands receive nonfatal injuries. Many of these injuries require medical attention and restricted activity but may be preventable. This study was designed to elucidate etiology, circumstances, and patterns of firefighter burn injury so that further prevention strategies can be designed. In particular, modification of protective equipment, or turnout gear, is one potential strategy to prevent burn injury. An Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective review was conducted with records of firefighters treated for burn injury from 2005 to 2009. Data collected included age, gender, TBSA, burn depth, anatomic location, total hospital days per patient, etiology, and circumstances of injury. Circumstances of injury were stratified into the following categories: removal/dislodging of equipment, failure of equipment to protect, training errors, and when excessive external temperatures caused patient sweat to boil under the gear. Over the 4-year period, 20 firefighters were treated for burn injury. Mean age was 38.9 ± 8.9 years and 19 of 20 patients were male. Mean burn size was 1.1 ± 2.7% TBSA. Eighteen patients suffered second-degree burns, while two patients suffered first-degree burns. Mean length of hospitalization was 2.45 days. Scald burns were responsible for injury to 13 firefighters (65%). Flame burns caused injury to four patients (20%). Only three patients received contact burns (15%). The face was the site most commonly burned, representing 29% of injuries. The hand/wrist and ears were the next largest groups, with 23 and 16% of the injuries, respectively. Other areas burned included the neck (10%), arm (6.5%), leg (6.5%), knees (3%), shoulders (3%), and head (3%). Finally, the circumstance of injury was evaluated for each patient. Misuse and noncontiguous areas of protective equipment accounted for 14 of the 20 injuries (70%). These burns were caused when hot steam

  6. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115

  7. Pattern of burn injury in hang-glider pilots.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D C; Nano, T; Pegg, S P

    1996-06-01

    High-voltage electrical injury has been well documented in a number of situations, such as the occupational hazard of linesmen and construction workers, and in the context of overhead railway power lines. Two cases of hang-glider pilots contacting 11,000-volt power lines have recently been treated in the Royal Brisbane Hospital Burns Unit. They demonstrate an interesting pattern of injury, not described in current burns literature, involving both hand and lower abdominal burns. Both patients sustained full-thickness patches of burn injury, with underlying muscle damage and peripheral neurological injury. This distribution of injury seems to be closely related to the design of the hang glider.

  8. Pamidronate attenuates muscle loss after pediatric burn injury.

    PubMed

    Børsheim, Elisabet; Herndon, David N; Hawkins, Hal K; Suman, Oscar E; Cotter, Matthew; Klein, Gordon L

    2014-06-01

    Children who are burned >40% total body surface area lose significant quantities of both bone and muscle mass because of acute bone resorption, inflammation, and endogenous glucocorticoid production, which result in negative nitrogen balance. Because administration of the bisphosphonate pamidronate within 10 days of the burn injury completely prevents the bone loss, we asked whether muscle protein balance was altered by the preservation of bone. We reviewed the results from 17 burned pediatric subjects previously enrolled in a double-blind randomized controlled study of pamidronate in the prevention of post-burn bone loss and who were concurrently evaluated for muscle protein synthesis and breakdown by stable isotope infusion studies during the acute hospitalization. We found a significantly lower fractional protein synthesis rate (FSR) in the pamidronate group and a correspondingly lower rate of appearance of the amino acid tracer in venous blood, suggesting lower muscle protein turnover. Moreover, net protein balance (synthesis minus breakdown) was positive in the subjects receiving pamidronate and negative in those receiving placebo. Muscle fiber diameter was significantly greater in the pamidronate subjects and leg strength at 9 months post-burn was not different between subjects who received pamidronate and normal physically fit age-matched children studied in our lab. Leg strength in burned subjects who served as controls tended to be weaker, although not significantly so. If substantiated by a larger study, these results suggest that bone may have a paracrine mechanism to preserve muscle and this finding may have implications for the treatment of sarcopenia in the elderly.

  9. Acute hand injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Yoseph A; Awan, Hisham M

    2017-03-22

    Hand and wrist injuries in athletes are common, representing between 3 and 25% of all sports injuries. As many as a quarter of all sports injuries involve the hand or wrist. We review the recent literature regarding acute hand injuries in athletes based on the structures involved - bone, muscle/tendon, ligament, and neurovascular - including diagnosis and pathophysiology of these injuries, focusing on athlete-specific facets of treatment, and when available, opinions on return to play.

  10. Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PMID:26768243

  11. Description of Missouri children who suffer burn injuries

    PubMed Central

    Quayle, K; Wick, N; Gnauck, K; Schootman, M; Jaffe, D

    2000-01-01

    Objective—This study uses Missouri's inpatient and outpatient E code data system to describe the demographic characteristics of Missouri children who suffered burn injuries during 1994 and 1995. Methods—Retrospective review of Missouri E code data. Results—Altogether 8404 children aged 0–14 years were treated for burn injuries in Missouri hospitals during 1994 and 1995. The rate of burn injury in Missouri children was 339 per 100 000/year. African-American boys 0–4 years living in urban counties were at increased risk. In addition, African-American girls ages 0–4 years living in counties with a high poverty rate had raised burn injury rates. Burns from hot objects and scalds from hot liquids caused more than half of the burns. Conclusions—Hospital based E coding has proven an invaluable tool for the study of burns and will, no doubt, prove equally useful for other injuries. PMID:11144622

  12. Acute and Perioperative Care of the Burn-Injured Patient

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Edward A.; Shank, Erik; Woodson, Lee; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2016-01-01

    Care of burn-injured patients requires knowledge of the pathophysiologic changes affecting virtually all organs from the onset of injury until wounds are healed. Massive airway and/or lung edema can occur rapidly and unpredictably after burn and/or inhalation injury. Hemodynamics in the early phase of severe burn injury are characterized by a reduction in cardiac output, increased systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance. Approximately 2–5 days after major burn injury, a hyperdynamic and hypermetabolic state develops. Electrical burns result in morbidity much higher than expected based on burn size alone. Formulae for fluid resuscitation should serve only as guideline; fluids should be titrated to physiologic end points. Burn injury is associated basal and procedural pain requiring higher than normal opioid and sedative doses. Operating room concerns for the burn-injured patient include airway abnormalities, impaired lung function, vascular access, deceptively large and rapid blood loss, hypothermia and altered pharmacology. PMID:25485468

  13. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  14. Autophagy in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Man J.; Dong, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a major kidney disease associated with poor clinical outcomes. The pathogenesis of acute kidney injury is multifactorial and is characterized by tubular cell injury and death. Recent studies have demonstrated autophagy induction in proximal tubular cells during acute kidney injury. The regulatory mechanisms of tubular cell autophagy are poorly understood; however, some recent findings have set up a foundation for further investigation. Although autophagy may promote cell death under certain experimental conditions, pharmacological and autophagy-related gene knockout studies have established a renoprotective role for autophagy in acute kidney injury. The mechanisms by which autophagy protects cells from injury and how, possibly, its pro-survival role switches to pro-death under certain conditions are discussed. Further research is expected to help us understand the regulatory network of tubular cell autophagy, define its precise roles in specific context of acute kidney injury, and identify autophagy-targeting strategies for the prevention and treatment of acute kidney injury. PMID:24485026

  15. Impaired glucose tolerance in pediatric burn patients at discharge from the acute hospital stay

    PubMed Central

    Fram, Ricki Y.; Cree, Melanie G.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Barr, David; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia, secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response, is a common occurrence after thermal injury. This stress response has been documented to persist up to 9 months post burn. The purpose of this study was to measure insulin sensitivity in severely burned children prior to discharge when wounds are 95% healed. Methods Twenty-four children, aged 4–17 years, with burns ≥ 40% total body surface area (TBSA) underwent a 2 hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) prior to discharge from the acute pediatric burn unit. Plasma glucose and insulin levels, as well as the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMAIR) were compared to published OGTT data from healthy, non-burned children. Results There was a significant difference between severely burned children and non-burned, healthy children with respect to the HOMAIR. Severely burned children had a HOMAIR of 3.53±1.62 compared to the value in non-burned healthy children was 1.28±0.16 (p<0.05). Conclusion Insulin resistance secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response persists in severely burned children when burn wounds are at least 95% healed. The results of this study warrant future investigations into therapeutic options for the burned child during the rehabilitative phase of their care after injury. PMID:20634704

  16. Do burns increase the severity of terror injuries?

    PubMed

    Peleg, Kobi; Liran, Alon; Tessone, Ariel; Givon, Adi; Orenstein, Arie; Haik, Josef

    2008-01-01

    The use of explosives and suicide bombings has become more frequent since October 2000. This change in the nature of terror attacks has marked a new era in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. We previously reported that the incidence of thermal injuries has since risen. However, the rise in the incidence of burns among victims of terror was proportionate to the rise in the incidence of burns among all trauma victims. This paper presents data from the Israeli National Trauma Registry during the years 1997--2003, to compare the severity of injuries and outcome (mortality rates) in terror victims with and without burn injuries. We also compare the severity of injuries and outcome (mortality rates) for patients with terror-attack related burns to non terror-attack related burns during the same period. Data was obtained from the Israeli National Trauma Registry for all patients admitted to 8 to 10 hospitals in Israel between 1997 and 2003. We analyzed and compared demographic and clinical characteristics of 219 terror-related burn patients (terror/burn), 2228 terror patients with no associated burns (Terror/no-burn) and 6546 non terror related burn patients (burn/no-terror). Severity of injuries was measured using the injury severity score, and burn severity by total body surface percentage indices. Admission rates to Intensive Care Units (ICU) and total length of hospitalization were also used to measure severity of injuries. In-hospital mortality rates were used to indicate outcome. Of burn/terror patients, 87.2% suffered other accompanying injuries, compared with 10.4% of burn/no-terror patients. Of burn/terror patients, 49.8% were admitted to ICU compared with only 11.9% of burn/no-terror patients and 23.8% of no-burn/terror patients. Mean length of hospital stay was 18.5 days for the terror/burn group compared with 11.1 days for the burn/no-terror group and 9.5 days for the terror/no-burn group. Burn/terror patients had a significantly higher injury severity score

  17. Applications of visible near-infrared spectroscopy and imaging in burn injury assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonardi, Lorenzo; Sowa, Michael G.; Payette, Jeri R.; Hewko, Mark D.; Schattka, Bernhard J.; Matas, Anna; Mantsch, Henry H.

    2000-05-01

    The major objective of the project is to develop a noninvasive method to assess thermal burns. Currently, the diagnosis relies primarily upon visual assessment of the injury by a burn specialist and/or plastic surgeon. The diagnosis is based on the surface appearance of the wound to determine the type or depth of the burn. Near IR spectroscopic measurements of injured tissue provide an objective means of distinguishing between surface and subsurface changes related to the tissue injury. An acute porcine model is employed to investigate the potential of near IR spectroscopy to accurately distinguish between burns of varying severity in the early postburn period. Parallel factor analysis is used to investigate the spectral changes related to burns of varying severity. Burn injuries drastically alter the physical and optical properties of the tissue. Thermal destruction of cutaneous vasculature disrupts perfusion and oxygen delivery to the affected tissue. Tissue blood oxygenation decreases with increased severity of the burn. The result demonstrate that near IR spectroscopy may provide a new tool for objective clinical assessment of burn injuries.

  18. Biomarkers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Kosutova, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its milder form acute lung injury (ALI) may result from various diseases and situations including sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, acute pancreatitis, aspiration of gastric contents, near-drowning etc. ALI/ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar injury, lung edema formation, neutrophil-derived inflammation, and surfactant dysfunction. Clinically, ALI/ARDS is manifested by decreased lung compliance, severe hypoxemia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Severity and further characteristics of ALI/ARDS may be detected by biomarkers in the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (or tracheal aspirate) of patients. Changed concentrations of individual markers may suggest injury or activation of the specific types of lung cells-epithelial or endothelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages, etc.), and thereby help in diagnostics and in evaluation of the patient's clinical status and the treatment efficacy. This chapter reviews various biomarkers of acute lung injury and evaluates their usefulness in diagnostics and prognostication of ALI/ARDS.

  19. Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Selewski, David T; Charlton, Jennifer R; Jetton, Jennifer G; Guillet, Ronnie; Mhanna, Maroun J; Askenazi, David J; Kent, Alison L

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advancements in our understanding of acute kidney injury (AKI) and its impact on outcomes across medicine. Research based on single-center cohorts suggests that neonatal AKI is very common and associated with poor outcomes. In this state-of-the-art review on neonatal AKI, we highlight the unique aspects of neonatal renal physiology, definition, risk factors, epidemiology, outcomes, evaluation, and management of AKI in neonates. The changes in renal function with gestational and chronologic age are described. We put forth and describe the neonatal modified Kidney Diseases: Improving Global Outcomes AKI criteria and provide the rationale for its use as the standardized definition of neonatal AKI. We discuss risk factors for neonatal AKI and suggest which patient populations may warrant closer surveillance, including neonates <1500 g, infants who experience perinatal asphyxia, near term/ term infants with low Apgar scores, those treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and those requiring cardiac surgery. We provide recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of these patients, including medications and renal replacement therapies. We discuss the need for long-term follow-up of neonates with AKI to identify those children who will go on to develop chronic kidney disease. This review highlights the deficits in our understanding of neonatal AKI that require further investigation. In an effort to begin to address these needs, the Neonatal Kidney Collaborative was formed in 2014 with the goal of better understanding neonatal AKI, beginning to answer critical questions, and improving outcomes in these vulnerable populations.

  20. Skeletal muscle protein breakdown remains elevated in pediatric burn survivors up to one year post injury

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Tony; Herndon, David N.; Porter, Craig; Chondronikola, Maria; Chaidemenou, Anastasia; Abdelrahman, Doaa Reda; Bohanon, Fredrick J.; Andersen, Clark; Sidossis, Labros S.

    2015-01-01

    Acute alterations in skeletal muscle protein metabolism are a well-established event associated with the stress response to burns. Nevertheless, the long-lasting effects of burn injury on skeletal muscle protein turnover are incompletely understood. This study was undertaken to investigate fractional synthesis (FSR) and breakdown (FBR) rates in skeletal muscle of pediatric burn patients (N=42, >30% total body surface area burns) for up to 1 year after injury. Skeletal muscle protein kinetics were measured in the postprandial state following bolus injections of 13C6 and 15N phenylalanine stable isotopes. Plasma and muscle phenylalanine enrichments were quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found that the FSR in burn patients was 2- to 3-fold higher than values from healthy men previously reported in the literature (p≤0.05). The FBR was 4- to 6-fold higher than healthy values (p<0.01). Therefore, net protein balance was lower in burn patients compared to healthy men from 2 weeks to 12 months post injury (p<0.05). These findings show that skeletal muscle protein turnover stays elevated for up to 1 year after burn, an effect attributable to simultaneous increases in FBR and FSR. Muscle FBR exceeds FSR during this time, producing a persistent net negative protein balance, even in the postprandial state, which likely contributes to the prolonged cachexia seen in burned victims. PMID:26263438

  1. Children with burns referred for child abuse evaluation: Burn characteristics and co-existent injuries.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Marie-Christin; Kemp, Alison; Maguire, Sabine; Nuttall, Diane; Feldman, Kenneth W; Lindberg, Daniel M

    2016-05-01

    Intentional burns represent a serious form of physical abuse that must be identified to protect children from further harm. This study is a retrospectively planned secondary analysis of the Examining Siblings To Recognize Abuse (ExSTRA) network data. Our objective was to describe the characteristics of burns injuries in children referred to Child Abuse Pediatricians (CAPs) in relation to the perceived likelihood of abuse. We furthermore compare the extent of diagnostic investigations undertaken in children referred to CAPs for burn injuries with those referred for other reasons. Within this dataset, 7% (215/2890) of children had burns. Children with burns were older than children with other injuries (median age 20 months vs. 10 months). Physical abuse was perceived as likely in 40.9% (88) and unlikely in 59.1% (127). Scalds accounted for 52.6% (113) and contact burns for 27.6% (60). Several characteristics of the history and burn injury were associated with a significantly higher perceived likelihood of abuse, including children with reported inflicted injury, absent or inadequate explanation, hot water as agent, immersion scald, a bilateral/symmetric burn pattern, total body surface area ≥10%, full thickness burns, and co-existent injuries. The rates of diagnostic testing were significantly lower in children with burns than other injuries, yet the yield of skeletal survey and hepatic transaminases testing were comparable between the two groups. This would imply that children referred to CAPs for burns warrant the same level of comprehensive investigations as those referred for other reasons.

  2. Acute injuries in Taekwondo.

    PubMed

    Schlüter-Brust, K; Leistenschneider, P; Dargel, J; Springorum, H P; Eysel, P; Michael, J W-P

    2011-08-01

    Although Taekwondo is becoming an increasingly popular sport, there is a lack of reliable epidemiologic data on Taekwondo injuries. To perform an epidemiologic study on the variety of types of injury in professional and amateur Taekwondo athletes and to find a relation between Taekwondo style, skill level, weight-class and warm-up routine and the occurrence of injuries, we analysed the injury data using a 7-page questionnaire from a total of 356 Taekwondo athletes who were randomly selected. Overall, we registered a total of 2,164 injuries in 356 athletes. Most traumas were contusions and sprains in the lower extremities. Professional Taekwondo athletes have an increased risk of injury in comparison to recreational athletes. Taekwondo style, weight class and tournament frequency have an influence on the athlete's injury profile. Warm-up routines were found to have a positive effect on injury rates. Overall, Taekwondo may be considered a rather benign activity, if injuries during Taekwondo tournaments can be avoided. If not, Taekwondo can result in serious musculoskeletal problems.

  3. Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder in children with burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Badger, Karen; Anderson, Lori; Kagan, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the characteristics of children with burns who were also diagnosed with attention deficit disorder (ADD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The study was intended to identify and better understand the risk factors for such injuries and to help direct future burn prevention and education efforts for children with these underlying disorders. We performed a retrospective, comparison group study of 103 pediatric burn patients ranging in age from 5 to 18 years. Forty-four children who were diagnosed with ADD or ADHD at the time of their burn injury were compared with a random sample of 59 burn-injured children without the diagnosis of ADD or ADHD. Variables analyzed included patient demographics, cause of burn, length of hospitalization, engagement in high risk behavior at the time of injury, presence of other developmental, mental health diagnoses, and/or school behavior problems. The ADD or ADHD group had a significantly greater incidence of mental health and school behavior problems than other children with burn injuries. They also had a significantly greater history of high risk behavior at the time of injury than the comparison group. Children with ADD or ADHD who also had an additional mental health diagnosis had a higher incidence of school behavior problems. Our findings suggest the need for additional studies of children with ADD or ADHD who sustain burn injuries. Children with ADD or ADHD who have school behavior problems and/or a tendency to engage in high-risk behavior may be at greatest risk for burn injuries and most likely to benefit from educational counseling or other modalities of burn prevention.

  4. Using online blogs to explore positive outcomes after burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Garbett, Kirsty; Harcourt, Diana; Buchanan, Heather

    2016-03-27

    This study uses blog analysis, a new and novel technique, to explore the positive outcomes experienced by burn survivors. This study examined 10 burn survivor blogs to offer a unique, longitudinal insight into burn survivor recovery. Using thematic analysis, three themes emerged: shift in self-perception, enhanced relationships and a change in life outlook. Many of these themes contained stories and experiences unique to a traumatic burn injury, suggesting that standardised trauma scales are not effectively measuring the impact of a burn in this population. Reflections on blog analysis are discussed, along with a recommendation that health researchers utilise the vast amount of data available from online blogs.

  5. Seawater Immersion Aggravates Burn Injury Causing Severe Blood Coagulation Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong; Mao, Qingxiang; Ma, Yongda; Wang, Li; Chen, Xian; Hu, Yi; Ge, Hengjiang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the endothelial function in a canine model of burn injury combined with seawater immersion. The model of burn injury was established. The dogs were randomly divided into four groups including dogs with burn injury (B group), or burn injury combined with seawater immersion (BI group), or only immersion in seawater (I group), or control animals with no injury or immersion (C group). The circulating endothelial cell (CEC) count and coagulation-fibrinolysis parameters were measured. The CEC count in B group increased at 4 h, 7 h, and 10 h after injury and then reduced, whereas it continuously increased to a greater extent in BI group (P < 0.05). The von Willebrand factor (vWF) activity, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), and the ratio of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) to 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α (6-K-PGF1α ) in BI group had a marked increase after injury, and the tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) in the BI group decreased. Microscope observations revealed thrombus formation in lungs of the animals in BI group, but not in C, I, or B groups. Burn injury causes endothelial dysfunction, and seawater immersion lastingly aggravates this injury, leading to a higher risk of developing thrombosis.

  6. Amitriptyline Usage Exacerbates the Immune Suppression Following Burn Injury.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Bobby L; Rice, Teresa C; Xia, Brent T; Boone, Kirsten I; Green, Ellis A; Gulbins, Erich; Caldwell, Charles C

    2016-11-01

    Currently, over 10% of the US population is taking antidepressants. Numerous antidepressants such as amitriptyline are known to inhibit acid sphingomyelinase (Asm), an enzyme that is known to mediate leukocyte function and homeostasis. Severe burn injury can lead to an immunosuppressive state that is characterized by decreased leukocyte function and numbers as well as increased susceptibility to infection. Based upon the intersection of these facts, we hypothesized that amitriptyline-treated, scald-injured mice would have an altered immune response to injury as compared with untreated scald mice. Prior to burn, mice were pretreated with amitriptyline. Drug- or saline-treated mice were subjected full thickness dorsal scald- or sham-injury. Immune cells from spleen, thymus, and bone marrow were subsequently harvested and characterized. We first observed that amitriptyline prior to burn injury increased body mass loss and spleen contraction. Both amitriptylinetreatment and burn injury resulted in a 40% decrease of leukocyte Asm activity. Following scald injury, we demonstrate increased reduction of lymphocyte precursors in the bone marrow and thymus, as well as mature leukocytes in the spleen in mice that were treated with amitriptyline. We also demonstrate that amitriptyline treatment prior to injury reduced neutrophil accumulation following peptidoglycan stimulus in scald-injured mice. These data show that Asm alterations can play a significant role in mediating alterations to the immune system after injury. The data further suggest that those taking antidepressants may be at a higher risk for complications following burn injury.

  7. AMITRIPTYLINE USAGE EXACERBATES THE IMMUNE SUPPRESSION FOLLOWING BURN INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bobby L.; Rice, Teresa C.; Xia, Brent T.; Boone, Kirsten I.; Green, Ellis A.; Gulbins, Erich; Caldwell, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, over 10% of the US population is taking antidepressants. Numerous antidepressants such as amitriptyline are known to inhibit acid sphingomyelinase (Asm), an enzyme that is known to mediate leukocyte function and homeostasis. Severe burn injury can lead to an immunosuppressive state that is characterized by decreased leukocyte function and numbers as well as increased susceptibility to infection. Based upon the intersection of these facts, we hypothesized that amitriptyline-treated, scald-injured mice would have an altered immune response to injury as compared with untreated scald mice. Prior to burn, mice were pretreated with amitriptyline. Drug- or saline-treated mice were subjected full thickness dorsal scald- or sham-injury. Immune cells from spleen, thymus, and bone marrow were subsequently harvested and characterized. We first observed that amitriptyline prior to burn injury increased body mass loss and spleen contraction. Both amitriptylinetreatment and burn injury resulted in a 40% decrease of leukocyte Asm activity. Following scald injury, we demonstrate increased reduction of lymphocyte precursors in the bone marrow and thymus, as well as mature leukocytes in the spleen in mice that were treated with amitriptyline. We also demonstrate that amitriptyline treatment prior to injury reduced neutrophil accumulation following peptidoglycan stimulus in scald-injured mice. These data show that Asm alterations can play a significant role in mediating alterations to the immune system after injury. The data further suggest that those taking antidepressants may be at a higher risk for complications following burn injury. PMID:27172154

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in burn patients: incidence and risk factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, L; Garcia, L; Oliveira, B; Tanita, M; Festti, J; Cardoso, L; Lavado, L; Grion, C

    2016-09-30

    After a burn lesion, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) may occur via direct lung injury due to inhaled smoke and fumes or mediated by the inflammatory response associated with the burn or its infectious complications. The aim of the present study is to assess the epidemiologic profile of ARDS in adult burn patients admitted to intensive care in a burn unit at a university hospital. A prospective cohort study was performed from January to December 2012. Demographic and diagnostic data, prognostic scores, etiology and data on the extent and depth of burns were collected. Data related to risk factors for ARDS and death were also recorded. A total of 85 patients were included in the study. Patients were aged 41.7 (SD = 15.7) years old; 71.8% were male and the mean total body surface area burned was 28.3% (SD = 19.1%); 35.3% presented inhalation injuries. Invasive ventilatory support was required in 44 ICU inpatients (51.8%). ARDS was diagnosed in 38.6% of patients under invasive mechanical ventilation. In multivariate analysis, the presence of inhalation injuries was a risk factor for ARDS (OR = 9.75; CI 95% 2.79 - 33.95; P < 0.001). ARDS is a common complication in burn patients admitted to specialized intensive care units. Inhalation injuries were an independent risk factor for ARDS. Mortality rate observed in the study patients was high and associated with ARDS diagnosis.

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in burn patients: incidence and risk factor analysis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, L.; Garcia, L.; Oliveira, B.; Tanita, M.; Festti, J.; Cardoso, L.; Lavado, L.; Grion, C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary After a burn lesion, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) may occur via direct lung injury due to inhaled smoke and fumes or mediated by the inflammatory response associated with the burn or its infectious complications. The aim of the present study is to assess the epidemiologic profile of ARDS in adult burn patients admitted to intensive care in a burn unit at a university hospital. A prospective cohort study was performed from January to December 2012. Demographic and diagnostic data, prognostic scores, etiology and data on the extent and depth of burns were collected. Data related to risk factors for ARDS and death were also recorded. A total of 85 patients were included in the study. Patients were aged 41.7 (SD = 15.7) years old; 71.8% were male and the mean total body surface area burned was 28.3% (SD = 19.1%); 35.3% presented inhalation injuries. Invasive ventilatory support was required in 44 ICU inpatients (51.8%). ARDS was diagnosed in 38.6% of patients under invasive mechanical ventilation. In multivariate analysis, the presence of inhalation injuries was a risk factor for ARDS (OR = 9.75; CI 95% 2.79 – 33.95; P < 0.001). ARDS is a common complication in burn patients admitted to specialized intensive care units. Inhalation injuries were an independent risk factor for ARDS. Mortality rate observed in the study patients was high and associated with ARDS diagnosis. PMID:28149245

  10. Acute Lung Injury Following Smoke Inhalation: Predictive Value of Sputum Biomarkers and Time Course of Lung Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Given the delay of 12 or...Keywords: Inhalation Burns, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Interleukin-8, Interleukin- 1 beta. 4/14/2006 Markers of Smoke Inhalation Injury 2...Zimmerman 2005; Park et al., 2001), all hallmarks of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). The general

  11. Diagnosis of cutaneous thermal burn injuries by multispectral imaging analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Zawacki, B. E.

    1978-01-01

    Special photographic or television image analysis is shown to be a potentially useful technique to assist the physician in the early diagnosis of thermal burn injury. A background on the medical and physiological problems of burns is presented. The proposed methodology for burns diagnosis from both the theoretical and clinical points of view is discussed. The television/computer system constructed to accomplish this analysis is described, and the clinical results are discussed.

  12. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article. PMID:27052074

  13. Effect of Topical Platelet-Rich Plasma on Burn Healing After Partial-Thickness Burn Injury.

    PubMed

    Ozcelik, Umit; Ekici, Yahya; Bircan, Huseyin Yuce; Aydogan, Cem; Turkoglu, Suna; Ozen, Ozlem; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-06-05

    BACKGROUND To investigate the effects of platelet-rich plasma on tissue maturation and burn healing in an experimental partial-thickness burn injury model. MATERIAL AND METHODS Thirty Wistar albino rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each. Group 1 (platelet-rich plasma group) was exposed to burn injury and topical platelet-rich plasma was applied. Group 2 (control group) was exposed to burn injury only. Group 3 (blood donor group) was used as blood donors for platelet-rich plasma. The rats were killed on the seventh day after burn injury. Tissue hydroxyproline levels were measured and histopathologic changes were examined. RESULTS Hydroxyproline levels were significantly higher in the platelet-rich plasma group than in the control group (P=.03). Histopathologically, there was significantly less inflammatory cell infiltration (P=.005) and there were no statistically significant differences between groups in fibroblast development, collagen production, vessel proliferations, or epithelization. CONCLUSIONS Platelet-rich plasma seems to partially improve burn healing in this experimental burn injury model. As an initial conclusion, it appears that platelet-rich plasma can be used in humans, although further studies should be performed with this type of treatment.

  14. Epidemiology of burn injuries II: psychiatric and behavioural perspectives.

    PubMed

    McKibben, Jodi B A; Ekselius, Lisa; Girasek, Deborah C; Gould, Neda F; Holzer, Charles; Rosenberg, Marta; Dissanaike, Sharmila; Gielen, Andrea C

    2009-12-01

    Modern technological advances have decreased the incidence and severity of burn injuries, and medical care improvements of burn injuries have significantly increased survival rates, particularly in developed countries. Still, fire-related burn injuries are responsible for 300,000 deaths and 10 million disability-adjusted life years lost annually worldwide. The extent to which psychiatric and behavioural factors contribute to the incidence and outcomes of these tragedies has not been systematically documented, and the available data is often insufficient to reach definitive conclusions. Accordingly, this article reviews the evidence of psychiatric and behavioural risk factors and prevention opportunities for burn injuries worldwide. Psychiatric prevalence rates and risk factors for burn injuries, prevalence and risks associated with 'intentional' burn injuries (self-immolation, assault, and child maltreatment), and prevention activities targeting the general population and those with known psychiatric and behavioural risk factors are discussed. These issues are substantially interwoven with many co-occurring risk factors. While success in teasing apart the roles and contributions of these factors rests upon improving the methodology employed in future research, the nature of this entanglement increases the likelihood that successful interventions in one problem area will reap benefits in others.

  15. Intestine Immune Homeostasis after Alcohol and Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoling; Hammer, Adam M.; Rendon, Juan L.; Choudhry, Mashkoor A.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury remains one of the most prevalent reasons for patients to be hospitalized. Burn injury accounts for 40,000 hospitalizations in the United States annually, resulting in a large burden on both the health and economic system and costing millions of dollars every year. The complications associated with post-burn care can quickly cause life-threatening conditions including sepsis, multiple organ dysfunction and failure. In addition, alcohol intoxication at the time of burn injury has been shown to exacerbate these problems. One of the biggest reasons for the onset of these complications is the global suppression of the host immune system and increased susceptibility to infection. It has been hypothesized that infections following burn and other traumatic injury may stem from pathogenic bacteria from within the host’s gastrointestinal tract. The intestine is the major reservoir of bacteria within the host, and many studies have demonstrated perturbations of the intestinal barrier following burn injury. This article reviews the findings of these studies as they pertain to changes in the intestinal immune system following alcohol and burn injury. PMID:25692258

  16. Paediatric burn injuries requiring hospitalization in Fars, Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Marashi, S.M.; Sanaei-Zadeh, H.; Taghizadeh Behbahani, A.; Ayaz, M.; Akrami, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to determine the demographic characteristics of burnt children in need of hospitalization, causes of burns and associated complications in Fars province, Iran. This is a retrospective cross-sectional study. Files of all children under 15 years of age who were hospitalized in the only burn referral centre of Fars province were evaluated. Data regarding age, gender, location (urban, rural), burn surface area (BSA), cause of burn, length of hospital stay and complications were extracted from patients’ files. Data were analyzed using SPSS, version 22 and the Chi-square test. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. A total of 122 patients (54.9% males) were studied. Children from rural areas were hospitalized 1.4 times more often than urban children. Overall, 31.2% of admissions occurred in winter. Burning with hot liquids (scalding) was the most common cause of burns (56.6%, n = 69). Mean BSA was 12.29 ± 21.18% and mean length of hospital stay was 7.59 ± 12.78 days. Burn complications were seen in 19 cases (15.6%). One child died due to inhalational thermal injury. This study showed that burns mostly occur in boys, in the winter and in rural areas of Fars province. Furthermore, scald burns are the most common type of burn injury. Since a significant number of children suffer from permanent complications following burn injuries, special planning is needed to prevent this type of injury PMID:28289355

  17. A review of first aid treatments for burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Cuttle, Leila; Pearn, John; McMillan, James R; Kimble, Roy M

    2009-09-01

    Throughout history there have been many different and sometimes bizarre treatments prescribed for burns. Unfortunately many of these treatments still persist today, although they often do not have sufficient evidence to support their use. This paper reviews common first aid and pre-hospital treatments for burns (water--cold or warm, ice, oils, powders and natural plant therapies), possible mechanisms whereby they might work and the literature which supports their use. From the published work to date, the current recommendations for the first aid treatment of burn injuries should be to use cold running tap water (between 2 and 15 degrees C) on the burn, not ice or alternative plant therapies.

  18. Summer camps for children with burn injuries: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Gary R; Lobato, Debra

    2010-01-01

    The first summer camps for children with burn injuries started over 25 years ago, and as of 2008, there were 60 camps worldwide. This review examines the literature on summer pediatric burn camps. The authors describe common characteristics of burn camp structure, activities, and staffing and then examine the scientific evidence regarding the effect of burn camp programs on campers and camp staff volunteers. A search of Pubmed and Psychinfo databases from 1970 to 2008 for articles related to pediatric burn summer camps identified 17 articles, of which 13 fit the inclusion criteria. Existing literature consists primarily of qualitative studies, suggesting that burn camp can decrease camper isolation, improve self-esteem, and promote coping and social skills. Studies examining volunteer staff at burn camp have consistently found that there are both personal and professional benefits. Quantitative studies of self-esteem have yielded equivocal results. No studies have examined safety or the effect of burn camp on medical or rehabilitation outcomes. For the past 25 years, pediatric summer camps for children with burn injuries have played an important rehabilitation role and provided a strong community that benefits both campers and staff. Future research using more rigorous research methods and examining a broader range of outcomes (eg, safety and medical/rehabilitation outcomes) is recommended.

  19. Impaired glucose tolerance in pediatric burn patients at discharge from the acute hospital stay.

    PubMed

    Fram, Ricki Y; Cree, Melanie G; Wolfe, Robert R; Barr, David; Herndon, David N

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response, is a common occurrence after thermal injury. This stress response has been documented to persist up to 9 months postburn. The purpose of this study was to measure insulin sensitivity in severely burned children before discharge when wounds are 95% healed. Twenty-four children, aged 4 to 17 years, with burns > or = 40% TBSA underwent a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test before discharge from the acute pediatric burn unit. Plasma glucose and insulin levels as well as the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMAIR) were compared with published oral glucose tolerance test data from healthy, nonburned children. There was a significant difference between severely burned children and nonburned, healthy children with respect to the HOMAIR. Severely burned children had a HOMAIR of 3.53 +/- 1.62 compared with the value in nonburned, healthy children of 1.28 +/- 0.16 (P < .05). Insulin resistance secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response persists in severely burned children when burn wounds are at least 95% healed. The results of this study warrant future investigations into therapeutic options for the burned child during the rehabilitative phase of their care after injury.

  20. Intestine immune homeostasis after alcohol and burn injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoling; Hammer, Adam M; Rendon, Juan L; Choudhry, Mashkoor A

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic injury remains one of the most prevalent reasons for patients to be hospitalized. Burn injury accounts for 40,000 hospitalizations in the United States annually, resulting in a large burden on both the health and economic system and costing millions of dollars every year. The complications associated with postburn care can quickly cause life-threatening conditions including sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction and failure. In addition, alcohol intoxication at the time of burn injury has been shown to exacerbate these problems. One of the biggest reasons for the onset of these complications is the global suppression of the host immune system and increased susceptibility to infection. It has been hypothesized that infections after burn and other traumatic injury may stem from pathogenic bacteria from within the host's gastrointestinal tract. The intestine is the major reservoir of bacteria within the host, and many studies have demonstrated perturbations of the intestinal barrier after burn injury. This article reviews the findings of these studies as they pertain to changes in the intestinal immune system after alcohol and burn injury.

  1. Intentional burn injury: an evidence-based, clinical and forensic review.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Adam R; Donne, Jeremy; Wilson, Diana; Dunn, Kenneth W

    2004-11-01

    Burn injury can be inflicted intentionally either by one person to another whenever one has the ability to physically control the other, or it can be self-inflicted. There is scant evidential basis for much that is written about and practiced in the evaluation and care of patients that have sustained intentional burn injuries. Yet this is an area in which medical personnel must necessarily be trained in both the therapeutic and forensic aspects of a complex problem. Failure to appreciate the complexity of medical and forensic interactions may have far reaching effects. A missed diagnosis can result in inappropriate medical care, on-going abuse and future fatality. Inept management can result on the one hand, in blame levelled inappropriately placing incomparable strain on family units and innocent parties, and on the other, allow abusers to continue unchecked. This is the first review on the subject in which lawyers and doctors collaborate to produce a holistic approach to this subject. In it we describe the legal considerations that medical staff must appreciate when approaching patients who may have suffered intentional burns. We analyse the various scenarios in which intentional burning can be found and challenge the clinical dogma with much of the management of paediatric inflicted burns has become imbued. We suggest a rational and balanced approach to all intentional burn injuries-especially when children are involved. In the light of current case law in which dogmatic medical evidence has been implicated in wrongful convictions for child abuse in the UK, it is imperative that medical professionals gather evidence carefully and completely and apply it with logic and impartiality. This paper will aid clinicians who may not be experienced in dealing with burn injuries, but find themselves in the position of seeing a burn acutely, to avoid common mistakes.

  2. Evaluation of burn injuries related to liquefied petroleum gas.

    PubMed

    Tarim, Mehmet Akin

    2014-01-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is a fuel that is widely used for domestic, agricultural, and industrial purposes. LPG is also commonly used in restaurants, industries, and cars; however, the home continues to be the main site for accidents. In Turkey, the increased usage of LPG as a cooking or heating fuel has resulted in many burn injuries from LPG mishaps. Between January 2000 and June 2011, 56 LPG-burned patients were compared with 112 flame-burned patients. There were no significant differences with respect to the mean age, sex, hospitalization time, and mortality in both groups. In the LPG-caused burn cases, 41 burns (73.2%) occurred at home, seven (12.5) were work-related mishaps, and eight (14.3) were associated with car accidents. The majority of the LPG burns (82%, 46 patients) resulted from a gas leak, and 18% of them were related to the failure to close LPG tubes in the patients' kitchens (10 patients). Burns to the face and neck (82 vs 67%, P = .039) and upper (62 vs 23%, P = .000) and lower (70 vs 45%, P = .002) extremities were significantly higher in LPG-caused burn cases than flame-burned cases. General awareness regarding the risk of LPG and first aid for burns appears to be lacking. The LPG delivery system should be standardized throughout countries that widely use LPG.

  3. Burn injury caused by laptop computers.

    PubMed

    Sharma, G

    2013-11-01

    Laptop burn is a real condition and medical reports indicate that using a laptop across the legs can indeed cause it. in very rare cases, the condition can cause damage leading to skin cancer. A 24-year-old man presented with an asymptomatic reddish brown pigmentation on the thighs. After an extensive work-up, burning caused by use of a laptop was observed. Burning was induced in 3 days by using laptop for 4 h daily. Laptop should be used in properly ventilated and air-conditioned rooms. The most effective way of preventing erythema is to use the laptop on the table or desk.

  4. Epidemiology of Burn Injuries at a Newly Established Burn Care Center in Rasht

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Cyrus Emir; Salehi, Seyed Hamid; Tolouei, Mohammad; Paydary, Koosha; Samidoust, Pirouz; Mobayen, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Background Advances in the care of burn injuries have resulted from the efforts of regional patient-based specialist teams at burn care centers. Objectives We conducted this study to assess the four-year epidemiology of burn injuries in Rasht, Iran. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, medical records of 2274 burn patients, treated at Velayat hospital from January 2007 to December 2010 in Rasht, Iran, were assessed. Age, sex, level of education, occupation, severity and degree of burn, burn surface area, burn cause and outcome of patients were evaluated. Results In our study the overall mortality rate was 8.7%; 65.7% of patients were men and 34.3% were women. Mean age of patients was 31.47 ± 22.67 years. Mean Total Burn Surface Area (TBSA) was 15.24 ± 18.4. Lowest TBSA was 0.5% and highest TBSA was 100%. Significant associations were observed between age (P = 0.0001), place of residence (P = 0.004), level of education (P = 0.0001), unemployment (P = 0.0001), marital status (P = 0.021), causes of burn (P = 0.0001), TBSA (P = 0.0001) and mortality rate. In our study, no significant difference was observed between age and sex (P = 0.071). Conclusions Due to high prevalence of burn injuries in Iran, increasing the level of awareness of the society as well as adhering to safety procedures both at home and workplace is recommended via implementing effective national safety policies. PMID:24350121

  5. Techniques for Early Characterization of Burn Injuries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-28

    describing the optical characteristics of thermally injired :;kin and Its changes with burn depth. Part TI: The Doppler Ultrasound Skin Blood Flow... thermal regulation, skin nutrition, and so on. A number of methols; have been developed in an attempt to quantify this parameter: radio- activo isotone...taken only after thermal stability is attained. 11: < . .. References (1] David M. Heimbach, Martin A. Afromowitz, Mark Hoeffner, Mark Burns, and Loren H

  6. Evolving Changes in the Management of Burns and Environmental Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    protects against hepatic damage postburn. Mol Med 2011;17:516–22. 65. Tuvdendorj D, Zhang XJ, Chinkes DL, et al. Intensive insulin treatment increases donor...is ruled out. Facial burns place the patient at risk for corneal injury, so examination using a Woods lamp and fluorescein should be performed...burns should be considered when the patient can no longer protect the corneas. Moisture goggles help protect the corneas until this operation can be

  7. Sepsis and Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Beliz; Haliloğlu, Murat; Cinel, İsmail

    2014-12-01

    Acute kindney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome which is generally defined as an abrupt decline in glomerular filtration rate, causing accumulation of nitrogenous products and rapid development of fluid, electrolyte and acid base disorders. In intensive care unit sepsis and septic shock are leading causes of AKI. Sepsis-induced AKI literally acts as a biologic indicator of clinical deterioration. AKI triggers variety of immune, inflammatory, metabolic and humoral patways; ultimately leading distant organ dysfunction and increases morbidity and mortality. Serial mesurements of creatinine and urine volume do not make it possible to diagnose AKI at early stages. Serum creatinine influenced by age, weight, hydration status and become apparent only when the kidneys have lost 50% of their function. For that reason we need new markers, and many biomarkers in the diagnosis of early AKI activity is assessed. Historically "Risk-Injury-Failure-Loss-Endstage" (RIFLE), "Acute Kidney Injury Netwok" (AKIN) and "The Kidney Disease/ Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) classification systems are used for diagnosing easily in clinical practice and research and grading disease. Classifications including diagnostic criteria are formed for the identification of AKI. Neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin-C (Cys-C), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and also "cell cycle arrest" molecules has been concerned for clinical use. In this review the pathophysiology of AKI, with the relationship of sepsis and the importance of early diagnosis of AKI is evaluated.

  8. Sepsis and Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bilgili, Beliz; Haliloğlu, Murat; Cinel, İsmail

    2014-01-01

    Acute kindney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome which is generally defined as an abrupt decline in glomerular filtration rate, causing accumulation of nitrogenous products and rapid development of fluid, electrolyte and acid base disorders. In intensive care unit sepsis and septic shock are leading causes of AKI. Sepsis-induced AKI literally acts as a biologic indicator of clinical deterioration. AKI triggers variety of immune, inflammatory, metabolic and humoral patways; ultimately leading distant organ dysfunction and increases morbidity and mortality. Serial mesurements of creatinine and urine volume do not make it possible to diagnose AKI at early stages. Serum creatinine influenced by age, weight, hydration status and become apparent only when the kidneys have lost 50% of their function. For that reason we need new markers, and many biomarkers in the diagnosis of early AKI activity is assessed. Historically “Risk-Injury-Failure-Loss-Endstage” (RIFLE), “Acute Kidney Injury Netwok” (AKIN) and “The Kidney Disease/ Improving Global Outcomes” (KDIGO) classification systems are used for diagnosing easily in clinical practice and research and grading disease. Classifications including diagnostic criteria are formed for the identification of AKI. Neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin-C (Cys-C), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and also “cell cycle arrest” molecules has been concerned for clinical use. In this review the pathophysiology of AKI, with the relationship of sepsis and the importance of early diagnosis of AKI is evaluated. PMID:27366441

  9. Development of an Animal Model for Burn-Blast Combined Injury and Cardiopulmonary System Changes in the Early Shock Stage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Quan; Chai, Jiake; Hu, Sen; Fan, Jun; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ma, Li; Duan, Hong-Jie; Liu, Lingying; Yang, Hongming; Li, Bai-Ling; Wang, Yi-He

    2015-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to establish an animal model for burn-blast combined injury research and elaborate cardiopulmonary system changes in the early shock stage. In this study, royal demolition explosive or RDX (hexagon, ring trimethylene nitramine) was used as an explosive source, and the injury conditions of the canine test subjects at various distances to the explosion (30, 50, and 70 cm) were observed by gross anatomy and pathology to determine a larger animal model of moderate blast injury. The canines were then subjected to a 35 % total body surface area (TBSA) full-thickness flame injury using napalm, which completed the development of a burn-blast combined injury model. Based on this model, the hemodynamic changes and arterial blood gas analysis after the burn-blast combined injury were measured to identify the cardiopulmonary system characteristics. In this research, RDX explosion and flame injury were used to develop a severe burn-blast injury animal model that was stable, close to reality, and easily controllable. The hemodynamic and arterial blood gas changes in the canine subjects after burn-blast injury changed distinctly from the burn and blast injuries. Blood pressure and cardiac output fluctuated, and the preload was significantly reduced, whereas the afterload significantly increased. Meanwhile, the oxygen saturation (SO2) decreased markedly with carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2), and lactic acid (Lac) rose, and oxygen partial pressure (PO2) reduced. These changes suggested that immediate clinical treatment is important during burn-blast injury both to stabilize cardiac function and supply blood volume and to reduce the vascular permeability, thereby preventing acute pneumonedema or other complications.

  10. Pathophysiology of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Basile, David P.; Anderson, Melissa D.; Sutton, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the leading cause of nephrology consultation and is associated with high mortality rates. The primary causes of AKI include ischemia, hypoxia or nephrotoxicity. An underlying feature is a rapid decline in GFR usually associated with decreases in renal blood flow. Inflammation represents an important additional component of AKI leading to the extension phase of injury, which may be associated with insensitivity to vasodilator therapy. It is suggested that targeting the extension phase represents an area potential of treatment with the greatest possible impact. The underlying basis of renal injury appears to be impaired energetics of the highly metabolically active nephron segments (i.e., proximal tubules and thick ascending limb) in the renal outer medulla, which can trigger conversion from transient hypoxia to intrinsic renal failure. Injury to kidney cells can be lethal or sublethal. Sublethal injury represents an important component in AKI, as it may profoundly influence GFR and renal blood flow. The nature of the recovery response is mediated by the degree to which sublethal cells can restore normal function and promote regeneration. The successful recovery from AKI depends on the degree to which these repair processes ensue and these may be compromised in elderly or CKD patients. Recent data suggest that AKI represents a potential link to CKD in surviving patients. Finally, earlier diagnosis of AKI represents an important area in treating patients with AKI that has spawned increased awareness of the potential that biomarkers of AKI may play in the future. PMID:23798302

  11. Long thoracic nerve injury due to an electric burn.

    PubMed

    Still, J M; Law, E J; Duncan, J W; Hughes, H F

    1996-01-01

    A 19-year-old white man was burned over 7.5% of his body when he sustained an electric injury from a transformer. There was no associated fall or loss of consciousness. Debridement and grafting were required. The patient had some transient weakness of the muscles of his right arm associated with lower cervical nerve-root injury. This subsequently improved. He also was found to have paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle, with winging of the scapula due to long thoracic nerve injury. This has not improved. A surgical procedure suggested to improve function of the shoulder was rejected by the patient. This is only the second case reported of long thoracic nerve injury due to an electric burn of which we are aware.

  12. Prevention of Infections Associated with Combat-Related Burn Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    microbial flora.19–22 Gram-positive skin flora such as Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus reside deep within skin appendages and colonize...such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae , and Escherichia coli, colonize the wound within the first 48 hours to 72 hours after injury.19,20...bacterial microorganisms that colonize the burn wound surface after injury, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and K. pneumoniae are the most likely to result

  13. Burn Injury Leads to Increased Long-Term Susceptibility to Respiratory Infection in both Mouse Models and Population Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fear, Vanessa S.; Boyd, James H.; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Burn injury initiates an acute inflammatory response that subsequently drives wound repair. However, acute disruption to the immune response is also common, leading to susceptibility to sepsis and increased morbidity and mortality. Despite increased understanding of the impact of burn injury on the immune system in the acute phase, little is known about long-term consequences of burn injury on immune function. This study was established to determine whether burn injury has long-term clinical impacts on patients’ immune responses. Methods Using a population-based retrospective longitudinal study and linked hospital morbidity and death data from Western Australia, comparative rates of hospitalisation for respiratory infections in burn patients and a non-injured comparator cohort were assessed. In addition, a mouse model of non-severe burn injury was also used in which viral respiratory infection was induced at 4 weeks post-injury using a mouse modified version of the Influenza A virus (H3NN; A/mem/71-a). Results and conclusions The burn injured cohort contained 14893 adult patients from 1980–2012 after removal of those patients with evidence of smoke inhalation or injury to the respiratory tract. During the study follow-up study a total of 2,884 and 2,625 respiratory infection hospital admissions for the burn and uninjured cohorts, respectively, were identified. After adjusting for covariates, the burn cohort experienced significantly elevated admission rates for influenza and viral pneumonia (IRR, 95%CI: 1.73, 1.27–2.36), bacterial pneumonia (IRR, 95%CI: 2.05, 1.85–2.27) and for other types of upper and lower respiratory infections (IRR, 95% CI: 2.38, 2.09–2.71). In the mouse study an increased viral titre was observed after burn injury, accompanied by a reduced CD8 response and increased NK and NKT cells in the draining lymph nodes. This data suggests burn patients are at long-term increased risk of infection due to sustained modulation of the

  14. Dye pack injury causing third-degree burns.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Robert L; Smith, Howard G

    2008-01-01

    A 42-year-old African-American male patient allegedly robbed a community bank. Upon leaving the bank a dye pack device detonated causing full thickness burn to the left thigh as well as second-degree burns to areas of his left leg, right leg, penis, and scrotum. The patient underwent surgical debridement and grafting of the left thigh burn wound. He had 100% graft take, and was discharged into the care of the Federal Bureau of Investigation awaiting trial for bank robbery. Security dye packs are stacks of currency bills, which are sewn together with a hollow chamber containing tear gas, smoke devices, or a dye and can be bent or folded. No previous reports of burn injuries secondary to dye packs have been reported in the literature. Of interest, however, personal injury lawsuits on the part of the accused have been tried in the court system. The continued evolution of theft, law enforcement, and antipersonnel devices underscores the importance that burn care providers be made aware of the mechanisms of action and injury associated with these devices.

  15. Methamphetamine laboratory explosions: a new and emerging burn injury.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ariel P; Wilson, Ashley K; Hornung, Carlton A; Polk, Hiram C; Rodriguez, Jorge L; Franklin, Glen A

    2005-01-01

    The proliferation of clandestine methamphetamine laboratories (meth labs) as a result of the growing popularity of the drug has resulted in an increasing incidence of burn injuries associated with laboratory accidents. We undertook this study to characterize these injuries. Fifteen consecutive patients were identified and case-matched by age and TBSA to 45 control subjects. Most meth lab patients were men, Caucasian, unemployed, and positive for polysubstance abuse. Resuscitation requirements were 1.8 times greater in these patients. There was a higher incidence of inhalational injury corresponding to higher intubation and tracheostomy rate and longer ventilator days among meth lab patients. The rate of nosocomial pneumonia, skin graft loss, and mortality were not different between the two groups. Meth lab injury is unique and requires more critical care resources. It also is associated with lack of insurance coverage and poor follow-up after injury. This injury has a significant impact not only on patients but also on the healthcare system.

  16. When is the Burn Injury Healed?: Psychosocial Implications of Care,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    within hours of the injury. She some- ceive them versus the perceptions of the how found the strength to make child care and nurses? Are they met? Could...Celia DF, Perry SW, Kulchycky S, Goodwin C. Med 1982; 12:237-242. Stress and coping In relatives of burn patients: A 15. Goggins M, Hall N, Nack K

  17. Extensive burn injury caused by fundamental electronic cigarette design flaw

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, S.; Almarzouqi, F.; Pallua, N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Currently, electronic cigarette (EC) devices are widely used as an alternative to conventional smoking. The underlying technical principle is an electric coil-based vaporizer unit, which vaporizes various solutions for inhalation purposes with a rechargeable lithium battery unit as power source. We report a case of extensive burn injury resulting from the thermal explosion of a battery unit within an EC device. Though internal thermal instabilities of lithium ion batteries are a known safety issue, the unique feature here is a pronounced amplification of the extent of burn injury due to an additional scalding burn mechanism that resulted from heating of the liquid reservoir adjacent to the battery. Thus, we demonstrate a relevant design flaw in various EC devices, which in the authors’ opinion needs to be addressed both by manufacturers and safety regulations. PMID:28149256

  18. Cimetidine effects on the immunosuppression induced by burn injury.

    PubMed

    Kokhaei, Parviz; Barough, Mahdieh Shokrollahi; Hassan, Zuhair M

    2014-09-01

    Although many studies on the immune response following burn injuries have been reported, more attention has been given to the immunosuppression mechanism and mediators that shape the process of immune suppression. Specifically, information is not available concerning the immunomodulatory effects of the drugs which are involved in the immune response restoration. In this study, we investigated the effects of Cimetidine on the modulation of immune response in patients with burn injury of 20-60%. Two groups of patients were involved in this study; the patients in one group were treated with 15 mg/kg per day of Cimetidine while the patients in the other group were treated with placebo. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) expressing CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19 and CD3/HLA-DR was analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell proliferation assay using H3 thymidine was performed on PBMC samples. The proliferation assay showed a significant suppression of cell proliferation rate in post-burn patients (p = 0.001). We observed a significant reduction in the lymphocyte count (p = 0.001) and frequency of CD3 (p = 0.007) and CD4 (p = 0.001) T cells in post-burn patients. Also, the frequency of CD 19+ and HLA DR+ cells was increased compare to normal donors following burn injury. Treatment with Cimetidine increased the frequency of CD8+ T cells in the patient's peripheral blood. The PBMC proliferation rate was restored following the treatment with Cimetidine (p = 0.02). Our data indicates that Cimetidine may have beneficial effects on cell mediated immunity following burn injury.

  19. Diabetes mellitus and burns. Part II-outcomes from burn injuries and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Goutos, Ioannis; Nicholas, Rebecca Spenser; Pandya, Atisha A; Ghosh, Sudip J

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly prevalent comorbidity in patients presenting to burn facilities. Diabetic patients tend to be older and present in a delayed manner with deeper injuries predominantly affecting the lower limb. Morbidity from burns is higher in this cohort including a longer length of hospital stay, greater need for surgical interventions and increased rate of infective complications. Nevertheless, there seems to be little effect of diabetes on associated mortality. The second part of this review article concentrates on the epidemiological profile of diabetic burn patients and the effect of the disease on morbidity and mortality. In addition, we present a review of therapeutic adjuncts, which may hold promise for the future management of this cohort of burn patients. PMID:26064798

  20. Burn center management of operating room fire injuries.

    PubMed

    Haith, Linwood R; Santavasi, Wil; Shapiro, Tyler K; Reigart, Cynthia L; Patton, Mary Lou; Guilday, Robert E; Ackerman, Bruce H

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100 operating room (OR) fires occur per year in the United States, with 15% resulting in serious injuries. Intraoperative cautery was frequently associated with OR fires before 1994; however, use of supplemental oxygen (O(2)), ethanol-based products, and disposable drapes have been more frequently associated with OR fires. Fires resulting from cosmetic and other small procedures involving use of nasal canula O(2) and electrocautery have been described in six published reports. We report five thermal injury cases admitted to our burn treatment center because of fires during surgical procedures over a 5-year period. Two patients undergoing supraorbital excision experienced 2.5 and 3% TBSA involvement burns; in a third patient surgical excision of a nasal polyp resulted in a 1% TBSA burn; in a fourth patient an excisional biopsy of a lymph node resulted in a 2.75% TBSA burn; and the last patient was burned during placement of a pacemaker, with resulting TBSA of 10.5%. Two of the five patients required intubation for inhalational injury. Two patients required tangential excision and grafting of their thermal injuries. All patients had received local or parenteral anesthesia with supplemental O(2)/nitrous oxide (N(2)O) for surgical procedure. There are a number of ignition sources in the OR, including electrocautery, lasers, and faulty OR equipment. The risk of OR fires increases with surgical procedures involving the face and neck, including tracheostomy and tracheobronchial surgery. The common use of O(2)/N(2)O mixtures or enriched O(2) for minimally complex surgical procedures and disposable drapes adds to the risk of an OR fire: the O(2)/N(2)O provides a fuel source, and the disposable drapes trap thedelivered gas. Electrocautery near an O(2)/N(2)O source resulted in the five thermal injuries and warrants careful reconsideration of technique for surgical procedures.

  1. Early glycemic control in critically ill patients with burn injury.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Claire V; Coffey, Rebecca; Cook, Charles H; Gerlach, Anthony T; Miller, Sidney F

    2011-01-01

    Glucose management in patients with burn injury is often difficult because of their hypermetabolic state with associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Recent studies suggest that time to glycemic control is associated with improved outcomes. The authors sought to determine the influence of early glycemic control on the outcomes of critically ill patients with burn injury. A retrospective analysis was performed at the Ohio State University Medical Center. Patients hospitalized with burn injury were enrolled if they were admitted to the intensive care unit between March 1, 2006, and February 28, 2009. Early glycemic control was defined as the achievement of a mean daily blood glucose of ≤150 mg/dl for at least two consecutive days by postburn day 3. Forty-six patients made up the study cohort with 26 achieving early glycemic control and 20 who did not. The two groups were similar at baseline with regard to age, pre-existing diabetes, APACHE II score and burn size and depth. There were no differences in number of surgical interventions, infectious complications, or length of stay between patients who achieved or failed early glycemic control. Failure of early glycemic control was, however, associated with significantly higher mortality both by univariate (35.0 vs 7.7%, P = .03) and multivariate analyses (hazard ratio 6.754 [1.16-39.24], P = .03) adjusting for age, TBSA, and inhalation injury. Failure to achieve early glycemic control in patients with burn injury is associated with an increased risk of mortality. However, further prospective controlled trials are needed to establish causality of this association.

  2. Boundary element method with bioheat equation for skin burn injury.

    PubMed

    Ng, E Y K; Tan, H M; Ooi, E H

    2009-11-01

    Burns are second to vehicle crashes as the leading cause of non-intentional injury deaths in the United States. The survival of a burn patient actually depends on the seriousness of the burn. It is important to understand the physiology of burns for a successful treatment of a burn patient. This has prompted researchers to conduct investigations both numerically and experimentally to understand the thermal behaviour of the human skin when subjected to heat injury. In this study, a model of the human skin is developed where the steady state temperature during burns is simulated using the boundary element method (BEM). The BEM is used since it requires boundary only discretion and thus, reduces the requirement of high computer memory. The skin is modeled as three layered in axisymmetric coordinates. The three layers are the epidermis (uppermost), dermis (middle) and subcutaneous fat. Burning is applied via a heating disk which is assumed to be at constant temperature. The results predicted by the BEM model showed very good agreement with the results obtained using the finite element method (FEM). The good agreement despite using only linear elements as compared to quadratic elements in the FEM model shows the versatility of the BEM. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to investigate how changes in the values of certain skin variables such as the thermal conductivity and environmental conditions like the ambient convection coefficient affect the temperature distribution inside the skin. The Taguchi method was also applied to identify the combination of parameters which produces the largest increase in skin temperature during burns.

  3. Model rocket engine burn injuries: the need for stricter regulation.

    PubMed

    Lynch, M T; Bellian, K T; Edlich, R F; Himel, H N

    1994-01-01

    During the 18-year period from 1975 to 1992, the Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System database received reports of 18 burn injuries caused by model rocketry sets and their engines. Children in the age range of 11 to 15 years, who frequently use the products inappropriately, are the pediatric population most at risk. Unfortunately, current regulations do not impose age restrictions on the purchase or use of these products; consequently, the industry sets its own age limits. The current regulations appear to be inadequate and need to be altered to cover the population at risk. Specific recommendations include imposing an adequate age limit and improving the labelling of these products. Two case reports are presented that exemplify the typical burn injuries sustained from model rocket engine accidents.

  4. Retinal injury by industrial laser burn.

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Herath, G; Lobo, A

    2014-04-01

    The following case study describes an injury sustained to the fovea of the right eye of a senior en gineer engaged in the repair of a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. Our patient presented with sudden loss of vision in his right eye following accidental exposure to an intense beam of light after the laser's xenon flash-lamp fired unexpectedly. This accident occurred while the patient was aligning the optical coupler mirror parallel to Nd:YAG laser rod ends using an L-CAT alignment aid. We describe the mechanism of retinal injury, outcome and important issues regarding the safe use of lasers.

  5. Emotional distress and psychosocial resources in patients recovering from severe burn injury.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Hanna; Renneberg, Babette; Ripper, Sabine; Germann, Günter; Wind, Gerhard; Jester, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Emotional distress as well as psychosocial resources in 55 patients with burn injuries was assessed during acute and follow-up treatment. Results showed significantly greater values of emotional distress among patients when compared with norms of the general population. As well as higher levels of general psychopathology, particularly prevalent were anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic symptoms. However, patients also reported high levels of resources such as general optimism, self-efficacy, and perceived social support. Within the sample, no significant correlation between severity of emotional distress and severity of burn injury was found. By psychological assessments a subgroup of highly distressed patients was identified. These patients were highly emotionally distressed while having objective injury severity comparable with the other patients in the sample. Reactions to burn accidents vary individually. The results demonstrate the importance of routine screenings of psychological symptoms. An early identification of patients at-risk allows for tailored psychotherapeutic interventions and can thus help to improve quality of life and general well-being of burn patients on a long-term basis.

  6. Stress disorder and PTSD after burn injuries: a prospective study of predictors of PTSD at Sina Burn Center, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Maghsoudi, Hemmat; Soudmand-Niri, Mohsen; Ranjbar, Fatemeh; Mashadi-Abdollahi, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Background: A burn injury can be a traumatic experience with tremendous social, physical, and psychological consequences. The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and predictors of PTSD Checklist score initially and 3 months after injury in burns victims admitted to the Sina Burn Center in north-west Iran. Methods: This prospective study examined adult patients aged 16–65 years with unintentional burns. The PTSD Checklist was used to screen for PTSD. Results: Flame burns constituted 49.4% of all burns. Mean PTSD score was 23.8 ± 14.7 early in the hospitalization period and increased to 24.2 ± 14.3, 3 months after the burn injury. Twenty percent of victims 2 weeks into treatment had a positive PTSD screening test, and this figure increased to 31.5% after 3 months. The likelihood of developing a positive PTSD screening test increased significantly after 3 months (P < 0.01). Using multivariate regression analysis, factors independently predicting PTSD score were found to be age, gender, and percentage of total body surface area burned. Conclusion: PTSD was a problem in the population studied and should be managed appropriately after hospital admission due to burn injury. Male gender, younger age, and higher total body surface area burned may predict a higher PTSD score after burn injury. PMID:21857783

  7. Skeletal Muscle Protein Breakdown Remains Elevated in Pediatric Burn Survivors up to One-Year Post-Injury.

    PubMed

    Chao, Tony; Herndon, David N; Porter, Craig; Chondronikola, Maria; Chaidemenou, Anastasia; Abdelrahman, Doaa Reda; Bohanon, Fredrick J; Andersen, Clark; Sidossis, Labros S

    2015-11-01

    Acute alterations in skeletal muscle protein metabolism are a well-established event associated with the stress response to burns. Nevertheless, the long-lasting effects of burn injury on skeletal muscle protein turnover are incompletely understood. This study was undertaken to investigate fractional synthesis (FSR) and breakdown (FBR) rates of protein in skeletal muscle of pediatric burn patients (n  =  42, >30% total body surface area burns) for up to 1 year after injury. Skeletal muscle protein kinetics were measured in the post-prandial state following bolus injections of C6 and N phenylalanine stable isotopes. Plasma and muscle phenylalanine enrichments were quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found that the FSR in burn patients was 2- to 3-fold higher than values from healthy men previously reported in the literature (P ≤ 0.05). The FBR was 4- to 6-fold higher than healthy values (P  <  0.01). Therefore, net protein balance was lower in burn patients compared with healthy men from 2 weeks to 12 months post-injury (P  <  0.05). These findings show that skeletal muscle protein turnover stays elevated for up to 1 year after burn, an effect attributable to simultaneous increases in FBR and FSR. Muscle FBR exceeds FSR during this time, producing a persistent negative net protein balance, even in the post-prandial state, which likely contributes to the prolonged cachexia seen in burned victims.

  8. An unusual burn injury caused by a car battery.

    PubMed

    Nisanci, Mustafa; Sengezer, Mustafa; Durmuş, Muzaffer

    2005-01-01

    In a car battery accident, a 21-year old man sustained a band of deep burn involving the dorsoradial aspect of the wrist. He was treated by excision and grafting on the third day after injury. A metal watchstrap that the patient was wearing, with evidence of the arching phenomenon on it, short-circuited the battery of the vehicle. Although the underlying etiology that triggered the events leading to thermal injury was an electrical accident, the current did not pass through any part of the patient's body, as what happens in an electrical injury. In our current understanding, the pathophysiology of electrical injury dictates the transmission of current through living tissues, leading to a specific type of tissue damage that should be distinguishable from the type that results from a usual thermal injury, as it happened in our case.

  9. Military and Civilian Burn Injuries During Armed Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Atiyeh, B.S.; Gunn, S.W.A.; Hayek, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment, and war burns have been described for more than 5,000 years of written history. Fire was probably utilized as a weapon long before that. With the ever-increasing destructive power and efficiency of modern weapons, casualties, both fatal and non-fatal, are reaching new highs, particularly among civilians who are becoming the major wartime targets in recent wars, accounting for most of the killed and wounded. Even though medical personnel usually believe that a knowledge of weaponry has little relevance to their ability to effectively treat injuries and that it may in some way be in conflict with their status, accorded under the Geneva and Hague treaties, it is imperative that they know how weapons are used and understand their effects on the human body. The present review explores various categories of weapons of modern warfare that are unfamiliar to most medical and paramedical personnel responsible for burn treatment. The mechanisms and patterns of injury produced by each class of weapons are examined so that a better understanding of burn management in a warfare situation may be achieved. PMID:21991098

  10. Military and civilian burn injuries during armed conflicts.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, B S; Gunn, S W A; Hayek, S N

    2007-12-31

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment, and war burns have been described for more than 5,000 years of written history. Fire was probably utilized as a weapon long before that. With the ever-increasing destructive power and efficiency of modern weapons, casualties, both fatal and non-fatal, are reaching new highs, particularly among civilians who are becoming the major wartime targets in recent wars, accounting for most of the killed and wounded. Even though medical personnel usually believe that a knowledge of weaponry has little relevance to their ability to effectively treat injuries and that it may in some way be in conflict with their status, accorded under the Geneva and Hague treaties, it is imperative that they know how weapons are used and understand their effects on the human body. The present review explores various categories of weapons of modern warfare that are unfamiliar to most medical and paramedical personnel responsible for burn treatment. The mechanisms and patterns of injury produced by each class of weapons are examined so that a better understanding of burn management in a warfare situation may be achieved.

  11. Financial burden of burn injuries in iran: a report from the burn registry program.

    PubMed

    Karimi, H; Motevalian, S A; Momeni, M; Ghadarjani, M

    2015-12-31

    Understanding the cost of burn treatment is very important for patients, their families, governmental authorities and insurance companies. It alleviates patient and familial stress, provides a framework for better use of resources, and facilitates better performance between burn centers. Hospital burn costs can provide a basis for authorities to budget for acute burn treatment, for further management of chronic complications, and for planning prevention and public educational programs in Iran. To identify costs we used data from our burn registry program. Over the two-year assessment period, we treated roughly 28,700 burn patients, 1,721 of whom were admitted, with a mortality rate of 5.9%. The male to female ratio was 1.7:1 (63% male; 37% female). Flame burns were most frequent (49.8%) followed by scalds (35.7%). Mean hospital stay was 14.41 days (range 0-64 days). Mean TBSA was 17.39%. Skin grafts were carried out in 65.4% of the patients, with a mean of 5.2 surgeries per patient. The total cost of all patient admissions over the two years was US$ 4,835,000. The maximum treatment cost for one patient was US$ 91,000. The mean cost per patient was US$ 2,810 (29,500,000 Rials). The mean cost for each percent of burn was US$ 162. The mean cost for a one-day stay in hospital was US$ 195. The mean cost of each operation was US$ 540. Patients who contracted infections endured longer hospital stays, meaning increased costs of US$ 195 per day. With comparable outcome and results, the cost of burn treatment in Iran is cheaper than in the US and Europe.

  12. Financial burden of burn injuries in iran: a report from the burn registry program

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, H.; Motevalian, S.A.; Momeni, M.; Ghadarjani, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding the cost of burn treatment is very important for patients, their families, governmental authorities and insurance companies. It alleviates patient and familial stress, provides a framework for better use of resources, and facilitates better performance between burn centers. Hospital burn costs can provide a basis for authorities to budget for acute burn treatment, for further management of chronic complications, and for planning prevention and public educational programs in Iran. To identify costs we used data from our burn registry program. Over the two-year assessment period, we treated roughly 28,700 burn patients, 1,721 of whom were admitted, with a mortality rate of 5.9%. The male to female ratio was 1.7:1 (63% male; 37% female). Flame burns were most frequent (49.8%) followed by scalds (35.7%). Mean hospital stay was 14.41 days (range 0-64 days). Mean TBSA was 17.39%. Skin grafts were carried out in 65.4% of the patients, with a mean of 5.2 surgeries per patient. The total cost of all patient admissions over the two years was US$ 4,835,000. The maximum treatment cost for one patient was US$ 91,000. The mean cost per patient was US$ 2,810 (29,500,000 Rials). The mean cost for each percent of burn was US$ 162. The mean cost for a one-day stay in hospital was US$ 195. The mean cost of each operation was US$ 540. Patients who contracted infections endured longer hospital stays, meaning increased costs of US$ 195 per day. With comparable outcome and results, the cost of burn treatment in Iran is cheaper than in the US and Europe PMID:27777552

  13. Electrical Burn Injuries. An Eight-year Review

    PubMed Central

    Buja, Z.; Arifi, H.; Hoxha, E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Electrical injuries are very aggressive pathological lesions with heavy functional and aesthetic consequences. The primary cause of their gravity is the progressive tissue necrosis that occurs with the continuous extension of wound necrosis, even leading to loss of the entire injured extremity. The goal of this study is to analyse the role of the inefficiency of the electric energy system in the incidence of electrical injuries in Kosovo during the period December 2000 to 2007 suffered by a total number of 182 patients treated in the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Pristina, Kosovo. Electrical injuries accounted overall for 17.25% of all patients admitted with burns; 35.72% of the burns were due to high voltage and 64.28% to low voltage; among the patients with contact burns the amputation rate was 28.58%, and four patients (7.14%) died. These results suggest that the aggravation of the electric energy system led to an increase in the number of patients with electrical injuries. PMID:21991188

  14. Activated nuclear factor kappa B and airway inflammation after smoke inhalation and burn injury in sheep.

    PubMed

    Cox, Robert A; Burke, Ann S; Jacob, Sam; Oliveras, Gloria; Murakami, Kazunori; Shimoda, Katsumi; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Traber, Lillian D; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel L; Hawkins, Hal K

    2009-01-01

    In a recent study, we have shown a rapid inflammatory cell influx across the glandular epithelium and strong proinflammatory cytokine expression at 4 hours after inhalation injury. Studies have demonstrated a significant role of nuclear factor kappa B in proinflammatory cytokine gene transcription. This study examines the acute airway inflammatory response and immunohistochemical detection of p65, a marker of nuclear factor kappa B activation, in sheep after smoke inhalation and burn injury. Pulmonary tissue from uninjured sheep and sheep at 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours after inhalation and burn injury was included in the study. Following immunostaining for p65 and myeloperoxidase, the cell types and the percentage of bronchial submucosal gland cells staining for p65 and the extent of myeloperoxidase stained neutrophils in the bronchial submucosa were determined. Results indicate absence of detection of P65 before 12 hours after injury. At 12 hours after injury, strong perinuclear staining for p65 was evident in bronchial gland epithelial cells, macrophages, and endothelial cells. Bronchial submucosal gland cells showed a significant increase in the percentage of cells stained for p65 compared with uninjured animals and earlier times after injury, P < .05. At 24 and 48 hours after injury, p65 expression was evident in the bronchiolar epithelium, Type II pneumocytes, macrophages, and endothelial cells. Quantitation of the neutrophil influx into the bronchial submucosa showed a significant increase compared with uninjured tissue at 24 and 48 hours after injury, P < .05. In conclusion, immunohistochemical detection of activated p65 preceded the overall inflammatory response measured in the lamina propria. However, detection of p65 did not correlate with a recent study showing rapid emigration of neutrophils at 4 hours postinjury. Together, these results suggest that p65 immunostaining may identify cells that are activated to produce proinflammatory cytokines after

  15. The rapidly increasing trend of cannabis use in burn injury.

    PubMed

    Jehle, Charles Christopher; Nazir, Niaman; Bhavsar, Dhaval

    2015-01-01

    The use of cannabis is currently increasing according to U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Surprisingly, cannabis use among burn patients is poorly reported in literature. In this study, rates of cannabis use in burn patients are compared with general population. Data from the National Burn Repository (NBR) were used to investigate incidence, demographics, and outcomes in relation to use of cannabis as evidenced by urine drug screen (UDS). Thousands of patients from the NBR from 2002 to 2011 were included in this retrospective study. Inclusion criteria were patients older than 12 years of age who received a drug screen. Data points analyzed were patients' age, sex, UDS status, mechanism of burn injury, total body surface area, length of stay, ICU days, and insurance characteristics. Incidence of cannabis use in burn patients from the NBR was compared against national general population rates (gathered by Health and Human Services) using chi-square tests. Additionally, the burn patient population was analyzed using bivariate analysis and t-tests to find differences in the characteristics of these patients as well as differences in outcomes. Seventeen thousand eighty out of over 112,000 patients from NBR had information available for UDS. The incidence of cannabis use is increasing among the general population, but the rate is increasing more quickly among patients in the burn patient population (P = .0022). In 2002, 6.0% of patients in burn units had cannabis+ UDS, which was comparable with national incidence of 6.2%. By 2011, 27.0% of burn patients tested cannabis+ while national incidence of cannabis use was 7.0%. Patients who test cannabis+ are generally men (80.1%, P < .0001) and are younger on average (35 years old vs 42, P < .0001). The most common mechanisms of injury among patients who test cannabis+ or cannabis- are similar. Flame injury makes up >60% of injuries, followed by scalds that are >15%. In comparing cannabis+/- patients

  16. Rock Climbing Injuries: Acute and Chronic Repetitive Trauma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Connie Y; Torriani, Martin; Huang, Ambrose J

    2016-01-01

    Rock climbing has increased in popularity as a sport, and specific injuries related to its practice are becoming more common. Chronic repetitive injuries are more common than acute injuries, although acute injuries tend to be more severe. We review both acute and chronic upper and lower extremity injuries. Understanding the injury pattern in rock climbers is important for accurate diagnosis.

  17. Pellagra. A challenging differential diagnosis in burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Villaverde Doménech, M E; Simón Sanz, E; Pujol Marco, C; Pérez del Caz, M D; Blanco Cerdá, O; Safont Albert, J

    2014-02-01

    With this case report we want to emphasize the importance of performing a thorough physical examination of the burn and detailed review of the patient's history. This is a challenging case because it deals with an uncommon disease nowadays, pellagra, which presents lesions with an appearance very similar to burns; on the other hand the management of pellagra is different to the management of the common burns we are used to handling day-to-day. With this case report we will be able to revise the broad list of different injuries that can bring up an issue related to a correct diagnosis, caused by a large diversity of different etiologies with cutaneous expression. We will look over the diagnostic process of pellagra, management, treatment and results in this patient.

  18. ICG angiography predicts burn scarring within 48 h of injury in a porcine vertical progression burn model.

    PubMed

    Fourman, Mitchell S; McKenna, Peter; Phillips, Brett T; Crawford, Laurie; Romanelli, Filippo; Lin, Fubao; McClain, Steve A; Khan, Sami U; Dagum, Alexander B; Singer, Adam J; Clark, Richard A F

    2015-08-01

    The current standard of care in determining the need to excise and graft a burn remains with the burn surgeon, whose clinical judgment is often variable. Prior work suggests that minimally invasive perfusion technologies are useful in burn prognostication. Here we test the predictive capabilities of Laser Doppler Imaging (LDI) and indocyanine green dye (ICG) angiography in the prediction of burn scarring 28 days after injury using a previously validated porcine burn model that shows vertical progression injury. Twelve female Yorkshire swine were burned using a 2.5 × 2.5 cm metal bar at variable temperature and application times to create distinct burn depths. Six animals (48 injuries total) each were analyzed with LDI or ICG angiography at 1, 24, 48, and 72 h following injury. A linear regression was then performed correlating perfusion measurements against wound contraction at 28 days after injury. ICG angiography showed a peak linear correlate (r(2)) of .63 (95% CI .34 to .92) at 48 h after burn. This was significantly different from the LDI linear regression (p < .05), which was measured at r(2) of .20 (95% CI .02 to .39). ICG angiography linear regression was superior to LDI at all timepoints. Findings suggest that ICG angiography may have significant potential in the prediction of long-term burn outcomes.

  19. Quantity and quality of nocturnal sleep affect morning glucose measurement in acutely burned children.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Theresa; Gottschlich, Michele M; Khoury, Jane; Simakajornboon, Narong; Kagan, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia after severe burn injury has long been recognized, whereas sleep deprivation after burns is a more recent finding. The postburn metabolic effects of poor sleep are not clear despite reports in other populations demonstrating the association between sleep insufficiency and deleterious endocrine consequences. The aim of this study was to determine whether a relationship between sleep and glucose dynamics exists in acutely burned children. Two overnight polysomnography runs (2200 to 0600) per subject were conducted in 40 patients with a mean (± SEM) age of 9.4 ± 0.7 years, 50.1 ± 2.9% TBSA burn, and 43.2 ± 3.6% full-thickness injury. Serum glucose was drawn in the morning (0600) immediately after the sleep test. Insulin requirements during the 24-hour period preceding the 0600 glucose measurement were recorded. Generalized linear models were used by the authors to evaluate percent time in each stage of sleep, percent wake time, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and morning serum glucose, accounting for insulin use. Increased time awake (P = .04, linear; P = .02, quadratic) and reduced time spent in stage 1 sleep (P = .03, linear) were associated with higher glucose levels. Sleep efficiency (P = .01, linear; P = .02, quadratic) and total sleep time (P = .01 linear; P = .02, quadratic) were inversely associated with glucose level. Morning glucose levels appear to be affected by the quality and quantity of overnight sleep in children who have sustained extensive burn injuries. Future research is needed to elucidate the metabolic and neuroendocrine consequences of sleep deprivation on metabolism after burns.

  20. [Unusual and fatal type of burn injury: hot air sauna burn].

    PubMed

    García-Tutor, E; Koljonen, V

    2007-01-01

    Sauna bathing is a popular recreational activity in Finland and is generally considered safe even for pregnant women and patients suffering from heart problems; but mixing alcohol with sauna bathing can be hazardous. In the normal Finnish recreational sauna the temperature is usually between 80 and 90 degrees C. A wide variety of burn injuries, in all age groups, are related to sauna bathing; scalds and contact burns account for over 85% while hot air, steam and flame burns for only 15%. Dehydration in patients under the influence of alcohol heightens the risk of hypotension which impairs skin blood circulation. This increased warming of the skin is an effect that is more marked on the outer and upper parts of the body exposed to hot air. Such patients require intensive care on admission: fluid replacement according to the Parkland formula, forced diuresis and immediate correction of acidosis and myoglobinuria. These patients have significant rhabdomyolysis on admission. The best predictor of survival is the creatine kinase level on the second post-injury day. CT scans are necessary to diagnose the underlying conditions of unconsciousness. The necrotic area extends to subcutaneous fat tissue and even to the underlying muscles. The level of excision is typically fascial and, in some areas, layers of the muscle must be removed. Owing to the popularity of sauna bathing throughout the world, it is important to know the extent of damage in this type of injury, in order not to underestimate the severity of such lesions.

  1. Alterations in airway microbiota in patients with PaO2/FiO2 ratio ≤ 300 after burn and inhalation injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Injury to the airways after smoke inhalation is a major mortality risk factor in victims of burn injuries, resulting in a 15-45% increase in patient deaths. Damage to the airways by smoke may induce acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is partly character...

  2. Thermal burn and electrical injuries among electric utility workers, 1995-2004.

    PubMed

    Fordyce, Tiffani A; Kelsh, Michael; Lu, Elizabeth T; Sahl, Jack D; Yager, Janice W

    2007-03-01

    This study describes the occurrence of work-related injuries from thermal-, electrical- and chemical-burns among electric utility workers. We describe injury trends by occupation, body part injured, age, sex, and circumstances surrounding the injury. This analysis includes all thermal, electric, and chemical injuries included in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD). There were a total of 872 thermal burn and electric shock injuries representing 3.7% of all injuries, but accounting for nearly 13% of all medical claim costs, second only to the medical costs associated with sprain- and strain-related injuries (38% of all injuries). The majority of burns involved less than 1 day off of work. The head, hands, and other upper extremities were the body parts most frequently injured by burns or electric shocks. For this industry, electric-related burns accounted for the largest percentage of burn injuries, 399 injuries (45.8%), followed by thermal/heat burns, 345 injuries (39.6%), and chemical burns, 51 injuries (5.8%). These injuries also represented a disproportionate number of fatalities; of the 24 deaths recorded in the database, contact with electric current or with temperature extremes was the source of seven of the fatalities. High-risk occupations included welders, line workers, electricians, meter readers, mechanics, maintenance workers, and plant and equipment operators.

  3. Firework injuries presenting to a national burn's unit.

    PubMed

    Jones, D; Lee, W; Rea, S; Donnell, M O; Eadie, P A

    2004-09-01

    The sale to the general public of fireworks is illegal in Ireland. However, many fireworks are readily available on the black market from illegal traders. The number of firework injuries presenting to our unit during the three week run-up to Hallowe'en October 2001 was recorded. In addition, each patient was contacted to determine how the fireworks were obtained, the average amount of money spent, and the level of adult supervision present at the time of injury. A total of 19 patients presented, 18 from the local catchment area, with a mean age of 16 yrs (range 5-46 yrs). Thirteen patients required admission. Sixteen patients sustained hand injuries including burns, and three sustained burns to other body areas. The amount of money spent varied between adults and children, the average amount among the paediatric group was Euro 2-4, but Euro 45 in the adult group. None were willing to identify the local source of their fireworks, but most fireworks originated in Northern Ireland. This small review highlights an ongoing problem in Ireland; fireworks are illegal, yet they are easily and cheaply available without quality or safety controls. Our public awareness campaign has failed to reach its target audience, and the illegal traders who sell these often inferior products are seldom charged. Children and adults will continue to sustain serious injuries as a result.

  4. Plasma proteome response to severe burn injury revealed by 18O-labeled "universal" reference-based quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Petritis, Brianne O; Kaushal, Amit; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Monroe, Matthew E; Moore, Ronald J; Schepmoes, Athena A; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L; Davis, Ronald W; Tompkins, Ronald G; Herndon, David N; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2010-09-03

    A burn injury represents one of the most severe forms of human trauma and is responsible for significant mortality worldwide. Here, we present the first quantitative proteomics investigation of the blood plasma proteome response to severe burn injury by comparing the plasma protein concentrations of 10 healthy control subjects with those of 15 severe burn patients at two time-points following the injury. The overall analytical strategy for this work integrated immunoaffinity depletion of the 12 most abundant plasma proteins with cysteinyl-peptide enrichment-based fractionation prior to LC-MS analyses of individual patient samples. Incorporation of an 18O-labeled "universal" reference among the sample sets enabled precise relative quantification across samples. In total, 313 plasma proteins confidently identified with two or more unique peptides were quantified. Following statistical analysis, 110 proteins exhibited significant abundance changes in response to the burn injury. The observed changes in protein concentrations suggest significant inflammatory and hypermetabolic response to the injury, which is supported by the fact that many of the identified proteins are associated with acute phase response signaling, the complement system, and coagulation system pathways. The regulation of approximately 35 proteins observed in this study is in agreement with previous results reported for inflammatory or burn response, but approximately 50 potentially novel proteins previously not known to be associated with burn response or inflammation are also found. Elucidating proteins involved in the response to severe burn injury may reveal novel targets for therapeutic interventions as well as potential predictive biomarkers for patient outcomes such as multiple organ failure.

  5. Beneficial Effects of Concomitant Neuronal and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition in Ovine Burn and Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Matthias; Hamahata, Atsumori; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Cox, Robert A.; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Westphal, Martin; Traber, Lillian D.; Herndon, David N.; Traber, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Different isoforms of nitric oxide synthase are critically involved in the development of pulmonary failure secondary to acute lung injury. Here we tested the hypothesis that simultaneous blockade of inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase effectively prevents the pulmonary lesions in an ovine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) induced by combined burn and smoke inhalation injury. Chronically instrumented sheep were allocated to a sham-injured group (n = 6), an injured and untreated group (n = 6), or an injured group treated with simultaneous infusion of selective inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (n = 5). The injury was induced by 48 breath of cotton smoke and a 3rd degree burn of 40% total body surface area. All sheep were mechanically ventilated and fluid resuscitated. The injury induced severe pulmonary dysfunction as indicated by decreases in PaO2/FiO2 ratio and increases in pulmonary shunt fraction, ventilatory pressures, lung lymph flow, and lung wet/dry weight ratio. The treatment fully prevented the elevations in lymph and plasma nitrate/nitrite levels, pulmonary shunting, ventilatory pressures, lung lymph flow, and wet/dry weight ratio and significantly attenuated the decline in PaO2/FiO2 ratio. In conclusion, simultaneous blockade of inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase exerts beneficial pulmonary effects in an ovine model of ARDS secondary to combined burn and smoke inhalation injury. This novel treatment strategy may represent a useful therapeutic adjunct for patients with these injuries. PMID:21263377

  6. Pulmonary expression of nitric oxide synthase isoforms in sheep with smoke inhalation and burn injury.

    PubMed

    Cox, Robert A; Jacob, Sam; Oliveras, Gloria; Murakami, Kazunori; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Traber, Lillian; Schmalstieg, Frank C; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel L; Hawkins, Hal K

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated increased plasma levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase in lung. This study further examines the pulmonary expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms in an ovine model of acute lung injury induced by smoke inhalation and burn injury (S+B injury). Female range bred sheep (4 per group) were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours after injury and immunohistochemistry was performed in tissues for various NOS isoforms. The study indicates that in uninjured sheep lung, endothelial (eNOS) is constitutively expressed in the endothelial cells associated with the airways and parenchyma, and in macrophages. Similarly, neuronal (nNOS) is constitutively present in the mucous cells of the epithelium and in neurons of airway ganglia. In uninjured lung, inducible (iNOS) was present in bronchial secretory cells and macrophages. In tissue after S+B injury, new expression of iNOS was evident in bronchial ciliated cells, basal cells, and mucus gland cells. In the parenchyma, a slight increase in iNOS immunostaining was seen in type I cells at 12 and 24 hours after injury only. Virtually no change in eNOS or nNOS was seen after injury.

  7. Pathophysiology of ischaemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Kanagasundaram, Nigel Suren

    2015-03-01

    Acute kidney injury is common, dangerous and costly, affecting around one in five patients emergency admissions to hospital. Although survival decreases as disease worsens, it is now apparent that even modest degrees of dysfunction are not only associated with higher mortality but are an independent risk factor for death. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury secondary to ischaemia - its commonest aetiology. The haemodynamic disturbances, endothelial injury, epithelial cell injury and immunological mechanisms underpinning its initiation and extension will be discussed along with the considerable and complex interplay between these factors that lead to an intense, pro-inflammatory state. Mechanisms of tubular recovery will be discussed but also the pathophysiology of abnormal repair with its direct consequences for long-term renal function. Finally, the concept of 'organ cross-talk' will be introduced as a potential explanation for the higher mortality observed with acute kidney injury that might be deemed modest in conventional biochemical terms.

  8. Genitalia burn: accident or violence? Concerns that transcend injury treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Ana Lúcia; Ferreira, Juliana Montez; da Silva, Paula Marques C.; Constancio, Dilene Francisco

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of genital burn which raised the suspicion of maltreatment (sexual abuse and neglect by lack of supervision). CASE DESCRIPTION: An infant was taken to the Emergency Room of a pediatric hospital with an extensive burn in the vulva and perineum. The mother claimed the burn had been caused by a sodium-hydroxide-based product. However, the injury severity led to the suspicion of sexual abuse, which was then ruled out by a multidisciplinary team, based on the consistent report by the mother. Besides, the lesion type matched those caused by the chemical agent involved in the accident and the family context was evaluated and considered adequate. The patient had a favorable outcome and was discharged after four days of hospitalization. Outpatient follow-up during six months after the accident enabled the team to rule out neglect by lack of supervision. COMMENTS: Accidents and violence are frequent causes of physical injuries in children, and the differential diagnosis between them can be a challenge for healthcare workers, especially in rare clinical conditions involving patients who cannot speak for themselves. The involvement of a multidisciplinary trained team helps to have an adequate approach, ensuring child protection and developing a bond with the family; the latter is essential for a continued patient follow-up. PMID:25119763

  9. A major burn injury in a liver transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Delikonstantinou, I.; Philp, B.; Kamel, D.; Barnes, D.; Dziewulski, P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Immunosuppressive therapy may aggravate the clinical course of a burned patient, primarily affecting wound healing and thus complicating permanent wound coverage. We hereby present the successful management of a 48-year-old female liver transplant recipient with a major burn injury, aiming to elucidate the effects of the patient’s immunosuppression on surgical treatment. After admission to the Burns ITU, the patient underwent serial debridement of the burn and coverage with cryopreserved allografts. Despite immunosuppression, no prolonged survival of the allo-epidermis was documented. Nevertheless, a variable degree of vascularized allo-dermis was clinically identified. She subsequently underwent skin autografting and was discharged home with most of the wounds healed. Although there are isolated reports of survival of skin allografts in immunocompromised patients, in our case the allografted skin did not provide permanent wound coverage. However, it permitted a staged surgical management, allowing the immunosuppressive regime to change, the skin donor sites to heal and it also provided a dermal scaffold for successful skin autografting. PMID:28149251

  10. Burn injury characteristics: findings from Pakistan National Emergency Department Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Burn injury is an important yet under-researched area in Pakistan. The objective of this study was to determine the characteristics and associated outcomes of burn injury patients presenting to major emergency departments in Pakistan. Methods Pakistan National Emergency Department Surveillance (Pak-NEDS) was a pilot active surveillance conducted between November 2010 and March 2011. Information related to patient demographics, mode of arrival, cause of burn injury, and outcomes was analyzed for this paper. Data were entered using Epi Info and analyzed using SPSS v.20. Ethical approval was obtained from all participating sites. Results There were 403 burn injury patients in Pak-NEDS, with a male to female ratio 2:1. About 48.9% of the burn injury patients (n = 199) were between 10 - 29 years of age. There was no statistically significant difference between unintentional and intentional burn injury patients except for body part injured (p-value 0.004) and ED disposition (p-value 0.025). Among 21 patients who died, most were between 40 - 49 years of age (61.9%) and suffered from fire burns (81%). Conclusion Burn injuries are a burden on emergency rooms in Pakistan. We were able to demonstrate the significant burden of burn injuries that is not addressed by specialized burn centers. PMID:26692165

  11. Retrospective analysis of patients with burn injury treated in a burn center in Turkey during the Syrian civil war

    PubMed Central

    Yuce, Yucel; Acar, Hakan A.; Erkal, Kutlu H.; Arditi, Nur B.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To report the management of burn injuries that occured in the Syria civil war, which were referred to our burn center. Methods: Forty-three patients with burns, injured in the civil war in Syria and whom were referred to Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Kartal Educating and Training Hospital Burn Centre of İstanbul, Turkey between 2011-2015 were analyzed in a retrospective study. Results: Most of our patients were in major burn classification (93%; 40/43) and most of them had burns >15% total on body surface area. Most of them were admitted to our center late after first management at centers with improper conditions and in cultures of these patients unusual and resistant strains specific to the battlefield were produced. Conclusion: Immediate transfer of the patients from the scene of incidence to burn centers ensures early treatment, this factor may be effective on the outcome of these patients. PMID:28042637

  12. Is there a threshold age and burn size associated with poor outcomes in the elderly after burn injury?

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G; Pinto, Ruxandra; Costford, Sheila R.; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Elderly burn care represents a vast challenge. The elderly are one of the most susceptible populations to burn injuries, but also one of the fastest growing demographics, indicating a substantial increase in patient numbers in the near future. Despite the need and importance of elderly burn care, survival of elderly burn patients is poor. Additionally, little is known about the responses of elderly patients after burn. One central question that has not been answered is what age defines an elderly patient. The current study was conducted to determine whether there is a cut-off age for elderly burn patients that is correlated with an increased risk for mortality and to determine the burn size in modern burn care that is associated with increased mortality. To answer these questions, we applied appropriate statistical analyses to the Ross Tilley Burn Centre and the Inflammatory and Host Response to Injury databases. We could not find a clear cut-off age that differentiates or predicts between survival and death. Risk of death increased linearly with increasing age. Additionally, we found that the LD50 decreases from 45% total body surface area (TBSA) to 25% TBSA from the age of 55 years to the age of 70 years, indicating that even small burns lead to poor outcome in the elderly. We therefore concluded that age is not an ideal to predictor of burn outcome, but we strongly suggest that burn care providers be aware that if an elderly patient sustains even a 25% TBSA burn, the risk of mortality is 50% despite the implementation of modern protocolized burn care. PMID:26803373

  13. Effect of Calendula officinalis Flower Extract on Acute Phase Proteins, Antioxidant Defense Mechanism and Granuloma Formation During Thermal Burns

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Preethi K.; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2008-01-01

    Effect of Calendula officinalis flower extract was investigated against experimentally induced thermal burns in rats. Burn injury was made on the shaven back of the rats under anesthesia and the animals were treated orally with different doses of the flower extract (20 mg, 100 mg and 200 mg/kg body weight). The animals treated with the extract showed significant improvement in healing when compared with the control untreated animals. The indicators of the wound healing such as collagen-hydroxyproline and hexosamine contents were significantly increased in the treated group indicating accelerated wound healing in the treated animals. The acute phase proteins—haptoglobin and orosomucoid which were increased due to burn injury were found to be decreased significantly in 200 mg/kg body weight extract treated animals. The antioxidant defense mechanism, which was decreased in the liver during burn injury, was found to be enhanced in treated animals. The lipid peroxidation was significantly lowered in the treated group when compared to control animals. Tissue damage marker enzymes- alkaline phosphatase, alanine and aspartate transaminases were significantly lowered in the treated groups in a dose dependant manner. The histopathological analyses of skin tissue also give the evidence of the increased healing potential of the extract after burn injury. PMID:18818737

  14. Central heating devices cause childhood injuries but rarely burns: a study in Greece.

    PubMed

    Petridou, Eleni; Alexe, Delia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios

    2002-06-01

    Injuries related to central heating devices represent a non-negligible fraction of all indoor injuries among children with mechanical lesions, outnumbering burns. Prevention strategies refer mainly to modifications or safer use of the appliances and improvements in building design.

  15. Hot asphalt burns: a review of injuries and management options.

    PubMed

    Bosse, George M; Wadia, Shernaz A; Padmanabhan, Pradeep

    2014-07-01

    Hot asphalt burns to human tissue can increase the likelihood of infection and potential conversion of partial thickness to full-thickness injuries. Successful intervention for hot asphalt burns requires immediate and effective cooling of the asphalt on the tissue followed by subsequent gradual removal of the cooled asphalt. A review of the literature reveals that multiple substances have been used to remove asphalt, including topical antibiotics, petroleum jelly, a commercial product known as De-Solv-It (ORANGE-SOL, Chandler, AZ), sunflower oil, baby oil, liquid paraffin, butter, mayonnaise, and moist-exposed burn ointment (MEBO). Although many of these products may be effective in the removal of asphalt, they may not be readily available in an emergency department setting. Topical antibiotics are readily available, are more commonly described in the medical literature, and would be expected to be effective in the removal of asphalt. We developed guidelines for on scene (first-aid) management and the initial care of such patients upon presentation to a health care facility. These guidelines emphasize the principles of early cooling, gradual removal of adherent asphalt using topical antibiotics, and avoidance of the use of topical agents, which are likely to result in tissue toxicity.

  16. Burn injuries related to liquefied petroleum gas-powered cars.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Mehmet; Kulahci, Yalcin; Zor, Fatih; Kapi, Emin

    2008-01-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), which is used as a type of fuel, is stored as a liquid under high pressure in tanks. Immediate and sudden explosion of these tanks can release a large amount of gas and energy into the environment and can result in serious burns. In this study, the cases of 18 patients injured due to LPG burns in five incidents were examined, along with their epidemiologic features. The authors also investigated the causes of the LPG tank explosions. Inhalation injury was present in 11 cases with varying degrees of severity, and 7 patients subsequently required mechanical ventilation. The explosions resulted from weakening of the tank wall (n = 2), crash impact (n = 2), and gas leakage from the tank (n = 1). LPG-powered cars are becoming more popular because of their lower operational costs. However, LPG tanks can be hazardous in the event of a tank explosion. Burns caused by explosions of the LPG tanks in cars have significant mortality and morbidity. This danger must be taken into account and public awareness must be increased.

  17. A Smartphone App and Cloud-Based Consultation System for Burn Injury Emergency Care

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Lee A.; Fleming, Julian; Hasselberg, Marie; Laflamme, Lucie; Lundin, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Background Each year more than 10 million people worldwide are burned severely enough to require medical attention, with clinical outcomes noticeably worse in resource poor settings. Expert clinical advice on acute injuries can play a determinant role and there is a need for novel approaches that allow for timely access to advice. We developed an interactive mobile phone application that enables transfer of both patient data and pictures of a wound from the point-of-care to a remote burns expert who, in turn, provides advice back. Methods and Results The application is an integrated clinical decision support system that includes a mobile phone application and server software running in a cloud environment. The client application is installed on a smartphone and structured patient data and photographs can be captured in a protocol driven manner. The user can indicate the specific injured body surface(s) through a touchscreen interface and an integrated calculator estimates the total body surface area that the burn injury affects. Predefined standardised care advice including total fluid requirement is provided immediately by the software and the case data are relayed to a cloud server. A text message is automatically sent to a burn expert on call who then can access the cloud server with the smartphone app or a web browser, review the case and pictures, and respond with both structured and personalized advice to the health care professional at the point-of-care. Conclusions In this article, we present the design of the smartphone and the server application alongside the type of structured patient data collected together with the pictures taken at point-of-care. We report on how the application will be introduced at point-of-care and how its clinical impact will be evaluated prior to roll out. Challenges, strengths and limitations of the system are identified that may help materialising or hinder the expected outcome to provide a solution for remote consultation on

  18. Neonatal burn injuries: an agony for the newborn as well as the burn care team.

    PubMed

    Saaiq, M; Ahmad, S; Zaib, S

    2013-12-31

    This retrospective analysis of neonatal burn injuries was carried out at the Department of Plastic Surgery and Burn Care Centre, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS), Islamabad, Pakistan. A total of 11 neonates who were aged less than 29 days were managed during the 2 year study period. Out of these, 72.7% (8) were male and 27.3% (3) were female. The mean age was 11.18±9.67days. The commonest underlying cause of burn insult was accidental direct contact with room heaters in 4 (36.3%) neonates. The TBSA burnt ranged from 3%-55%, with a mean of 18.72±17.13%. All the neonates (100%) presented during winter season. Among the body areas affected, the most common was face/head and neck (10). The commonest operative procedure undertaken among the neonates included early wound excision followed by resurfacing with split thickness autografts (5). There were three in-hospital mortalities (27.2%) in our series.

  19. Acute epididymitis: a work-related injury?

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, E. K.; Anderson, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    Occupational medicine physicians frequently are presented with requests by employers to determine the work-relatedness of medical illnesses or injuries. Occasionally, this involves a sudden onset of acute epididymitis in the male employee after strenuous activity in the workplace. Because the vast majority of acute epididymitis cases have an underlying sexually transmitted disease component, this poses a real dilemma for the consulting physician. This article discusses the etiology and pathogenesis of acute epididymitis along with its epidemiologic significance and reviews workers' compensation and its possible legal interpretation when acute epididymitis occurs at the worksite. PMID:8691501

  20. Influence of Injury Characteristics and Payer Status on Burn Treatment Location in Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Matthew B.; Mack, Christopher D.; Kramer, C. Bradley; Heimbach, David M.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Rivara, Frederick P.

    2011-01-01

    The provision of optimal burn care is a resource-intensive endeavor. The American Burn Association has developed criteria to help guide the decision to refer a patient to a burn center for definitive injury care. The purpose of this study was to compare the patient and injury characteristics of patients admitted to the single verified burn center in Washington State with those treated at other facilities in the state. We performed a retrospective review of all patients admitted to a hospital with a burn injury in Washington State from 1987 to 2005 using the state’s discharge database (Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System). Patient and injury factors of patients admitted to the state’s single verified burn center or at other hospitals were compared. Multivariate poisson regression was used to calculate the relative risk of injury and patient factors that were significantly associated with admission to the verified burn center. From 1987 to 2005, a total of 16,531 patients were admitted to a Washington State hospital after burn injury. Of these patients, 8624 (52.2%) were treated definitively at the University of Washington Burn Center. Patients treated at this verified center had larger overall burn size (7.4% vs 4.5% TBSA, P < .001), higher percent full-thickness burn (4.3% vs 1.2%, P < .001), and higher rates of inhalation injury (2.3% vs 1.5%, P = .005). Uninsured status (relative risk = 1.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.4–1.5) was also significantly associated with treatment at the verified burn center. Injury severity and payer status were both found to be independent predictors of treatment at the single verified burn center in Washington. PMID:18388579

  1. The Immune Response to Skin Trauma Is Dependent on the Etiology of Injury in a Mouse Model of Burn and Excision.

    PubMed

    Valvis, Samantha M; Waithman, Jason; Wood, Fiona M; Fear, Mark W; Fear, Vanessa S

    2015-08-01

    Skin trauma has many different causes including incision, blunt force, and burn. All of these traumas trigger an immune response. However, it is currently unclear whether the immune response is specific to the etiology of the injury. This study was established to determine whether the immune response to excision and burn injury of equivalent extent was the same. Using a mouse model of a full-thickness 19 mm diameter excision or 19 mm diameter full-thickness burn injury, we examined the innate immune response at the level of serum cytokine induction, whole-blood lymphocyte populations, dendritic cell function/phenotype, and the ensuing adaptive immune responses of CD4 and CD8 T-cell populations. Strikingly, both the innate and adaptive immune system responses differed between the burn and excision injuries. Acute cytokine induction was faster and different in profile to that of excision injury, leading to changes in systemic monocyte and neutrophil levels. Differences in the immune profile between burn and excision were also noted up to day 84 post injury, suggesting that the etiology of injury leads to sustained changes in the response. This may in part underlie clinical observations of differences in patient morbidity and mortality in response to different skin injury types.

  2. Acute injuries from mountain biking.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, T K; Bracker, M D; Patrick, K

    1993-01-01

    We questioned members of 2 southern California off-road bicycling organizations about injuries associated with the use of all-terrain bicycles. Cyclists were asked about riding and safety habits, the kind(s) of injury sustained with their most recent accident and whether they sought medical treatment, and the circumstances of the accident. Of 459 mailed surveys, 268 (58.4%) were returned. Respondents (82.8% of whom were male) ranged in age from 14 to 68 years. Of these, 225 (84%) had been injured while riding all-terrain bicycles, 51% in the past year. Although most injuries were characterized as minor, 26% required professional medical care, and 4.4% of those injured were admitted to hospital. Extremity injuries--abrasions, lacerations, contusions--occurred in 201 (90%) cyclists with 27 (12%) sustaining a fracture or dislocation. High levels of helmet use (88%) may explain the low occurrence of head and neck trauma (12%). Frequent riding and riding on paved terrain were associated with increased severity of injury, although most accidents--197 (87.6%)--occurred off paved roads. These results suggest that, compared with regular bicyclists, all-terrain cyclists have more, but not necessarily more severe, injuries. Clinicians and emergency medical personnel should be aware that the increasing popularity of off-road cycling may change the frequency and nature of bicycling injuries. PMID:8212679

  3. [The acute knee injury - practical considerations].

    PubMed

    Bouaicha, Samy

    2014-04-09

    The acute knee injury represents one of the most common reasons to visit a general practitioner or an emergency department in a hospital. The initial assessment of an acute knee injury usually is affected by severe swelling, pain and a significant lack of motion. Conventional radiographs in three planes may provide additional information to limit the differential diagnosis. A clinical re-evaluation after five to ten days usually allows proper functional testing and therefore correct diagnosis in the majority of cases can be made. With suspicious clinical findings, MRI may be helpful to evaluate ligamentous, meniscal and cartilaginous structures. Femoro-tibial knee dislocation represents the most harmful acute knee injury and needs to be further evaluated and treated in an adequate medical institution in every suspicious case. Rapid vascular diagnostic with (CT)-angiography is crucial. Behind a multi-ligament injury of the knee a spontaneously reduced dislocation may hide and proper neuro-vascular exam therefore is mandatory in every patient. When fracture, blocking and major instability can be excluded at initial assessment, there is usually no need for any acute surgical intervention and initial conservative treatment may be conducted on an out-patient basis for most of the patients. Priority of surgical treatment depends on the injury pattern and delayed intervention with a pre-habilitative phase may be beneficial for certain pathologies.

  4. Localized hand burns with or without concurrent blast injuries from fireworks.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; Al-Tamimi, A S

    2009-05-01

    This is a retrospective study of 32 cases with localized hand burns from fireworks. All cases occurred during two national festivals of our country. The majority (54%) were children between 5 and 14 years, and 94% were males. All patients had localized hand burns. Patients were divided into two groups. Group I (n=10) patients had isolated burn injuries and Group II (n=22) patients had other concurrent hand injuries from the 'blast' of the fireworks such as tendon avulsion, nerve injury, fracture, dislocations, and amputations. Primary management of concurrent injuries along with dressing to the burn injury in a "flamazine bag" was done. All burns healed within 3 weeks and all surgical wounds/fractures healed without infection. Three patients required secondary release of contractures and skin grafting. Eventually, all patients were able to use their injured hands in daily activities.

  5. [Pregnancy-related acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Filipowicz, Ewa; Staszków, Monika

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in obstetrics may be caused by the same disorders that are observed in the general population or may be specific for a pregnancy such as: preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome or acute fatty liver of pregnancy. The renal changes may be only temporary, and resolve within a few weeks postpartum, or may become irreversible leading to a progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the article the most important pregnancy related syndromes associated with AKI have been shortly reviewed.

  6. Factors related to child maltreatment in children presenting with burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Wibbenmeyer, Lucy; Liao, Junlin; Heard, Jason; Kealey, Lyn; Kealey, Gerald; Oral, Resmiye

    2014-01-01

    The underpinnings of maltreatment in children presenting with burn injuries are necessary to discern as detection and prevention rest on a clear delineation of factors associated with maltreatment. Inaccurate identification of child victims can result in perpetuation of the maltreatment and its attendant neuropsychological sequela. The authors sought to determine factors associated with maltreatment in children presenting with burn injuries, which would guide the burn team in assessing the likelihood of maltreatment. All consenting children admitted with burn injuries were surveyed regarding their injury mechanism and current sociodemographic status. Suspicious injuries were referred by the burn team to the multidisciplinary review team (MRT). The MRT reported injuries with signs of physical abuse, supervision neglect, neglect of other basic needs, or sexual abuse. These children constituted the cases in our study. Variables related to maltreatment were entered into stepwise logistic regression to identify independent predicting variables. P< .05 was considered significant. MRT identified 16 children (24%) admitted with burn injuries with suspicions of maltreatment. Risk factors related to suspicions of maltreatment included: young age, large burns, tap water injury, immersion lines, delay in care, absence of a two-parent family (unconventional family structure), young parents, inconsistent history, and injury pattern. In this single-center prospective study, the authors identified several factors that, when present in injuries with initial suspicion of maltreatment, should trigger a child maltreatment workup. Burn clinicians have an important role as advocates for children and their families. It is important to continue to further the knowledge of maltreatment detection and prevention among children presenting with burn injuries.

  7. [Psychiatric sequelae of severe burn injuries: emotional distress and resources of occupationally versus non occupationally insured patients 1 year after burn injury].

    PubMed

    Ripper, S; Stolle, A; Seehausen, A; Klinkenberg, M; Germann, G; Hartmann, B; Renneberg, B

    2010-11-01

    Severe burn injuries are traumatic events and can have serious impact on all areas of life frequently causing high emotional distress. In a multicentre study resources and emotional distress of patients with serious burn injuries were assessed during the first hospitalization and at 6 and 12 months follow-up. Patients with severe burn injuries after accidents in a private environment (NBG patients) and patients after occupational accidents covered by the German Social Accident Insurance (BG patients) were compared. All patients reported marked emotional impairment, particularly during the hospitalization. At follow-up a reduction of emotional distress was detected. Nearly half of the patients received a diagnosis of one or more mental disorders according to DSM-IV criteria. When treating patients with burns, special attention should be given to their mental health. They should be offered psychological support to cope with the aftermath of the accident, especially after discharge from hospital when returning to their normal surroundings.

  8. DNA repair in ischemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Pressly, Jeffrey D; Park, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a common cause of acute kidney injury leading to an induction of oxidative stress, cellular dysfunction, and loss of renal function. DNA damage, including oxidative base modifications and physical DNA strand breaks, is a consequence of renal IRI. Like many other organs in the body, a redundant and highly conserved set of endogenous repair pathways have evolved to selectively recognize the various types of cellular DNA damage and combat its negative effects on cell viability. Severe damage to the DNA, however, can trigger cell death and elimination of the injured tubular epithelial cells. In this minireview, we summarize the state of the current field of DNA damage and repair in the kidney and provide some expected and, in some cases, unexpected effects of IRI on DNA damage and repair in the kidney. These findings may be applicable to other forms of acute kidney injury and could provide new opportunities for renal research.

  9. The biochemistry of blister fluid from pediatric burn injuries: proteomics and metabolomics aspects.

    PubMed

    Zang, Tuo; Broszczak, Daniel A; Broadbent, James A; Cuttle, Leila; Lu, Haitao; Parker, Tony J

    2016-01-01

    Burn injury is a prevalent and traumatic event for pediatric patients. At present, the diagnosis of burn injury severity is subjective and lacks a clinically relevant quantitative measure. This is due in part to a lack of knowledge surrounding the biochemistry of burn injuries and that of blister fluid. A more complete understanding of the blister fluid biochemistry may open new avenues for diagnostic and prognostic development. Burn insult induces a highly complex network of signaling processes and numerous changes within various biochemical systems, which can ultimately be examined using proteome and metabolome measurements. This review reports on the current understanding of burn wound biochemistry and outlines a technical approach for 'omics' profiling of blister fluid from burn wounds of differing severity.

  10. Previous burn injury predisposes mice to lipopolysaccharide-induced changes in glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Carter, Edward A; Paul, Kasie W; Barrow, Sandra A; Fischman, Alan J; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    In mice, it has been demonstrated that at 7 days after burn injury, injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is more lethal than the same dose at 1 day after injury. In the present study, we examined the effect of LPS injection to mice burned 7 days previously on glucose metabolism ([(18)F] 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose [(18)FDG] uptake) in vivo. CD-1 male mice (25-28 g, Charles River Breeding Laboratories, Wilmington, MA) were anesthetized, backs shaven, and subjected to dorsal full thickness burn on 25% TBSA. Sham-treated animals were used as controls. Six days after burn injury, all mice were fasted overnight. One half of the burned and sham controls were subsequently injected IP with LPS (10 mg/kg; Escherichia coli). The remaining animals were injected with saline IP. Two hours later, all mice were injected IV with 50 μCi of (18)F FDG. One hour later, the animals were euthanized, and biodistribution was measured. Tissues were weighed, and radioactivity was measured with a well-type γ counter. Results were expressed as %dose/g tissue, mean ± SEM. The combination of burn 7 days previously and LPS significantly increased mortality compared to animals with burn alone, LPS alone, or sham controls. Burn injury 7 days previously caused a significant decrease in (18)FDG uptake by the brain compared to sham controls. The combination of LPS and burn injury 7 days previously produced a significant increase in (18)FDG uptake by brown adipose tissue and heart compared with either treatment separately. LPS produced a significant increase in (18)FDG uptake by lung, spleen, and gastrointestinal tract of the sham animals, changes that were different in mice burned 7 days previously and injected with LPS. The present results suggest that burn injury 7 days previously predisposes mice to alterations in (18)FDG uptake produced by LPS. These changes may relate, in part, to the increased lethality of LPS injection in previously burned mice.

  11. The treatment of extensively burned patients and {beta} irradiational injury skin burn patients with irradiated pigskin

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Zhong Yi; Lu Xing An; Jing Ling; Qi Qiang

    1994-12-31

    Obvious therapeutic effects achieved by the covering of irradiation sterilized pigskin on burn wounds, escarectomized 3rd degree burn wounds and {beta} injured burns are introduced. The article introduces also the manufacture processes of irradiated pigskins and the selection of surgical treatments of various burns.

  12. The morphology of cutaneous burn injuries and the type of heat application.

    PubMed

    Fracasso, T; Pfeiffer, H; Pellerin, P; Karger, B

    2009-05-30

    The morphology of burn injuries in 120 consecutive patients from the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, CHR, Hospital B in Lille was correlated to the etiology and type of heat. Analysis identified five typical patterns of cutaneous burn injuries. Jet of flame-pattern from methylated spirits and gasoline detonations: superficial burn injuries; sparing of skin wrinkles and the submental region; absence or small amounts of soot; preference of exposed body regions, esp. the face and hands. Explosion-pattern from explosions and electrothermal injuries: superficial burn injuries; sparing of skin wrinkles but not of the submental region; soot; preference of exposed body regions. Alveolar soot arrangement and metallisation in electrothermal injuries. Considerable third-degree burns in dust explosions. Flame-pattern from direct flame effects due to burning gasoline or oil, open fires or ignited clothing: nonuniform depth including large third-degree burns; no sparing of the submental region; soot; preference of body regions covered by clothing. Immersion-pattern: superficial (bullous) injuries; blurred junction between scalded and unscalded areas; extremities, buttocks, and back are favourite sites; cave child abuse: waterlines and zebra-burns. Spilling-pattern: superficial injuries; sharp junction between scalded and unscalded areas; head, anterior trunk, and upper extremities are favourite sites; running off and splashing stains. Consideration of these patterns can assist the reconstruction in fire investigations or unclear scaldings. In cases of suspected arson, a typical burn injury pattern or a single finding not compatible with the rest of the pattern can disprove a suspect or raise the level of suspicion.

  13. Children with burn injuries--assessment of trauma, neglect, violence and abuse.

    PubMed

    Toon, Michael H; Maybauer, Dirk M; Arceneaux, Lisa L; Fraser, John F; Meyer, Walter; Runge, Antoinette; Maybauer, Marc O

    2011-07-01

    Burns are an important cause of injury to young children, being the third most frequent cause of injury resulting in death behind motor vehicle accidents and drowning. Burn injuries account for the greatest length of stay of all hospital admissions for injuries and costs associated with care are substantial. The majority of burn injuries in children are scald injuries resulting from hot liquids, occurring most commonly in children aged 0-4 years. Other types of burns include electrical, chemical and intentional injury. Mechanisms of injury are often unique to children and involve exploratory behavior without the requisite comprehension of the dangers in their environment. Assessment of the burnt child includes airway, breathing and circulation stabilization, followed by assessment of the extent of the burn and head to toe examination. The standard rule of 9s for estimating total body surface area (TBSA) of the burn is inaccurate for the pediatric population and modifications include utilizing the Lund and Browder chart, or the child's palm to represent 1% TBSA. Further monitoring may include cardiac assessment, indwelling catheter insertion and evaluation of inhalation injury with or without intubation depending on the context of the injury. Risk factors and features of intentional injury should be known and sought and vital clues can be found in the history, physical examination and common patterns of presentation. Contemporary burn management is underscored by several decades of advancing medical and surgical care however, common to all injuries, it is in the area of prevention that the greatest potential to reduce the burden of these devastating occurrences exists.

  14. Bacterial Respiratory Tract Infections are Promoted by Systemic Hyperglycemia after Severe Burn Injury in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Mlcak, Ronald P; Finnerty, Celeste C; Cox, Robert A; Williams, Felicia N; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Background Burn injuries are associated with hyperglycemia leading to increased incidence of infections with pneumonia being one of the most prominent and adverse complication. Recently, various studies in critically ill patients indicated that increased pulmonary glucose levels with airway/blood glucose threshold over 150 mg/dl lead to an overwhelming growth of bacteria in the broncho-pulmonary system, subsequently resulting in an increased risk of pulmonary infections. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a similar cutoff value exists for severely burned pediatric patients. Methods One-hundred six severely burned pediatric patients were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided in two groups: high (H) defined as daily average glucose levels >75% of LOS >150 mg/dl), and low (L) with daily average glucose levels >75% of the LOS <150 mg/dl). Incidences of pneumonia, atelectasis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were assessed. Incidence of infections, sepsis, and respiratory parameters were recorded. Blood was analyzed for glucose and insulin levels. Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s t-test and chi-square test. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results Patient groups were similar in demographics and injury characteristics. Pneumonia in patients on the mechanical ventilation (L: 21% H: 32%) and off mechanical ventilation (L: 5% H: 15%), as well as ARDS were significantly higher in the high group (L: 3% H: 19%), p<0.05, while atelectasis was not different. Patients in the high group required significantly longer ventilation compared to low patients (p<0.05). Furthermore, incidence of infection and sepsis were significantly higher in the high group, p<0.05. Conclusion Our results indicate that systemic glucose levels over 150 mg/dl are associated with a higher incidence of pneumonia confirming the previous studies in critically ill patients. PMID:24074819

  15. Visualizing the Propagation of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cereda, Maurizio; Xin, Yi; Meeder, Natalie; Zeng, Johnathan; Jiang, YunQing; Hamedani, Hooman; Profka, Harrilla; Kadlecek, Stephen; Clapp, Justin; Deshpande, Charuhas G.; Wu, Jue; Gee, James C.; Kavanagh, Brian P.; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation worsens acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but this secondary ‘ventilator-associated’ injury is variable and difficult to predict. We aimed to visualize the propagation of such ventilator-induced injury, in the presence (and absence) of a primary underlying lung injury, and to determine the predictors of propagation. Methods Anesthetized rats (n=20) received acid aspiration (HCl) followed by ventilation with moderate tidal volume (VT). In animals surviving ventilation for at least two hours, propagation of injury was quantified using serial computed tomography (CT). Baseline lung status was assessed by oxygenation, lung weight, and lung strain (VT/expiratory lung volume). Separate groups of rats without HCl aspiration were ventilated with large (n=10) or moderate (n=6) VT. Results In 15 rats surviving longer than two hours, CT opacities spread outwards from the initial site of injury. Propagation was associated with higher baseline strain (propagation vs. no propagation, mean ± SD: 1.52 ± 0.13 vs. 1.16 ± 0.20, p<0.01), but similar oxygenation and lung weight. Propagation did not occur where baseline strain <1.29. In healthy animals, large VT caused injury that was propagated inwards from the lung periphery; in the absence of preexisting injury, propagation did not occur where strain was <2.0. Conclusions Compared with healthy lungs, underlying injury causes propagation to occur at a lower strain threshold and, it originates at the site of injury; this suggests that tissue around the primary lesion is more sensitive. Understanding how injury is propagated may ultimately facilitate a more individualized monitoring or management. PMID:26536308

  16. Effect of Fasting on the Metabolic Response of Liver to Experimental Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Orman, Mehmet A.; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Berthiaume, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Liver metabolism is altered after systemic injuries such as burns and trauma. These changes have been elucidated in rat models of experimental burn injury where the liver was isolated and perfused ex vivo. Because these studies were performed in fasted animals to deplete glycogen stores, thus simplifying quantification of gluconeogenesis, these observations reflect the combined impact of fasting and injury on liver metabolism. Herein we asked whether the metabolic response to experimental burn injury is different in fed vs. fasted animals. Rats were subjected to a cutaneous burn covering 20% of the total body surface area, or to similar procedures without administering the burn, hence a sham-burn. Half of the animals in the burn and sham-burn groups were fasted starting on postburn day 3, and the others allowed to continue ad libitum. On postburn day 4, livers were isolated and perfused for 1 hour in physiological medium supplemented with 10% hematocrit red blood cells. The uptake/release rates of major carbon and nitrogen sources, oxygen, and carbon dioxide were measured during the perfusion and the data fed into a mass balance model to estimate intracellular fluxes. The data show that in fed animals, injury increased glucose output mainly from glycogen breakdown and minimally impacted amino acid metabolism. In fasted animals, injury did not increase glucose output but increased urea production and the uptake of several amino acids, namely glutamine, arginine, glycine, and methionine. Furthermore, sham-burn animals responded to fasting by triggering gluconeogenesis from lactate; however, in burned animals the preferred gluconeogenic substrate was amino acids. Taken together, these results suggest that the fed state prevents the burn-induced increase in hepatic amino acid utilization for gluconeogenesis. The role of glycogen stores and means to increase and/or maintain internal sources of glucose to prevent increased hepatic amino acid utilization warrant further

  17. "Put on your face to face the world": women's narratives of burn injury.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Tevya A; Medved, Maria I; Hiebert-Murphy, Diane; Brockmeier, Jens; Sareen, Jitender; Thakrar, Sulaye; Logsetty, Sarvesh

    2013-12-01

    The survival rate of individuals with burn injury has significantly increased due to medical advances in burn care. This has led to a need to focus on psychological aspects of burn injury recovery, particularly on how people come to terms with their changed bodies. The literature suggests that burn size and severity are not directly associated with the degree of distress but that subjective perceptions and interpretations - of, for instance, body image - are pertinent. Body image appears to be particularly important for women and thus, in this study, we investigated women's experiences of their bodies following mild to moderate burns. We conducted in-depth interviews with 10 female burn survivors in the first year after injury, using methods of narrative analysis for the investigations of the transcripts. Thirteen consecutive women who met inclusion criterion were approached at regional burn care follow-up clinic. In their narratives, the women predominantly emphasized how well they were doing; however, counter-narratives emerged indicating dissatisfaction and distress. The tension between these two different kinds of narratives suggests an ambivalent relationship with the burn injury. We concluded that it is imperative for health care professionals to be cognizant of these conflicting experiences in order to adequately address burn survivors' needs in rehabilitation.

  18. Gendered pattern of burn injuries in India: a neglected health issue.

    PubMed

    Bhate-Deosthali, Padma; Lingam, Lakshmi

    2016-05-01

    There are an estimated 7 million burn injuries in India annually, of which 700,000 require hospital admission and 140,000 are fatal. According to the National Burns Programme, 91,000 of these deaths are women; a figure higher than that for maternal mortality. Women of child bearing age are on average three times more likely than men to die of burn injuries. This paper reviews the existing literature on burn injuries in India and raises pertinent issues about prevalence, causes and gaps in recognising the gendered factors leading to a high number of women dying due to burns. The work of various women's groups and health researchers with burns victims raises several questions about the categorisation of burn deaths as accident, suicide and homicide and the failure of the health system to recognise underlying violence. Despite compelling evidence, the health system has not recognised this as a priority. Considering the substantial cost of burns care, prevention is the key which requires health systems to recognise the linkages between burn injuries and domestic violence. Health systems need to integrate awareness programmes about domestic violence and train health professionals to identify signs and symptoms of violence. This would contribute to early identification of abuse so that survivors are able to access support services at an early stage.

  19. The occurrence and seasonal variation of accelerant-related burn injuries in central Florida.

    PubMed

    Rainey, Susan; Cruse, C Wayne; Smith, Jackie S; Smith, Kirk R; Jones, Dawn; Cobb, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Accidental burn injuries result in significant economic and public health burdens. The inappropriate use of gasoline and other accelerants has been identified in many studies as dangerous, yet it remains an all-too-common practice resulting in a significant number of injuries annually. Florida's unique climate permits outdoor recreational and maintenance activities, such as burning yard debris and other trash, throughout the year. Additionally, the hurricane season, lasting from June 1 though November 30, produces large amounts of waste in its wake. The purpose of this study was to examine the seasonal pattern of occurrence and develop an understanding of factors related to accelerant-related burn injuries with the goal of prevention. This nonexperimental research involved a retrospective quantitative observational study of data stored in the National Trauma Registry database. All burn patients admitted to the Tampa General Regional Burn Center as inpatients between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2005, were included. As with previous studies on the occurrence of accelerant related injuries, young men were much more likely to suffer this type of injury. The hurricane season correlates with an increased number of accelerant related burn injuries, which differs somewhat from the seasonal variations in other regions. The size and severity of accelerant-related injuries varies significantly, as does the length of hospital stay. Accelerant use is frequently associated with trash/brush-related accidents. Hurricane seasons can produce an inordinately large amount of debris and therefore are related with an increased incident in this type of burn injury. The results of this study support the development of a community-based educational program directed at burn injury prevention, with special attention to the implications of the hurricane season.

  20. Sodium hypochlorite-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Peck, Brandon W; Workeneh, Biruh; Kadikoy, Huseyin; Abdellatif, Abdul

    2014-03-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (bleach) is commonly used as an irrigant during dental procedures as well as a topical antiseptic agent. Although it is generally safe when applied topically, reports of accidental injection of sodium hypochlorite into tissue have been reported. Local necrosis, pain and nerve damage have been described as a result of exposure, but sodium hypo-chlorite has never been implicated as a cause of an acute kidney injury (AKI). In this report, we describe the first case of accidental sodium hypochlorite injection into the infraorbital tissue during a dental procedure that precipitated the AKI. We speculate that oxidative species induced by sodium hypochlorite caused AKI secondary to the renal tubular injury, causing mild acute tubular necrosis.

  1. The Measured Effect Magnitude of Co-Morbidities on Burn injury Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Knowlin, Laquanda; Stanford, Lindsay; Moore, Danier; Cairns, Bruce; Charles, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The ability to better prognosticate burn injury outcome is challenging and historically, most center use the Baux or revised Baux score to help prognosticate burn outcome, however, the weighted contribution of comorbidity on burn mortality has traditionally not been accounted for nor adequately studied. We therefore sought to determine the effect of comorbidities, using the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) on burn mortality. Methods The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of comorbidities on burn injury mortality as determined by the LA50 (lethal TBSA burn at which 50% of the cohort will succumb from the burn injury) in a retrospective analysis of patients admitted to a regional burn center from 2002–2012. Independent variables analyzed included basic demographics, burn mechanism, presence of inhalation injury, TBSA (total body surface area), length of hospital stay, and pre-existing comorbidities. Bivariate analysis was performed and logistic regression modeling using significant variables was utilized to estimate odds of death. Results 7640 patients were included in this study. Overall survival rate was 96%. 40% of our burn cohort had at least one comorbidity. There was a linear increase in the likelihood of death with an increase in CCI. The logistic regression model for mortality outcomes identified four statistically significant variables: age, TBSA, inhalational injury and the presence of comorbidities (OR = 1.59 for each 1 point increase in CCI; 95% CI 1.44–1.77). The unadjusted LA50 was 53% for the entire cohort. Partial adjustment multivariate regression controlling for burn mechanism and inhalation injury only, produced a slight reduction in LA50 for the 0–18 and 19–64 age categories to 76% and 48%, respectively, but a significant decrease occurred in the ≥ 65 years age group with a reduced LA50 to 20% (p<0.001). After full adjustment for all significant covariates, including comorbidities, the independent magnitude of

  2. Burn Injuries in Children and the Use of Biological Dressings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    is the subcutaneous fat, which con- tains free nerve endings and the roots of hair follicles . Burns are classified as first, second, or third degree...and hair follicles , is also destroyed, third-degree burns appear dry, white, charred, or leathery, and the tissue has no sensation. Burns that extend...are blanching, and are extremely tender. Hair is usually intact, and there may be thin, fluid-filled blis- ters. Deep partial-thickness burns extend

  3. Dengue-associated acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, João Fernando Picollo; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is presently the most relevant viral infection transmitted by a mosquito bite that represents a major threat to public health worldwide. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious and potentially lethal complication of this disease, and the actual incidence is unknown. In this review, we will assess the most relevant epidemiological and clinical data regarding dengue and the available evidence on the frequency, etiopathogenesis, outcomes and treatment of dengue-associated AKI. PMID:26613023

  4. Mechanisms of toxic smoke inhalation and burn injury: role of neutral endopeptidase and vascular leakage in mice.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sam; Deyo, Donald J; Cox, Robert A; Traber, Daniel L; Herndon, David N; Hawkins, Hal K

    2009-03-01

    The effects of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) in acute inflammation in the lung were studied using a newly developed murine model of smoke and burn (SB) injury. C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with an i.v. dose of a specific NEP antagonist CGS-24592 (10 mg/Kg) 1 h prior to SB injury (n = 5-8/group). Mice were anesthetized with i.p. ketamine/xylazine, intubated, and exposed to cooled cotton smoke (2 x 30 s). After s.c. injection of 1 ml 0.9% saline, each received a 40% total body surface area (TBSA) flame burn. Buprenorphene (2 mg/kg) was given i.p. and resuscitated by saline. Evans Blue dye (EB) was injected i.v. 15 min before sacrifice. Lung wet/dry weight ratio was measured. After vascular perfusion, lungs were analyzed for their levels of EB dye and myeloperoxidase (MPO). In mice pretreated with CGS-24592 followed by SB injury the EB levels were significantly higher (61%, p = 0.043) than those with SB injury alone. There was a significant increase (144%, p = 0.035) in EB dye in animals with SB injury alone as compared to shams. In mice pretreated with CGS-24592 prior to SB injury wet/dry weight ratios were significantly (27%, p = 0.042) higher compared to animals with SB injury alone. CGS-24592 pretreatment also caused a significant increase in MPO (29%, p = 0.026) as compared to mice with SB injury alone. In conclusion the current study indicates that specific NEP inhibitor CGS 24592 exacerbates the SB-induced lung injury and inflammation in mice.

  5. Interleukin-1 and acute brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Katie N.; Parry-Jones, Adrian R.; Allan, Stuart M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the key host-defense response to infection and injury, yet also a major contributor to a diverse range of diseases, both peripheral and central in origin. Brain injury as a result of stroke or trauma is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, yet there are no effective treatments, resulting in enormous social and economic costs. Increasing evidence, both preclinical and clinical, highlights inflammation as an important factor in stroke, both in determining outcome and as a contributor to risk. A number of inflammatory mediators have been proposed as key targets for intervention to reduce the burden of stroke, several reaching clinical trial, but as yet yielding no success. Many factors could explain these failures, including the lack of robust preclinical evidence and poorly designed clinical trials, in addition to the complex nature of the clinical condition. Lack of consideration in preclinical studies of associated co-morbidities prevalent in the clinical stroke population is now seen as an important omission in previous work. These co-morbidities (atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, infection) have a strong inflammatory component, supporting the need for greater understanding of how inflammation contributes to acute brain injury. Interleukin (IL)-1 is the prototypical pro-inflammatory cytokine, first identified many years ago as the endogenous pyrogen. Research over the last 20 years or so reveals that IL-1 is an important mediator of neuronal injury and blocking the actions of IL-1 is beneficial in a number of experimental models of brain damage. Mechanisms underlying the actions of IL-1 in brain injury remain unclear, though increasing evidence indicates the cerebrovasculature as a key target. Recent literature supporting this and other aspects of how IL-1 and systemic inflammation in general contribute to acute brain injury are discussed in this review. PMID:25705177

  6. Evaluating the Socioeconomic and Cultural Factors Associated with Pediatric Burn Injuries in Maputo, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Karan, Abraar; Amado, Vanda; Vitorino, Pio; Kulber, David; Taela, Atanasio; DeUgarte, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric burn injuries are one of the leading causes of preventable morbidity and mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa. Research on the complex system of social, economic and cultural factors contributing to burn injuries in this setting is much needed. Methods We conducted a prospective questionnaire-based analysis of pediatric burn patients presenting to the Hospital Central de Maputo. A total of 39 patients were included in the study. Interviews were conducted with the children’s caretakers by two trained medical students at the Eduardo Mondlane Medical School in Maputo with the aid of local nursing staff. Results Most burns occurred from scald wounds (26/39) particularly from bathwater, followed by fire burns (11/39). Burns occurred more frequently in the afternoon (16/39) and evening (16/39). Over one quarter of burns (9/33) occurred in the absence of a caretaker. One third (12/36) of participants attempted to treat the burn at home prior to bringing the child in to the hospital, and roughly two-thirds (24/37) reported using traditional remedies for burn care. The average household had just 2 rooms for an average of 5 family members. Most burns were grade II (25/37). Conclusions Prevention efforts in this setting are much needed and can be implemented taking complex cultural and social factors into account. Education regarding regulation of water temperature for baths is important, given the prevalence of scald burns. Moreover, the introduction of low-cost, safer cooking technology can help mitigate inhalation injury and reduce fire burns. Additionally, burn care systems must be integrated with local traditional medical interventions to respect local cultural medicinal practices. PMID:26280740

  7. Burn-induced subepicardial injury in frog heart: a simple model mimicking ST segment changes in ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Itsuro

    2016-02-01

    To mimic ischemic heart disease in humans, several animal models have been created, mainly in rodents by surgically ligating their coronary arteries. In the present study, by simply inducing burn injuries on the bullfrog heart, we reproduced abnormal ST segment changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG), mimicking those observed in ischemic heart disease, such as acute myocardial infarction and angina pectoris. The "currents of injury" created by a voltage gradient between the intact and damaged areas of the myocardium, negatively deflected the ECG vector during the diastolic phase, making the ST segment appear elevated during the systolic phase. This frog model of heart injury would be suitable to explain the mechanisms of ST segment changes observed in ischemic heart disease.

  8. Burn and Smoke Inhalation Injury in Sheep Depletes Vitamin E: Kinetic studies using deuterated tocopherols

    PubMed Central

    Traber, M.G.; Shimoda, K.; Murakami, K.; Leonard, S. W.; Enkhbaatar, P.; Traber, L.D.; Traber, D.L.

    2007-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that burn and smoke injury will deplete tissue α-tocopherol and cause its faster plasma disappearance, deuterium-labeled vitamin E was administered to sheep exposed to both surface skin burn and smoke insufflation that causes injury similar to human victims of fire accidents. Two different protocols were used: 1) deuterated vitamin E was administered orally with food at 0 time (just prior to injury), or 2) the labeled vitamin E was administered orally with food the day prior to injury. The animals that had been operatively prepared seven days before, were anaesthetized, then received both 40% body surface area 3rd° burn and 48 breaths of cotton smoke, or sham injuries. All were resuscitated with Ringer’s lactate solution (4 ml/kg/% BSA burn/24h) and mechanically ventilated. Blood samples were collected at various times after vitamin E dosing. In both studies the depletion of plasma α-tocopherol was faster in the injured sheep. The sheep given deuterated vitamin E 24 h prior to injury had similar maximum α-tocopherol concentrations at similar times. The exponential rates of α -tocopherol disappearance were 1.5 times greater and half-lives were 12 h shorter (p<0.05) in the injured sheep. In separate studies, various tissues were obtained from sheep that were sacrificed from 4 h to 48 h after injury. The liver α -tocopherol concentrations in sheep killed at various times after injury appear to show a linear decrease at a rate of 0.1 nmol α -tocopherol/g liver per hour, suggesting that the liver is supplying α -tocopherol to maintain the plasma and lung α -tocopherol concentrations, but that this injury is so severe that the liver is unable to maintain lung α -tocopherol concentrations. These findings suggest that α -tocopherol should be administered to burn patients to prevent vitamin E depletion and to protect against oxidative stress from burn injury. PMID:17395015

  9. Thermal Injury Model in the Rabbit Ear with Quantifiable Burn Progression and Hypertrophic Scar.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Emily E; Niknam-Bienia, Solmaz; Xie, Ping; Jia, Sheng-Xian; Hong, Seok Jong; Mustoe, Thomas A; Galiano, Robert D

    2017-04-01

    Hypertrophic scar is a major clinical outcome of deep-partial thickness to full thickness thermal burn injury. Appropriate animal models are a limitation to burn research due to the lack of, or access to, animal models which address the endpoint of hypertrophic scar. Lower species, such as rodents, heal mainly by contracture, which limits the duration of study. Higher species, such as pigs, heal more similarly to humans, but are associated with high cost, long duration for scar development, challenges in quantifying scar hypertrophy, and poor manageability. Here we present a quantifiable deep-partial thickness burn model in the rabbit ear. Burns were created using a dry-heated brass rod for 10 s and 20 s at 90°C. At the time of eschar excision on day 3, excisional wounds were made on the contralateral ear for comparison. Burn wound progression, in which the wound size expands over time is a major distinction between excisional and thermal injuries, was quantified at 1 h and 3 d after the injuries using calibrated photographs and histology and the size of the wounds was found to be unchanged from the initial wound size at 1 h, but 10% in the 20 s burn wounds at 3 d. A quantifiable hypertrophic scar, measured by histology as the scar elevation index, was present in both 20 s burn wounds and excisional wounds at day 35. ImageJ measurements revealed that the 20 s burn wound scars were 22% larger than the excisional wound scars and the 20 s burn scar area measurements from histology were 26% greater than in the excisional wound scar. The ability to measure both burn progression and scar hypertrophy over a 35-day time frame suits this model to screening early intervention burn wound therapeutics or scar treatments in a burn-specific scar model. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Epidemiology of Overuse and Acute Injuries Among Competitive Collegiate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingzhen; Tibbetts, Abigail S.; Covassin, Tracey; Cheng, Gang; Nayar, Saloni; Heiden, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Context: Although overuse injuries are gaining attention, epidemiologic studies on overuse injuries in male and female collegiate athletes are lacking. (70.7%) acute injuries were reported. The overall injury rate was Objective: To report the epidemiology of overuse injuries sustained by collegiate athletes and to compare the rates of overuse and acute injuries. Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Setting: A National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 1317 reported injuries sustained by 573 male and female athletes in 16 collegiate sports teams during the 2005–2008 seasons. Main Outcome Measure(s): The injury and athlete-exposure (AE) data were obtained from the Sports Injury Monitoring System. An injury was coded as either overuse or acute based on the nature of injury. Injury rate was calculated as the total number of overuse (or acute) injuries during the study period divided by the total number of AEs during the same period. Results: A total of 386 (29.3%) overuse injuries and 931 63.1 per 10000 AEs. The rate ratio (RR) of acute versus overuse injuries was 2.34 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.05, 2.67). Football had the highest RR (RR = 8.35, 95% CI = 5.38, 12.97), and women's rowing had the lowest (RR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.51, 1.10). Men had a higher acute injury rate than women (49.8 versus 38.6 per 10000 AEs). Female athletes had a higher rate of overuse injury than male athletes (24.6 versus 13.2 per 10000 AEs). More than half of the overuse injuries (50.8%) resulted in no time loss from sport. Conclusions: Additional studies are needed to examine why female athletes are at greater risk for overuse injuries and identify the best practices for prevention and rehabilitation of overuse injuries. PMID:22488286

  11. Topically Applied Metal Chelator Reduces Thermal Injury Progression in a Rat Model of Brass Comb Burn

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng Z.; El Ayadi, Amina; Goswamy, Juhi; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Mifflin, Randy; Sousse, Linda; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Papaconstantinou, John; Herndon, David N.; Ansari, Naseem H.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress may be involved in the cellular damage and tissue destruction as burn wounds continues to progress after abatement of the initial insult. Since iron and calcium ions play key roles in oxidative stress, this study tested whether topical application of Livionex formulation (LF) lotion, that contains disodium EDTA as a metal chelator and methyl sulfonyl methane (MSM) as a permeability enhancer, would prevent or reduce burn injury. Methods We used an established brass comb burn model with some modifications. Topical application of LF lotion was started 5 minutes post-burn, and repeated every 8 hours for 3 consecutive days. Rats were euthanized and skin harvested for histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Formation of protein adducts of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), malonadialdehyde (MDA) and acrolein (ACR) and expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) isozymes, ALDH1 and ALDH2 were assessed. Results LF lotion-treated burn sites and interspaces showed mild morphological improvement compared to untreated burn sites. Furthermore, the lotion significantly decreased the immunostaining of lipid aldehyde-protein adducts including protein -HNE, -MDA and -ACR adducts, and restored the expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes in the unburned interspaces. Conclusion This data, for the first time, demonstrates that a topically applied EDTA-containing lotion protects burn injury progression with a concomitant decrease in the accumulation of reactive lipid aldehydes and protection of aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes. Present studies are suggestive of therapeutic intervention of burn injury by this novel lotion. PMID:26392023

  12. Management of acute traumatic spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Shank, C D; Walters, B C; Hadley, M N

    2017-01-01

    Acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating disease process affecting tens of thousands of people across the USA each year. Despite the increase in primary prevention measures, such as educational programs, motor vehicle speed limits, automobile running lights, and safety technology that includes automobile passive restraint systems and airbags, SCIs continue to carry substantial permanent morbidity and mortality. Medical measures implemented following the initial injury are designed to limit secondary insult to the spinal cord and to stabilize the spinal column in an attempt to decrease devastating sequelae. This chapter is an overview of the contemporary management of an acute traumatic SCI patient from the time of injury through the stay in the intensive care unit. We discuss initial triage, immobilization, and transportation of the patient by emergency medical services personnel to a definitive treatment facility. Upon arrival at the emergency department, we review initial trauma protocols and the evidence-based recommendations for radiographic evaluation of the patient's vertebral column. Finally, we outline closed cervical spine reduction and various aggressive medical therapies aimed at improving neurologic outcome.

  13. Acute Kidney Injury in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Kirk B.; Stevens, Todd M; Singal, Ashwani K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs commonly in patients with advanced cirrhosis and negatively impacts pre- and post-transplant outcomes. Physiologic changes that occur in patients with decompensated cirrhosis with ascites, place these patients at high risk of AKI. The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis include prerenal injury, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and the hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), accounting for more than 80% of AKI in this population. Distinguishing between these causes is particularly important for prognostication and treatment. Treatment of Type 1 HRS with vasoconstrictors and albumin improves short term survival and renal function in some patients while awaiting liver transplantation. Patients with HRS who fail to respond to medical therapy or those with severe renal failure of other etiology may require renal replacement therapy. Simultaneous liver kidney transplant (SLK) is needed in many of these patients to improve their post-transplant outcomes. However, the criteria to select patients who would benefit from SLK transplantation are based on consensus and lack strong evidence to support them. In this regard, novel serum and/or urinary biomarkers such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, interleukins-6 and 18, kidney injury molecule-1, fatty acid binding protein, and endothelin-1 are emerging with a potential for accurately differentiating common causes of AKI. Prospective studies are needed on the use of these biomarkers to predict accurately renal function recovery after liver transplantation alone in order to optimize personalized use of SLK. PMID:26623266

  14. The use of immunonutrition in burn injury care: where are we?

    PubMed

    Kurmis, Rochelle; Parker, Andrea; Greenwood, John

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the current evidence for immunonutrition use in patients with burn injury. Nutrients of interest included glutamine, arginine, and omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil). A literature review was conducted to identify studies that evaluated the use of immunonutrients in pediatric and adult patients with burn injury. Search terms included burns, immunonutrition, pharmaconutrition, glutamine, arginine, omega-3, and fish oil. Glutamine: Nine randomized controlled trials (four represented in abstract only) investigating enteral supplementation and two trials investigating parenteral supplementation of glutamine were identified. Arginine: Five trials investigating the effect of arginine supplementation were identified (three represented in abstract only). Omega-3 fatty acids: Three studies investigating the effect of enteral fish oil supplementation were identified (one represented in abstract only). Combined immunonutrients: Six studies were identified that investigated immunonutrients as a combination of active dietary constituents (rather than as individual nutrients). Despite the semiessential nature of arginine after burn injury, there were surprisingly little data regarding nutritional supplementation. Literature around supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids is found to be lacking in the burn injury population. The combination of immunonutrients as a component of enteral formulae limits identification of the active nutrient and ideal dosage. Current evidence supports the use of enteral glutamine supplementation for patients with severe burn injuries. Questions remain regarding dosage, timing, and length of supplementation.

  15. Severe burn injuries caused by bioethanol-design fireplaces-an overview on recreational fire threats.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Robert; Knobloch, Karsten; Lorenzen, Johan; Breuing, Karl H; Koennecker, Soeren; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver; Vogt, Peter M

    2011-01-01

    Commercially available bioethanol-fueled fireplaces have become increasingly popular additions for interior home decoration in Europe and more recently in the United States. These fireplaces are advertised as smokeless, ecologically friendly, and do not require professional installation, formal gas lines, or venting. Although manufacturers and businesses promote their safety, recent presentations of injuries have alerted the authors to the relevant danger bioethanol fireplaces can pose for the incautious user. Are bioethanol fireplaces going to become the future threat in domestic burn accidents beside common barbeque burns? A Medline literature search on barbeque and domestic fireplace accidents was performed to compare and stratify the injury patterns reported and to identify a risk profile for contemporary bioethanol-fueled fireplaces. To exemplify, two representative clinical cases of severe burn accidents caused by bioethanol-fueled fireplaces, both treated in the burn unit of the authors, are being presented. Design fireplaces are being recognized as an increasing source of fuel and fire-related danger in the home. This risk may be underestimated by the uninformed customer, resulting in severe burn injuries. Because bioethanol-fueled fireplaces have become more commonplace, they may overtake barbecue-related injury as the most common domestic burn injury.

  16. Burn injury diagnostic imaging device's accuracy improved by outlier detection and removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weizhi; Mo, Weirong; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Yang; Squiers, John J.; Sellke, Eric W.; Fan, Wensheng; DiMaio, J. Michael; Thatcher, Jeffery E.

    2015-05-01

    Multispectral imaging (MSI) was implemented to develop a burn diagnostic device that will assist burn surgeons in planning and performing burn debridement surgery by classifying burn tissue. In order to build a burn classification model, training data that accurately represents the burn tissue is needed. Acquiring accurate training data is difficult, in part because the labeling of raw MSI data to the appropriate tissue classes is prone to errors. We hypothesized that these difficulties could be surmounted by removing outliers from the training dataset, leading to an improvement in the classification accuracy. A swine burn model was developed to build an initial MSI training database and study an algorithm's ability to classify clinically important tissues present in a burn injury. Once the ground-truth database was generated from the swine images, we then developed a multi-stage method based on Z-test and univariate analysis to detect and remove outliers from the training dataset. Using 10-fold cross validation, we compared the algorithm's accuracy when trained with and without the presence of outliers. The outlier detection and removal method reduced the variance of the training data from wavelength space, and test accuracy was improved from 63% to 76%. Establishing this simple method of conditioning for the training data improved the accuracy of the algorithm to match the current standard of care in burn injury assessment. Given that there are few burn surgeons and burn care facilities in the United States, this technology is expected to improve the standard of burn care for burn patients with less access to specialized facilities.

  17. Preventing Burns and Scalds. Injury Prevention for Young Children from the National Safety Certification System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Sheryl L.; Walker, April L.

    This booklet outlines a comprehensive fire and burn injury prevention program which includes an instructor's manual, a videotape, and a test: the video provides additional information and examples of injury prevention techniques, and the test measures the amount of knowledge acquired. Following an introduction, the prevalence and extent of burn…

  18. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury after acupuncture sessions.

    PubMed

    Papasotiriou, Marios; Betsi, Grigoria; Tsironi, Maria; Assimakopoulos, Georgios

    2014-05-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is usually caused by muscle injury, drugs or alcohol and presents with muscle weakness and pain. It is characterized by rise in serum creatine kinase, aminotransferases and electrolytes as well as myoglobinuria. Myoglobinuria may cause acute kidney injury by direct proximal tubule cytotoxicity, renal vasoconstriction, intraluminal cast formation and distal tubule obstruction. Muscle pain and weakness as well as vascular injury have been reported after acupuncture. We report a case of severe rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury after acupuncture sessions.

  19. Vagal nerve stimulation protects against burn-induced intestinal injury through activation of enteric glia cells

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Todd W.; Bansal, Vishal; Krzyzaniak, Michael; Putnam, James G.; Peterson, Carrie Y.; Loomis, William H.; Wolf, Paul; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P.

    2010-01-01

    The enteric nervous system may have an important role in modulating gastrointestinal barrier response to disease through activation of enteric glia cells. In vitro studies have shown that enteric glia activation improves intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering the expression of tight junction proteins. We hypothesized that severe injury would increase expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of enteric glial activation. We also sought to define the effects of vagal nerve stimulation on enteric glia activation and intestinal barrier function using a model of systemic injury and local gut mucosal involvement. Mice with 30% total body surface area steam burn were used as model of severe injury. Vagal nerve stimulation was performed to assess the role of parasympathetic signaling on enteric glia activation. In vivo intestinal permeability was measured to assess barrier function. Intestine was collected to investigate changes in histology; GFAP expression was assessed by quantitative PCR, by confocal microscopy, and in GFAP-luciferase transgenic mice. Stimulation of the vagus nerve prevented injury-induced intestinal barrier injury. Intestinal GFAP expression increased at early time points following burn and returned to baseline by 24 h after injury. Vagal nerve stimulation prior to injury increased GFAP expression to a greater degree than burn alone. Gastrointestinal bioluminescence was imaged in GFAP-luciferase transgenic animals following either severe burn or vagal stimulation and confirmed the increased expression of intestinal GFAP. Injection of S-nitrosoglutathione, a signaling molecule released by activated enteric glia cells, following burn exerts protective effects similar to vagal nerve stimulation. Intestinal expression of GFAP increases following severe burn injury. Stimulation of the vagus nerve increases enteric glia activation, which is associated with improved intestinal barrier function. The vagus nerve may mediate the

  20. Quantifying Risk Factors for Long-Term Sleep Problems After Burn Injury in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Austin F; Ryan, Colleen M; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Kazis, Lewis E; Li, Nien Chen; Rose, Mary; Liang, Matthew H; Wang, Chao; Palmieri, Tina; Meyer, Walter J; Pidcock, Frank S; Reilly, Debra; Sheridan, Robert L; Tompkins, Ronald G

    Restorative sleep is an important component of quality of life. Disturbances in sleep after burn injury were reported but all based on uncontrolled or nonstandardized data. The occurrence and the effect of long-term sleep problems in young adult burn survivors have not been well defined. This 5-year (2003-2008) prospective multicenter longitudinal study included adults with burn injuries ages 19 to 30 years who completed the Young Adult Burn Outcome Questionnaire (YABOQ) up to 36 months after injury. The items measured 15 patient-reported outcomes including physical, psychological, and social statuses and symptoms such as itch and pain. Scores of these 15 YABOQ outcome domains were standardized to a mean of 50 and a SD of 10 based on an age-matched nonburned reference group of young adults. Sleep quality was assessed using the item 'How satisfied are you now with your sleep,' rated by a 5-point Likert scale. Patients responding with very and somewhat dissatisfied were classified as having sleep dissatisfaction and the remaining as less or not dissatisfied. The associations between sleep dissatisfaction (yes/no) and YABOQ outcome domains were analyzed longitudinally using mixed-effect generalized linear models, adjusted for %TBSA burned, age, gender, and race. Generalized estimating equations were used to take into account correlated error resulting from repeated surveys on each patient over time. One hundred and fifty-two burn survivors participated in the YABOQ survey at baseline and during the follow-up who had at least one survey with a response to the sleep item. Among them, sleep dissatisfaction was twice as prevalent (76/152, 50%) when compared with the nonburned reference group (29/112, 26%). The likelihood of a burn survivor being dissatisfied with sleep was reduced over time after the burn injury. Sleep dissatisfaction following burns was significantly associated, in a dose-dependent manner, with increasing burn size (P = .001). Better sleep was associated

  1. Intraluminal Flagellin Differentially Contributes to Gut Dysbiosis and Systemic Inflammation following Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Logan; Doyle, Allie; Miller, Aaron L.; Pyles, Richard B.; Olah, Gabor; Szabo, Csaba; Hoskins, Sarah; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia

    2016-01-01

    Burn injury is associated with a loss of gut barrier function, resulting in systemic dissemination of gut-derived bacteria and their products. The bacterial protein and TLR5 agonist, flagellin, induces non-specific innate immune responses. Because we detected flagellin in the serum of burn patients, we investigated whether gut-derived flagellin was a primary or secondary contributor to intestinal dysfunction and systemic inflammation following burn injury. The apical surface of polarized human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), Caco-2BBe, were exposed to 50 or 500 ng of purified flagellin and 1 x 105 of an intestinal E. coli (EC) isolate as follows: 1) flagellin added 30 min prior to EC, 2) flagellin and EC added simultaneously, or 3) EC added 30 min prior to flagellin. Our results showed that luminal flagellin and EC modulated each other's biological actions, which influenced their ability to induce basolateral secretion of inflammatory cytokines and subsequent translocation of bacteria and their products. A low dose of flagellin accompanied by an enteric EC in the lumen, tempered inflammation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. However, higher doses of flagellin acted synergistically with EC to induce both intestinal and systemic inflammation that compromised barrier integrity, increasing systemic inflammation following burn injury, a process we have termed flagellemia. In a murine model of burn injury we found that oral gavage of flagellin (1 μg/mouse) significantly affected the gut microbiome after burn injury. In these mice, flagellin disseminated out of the intestine into the serum and to distal organs (mesenteric lymph nodes and lungs) where it induced secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) and CXCL1/KC (mouse equivalent of human IL-8) at 24 and 48h post-burn. Our results illustrated that gut-derived flagellin alone or accompanied by a non-pathogenic enteric EC strain can function as an initiator of luminal and systemic inflammation

  2. Intensive care of children with burn injuries and the role of the multidisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Biasini, Augusto; Biasini, Marco; Stella, Marcello

    2014-11-01

    Trauma from burns and scalds in children is more common and more damaging than in adults, and may indicate abuse. The main goal of intensive care of an acute burn is to limit the extent of the systemic insult. Effective treatment of such acute physiological changes requires experienced monitoring by multidisciplinary teams, following appropriate emergency protocols at specialised burn centres in cases of major trauma. First aid involves maintaining a patent airway, supporting circulation and respiration, arresting the burning, managing pain and distress, reducing infection and considering transfer to specialist care. Advances in techniques and treatment have increased survival rates and ultimate quality of life, but education and prevention programmes are still required at all levels to reduce the incidence of burns among children.

  3. Acute kidney injury in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Campbell, G Adam; Hu, Daniel; Okusa, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent and significant complication of cancer and cancer therapy. Cancer patients frequently encounter risk factors for AKI including older age, CKD, prerenal conditions, sepsis, exposure to nephrotoxins, and obstructive physiology. AKI can also be secondary to paraneoplastic conditions, including glomerulonephritis and microangiopathic processes. This complication can have significant consequences, including effects on patients' ability to continue to receive therapy for their malignancy. This review will serve to summarize potential etiologies of AKI that present in patients with cancer as well as to highlight specific patient populations, such as the critically ill cancer patient.

  4. Synthetic cannabinoids and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Faisal; Prabhakar, Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCB) are a family of chemicals that bind to cannabinoid receptors and cause psychoactive effects. Over the past few years, they have been increasingly used for recreational purposes, especially by young adults, and have been reported to have many adverse effects. Acute kidney injury (AKI) has been recently reported; the pathophysiology of SCB-induced AKI is unknown. We report three cases of AKI in the setting of SCB use. The peak serum creatinine levels ranged from 3.0 to 5.7 mg/dL; one patient required hemodialysis. SCB can induce AKI. PMID:26424946

  5. Acute kidney injury in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Mitchell H

    2013-08-01

    Most patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI) are older than 65 years. Specific structural and functional changes that occur in the aging kidney predispose the elderly patient to AKI. This risk is further compounded by comorbid conditions, polypharmacy, and the need for invasive procedures. When AKI does occur, it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although morbidity and mortality increases with advancing age, many elderly patients can survive AKI and do well. Thus, decision making should be thoughtful and individualized, and not dependent on age. Whenever possible, preventive approaches should be pursued to lessen the burden of AKI.

  6. Acute Kidney Injury: Diagnostic Approaches and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Konstantinos; Spanou, Loukia

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a significant independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality. In the last ten years a large number of publications have highlighted the limitations of traditional approaches and the inadequacies of conventional biomarkers to diagnose and monitor renal insufficiency in the acute setting. A great effort was directed not only to the discovery and validation of new biomarkers aimed to detect AKI more accurately but also to standardise the definition of AKI. Despite the advances in both areas, biomarkers have not yet entered into routine clinical practice and the definition of this syndrome has many areas of uncertainty. This review will discuss the controversies in diagnosis and the potential of novel biomarkers to improve the definition of the syndrome. PMID:28167845

  7. Long term functional outcomes and quality of life following severe burn injury.

    PubMed

    Druery, Martha; Brown, Tim La H; La H Brown, Tim; Muller, Michael

    2005-09-01

    This study was designed to examine functional and psychological outcome of severely burned patients adults. Adult patients (n=38) admitted to the Royal Brisbane hospital with burns >40% TBSA were assessed two years post injury using the Abbreviated BSHS and a supplemental questionnaire relating to specific physiotherapy and occupational health issues. An average return to driving occurred at 36 weeks and return to work at 51 weeks. Involvement of the hands and face significantly altered the physical domain of the questionnaire and the sub-domain examining role. Genital burns altered the sexual sub-domain, but this was not gender dependant. Mobility and self care were significantly altered when a burn was >20% TBSA full thickness. The study demonstrates that these patients can develop functional independence and good quality of life. The long term outlook for patients with large burns is generally positive. Consequently, burn care professionals can be reassured that the effort is worthwhile.

  8. Acute kidney injury in the pregnant patient.

    PubMed

    Nwoko, Rosemary; Plecas, Darko; Garovic, Vesna D

    2012-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is costly and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. An understanding of the renal physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy is essential for proper evaluation, diagnosis, and management of AKI. As in the general population, AKI can occur from prerenal, intrinsic, and post-renal causes. Major causes of pre-renal azotemia include hyperemesis gravidarum and uterine hemorrhage in the setting of placental abruption. Intrinsic etiologies include infections from acute pyelonephritis and septic abortion, bilateral cortical necrosis, and acute tubular necrosis. Particular attention should be paid to specific conditions that lead to AKI during the second and third trimesters, such as preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and TTP-HUS. For each of these disorders, delivery of the fetus is the recommended therapeutic option, with additional therapies indicated for each specific disease entity. An understanding of the various etiologies of AKI in the pregnant patient is key to the appropriate clinical management, prevention of adverse maternal outcomes, and safe delivery of the fetus. In pregnant women with pre-existing kidney disease, the degree of renal dysfunction is the major determining factor of pregnancy outcomes, which may further be complicated by a prior history of hypertension.

  9. The year in burns 2011.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Steven E; Arnoldo, Brett D

    2012-12-01

    For 2011, approximately 1746 original research articles in burns were published in English in scientific journals. This article reviews those with the most potential impact on for burn therapeutics and outcomes according to the Editor of one of the major journals (Burns) and his colleague. As done previously, articles were found and divided into these topic areas: epidemiology of injury and burn prevention, wound and scar characterisation, acute care and critical care, inhalation injury, infection, psychological considerations, pain and itching management, rehabilitation and long-term outcomes, and burn reconstruction. Each selected article is mentioned briefly with editorial comment.

  10. The evaluation of physical exam findings in patients assessed for suspected burn inhalation injury.

    PubMed

    Ching, Jessica A; Shah, Jehan L; Doran, Cody J; Chen, Henian; Payne, Wyatt G; Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the utility of singed nasal hair (SN), carbonaceous sputum (CS), and facial burns (FB) as indicators of burn inhalation injury, when compared to the accepted standard of bronchoscopic diagnosis of inhalation injury. An institutional review board approved, retrospective review was conducted. All patients were suspected to have burn inhalation injury and subsequently underwent bronchoscopic evaluation. Data collected included: percent burn TBSA, burn injury mechanism, admission physical exam findings (SN, CS, FB), and bronchoscopy findings. Thirty-five males and twelve females met inclusion criteria (n = 47). Bronchoscopy was normal in 31 patients (66%). Data were analyzed as all patients and in subgroups according to burn TBSA and an enclosed space mechanism of injury. Physical exam findings (SN, CS, FB) were evaluated individually and in combination. Overall, the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values calculated were poor and inconsistent, and they did not improve within subgroup analysis or when physical findings were combined. Further statistical analysis suggested the physical findings, whether in isolation or in combination, have poor discrimination between patients that have and do not have inhalation injury (AUC < 0.7, P > .05) and poor agreement with the diagnosis made by bronchoscopy (κ < 0.4, P > .05). This remained true in the subgroup analysis as well. Our data demonstrated the findings of SN, CS, and FB are unreliable evidence for inhalation injury, even in the context of an enclosed space mechanism of injury. Thus, these physical findings are not absolute indicators for intubation and should be interpreted as one component of the history and physical.

  11. Caregiver-related predictors of thermal burn injuries among Iranian children: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Mohammadi, Reza; Ayubi, Erfan; Almasi-Hashiani, Amir; Pakzad, Reza; Sullman, Mark J. M.; Safiri, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Burns are a common and preventable cause of injury in children. The aim of this study was to investigate child and caregiver characteristics which may predict childhood burn injuries among Iranian children and to examine whether confounding exists among these predictors. Methods A hospital based case-control study was conducted using 281 burn victims and 273 hospital-based controls, which were matched by age, gender and place of residence (rural/urban). The characteristics of the children and their caregivers were analyzed using crude and adjusted models to test whether these were predictors of childhood burn injuries. Results The age of the caregiver was significantly lower for burn victims than for the controls (P<0.05). Further, the amount of time the caregiver spent outdoors with the child and their economic status had a significant positive association with the odds of a burn injury (P<0.05). A multivariate logistic regression found that Type A behaviour among caregivers was independently associated with the child's odds of suffering a burn injury (OR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.04–1.21). The research also found that children with ADHD (Inattentive subscale: Crude OR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.16–3.95, Adjusted OR = 5.65, 95% CI: 2.53–12.61; Hyperactive subscale: Crude OR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.23–2.41, Adjusted OR = 2.53, 95% CI: 1.65–3.87) also had increased odds of suffering a burn injury. However, several variables were identified as possible negative confounder variables, as the associations were stronger in the multivariate model than in the crude models. Conclusion The caregiver's characteristics which were predictors of burn injuries among Iranian children were: being younger, high socio-economic status, Type A behavioural pattern and spending more time outdoors. In addition, the relationship between a child's ADHD scores and the odds of a burn injury may be negatively confounded by the caregivers predictor variables. PMID:28151942

  12. Social Support and Resilience Among Patients with Burn Injury in Lahore, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Sadiq; Bhuiyan, Mariam M; Usman, Jawad; Inam-ul-Haq, Ahmed; Cheema, Sara S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Social support and ego resiliency play a great role in maintaining the physical and mental health of patients with burn injuries. The present study has been designed to compare ego resiliency levels and the degree of social support in patients with a burn injury and their healthy counterparts. Methods This study was conducted in two teaching hospitals in Lahore, Pakistan from May 2015 to July 2015. A total of 80 burn patients presenting in outpatient departments of general surgery, plastic surgery, and burn centers of these hospitals were surveyed conveniently, and for comparison, 80 patients presenting in outpatient departments with minor ailments, for routine checkups or follow-ups were recruited. The questionnaire comprised three sections: demographics, the Urdu versions of the Ego Resiliency Scale (ER-89), and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS). All data were analyzed in SPSS v. 20 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY). Results Patients with a burn injury were associated with lower scores on the social support scale as well as its subscales assessing support from the significant other, family and friends than their healthy counterparts. However, no significant differences in scores on the ego resiliency scale were reported between these two groups. Conclusion Patients with a burn injury perceived low social support levels from society, which negatively affects their health outcomes. However, their resilience levels were not significantly different from their healthy counterparts. PMID:28070467

  13. Outcomes of Older Adults with Burn Injury: University Clinical Center of Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    B. Duci, Shkelzen; M. Arifi, Hysni; R. Ahmeti, Hasan; K. Zatriqi, Violeta; A. Buja, Zejn; T. Hoxha, Enver; Y. Mekaj, Agon

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Advances in burn care over the past 50 years have brought about remarkable improvement in mortality rates such that survival has become an expected outcome even in patients with extensive injuries. Although these improvements have occurred in all age groups, survival in older adults still lags far behind that in younger cohorts. This study determines the outcomes of older adults with burn injury in University Clinical Center of Kosovo. METHODS This is a retrospective study that includes 56 burn patients, older than 60 years who were admitted at the Department of Plastic Surgery, between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. Data processing was done with the statistical package of Stat 3. From the statistical parameters the structural index, arithmetic median, and standard deviation were calculated. RESULTS Fifty six burned patient older than 60 years were included during a 10-year period. Of the 56 elderly patients 29 were women and 27 were men with a mean age of 66.7 years (range, 60-85 years). The differences were not statistically significant for both genders regarding the causes of burn injury. CONCLUSION Considering the gradual increase of the elderly population in our country based on the data of the Ministry of Public Services, an increase is expected to the incidence of burn injuries in the population of this category of our country. PMID:26284184

  14. Household related predictors of burn injuries in an Iranian population: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To prevent burn injuries it is vital to have sound information on predictors of its occurrence in different settings. Ardabil Province is the coldest province of Iran with high burden of burn injuries. The aim of this study was to determine the household related predictors of unintentional burns in Ardabil Province located at North-West of Iran. Methods The study was conducted through a hospital based case–control design. 239 burn victims as well as 246 hospital-based controls were enrolled. Both bivariate and multivariate analysis methods were used. Results Males comprised 55.2% of all the study subjects. Mean age of the participants was 21.8 years (95% CI: 19.17-24.4). The economic ability of the households was associated with risk of burn injuries. Multivariate conditional logistic regression results showed the following variables to be independent factors associated with burn injuries. Using non-conventional pipe-less air heaters instead of conventional piped kerosene- or gas-burning heaters (Odds ratio: 1.98, 95% CI: 1.1-3.6). Common use of picnic gas-stove for cooking at home (odds ratio = 1.6, 95%CI: 1–2.4). Using electric samovars instead of other types of samovars (Odds ratio = 0.3, 95% CI: 0.1-1). Using samovars lacking the national standard authorization mark (Odds ratio = 2.2, 95% CI: 1.4-3.6). Conclusion Using some types of specific heating or cooking appliances, and unsafe use of conventional appliances were major risk predictors of burn injuries in this population. PMID:22571762

  15. Long-Term Study Of Health And Quality Of Life After Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moi, A.L.; Haugsmyr, E.; Heisterkamp, H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The aim of the present study was to examine burn patient health status, quality of life and work status 16.2 (1.7) [mean (SD)] years after burn injury, and to compare the findings with similar questionnaire data from the same people obtained 11.5 years earlier. Data on burn-specific health (BSHS-N), generic health (SF-36), overall quality of life (QOLS), injury characteristics, socio-demography and work were obtained in 2001 from 95 adult burn patients. In 2013, 78 participants were still eligible, and 34 of them (age: 53.4 [9.4] [mean (SD)], total body surface burn: 17.8% [12.7%]; full thickness injury: 4.4% [5.1%]) answered a follow up study. In 2001, the burn patients reported impaired health status, but an overall quality of life comparable to the Norwegian general population. In particular, the participants were satisfied with their close relationships. At follow up 11.5 years later, the perceived burn-specific and generic health remained unchanged, whereas overall quality of life had improved significantly (QOLS score 77.2 (10.2) vs. 73.1 (12.1), p=0.003), with the largest improvements in the items related to satisfaction with helping others, work, physical active pastimes and independence. The results indicate that self-perceived functioning and wellbeing expressed by burn-specific and generic health status remain stable after the first years post injury. The improvement in overall quality of life 16.2 years post injury suggests long-term processes of growth. PMID:28289366

  16. Long-Term Study Of Health And Quality Of Life After Burn Injury.

    PubMed

    Moi, A L; Haugsmyr, E; Heisterkamp, H

    2016-12-31

    The aim of the present study was to examine burn patient health status, quality of life and work status 16.2 (1.7) [mean (SD)] years after burn injury, and to compare the findings with similar questionnaire data from the same people obtained 11.5 years earlier. Data on burn-specific health (BSHS-N), generic health (SF-36), overall quality of life (QOLS), injury characteristics, socio-demography and work were obtained in 2001 from 95 adult burn patients. In 2013, 78 participants were still eligible, and 34 of them (age: 53.4 [9.4] [mean (SD)], total body surface burn: 17.8% [12.7%]; full thickness injury: 4.4% [5.1%]) answered a follow up study. In 2001, the burn patients reported impaired health status, but an overall quality of life comparable to the Norwegian general population. In particular, the participants were satisfied with their close relationships. At follow up 11.5 years later, the perceived burn-specific and generic health remained unchanged, whereas overall quality of life had improved significantly (QOLS score 77.2 (10.2) vs. 73.1 (12.1), p=0.003), with the largest improvements in the items related to satisfaction with helping others, work, physical active pastimes and independence. The results indicate that self-perceived functioning and wellbeing expressed by burn-specific and generic health status remain stable after the first years post injury. The improvement in overall quality of life 16.2 years post injury suggests long-term processes of growth.

  17. Adenosine and protection from acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Steven C.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of Review Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) is a major clinical problem without effective therapy. Development of AKI among hospitalized patients drastically increases mortality, and morbidity. With increases in complex surgical procedures together with a growing elderly population, the incidence of AKI is rising. Renal adenosine receptor (AR) manipulation may have great therapeutic potential in mitigating AKI. In this review, we discuss renal AR biology and potential clinical therapies for AKI. Recent Findings The 4 AR subtypes (A1AR, A2AAR, A2BAR and A3AR) have diverse effects on the kidney. The pathophysiology of AKI may dictate the specific AR subtype activation needed to produce renal protection. The A1AR activation in renal tubules and endothelial cells produces beneficial effects against ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury by modulating metabolic demand, decreasing necrosis, apoptosis and inflammation. The A2AAR protects against AKI by modulating leukocyte-mediated renal and systemic inflammation whereas the A2BAR activation protects by direct activation of renal parenchymal ARs. In contrast, the A1AR antagonism may play a protective role in nephrotoxic AKI and radiocontrast induced nephropathy by reversing vascular constriction and inducing naturesis and diuresis. Furthermore, as the A3AR-activation exacerbates apoptosis and tissue damage due to renal IR, selective A3AR antagonism may hold promise to attenuate renal IR injury. Finally, renal A1AR activation also protects against renal endothelial dysfunction caused by hepatic IR injury. Summary Despite the current lack of therapies for the treatment and prevention of AKI, recent research suggests that modulation of renal ARs holds promise in treating AKI and extrarenal injury. PMID:22080856

  18. Treatment of acute burn blisters in unscheduled care settings.

    PubMed

    Payne, Sarah; Cole, Elaine

    2012-09-01

    Many patients with minor burns present at emergency departments and urgent care centres, where their management is often undertaken by experienced nurses rather than experts in treating burns. This article describes a small study of the clinical decision making that underpins nurses' management of minor burns in these non-specialist settings. The results suggest that, due to a lack of relevant research, nurses base their decisions on previous experience or expert colleagues' opinions and advice rather than on the evidence.

  19. Impact of bronchial circulation on bronchial exudation following combined burn and smoke inhalation injury in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Naoki; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Maybauer, Dirk M.; Maybauer, Marc O.; Westphal, Martin; Murakami, Kazunori; Hawkins, Hal K.; Cox, Robert A.; Traber, Lillian. D.; Traber, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported bronchial circulation contributes to pulmonary edema and increases shunt fraction following smoke inhalation, and bronchial blood flow significantly increases in inhalation injury. We hypothesized reduction of bronchial blood flow reduces exudation to the airway and ameliorates lung injury from combined burn and smoke insults (B & S injury). Method Merino ewes (n=28) randomly divided into three groups (1: bronchial artery ligated and injured (Injury + ligation group); 2: bronchial artery left intact and injured (Injury + no ligation group); 3: bronchial artery ligated but not injured (No injury + ligation group) were subjected to a flame burn and inhalation injury under halothane anesthesia. Parameters were analyzed using Scheffe’s post hoc test (P<0.05). All Groups were resuscitated with Ringer lactate solution and placed on a ventilator for 48 hours. Results Pulmonary gas exchange (PaO2/FiO2) improved in injury + ligation group. Further, obstruction score, an index of airway cast formation, significantly changed between injury + no ligation group compared to both ligation groups. Conclusion Bronchial circulation plays a significant role in lung injury after B & S injury, and reduction of bronchial blood flow by bronchial artery ligation reduces bronchial exudation, resulting in improved gas exchange. PMID:21195551

  20. Armed Conflict and Burn Injuries: a Brief Review*

    PubMed Central

    Atiyeh, B.S.; Hayek, S.N.; Gunn, S.W.A.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Burns and fire disasters are sad but common and obligatory components of armed conflicts, and with the increasing sophistication of weaponry and of chemical and nuclear devices the problem is not set to disappear; on the contrary. Indeed, with the (fortunate) decrease of major international wars but with the (unfortunate) increase of smaller ethnic and sectarian but equally treacherous conflicts, burns are bound to remain a constant problem. Yet the profession is ill prepared for such dark challenges. PMID:21990978

  1. Acute Kidney Injury Subsequent to Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Robert S.; Herron, Crystal R.; Groom, Robert C.; Brown, Jeremiah R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery is a common and underappreciated syndrome that is associated with poor short- and long-term outcomes. AKI after cardiac surgery may be epiphenomenon, a signal for adverse outcomes by virtue of other affected organ systems, and a consequence of multiple factors. Subtle increases in serum creatinine (SCr) postoperatively, once considered inconsequential, have been shown to reflect a kidney injury that likely occurred in the operating room during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and more often in susceptible individuals. The postoperative elevation in SCr is a delayed signal reflecting the intraoperative injury. Preoperative checklists and the conduct of CPB represent opportunities for prevention of AKI. Newer definitions of AKI provide us with an opportunity to scrutinize perioperative processes of care and determine strategies to decrease the incidence of AKI subsequent to cardiac surgery. Recognizing and mitigating risk factors preoperatively and optimizing intraoperative practices may, in the aggregate, decrease the incidence of AKI. This review explores the pathophysiology of AKI and addresses the features of patients who are the most vulnerable to AKI. Preoperative strategies are discussed with particular attention to a readiness for surgery checklist. Intraoperative strategies include minimizing hemodilution and maximizing oxygen delivery with specific suggestions regarding fluid management and plasma preservation. PMID:26390675

  2. Memories of pain after burn injury--the patient's experience.

    PubMed

    Tengvall, Oili; Wickman, Marie; Wengström, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    Pain after burns is a major clinical problem and researchers continue to report that burn pain remains undertreated. Adequate pain management could contribute to the prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder and can give a growing sense of patients' self-confidence and strength. Freedom from pain might be unrealistic, but the objective should be to reduce pain as much as possible. The purpose of this study was to describe burn patients' experiences and memories of pain during burn care and to acquire a deeper understanding of how patients cope with the experience. The study method was qualitative and interviews were conducted with 12 adult burn patients (eight men and four women) 6 to 12 months postburn (mean = 7 months). The mean burn size for the group was 10.6% mean of TBSA and the mean stay in hospital was 16 days. The interviews were analyzed using Kvales' method for structuring analysis. The patients' experiences and memories of pain during the trajectory of care were clearly described by the informants during the interviews. Four themes were identified for pain: becoming aware of pain, allowing oneself to feel pain, different pain experiences, and fragile body surface. Four themes were identified for coping: pragmatic coping, allowing someone to care for you, carrying the pain, and perspectives on the trauma. Both good and bad memories were recorded during the care trajectory, and it is evident that the patient has to carry the pain experience by themselves to a large extent.

  3. Modelling human burn injuries in a three-dimensional virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Dirnberger, J; Giretzlehner, M; Ruhmer, M; Haller, H; Rodemund, C

    2003-01-01

    This paper gives a work-in-progress report on our research project BurnCase, a virtual environment for modelling human burn injuries. The goal of the project is to simplify and improve the diagnosis and medical treatment of burns. Due to the lack of electronic and computational support for current diagnosis methods, enormous variations regarding the approximated size of burned skin regions exist. And although Simplifications like the Rule-Of-Nines-Method ([Weidringer, 2002]), Lund and Browder ([LundBrowder, 1944]) and others try to compensate for these errors, the fact remains that different physicians overestimate the BSA (Body Surface Area) by 20% up to 50%, depending on the different experience and subjectivity of the approximation process. Nevertheless, different supporting mechanisms have been developed to assist the process of burn region transfer so that after transferring all burned regions on the virtual human body, calculations can be applied in order to evaluate standard indices like the ABSI (Abbreviated Burn Severity Index), and Baux ([Baux, 1989]) as well as ICD10 (International Classification of Diseases) diagnosis encoding. The virtual body simulation is based on state-of-the-art 3D computer graphics (OpenGL). Thus a simulation system, providing a graphical user interface, allows surgeons to transfer a patient's burn injury regions onto an appropriate 3-dimensional model. As such, the BurnCase system improves surface determination by calculating region surfaces up to a precision of one cm2. This improves the average variation to less than 5%, limited by the precision of the surface transfer onto the virtual model. The system already allows the transfer of burned regions by using standard input devices. For this purpose different reference models of human bodies have been created in order to receive appropriate results based on measured physical data of different patients. Moreover, an underlying database stores all entered case studies so that it is

  4. Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... if signs of infection develop. These signs include: Drainage or pus from the burned skin Fever Increased pain Red streaks spreading from the burn Swollen lymph nodes Also call a provider right away if ...

  5. Pediatric burn injuries from day-old campfires: a highly morbid and preventable problem.

    PubMed

    Antonoff, Mara B; Abbott, Andrea M; Rood, Jody; Mohr, Wm J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the authors' experience with pediatric burns from day-old campfires. The authors sought to characterize the operative courses, hospitalizations, and complications arising from burn injuries in this patient population. After Institutional Review Board approval, charts were retrospectively reviewed of pediatric patients seeking care for burn injuries at a regional burn center over 6 years. From June 2002 to September 2008, 30 pediatric patients sought care for burn injuries sustained in campfires; 25 (83.3%) of these occurred in fire pits with previously extinguished fires; 68% were male, with median age of 2.0 years (range, 14 months to 17 years). The median TBSA burned was 2% (range, 1-40%). The most common burn locations were hand (68%), forearm (28%), and foot (24%). Additional locations included back, arm, abdomen, and thigh. Eighteen patients (72%) required hospital admission; among these patients, mean number of hospitalizations was 1.3 (range, 1-2) and mean length of stay was 5 days (range, 1-22 days). This group accounted for 23 admissions, 96 hospital days, 3 intensive care unit days, 16 operations under general anesthesia, and 30 procedural sedations/dressing changes under anesthesia. Operative procedures included 9 full-thickness skin grafts, 13 split-thickness skin grafts, 2 escharotomies, and 1 amputation. Complications included one death (4%), one graft loss (4%), two cellulitis (8%), and four scar hypertrophies (16%). Day-old campfires may cause significant burns in the pediatric population, resulting in considerable short- and long-term morbidities and utilization of health care resources. Our experience with this patient population lends justification for campaigns aimed to prevent such injuries.

  6. Burn injury from car seat in an 11-month-old infant.

    PubMed

    Moharir, Madhavi; Niec, Anne; Wekerle, Christine

    2012-11-01

    Burns in young infants have long been recognized as a potential cause of nonaccidental injury. Accidental exposure to hot car seat parts resulting in significant burn injury is an unusual mimicker of child abuse. A case involving an 11-month-old child who presented with a significant contact burn injury related to the noncovered, heated, plastic part of a car seat, is described. The present case encourages physicians to maintain an unbiased approach to each referred case and to explore the differential diagnosis by detailed history and physical examination. It also serves as a reminder in caregiver education about the precautions to be taken during long-distance travel with young children and infants.

  7. Resuscitation after severe burn injury using high-dose ascorbic acid: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Steven Alexander; Beers, Ryan J; Lentz, Christopher W

    2011-01-01

    Resuscitation of burn victims with high-dose ascorbic acid (vitamin C [VC]) was reported in Japan in the year 2000. Benefits of VC include reduction in fluid requirements, resulting in less tissue edema and body weight gain. In turn, these patients suffer less respiratory impairment and reduced requirement for mechanical ventilation. Despite these results, few burn centers resuscitate patients with VC in fear that it may increase the risk of renal failure. A retrospective review of 40 patients with greater than 20% TBSA between 2007 and 2009 was performed. Patients were divided into two groups: one received only lactated Ringer's (LR) solution and another received LR solution plus 66 mg/kg/hr VC. Both groups were resuscitated with the Parkland formula to maintain stable hemodynamics and adequate urine output (>0.5 ml/kg/hr). Patients with >10-hour delay in transfer to the burn center were excluded. Data collected included age, gender, weight, %TBSA, fluid administered in the first 24 hours, urine output in the first 24 hours, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score. PaO2 in millimeters mercury:%FIO2 ratio and positive end-expiratory pressure were measured at 12-hour intervals, and hematocrit was measured at 6-hour intervals. Comorbidities, mortality, pneumonia, fasciotomies, and renal failure were also noted. After 7 patients were excluded, 17 patients were included in the VC group and 16 in the LR group. VC and LR were matched for age (42 ± 16 years vs 50 ± 20 years, P = .2), burn size (45 ± 21%TBSA vs 39 ± 15%TBSA, P = .45), Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (17 ± 7 vs 18 ± 8, P = .8), and gender. Fluid requirements in the first 24 hours were 5.3 ± 1 ml/kg/%TBSA for VC and 7.1 ± 1 ml/kg/%TBSA for LR (P < .05). Urine output was 1.5 ± 0.4 ml/kg/hr for VC and 1 ± 0.5 ml/kg/hr for LR (P < .05). Vasopressors were needed in four VC patients and nine LR patients (P = .07). VC patients required vasopressors to maintain mean

  8. Applicability of new supervised statistical models to assess burn injury patterns, outcomes, and their interrelationship

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, H.; Bangdiwala, S.I.; Mohmmadi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The aim of the study was to investigate the possibility of using supervised statistical models to assess burn injury patterns, outcomes and their interrelationship. Using burn study data, a preliminary principal component analysis was carried out and two separate clusters were observed. Observations were split into two classes and analysed by partial least squares (PLS) regression discriminant analysis to assess possible predictors of each class. To assess predictors of total body surface area burned (TBSA), the orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS) model was used after PLS regression. The identified classes were later designated as high-risk burn victims and low-risk burn victims. Female gender fell into the high-risk class. Many possible predictors were found to be associated with burn injury extent, after modelling the natural logarithm of TBSA by OPLS. The fitted model explained 76% of variation in Y. It excluded up to 9% of orthogonal variation captured in two orthogonal components. This seems to be the first application of the OPLS model in public health epidemiology. The results of this study were promising regarding the use of supervised models in injury pattern analysis. PMID:22639562

  9. Applicability of new supervised statistical models to assess burn injury patterns, outcomes, and their interrelationship.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, H; Bangdiwala, S I; Mohmmadi, R

    2011-12-31

    The aim of the study was to investigate the possibility of using supervised statistical models to assess burn injury patterns, outcomes and their interrelationship. Using burn study data, a preliminary principal component analysis was carried out and two separate clusters were observed. Observations were split into two classes and analysed by partial least squares (PLS) regression discriminant analysis to assess possible predictors of each class. To assess predictors of total body surface area burned (TBSA), the orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS) model was used after PLS regression. The identified classes were later designated as high-risk burn victims and low-risk burn victims. Female gender fell into the high-risk class. Many possible predictors were found to be associated with burn injury extent, after modelling the natural logarithm of TBSA by OPLS. The fitted model explained 76% of variation in Y. It excluded up to 9% of orthogonal variation captured in two orthogonal components. This seems to be the first application of the OPLS model in public health epidemiology. The results of this study were promising regarding the use of supervised models in injury pattern analysis.

  10. Th17 cells: critical mediators of host responses to burn injury and sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Rendon, Juan L.; Choudhry, Mashkoor A.

    2012-01-01

    Th cells have long been recognized as vital components of the adaptive immune system. Until recently, CD3+CD4+ Th cells were divided into cell-mediated Th1 or humoral Th2 responses. However, the Th1-Th2 hypothesis failed to accommodate the more recently described Th17 cells. Today, the major Th cell subsets include Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22, and Tregs, each of which produce specific effector cytokines under unique transcriptional regulation. Specifically, Th17 cells produce effector cytokines IL-17, IL-21, and IL-22 under the regulation of ROR-γt. Th17 lymphocytes were first described as orchestrators of neutrophil recruitment and activation and as key players in chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. More recent evidence suggest that Th17 lymphocytes and their effector cytokines play a crucial role in maintaining mucosal immunity and barrier integrity, including the skin, lung, and gut. Burn injury induces global changes to the systemic immune response, including suppressed immune function and increased susceptibility to infection. Moreover, burn trauma is associated with remote organ injury. This relationship between burn and remote organ injury supports the hypothesis that immune suppression may facilitate the development of sepsis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in critically ill burn patients. Herein, we discuss this emerging adaptive cell subset in critical care settings, including burn injury and clinical sepsis, and highlight the potential therapeutic role of IL-22. PMID:22753950

  11. Physical outcomes of patients with burn injuries--a 12 month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Mark; McMahon, Margaret; Stiller, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    There is only limited research documenting functional ability, physical fitness, and health related quality of life after burn injury. The objective of this study was to measure a comprehensive range of physiotherapy-related outcomes over a 12-month period for patients with significant burn injuries. A prospective study was performed on consecutive patients admitted to the Royal Adelaide Hospital over a 12-month period. Outcomes were measured at admission and discharge from hospital and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months, and comprised the: Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, Lower Extremity Functional Scale questionnaire, shuttle walk test, grip strength and scar appearance using the Matching Assessment with Photographs of Scars. A total of 86 patients (74 male, mean age 38 years) participated. There was a significant deterioration in all outcomes in the first few months after burn injury, with most outcomes improving towards baseline levels by 6 months. However, lower limb function (Lower Extremity Functional Scale) remained significantly reduced at 12 months and functional exercise capacity (shuttle walk test) was still markedly reduced at 6 months compared with predicted normal values. The total burn surface area significantly affected many of the outcomes. In conclusion, for this sample of patients after burn injury, there was an acceptable rate of recovery for physiotherapy-related outcomes, in that most measures had returned to near baseline levels by 6 months postinjury, with the exception of lower limb function and functional exercise capacity.

  12. Burn injuries caused by a hair-dryer--an unusual case of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Darok, M; Reischle, S

    2001-01-01

    About 1.4-26% burn injuries in children appear to be abusive in origin. A 2.5-year-old girl was referred to our institute because of suspected child abuse. Clinical examination and later interrogation of the mother revealed non-recent deep second degree burn injuries on both gluteal regions, caused by the partner of the mother by pressing a hand-held hair-dryer against the skin. The authors present the findings of this unusual method of child abuse.

  13. Erythropoietin (EPO) in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Moore, Elizabeth; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-03-21

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a 30.4 kDa glycoprotein produced by the kidney, and is mostly well-known for its physiological function in regulating red blood cell production in the bone marrow. Accumulating evidence, however, suggests that EPO has additional organ protective effects, which may be useful in the prevention or treatment of acute kidney injury. These protective mechanisms are multifactorial in nature and include inhibition of apoptotic cell death, stimulation of cellular regeneration, inhibition of deleterious pathways, and promotion of recovery.In this article, we review the physiology of EPO, assess previous work that supports the role of EPO as a general tissue protective agent, and explain the mechanisms by which it may achieve this tissue protective effect. We then focus on experimental and clinical data that suggest that EPO has a kidney protective effect.

  14. Acute liver injury secondary to sertraline.

    PubMed

    Suen, Christopher F D Li Wai; Boyapati, Ray; Simpson, Ian; Dev, Anouk

    2013-09-26

    Sertraline is widely prescribed to treat depression and anxiety disorders. However, hepatitis secondary to its use is a rare entity. We report the case of a 26-year-old woman in her 20th week of pregnancy presented with nausea, vomiting, malaise and dark urine. This occurred 6 months after sertraline 50 mg daily was started for the treatment of depression. Three weeks prior to her presentation, the dose of sertraline was increased to 100 mg daily. The patient's liver biochemical profile demonstrated increased transaminases. The biopsy of the liver showed lobular hepatitis, with a mild prominence of eosinophils, suggestive of a drug-induced or toxin-induced aetiology. Extensive biochemical work-up failed to show any other pathology to account for her hepatitis. Liver function tests normalised after cessation of sertraline, indicating a probable association between sertraline use and acute hepatocellular injury in our patient.

  15. Nitric oxide and hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-wu; Han, Cui-hong; Zhang, Pei-xi; Zheng, Juan; Liu, Kan; Sun, Xue-jun

    2016-01-01

    Hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) refers to the damage to the lungs secondary to exposure to elevated oxygen partial pressure. HALI has been a concern in clinical practice with the development of deep diving and the use of normobaric as well as hyperbaric oxygen in clinical practice. Although the pathogenesis of HALI has been extensively studied, the findings are still controversial. Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger and has been considered as a signaling molecule involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Although the role of NO in the occurrence and development of pulmonary diseases including HALI has been extensively studied, the findings on the role of NO in HALI are conflicting. Moreover, inhalation of NO has been approved as a therapeutic strategy for several diseases. In this paper, we briefly summarize the role of NO in the pathogenesis of HALI and the therapeutic potential of inhaled NO in HALI. PMID:27867474

  16. Fluid management in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Stuart L

    2014-01-01

    Fluid management in critical illness has undergone extensive reevaluation in the past decade. Since a significant percentage of critically ill patients develop acute kidney injury (AKI), optimal fluid management is even more paramount to prevent the ill effects of either underhydration or overhydration. The concepts of early goal-directed fluid therapy (EGDT) and conservative late fluid management permeate current clinical research, and the independent association between fluid accumulation and mortality has been repeatedly demonstrated. A number of prospective randomized trials are planned to provide an adequately powered assessment of the effect of EGDT or earlier renal replacement therapy initiation in patients with, or at risk for AKI. The aim of this analytical review is to use existing clinical and physiological studies to support a 3-phase model of fluid management in the critically ill patient with AKI.

  17. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Roberts, George H

    2004-01-01

    Transfusion is an inevitable event in the life of many individuals. Transfusion medicine personnel attempt to provide blood products that will result in a safe and harmless transfusion. However, this is not always possible since no laboratory test gives totally accurate and reliable results all the time and testing in routine transfusion services is devoted primarily to the identification of red blood cell problems. Thus, when patients are transfused, several possible adverse effects may occur in the transfused patient even though quality testing indicates no potential problem. These adverse events include infectious complications, hemolytic reactions, anaphylaxis, urticaria, circulatory overload, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, chills and fever, immunomodulation, and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

  18. Transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Federico, Anne

    2009-02-01

    Approximately one person in 5,000 will experience an episode of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) in conjunction with the transfusion of whole blood or blood components. Its hallmarks include hypoxemia, dyspnea, fever, hypotension, and bilateral pulmonary edema (noncardiogenic). The mortality for reported cases is 16.3%. The incidence and mortality may be even higher than estimated because of under-recognition and under-reporting. Although TRALI was identified as a clinical entity in the 1980s, a lack of consensus regarding a definition was present until 2004. An exact cause has yet to be identified; however, there are two theories regarding the etiology: the "antibody" and the "two-hit" theories. These theories involve both donor and recipient factors. Further education and research are needed to assist in the development of strategies for the prevention and treatment of TRALI.

  19. Clinical management of electrical burns in the developing world: a case of electrical burn injury left untreated leading to amputation.

    PubMed

    Choong, Marcus; Chy, Delia; Guevarra, Jerric R; Ross, Allen

    2017-02-15

    We discuss the case of a 26-year-old male patient from Northern Samar, the Philippines who was left without essential health services after the amputation of all four limbs following a high voltage (20 000 volts) injury in Metro Manila in 2011. Local health services in the developing world are faced with enormous challenges in providing first-line care for burn patients. The cost of maintaining a burn unit, finding suitable qualified staff, and appropriate referral mechanisms are only some of the challenges faced. Once a patient is discharged from hospital they face more obstacles in obtaining artificial limbs, physiotherapy and access to mental health services. Disability pensions are non-existent thus patients place a considerable lifelong burden on their families.

  20. The impact of non-severe burn injury on cardiac function and long-term cardiovascular pathology

    PubMed Central

    O’Halloran, Emily; Shah, Amit; Dembo, Lawrence; Hool, Livia; Viola, Helena; Grey, Christine; Boyd, James; O’Neill, Tomas; Wood, Fiona; Duke, Janine; Fear, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Severe burn injury significantly affects cardiovascular function for up to 3 years. However, whether this leads to long-term pathology is unknown. The impact of non-severe burn injury, which accounts for over 80% of admissions in developed countries, has not been investigated. Using a rodent model of non-severe burn injury with subsequent echocardiography we showed significantly increased left ventricular end systolic diameter (LVESD) and ventricular wall thickness at up to 3 months post-injury. Use of propranolol abrogated the changes in cardiac measures observed. Subsequently we investigated changes in a patient cohort with non-severe injury. Echocardiography measured at baseline and at 3 months post-injury showed increased LVESD at 3 months and significantly decreased posterior wall diameter. Finally, 32 years of Western Australian hospital records were used to investigate the incidence of cardiovascular disease admissions after burn injury. People who had experienced a burn had increased hospital admissions and length of stay for cardiovascular diseases when compared to a matched uninjured cohort. This study presents animal, patient and population data that strongly suggest non-severe burn injury has significant effects on cardiovascular function and long-term morbidity in some burn patients. Identification of patients at risk will promote better intervention and outcomes for burn patients. PMID:27694999

  1. The impact of non-severe burn injury on cardiac function and long-term cardiovascular pathology.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Emily; Shah, Amit; Dembo, Lawrence; Hool, Livia; Viola, Helena; Grey, Christine; Boyd, James; O'Neill, Tomas; Wood, Fiona; Duke, Janine; Fear, Mark

    2016-10-03

    Severe burn injury significantly affects cardiovascular function for up to 3 years. However, whether this leads to long-term pathology is unknown. The impact of non-severe burn injury, which accounts for over 80% of admissions in developed countries, has not been investigated. Using a rodent model of non-severe burn injury with subsequent echocardiography we showed significantly increased left ventricular end systolic diameter (LVESD) and ventricular wall thickness at up to 3 months post-injury. Use of propranolol abrogated the changes in cardiac measures observed. Subsequently we investigated changes in a patient cohort with non-severe injury. Echocardiography measured at baseline and at 3 months post-injury showed increased LVESD at 3 months and significantly decreased posterior wall diameter. Finally, 32 years of Western Australian hospital records were used to investigate the incidence of cardiovascular disease admissions after burn injury. People who had experienced a burn had increased hospital admissions and length of stay for cardiovascular diseases when compared to a matched uninjured cohort. This study presents animal, patient and population data that strongly suggest non-severe burn injury has significant effects on cardiovascular function and long-term morbidity in some burn patients. Identification of patients at risk will promote better intervention and outcomes for burn patients.

  2. Acute pain in an emergency clinic: latency of onset and descriptor patterns related to different injuries.

    PubMed

    Melzack, R; Wall, P D; Ty, T C

    1982-09-01

    Features of acute pain were examined in patients at an emergency clinic. Patients who had severe, life-threatening injuries or who were agitated, drunk, or 'in shock' were excluded from the study. Of 138 patients who were alert, rational and coherent, 51 (37%) stated that they did not feel pain at the time of injury. The majority of these patients reported onset of pain within an hour of injury, although the delays were as long as 9 h or more in some patients. The predominant emotions of the patients were embarrassment at appearing careless or worry about loss of wages. None expressed any pleasure or indicated any prospect of gain as a result of the injury. The occurrence of delays in pain onset was related to the nature of the injury. Of 46 patients whose injuries were limited to skin (lacerations, cuts, abrasions, burns), 53% had a pain-free period. Of 86 patients with deep-tissue injuries (fractures, sprains, bruises, amputation of a finger, stabs and crushes), only 28% had a pain-free period. The McGill Pain Questionnaire was administered to patients who felt pain immediately after injury or after a delay, and revealed a normal distribution of sensory scores but very low affective scores compared to patients with chronic pain. The results indicate that the relationship between injury and pain is highly variable and complex.

  3. Autophagy in acute kidney injury and repair.

    PubMed

    He, Liyu; Livingston, Man J; Dong, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major kidney disease associated with a poor clinical outcome both in the short and long term. Autophagy is a cellular stress response that plays important roles in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Autophagy is induced in proximal tubules during AKI. A renoprotective role of autophagy in AKI has been demonstrated by pharmacological and genetic inhibition studies. The role of autophagy in kidney recovery and repair from AKI, however, remains largely unknown. A dynamic change in autophagy during the recovery phase of AKI seems to be important for tubular proliferation and repair. In renal fibrosis, autophagy may either promote this via the induction of tubular atrophy and decomposition, or prevent it via effects on the intracellular degradation of excessive collagen. Further research is expected to improve the understanding of the regulation of autophagy in kidney injury and repair, elucidate the pathological roles of autophagy in renal fibrosis, and discover therapeutic targets for treating AKI and preventing its progression to chronic kidney disease.

  4. Acute kidney injury: global health alert.

    PubMed

    Li, Philip Kam Tao; Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Mehta, Ravindra L

    2013-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly prevalent in developing and developed countries and is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. Most etiologies of AKI can be prevented by interventions at the individual, community, regional and in-hospital levels. Effective measures must include community-wide efforts to increase an awareness of the devastating effects of AKI and provide guidance on preventive strategies, as well as early recognition and management. Efforts should be focused on minimizing causes of AKI, increasing awareness of the importance of serial measurements of serum creatinine in high-risk patients, and documenting urine volume in acutely ill people to achieve early diagnosis; there is as yet no definitive role for alternative biomarkers. Protocols need to be developed to systematically manage prerenal conditions and specific infections. More accurate data about the true incidence and clinical impact of AKI will help to raise the importance of the disease in the community, and increase awareness of AKI by governments, the public, general and family physicians and other healthcare professionals to help prevent the disease. Prevention is the key to avoid the heavy burden of mortality and morbidity associated with AKI.

  5. Acute renal injury after partial hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Luis Alberto Batista; Bredt, Luis Cesar; Cipriani, Raphael Flavio Fachini

    2016-01-01

    Currently, partial hepatectomy is the treatment of choice for a wide variety of liver and biliary conditions. Among the possible complications of partial hepatectomy, acute kidney injury (AKI) should be considered as an important cause of increased morbidity and postoperative mortality. Difficulties in the data analysis related to postoperative AKI after liver resections are mainly due to the multiplicity of factors to be considered in the surgical patients, moreover, there is no consensus of the exact definition of AKI after liver resection in the literature, which hampers comparison and analysis of the scarce data published on the subject. Despite this multiplicity of risk factors for postoperative AKI after partial hepatectomy, there are main factors that clearly contribute to its occurrence. First factor relates to large blood losses with renal hypoperfusion during the operation, second factor relates to the occurrence of post-hepatectomy liver failure with consequent distributive circulatory changes and hepatorenal syndrome. Eventually, patients can have more than one factor contributing to post-operative AKI, and frequently these combinations of acute insults can be aggravated by sepsis or exposure to nephrotoxic drugs. PMID:27478539

  6. Acute kidney injury in the tropics

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; George, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most challenging problems faced by clinicians in the tropics owing to its fast-changing burden. AKI in the tropics is strikingly different from that in the developed world in terms of etiology and presentation. In addition, there is a stark contrast between well-developed and poor areas in the tropics. The true epidemiological picture of AKI in the tropics is not well understood due to the late presentation of patients to tertiary centers. Infections remain the major culprit in most cases of AKI, with high mortality rates in the tropics. Human immunodeficiency virus–related AKI, related to nephrotoxicity due to antiretroviral therapy, is on the rise. Acute tubular necrosis and thrombotic microangiopathy are the most common mechanisms of AKI. A notable problem in the tropics is the scarcity of resources in health centers to support patients who require critical care due to AKI. This article reviews the unique and contrasting nature of AKI in the tropics and describes its management in each situation. PMID:21911980

  7. Acute kidney injury in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; George, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most challenging problems faced by clinicians in the tropics owing to its fast-changing burden. AKI in the tropics is strikingly different from that in the developed world in terms of etiology and presentation. In addition, there is a stark contrast between well-developed and poor areas in the tropics. The true epidemiological picture of AKI in the tropics is not well understood due to the late presentation of patients to tertiary centers. Infections remain the major culprit in most cases of AKI, with high mortality rates in the tropics. Human immunodeficiency virus-related AKI, related to nephrotoxicity due to antiretroviral therapy, is on the rise. Acute tubular necrosis and thrombotic microangiopathy are the most common mechanisms of AKI. A notable problem in the tropics is the scarcity of resources in health centers to support patients who require critical care due to AKI. This article reviews the unique and contrasting nature of AKI in the tropics and describes its management in each situation.

  8. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)].

    PubMed

    Schweisfurth, H; Sopivnik, I; Moog, R

    2014-09-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is primarily caused by transfusion of fresh frozen plasma or platelet concentrates and occurs by definition within 6 hours after transfusion with acute shortness of breath, hypoxemia and radiographically detectable bilateral infiltrates of the lung. Mostly leucocyte antibodies in the plasma of the blood donor (immunogenic TRALI) are responsible. Apart from antibodies, other substances such as biologically active lipids, mainly arising from the storage of platelet and red blood cell concentrates, can activate neutrophilic granulocytes and trigger a non-immunogenic TRALI. Pathophysiologically, granulocytes in the capillaries of the lung vessels release oxygen radicals and enzymes which damage the endothelial cells and cause pulmonary edema. Therapeutically, nasal oxygen administration may be sufficient. In severe cases, mechanical ventilation, invasive hemodynamic monitoring and fluid intake are required. Diuretics should be avoided. The administration of glucocorticoids is controversial. Antibody-related TRALI reactions occurred mainly after transfusion of fresh frozen plasma, which had been obtained from womenimmunized during pregnancy against leukocyte antigens. Therefore, in Germany, since 2009 only plasma from female donors without a history of prior or current pregnancy or negative testing for antibodies against HLA I, II or HNA has been used with the result that since then no TRALI-related death has been registered.

  9. Exercise training after burn injury: a survey of practice.

    PubMed

    Diego, Alejandro M; Serghiou, Michael; Padmanabha, Anand; Porro, Laura J; Herndon, David N; Suman, Oscar E

    2013-01-01

    Exercise programs capable of contributing positively to the long-term rehabilitation of burn patients should be included in outpatient rehabilitation programs. However, the extent and intensity of the resistance and cardiopulmonary exercise prescribed are unclear. This study was conducted to investigate the existence, design, content, and prescription of outpatient cardiopulmonary and resistance exercise programs within outpatient burn rehabilitation. A survey was designed to gather information on existing exercise programs for burn survivors and to assess the extent to which these programs are included in overall outpatient rehabilitation programs. Three hundred and twenty-seven surveys were distributed in the licensed physical and occupational therapists part of the American Burn Association Physical Therapy/Occupational Therapy Special Interest Group. One hundred and three surveys were completed. Eighty-two percent of respondents indicated that their institutions offered outpatient therapy after discharge. The frequency of therapists' contact with patients during this period varied greatly. Interestingly, 81% of therapists stated that no hospital-based cardiopulmonary endurance exercise programs were available. Patients' physical function was infrequently determined through the use of cardiopulmonary parameters (oxygen consumption and heart rate) or muscle strength. Instead, more subjective parameters such as range of motion (75%), manual muscle testing (61%), and quality of life (61%) were used. Prescription and follow-up assessment of cardiopulmonary endurance training are inconsistent among institutions, underscoring the need for greater awareness of the importance of exercise in any burn rehabilitation program. Identification of cardiopulmonary and progressive resistance parameters for establishing and tracking exercise training is also needed to maximize exercise-induced benefits.

  10. Alveolar edema fluid clearance and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Berthiaume, Yves; Matthay, Michael A

    2007-12-15

    Although lung-protective ventilation strategies have substantially reduced mortality of acute lung injury patients there is still a need for new therapies that can further decrease mortality in patients with acute lung injury. Studies of epithelial ion and fluid transport across the distal pulmonary epithelia have provided important new concepts regarding potential new therapies for acute lung injury. Overall, there is convincing evidence that the alveolar epithelium is not only a tight epithelial barrier that resists the movement of edema fluid into the alveoli, but it is also actively involved in the transport of ions and solutes, a process that is essential for edema fluid clearance and the resolution of acute lung injury. The objective of this article is to consider some areas of recent progress in the field of alveolar fluid transport under normal and pathologic conditions. Vectorial ion transport across the alveolar and distal airway epithelia is the primary determinant of alveolar fluid clearance. The general paradigm is that active Na(+) and Cl(-) transport drives net alveolar fluid clearance, as demonstrated in several different species, including the human lung. Although these transport processes can be impaired in severe lung injury, multiple experimental studies suggest that upregulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) transport might be an effective therapy in acute lung injury. We will review mechanisms involved in pharmacological modulation of ion transport in lung injury with a special focus on the use of beta-adrenergic agonists which has generated considerable interest and is a promising therapy for clinical acute lung injury.

  11. Quality of life and predictors of long-term outcome after severe burn injury.

    PubMed

    Renneberg, Babette; Ripper, Sabine; Schulze, Julian; Seehausen, Annika; Weiler, Matthias; Wind, Gerhard; Hartmann, Bernd; Germann, Günter; Liedl, Alexandra

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the long-term quality of life after severe burn injury. In a prospective longitudinal design, N = 265 burn patients were examined 6, 12, 24, and 36 months after burn injury. A multilevel approach was used to measure stability and change in self-reported health status. Besides injury-related variables, self-report instruments included measures of quality of life, psychological distress, personality, and specific burn outcome measures. Fitting of unconditional growth models indicated that there was significant intra- and inter-individual variation in self-reported physical and mental health short form-12. Over the course of 3 years, participants reported on average a slight improvement of physical quality of life. Physical health was mainly predicted by mobility and level of burn severity. Variance in mental health status was mainly predicted by gender, mobility, neuroticism, level of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related avoidance. Thus mobility (i.e., simple abilities) seems a crucial variable for overall quality of life. An early identification and treatment of patients with high levels of depression and PTSD-related avoidance may contribute to better mental health.

  12. Clinical and demographic features of burn injuries in karachi: a six-year experience at the burns centre, civil hospital, Karachi.

    PubMed

    Ali, S A; Hamiz-Ul-Fawwad, S; Al-Ibran, E; Ahmed, G; Saleem, A; Mustafa, D; Hussain, M

    2016-03-31

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, with 195,000 deaths annually. This study was conducted to identify the demographics of burn victims and the effect of different variables on the outcome of their injuries. 4016 patients admitted to the Burns Centre, Civil Hospital Karachi from January 2006 to December 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Demographics, burn injury details and their outcome were recorded in a pre-designed questionnaire. Injuries were categorized as: fire, chemical, scald or electrical. To estimate total body surface area (TBSA) burned in adults, the rule of nines was used. For children and infants, the Lund-Browder chart was employed. SPSS v16.0 software was used for analysis. Frequencies and percentages of all variables, and the measure of central tendencies and dispersion for continuous variables were calculated. Cross tabs were used to assess mortality. Mean age was 28.13 years. More than half of the cases (n=2337, 58.2%) were aged between 16-30 years. Labourers, housewives and students were the most commonly affected groups. Burn injuries by flame/fire and electricity were most common. Most cases were accidental, followed by suicide attempts and homicides. Mean percentage of TBSA affected was 35.49%. Mean duration of hospital stay was 16.45 days. 50.6% of the expired cases were females. The mean age of expired patients was 30.07 while for patients who survived it was 27.01 years. The outcome of burn injuries is related to various demographic factors. Female gender, increasing age, burn injuries following suicide attempts and greater surface area involvement predict poor outcome.

  13. Clinical and demographic features of burn injuries in karachi: a six-year experience at the burns centre, civil hospital, Karachi

    PubMed Central

    Ali, S.A.; Hamiz-ul-Fawwad, S.; Al-Ibran, E.; Ahmed, G.; Saleem, A.; Mustafa, D.; Hussain, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, with 195,000 deaths annually. This study was conducted to identify the demographics of burn victims and the effect of different variables on the outcome of their injuries. 4016 patients admitted to the Burns Centre, Civil Hospital Karachi from January 2006 to December 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Demographics, burn injury details and their outcome were recorded in a pre-designed questionnaire. Injuries were categorized as: fire, chemical, scald or electrical. To estimate total body surface area (TBSA) burned in adults, the rule of nines was used. For children and infants, the Lund-Browder chart was employed. SPSS v16.0 software was used for analysis. Frequencies and percentages of all variables, and the measure of central tendencies and dispersion for continuous variables were calculated. Cross tabs were used to assess mortality. Mean age was 28.13 years. More than half of the cases (n=2337, 58.2%) were aged between 16-30 years. Labourers, housewives and students were the most commonly affected groups. Burn injuries by flame/fire and electricity were most common. Most cases were accidental, followed by suicide attempts and homicides. Mean percentage of TBSA affected was 35.49%. Mean duration of hospital stay was 16.45 days. 50.6% of the expired cases were females. The mean age of expired patients was 30.07 while for patients who survived it was 27.01 years. The outcome of burn injuries is related to various demographic factors. Female gender, increasing age, burn injuries following suicide attempts and greater surface area involvement predict poor outcome. PMID:27857643

  14. Acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gary C; Ramanathan, Vivek S; Law, David; Funchain, Pauline; Chen, George C; French, Samuel; Shlopov, Boris; Eysselein, Viktor; Chung, David; Reicher, Sonya; Pham, Binh V

    2010-01-01

    We report three cases of patients with acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements. One patient took Hydroxycut while the other two took Herbalife supplements. Liver biopsies for all patients demonstrated findings consistent with drug-induced acute liver injury. To our knowledge, we are the first institute to report acute liver injury from both of these two types of weight-loss herbal supplements together as a case series. The series emphasizes the importance of taking a cautious approach when consuming herbal supplements for the purpose of weight loss. PMID:21173910

  15. Acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gary C; Ramanathan, Vivek S; Law, David; Funchain, Pauline; Chen, George C; French, Samuel; Shlopov, Boris; Eysselein, Viktor; Chung, David; Reicher, Sonya; Pham, Binh V

    2010-11-27

    We report three cases of patients with acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements. One patient took Hydroxycut while the other two took Herbalife supplements. Liver biopsies for all patients demonstrated findings consistent with drug-induced acute liver injury. To our knowledge, we are the first institute to report acute liver injury from both of these two types of weight-loss herbal supplements together as a case series. The series emphasizes the importance of taking a cautious approach when consuming herbal supplements for the purpose of weight loss.

  16. Primary triage of mass burn casualties with associated severe traumatic injuries.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, B; Gunn, S William A; Dibo, S

    2013-03-31

    A key aim in any mass disaster event is to avoid diverting resources by overwhelming specialized tertiary centers with minor casualties. The most crucial aspect of an effective disaster response is pre-hospital triage at the scene. Unfortunately, many triage systems have serious shortcomings in their methodologies and no existing triage system has enough scientific evidence to justify its universal adoption. Moreover, it is observed that the optimal approach to planning is by no means clear-cut and that each new incident involving burns appears to produce its own unique problems not all of which were predictable. In most major burns disasters, victims mostly have combined trauma burn injuries and form a heterogeneous group with a broad range of devastating injuries. Are these victims primarily burn patients or trauma patients? Should they be taken care of in a burn center or in a trauma center or only in a combined burns-trauma center? Who makes the decision? The present review is aimed at answering some of these questions.

  17. Major burn injuries associated with Christmas celebrations: a 41-year experience from Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Rohrer-Mirtschink, S.; Forster, N.; Giovanoli, P.; Guggenheim, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In Switzerland it is customary to light candles on Christmas trees and advent wreaths. This tradition leads to an increased risk of home fires. We reviewed the records of patients who sustained burn injuries from a lit Christmas tree or advent wreath during the Christmas holidays between January 1971 and January 2012. We treated 28 patients and observed 4 fatalities (mortality rate: 14%). 61% of the patients were male, 39% were female. The mean abbreviated burn severity index (ABSI) was 6.5 points in the group of the survivors and 10.8 points in the group of the non-survivors. The mean total body surface area burned (TBSA) for survivors was 18.9%, with 14.1% having full thickness burns; for the non-survivors the mean TBSA was 45.2%, with 38% having full thickness burns. The Mann-Whitney U-test showed a significant difference between the survivors and the fatalities concerning the mean total and full thickness burned body surface area (p value 0.009 and 0.012). More than sixty percent of the fires occurred in January and the most severe accidents were seen after January 4th. Despite Christmas decoration-associated fires being relatively uncommon, they tend to cause more serious injuries than regular household fires. We recommend that in countries where it is customary to set up flammable Christmas decorations, state-issued information pamphlets with instructions on fire safety conduct should be distributed. PMID:26668566

  18. Major burn injuries associated with Christmas celebrations: a 41-year experience from Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Rohrer-Mirtschink, S; Forster, N; Giovanoli, P; Guggenheim, M

    2015-03-31

    In Switzerland it is customary to light candles on Christmas trees and advent wreaths. This tradition leads to an increased risk of home fires. We reviewed the records of patients who sustained burn injuries from a lit Christmas tree or advent wreath during the Christmas holidays between January 1971 and January 2012. We treated 28 patients and observed 4 fatalities (mortality rate: 14%). 61% of the patients were male, 39% were female. The mean abbreviated burn severity index (ABSI) was 6.5 points in the group of the survivors and 10.8 points in the group of the non-survivors. The mean total body surface area burned (TBSA) for survivors was 18.9%, with 14.1% having full thickness burns; for the non-survivors the mean TBSA was 45.2%, with 38% having full thickness burns. The Mann-Whitney U-test showed a significant difference between the survivors and the fatalities concerning the mean total and full thickness burned body surface area (p value 0.009 and 0.012). More than sixty percent of the fires occurred in January and the most severe accidents were seen after January 4th. Despite Christmas decoration-associated fires being relatively uncommon, they tend to cause more serious injuries than regular household fires. We recommend that in countries where it is customary to set up flammable Christmas decorations, state-issued information pamphlets with instructions on fire safety conduct should be distributed.

  19. Involvement of NADPH oxidases in alkali burn-induced corneal injury.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xue-Jun; Liu, Xian; Chen, Ying-Ying; Zhao, Yao; Xu, Man; Han, Xiao-Jian; Liu, Qiu-Ping; Yi, Jing-Lin; Li, Jing-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Chemical burns are a major cause of corneal injury. Oxidative stress, inflammatory responses and neovascularization after the chemical burn aggravate corneal damage, and lead to loss of vision. Although NADPH oxidases (Noxs) play a crucial role in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the role of Noxs in chemical burn-induced corneal injury remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the transcription and expression of Noxs in corneas were examined by RT-qPCR, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. It was found that alkali burns markedly upregulated the transcription and expression of Nox2 and Nox4 in human or mouse corneas. The inhibition of Noxs by diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) or apocynin (Apo) effectively attenuated alkali burn-induced ROS production and decreased 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) protein levels in the corneas. In addition, Noxs/CD11b double‑immunofluorescence staining indicated that Nox2 and Nox4 were partially co-localized with CD11b. DPI or Apo prevented the infiltration of CD11b-positive inflammatory cells, and inhibited the transcription of inflammatory cytokines following alkali burn-induced corneal injury. In our mouse model of alkali burn-induced corneal injury, corneal neovascularization (CNV) occurred on day 3, and it affected 50% of the whole area of the cornea on day 7, and on day 14, CNV coverage of the cornea reached maximum levels. DPI or Apo effectively attenuated alkali burn‑induced CNV and decreased the mRNA levels of angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptors and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Taken together, our data indicate that Noxs play a role in alkali burn-induced corneal injury by regulating oxidative stress, inflammatory responses and CNV, and we thus suggest that Noxs are a potential therapeutic target in the future treatment of chemical-induced corneal injury.

  20. Practice guidelines for the application of nonsilicone or silicone gels and gel sheets after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Carter, Alissa; Forbes, Lisa; Hsu, Shu-Chuan Chen; McMahon, Margaret; Parry, Ingrid; Ryan, Colleen M; Serghiou, Michael A; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Patricia A; de Oliveira, Ana; Boruff, Jill

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this review was to systematically evaluate available clinical evidence for the application of nonsilicone or silicone gels and gel sheets on hypertrophic scars and keloids after a burn injury so that practice guidelines could be proposed. This review provides evidence based recommendations, specifically for the rehabilitation interventions required for the treatment of aberrant wound healing after burn injury with gels or gel sheets. These guidelines are designed to assist all healthcare providers who are responsible for initiating and supporting scar management interventions prescribed for burn survivors. Summary recommendations were made after the literature, retrieved by systematic review, was critically appraised and the level of evidence determined according to Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine criteria.

  1. Effect of Malva sylvestris cream on burn injury and wounds in rats

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Ebrahim; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Azadbakht, Mohammad; Akbari, Jafar; Enayati-fard, Reza; Azizi, Sohail

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Burn injury is one of the most health-threatening problems in the world. Malva sylvestris (M. sylvestris) flowers have a high mucilage content and are used as a remedy for cut wound and dermal infected wounds in Iranian folklore Medicine. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of M. sylvestris cream on the second degree burn injury in rats. Materials and Methods: Five groups of 10 rats per group were burned with hot metal plate. Animals were administrated divided as control, normal saline, standard silver sulfadiazine 1% (SSD), 5% M. sylvestris, and 10% M. sylvestris into separate groups. Wound area, percentage of wound contraction, and histological and bacteriological assessments were evaluated. Results: Wound sizes were not significantly different among groups on 1st and 3rd days after burn injury, while they were significantly different among groups after 7th day post-burn injury. The average areas of wounds on the 15th day were 7.5±2.9, 6.7±2, 10.5±1.6, 4.7±2, and 4.5±2 cm2 for base cream, normal saline, SSD, 5% M. sylvestris, and 10% M. sylvestris, respectively. The results of histology exhibited well-formed horizontally-oriented collagen fibers in MS topical treatment groups. Microorganisms existed in the SSD group were most probably Staphilococcus epidermitis and for NS group were staphylococcus saprophiteccus. Conclusion: M. sylvestris cream improved histological changes of tissue components in the process of healing when compared with SSD cream. Therefore, it can be used as a topical treatment agent for burn wound. PMID:26909337

  2. Transfusion related acute lung injury presenting with acute dyspnoea: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Haji, Altaf Gauhar; Sharma, Shekhar; Vijaykumar, DK; Paul, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative period. Investigation results were non-specific and a diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury was made after excluding other possible causes of acute lung injury. She responded to symptomatic management with ventilatory and vasopressor support and recovered completely over the next 72 hours. Conclusion The diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury relies on excluding other causes of acute pulmonary edema following transfusion, such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. All plasma containing blood products have been implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury, with the majority being linked to whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, involving priming of the inflammatory machinery and then activation of this primed mechanism. Treatment is supportive, with prognosis being substantially better than for most other causes of acute lung injury. PMID:18957111

  3. Home remedy or hazard? management and costs of paediatric steam inhalation therapy burn injuries

    PubMed Central

    Himdani, Sarah Al; Javed, Muhammad Umair; Hughes, Juliana; Falconer, Olivia; Bidder, Christopher; Hemington-Gorse, Sarah; Nguyen, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Background Steam inhalation has long been considered a beneficial home remedy to treat children with viral respiratory tract infections, but there is no evidence to suggest a benefit and children are at risk of serious burn injuries. Aim To determine the demographics, mechanism, management, and costs of steam inhalation therapy scalds to a regional burns centre in the UK, and to ascertain whether this practice is recommended by primary care providers. Design and setting A retrospective study of all patients admitted to a regional burns centre in Swansea, Wales, with steam inhalation therapy scalds. Method Patients who attended the burns centre for steam inhalation therapy scalds between January 2010 and February 2015 were identified using the burns database and data on patient demographics, treatment, and costs incurred were recorded. In addition, an electronic survey was e-mailed to 150 local GPs to determine whether they recommended steam inhalation therapy to patients. Results Sixteen children attended the burns centre with steam inhalation scalds. The average age attending was 7.4 years (range 1–15 years) and, on average, three children per year were admitted. The most common indication was for the common cold (n = 9). The average size of the burns was 3.1% (range: 0.25–17.0%) of total body area. One child was managed surgically; the remainder were treated with dressings, although one patient required a stay in a high-dependency unit. The total cost of treatment for all patients was £37 133. All in all, 17 out of 21 GPs surveyed recommended steam inhalation to their patients; eight out of 19 GPs recommended it for children aged <5 years. Conclusion Steam inhalation incurs a significant cost to patients and the healthcare system. Its practice continues to be recommended by GPs but children, due to their limited motor skills, curiosity, and poor awareness of danger, are at significant risk of burn injuries and this dangerous practice should no longer be

  4. Contractures in burn injury part II: investigating joints of the hand.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jeffrey C; Holavanahalli, Radha; Helm, Phala; O'Neil, Carina; Goldstein, Richard; Kowalske, Karen

    2008-01-01

    This study prospectively examines the incidence and severity of hand contractures after burn injury and determines predictors of contracture development. Data were collected prospectively from 1993 to 2002 for adult burn survivors admitted to a regional burn center. Demographic and medical data were collected on each subject. Primary outcome measures include presence of contractures, number of contractures, and the severity of contractures at each of the hand joints at hospital discharge. The metacarpal-phalangeal, proximal inter-phalangeal (PIP), and distal inter-phalangeal joints of all digits and the wrist joints are included in this study. Regression analysis was performed to determine predictors of the presence, severity, and number of contractures. Of the 985 study patients, 23% demonstrated at least one hand contracture at hospital discharge. Those with a contracture averaged ten contractures per person. Most contractures were mild (48%) or moderate (41%) in severity. The wrist was the most frequently affected joint (22%). Statistically significant predictors of contracture development include concomitant medical problems, total body surface area grafted and presence of hand burn and hand grafting (P < .05). Predictors of the number of contractures include length of stay, concomitant medical problems, burn size and presence of hand burn and grafting (P < .05). Contractures of the hand are a significant complication of burn injury. Clinicians can use the contracture predictors to help target interventions for those patients most at risk of developing hand contractures. Given the functional importance of the hand in daily living, the burn care community is challenged to find new ways of preventing and treating hand contractures.

  5. A Prospective Multi-Center Audit of Nutrition Support Parameters Following Burn Injury.

    PubMed

    Kurmis, Rochelle; Heath, Kathryn; Ooi, Selena; Munn, Zachary; Forbes, Sharon; Young, Vicki; Rigby, Paul; Wood, Kate; Phillips, Frances; Greenwood, John

    2015-01-01

    The importance of nutrition support delivery to the severe burn-injured patient is well recognized, however, nutrition provision to the patient may be sub optimal in practice. The aim of this study was to conduct a prospective multi-center audit across Australia and New Zealand using the Joanna Briggs Institute Burns Node Nutrition audit criteria. Thirty-four patients with severe burn injury (≥20% TBSA in adults and ≥10% TBSA in children) were identified on admission or on referral to the Dietitian at the eight participating Burn Units between February 1, 2012 and April 30, 2012 for inclusion in the study. De-identified patient data was analyzed using the Joanna Briggs Institute, Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System. Compliance with individual audit criterion ranged from 33 to 100%. Provision of prescribed enteral feed volumes and weekly weighing of patients were highlighted as key areas for clinical improvement. Clinical audit is a valuable tool for evaluating current practice against best evidence to ensure that quality patient care is delivered. The use of the Joanna Briggs Institute Burns Node audit criteria has allowed for a standardized multi-center audit to be conducted. Improving nutrition support delivery in burn patients was identified as a key area requiring ongoing clinical improvement across Australia and New Zealand. Clinician feedback on use of the audit criteria will allow for future refinement of individual criterion, and presentation of results of this audit has resulted in a review of the Bi-National Burns Registry nutrition quality indicators.

  6. The throw: biomechanics and acute injury.

    PubMed

    Gainor, B J; Piotrowski, G; Puhl, J; Allen, W C; Hagen, R

    1980-01-01

    The throw and its modifications are integral components of many sports. This study correlates case histories of acute injuries in throwing with a biomechanical analysis of the throwing mechanism. Comparisons are made with a similar analysis of the kick analyzed by the same film technique and computer program. Just prior to ball release, the pitching arm extends through an arc of about 73 degress in 40 msec, beginning with the elbow flexed at 80 degrees. This produces an axial load on the humerus and coincides with a pulse of external torque at the shoulder. This acts as stress protection to the humerus which is developing an internal torque of 14,000 inch-lb prior to ball release. The change in angular velocity, or the angular acceleration, during the throw is acquired in a much shorter time than in the kick. Torque is directly proportional to angular acceleration. This necessitates the development of substantially higher torques in the humerus during the throw than about the knee during a kick. The kinetic energy in the arm is 27,000 inch-lb during the throw. This is much higher than the kinetic energy in the kicking leg because the kinetic energy varies proportionally with the square of the angular velocity of the extremity. The angular velocity of the arm is about twice that of the leg. Thus, the pitching arm contains about four times as much kinetic energy as the kicking leg. These severe overloading conditions predispose the upper extremity to injury in the throwing mechanism.

  7. [Positive end-expiratory pressure : adjustment in acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Bruells, C S; Dembinski, R

    2012-04-01

    Treatment of patients suffering from acute lung injury is a challenge for the treating physician. In recent years ventilation of patients with acute hypoxic lung injury has changed fundamentally. Besides the use of low tidal volumes, the most beneficial setting of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has been in the focus of researchers. The findings allow adaption of treatment to milder forms of acute lung injury and severe forms. Additionally computed tomography techniques to assess the pulmonary situation and recruitment potential as well as bed-side techniques to adjust PEEP on the ward have been modified and improved. This review gives an outline of recent developments in PEEP adjustment for patients suffering from acute hypoxic and hypercapnic lung injury and explains the fundamental pathophysiology necessary as a basis for correct treatment.

  8. The effectiveness of using pictures in teaching young children about burn injury accidents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsueh-Fen; Lin, Fang-Suey; Chang, Chien-Ju

    2015-11-01

    This study utilized the "story grammar" approach (Stein and Glenn, 1979) to analyze the within-corpus differences in recounting of sixty 6- and 7-year-old children, specifically whether illustrations (5-factor accident sequence) were or were not resorted to as a means to assist their narration of a home accident in which a child received a burn injury from hot soup. Our investigation revealed that the message presentation strategy "combining oral and pictures" better helped young children to memorize the story content (sequence of events leading to the burn injury) than "oral only." Specifically, the content of "the dangerous objects that caused the injury", "the unsafe actions that people involved took", and "how the people involved felt about the severity of the accident" differed significantly between the two groups.

  9. Burn injury and long-term nervous system morbidity: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Vetrichevvel, Thirthar P; Randall, Sean M; Fear, Mark W; Wood, Fiona M; Boyd, James H; Duke, Janine M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate if children and adults who are hospitalised for a burn injury have increased long-term hospital use for nervous system diseases. Design A population-based retrospective cohort study using linked administrative health data from the Western Australian Data Linkage System. Participants Records of 30 997 persons hospitalised for a first burn injury in Western Australia during the period 1980–2012, and 123 399 persons who were age and gender frequency matched with no injury admissions randomly selected from Western Australia's birth registrations and electoral roll. Main outcome measures Admission rates and summed length of stay for nervous system diseases. Negative binomial and Cox proportional hazards regression modelling were used to generate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and HRs with 95% CIs, respectively. Results After adjustment for demographic factors and pre-existing health status, the burn injury cohort had 2.20 times (95% CI 1.86 to 2.61) as many nervous system admissions and 3.25 times the number of days in hospital (95% CI: 2.28 to 4.64) than the uninjured cohort. This increase was found for those who had sustained burns during childhood (<15 years: IRR, 95% CI: 1.97, 1.49 to 2.61) and early to mid-adulthood (15–45 years: IRR, 95% CI: 2.70, 2.06 to 3.55) and older adults (≥45 years: IRR, 95% CI: 1.62, 1.33 to 1.97). Significantly elevated first-time postburn admissions were observed for children for 15 years postburn discharge (0–5 years: HR, 95% CI: 1.97, 1.75 to 2.22; 5–15 years: HR, 95% CI: 1.44, 1.28 to 1.63) and for adults 45 years and older at index burn for 5 years postburn only (HR, 95% CI: 1.72, 1.42 to 2.09). Conclusions Burn injury appears to be associated with increased nervous system-related morbidity for many years after burn injury. Further work into the mechanisms and possible treatments to reduce this morbidity are warranted in light of these findings. PMID:27609857

  10. Acute kidney injury and dialysis in children: illustrative cases.

    PubMed

    Symons, Jordan M; Picca, Stefano

    2008-09-01

    Pediatric nephrologists and critical care physicians are faced with a heterogeneous patient population with varied epidemiology caring for children with acute kidney injury or other diseases that may require renal replacement therapy provision. We have composed 4 detailed case scenarios to highlight the challenges and interdisciplinary approach required for optimal care provision to children, and that serve to direct the different articles contained in this special issue of Seminars of Nephrology devoted to acute kidney injury in children.

  11. Prostatic surgery associated acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Costalonga, Elerson Carlos; Costa e Silva, Verônica Torres; Caires, Renato; Hung, James; Yu, Luis; Burdmann, Emmanuel A

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with extended hospital stays, high risks of in-hospital and long-term mortality, and increased risk of incident and progressive chronic kidney disease. Patients with urological diseases are a high-risk group for AKI owing to the coexistence of obstructive uropathy, older age, and preexistent chronic kidney disease. Nonetheless, precise data on the incidence and outcomes of postoperative AKI in urological procedures are lacking. Benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer are common diagnoses in older men and are frequently treated with surgical procedures. Whereas severe AKI after prostate surgery in general appears to be unusual, AKI associated with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) syndrome and with rhabdomyolysis (RM) after radical prostatectomy have been frequently described. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, risk factors, outcomes, prevention, and treatment of AKI associated with prostatic surgery. The mechanisms of TURP syndrome and RM following prostatic surgeries will be emphasized. PMID:25374813

  12. Acute Kidney Injury in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Müller, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) significantly increases the overall morbidity and mortality, particularly by elevating the cardiovascular risk. The kidneys are severely affected as well, partly as a result of intrarenal athero- and arteriosclerosis but also due to noninflammatory glomerular damage (diabetic nephropathy). DM is the most frequent cause of end-stage renal disease in our society. Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains a clinical and prognostic problem of fundamental importance since incidences have been increased in recent years while mortality has not substantially been improved. As a matter of fact, not many studies particularly addressed the topic “AKI in diabetes mellitus.” Aim of this article is to summarize AKI epidemiology and outcomes in DM and current recommendations on blood glucose control in the intensive care unit with regard to the risk for acquiring AKI, and finally several aspects related to postischemic microvasculopathy in AKI of diabetic patients shall be discussed. We intend to deal with this relevant topic, last but not least with regard to increasing incidences and prevalences of both disorders, AKI and DM. PMID:27974972

  13. Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Loubon, Christian; Fernández-Molina, Manuel; Carrascal-Hinojal, Yolanda; Fulquet-Carreras, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) is a well-recognized complication resulting with the higher morbid-mortality after cardiac surgery. In its most severe form, it increases the odds ratio of operative mortality 3–8-fold, length of stay in the Intensive Care Unit and hospital, and costs of care. Early diagnosis is critical for an optimal treatment of this complication. Just as the identification and correction of preoperative risk factors, the use of prophylactic measures during and after surgery to optimize renal function is essential to improve postoperative morbidity and mortality of these patients. Cardiopulmonary bypass produces an increased in tubular damage markers. Their measurement may be the most sensitive means of early detection of AKI because serum creatinine changes occur 48 h to 7 days after the original insult. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 are most promising as an early diagnostic tool. However, the ideal noninvasive, specific, sensitive, reproducible biomarker for the detection of AKI within 24 h is still not found. This article provides a review of the different perspectives of the CSA-AKI, including pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, biomarkers, classification, postoperative management, and treatment. We searched the electronic databases, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE using search terms relevant including pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, biomarkers, classification, postoperative management, and treatment, in order to provide an exhaustive review of the different perspectives of the CSA-AKI. PMID:27716701

  14. Post-partum acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Pahwa, Naresh; Bharani, Rajesh; Kumar, Ravindra

    2014-11-01

    To determine the risk factors, course of hospital stay and mortality rate among women with post-partum acute kidney injury (AKI), we studied (of 752 patients with AKI admitted to a tertiary care center during the study period between November 2009 and August 2012) 27 (3.59%) women with post-partum AKI. The data regarding age, parity, cause of renal failure, course of hospital stay and requirement of dialysis were recorded. Sepsis was the major cause (70.3%) of post-partum AKI. Other causes included disseminated intravascular coagulation (55.5%), pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (40.7%), ante- and post-partum hemorrhage (40.7% and 22.2%) and hemolytic anemia and elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count syndrome (29.6%); most patients had more than one cause of AKI. We found a very high prevalence (18.5%) of cortical necrosis in our study patients. A significant correlation was also found between the creatinine level on admission and the period of onset of disease after delivery. In conclusion, several factors are involved in causing post-partum AKI in our population, and sepsis was the most common of them.

  15. The Effect of Massage on Anticipatory Anxiety and Procedural Pain in Patients with Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Mohades Ardebili, Fatimah; Rafii, Forough; Manafi, Farzad

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pain related to burn injuries is one of the most troublesome pain intensity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of massage on anticipatory anxiety, procedural pain intensity, vital signs and relaxation level of patients with burn injury. METHODS In this quasi-experimental study, through convenience sampling, 60 hospitalized adult burn patients were selected from a specialized burn and reconstructive hospital. Subjects were assigned to massage and control groups through simple randomization. Massage was offered by using non aromatic oil about 10-15 minutes before wound care on intact part of the body once a day for 20 minutes on patients’ bedside for 3 consecutive days. In the 3 days, the control group did not received any massage and were asked to stay at bed. Demographic and clinical characteristics and vital signs, Visual Analogue Scale and the Persian version of Burn Specific Pain Anxiety Scale were used to determine baseline and procedural pain, anxiety and relaxation levels and anticipatory anxiety. RESULTS No significant difference was noted between mean score of pain intensity, anxiety and relaxation level, and vital signs in massage and control groups after intervention following wound care. In massage and control groups, there was no significant differences between mean scores of anticipatory anxiety before and after intervention. There was no significant difference between the mean scores of anticipatory anxiety in massage and control groups after intervention prior wound care. CONCLUSION Massage was shown not to have any effect on anticipatory anxiety and procedural pain. PMID:28289612

  16. Analysis of factorial time-course microarrays with application to a clinical study of burn injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Baiyu; Xu, Weihong; Herndon, David; Tompkins, Ronald; Davis, Ronald; Xiao, Wenzhong; Wong, Wing Hung; Toner, Mehmet; Warren, H Shaw; Schoenfeld, David A; Rahme, Laurence; McDonald-Smith, Grace P; Hayden, Douglas; Mason, Philip; Fagan, Shawn; Yu, Yong-Ming; Cobb, J Perren; Remick, Daniel G; Mannick, John A; Lederer, James A; Gamelli, Richard L; Silver, Geoffrey M; West, Michael A; Shapiro, Michael B; Smith, Richard; Camp, David G; Qian, Weijun; Storey, John; Mindrinos, Michael; Tibshirani, Rob; Lowry, Stephen; Calvano, Steven; Chaudry, Irshad; West, Michael A; Cohen, Mitchell; Moore, Ernest E; Johnson, Jeffrey; Moldawer, Lyle L; Baker, Henry V; Efron, Philip A; Balis, Ulysses G J; Billiar, Timothy R; Ochoa, Juan B; Sperry, Jason L; Miller-Graziano, Carol L; De, Asit K; Bankey, Paul E; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Minei, Joseph P; Arnoldo, Brett D; Hunt, John L; Horton, Jureta; Cobb, J Perren; Brownstein, Bernard; Freeman, Bradley; Maier, Ronald V; Nathens, Avery B; Cuschieri, Joseph; Gibran, Nicole; Klein, Matthew; O'Keefe, Grant

    2010-06-01

    Time-course microarray experiments are capable of capturing dynamic gene expression profiles. It is important to study how these dynamic profiles depend on the multiple factors that characterize the experimental condition under which the time course is observed. Analytic methods are needed to simultaneously handle the time course and factorial structure in the data. We developed a method to evaluate factor effects by pooling information across the time course while accounting for multiple testing and nonnormality of the microarray data. The method effectively extracts gene-specific response features and models their dependency on the experimental factors. Both longitudinal and cross-sectional time-course data can be handled by our approach. The method was used to analyze the impact of age on the temporal gene response to burn injury in a large-scale clinical study. Our analysis reveals that 21% of the genes responsive to burn are age-specific, among which expressions of mitochondria and immunoglobulin genes are differentially perturbed in pediatric and adult patients by burn injury. These new findings in the body's response to burn injury between children and adults support further investigations of therapeutic options targeting specific age groups. The methodology proposed here has been implemented in R package "TANOVA" and submitted to the Comprehensive R Archive Network at http://www.r-project.org/. It is also available for download at http://gluegrant1.stanford.edu/TANOVA/.

  17. Survival in major burn injuries treated by one bathing in cerium nitrate.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, D; Sparkes, B G; Lüscher, N; Schoenenberger, G A; Allgöwer, M

    1992-08-01

    Sixty-four patients aged 16-74 years with total body surface area burns (TBSA) ranging from 30 to 90 per cent, were given one bathing in 0.04 M cerium nitrate within 4 h of admission to hospital. Of 21 patients aged 16-30 years, one died (aged 28 with 90 per cent TBSA), and of those aged 31-74 years, two died, one (aged 50 years with 55 per cent TBSA) had multiple internal injuries, the other (aged 51 years with 55 per cent TBSA) had a pulmonary embolism at day 19. Two risk scores, developed from data on 11,200 burn patients treated by standard methods (Roi et al. 1983), were applied to the analysis of risk for 59 patients for whom both total burn surface (TB) and full thickness (FT) areas had been recorded. About 20 patients bore risk of 0.8 or greater on the FT scale and 1.0 on the TB scale, yet instead of 80 per cent deaths among these, only two died. No FT assessment had been made on the multiple injury death whose TB risk score was 0.66. Such survival results in high-risk patients should encourage the use of cerium nitrate for treating serious burn injury.

  18. Update on traumatic acute spinal cord injury. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Galeiras Vázquez, R; Ferreiro Velasco, M E; Mourelo Fariña, M; Montoto Marqués, A; Salvador de la Barrera, S

    2017-02-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury requires a multidisciplinary approach both for specialized treatment of the acute phase and for dealing with the secondary complications. A suspicion or diagnosis of spinal cord injury is the first step for a correct management. A review is made of the prehospital management and characteristics of the acute phase of spinal cord injury. Respiratory monitoring for early selective intubation, proper identification and treatment of neurogenic shock are essential for the prevention of secondary spinal cord injury. The use of corticosteroids is currently not a standard practice in neuroprotective treatment, and hemodynamic monitoring and early surgical decompression constitute the cornerstones of adequate management. Traumatic spinal cord injury usually occurs as part of multiple trauma, and this can make diagnosis difficult. Neurological examination and correct selection of radiological exams prevent delayed diagnosis of spinal cord injuries, and help to establish the prognosis.

  19. Inductive and Deductive Approaches to Acute Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    DeGracia, Donald J.; Tri Anggraini, Fika; Taha, Doaa Taha Metwally; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Many clinically relevant forms of acute injury, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, and myocardial infarction, have resisted treatments to prevent cell death following injury. The clinical failures can be linked to the currently used inductive models based on biological specifics of the injury system. Here we contrast the application of inductive and deductive models of acute cell injury. Using brain ischemia as a case study, we discuss limitations in inductive inferences, including the inability to unambiguously assign cell death causality and the lack of a systematic quantitative framework. These limitations follow from an overemphasis on qualitative molecular pathways specific to the injured system. Our recently developed nonlinear dynamical theory of cell injury provides a generic, systematic approach to cell injury in which attractor states and system parameters are used to quantitatively characterize acute injury systems. The theoretical, empirical, and therapeutic implications of shifting to a deductive framework are discussed. We illustrate how a deductive mathematical framework offers tangible advantages over qualitative inductive models for the development of therapeutics of acutely injured biological systems. PMID:27437490

  20. Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause swelling, blistering, scarring and, in serious cases, shock, and even death. They also can lead to infections because they damage your skin's protective barrier. Treatment for burns depends on the cause of the ...

  1. Clinical progression and outcome of dysphagia following thermal burn injury: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rumbach, Anna F; Ward, Elizabeth C; Cornwell, Petrea L; Bassett, Lynell V; Muller, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to establish clinical profiles of dysphagic and nondysphagic individuals following thermal burn injury and 2) to provide a clinical profile of the progression and outcome of dysphagia resolution by hospital discharge for a dysphagic cohort. A total of 438 consecutively admitted patients with thermal burns were included. All patients underwent a clinical swallowing examination. Medical parameters regarding burn presentation and its treatment and speech-language pathology specific variables from admission to discharge were collected for each participant. Dysphagia was identified in 49 patients via clinical assessment, and their course of recovery was followed up until the point of dysphagia resolution or discharge. No significant difference was observed between the dysphagic and nondysphagic groups in age, gender, and injury etiology. However, the dysphagic cohort was significantly different from the nondysphagic group in all variables pertaining to injury presentation and medical management. Individuals with dysphagia took significantly longer to start, and maintain, oral intake and required nonoral supplementation for three and a half times longer than those who were nondysphagic. Length of speech-language pathology intervention averaged 1 month for the dysphagics and increased with dysphagia severity. Return to normal fluid consistencies occurred in >75% of dysphagic individuals by week 7 after injury, although resumption of normal diet textures was more protracted, with 75% resuming normal oral intake by week 9. Dysphagia had resolved in 50% of the cohort by week 6, and by hospital discharge, 85% of the dysphagic individuals had resumed normal oral intake of thin fluids and a general diet. This is the first large prospective cohort study to establish clinical profiles of dysphagic and nondysphagic cohorts and document the nature of dysphagia and patterns of recovery within the thermal burn population. These current data will

  2. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Wartime Military Burns: Application of the Berlin Criteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome in wartime military burns: Application of the Berlin criteria Slava M. Belenkiy, MD, Allison R. Buel, DO, Jeremy...Andriy I. Batchinsky, MD, Leopoldo C. Cancio, MD, and Kevin K. Chung, MD, San Antonio, Texas BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS...EVIDENCE: Epidemiologic/prognostic study, level III. KEY WORDS: Mechanical ventilation; adult respiratory distress syndrome ; the Berlin definition; combat

  3. In situ metabolic flux analysis to quantify the liver metabolic response to experimental burn injury.

    PubMed

    Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Sharma, Nripen S; Uygun, Basak; Bieganski, Robert; Saeidi, Nima; Nahmias, Yaakov; Uygun, Korkut; Yarmush, Martin L; Berthiaume, Francois

    2011-04-01

    Trauma such as burns induces a hypermetabolic response associated with altered central carbon and nitrogen metabolism. The liver plays a key role in these metabolic changes; however, studies to date have evaluated the metabolic state of liver using ex vivo perfusions or isotope labeling techniques targeted to specific pathways. Herein, we developed a unique mass balance approach to characterize the metabolic state of the liver in situ, and used it to quantify the metabolic changes to experimental burn injury in rats. Rats received a sham (control uninjured), 20% or 40% total body surface area (TBSA) scald burn, and were allowed to develop a hypermetabolic response. One day prior to evaluation, all animals were fasted to deplete glycogen stores. Four days post-burn, blood flow rates in major vessels of the liver were measured, and blood samples harvested. We combined measurements of metabolite concentrations and flow rates in the major vessels entering and leaving the liver with a steady-state mass balance model to generate a quantitative picture of the metabolic state of liver. The main findings were: (1) Sham-burned animals exhibited a gluconeogenic pattern, consistent with the fasted state; (2) the 20% TBSA burn inhibited gluconeogenesis and exhibited glycolytic-like features with very few other significant changes; (3) the 40% TBSA burn, by contrast, further enhanced gluconeogenesis and also increased amino acid extraction, urea cycle reactions, and several reactions involved in oxidative phosphorylation. These results suggest that increasing the severity of injury does not lead to a simple dose-dependent metabolic response, but rather leads to qualitatively different responses.

  4. Outcomes in Adult Survivors of Childhood Burn Injuries as Compared with Matched Controls.

    PubMed

    Stone, James; Gawaziuk, Justin P; Khan, Sazzadul; Chateau, Dan; Bolton, James M; Sareen, Jitender; Enns, Jessica; Doupe, Malcolm; Brownell, Marni; Logsetty, Sarvesh

    2016-01-01

    Limited research exists examining long-term mental and physical health outcomes in adult survivors of pediatric burns. The authors examine the postinjury lifetime prevalence of common mental and physical disorders in a large pediatric burn cohort and compare the results with matched controls. Seven hundred and forty five survivors of childhood burns identified in the Burn Registry (<18 years old and total BSA >1% between April 1, 1988 and March 31, 2010) were matched 1:5 to the general population based on age at time of injury (index date), sex, and geographic residence. Postinjury rate ratio (RR) was used to compare burn cases and control cohorts for common mental and physical illnesses through physician billings, and hospital claims. RR was adjusted for sex, rural residence, and income. Compared with matched controls, postburn cases had significantly higher RR of all mental disorders, which remained significant (P < .05) after adjustment (major depression RR = 1.5 [confidence limit {CL}: 1.2-1.8], anxiety disorder RR = 1.5 [CL: 1.3-1.8), substance abuse RR = 2.3 [CL: 1.7-3.2], suicide attempt RR = 4.3 [CL: 1.6-12.1], or any mental disorder RR = 1.5 [CL: 1.3-1.8]). The relative rate of some physical illnesses was also significantly increased in burn survivors: arthritis RR = 1.2 (CL: 1.1-1.4), fractures RR = 1.4 (CL: 1.2-1.6), total respiratory morbidity RR = 1.1 (CL: 1.02-1.3), and any physical illness RR = 1.2 (CL: 1.1-1.3). Adult survivors of childhood burn injury have significantly increased rates of postburn mental and physical illnesses. Screening and appropriate management of these illnesses is essential when caring for this population.

  5. Chronic Wounds in Burn Injury: A Case Report on Importance of Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Gallardo, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Institutes of Health and the Center for Disease and Prevention, it is estimated that 65 to 80 percent of the human infectious are caused by biofilms. Antibiotics and drainage of purulent discharge are the main treatment measures. But in chronic infections sometimes these findings are not easy to recognize. Biofilm is an extracellular polymeric conglomeration generally composed of extracellular DNA, proteins, and polysaccharides, which help bacteria to survive into the host. The following case is the example of chronic wound in burn patient, where biofilm gets involved and special attention is given to the relationship biofilm–chronic wound injury in a burn patient. PMID:27579274

  6. Airway Management and Smoke Inhalation Injury in the Burn Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    injury, using cotton ties or similar methods. Note that care must be taken to protect the corner of the mouth, if possible. (B) Adhesive tape will not...especially during transport. Thus, cotton ties (1/2-in umbilical ties), rather than adhesive tape, are used to secure the endotracheal tube...containing compounds such as cellulosics (eg, wood, paper, coal, charcoal), natural gases (eg, methane, butane, propane ), and petroleum products. Carbon

  7. Impact of obesity on body image dissatisfaction and social integration difficulty in adolescent and young adult burn injury survivors.

    PubMed

    Chondronikola, Maria; Sidossis, Labros S; Richardson, Lisa M; Temple, Jeff R; van den Berg, Patricia A; Herndon, David N; Meyer, Walter J

    2013-01-01

    Burn injury deformities and obesity have been associated with social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction. However, the combined effects of obesity and burn injury on social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction are unknown. Adolescent and young adult burn injury survivors were categorized as normal weight (n = 47) or overweight and obese (n = 21). Burn-related and anthropometric information were obtained from patients' medical records, and validated questionnaires were used to assess the main outcomes and possible confounders. Analysis of covariance and multiple linear regressions were performed to evaluate the objectives of this study. Obese and overweight burn injury survivors did not experience increased body image dissatisfaction (12 ± 4.3 vs 13.1 ± 4.4; P = .57) or social integration difficulty (17.5 ± 6.9 vs 15.5 ± 5.7; P = .16) compared with normal weight burn injury survivors. Weight status was not a significant predictor of social integration difficulty or body image dissatisfaction (P = .19 and P = .24, respectively). However, mobility limitations predicted greater social integration difficulty (P = .005) and body image dissatisfaction (P < .001), whereas higher weight status at burn was a borderline significant predictor of body image dissatisfaction (P = .05). Obese and overweight adolescents and young adults, who sustained major burn injury as children, do not experience greater social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction compared with normal weight burn injury survivors. Mobility limitations and higher weight status at burn are likely more important factors affecting the long-term social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction of these young people.

  8. Glomerular haematuria, renal interstitial haemorrhage and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Martín Cleary, Catalina; Moreno, Juan Antonio; Fernández, Beatriz; Ortiz, Alberto; Parra, Emilio G; Gracia, Carolina; Blanco-Colio, Luis M; Barat, Antonio; Egido, Jesús

    2010-12-01

    Macroscopic haematuria of glomerular origin has been associated with acute kidney injury. We report a patient with IgA nephropathy, macroscopic haematuria and acute kidney injury. Systemic anticoagulation may have aggravated haematuria. There was extensive interstitial and intratubular red blood cell extravasation, and interstitial haemosiderin deposits. The abundant presence of macrophages expressing the haemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 and of cells stained for oxidative stress markers (NADPH-p22 phox and heme-oxigenase-1) in areas of interstitial haemorrhage and red blood cell cast-containing tubules provided evidence for a role for free haemoglobin in tubulointerstitial renal injury in human glomerular disease.

  9. Bath Salts: A Newly Recognized Cause of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    McNeely, Jonathan; Parikh, Samir; Valentine, Christopher; Haddad, Nabil; Shidham, Ganesh; Rovin, Brad; Hebert, Lee; Agarwal, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Bath salts are substance of abuse that are becoming more common and are difficult to recognize due to negative toxicology screening. Acute kidney injury due to bath salt use has not previously been described. We present the case of a previously healthy male who developed acute kidney injury and dialysis dependence after bath salt ingestion and insufflation. This was self-reported with negative toxicology screening. Clinical course was marked by severe hyperthermia, hyperkalemia, rhabdomyolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, oliguria, and sepsis. We discuss signs and symptoms, differential diagnoses, potential mechanisms of injury, management, and review of the literature related to bath salt toxicity. PMID:24555135

  10. Giant multinucleated macrophages occur in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Leskovar, A; Turek, J; Borgens, R B

    2001-05-01

    Using a cell-isolation and -culture procedure specific for macrophages, we report the existence of giant (more than 50 microm diameter), multinucleated macrophages within an acute, 5-day-old adult rat spinal cord injury. The size and multinuclearity of these isolated giant cells was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy. Giant macrophages are markers for long-term infection, disease, and chronic injury in other soft tissues and are unexpected in the acute inflammatory stage of central nervous system injury. To our knowledge, this descriptive report is the first confirming the existence of giant macrophages in any injured nervous tissue, with additional data suggesting some of these cells to be multinucleated.

  11. Mechanism of acute depletion of plasma fibronectin following thermal injury in rats. Appearance of a gelatinlike ligand in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Deno, D.C.; McCafferty, M.H.; Saba, T.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma fibronectin was depleted within 15 min following sublethal burn, followed by partial recovery at 8 h and complete restoration by 24 h in anesthetized rats. Radiolabeled /sup 75/Se-plasma fibronectin, injected intravenously before burn, was rapidly sequestered in burn skin as well as the liver. Fibronectin levels at 2 h postburn as detected by immunoassay vs. /sup 75/Se-plasma fibronectin indicated that more fibronectin was in the plasma than detected by electroimmunoassay. Crossed immunoelectrophoretic analysis of fibronectin in early postburn plasma demonstrated a reduced electrophoretic mobility of the fibronectin antigen. Addition of heparin or fibrin, both of which have affinity for fibronectin, to normal plasma was unable to reproduce this altered fibronectin electrophoretic pattern. In contrast, addition of gelatin or native collagen to normal plasma reproduced the abnormal electrophoretic pattern of fibronectin seen in burn plasma. Extracts of burned skin, but not extracts of normal skin, when added to normal plasma, elicited a similar altered electrophoretic pattern for fibronectin. By gel filtration, fibronectin in burn plasma had an apparent molecular weight approximately 40% greater than that observed in normal plasma. These data suggest the release into the blood of a gelatinlike ligand from burned skin, which complexes with plasma fibronectin. Thus, fibronectin deficiency acutely postburn appears mediated by (a) its accumulation at the site of burn injury; (b) its removal from the circulation by the liver; and (c) its presence in the plasma in a form that is less detectable by immunoassay.

  12. A rat model of unilateral hindpaw burn injury: slowly developing rightwards shift of the morphine dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuxing; Lim, Grewo; Yang, Liling; Zeng, Qing; Sung, Backil; Jeevendra Martyn, J A; Mao, Jianren

    2005-07-01

    Management of pain after burn injury is an unresolved clinical issue. In a rat model of hindpaw burn injury, we examined the effects of systemic morphine on nociceptive behaviors following injury. Injury was induced by immersing the dorsal part of one hindpaw into a hot water bath (85 degrees C) for 4, 7, or 12 s under pentobarbital anesthesia. Mechanical allodynia to von Frey filament stimulation and thermal hyperalgesia to radiant heat were assessed. Burn injury induced by the 12-s (but not 4-, or 7-s) hot water immersion resulted in reliable and lasting mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia evident by day 1. In addition, there was an upregulation of protein kinase Cgamma and a progressive downregulation of mu-opioid receptors within the spinal cord dorsal horn ipsilateral to injury as revealed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. In both injured and sham rats, the anti-nociceptive effects of subcutaneous morphine were examined on post-injury days 7 and 14. While the morphine AD50 dose was comparable on day 7 between burn (1.61 mg/kg) and control (1.7 mg/kg) rats, the morphine dose-response curve was shifted to the right in burn-injured rats (4.6 mg/kg) on post-injury day 14 as compared with both the injured rats on post-injury day 7 and sham rats on day 14 (1.72 mg/kg). These data indicate that hindpaw burn injury reliably produces persistent mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and that the reduced efficacy of morphine anti-nociception in chronic burn injury may be in part due to a downregulation of spinal mu-opioid receptors.

  13. The Epidemiology of Emergency Department-Treated Burn Injuries Associated with Portable Heaters in the United States, 2003-2013.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Raina D; McGwin, Gerald

    The purpose of this study is to examine the epidemiology of portable space heater-related burn injuries among an emergency department nationally representative population of the United States. The data analyzed in this study were collected from the Consumer Products Safety Commission's 2003-2013 National Electronic Injury Surveillance System. There were approximately 53,636 space heater-related thermal burn injuries attributed to portable space heaters from 2003 to 2013. The rate of injuries was relatively constant during the 10-year span. The number of burn injuries was highest during winter months. Young children, older adults, males, and Blacks had the highest rates of injury. The body part most commonly injured was the hand, which accounted for 33.3% of all burn injuries. It is important to understand the characteristics of persons who have an increased risk of portable space heater burn and trip/fall injuries, so that preventative methods and awareness strategies can be used to help reduce the number of annual portable space heater injuries.

  14. Nonlinear Dynamic Theory of Acute Cell Injuries and Brain Ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Doaa; Anggraini, Fika; Degracia, Donald; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia in the form of stroke and cardiac arrest brain damage affect over 1 million people per year in the USA alone. In spite of close to 200 clinical trials and decades of research, there are no treatments to stop post-ischemic neuron death. We have argued that a major weakness of current brain ischemia research is lack of a deductive theoretical framework of acute cell injury to guide empirical studies. A previously published autonomous model based on the concept of nonlinear dynamic network was shown to capture important facets of cell injury, linking the concept of therapeutic to bistable dynamics. Here we present an improved, non-autonomous formulation of the nonlinear dynamic model of cell injury that allows multiple acute injuries over time, thereby allowing simulations of both therapeutic treatment and preconditioning. Our results are connected to the experimental data of gene expression and proteomics of neuron cells. Importantly, this new model may be construed as a novel approach to pharmacodynamics of acute cell injury. The model makes explicit that any pro-survival therapy is always a form of sub-lethal injury. This insight is expected to widely influence treatment of acute injury conditions that have defied successful treatment to date. This work is supported by NIH NINDS (NS081347) and Wayne State University President's Research Enhancement Award.

  15. Laboratory Test Surveillance following Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Michael E.; Peterson, Josh F.; Eden, Svetlana K.; Hung, Adriana M.; Speroff, Theodore; Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Parr, Sharidan K.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Siew, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with hospitalized acute kidney injury (AKI) are at increased risk for accelerated loss of kidney function, morbidity, and mortality. We sought to inform efforts at improving post-AKI outcomes by describing the receipt of renal-specific laboratory test surveillance among a large high-risk cohort. Methods We acquired clinical data from the Electronic health record (EHR) of 5 Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals to identify patients hospitalized with AKI from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2009, and followed these patients for 1 year or until death, enrollment in palliative care, or improvement in renal function to estimated GFR (eGFR) ≥60 L/min/1.73 m2. Using demographic data, administrative codes, and laboratory test data, we evaluated the receipt and timing of outpatient testing for serum concentrations of creatinine and any as well as quantitative proteinuria recommended for CKD risk stratification. Additionally, we reported the rate of phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) monitoring recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Results A total of 10,955 patients admitted with AKI were discharged with an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. During outpatient follow-up at 90 and 365 days, respectively, creatinine was measured on 69% and 85% of patients, quantitative proteinuria was measured on 6% and 12% of patients, PTH or phosphorus was measured on 10% and 15% of patients. Conclusions Measurement of creatinine was common among all patients following AKI. However, patients with AKI were infrequently monitored with assessments of quantitative proteinuria or mineral metabolism disorder, even for patients with baseline kidney disease. PMID:25117447

  16. Acute kidney injury in pregnancy: a clinical challenge.

    PubMed

    Machado, Susana; Figueiredo, Nuno; Borges, Andreia; São José Pais, Maria; Freitas, Luís; Moura, Paulo; Campos, Mário

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury in pregnancy declined significantly over the second half of the 20th century; however, it is still associated with major maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. A set of systemic and renal physiological adaptive mechanisms occur during a normal gestation that will constrain several changes in laboratory parameters of renal function, electrolytes, fluid and acid-base balances. The diagnosis of acute kidney injury in pregnancy is based on the serum creatinine increase. The usual formulas for estimating glomerular filtration rate are not validated in this population. During the first trimester of gestation, acute kidney injury develops most often due to hyperemesis gravidarum or septic abortion. In the third trimester, the differential diagnosis is more challenging for the obstetrician and the nephrologist and comprises some pathologies that are reviewed in this article: preeclampsia/HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy and thrombotic microangiopathies.

  17. The anatomy and biomechanics of acute and chronic whiplash injury.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Gunter P; Winkelstein, Beth A; Ivancic, Paul C; Svensson, Mats Y; Vasavada, Anita

    2009-04-01

    Whiplash injury is the most common motor vehicle injury, yet it is also one of the most poorly understood. Here we examine the evidence supporting an organic basis for acute and chronic whiplash injuries and review the anatomical sites within the neck that are potentially injured during these collisions. For each proposed anatomical site--facet joints, spinal ligaments, intervertebral discs, vertebral arteries, dorsal root ganglia, and neck muscles--we present the clinical evidence supporting that injury site, its relevant anatomy, the mechanism of and tolerance to injury, and the future research needed to determine whether that site is responsible for some whiplash injuries. This article serves as a snapshot of the current state of whiplash biomechanics research and provides a roadmap for future research to better understand and ultimately prevent whiplash injuries.

  18. Update on traumatic acute spinal cord injury. Part 2.

    PubMed

    Mourelo Fariña, M; Salvador de la Barrera, S; Montoto Marqués, A; Ferreiro Velasco, M E; Galeiras Vázquez, R

    2017-02-01

    The aim of treatment in acute traumatic spinal cord injury is to preserve residual neurologic function, avoid secondary injury, and restore spinal alignment and stability. In this second part of the review, we describe the management of spinal cord injury focusing on issues related to short-term respiratory management, where the preservation of diaphragmatic function is a priority, with prediction of the duration of mechanical ventilation and the need for tracheostomy. Surgical assessment of spinal injuries based on updated criteria is discussed, taking into account that although the type of intervention depends on the surgical team, nowadays treatment should afford early spinal decompression and stabilization. Within a comprehensive strategy in spinal cord injury, it is essential to identify and properly treat patient anxiety and pain associated to spinal cord injury, as well as to prevent and ensure the early diagnosis of complications secondary to spinal cord injury (thromboembolic disease, gastrointestinal and urinary disorders, pressure ulcers).

  19. Alternative complement pathway activation increases mortality in a model of burn injury in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, J A; Donelan, M; Hawiger, A; Burke, J F

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the role of the complement system in burn injury in an experimental model in mice. A 25% body surface area, full-thickness scald wound was produced in anesthetized animals. Massive activation of the alternative complement pathway, but not the classical pathway, was seen. This activation was associated with the generation of neutrophil aggregating activity in the plasma, neutrophil aggregates in the lungs, increased pulmonary vascular permeability, and increased lung edema formation. Decomplementation with cobra venom factor (CVF) or genetic C5 deficiency diminished these pathologic changes, and CVF pretreatment substantially reduced burn mortality in the first 24 h. Preliminary data show that human burn patients have a similar pattern of complement activation involving predominantly the alternative pathway, indicating the possible relevance of the murine model to human disease. Images PMID:7174787

  20. Myocardial injury after electrical burns: short and long term study.

    PubMed

    Guinard, J P; Chiolero, R; Buchser, E; Delaloye-Bischof, A; Payot, M; Grbic, A; Krupp, S; Freeman, J

    1987-01-01

    Miscellaneous cardiac abnormalities can occur after electrical burns. The long term outcomes are still unknown. We studied 10 patients, 9 of whom suffered high-voltage electrocution, and one of whom was struck by lightning. Serial electrocardiograms (ECG) and serum MB creatine phosphokinase isoenzyme (MB-CPK) activities were obtained during their stay in hospital. ECG and thallium 201 cardiac scintigraphy at rest, as well as echocardiograms were obtained in all patients 4 to 48 months after discharge. In hospital, 9 patients showed one or more abnormal findings at physical examination (4 cases), ECG (8 cases), MB-CPK (1 case). At long term follow-up, 5 patients had one or more myocardial functions or conduction abnormalities, with or without symptoms. One patient had compensated heart failure. Nine patients were asymptomatic. Abnormal ECG findings persisted in 3 patients. Three cardiac scans showed evidence of regional myocardial hypoperfusion. Decreases in left ventricular indices measured by echocardiogram were found in 3 patients. We conclude that high-voltage electrocution is associated with a high incidence of cardiac abnormalities, which may persist. Long term evaluation, requiring cardiac T1 201 scintigraphy and echocardiogram, may be justified.

  1. Violence against children: further evidence suggesting a relationship between burns, scalds, and the additional injuries.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Dragana; Krohn, Julia; Larson, Mandi; Lambe, Andrea; Püschel, Klaus; Kurth, Henrike

    2010-01-01

    Up to 22 % of all child maltreatment cases involve non-accidental burns or scalds. In the time period of 2000 until 2007, 20 children with non-accidental burns and scalds in conjunction with other mechanisms of injury were examined at children's hospitals in Hamburg and at the Institute of Legal Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, by experts in forensic medicine. The fact that these children presented with additional injuries due to blunt and sharp force and sometimes had signs of neglect emphasize the urgent need for a multidisciplinary cooperation between pediatricians and forensic medical experts to ensure the early identification and prevention of child maltreatment. A new approach for Germany, enforcing mandatory child well-being examinations is discussed.

  2. Brain hemorrhage after electrical burn injury: Case report and probable mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Axayacalt, Gutierrez Aceves Guillermo; Alejandro, Ceja Espinosa; Marcos, Rios Alanis; Inocencio, Ruiz Flores Milton; Alfredo, Herrera Gonzalez Jose

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-voltage electric injury may induce lesion in different organs. In addition to the local tissue damage, electrical injuries may lead to neurological deficits, musculoskeletal damage, and cardiovascular injury. Severe vascular damage may occur making the blood vessels involved prone to thrombosis and spontaneous rupture. Case Description: Here, we present the case of a 39-year-old male who suffered an electrical burn with high tension wire causing intracranial bleeding. He presented with an electrical burn in the parietal area (entry zone) and the left forearm (exit zone). The head tomography scan revealed an intraparenchimatous bleeding in the left parietal area. In this case, the electric way was the scalp, cranial bone, blood vessels and brain, upper limb muscle, and skin. The damage was different according to the dielectric property in each tissue. The injury was in the scalp, cerebral blood vessel, skeletal muscle, and upper limb skin. The main damage was in brain’s blood vessels because of the dielectric and geometric features that lead to bleeding, high temperature, and gas delivering. Conclusion: This is a report of a patient with an electric brain injury that can be useful to elucidate the behavior of the high voltage electrical current flow into the nervous system. PMID:27904757

  3. Effect of Fireworks Laws on Pediatric Fireworks-Related Burn Injuries.

    PubMed

    Myers, John; Lehna, Carlee

    Changes in U.S. fireworks laws have allowed younger children to purchase fireworks. In addition, the changes have allowed individuals to purchase more powerful fireworks. The purpose of this study is to examine the epidemiology of pediatric firework-related burn injuries among a nationally representative sample of the United States for the years 2006 to 2012. We examined inpatient admissions for pediatric firework-related burn patients from 2006 to 2012 using the nationwide inpatient sample and examined emergency department admissions using the nationwide emergency department sample. Both data sources are part of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Trajectories over time were evaluated. A total of 3193 injuries represented an estimated 90,257 firework-related injuries treated in the United States from 2006 to 2012. A majority of injuries were managed in the emergency department (n = 2008, 62.9%). The incidence generally increased over time; increasing from 4.28 per 100,000 population in 2006 to 5.12 per 100,000 population in 2012, P = .019. However, the proportion of injuries requiring inpatient admission (28.9% in 2006 to 50.0% in 2012, P < .001) and mean length of stay in the hospital (3.12 days in 2006 to 7.35 days in 2012, P < .001) significantly increased over time, while the mean age decreased over time (12.1-year-old in 2006 to 11.4-year-old in 2012, P = .006). The relaxing of U.S. fireworks laws may have had a modest effect on incidence of related injuries and the age of purchaser. However, it has had a dramatic effect on the severity of the related injuries, resulting in more inpatient admissions and longer length of stay in the hospital. Preventative methods should be taken to reduce the rate and severity of firework-related injuries among U.S. youths.

  4. Camphor burns of the palm and non-suicidal self-injury: An uncommonly reported, but socially relevant issue

    PubMed Central

    Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad; Friji, Meethale Thiruvoth; Kumar, S. Dinesh; Asokan, Arjun; Pandey, Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    Camphor is a waxy white sublimating chemical derived from natural as well as synthetic sources and widely used in various communities worldwide for a number of medicinal, culinary, and religious reasons. Camphor is burnt as an offering to God in many religious communities. We report three incidences of self inflicted injury from burning camphor on the palm resulting in full thickness burns. Non-suicidal self-injury is socially unacceptable destruction or alteration of body tissue when there is no suicidal intent or pervasive developmental disorder and we have explored an association between this and burn injury. This report also highlights the unique social and cultural pattern of this burn injury and the importance of psycho-therapeautic help for these victims. PMID:25190924

  5. Camphor burns of the palm and non-suicidal self-injury: An uncommonly reported, but socially relevant issue.

    PubMed

    Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad; Friji, Meethale Thiruvoth; Kumar, S Dinesh; Asokan, Arjun; Pandey, Sandhya

    2014-05-01

    Camphor is a waxy white sublimating chemical derived from natural as well as synthetic sources and widely used in various communities worldwide for a number of medicinal, culinary, and religious reasons. Camphor is burnt as an offering to God in many religious communities. We report three incidences of self inflicted injury from burning camphor on the palm resulting in full thickness burns. Non-suicidal self-injury is socially unacceptable destruction or alteration of body tissue when there is no suicidal intent or pervasive developmental disorder and we have explored an association between this and burn injury. This report also highlights the unique social and cultural pattern of this burn injury and the importance of psycho-therapeautic help for these victims.

  6. 78 FR 57486 - Eligibility of Disabled Veterans and Members of the Armed Forces With Severe Burn Injuries for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    .... Additionally, a copy of the rulemaking and its impact analysis are available on VA's Web site at http://www1.va...; certification. * * * * * (b) * * * (4) Severe burn injury: Deep partial thickness or full thickness...

  7. The trauma bubble: patient and family experience of serious burn injury.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Janice G; Taggart, Susan B; Johnston, Rae A; Ko, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the lived experience of burn injury for Australian patients and families. Of specific interest was the period covering emergency and inhospital care and early experiences of transition into the community. Eighteen participants including patients with serious burn injury and close family members engaged in indepth, semistructured interviews. Data were analysed using Heideggerian phenomenology and were interpreted within the framework of Merleau-Ponty's philosophy of the body. Participants experienced substantial emotional trauma that was unrelated to burn size or severity. Emotional distress was highest amongst people with facial burns. Strong recollections of the accident and poorly managed pain seemed to exacerbate the experience of trauma. Patients described physical otherness, memories of consuming, embodied pain, and recycling of the initial catastrophe. Family members expressed vicarious suffering and were confronted by the physical otherness of their loved one. Participants were isolated in their "bubble of trauma" as they tried to contain grief and loss, and protect loved ones from their distress. Emotional trauma persisted after discharge challenging family functioning and adjustment. These findings support a systematic approach to identifying and responding to the emotional needs of patients and family, including early information about possible emotional reactions to traumatic events and proactive engagement with psychology services. Best practice approaches for early pain management should be a focus for both clinical care and further research.

  8. Acute lung injury in fulminant hepatic failure following paracetamol poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Baudouin, S. V.; Howdle, P.; O'Grady, J. G.; Webster, N. R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--There is little information on the incidence of acute lung injury or changes in the pulmonary circulation in acute liver failure. The aim of this study was to record the incidence of acute lung injury in fulminant hepatic failure caused by paracetamol poisoning, to document the associated pulmonary circulatory changes, and to assess the impact of lung injury on patient outcome. METHODS--The degree of lung injury was retrospectively assessed by a standard scoring system (modified from Murray) in all patients with fulminant hepatic failure caused by paracetamol poisoning, admitted to the intensive care unit over a one year period. The severity of liver failure and illness, other organ system failure, and patient outcome were also analysed. RESULTS--Twenty four patients with paracetamol-induced liver failure were admitted and nine developed lung injury of whom eight (33%) had severe injury (Murray score > 2.5). In two patients hypoxaemia contributed to death. Patients with lung injury had higher median encephalopathy grades (4 v 2 in the non-injured group) and APACHE II scores (29 v 16). Circulatory failure, requiring vasoconstrictor support, occurred in all patients with lung injury but in only 40% of those without. Cerebral oedema, as detected by abnormal rises in intracranial pressure, also occurred in all patients with lung injury but in only 27% of the non-injured patients. The incidence of renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy was similar in both groups (67% and 47%). Pulmonary artery occlusion pressures were normal in the lung injury group. Cardiac output was high (median 11.2 1/min), systemic vascular resistance low (median 503 dynes/s/cm-5), and pulmonary vascular resistance low (median 70 dynes/s/cm-5), but not significantly different from the group without lung injury. Mortality was much higher in the lung injury group than in the non-injured group (89% v 13%). CONCLUSIONS--Acute lung injury was common in patients with paracetamol

  9. Thoracic Duct Chylous Fistula Following Severe Electric Injury Combined with Sulfuric Acid Burns: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fei; Cheng, Dasheng; Qian, Mingyuan; Lu, Wei; Li, Huatao; Tang, Hongtai; Xia, Zhaofan

    2016-10-11

    BACKGROUND As patients with thoracic duct injuries often suffer from severe local soft tissue defects, integrated surgical treatment is needed to achieve damage repair and wound closure. However, thoracic duct chylous fistula is rare in burn patients, although it typically involves severe soft tissue damage in the neck or chest. CASE REPORT A 32-year-old male patient fell after accidentally contacting an electric current (380 V) and knocked over a barrel of sulfuric acid. The sulfuric acid continuously poured onto his left neck and chest, causing combined electrical and sulfuric acid burn injuries to his anterior and posterior torso, and various parts of his limbs (25% of his total body surface area). During treatment, chylous fistula developed in the left clavicular region, which we diagnosed as thoracic duct chylous fistula. We used diet control, intravenous nutritional support, and continuous somatostatin to reduce the chylous fistula output, and hydrophilic silver ion-containing dressings for wound coverage. A boneless muscle flap was used to seal the left clavicular cavity, and, integrated, these led to resolution of the chylous fistula. CONCLUSIONS Patients with severe electric or chemical burns in the neck or chest may be complicated with thoracic duct injuries. Although conservative treatment can control chylous fistula, wound cavity filling using a muscle flap is an effective approach for wound healing.

  10. Time-dependent changes of immunologic responses after burn injury and immunomodulation by cimetidine and pyrimethamine in an animal model.

    PubMed

    A, Jafarzadeh; Zm, Hassan; M, Ebtekar; S, Mohaghegh-Hazrati; T, Tiraihi

    2010-10-01

    Severe suppression of the immune system is the major cause of infections following burn injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the time-related alterations of immune responses following thermal injury in an animal model and also to modulate immune responses by use of the immunomdulators cimetidine and pyrimethamine. Male Balb/c mice were anesthetized and given a 10% total body surface area full-thickness burn. The time-dependent changes of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and antibody responses to sheep red blood cell (SRBC) were assessed at post-burn days (PBD). The effects of different doses of cimetidine and pyrimethamine on DTH response were also quantitated at 10 PBD. Marked suppression of DTH response occurred during 30 days after burn trauma, with maximal suppression occurring between 10 to 14 days after burn injury. Simultaneously the antibody response to SRBC was significantly increased after thermal trauma. Cimetidine (at doses of 10 and 15 mg/kg) and pyrimethamine (at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg) significantly augmented DTH response after thermal injury. These results showed that the severe time-dependent alterations occurred in DTH and antibody responses following burn injury. Cimetidine and pyrimethamine also restore burn-induced suppression of DTH response following thermal trauma.

  11. The wound/burn guidelines - 6: Guidelines for the management of burns.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Yuichiro; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Sakai, Keisuke; Hashimoto, Akira; Hayashi, Masahiro; Madokoro, Naoki; Asano, Yoshihide; Abe, Masatoshi; Ishii, Takayuki; Isei, Taiki; Ito, Takaaki; Inoue, Yuji; Imafuku, Shinichi; Irisawa, Ryokichi; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Ogawa, Fumihide; Kadono, Takafumi; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kukino, Ryuichi; Kono, Takeshi; Kodera, Masanari; Takahara, Masakazu; Tanioka, Miki; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hasegawa, Minoru; Fujimoto, Manabu; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Maekawa, Takeo; Matsuo, Koma; Yamasaki, Osamu; Le Pavoux, Andres; Tachibana, Takao; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-09-01

    Burns are a common type of skin injury encountered at all levels of medical facilities from private clinics to core hospitals. Minor burns heal by topical treatment alone, but moderate to severe burns require systemic management, and skin grafting is often necessary also for topical treatment. Inappropriate initial treatment or delay of initial treatment may exert adverse effects on the subsequent treatment and course. Therefore, accurate evaluation of the severity and initiation of appropriate treatment are necessary. The Guidelines for the Management of Burn Injuries were issued in March 2009 from the Japanese Society for Burn Injuries as guidelines concerning burns, but they were focused on the treatment for extensive and severe burns in the acute period. Therefore, we prepared guidelines intended to support the appropriate diagnosis and initial treatment for patients with burns that are commonly encountered including minor as well as moderate and severe cases. Because of this intention of the present guidelines, there is no recommendation of individual surgical procedures.

  12. Biomarkers in acute kidney injury: Evidence or paradigm?

    PubMed

    Lombi, Fernando; Muryan, Alexis; Canzonieri, Romina; Trimarchi, Hernán

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury in the critically ill represents an independent risk factor of morbidity and mortality in the short and long terms, with significant economic impacts in terms of public health costs. Currently its diagnosis is still based on the presence of oliguria and/or a gradual increase in serum creatinine, which make the diagnosis a delayed event and to detriment of the so-called 'therapeutic window'. The appearance of new biomarkers of acute kidney injury could potentially improve this situation, contributing to the detection of 'subclinical acute kidney injury', which could allow the precocious employment of multiple treatment strategies in order to preserve kidney function. However these new biomarkers display sensitive features that may threaten their full capacity of action, which focus specifically on their additional contribution in the early approach of the situation, given the lack of specific validated treatments for acute kidney injury. This review aims to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of these new tools in the early management of acute kidney injury.

  13. Endovascular Treatment of Acute and Chronic Thoracic Aortic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Raupach, Jan Ferko, Alexander; Lojik, Miroslav; Krajina, Antonin; Harrer, Jan; Dominik, Jan

    2007-11-15

    Our aim is to present midterm results after endovascular repair of acute and chronic blunt aortic injury. Between December 1999 and December 2005, 13 patients were endovascularly treated for blunt aortic injury. Ten patients, 8 men and 2 women, mean age 38.7 years, were treated for acute traumatic injury in the isthmus region of thoracic aorta. Stent-graftings were performed between the fifth hour and the sixth day after injury. Three patients (all males; mean age, 66 years; range, 59-71 years) were treated due to the presence of symptoms of chronic posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta (mean time after injury, 29.4 years, range, 28-32). Fifteen stent-grafts were implanted in 13 patients. In the group with acute aortic injury one patient died due to failure of endovascular technique. Lower leg paraparesis appeared in one patient; the other eight patients were regularly followed up (1-72 months; mean, 35.6 months), without complications. In the group with posttraumatic pseudoaneurysms all three patients are alive. One patient suffered postoperatively from upper arm claudication, which was treated by carotidosubclavian bypass. We conclude that the endoluminal technique can be used successfully in the acute repair of aortic trauma and its consequences. Midterm results are satisfactory, with a low incidence of neurologic complications.

  14. Diffuse Brain Injury Induces Acute Post-Traumatic Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Rachel K.; Striz, Martin; Bachstetter, Adam D.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Donohue, Kevin D.; O'Hara, Bruce F.; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Clinical observations report excessive sleepiness immediately following traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, there is a lack of experimental evidence to support or refute the benefit of sleep following a brain injury. The aim of this study is to investigate acute post-traumatic sleep. Methods Sham, mild or moderate diffuse TBI was induced by midline fluid percussion injury (mFPI) in male C57BL/6J mice at 9:00 or 21:00 to evaluate injury-induced sleep behavior at sleep and wake onset, respectively. Sleep profiles were measured post-injury using a non-invasive, piezoelectric cage system. In separate cohorts of mice, inflammatory cytokines in the neocortex were quantified by immunoassay, and microglial activation was visualized by immunohistochemistry. Results Immediately after diffuse TBI, quantitative measures of sleep were characterized by a significant increase in sleep (>50%) for the first 6 hours post-injury, resulting from increases in sleep bout length, compared to sham. Acute post-traumatic sleep increased significantly independent of injury severity and time of injury (9:00 vs 21:00). The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β increased in brain-injured mice compared to sham over the first 9 hours post-injury. Iba-1 positive microglia were evident in brain-injured cortex at 6 hours post-injury. Conclusion Post-traumatic sleep occurs for up to 6 hours after diffuse brain injury in the mouse regardless of injury severity or time of day. The temporal profile of secondary injury cascades may be driving the significant increase in post-traumatic sleep and contribute to the natural course of recovery through cellular repair. PMID:24416145

  15. Reconstruction of Extensive Calvarial Exposure After Major Burn Injury in 2 Stages Using a Biodegradable Polyurethane Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, Marcus James Dermot; Rooke, Michael; Caplash, Yugesh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To share our experience of an extensive calvarial reconstruction in a severely burn-injured, elderly patient in a 2-stage procedure utilizing a novel biodegradable temporizing matrix (NovoSorb BTM), followed by autograft. Materials and Methods: A 66-year-old patient with 75% full-thickness burns, including 7% total body surface area head and neck, with calvarial exposure of approximately 350 cm2, complicated by acute renal failure and smoke inhalation injury. Exposed calvarium was burred down to diploe and biodegradable temporizing matrix was applied. Over the next 29 days, the biodegradable temporizing matrix integrated by vascular and tissue ingrowth from the diploe. Delamination and grafting occurred, however, at 43 days postimplantation of biodegradable temporizing matrix due to skin graft donor-site constraints. Results: Graft take was complete, yielding a robust and aesthetically pleasing early result (26 days post–graft application). Conclusions: Biodegradable temporizing matrix offers an additional resource for reconstructive surgeons faced with fragile patients and complex wounds. PMID:27222681

  16. Models of Hematopoietic Dynamics Following Burn for Use in Combined Injury Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-28

    Kaushansky, K., 2005. “The molecular mechanisms that control thrombopoiesis,” The Jour- nal of Clinical Investigation, 115(12), 3339–47. Kiang, J. G...radiation models by mathematically interpreting burn-dependent mechanisms and developing new model parameters. The re- sulting models predict the effects of...circulation. These compartments are regulated through feedback mechanisms . Acute radiation exposure leads to damage and the eventual death of a dose

  17. Acute discrimination between superficial-partial and deep-partial thickness burns in a preclinical model with laser speckle imaging.

    PubMed

    Crouzet, Christian; Nguyen, John Quan; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Bernal, Nicole P; Durkin, Anthony J; Choi, Bernard

    2015-08-01

    A critical need exists for a robust method that enables early discrimination between superficial-partial and deep-partial thickness burn wounds. In this study, we report on the use of laser speckle imaging (LSI), a simple, non-invasive, optical imaging modality, to measure acute blood flow dynamics in a preclinical burn model. We used a heated brass comb to induce burns of varying severity to nine rats and collected raw speckle reflectance images over the course of three hours after burn. We induced a total of 12 superficial-partial and 18 deep-partial thickness burn wounds. At 3h after burn we observed a 28% and 44% decrease in measured blood flow for superficial-partial and deep-partial thickness burns, respectively, and that these reductions were significantly different (p=0.00007). This preliminary data suggests the potential role of LSI in the clinical management of burn wounds.

  18. Paradoxical Effect of Hyperoncotic Albumin in Acutely Burned Children

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    lob (gnil respiratory acidosis : but within a few hours, she suffered a I 12 2.880 1,8) 1(0.0 cardiac arrest and (tied. Acute tubular necrosis and...only minimally, and the acidosis er- stitial pulmonary edema were found at autopsy. sisted. Thirty-six hours postburn, the patient suffered the first...urea fluids and protein as fluid infusion proceeds (1). .4 nitrogen 48 mg/di. The hyperkalemia was treated with glucose, Certainly, the most

  19. Physical rehabilitation of pediatric burns

    PubMed Central

    Atiyeh, B.; Janom, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Significant improvements have been made in the acute treatment of pediatric burn injuries over the past 3 decades which have significantly decreased mortality. Each year, more burned children are necessitating serious medical attention during their convalescence. For children with serious consequences resulting from burns that can persist from childhood through adolescence into adulthood, the value of long-term rehabilitation cannot be over stated. Burn injury management should not focus only on the immediate treatment. Long-term functional outcome and the required rehabilitation that burn victims must go through should be given equal if not more attention. The present is a review of the available modalities utilized for the physical rehabilitation of convalescent pediatric burns in order to overcome the catabolic state, improve muscle power and fitness, reduce disfiguring scars and prevent contractures. PMID:25249846

  20. Physical rehabilitation of pediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, B; Janom, H H

    2014-03-31

    Significant improvements have been made in the acute treatment of pediatric burn injuries over the past 3 decades which have significantly decreased mortality. Each year, more burned children are necessitating serious medical attention during their convalescence. For children with serious consequences resulting from burns that can persist from childhood through adolescence into adulthood, the value of long-term rehabilitation cannot be over stated. Burn injury management should not focus only on the immediate treatment. Long-term functional outcome and the required rehabilitation that burn victims must go through should be given equal if not more attention. The present is a review of the available modalities utilized for the physical rehabilitation of convalescent pediatric burns in order to overcome the catabolic state, improve muscle power and fitness, reduce disfiguring scars and prevent contractures.

  1. Identification of traumatic injury in burned cranial bone: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Pope, Elayne J; Smith, O'Brian C

    2004-05-01

    Interpreting patterns of injury in victims of fire-related deaths poses challenges for forensic investigators. Determining manner of death (accident, suicide or homicide) using charred remains is compounded by the thermal distortion and fragmentation of soft and skeletal tissues. Heat degrades thin cranial structures and obscures the characteristic signatures of perimortem ballistic, blunt, and sharp force trauma in bone, making differentiation from thermal trauma difficult. This study documents the survivability and features of traumatic injury through all stages of burning for soft tissue reduction and organic degradation of cranial bone. Forty cadaver heads were burned in environments simulating forensic fires. Progression of thermal degradation was photographically documented throughout the destructive stages for soft tissues and bone to establish expected burn sequence patterns for the head. In addition to testing intact vaults, a percentage were selectively traumatized to introduce the variables of soft tissue disruption, fractures, impact marks, and incisions throughout the cremation process. Skeletal materials were recovered, reconstructed, and correlated with photographs to discern burn patterns and survivability of traumatic features. This study produced two important results: (1) Identification of preexistent trauma is possible in reconstructed burned cranial bone. Signatures of ballistic (internal and external bevel, secondary fractures), blunt force (impact site, radiating fractures), and sharp force (incisions, stabs, sectioning) survive the cremation process. (2) In non-traumatized specimens, the skull does not explode from steam pressure but does fragment as a result of external forces (collapsed debris, extinguishment methods) and handling. The features of both results are sequentially described throughout the progression of thermal destruction.

  2. Acute gastroduodenal injury after ingestion of diluted herbicide pendimethalin.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, K; Azuhata, H; Katoh, H; Kuwano, H

    2009-03-01

    The herbicide, pendimethalin, is used worldwide, but its acute toxicity is not yet widely known. There have been some reported acute pendimethalin poisoning cases in humans and most of them intentionally ingested the concentrated formulation. We describe a 73-year-old man who developed corrosive gastroduodenal injury after accidental ingestion of the diluted (300 times with water) pendimethalin formulation. He had a history of reflux oesophagitis and had been taking omeprazol (10 mg/day) for a year. He consumed alcohol two hours after the accidental ingestion and then had nausea and epigastric pain. Endoscopy performed three days post-exposure revealed gastroduodenal injury. As he had consumed alcohol every day for years and had no history of gastroduodenal ulcer, the accidental ingestion may be associated with this injury. He was successfully treated by increasing his dosage of omeprazol (20 mg/day) for two weeks. This case indicates that ingestion of a small quantity of pendimethalin can provoke gastroduodenal injury.

  3. [Acute and overuse injuries in elite paracycling - an epidemiological study].

    PubMed

    Kromer, P; Röcker, K; Sommer, A; Baur, H; Konstantinidis, L; Gollhofer, A; Südkamp, N P; Hirschmüller, A

    2011-09-01

    Although paracycling is a growing discipline in high level competitive sports as well as in posttraumatic rehabilitation, epidemiological data of resulting injuries is still missing. Therefore, 19 athletes of the German national paracycling team were asked about their injuries during the 2008 season using a standardized questionnaire. Overall, 18 (94.7 %) of 19 athletes reported overuse injuries; most commonly localized at the back (83.3 %), neck/shoulder (77.8 %), knee (50 %), groin/buttock (50 %) and hands/wrists (38.9 %). Altogether, 18 accidents were registered, corresponding to an injury rate of 0,95 acute injuries per athlete per year (0,07 / 1000 km). The most common acute injuries were abrasions (69.2 %) and contusions (61.5 %), whereas fractures were stated only twice (11.8 %). The anatomical distribution of overuse injuries in disabled cyclists confirms the results of studies in able-bodied cycling, although the incidences in low-back pain and neck/shoulder pain is clearly higher in disabled cycling, as well as the rate of traumatic injuries.

  4. Adrenomedullin ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takefumi; Obata, Hiroaki; Murakami, Shinsuke; Hamada, Kaoru; Kangawa, Kenji; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nagaya, Noritoshi

    2007-08-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), an endogenous peptide, has been shown to have a variety of protective effects on the cardiovascular system. However, the effect of AM on acute lung injury remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated whether AM infusion ameliorates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in rats. Rats were randomized to receive continuous intravenous infusion of AM (0.1 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) or vehicle through a microosmotic pump. The animals were intratracheally injected with either LPS (1 mg/kg) or saline. At 6 and 18 h after intratracheal instillation, we performed histological examination and bronchoalveolar lavage and assessed the lung wet/dry weight ratio as an index of acute lung injury. Then we measured the numbers of total cells and neutrophils and the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In addition, we evaluated BALF total protein and albumin levels as indexes of lung permeability. LPS instillation caused severe acute lung injury, as indicated by the histological findings and the lung wet/dry weight ratio. However, AM infusion attenuated these LPS-induced abnormalities. AM decreased the numbers of total cells and neutrophils and the levels of TNF-alpha and CINC in BALF. AM also reduced BALF total protein and albumin levels. In addition, AM significantly suppressed apoptosis of alveolar wall cells as indicated by cleaved caspase-3 staining. In conclusion, continuous infusion of AM ameliorated LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats. This beneficial effect of AM on acute lung injury may be mediated by inhibition of inflammation, hyperpermeability, and alveolar wall cell apoptosis.

  5. TLR4 and TNF-α polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk for severe sepsis following burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Barber, R; Aragaki, C; Rivera-Chavez, F; Purdue, G; Hunt, J; Horton, J

    2004-01-01

    Context: Sepsis, organ failure, and shock remain common among patients with moderate to severe burn injuries. The inability of clinical factors to identify at-risk patients suggests that genetic variation may influence the risk for serious infection and the outcome from severe injury. Objective: Resolution of genetic variants associated with severe sepsis following burn injury. Patients: A total of 159 patients with burns ⩾20% of their total body surface area or any smoke inhalation injury without significant non-burn related trauma (injury severity score (ISS)⩾16), traumatic or anoxic brain injury, or spinal cord injury and who survived more than 48 h post-admission. Methods: Candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within bacterial recognition (TLR4 +896, CD14 –159) and inflammatory response (TNF-α –308, IL-1ß –31, IL-6 –174) loci were evaluated for association with increased risk for severe sepsis (sepsis plus organ dysfunction or septic shock) and mortality. Results: After adjustment for age, full-thickness burn size, ethnicity, and gender, carriage of the TLR4 +896 G-allele imparted at least a 1.8-fold increased risk of developing severe sepsis following a burn injury, relative to AA homozygotes (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 6.4; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8 to 23.2). Carriage of the TNF-α –308 A-allele imparted a similarly increased risk, relative to GG homozygotes (aOR = 4.5; 95% CI 1.7 to 12.0). None of the SNPs examined were significantly associated with mortality. Conclusions: The TLR4 +896 and TNF-α –308 polymorphisms were significantly associated with an increased risk for severe sepsis following burn trauma. PMID:15520404

  6. Ammonium dichromate poisoning: A rare cause of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, H; Gopi, M; Arumugam, A

    2014-11-01

    Ammonium dichromate is an inorganic compound frequently used in screen and color printing. Being a strong oxidizing agent, it causes oxygen free radical injury resulting in organ failure. We report a 25-year-old female who presented with acute kidney injury after consumption of ammonium dichromate. She was managed successfully with hemodialysis and supportive measures. This case is reported to highlight the toxicity of ammonium dichromate.

  7. Acute kidney injury caused by zonisamide-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshiro; Hasegawa, Midori; Nabeshima, Kuihiro; Tomita, Makoto; Murakami, Kazutaka; Nakai, Shigeru; Yamakita, Takashi; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2010-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), also known as drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), is a severe adverse drug reaction affecting multiple organs caused by drug treatment. The current report describes a man who was prescribed zonisamide for epilepsy and subsequently developed widespread skin rash, acute kidney injury, high-grade fever, eosinophilia, liver dysfunction, lymphadenopathy and an increase in antihuman herpesvirus-6 immunoglobulin G titer. Hypersensitivity to zonisamide was confirmed by the skin patch test. Based on these findings, the patient was diagnosed with DRESS/DIHS caused by zonisamide. This is the first report of acute kidney injury due to zonisamide-induced DRESS/DIHS.

  8. Early fluid resuscitation with hyperoncotic hydroxyethyl starch 200/0.5 (10%) in severe burn injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Despite large experience in the management of severe burn injury, there are still controversies regarding the best type of fluid resuscitation, especially during the first 24 hours after the trauma. Therefore, our study addressed the question whether hyperoncotic hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 200/0.5 (10%) administered in combination with crystalloids within the first 24 hours after injury is as effective as 'crystalloids only' in severe burn injury patients. Methods 30 consecutive patients were enrolled to this prospective interventional open label study and assigned either to a traditional 'crystalloids only' or to a 'HES 200/0.5 (10%)' volume resuscitation protocol. Total amount of fluid administration, complications such as pulmonary failure, abdominal compartment syndrome, sepsis, renal failure and overall mortality were assessed. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was performed for binary outcomes and adjustment for potential confounders was done in the multivariate regression models. For continuous outcome parameters multiple linear regression analysis was used. Results Group differences between patients receiving crystalloids only or HES 200/0.5 (10%) were not statistically significant. However, a large effect towards increased overall mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 7.12; P = 0.16) in the HES 200/0.5 (10%) group as compared to the crystalloids only group (43.8% versus 14.3%) was present. Similarly, the incidence of renal failure was 25.0% in the HES 200/0.5 (10%) group versus 7.1% in the crystalloid only group (adjusted hazard ratio 6.16; P = 0.42). Conclusions This small study indicates that the application of hyperoncotic HES 200/0.5 (10%) within the first 24 hours after severe burn injury may be associated with fatal outcome and should therefore be used with caution. Trial registration NCT01120730. PMID:20584291

  9. Low Tidal Volume Ventilation in Patients Without Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weibing; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Ye; Zhu, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a life threatening respiratory condition characterized by breakdown of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leading to flooding of the alveolar space producing the classical chest radiograph of bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. In this study, we employed lung protective ventilation strategies in patients without acute lung injury (ALI) to determine whether mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volume would provide more clinical benefits to patients without ALI.

  10. Bronchoscopy-Derived Correlates of Lung Injury Following Inhalational Injuries: A Prospective Obervational Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major factor determining morbidity following burns and inhalational injury. In experimental models, factors potentially contributing to ALI risk include inhalation of toxins directly causing cell damage; inflammation; and infection. However, few studi...

  11. Oral penicillin-associated acute kidney injury in an infant with acute pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Zieg, Jakub; Hacek, Jaromir

    2015-04-01

    Beta-lactam-associated acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN) is a rare condition in childhood. We report the case of an infant with penicillin-associated ATIN and concomitant acute pyelonephritis resulting in the development of severe acute kidney injury (AKI). The treatment consisted of penicillin suspension and appropriate AKI management, which required a short period of dialysis. Finally, full recovery and normalization of laboratory parameters occurred. We present here the first case of oral penicillin-associated ATIN in childhood.

  12. Neonatal acute kidney injury - Severity and recovery prediction and the role of serum and urinary biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Deirdre U

    2017-02-01

    Neonatal acute kidney injury is common, in part due to incomplete renal maturation and also due to frequent exposure to risk factors for acute kidney injury such as perinatal asphyxia, extracorporeal-membrane-oxygenation, cardiac surgery, sepsis, prematurity and nephrotoxicity. However the current method by which acute kidney injury is diagnosed is sub-optimal and not universally accepted which impairs the accurate estimation of the true incidence of neonatal acute kidney injury. Serum Cystatin-C, urinary NGAL, KIM-1 and IL-18 are promising neonatal acute kidney injury biomarkers however the diagnosis of acute kidney injury remains serum creatinine/urine output-based in many studies. Emerging biomarkers which require further study in the neonatal population include netrin-1 and EGF. Increased awareness amongst clinicians of nephrotoxic medications being a modifiable risk factor for the development of neonatal acute kidney injury is imperative. The burden of chronic kidney failure following neonatal acute kidney injury is unclear and requires further study.

  13. Impact of a modern firefighting protective uniform on the incidence and severity of burn injuries in New York City firefighters.

    PubMed

    Prezant, D J; Kelly, K J; Malley, K S; Karwa, M L; McLaughlin, M T; Hirschorn, R; Brown, A

    1999-06-01

    The New York City Fire Department (FDNY) is the largest fire department in the United States, with over 11,000 firefighters. In 1994, FDNY changed to a modern firefighting protective uniform. The major difference between traditional and modern uniforms is that modern uniforms include both protective over-coat and over-pant, whereas traditional uniforms include only the over-coat. Furthermore, modern uniforms are manufactured using improved thermal protective textiles that meet or exceed current National Fire Protection Association standards for structural firefighting. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the modern uniform on the incidence and severity of FDNY burn injuries. We also evaluated the incidence and severity of other non-burn injuries to determine whether there was serious adverse impact. The number of lower-extremity burns decreased by 85% when 2 years' experience while wearing the modern uniform was compared with 2 years while wearing the traditional uniform. Upper-extremity burns and head burns decreased by 65% and 40%, respectively. Severity indicators (days lost to medical leave, hospital admissions, and skin grafts) for lower- and upper-extremity burn injuries were all substantially reduced. This occurred without significant change in the incidence or severity of trunk burns, heat exhaustion, inhalation injuries (actually decreased), or cardiac events. The reduction in the incidence and severity of burn injuries, the major occupational injury affecting this workforce, has been so dramatic and without untoward effects that the introduction of the modern uniform must be characterized as a sentinel event in the history of firefighter health and safety.

  14. No correlation between initial arterial carboxyhemoglobin level and degree of lung injury following ovine burn and smoke inhalation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Matthias; Cox, Robert A; Traber, Daniel L; Hamahata, Atsumori; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Traber, Lillian D; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2014-04-01

    Fire victims often suffer from burn injury and concomitant inhalation trauma, the latter significantly contributing to the morbidity and mortality in these patients. Measurement of blood carboxyhemoglobin levels has been proposed as a diagnostic marker to verify and, perhaps, quantify the degree of lung injury following inhalation trauma. However, this correlation has not yet been sufficiently validated. A total of 77 chronically instrumented sheep received sham injury, smoke inhalation injury, or combined burn and inhalation trauma following an established protocol. Arterial carboxyhemoglobin concentrations were determined directly after injury and correlated to several clinical and histopathological determinants of lung injury that were detected 48 hours post-injury. The injury induced severe impairment of pulmonary gas exchange and increases in transvascular fluid flux, lung water content, and airway obstruction scores. No significant correlations were detected between initial carboxyhemoglobin levels and all measured clinical and histopathological determinants of lung injury. In conclusion, the amount of arterial carboxyhemoglobin concentration cannot predict the degree of lung injury at 48 hours after ovine burn and smoke inhalation trauma.

  15. Severe but reversible acute kidney injury resulting from Amanita punctata poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eunjung; Cheong, Ka-Young; Lee, Min-Jeong; Kim, Seirhan; Shin, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Heungsoo; Park, In-Whee

    2015-01-01

    Mushroom-related poisoning can cause acute kidney injury. Here we report a case of acute kidney injury after ingestion of Amanita punctata, which is considered an edible mushroom. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred within 24 hours from the mushroom intake and were followed by an asymptomatic period, acute kidney injury, and elevation of liver and pancreatic enzymes. Kidney function recovered with supportive care. Nephrotoxic mushroom poisoning should be considered as a cause of acute kidney injury. PMID:26779427

  16. The burning issues of motor vehicle radiator scald injuries revisited – a fresh review and changing prevention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, J.N.; Tan, A.; Frew, Q.; Dziewulski, P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary A preventable subgroup of burn injuries is scalds sustained from motor vehicle radiators. This study was to determine changes in trends in epidemiology of such injuries and to discuss whether current and other prevention efforts proposed previously require reinforcement. We conducted a retrospective study (February 2007-August 2015) of all motor vehicle-related burn referrals to our regional burns service. 68 cases of motor vehicle radiator burns were identified. Male to female ratio was 65:3. Mean age was 35.1 (range = 9-71). Most cases occurred in the summer months (22/68 = 32.4%). 65 cases (95.6%) involved car radiators. 66% of injuries resulted from actively removing the pressure cap of an overheated radiator in the motor vehicle. Mean total burn surface area (%TBSA) was 2.1% (range = 0.5- 11%). The depths of burn injuries were mostly superficial partial thickness. Face, chest and upper limbs were the most common sites of injury. Mean healing time was 14.2 days (range = 4-60). Following the introduction of safety measures by vehicle manufacturers, motor vehicle radiator burns in this era are mostly minor injuries and can be potentially managed conservatively as an outpatient. This contrasts with findings from previous studies over a decade ago of larger, more significant injuries requiring admission and surgery. Whilst manufacturers have installed safety measures into the design of radiator caps, our findings suggest that re-educating the public to allow a period of cooling prior to opening caps should be reinforced. PMID:28289357

  17. The burning issues of motor vehicle radiator scald injuries revisited - a fresh review and changing prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Patel, J N; Tan, A; Frew, Q; Dziewulski, P

    2016-12-31

    A preventable subgroup of burn injuries is scalds sustained from motor vehicle radiators. This study was to determine changes in trends in epidemiology of such injuries and to discuss whether current and other prevention efforts proposed previously require reinforcement. We conducted a retrospective study (February 2007-August 2015) of all motor vehicle-related burn referrals to our regional burns service. 68 cases of motor vehicle radiator burns were identified. Male to female ratio was 65:3. Mean age was 35.1 (range = 9-71). Most cases occurred in the summer months (22/68 = 32.4%). 65 cases (95.6%) involved car radiators. 66% of injuries resulted from actively removing the pressure cap of an overheated radiator in the motor vehicle. Mean total burn surface area (%TBSA) was 2.1% (range = 0.5- 11%). The depths of burn injuries were mostly superficial partial thickness. Face, chest and upper limbs were the most common sites of injury. Mean healing time was 14.2 days (range = 4-60). Following the introduction of safety measures by vehicle manufacturers, motor vehicle radiator burns in this era are mostly minor injuries and can be potentially managed conservatively as an outpatient. This contrasts with findings from previous studies over a decade ago of larger, more significant injuries requiring admission and surgery. Whilst manufacturers have installed safety measures into the design of radiator caps, our findings suggest that re-educating the public to allow a period of cooling prior to opening caps should be reinforced.

  18. Efficacy of a children’s procedural preparation and distraction device on healing in acute burn wound care procedures: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The intense pain and anxiety triggered by burns and their associated wound care procedures are well established in the literature. Non-pharmacological intervention is a critical component of total pain management protocols and is used as an adjunct to pharmacological analgesia. An example is virtual reality, which has been used effectively to dampen pain intensity and unpleasantness. Possible links or causal relationships between pain/anxiety/stress and burn wound healing have previously not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to investigate these relationships, specifically by determining if a newly developed multi-modal procedural preparation and distraction device (Ditto™) used during acute burn wound care procedures will reduce the pain and anxiety of a child and increase the rate of re-epithelialization. Methods/design Children (4 to 12 years) with acute burn injuries presenting for their first dressing change will be randomly assigned to either the (1) Control group (standard distraction) or (2) Ditto™ intervention group (receiving Ditto™, procedural preparation and Ditto™ distraction). It is intended that a minimum of 29 participants will be recruited for each treatment group. Repeated measures of pain intensity, anxiety, stress and healing will be taken at every dressing change until complete wound re-epithelialization. Further data collection will aid in determining patient satisfaction and cost effectiveness of the Ditto™ intervention, as well as its effect on speed of wound re-epithelialization. Discussion Results of this study will provide data on whether the disease process can be altered by reducing stress, pain and anxiety in the context of acute burn wounds. Trial registration ACTRN12611000913976 PMID:23234491

  19. Alterations in airway microbiota in patients with PaO2/FiO2 ratio ≤ 300 after burn and inhalation injury

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Shaun D.; Yourstone, Scott; Jones, Samuel W.; Cairns, Bruce A.; Jones, Corbin D.; Jaspers, Ilona; Diaz-Sanchez, David

    2017-01-01

    Background Injury to the airways after smoke inhalation is a major mortality risk factor in victims of burn injuries, resulting in a 15–45% increase in patient deaths. Damage to the airways by smoke may induce acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is partly characterized by hypoxemia in the airways. While ARDS has been associated with bacterial infection, the impact of hypoxemia on airway microbiota is unknown. Our objective was to identify differences in microbiota within the airways of burn patients who develop hypoxemia early after inhalation injury and those that do not using next-generation sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Results DNA was extracted from therapeutic bronchial washings of 48 patients performed within 72 hours of hospitalization for burn and inhalation injury at the North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center. DNA was prepared for sequencing using a novel molecule tagging method and sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Bacterial species were identified using the MTToolbox pipeline. Patients with hypoxemia, as indicated by a PaO2/FiO2 ratio ≤ 300, had a 30% increase in abundance of Streptococcaceae and Enterobacteriaceae and 84% increase in Staphylococcaceae as compared to patients with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio > 300. Wilcoxon rank-sum test identified significant enrichment in abundance of OTUs identified as Prevotella melaninogenica (p = 0.042), Corynebacterium (p = 0.037) and Mogibacterium (p = 0.048). Linear discriminant effect size analysis (LefSe) confirmed significant enrichment of Prevotella melaninognica among patients with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio ≤ 300 (p<0.05). These results could not be explained by differences in antibiotic treatment. Conclusions The airway microbiota following burn and inhalation injury is altered in patients with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio ≤ 300 early after injury. Enrichment of specific taxa in patients with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio ≤ 300 may indicate airway environment and patient changes that favor these microbes

  20. Sweat gland regeneration after burn injury: is stem cell therapy a new hope?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuiping; Chen, Yan; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-05-01

    Stem cells are the seeds of tissue repair and regeneration and a promising source for novel therapies. The skin of patients with an extensive deep burn injury is repaired by a hypertrophic scar without regeneration of sweat glands and therefore loses the function of perspiration. Stem cell therapy provides the possibility of sweat gland regeneration. In particular, recent studies have reported the reprogramming of mesenchymal stromal cells into sweat gland-like (SGL) cells. We present an overview of recent researches into sweat gland regeneration with stem cells. Difficulties of sweat gland regeneration after deep burns have been elaborated. The advantage and disadvantage of several stem cell types in sweat gland regeneration have been discussed. Additionally, the possible mechanisms for reprogramming stem cells to SGL cells are summarized. A brief discussion on clinical application of stem cell-derived SGL cells is also presented. This review may possibly provide some implications for sweat gland regeneration.

  1. Effects of glycyl-glutamine dipeptide supplementation on myocardial damage and cardiac function in rats after severe burn injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Yan, Hong; Lv, Shang-Gun; Wang, Lin; Liang, Guang-Ping; Wan, Qian-Xue; Peng, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Glutamine decreases myocardial damage in ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, the cardioprotective effect of glutamine after burn injury remains unclear. Present study was to explore the protective effect of glycyl-glutamine dipeptide on myocardial damage in severe burn rats. Seventy-two Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: normal control (C), burned control (B) and glycyl-glutamine dipeptide-treated (GG) groups. B and GG groups were inflicted with 30% total body surface area of full thickness burn. The GG group was given 1.5 g/kg glycyl-glutamine dipeptide per day and the B group was given the same dose of alanine via intraperitoneal injection for 3 days. The serum CK, LDH, AST, and, blood lactic acid levels, as well as the myocardium ATP and GSH contents, were measured. The indices of cardiac contractile function and histopathological change were analyzed at 12, 24, 48, and 72 post-burn hours (PBH). The serum CK, LDH, AST and blood lactic acid levels increased, and the myocardium ATP and GSH content decreased in both burned groups. Compared with B group, the CK, LDH, AST and blood lactic acid levels reduced, myocardium ATP and GSH content increased in GG group. Moreover, the inhibition of cardiac contractile function and myocardial histopathological damage were reduced significantly in GG group. We conclude that myocardial histological structure and function were damaged significantly after burn injury, glycyl-glutamine dipeptide supplementation is beneficial to myocardial preservation by improving cardiocyte energy metabolism, increasing ATP and glutathione synthesis.

  2. Saturday-morning television: do sponsors promote high-risk behavior for burn injury?

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Tina L; Aoki, Traci; Combs, Elena; Curri, Terese; Garma, Sylvia; Kaulkin, Cammie; Lawless, Mary Beth; Nelson, Kate; Sanders, Johanna; Warden, Nancy; Greenhalgh, David G

    2004-01-01

    Television has become an important tool for learning and socialization in children. Although television violence has been associated with adverse effects, data on depiction of fire and burn injury are lacking. We sought to determine whether Saturday-morning television programming, viewed primarily by children, depicts fire and burn injury as safe or without consequence, thus potentially increasing the incidence of burn injury in children. This was a prospective observational study. Saturday-morning children's television programs were videotaped from 7 AM to 11 AM for eight different television networks during a 6-month period. Tapes were scored for scenes depicting fire or smoke by independent observers. Recorded items included show category, scene type, gender target, context of fire, and outcome after exposure to flame. Fire events were documented during programs and their associated commercials. A total of 108 hours of children's programs, 16 hours per network, were recorded. Scenes depicting fire or smoke were identified 1960 times, with 39% of events occurring during the program itself and 61% in commercials. Fire was depicted as either safe or without consequence in 64% of incidents. Action adventure stories accounted for 56% of flame depictions. Overall, one incident involving flame and fire was portrayed for each 3 minutes of television programming. Saturday-morning television programming frequently depicts fire as safe, empowering, or exciting. The incidence of flame use in programming varies between stations but is most prevalent in action/adventure stories. Television commercials, although brief, provide the majority of the misinformation regarding fire. Medical professional societies should alert the public to this potential hazard and recommend responsible portrayal of fire in children's television programming.

  3. Requirements for Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute burn and chronic surgical wound infection.

    PubMed

    Turner, Keith H; Everett, Jake; Trivedi, Urvish; Rumbaugh, Kendra P; Whiteley, Marvin

    2014-07-01

    Opportunistic infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be acute or chronic. While acute infections often spread rapidly and can cause tissue damage and sepsis with high mortality rates, chronic infections can persist for weeks, months, or years in the face of intensive clinical intervention. Remarkably, this diverse infectious capability is not accompanied by extensive variation in genomic content, suggesting that the genetic capacity to be an acute or a chronic pathogen is present in most P. aeruginosa strains. To investigate the genetic requirements for acute and chronic pathogenesis in P. aeruginosa infections, we combined high-throughput sequencing-mediated transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) and genome-wide insertion mutant fitness profiling (Tn-seq) to characterize gene expression and fitness determinants in murine models of burn and non-diabetic chronic wound infection. Generally we discovered that expression of a gene in vivo is not correlated with its importance for fitness, with the exception of metabolic genes. By combining metabolic models generated from in vivo gene expression data with mutant fitness profiles, we determined the nutritional requirements for colonization and persistence in these infections. Specifically, we found that long-chain fatty acids represent a major carbon source in both chronic and acute wounds, and P. aeruginosa must biosynthesize purines, several amino acids, and most cofactors during infection. In addition, we determined that P. aeruginosa requires chemotactic flagellar motility for fitness and virulence in acute burn wound infections, but not in non-diabetic chronic wound infections. Our results provide novel insight into the genetic requirements for acute and chronic P. aeruginosa wound infections and demonstrate the power of using both gene expression and fitness profiling for probing bacterial virulence.

  4. Growth and development alter susceptibility to acute renal injury.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Naito, Masayo; Lund, Steve R; Kim, Nayeon; Bomsztyk, Karol

    2008-09-01

    Many of the studies of acute renal injury have been conducted in young mice usually during their rapid growth phase; yet, the impact of age or growth stage on the degree of injury is unknown. To address this issue, we studied three forms of injury (endotoxemic-, glycerol-, and maleate-induced) in mice ranging in age from adolescence (3 weeks) to maturity (16 weeks). The severity of injury within each model significantly correlated with weight and age. We also noticed a progressive age-dependent reduction in renal cholesterol content, a potential injury modifier. As the animals grew and aged they also exhibited stepwise decrements in the mRNAs of HMG CoA reductase and the low density lipoprotein receptor, two key cholesterol homeostatic genes. This was paralleled by decreased amounts of RNA polymerase II and the transcription factor SREBP1/2 at the reductase and lipoprotein receptor gene loci as measured by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Our study shows that the early phase of mouse growth can profoundly alter renal susceptibility to diverse forms of experimental acute renal injury.

  5. Body temperature control in sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Giueng-Chueng; Chi, Wei-Ming; Perng, Wan-Cherng; Huang, Kun-Lun

    2003-12-31

    Body temperature is precisely regulated to maintain homeostasis in homeothermic animals. Although it remains unproved whether change of body temperature constitutes a beneficial or a detrimental component of the septic response, temperature control should be an important entity in septic experiments. We investigated the effect of body temperature control on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. Acute lung injury in rats was induced by intratracheal spray of LPS and body temperature was either clamped at 37 degrees C for 5 hours or not controlled. The severity of lung injury was evaluated at the end of the experiment. Intratracheal administration of aerosolized LPS caused a persistent decline in body temperature and a significant lung injury as indicated by an elevation of protein-concentration and LDH activity in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio of lungs. Administration of LPS also caused neutrophil sequestration and lipid peroxidation in the lung tissue as indicated by increase in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) production, respectively. Control of body temperature at 37 degrees C after LPS (LPS/BT37, n = 11) significantly reduced acute lung injury as evidenced by decreases in BAL fluid protein concentration (983 +/- 189 vs. 1403 +/- 155 mg/L) and LDH activity (56 +/- 10 vs. 123 +/- 17 deltamAbs/min) compared with the LPS group (n = 11). Although the W/D ratio of lung and MDA level were lower in the rats received temperature control compared with those received LPS only, the differences were not statistically significant. Our results demonstrated that intratracheal administration of aerosolized LPS induced a hypothermic response and acute lung injury in rats and controlling body temperature at a normal range may alleviate the LPS-induced lung injury.

  6. Self-perceptions of young adults who survived severe childhood burn injury.

    PubMed

    Russell, William; Robert, Rhonda S; Thomas, Christopher R; Holzer, Charles E; Blakeney, Patricia; Meyer, Walter J

    2013-01-01

    significantly lower self-concept scores on the TSCS2 physical scale are consistent with the physical disfigurement and handicaps common with major burn injuries, and a strong indication of this group's perception of the first impression made when interacting with others. The survivors seem to feel worthwhile within the contexts of family and friends. Although the major limitation of this study using the TSCS2 is the lack of a matched reference population to compare the burn survivors, the TSCS2 does help in gaining insight into the self-esteem issues of the burn survivor population.

  7. Assessment of electrical burn injury using structured illumination in an in-vivo electrical injury model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thu T. A.; Basiri, Ali; Shupp, J. W.; Moffatt, L. T.; Jordan, M. H.; Jeng, J. C.; Leto, E.; Ramella-Roman, J. C.

    2010-10-01

    Electrical injury is a devastating and hard to treat clinical lesion. Fully understanding the pathophysiology of electrical trauma is still a challenge for clinicians and scientists. Further elucidating the natural history of this form of tissue injury could be helpful in improving limb salvage and offering stage-appropriate therapy. Multi-spectral imaging technique is a non-invasive technology that can be used to determine optical properties of tissues in and adjacent to injury. Images at different wavelengths can provide essential information related to the pathophysiological condition of the tissue. To promote the applicability of this technique in medical diagnosis, we built a complete experimental model of electrical injury. In this model, electrical injuries were created by a reliable high-tension shock system at preset voltage or current. A thermal camera recorded the change of skin temperature during the electrical shock. Then, a high-resolution spectral imaging system based on structured illumination was used to capture images for post analysis to extrapolate optical properties of the tissue. To test accuracy, this imaging system was calibrated by using a set of epoxy phantoms with known optical properties. In this paper, the results of experiments conducted on rats and discussions on the systemic changes in tissue optical properties before and after electrical shock are presented.

  8. Assessment of electrical burn injury using structured illumination in an in-vivo electrical injury model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thu T. A.; Basiri, Ali; Shupp, J. W.; Moffatt, L. T.; Jordan, M. H.; Jeng, J. C.; Leto, E.; Ramella-Roman, J. C.

    2011-03-01

    Electrical injury is a devastating and hard to treat clinical lesion. Fully understanding the pathophysiology of electrical trauma is still a challenge for clinicians and scientists. Further elucidating the natural history of this form of tissue injury could be helpful in improving limb salvage and offering stage-appropriate therapy. Multi-spectral imaging technique is a non-invasive technology that can be used to determine optical properties of tissues in and adjacent to injury. Images at different wavelengths can provide essential information related to the pathophysiological condition of the tissue. To promote the applicability of this technique in medical diagnosis, we built a complete experimental model of electrical injury. In this model, electrical injuries were created by a reliable high-tension shock system at preset voltage or current. A thermal camera recorded the change of skin temperature during the electrical shock. Then, a high-resolution spectral imaging system based on structured illumination was used to capture images for post analysis to extrapolate optical properties of the tissue. To test accuracy, this imaging system was calibrated by using a set of epoxy phantoms with known optical properties. In this paper, the results of experiments conducted on rats and discussions on the systemic changes in tissue optical properties before and after electrical shock are presented.

  9. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tp; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick Sh; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-07-30

    This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing - a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms). Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60-90 ms). The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41-45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative. Immobilization should not be

  10. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Daniel TP; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick SH; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms). Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms). The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative. Immobilization should not

  11. [Evidence for treatment of acute syndesmosis injuries in sports].

    PubMed

    Best, R; Mauch, F; Bauer, G

    2013-06-01

    Injuries of the distal syndesmosis often accompany acute ankle sprains especially in professional team sports. While small partial syndesmosis lesions can often be missed as a consequence of impressive symptoms due to ventrolateral capsuloligamentous injuries, higher grade injuries of the syndesmosis can mostly be diagnosed without any problem. Furthermore, there is a consensus concerning the necessity of operative treatment in significantly unstable situations as well concerning conservative treatment of incomplete partial lesions. Consequently, the greatest challenge regarding diagnostic tools, quantification and optimal therapy arises in the most common form of sport-associated, complete or partial lesions of the distal syndesmosis. This review article summarizes sports-associated injuries of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis considering the current literature and placing the emphasis on the anatomy, pathobiomechanics, diagnostics and therapy of syndesmosis lesions from an evidence-based viewpoint.

  12. Anti-oxidative aspect of inhaled anesthetic gases against acute brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tuo; Sun, Yang; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Acute brain injury is a critical and emergent condition in clinical settings, which needs to be addressed urgently. Commonly acute brain injuries include traumatic brain injury, ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Oxidative stress is a key contributor to the subsequent injuries and impedes the reparative process after acute brain injury; therefore, facilitating an anti-oxidative approach is important in the care of those diseases. Readiness to deliver and permeability to blood brain barrier are essential for the use of this purpose. Inhaled anesthetic gases are a group of such agents. In this article, we discuss the anti-oxidative roles of anesthetic gases against acute brain injury. PMID:28217295

  13. Functional and psychological outcomes following burn injury: reduced income and hidden emotions are predictors of greater distress.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Jeanne; James, Frances; McNeill, Rob; Brown, Paul; Cameron, Linda; Mills, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether functional and psychosocial outcomes after burn injury in New Zealand are consistent with the international literature. Fifty participants with burns >10% TBSA and a mean of 5.1 years since burn completed a survey that included questionnaires and open-ended questions. The rates of psychosocial distress for this sample were consistent with international reports. Psychological distress was predicted by negative change in income and by reports that the individual has hidden thoughts and emotions from others. Respondents also described positive changes in their life as a result of the burn injury that were independent of negative outcomes. Participants indicated good long-term functional improvement but ongoing psychological distress. Important indicators for poor outcome may be loss of income and reluctance to discuss emotions.

  14. Early Acute Kidney Injury in Military Casualties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    J. A.; Kwan, H. K.; Glass, K. R.; Morrow, B . D.; Latack, W.; Henderson, A. T.; Saenz, K. K.; Siew, E. D.; Ikizler, T. A.; Chung, K. K.; 5d. PROJECT...19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b . ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98...among trauma patients. Ann Surg. 2010;252:158Y165. 12. Skinner DL, Hardcastle TC, Rodseth RN, Muckart DJ. The incidence and outcomes of acute kidney

  15. Hypothyroidism causing paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury - case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present a patient with severe hypothyroidism complicated by paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury. A 65 year old male patient, diagnosed with hypothyroidism one year ago was transferred to our unit in a state of drowsiness and confusion. He was severely hypothyroid and had paralytic ileus and impaired renal function at the time of transfer. Hypokalaemia was present, and was likely to have contributed to the paralytic ileus and this together with dehydration was likely to have contributed to renal injury. Nonetheless, hypothyroidism is very likely to have been the principal precipitant of both these complications, and both paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury improved with thyroxine replacement. Unfortunately, the patient died unexpectedly eight days after admission to the unit. Hypothyroidism may induce de novo acute kidney injury or it may exacerbate ongoing chronic kidney disease. This rare complication is assumed to be due to the hypodynamic circulatory state created by thyroid hormone deficiency. Paralytic ileus is an even rarer fatal manifestation of hypothyroidism and is thought to be due to an autonomic neuropathy affecting the intestines that is reversible with thyroxine replacement. To our knowledge, both these complications have not been observed in a single patient so far. It is important that clinicians are aware of these rare manifestations of hypothyroidism as in most occasions, thyroxine deficiency may be missed, and treatment can reverse the complications. PMID:21303532

  16. Hypothyroidism causing paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury - case report.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Gamakaranage, Champika Sssk; Epa, Dhanesha S; Gnanathasan, Ariaranee; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2011-02-08

    We present a patient with severe hypothyroidism complicated by paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury. A 65 year old male patient, diagnosed with hypothyroidism one year ago was transferred to our unit in a state of drowsiness and confusion. He was severely hypothyroid and had paralytic ileus and impaired renal function at the time of transfer. Hypokalaemia was present, and was likely to have contributed to the paralytic ileus and this together with dehydration was likely to have contributed to renal injury. Nonetheless, hypothyroidism is very likely to have been the principal precipitant of both these complications, and both paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury improved with thyroxine replacement. Unfortunately, the patient died unexpectedly eight days after admission to the unit.Hypothyroidism may induce de novo acute kidney injury or it may exacerbate ongoing chronic kidney disease. This rare complication is assumed to be due to the hypodynamic circulatory state created by thyroid hormone deficiency. Paralytic ileus is an even rarer fatal manifestation of hypothyroidism and is thought to be due to an autonomic neuropathy affecting the intestines that is reversible with thyroxine replacement. To our knowledge, both these complications have not been observed in a single patient so far.It is important that clinicians are aware of these rare manifestations of hypothyroidism as in most occasions, thyroxine deficiency may be missed, and treatment can reverse the complications.

  17. The year in burns 2013.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Steven E; Phelan, Herbert A; Arnoldo, Brett D

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 3415 research articles were published with burns in the title, abstract, and/or keyword in 2013. We have continued to see an increase in this number; the following reviews articles selected from these by the Editor of one of the major journals (Burns) and colleagues that in their opinion are most likely to have effects on burn care treatment and understanding. As we have done before, articles were found and divided into the following topic areas: epidemiology of injury and burn prevention, wound and scar characterization, acute care and critical care, inhalation injury, infection, psychological considerations, pain and itching management, rehabilitation and long-term outcomes, and burn reconstruction. The articles are mentioned briefly with notes from the authors; readers are referred to the full papers for details.

  18. The impact of caregiver support on mortality following burn injury in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Alsafran, Salman K; Davis, James S; Tankel, Susan; Varas, Robin; Quintana, Olga; Manning, Ron; Glenn, Candace; Pizano, Louis R; Namias, Nicholas; Schulman, Carl I

    2013-01-01

    Advances in burn care have decreased mortality in the past 20 years, but affecting elderly mortality rates (>65 years) remain challenging. This study evaluates the impact of home caregiver support on elderly burn patients' mortality. The authors retrospectively reviewed patients aged 65 and older admitted to their burn center from July 1995 to October 2004. Patient demographics, Injury Severity Score, TBSA, and patients' primary caregiver were collected. The outcomes were mortality, disposition, and length of stay and these were evaluated using univariate and subsequently multivariate regression. Significance was calculated at P ≤ .05. A total of 112 patients were included in the analysis. The mean age was 76±8. Male patients constituted 47%, whereas 53% were female patients, and mean TBSA was 21±16%. Thirty patients' primary caregiver was a spouse, for 38 it was a child, and 44 had no caregiver. Fifty-eight patients survived (51.7%), and 54 patients died (48.3%). Only 21% of the survivors had a child as their primary caregiver; however, 48% of the nonsurvivors had a child as the primary caregiver (P ≤ 0.05). On multivariate analysis, age, TBSA, and child as primary caregiver were all independent predictors of mortality. Having a child as a caregiver provided the largest impact, with an odds ratio of 4.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-15.62; P = .02).

  19. The Effects of Punica granatum Flower Extract on Skin Injuries Induced by Burn in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Ebrahim; Akbari, Jafar; Azadbakht, Mohammad; Azizi, Soheil

    2017-01-01

    Background. We compared the efficacy of P. granatum (P) flower extract with that of silver sulfadiazine (SSD) for treating thermal burn injuries in rats. Methods. Ten Wistar rats in each group were topically given base cream, normal saline, cream containing 1% SSD, or creams containing 5% or 10% Punica granatum flower extract. The treatments were administered once daily until complete wound healing was observed. The wound area and healing time were assessed. In addition, percentage wound contraction and histopathological characteristics such as neovascularization and collagen formation were determined. The tannin content in P. granatum extract was determined. Results. The decrease in the average size of wounds on day 15 of the treatment was higher in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum extract than in rats treated with cream containing SSD (2.8 ± 0.9 cm2 versus 8.4 ± 3.2 cm2). The wounds completely healed on day 25 of the treatment in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum flower extract compared with those in rats treated with the other agents. Conclusion. These results indicated that P. granatum flower extract promoted wound healing in rats and could be used for managing burn injuries. PMID:28203250

  20. NMDA Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Liu, Yong; Peng, XiangPing; Liu, Wei; Zhao, FeiYan; Feng, DanDan; Han, JianZhong; Huang, YanHong; Luo, SiWei; Li, Lian; Yue, Shao Jie; Cheng, QingMei; Huang, XiaoTing; Luo, ZiQiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Glutamate is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Large amount of glutamate can overstimulate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), causing neuronal injury and death. Recently, NMDAR has been reported to be found in the lungs. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of memantine, a NMDAR channel blocker, on bleomycin-induced lung injury mice. Methods C57BL/6 mice were intratracheally injected with bleomycin (BLM) to induce lung injury. Mice were randomized to receive saline, memantine (Me), BLM, BLM plus Me. Lungs and BALF were harvested on day 3 or 7 for further evaluation. Results BLM caused leukocyte infiltration, pulmonary edema and increase in cytokines, and imposed significant oxidative stress (MDA as a marker) in lungs. Memantine significantly mitigated the oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury caused by BLM. Moreover, activation of NMDAR enhances CD11b expression on neutrophils. Conclusions Memantine mitigates oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury in BLM challenged mice. PMID:25942563

  1. Paeoniflorin ameliorates acute necrotizing pancreatitis and pancreatitis‑induced acute renal injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Weixing; Shi, Qiao; Zhao, Liang; Mei, Fangchao; Li, Chen; Zuo, Teng; He, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    Acute renal injury caused by acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) is a common complication that is associated with a high rate of mortality. Paeoniflorin is the active ingredient of paeonia radix and exhibits a number of pharmacological effects, such as anti‑inflammatory, anticancer, analgesic and immunomodulatory effects. The present study detected the potential treatment effects of paeoniflorin on acute renal injury induced by ANP in a rat model. The optimal dose of paeoniflorin for preventing acute renal injury induced by ANP was determined. Then, the possible protective mechanism of paeoniflorin was investigated. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α, interleukin (IL)‑1β and IL‑6 were measured with enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay kits. Renal inflammation and apoptosis were measured by immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The expression of nitric oxide in kidney tissues was also evaluated. The p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were measured by western blotting. The results shown that paeoniflorin may ameliorate acute renal injury following ANP in rats by inhibiting inflammatory responses and renal cell apoptosis. These effects may be associated with the p38MAPK and nuclear factor‑κB signal pathway.

  2. Burn injury during long-term oxygen therapy in Denmark and Sweden: the potential role of smoking

    PubMed Central

    Tanash, Hanan A; Ringbaek, Thomas; Huss, Fredrik; Ekström, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Background Long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) increases life expectancy in patients with COPD and severe hypoxemia. Smoking is the main cause of burn injury during LTOT. Policy regarding smoking while on LTOT varies between countries. In this study, we compare the incidence of burn injury that required contact with a health care specialist, between Sweden (a country with a strict policy regarding smoking while on LTOT) and Denmark (a country with less strict smoking policy). Methods This was a population-based, cohort study of patients initiating LTOT due to any cause in Sweden and Denmark. Data on diagnoses, external causes, and procedures were obtained from the Swedish and Danish National Patient Registers for inpatient and outpatient care. Patients were followed from January 1, 2000, until the first of the following: LTOT withdrawal, death, or study end (December 31, 2009). The primary end point was burn injury during LTOT. Results A total of 23,741 patients received LTOT in Denmark and 7,754 patients in Sweden. Most patients started LTOT due to COPD, both in Sweden (74%) and in Denmark (62%). The rate of burn injury while on LTOT was higher in Denmark than in Sweden; 170 (95% confidence interval [CI], 126–225) vs 85 (95% CI, 44–148) per 100,000 person-years; rate ratio 2.0 (95% CI, 1.0–4.1). The risk remained higher after adjustment for gender, age, and diagnosis in multivariate Cox regression, hazard ratio 1.8 (95% CI, 1.0−3.5). Thirty-day mortality after burn injury was 8% in both countries. Conclusion Compared to Sweden, the rate of burn injury was twice as high in Denmark where smoking is not a contraindication for prescribing LTOT. PMID:28123292

  3. Acute Pharmacological DVT Prophylaxis after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thibault-Halman, Ginette; Casha, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A systematic review of the literature was performed to address pertinent clinical questions regarding deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis in the setting of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Deep vein thromboses are a common occurrence following SCI. Administration of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) within 72 h of injury is recommended to minimize the occurrence of DVT. Furthermore, when surgical intervention is required, LMWH should be held the morning of surgery, and resumed within 24 h post-operatively. PMID:20795870

  4. Patient Experience of Wearing Compression Garments Post Burn Injury: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Coghlan, Nicole; Copley, Jodie; Aplin, Tammy; Strong, Jenny

    2017-02-16

    This review was conducted to critically appraise the literature regarding the patient's lived experience of, and adherence to, wearing compression garments post burn injury. Scholarly articles were identified from searches of the following databases: Pubmed, Cochrane Central, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and OT Seeker. Combinations of key words including compression therapy/garment, pressure therapy/garment, burn(s), adherence, and patient experience were utilized. Retrieved studies were included in the review if they were written in English, reported on adult burn populations, and the patient's lived experience of wearing compression garments. Included studies were critically appraised and content analysis was completed on the results sections of the two qualitative studies. Nine studies investigating patient's lived experiences were retained: one systematic review, one randomized controlled trial, five cross-sectional surveys, and two qualitative studies. An adherence framework provided a conceptual basis to categorize reported patient's lived experiences. Results identified a strong focus on patient and treatment-related experiences with limited investigation of condition, patient-provider and health care system experiences. Minimal investigation has been completed regarding the impact of these patient's lived experiences on the adherence to wearing compression garments. Additional research using qualitative methods is required to gain a deep understanding of patient's experiences and perspectives of wearing compression garments and how these experiences influence on their adherence to wearing them. Identification of key experiences that lead to patients removing their compression garments may lead to modification of treatment and system approaches to better align with patients' needs and development of potential interventions that promote adherence.

  5. Evaluation of intragastric vs intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests in the evaluation of insulin resistance in a rodent model of burn injury and glucagon-like polypeptide-1 treatment.

    PubMed

    Watada, Susumu; Yu, Yong-Ming; Fischman, Alan J; Kurihara, Tomohiro; Shen, Chuan-An; Tompkins, Ronald G; Fagan, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of glucose tolerance in rodent models is usually performed after intraperitroneal administration of glucose (intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test [IPGTT]), whereas in humans the test is performed with oral glucose. Hyperglycemia is a major clinical manifestation of burn injury. Our previous studies using IPGTT have demonstrated burn injury-induced insulin resistance and the beneficial effects of glucagon-like polypeptide-1 (GLP-1) in improving insulin resistance. The goal of the present study is to compare the results of these two procedures under 1) burn injury-induced insulin resistance and 2) GLP-1 treatment after burn. Male CD rats were divided into three groups: sham burn, burn, and burn with GLP-1. Blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were measured during intragastric glucose tolerance test (IGGTT) on day 6 after 40% of full-thickness burn injury. The results were compared with our previous IPGTT. Blood glucose curves for IGGTT and IPGTT showed a similar pattern. However, IGGTT demonstrated a significant lower level of maximal blood glucose when compared with IPGTT. This was accompanied by higher peak insulin levels in sham burn and burn groups. In contrast, peak insulin levels of each burn with GLP-1 group were similar. 1) Both IPGTT and IGGTT demonstrated burn injury-induced insulin resistance and the efficacy of GLP-1 for reducing hyperglycemia after burn injury. 2) The observed differences in the plasma glucose and insulin levels between IGGTT and IPGTT suggest that endogenously produced GLP-1 during the IGGTT may play a role in ameliorating insulin resistance after burn injury.

  6. Nrf2 plays a pivotal role in protection against burn trauma-induced intestinal injury and death.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhao; Zhang, Yiran; Ma, Liang; Ni, Yiming; Zhao, Haige

    2016-04-12

    Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) is a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that principally defends against oxidative stress and also plays a unique role in severe sepsis. However, its contribution to intestinal injury and death after burn trauma is unclear.In this study, wild-type (Nrf2+/+) and Nrf2-deficient (Nrf2-/-) mice were subjected to 15% or 30% total body surface area burn or sham injury. Survival, systemic inflammation, and gut injury were determined.Nrf2-/- mice were more susceptible to burn-induced intestinal injury, as characterized by increases in damage to the gut structure and in intestinal permeability. This exacerbation was associated with an increase in the intestinal mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-6, IL-1B, monocyte chemotactic protein 1, intercellular adhesion molecule, and vascular cell adhesion molecule) and a decrease in the intestinal mRNA expression of Nrf2-regulated genes (NAD(P)H dehydrogenasequinine-1 and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit). Nrf2-deficient mice also showed a lower survival rate and higher levels of systemic cytokines (IL-6 and IL-1B) and high-mobility group protein B1 than wild-type mice. This study demonstrates for the first time that mice that lack Nrf2 are more susceptible to burn-induced intestinal injury and have more systemic inflammation and a lower survival rate.

  7. Acute kidney injury and ESRD management in austere environments.

    PubMed

    Raman, Gaurav; Perkins, Robert M; Jaar, Bernard G

    2012-05-01

    Current knowledge about managing acute kidney injury in disaster situations stems mostly from lessons learned while taking care of crush syndrome patients during major earthquakes. More recently, there has been a greater focus on emergency preparedness for ESRD management. Natural or man-made disasters create an "austere environment," wherein resources to administer standard of care are limited. Advance planning and timely coordinated intervention during disasters are paramount to administer effective therapies and save lives. This article reviews the presentation and management of disaster victims with acute kidney injury and those requiring renal replacement therapies. Major contributions of some key national and international organizations in the field of disaster nephrology are highlighted. The article intends to increase awareness about nephrology care of disaster victims, among nephrology and non-nephrology providers alike.

  8. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. PMID:21134622

  9. [Current concept of TRALI (transfusion-related acute lung injury)].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takehiko; Okazai, Hitoshi

    2007-11-01

    It is only 20 years since TRALI was clinically recognized. As it is gradually recognized among Japanese medical community, the number of cases reported is increasing gradually. In the past nine years (1997-2005), Japanese Red Cross confirmed 118 TRALI cases and 38 possible TRALI cases in Japan. Twelve TRALI cases among them occurred during or after anesthesia on the day of operation. Since acute lung injury is caused by multiple pathological factors, it is difficult to identify its main cause as transfusion. Therefore, TRALI has been underdiagnosed and underreported. Several mechanisms have been proposed. Although anti-HLA antibody, anti-HNA antibody, or other immunoreactive substances appear to be involved in developing TRALI, underlying conditions like systemic inflammation may be required for igniting TRALI Although TRALI developed in the operating theater seems to be a small fraction of whole TRALI cases, anesthesiologists should be aware of TRALI, and remember it as one of the causes of acute lung injury.

  10. Diagnostic Criteria for Acute Kidney Injury: Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Acute kidney injury in a clinical diagnosis guided by standard criteria based on changes in serum creatinine, urine output or both. Severity of acute kidney injury is determined by the magnitude of increase in serum creatinine or decrease in urine output. Patients manifesting both oliguria and azotemia and those in which these impairments are persistent are more likely to have worse disease and worse outcomes. Both short- and long-term outcomes are worse when patients have some stage of AKI by both criteria. Duration of AKI was also a significant predictor of long-term outcomes irrespective of severity. New biomarkers for AKI may substantially aid in the risk assessment and evaluation of patients at risk for AKI. PMID:26410133

  11. Suramin protects from cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Dupre, Tess V; Doll, Mark A; Shah, Parag P; Sharp, Cierra N; Kiefer, Alex; Scherzer, Michael T; Saurabh, Kumar; Saforo, Doug; Siow, Deanna; Casson, Lavona; Arteel, Gavin E; Jenson, Alfred Bennett; Megyesi, Judit; Schnellmann, Rick G; Beverly, Levi J; Siskind, Leah J

    2016-02-01

    Cisplatin, a commonly used cancer chemotherapeutic, has a dose-limiting side effect of nephrotoxicity. Approximately 30% of patients administered cisplatin suffer from kidney injury, and there are limited treatment options for the treatment of cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin, which is Federal Drug Administration-approved for the treatment of trypanosomiasis, improves kidney function after various forms of kidney injury in rodent models. We hypothesized that suramin would attenuate cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin treatment before cisplatin administration reduced cisplatin-induced decreases in kidney function and injury. Furthermore, suramin attenuated cisplatin-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis in the kidney cortex. Treatment of mice with suramin 24 h after cisplatin also improved kidney function, suggesting that the mechanism of protection is not by inhibition of tubular cisplatin uptake or its metabolism to nephrotoxic species. If suramin is to be used in the context of cancer, then it cannot prevent cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity of cancer cells. Suramin did not alter the dose-response curve of cisplatin in lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. In addition, suramin pretreatment of mice harboring lung adenocarcinomas did not alter the initial cytotoxic effects of cisplatin (DNA damage and apoptosis) on tumor cells. These results provide evidence that suramin has potential as a renoprotective agent for the treatment/prevention of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury and justify future long-term preclinical studies using cotreatment of suramin and cisplatin in mouse models of cancer.

  12. Acute kidney injury requiring haemodialysis following ingestion of mephedrone

    PubMed Central

    Rhidian, Rhys; Babu, Adarsh

    2013-01-01

    A 25-year-old man was found to have acute kidney injury (AKI) following ingestion of mephedrone. He presented to this local emergency department with worsening bilateral loin pain. He became oligoanuric, serum creatine peaked at 1214 µmol/l and he required several sessions of haemodialysis before kidney function began to improve. The mechanism of AKI and legal aspects of the use of mephedrone are discussed. PMID:23456157

  13. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI): a review.

    PubMed

    Menitove, Jay E

    2007-01-01

    Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury, or TRALI, denotes the most frequently reported fatal complication of blood transfusion. TRALI accounted for 34% of transfusion associated mortalities reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2005. TRALI caused more deaths than those attributed to hemolytic reactions following incorrect blood administration or sepsis resulting from bacterial contamination of platelet and red cell components. (Holness, Leslie. Food and Drug Administration. Personal Communication, 2006) This paper reviews TRALI for the clinical physician.

  14. Presumptive acute lung injury following multiple surgeries in a cat.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Masaaki; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Rieko; Sasaki, Jun; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Uzuka, Yuji; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Nezu, Yoshinori

    2013-04-01

    A 12-year-old, 3.5-kg spayed female domestic shorthair cat had a tracheal mass identified as malignant B-cell lymphoma. The cat had tracheal resection and subsequently developed laryngeal paralysis. Due to multiple episodes of respiratory distress the cat subsequently had tracheal surgeries. Finally, the cat had a sudden onset of severe respiratory distress and collapsed. Computed tomography imaging and arterial blood gas analysis supported a diagnosis of acute lung injury.

  15. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U.; Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Boorman, Gary A.; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2013-01-15

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  16. Limiting the use of routine radiography for acute ankle injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cockshott, W. P.; Jenkin, J. K.; Pui, M.

    1983-01-01

    In the diagnosis of ankle injuries routine radiography is often productive. An international survey of the average number of radiographs made of injured ankles suggested that two projections are adequate to detect fractures. This was confirmed in a prospective study of 242 patients coming to a hospital emergency department with recent ankle injuries. All the fractures could be identified on an anteroposterior or a lateral projection, although some were more obvious on an oblique view. As well, all the fractures were associated with malleolar soft-tissue swelling. Thus, radiography for acute ankle injuries could safely be restricted to patients with soft-tissue swelling, and fractures could be diagnosed using only two routine projections, though for management purposes additional projections might be needed. With a policy of limiting the use of radiography substantial cost reductions are possible. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6407744

  17. Autophagy in Acute Brain Injury: Feast, Famine, or Folly?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Craig M.; Chen, Yaming; Sullivan, Mara L.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Clark, Robert S. B.

    2010-01-01

    In the central nervous system, increased autophagy has now been reported after traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and seizures. This increase in autophagy could be physiologic, converting damaged or dysfunctional proteins, lipids and/or organelles to their amino acid and fatty acid components for recycling. On the other hand, this increase in autophagy could be supraphysiologic, perhaps consuming and eliminating functional proteins, lipids and/or organelles as well. Whether an increase in autophagy is beneficial (feast) or detrimental (famine) in brain likely depends on both the burden of intracellular substrate targeted for autophagy and the capacity of the cell’s autophagic machinery. Of course, increased autophagy observed after brain injury could also simply be an epiphenomenon (folly). These divergent possibilities have clear ramifications for designing therapeutic strategies targeting autophagy after acute brain injury, and are the subject of this review. PMID:20883784

  18. Intrafacility transportation of patients with acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hsinfen

    2014-06-01

    Patients with acute brain injury (ABI) frequently require diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the areas located outside of the intensive care unit. Transports can be risky for critically ill patients with ABI. Secondary brain injury can occur during the transport from causes such as ischemia, hypotension, hypoxia, hypercapnia, and cerebral edema. Preparation and implementation of preventive procedures including pretransport assessment, monitoring during transport, and posttransport examination and documentation for transports of patients with ABI deem to be necessary. The purpose of this article is to review the typical risks associated with the transports of the patients with ABI out of the intensive care unit and to propose the strategies that can be used to minimize the risks of secondary brain injury.

  19. Hyperhomocysteinemia Exacerbates Cisplatin-induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yanjun; Zhen, Xin; Zhu, Fengxin; Hu, Zheng; Lei, Wenjing; Li, Shuang; Zha, Yan; Nie, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) has been linked to several clinical manifestations including chronic kidney disease. However, it is not known whether HHcy has a role in the development of acute kidney injury (AKI). In the present study, we reported that HHcy mice developed more severe renal injury after cisplatin injection and ischemia-reperfusion injury shown as more severe renal tubular damage and higher serum creatinine. In response to cisplatin, HHcy mice showed more prevalent tubular cell apoptosis and decreased tubular cell proliferation. Mechanistically, a heightened ER stress and a reduced Akt activity were observed in kidney tissues of HHcy mice after cisplatin injection. Stimulating cultured NRK-52E cells with Hcy significantly increased the fraction of cells in G2/M phase and cell apoptosis together with decreased Akt kinase activity. Akt agonist IGF-1 rescued HHcy-induced cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that HHcy increases the sensitivity and severity of AKI. PMID:28255274

  20. Prevention of tap water scald burns: evaluation of a multi-media injury control program.

    PubMed

    Katcher, M L

    1987-09-01

    A prospective study was designed to evaluate a mass media injury prevention program reaching two million people to determine its impact on risk awareness of hot tap water burns and injury-prevention behavior. Liquid-crystal thermometers for testing hot water temperature were offered at no cost; 140,000 were requested. Pre- and post-program general population random surveys (N = 337 and 318, respectively) found increased awareness of the danger of hot tap water, from 72 per cent to 89 per cent, but no increase in testing or lowering of water heater temperatures. A third random sample survey (N = 325) among thermometer requesters found a higher rate of testing (difference 58.1 per cent, 95 per cent CL 55.3 per cent, 60.9 per cent) than in the general population. Of those who tested, 43 per cent reported temperatures in the dangerous range of 54.4 degrees C (130 degrees F) or greater; 52 per cent of this group lowered their water heater thermostat. These findings indicate that: more than 25 per cent of the public is unaware of the potential danger of hot tap water; a safety education program which increases awareness will not necessarily result in injury-control behavior; and most people motivated to request a free thermometer will test their hot water temperature and lower it if necessary. As a result of this effort, thermostats of an estimated 20,000 water heaters were lowered from dangerously high levels.

  1. Prevention of tap water scald burns: evaluation of a multi-media injury control program.

    PubMed Central

    Katcher, M L

    1987-01-01

    A prospective study was designed to evaluate a mass media injury prevention program reaching two million people to determine its impact on risk awareness of hot tap water burns and injury-prevention behavior. Liquid-crystal thermometers for testing hot water temperature were offered at no cost; 140,000 were requested. Pre- and post-program general population random surveys (N = 337 and 318, respectively) found increased awareness of the danger of hot tap water, from 72 per cent to 89 per cent, but no increase in testing or lowering of water heater temperatures. A third random sample survey (N = 325) among thermometer requesters found a higher rate of testing (difference 58.1 per cent, 95 per cent CL 55.3 per cent, 60.9 per cent) than in the general population. Of those who tested, 43 per cent reported temperatures in the dangerous range of 54.4 degrees C (130 degrees F) or greater; 52 per cent of this group lowered their water heater thermostat. These findings indicate that: more than 25 per cent of the public is unaware of the potential danger of hot tap water; a safety education program which increases awareness will not necessarily result in injury-control behavior; and most people motivated to request a free thermometer will test their hot water temperature and lower it if necessary. As a result of this effort, thermostats of an estimated 20,000 water heaters were lowered from dangerously high levels. PMID:3618853

  2. Targeted Lipid Profiling Discovers Plasma Biomarkers of Acute Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Sunil A.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Liebeskind, David S.; Won, Seok Joon; Swanson, Raymond A.

    2015-01-01

    Prior efforts to identify a blood biomarker of brain injury have relied almost exclusively on proteins; however their low levels at early time points and poor correlation with injury severity have been limiting. Lipids, on the other hand, are the most abundant molecules in the brain and readily cross the blood-brain barrier. We previously showed that certain sphingolipid (SL) species are highly specific to the brain. Here we examined the feasibility of using SLs as biomarkers for acute brain injury. A rat model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a mouse model of stroke were used to identify candidate SL species though our mass-spectrometry based lipid profiling approach. Plasma samples collected after TBI in the rat showed large increases in many circulating SLs following injury, and larger lesions produced proportionately larger increases. Plasma samples collected 24 hours after stroke in mice similarly revealed a large increase in many SLs. We constructed an SL score (sum of the two SL species showing the largest relative increases in the mouse stroke model) and then evaluated the diagnostic value of this score on a small sample of patients (n = 14) who presented with acute stroke symptoms. Patients with true stroke had significantly higher SL scores than patients found to have non-stroke causes of their symptoms. The SL score correlated with the volume of ischemic brain tissue. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using lipid biomarkers to diagnose brain injury. Future studies will be needed to further characterize the diagnostic utility of this approach and to transition to an assay method applicable to clinical settings. PMID:26076478

  3. Free fat interpositional graft in acute physeal injuries: the anticipatory Langenskiöld procedure.

    PubMed

    Foster, B K; John, B; Hasler, C

    2000-01-01

    Free fat graft interposition has been used extensively in management of physeal injuries with established growth disturbances. The use of this technique as part of the management of acute physeal injuries has not been reported. Here we report on its application in acute physeal injuries, where it has prevented the formation of an anticipated physeal arrest.

  4. Injury-related fear-avoidance and symptoms of posttraumatic stress in parents of children with burns.

    PubMed

    Willebrand, M; Sveen, J

    2016-03-01

    Parents of children with burns experience a range of psychological reactions and symptoms, and parents' health is known to impact children's health. So far, there is little research into potential mechanisms that maintain parents' symptoms. The aim was to investigate parental injury-related fear-avoidance, and its associations with injury severity and health measures. Parents (n=107) of children aged 0.4-18 years that sustained burns 0.1-9.0 years previously completed questionnaires on fear-avoidance, posttraumatic stress, and health of the child. Analyses showed that the average level of fear-avoidance was low and positively associated with measures of injury severity and parents' symptoms of posttraumatic stress, and negatively associated with parents' ratings of their child's health. In two separate multiple regressions with parents' symptoms of PTSD and the child's health as dependent variables, fear-avoidance made the largest contribution in both models while injury severity was non-significant. Results were not related to comorbid conditions of the child, scarring, or parent-related socio-demographic variables. In summary, injury-related fear-avoidance is more likely among parents whose children sustain more severe burns. In turn, fear-avoidance contributes significantly to parents' symptoms of PTSD and to poorer health ratings regarding the child, irrespective of injury severity or child comorbidity.

  5. Forty-Year Follow-up of Full-Thickness Skin Graft After Thermal Burn Injury to the Volar Hand

    PubMed Central

    Kasdan, Morton L.; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The hands are commonly affected in severe thermal burn injuries. Resulting contractures lead to significant loss of function. Burn contracture release and skin grafting are necessary to restore hand function. We report a case in which surgical reconstruction of a volar hand burn was performed with full-thickness skin grafting. The patient had a 40-year follow-up to assess the function and cosmesis of the repaired hand. Methods: We report a case in which a 15-month-old boy presented after receiving third-degree burns to the left volar hand, including the flexural aspects of the index, long, and ring fingers by placing it on a hot kitchen stove burner. The patient subsequently underwent scar contracture release and full-thickness skin grafting. Results: Eleven years after reconstruction, further contractures developed associated with the patient's growth, which were reconstructed with repeat full-thickness skin graft from the inguinal region. No recurrence was witnessed afterward and 40 years after initial injury, the patient maintains full activities of daily living and use of his hand in his occupation. Conclusions: There is debate regarding the superiority of split-thickness versus full-thickness grafts during reconstruction. Our case strengthens the argument for durability of a full-thickness skin graft following thermal burn injury. PMID:27555888

  6. Comparison of Healing Effect of Aloe Vera Extract and Silver Sulfadiazine in Burn Injuries in Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Akhoondinasab, Mohammad Reza; Akhoondinasab, Motahhare; Saberi, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Wound healing is widely discussed in the medical literature. This study compared the healing effect of aloe vera extract and silver sulfadiazine in burn injuries in experimental rat model. METHODS Sixteen rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups, each group 8 rats. A deep second-degree burn on the lower back and 3rd degree burn on upper back of each rat were created with a standard burning procedure. Burns were dressed daily with aloe vera extract in group 2 and silver sulfadiazine in group 1. Response to treatment was assessed by digital photography during treatment until day 32. Histological parameters (PMN, epithelialization, fibrosis and angiogenesis) were assessed after biopsy of scar at the end of research. RESULTS Wound healing was more visible in aloe vera group. Also the speed of healing in aloe vera group was better than silver sulfadiazine group. CONCLUSIONS Based on our findings, aloe vera can be a therapy of choice for burn injuries. PMID:25489521

  7. 77 FR 70389 - Eligibility of Disabled Veterans and Members of the Armed Forces With Severe Burn Injuries for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Severe Burn Injuries for Financial Assistance in the Purchase of an Automobile or Other Conveyance and... financial assistance in the purchase of an automobile or other conveyance and adaptive equipment. The... assistance in the purchase of an automobile or other conveyance and adaptive equipment. Pursuant to...

  8. Dupuytren’s contracture following burn injury of the hand: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Chenicheri; Sugg, Kristoffer B; Huettner, William; Jarrahnejad, Payam

    2008-01-01

    In burn patients, scar contractures adjacent to or across the joints lead to disabling deformities. In Dupuytren’s disease, the proliferative process involves the fascia of the palm and fingers, resulting in disabling flexion contractures of the fingers and the palm. A single insult involving the hand or even a more proximal injury may lead to Dupuytren’s disease. PMID:19554166

  9. Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion associated with staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome caused by burns.

    PubMed

    Yokochi, Takaoki; Sakanishi, Shinpei; Ishidou, Yuuki; Kawano, Go; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Akita, Yukihiro; Obu, Keizo

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) associated with toxic shock syndrome caused by burns. A one-year-old girl was admitted to our hospital for treatment of severe burns. On day 3, she exhibited a fever, generalized rash and multiple organ failure. She was diagnosed with toxic shock syndrome after burns. She had seizures with fever twice on the same day, followed by secondary seizures on day 8 and transient deterioration of the gross motor functions involved in sitting alone and rolling over. On day 9, MRI diffusion-weighted images showed bright tree appearance (BTA). We conclude that she developed AESD.

  10. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and chemical burns after exposure to chlorine-containing bleach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hong-Joon; Chang, Jin-Sun; Ahn, Seong; Kim, Tae-Ok; Park, Cheol-Kyu; Lim, Jung-Hwan; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Yu-Il; Lim, Sung-Chul; Kim, Young-Chul; Kwon, Yong-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Chlorine-containing bleach can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and chemical burns. However, simultaneous occurrence of the two conditions caused by this agent is very rare. We describe the case of a 74-year-old female who presented with shortness of breath and hemoptysis following accidental exposure to chlorine-containing bleach. She had second- to third-degree chemical burns on both buttocks and thighs, and received mechanical ventilation because of the development of ARDS. Mechanical ventilation was discontinued on day 6 of hospitalization because of the rapid improvement of hypoxemia, and the patient was transferred to another hospital for further management of the chemical burns on day 18.

  11. Cell proliferation contributes to PNEC hyperplasia after acute airway injury.

    PubMed

    Stevens, T P; McBride, J T; Peake, J L; Pinkerton, K E; Stripp, B R

    1997-03-01

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs) are airway epithelial cells that are capable of secreting a variety of neuropeptides. PNECs are scattered throughout the bronchial tree either as individual cells or clusters of cells termed neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs). PNECs and their secretory peptides have been considered to play a role in fetal lung development. Although the normal physiological function of PNECs and neuropeptides in normal adult lungs and in repair from lung injury is not known, PNEC hyperplasia has been associated with chronic lung diseases, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and with chronic exposures, such as hypoxia, tobacco smoke, nitrosamines, and ozone. To evaluate changes in PNEC number and distribution after acute airway injury, FVB/n mice were treated with either naphthalene or vehicle. Naphthalene is an aromatic hydrocarbon that, at the dose used in this study, selectively destroys nonciliated bronchial epithelial cells (Clara cells) through cytochrome P-450-mediated metabolic activation into cytotoxic epoxides. PNECs were identified by immunohistochemical analysis of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity (CGRP-IR). Proliferating cells were marked with [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. Acute naphthalene toxicity results in PNEC hyperplasia that is detectable after 5 days of recovery. PNEC hyperplasia is characterized by increased numbers of NEBs without significant changes in the number of isolated PNECs and by increased [(3)H]thymidine labeling of CGRP-IR cells. These data show that cell proliferation contributes to PNEC hyperplasia after acute airway injury and suggest that PNECs may be capable of more rapidly increasing their number in response to injury than previously recognized.

  12. Biomarkers of acute kidney injury and associations with short- and long-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Jennifer A.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is strongly associated with increased mortality and other adverse outcomes. Medical researchers have intensively investigated novel biomarkers to predict short- and long-term outcomes of acute kidney injury in many patient care settings, such as cardiac surgery, intensive care units, heart failure, and transplant. Future research should focus on leveraging this relationship to improve enrollment for clinical trials of acute kidney injury. PMID:27239295

  13. Alpinetin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced acute kidney injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Zhou, Li-shan; Yan, Li; Ren, Juan; Zhou, Dai-xing; Li, Shu-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Alpinetin, a novel plant flavonoid isolated from Alpinia katsumadai Hayata, has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. However, the effects of alpinetin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury have not been reported. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects and the underlying mechanism of alpinetin against LPS-induced acute kidney injury in mice. The results showed that alpinetin inhibited LPS-induced kidney histopathologic changes, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine levels. Alpinetin also inhibited LPS-induced ROS, MDA, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production in kidney tissues. Meanwhile, Western blot analysis showed that alpinetin suppressed LPS-induced TLR4 expression and NF-κB activation in kidney tissues. In addition, alpinetin was found to up-regulate the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, alpinetin protected LPS-induced kidney injury through activating Nrf2 and inhibiting TLR4 expression.

  14. Geographic mapping as a tool for identifying communities at high risk of fire and burn injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Poulos, Roslyn G; Hayen, Andrew; Chong, Shanley S S; Finch, Caroline F

    2009-05-01

    Burns are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Although industrialized countries have achieved significant declines in deaths and hospitalizations for these injuries in recent decades, the benefits have not been shared equally by children across all socioeconomic groups. We used Bayesian methods to map posterior expected relative risks, as an estimate of smoothed hospital separation ratios for fire and burns in children, across local government areas in New South Wales, Australia. The geographic pattern of relative risk varied by age group; higher than average risks were observed for children residing in rural and remote areas, as well as in scattered local government areas closer to the coast and in some metropolitan regions. Mapping the occurrence of injury gives injury practitioners the opportunity to identify high risk communities for further investigation of risk factors and implementation of targeted interventions within a defined area.

  15. Third-Degree Hindpaw Burn Injury Induced Apoptosis of Lumbar Spinal Cord Ventral Horn Motor Neurons and Sciatic Nerve and Muscle Atrophy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng-Hua; Cheng, Kuang-I; Chai, Chee-Yin; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Wu, Tai-Cheng; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2015-01-01

    Background. Severe burns result in hypercatabolic state and concomitant muscle atrophy that persists for several months, thereby limiting patient recovery. However, the effects of burns on the corresponding spinal dermatome remain unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether burns induce apoptosis of spinal cord ventral horn motor neurons (VHMNs) and consequently cause skeletal muscle wasting. Methods. Third-degree hindpaw burn injury with 1% total body surface area (TBSA) rats were euthanized 4 and 8 weeks after burn injury. The apoptosis profiles in the ventral horns of the lumbar spinal cords, sciatic nerves, and gastrocnemius muscles were examined. The Schwann cells in the sciatic nerve were marked with S100. The gastrocnemius muscles were harvested to measure the denervation atrophy. Result. The VHMNs apoptosis in the spinal cord was observed after inducing third-degree burns in the hindpaw. The S100 and TUNEL double-positive cells in the sciatic nerve increased significantly after the burn injury. Gastrocnemius muscle apoptosis and denervation atrophy area increased significantly after the burn injury. Conclusion. Local hindpaw burn induces apoptosis in VHMNs and Schwann cells in sciatic nerve, which causes corresponding gastrocnemius muscle denervation atrophy. Our results provided an animal model to evaluate burn-induced muscle wasting, and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25695065

  16. Transplanting Kidneys from Deceased Donors With Severe Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Heilman, R L; Smith, M L; Kurian, S M; Huskey, J; Batra, R K; Chakkera, H A; Katariya, N N; Khamash, H; Moss, A; Salomon, D R; Reddy, K S

    2015-08-01

    Our aim was to determine outcomes with transplanting kidneys from deceased donors with acute kidney injury, defined as a donor with terminal serum creatinine ≥2.0 mg/dL, or a donor requiring acute renal replacement therapy. We included all patients who received deceased donor kidney transplant from June 2004 to October 2013. There were 162 AKI donor transplant recipients (21% of deceased donor transplants): 139 in the standard criteria donor (SCD) and 23 in the expanded criteria donor (ECD) cohort. 71% of the AKI donors had stage 3 (severe AKI), based on acute kidney injury network (AKIN) staging. Protocol biopsies were done at 1, 4, and 12 months posttransplant. One and four month formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) biopsies from 48 patients (24 AKI donors, 24 non-AKI) underwent global gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays (96 arrays). DGF was more common in the AKI group but eGFR, graft survival at 1 year and proportion with IF/TA>2 at 1 year were similar for the two groups. At 1 month, there were 898 differentially expressed genes in the AKI group (p-value <0.005; FDR <10%), but by 4 months there were no differences. Transplanting selected kidneys from deceased donors with AKI is safe and has excellent outcomes.

  17. [Acute lung injury as a consequence of blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moyado, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) has been recognized as a consequence of blood transfusion (BT) since 1978; the Food and Drug Administration, has classified it as the third BT mortality issue, in 2004, and in first place related with ALI. It can be mainly detected as: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). The clinical onset is: severe dyspnea, bilateral lung infiltration and low oxygen saturation. In USA, ARDS has an incidence of three to 22.4 cases/100 000 inhabitants, with 58.3 % mortality. TACO and TRALI are less frequent; they have been reported according to the number of transfusions: one in 1275 to 6000 for TRALI and one in 356 transfusions for TACO. Mortality is reported from two to 20 % in TRALI and 20 % in TACO. Antileukocyte antibodies in blood donors plasma, caused TRALI in 89 % of cases; also it has been found antigen specificity against leukocyte blood receptor in 59 %. The UCI patients who received a BT have ALI as a complication in 40 % of cases. The capillary pulmonary endothelia is the target of leukocyte antibodies and also plasma biologic modifiers of the stored plasma, most probable like a Sanarelli-Shwar-tzman phenomenon.

  18. Burn Injury-Specific Home Safety Assessment: A Cross-Sectional Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Arshi, Shahnam; Bazargani, Homayoun Sadeghi; Mohammadi, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of injury specific home safety investigation and to examine the home safety status focused on burn related safety in a rural population in the North-West of Iran. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 265 rural households of rural Meshkinshahr, Iran. Cluster sampling method was used in 38 clusters with 7 households in each cluster. Clusters were selected on a probability proportional to size (PPS) basis using the available health census database called D-Tarh. Data were analyzed using the statistical software package STATA 8. Results Possible risks were explored in fields of house structure; cooking and eating attitudes and behaviors; cooking appliances, specific appliances such as picnic gas burners, valors (traditional heaters), samovars (traditional water boilers), and air-heating appliances. Many safety concerns were explored needing to draw the attention of researchers and public health policy makers. Conclusion Injury specific home safety surveys are useful and may provide useful information for safety promotion interventions. PMID:23209574

  19. Erythrocyte Aggregation due to Surface Nanobubble Interactions During the Onset of Thermal Burn Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidner, Harrison S.

    Red Blood Cell (RBC) aggregation is an important hemorheological phenomenon especially in microcirculation. In healthy individuals, RBCs are known to aggregate and gravitate toward the faster flow in the center of vessels to increase their throughput for more efficient oxygen delivery. Their aggregation is known to occur during a variety of environmental, pathological, and physiological conditions and is reversible when aggregates are subject to the relatively high shear forces in the circulation. The likelihood that aggregates will monodisperse in flow is dependent on the conditions during which they form. In situations where such aggregates are not sheared to monodispersion their presence can impact the perfusion of microvascular networks. More specifically, aggregates subject to the low shear rates in the zone of stasis near regions of thermal burn injury are capable of occluding vessels in the microcirculation and inhibiting the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissue downstream. The basic mechanism leading to erythrocyte aggregation at the onset of thermal injury is unknown. This dissertation investigates parameters involved in erythrocyte aggregation, methods of measuring and testing erythrocyte aggregation, and incorporates modeling based on first principles ultimately to propose a mechanism of this phenomenon.

  20. A case of life-threatening acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy caused by Dioscorea quinqueloba.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung-Sik; Heo, Sang Taek

    2015-01-01

    Some herbal medications induce acute kidney injury. The acute kidney injuries caused by herbal medications are mild and commonly treated by palliative care. A 51-years-old man who drank the juice squeezed from the raw tubers of Dioscorea quinqueloba (D. quinqueloba) was admitted with nausea, vomiting and chilling. He developed a seizure with decreased level of consciousness. He was diagnosed with acute kidney injury, which was cured by continuous venovenous hemodialfiltration. Non-detoxified D. quinqueloba can cause severe acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy. It is critical to inform possible adverse effects of the medicinal herbs and to implement more strict regulation of these products.

  1. Response to: Practice of first aid in burn related injuries in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Baker, Benjamin; Amin, Kavit; Khor, Wee Sim; Khwaja, Nadeem

    2015-12-01

    Traditional remedies for burns first aid are rarely compliant with current best practice. Greater Manchester is one of the most ethnically diverse regions in the UK. Our burns centre has noted the prevalent use of traditional remedies over recognised first aid prior to presentation. We review traditional burns remedies and highlight the importance of burns first aid education that is accessible to migrant communities.

  2. Pathophysiology of acute kidney injury: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaoyan; Murugan, Raghavan; Peng, Zhiyong; Kellum, John A

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients is a devastating illness associated with prolonged hospital stay and high mortality. Limited progress has been made in the field of AKI, and its treatment using renal replacement therapy, at best, only provides partial renal support. Ischemia-reperfusion rodent AKI models do not resemble human renal injury and the absence of renal biopsy data limits our understanding of the pathophysiology of human AKI. However, laboratory and clinical evidence suggests that the inflammatory milieu leads to dysfunction of renal cells and this may be the key factor leading to AKI. Cells in injured tissues release immunological danger signals or danger-associated molecular pattern molecules which communicate with remote organs including the kidney, where they activate dendritic cells and T cells and thus initiate inflammation. Once the initial insult has passed, tubular epithelial cells undergo dedifferentiation, reacquire progenitorial ability to proliferate, migrate, and redifferentiate into mature intrinsic cells. Dissonance of mediator secretion and cell responses may lead to persistent injury and de novo chronic kidney disease. A number of soluble mediators including transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) initiate a variety of pathophysiological processes at the beginning of kidney injury. TGF-beta also plays a fundamental role in cell proliferation and interstitial fibrosis in later phases. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, especially angiotensin II, contributes to kidney injury through the angiotensin II type 1 receptor, TGF-beta receptor Smad and epidermal growth factor receptor by affecting general angiostasis and vascular remodeling, indirectly modulating inflammation and cell reactions. We review the pathophysiology of AKI in light of new information regarding renal injury and repair.

  3. Acute cervical cord injuries in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J W; Kendall, B E; Kocen, R S; Milligan, N M

    1982-01-01

    Seven cases with acute cervical cord lesions associated with a fit and fall, were found in approximately 500 patients with epilepsy over a period of 7 years. In all patients the epilepsy was refractory to drug therapy and six suffered tonic fits which resulted in falls and frequent head injuries. Notable radiological changes were found in the cervical spine; there was ankylosis in five, hyperostosis in four and the minimum sagittal diameter of the bony canal was less than 11mm in three cases. The findings indicate that repetitive trauma may be a factor in producing bony changes in the cervical spine which put the patient at risk of cervical cord injury, especially when the spinal canal is developmentally narrow. Images PMID:7143009

  4. Molecular mechanisms of neuroinflammation and injury during acute viral encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Shives, Katherine D; Tyler, Kenneth L; Beckham, J David

    2017-03-11

    Viral infections in the central nervous system are a major cause of encephalitis. West Nile virus (WNV) and Herpes simplex virus (HSV) are the most common causes of viral encephalitis in the United States. We review the role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of WNV and HSV infections in the central nervous system (CNS). We discuss the role of the innate and cell-mediated immune responses in peripheral control of viral infection, viral invasion of the CNS, and in inflammatory-mediated neuronal injury. By understanding the role of specific inflammatory responses to viral infections in the CNS, targeted therapeutic approaches can be developed to maximize control of acute viral infection while minimizing neuronal injury in the CNS.

  5. Dapagliflozin-Induced Acute-on-Chronic Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Joshua A.; Ann Lo, Amy; Wallia, Amisha; Rogers, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors are a new class of oral hypoglycemic agents, and thus safety data are limited. We present a 48-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus and Child’s Class A cirrhosis secondary to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis presenting with jaundice and acute cholestatic liver injury. Other than starting dapagliflozin, she reported no medication changes or supplement use. Before treatment, her total bilirubin was 1.2 mg/dL. On admission, her liver values were elevated and liver biopsy was consistent with drug-induced liver injury. This report raises awareness about the potential hepatotoxic effects of dapagliflozin, particularly in patients with chronic liver disease. PMID:28008402

  6. Protein methionine oxidation augments reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Sean X.; Blokhin, Ilya O.; Wilson, Katina M.; Dhanesha, Nirav; Doddapattar, Prakash; Grumbach, Isabella M.; Chauhan, Anil K.; Lentz, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Reperfusion injury can exacerbate tissue damage in ischemic stroke, but little is known about the mechanisms linking ROS to stroke severity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that protein methionine oxidation potentiates NF-κB activation and contributes to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. We found that overexpression of methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA), an antioxidant enzyme that reverses protein methionine oxidation, attenuated ROS-augmented NF-κB activation in endothelial cells, in part, by protecting against the oxidation of methionine residues in the regulatory domain of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In a murine model, MsrA deficiency resulted in increased NF-κB activation and neutrophil infiltration, larger infarct volumes, and more severe neurological impairment after transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. This phenotype was prevented by inhibition of NF-κB or CaMKII. MsrA-deficient mice also exhibited enhanced leukocyte rolling and upregulation of E-selectin, an endothelial NF-κB–dependent adhesion molecule known to contribute to neurovascular inflammation in ischemic stroke. Finally, bone marrow transplantation experiments demonstrated that the neuroprotective effect was mediated by MsrA expressed in nonhematopoietic cells. These findings suggest that protein methionine oxidation in nonmyeloid cells is a key mechanism of postischemic oxidative injury mediated by NF-κB activation, leading to neutrophil recruitment and neurovascular inflammation in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27294204

  7. Acute kidney injury: changing lexicography, definitions, and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Himmelfarb, J; Ikizler, T A

    2007-05-01

    In recent years, there have been numerous advances in understanding the molecular determinants of functional kidney injury after ischemic and/or toxic exposure. However, translation of successful novel therapies designed to attenuate kidney functional injury from animal models to the clinical sphere has had modest results. This lack of translatability is at least in part due to lack of sufficient standardization in definitions and classification of cases of acute kidney injury (AKI), an incomplete understanding of the natural history of human AKI, and a limited understanding of how kidney injury interacts with other organ system failure in the context of systemic metabolic abnormalities. A concerted effort is now being made by nephrologists and intensivists to arrive at standardized terminology and classification of AKI. There have also been dramatic advances in our understanding of the epidemiology and natural history of AKI, particularly in the hospital and intensive care unit setting. Promising strategies are now being developed which may ultimately lead to improved outcomes for patients at risk for or who have developed AKI, which should be readily testable in the coming decade.

  8. Defining the acute kidney injury and repair transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Liu, Jing; McMahon, Andrew P

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian kidney has an intrinsic ability to repair after significant injury. However, this process is inefficient: patients are at high risk for the loss of kidney function in later life. No therapy exists to treat established acute kidney injury (AKI) per se: strategies to promote endogenous repair processes and retard associated fibrosis are a high priority. Whole-organ gene expression profiling has been used to identify repair responses initiated with AKI, and factors that may promote the transition from AKI to chronic kidney disease. Transcriptional profiling has shown molecular markers and potential regulatory pathways of renal repair. Activation of a few key developmental pathways has been reported during repair. Whether these are comparable networks with similar target genes with those in earlier nephrogenesis remains unclear. Altered microRNA profiles, persistent tubular injury responses, and distinct late inflammatory responses highlight continuing kidney pathology. Additional insights into injury and repair processes will be gained by study of the repair transcriptome and cell-specific translatome using high-resolution technologies such as RNA sequencing and translational profiling tailored to specific cellular compartments within the kidney. An enhanced understanding holds promise for both the identification of novel therapeutic targets and biomarker-based evaluation of the damage-repair process.

  9. When to correct coagulopathy in acute kidney injury?

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Gupta, Babita; D’souza, Nita; Shende, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in adult trauma patients is 18% with 70% requiring renal replacement therapy. It is a challenge to treat AKI with coagulopathy since there are no defined transfusion triggers for these patients. We report a case wherein a polytrauma patient developed AKI for which he/she was dialysed and subsequently had an intracerebral bleed. There is a need to develop guidelines to transfusion triggers in AKI patients keeping vigilance on fluid overload, hyperkalemia and uraemia-induced platelet dysfunction. PMID:25885629

  10. Management of Acute Kidney Injury in Pregnancy for the Obstetrician.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Anjali

    2016-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a complex disorder that occurs in several clinical settings. During pregnancy, there are additional unique conditions that contribute to AKI. The clinical manifestations of AKI during pregnancy range from a minimal elevation in serum creatinine to renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy, similar to AKI in the general population. Recent epidemiologic studies in the general population show an increase in mortality associated with AKI, particularly when dialysis is required. The incidence of AKI in pregnancy remains a cause of significant morbidity and mortality.

  11. Acute spinal cord injury: tetraplegia and paraplegia in small animals.

    PubMed

    Granger, Nicolas; Carwardine, Darren

    2014-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a common problem in animals for which definitive treatment is lacking, and information gained from its study has benefit for both companion animals and humans in developing new therapeutic approaches. This review provides an overview of the main concepts that are useful for clinicians in assessing companion animals with severe acute SCI. Current available advanced ancillary tests and those in development are reviewed. In addition, the current standard of care for companion animals following SCI and recent advances in the development of new therapies are presented, and new predictors of recovery discussed.

  12. Acute cardiac injury after subarachnoid haemorrhage: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Marcì, Marcello; Savatteri, Paolino; Pizzuto, Antonino; Giammona, Giuseppe; Renda, Baldassare; Lojacono, Francesca; Sanfilippo, Nicola

    2009-12-09

    It is well known that cardiopulmonary complications are often associated to subarachnoid haemorrhage. For appropriate therapeutic managing it is very important to distinguish acute coronary syndrome from neurogenic myocardial injury, which is a reversible condition. Furthermore, because the hearts of brain dead patients may be utilized for therapeutic purpose, it has became of importance to rule out erroneous diagnosis of cardiac ischemia in order to avoid rejection of hearts potential suitable for transplantation.We present a report of two female patients affected by cardiac complications caused by aneurismal subarachnoid haemorrhage admitted to our neurosurgical intensive care department.

  13. Acute kidney injury in pregnancy: the thrombotic microangiopathies.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Chitra; Maynard, Sharon E

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rare but serious complication of pregnancy. Although prerenal and ischemic causes of AKI are most common, renal insufficiency can complicate several other pregnancy-specific conditions. In particular, severe preeclampsia/HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) are all frequently complicated by AKI, and share several clinical features which pose diagnostic challenges to the clinician. In this article, we discuss the clinical and laboratory features, pathophysiology and treatment of these 3 conditions, with particular attention to renal manifestations. It is imperative to distinguish these conditions to make appropriate therapeutic decisions which can be lifesaving for the mother and fetus. Typically AFLP and HELLP improve after delivery of the fetus, whereas plasma exchange is the first-line treatment for TTP.

  14. Acute renal injury induced by valacyclovir hydrochloride: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanning; Cong, Yuxi; Teng, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Acyclovir has been a frequently used antiviral agent in the clinical treatment of leukemia, acute encephalitis, malignant tumor and herpes simplex. The adverse effects of this drug have been widely described in clinical practice. In the present study, a case of a 35-year-old female patient diagnosed with herpes simplex, who developed acute renal injury following treatment with valacyclovir hydrochloride, is described. Kidney biopsy, light microscopy and laboratory examination were performed, and all findings revealed the signs of evident vacuolar degeneration of capillary endothelial and renal tubular epithelial cells, erythrocyte aggregation in partial renal tubule and microvilli exfoliation from epithelial cells. Renal interstitial edema was clearly identified. The clinical evidence observed from this female patient indicated that renal functions should be closely monitored during valacyclovir hydrochloride administration. A variety of effective measures, such as hydration, alkalizing urine, promoting the discharge of medication and the use of antagonists are recommended following the administration of antiviral agents. PMID:28101180

  15. Mental and Physical Health Outcomes in Parents of Children with Burn Injuries as Compared with Matched Controls.

    PubMed

    Enns, Jessica; Gawaziuk, Justin P; Khan, Sazzadul; Chateau, Dan; Bolton, James M; Sareen, Jitender; Stone, James; Doupe, Malcolm; Logsetty, Sarvesh

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric burn injuries are common, and the stress of caring for them can affect caregivers' health. This study's objective was to examine the rates of common mental and physical disorders of parents of burn-injured children (cases) compared with matched controls (controls). This is a population-based study linking the Regional Pediatric burn registry with administrative health information. Pediatric burn cases were matched 1:5 with control children from the general population based on age, sex, and geographical location then parents identified. One thousand and twenty-six parental cases and 4858 controls were identified. International Classification of Disease codes were used to identify diagnoses of common mental and physical disorders. Using rates of disease 2 years before and 2 years after the date of burn, the changes in the relative rates of health outcomes were compared between the cases and the controls. The cases had higher rates of postinjury mental and physical illness compared with the matches. However, it was found that controls also had increased rates postindex date and additionally cases had increased rates of preinjury illnesses. There was no difference in the relative rates of illnesses between the groups from pre- to post-index date. The higher rate of illness in cases postinjury could be explained by preinjury illness, and similar rate increases in the control cohort. Evaluation of the effect of a child's burn injury on parents should take into context the preexisting health of the parent. Socioeconomic factors associated with increased risk of burns may also be associated with adverse health outcomes.

  16. Psychometric Properties of a New Instrument for Assessing Irrational Thoughts in Burn Victims (Scale of Irrational Thoughts After Burn Injuries).

    PubMed

    Zare, Zahra; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Ranjbar, Fatemeh; Stark Ekman, Diana; Farahbakhsh, Mostafa; Maghsoudi, Hemmat; Ekman, Robert; Nasiri, Farideh

    2017-02-09

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a scale for assessing irrational thoughts among burned patients. The present study was mixed (qualitative-methodologic) which was performed in several stages such as investigating similar or related scales, interviewing with patients and psychologists. Content validity was calculated by modified KAPPA basis on relevance and clarity. The reliability of the scale was measured using internal consistency and the test-retest method. To determine the construct validity, exploratory factor analysis approach using maximum likelihood extraction with varimax rotation was conducted. A total of 329 burned patients were recruited from Tehran, Tabriz, and Kermanshah provinces of Iran. Modified kappa scores were 0.80 and 0.91 for relevance and clarity of the items included in scale. The Cronbach alpha for overall scale, subscale 1, and subscale 2 were 0.89, 0.88, and 0.8, respectively. Test-retest reliability was also acceptable (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.80). The best solution from the maximum likelihood analysis of the 39 items of the scale revealed two factors corresponding to the two subscales with 14 items that subscale 1 (self-acceptance) consisted of 10 statements accounting for 60% of the variance (eigenvalue = 5.04) and subscale 2 (distastefulness and pity) consisted of four statements accounting for 40% of the variance (eigenvalue = 1.53). The scale reflects acceptable levels of validity and reliability in assessing the irrational thoughts among Iranian patients. Moreover, the testing populations of both patients with burned faces and patients with other burned body parts indicates that the scale may also be applicable for patients' burn disfigurements on any part of their bodies.

  17. Veno-venous continuous renal replacement therapy for burned patients with acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, R; Ethier, J; Quérin, S; Béroniade, V; Falardeau, P; Leblanc, M

    2000-11-01

    From 1995 to 1998, 12 burned patients with acute renal failure (ARF) were treated by veno-venous continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) at the Burn Unit of Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal. Their mean (+/-SD) age was 51+/-12 years, and the mean burned surface covered 48.6+/-15.8% of total body surface area. All patients were mechanically ventilated and presented evidence of sepsis. The mean delay before occurrence of ARF was 15+/-6 days and ARF was mainly related to sepsis and hypotension. Main reasons for CRRT initiation were azotemia and fluid overload. A total of 15 CRRT modalities were applied (12 continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration, CVVHDF; two continuous veno-venous hemofiltration, CVVH; and one continuous veno-venous hemodialysis, CVVHD) over 14+/-13 days. For CRRT, nine patients received heparin and three were not anticoagulated. Mean values for dialysate and reinjection flow rates were 1134+/-250 ml/h and 635+/-327 ml/h, respectively. Admission weight was 78.8+/-12.7 kg with a mean weight gain before CRRT initiation of 10.0+/-5.8 kg and a mean weight loss during CRRT of 8.9+/-5.5 kg. Nine patients received enteral plus parenteral nutrition, and three, parenteral nutrition only; the total caloric intake was 31.5+/-7.0 kcal/kg/day and protein intake, 1.8+/-0.4 g/kg/day. The normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR) was evaluated at 2.28+/-0.78 g/kg/day during CRRT. The mortality rate was 50%. The six survivors all recovered normal renal function with four of them requiring intermittent hemodialysis for short periods. In conclusion, veno-venous CRRT is particularly well suited for this selected population allowing smooth fluid removal and aggressive nutritional support.

  18. [The quality of voice in coal-miners after burn/inhalation injury due to methane explosion].

    PubMed

    Orecka, Boguslawa; Sikora, Łukasz; Misiołek, Maciej; Fira, Rafał; Miśkiewicz-Orczyk, Katarzyna; Paluch, Zbigniew; Krzywiecki, Andrzej; Grzanka, Alicja; Namysłowski, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    The job as a coal-miner exposes to the greatest risk. One of the most dangerous health hazard is a burn/inhalation injury during the methane explosion. The victims undergo physical trauma, effect of high temperature and inhalation of toxic gases and products of incomplete combustion, As a result of inhalation injury both, upper and lower airways are affected. The aim of the study was to analyse the relationship between burn/inhalation injury and quality of voice in affected coal-miners. A group of 23 patients (men) in age from 28 to 59 (mean 38.5) 3 years after burn/inhalation injury participated in this study. The voice evaluation based on ENT examination, videlaryngostroboscopy, acoustic analysis, MPT parameter and GRBAS analysis was performed. The special control group of coal-miners served as a control. On the basis of the subjective evaluation and the objective acoustic analysis, aerodynamic parameter and videlaryngostroboscopy the worse quality of voice in the group of injured coalminers was shown in comparison to the control group. No substantial correlation between the acoustic parameters, MPT parameter and ventilating rates was found.

  19. Coronary stenting during burn shock: diagnostic and treatment considerations.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Shea C; Fidler, Philip E; Atweh, Nabil A

    2006-01-01

    Myocardial injury is known to occur in victims of both thermal and electrical burns. A variety of mechanisms have been ascribed to the pathogenesis of cardiac damage during burn shock. However, limited evidence exists that coronary artery thrombosis plays a frequent role. Distinguishing between acute coronary syndrome (impending myocardial infarction from coronary artery occlusion) vs global cardiac injury is essential; the care diverges drastically. The following case describes a patient who was angiographically proven to have acute coronary thrombosis amidst burn shock ftera 50% TBSA electrical flash burn. Managing the patient's burn shock, myocardial injury, and multiple surgical procedures while considering antiplatelet medications for a newly placed coronary artery stent presented a number of challenges not previously reported.

  20. Epidemiology of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Children and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Kaddourah, Ahmad; Basu, Rajit K; Bagshaw, Sean M; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2017-01-05

    Background The epidemiologic characteristics of children and young adults with acute kidney injury have been described in single-center and retrospective studies. We conducted a multinational, prospective study involving patients admitted to pediatric intensive care units to define the incremental risk of death and complications associated with severe acute kidney injury. Methods We used the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria to define acute kidney injury. Severe acute kidney injury was defined as stage 2 or 3 acute kidney injury (plasma creatinine level ≥2 times the baseline level or urine output <0.5 ml per kilogram of body weight per hour for ≥12 hours) and was assessed for the first 7 days of intensive care. All patients 3 months to 25 years of age who were admitted to 1 of 32 participating units were screened during 3 consecutive months. The primary outcome was 28-day mortality. Results A total of 4683 patients were evaluated; acute kidney injury developed in 1261 patients (26.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 25.6 to 28.2), and severe acute kidney injury developed in 543 patients (11.6%; 95% CI, 10.7 to 12.5). Severe acute kidney injury conferred an increased risk of death by day 28 after adjustment for 16 covariates (adjusted odds ratio, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.17 to 2.68); death occurred in 60 of the 543 patients (11.0%) with severe acute kidney injury versus 105 of the 4140 patients (2.5%) without severe acute kidney injury (P<0.001). Severe acute kidney injury was associated with increased use of mechanical ventilation and renal-replacement therapy. A stepwise increase in 28-day mortality was associated with worsening severity of acute kidney injury (P<0.001 by log-rank test). Assessment of acute kidney injury according to the plasma creatinine level alone failed to identify acute kidney injury in 67.2% of the patients with low urine output. Conclusions Acute kidney injury is common and is associated with poor outcomes, including increased

  1. Burns from acetylene gas: more than skin deep.

    PubMed

    Al-Hassani, Fawaz; Amin, Kavit; Lo, Steven

    2014-05-19

    Oxyacetylene welding torches are commonly used in industry, yet serious burns are fortunately rare. When dealing with the sequelae of these burn injuries, one must be aware of the high pressure component of these flame burns, which can penetrate and dissect the subcutaneous tissue. Appropriate initial assessment and preoperative planning are, therefore, essential to exclude and identify problems such as, compartment syndrome, subcutaneous emphysema and acute carpal tunnel syndrome. We present a case in which an innocuous palmar burn revealed a penetrating flame injury into the carpal tunnel.

  2. Burns from acetylene gas: more than skin deep

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hassani, Fawaz; Amin, Kavit; Lo, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Oxyacetylene welding torches are commonly used in industry, yet serious burns are fortunately rare. When dealing with the sequelae of these burn injuries, one must be aware of the high pressure component of these flame burns, which can penetrate and dissect the subcutaneous tissue. Appropriate initial assessment and preoperative planning are, therefore, essential to exclude and identify problems such as, compartment syndrome, subcutaneous emphysema and acute carpal tunnel syndrome. We present a case in which an innocuous palmar burn revealed a penetrating flame injury into the carpal tunnel. PMID:24842344

  3. Acute Cortical Transhemispheric Diaschisis after Unilateral Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Le Prieult, Florie; Thal, Serge C; Engelhard, Kristin; Imbrosci, Barbara; Mittmann, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Focal neocortical brain injuries lead to functional alterations, which can spread beyond lesion-neighboring brain areas. The undamaged hemisphere and its associated disturbances after a unilateral lesion, so-called transhemispheric diaschisis, have been progressively disclosed over the last decades; they are strongly involved in the pathophysiology and, potentially, recovery of brain injuries. Understanding the temporal dynamics of these transhemispheric functional changes is crucial to decipher the role of the undamaged cortex in the processes of functional reorganization at different stages post-lesion. In this regard, little is known about the acute-subacute processes after 24-48 h in the brain hemisphere contralateral to injury. In the present study, we performed a controlled cortical impact to produce a unilateral traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the motor and somatosensory cortex of mice. In vitro extracellular multi-unit recordings from large neuronal populations, together with single-cell patch-clamp recordings in the cortical network contralateral to the lesion, revealed a strong, but transient, neuronal hyperactivity as early as 24-48 h post-TBI. This abnormal excitable state in the intact hemisphere was not accompanied by alterations in neuronal intrinsic properties, but it was associated with an impairment of the phasic gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic transmission and an increased expression of GABAA receptor subunits related to tonic inhibition exclusively in the contralateral hemisphere. These data unravel a series of early transhemispheric functional alterations after diffuse unilateral cortical injury, which may compensate and stabilize the disrupted brain functions. Therefore, our findings support the hypothesis that the undamaged hemisphere could play a significant role in early functional reorganization processes after a TBI.

  4. The design and evaluation of a system for improved surveillance and prevention programmes in resource-limited settings using a hospital-based burn injury questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Michael; Falk, Henry; Meddings, David; Sugerman, David; Mehta, Sumi; Sage, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Limited and fragmented data collection systems exist for burn injury. A global registry may lead to better injury estimates and identify risk factors. A collaborative effort involving the WHO, the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves, the CDC and the International Society for Burn Injuries was undertaken to simplify and standardise inpatient burn data collection. An expert panel of epidemiologists and burn care practitioners advised on the development of a new Global Burn Registry (GBR) form and online data entry system that can be expected to be used in resource-abundant or resource-limited settings. Methods International burn organisations, the CDC and the WHO solicited burn centre participation to pilot test the GBR system. The WHO and the CDC led a webinar tutorial for system implementation. Results During an 8-month period, 52 hospitals in 30 countries enrolled in the pilot and were provided the GBR instrument, guidance and a data visualisation tool. Evaluations were received from 29 hospitals (56%). Key findings Median time to upload completed forms was <10 min; physicians most commonly entered data (64%), followed by nurses (25%); layout, clarity, accuracy and relevance were all rated high; and a vast majority (85%) considered the GBR ‘highly valuable’ for prioritising, developing and monitoring burn prevention programmes. Conclusions The GBR was shown to be simple, flexible and acceptable to users. Enhanced regional and global understanding of burn epidemiology may help prioritise the selection, development and testing of primary prevention interventions for burns in resource-limited settings. PMID:27044496

  5. The Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril inhibits poly(adp-ribose) polymerase activation and exerts beneficial effects in an ovine model of burn and smoke injury.

    PubMed

    Asmussen, Sven; Bartha, Eva; Olah, Gabor; Sbrana, Elena; Rehberg, Sebastian W; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Hawkins, Hal K; Ito, Hiroshi; Cox, Robert A; Traber, Lillian D; Traber, Daniel L; Szabo, Csaba

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the effect of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril in a clinically relevant ovine model of smoke and burn injury, with special reference to oxidative stress and activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, in the lung and in circulating leukocytes. Female, adult sheep (28-40 kg) were divided into three groups. After tracheostomy and under deep anesthesia, both vehicle-control-treated (n = 5) and captopril-treated (20 mg/kg per day, i.v., starting 0.5 h before the injury) (n = 5) groups were subjected to 2 × 20%, third-degree burn injury and were insufflated with 48 breaths of cotton smoke. A sham group not receiving burn/smoke was also studied (n = 5). Animals were mechanically ventilated and fluid resuscitated for 24 h in the awake state. Burn and smoke injury resulted in an upregulation of ACE in the lung, evidenced by immunohistochemical determination and Western blotting. Burn and smoke injury resulted in pulmonary dysfunction, as well as systemic hemodynamic alterations. Captopril treatment of burn and smoke animals improved PaO2/FiO2 ratio and pulmonary shunt fraction and reduced the degree of lung edema. There was a marked increase in PAR levels in circulating leukocytes after burn/smoke injury, which was significantly decreased by captopril. The pulmonary level of ACE and the elevated pulmonary levels of transforming growth factor β in response to burn and smoke injury were significantly decreased by captopril treatment. Our results suggest that the ACE inhibitor captopril exerts beneficial effects on the pulmonary function in burn/smoke injury. The effects of the ACE inhibitor may be related to the prevention of reactive oxygen species-induced poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase overactivation. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition may also exert additional beneficial effects by inhibiting the expression of the profibrotic mediator transforming growth factor β.

  6. Adrenal insufficiency presenting as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seung Won; Kim, Tong Yoon; Lee, Sangmin; Jeong, Jeong Yeon; Shim, Hojoon; Han, Yu min; Choi, Kyu Eun; Shin, Seok Joon; Yoon, Hye Eun

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is an uncommon cause of hypercalcemia and not easily considered as an etiology of adrenal insufficiency in clinical practice, as not all cases of adrenal insufficiency manifest as hypercalcemia. We report a case of secondary adrenal insufficiency presenting as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury in a 66-year-old female. The patient was admitted to the emergency department with general weakness and poor oral intake. Hypercalcemia (11.5 mg/dL) and moderate renal dysfunction (serum creatinine 4.9 mg/dL) were shown in her initial laboratory findings. Studies for malignancy and hyperparathyroidism showed negative results. Basal cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels and adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test confirmed the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency. With the administration of oral hydrocortisone, hypercalcemia was dramatically resolved within 3 days. This case shows that adrenal insufficiency may manifest as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury, which implicates that adrenal insufficiency should be considered a cause of hypercalcemia in clinical practice. PMID:27536162

  7. Electrolyte disturbances and acute kidney injury in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Lameire, Norbert; Van Biesen, Wim; Vanholder, Raymond

    2010-11-01

    The interrelation between kidney disease and cancer is complex and reciprocal. Among the most frequent cancer-associated kidney diseases are the electrolyte and acid-base disturbances, which occur frequently and often are associated with an ominous prognosis, and acute kidney injury. Tumor lysis syndrome is a potentially life-threatening condition that frequently occurs in patients with a high tumor burden and high cellular turnover after cytotoxic therapy (including steroids in steroid-sensitive hematologic malignancies). Electrolyte and acid-base disturbances are the consequence of neoplastic spread, anticancer treatment, or, more rarely, paraneoplastic phenomena of all types of tumors. This article reviews hyponatremia and hypernatremia, hypokalemia and hyperkalemia, hypomagnesemia, hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, and the most important disturbances in acid-base balance in cancer patients. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent occurrence in cancer patients and has the potential to substantially alter the outcome of patients with cancer and jeopardize their chances of receiving optimal cancer treatment and a potential cure. As in many other circumstances, the etiology of AKI in cancer patients is multifactorial. Initiation and/or continuation of dialysis in the AKI cancer patient should be based on the general clinical condition and overall life expectancy and the personal patient expectations on quality of life after eventual recovery.

  8. Acute kidney injury by radiographic contrast media: pathogenesis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Andreucci, Michele; Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Sabbatini, Massimo; Michael, Ashour

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that iodinated radiographic contrast media may cause kidney dysfunction, particularly in patients with preexisting renal impairment associated with diabetes. This dysfunction, when severe, will cause acute renal failure (ARF). We may define contrast-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) as ARF occurring within 24-72 hrs after the intravascular injection of iodinated radiographic contrast media that cannot be attributed to other causes. The mechanisms underlying contrast media nephrotoxicity have not been fully elucidated and may be due to several factors, including renal ischaemia, particularly in the renal medulla, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduction of nitric oxide (NO) production, and tubular epithelial and vascular endothelial injury. However, contrast-induced AKI can be prevented, but in order to do so, we need to know the risk factors. We have reviewed the risk factors for contrast-induced AKI and measures for its prevention, providing a long list of references enabling readers to deeply evaluate them both.

  9. Microbiota protects mice against acute alcohol-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng; Miyamoto, Yukiko; Mazagova, Magdalena; Lee, Kuei-Chuan; Eckmann, Lars; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic alcohol abuse is associated with intestinal bacterial overgrowth, increased intestinal permeability, and translocation of microbial products from the intestine to the portal circulation and liver. Translocated microbial products contribute to experimental alcoholic liver disease. Aim To investigate the physiological relevance of the intestinal microbiota in alcohol-induced liver injury. Methods We subjected germ-free and conventional C57BL/6 mice to a model of acute alcohol exposure that mimics binge drinking. Results Germ-free mice showed significantly greater liver injury and inflammation after oral gavage of ethanol compared with conventional mice. In parallel, germ-free mice exhibited increased hepatic steatosis and upregulated expression of genes involved in fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis compared with conventional mice after acute ethanol administration. The absence of microbiota was also associated with increased hepatic expression of ethanol metabolizing enzymes, which led to faster ethanol elimination from the blood and lower plasma ethanol concentrations. Intestinal levels of ethanol metabolizing genes showed regional expression differences, and were overall higher in germ-free relative to conventional mice. Conclusion Our findings indicate that absence of the intestinal microbiota increases hepatic ethanol metabolism and the susceptibility to binge-like alcohol drinking. PMID:26556636

  10. Acute kidney injury in patients with chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Rognant, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent clinical event in patients with liver disease, compounding their prognosis. Furthermore, it is likely that the occurrence of AKI has a detrimental impact on the subsequent renal function and the long-term survival of these patients. Recently, some authors advocated the use of new diagnostic criteria for detecting acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis. These criteria are based on the rapidity and extent of the creatinine increase comparing to the basal creatinine and also on the kinetics of diuresis decrease. Although their validity in this population requires further studies to be clearly established, these new criteria could have two advantages: (1) to allow earlier diagnosis of AKI and, thus, hepatorenal syndrome for which earlier intervention could improve patients’ survival; and (2) to promote more intensive monitoring of renal function in these patients with high risk of AKI. Finally, recent practice guidelines about the prevention and treatment of general AKI have been published which should be useful in optimising the management of AKI in cirrhotic patients. PMID:25954481

  11. Collective epithelial migration drives kidney repair after acute injury.

    PubMed

    Palmyre, Aurélien; Lee, Jeongeun; Ryklin, Gennadiy; Camarata, Troy; Selig, Martin K; Duchemin, Anne-Laure; Nowak, Paul; Arnaout, M Amin; Drummond, Iain A; Vasilyev, Aleksandr

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and significant medical problem. Despite the kidney's remarkable regenerative capacity, the mortality rate for the AKI patients is high. Thus, there remains a need to better understand the cellular mechanisms of nephron repair in order to develop new strategies that would enhance the intrinsic ability of kidney tissue to regenerate. Here, using a novel, laser ablation-based, zebrafish model of AKI, we show that collective migration of kidney epithelial cells is a primary early response to acute injury. We also show that cell proliferation is a late response of regenerating kidney epithelia that follows cell migration during kidney repair. We propose a computational model that predicts this temporal relationship and suggests that cell stretch is a mechanical link between migration and proliferation, and present experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis. Overall, this study advances our understanding of kidney repair mechanisms by highlighting a primary role for collective cell migration, laying a foundation for new approaches to treatment of AKI.

  12. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Looney, Mark R; Gropper, Michael A; Matthay, Michael A

    2004-07-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is an underreported complication of transfusion therapy, and it is the third most common cause of transfusion-associated death. TRALI is defined as noncardiogenic pulmonary edema temporally related to transfusion therapy. The diagnosis of TRALI relies on excluding other diagnoses such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Supportive diagnostic evidence includes identifying neutrophil or human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies in the donor or recipient plasma. All plasma-containing blood products have been implicated in TRALI, with the majority of cases linked to whole blood, packed RBCs, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of TRALI may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, with the first "hit" being a predisposing inflammatory condition commonly present in the operating room or ICU. The second hit may involve the passive transfer of neutrophil or HLA antibodies from the donor or the transfusion of biologically active lipids from older, cellular blood products. Treatment is supportive, with a prognosis substantially better than most causes of clinical acute lung injury.

  13. Acute kidney injury in pregnancy-current status.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Anjali; Santos, Jolina; Linde, Brian; Anis, Kisra

    2013-05-01

    Pregnancy-related acute kidney injury (PR-AKI) causes significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Management of PR-AKI warrants a thorough understanding of the physiologic adaptations in the kidney and the urinary tract. Categorization of etiologies of PR-AKI is similar to that of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the nonpregnant population. The causes differ between developed and developing countries, with thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) being common in the former and septic abortion and puerperal sepsis in the latter. The incidence of PR-AKI is reported to be on a decline, but there is no consensus on the exact definition of the condition. The physiologic changes in pregnancy make diagnosis of PR-AKI difficult. Newer biomarkers are being studied extensively but are not yet available for clinical use. Early and accurate diagnosis is necessary to improve maternal and fetal outcomes. Timely identification of "at-risk" individuals and treatment of underlying conditions such as sepsis, preeclampsia, and TMAs remain the cornerstone of management. Questions regarding renal replacement therapy such as modality, optimal prescription, and timing of initiation in PR-AKI remain unclear. There is a need to systematically explore these variables to improve care of women with PR-AKI.

  14. Chemical burns

    PubMed Central

    Cartotto, Robert C.; Peters, Walter J.; Neligan, Peter C.; Douglas, Leith G.; Beeston, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To report a burn unit’s experience with chemical burns and to discuss the fundamental principles in managing chemical burns. Design A chart review. Setting A burn centre at a major university-affiliated hospital. Patients Twenty-four patients with chemical burns, representing 2.6% of all burn admissions over an 8-year period at the Ross Tilley Regional Adult Burn Centre. Seventy-five percent of the burn injuries were work-related accidents. Chemicals involved included hydrofluoric acid, sulfuric acid, black liquor, various lyes, potassium permanganate and phenol. Results Fourteen patients required excision and skin grafting. Complications were frequent and included ocular chemical contacts, wound infections, tendon exposures, toe amputation and systemic reactions from absorption of chemical. One patient died from a chemical scald burn to 98% of the body surface area. Conclusions The key principles in the management of chemical burns include removal of the chemical, copious irrigation, limited use of antidotes, correct estimation of the extent of injury, identification of systemic toxicity, treatment of ocular contacts and management of chemical inhalation injury. Individualized treatment is emphasized. PMID:8640619

  15. Innate response to self-antigen significantly exacerbates burn wound depth

    PubMed Central

    Suber, Freeman; Carroll, Michael C.; Moore, Francis D.

    2007-01-01

    A major component of burn injury is caused by additional local damage from acute inflammation. Using a scald burn model in mice, we find that this part of the injury is dependent on recognition of self-antigen by specific natural IgM, leading to activation of the complement system. We propose that the depth of a burn wound is a sum of the thermal energy applied and of the degree of host inflammatory response. PMID:17360462

  16. Adenosine 2A receptors in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Vincent, I S; Okusa, M D

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important clinical problem that may lead to death and for those who survive, the sequelae of AKI include loss of quality of life, chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. The incidence of AKI continues to rise without clear successes in humans for the pharmacological prevention of AKI or treatment of established AKI. Dendritic cells and macrophages are critical early initiators of innate immunity in the kidney and orchestrate inflammation subsequent to ischaemia-reperfusion injury. These innate cells are the most abundant leucocytes present in the kidney, and they represent a heterogeneous population of cells that are capable of responding to cues from the microenvironment derived from pathogens or endogenous inflammatory mediators such as cytokines or anti-inflammatory mediators such as adenosine. Lymphocyte subsets such as natural killer T cells and Tregs also play roles in regulating ischaemic injury by promoting and suppressing inflammation respectively. Adenosine, produced in response to IR, is generally considered as a protective signalling molecule and elicits its physiological responses through four distinct adenosine receptors. However, its short half-life, lack of specificity and rapid metabolism limit the use of adenosine as a therapeutic agent. These adenosine receptors play various roles in regulating the activity of the aforementioned hematopoietic cells in elevated levels of adenosine such as during hypoxia. This review focuses on the importance of one receptor, the adenosine 2A subtype, in blocking inflammation associated with AKI.

  17. Vitamin D deficiency aggravates ischemic acute kidney injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    de Bragança, Ana Carolina; Volpini, Rildo A; Canale, Daniele; Gonçalves, Janaína G; Shimizu, Maria Heloisa M; Sanches, Talita R; Seguro, Antonio C; Andrade, Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) increases the risk of death in hospitalized patients. Renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) induces acute kidney injury (AKI), which activates cell cycle inhibitors, including p21, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and genomic target of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, which is in turn a potent immunomodulator with antiproliferative effects. In this study, we assess the impact of VDD in renal IRI. Wistar rats were divided into groups, each evaluated for 30 days: control (receiving a standard diet); VDD (receiving a vitamin D-free diet); IRI (receiving a standard diet and subjected to 45-min bilateral renal ischemia on day 28); and VDD + IRI (receiving a vitamin D-free diet and subjected to 45-min bilateral renal ischemia on day 28). At 48 h after IRI, animals were euthanized; blood, urine, and kidney tissue samples were collected. Compared with IRI rats, VDD + IRI rats showed a more severe decrease in glomerular filtration rate, greater urinary protein excretion, a higher kidney/body weight ratio and lower renal aquaporin 2 expression, as well as greater morphological damage, characterized by increased interstitial area and tubular necrosis. Our results suggest that the severity of tubular damage in IRI may be associated with downregulation of vitamin D receptors and p21. VDD increases renal inflammation, cell proliferation and cell injury in ischemic AKI. PMID:25780095

  18. Biomarkers in acute kidney injury - pathophysiological basis and clinical performance.

    PubMed

    Schrezenmeier, E V; Barasch, J; Budde, K; Westhoff, T; Schmidt-Ott, K M

    2017-03-01

    Various biomarkers of acute kidney injury (AKI) have been discovered and characterized in the recent past. These molecules can be detected in urine or blood and signify structural damage to the kidney. Clinically, they are proposed as adjunct diagnostics to serum creatinine and urinary output to improve the early detection, differential diagnosis and prognostic assessment of AKI. The most obvious requirements for a biomarker include its reflection of the underlying pathophysiology of the disease. Hence, a biomarker of AKI should derive from the injured kidney and reflect a molecular process intimately connected with tissue injury. Here, we provide an overview of the basic pathophysiology, the cellular sources and the clinical performance of the most important currently proposed biomarkers of AKI: neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), interleukin-18 (IL-18), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2) and calprotectin (S100A8/9). We also acknowledge each biomarker's advantages and disadvantages as well as important knowledge gaps and perspectives for future studies.

  19. Traumatic forequarter amputation associated acute lung injury (ALI): report of one case.

    PubMed

    Liang, K; Gan, X; Deng, Z

    2012-07-01

    One case of traumatic forequarter amputation associated acute lung injury (ALI) was presented. A discussion reviewing the treatment guidelines for this devastating injury, and pointing out the importance of supporting the lung and preventing the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was included.

  20. Use of cyanide antidotes in burn patients with suspected inhalation injuries in North America: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Dumestre, Danielle; Nickerson, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the use of cyanide antidotes and the determine the opinion on empiric administration of hydroxocobalamin in North American burn patients with suspected smoke inhalation injuries. An online cross-sectional survey was sent to directors of 90 major burn centers in North America, which were listed on the American Burn Association Web site. A multiple-choice format was used to determine the percentage of patients tested for cyanide poisoning on admission, the current administration of a cyanide antidote based solely on clinical suspicion of poisoning, and the antidote used. To ascertain views on immediate administration of hydroxocobalamin before confirmation of cyanide poisoning an option was included to expand the response in written format. Twenty-nine of 90 burn directors (32%) completed the survey. For the population of interest, the majority of burn centers (59%) do not test for cyanide poisoning on admission and do not administer an antidote based solely on clinical suspicion of cyanide poisoning (58%). The most commonly available antidote is hydroxocobalamin (50%), followed by the cyanide antidote kit (29%). The opinion regarding instant administration of hydroxocobalamin when inhalation injury is suspected is mixed: 31% support its empiric use, 17% do not, and the remaining 52% have varying degrees of confidence in its utility. In North America, most patients burnt in closed-space fires with inhalation injuries are neither tested for cyanide poisoning in a timely manner nor empirically treated with a cyanide antidote. Although studies have shown the safety and efficacy of empiric and immediate administration of hydroxocobalamin, most centers are not willing to do so.

  1. Acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Okunola, Oluyomi O; Ayodele, Olugbenga E; Adekanle, Adebode D

    2012-11-01

    The morbidity and mortality from acute kidney injury (AKI) have remained relatively high over the last six decades. The triad of infections, nephrotoxins and obstetric complications are still major causes of acute kidney injury in the tropics. This retrospective study is a five-year audit of acute renal failure (ARF) (or stage 3 AKI) in patients requiring hemodialysis at the renal unit of the Department of Medicine of the Ladoke Akintola University of Technology (LAUTECH) Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria. A total of 80 patients with AKI were treated over a five-year period at our center, of which 45 (56.2%) were in ARF, i.e. stage 3 AKI requiring hemodialysis. There were 24 males and 21 females. The most common cause of ARF among the patients was sepsis syndrome 16 (35.5%), while pregnancy-related cases accounted for 15 (33.3%) and nephrotoxins for 6 (13.3%). Five (33%) of the 15 pregnancy-related patients survived, and all were cases of septic abortion. Of the other 10 patients that did not survive, three (30%) had post-partum hemorrhage and seven (70%) post-partum eclampsia. In all, the mortality rate among our AKI presenting for hemodialysis at our center over a given year period was 28.8%. Majority of these were eclampsia related. The causes of ARF still remain the same in the tropics, eclampsia portends poor prognosis. Concerted efforts should be made at limiting this trend by active preventive services and early recognition of high-risk obstetrics cases.

  2. The intensive care medicine agenda on acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Pickkers, Peter; Ostermann, Marlies; Joannidis, Michael; Zarbock, Alexander; Hoste, Eric; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Prowle, John; Darmon, Michael; Bonventre, Joseph V; Forni, Lui; Bagshaw, Sean M; Schetz, Miet

    2017-01-30

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in the critically ill. Current standard of care mainly relies on identification of patients at risk, haemodynamic optimization, avoidance of nephrotoxicity and the use of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in established AKI. The detection of early biomarkers of renal tissue damage is a recent development that allows amending the late and insensitive diagnosis with current AKI criteria. Increasing evidence suggests that the consequences of an episode of AKI extend long beyond the acute hospitalization. Citrate has been established as the anticoagulant of choice for continuous RRT. Conflicting results have been published on the optimal timing of RRT and on the renoprotective effect of remote ischaemic preconditioning. Recent research has contradicted that acute tubular necrosis is the common pathology in AKI, that septic AKI is due to global kidney hypoperfusion, that aggressive fluid therapy benefits the kidney, that vasopressor therapy harms the kidney and that high doses of RRT improve outcome. Remaining uncertainties include the impact of aetiology and clinical context on pathophysiology, therapy and prognosis, the clinical benefit of biomarker-driven interventions, the optimal mode of RRT to improve short- and long-term patient and kidney outcomes, the contribution of AKI to failure of other organs and the optimal approach for assessing and promoting renal recovery. Based on the established gaps in current knowledge the trials that must have priority in the coming 10 years are proposed together with the definition of appropriate clinical endpoints.

  3. Preparation of asiaticoside-loaded coaxially electrospinning nanofibers and their effect on deep partial-thickness burn injury.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lifei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Du, Lina; Jin, Yiguang

    2016-10-01

    Sodium alginate and chitosan were in favor of wound healing. However, the two polymers were not compatible in one formulation due to the electrostatic interaction. Coaxially electrospinning technology could make two or more noneletrospun polymers to be electrospun in independent core and shell layer. Asiaticoside-loaded coaxially electrospinning nanofibers of alginate, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and chitosan (alginate/PVA/chitosan) were prepared and evaluated. Morphologies and microstructure of nanofibers were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Drug release in vitro of coaxial nanofibers was also evaluated. Deep partial-thickness burn injury were established and used to evaluate the improved healing effect of asiaticoside-loaded coaxial nanofibers. Drug-loaded coaxial nanofibers prepared with the optimized formulations and technologies had the obvious core-shell structure. Coaxial nanofibers showed faster drug release profiles in vitro and this facilitated wound healing. Its healing effect on rats with deep partial-thickness burn injury was also significant based on morphology, wound healing ratio, and pathological sections. Positive expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and down regulation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) also validated the improved effect of wound healing. In general, the asiaticoside-loaded coaxial nanofibers had obvious core-shell structure with smooth surface and uniform diameter. Its healing effect on deep partial-thickness burn injury of rats was obvious. Asiaticoside-loaded coaxial nanofibers provide a novel promising option for treatment of deep partial-thickness burn injury.

  4. An unusual cause of acute kidney injury due to oxalate nephropathy in systemic scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Mascio, Heather M; Joya, Christie A; Plasse, Richard A; Baker, Thomas P; Flessner, Michael F; Nee, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Oxalate nephropathy is an uncommon cause of acute kidney injury. Far rarer is its association with scleroderma, with only one other published case report in the literature. We report a case of a 75-year-old African-American female with a history of systemic scleroderma manifested by chronic pseudo-obstruction and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) treated with rifaximin, who presented with acute kidney injury with normal blood pressure. A renal biopsy demonstrated extensive acute tubular injury with numerous intratubular birefringent crystals, consistent with oxalate nephropathy. We hypothesize that her recent treatment with rifaximin for SIBO and decreased intestinal transit time in pseudo-obstruction may have significantly increased intestinal oxalate absorption, leading to acute kidney injury. Oxalate nephropathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute kidney injury in scleroderma with normotension, and subsequent evaluation should be focused on bowel function to include alterations in gut flora due to antibiotic administration.

  5. A case of chemical scalp burns after hair highlights: experimental evidence of oxidative injuries.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Roberta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Pendolino, Flavio; Facchin, Giangiacomo; Snenghi, Rossella

    2016-12-01

    Hair highlights are quite common procedures carried out in hair salons by using a mixture of a lightening powder containing persulfates with a suspension containing hydrogen peroxide: a representative case of chemical scalp burns is described as a consequence of this treatment. The aim of the paper is to demonstrate the strict relationship between the scalp damage and the commercial products used in a case of hair highlighting. The results of some chemical analyses have been reported, showing, in particular, that the chemical reactivity of the mixture changes in the time, thus strongly suggesting that the procedure for the application of the mixture is critical for the occurrence of possible accidents. The presence in the powder of chemical compounds bearing aliphatic chains as surfactants explains the appearance of dramatic symptoms after days due to a slow dissolution of the oxidant compounds in the stratum corneum of skin with no effect in reducing injury of palliative treatments. Safety suggestions and recommendations for producers and workers are also included.

  6. Clothing Flammability and Burn Injuries: Public Opinion Concerning an Overlooked, Preventable Public Health Problem.

    PubMed

    Frattaroli, Shannon; Spivak, Steven M; Pollack, Keshia M; Gielen, Andrea C; Salomon, Michele; Damant, Gordon H

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe knowledge of clothing flammability risk, public support for clothing flammability warning labels, and stronger regulation to reduce the risk. As part of a national survey of homeowners about residential sprinkler systems, the authors included questions about clothing flammability. The authors used an online web panel to sample homeowners and descriptive methods to analyze the resulting data. The sample included 2333 homeowners. Knowledge of clothing flammability and government oversight of clothing flammability risk was low. Homeowners were evenly split about the effectiveness of current standards; however, when presented with clothing-related burn injury and death data, a majority (53%) supported stricter standards. Most homeowners (64%) supported warning labels and indicated that such labels would either have no effect on their purchasing decisions (64%) or be an incentive (24%) to purchase an item. Owners of sprinkler-equipped homes were more likely to support these interventions than owners of homes without sprinkler systems. Public knowledge about clothing flammability risks is low. Most homeowners supported clothing labels to inform consumers of this risk and increased government intervention to reduce the risk.

  7. Metallothionein-induced zinc partitioning exacerbates hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Min; McLaughlin, Joseph N.; Frederick, Daniel R.; Zhu, Lin; Thambiayya, Kalidasan; Wasserloos, Karla J.; Kaminski, Iris; Pearce, Linda L.; Peterson, Jim; Li, Jin; Latoche, Joseph D.; Peck Palmer, Octavia M.; Stolz, Donna Beer; Fattman, Cheryl L.; Alcorn, John F.; Oury, Tim D.; Angus, Derek C.; Pitt, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Hypozincemia, with hepatic zinc accumulation at the expense of other organs, occurs in infection, inflammation, and aseptic lung injury. Mechanisms underlying zinc partitioning or its impact on extrahepatic organs are unclear. Here we show that the major zinc-binding protein, metallothionein (MT), is critical for zinc transmigration from lung to liver during hyperoxia and preservation of intrapulmonary zinc during hyperoxia is associated with an injury-resistant phenotype in MT-null mice. Particularly, lung-to-liver zinc ratios decreased in wild-type (WT) and increased significantly in MT-null mice breathing 95% oxygen for 72 h. Compared with female adult WT mice, MT-null mice were significantly protected against hyperoxic lung injury indicated by reduced inflammation and interstitial edema, fewer necrotic changes to distal airway epithelium, and sustained lung function at 72 h hyperoxia. Lungs of MT-null mice showed decreased levels of immunoreactive LC3, an autophagy marker, compared with WT mice. Analysis of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the lungs revealed similar levels of manganese-SOD activity between strains under normoxia and hyperoxia. Lung extracellular SOD activity decreased significantly in both strains at 72 h of hyperoxia, although there was no difference between strains. Copper-zinc-SOD activity was ∼4× higher under normoxic conditions in MT-null compared with WT mice but was not affected in either group by hyperoxia. Collectively the data suggest that genetic deletion of MT-I/II in mice is associated with compensatory increase in copper-zinc-SOD activity, prevention of hyperoxia-induced zinc transmigration from lung to liver, and hyperoxia-resistant phenotype strongly associated with differences in zinc homeostasis during hyperoxic acute lung injury. PMID:23275622

  8. Histone lysine crotonylation during acute kidney injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Andres, Olga; Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Cannata-Ortiz, Pablo; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto; Sanz, Ana Belen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a potentially lethal condition for which no therapy is available beyond replacement of renal function. Post-translational histone modifications modulate gene expression and kidney injury. Histone crotonylation is a recently described post-translational modification. We hypothesized that histone crotonylation might modulate kidney injury. Histone crotonylation was studied in cultured murine proximal tubular cells and in kidneys from mice with AKI induced by folic acid or cisplatin. Histone lysine crotonylation was observed in tubular cells from healthy murine and human kidney tissue. Kidney tissue histone crotonylation increased during AKI. This was reproduced by exposure to the protein TWEAK in cultured tubular cells. Specifically, ChIP-seq revealed enrichment of histone crotonylation at the genes encoding the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator PGC-1α and the sirtuin-3 decrotonylase in both TWEAK-stimulated tubular cells and in AKI kidney tissue. To assess the role of crotonylation in kidney injury, crotonate was used to increase histone crotonylation in cultured tubular cells or in the kidneys in vivo. Crotonate increased the expression of PGC-1α and sirtuin-3, and decreased CCL2 expression in cultured tubular cells and healthy kidneys. Systemic crotonate administration protected from experimental AKI, preventing the decrease in renal function and in kidney PGC-1α and sirtuin-3 levels as well as the increase in CCL2 expression. For the first time, we have identified factors such as cell stress and crotonate availability that increase histone crotonylation in vivo. Overall, increasing histone crotonylation might have a beneficial effect on AKI. This is the first observation of the in vivo potential of the therapeutic manipulation of histone crotonylation in a disease state. PMID:27125278

  9. Stress Ulcer Disease in the Burned Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    association of acute upper gastrointestinal tract disease with burn injury was noted as early as 1823 by both Cumin |l| and Swan [2|. but was largely...recommend intragastric irrigation with warm saline [42] and/or selective arterial injec- tion of vasoactive agents such as posterior pituitary extract [43... Cumin , W.: Cases of severe burn, with dissections and remarks. Edinburgh Medical Journal 7^:337, 1823 2. Swan. J.: Practical observations: case of a

  10. Hepatic cryoablation-induced acute lung injury: histopathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Washington, K; Debelak, J P; Gobbell, C; Sztipanovits, D R; Shyr, Y; Olson, S; Chapman, W C

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown that hepatic cryoablation (cryo), but not partial hepatectomy, induces a systemic inflammatory response, with distant organ injury and overproduction of NF-kappaB-dependent cytokines. Serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) levels are markedly increased 1 h and beyond after cryo compared with partial hepatectomy where no elevation occurs. NF-kappaB activation (by electrophoretic mobility shift assay) is strikingly increased in the noncryo liver (but not in the lung) at 30 min and in both the liver and lung tissue 1 h after cryo, returning to the baseline by 2 h and beyond. The current study investigated the histopathologic changes associated with cryoablation-induced acute lung injury. Animals underwent 35% hepatic resection or a similar volume hepatic cryo and were sacrificed at 1, 2, 6, and 24 h. Pulmonary histologic features were assessed using hematoxylin and eosin and immunoperoxidase staining with a macrophage-specific antibody (anti-lysozyme, 1:200 dilution, Dako, Carpinteria, CA). The following features were graded semiquantitatively (0-3): perivascular lymphoid cuffs, airspace edema and hemorrhage, margination of neutrophils within pulmonary vasculature, and the presence of macrophages with foamy cytoplasm in the pulmonary interstitium. Hepatic resection (n = 21) resulted in slight perivascular edema at 1, 2, 6, and 24 h post-resection, but there were no other significant changes. Pulmonary findings after hepatic cryo (n = 22) included prominent perivascular lymphoid cuffs 1 and 2 h following hepatic injury that were not present at any other time point (P 0.01). Marginating PMNs and foamy macrophages were more common after cryo at all time points (P<0.05, cryo vs resection). Severe lung injury, as evidenced by airspace edema and parenchymal hemorrhage, was present in four of six (67%) animals at 24 h (P 0.03). In follow-up studies immediate resection (n = 15) of the cryo

  11. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0013 TITLE: DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE - INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY...2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE -INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY 5b...leads to permanent disability following traumatic spine injury. A dramatic increase in blast related spinal burst fracture has been observed in

  12. An unusual case of reversible acute kidney injury due to chlorine dioxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bathina, Gangadhar; Yadla, Manjusha; Burri, Srikanth; Enganti, Rama; Prasad Ch, Rajendra; Deshpande, Pradeep; Ch, Ramesh; Prayaga, Aruna; Uppin, Megha

    2013-09-01

    Chlorine dioxide is a commonly used water disinfectant. Toxicity of chlorine dioxide and its metabolites is rare. In experimental studies, it was shown that acute and chronic toxicity were associated with insignificant hematological changes. Acute kidney injury due to chlorine dioxide was not reported. Two cases of renal toxicity due to its metabolites, chlorate and chlorite were reported. Herein, we report a case of chlorine dioxide poisoning presenting with acute kidney injury.

  13. Injury to skeletal muscle of mice following acute and sub-acute pregabalin exposure

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Mohammad; Moallem, Seyed Adel; Attaranzadeh, Armin; Saberi, Zahra; Etemad, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Pregabalin (PGB) is a new antiepileptic drug that has received FDA approval for patient who suffers from central neuropathic pain, partial seizures, generalized anxiety disorder, fibromyalgia and sleep disorders. This study was undertaken to evaluate the possible adverse effects of PGB on the muscular system of mice. Materials and Methods: To evaluate the effect of PGB on skeletal muscle, the animals were exposed to a single dose of 1, 2 or 5 g /kg or daily doses of 20, 40 or 80 mg/kg for 21 days, intraperitoneally (IP). Twaenty-four hr after the last drug administration, all animals were sacrificed. The level of fast-twitch skeletal muscle troponin I and CK-MM activity were evaluated in blood as an indicator of muscle injury. Skeletal muscle pathological findings were also reported as scores ranging from 1 to 3 based on the observed lesion. Results: In the acute and sub-acute toxicity assay IP injection of PGB significantly increased the activity and levels of CK-MM and fsTnI compared to the control group. Sub-acute exposure to PGB caused damages that include muscle atrophy, infiltration of inflammatory cells and cell degeneration. Conclusion: PGB administration especially in long term care causes muscle atrophy with infiltration of inflammatory cells and cell degeneration. The fsTnI and CK-MM are reliable markers in PGB-related muscle injury. The exact mechanisms behind the muscular damage are unclear and necessitate further investigations. PMID:28392896

  14. Neutrophil Accumulation in the Small Intestine Contributes to Local Tissue Destruction Following Combined Radiation and Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Stewart R; Chen, Michael M; Palmer, Jessica L; Wang, Lu; Ramirez, Luis; Plackett, Timothy P; Gamelli, Richard L; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    Objective The threat of nuclear disaster makes combined radiation and thermal burn injury (CRI) a relevant topic when discussing modern trauma, as burn injuries are likely to occur with detonation of a conventional nuclear weapon. Previous studies in a murine model have shown that there is a breakdown of the gut epithelium and subsequent bacterial translocation into mesenteric lymph nodes after CRI. This study examines the early innate immune response of the small intestine following CRI. Methods Using a previously established murine model of 5 - 5.5Gy total body irradiation combined with 15% total body surface area burn, the injury response of the small intestine was examined at 24, 48 and 72hr by visual assessment, myeloperoxidase and cytokine measurement. Results At 24hr, intestinal damage as measured by villus blunting, crypt debris and decreased mitosis, was apparent in all injury groups but the derangements persisted out to 72hr only with CRI. The prolonged intestinal damage in CRI was accompanied by a 2-fold (p<0.05) elevation in myeloperoxidase activity over sham animals at 48hr and persisted as a 3-fold (p<0.05) elevation at 72hr post-injury. Corresponding levels of KC were 8-fold (p<0.05) higher than sham at 48hr with persistent elevation at 72hr. Conclusions An enhanced innate immune response, partially mediated by the influx of neutrophils into the gastrointestinal tract is contributing to the hyperinflammatory state seen following CRI. Attenuation of the local gastrointestinal inflammatory response may play a major role in managing victims following nuclear disaster. PMID:25501789

  15. Acute Kidney Injury Associated With Vancomycin When Laxity Leads to Injury and Findings on Kidney Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Katikaneni, Madhavi; Lwin, Lin; Villanueva, Hugo; Yoo, Jinil

    2016-01-01

    The issue of vancomycin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) has resurged with the use of intravenous vancomycin as a first-line antibiotic, often for prolonged periods of time for the management of serious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, and with a higher recommended trough level (15-20 μg/mL). We have observed 3 patients on intravenous vancomycin who developed very high trough levels (>40 μg/mL) and severe (stage 3) AKI. Those 3 patients underwent kidney biopsy for unresolving AKI, which revealed findings compatible with acute tubular necrosis. The first patient initially developed asymptomatic acute interstitial nephritis because of a concomitant antibiotic that caused worsening of kidney function, and the dose of vancomycin was not properly adjusted while staying at the nursing home. The second was an emaciated patient (BMI, 14) whose serum creatinine level was a deceptive marker of kidney function for the proper dosing of vancomycin, resulting in a toxic level. The third patient developed vancomycin-related AKI on an initially high therapeutic level, which then contributed to further rising in vancomycin level and subsequently causing severe AKI. One patient required hemodialysis, but all 3 patients ultimately recovered their kidney function significantly. A regular monitoring (preferably twice weekly) of serum creatinine and vancomycin trough level is advisable to minimize vancomycin-associated AKI, primarily acute tubular necrosis, for patients requiring prolonged administration of vancomycin (>2 weeks) on the currently recommended higher therapeutic trough levels (>15 μg/mL).

  16. Necroptosis in acute kidney injury: a shedding light

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S; Zhang, C; Hu, L; Yang, C

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and severe clinical condition with a heavy healthy burden around the world. In spite of supportive therapies, the mortality associated with AKI remains high. Our limited understanding of the complex cell death mechanism in the process of AKI impedes the development of desirable therapeutics. Necroptosis is a recently identified novel form of cell death contributing to numerable diseases and tissue damages. Increasing evidence has suggested that necroptosis has an important role in the pathogenesis of various types of AKI. Therefore, we present here the signaling pathways and main regulators of necroptosis that are potential candidate for therapeutic strategies. Moreover, we emphasize on the potential role and corresponding mechanisms of necroptosis in AKI based on recent advances, and also discuss the possible therapeutic regimens based on manipulating necroptosis. Taken together, the progress in this field sheds new light into the prevention and management of AKI in clinical practice. PMID:26938298

  17. Hypothermia-induced acute kidney injury in an elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Mun Chul; Park, Jae Woo; Yang, Min A; Lee, Cheon Beom; Sun, In O; Lee, Kwang Young

    2014-01-01

    Hypothermia, defined as an unintentional decline in the core body temperature to below 35℃, is a life-threatening condition. Patients with malnutrition and diabetes mellitus as well as those of advanced age are at high risk for accidental hypothermia. Due to the high mortality rates of accidental hypothermia, proper management is critical for the wellbeing of patients. Accidental hypothermia was reported to be associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) in over 40% of cases. Although the pathogenesis remains to be elucidated, vasoconstriction and ischemia in the kidney were considered to be the main mechanisms involved. Cases of AKI associated with hypothermia have been reported worldwide, but there have been few reports of hypothermia-induced AKI in Korea. Here, we present a case of hypothermia-induced AKI that was treated successfully with rewarming and supportive care.

  18. Acute kidney injury after massive attack of Africanised bees

    PubMed Central

    Bridi, Ramaiane A; Balbi, Andre Luis; Neves, Precil M; Ponce, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a well-documented complication of massive attack by Africanised bees and can be observed 48–72 h after the accident. We report a case of Africanised bees attack followed by severe and lethal AKI. A 56-year-old man was admitted to emergency department after a massive attack of Africanised bees (>1000 bee stings). He was unconscious, presenting with hypotension and tachycardia. Mechanical ventilation, volume expansion and care for anaphylaxis were instituted. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) and after 48 h he developed rhabdomyolysis, oliguria, increased creatinine levels, hyperkalaemia and refractory acidosis. A diagnosis of AKI secondary to rhabdomyolysis and shock was made. The patient was treated with a prolonged course of haemodialysis. However, he progressed to refractory shock and died 5 days after admission. PMID:24618864

  19. [Star fruit as a cause of acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Scaranello, Karilla Lany; Alvares, Valeria Regina de Cristo; Carneiro, Daniely Maria Queiroz; Barros, Flávio Henrique Soares; Gentil, Thais Marques Sanches; Thomaz, Myriam José; Pereira, Benedito Jorge; Pereira, Mariana Batista; Leme, Graziella Malzoni; Diz, Mary Carla Esteves; Laranja, Sandra Maria Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    The star fruit belongs to the family Oxalidacea, species Averrhoa carambola. It is rich in minerals, vitamin A, C, B complex vitamins and oxalic acid. Recent studies show that the toxicity of the fruit differs between the patients and may be explained by single biological responses, age, and the intake quantity of the neurotoxin in each fruit in addition to glomerular filtration rate given by each patient. Additionally, the nephrotoxicity caused by the fruit is dose-dependent and may lead to the deposition of crystals of calcium oxalate intratubular, as well as by direct injury to the renal tubular epithelium, leading to apoptosis of the same. We report the case of a patient who after ingestion of the juice and fresh fruit, developed acute renal failure requiring dialysis, evolving with favourable outcome and recovery of renal function.

  20. Acute kidney injury in the fetus and neonate.

    PubMed

    Nada, Arwa; Bonachea, Elizabeth M; Askenazi, David J

    2017-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an under-recognized morbidity of neonates; the incidence remains unclear due to the absence of a unified definition of AKI in this population and because previous studies have varied greatly in screening for AKI with serum creatinine and urine output assessments. Premature infants may be born with less than half of the nephrons compared with term neonates, predisposing them to chronic kidney disease (CKD) early on in life and as they age. AKI can also lead to CKD, and premature infants with AKI may be at very high risk for long-term kidney problems. AKI in neonates is often multifactorial and may result from prenatal, perinatal, or postnatal insults as well as any combination thereof. This review focuses on the causes of AKI, the importance of early detection, the management of AKI in neonates, and long-term sequela of AKI in neonates.

  1. Galangin dampens mice lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yu-Sheng; Tao, Wei; Miao, Qian-Bing; Lu, Shi-Chun; Zhu, Ya-Bing

    2014-10-01

    Galangin, an active ingredient of Alpinia galangal, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Inflammation and oxidative stress are known to play vital effect in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). In this study, we determined whether galangin exerts lung protection in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Male BALB/c mice were randomized to receive galangin or vehicle intraperitoneal injection 3 h after LPS challenge. Samples were harvested 24 h post LPS administration. Galangin administration decreased biochemical parameters of oxidative stress and inflammation, and improved oxygenation and lung edema in a dose-dependent manner. These protective effects of galangin were associated with inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and upregulation of heme oxygenase (HO)-1. Galangin reduces LPS-induced ALI by inhibition of inflammation and oxidative stress.

  2. Warfarin related acute kidney injury: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Mendonca, S.; Gupta, D.; Valsan, A.; Tewari, R.

    2017-01-01

    Warfarin is an oral anticoagulant used extensively in clinical practice; However, its side-effect of causing renal damage has been recently detected. The mechanism leading to renal damage is glomerular hemorrhage and red blood cell tubular casts prothrombin time. Recently, it was found that warfarin causes renal damage in patients with chronic kidney disease and is also associated with progression of renal disease. Warfarin causing acute kidney injury in patients with normal renal function is a rare manifestation. It is important to be aware of this condition as its innocuous presence can lead to chronic kidney disease if not corrected in time. Further studies have also found that novel oral anticoagulants such as dabigatran also cause a similar syndrome and hence a new term called anticoagulant-related nephropathy is now in vogue. PMID:28182051

  3. In vivo imaging of human burn injuries with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki Hean; Pierce, Mark C.; Maguluri, Gopi; Park, B. Hyle; Yoon, Sang June; Lydon, Martha; Sheridan, Robert; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2012-06-01

    The accurate determination of burn depth is critical in the clinical management of burn wounds. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) has been proposed as a potentially non-invasive method for determining burn depth by measuring thermally induced changes in the structure and birefringence of skin, and has been investigated in pre-clinical burn studies with animal models and ex vivo human skin. In this study, we applied PS-OCT to the in-vivo imaging of two pediatric burn patients. Deep and superficial burned skins along with contralateral controls were imaged in 3D. The imaging size was 8 mm×6 mm×2 mm in width, length, and depth in the air respectively, and the imaging time was approximately 6 s per volume. Superficially burned skins exhibited the same layered structure as the contralateral controls, but more visible vasculature and reduced birefringence compared to the contralateral controls. In contrast, a deeply burned skin showed loss of the layered structure, almost absent vasculature, and smaller birefringence compared to superficial burns. This study suggested the vasculature and birefringence as parameters for characterizing burn wounds.

  4. Multiphoton imaging for assessing renal disposition in acute kidney injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Liang, Xiaowen; Wang, Haolu; Roberts, Darren M.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-11-01

    Estimation of renal function and drug renal disposition in acute kidney injury (AKI), is important for appropriate dosing of drugs and adjustment of therapeutic strategies, but is challenging due to fluctuations in kidney function. Multiphoton microscopy has been shown to be a useful tool in studying drug disposition in liver and can reflect dynamic changes of liver function. We extend this imaging technique to investigate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and tubular transporter functional change in various animal models of AKI, which mimic a broad range of causes of AKI such as hypoxia (renal ischemia- reperfusion), therapeutic drugs (e.g. cisplatin), rhabdomyolysis (e.g. glycerol-induced) and sepsis (e.g. LPSinduced). The MPM images revealed acute injury of tubular cells as indicated by reduced autofluorescence and cellular vacuolation in AKI groups compared to control group. In control animal, systemically injected FITC-labelled inulin was rapidly cleared from glomerulus, while the clearance of FITC-inulin was significantly delayed in most of animals in AKI group, which may reflect the reduced GFR in AKI. Following intravenous injection, rhodamine 123, a fluorescent substrate of p-glycoprotein (one of tubular transporter), was excreted into urine in proximal tubule via p-glycoprotein; in response to AKI, rhodamine 123 was retained in tubular cells as revealed by slower decay of fluorescence intensity, indicating P-gp transporter dysfunction in AKI. Thus, real-time changes in GFR and transporter function can be imaged in rodent kidney with AKI using multiphoton excitation of exogenously injected fluorescent markers.

  5. Cement Burns

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Munir; Moynagh, M.; Lawlor, C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Cement burns account for relatively few admissions to a burn unit; however, these burns deserve separate consideration because of special features of diagnosis and management. Cement burns, even though potentially disabling, have rarely been reported in literature. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all patients admitted with cement burns injuries to the national burns unit at the St James's Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, over a 10-year period for the years 1996–2005. Results: A total of 46 patients with cement burns were admitted. The majority of patients were aged 16–74 years (mean age = 32 years). Eighty-seven percent of injuries occurred in an industrial and 13% in a domestic setting. The upper and lower extremities were involved in all the patients, and the mean total body surface area affected was 6.5%. The mean length of hospital stay was 21 days with a range of 1–40 days. Thirty-eight (82%) were surgically managed involving debridement and split-thickness skin graft (SSG) and four (9%) were conservatively managed. A further four did not have data available. Conclusion: Widespread inexperience in dealing with this group of cement burns patients and delays in referral to burns unit highlights the potential for greater levels of general awareness and knowledge in both prevention and treatment of these burns. As well, early debridement and split-thickness skin grafting at diagnosis constitutes the best means of reducing the high socioeconomic costs and allows for early return to work. PMID:18091981

  6. Acute kidney injury associated with ingestion of star fruit: Acute oxalate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Barman, A K; Goel, R; Sharma, M; Mahanta, P J

    2016-01-01

    Starfruit (Averrhoa carambola) and its juice are popular in the Indian subcontinent as an indigenous medicine. Oxalate concentration in this fruit and it's freshly prepared juice is very high. We present a report of patients presenting with acute kidney injury due to oxalate nephropathy admitted in a single center. All patients had history of ingesting star fruit. Patients became symptomatic after 10-12 h of eating and main symptoms were pain abdomen and decrease in urine output. Three patients needed hemodialysis. All improved with complete renal recovery. Taking star fruit in large amount on an empty stomach and in a dehydrated state is a risk factor for nephrotoxicity.

  7. Acute kidney injury associated with ingestion of star fruit: Acute oxalate nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Barman, A. K.; Goel, R.; Sharma, M.; Mahanta, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Starfruit (Averrhoa carambola) and its juice are popular in the Indian subcontinent as an indigenous medicine. Oxalate concentration in this fruit and it's freshly prepared juice is very high. We present a report of patients presenting with acute kidney injury due to oxalate nephropathy admitted in a single center. All patients had history of ingesting star fruit. Patients became symptomatic after 10–12 h of eating and main symptoms were pain abdomen and decrease in urine output. Three patients needed hemodialysis. All improved with complete renal recovery. Taking star fruit in large amount on an empty stomach and in a dehydrated state is a risk factor for nephrotoxicity. PMID:27942177

  8. Reversible anuric acute kidney injury secondary to acute renal autoregulatory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Imbriano, Louis J; Maesaka, John K; Drakakis, James; Mattana, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Autoregulation of glomerular capillary pressure via regulation of the resistances at the afferent and efferent arterioles plays a critical role in maintaining the glomerular filtration rate over a wide range of mean arterial pressure. Angiotensin II and prostaglandins are among the agents which contribute to autoregulation and drugs which interfere with these agents may have a substantial impact on afferent and efferent arteriolar resistance. We describe a patient who suffered an episode of anuric acute kidney injury following exposure to a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent while on two diuretics, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and an angiotensin receptor blocker. The episode completely resolved and we review some of the mechanisms by which these events may have taken place and suggest the term "acute renal autoregulatory dysfunction" to describe this syndrome.

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and chemical burns after exposure to chlorine-containing bleach: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong-Joon; Chang, Jin-Sun; Ahn, Seong; Kim, Tae-Ok; Park, Cheol-Kyu; Lim, Jung-Hwan; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Yu-Il; Lim, Sung-Chul; Kim, Young-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Chlorine-containing bleach can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and chemical burns. However, simultaneous occurrence of the two conditions caused by this agent is very rare. We describe the case of a 74-year-old female who presented with shortness of breath and hemoptysis following accidental exposure to chlorine-containing bleach. She had second- to third-degree chemical burns on both buttocks and thighs, and received mechanical ventilation because of the development of ARDS. Mechanical ventilation was discontinued on day 6 of hospitalization because of the rapid improvement of hypoxemia, and the patient was transferred to another hospital for further management of the chemical burns on day 18. PMID:28203432

  10. Treatment of an acute deep hand burn in a lowincome country with no available microsurgery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Amouzou, K.S.; El Harti, A.; Kouevi-Koko, T.E.; Abalo, A.; Dossim, A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Deep hand burns usually lead to joint and tendon exposure. A simple skin graft is insufficient to achieve healing. Soft tissue reconstruction represents a surgical challenge that ranges from the simplest to the most complex flaps. In some areas, microsurgery is not technically possible. Choice is then limited to pedicled distant flaps such as the abdominal wall flap-graft. We report a case of an acute burned hand with exposure of metacarpophalangeal joints from the second to the fourth radius as well as proximal inter phalangeal joints from the second to the fifth radius and extensor tendons, treated in the burns and wound care unit of the Sylvanus Olympio Teaching Hospital in Lomé. The dorsum hand and fingers were covered with a pedicled abdominal flap-graft that was severed in two stages at 22 and 29 days. We achieved good results (sensitivity S3+, useful aesthetic hand) at two-year follow up. PMID:28149255

  11. Potential Application of Viral Empty Capsids for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Prof. Ariella Oppenheim CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Hebrew University of Jerusalem...Lung / 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Prof. Ariella...mechanism elicited by VLPs that attenuate 2CLP-induced sepsis, to be performed as the project continues. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Acute Respiratory Distress

  12. Acute Lung Injury Following Smoke Inhalation: Predictive Value of Sputum Biomarkers and Time Course of Lung Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Criteria for diagnosing ALI and predicting...Rationale: Smoke inhalation victims are at high risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Given the delay of 12 or more hours...Background: Although smoke inhalation injury victims frequently develop acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ), no early prognostic

  13. Obesity, Acute Kidney Injury, and Mortality in Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Danziger, John; Chen, Ken; Lee, Joon; Feng, Mengling; Mark, Roger G.; Celi, Leo Anthony; Mukamal, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although obesity is associated with risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and improved survival, less is known about the associations of obesity with risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) and post-AKI mortality. Methods In a single-center inception cohort of almost 15,000 critically ill patients, we evaluated the association of obesity with AKI and AKI severity, as well as in-hospital and one-year survival. AKI was defined using the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative criteria. Results The AKI incidence rates for normal, overweight, Class I, II, and III Obesity were 18.6, 20.6, 22.5, 24.3 and 24.0 percent respectively, and the adjusted odds ratios of AKI were 1.18 [95% CI 1.06–1.31], 1.35 [1.19–1.53], 1.47 [1.25–1.73], 1.59 [1.31–1.87], compared to normal weight, respectively. Each 5 kg/m2 increase in body mass index (BMI) was associated with a 10% risk [95% CI 1.06–1.24; p<0.001] of more severe AKI. Within-hospital and one-year survival rates associated with the AKI episodes were similar across BMI categories. In conclusion, obesity is a risk factor for AKI injury, which is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality. PMID:26496453

  14. [Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI): an unrecognised pathology].

    PubMed

    Moalic, V; Vaillant, C; Ferec, C

    2005-03-01

    Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare but potentially severe complication of blood transfusion, manifested by pulmonary oedema, fever and hypotension. The signs and symptoms are often attributed to other clinical aspects of a patient's condition, and therefore, TRALI may go unrecognised. It has been estimated to be the third cause of transfusion related mortality, so it should be better diagnosed. Cases are related to multiple blood units, such as white blood cells, red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, platelets or intravenous immunoglobulins. Physiopathology of TRALI is poorly understood, and still controversial. It is often due to an immunological conflict between transfused plasma antibodies and recipients' blood cells. These antibodies are either HLA (class I or II) or granulocyte-specific. They appear to act as mediators, which result in granulocytes aggregation, activation and micro vascular pulmonary injury. Lipids or cytokines in blood units are also involved as TRALI priming agents. Diagnosis is based on antibody screening in blood components and on specific-antigen detection in the recipient. The screening of anti-HLA or anti-granulocytes is recommended as part of prevention for female donors who had been pregnant. Preventative measures should also include leucoreduction and measures to decrease the amount of priming agents in blood components. In this article, we summarise what is known about TRALI, and we focus attention on unanswered questions and controversial issues related to TRALI.

  15. Acute kidney injury: Renal disease in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Seller-Pérez, G; Más-Font, S; Pérez-Calvo, C; Villa-Díaz, P; Celaya-López, M; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in the ICU frequently requires costly supportive therapies, has high morbidity, and its long-term prognosis is not as good as it has been presumed so far. Consequently, AKI generates a significant burden for the healthcare system. The problem is that AKI lacks an effective treatment and the best approach relies on early secondary prevention. Therefore, to facilitate early diagnosis, a broader definition of AKI should be established, and a marker with more sensitivity and early-detection capacity than serum creatinine - the most common marker of AKI - should be identified. Fortunately, new classification systems (RIFLE, AKIN or KDIGO) have been developed to solve these problems, and the discovery of new biomarkers for kidney injury will hopefully change the way we approach renal patients. As a first step, the concept of renal failure has changed from being a "static" disease to being a "dynamic process" that requires continuous evaluation of kidney function adapted to the reality of the ICU patient.

  16. The Effects of Alcohol Intoxication and Burn Injury on the Expression of Claudins and Mucins in the Small and Large Intestines

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Adam M.; Khan, Omair M.; Morris, Niya L.; Li, Xiaoling; Movtchan, Nellie V.; Cannon, Abigail R.; Choudhry, Mashkoor A.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol intoxication at the time of burn injury exacerbates post-burn pathogenesis. Recent findings suggest gut barrier integrity is compromised after combined alcohol and burn insult, which could contribute to these complications. Tight junction proteins and mucins play critical roles in keeping the gut barrier intact. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine the effects of alcohol and burn injury on claudin and mucin expression in the intestines. We also evaluated if the combined insult differentially influences their expression in the small and large intestines. Male C57BL/6 mice were given a single dose of 2.9g/kg ethanol prior to a ~12.5% body area burn. One and three days following injury, we profiled expression of several tight junction proteins, mucin, and bacterial 16S rRNA genes in small and large intestine using qPCR. We observed >50% decrease in claudin-4 and claudin-8 genes in both ileal and colonic epithelial cells one day after injury. Claudin-2 was significantly upregulated, and occludin was down-regulated in small intestine one day following injury. Mucin-3 expression was substantially elevated (>50%) in small intestine, whereas mucin-2, and mucin-4 were considerably diminished in the colon (>50%) one day following injury. Most parameters were normalized to sham levels on day three, except for mucin-3 and claudin-8, which remained decreased in large intestine. Neither alcohol nor burn alone resulted in changes in junction or mucin gene expression compared to shams. This was accompanied with increases in the family of Gram-negative bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, in both small and large intestine one day following injury. These findings suggest that alcohol and burn injury disrupts normal gut microbiota and alters tight junction and mucin expression in the small and large intestines. PMID:26368926

  17. Postpartum acute kidney injury: a review of 99 cases.

    PubMed

    Eswarappa, Mahesh; Madhyastha, P Rakesh; Puri, Sonika; Varma, Vijay; Bhandari, Aneesh; Chennabassappa, Gurudev

    2016-07-01

    Postpartum acute kidney injury (PPAKI) constitutes an important cause of obstetric AKI. It is associated with high maternal and fetal mortality in developing nations. The aim of this study is to survey the etiology and outcomes of PPAKI in a tertiary care Indian hospital. Ninety-nine patients, without prior comorbidities, treated for PPAKI, between 2005-2014 at M.S. Ramaiah Medical College, were included for analysis in this retrospective, observational study. AKI was analyzed in terms of maximal stage of renal injury attained as per RIFLE criteria. Outcomes included requirement for renal replacement therapy (RRT), maternal and fetal outcomes. PPAKI constituted 60% of all obstetric AKI cases. Median maternal age was 23 years and 52% of patients were primigravidas. Mean serum creatinine was 4.1 mg/dL. Failure (33%) and injury (31%) were the major categories as per RIFLE criteria. Thirty-nine percent of cases required RRT. Sepsis, particularly puerperal sepsis, was the leading causes of PPAKI (75% of cases) and maternal mortality (94% of deaths). Maternal and fetal mortality were 19% and 22% respectively. The incidence of cortical necrosis was 10.3%. Three patients required long-term RRT. In conclusion, consistent with other Indian literature, we report a high incidence of PPAKI. We found incremental mortality on moving from "Risk" to "Failure" category of RIFLE. PPAKI was associated with high maternal and fetal mortality with sepsis being the leading cause. Our study highlights the need for provision of better quality of maternal care and fetal monitoring to decrease mortality associated with PPAKI in developing countries.

  18. Optimizing sedation in patients with acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Mauro; Crippa, Ilaria Alice; Mehta, Sangeeta; Menon, David; Payen, Jean-Francois; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Citerio, Giuseppe

    2016-05-05

    Daily interruption of sedative therapy and limitation of deep sedation have been shown in several randomized trials to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay, and to improve the outcome of critically ill patients. However, patients with severe acute brain injury (ABI; including subjects with coma after traumatic brain injury, ischaemic/haemorrhagic stroke, cardiac arrest, status epilepticus) were excluded from these studies. Therefore, whether the new paradigm of minimal sedation can be translated to the neuro-ICU (NICU) is unclear. In patients with ABI, sedation has 'general' indications (control of anxiety, pain, discomfort, agitation, facilitation of mechanical ventilation) and 'neuro-specific' indications (reduction of cerebral metabolic demand, improved brain tolerance to ischaemia). Sedation also is an essential therapeutic component of intracranial pressure therapy, targeted temperature management and seizure control. Given the lack of large trials which have evaluated clinically relevant endpoints, sedative selection depends on the effect of each agent on cerebral and systemic haemodynamics. Titration and withdrawal of sedation in the NICU setting has to be balanced between the risk that interrupting sedation might exacerbate brain injury (e.g. intracranial pressure elevation) and the potential benefits of enhanced neurological function and reduced complications. In this review, we provide a concise summary of cerebral physiologic effects of sedatives and analgesics, the advantages/disadvantages of each agent, the comparative effects of standard sedatives (propofol and midazolam) and the emerging role of alternative drugs (ketamine). We suggest a pragmatic approach for the use of sedation-analgesia in the NICU, focusing on some practical aspects, including optimal titration and management of sedation withdrawal according to ABI severity.

  19. A crucial role of nitric oxide in acute lung injury secondary to the acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Yan, Wen-Mao; Yang, Bin; Shi, Jing-dong; Song, Mao-min; Zhao, Yuqian

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in acute lung inflammation and injury secondary to acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), 5% sodium taurocholate was retrogradely injected into the biliopancreatic duct of rats to ANP model. These ANP rats were given L-Arginine (L-Arg, 100 mg/kg), L-NAME (10 mg/kg), or their combination by intraperitoneal injection 30 min prior to ANP induction. At 1, 3, 6, and 12 hours after ANP induction, lung NO production, and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression were measured. Lung histopathological changes, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein concentration, proinflammatory mediators tumor necrotic factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and lung tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were examined. Results showed that NO production and iNOS mRNA expression in alveolar macrophages (AMs) were significantly increased along with significant increases in lung histological abnormalities and BAL proteins in the ANP group, all of which were further enhanced by pretreatment with L-Arg and attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, respectively. These markers were slightly attenuated by pretreatment with combination of L-Arg + L-NAME, suggesting that NO is required for initiating the acute lung damage in ANP rats, and also that L-Arg-enhanced lung injury is mediated by its NO generation rather than its direct effect. MPO activity and TNF-alpha expression in lung were upregulated in the ANP rats and further enhanced by pretreatment with L-Arg and attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, respectively. These results suggest that overproduction of NO mediated by iNOS in the lung is required for the acute lung inflammation and damage secondary to ANP.

  20. Acute kidney injury in liver cirrhosis: new definition and application

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Florence

    2016-01-01

    The traditional diagnostic criteria of renal dysfunction in cirrhosis are a 50% increase in serum creatinine (SCr) with a final value above 1.5 mg/dL. This means that patients with milder degrees of renal dysfunction are not being diagnosed, and therefore not offered timely treatment. The International Ascites Club in 2015 adapted the term acute kidney injury (AKI) to represent acute renal dysfunction in cirrhosis, and defined it by an increase in SCr of 0.3 mg/dL (26.4 µmoL/L) in <48 hours, or a 50% increase in SCr from a baseline within ≤3 months. The severity of AKI is described by stages, with stage 1 represented by these minimal changes, while stages 2 and 3 AKI by 2-fold and 3-fold increases in SCr respectively. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), renamed AKI-HRS, is defined by stage 2 or 3 AKI that fulfils all other diagnostic criteria of HRS. Various studies in the past few years have indicated that these new diagnostic criteria are valid in the prediction of prognosis for patients with cirrhosis and AKI. The future in AKI diagnosis may include further refinements such as inclusion of biomarkers that can identify susceptibility for AKI, differentiating the various prototypes of AKI, or track its progression. PMID:27987536

  1. Effect of Thoracentesis on Intubated Patients with Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Matthew B; Serna-Gallegos, Derek; Ault, Mark; Khan, Ahsan; Chung, Rex; Ley, Eric J; Melo, Nicolas; Margulies, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    Pleural effusions occur frequently in mechanically ventilated patients, but no consensus exists regarding the clinical benefit of effusion drainage. We sought to determine the impact of thoracentesis on gas exchange in patients with differing severities of acute lung injury (ALI). A retrospective analysis was conducted on therapeutic thoracenteses performed on intubated patients in an adult surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary center. Effusions judged by ultrasound to be 400 mL or larger were drained. Subjects were divided into groups based on their initial P:F ratios: normal >300, ALI 200 to 300, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) <200. Baseline characteristics, physiologic variables, arterial blood gases, and ventilator settings before and after the intervention were analyzed. The primary end point was the change in measures of oxygenation. Significant improvements in P:F ratios (mean ± SD) were seen only in patients with ARDS (50.4 ± 38.5, P = 0.001) and ALI (90.6 ± 161.7, P = 0.022). Statistically significant improvement was observed in the pO2 (31.1, P = 0.005) and O2 saturation (4.1, P < 0.001) of the ARDS group. The volume of effusion removed did not correlate with changes in individual patient's oxygenation. These data support the role of therapeutic thoracentesis for intubated patients with abnormal P:F ratios.

  2. Renal oxygenation in acute renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Amany; Ho, Julie; Ow, Connie P C; Eppel, Gabriela A; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W; Schlaich, Markus P; Evans, Roger G

    2014-05-01

    Tissue hypoxia has been demonstrated, in both the renal cortex and medulla, during the acute phase of reperfusion after ischemia induced by occlusion of the aorta upstream from the kidney. However, there are also recent clinical observations indicating relatively well preserved oxygenation in the nonfunctional transplanted kidney. To test whether severe acute kidney injury can occur in the absence of widespread renal tissue hypoxia, we measured cortical and inner medullary tissue Po2 as well as total renal O2 delivery (Do2) and O2 consumption (Vo2) during the first 2 h of reperfusion after 60 min of occlusion of the renal artery in anesthetized rats. To perform this experiment, we used a new method for measuring kidney Do2 and Vo2 that relies on implantation of fluorescence optodes in the femoral artery and renal vein. We were unable to detect reductions in renal cortical or inner medullary tissue Po2 during reperfusion after ischemia localized to the kidney. This is likely explained by the observation that Vo2 (-57%) was reduced by at least as much as Do2 (-45%), due to a large reduction in glomerular filtration (-94%). However, localized tissue hypoxia, as evidence by pimonidazole adduct immunohistochemistry, was detected in kidneys subjected to ischemia and reperfusion, particularly in, but not exclusive to, the outer medulla. Thus, cellular hypoxia, particularly in the outer medulla, may still be present during reperfusion even when reductions in tissue Po2 are not detected in the cortex or inner medulla.

  3. Special nutrition challenges: current approach to acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Mary S; Phipps, Shauna C

    2014-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), previously known as acute renal failure, is defined as a sudden decline in glomerular filtration rate with accumulation of metabolic waste products, toxins, and drugs, as well as alteration in the intrinsic functions of the kidney. Reports of mortality are as high as 80%, with numerous contributing causes including infection, cardiorespiratory complications, and cardiovascular disease. Concurrent with the high prevalence of critical illness in this population is the protein energy wasting (PEW), seen in up to 42% of patients upon intensive care unit admission. The pathophysiologic derangements of critical illness, the low energy and protein stores, and uremic complications require early nutrition intervention to attenuate the inflammatory response and oxidative stress, improve endothelial function, stabilize blood sugar, and preserve lean body mass. This article addresses the unique challenges of nutrition support for the patient with AKI in the setting of critical illness and renal replacement therapy. Evidence-based recommendations are provided to meet the macronutrient and micronutrient requirements of this heterogeneous and complex patient population.

  4. Acute kidney injury in liver cirrhosis: new definition and application.

    PubMed

    Wong, Florence

    2016-12-01

    The traditional diagnostic criteria of renal dysfunction in cirrhosis are a 50% increase in serum creatinine (SCr) with a final value above 1.5 mg/dL. This means that patients with milder degrees of renal dysfunction are not being diagnosed, and therefore not offered timely treatment. The International Ascites Club in 2015 adapted the term acute kidney injury (AKI) to represent acute renal dysfunction in cirrhosis, and defined it by an increase in SCr of 0.3 mg/dL (26.4 µmoL/L) in <48 hours, or a 50% increase in SCr from a baseline within ≤3 months. The severity of AKI is described by stages, with stage 1 represented by these minimal changes, while stages 2 and 3 AKI by 2-fold and 3-fold increases in SCr respectively. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), renamed AKI-HRS, is defined by stage 2 or 3 AKI that fulfils all other diagnostic criteria of HRS. Various studies in the past few years have indicated that these new diagnostic criteria are valid in the prediction of prognosis for patients with cirrhosis and AKI. The future in AKI diagnosis may include further refinements such as inclusion of biomarkers that can identify susceptibility for AKI, differentiating the various prototypes of AKI, or track its progression.

  5. Malarial acute kidney injury in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Kapil; Gupta, Shalu

    2012-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious complication of malaria which has a very high mortality rate. A retrospective analysis of medical record data of children treated for malarial AKI in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) was performed in order to evaluate the incidence, poor prognostic factors and outcome of AKI with malaria. Eighteen (48.6%) malarial patients had AKI (11 Plasmodium vivax positive, six P. falciparum positive and one mixed infection) with a male-to-female ratio of 1:2. The mean age was 75 ± 32 months (range, 1 month to 10 years). Oliguria was present in 61.1% and 55.5% required renal replacement therapy. Mortality was noted in 33.3% of patients and full recovery was achieved in 50% of patients. Oliguria, shock, central nervous system involvement, jaundice, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy and acute respiratory distress syndrome emerged as bad prognostic factors in simple univariate analysis. Malaria patients with and without AKI differ significantly in terms of shock, ventilator requirement, mortality and length of PICU stay.

  6. Peptide nanomedicines for treatment of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represent a heterogenous group of lung disease in critically ill patients. Despite the increased understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of ARDS, the mortality remains unacceptably high, ranging from 34% to 64%. Hence, ARDS represents an unmet medical need with an urgency to develop effective pharmacotherapies. Several promising targets that have been identified as potential therapies for ARDS have been limited because of difficulty with delivery. In particular, delivery of peptides and proteins to the lung is an ongoing challenge. Nanobiotechnology and nanoscience are the basis of innovative techniques to deliver drugs targeted to the site of inflamed organs, such as the lungs. Nanoscale drug delivery systems have the ability to improve the pharmacokinetics and pharmakodynamics of agents allowing an increase in the biodistribution of therapeutic agents to target organs, resulting in improved efficacy with reduction in drug toxicity. These systems are exploited for therapeutic purpose to carry the drug in the body in a controlled manner from the site of administration to the therapeutic target. Hence, it is an attractive strategy to test potential targets for ALI/ARDS using nanotechnology. To this end, we have identified several potential targets and proposed the delivery of these agents using nanomicelles to improve the drug delivery.

  7. VEGF Promotes Malaria-Associated Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carapau, Daniel; Pena, Ana C.; Ataíde, Ricardo; Monteiro, Carla A. A.; Félix, Nuno; Costa-Silva, Artur; Marinho, Claudio R. F.; Dias, Sérgio; Mota, Maria M.

    2010-01-01

    The spectrum of the clinical presentation and severity of malaria infections is broad, ranging from uncomplicated febrile illness to severe forms of disease such as cerebral malaria (CM), acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) or severe anemia (SA). Rodent models that mimic human CM, PAM and SA syndromes have been established. Here, we show that DBA/2 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA constitute a new model for malaria-associated ALI. Up to 60% of the mice showed dyspnea, airway obstruction and hypoxemia and died between days 7 and 12 post-infection. The most common pathological findings were pleural effusion, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema, consistent with increased lung vessel permeability, while the blood-brain barrier was intact. Malaria-associated ALI correlated with high levels of circulating VEGF, produced de novo in the spleen, and its blockage led to protection of mice from this syndrome. In addition, either splenectomization or administration of the anti-inflammatory molecule carbon monoxide led to a significant reduction in the levels of sera VEGF and to protection from ALI. The similarities between the physiopathological lesions described here and the ones occurring in humans, as well as the demonstration that VEGF is a critical host factor in the onset of malaria-associated ALI in mice, not only offers important mechanistic insights into the processes underlying the pathology related with malaria but may also pave the way for interventional studies. PMID:20502682

  8. Acute Kidney Injury in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mohit; Manu, Gurusidda; Kwatra, Shivani; Owusu, Osei-Tutu

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a highly effective treatment strategy for lymphoproliferative disorders and bone marrow failure states including aplastic anemia and thalassemia. However, its use has been limited by the increased treatment related complications, including acute kidney injury (AKI) with an incidence ranging from 20% to 73%. AKI after HSCT has been associated with an increased risk of mortality. The incidence of AKI reported in recipients of myeloablative allogeneic transplant is considerably higher in comparison to other subclasses mainly due to use of cyclosporine and development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in allogeneic groups. Acute GVHD is by itself a major independent risk factor for the development of AKI in HSCT recipients. The other major risk factors are sepsis, nephrotoxic medications (amphotericin B, acyclovir, aminoglycosides, and cyclosporine), hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), marrow infusion toxicity, and tumor lysis syndrome. The mainstay of management of AKI in these patients is avoidance of risk factors contributing to AKI, including use of reduced intensity-conditioning regimen, close monitoring of nephrotoxic medications, and use of alternative antifungals for prophylaxis against infection. Also, early identification and effective management of sepsis, tumor lysis syndrome, marrow infusion toxicity, and hepatic SOS help in reducing the incidence of AKI in HSCT recipients. PMID:27885340

  9. [Acute kidney injury and septic shock: experiences in treatment].

    PubMed

    Pozzato, Marco; Ferrari, Fiorenza; Livigni, Sergio; Quarello, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in 5-45% of critically ill patients, and renal replacement therapy (RRT) is required in 4-10% of patients with AKI. AKI has long been considered to be hemodynamic damage from low blood flow resulting in shock, and efforts have been made to prevent and cure it by increasing the renal blood flow and improving the cardiac output and perfusion pressure. In recent years, new experimental studies on patients with septic AKI have shown that the renal blood flow remains unaltered or even increases in septic shock. An important mechanism in the pathophysiology of sepsis and septic shock appears to be apoptosis rather than ischemic necrosis. The type of treatment as well as the dose and timing of initiation of RRT seem to have strategic importance in the recovery of AKI in patients admitted to the ICU. In critically ill (often postsurgical and septic) patients with acute renal failure the use of new anticoagulation strategies has permitted to perform treatments for a sufficient number of hours to achieve the correct level of purification by minimizing the downtime and the bleeding risk. In our center the use of protocols for different methods and different types of anticoagulants has simplified the treatment of all patients with AKI and septic shock admitted to the ICU.

  10. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Bux, Jürgen; Sachs, Ulrich J H

    2007-03-01

    In recent years, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) has developed from an almost unknown transfusion reaction to the most common cause of transfusion-related major morbidities and fatalities. A clinical definition of TRALI was established in 2004, based on acute respiratory distress, non-cardiogenic lung oedema temporal association with transfusion and hypoxaemia. Histological findings reveal lung oedema, capillary leucostasis and neutrophil extravasation. However, the pathogenesis of TRALI remains controversial. Leucocyte antibodies, present in fresh frozen plasma and platelet concentrates from multiparous donors, and neutrophil priming agents released in stored cellular blood components have been considered to be causative. As neutrophils and endothelial cells are pivotal in the pathogenesis of TRALI, a threshold model was established to try to unify the various reported findings on pathogenesis. This model comprises the priming of neutrophils and/or endothelium by the patient's co-morbidity, neutrophil and/or endothelial cell activation by the transfused blood component, and the severity of the TRALI reaction.

  11. Comparison of measures of physiologic stress during treadmill exercise in a patient with 20% lower extremity burn injuries and healthy matched and nonmatched individuals.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, J L; Giuffrida, C; Petrazzi, A; Schlanser, J; McDowell-Montini, C; Pietrzyk, C; Landry, V L

    2000-01-01

    Patients with