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Sample records for acute cardiorenal syndrome

  1. Cardiorenal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Kidney dysfunction in patients with heart failure and cardiovascular disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease are common. A recently proposed consensus definition of cardiorenal syndrome stresses the bidirectional nature of these heart-kidney interactions. The treatment of cardiorenal syndrome is challenging, however, promising new therapeutic options are currently being investigated in recent and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:20948701

  2. [Organ damage and cardiorenal syndrome in acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Casado Cerrada, Jesús; Pérez Calvo, Juan Ignacio

    2014-03-01

    Heart failure is a complex syndrome that affects almost all organs and systems of the body. Signs and symptoms of organ dysfunction, in particular kidney dysfunction, may be accentuated or become evident for the first time during acute decompensation of heart failure. Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney, regardless of which of the two organs may have suffered the initial damage and regardless also of their previous functional status. Research into the mechanisms regulating the complex relationship between the two organs is prompting the search for new biomarkers to help physicians detect renal damage in subclinical stages. Hence, a preventive approach to renal dysfunction may be adopted in the clinical setting in the near future. This article provides a general overview of cardiorenal syndrome and an update of the physiopathological mechanisms involved. Special emphasis is placed on the role of visceral congestion as an emergent mechanism in this syndrome.

  3. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure: Revisiting Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Julio; Miñana, Gema; Santas, Enrique; Bertomeu-González, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney. Worsening renal function that occurs in patients with acute heart failure has been classified as cardiorenal syndrome type 1. In this setting, worsening renal function is a common finding and is due to complex, multifactorial, and not fully understood processes involving hemodynamic (renal arterial hypoperfusion and renal venous congestion) and nonhemodynamic factors. Traditionally, worsening renal function has been associated with worse outcomes, but recent findings have revealed mixed and heterogeneous results, perhaps suggesting that the same phenotype represents a diversity of pathophysiological and clinical situations. Interpreting the magnitude and chronology of renal changes together with baseline renal function, fluid overload status, and clinical response to therapy might help clinicians to unravel the clinical meaning of renal function changes that occur during an episode of heart failure decompensation. In this article, we critically review the contemporary evidence on the pathophysiology and clinical aspects of worsening renal function in acute heart failure.

  4. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome. PMID:27635229

  5. Type 4 cardiorenal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro da Silva, Ana Luísa; Vaz da Silva, Manuel Joaquim

    2016-11-01

    The Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative consensus conference proposed a classification of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS), aiming for a better delineation of each subtype. Although the exact pathophysiology of type 4 CRS is not completely understood, the mechanisms involved are probably multifactorial. There is growing evidence that oxidative stress is a major connector in the development and progression of type 4 CRS. Giving its complexity, poor prognosis and increasing incidence, type 4 CRS is becoming a significant public health problem. Patients with chronic kidney disease are particularly predisposed to cardiac dysfunction, due to the high prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in this population, but the contribution of risk factors specific to chronic kidney disease should also be taken into account. Much remains to be elucidated about type 4 CRS: despite progress over the last decade, there are still significant questions regarding its pathophysiology and there is as yet no specific therapy. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved may provide potential targets for intervention. The present review will provide a brief description of the definition, epidemiology, diagnosis, prognosis, biomarkers and management strategies of type 4 CRS, and the pathophysiological mechanisms and risk factors presumably involved in its development will be particularly highlighted.

  6. New Biomarkers of Acute Kidney Injury and the Cardio-renal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Changes in renal function are one of the most common manifestations of severe illness. There is a clinical need to intervene early with proven treatments in patients with potentially deleterious changes in renal function. Unfortunately progress has been hindered by poor definitions of renal dysfunction and a lack of early biomarkers of renal injury. In recent years, the definitional problem has been addressed with the establishment of a new well-defined diagnostic entity, acute kidney injury (AKI), which encompasses the wide spectrum of kidney dysfunction, together with clearer definition and sub-classification of the cardio-renal syndromes. From the laboratory have emerged new biomarkers which allow early detection of AKI, including neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and cystatin C. This review describes the new concepts of AKI and the cardio-renal syndromes as well as novel biomarkers which allow early detection of AKI. Panels of AKI biomarker tests are likely to revolutionise the diagnosis and management of critically ill patients in the coming years. Earlier diagnosis and intervention should significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with acute kidney damage. PMID:21474979

  7. Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1: Renal Dysfunction in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Kurt W.; Thenappan, Thenappan; Markowitz, Jeremy S.; Pritzker, Marc R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To present a review of cardiorenal syndrome type 1 (CRS1). Methods Review of the literature. Results Acute kidney injury occurs in approximately one-third of patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and the resultant condition was named CRS1. A growing body of literature shows CRS1 patients are at high risk for poor outcomes, and thus there is an urgent need to understand the pathophysiology and subsequently develop effective treatments. In this review we discuss prevalence, proposed pathophysiology including hemodynamic and nonhemodynamic factors, prognosticating variables, data for different treatment strategies, and ongoing clinical trials and highlight questions and problems physicians will face moving forward with this common and challenging condition. Conclusion Further research is needed to understand the pathophysiology of this complex clinical entity and to develop effective treatments. PMID:27158218

  8. Incidence, Mortality and Positive Predictive Value of Type 1 Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pimienta González, Raquel; Couto Comba, Patricia; Rodríguez Esteban, Marcos; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Hernández Afonso, Julio; Rodríguez Pérez, María del Cristo; Marcelino Rodríguez, Itahisa; Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Elosua, Roberto; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the risk of cardiovascular mortality associated with cardiorenal syndrome subtype 1 (CRS1) in patients who were hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) was greater than the expected risk based on the sum of its components, to estimate the predictive value of CRS1, and to determine whether the severity of CRS1 worsens the prognosis. Methods Follow-up study of 1912 incident cases of ACS for 1 year after discharge. Cox regression models were estimated with time to event (in-hospital death, and readmission or death during the first year after discharge) as the dependent variable. Results The incidence of CRS1 was 9.2/1000 person-days of hospitalization (95% CI = 8.1–10.5), but these patients accounted for 56.6% (95% CI = 47.4–65.) of all mortality. The positive predictive value of CRS1 was 29.6% (95% CI = 23.9–36.0) for in-hospital death, and 51.4% (95% CI = 44.8–58.0) for readmission or death after discharge. The risk of in-hospital death from CRS1 (RR = 18.3; 95% CI = 6.3–53.2) was greater than the sum of risks associated with either acute heart failure (RR = 7.6; 95% CI = 1.8–31.8) or acute kidney injury (RR = 2.8; 95% CI = 0.9–8.8). The risk of events associated with CRS1 also increased with syndrome severity, reaching a RR of 10.6 (95% CI = 6.2–18.1) for in-hospital death at the highest severity level. Conclusions The effect of CRS1 on in-hospital mortality is greater than the sum of the effects associated with each of its components, and it increases with the severity of the syndrome. CRS1 accounted for more than half of all mortality, and its positive predictive value approached 30% in-hospital and 50% after discharge. PMID:27907067

  9. Cardiorenal syndrome: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pokhrel, Narayan; Maharjan, Najindra; Dhakal, Bismita; Arora, Rohit R

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of cardiorenal syndrome is increasing; however, its pathophysiology and effective management are still not well understood. For many years, diuretics have been the mainstay of treatment for cardiorenal syndrome, although a significant proportion of patients develop resistance to diuretics and even deteriorate while on diuretics. Trials on different ways to counteract diuretic resistance and newer treatment modalities, such as nesiritide, arginine vasopressin receptor antagonists, adenosine receptor antagonists and ultrafiltration, have shown promising results. PMID:19343160

  10. Cardiorenal syndromes: definition and classification.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    To include the vast array of interrelated derangements, and to stress the bidirectional nature of the heart-kidney interactions, the classification of the cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) includes today five subtypes whose etymology reflects the primary and secondary pathology, the time-frame and simultaneous cardiac and renal codysfunction secondary to systemic disease. The CRS can be generally defined as a pathophysiologic disorder of the heart and kidneys, whereby acute or chronic dysfunction in one organ may induce acute or chronic dysfunction in the other organ. Type 1 CRS reflects an abrupt worsening of cardiac function (e.g. acute cardiogenic shock or decompensated congestive heart failure) leading to acute kidney injury. Type 2 CRS describes chronic abnormalities in cardiac function (e.g. chronic congestive heart failure) causing progressive and permanent chronic kidney disease. Type 3 CRS consists in an abrupt worsening of renal function (e.g. acute kidney ischemia or glomerulonephritis) causing acute cardiac disorder (e.g. heart failure, arrhythmia, ischemia). Type 4 CRS describes a state of chronic kidney disease (e.g. chronic glomerular disease) contributing to decreased cardiac function, cardiac hypertrophy and/ or increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Type 5 CRS reflects a systemic condition (e.g. diabetes mellitus, sepsis) causing both cardiac and renal dysfunction. The identification of patients and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying each syndrome subtype will help to understand clinical disorders and to design future clinical trials.

  11. Cardiorenal biomarkers in acute heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Rajiv; Gopal, Dipika; Kipper, Ben A.; De La Parra Landa, Alejandro; Lee, Hermineh Aramin Elizabeth; Shah, Saloni; Maisel, Alan S.

    2012-01-01

    Managing patients with heart failure (HF) is a challenging task within itself, but the presence of associated worsening renal function can greatly increase mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key to prevent re-hospitalizations and reduce healthcare costs. Biomarkers have long been established as highly sensitive and specific tools in diagnosing and prognosticating patients with HF. Reflecting distinct pathophysiological events and ongoing cellular insult, biomarkers have been proven superior to conventional laboratory tests. Availability of better assays and rapid analysis has allowed the use of biomarkers as point-of-care tests in the emergency department and at the patient's bed-side. Acute HF patients often go on to develop worsening renal function, termed as acute cardiorenal syndrome. The growing breadth of studies has shown the implications of combining multiple biomarkers to better chart outcomes and produce desirable results in such patients. PMID:23097660

  12. Novel Renal Biomarkers to Assess Cardiorenal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brisco, Meredith A.; Testani, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Renal dysfunction (RD) in heart failure portends adverse outcomes and often limits aggressive medical and decongestive therapies. Despite the high prevalence in this population, not all forms of RD are prognostically or mechanistically equivalent: RD can result from irreversible nephron loss secondary to diabetic or hypertensive kidney disease or it can develop secondary to the HF itself, i.e. the cardiorenal syndrome. Furthermore, filtration is only one aspect of renal performance such that significant renal impairment secondary to cardiorenal syndrome can exist despite a normal glomerular filtration rate. Renal biomarkers have the potential to inform some of the intricacies involved in accurately assessing cardiorenal interactions. This article discusses novel biomarkers for cardiorenal syndrome and their utility in prognosis, diagnosis, and targeted treatment of heart failure-induced RD. PMID:25239434

  13. Cardiorenal syndrome in children with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Price, Jack F; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2009-09-01

    Concomitant cardiac and renal dysfunction has been termed the cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). This clinical condition usually manifests as heart failure with worsening renal function and occurs frequently in the acute care setting. A consistent definition of CRS has not been universally agreed upon, although a recent classification of CRS describes several subtypes depending on the primary organ injured and the chronicity of the injury. CRS may develop in adults and children and is a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized and ambulatory patients. The underlying physiology of CRS is not well understood, creating a significant challenge for clinicians when treating heart failure patients with renal insufficiency. This review summarizes recent data characterizing the incidence, physiology, and management of children who have heart failure and acute kidney injury.

  14. ADPKD: Prototype of Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 4

    PubMed Central

    Virzì, Grazia Maria; Corradi, Valentina; Panagiotou, Anthi; Gastaldon, Fiorella; Cruz, Dinna N.; de Cal, Massimo; Clementi, Maurizio; Ronco, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The cardiorenal syndrome type 4 (Chronic Renocardiac Syndrome) is characterized by a condition of primary chronic kidney disease (CKD) that leads to an impairment of the cardiac function, ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, and/or increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Clinically, it is very difficult to distinguish between CRS type 2 (Chronic Cardiorenal Syndrome) and CRS type 4 (Chronic Renocardiac Syndrome) because often it is not clear whether the primary cause of the syndrome depends on the heart or the kidney. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), a genetic disease that causes CKD, could be viewed as an ideal prototype of CRS type 4 because it is certain that the primary cause of cardiorenal syndrome is the kidney disease. In this paper, we will briefly review the epidemiology of ADPKD, conventional and novel biomarkers which may be useful in following the disease process, and prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:21234092

  15. Pathogenesis of cardiorenal syndrome type 1 in acute decompensated heart failure: workgroup statements from the eleventh consensus conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI).

    PubMed

    Haase, Michael; Müller, Christian; Damman, Kevin; Murray, Patrick T; Kellum, John A; Ronco, Claudio; McCullough, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiorenal syndromes (CRS) types 1-5 are still sparsely characterized. In an attempt to address this issue, a consensus conference on CRS was held in Venice, Italy, in November 2012 under the auspices of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI). Working group 1 discussed monodirectional mechanisms of CRS type 1 which is characterized by a rapid worsening of cardiac function leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). Pre-conference we performed a systematic search and review of the available literature using a modified Delphi analysis. Hereby identified and in this review discussed questions were: (i) What are the predominant pathophysiologic mechanisms of CRS type 1 in acute decompensated heart failure? (ii) Could biomarker profiling identify pathomechanisms or hemodynamic phenotype of patients with CRS type 1? Could predictive biomarkers improve renal safety of therapy in CRS type 1? (iii) How do the timing, severity and duration relate to the mechanisms and outcomes of CRS type 1? In summary, after discussion and appraisal of the best available evidence, working group 1 makes consensus recommendations for future research on pathologic mechanisms of CRS type 1 and recommendations for clinical practice where treatment is in either proof or disproof of a mechanism.

  16. Advances in the pathogenesis of cardiorenal syndrome type 3.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Anna; Virzì, Grazia Maria; Brocca, Alessandra; de Cal, Massimo; Pastori, Silvia; Clementi, Maurizio; Granata, Antonio; Vescovo, Giorgio; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) type 3 is a subclassification of the CRS whereby an episode of acute kidney injury (AKI) leads to the development of acute cardiac injury or dysfunction. In general, there is limited understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in CRS type 3. An episode of AKI may have effects that depend on the severity and duration of AKI and that both directly and indirectly predispose to an acute cardiac event. Experimental data suggest that cardiac dysfunction may be related to immune system activation, inflammatory mediators release, oxidative stress, and cellular apoptosis which are well documented in the setting of AKI. Moreover, significant derangements, such as fluid and electrolyte imbalance, metabolic acidosis, and uremia, which are typical features of acute kidney injury, may impair cardiac function. In this review, we will focus on multiple factors possibly involved in the pathogenesis issues regarding CRS type 3.

  17. Cardiorenal syndrome type 4: a review.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Anna; Virzì, Grazia Maria; Goh, Ching Yan; Cruz, Dinna N; Granata, Antonio; Vescovo, Girogio; Ronco, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    There is a bidirectional and complex relationship between the heart and kidneys. This interaction is physical, chemical as well as biological and is also reflected in a strong connection between renal and cardiovascular diseases. Cardiorenal syndrome type 4 (CRS type 4) is characterized by primary chronic kidney disease (CKD) leading to an impairment of cardiac function, with ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, and/or increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The incidence of CKD is increasing, and CRS type 4 is becoming a major public health problem associated with a high morbidity and mortality. In this study, we briefly review the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CRS type 4, the role of biomarkers in its early identification, and its management.

  18. Ultrasonography: Ariadne's Thread in the Diagnosis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Floccari, Fulvio; Granata, Antonio; D'Amelio, Alessandro; Rivera, Rodolfo; Fiorini, Fulvio; Malaguti, Moreno; Timio, Mario

    2012-02-01

    The term cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) describes a broad spectrum of clinical conditions with four combinations of acute and chronic heart and kidney failure. Based on the pathophysiological primum movens, the actual classification recognizes five CRS types: in type I and II CRS, the initiating event is heart failure (acute or chronic), while it is kidney failure in type III and IV CRS; type V is linked to systemic diseases. Ultrasound techniques (echocardiography and ultrasonography of the kidney, inferior vena cava and chest) can be extremely helpful in establishing a prompt diagnosis and a correct CRS classification. Basic echocardiography allows evaluation of ventricular diastolic and systolic functions, investigates pulmonary congestion and pericardial effusion, and describes volume overload. On the other hand, renal ultrasound helps clinicians to distinguish between acute and chronic renal failure, excludes urinary tract dilation or pathological bladder repletion, and provides crucial information regarding kidney volume or echogenicity. Applying basic knowledge of echocardiography and renal ultrasound, nephrologists may be in a better position for patient treatment and management, bearing in mind that doctors can properly use a stethoscope although not being a cardiologist.

  19. Ultrasonography: Ariadne's Thread in the Diagnosis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Di Lullo, Luca; Floccari, Fulvio; Granata, Antonio; D'Amelio, Alessandro; Rivera, Rodolfo; Fiorini, Fulvio; Malaguti, Moreno; Timio, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The term cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) describes a broad spectrum of clinical conditions with four combinations of acute and chronic heart and kidney failure. Based on the pathophysiological primum movens, the actual classification recognizes five CRS types: in type I and II CRS, the initiating event is heart failure (acute or chronic), while it is kidney failure in type III and IV CRS; type V is linked to systemic diseases. Ultrasound techniques (echocardiography and ultrasonography of the kidney, inferior vena cava and chest) can be extremely helpful in establishing a prompt diagnosis and a correct CRS classification. Basic echocardiography allows evaluation of ventricular diastolic and systolic functions, investigates pulmonary congestion and pericardial effusion, and describes volume overload. On the other hand, renal ultrasound helps clinicians to distinguish between acute and chronic renal failure, excludes urinary tract dilation or pathological bladder repletion, and provides crucial information regarding kidney volume or echogenicity. Applying basic knowledge of echocardiography and renal ultrasound, nephrologists may be in a better position for patient treatment and management, bearing in mind that doctors can properly use a stethoscope although not being a cardiologist. PMID:22493598

  20. Current and Potential Therapeutic Strategies for Hemodynamic Cardiorenal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Obi, Yoshitsugu; Kim, Taehee; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Amin, Alpesh N.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) encompasses conditions in which cardiac and renal disorders co-exist and are pathophysiologically related. The newest classification of CRS into seven etiologically and clinically distinct types for direct patient management purposes includes hemodynamic, uremic, vascular, neurohumoral, anemia- and/or iron metabolism-related, mineral metabolism-related and protein-energy wasting-related CRS. This classification also emphasizes the pathophysiologic pathways. The leading CRS category remains hemodynamic CRS, which is the most commonly encountered type in patient care settings and in which acute or chronic heart failure leads to renal impairment. Summary This review focuses on selected therapeutic strategies for the clinical management of hemodynamic CRS. This is often characterized by an exceptionally high ratio of serum urea to creatinine concentrations. Loop diuretics, positive inotropic agents including dopamine and dobutamine, vasopressin antagonists including vasopressin receptor antagonists such as tolvaptan, nesiritide and angiotensin-neprilysin inhibitors are among the pharmacologic agents used. Additional therapies include ultrafiltration (UF) via hemofiltration or dialysis. The beneficial versus unfavorable effects of these therapies on cardiac decongestion versus renal blood flow may act in opposite directions. Some of the most interesting options for the outpatient setting that deserve revisiting include portable continuous dobutamine infusion, peritoneal dialysis and outpatient UF via hemodialysis or hemofiltration. Key Messages The new clinically oriented CRS classification system is helpful in identifying therapeutic targets and offers a systematic approach to an optimal management algorithm with better understanding of etiologies. Most interventions including UF have not shown a favorable impact on outcomes. Outpatient portable dobutamine infusion is underutilized and not well studied. Revisiting traditional and

  1. [Pathophysiology and diagnosis of cardio-renal syndrome: actual picture and future prospectives].

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Floccari, Fulvio; De Pascalis, Antonio; Marinelli, Annibale; Barbera, Vincenzo; Santoboni, Alberto; Malaguti, Moreno; Balducci, Alessandro; Russo, Domenico; Rivera, Rodolfo; Gorini, Antonio; Ronco, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    The cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) indicates how close the relationship is between heart and kidney during failure of these organs. At present, the classification of the syndrome includes five types of CRS: types I and II which are strictly related to initial heart failure (both acute and chronic), types III and IV which include initial kidney failure, and type V which includes several systemic diseases. Many pathophysiological pathways have been described illustrating how heart and kidney disease are involved in clinical conditions. The diagnosis of CRS is based on both blood tests and ultrasound imaging. Several biomarkers indicating levels of heart and kidney function have emerged over the last few decades which can be used to predict kidney failure in patients with acute or chronic heart disease. Kidney injury biomarkers have also to be tested, especially those indicating glomerular and tubular damage. Renal ultrasound and trans-thoracic echocardiography can provide further information on heart and kidney failure in patients with cardio-renal syndrome at any stage.

  2. [The nephrologist and the role of ultrasound imaging in the diagnosis of cardiorenal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Floccari, Fulvio; Rivera, Rodolfo; Granata, Antonio; D'Amelio, Alessandro; Logias, Francesco; Otranto, Giovanni; Villani, Annalisa; Santoboni, Alberto; Malaguti, Moreno; Timio, Mario; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2012-01-01

    The term cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) refers to multiple possible clinicopathological correlations between heart and kidney failure. The most recent classification recognizes five types of CRS: types I and II originate from heart failure (acute and chronic, respectively), type III and IV from kidney failure (again acute and chronic), while type V originates from a range of systemic diseases. Echocardiography and renal ultrasound are important means to arrive at a correct diagnosis. Basic echocardiography (defined by some as "echocardioscopy") allows the assessment of the left and right ventricles (diastolic and systolic function), atrial size, pulmonary circulation markers such as systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (PAPs) and tricuspid annular plane excursion (TAPSE), pericardial effusions, valve dysfunctions, and volume repletion. Renal ultrasound is of help in distinguishing between chronic and acute renal failure (kidney volume, parenchymal thickness, echogenicity) and excluding obstructive kidney disease.

  3. Estrogen and Mitochondria Function in Cardiorenal Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; Aroor, Annayya R.; Sowers, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS) consists of a constellation of cardiac, renal, and metabolic disorders including insulin resistance (IR), obesity, metabolic dyslipidemia, high-blood pressure, and evidence of early cardiac and renal disease. Mitochondria dysfunction often occurs in the CRS, and this dysfunction is promoted by excess reactive oxygen species, genetic factors, IR, aging, and altered mitochondrial biogenesis. Recently, it has been shown that there are important sex-related differences in mitochondria function and metabolic, cardiovascular, and renal components. Sex differences in the CRS have mainly been attributed to the estrogen’s effects that are mainly mediated by estrogen receptor (ER) α, ERβ, and G-protein coupled receptor 30. In this review, we discuss the effects of estrogen on the mitochondrial function, insulin metabolic signaling, glucose transport, lipid metabolism, and inflammatory responses from liver, pancreatic β cells, adipocytes, skeletal muscle, and cardiovascular tissue. PMID:25149220

  4. Proximal Tubule Cell Hypothesis for Cardiorenal Syndrome in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Akihiko; Kaseda, Ryohei; Hosojima, Michihiro; Sato, Hiroyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is remarkably high among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), even in the early microalbuminuric stages with normal glomerular filtration rates. Proximal tubule cells (PTCs) mediate metabolism and urinary excretion of vasculotoxic substances via apical and basolateral receptors and transporters. These cells also retrieve vasculoprotective substances from circulation or synthesize them for release into the circulation. PTCs are also involved in the uptake of sodium and phosphate, which are critical for hemodynamic regulation and maintaining the mineral balance, respectively. Dysregulation of PTC functions in CKD is likely to be associated with the development of CVD and is linked to the progression to end-stage renal disease. In particular, PTC dysfunction occurs early in diabetic nephropathy, a leading cause of CKD. It is therefore important to elucidate the mechanisms of PTC dysfunction to develop therapeutic strategies for treating cardiorenal syndrome in diabetes. PMID:21197105

  5. Cardiorenal syndrome: ultrafiltration therapy for heart failure--trials and tribulations.

    PubMed

    Kazory, Amir

    2013-10-01

    Heart failure remains the leading cause of hospitalization in older patients and is considered a growing public health problem with a significant financial burden on the health care system. The suboptimal efficacy and safety profile of diuretic-based therapeutic regimens coupled with unsatisfactory results of the studies on novel pharmacologic agents have positioned ultrafiltration on the forefront as an appealing therapeutic option for patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). In recent years, substantial interest in the use of ultrafiltration has been generated due to the advent of dedicated portable devices and promising results of trials focusing both on mechanistic and clinical aspects of this therapeutic modality. This article briefly reviews the proposed benefits of ultrafiltration therapy in the setting of ADHF and summarizes the major findings of the currently available studies in this field. The results of more recent trials on cardiorenal syndrome that present a counterpoint to previous observations and highlight certain limitations of ultrafiltration therapy are then discussed, followed by identification of major challenges and unanswered questions that could potentially hinder its more widespread use. Future studies are warranted to shed light on less well characterized aspects of ultrafiltration therapy and to further define its role in ADHF and cardiorenal syndrome.

  6. Cardiorenal Syndrome and the Role of the Bone-Mineral Axis and Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Charytan, David M.; Fishbane, Steven; Malyszko, Jolanta; McCullough, Peter A.; Goldsmith, David

    2015-01-01

    The association between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established, and there is mounting evidence of inter-organ crosstalk that may accelerate pathological processes and the progression of organ dysfunction in both systems. This process, termed cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) by the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative, is considered a major health problem: patients with CKD and CVD are at much higher risk of mortality than patients with either condition alone. To date, the majority of CRS research has focused on neurohormonal mechanisms and hemodynamic alterations. However, mounting evidence suggests that abnormalities in the normal pathophysiology of the bone-mineral axis, iron, and erythropoietin play a role in accelerating CKD and CVD. The goal of this manuscript is to review the role and interrelated effects of the bone-mineral axis and anemia in the pathogenesis of chronic CRS. PMID:25727384

  7. Cardiorenal syndrome: pathophysiology and potential targets for clinical management.

    PubMed

    Hatamizadeh, Parta; Fonarow, Gregg C; Budoff, Matthew J; Darabian, Sirous; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-02-01

    Combined dysfunction of the heart and the kidneys, which can be associated with haemodynamic impairment, is classically referred to as cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). Cardiac pump failure with resulting volume retention by the kidneys, once thought to be the major pathophysiologic mechanism of CRS, is now considered to be only a part of a much more complicated phenomenon. Multiple body systems may contribute to the development of this pathologic constellation in an interconnected network of events. These events include heart failure (systolic or diastolic), atherosclerosis and endothelial cell dysfunction, uraemia and kidney failure, neurohormonal dysregulation, anaemia and iron disorders, mineral metabolic derangements including fibroblast growth factor 23, phosphorus and vitamin D disorders, and inflammatory pathways that may lead to malnutrition-inflammation-cachexia complex and protein-energy wasting. Hence, a pathophysiologically and clinically relevant classification of CRS based on the above components would be prudent. With the existing medical knowledge, it is almost impossible to identify where the process has started in any given patient. Rather, the events involved are closely interrelated, so that once the process starts at a particular point, other pathways of the network are potentially activated. Current therapies for CRS as well as ongoing studies are mostly focused on haemodynamic adjustments. The timely targeting of different components of this complex network, which may eventually lead to haemodynamic and vascular compromise and cause refractoriness to conventional treatments, seems necessary. Future studies should focus on interventions targeting these components.

  8. Cardiorenal Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiometabolic Risks in Minority Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ferdinand, Keith C.; Rodriguez, Fatima; Nasser, Samar A.; Caballero, A. Enrique; Puckrein, Gary A.; Zangeneh, Farhad; Mansour, Michael; Foody, JoAnne Micale; Pemu, Priscilla E.; Ofili, Elizabeth O.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), including heart disease and stroke, is the leading cause of death in the USA, regardless of self-determined race/ethnicity, and largely driven by cardiometabolic risk (CMR) and cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS). The primary drivers of increased CMR include obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease as well as associated adverse behaviors of physical inactivity, smoking, and unhealthy eating habits. Given the importance of CRS for public health, multiple stakeholders, including the National Minority Quality Forum (the Forum), the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), the American College of Cardiology (ACC), and the Association of Black Cardiologists (ABC), have developed this review to inform clinicians and other health professionals of the unique aspects of CMR in racial/ethnic minorities and of potential means to improve CMR factor control, to reduce CRS and CVD in diverse populations, and to provide more effective, coordinated care. This paper highlights CRS and CMR as sources of significant morbidity and mortality (particularly in racial/ethnic minorities), associated health-care costs, and an evolving index tool for cardiometabolic disease to determine geographical and environmental factors. Finally, this work provides a few examples of interventions potentially successful at reducing disparities in cardiometabolic health. PMID:24847329

  9. Peritoneal dialysis for chronic cardiorenal syndrome: Lessons learned from ultrafiltration trials

    PubMed Central

    Kazory, Amir

    2015-01-01

    The current models of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) are mainly based on a cardiocentric approach; they assume that worsening renal function is an adverse consequence of the decline in cardiac function rather than a separate and independent pathologic phenomenon. If this assumption were true, then mechanical extraction of fluid (i.e., ultrafiltration therapy) would be expected to portend positive impact on renal hemodynamics and function through improvement in cardio-circulatory physiology and reduction in neurohormonal activation. However, currently available ultrafiltration trials, whether in acute heart failure (AHF) or in CRS, have so far failed to show any improvement in renal function; they have reported no impact or even observed adverse renal outcomes in this setting. Moreover, the presence or absence of renal dysfunction seems to affect the overall safety and efficacy of ultrafiltration therapy in AHF. This manuscript briefly reviews cardiorenal physiology in AHF and concludes that therapeutic options for CRS should not only target cardio-circulatory status of the patients, but they need to also have the ability of addressing the adverse homeostatic consequences of the associated decline in renal function. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) can be such an option for the chronic cases of CRS as it has been shown to provide efficient intracorporeal ultrafiltration and sodium extraction in volume overloaded patients while concurrently correcting the metabolic consequences of diminished renal function. Currently available trials on PD in heart failure have shown the safety and efficacy of this therapeutic modality for patients with chronic CRS and suggest that it could represent a pathophysiologically and conceptually relevant option in this setting. PMID:26225199

  10. Oxidative Stress: Dual Pathway Induction in Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Virzì, Grazia Maria; Clementi, Anna; de Cal, Massimo; Brocca, Alessandra; Day, Sonya; Pastori, Silvia; Bolin, Chiara; Vescovo, Giorgio; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1 (Type 1) is a specific condition which is characterized by a rapid worsening of cardiac function leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). Even though its pathophysiology is complex and not still completely understood, oxidative stress seems to play a pivotal role. In this study, we examined the putative role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of CRS Type 1. Twenty-three patients with acute heart failure (AHF) were included in the study. Subsequently, 11 patients who developed AKI due to AHF were classified as CRS Type 1. Quantitative determinations for IL-6, myeloperoxidase (MPO), nitric oxide (NO), copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD), and endogenous peroxidase activity (EPA) were performed. CRS Type 1 patients displayed significant augmentation in circulating ROS and RNS, as well as expression of IL-6. Quantitative analysis of all oxidative stress markers showed significantly lower oxidative stress levels in controls and AHF compared to CRS Type 1 patients (P < 0.05). This pilot study demonstrates the significantly heightened presence of dual oxidative stress pathway induction in CRS Type 1 compared to AHF patients. Our findings indicate that oxidative stress is a potential therapeutic target, as it promotes inflammation by ROS/RNS-linked pathogenesis. PMID:25821554

  11. The Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System in Obesity and Hypertension: Roles in the Cardiorenal Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cabandugama, Peminda K; Gardner, Michael J; Sowers, James R

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, more than 50 million people have blood pressure at or above 120/80 mm Hg. All components of cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS) are linked to metabolic abnormalities and obesity. A major driver for CRS is obesity. Current estimates show that many of those with hypertension and CRS show some degree of systemic and cardiovascular insulin resistance. Several pathophysiologic factors participate in the link between hypertension and CRS. This article updates recent literature with a focus on the function of insulin resistance, obesity, and renin angiotensin aldosterone system-mediated oxidative stress on endothelial dysfunction and the pathogenesis of hypertension.

  12. Cardiorenal metabolic syndrome in the African diaspora: rationale for including chronic kidney disease in the metabolic syndrome definition.

    PubMed

    Lea, Janice P; Greene, Eddie L; Nicholas, Susanne B; Agodoa, Lawrence; Norris, Keith C

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is more likely to progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in African Americans while the reasons for this are unclear. The metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for the development of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and has been recently linked to incident CKD. Historically, fewer African Americans meet criteria for the definition of metabolic syndrome, despite having higher rates of cardiovascular mortality than Caucasians. The presence of microalbuminuria portends increased cardiovascular risks and has been shown to cluster with the metabolic syndrome. We recently reported that proteinuria is a predictor of CKD progression in African American hypertensives with metabolic syndrome. In this review we explore the potential value of including CKD markers--microalbuminuria/proteinuria or low glomerular filtration rate (GFR)-in refining the cluster of factors defined as metabolic syndrome, ie, "cardiorenal metabolic syndrome."

  13. Kidney disease in heart failure: the importance of novel biomarkers for type 1 cardio-renal syndrome detection.

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; McCullough, Peter A; Ronco, Claudio; Nuti, Ranuccio

    2015-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in heart failure (HF) has been recognized as an independent risk factor for adverse outcome, although the most important clinical trials tend to exclude patients with moderate and severe renal insufficiency. Despite this common association, the precise pathophysiological connection and liaison between heart and kidney is partially understood. Moreover, is it not enough considering how much cardio-renal syndrome type 1 is attributable to previous CKD, and how much to new-onset acute kidney injury (AKI). Neither development of AKI, its progression and time nor duration is related to an adverse outcome. An AKI definition is not universally recognized, and many confounding terms have been used in literature: "worsening renal function", "renal impairment", "renal dysfunction", etc., are all names that contribute to misunderstanding, and do not facilitate an universal classification. Therefore, AKI development should be the consequence of the basal clinical characteristics of patients, different primitive kidney disease and hemodynamic status. AKI could also be the mirror of several underlying associated diseases poorly controlled. Finally, it is not clear which is the optimal laboratory tool for identifying patients with an increased risk of AKI. In the current report, we review the different kidney diseases' impact in HF, and we analyze the modalities for AKI recognition during HF focusing our attention about some new biomarkers with potential application in the current setting.

  14. Uric Acid – Key Ingredient in the Recipe for Cardiorenal Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Kunal; Malhotra, Kunal; Sowers, James; Aroor, Annayya

    2013-01-01

    Elevated serum uric acid levels are a frequent finding in persons with obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular and kidney disease as well as in those with the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS). The increased consumption of a fructose-rich Western diet has contributed to the increasing incidence of the CRS, obesity and diabetes especially in industrialized populations. There is also increasing evidence that supports a causal role of high dietary fructose driving elevations in uric acid in association with the CRS. Animal and epidemiological studies support the notion that elevated serum uric acid levels play an important role in promoting insulin resistance and hypertension and suggest potential pathophysiological mechanisms that contribute to the development of the CRS and associated cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. To this point, elevated serum levels of uric acid appear to contribute to impaired nitric oxide production/endothelial dysfunction, increased vascular stiffness, inappropriate activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, enhanced oxidative stress, and maladaptive immune and inflammatory responses. These abnormalities, in turn, promote vascular, cardiac and renal fibrosis as well as associated functional abnormalities. Small clinical trials have suggested that uric acid-lowering therapies may be beneficial in such patients; however, a consensus on the treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia is lacking. Larger randomized controlled trials need to be performed in order to critically evaluate the beneficial effect of lowering serum uric acid in patients with the CRS and those with diabetes and/or hypertension. PMID:24454316

  15. Pathogenesis and treatment of the cardiorenal syndrome: Implications of L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway impairment.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Niwanthi W; Nanayakkara, Shane; Kaye, David M

    2015-10-01

    A highly complex interplay exists between the heart and kidney in the setting of both normal and abnormal physiology. In the context of heart failure, a pathophysiological condition termed the cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) exists whereby dysfunction in the heart or kidney can accelerate pathology in the other organ. The mechanisms that underpin CRS are complex, and include neuro-hormonal activation, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. The endothelium plays a central role in the regulation of both cardiac and renal function, and as such impairments in endothelial function can lead to dysfunction of both these organs. In particular, reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) is a key pathophysiologic component of endothelial dysfunction. The synthesis of NO by the endothelium is critically dependent on the plasmalemmal transport of its substrate, L-arginine, via the cationic amino acid transporter-1 (CAT1). Impaired L-arginine-NO pathway activity has been demonstrated individually in heart and renal failure. Recent findings suggest abnormalities of the L-arginine-NO pathway also play a role in the pathogenesis of CRS and thus this pathway may represent a potential new target for the treatment of heart and renal failure.

  16. Prenatal Programming and Epigenetics in the Genesis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nistala, Ravi; Hayden, Melvin R; Demarco, Vincent G; Henriksen, Erik J; Lackland, Daniel T; Sowers, James R

    2011-01-01

    The presence of a group of interacting maladaptive factors, including hypertension, insulin resistance, metabolic dyslipidemia, obesity, and microalbuminuria and/or reduced renal function, collectively constitutes the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS). Nutritional and other environmental cues during fetal development can permanently affect the composition, homeostatic systems, and functions of multiple organs and systems; this process has been referred to as 'programming'. Since the original formulation of the notion that low birth weight is a proxy for 'prenatal programming' of adult hypertension and cardiovascular disease, evidence has also emerged for programming of kidney disease, insulin resistance, obesity, metabolic dyslipidemia, and other chronic diseases. The programming concept was initially predicated on the notion that in utero growth restriction due to famine was responsible for increased hypertension, and cardiovascular and renal diseases. On the other hand, we are now more commonly exposed to increasing rates of maternal obesity. The current review will discuss the overarching role of maternal overnutrition, as well as fetal undernutrition, in epigenetic programming in relation to the pathogenesis of the CRS in children and adults.

  17. Left Ventricular Mass and Intrarenal Arterial Stiffness as Early Diagnostic Markers in Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 5 due to Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gigante, Antonietta; Barilaro, Giuseppe; Barbano, Biagio; Romaniello, Antonella; Di Mario, Francesca; Quarta, Silvia; Gasperini, Maria Ludovica; Di Lazzaro Giraldi, Gianluca; Laviano, Alessandro; Amoroso, Antonio; Cianci, Rosario; Rosato, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiorenal syndrome type 5 (CRS-5) includes a group of conditions characterized by a simultaneous involvement of the heart and kidney in the course of a systemic disease. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is frequently involved in the etiology of acute and chronic CRS-5 among connective tissue diseases. In SSc patients, left ventricular mass (LVM) can be used as a marker of nutritional status and fibrosis, while altered intrarenal hemodynamic parameters are suggestive of early kidney involvement. Methods Forty-two consecutive patients with a diagnosis of SSc without cardiac and/or renal impairment were enrolled to assess whether cardiac muscle mass can be related to arterial stiffness. Thirty subjects matched for age and sex were also enrolled as healthy controls (HC). All patients performed echocardiography and renal ultrasound. Results Doppler indices of intrarenal stiffness and echocardiographic indices of LVM were significantly increased in SSc patients compared to HC. A positive correlation exists between LVM/body surface area and pulsatile index (p < 0.05, r = 0.36), resistive index (p < 0.05, r = 0.33) and systolic/diastolic ratio (p < 0.05, r = 0.38). Doppler indices of intrarenal stiffness and LVM indices were significantly higher in SSc patients with digital ulcers than in SSc patients without a digital ulcer history. Conclusions SSc is characterized by the presence of microvascular and multiorgan injury. An early cardiac and renal impairment is very common. LVM and intrarenal arterial stiffness can be considered as early markers of CRS onset. The clinical use of these markers permits a prompt identification of organ damage. An early diagnosis allows the appropriate setting of pharmacological management, by slowing disease progression. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:27022332

  18. Nonuremic Indication for Peritoneal Dialysis for Refractory Heart Failure in Cardiorenal Syndrome Type II: Review and Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) type II is a serious condition in which chronic cardiac abnormalities cause worsening kidney function, leading to permanent chronic kidney damage. Management of CRS type II coupled with diuretic-resistant congestive heart failure (CHF) has been an issue of dispute. However, since the early 1990s, reports indicating the clinical usefulness of peritoneal dialysis (PD) as maintenance therapy for intractable CHF in this population have been accumulating. The present manuscript reviews the mechanisms by which kidney dysfunction develops within CHF, and then examines recent experiences of PD as chronic supportive therapy for intractable CRS type II, reviews the contributing mechanisms, and discusses the rationale for using PD as a new therapeutic approach in the nonuremic setting of CHF. PMID:23349193

  19. Prevalence, Predictors, and Outcomes of Cardiorenal Syndrome in Children with Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Report from the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry

    PubMed Central

    Kaddourah, Ahmad; Goldstein, Stuart L; Lipshultz, Steven E; Wilkinson, James D; Sleeper, Lynn A; Lu, Minmin; Colan, Steven D; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Aydin, Scott I; Rossano, Joseph; Everitt, Melanie D; Gossett, Jeffrey G; Rusconi, Paolo; Kantor, Paul F; Singh, Rakesh K; Jefferies, John L

    2015-01-01

    Background The association of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) with mortality in children with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is unknown. Methods With a modified Schwartz formula, we estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) for children ≥1 year old with DCM enrolled in the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry at the time of DCM diagnosis and annually thereafter, and defined CRS as an eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2. Children with and without CRS were compared on survival and serum creatinine concentrations (SCr). The association between eGFR and echocardiographic measures was assessed with linear mixed-effects regression models. Results Of 285 eligible children with DCM diagnosed at ≥1 year of age, 93 were evaluable. CRS was identified in 57 (61.3%). Mean (SD) eGFR was 62.0 (22.6) mL/min/1.73 m2 for children with CRS and 108.0 (14.0) for those without (P<0.001); median SCr concentrations were 0.9 and 0.5 mg/dL, respectively (P<0.001). The mortality hazard ratio of children with CRS vs. no CRS was 2.4 (95% CI: 0.8-7.4). eGFR was positively correlated with measures of left ventricular function and negatively correlated with age. Conclusions CRS in children newly diagnosed with DCM may be associated with higher 5-year mortality. Children with DCM, especially those with impaired left ventricular function, should be monitored for renal disease. PMID:26210985

  20. Acute Coronary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... angina? This content was last reviewed July 2015. Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) ... Recovery FAQs • Heart Attack Tools & Resources • Support Network Heart Attack Tools & Resources What Is a Heart Attack? How ...

  1. Combined therapy with melatonin and exendin-4 effectively attenuated the deterioration of renal function in rat cardiorenal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Hung; Chen, Chih-Hung; Wallace, Christopher Glenn; Chen, Yen-Ta; Yang, Chih-Chao; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ling; Chua, Sarah; Yip, Hon-Kan; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey

    2017-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that combined therapy with melatonin (Mel) and exendin-4 (Ex4) would be superior to either therapy alone for preventing the deterioration of renal function in cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). Male adult Sprague Dawley rats (n = 48) were randomly and equally divided into sham-control (SC), chronic kidney disease (CKD; induced by 5/6 nephrectomy), CRS (CKD + dilated cardiomyopathy, DCM; induced by doxorubicin 7 mg/kg i.p. every 5 days, 4 doses), CRS-Mel (20 mg/kg/day), CRS-Ex4 (10 µg/kg/day) and CRS-Mel-Ex4. They were euthanized by day 60 after CRS induction. By day 60, plasma creatinine level, urine protein/creatinine ratio and kidney injury histopathology score were highest in CRS, lowest in SC, and progressively decreased from CKD, CRS-Mel, CRS-Ex4 to CRS-Mel-Ex4 (all P<0.0001). The kidney protein expressions of inflammation (TNF-α/NF-κB/MMP-9/iNOS/RANTES), oxidative stress (NOX-1/NOX-2/NOX-4/oxidized protein), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3/cleaved PARP/Bax), DNA-damaged marker (γ-H2AX) and fibrosis (p-mad3/TFG-β) showed identical patterns of creatinine level, whereas kidney protein expressions of GLP-1R showed a progressive increase from SC to CRS-Mel-Ex4 (all P<0.0001). Cellular expressions of inflammatory (CD14/CD68), DNA/kidney-damaged (γ-H2AX/KIM-1) and podocyte/renal tubule dysfunction signaling (β-catenin/Wnt1/Wnt4) biomarkers in kidney tissue exhibited an identical pattern of creatinine level (all P<0.0001). Podocyte components (podocin/dystroglycan/p-cadherin/synatopodin) were highest in SC, lowest in CRS, and significantly progressively increased from CKD to CRS-Mel-Ex4 (all P<0.0001). In conclusion, combined Mel-Ex4 therapy was superior to either one alone in preserving renal-function and kidney architectural integrity in the setting of CRS. PMID:28337255

  2. Decongestive treatment of acute decompensated heart failure: cardiorenal implications of ultrafiltration and diuretics.

    PubMed

    Freda, Benjamin J; Slawsky, Mara; Mallidi, Jaya; Braden, Gregory L

    2011-12-01

    In patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), treatment aimed at adequate decongestion of the volume overloaded state is essential. Despite diuretic therapy, many patients remain volume overloaded and symptomatic. In addition, adverse effects related to diuretic treatment are common, including worsening kidney function and electrolyte disturbances. The development of decreased kidney function during treatment affects the response to diuretic therapy and is associated with important clinical outcomes, including mortality. The occurrence of diuretic resistance and the morbidity and mortality associated with diuretic therapy has stimulated interest to develop effective and safe treatment strategies that maximize decongestion and minimize decreased kidney function. During the last few decades, extracorporeal ultrafiltration has been used to remove fluid from diuretic-refractory hypervolemic patients. Recent clinical studies using user-friendly machines have suggested that ultrafiltration may be highly effective for decongesting patients with ADHF. Many questions remain regarding the comparative impact of diuretics and ultrafiltration on important clinical outcomes and adverse effects, including decreased kidney function. This article serves as a summary of key clinical studies addressing these points. The overall goal is to assist practicing clinicians who are contemplating the use of ultrafiltration for a patient with ADHF.

  3. Evidence of Uncoupling between Renal Dysfunction and Injury in Cardiorenal Syndrome: Insights from the BIONICS Study

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, Matthieu; De Berardinis, Benedetta; Gaggin, Hanna K.; Magrini, Laura; Belcher, Arianna; Zancla, Benedetta; Femia, Alexandra; Simon, Mandy; Motiwala, Shweta; Sambhare, Rasika; Di Somma, Salvatore; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Vaidya, Vishal S.; Januzzi, James L.; (GREAT), from the Global Research on Acute Conditions Team

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study was to assess urinary biomarkers of renal injury for their individual or collective ability to predict Worsening renal function (WRF) in patients with acutely decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Methods In a prospective, blinded international study, 87 emergency department (ED) patients with ADHF were evaluated with biomarkers of cardiac stretch (B type natriuretic peptide [BNP] and its amino terminal equivalent [NT-proBNP], ST2), biomarkers of renal function (creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR]) and biomarkers of renal injury (plasma neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin [pNGAL], urine kidney injury molecule-1 [KIM-1], urine N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase [NAG], urine Cystatin C, urine fibrinogen). The primary endpoint was WRF. Results 26% developed WRF; baseline characteristics of subjects who developed WRF were generally comparable to those who did not. Biomarkers of renal function and urine biomarkers of renal injury were not correlated, while urine biomarkers of renal injury correlated between each other. Biomarker concentrations were similar between patients with and without WRF except for baseline BNP. Although plasma NGAL was associated with the combined endpoint, none of the biomarker showed predictive accuracy for WRF. Conclusions In ED patients with ADHF, urine biomarkers of renal injury did not predict WRF. Our data suggest that a weak association exists between renal dysfunction and renal injury in this setting (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT#0150153). PMID:25386851

  4. Allergic acute coronary syndrome (Kounis syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Lovely; Masrur, Shihab; Parker, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Anaphylaxis rarely manifests as a vasospastic acute coronary syndrome with or without the presence of underlying coronary artery disease. The variability in the underlying pathogenesis produces a wide clinical spectrum of this syndrome. We present three cases of anaphylactic acute coronary syndrome that display different clinical variants of this phenomenon. The main pathophysiological mechanism of the allergic anginal syndromes is the inflammatory mediators released during a hypersensitivity reaction triggered by food, insect bites, or drugs. It is important to appropriately recognize and treat Kounis syndrome in patients with exposure to a documented allergen. PMID:26130889

  5. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hecker, M; Weigand, M A; Mayer, K

    2012-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the clinical manifestation of an acute lung injury caused by a variety of direct and indirect injuries to the lung. The cardinal clinical feature of ARDS, refractory arterial hypoxemia, is the result of protein-rich alveolar edema with impaired surfactant function, due to vascular leakage and dysfunction with consequently impaired matching of ventilation to perfusion. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of ARDS has led to the development of novel therapies, pharmacological strategies, and advances in mechanical ventilation. However, protective ventilation is the only confirmed option in ARDS management improving survival, and few other therapies have translated into improved oxygenation or reduced ventilation time. The development of innovative therapy options, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, have the potential to further improve survival of this devastating disease.

  6. Acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening condition with multiple causes and a high mortality rate. Approximately 150,000 cases are reported in the United States annually, making ARDS a public health concern. Management of the condition is complex because of its severity, and medical imaging is essential for both the diagnosis and management of ARDS. This article introduces common signs, symptoms, risk factors, and causes of ARDS. Diagnostic criteria, histopathology, treatment strategies, and prognostic information also are discussed. The article explains the value of medical imaging studies of ARDS, especially radiography, computed tomography, and ultrasonography.

  7. [Acute coronary syndrome -- 2012].

    PubMed

    Becker, Dávid; Merkely, Béla

    2012-12-23

    The acute coronary syndrome is the most severe form of coronary artery disease. It is an immediate threat of life and the mortality rate can be high without proper therapy and patient management. Based on the first ECG, two different forms can be distinguished: acute coronary syndrome with and without ST elevation. Besides adequate medication, management of these patients is an essential part of treatment. In case of ST elevation, coronarography and percutaneous coronary intervention is needed in general, within 24 hours from the onset of symptoms. When ST elevation is not detected on the ECG, individual ischemic risk factors and predictable mortality of the patient may define the necessity and the date of the invasive examination. The Hungarian hemodynamic laboratory network covers almost the whole country and, therefore, practically each patient may receive a state-of-the-art therapy. Although indicators of cardiovascular diseases are still prominent, the mortality rate of myocardial Infarction is decreasing in Hungary due to the well-organized invasive care.

  8. Cardiorenal Involvement in Metabolic Syndrome Induced by Cola Drinking in Rats: Proinflammatory Cytokines and Impaired Antioxidative Protection

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Losada, Matilde; Gómez Llambí, Hernán; Ottaviano, Graciela; Cao, Gabriel; Müller, Angélica; Azzato, Francisco; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Milei, José

    2016-01-01

    We report experimental evidence confirming renal histopathology, proinflammatory mediators, and oxidative metabolism induced by cola drinking. Male Wistar rats drank ad libitum regular cola (C, n = 12) or tap water (W, n = 12). Measures. Body weight, nutritional data, plasma glucose, cholesterol fractions, TG, urea, creatinine, coenzyme Q10, SBP, and echocardiograms (0 mo and 6 mo). At 6 months euthanasia was performed. Kidneys were processed for histopathology and immunohistochemistry (semiquantitative). Compared with W, C rats showed (I) overweight (+8%, p < 0.05), hyperglycemia (+11%, p < 0.05), hypertriglyceridemia (2-fold, p < 0.001), higher AIP (2-fold, p < 0.01), and lower Q10 level (−55%, p < 0.05); (II) increased LV diastolic diameter (+9%, p < 0.05) and volume (systolic +24%, p < 0.05), posterior wall thinning (−8%, p < 0.05), and larger cardiac output (+24%, p < 0.05); (III) glomerulosclerosis (+21%, p < 0.05), histopathology (+13%, p < 0.05), higher tubular expression of IL-6 (7-fold, p < 0.001), and TNFα (4-fold, p < 0.001). (IV) Correlations were found for LV dimensions with IL-6 (74%, p < 0.001) and TNFα (52%, p < 0.001) and fully abolished after TG and Q10 control. Chronic cola drinking induced cardiac remodeling associated with increase in proinflammatory cytokines and renal damage. Hypertriglyceridemia and oxidative stress were key factors. Hypertriglyceridemic lipotoxicity in the context of defective antioxidant/anti-inflammatory protection due to low Q10 level might play a key role in cardiorenal disorder induced by chronic cola drinking in rats. PMID:27340342

  9. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Matĕjovic, M; Novák, I; Srámek, V; Rokyta, R; Hora, P; Nalos, M

    1999-04-26

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the general term used for severe acute respiratory failure of diverse aetiology. It is associated with a high morbidity, mortality (50-70%), and financial costs. Regardless of aetiology, the basic pathogenesis of ARDS is a systemic inflammatory response leading to a diffuse inflammatory process that involves both lungs, thus causing diffuse alveolar and endothelial damage with increased pulmonary capillary permeability and excessive extravascular lung water accumulation. ARDS is commonly associated with sepsis and multiple organ failure. The clinical picture involves progressive hypoxaemia, radiographic evidence of pulmonary oedema, decreased lung compliance and pulmonary hypertension. Despite the scientific and technological progress in critical care medicine, there is no specific ARDS therapy available at the moment and its management remains supportive. Therapeutic goals include resolution of underlying conditions, maintenance of acceptable gas exchange and tissue oxygenation and prevention of iatrogenic lung injury. Many new specific therapeutic strategies have been developed, however, most of them require further scientific evaluation. The paper reviews definition, basic pathogenesis and pathophysiology of ARDS and discusses current concepts of therapeutic possibilities of ARDS.

  10. Acute Diarrheal Syndromic Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Kam, H.J.; Choi, S.; Cho, J.P.; Min, Y.G.; Park, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective In an effort to identify and characterize the environmental factors that affect the number of patients with acute diarrheal (AD) syndrome, we developed and tested two regional surveillance models including holiday and weather information in addition to visitor records, at emergency medical facilities in the Seoul metropolitan area of Korea. Methods With 1,328,686 emergency department visitor records from the National Emergency Department Information system (NEDIS) and the holiday and weather information, two seasonal ARIMA models were constructed: (1) The simple model (only with total patient number), (2) the environmental factor-added model. The stationary R-squared was utilized as an in-sample model goodness-of-fit statistic for the constructed models, and the cumulative mean of the Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE) was used to measure post-sample forecast accuracy over the next 1 month. Results The (1,0,1)(0,1,1)7 ARIMA model resulted in an adequate model fit for the daily number of AD patient visits over 12 months for both cases. Among various features, the total number of patient visits was selected as a commonly influential independent variable. Additionally, for the environmental factor-added model, holidays and daily precipitation were selected as features that statistically significantly affected model fitting. Stationary R-squared values were changed in a range of 0.651-0.828 (simple), and 0.805-0.844 (environmental factor-added) with p<0.05. In terms of prediction, the MAPE values changed within 0.090-0.120 and 0.089-0.114, respectively. Conclusion The environmental factor-added model yielded better MAPE values. Holiday and weather information appear to be crucial for the construction of an accurate syndromic surveillance model for AD, in addition to the visitor and assessment records. PMID:23616829

  11. Acute cardiac tamponade: an unusual cause of acute renal failure in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Nampoory, Naryanan; Gheith, Osama; Al-Otaibi, Torki; Halim, Medhat; Nair, Prasad; Said, Tarek; Mosaad, Ahmed; Al-Sayed, Zakareya; Alsayed, Ayman; Yagan, Jude

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of slow graft function in a renal transplant recipient caused by uremic acute pericardial effusion with tamponade. Urgent pericardiocentesis was done with an improvement in blood pressure, immediate diuresis, and quick recovery of renal function back to baseline. Pericardial tamponade should be included in consideration of causes of type 1 cardiorenal syndrome in renal transplant recipients.

  12. Acute coronary syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndromes: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. ... risk: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. ...

  13. Acute radiation syndrome and chronic radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grammaticos, Philip; Giannoula, Evanthia; Fountos, George P

    2013-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) or sickness or poisoning or toxicity is induced after a whole body exposure of men to high doses of radiation between 1-12Gy. First symptoms are from the gastrointestinal system, which together with bone marrow are the most sensitive parts of our body. Chronic radiation syndrome (CRS) may be induced by smaller than 1Gy radiation doses or after a mild form of ARS. Prophylaxis and treatment suggestions are described. In cases of ARS, a large part of the exposed population after proper medical care may survive, while without medical care this part of the population will be lost. Prophylaxis may also save another part of the population.

  14. Uric acid: A Danger Signal from the RNA World that may have a role in the Epidemic of Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome and CardioRenal Disease: Evolutionary Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard J; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Gaucher, Eric A

    2011-01-01

    All humans are uricase knockouts; we lost the uricase gene due to a mutation that occurred in the mid Miocene approximately 15 million years ago. The consequence of being a uricase knockout is that we have higher serum uric acid levels that are less regulatable and can be readily influenced by diet. This increases our risk for gout and kidney stones, but there is also increasing evidence that uric acid increases our risk for hypertension, kidney disease, obesity and diabetes. This raises the question of why this mutation occurred. In this paper we review current hypotheses. We suggest that uric acid is a danger and survival signal carried over from the RNA world. The mutation of uricase that occurred during the food shortage and global cooling that occurred in the Miocene resulted in a survival advantage for early primates, particularly in Europe. Today, the loss of uricase functions as a thrifty gene, increasing our risk for obesity and cardiorenal disease. PMID:22000645

  15. Cardio-renal protection with empagliflozin

    PubMed Central

    Jerums, George; Ekinci, Elif I.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) and kidney disease are common and significant complications in people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). CV disease is the leading cause of death, morbidly and hospitalisations for people with T2DM. Furthermore, diabetic kidney disease is a major risk factor for CV disease and is the main reason why patients need renal replacement therapy. In this perspective, we highlight the results of the recent landmark EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial which has shown that empagliflozin, a member of the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor class of glucose lowering medications, reduces death from CV causes, hospitalisation for heart failure and progression to end stage kidney disease in patients with T2DM and established CV disease. The SGLT2 receptor mediates high-capacity glucose uptake in the early proximal tubule, and SGLT2 inhibitors, via their ability to promote glycosuria, have been developed as glucose lowering medications. As well as having a glucose lowering effect, SGLT-2 inhibitors also reduce blood pressure, promote weight loss and reduce uric acid levels. Potential side-effects or concerns related to the use of SGLT-2 inhibitors include increased rates of urinary tract infections, genital tract infections, postural hypotension, diabetic ketoacidosis, acute kidney injury and possible increased rates of fractures. The exact mechanisms that result in empagliflozin’s dramatic CV and renal protective effects, with a very favourable safety/tolerability profile, in the EMPA-REG study remain to be fully defined. However, they are most likely distinct from the glucose lowering effects of empagliflozin. CV safety trials involving dapagliflozin and canagliflozin, members of the SGLT-2 class, are under way and the results from these studies will help to answer the question as to whether the cardio-renal benefits of empagliflozin are a class-effect or not. Without doubt, trials to investigate whether SGLT-2 inhibitors have cardio-renal protective effects in

  16. Towards Prevention of Acute Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A.; Thongprayoon, C.; Pickering, B.W.; Akhoundi, A.; Wilson, G.; Pieczkiewicz, D.; Herasevich, V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Identifying patients at risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) before their admission to intensive care is crucial to prevention and treatment. The objective of this study is to determine the performance of an automated algorithm for identifying selected ARDS predisposing conditions at the time of hospital admission. Methods This secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study included 3,005 patients admitted to hospital between January 1 and December 31, 2010. The automated algorithm for five ARDS predisposing conditions (sepsis, pneumonia, aspiration, acute pancreatitis, and shock) was developed through a series of queries applied to institutional electronic medical record databases. The automated algorithm was derived and refined in a derivation cohort of 1,562 patients and subsequently validated in an independent cohort of 1,443 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of an automated algorithm to identify ARDS risk factors were compared with another two independent data extraction strategies, including manual data extraction and ICD-9 code search. The reference standard was defined as the agreement between the ICD-9 code, automated and manual data extraction. Results Compared to the reference standard, the automated algorithm had higher sensitivity than manual data extraction for identifying a case of sepsis (95% vs. 56%), aspiration (63% vs. 42%), acute pancreatitis (100% vs. 70%), pneumonia (93% vs. 62%) and shock (77% vs. 41%) with similar specificity except for sepsis and pneumonia (90% vs. 98% for sepsis and 95% vs. 99% for pneumonia). The PPV for identifying these five acute conditions using the automated algorithm ranged from 65% for pneumonia to 91 % for acute pancreatitis, whereas the NPV for the automated algorithm ranged from 99% to 100%. Conclusion A rule-based electronic data extraction can reliably and accurately identify patients at risk of ARDS at the time of hospital

  17. Acute cerebellar ataxia, acute cerebellitis, and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jay; Mitchell, Wendy G

    2012-11-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia and acute cerebellitis represent a process characterized by parainfectious, postinfectious, or postvaccination cerebellar inflammation. There is considerable overlap between these entities. The mildest cases of acute cerebellar ataxia represent a benign condition that is characterized by acute truncal and gait ataxia, variably with appendicular ataxia, nystagmus, dysarthria, and hypotonia. It occurs mostly in young children, presents abruptly, and recovers over weeks. Neuroimaging is normal. Severe cases of cerebellitis represent the other end of the spectrum, presenting with acute cerebellar signs often overshadowed by alteration of consciousness, focal neurological deficits, raised intracranial pressure, hydrocephalus, and even herniation. Neuroimaging is abnormal and the prognosis is less favorable than in acute cerebellar ataxia. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis may be confused with acute cerebellitis when the clinical findings are predominantly cerebellar, but lesions on neuroimaging are usually widespread. Paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is often initially misdiagnosed as acute cerebellar ataxia, but has very specific features, course, and etiopathogensis.

  18. A rare cause of acute coronary syndrome: Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Almeida, João; Ferreira, Sara; Malheiro, Joana; Fonseca, Paulo; Caeiro, Daniel; Dias, Adelaide; Ribeiro, José; Gama, Vasco

    2016-12-01

    Kounis syndrome is an acute coronary syndrome in the context of a hypersensitivity reaction. The main pathophysiological mechanism appears to be coronary vasospasm. We report the case of a patient with a history of allergy to quinolones, who was given ciprofloxacin before an elective surgical procedure and during drug administration developed symptoms and electrocardiographic changes suggestive of ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. The drug was suspended and coronary angiography excluded epicardial coronary disease. Two hours after withdrawal of the drug the symptoms and ST elevation had resolved completely.

  19. Pathobiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sapru, Anil; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael W; Dahmer, Mary K

    2015-06-01

    The unique characteristics of pulmonary circulation and alveolar-epithelial capillary-endothelial barrier allow for maintenance of the air-filled, fluid-free status of the alveoli essential for facilitating gas exchange, maintaining alveolar stability, and defending the lung against inhaled pathogens. The hallmark of pathophysiology in acute respiratory distress syndrome is the loss of the alveolar capillary permeability barrier and the presence of protein-rich edema fluid in the alveoli. This alteration in permeability and accumulation of fluid in the alveoli accompanies damage to the lung epithelium and vascular endothelium along with dysregulated inflammation and inappropriate activity of leukocytes and platelets. In addition, there is uncontrolled activation of coagulation along with suppression of fibrinolysis and loss of surfactant. These pathophysiological changes result in the clinical manifestations of acute respiratory distress syndrome, which include hypoxemia, radiographic opacities, decreased functional residual capacity, increased physiologic deadspace, and decreased lung compliance. Resolution of acute respiratory distress syndrome involves the migration of cells to the site of injury and re-establishment of the epithelium and endothelium with or without the development of fibrosis. Most of the data related to acute respiratory distress syndrome, however, originate from studies in adults or in mature animals with very few studies performed in children or juvenile animals. The lack of studies in children is particularly problematic because the lungs and immune system are still developing during childhood and consequently the pathophysiology of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome may differ in significant ways from that seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. This article describes what is known of the pathophysiologic processes of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as we know it today while also presenting the much

  20. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  1. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated with Tumor Lysis Syndrome in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D’Angelo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  2. Hyponatremia and hypoglycemia in acute Sheehan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bunch, T J; Dunn, W F; Basu, A; Gosman, R I

    2002-10-01

    We report the case of a 23-year-old Saudi Arabian woman who presented to the medical intensive care unit with severe hyponatremia and hypoglycemia following a Cesarean section delivery complicated by hemorrhage due to disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. She was treated successfully for adrenal insufficiency acutely, and was later discharged on hormone replacement therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of acute Sheehan's syndrome presenting with both hyponatremia and suggestive hypoglycemia. Pituitary necrosis is an uncommon complication of peripartum hemorrhagic shock. Since the initial description by Sheehan in 1937, the incidence of the syndrome has gradually declined through improved management of hemodynamic complications leading to the infarction of the gland. There are many studies describing complications of late Sheehan's syndrome; however, relatively few contain descriptions of the acute phase. In addition, the diagnosis of this syndrome is often determined after resolution of the acute process with resultant lack of data regarding immediate endocrine and imaging abnormalities. In this report, we describe the complete endocrine and imaging assessment of a patient presenting in critical condition due to necrosis of the pituitary gland in the immediate postpartum period.

  3. Acute radiation syndrome after endovascular AAA repair.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Saum A; Coyle, Brian W; Vogel, Todd R; Haser, Paul B; Graham, Alan M

    2011-02-01

    Acute radiation syndrome or radiation sickness is a serious illness that occurs after the body receives a high dose of radiation, typically over a short period of time. This condition may be underrecognized by interventionalists and must be considered whenever performing complex endovascular procedures.

  4. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Epidemic in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Guiyun

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed the dynamics of cumulative severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) cases in Singapore, Hong Kong, and Beijing using the Richards model. The predicted total SARS incidence was close to the actual number of cases; the predicted cessation date was close to the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval. PMID:14720403

  5. [Triggering of acute coronary syndromes. Pathophysiologic relationships].

    PubMed

    González Pliego, José Angel

    2006-01-01

    In this review, the relationship of external triggers with the development of acute coronary syndromes is described. Based on current evidence, the pathophysiological mechanisms that probably result in the rupture of vulnerable coronary plaques are revised and preventive measures to stop the functional and lethal consequences of its occurrence are proposed.

  6. 5-Fluoro-2'-Deoxycytidine and Tetrahydrouridine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. The influence of selective vitamin D receptor activator paricalcitol on cardiovascular system and cardiorenal protection.

    PubMed

    Duplancic, Darko; Cesarik, Marijan; Poljak, Nikola Kolja; Radman, Maja; Kovacic, Vedran; Radic, Josipa; Rogosic, Veljko

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitous distribution of vitamin D receptors in the human body is responsible for the pleiotropic effects of vitamin D-receptor activation. We discuss the possible beneficial effects of a selective activator of vitamin D receptor, paricalcitol, on the cardiovascular system in chronic heart failure patients and chronic kidney patients, in light of new trials. Paricalcitol should provide additional clinical benefits over the standard treatment for chronic kidney and heart failure, especially in cases of cardiorenal syndrome.

  8. Sheehan syndrome: acute presentation with severe headache.

    PubMed

    Hale, B; Habib, A S

    2014-11-01

    Postpartum headache is a common occurrence with a broad differential diagnosis. Sheehan syndrome, or postpartum pituitary necrosis, is not typically recognized as a cause of postpartum headache. We present a case of Sheehan syndrome that initially presented as severe headache after vaginal delivery complicated by retained placenta and postpartum hemorrhage. The patient was discharged home on postpartum day three but continued to have headaches and returned to hospital on postpartum day six with severe headache, failure to lactate, edema, dizziness, fatigue, nausea and vomiting. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed pituitary infarction consistent with Sheehan syndrome. We discuss the differential diagnosis for postpartum headache, the pathophysiological features of Sheehan syndrome and headache as an atypical acute presentation.

  9. Acute exertional anterior compartment syndrome in an adolescent female.

    PubMed

    Fehlandt, A; Micheli, L

    1995-01-01

    Acute compartment syndromes usually occur as a complication of major trauma. While the chronic exertional anterior tibial compartment syndrome is well described in the sports medicine literature, reports of acute tibial compartment syndromes due to physical exertion, or repetitive microtrauma, are rare. The case of an adolescent female who developed an acute anterior compartment syndrome from running in a soccer game is described in this report. Failure to recognize the onset of an acute exertional compartment syndrome may lead to treatment delay and serious complications. Whereas the chronic exertional anterior compartment syndrome is characterized by pain that diminishes with the cessation of exercise, the onset of the acute exertional anterior compartment syndrome is heralded by pain that continues, or increases, after exercise has stopped. Compartment pressure measurement confirms the clinical diagnosis and helps guide treatment. True compartment syndromes require urgent fasciotomy.

  10. Radiobiology of the acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macià I Garau, Miquel; Lucas Calduch, Anna; López, Enric Casanovas

    2011-07-06

    ACUTE RADIATION SYNDROME OR ACUTE RADIATION SICKNESS IS CLASSICALLY SUBDIVIDED INTO THREE SUBSYNDROMES: the hematopoietic, gastrointestinal and neurovascular syndrome but many other tissues can be damaged. The time course and severity of clinical signs and symptoms are a function of the overall body volume irradiated, the inhomogeneity of dose exposure, the particle type, the absorbed dose and the dose rate. Classical pathophysiology explain the failure of each of these organs and the timing of appearance of their signs and symptoms due to radiation-induced cytocidal effects of a great number of parenchymal cells of hierarchically organized tissues. Contemporaneously, many other radiation-induced effects has been described and all of them may lead to tissue injury with their corresponding signs and symptoms that can be expressed after short or long period of time. Radiation-induced multi-organ involvement is thought to be due to radiation-induced systemic inflammatory response mediated by released pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  11. Radiobiology of the acute radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Macià i Garau, Miquel; Lucas Calduch, Anna; López, Enric Casanovas

    2011-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome or acute radiation sickness is classically subdivided into three subsyndromes: the hematopoietic, gastrointestinal and neurovascular syndrome but many other tissues can be damaged. The time course and severity of clinical signs and symptoms are a function of the overall body volume irradiated, the inhomogeneity of dose exposure, the particle type, the absorbed dose and the dose rate. Classical pathophysiology explain the failure of each of these organs and the timing of appearance of their signs and symptoms due to radiation-induced cytocidal effects of a great number of parenchymal cells of hierarchically organized tissues. Contemporaneously, many other radiation-induced effects has been described and all of them may lead to tissue injury with their corresponding signs and symptoms that can be expressed after short or long period of time. Radiation-induced multi-organ involvement is thought to be due to radiation-induced systemic inflammatory response mediated by released pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:24376969

  12. Pharmacotherapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shafeeq, Hira; Lat, Ishaq

    2012-10-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represent a continuum of a clinical syndrome of respiratory failure due to refractory hypoxia. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is differentiated from ALI by a greater degree of hypoxemia and is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The mortality for ARDS ranges from 22-41%, with survivors usually requiring long-term rehabilitation to regain normal physiologic function. Numerous pharmacologic therapies have been studied for prevention and treatment of ARDS; however, studies demonstrating clear clinical benefit for ARDS-related mortality and morbidity are limited. In this focused review, controversial pharmacologic therapies that have demonstrated, at minimum, a modest clinical benefit are discussed. Three pharmacologic treatment strategies are reviewed in detail: corticosteroids, fluid management, and neuromuscular blocking agents. Use of corticosteroids to attenuate inflammation remains controversial. Available evidence does not support early administration of corticosteroids. Additionally, administration after 14 days of disease onset is strongly discouraged. A liberal fluid strategy during the early phase of comorbid septic shock, balanced with a conservative fluid strategy in patients with ALI or ARDS during the postresuscitation phase, is the optimum approach for fluid management. Available evidence supports an early, short course of continuous-infusion cisatracurium in patients presenting with severe ARDS. Evidence of safe and effective pharmacologic therapies for ARDS is limited, and clinicians must be knowledgeable about the areas of controversies to determine application to patient care.

  13. Hydropneumopericardium Presenting as an Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vidi, Venkatesan; Singh, Premranjan P.; Alhumaid, Alia C.; Lee, Richard S.; Kinnunen, Paula M.

    2009-01-01

    Hydropneumopericardium is a very rare complication of long-standing paraesophageal hernia, occurring as a result of rupture of the intrathoracic gastric volvulus into the pericardium. A chronic paraesophageal hernia that is complicated by gastric volvulus can develop into such surgical emergencies as acute gastric obstruction, strangulation, perforation, and rupture into adjacent structures. Subsequent hydropneumopericardium constitutes an acute emergency that requires immediate surgical treatment and pericardial drainage. Herein, we discuss what we believe to be the 1st reported case of hydropneumopericardium that presented as an acute coronary syndrome in a patient who had a chronic paraesophageal hernia (as a result of rupture of the gastric volvulus into the pericardium). The 80-year-old patient did not survive the condition. PMID:19568401

  14. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-06

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-1; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-2; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Prone positioning in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Kristy; Dufault, Marlene; Bergeron, Kathy

    2015-08-12

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a condition with a high morbidity and mortality rate, and treatment is often long and costly. Prone positioning is a rarely used intervention for patients with this syndrome, although research suggests it may be effective. A literature search was undertaken to examine the effects of prone positioning on oxygenation, morbidity and mortality in patients with ARDS. It revealed that prone positioning, when used with low tidal volume ventilation over an extended period, may reduce mortality rates in selected patients with severe ARDS. The selection of patients with severe ARDS for prone positioning should be done on a case-by-case basis to maximise benefits and minimise complications. Further research is required on the use of prone positioning in patients with severe ARDS to support or disclaim the therapy's use in practice, and to compare confounding variables such as ideal prone duration and mechanical versus manual pronation.

  16. Genetics of the acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute coronary artery syndrome in the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries, and its epidemiological burden is also constantly increasing worldwide, including Asia. Due to social and economic consequences, a number of experimental and epidemiological studies have analyzed its etiology so far, in order to develop effective preventive and treatment measures. Thanks to these studies, it is now clear that coronary artery disease (CAD) is a complex multifactorial disorder, resulting from close interaction between acquired and inherited risk factors. In particular, considerable advances were made in the last decade about our understanding of the genetic causes of CAD, mainly propelled by the progresses in whole genome scanning and the development of genome wide association studies. This narrative review is hence dedicated to explore the role of genetic factors in the risk of developing acute CAD. PMID:27294088

  17. Acute radiation syndrome: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Elizabeth H; Nemhauser, Jeffrey B; Smith, James M; Kazzi, Ziad N; Farfán, Eduardo B; Chang, Arthur S; Naeem, Syed F

    2010-06-01

    Primary care physicians may be unprepared to diagnose and treat rare, yet potentially fatal, illnesses such as acute radiation syndrome (ARS). ARS, also known as radiation sickness, is caused by exposure to a high dose of penetrating, ionizing radiation over a short period of time. The time to onset of ARS is dependent on the dose received, but even at the lowest doses capable of causing illness, this will occur within a matter of hours to days. This article describes the clinical manifestations of ARS, provides guidelines for assessing its severity, and makes recommendations for managing ARS victims.

  18. Emerging Therapies for Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Scott M.; Wilensky, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    In the majority of cases acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are caused by activation and aggregation of platelets and subsequent thrombus formation leading to a decrease in coronary artery blood flow. Recent focus on the treatment of ACS has centered on reducing the response of platelets to vascular injury as well as inhibiting fibrin deposition. Novel therapies include more effective P2Y12 receptor blockers thereby reducing inter-individual variability, targeting the platelet thrombin receptor (protease activated receptor 1) as well as directly inhibiting factor Xa or thrombin activity. In this review we discuss the clinical data evaluating the effectiveness of these various new ACS treatment options. PMID:22028691

  19. Middle East respiratory syndrome and severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Rahul; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-02-01

    The recent emergence of the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV, a close relative of the Severe Acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV, both of which caused a lethal respiratory infection in humans, reinforces the need for further understanding of coronavirus pathogenesis and the host immune response. These viruses have evolved diverse strategies to evade and block host immune responses, facilitating infection and transmission. Pathogenesis following infection with these viruses is characterized by a marked delay in the induction of Type I interferon (IFN I) and, subsequently, by a poor adaptive immune response. Therapies that expedite IFN I induction as well as interventions that antagonize immunoevasive virus proteins are thus promising candidates for immune modulation.

  20. Stiff Person Syndrome Masquerading as Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish; Soe, Myat Han; Singh, Jagdeep; Newsome, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Stiff person syndrome (SPS) is a rare neuroimmunological disorder characterized by severe progressive muscle stiffness in axial and lower extremity musculature with superimposed painful muscle spasms. Although chest pain is a common reason for SPS patients presenting to the emergency room, this disorder is overlooked and not part of the differential diagnosis of chest pain. Herein, we report on a middle age male presenting with classic symptoms of SPS; however, due to the rarity of this disease, he was initially thought to have acute coronary syndrome. Clinicians should consider the diagnosis of SPS in patients with fluctuating muscle spasms in the torso and/or extremities in the setting of repeated hospitalizations without subsequent symptom relief.

  1. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Acute buried bumper syndrome: an endoscopic peg tube salvage approach.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ganesh; Suvarna, Deepak; Pai, Cannanore Ganesh

    2010-05-01

    Acute buried bumper syndrome is an uncommon complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement. If not recognized and treated appropriately, it can lead to serious complications including death. We report a case of an acute buried bumper syndrome, successfully managed with PEG tube repositioning through the original tract, without the need of replacement.

  3. Takotsubo syndrome after mitral valve replacement for acute endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Gariboldi, Vlad; Jop, Bertrand; Grisoli, Dominique; Jaussaud, Nicolas; Kerbaul, François; Collart, Frédéric

    2011-03-01

    Takotsubo syndrome is characterized by transient and acute left ventricular dysfunction and apical ballooning, with electrocardiographic abnormalities, but without coronary disease. We report a case of Takotsubo syndrome occurring after emergent mitral valve replacement for acute infective endocarditis. The patient is a 66-year-old woman who regained complete recovery of left ventricular function.

  4. [Clinico-diagnostic evaluation of acute delirious syndromes in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Panteleeva, G P

    1989-01-01

    Psychopathologic and nosologic issues of acute paranoid and Kandinsky-Clerambault syndromes are discussed on the background of clinical studies of 225 schizophrenic patients with these syndromes being initial manifestations. The data on the syndromes typology, clinical value and prognosis of acute delirious disorders are presented. These are shown to be not confined to progredient schizophrenia, including its paranoid form. Rather, they can manifest a course of the disease unspecific for schizophrenia, the so-called schizophrenic reactions and phasic states thus reflecting the course of latent schizophrenia. A differentiated approach to clinical and psychopathological analysis of acute delirious syndromes in schizophrenia is essential for adequate choice of medicosocial measures and epidemiologic investigations.

  5. Acute renal failure: A rare presentation of Sheehan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Manzoor A; Laway, Bashir A; Allaqaband, Faheem A; Kotwal, Suman K; Wani, Imtiyaz A; Banday, Khursheed A

    2012-03-01

    Sheehan's syndrome occurs as a result of ischemic pituitary necrosis secondary to severe postpartum bleeding. It is one of the most common causes of hypopituitarism, characterized by variable clinical presentation. Acute kidney injury occurs rarely in Sheehan's syndrome and most of the cases have been found to be precipitated by rhabdomyolysis. We here present a case of Sheehan's syndrome with acute kidney injury where theprecipitating cause was chronic hypocortisolemia. We believe this is the first reported case of Sheehan's syndrome in which acute kidney injury was precipitated by adrenal insufficiency.

  6. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    López, Mario; Martín, Margarita

    2011-07-13

    The acute radiation syndrome (ARS) occurs after whole-body or significant partial-body irradiation (typically at a dose of >1 Gy). ARS can involve the hematopoietic, cutaneous, gastrointestinal and the neurovascular organ systems either individually or in combination. There is a correlation between the severity of clinical signs and symptoms of ARS and radiation dose. Radiation induced multi-organ failure (MOF) describes the progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems over time. Radiation combined injury (RCI) is defined as radiation injury combined with blunt or penetrating trauma, burns, blast, or infection. The classic syndromes are: hematopoietic (doses >2-3 Gy), gastrointestinal (doses 5-12 Gy) and cerebrovascular syndrome (doses 10-20 Gy). There is no possibility to survive after doses >10-12 Gy. The Phases of ARS are-prodromal: 0-2 days from exposure, latent: 2-20 days, and manifest illness: 21-60 days from exposure. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a dose of 5 μg/kg body weight per day subcutaneously has been recommended as treatment of neutropenia, and antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents for prevention or treatment of infections. If taken within the first hours of contamination, stable iodine in the form of nonradioactive potassium iodide (KI) saturates iodine binding sites within the thyroid and inhibits incorporation of radioiodines into the gland. Finally, if severe aplasia persists under cytokines for more than 14 days, the possibility of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation should be evaluated. This review will focus on the clinical aspects of the ARS, using the European triage system (METREPOL) to evaluate the severity of radiation injury, and scoring groups of patients for the general and specific management of the syndrome.

  7. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    López, Mario; Martín, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome (ARS) occurs after whole-body or significant partial-body irradiation (typically at a dose of >1 Gy). ARS can involve the hematopoietic, cutaneous, gastrointestinal and the neurovascular organ systems either individually or in combination. There is a correlation between the severity of clinical signs and symptoms of ARS and radiation dose. Radiation induced multi-organ failure (MOF) describes the progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems over time. Radiation combined injury (RCI) is defined as radiation injury combined with blunt or penetrating trauma, burns, blast, or infection. The classic syndromes are: hematopoietic (doses >2–3 Gy), gastrointestinal (doses 5–12 Gy) and cerebrovascular syndrome (doses 10–20 Gy). There is no possibility to survive after doses >10–12 Gy. The Phases of ARS are—prodromal: 0–2 days from exposure, latent: 2–20 days, and manifest illness: 21–60 days from exposure. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a dose of 5 μg/kg body weight per day subcutaneously has been recommended as treatment of neutropenia, and antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents for prevention or treatment of infections. If taken within the first hours of contamination, stable iodine in the form of nonradioactive potassium iodide (KI) saturates iodine binding sites within the thyroid and inhibits incorporation of radioiodines into the gland. Finally, if severe aplasia persists under cytokines for more than 14 days, the possibility of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation should be evaluated. This review will focus on the clinical aspects of the ARS, using the European triage system (METREPOL) to evaluate the severity of radiation injury, and scoring groups of patients for the general and specific management of the syndrome. PMID:24376971

  8. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  9. Progress and perspectives in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rotta, Alexandre Tellechea; Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Andreolio, Cinara; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of acute onset characterized by hypoxemia and infiltrates on chest radiographs that affects both adults and children of all ages. It is an important cause of respiratory failure in pediatric intensive care units and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, until recently, the definitions and diagnostic criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome have focused on the adult population. In this article, we review the evolution of the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome over nearly five decades, with a special focus on the new pediatric definition. We also discuss recommendations for the implementation of mechanical ventilation strategies in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and the use of adjuvant therapies.

  10. Novel oral anticoagulants in acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costopoulos, Charis; Niespialowska-Steuden, Maria; Kukreja, Neville; Gorog, Diana A

    2013-09-10

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with a prevalence that has now reached pandemic levels as a consequence of the rapid modernization of the developing world. Its presentation as an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a frequent reason for hospital admission and of profound implications for personal, societal and global health. Despite improvements in the management of ACS with anti-platelet and anticoagulant therapy and revascularization techniques, many patients continue to suffer recurrent ischemic events. The need to reduce future cardiovascular events has led to the development of novel therapies to prevent coronary thrombosis, targeting thrombin-mediated pathways. These include direct Xa inhibitors (apixaban, rivaroxaban and darexaban), direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran) and PAR 1 antagonists (vorapaxar and atopaxar). This article critically reviews the comparative mechanisms of action, the risks and benefits, together with the clinical evidence base for the use of these novel oral agents in the management of ACS patients.

  11. Acute coronary syndromes in patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Seecheran, Valmiki K.; Giddings, Stanley L.

    2017-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) has considerably increased the life expectancy of patients infected with HIV. Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of mortality in patients infected with HIV. This is primarily attributed to their increased survival, HAART-induced metabolic derangements, and to HIV itself. The pathophysiology of atherosclerosis in HIV is both multifactorial and complex – involving direct endothelial injury and dysfunction, hypercoagulability, and a significant contribution from traditional cardiac risk factors. The advent of HAART has since heralded a remarkable improvement in outcomes, but at the expense of other unforeseen issues. It is thus of paramount importance to swiftly recognize and manage acute coronary syndromes in HIV-infected patients to attenuate adverse complications, which should translate into improved clinical outcomes. PMID:27845996

  12. [Acute aortic syndromes and sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Baguet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disease, often present in "cardiovascular or metabolic patients". OSA favours the occurrence of arterial lesions, all the more if severe. There is a strong relationship between OSA and acute aortic syndromes (AAS). This relationship is in part explained by aortic dilatation linked to OSA. The presence of repeated episodes of sudden variation of transmural pressure applied on aortic wall seems to play a major role in this dilatation. All OSA patients should have a search of aortic dilatation by ultrasound (at a thoracic and abdominal level). Also, screening of OSA should be systematically performed in patients with aortic disease. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure in apneic patients with AAS has not been studied.

  13. Acute respiratory distress syndrome after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Lisa Q.; Di Franco, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a leading cause of postoperative respiratory failure, with a mortality rate approaching 40% in the general population and 80% in the subset of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The increased risk of ARDS in these patients has traditionally been associated with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), the need for blood product transfusions, large volume shifts, mechanical ventilation and direct surgical insult. Indeed, the impact of ARDS in the cardiac population is substantial, affecting not only survival but also in-hospital length of stay and long-term physical and psychological morbidity. No patient undergoing cardiac surgery can be considered ARDS risk-free. Early identification of those at higher risk is crucial to warrant the adoption of both surgical and non-surgical specific preventative strategies. The present review focuses on epidemiology, risk assessment, pathophysiology, prevention and management of ARDS in the specific setting of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:27867583

  14. The clinics of acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rastelli, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Risk stratification and management of patients with chest pain continues to be challenging despite considerable efforts made in the last decades by many clinicians and researchers. The throutful evaluation necessitates that the physicians have a high index of suspicion for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and always keep in mind the myriad of often subtle and atypical presentations of ischemic heart disease, especially in certain patient populations such as the elderly ones. In this article we aim to review and discuss the available evidence on the value of clinical presentation in patients with a suspected ACS, with special emphasis on history, characteristics of chest pain, associated symptoms, atypical presentations, precipitating and relieving factors, drugs, clinical rules and significance of clinical Gestalt. PMID:27294087

  15. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Ring Sideroblasts; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation

  16. Klinefelter syndrome and acute basophilic leukaemia--case report.

    PubMed

    Ljubić, Nives; Lang, Nada; Skelin, Ika Kardum; Lasan, Ruzica; Dominis, Mara; Perković, Leila; Zupanić-Krmek, Dubraka; Grgurević-Batinica, Anita

    2010-06-01

    Patients with 47, XXY karyotype (Klinefelter syndrome) appear to have increased risk of developing cancer, especially male breast cancer, germ cell tumours and non Hodgkin lymphomas, but rarely acute myeloid leukaemia. We report a patient with acute basophilic leukaemia with 47, XXY karyotype in both the tumour and constitutional cells. Acute basophilic leukaemia is very rare disease comprising less than 1% of all acute myeloid leukaemias. Morphological characteristic of leukaemic blast cells is moderately basophilic cytoplasm containing a variable number of coarse basophilic granules. The most characteristic cytochemical reaction is metachromatic positivity with toluidine blue. Blast are myeloperoxidase negative. Also leukemic blasts express myeloid and monocyte markers. There is no consistent chromosomal abnormality identified in this leukaemia. This is the first reported case of acute basophilic leukaemia in patient with Klinefelter syndrome. In this article the medical history of the patient is given and the possible connection between Klinefelter syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia is discussed.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Risaku

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome affects military personnel and civilians following the uncontrolled dispersal of radiation, such as that caused by detonation of nuclear devices and inappropriate medical treatments. Therefore, there is a growing need for medical interventions that facilitate the improved recovery of victims and patients. One promising approach may be cell therapy, which, when appropriately implemented, may facilitate recovery from whole body injuries. This editorial highlights the current knowledge regarding the use of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the benefits and limitations of which are under investigation. Establishing successful therapies for acute radiation syndrome may require using such a therapeutic approach in addition to conventional approaches.

  18. Acute Respiratory Distress: from syndrome to disease.

    PubMed

    Cardinal-Fernández, P; Correger, E; Villanueva, J; Rios, F

    2016-04-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is currently one of the most important critical entities given its high incidence, rate of mortality, long-term sequelae and non-specific pharmacological treatment. The histological hallmark of ARDS is diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Approximately 50% of ARDS patients present DAD, the rest is made up of a heterogeneous group of histological patterns, many of which correspond to a well-recognized disease. For that reason, if these patterns could be diagnosed, patients could benefit from a treatment. Recently, the effect of DAD in clinical and analytical evolution of ARDS has been demonstrated, so the classical approach to ARDS as an entity defined solely by clinical, radiological and gasometrical variables should be reconsidered. This narrative review aims to examine the need to evolve from the concept of ARDS as a syndrome to ARDS as a specific disease. So we have raised 4 critical questions: a) What is a disease?; b) what is DAD?; c) how is DAD considered according to ARDS definition?, and d) what is the relationship between ARDS and DAD?

  19. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome in children].

    PubMed

    Stucki, P; Scalfaro, P; Parret, L; Wassenberg, J; Krähenbühl, J D; Curchod, P; Di Bernardo, S; Llor, J; Cotting, J

    2001-03-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) encountered in a child may be either due to a primary lung infection or may be secondary to a systemic inflammatory response of varying origin. Therapy is based on: 1) the mechanical ventilation strategy aimed at maintaining the functional residual capacity by alveolar recruitment using positive end expiratory pressure and to limit secondary pulmonary lesions by using small tidal volumes, 2) prone positioning as soon as sufficient stability is achieved; 3) optimizing tissue oxygen delivery by cardiac support; 4) correction of any other organ dysfunction. If this conventional approach is not sufficient experimental therapies may be tempted given the vital risk. For instance inhaled nitric oxide and high frequency oscillation ventilation may be a valuable support. Newer techniques, such as partial liquid ventilation, are being developed and could become useful therapeutic options. After the acute phase a close medical follow-up is mandatory. Because of the possibility of a chronic respiratory insufficiency with negative consequences on the right ventricular function, these patients may need long term oxygen therapy and diuretics. Cardiac echography helps orientation in maintaining or discontinuing this long term therapy by estimating the arterial pulmonary pressure.

  20. Acute aortic syndromes: pathophysiology and management.

    PubMed

    Alli, Oluseun; Jacobs, Larry; Amanullah, Aman M

    2008-01-01

    The acute aortic syndromes carry significant morbidity and mortality, especially when detected late. Symptoms may mimic myocardial ischemia, and physical findings may be absent or, if present, can be suggestive of a diverse range of other conditions. Maintaining a high clinical index of suspicion is crucial in establishing the diagnosis. All patients with suspected aortic disease and evidence of acute ischemia on electrocardiogram should undergo diagnostic imaging studies before thrombolytics are administered. The demonstration of an intimal flap separating 2 lumina is the basis for diagnosis. Tear detection and localization are very important because any therapeutic intervention aims to occlude the entry tear. The goals of medical therapy are to reduce the force of left ventricular contractions, decrease the steepness of the rise of the aortic pulse wave, and reduce the systemic arterial pressure to as low a level as possible without compromising perfusion of vital organs. Surgical therapy still remains the gold standard of care for type A aortic dissection, whereas in type B dissection, percutaneous aortic stenting and fenestration techniques have been developed and are sometimes used in conjunction with medical therapy in certain situations.

  1. [Acute coronary syndrome after hornet bite, type II Kounis syndrome - a case report].

    PubMed

    Alihodzić, Hajriz; Ilić, Boris; Mladina, Nada; Mrsić, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Kounis syndrome is an accidental occurrence of acute coronary syndrome associated with anaphylaxis, where acute inflammatory mediators cause the spasm of coronary arteries with the erosion and rupture of atheromatous plaque. We present a 53-year-old male who during the treatment of anaphylaxis after a hornet bite developed acute anteroseptal myocardial infarction. The diagnosis of type II Kounis syndrome was proven by electrocardiographic abnormalities and biochemical markers with clinical manifestation of acute coronary syndrome, and was associated with anaphylaxis which demanded prehospital treatment of the patient after the hornet bite. Anaphylaxis after a hornet bite requires consideration of acute coronary syndrome if patients have chest pain and hemodynamic impairment, as these conditions occur infrequently but demand additional diagnostics and adequate treatment.

  2. Pharmacological countermeasures for the acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Mang; Whitnall, Mark H

    2009-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome (ARS) is defined as the signs and symptoms that occur within several months after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). This syndrome develops after total- or partial-body irradiation at a relatively high dose (above about 1 Gy in humans) and dose rate. Normal tissue injuries induced by IR differ depending on the target organ and cell type. Organs and cells with high sensitivity to radiation include the skin, the hematopoietic system, the gut, the spermatogenic cells and the vascular system. Exposure to IR causes damage to DNA, protein, and lipids in mammalian cells, as well as increased mitochondria-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), with subsequent cell cycle checkpoint arrest, apoptosis, and stress-related responses. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are a primary lethal lesion induced by IR. The cellular response to damage is complex and relies on simultaneous activation of a number of signaling networks. Among these, the activation of DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR), and signaling pathways containing ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), play important roles. The transcription factor NFkappaB has emerged as a pro-survival actor in response to IR in ATM and p53-induced protein with a death domain (PIDD) cascades. Although radiation-induced ARS has been well documented at the clinical level, and mechanistic information is accumulating, successful prophylaxis and treatment for ARS is problematic, even with the use of supportive care and growth factors. There is a pressing need to develop radiation countermeasures that can be used both in the clinic, for small-scale incidents, and outside the clinic, in mass casualty scenarios. In this review we summarize recent information on intracellular and extracellular signaling pathways relevant to radiation countermeasure research.

  3. Management of the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Steven A; Bidani, Akhil

    2002-05-01

    Significant advances have occurred in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of ARDS. It is now recognized that ARDS is a manifestation of a diffuse process that results from a complicated cascade of events following an initial insult or injury. Mechanical ventilation and PEEP are still important components of supportive therapy. To avoid ventilator-associated lung injury there is emphasis on targeting ventilator management based on measurement of pulmonary mechanics. For those with resistant hypoxia and severe pulmonary hypertension adjunctive modalities, such as prone positioning and low-dose iNO, may provide important benefit. Alternative modes of supporting gas exchange, such as with partial liquid ventilation and extracorporeal gas-exchange, may serve as rescue therapies. Advances in cell and molecular biology have contributed to a better understanding of the role of inflammatory cells and mediators that contribute to the acute lung injury and the pathophysiology of the syndrome that manifests as ARDS. Based on this new understanding, the potential targets for intervention to ameliorate the systemic inflammatory response have proliferated. Examples include the cytokine network and its receptors, antioxidants, and endothelins. Apart from the challenge of testing these agents in experimental models, it seems likely that determination of the optimum combination of agents will become an equally important endeavor. A particular challenge is to develop better methods of predicting which of the many at-risk patients will go on to full-blown ARDS and MODS, thereby targeting subgroups of patients most likely to benefit from anti-inflammatory therapies. Similarly, the adverse effects of immunosuppressive therapy may be diminished by improved, perhaps molecular, techniques to detect microbial pathogens and permit differentiation between Systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis.

  4. Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Salu, P; Stempels, N; Vanden Houte, K; Verbeelen, D

    1990-01-01

    A case of acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome (TINU syndrome) in an elderly woman is reported. The present case demonstrates that this entity originally observed in children, and more recently in adults, may also occur in the elderly. The aetiology and treatment are briefly discussed. Images PMID:2407289

  5. Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Salu, P; Stempels, N; Vanden Houte, K; Verbeelen, D

    1990-01-01

    A case of acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome (TINU syndrome) in an elderly woman is reported. The present case demonstrates that this entity originally observed in children, and more recently in adults, may also occur in the elderly. The aetiology and treatment are briefly discussed.

  6. Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh after weight training.

    PubMed Central

    Bidwell, J P; Gibbons, C E; Godsiff, S

    1996-01-01

    Compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare but serious condition that is normally associated with closed trauma or compressive injury. A case of acute compartment syndrome of the thigh occurred in a 16 year old boy after intensive weight training. There was no evidence of muscle tear or focal haemorrhage during subsequent fasciotomy. PMID:8889126

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: 30 years later.

    PubMed

    Lesur, O; Berthiaume, Y; Blaise, G; Damas, P; Deland, E; Guimond, J G; Michel, R P

    1999-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was first described about 30 years ago. Modern definitions and statements have recently been proposed to describe ARDS accurately, but none is perfect. Diffuse alveolar damage is the basic pathological pattern most commonly observed in ARDS, and the term includes permeability edema. The alveolar epithelium of the alveolar-capillary barrier is clearly a key component requiring repair, given its multipotent functional activity. Lung inflammation and neutrophil accumulation are essential markers of disease in ARDS, and a wide variety of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been described in the alveolar fluid and blood of patients. These molecules still have to prove their value as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers of ARDS. Supportive therapy in ARDS improved in the past decade; mechanical ventilation with lung protective strategies and patient positioning are gaining interest, but the indications for corticosteroids for ARDS are still debated. Nitric oxide may have a place in the treatment of one-third of patients. Novel approaches, such as surfactant replacement and liquid ventilation, may further improve supportive therapy. Innovative interventions may be on the horizon in treatments that help to resolve or modulate common pathways of ARDS, such as inflammation (eg, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor) or epithelial repair (eg, keratinocyte growth factor).

  8. Molecular Diagnosis of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, James B.; Richardson, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) first appeared in Guangdong Province, China, in November 2002. Although virus isolation and serology were useful early in the SARS outbreak for diagnosing new cases, these tests are not generally useful because virus culture requires a BSL-3 laboratory and seroconversion is often delayed until 2 to 3 weeks after infection. The first qualitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction tests for SARS-coronavirus (CoV) were sensitive and capable of detecting 1 to 10 genome equivalents. These assays were quickly supplemented with quantitative real-time assays that helped elucidate the natural history of SARS, particularly the initial presence of low viral loads in the upper respiratory tract and high viral loads in the lower respiratory tract. The unique natural history of SARS-CoV infection dictates the testing of both respiratory and nonrespiratory specimens, the testing of multiple specimens from the same patient, and sending out positives to be confirmed by a reference laboratory. Commercially available reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction tests for SARS have recently appeared; however, meaningful evaluations of these assays have not yet been performed and their true performance has not been determined. These and other issues related to diagnosis of SARS-CoV infection are discussed in this review. PMID:16258152

  9. Prognostic biomarkers in acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pavan, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a leading cause of death around the globe. Beside a still high mortality rate, additional complications of ACS include arrhythmias, left ventricular mural thrombus, cardiac fibrosis, heart failure (HF), cardiogenic shock, mitral valve dysfunction, aneurysms, up to cardiac rupture. Despite many prognostic tools have been developed over the past decades, efforts are still ongoing to identify reliable and predictive biomarkers, which may help predict the prognosis of these patients and especially the risk of HF. Recent evidence suggests that the value of a discrete number of biomarkers of myocardial fibrosis, namely the soluble form of suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2) and galectin-3 (GAL-3), may be predictive of HF and death in patients with ACS. Interestingly, the already promising predictive value of these biomarkers when measured alone was shown to be consistently magnified when combined with other and well-established cardiac biomarkers such natriuretic peptides and cardiac troponins. This article is hence aimed to review the current knowledge about cardiac biomarkers of fibrosis and adverse remodeling. PMID:27500159

  10. [Kinetic therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chechenin, M G; Voevodin, S V; Pronichev, E Iu; Shuliveĭstrov, Iu V

    2004-01-01

    The authors evaluated the clinical and physiological effects of kinetic therapy (KT) in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Forty-six patients with ARDS underwent successive postural positioning in accordance with two regimens: 1) lateral, prone, contralateral, supine positions; 2) prone, lateral, contralateral, supine positions. The criterion for changing each position was the change in monitoring indices: SpO2, PaO2, and thoracopulmonary compliance (C). KT was performed until a respirator was withdrawn from the patient. In 25 patients, each maneuver of positioning was made during 30-minute propofol sedation. The control group included 24 patients with ARDS who received neither KT nor propofol sedation. KT caused a decrease in Vd/Vt, Qs/Qt and an increase in PaO2/FiO2 and C was more intensive, as compared with the control group. The duration of the patient's prone position was 3.2-0.7 hours and that of the supine position was 3.4-0.8 hours. The right and left lateral positions lasted 1.1-0.2 and 1.3-0.2 hours, respectively. KT regimen 1 was found to be more effective than KT regimen 2. Propofol sedation enhanced the efficiency of KT. The latter reduced death rates in patients with ARDS.

  11. Cardiac CT: atherosclerosis to acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Munnur, Ravi Kiran; Cameron, James D.; Ko, Brian S.; Meredith, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) is a robust non-invasive method to assess coronary artery disease (CAD). Qualitative and quantitative assessment of atherosclerotic coronary stenosis with CCTA has been favourably compared with invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Importantly, it allows the study of preclinical stages of atherosclerotic disease, may help improve risk stratification and monitor the progressive course of the disease. The diagnostic accuracy of CCTA in the assessment of coronary artery bypass grafts (CABG) is excellent and the constantly improving technology is making the evaluation of stents feasible. Novel techniques are being developed to assess the functional significance of coronary stenosis. The excellent negative predictive value of CCTA in ruling out disease enables early and safe discharge of patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in the Emergency Department (ED). In addition, CCTA is useful in predicting clinical outcomes based on the extent of coronary atherosclerosis and also based on individual plaque characteristics such as low attenuation plaque (LAP), positive remodelling and spotty calcification. In this article, we review the role of CCTA in the detection of coronary atherosclerosis in native vessels, stented vessels, calcified arteries and grafts; the assessment of plaque progression, evaluation of chest pain in the ED, assessment of functional significance of stenosis and the prognostic significance of CCTA. PMID:25610801

  12. Acute coronary syndromes as auto-inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    From the onset to the healing stage of acute coronary syndromes, an endless inflammation has been presented with complex, multiple cross-talk mechanisms at the molecular, cellular, and organ levels. Even though the early reperfusion treatment either by thrombolysis or percutaneous coronary intervention provides the excellent clinical benefits in patients with acute coronary syndromes, ischemia/ reperfusion injury may somewhat offset those great advantages. Inflammation, although potentially protective, has been deeply associated with those detrimental conditions. The hexagonal vascular inflammatory network which is composed of activated various leukocytes, vascular endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, platelets, excess reactive oxygen species, and cholesterol may contribute these vicious circles. To address these complex syndromes with more benefits regarding the prevention and treatment, this review comprehensively updates the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes from the view points of vascular inflammation.

  13. Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP): relationship to Hamman-Rich syndrome, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Parambil, Joseph G

    2012-10-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) is a term used for an idiopathic form of acute lung injury characterized clinically by acute respiratory failure with bilateral lung infiltrates and histologically by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), a combination of findings previously known as the Hamman-Rich syndrome. This review aims to clarify the diagnostic criteria of AIP, its relationship with DAD and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), key etiologies that need to be excluded before making the diagnosis, and the salient clinical features. Cases that meet clinical and pathologic criteria for AIP overlap substantially with those that fulfill clinical criteria for ARDS. The main differences between AIP and ARDS are that AIP requires a histologic diagnosis of DAD and exclusion of known etiologies. AIP should also be distinguished from "acute exacerbation of IPF," a condition in which acute lung injury (usually DAD) supervenes on underlying usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP)/idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

  14. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: the Berlin Definition.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, V Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Thompson, B Taylor; Ferguson, Niall D; Caldwell, Ellen; Fan, Eddy; Camporota, Luigi; Slutsky, Arthur S

    2012-06-20

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was defined in 1994 by the American-European Consensus Conference (AECC); since then, issues regarding the reliability and validity of this definition have emerged. Using a consensus process, a panel of experts convened in 2011 (an initiative of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine endorsed by the American Thoracic Society and the Society of Critical Care Medicine) developed the Berlin Definition, focusing on feasibility, reliability, validity, and objective evaluation of its performance. A draft definition proposed 3 mutually exclusive categories of ARDS based on degree of hypoxemia: mild (200 mm Hg < PaO2/FIO2 ≤ 300 mm Hg), moderate (100 mm Hg < PaO2/FIO2 ≤ 200 mm Hg), and severe (PaO2/FIO2 ≤ 100 mm Hg) and 4 ancillary variables for severe ARDS: radiographic severity, respiratory system compliance (≤40 mL/cm H2O), positive end-expiratory pressure (≥10 cm H2O), and corrected expired volume per minute (≥10 L/min). The draft Berlin Definition was empirically evaluated using patient-level meta-analysis of 4188 patients with ARDS from 4 multicenter clinical data sets and 269 patients with ARDS from 3 single-center data sets containing physiologic information. The 4 ancillary variables did not contribute to the predictive validity of severe ARDS for mortality and were removed from the definition. Using the Berlin Definition, stages of mild, moderate, and severe ARDS were associated with increased mortality (27%; 95% CI, 24%-30%; 32%; 95% CI, 29%-34%; and 45%; 95% CI, 42%-48%, respectively; P < .001) and increased median duration of mechanical ventilation in survivors (5 days; interquartile [IQR], 2-11; 7 days; IQR, 4-14; and 9 days; IQR, 5-17, respectively; P < .001). Compared with the AECC definition, the final Berlin Definition had better predictive validity for mortality, with an area under the receiver operating curve of 0.577 (95% CI, 0.561-0.593) vs 0.536 (95% CI, 0.520-0.553; P

  15. [Acute amnestic syndrome: left thalamo-polar infarct].

    PubMed

    Ghika, Joseph

    2012-04-11

    An 80-year old American patient was found wandering in a mountain village of Switzerland, with an anterograde, prospective, retrograde, dyschronologic amnesic syndrome without confabulation, paramnesia or false recognitions, disoriented, slightly confused, with no focal sensory, motor, ataxic or visual field deficit, with a mild dysexecutive syndrome. The MR imaging showed an acute thalamo-polar artery infarct. A dysconnection of the mamillo-othalamic and thalamo-temporal pathways is felt at the origin of the amnesic syndrome. A brief review of the other presentation of this chamelon syndrome is presented, together the main etiologies at its origin.

  16. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  18. 'The Right Ventricle in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome'.

    PubMed

    Zochios, Vasileios; Parhar, Ken; Tunnicliffe, William; Roscoe, Andrew; Gao, Fang

    2017-03-03

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is associated with poor clinical outcomes with a pooled mortality rate of approximately 40% despite best standards of care. Current therapeutic strategies are based upon improving oxygenation and pulmonary compliance while minimizing ventilator induced lung injury. It has been demonstrated that relative hypoxemia can be well tolerated and improvements in oxygenation do not necessarily translate into survival benefit. Cardiac failure, in particular right ventricular dysfunction, is commonly encountered in moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and is reported to be one of the major determinants of mortality. The prevalence rate of echocardiographically evident right ventricular dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome varies across studies ranging from 22% to 50%. Although there is no definitive causal relationship between right ventricular dysfunction and mortality, severe right ventricular dysfunction is associated with increased mortality. Factors that can adversely affect right ventricular function include hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, hypercapnia, and invasive ventilation with high driving pressure. It might be expected that early diagnosis of right ventricular dysfunction would be of benefit however, echocardiography markers (qualitative and quantitative) used to prospectively evaluate the right ventricle in acute respiratory distress syndrome have not been tested in adequately powered studies. In this review we examine the prognostic implications and pathophysiology of right ventricular dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome and discuss available diagnostic modalities and treatment options. We aim to identify gaps in knowledge and directions for future research that could potentially improve clinical outcomes in this patient population.

  19. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Gerstmann's syndrome following an acute herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ilchevsky, S; Boev, I; Kazakova, T

    1998-01-01

    The authors present a rare clinical case of a woman who developed Gerstmann's syndrome following an acute Herpes simplex viral encephalitis. Clinical observation and laboratory evaluation were performed during the acute phase of the disease. After that the follow-up continued for one-year period. The localization of the pathologic process was determined by computerized tomography, conducted periodically. The characteristics of the clinical picture are interpreted in the context of the contemporary concepts of the topical diagnosis of Gerstmann's syndrome. The possibility of a sudden onset of acute Herpes simplex viral encephalitis without a preceding febrile-intoxication syndrome is worth noting. Conclusions are drawn stressing the need of an early etiologic treatment and the importance of the rehabilitation activities during the convalescence period.

  1. Clinical acute cholecystitis and the Curtis-Fitz-Hugh syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Shanahan, D.; Lord, P. H.; Grogono, J.; Wastell, C.

    1988-01-01

    When patients are admitted with clinically diagnosed acute cholecystitis, no cause will be found for their pain in 9-13% (4.5). Our retrospective study shows that women between 15-35 years are most likely to be in this group. Our prospective study of all patients in the 15-35 year age group admitted with clinical 'acute cholecystitis', showed that in 6 out of 7 patients with 'undiagnosed' pain, the Curtis-Fitz-Hugh syndrome was the cause. We suggest that screening for the Curtis-Fitz-Hugh syndrome is performed in all patients with right upper quadrant pain who have a normal ultrasound scan. PMID:3408139

  2. Acute coronary syndrome among older patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Veerasamy, Murugapathy; Edwards, Richard; Ford, Gary; Kirkwood, Tom; Newton, Julia; Jones, Dave; Kunadian, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Due to advances in medicine in the past few decades, life expectancy has increased resulting in an aging population in developed and developing countries. Acute coronary syndrome causes greater morbidity and mortality in this group of older patients, which appears to be due to age-related comorbidities. This review examines the incidence and prevalence of acute coronary syndrome among older patients, examines current treatment strategies, and evaluates the predictors of adverse outcomes. In particular, the impact of frailty on outcomes and the need for frailty assessment in developing future research and management strategies among older patients are discussed.

  3. On some physiological aspects of ethanol repercussion on neural and cardiorenal functions.

    PubMed

    Araujo Guedes, Rubem Carlos; de Alburquerque Paiva, Ana Maria; Amâncio-dos-Santos, Angela; Vieira-Filho, Leucio Duarte; Oliveira da Paixão, Ana Durce

    2009-12-01

    Chronic ethanol ingestion, mostly in young adults, constitutes a frequent drug-abuse situation, which is associated to a wide variety of pathological disturbance affecting a number of organs, including liver, kidney, heart, pancreas and brain. The ethanol effects are more prominent when occurring at the perinatal period of life, generating, among other disabilities, brain developmental and functional impairments, as well as the so-called "fetal alcoholic syndrome". However, low doses of ethanol, although not producing conspicuous signs of physiological impairment, may affect the developing organism, impairing the renal and cardiovascular system, among others. As a consequence of increased oxidative stress produced by ethanol intake and its subsequent oxidation, lipid peroxidation increases, enhancing reactive oxygen species formation, which is potentially injurious to the brain tissue. When occurring during gestation, lipid peroxidation may occur in the placenta, an event that would partially be responsible for fetal nutrition disturbance and consequently late physiological impairment. In this short review, data on ethanol effects on the nervous and cardiorenal structure and function are analyzed at the light of the most relevant hypotheses concerning ethanol mechanisms of action. Additionally, experimental data from the authors' laboratories are presented and discussed, focusing particular attention to the possibility of differential neural and cardiorenal ethanol effects as a function of the dose used in distinct experimental models.

  4. Acute exercise-induced bilateral thigh compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boland, Michael R; Heck, Chris

    2009-03-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh is rare due to the space's ability to accommodate large volumes of fluid and, with the exception of the lateral septum, its thin compliant linings. This article describes a case of bilateral exercise-induced severe compartment syndrome treated with anterior and posterior fasciotomies. A 29-year-old man was admitted to intensive care with myoglobinuria. His left thigh was evaluated 18 hours later for compartment syndrome. The patient reported that 14 hours prior to initial presentation, he had participated in a 1-hour session of vigorous basketball. He gradually developed bilateral moderately severe thigh pain and tea-colored urine. Physical examination revealed pain secondary to passive stretch of both knees at 20 degrees flexion, plus firm anterior and posterior compartments to palpation. A handheld pressure monitor revealed the following compartment pressures: left anterior 80 mm Hg; left posterior 75 mm Hg; right anterior 45 mm Hg; and right posterior 50 mm Hg. Bilateral emergent anterior and posterior compartment fasciotomies were performed. The patient developed a significant severe distal motor and sensory neurological deficit on the left side, which recovered to 3/5 motor strength and protective sensation. At 6-month follow-up, he ambulated with the assistance of a left ankle foot orthosis. Acute severe compartment syndrome can occur following vigorous exercise. We recommend fasciotomies after exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome rather than initial observation because of the severity of morbidity associated with undertreated compartment syndrome.

  5. Acute compartment syndrome after muscle rupture in a non-athlete.

    PubMed Central

    Thennavan, A S; Funk, L; Volans, A P

    1999-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome after muscle rupture, although rare, is a limb threatening condition, which warrants emergency treatment. The case of acute compartment syndrome secondary to a gastrocnemius muscle tear of the right lower leg, in a non-athlete is reported. To our knowledge, this is the only description of acute compartment syndrome due to muscle rupture in a non-athlete. PMID:10505928

  6. Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm caused by calcific tendinitis of the distal biceps.

    PubMed

    Garayoa, Santiago Amillo; Romero-Muñoz, Luis M; Pons-Villanueva, Juan

    2010-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm requires immediate treatment to avoid damage of the soft tissues and a poor functional outcome for the forearm. Muscular and bone lesions are the main causes of acute compartment syndromes. We report a case of acute compartment syndrome of the forearm caused by a calcific tendinitis of the distal biceps.

  7. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. CPX-351 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  9. Acute aortic syndromes: definition, prognosis and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, S W; Kodolitsch, Y V; Debus, E S; Wipper, S; Tsilimparis, N; Larena-Avellaneda, A; Diener, H; Kölbel, T

    2014-04-01

    Acute aortic syndromes (AAS) are life-threatening vascular conditions of the thoracic aorta presenting with acute pain as the leading symptom in most cases. The incidence is approximately 3-5/100,000 in western countries with increase during the past decades. Clinical suspicion for AAS requires immediate confirmation with advanced imaging modalities. Initial management of AAS addresses avoidance of progression by immediate medical therapy to reduce aortic shear stress. Proximal symptomatic lesions with involvement of the ascending aorta are surgically treated in the acute setting, whereas acute uncomplicated distal dissection should be treated by medical therapy in the acute period, followed by surveillance and repeated imaging studies. Acute complicated distal dissection requires urgent invasive treatment and thoracic endovascular aortic repair has become the treatment modality of choice because of favorable outcomes compared to open surgical repair. Intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcers, and traumatic aortic injuries of the descending aorta harbor specific challenges compared to aortic dissection and treatment strategies are not as uniformly defined as in aortic dissection. Moreover these lesions have a different prognosis. Once the acute period of aortic syndrome has been survived, a lifelong medical treatment and close surveillance with repeated imaging studies is essential to detect impending complications which might need invasive treatment within the short-, mid- or long-term.

  10. Scrub Typhus Leading to Acute Encephalitis Syndrome, Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Trishna; Laskar, Basanta; Khan, Abdul M.; Dutta, Prafulla

    2017-01-01

    To determine the contribution of Orientia tsutsugamushi, the agent of scrub typhus, as a cause of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) in Assam, India, we conducted a retrospective study of hospital patients with symptoms of AES during 2013–2015. Our findings suggest that O. tsutsugamushi infection leads to AES and the resulting illness and death. PMID:27875108

  11. Blastomyces gilchristii as Cause of Fatal Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dalcin, Daniel; Rothstein, Aaron; Spinato, Joanna; Escott, Nicholas; Kus, Julianne V

    2016-02-01

    Since the 2013 description of Blastomyces gilchristii, research describing the virulence or clinical outcome of B. gilchristii infection has been lacking. We report molecular evidence of B. gilchristii as an etiologic agent of fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome. B. gilchristii infection was confirmed by PCR and sequence analysis.

  12. Blastomyces gilchristii as Cause of Fatal Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Aaron; Spinato, Joanna; Escott, Nicholas; Kus, Julianne V.

    2016-01-01

    Since the 2013 description of Blastomyces gilchristii, research describing the virulence or clinical outcome of B. gilchristii infection has been lacking. We report molecular evidence of B. gilchristii as an etiologic agent of fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome. B. gilchristii infection was confirmed by PCR and sequence analysis. PMID:26812599

  13. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Prevention in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a newly identified respiratory disease that threatened Taiwan between April 14 and July 5, 2003. Chang Gung University experienced various SARS-related episodes, such as the postponement of classes for 7 days, the reporting of probable SARS cases, and the isolation of students under Level A and B…

  14. Duration of Antibody Responses after Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Ping; Wang, Nai-Chang; Chang, Yi-Hua; Tian, Xiang-Yi; Na, Dan-Yu; Zhang, Li-Yuan; Zheng, Lei; Lan, Tao; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2007-01-01

    Among 176 patients who had had severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), SARS-specific antibodies were maintained for an average of 2 years, and significant reduction of immunoglobulin G–positive percentage and titers occurred in the third year. Thus, SARS patients might be susceptible to reinfection >3 years after initial exposure. PMID:18258008

  15. Acute radiation syndrome caused by accidental radiation exposure - therapeutic principles.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Harald; Meineke, Viktor

    2011-11-25

    Fortunately radiation accidents are infrequent occurrences, but since they have the potential of large scale events like the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima, preparatory planning of the medical management of radiation accident victims is very important. Radiation accidents can result in different types of radiation exposure for which the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, as well as the outcomes, differ. The clinical course of acute radiation syndrome depends on the absorbed radiation dose and its distribution. Multi-organ-involvement and multi-organ-failure need be taken into account. The most vulnerable organ system to radiation exposure is the hematopoietic system. In addition to hematopoietic syndrome, radiation induced damage to the skin plays an important role in diagnostics and the treatment of radiation accident victims. The most important therapeutic principles with special reference to hematopoietic syndrome and cutaneous radiation syndrome are reviewed.

  16. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Prone position in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Setten, Mariano; Plotnikow, Gustavo Adrián; Accoce, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome occupies a great deal of attention in intensive care units. Despite ample knowledge of the physiopathology of this syndrome, the focus in intensive care units consists mostly of life-supporting treatment and avoidance of the side effects of invasive treatments. Although great advances in mechanical ventilation have occurred in the past 20 years, with a significant impact on mortality, the incidence continues to be high. Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, especially the most severe cases, often present with refractory hypoxemia due to shunt, which can require additional treatments beyond mechanical ventilation, among which is mechanical ventilation in the prone position. This method, first recommended to improve oxygenation in 1974, can be easily implemented in any intensive care unit with trained personnel. Prone position has extremely robust bibliographic support. Various randomized clinical studies have demonstrated the effect of prone decubitus on the oxygenation of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome measured in terms of the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, including its effects on increasing patient survival. The members of the Respiratory Therapists Committee of the Sociedad Argentina de Terapia Intensiva performed a narrative review with the objective of discovering the available evidence related to the implementation of prone position, changes produced in the respiratory system due to the application of this maneuver, and its impact on mortality. Finally, guidelines are suggested for decision-making. PMID:27925054

  18. Prone position in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Setten, Mariano; Plotnikow, Gustavo Adrián; Accoce, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome occupies a great deal of attention in intensive care units. Despite ample knowledge of the physiopathology of this syndrome, the focus in intensive care units consists mostly of life-supporting treatment and avoidance of the side effects of invasive treatments. Although great advances in mechanical ventilation have occurred in the past 20 years, with a significant impact on mortality, the incidence continues to be high. Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, especially the most severe cases, often present with refractory hypoxemia due to shunt, which can require additional treatments beyond mechanical ventilation, among which is mechanical ventilation in the prone position. This method, first recommended to improve oxygenation in 1974, can be easily implemented in any intensive care unit with trained personnel. Prone position has extremely robust bibliographic support. Various randomized clinical studies have demonstrated the effect of prone decubitus on the oxygenation of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome measured in terms of the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, including its effects on increasing patient survival. The members of the Respiratory Therapists Committee of the Sociedad Argentina de Terapia Intensiva performed a narrative review with the objective of discovering the available evidence related to the implementation of prone position, changes produced in the respiratory system due to the application of this maneuver, and its impact on mortality. Finally, guidelines are suggested for decision-making.

  19. [Hepatic retransplant and acute Budd Chiari syndrome. Case report].

    PubMed

    Savio-López, Andrés M; Lara-Molina, Evelin E; Soliva-Domínguez, Ramón; Capo-Jorge, José A; Gala-López, Boris; González-Castillo, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    Hepatic retransplant constitutes 10-20% of all orthotopic hepatic transplants. The piggy-back technique was used in hepatectomy with conservation of the retrohepatic vena cava. A side-to-side cavo-cavostomy technique is described in the case of hepatic congestion or acute Budd Chiari syndrome post-transplant. This is an extremely serious condition and can result in death. We present the first case of hepatic retransplant performed in Hospital Hermanos Ameijeiras in a patient who received who received his first transplant due to non-resectable hepatocarcinoma and who required retransplant due to acute rejection and graft dysfunction. During retransplant, the Belghiti side-to-side anastomosis technique was used to resolve the acute Budd Chiari syndrome that presented itself. Post-surgical evolution at 18 months was satisfactory without evidence of complications of the graft. Acute Budd Chiari syndrome post-transplant can satisfactorily be resolved with the Belghiti technique, although it is preferable to take prophylactic measures to avoid it.

  20. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-14

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Hypereosinophilic syndrome causing acute hemiplegia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Noureen, Nuzhat; Rana, Muhammad Tariq

    2008-06-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a rare heterogeneous group of disorders, characterized by marked peripheral blood and tissue eosinophilia resulting in end organ damage. This case describes a six-year-old girl child who presented with sudden weakness of right half of body and fever. Computed tomogram of brain showed infarction of left internal capsule and basal ganglia. She had peripheral and bone marrow eosinophilia. No other cause was found for infarction.

  2. Differentiation syndrome in acute myeloid leukemia after treatment with azacitidine.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Christin B; Roberts, Owen

    2015-11-01

    We report a case report of hyperleukocytosis, fever, hypotension, pulmonary and pericardial effusions, and acute kidney injury during initial treatment with azacitidine in a patient with AML-MRC. Collectively, the symptomatology resembled differentiation syndrome. Azacitidine has been previously associated with fever, peripheral edema, and hyperleukocytosis, but its side effect profile has never been described as similar to differentiation syndrome. The patient's deteriorating course quickly turned around after treatment with dexamethasone. This potential reaction, and potential treatment, is important for clinicians to be aware of.

  3. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  4. Mad honey intoxication mimicking acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dur, Ali; Sonmez, Ertan; Civelek, Cemil; AhmetTurkdogan, Kenan; AkifVatankulu, Mehmet; Sogut, Ozgur

    2014-09-01

    Mad honey intoxication or grayanotoxin poisoning is caused by consumption of grayanotoxin-containing toxic honey produced from leaves and flowers of the Rhododendron family. Despite the rarity of intoxication cases, the correct diagnosis and treatment are required because of the significance of haemodynamic disturbance and confounding of symptoms for disease identification. We report herein a case of a patient with mad honey intoxication mimicking acute non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction and review the pathophysiology and diagnostic considerations.

  5. Acute kidney injury caused by zonisamide-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshiro; Hasegawa, Midori; Nabeshima, Kuihiro; Tomita, Makoto; Murakami, Kazutaka; Nakai, Shigeru; Yamakita, Takashi; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2010-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), also known as drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), is a severe adverse drug reaction affecting multiple organs caused by drug treatment. The current report describes a man who was prescribed zonisamide for epilepsy and subsequently developed widespread skin rash, acute kidney injury, high-grade fever, eosinophilia, liver dysfunction, lymphadenopathy and an increase in antihuman herpesvirus-6 immunoglobulin G titer. Hypersensitivity to zonisamide was confirmed by the skin patch test. Based on these findings, the patient was diagnosed with DRESS/DIHS caused by zonisamide. This is the first report of acute kidney injury due to zonisamide-induced DRESS/DIHS.

  6. Early Treatment of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Przybysz, Thomas M; Heffner, Alan C

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is defined by acute diffuse inflammatory lung injury invoked by a variety of systemic or pulmonary insults. Despite medical progress in management, mortality remains 27% to 45%. Patients with ARDS should be managed with low tidal volume ventilation. Permissive hypercapnea is well tolerated. Conservative fluid strategy can reduce ventilator and hospital days in patients without shock. Prone positioning and neuromuscular blockers reduce mortality in some patients. Early management of ARDS is relevant to emergency medicine. Identifying ARDS patients who should be transferred to an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation center is an important task for emergency providers.

  7. Overview of current lung imaging in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zompatori, Maurizio; Ciccarese, Federica; Fasano, Luca

    2014-12-01

    Imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and follow-up of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Chest radiography, bedside lung ultrasonography and computed tomography scans can provide useful information for the management of patients and detection of prognostic factors. However, imaging findings are not specific and several possible differential diagnoses should be taken into account. Herein we will review the role of radiological techniques in ARDS, highlight the plain radiological and computed tomography findings according to the pathological stage of the disease (exudative, inflammatory and fibroproliferative), and summarise the main points for the differential diagnosis with cardiogenic oedema, which is still challenging in the acute stage.

  8. [Acute coronary syndrome and cancer: which therapeutic option first?].

    PubMed

    Vicinelli, Paolo; Martinoni, Alessandro; Villani, Camillo; Zuccari, Marco; Morra, Sergio; Di Credico, Germano; D'Urbano, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease and cancer are the leading causes of mortality worldwide. We report our experience in a cancer patient with acute coronary syndrome successfully treated by hybrid revascularization, i.e. off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting, followed by surgical removal of the tumor and percutaneous coronary intervention. The concomitant presence of cancer and acute coronary syndrome is not rare, ranging from 1.9% to 4.2%. Usually, the most life-threatening disease should be treated first, more frequently coronary artery disease. There are several therapeutic approaches to patients with cancer and coronary artery disease and cancer, including percutaneous coronary intervention, surgical treatment of cancer, or coronary artery bypass grafting. Each of these options should consider the severity of cardiac disease, the stage of malignancy and the clinical conditions of the patient.

  9. Bilateral acute lupus pneumonitis in a case of rhupus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Supriya; Saha, Kaushik

    2012-07-01

    Rhupus syndrome, the overlap of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), is an extremely uncommon condition. Organ damages found due to SLE are usually mild in rhupus. Lupus pneumonitis in rhupus syndrome has not been reported worldwide. We are reporting a 23-year-old female with bilateral symmetric erosive arthritis, oral ulcer, alopecia, polyserositis, anemia, leucopenia, positive RA-factor, anti nuclear antibody (ANA) and anti ds-DNA. She presented with acute onset dyspnea, high fever, chest pain, tachycardia, tachypnea, hypoxia and respiratory alkalosis. High resolution computed tomography (HRCT)-thorax showed bilateral, basal consolidation with air bronchogram. Repeated sputum and single broncho alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid examination revealed no organism or Hemosiderin-laden macrophage. The diagnosis of rhupus was confirmed by combined manifestations of RA and SLE, and the diagnosis of acute lupus pneumonitis was established by clinico-radiological picture and by excluding other possibilities.

  10. [Alcohol and acute respiratory distress syndrome: casuality or causality?].

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Xavier; Guardiola, Juan J; Soler, Manuel

    2013-06-18

    Alcohol has been considered an important risk factor for the development of pneumonia since the last century. Nevertheless, it was not thought that it had relevant effects on lung structure and functions until recently. Recent studies have shown that the risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is 2-4 times higher among alcoholic patients with sepsis or trauma, and that alcoholism can play a roll in more than 50% of cases in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. Although alcoholism per se does not cause acute lung injury it predisposes to pulmonary dysfunction after inflammatory stress, that is present in clinical situations that cause ARDS leading to its development and complicating its outcome. Recent investigations in animals and humans with alcohol abuse have uncovered several alterations currently known as the "alcoholic lung". This revision discusses the association between alcohol abuse and lung injury/ARDS and tries to explain the physiopathology along with possible treatments.

  11. Periodontal status and Prevotella intermedia antibody in acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Hirofumi; Oe, Yoko; Nakayama, Hideki; Matsuo, Katsuhiko; Fukunaga, Takashi; Sugamura, Koichi; Kawano, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Seigo; Shinohara, Masanori; Izumi, Yuichi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2009-11-12

    We performed periodontal examination and measured serum antibody levels against Prevotella intermedia in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Composite periodontal risk scores were significantly higher in the ACS group than in the coronary artery disease (CAD) group. Serum antibody levels were higher in the ACS group than in the CAD group and those were significantly correlated with the composite periodontal risk scores. These results provided important information about the status of P. intermedia infection in patients with ACS.

  12. Trastuzumab-Induced Myocardiotoxicity Mimicking Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, K.B.; Miranda, C.H.; Andrade, J.M.; Galli, L.G.; Tiezzi, D.G.; Oliveira, H.F.; Zola, F.E.; Volpe, G.; Pazin-Filho, A.; Peria, F.M.

    2012-01-01

    Trastuzumab is an important biological agent in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer, with effects on response rates, progression-free survival, overall survival and quality of life. Although this drug is well tolerated in terms of adverse effects, trastuzumab-associated myocardiotoxicity has been described to have an incidence of 0.6–4.5% and in rare cases, the drug can trigger severe congestive heart failure with progression to death or even mimic acute coronary syndrome with complete left bundle branch blockade. In this paper is reported a case of trastuzumab-associated myocardiotoxicity manifesting as acute coronary syndrome in a 69-year-old female. The patient is currently undergoing a conservative clinical treatment that restricts overexertion. The majority of clinical studies report trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity as a rare event, and, when present, characterized by mild to moderate clinical signs, the ease of reversibility with pharmacological measures and the temporary discontinuation of the medication. Conversely, it is vital for the oncologist/cardiologist to consider the possibility that trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity may manifest itself as a severe clinical case, mimicking acute coronary syndrome, justifying careful risk stratification and adequate cardiac monitoring, especially in high-risk patients. PMID:22666200

  13. GERSTMANN’S SYNDROME IN ACUTE STROKE PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Zukic, Sanela; Mrkonjic, Zamir; Sinanovic, Osman; Vidovic, Mirjana; Kojic, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Gerstmann in 1924. observed in a few patients a concomitant impairment in discriminating their own fingers, writing by hand, distinguishing left from right and performing calculations. He claimed that this tetrad of symptoms constituted a syndromal entity, assigned it to a lesion of the dominant parietal lobe. Since than, Gerstmann`s syndrome (GS) was enigma for neuropsychologists. The aim of this study was to analyze frequency and clinical features of GS among acute stroke patients. Patients and methods: We prospectively analyzed 194 acute stroke patients (average age 65±11.06 years, male 113 (58.2%), female 81 (41.8%) hospitalized at department of Neurology, University Clinical Center tuzla, during the six mounths in 2010. For clinical assessment of agraphia, alexia and acalculia we used Minessota test for differential diagnosis of aphasia’s. Results: Among these acute stroke patients, 59 (30.40%) had alexia, agraphia and acalculia or different combinations of these disorders. two patients (3.4%) had agraphia and acalculia associated with other part of tetrad of GS: fi nger agnosia and left-right disorientation. they both where men, right handed, and cranial computed tomography scan showed ischemic lesion in the left parietal and left temporoparietal lobe. Conclusion: Gerstmann`s syndrome is rare clinical entity, and has the high value in localization and the lesion is mainly localized to angular gyrus of the dominant hemisphere. PMID:23378691

  14. Network analysis reveals distinct clinical syndromes underlying acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Hall, David P; MacCormick, Ian J C; Phythian-Adams, Alex T; Rzechorzek, Nina M; Hope-Jones, David; Cosens, Sorrel; Jackson, Stewart; Bates, Matthew G D; Collier, David J; Hume, David A; Freeman, Thomas; Thompson, A A Roger; Baillie, John Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, headache, sleep disturbance, fatigue and dizziness are given equal diagnostic weighting. Different pathophysiological mechanisms are now thought to underlie headache and sleep disturbance during acute exposure to high altitude. Hence, these symptoms may not belong together as a single syndrome. Using a novel visual analogue scale (VAS), we sought to undertake a systematic exploration of the symptomatology of AMS using an unbiased, data-driven approach originally designed for analysis of gene expression. Symptom scores were collected from 292 subjects during 1110 subject-days at altitudes between 3650 m and 5200 m on Apex expeditions to Bolivia and Kilimanjaro. Three distinct patterns of symptoms were consistently identified. Although fatigue is a ubiquitous finding, sleep disturbance and headache are each commonly reported without the other. The commonest pattern of symptoms was sleep disturbance and fatigue, with little or no headache. In subjects reporting severe headache, 40% did not report sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance correlates poorly with other symptoms of AMS (Mean Spearman correlation 0.25). These results challenge the accepted paradigm that AMS is a single disease process and describe at least two distinct syndromes following acute ascent to high altitude. This approach to analysing symptom patterns has potential utility in other clinical syndromes.

  15. Network Analysis Reveals Distinct Clinical Syndromes Underlying Acute Mountain Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Hall, David P.; MacCormick, Ian J. C.; Phythian-Adams, Alex T.; Rzechorzek, Nina M.; Hope-Jones, David; Cosens, Sorrel; Jackson, Stewart; Bates, Matthew G. D.; Collier, David J.; Hume, David A.; Freeman, Thomas; Thompson, A. A. Roger; Baillie, John Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, headache, sleep disturbance, fatigue and dizziness are given equal diagnostic weighting. Different pathophysiological mechanisms are now thought to underlie headache and sleep disturbance during acute exposure to high altitude. Hence, these symptoms may not belong together as a single syndrome. Using a novel visual analogue scale (VAS), we sought to undertake a systematic exploration of the symptomatology of AMS using an unbiased, data-driven approach originally designed for analysis of gene expression. Symptom scores were collected from 292 subjects during 1110 subject-days at altitudes between 3650 m and 5200 m on Apex expeditions to Bolivia and Kilimanjaro. Three distinct patterns of symptoms were consistently identified. Although fatigue is a ubiquitous finding, sleep disturbance and headache are each commonly reported without the other. The commonest pattern of symptoms was sleep disturbance and fatigue, with little or no headache. In subjects reporting severe headache, 40% did not report sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance correlates poorly with other symptoms of AMS (Mean Spearman correlation 0.25). These results challenge the accepted paradigm that AMS is a single disease process and describe at least two distinct syndromes following acute ascent to high altitude. This approach to analysing symptom patterns has potential utility in other clinical syndromes. PMID:24465370

  16. Potential Application of Viral Empty Capsids for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Prof. Ariella Oppenheim CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Hebrew University of Jerusalem...Lung / 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Prof. Ariella...mechanism elicited by VLPs that attenuate 2CLP-induced sepsis, to be performed as the project continues. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Acute Respiratory Distress

  17. Lung parenchyma remodeling in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rocco, P R M; Dos Santos, C; Pelosi, P

    2009-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the most severe manifestation of acute lung injury (ALI), is described as a stereotyped response to lung injury with a transition from alveolar capillary damage to a fibroproliferative phase. Most ARDS patients survive the acute initial phase of lung injury and progress to either reparation of the lesion or evolution of the syndrome. Despite advances in the management of ARDS, mortality remains high (40%) and autopsies show extended pulmonary fibrosis in 55% of patients, suggesting the importance of deregulated repair in the morbidity and mortality of these patients. Factors influencing progression to fibroproliferative ARDS versus resolution and reconstitution of the normal pulmonary parenchymal architecture are poorly understood. Abnormal repair and remodeling may be profoundly affected by both environmental and genetic factors. In this line, mechanical ventilation may affect the macromolecules that constitute the extracellular matrix (collagen, elastin, fibronectin, laminin, proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycans), suffer changes and impact the biomechanical behavior of lung parenchyma. Furthermore, evidence suggests that acute inflammation and fibrosis may be partially independent and/or interacting processes that are autonomously regulated, and thus amenable to individual and specific therapies. In this review, we explore recent advances in the field of fibroproliferative ARDS/ALI, with special emphasis on 1) the physiological properties of the extracellular matrix, 2) the mechanisms of remodeling, 3) the impact of mechanical ventilation on lung fibrotic response, and (4) therapeutic interventions in the remodeling process.

  18. Post poliomyelitis syndrome: A rare sequel of acute poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Abrar, Anam; Ahmad, Arsalan

    2015-03-01

    Post poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) is a rare sequel of acute poliomyelitis, usually seen 30-40 years after an acute episode. It is characterized by new muscle weakness seen in survivors of acute poliomyelitis. We describe a rare case of a 50 year old man; with a previous history of poliomyelitis in right lower limb who now presented with complaints of progressive left lower limb weakness for past two years. The diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical suspicion and EMG findings. PPS is not a well recognized disease in Pakistan and due to the lack of documentation; its true prevalence is not known. Though, over the years, cases of Poliomyelitis have decreased worldwide, however, PPS still remains a constant challenge for the physicians. This report highlights the impact of the disease on the quality of life of patients suffering from PPS and emphasis on the need for new therapeutic approach.

  19. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  20. [A case of acute coronary syndrome following the use of parenteral penicillin: Kounis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tok, Derya; Ozcan, Fırat; Sentürk, Bihter; Gölbaşı, Zehra

    2012-10-01

    Kounis syndrome refers to the concurrence of acute coronary events and allergic or hypersensitivity reactions. In this report, we describe the case of a male patient, in whom acute ST-segment elevation and myocardial infarction developed immediately after injection of depot penicillin, and we discuss the Kounis syndrome. A 52-year-old male patient had chest pain, hypotension and ST-elevation on leads DI and aVL of electrocardiography 30 minutes after intramuscular penicillin injection due to cryptic tonsillitis. Kounis syndrome was considered as a possible diagnosis according to the presentation. Histamine and tryptase levels were not studied due to the delay on arrival to the emergency department. The patient promptly underwent coronary angiography, which revealed only diffuse plaques in all main coronary arteries without any obstructive lesion. We found only increased immunoglobulin (Ig) E, which is associated with the syndrome. With this report, we remind clinicians to consider Kounis syndrome in patients who are subjected to allergenic substances and demonstrate acute chest pain.

  1. A Comparison of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Outcomes Between Military and Civilian Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    MILITARY MEDICINE, 180, 3:56, 2015 A Comparison of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Outcomes Between Military and Civilian Burn Patients J Alan...Chung, MC USA*‡ ABSTRACT Background: The objective of this report was to compare the prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and...Development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common complication of burn injury and is associated with poor outcomes. Previous reports using

  2. Acute respiratory failure mimicking acute respiratory distress syndrome due to parenchymal infiltration by metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Malignant melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and carries a predisposition for metastasis to many different organs. Pulmonary dissemination is common, most often presenting as multiple discrete pulmonary nodules. While a variety of other intrathoracic patterns can occur, diffuse parenchymal infiltration causing acute respiratory failure is an extremely rare manifestation of metastatic disease. We present a case of an otherwise healthy man who developed rapidly progressive respiratory failure mimicking acute respiratory distress syndrome due to melanomatous infiltration of the lung parenchyma and airways. PMID:25006412

  3. Acute thigh compartment syndrome post femoral vein catheterization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Mark W

    2008-08-01

    This case report presents a previously unreported etiology of acute thigh compartment syndrome following ipsilateral femoral vein catheterization, including clinical results and a brief review of the literature.

  4. [The Fabry's Disease Cardiomyopathy as Differential Diagnosis of Acute Coronary Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Oder, Daniel; Störk, Stefan; Wanner, Christoph; Ertl, Georg; Weidemann, Frank; Nordbeck, Peter

    2017-03-01

    The progressive cardiomyopathy in patients with Fabry disease is often accompanied by angina pectoris and elevated levels of high-sensitive troponin T (hs-TnT), potentially mimicking acute coronary syndrome. Here, we present to representative cases with focus on clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic settings. An overview on the cardiomyopathy associated with Fabry disease and its role as differential diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome is provided. Fabry cardiomyopathy might exhibit similar clinical and biochemical constellations as seen in acute coronary syndrome. Thus, Fabry cardiomyopathy should be considered a differential diagnosis in acute coronary syndrome, particularly in patients demonstrating left ventricular hypertrophy of unknown origin.

  5. Acute myocarditis associated with novel Middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Alhogbani, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    The novel Middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MeRS-CoV) has been identified as a cause of pneumonia; however, it has not been reported as a cause of acute myocarditis. A 60-year-old man presented with pneumonia and congestive heart failure. On the first day of admission, he was found to have an elevated troponin-l level and severe global left ventricular systolic dysfunction on echo-cardiography. The serum creatinine level was found mildly elevated. Chest radiography revealed in the lower lung fields accentuated bronchovascular lung markings and multiple small patchy opacities. Laboratory tests were negative for viruses known to cause myocarditis. Sputum sample was positive for MeRS-CoV. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance revealed evidence of acute myocarditis. the patient had all criteria specified by the international Consensus Group on CMR in Myocarditis that make a clinical suspicion for acute myocarditis. this was the first case that demonstrated that MeRS-CoV may cause acute myocarditis and acute-onset heart failure.

  6. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  8. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-17

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  10. Acute soft head syndrome in children with sickle cell anaemia in lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akodu, Samuel Olufemi; Njokanma, Olisamedua Fidelis; Diaku-Akinwumi, Ijeoma Nnenna; Ubuane, Peter Odion; Adediji, Uchechukwu Okwudili

    2014-09-01

    Acute soft head syndrome is rare complications seen in children with sickle cell anaemia. A case report of a child with sickle cell anaemia who developed acute soft head syndrome. A 12-year old known sickle cell anaemia patient presented with acute, rapidly progressive skull pain and swelling, manifestations indicative of the rare complication of SCD which is called acute soft head syndrome. Conservative treatment with intravenous fluids and analgesics and empirical use of broad-spectrum antibiotics resulted in recovery. Acute soft head syndrome is a rare complication in children with sickle cell anaemia probably related to skull infarction. It further draws attention to the importance of acute soft head syndrome as a differential to be considered for pains in the head and skull swellings in children with sickle cell anaemia.

  11. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  12. Improved outcome of acute myeloid leukaemia in Down's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Craze, J; Harrison, G; Wheatley, K; Hann, I; Chessells, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To review the clinical features, treatment, and outcome of children in the UK with Down's syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML).
DESIGN—A retrospective study of 59 children with Down's syndrome and AML presenting between 1987 and 1995. Data were obtained from hospital case notes, trial records, and by questionnaire.
RESULTS—The patients were unusually young (median age, 23 months) with a predominance of megakaryoblastic AML. Two of the seven infants who presented with abnormal myelopoesis aged 2 months or younger achieved complete spontaneous remission. Most of the older children with AML (32 of 52) were treated on recognised intensive protocols but 13 received individualised treatment and seven symptomatic treatment alone. Only four received a bone marrow transplant (BMT) in first remission. For the 45 older children who received chemotherapy the overall survival was 55% (median follow up 4.5 years). Patients on individualised protocols had a similar overall survival and toxic death rate but marginally higher relapse rate than those on standard (intensive) protocols. Children with Down's syndrome treated on the national AML 10 trial had a similar overall survival (70% v 59%) at five years to children of comparable age without Down's syndrome: their improved relapse risk (12% v 38%) offset the slight increase in deaths as a result of treatment toxicity (19% v 11%).
CONCLUSION—Neonates with Down's syndrome and abnormal myelopoesis may achieve spontaneous remission, and older children with Down's syndrome and AML can be treated successfully with intensive chemotherapy, without BMT.

 PMID:10373130

  13. Prediction of acute coronary syndromes by urinary proteome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Htun, Nay M.; Magliano, Dianna J.; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Lyons, Jasmine; Petit, Thibault; Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Ramirez-Torres, Adela; von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Maahs, David; Schanstra, Joost P.; Pontillo, Claudia; Pejchinovski, Martin; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Delles, Christian; Mischak, Harald; Staessen, Jan A.; Shaw, Jonathan E.

    2017-01-01

    Identification of individuals who are at risk of suffering from acute coronary syndromes (ACS) may allow to introduce preventative measures. We aimed to identify ACS-related urinary peptides, that combined as a pattern can be used as prognostic biomarker. Proteomic data of 252 individuals enrolled in four prospective studies from Australia, Europe and North America were analyzed. 126 of these had suffered from ACS within a period of up to 5 years post urine sampling (cases). Proteomic analysis of 84 cases and 84 matched controls resulted in the discovery of 75 ACS-related urinary peptides. Combining these to a peptide pattern, we established a prognostic biomarker named Acute Coronary Syndrome Predictor 75 (ACSP75). ACSP75 demonstrated reasonable prognostic discrimination (c-statistic = 0.664), which was similar to Framingham risk scoring (c-statistics = 0.644) in a validation cohort of 42 cases and 42 controls. However, generating by a composite algorithm named Acute Coronary Syndrome Composite Predictor (ACSCP), combining the biomarker pattern ACSP75 with the previously established urinary proteomic biomarker CAD238 characterizing coronary artery disease as the underlying aetiology, and age as a risk factor, further improved discrimination (c-statistic = 0.751) resulting in an added prognostic value over Framingham risk scoring expressed by an integrated discrimination improvement of 0.273 ± 0.048 (P < 0.0001) and net reclassification improvement of 0.405 ± 0.113 (P = 0.0007). In conclusion, we demonstrate that urinary peptide biomarkers have the potential to predict future ACS events in asymptomatic patients. Further large scale studies are warranted to determine the role of urinary biomarkers in clinical practice. PMID:28273075

  14. Hypothyroid-induced acute compartment syndrome in all extremities

    PubMed Central

    Musielak, Matthew C.; Chae, Jung Hee

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is an uncommon complication of uncontrolled hypothyroidism. If unrecognized, this can lead to ischemia, necrosis and potential limb loss. A 49-year-old female presented with the sudden onset of bilateral lower and upper extremity swelling and pain. The lower extremity anterior compartments were painful and tense. The extensor surface of the upper extremities exhibited swelling and pain. Motor function was intact, however, limited due to pain. Bilateral lower extremity fasciotomies were performed. Postoperative Day 1, upper extremity motor function decreased significantly and paresthesias occurred. She therefore underwent bilateral forearm fasciotomies. The pathogenesis of hypothyroidism-induced compartment syndrome is unclear. Thyroid-stimulating hormone-induced fibroblast activation results in increased glycosaminoglycan deposition. The primary glycosaminoglycan in hypothyroid myxedematous changes is hyaluronic acid, which binds water causing edema. This increases vascular permeability, extravasation of proteins and impaired lymphatic drainage. These contribute to increased intra-compartmental pressure and subsequent ACS. PMID:28003319

  15. [Clinico-psychopathologic varieties of the acute Kandinsky-Clerambault syndrome in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Dikaia, V I

    1985-01-01

    Acute cases of the Kandinsky-Clerambault syndrome first manifested in adulthood were studied in schizophrenic patients. On the basis of the clinical mechanisms of the development of psychosis and the specific features of acute delirious disturbances in the structure of psychosis 3 clinical variants of the acute syndrome of psychic automatism were identified: developing according to the type of reaction in the structure of acute paranoid (the first variant), according to the regularities of endogenic paroxysm in the picture of acute sensory delirium (the second variant) and according to the mechanism of exacerbation of chronic delirium entering the structure of acute interpretative delirium (the third variant).

  16. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome: a review of the Berlin definition].

    PubMed

    de Luis Cabezón, N; Sánchez Castro, I; Bengoetxea Uriarte, U X; Rodrigo Casanova, M P; García Peña, J M; Aguilera Celorrio, L

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is due to many causes. The absence of a universal definition up until now has led to a series of practical problems for a definitive diagnosis. The incidences of ARDS and Acute Lung Injury (ALI) vary widely in the current literature. The American-European Consensus Conference definition has been applied since its publication in 1994 and has helped to improve knowledge about ARDS. However, 18 years later, in 2011, the European Intensive Medicine Society, requested a team of international experts to meet in Berlin to review the ARDS definition. The purpose of the Berlin definition is not to use it as a prognostic tool, but to improve coherence between research and clinical practice.

  17. Acute Compartment Syndrome in Orthopedics: Causes, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Hasnain; Mahapatra, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Almost all orthopaedic surgeons come across acute compartment syndrome (ACS) in their clinical practice. Diagnosis of ACS mostly relies on clinical findings. If the diagnosis is missed and left untreated, it can lead to serious consequences which can endanger limb and life of the patient and also risk the clinician to face lawsuits. This review article highlights the characteristic features of ACS which will help an orthopaedic surgeon to understand the pathophysiology, natural history, high risk patients, diagnosis, and surgical management of the condition. PMID:25688303

  18. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  19. Filgrastim for the treatment of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farese, A M; MacVittie, T J

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved Neupogen(®) (filgrastim) for the treatment of patients with radiation-induced myelosuppression following a radiological/nuclear incident. It is the first medical countermeasure currently approved by the FDA for this indication under the criteria of the FDA "animal rule". This article summarizes the consequences of high-dose radiation exposure, a description of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS), the use of hematopoietic growth factors in radiation accident victims and current available treatments for H-ARS with an emphasis on the use of Neupogen in this scenario.

  20. Drug-induced pulmonary edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee-Chiong, Teofilo; Matthay, Richard A

    2004-03-01

    Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, and, to a lesser extent, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are common clinical manifestations of drug-induced lung diseases. Clinical features and radiographic appearances are generally indistinguishable from other causes of pulmonary edema and ARDS. Typical manifestations include dyspnea, chest discomfort, tachypnea, and hypoxemia. Chest radiographs commonly reveal interstitial and alveolar filling infiltrates. Unlike pulmonary edema that is due to congestive heart failure, cardiomegaly and pulmonary vascular redistribution are generally absent in cases that are drug-related. Rare cases of drug-induced myocarditis with heart failure and pulmonary edema have been described. Results from laboratory evaluation and respiratory function tests are nonspecific.

  1. Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D

    2016-02-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are hematologic diseases that frequently affect older adults. Treatment is challenging. Management of older adults with MDS and AML needs to be individualized, accounting for both the heterogeneity of disease biology and patient characteristics, which can influence life expectancy and treatment tolerance. Clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and physiologic changes of aging are needed to define optimal standards of care. This article highlights key evidence related to the management of older adults with MDS and AML and highlights future directions for research.

  2. Acute Reversible Charles Bonnet Syndrome Following Eye Patch Placement.

    PubMed

    Nan, Lian; Yanbin, Hou; Jingping, Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is characterised by recurrent vivid visual hallucinations in the presence of normal cognition. We present a case of CBS secondary to eye patching following Pars Plana Vitrectomy with an unusually acute onset in a 48-year-old woman. She presented with formed visual hallucinations that started less than 30 min after patching of her left eye. The patch was removed after 2 d, and these hallucinations persisted 2 d following eye patch removal. It is important that the ophthalmic surgeon be aware of the potential for development of CBS and offer appropriate referral and reassurance should it occur.

  3. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Pravastatin Sodium in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Prevalence of Burnout Syndrome in Patients Admitted with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prosdócimo, Ana Cláudia Giaxa; Lucina, Luciane Boreki; Marcia, Olandoski; Jobs, Priscila Megda João; Schio, Nicolle Amboni; Baldanzi, Fernanda Fachin; Costantini, Costantino Ortiz; Benevides-Pereira, Ana Maria Teresa; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Faria-Neto, José Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Background Burnout Syndrome is the extreme emotional response to chronic occupational stress, manifesting as physical and mental exhaustion. Although associated with higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, no study so far has evaluated whether the Burnout Syndrome could be a prevalent factor in non-elderly individuals active in the labor market, admitted for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Objective To evaluate the prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome in non-elderly, economically active patients, hospitalized with ACS. Methods Cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary and private cardiology center, with economically active patients aged <65 years, hospitalized with diagnosis of ACS. The Burnout Syndrome was evaluated with the Burnout Syndrome Inventory (BSI), which assesses workplace conditions and four dimensions that characterize the syndrome: emotional exhaustion (EE), emotional distancing (EmD), dehumanization (De) and professional fulfillment (PF). The Lipp’s Stress Symptoms Inventory for Adults (LSSI) was applied to evaluate global stress. Results Of 830 patients evaluated with suspected ACS, 170 met the study criteria, 90% of which were men, overall average age was 52 years, and 40.5% had an average income above 11 minimum wages. The prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome was 4.1%. When we evaluated each dimension individually, we found high EE in 34.7%, high De in 52.4%, high EDi in 30.6%, and low PF in 5.9%. The overall prevalence of stress was 87.5%. Conclusion We found a low prevalence of Burnout Syndrome in an economically active, non-elderly population among patients admitted for ACS in a tertiary and private hospital. PMID:25517388

  5. Safety and effectiveness of transdermal nicotine patch in smokers admitted with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Meine, Trip J; Patel, Manesh R; Washam, Jeffrey B; Pappas, Paul A; Jollis, James G

    2005-04-15

    An analysis of smokers admitted with acute coronary syndrome who received transdermal nicotine therapy and those who did not was performed. Propensity analysis was used to match patients. Transdermal nicotine therapy appears safe and does not have an effect on the mortality of patients with acute coronary syndromes.

  6. Acute peripheral neuropathy in adults. Guillain-Barré syndrome and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Pascuzzi, R M; Fleck, J D

    1997-08-01

    Acute paralysis in adults has an extensive assortment of etiologies. Guillian-Barré syndrome is the most common cause of acute neuropathy in adults. This review emphasizes pathophysiology, clinical features, differential diagnosis, and a practical approach to the laboratory work-up for patients with suspected Guillian-Barré syndrome. The current status of immunotherapy is reviewed.

  7. Acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome in dogs: 108 cases.

    PubMed

    Mortier, F; Strohmeyer, K; Hartmann, K; Unterer, S

    2015-06-13

    No prospective studies including large numbers of dogs with acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome (AHDS) are published so far. The aim of this case-control study was to describe signalment, history, clinical signs, laboratory values and course of disease in dogs with AHDS. Dogs (108) with idiopathic acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea (<3 days) were prospectively enrolled. Clinical assessment was performed by calculation of the 'AHDS index' (0-18). The hospital population and 21 healthy dogs served as control groups. Dogs with AHDS had a significantly lower body weight (median 9.8 kg) and age (median five years) than other dogs of the hospital population (20 kg; 10 years) (P<0.001). Predisposed breeds were Yorkshire terrier, miniature pinscher, miniature schnauzer and Maltese. The syndrome was more likely to occur during winter. Vomiting preceded the onset of bloody diarrhoea in 80 per cent of dogs and haematemesis was observed in half of those cases. Median AHDS index at presentation was 12 (range 3-17). Haematocrit was generally high (median 57.1 per cent; range 33-76 per cent), but exceeded 60 per cent only in 31.4 per cent of dogs. Haematocrit of 48.1 per cent of dogs was above reference range, as was monocyte (50.0 per cent), segmented (59.6 per cent) and band neutrophil count (45.2 per cent). A rapid clinical improvement occurred during the first 48 hours.

  8. The intersection between asthma and acute chest syndrome in children with sickle-cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    DeBaun, Michael R; Strunk, Robert C

    2016-06-18

    Acute chest syndrome is a frequent cause of acute lung disease in children with sickle-cell disease. Asthma is common in children with sickle-cell disease and is associated with increased incidence of vaso-occlusive pain events, acute chest syndrome episodes, and earlier death. Risk factors for asthma exacerbation and an acute chest syndrome episode are similar, and both can present with shortness of breath, chest pain, cough, and wheezing. Despite overlapping risk factors and symptoms, an acute exacerbation of asthma or an episode of acute chest syndrome are two distinct entities that need disease-specific management strategies. Although understanding has increased about asthma as a comorbidity in sickle-cell disease and its effects on morbidity, substantial gaps remain in knowledge about best management.

  9. The intersection between asthma and acute chest syndrome in children with sickle-cell anaemia

    PubMed Central

    DeBaun, Michael R; Strunk, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Acute chest syndrome is a frequent cause of acute lung disease in children with sickle-cell disease. Asthma is common in children with sickle-cell disease and is associated with increased incidence of vaso-occlusive pain events, acute chest syndrome episodes, and earlier death. Risk factors for asthma exacerbation and an acute chest syndrome episode are similar, and both can present with shortness of breath, chest pain, cough, and wheezing. Despite overlapping risk factors and symptoms, an acute exacerbation of asthma or an episode of acute chest syndrome are two distinct entities that need disease-specific management strategies. Although understanding has increased about asthma as a comorbidity in sickle-cell disease and its effects on morbidity, substantial gaps remain in knowledge about best management. PMID:27353685

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Wartime Military Burns: Application of the Berlin Criteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome in wartime military burns: Application of the Berlin criteria Slava M. Belenkiy, MD, Allison R. Buel, DO, Jeremy...Andriy I. Batchinsky, MD, Leopoldo C. Cancio, MD, and Kevin K. Chung, MD, San Antonio, Texas BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS...EVIDENCE: Epidemiologic/prognostic study, level III. KEY WORDS: Mechanical ventilation; adult respiratory distress syndrome ; the Berlin definition; combat

  11. Catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome presenting as acute vascular occlusion in a young female patient.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Joaquín Valle; Del Pozo, Francisco Javier Fonseca; Álvarez, Manuel Vaquero; Pedraza, Jorge; Aguayo, Miguel Angel; Sanchez, Almudena

    2016-10-10

    Acquired thrombotic and thromboembolic disorders may be presented initially with symptoms and signs of acute ischaemia or organ dysfunction that will lead many of these patients to seek care in the emergency department. We report a case of a 19-year-old female patient who developed catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS syndrome or Asherson syndrome) 6 weeks post stillbirth with an initial presentation of acute vascular occlusion. The patient was immediately operated and anticoagulated with significant improvement.

  12. Acute Neurological Involvement in Diarrhea-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Thérésa; Elmaleh, Monique; Charbit, Marina; Launay, Emma Allain; Harambat, Jérôme; Brun, Muriel; Ranchin, Bruno; Bandin, Flavio; Cloarec, Sylvie; Bourdat-Michel, Guylhene; Piètrement, Christine; Champion, Gérard; Ulinski, Tim; Deschênes, Georges

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Neurologic involvement is the most threatening complication of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS). Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We report a retrospective multicenter series of 52 patients with severe initial neurologic involvement that occurred in the course of D+HUS. Results: Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection was documented in 24. All except two patients had acute renal failure that required peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, or both techniques. A first group of eight patients remained with normal consciousness; five of them had protracted seizures. A second group of 23 patients had stuporous coma; five of these had protracted severe seizures, and 18 had a neurologic defect including pyramidal syndrome, hemiplegia or hemiparesia, and extrapyramidal syndrome. A third group of 21 patients had severe coma. Plasma exchanges were undertaken in 25 patients, 11 of whom were treated within 24 hours after the first neurologic sign; four died, two survived with severe sequelae, and five were alive without neurologic defect. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for 29 patients showed that (1) every structure of the central nervous system was susceptible to involvement; (2) no correlation seemed to exist between special profile of localization on early MRI and the final prognosis; and (3) MRI did not exhibit any focal lesions in three patients. The overall prognosis of the series was marked by the death of nine patients and severe sequelae in 13. Conclusions: Neurologic involvement is associated with a severe renal disease but does not lead systematically to death or severe disability. PMID:20498239

  13. [Transformation of myelodysplastic syndrome to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: 2 new cases].

    PubMed

    Guillén, M; Madero, L; Parra, L; Hernández, C; Herrero, B; Carceller, F; Lassaletta, A; Sevilla, J

    2013-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal disorders of hematopoietic stem cells, with a variable risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. Progression into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is an extremely rare event, with very few cases published in children. In this report, we describe two cases of myelodysplastic syndromes that progressed to ALL. Moreover, we review previously reported cases of MDS transformation to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the pediatric population whose prognosis seems to be similar to that for adults.

  14. Acute Liver Failure Due to Budd-Chiari Syndrome in the Setting of Cardiac Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Stine, Jonathan G; Newton, Kelly; Vinayak, Ajeet G

    2015-04-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the heart, specifically cardiac sarcomas, are rare and mainly diagnosed at autopsy. Acute Budd-Chiari syndrome is a recognized cause of acute liver failure and has been associated with several rare cardiac tumors: atrial myxoma, caval rhabdomyosarcoma, and primary cardiac adenocarcinoma. We present the first case of a fatal, highly differentiated cardiac synovial sarcoma that presented as acute liver failure from Budd-Chiari syndrome.

  15. Acute fulminant neuropathy in a patient with Churg-Strauss syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, K. K.; Yeung, H. M.; Loo, K. T.; Chan, H. M.; Wong, C. K.; Li, P. C.

    1997-01-01

    We report a patient with an acute neuropathy initially mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome, both clinically and electrophysiologically. Persistent eosinophilia, positive antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody and eosinophilic vasculitis in sural nerve biopsy later confirmed Churg-Strauss syndrome. Since vasculitic neuropathy can present in an acute and fulminant form, the role of early antibody testing and sural nerve biopsy in atypical cases of acute neuropathy is emphasized. Images Figure PMID:9156128

  16. A Pathophysiologic Approach to Biomarkers in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blondonnet, Raiko; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Sapin, Vincent; Jabaudon, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute-onset hypoxic condition with radiographic bilateral lung infiltration. It is characterized by an acute exudative phase combining diffuse alveolar damage and lung edema followed by a later fibroproliferative phase. Despite an improved understanding of ARDS pathobiology, our ability to predict the development of ARDS and risk-stratify patients with the disease remains limited. Biomarkers may help to identify patients at the highest risk of developing ARDS, assess response to therapy, predict outcome, and optimize enrollment in clinical trials. After a short description of ARDS pathobiology, here, we review the scientific evidence that supports the value of various ARDS biomarkers with regard to their major biological roles in ARDS-associated lung injury and/or repair. Ongoing research aims at identifying and characterizing novel biomarkers, in order to highlight relevant mechanistic explorations of lung injury and repair, and to ultimately develop innovative therapeutic approaches for ARDS patients. This review will focus on the pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications of biomarkers in ARDS and on their utility to ultimately improve patient care.

  17. A Pathophysiologic Approach to Biomarkers in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blondonnet, Raiko; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Sapin, Vincent; Jabaudon, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute-onset hypoxic condition with radiographic bilateral lung infiltration. It is characterized by an acute exudative phase combining diffuse alveolar damage and lung edema followed by a later fibroproliferative phase. Despite an improved understanding of ARDS pathobiology, our ability to predict the development of ARDS and risk-stratify patients with the disease remains limited. Biomarkers may help to identify patients at the highest risk of developing ARDS, assess response to therapy, predict outcome, and optimize enrollment in clinical trials. After a short description of ARDS pathobiology, here, we review the scientific evidence that supports the value of various ARDS biomarkers with regard to their major biological roles in ARDS-associated lung injury and/or repair. Ongoing research aims at identifying and characterizing novel biomarkers, in order to highlight relevant mechanistic explorations of lung injury and repair, and to ultimately develop innovative therapeutic approaches for ARDS patients. This review will focus on the pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications of biomarkers in ARDS and on their utility to ultimately improve patient care. PMID:26980924

  18. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  20. Post-therapeutic acute malignant myeloproliferative syndrome and acute nonlymphocytic leukemia in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, G.A.; Aggarwal, K.K.; Han, T.

    1982-12-01

    In a prospective randomized study of treatment with radiation therapy (RT) or RT + chemotherapy (CT) for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Stages I-III, one patient developed an acute malignant myeloproliferative syndrome (AMMS) and four others acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL). There was correlation between the intensity of treatment and development of this complication: Among patients treated with local radiation with or without chemotherapy no cases of AMMS or ANLL were observed. However, patients treated with total lymphoid irradiation alone (TLI) had an observed to expected ratio of 162. Among patients treated with TLI plus CT this ratio increased to over 1000. The cytogenetic, clinical, and hematologic abnormalities of these patients are discussed.

  1. The acute gastrointestinal subsyndrome of the acute radiation syndrome: a rhesus macaque model.

    PubMed

    MacVittie, Thomas J; Farese, Ann M; Bennett, Alexander; Gelfond, Daniel; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Tudor, Gregory; Booth, Catherine; McFarland, Emylee; Jackson, William

    2012-10-01

    The development of medical countermeasures against the acute gastrointestinal subsyndrome of the acute radiation syndrome in humans requires well characterized and validated animal models. These models must adhere to the criteria of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Animal Rule and consider the natural history and clinical context of the human radiation response and treatment in the nuclear terrorist scenario. The models must define the radiation dose- and time-dependent relationships for mortality and major signs of morbidity, including concurrent damage in other organs, such as the bone marrow, that may contribute to the overall mortality and morbidity. There are no such models of the gastrointestinal syndrome in response to total-body irradiation in the nonhuman primate. Herein, these parameters are defined for the rhesus macaque exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation and administered medical management. Rhesus macaques (n = 69) were exposed bilaterally to 6 MV linear accelerator-derived photon total body irradiation to midline tissue (thorax) doses ranging from 10.0 to 14.0 Gy at 0.80 Gy min(-1). Following irradiation, all animals were administered supportive care consisting of fluids, anti-emetics, anti-diarrheal medication, antibiotics, blood transfusions, analgesics, and nutrition. The primary endpoint was survival at 15 d post-irradiation. Secondary endpoints included indices of dehydration, diarrhea, weight loss, hematological parameters, cellular histology of the small and large intestine, and mean survival time of decedents. Mortality within the 15-d in vivo study defined the acute gastrointestinal syndrome and provided an LD30/15 of 10.76 Gy, LD50/15 of 11.33 Gy, and an LD70/15 of 11.90 Gy. Intestinal crypt and villus loss were dose- and time-dependent with an apparent nadir 7 d post-irradiation and recovery noted thereafter. Severe myelosuppression and thrombocytopenia were noted in all animals, requiring the administration of

  2. Pleural effusions in patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Faiz, Saadia A; Bashoura, Lara; Lei, Xiudong; Sampat, Keeran R; Brown, Tiffany C; Eapen, George A; Morice, Rodolfo C; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Jimenez, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    Pleural effusions are rarely observed in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Therefore the underlying etiology of pleural effusions and the efficacy and safety of pleural procedures in this population has not been well studied. In a retrospective review of cases from 1997 to 2007, we identified 111 patients with acute leukemia or MDS/MPN who underwent pleural procedures. Clinical characteristics were reviewed, and survival outcomes were estimated by Kaplan-Meier methods. A total of 270 pleural procedures were performed in 111 patients (69 AML, 27 ALL, 15 MDS/MPN). The main indications for pleural procedures were possible infection (49%) and respiratory symptoms (48%), and concomitant clinical symptoms included fever (34%), dyspnea (74%), chest pain (24%) and cough (37%). Most patients had active disease (61%). The most frequent etiology of pleural effusions was infection (47%), followed by malignancy (36%). Severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 20 × 10(3)/µL) was present in 43% of the procedures, yet the procedural complication rate was only 1.9%. Multivariate analysis revealed that older age, AML, MDS/MPN and active disease status were associated with a shorter median overall survival. Infection and malignant involvement are the most common causes of pleural effusion in patients with acute leukemia or MDS. After optimizing platelet count and coagulopathy, thoracentesis may be performed safely and with high diagnostic yield in this population. Survival in these patients is determined by the response to treatment of the hematologic malignancy.

  3. Pseudo-acute myocardial infarction due to transient apical ventricular dysfunction syndrome (Takotsubo syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Bruno Araújo; Cidrão, Alan Alves de Lima; Sousa, Ítalo Bruno dos Santos; Ferreira, José Adailson da Silva; Messias Neto, Valdevino Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Takotsubo syndrome is characterized by predominantly medial-apical transient left ventricular dysfunction, which is typically triggered by physical or emotional stress. The present article reports the case of a 61-year-old female patient presenting with dizziness, excessive sweating, and sudden state of ill feeling following an episode involving intense emotional stress. The physical examination and electrocardiogram were normal upon admission, but the troponin I and creatine kinase-MB concentrations were increased. Acute myocardial infarction without ST segment elevation was suspected, and coronary angiography was immediately performed, which showed severe diffuse left ventricular hypokinesia, medial-apical systolic ballooning, and a lack of significant coronary injury. The patient was referred to the intensive care unit and was successfully treated with supportive therapy. As this case shows, Takotsubo syndrome might simulate the clinical manifestations of acute myocardial infarction, and coronary angiography is necessary to distinguish between both myocardial infarction and myocardial infarction in the acute stage. The present patient progressed with spontaneous resolution of the ventricular dysfunction without any sequelae. PMID:23887762

  4. Dyspnoea management in acute coronary syndrome patients treated with ticagrelor

    PubMed Central

    Parodi, Guido; Storey, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of dyspnoea in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients has always been considered a challenging diagnostic and therapeutic clinical scenario. P2Y12 platelet receptor inhibitors (i.e., clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor) are currently the cornerstone of treatment of ACS patients. Thus, in the last few years, the potential association between ACS and dyspnoea has also become more challenging with the increasing use of ticagrelor in these patients due to its beneficial effects on ischaemic event prevention and mortality, since ticagrelor can induce dyspnoea as a side effect. The present article is intended to review the current literature regarding dyspnoea occurrence in ACS patients, especially those treated with ticagrelor, and to propose ticagrelor-associated dyspnoea management recommendations based on current knowledge. PMID:25267878

  5. The acute lymphoblastic leukemia of Down Syndrome - Genetics and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izraeli, Shai

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down Syndrome (DS) are at markedly increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ALL is of B cell precursor (BCP) phenotype. T-ALL is only rarely diagnosed as well as infant leukemia. Gene expression profiling and cytogenetics suggest that DS-ALL is an heterogeneous disease. More than half of the leukemias are characterized by aberrant expression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor CRLF2 caused by genomic rearrangements. These rearrangements are often associated with somatic activating mutations in the receptors or in the downstream components of the JAK-STAT pathway. The activation of JAK-STAT pathway suggests that targeted therapy with JAK or downstream inhibitors may be effective for children with DS-ALL. The basis of the increased risk of BCP-ALL and in particular of the CRLF2 aberrations is presently unknown. Neither is it known which genes on the trisomic chromosome 21 are involved.

  6. Advances in antiplatelet therapy for acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Hussain; Ruparelia, Neil

    2012-07-01

    Admissions to emergency care centres with acute coronary syndromes remain one of the principal burdens on healthcare systems in the Western world. Early pharmacological treatment in these patients is crucial, lessening the impact on both morbidity and mortality, with the cornerstone of management being antiplatelet agents. While aspirin and clopidogrel have been the drugs of choice for nearly a decade, an array of newer, more potent antiplatelet agents are now available or in late stage development. Data are rapidly gathering suggesting these agents have superior anti-ischaemic properties, improving patient outcomes, but that for some agents increased vigilance and appropriate patient selection may be necessary to guard against bleeding complications. In this review, the authors aim to deliver an overview of the changing field of antiplatelet therapy and provide information about the relative risks and benefits of these newer agents, many of which will be entering widespread clinical use imminently.

  7. Acute digital ischemia: A rare presentation of antisynthetase syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jin Ei; Palakodeti, Sandeep; Koster, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome (ASS) is recognized as a subgroup of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs). It is associated with autoantibodies directed against aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) synthetase enzymes. We report the first case of anti-PL-7/anti-SSA 52kD ASS presenting as acute digital ischemia, an association not described previously. Occlusive vasculopathy is a rare but serious manifestation that can be seen at presentation in patients with ASS and may herald the onset of severe interstitial lung disease (ILD). Comprehensive evaluation should be performed to confirm the presence of subclinical myositis. Extensive myositis-specific antibody testing is strongly recommended even if initial screening autoimmune serologies are unrevealing. PMID:28293456

  8. [Hematopoiesis during remote period after acute radiation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kotenko, K V; Bushmanov, A Iu; Suvorova, L A; Galstian, I A; Nadezhina, N M; Nugis, V Iu

    2011-01-01

    Based on the long (19.7 +/- 1.8 year) hemopoiesis follow-up study in 152 patients after acute radiation syndrome (ARS) as a result of exposure to gamma-, gamma-beta and gamma-eta radiation in a wide dose range (1.2-9.8 Gy) it was detected that cytopenia appears in the late consequences period: thrombocytopenia was found in 26.9% cases, leukocytopenia, neutropenia and lymphocytopenia--in 13.1% patients. A higher ARS degree causes the increase of various disorders (cytopenia and cytosis) in the late period. It reflects a tight interrelation between blood cell contents and radiation dose. Frequency of cytopenias increases if such somatic disorders: persistent hepatitis, hepatic cirrhosis and late radiation ulcers as appear.

  9. The pathophysiology, diagnosis and current management of acute compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, James; Haddad, Behrooz; Khan, Wasim S

    2014-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is a surgical emergency warranting prompt evaluation and treatment. It can occur with any elevation in interstitial pressure in a closed osseo-fascial compartment. Resultant ischaemic damage may be irreversible within six hours and can result in long-term morbidity and even death. The diagnosis is largely clinical with the classical description of 'pain out of proportion to the injury'. Compartment pressure monitors can be a helpful adjunct where the diagnosis is in doubt. Initial treatment is with the removal of any constricting dressings or casts, avoiding hypotension and optimizing tissue perfusion by keeping the limb at heart level. If symptoms persist, definitive treatment is necessary with timely surgical decompression of all the involved compartments. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnosis and current management of ACS.

  10. Orchitis: a complication of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS).

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Qi, Lihua; Chi, Xiaochun; Yang, Jingjing; Wei, Xiaohong; Gong, Encong; Peh, Suatcheng; Gu, Jiang

    2006-02-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus has been known to damage multiple organs; however, little is known about its impact on the reproductive system. In the present study, we analyzed the pathological changes of testes from six patients who died of SARS. Results suggested that SARS caused orchitis. All SARS testes displayed widespread germ cell destruction, few or no spermatozoon in the seminiferous tubule, thickened basement membrane, and leukocyte infiltration. The numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes and CD68+ macrophages increased significantly in the interstitial tissue compared with the control group (P < 0.05). SARS viral genomic sequences were not detected in the testes by in situ hybridization. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated abundant IgG precipitation in the seminiferous epithelium of SARS testes, indicating possible immune response as the cause for the damage. Our findings indicated that orchitis is a complication of SARS. It further suggests that the reproductive functions should be followed and evaluated in recovered male SARS patients.

  11. Hyponatremia in acute brain disease: the cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Betjes, Michiel G.H.

    2002-02-01

    Hyponatremia in acute brain disease is a common occurrence, especially after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Originally, excessive natriuresis, called cerebral salt wasting, and later the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), were considered to be the causes of hyponatremia. In recent years, it has become clear that most of these patients are volume-depleted and have a negative sodium balance, consistent with the original description of cerebral salt wasting. Elevated plasma concentrations of atrial or brain natriuretic peptide have been identified as the putative natriuretic factor. Hyponatremia and volume depletion may aggravate neurological symptoms, and timely treatment with adequate replacement of water and NaCl is essential. The use of fludrocortisone to increase sodium reabsorption by the renal tubules may be an alternative approach.

  12. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: prevention and early recognition.

    PubMed

    de Haro, Candelaria; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Torrents, Eva; Artigas, Antonio

    2013-04-24

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is common in critically ill patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU). ARDS results in increased use of critical care resources and healthcare costs, yet the overall mortality associated with these conditions remains high. Research focusing on preventing ARDS and identifying patients at risk of developing ARDS is necessary to develop strategies to alter the clinical course and progression of the disease. To date, few strategies have shown clear benefits. One of the most important obstacles to preventive interventions is the difficulty of identifying patients likely to develop ARDS. Identifying patients at risk and implementing prevention strategies in this group are key factors in preventing ARDS. This review will discuss early identification of at-risk patients and the current prevention strategies.

  13. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome: Clinical Outcome and Prognostic Correlates1

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Man Leung; Yuen, Hon; Lai, Sik To

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) poses a major threat to the health of people worldwide. We performed a retrospective case series analysis to assess clinical outcome and identify pretreatment prognostic correlates of SARS, managed under a standardized treatment protocol. We studied 127 male and 196 female patients with a mean age of 41±14 (range 18–83). All patients, except two, received ribavirin and steroid combination therapy. In 115 (36%) patients, the course of disease was limited. Pneumonitis progressed rapidly in the remaining patients. Sixty-seven (21%) patients required intensive care, and 42 (13%) required ventilator support. Advanced age, high admission neutrophil count, and high initial lactate dehydrogenase level were independent correlates of an adverse clinical outcome. SARS-associated coronavirus caused severe illnesses in most patients, despite early treatment with ribavirin and steroid. This study has identified three independent pretreatment prognostic correlates. PMID:14519241

  14. Acute digital ischemia: A rare presentation of antisynthetase syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jin Ei; Palakodeti, Sandeep; Koster, Matthew J

    2017-03-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome (ASS) is recognized as a subgroup of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs). It is associated with autoantibodies directed against aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) synthetase enzymes. We report the first case of anti-PL-7/anti-SSA 52kD ASS presenting as acute digital ischemia, an association not described previously. Occlusive vasculopathy is a rare but serious manifestation that can be seen at presentation in patients with ASS and may herald the onset of severe interstitial lung disease (ILD). Comprehensive evaluation should be performed to confirm the presence of subclinical myositis. Extensive myositis-specific antibody testing is strongly recommended even if initial screening autoimmune serologies are unrevealing.

  15. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  16. Increased QT interval dispersion in diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome with atypical symptoms and EKG.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Fernando; Chávez, Elibet; Machín, Wilfredo J; Alonso, Alain; González, Vielka

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION EKG remains a highly valuable tool for heart disease management. Corrected QT interval dispersion is a useful EKG parameter to assess prognosis in ischemic heart disease and specifically acute coronary syndrome. Understanding QT interval physiopathology helps assess importance of QT measurement in this context. Although increased QT dispersion is an ominous prognostic marker, its utility has not been evaluated for all types of acute coronary syndrome, even though in many circumstances it is the only tool available for diagnosing patients with equivocal EKG signs and/or atypical symptoms. OBJECTIVE Describe corrected QT interval dispersion in acute coronary syndrome in three groups of patients-with ST elevation, without ST elevation, and without ST elevation with equivocal EKG signs-admitted to the intensive care unit of Celestino Hernández Robau University Hospital in Santa Clara, Cuba, from January 2010 through June 2011. METHODS A descriptive retrospective study was conducted in 194 patients admitted with diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. QT interval was measured and its dispersion calculated for the first EKG after symptom onset. Patterns were assessed for typical and atypical clinical presentations, and unequivocal and equivocal EKG signs. RESULTS Nonclassifiable acute coronary syndrome was found in 6.7% of patients (13/194), the majority of whom had increased QT dispersion (76.9%, 10/13). There were significant differences in QT dispersion patterns between patients with typical and atypical presentations and between patients with equivocal and unequivocal EKG findings. In non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome and nonclassifiable acute coronary syndrome with increased dispersion, atypical presentation was the most common (65.5%, 19/29; and 90%, 9/10, respectively). CONCLUSION Corrected QT interval dispersion is a useful diagnostic tool for acute coronary syndrome, especially when patients present with atypical symptoms and equivocal EKG

  17. Diagnostic Performance of Resting CT Myocardial Perfusion in Patients With Possible Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Kelley R.; Busey, Janet; Mitsumori, Lee M.; Strote, Jared; Caldwell, James H.; Busch, Joshua H.; Shuman, William P.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Coronary CT angiography has high sensitivity, but modest specificity, to detect acute coronary syndrome. We studied whether adding resting CT myocardial perfusion imaging improved the detection of acute coronary syndrome. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Patients with low-to-intermediate cardiac risk presenting with possible acute coronary syndrome received both the standard of care evaluation and a research thoracic 64-MDCT examination. Patients with an obstructive (> 50%) stenosis or a nonevaluable coronary segment on CT were diagnosed with possible acute coronary syndrome. CT perfusion was determined by applying gray and color Hounsfield unit maps to resting CT angiography images. Adjudicated patient diagnoses were based on the standard of care and 3-month follow-up. Patient-level diagnostic performance for acute coronary syndrome was calculated for coronary CT, CT perfusion, and combined techniques. RESULTS A total of 105 patients were enrolled. Of the nine (9%) patients with acute coronary syndrome, all had obstructive CT stenoses but only three had abnormal CT perfusion. CT perfusion was normal in all other patients. To detect acute coronary syndrome, CT angiography had 100% sensitivity, 89% specificity, and a positive predictive value of 45%. For CT perfusion, specificity and positive predictive value were each 100%, and sensitivity was 33%. Combined cardiac CT and CT perfusion had similar specificity but a higher positive predictive value (100%) than did CT angiography. CONCLUSION Resting CT perfusion using CT angiographic images may have high specificity and may improve CT positive predictive value for acute coronary syndrome without added radiation and contrast. However, normal resting CT perfusion cannot exclude acute coronary syndrome. PMID:23617513

  18. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. A Case of Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome Presenting With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kyung-Suk; Ko, Jaehoon; Lee, Seong Soo; Shin, Beomsu; Choi, Dong-Chull

    2014-01-01

    Although idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome(IHES) commonly involves the lung, it is rarely associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Here we describe a case of IHES presented in conjunction with ARDS. A 37-year-old male visited the emergency department at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea, with a chief complaint of dyspnea. Blood tests showed profound peripheral eosinophilia and thrombocytopenia. Patchy areas of consolidation with ground-glass opacity were noticed in both lower lung zones on chest radiography. Rapid progression of dyspnea and hypoxia despite supplement of oxygen necessitated the use of mechanical ventilation. Eosinophilic airway inflammation was subsequently confirmed by bronchoalveolar lavage, leading to a diagnosis of IHES. High-dose corticosteroids were administered, resulting in a dramatic clinical response. PMID:24404401

  20. Rare Case of Posterior Reversible Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Secondary to Acute Chest Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Daniel; El-Sherif, Yasir

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 29/m with a history of sickle cell disease who presented to the emergency department with sudden onset of chest, trunk, extremity, and back pain, consistent in quality and severity with the patient's usual pain crises. Soon after admission to the medical unit for acute chest syndrome (ACS), the patient developed sudden onset of hypertension associated with left sided hemiplegia, lethargy, dysarthria, aphasia, and left sided facial droop. Neuroimaging revealed that on MRI Brain there was multifocal extensive signal abnormality and a small focal areas of hemorrhage compatible with posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES). Patient was treated with levetiracetam and phenytoin and improved soon afterwards, with resolution seen on follow-up MRI two months later. PMID:27957377

  1. Acute motor-sensory axonal neuropathy with hyperreflexia in Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Ayşe; Dursun, Şiar; Akyildiz, Utku Ogan; Oktay, Seçil; Tataroğlu, Cengiz

    2015-04-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is an acute inflammatory autoimmune polyradiculoneuritis. Progressive motor weakness and areflexia are essential for its diagnosis. Hyperreflexia has rarely been reported in the early healing period of Guillain-Barré syndrome following Campylobacter jejuni infection in patients with acute motor axonal neuropathy with antiganglioside antibody positivity. In this study, we report a 12-year-old girl presenting with complaints of inability to walk, numbness in hands and feet, and hyperactive deep tendon reflexes since the onset of the clinical picture, diagnosed with acute motor-sensory axonal neuropathy type of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  2. Cynomolgus Macaque as an Animal Model for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Cynomolgus Macaque as an Animal Model for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome James V. Lawler 1¤a , Timothy P. Endy 2¤b , Lisa E. Hensley 2 , Aura...model for severe acute respiratory syndrome . PLoS Med 3(5): e149. Received: July 5, 2005 Accepted: January 10, 2006 Published: April 18, 2006 DOI...United States of America A B S T R A C T Background The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002 and 2003 affected global health and

  3. Pleural effusion complicating acute peritoneal dialysis in hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Butani, L; Polinsky, M S; Kaiser, B A; Baluarte, H J

    1998-11-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a leading cause of acute renal failure (ARF) in children, and one for which treatment with peritoneal dialysis (PD) is often necessary. Between January 1982 and December 1996, 176 children received PD for ARF at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children; 34 (19%) of whom had HUS. Of these 34, 7 (20%) developed pleural effusions (PE) while receiving PD, whereas none of the remaining 142 children with other causes of ARF did so. The mean age of the 7 affected children was 5.2 (range 0.4-17) years; none had heart failure or nephrotic syndrome, nor had any of them undergone thoracic surgery. PE were diagnosed by chest radiograph at an interval of 2 (range 1-3) days after starting PD. Thereafter, 4 (57%) patients were successfully maintained on a modified PD prescription; 2 others were converted to hemodialysis and 1 to continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration. Although PE are a known complication of PD, none of the patients so treated for non-HUS related ARF developed them. Whether they represent a purely mechanical complication of PD, or are in some way attributable to HUS itself, is not entirely clear. Regardless, when children with HUS require PD, physicians should monitor for the development of this potential complication to minimize the risk of serious respiratory compromise.

  4. Update on management of cardiac arrhythmias in acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Willich, T; Goette, A

    2015-04-01

    This review summarizes different types of arrhythmias in patients with acute coronary syndromes and provides an overview of the available therapeutic options for acute care and management of critical arrhythmias. The different therapeutic options are depending on the origin and type of arrhythmia. The main common dominant mechanisms are intramural re-entry in ischemia and triggered activity in reperfusion. The different forms of arrhythmia were explained in detail. Atrial arrhythmias are mainly atrial fibrillation; other forms are rare and usually self-limited. As therapeutic options antiarrhythmic drug therapy with beta-blockers or amiodarone and direct current cardioversion are suitable. Ventricular arrhythmias can be divided in premature ventricular complexes, accelerated idioventricular rhythm, non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT), ventricular fibrillation (VF) and electrical storm. As therapeutic options antiarrhythmic drug therapy, implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy (ICD), radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) and stellate ganglion blockade are available. The treatment with antiarrhythmic drug is rather cautious recommended, with the exception of beta-blockers. An additional drug therapy with ranolazine may be considered. The advantage of ICD therapy for long-term primary or secondary prophylactic therapy has been well documented. ICD therapy is associated with significant reduction in mortality compared with antiarrhythmic drug therapy (mainly amiodarone), with the exception of beta-blockers. RFA and stellate ganglion blockade are rather intended as therapeutically options for incessant VT/VF or electrical storm.

  5. Diagnostic Utility of Neuregulin for Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Jeremy; Smith, Holly M.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Liu, Dandan; Carlise, Jahred; Tortora, Laura; Storrow, Alan B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic test characteristics of serum neuregulin-1β (NRG-1β) for the detection of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We recruited emergency department patients presenting with signs and symptoms prompting an evaluation for ACS. Serum troponin and neuregulin-1β levels were compared between those who had a final discharge diagnosis of myocardial infarction (STEMI and NSTEMI) and those who did not, as well as those who more broadly had a final discharge diagnosis of ACS (STEMI, NSTEMI, and unstable angina). Of 319 study participants, 11% had evidence of myocardial infarction, and 19.7% had a final diagnosis of ACS. Patients with MI had median neuregulin levels of 0.16 ng/mL (IQR [0.16–24.54]). Compared to the median of those without MI, 1.46 ng/mL (IQR [0.16–15.02]), there was no significant difference in the distribution of results (P = 0.63). Median neuregulin levels for patients with ACS were 0.65 ng/mL (IQR [0.16–24.54]). There was no statistical significance compared to those without ACS who had a median of 1.40 ng/mL (IQR [0.16–14.19]) (P = 0.95). Neuregulin did not perform successfully as a biomarker for acute MI or ACS in the emergency department. PMID:27110055

  6. Acute Coronary Syndromes in Women: Recent Treatment Trends and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Garth

    2016-01-01

    In the USA and internationally, women experience farranging differences with respect to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and myocardial infarction (MI). Women suffer from more comorbidities than men, such as smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and poor mental health. They some-times exhibit atypical MI presentation symptoms and are overall less likely to present with chest pain. Women are more likely than men to encounter delays between the onset of symptoms and arrival at the hospital or to guideline treatment. The use of various surgical and pharmacological treatments, including revascularization approaches, also differs. Women, on average, have worse outcomes than men following MI, with more complications, higher mortality rates, and poorer recovery. Internationally, outcomes are similar despite various differences in health care and culture in non-US countries. In this review, we detail differences regarding ACS and MI in women, describing their complex correlations and discussing their possible causes. Educational approaches that are tailored to women might help to reduce the incidence of ACS and MI, as well as outcomes following hospitalization. Although outcomes following acute MI have been improving over the years, women may require special consideration in order to see continued improvement. PMID:26884685

  7. Wallenberg Syndrome: An Exceptional Cause of Acute Vertigo in Children.

    PubMed

    Ehresmann, Aude Ménétrey; Van, Hélène Cao; Merlini, Laura; Fluss, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of acute vertigo in childhood is often challenging, but fortunately a central cause is rarely identified. We present the case of a 7-year-old boy who developed, after a mild head trauma, a rotary vertigo associated with nausea and vomiting. A posttraumatic peripheral vestibular dysfunction was first suspected but not confirmed by an otoneurological evaluation. When subtle neurological signs were elicited, a brain magnetic resonance imaging was promptly requested. This showed a small infarct on the lateral posterior left part of the medulla oblongata of the brainstem, typical of Wallenberg syndrome. Vascular imaging was normal and no defined etiology was found. The child was started on prophylactic acetylsalicylic acid. The rapid disappearance of vertigo was noted. On follow-up at 6 months, there has been no recurrence and neurological examination was fully normal. Our case extends the differential diagnosis of acute vertigo in childhood that rarely includes the possibility of a brainstem infarct whose recognition through appropriate clinical examination is nevertheless capital for appropriate investigations and management.

  8. A consensus statement on lipid management after acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schiele, François; Farnier, Michel; Krempf, Michel; Bruckert, Eric; Ferrières, Jean

    2016-11-17

    In patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome (ACS), the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology give a Class I, Level A recommendation for the prescription of high-intensity statins to be initiated as early as possible, regardless of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level. Although statins are widely prescribed after ACS, the intensity of therapy and the proportion of patients achieving target LDL-C values are often not in line with recommendations due to a lack of compliance with guidelines by the physicians, a lack of compliance with treatment or poor tolerance by patients, and poor dose adaptation. In this context, a group of French physicians came together to define strategies to facilitate and improve the management of lipid-lowering therapy after ACS. This paper outlines the scientific rationale for the use of statins at the acute phase of ACS, the utility of ezetimibe, the measurement of LDL-C during the course of ACS, the opportunities for detecting familial hypercholesterolaemia and the results of the consensus for the management of lipid-lowering therapy, illustrated in two decision-making algorithms.

  9. A Case of Acute Budd-Chiari Syndrome Complicating Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome Presenting as Acute Abdomen and Responding to Tight Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yasushi; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman with primary antiphospholipid syndrome was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department of our hospital with fever, acute abdomen, watery diarrhea, and extremely high levels of inflammatory parameters. She had a history of left lower limb deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism and was taking warfarin potassium. Acute gastroenteritis was suspected and an antibiotic was administered, but symptoms progressed. Abdominal ultrasonography showed occlusion of the left hepatic vein and the middle hepatic vein and her D-dimer level was high. Accordingly, Budd-Chiari syndrome was diagnosed and high-dose intravenous infusion of heparin was initiated. Her abdominal symptoms improved and the levels of inflammatory parameters and D-dimer decreased rapidly. It is known that antiphospholipid syndrome can be complicated by Budd-Chiari syndrome that usually occurs as subacute or chronic onset, but acute onset is rare. It is difficult to diagnose acute Budd-Chiari syndrome complicating antiphospholipid syndrome and this complication generally has a poor outcome. However, the present case can get early diagnosis and successful treatment with tight anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27672472

  10. Acute Angle Closure Glaucoma with Capilllary Leak Syndrome Following Snake Bite

    PubMed Central

    George, Twinkle Ann; AV, Asha; Ravindran, Risha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute angle closure glaucoma is rarely seen as complication of snake bite.We report three cases of bilateral acute angle closure glaucoma with capillary leak syndrome and acute renal failure secondary to hematotoxic snake bites. We are also briefly discussing the association of capillary leak syndrome and angle closure glaucoma in hematotoxic snake bite. This is the first time an association between angle closure and capillary leak syndrome following snake bite is reported. Study type: Descriptive case series. Materials and Methods: Records of all patients admitted to ICU with snake bite were reviewed to identify cases developing acute angle closure glaucoma. These cases with acute angle closure glaucoma are analysed in detail for systemic condition. Diagnosis, management and outcome of cases are described Results: Of the 119 snake bites admitted, 47 patients had confirmed hematotoxic snake bite. Fifteen of these patients underwent hemodialysis for acute renal failure. Seven of them were diagnosed to have capillary leak syndrome and all of them complained of decreased vision. Three of the 7 cases had acute angle closure glaucoma on the second day of bite. One of the patients expired and other two recovered fully, both of them had normal IOP and good vision at one month follow-up. Conclusion: Acute angle closure glaucoma seems to be associated with systemic capillary leak syndrome in hematotoxic snake bite. High suspicion, early recognition, timely and appropriate treatment can prevent visual loss in this rare complication. PMID:25478432

  11. Update: acute coronary syndromes (VI): treatment of acute coronary syndromes in the elderly and in patients with comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Savonitto, Stefano; Morici, Nuccia; De Servi, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    Acute coronary syndromes have a wide spectrum of clinical presentations and risk of adverse outcomes. A distinction should be made between treatable (extent of ischemia, severity of coronary disease and acute hemodynamic deterioration) and untreatable risk (advanced age, prior myocardial damage, chronic kidney dysfunction, other comorbidities). Most of the patients with "untreatable" risk have been excluded from the "guideline-generating" clinical trials. In recent years, despite the paucity of specific randomized trials, major advances have been completed in the management of elderly patients and patients with comorbidities: from therapeutic nihilism to careful titration of antithrombotic agents, a shift toward the radial approach to percutaneous coronary interventions, and also to less-invasive cardiac surgery. Further advances should be expected from the development of drug regimens suitable for use in the elderly and in patients with renal dysfunction, from a systematic multidisciplinary approach to the management of patents with diabetes mellitus and anemia, and from the courage to undertake randomized trials involving these high-risk populations.

  12. Study of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia After Induction Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ji-Hong; Tian, Jian-Mei; Sheng, Mao; Hu, Shao-Yan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Li-Ya; Gu, Qing; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Increasing occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome has been reported in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the etiology of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is not clear. To study the possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment of this complication, we reported 11 cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after induction chemotherapy. After appropriate treatment, the clinical symptoms of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in most cases disappeared even though induction chemotherapy continued. During the 1-year follow-up, no recurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was observed. Although the clinical and imaging features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome may be diverse, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be recognized as a possible important complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia when neurologic symptoms appear. In line with previous reports, our study also indicated that posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was reversible when diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Thus, the occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be considered and investigated to optimize the early induction scheme of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment.

  13. [Acute pancreatitis after bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy in patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cougard, P; Peix, J L; Peschaud, F; Goudet, P

    2001-05-01

    Two cases of acute necrotizing pancreatitis after bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy were observed in patients with an ectopic ACTH syndrome. Two reasons may be suspected: the difficulty of dissection in such patients and the specific morbidity in relation to hypercorticism.

  14. The role of rib infarcts in the acute chest syndrome of sickle cell diseases.

    PubMed

    Rucknagel, D L

    2001-01-01

    The acute chest syndrome is a generic term for pulmonary complications of sickle cell diseases with heterogeneous etiologies that include pneumonia, vaso-occlusion of pulmonary arterioles, rib infarction, and fat embolism syndrome. My review summarizes these etiologies, the evidence, and pathophysiology supporting the hypothesis that infarction of segments of ribs by the same vaso-occlusive process responsible for the acute episodes of pain (characteristic of the sickle cell diseases) is often involved in the acute chest structure. Inflammation associated with the infarct then causes splinting, hypoventilation, and hypoxia and further vaso-occlusion. The relationship with adult respiratory distress syndrome and fat embolism is also discussed. Use of the incentive spirometer combined with effective analgesia when chest pain is present is advocated for prevention of the pulmonary infiltrates. Newer understanding of the role of nitric oxide in regulating oxygen transport and its relationship to blood transfusions used in therapy of the acute chest syndrome are discussed.

  15. The acute respiratory distress syndrome in catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome: analysis of a series of 47 patients

    PubMed Central

    Bucciarelli, S; Espinosa, G; Asherson, R A; Cervera, R; Claver, G; Gómez‐Puerta, J A; Ramos‐Casals, M; Ingelmo, M

    2006-01-01

    Background The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a non‐cardiogenic form of pulmonary oedema characterised by severe hypoxaemia refractory to oxygen therapy, with diffuse pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiographs. It can be precipitated by various serious medical and surgical conditions, including systemic autoimmune diseases. The “catastrophic” variant of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an accelerated form of this systemic autoimmune condition which results in multiorgan failure because of multiple small vessel occlusions. Objective To analyse the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with catastrophic APS who develop ARDS. Methods Cases with ARDS were selected from the web site based international registry of patients with catastrophic APS (CAPS registry) (http://www.med.ub.es/MIMMUN/FORUM/CAPS.HTM) and their characteristics examined. Results Pulmonary involvement was reported in 150 of 220 patients with catastrophic APS (68%) and 47 patients (21%) were diagnosed as having ARDS. Nineteen (40%) of these patients died. Pathological studies were undertaken in 10 patients and thrombotic microangiopathy was present in seven. There were no differences in age, sex, precipitating factors, clinical manifestations, or mortality between catastrophic APS patients with and without ARDS. Conclusions ARDS is the dominant pulmonary manifestation of catastrophic APS. Thus the existence of ARDS in the context of an APS makes it necessary to rule out the presence of the catastrophic variant of this syndrome. PMID:15919677

  16. Ionizing irradiation induces acute haematopoietic syndrome and gastrointestinal syndrome independently in mice.

    PubMed

    Leibowitz, Brian J; Wei, Liang; Zhang, Lin; Ping, Xiaochun; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel; Cheng, Tao; Yu, Jian

    2014-03-18

    The role of bone marrow (BM) and BM-derived cells in radiation-induced acute gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome is controversial. Here we use bone marrow transplantation (BMT), total body irradiation (TBI) and abdominal irradiation (ABI) models to demonstrate a very limited, if any, role of BM-derived cells in acute GI injury and recovery. Compared with WT BM recipients, mice receiving BM from radiation-resistant PUMA KO mice show no protection from crypt and villus injury or recovery after 15 or 12 Gy TBI, but have a significant survival benefit at 12 Gy TBI. PUMA KO BM significantly protects donor-derived pan-intestinal haematopoietic (CD45+) and endothelial (CD105+) cells after IR. We further show that PUMA KO BM fails to enhance animal survival or crypt regeneration in radiosensitive p21 KO-recipient mice. These findings clearly separate the effects of radiation on the intestinal epithelium from those on the BM and endothelial cells in dose-dependent acute radiation toxicity.

  17. Ionizing irradiation induces acute haematopoietic syndrome and gastrointestinal syndrome independently in mice

    PubMed Central

    Leibowitz, Brian J.; Wei, Liang; Zhang, Lin; Ping, Xiaochun; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel; Cheng, Tao; Yu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The role of bone marrow (BM) and BM-derived cells in radiation-induced acute gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome is controversial. Here we use bone marrow transplantation (BMT), total body irradiation (TBI) and abdominal irradiation (ABI) models to demonstrate a very limited, if any, role of BM-derived cells in acute GI injury and recovery. Compared with WT BM recipients, mice receiving BM from radiation-resistant PUMA KO mice show no protection from crypt and villus injury or recovery after 15 or 12 Gy TBI, but have a significant survival benefit at 12 Gy TBI. PUMA KO BM significantly protects donor-derived pan-intestinal haematopoietic (CD45 +) and endothelial (CD105 +) cells after IR. We further show that PUMA KO BM fails to enhance animal survival or crypt regeneration in radiosensitive p21 KO-recipient mice. These findings clearly separate the effects of radiation on the intestinal epithelium from those on the BM and endothelial cells in dose-dependent acute radiation toxicity. PMID:24637717

  18. Immunotherapy of acute radiation syndromes with antiradiation gamma G globulin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav; Casey, Rachael; Jones, Jeffrey; Kedar, Prasad

    Introduction: If an immunotherapy treatment approach to treatment of acute radiation syndromes (ARS) were to be developed; consideration could be given to neutralization of radiation toxins (Specific Radiation Determinants- SRD) by specific antiradiation antibodies. To accomplish this objective, irradiated animals were injected with a preparation of antiradiation immunoglobulin G (IgG) obtained from hyperimmune donors. Radiation-indeced toxins that we call Specific Radiation Determinants (SRD) possess toxic (neurotoxic, haemotoxic and enterotoxic) characteristics as well as specific antigenic properties that combined with the direct physiochemical direct radiation damage, induce the development of many of the pathological processes associated with ARS. We tested several specific hyperimmune IgG preparations against these radiation toxins and observed that their toxic properties were neutralized by specific antiradiation IgGs. Material and Methods: Rabbits were inoculated with SRD radiation toxins to induce hyperimmune serum. The hyperimmune serum was pooled from several animals, purified, and concentrated. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of the hyperimmune serum revealed high titers of IgG with specific binding to radiation toxins. The antiradiation IgG preparation was injected into laboratory animals one hour before and three hours after irradiation, and was evaluated for its ability to protect inoculated animals against the development of acute radiation syndromes. Results: Animals that were inoculated with specific antiradiation antibodies before receiving lethal irradiation at LD 100/30 exhibited 60-75% survival rate at 30 days, whereas all control animals expired by 30 days following exposure. These inoculated animals also exhibited markedly reduced clinical symptoms of ARS, even those that did not survive irradiation. Discussion: The results of our experiments demonstrate that rabbit hyperimmune serum directed against SRD toxins afford significant, albeit

  19. Characterization of the Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyal D.; McGuire, Joseph F.; Kennel, Allison; Mutch, P. Jane; Parker-Athill, E. Carla; Hanks, Camille E.; Lewin, Adam B.; Storch, Eric A.; Toufexis, Megan D.; Dadlani, Gul H.; Rodriguez, Carina A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS) is a subtype of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) marked by an abrupt onset or exacerbation of neuropsychiatric symptoms. We aim to characterize the phenotypic presentation of youth with PANS. Methods: Forty-three youth (ages 4–14 years) meeting criteria for PANS were assessed using self-report and clinician-administered measures, medical record reviews, comprehensive clinical evaluation, and laboratory measures. Results: Youth with PANS presented with an early age of OCD onset (mean=7.84 years) and exhibited moderate to severe obsessive compulsive symptoms upon evaluation. All had comorbid anxiety and emotional lability, and scored well below normative means on all quality of life subscales. Youth with elevated streptococcal antibody titers trended toward having higher OCD severity, and presented more frequently with dilated pupils relative to youth without elevated titers. A cluster analysis of core PANS symptoms revealed three distinct symptom clusters that included core characteristic PANS symptoms, streptococcal-related symptoms, and cytokine-driven/physiological symptoms. Youth with PANS who had comorbid tics were more likely to exhibit a decline in school performance, visuomotor impairment, food restriction symptoms, and handwriting deterioration, and they reported lower quality of life relative to youth without tics. Conclusions: The sudden, acute onset of neuropsychiatric symptoms, high frequency of comorbidities (i.e., anxiety, behavioral regression, depression, and suicidality), and poor quality of life capture the PANS subgroup as suddenly and severely impaired youth. Identifying clinical characteristics of youth with PANS will allow clinicians to diagnose and treat this subtype of OCD with a more strategized and effective approach. PMID:25314221

  20. New Insights toward the Acute Non-Thyroidal Illness Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wajner, Simone Magagnin; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2012-01-01

    The non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) refers to changes in serum thyroid hormone levels observed in critically ill patients in the absence of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid primary dysfunction. Affected individuals have low T3, elevated rT3, and inappropriately normal TSH levels. The pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood but the acute and chronic changes in pituitary-thyroid function are probably the consequence of the action of multiple factors. The early phase seems to reflect changes occurring primarily in the peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism, best seen in humans since 80-90% of the circulating T3 are derived from the pro-hormone T4. The conversion of T4 to T3 is catalyzed by type 1 (D1) and type 2 (D2) deiodinases via outer-ring deiodination. In contrast, type 3 deiodinase (D3) catalyzes the inactivation of both T4 and T3. Over the last decades, several studies have attempted to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the changes on circulating thyroid hormones in NTIS. Increased inflammatory cytokines, which occurs in response to virtually any illness, has long been speculated to play a role in derangements of deiodinase expression. On the other hand, oxidative stress due to augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is characteristic of many diseases that are associated with NTIS. Changes in the intracellular redox state may disrupt deiodinase function by independent mechanisms, which might include depletion of the as yet unidentified endogenous thiol cofactor. Here we aim to present an updated picture of the advances in understanding the mechanisms that result in the fall of thyroid hormone levels in the acute phase of NTIS.

  1. Cytomegalovirus in Plasma of Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nikitskaya, E. A.; Grivel, J.C.; Maryukhnich, E. V.; Lebedeva, A. M.; Ivanova, O. I.; Savvinova, P. P.; Shpektor, A. V.; Margolis, L. B.; Vasilieva, E. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and local and systemic inflammation, including accumulation of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques and upregulation of blood cytokines (e.g., C-reactive protein (CRP)), has been known for more than 100 years. The atherosclerosis-associated inflammatory response has been traditionally considered as an immune system reaction to low-density lipoproteins. At the same time, some data have indicated a potential involvement of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the activation and progression of atherosclerosis-associated inflammation, leading to ACS. However, these data have been tangential and mainly concerned the relationship between a coronary artery disease (CAD) prognosis and the anti-CMV antibody titer. We assumed that ACS might be associated with CMV reactivation and virus release into the bloodstream. The study’s aim was to test this assumption through a comparison of the plasma CMV DNA level in patients with various CAD forms and in healthy subjects. To our knowledge, no similar research has been undertaken yet. A total of 150 subjects (97 CAD patients and 53 healthy subjects) were examined. Real- time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the number of plasma CMV DNA copies. We demonstrated that the number of plasma CMV genome copies in ACS patients was significantly higher than that in healthy subjects (p = 0.01). The CMV genome copy number was correlated with the plasma CRP level (p = 0.002). These findings indicate a potential relationship between CMV activation and atherosclerosis exacerbation that, in turn, leads to the development of unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction. Monitoring of the CMV plasma level in CAD patients may be helpful in the development of new therapeutic approaches to coronary atherosclerosis treatment. PMID:27437144

  2. MS-275 and GM-CSF in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome and/or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. [Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in a case of acute rejection of cardiac transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ollitrault, J; Daubert, J C; Ramée, M P; Ritter, P; Mabo, P; Leguerrier, A; Rioux, C; Logeais, Y

    1990-09-01

    A Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome was observed during acute rejection in a patient who had undergone orthotopic cardiac transplantation. The sometimes intermittent nature of this syndrome could explain its postoperative appearance in this patient; the relationship with the episode of rejection is discussed.

  4. Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome presenting as acute respiratory distress and cor pulmonale.

    PubMed

    Zaki, S A; Shanbag, P; Chavan, V; Shenoy, P

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 7-year-old boy with staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome who presented with acute respiratory distress and cor pulmonale. We wish to highlight this unusual presentation as the diagnosis of toxic shock syndrome depends chiefly on a high degree of clinical suspicion. Early diagnosis and prompt institution of appropriate therapy will significantly reduce morbidity and mortality.

  5. Acute middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in livestock Dromedaries, Dubai, 2014.

    PubMed

    Wernery, Ulrich; Corman, Victor M; Wong, Emily Y M; Tsang, Alan K L; Muth, Doreen; Lau, Susanna K P; Khazanehdari, Kamal; Zirkel, Florian; Ali, Mansoor; Nagy, Peter; Juhasz, Jutka; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Sunitha; Syriac, Ginu; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Patteril, Nissy Annie Georgy; Woo, Patrick C Y; Drosten, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Camels carry Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, but little is known about infection age or prevalence. We studied >800 dromedaries of all ages and 15 mother-calf pairs. This syndrome constitutes an acute, epidemic, and time-limited infection in camels <4 years of age, particularly calves. Delayed social separation of calves might reduce human infection risk.

  6. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hodder, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1) an airway disease – acute potentially fatal asthma, and (2) a pulmonary parenchymal disease – acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician. PMID:27147862

  7. Low-Dose or High-Dose Conditioning Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  8. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Diagnosis of Acute Coronary Syndrome with a Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Berikol, Göksu Bozdereli; Yildiz, Oktay; Özcan, I Türkay

    2016-04-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a serious condition arising from an imbalance of supply and demand to meet myocardium's metabolic needs. Patients typically present with retrosternal chest pain radiating to neck and left arm. Electrocardiography (ECG) and laboratory tests are used indiagnosis. However in emergency departments, there are some difficulties for physicians to decide whether hospitalizing, following up or discharging the patient. The aim of the study is to diagnose ACS and helping the physician with his decisionto discharge or to hospitalizevia machine learning techniques such as support vector machine (SVM) by using patient data including age, sex, risk factors, and cardiac enzymes (CK-MB, Troponin I) of patients presenting to emergency department with chest pain. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging data of 228 patients presenting to emergency department with chest pain were reviewedand the performance of support vector machine. Four different methods (Support vector machine (SVM), Artificial neural network (ANN), Naïve Bayes and Logistic Regression) were tested and the results of SVM which has the highest accuracy is reported. Among 228 patients aged 19 to 91 years who were included in the study, 99 (43.4 %) were qualified as ACS, while 129 (56.5 %) had no ACS. The classification model using SVM attained a 99.13 % classification success. The present study showed a 99.13 % classification success for ACS diagnosis attained by Support Vector Machine. This study showed that machine learning techniques may help emergency department staff make decisions by rapidly producing relevant data.

  10. Machine learning for risk prediction of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    VanHouten, Jacob P; Starmer, John M; Lorenzi, Nancy M; Maron, David J; Lasko, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) accounts for 1.36 million hospitalizations and billions of dollars in costs in the United States alone. A major challenge to diagnosing and treating patients with suspected ACS is the significant symptom overlap between patients with and without ACS. There is a high cost to over- and under-treatment. Guidelines recommend early risk stratification of patients, but many tools lack sufficient accuracy for use in clinical practice. Prognostic indices often misrepresent clinical populations and rely on curated data. We used random forest and elastic net on 20,078 deidentified records with significant missing and noisy values to develop models that outperform existing ACS risk prediction tools. We found that the random forest (AUC = 0.848) significantly outperformed elastic net (AUC=0.818), ridge regression (AUC = 0.810), and the TIMI (AUC = 0.745) and GRACE (AUC = 0.623) scores. Our findings show that random forest applied to noisy and sparse data can perform on par with previously developed scoring metrics.

  11. [Management of acute coronary syndrome without ST-segment elevation].

    PubMed

    Liebetrau, C; Hamm, C W

    2017-02-23

    Acute coronary syndrome without persistent ST-segment elevation (non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction and instable angina pectoris NSTEMI-ACS) is common and is associated with a high mortality. In addition to 12-channel echocardiograph (ECG) assessment, measurement of cardiac troponins I and T are important for risk stratification and diagnosis. The introduction of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays and their implementation into clinical practice has influenced risk stratification and treatment of these patients. Additional diagnostic validation must supplement routine clinical chemistry testing following the initial measurement to distinguish between different possible causes of troponin elevation above the 99th percentile. The time point for the additional troponin measurement depends on the different protocols and troponin assays and is stipulated in the current guidelines. The use of both 1‑hour and 3‑hour protocols together with the clinical presentation and work-up of possible differential diagnoses provide optimal care of patients. Patients who test positive for troponin dynamics should undergo invasive diagnostics and treatment within 24 h of presentation and within 2 h is recommended for unstable patients. Clopidogrel is indicated only in patients requiring oral anticoagulation.

  12. Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Jae; Moon, Jae Young; Shin, Ein-Soon; Kim, Je Hyeong; Jung, Hoon; Park, So Young; Kim, Ho Cheol; Sim, Yun Su; Rhee, Chin Kook; Lim, Jaemin; Lee, Seok Jeong; Lee, Won-Yeon; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Kwak, Sang Hyun; Kang, Eun Kyeong; Chung, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We generate strong (1) and weak (2) grade of recommendations based on high (A), moderate (B) and low (C) grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A) and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B) to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B) and inhaled nitric oxide (1A) as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C), and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B). The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B), however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B). In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B) and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B) and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B). Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A). In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients. PMID:27790273

  13. Linking Doses with Clinical Scores of Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen

    2016-10-01

    In radiation accidents, determining the radiation dose the victim received is a key step for medical decision making and patient prognosis. To reconstruct and evaluate the absorbed dose, researchers have developed many physical devices and biological techniques during the last decades. However, using the physical parameter "absorbed dose" alone is not sufficient to predict the clinical development of the various organs injured in an individual patient. In operational situations for radiation accidents, medical responders need more urgently to classify the severity of the radiation injury based on the signs and symptoms of the patient. In this work, the author uses a unified hematopoietic model to describe dose-dependent dynamics of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and platelets, and the corresponding clinical grading of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. This approach not only visualizes the time course of the patient's probable outcome in the form of graphs but also indirectly gives information of the remaining stem and progenitor cells, which are responsible for the autologous recovery of the hematopoietic system. Because critical information on the patient's clinical evolution can be provided within a short time after exposure and only peripheral cell counts are required for the simulation, these modeling tools will be useful to assess radiation exposure and injury in human-involved radiation accident/incident scenarios.

  14. An approach to ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Patricia

    2000-01-01

    Appropriate management of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represents a challenge for physicians working in the critical care environment. Significant advances have been made in understanding the pathophysiology of ARDS. There is also an increasing appreciation of the role of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). VILI is most likely related to several different aspects of ventilator management: barotrauma due to high peak airway pressures, lung overdistension or volutrauma due to high transpulmonary pressures, alveolar membrane damage due to insufficient positive end-expiratory pressure levels and oxygen-related cell toxicity. Various lung protective strategies have been suggested to minimize the damage caused by conventional modes of ventilation. These include the use of pressure- and volume-limited ventilation, the use of the prone position in the management of ARDS, and extracorporeal methods of oxygen delivery and carbon dioxide removal. Although the death rate resulting from ARDS has been declining over the past 10 years, there is no evidence that any specific treatment or change in approach to ventilation is the cause of this improved survival. PMID:10948686

  15. Noninvasive ventilation on mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ling; Wang, Jian; Xu, Xiaobo; Song, Yuanlin; Jiang, Jinjun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). [Subjects and Methods] The clinical data of 58 patients with ARDS that required mechanical ventilation in two intensive care units (ICU) was reviewed. [Results] Endotracheal intubation was performed in 55.17% of the total patients and in 39.53% of the patients who received NIV treatment. The APACHE II score for patients who only received IV was significantly higher than those who only underwent NIV (25.67 ± 5.30 vs. 18.12 ± 7.20). However, there were no significant differences in 28-day/90-day survival rates, duration of mechanical ventilation, and length of ICU stay between these two groups. For patients from a NIV-to-IV group, the APACHE II scores before endotracheal intubation were higher than the scores from IV patients (26.12 ± 4.08 vs. 21.94 ± 6.10). The 90-day survival rate in the NIV-to-IV group was significantly lower than that of the IV-only group (23.5% vs. 73.3%), although there was no difference in the 28-day survival rate between the two groups. [Conclusion] The application of NIV reduces the percentage of patients requiring endotracheal intubation. PMID:27630415

  16. Emerging Therapies for the Prevention of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ruthman, Carl A.; Festic, Emir

    2015-01-01

    The development of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) carries significant risk of morbidity and mortality. To date, pharmacologic therapy has been largely ineffective for patients with ARDS. We present our personal review aimed at outlining current and future directions for the pharmacologic prevention of ARDS. Several available risk-stratification or prediction scores strategies for identification of patients at risk of ARDS have been reported. Although not ready for the clinical everyday use, they are and will be instrumental in the ongoing and future trials of pharmacoprevention of ARDS. Several systemic medications established the potential role in ARDS prevention based on the preclinical studies and observational data. Due to potential for systemic adverse effects to neutralize any pharmacologic benefits of systemic therapy, inhaled medications appear particularly attractive candidates for ARDS prevention. This is because of their direct delivery to the site of the proposed action (lungs), while pulmonary epithelial surface is still functional. We postulate that overall morbidity and mortality rates from ARDS in the future will be contingent upon decreasing the overall incidence of ARDS through effective identification of those at risk and early application of proven supportive care and pharmacologic interventions. PMID:26002528

  17. Human Kluver-Bucy syndrome following acute subdural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Yoneoka, Y; Takeda, N; Inoue, A; Ibuchi, Y; Kumagai, T; Sugai, T; Takeda, K-I; Ueda, K

    2004-11-01

    We present a rare case of complete human Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS) following recovery from transtentorial herniation caused by acute subdural haematoma (ASDH). A 17-year-old right-handed high school boy got into stupor within five minutes after 3-rounds of sparing at boxing. Emergency computed tomographic (CT) scan showed right cerebral hemispheric ASDH, which was evacuated following intentional decompressive craniectomy. After recovery of consciousness, he developed emotional changes (placidity with loss of normal fear and anger), psychic blindness, aberrant sexual behaviour, excessive oral tendencies, increased appetite, and hypermetamorphosis in order of mention, which were observed with waxing and waning from 17th to 28th hospital day. Peri-operative CT scaning and magnetic resonance imaging showed lesions of the right temporal lobe and right-dominant orbitofrontal regions including bilateral rectal and medial orbital gyri, and the intact left temporal lobe. Two pathogeneses can be thought of and the whole picture of KBS following ASDH can arise even though one (left in this case) temporal lobe is preserved, 1) in which associated orbitofrontal lesions of the frontal lobes may correlate with occurrence of KBS, or 2) cerebral blood hypoperfusion of both temporal lobes due to increased intracranial pressure and/or compression of both posterior cerebral arteries at the edge of the tentorium cerebelli occurs.

  18. The Vulnerable Plaque: the Real Villain in Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Michael; Puri, Aniket; Devlin, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    The term "vulnerable plaque" refers to a vascular lesion that is prone to rupture and may result in life-threatening events which include myocardial infarction. It consists of thin-cap fibroatheroma and a large lipid core which is highly thrombogenic. Acute coronary syndromes often result from rupture of vulnerable plaques which frequently are only moderately stenosed and not visible by conventional angiography. Several invasive and non-invasive strategies have been developed to assess the burden of vulnerable plaques. Intravascular ultrasound provides a two-dimensional cross-sectional image of the arterial wall and can help assess the plaque burden and composition. Optical coherent tomography offers superior resolution over intravascular ultrasound. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging provides non-invasive imaging for visualizing fibrous cap thickness and rupture in plaques. In addition, it may be of value in assessing the effects of treatments, such as lipid-lowering therapy. Technical issues however limit its clinical applicability. The role of multi-slice computed tomography, a well established screening tool for coronary artery disease, remains to be determined. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) may provide physiological functional assessment of plaque vulnerability; however, its role in the management of vulnerable plaque requires further studies. Treatment of the vulnerable patient may involve systemic therapy which currently include statins, ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, aspirin, and calcium-channel blockers and in the future local therapeutic options such as drug-eluting stents or photodynamic therapy. PMID:21673834

  19. Device monitoring strategies in acute heart failure syndromes.

    PubMed

    Samara, Michael A; Tang, W H Wilson

    2011-09-01

    Acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS) represent the most common discharge diagnoses in adults over age 65 and translate into dramatically increased heart failure-associated morbidity and mortality. Conventional approaches to the early detection of pulmonary and systemic congestion have been shown to be of limited sensitivity. Despite their proven efficacy, disease management and structured telephone support programs have failed to achieve widespread use in part due to their resource intensiveness and reliance upon motivated patients. While once thought to hold great promise, results from recent prospective studies on telemonitoring strategies have proven disappointing. Implantable devices with their capacity to monitor electrophysiologic and hemodynamic parameters over long periods of time and with minimal reliance on patient participation may provide solutions to some of these problems. Conventional electrophysiologic parameters and intrathoracic impedance data are currently available in the growing population of heart failure patients with equipped devices. A variety of implantable hemodynamic monitors are currently under investigation. How best to integrate these devices into a systematic approach to the management of patients before, during, and after AHFS is yet to be established.

  20. [Emergence of new pneumonia: besides severe acute respiratory syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, P; Pozzi, E

    2006-10-01

    Important epidemiological modifications have been registered in respiratory infections, both in immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. Pathogens with modified antibiotic susceptibility patterns have emerged, which display an increased antibiotic resistance, such as S. pneumoniae, S. aureus, H. influenzae. This trait has a strong impact on the therapeutic choices, particularly when an empiric antibiotic treatment is selected. The prevalence of bacterial species showing non-susceptibility to the most common prescribed antibiotics (betalactams, macrolides etc.) follows a different geographic distribution. Some pathogens have acquired a new epidemiological role in patients affected with immune deficiencies: among them P. carinii and other bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. The emergence of new, previously unknown, species, has been registered, both bacteria (C. pneumoniae) and viruses (Metapneumovirus, Hantavirus etc.). Such aspects must be considered in the diagnosis of respiratory infections, which should include diagnostic tests for the identification of such pathogens. Among the new respiratory infections severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has quickly become a health care emergency, so that efforts have been made to identify the aetiological agent as well as the main epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the disease. Avian influenza has raised great interest immediately after the first cases of human infection caused by the avian virus, especially after the outbreaks in Asian countries and in the Netherlands. A crucial step in containing infection is the prevention of the disease; efforts are directed toward this endpoint.

  1. Acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes in older adults.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D; Rao, Arati V; Pardee, Timothy S

    2014-08-20

    Treatment of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging because of disease morbidity and associated treatments. Both diseases represent a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders primarily affecting older adults, with treatment strategies ranging from supportive care to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Although selected older adults can benefit from intensive therapies, as a group they experience increased treatment-related morbidity, are more likely to relapse, and have decreased survival. Age-related outcome disparities are attributed to both tumor and patient characteristics, requiring an individualized approach to treatment decision making beyond consideration of chronologic age alone. Selection of therapy for any individual requires consideration of both disease-specific risk factors and estimates of treatment tolerance and life expectancy derived from evaluation of functional status and comorbidity. Although treatment options for older adults are expanding, clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and aging are needed to define standard-of-care treatments for both disease groups. In addition, trials should include outcomes addressing quality of life, maintenance of independence, and use of health care services to assist in patient-centered decision making. This review will highlight available evidence in treatment of older adults with AML or MDS and unanswered clinical questions for older adults with these diseases.

  2. Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Klepin, Heidi D.; Rao, Arati V.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging because of disease morbidity and associated treatments. Both diseases represent a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders primarily affecting older adults, with treatment strategies ranging from supportive care to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Although selected older adults can benefit from intensive therapies, as a group they experience increased treatment-related morbidity, are more likely to relapse, and have decreased survival. Age-related outcome disparities are attributed to both tumor and patient characteristics, requiring an individualized approach to treatment decision making beyond consideration of chronologic age alone. Selection of therapy for any individual requires consideration of both disease-specific risk factors and estimates of treatment tolerance and life expectancy derived from evaluation of functional status and comorbidity. Although treatment options for older adults are expanding, clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and aging are needed to define standard-of-care treatments for both disease groups. In addition, trials should include outcomes addressing quality of life, maintenance of independence, and use of health care services to assist in patient-centered decision making. This review will highlight available evidence in treatment of older adults with AML or MDS and unanswered clinical questions for older adults with these diseases. PMID:25071138

  3. Cardiorenal fibrosis and dysfunction in aging: Imbalance in mediators and regulators of collagen.

    PubMed

    Sangaralingham, S Jeson; Wang, Bing H; Huang, Li; Kumfu, Sirinart; Ichiki, Tomoko; Krum, Henry; Burnett, John C

    2016-02-01

    Cardiorenal fibrosis is a biological process that increases with age and contributes to dysfunction of the heart and kidney. While numerous circulating and tissue hormones, cytokines and enzymes have been identified in the development of cardiorenal fibrosis, several reports have suggested that the anti-fibrotic natriuretic peptide system (NPS), pro-fibrotic renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are fundamental regulators and mediators of this process. However, the simultaneous assessment of these components in the development of age-mediated cardiorenal fibrotic remodeling is not completely understood. Thus, we assessed cardiorenal structure and function, the circulating NPS and RAAS and the cardiorenal tissue gene expression of collagen (Col) I, Col III, TGF-β1, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in 2 and 20 month old Fischer rats. Our studies determined that aging was characterized by an increase in cardiorenal fibrosis that was accompanied with cardiorenal dysfunction. These alterations were associated with lower circulating atrial and C-type natriuretic peptides and higher angiotensin II and aldosterone levels in the aged rats. Moreover, we observed a decrease in Col I and III and an increase in TIMP- mRNA expressions in the aged heart and kidney, while TGF-β1 expression increased and MMP-9 decreased only in the aged kidney. We conclude that the age-mediated alterations in these fibrotic regulator and mediator profiles favors collagen accumulation due to an imbalance between the NPS and RAAS as well as a decline in the degradative pathway, thus suggesting a therapeutic opportunity to target these components.

  4. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  5. Acute hyponatraemia secondary to cerebral salt wasting syndrome in a patient with tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ti, L K; Kang, S C; Cheong, K F

    1998-08-01

    A 30-year-old HIV-positive man presented with acute hydrocephalus secondary to tuberculous meningitis, for which an external ventricular drain was inserted. He developed marked natriuresis in the postoperative period, which resulted in acute hyponatraemia (131 to 122 mmol/l) and a contraction of his intravascular volume. A diagnosis of cerebral salt wasting syndrome was made, and he responded to sodium and fluid loading. This case highlights the differentiation of cerebral salt wasting syndrome from the more commonly occurring syndrome of inappropriate anti-diuretic hormone secretion as the aetiology of the hyponatraemia.

  6. Antisynthetase syndrome (ASS) presenting as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in a patient without myositis features.

    PubMed

    Kanchustambham, Venkat Kiran; Saladi, Swetha; Mahmoudassaf, Sarah; Patolia, Setu

    2016-12-09

    A woman aged 61 years presented to the emergency room with a 1-week history of dyspnoea on exertion and dry cough. X-ray of the chest showed diffuse interstitial opacities and was started on antibiotics and furosemide, and despite these measures, patient's respiratory status worsened, prompting endotracheal intubation. CT of the chest showed diffuse bilateral ground glass opacities and underwent bronchoscope with trans-bronchial biopsy that showed chronic bronchitis. Pt was empirically started on intravenous steroids due to concerns for interstitial lung disease (ILD). Autoimmune work up was sent and underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery-guided biopsy of the lung that showed non-specific interstitial pattern with fibrosis. The patient was diagnosed as having antisynthetase syndrome with pulmonary involvement (ILD) as the cause of her acute respiratory failure. Azathioprine was started as steroid-sparing agent and was weaned off the ventilator to a tracheostomy collar and discharged to long-term rehabilitation centre.

  7. Association of cardiovascular risk factors with the different presentations of acute coronary syndrome1

    PubMed Central

    Brunori, Evelise Helena Fadini Reis; Lopes, Camila Takáo; Cavalcante, Agueda Maria Ruiz Zimmer; Santos, Vinicius Batista; Lopes, Juliana de Lima; de Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify the relationship between different presentations of acute coronary syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors among hospitalized individuals. METHOD: cross-sectional study performed in a teaching hospital in São Paulo, in the State of São Paulo (SP). Socio-demographic, clinical and anthropometric data of 150 individuals hospitalized due to acute coronary syndrome were collected through interviews and review of clinical charts. Association between these data and the presentation of the syndrome were investigated. RESULTS: there was a predominance of ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction. There was significant association of systemic hypertension with unstable angina and high values of low density lipoprotein with infarction, without influence from socio-demographic characteristics. CONCLUSION: arterial hypertension and high levels of low-density lipoprotein were associated with different presentations of coronary syndrome. The results can provide support for health professionals for secondary prevention programs aimed at behavioural changing. PMID:25296136

  8. Capgras-like syndrome in a patient with an acute urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Salviati, Massimo; Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Macrì, Francesco; Fojanesi, Marta; Minichino, Amedeo; Gallo, Mariana; De Michele, Francesco; Chiaie, Roberto Delle; Biondi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Delusional misidentification syndromes are a group of delusional phenomena in which patients misidentify familiar persons, objects, or themselves, believing that they have been replaced or transformed. In 25%–40% of cases, misidentification syndromes have been reported in association with organic illness. We report an acute episode of Capgras-like delusion lasting 8 days, focused on the idea that people were robots with human bodies, in association with an acute urinary infection. To our knowledge, this is the first case report associating urinary tract infection with Capgras-like syndrome. Awareness of the prevalence of delusional misidentification syndromes associated with acute medical illness should promote diligence on the part of clinicians in recognizing this disorder. PMID:23355784

  9. [Features of the course of schizophrenia manifesting as an acute Kandinsky-Clérambault syndrome].

    PubMed

    Dikaia, V I

    1986-01-01

    A clinical follow-up study of 57 schizophrenic patients revealed heterogeneity of the clinical role of acute Kandinsky-Clerambault syndrome in the picture of the disease. The author describes the syndrome of psychic automatism in the framework of "schizophrenic reactions" in the time-course of latent schizophrenia, in the picture of the attack in shift-like and recurrent course and in the structure of the shift resembling clinically the exacerbation of the continuously progressive process. The author also shows the correlation between the premanifest period, clinical mechanisms of the development of manifest psychosis, the structure of acute Kandinsky-Clerambault syndrome and the subsequent characteristics of the schizophrenia course. The question of prognostic significance of the differential approach to the assessment of acute Kandinsky-Clerambault syndrome and of its different clinical significance in the picture of clinical diseases is discussed.

  10. Hepatitis E as a cause of acute jaundice syndrome in northern Uganda, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Gerbi, Gemechu B; Williams, Roxanne; Bakamutumaho, Barnabas; Liu, Stephen; Downing, Robert; Drobeniuc, Jan; Kamili, Saleem; Xu, Fujie; Holmberg, Scott D; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of acute viral hepatitis in developing countries; however, its contribution to acute jaundice syndrome is not well-described. A large outbreak of hepatitis E occurred in northern Uganda from 2007 to 2009. In response to this outbreak, acute jaundice syndrome surveillance was established in 10 district healthcare facilities to determine the proportion of cases attributable to hepatitis E. Of 347 acute jaundice syndrome cases reported, the majority (42%) had hepatitis E followed by hepatitis B (14%), malaria (10%), hepatitis C (5%), and other/unknown (29%). Of hepatitis E cases, 72% occurred in Kaboong district, and 68% of these cases occurred between May and August of 2011. Residence in Kaabong district was independently associated with hepatitis E (adjusted odds ratio = 13; 95% confidence interval = 7-24). The findings from this surveillance show that an outbreak and sporadic transmission of hepatitis E occur in northern Uganda.

  11. The acute phase reactant, fibrinogen, as a guide to plasma exchange therapy for acute Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sanjay, Rashmi; Flanagan, Janice; Sodano, Donata; Gorson, Kenneth C; Ropper, Allan H; Weinstein, Robert

    2006-07-01

    The Guillian Barré syndrome is an acute inflammatory disorder for which plasma exchange is effective treatment. Up to 10% relapse after plasma exchange suggesting that treatment sometimes finishes before disease activity has resolved. We studied whether plasma fibrinogen, an inflammatory marker, might be used to determine when to discontinue plasma exchange in patients with acute Guillain-Barré syndrome. We conducted a post-hoc analysis of apheresis database and hospital records of patients treated with plasma exchange for acute Guillain-Barré syndrome during 1999-2004. Data were analyzed from 28 patients who underwent a total of 29 courses of plasma exchange for acute Guillain-Barré syndrome. The mean (+/-SD) plasma fibrinogen concentration was 422.5 (+/-96.4) mg/dl at the time of presentation and, in 17 of the 29, it was above 400 mg/dl (reference range 200-400). Twenty of the 21 patients whose fibrinogen fell by more than 30% from baseline by the time of the final plasma exchange treatment had neurological improvement. There was improvement in only 3 of the 8 instances where fibrinogen decreased by less than 30% by the end of plasma exchange therapy. A > or =30% decrease in fibrinogen by the conclusion of plasma exchange was significantly associated with sustained neurological improvement (P = 0.0025). The plasma fibrinogen level appears to reflect disease activity in acute Guillain-Barré syndrome. A <30% fall in fibrinogen level despite plasma exchange may indicate the need to continue plasma exchange to maximize the benefit of treatment or minimize the risk of relapse. Therapeutic plasma exchange need not be extended when plasma fibrinogen remains > or =30% below its level at presentation by the time of the final planned plasma exchange procedure.

  12. [Psychopathology and various mechanisms contributing to the formation of the Kandinsky syndrome in acute alcoholic hallucinosis].

    PubMed

    Guliamova, N M

    1983-01-01

    Forty patients with acute alcoholic hallucinosis associated with the Kandinsky syndrome were examined clinicopsychopathologically. Manifestation of the Kandinsky syndrome was limited by associative automatism in patients with stage II alcoholism with transient hallucinosis lasting 2-4 days. In patients with stage III alcoholism with more prolonged (6-9 days) psychoses, the non-extensive Kandinsky syndrome manifested itself in integrity. Psychopathological phenomena of the syndrome in the picture of acute alcoholic hallucinosis were notable for their descriptiveness, concreteness, extreme simplicity, and instability. Senestopathic and kinesthetic automatisms were localized at the sites of real painful disorders. Therefore, apart from cerebral disorders, the peripheral sensory mechanisms are considered to be of importance in the genesis of the Kandinsky syndrome.

  13. Bilineal Acute Leukemia Associated With Fanconi Syndrome: The First Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Miri-Aliabad, Ghasem; Sadat-Hosseini, Maryam; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi syndrome is a metabolic disorder involving dysfunction of the renal proximal tubules, resulting in excessive urinary excretion of several metabolites. Various factors may lead to Fanconi syndrome, as it may be a genetic disease with primary or secondary etiologies, or may be acquired. In this study, we report a unique case of Fanconi syndrome with development of a relatively rare acute leukemia, a condition that has not been reported before. The case was an 8-year-old boy with familial occurrence of Fanconi syndrome, presenting with pallor, asthenia, recurrent infections, growth failure, and a variety of biochemical and hematological abnormalities. After physical examination, radiographic studies, and comprehensive laboratory analyses, Fanconi syndrome associated with bilineal acute leukemia, of myeloid and T-lymphoid lineages, was diagnosed. PMID:27617066

  14. Acute volume loading and exercise capacity in postural tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Rocío A; Arnold, Amy C; Nwazue, Victor C; Okamoto, Luis E; Paranjape, Sachin Y; Black, Bonnie K; Diedrich, Andre; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo; Raj, Satish R; Gamboa, Alfredo

    2014-09-15

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is associated with exercise intolerance, hypovolemia, and cardiac atrophy, which may contribute to reduced stroke volume and compensatory exaggerated heart rate (HR) increases. Acute volume loading with intravenous (iv) saline reduces HR and improves orthostatic tolerance and symptoms in POTS, but its effect on exercise capacity is unknown. In this study, we determined the effect of iv saline infusion on peak exercise capacity (VO2peak) in POTS. Nineteen patients with POTS participated in a sequential study. VO2peak was measured on two separate study days, following administration of placebo or 1 liter of i.v. saline (NaCl 0.9%). Patients exercised on a semirecumbent bicycle with resistance increased by 25 W every 2 min until maximal effort was achieved. Patients exhibited blood volume deficits (-13.4 ± 1.4% ideal volume), consistent with mild to moderate hypovolemia. At baseline, saline significantly increased stroke volume (saline 80 ± 8 ml vs. placebo 64 ± 4 ml; P = 0.010), increased cardiac output (saline 6.9 ± 0.5 liter/min vs. placebo 5.7 ± 0.2 liter/min; P = 0.021), and reduced systemic vascular resistance (saline 992.6 ± 70.0 dyn-s/cm(5) vs. placebo 1,184.0 ± 50.8 dyn-s/cm(5); P = 0.011), with no effect on HR or blood pressure. During exercise, saline did not produce differences in VO2peak (saline 26.3 ± 1.2 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1) vs. placebo 27.7 ± 1.8 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1); P = 0.615), peak HR [saline 174 ± 4 beats per minute (bpm) vs. placebo 175 ± 3 bpm; P = 0.672] or other cardiovascular parameters. These findings suggest that acute volume loading with saline does not improve VO2peak or cardiovascular responses to exercise in POTS, despite improvements in resting hemodynamic function.

  15. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  16. Acute forearm compressive myopathy syndrome secondary to upper limb entrapment: an unusual cause of renal failure.

    PubMed

    Tachtsi, Maria D; Kalogirou, Thomas E; Atmatzidis, Stefanos K; Papadimitriou, Dimitrios K; Atmatzidis, Konstantinos S

    2011-05-01

    Compressive myopathy syndrome (SCM) is a syndrome characterized by the lesion of skeletal muscle resulting in subsequent release of intracellular contents (myoglobin, creatine phosphokinase, potassium, etc.) into the circulatory system, which can cause potentially lethal complications. There are numerous causes that can lead to SCM resulting to acute rhabdomyolysis, and many patients present with multiple causes. The most common potentially lethal complication is acute renal failure. The occurrence of acute rhabdomyolysis should be considered as a possibility in any patient who can remain stationary for long periods, or is in a coma, or is intoxicated in any form. We report the rare case of a 26-year-old patient who developed SCM caused by ischemia reperfusion, with subsequent acute rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure after prolonged compression of the right upper extremity.

  17. Nutrition: A Primary Therapy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Bryan; Typpo, Katri

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate nutrition is an essential component of intensive care management of children with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is linked to patient outcomes. One out of every two children in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) will develop malnutrition or have worsening of baseline malnutrition and present with specific micronutrient deficiencies. Early and adequate enteral nutrition (EN) is associated with improved 60-day survival after pediatric critical illness, and, yet, despite early EN guidelines, critically ill children receive on average only 55% of goal calories by PICU day 10. Inadequate delivery of EN is due to perceived feeding intolerance, reluctance to enterally feed children with hemodynamic instability, and fluid restriction. Underlying each of these factors is large practice variation between providers and across institutions for initiation, advancement, and maintenance of EN. Strategies to improve early initiation and advancement and to maintain delivery of EN are needed to improve morbidity and mortality from pediatric ARDS. Both, over and underfeeding, prolong duration of mechanical ventilation in children and worsen other organ function such that precise calorie goals are needed. The gut is thought to act as a “motor” of organ dysfunction, and emerging data regarding the role of intestinal barrier functions and the intestinal microbiome on organ dysfunction and outcomes of critical illness present exciting opportunities to improve patient outcomes. Nutrition should be considered a primary rather than supportive therapy for pediatric ARDS. Precise nutritional therapies, which are titrated and targeted to preservation of intestinal barrier function, prevention of intestinal dysbiosis, preservation of lean body mass, and blunting of the systemic inflammatory response, offer great potential for improving outcomes of pediatric ARDS. In this review, we examine the current evidence regarding dose, route, and timing of nutrition

  18. The challenge of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Testarelli, L; D' Aversa, L; Dolci, G

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is caused by a newly identified coronavirus, called SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that appears to be transmitted primarily through droplets of saliva. This is the reason why the most important international organizations recommend that the dentists adopt a unique preventive approach to the problem: SARS patients should not be treated in the dental office. This is possible only if a suspected case of SARS is correctly and promptly identified. But a correct identification is made difficult by several factors, such as the incubation period, a possibly asymptomatic onset of the illness, the still low specificity and sensitivity of laboratory and instrumental tests. A case or suspected case of SARS may thus unwillingly be treated at the dental office. It is therefore necessary to adopt protective measures for the dental personnel and to implement and enforce infection control measures in order to eliminate the risk of viral contamination. Nonetheless, these procedures do not ensure a complete elimination of SARS-CoV contamination risk since a major risk is represented by blood-borne infection, which is originated by the mouth of patients, and the contamination of dental units water lines (DUWLs) is most difficult to control. Blood-borne contamination may be achieved only by adopting a high level, between-patients disinfection protocol of the DUWLs based on the use of chemical agents with biocidal activity against spores, viruses, bacteria and fungi (Autosteril method). In conclusion a fully effective control of the cross-infection risk will be obtained only by adopting a correct, integrated use of different infection control procedures.

  19. Ventricular Tachycardia and Resembling Acute Coronary Syndrome During Pheochromocytoma Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shi-jun; Wang, Tao; Wang, Lin; Pang, Zhan-qi; Ma, Ben; Li, Ya-wen; Yang, Jian; Dong, He

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pheochromocytomas are neuroendocrine tumors, and its cardiac involvement may include transient myocardial dysfunction, acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and even ventricular arrhythmias. A patient was referred for evaluation of stuttering chest pain, and his electrocardiogram showed T-wave inversion over leads V1 to V4. Coronary angiography showed 90% stenosis in the mid-left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), which was stented. Five days later, the patient had ventricular tachycardia, and severe hypertension, remarkable blood pressure fluctuation between 224/76 and 70/50 mm Hg. The patient felt abdominal pain and his abdominal ultrasound showed suspicious right adrenal gland tumor. Enhanced computed tomography of adrenal gland conformed that there was a tumor in right adrenal gland accompanied by an upset level of aldosterone. The tumor was removed by laparoscope, and the pathological examination showed pheochromocytoma. After the surgery, the blood pressure turned normal gradually. There was no T-wave inversion in lead V1-V4. Our case illustrates a rare pheochromocytoma presentation with a VT and resembling ACS. In our case, the serious stenosis in the mid of LAD could be explained by worsen the clinical course of myocardial ischemia or severe coronary vasospasm by the excessive amounts of catecholamines released from the tumor. Coronary vasospasm was possible because he had no classic coronary risk factors (e.g. family history and smoking habit, essential hypertension, hyperglycemia and abnormal serum lipoprotein, high body mass index). Thus, pheochromocytoma was missed until he revealed the association of his symptoms with abdominalgia. As phaeochromocytomas that present with cardiovascular complications can be fatal, it is necessary to screen for the disease when patients present with symptoms indicating catecholamine excess. PMID:27057898

  20. Familial Aggregation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Goldin, Lynn R.; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y.; Liang, Xueying Sharon; Derolf, Åsa R.; Landgren, Ola; Björkholm, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Apart from rare pedigrees with multiple cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there is limited data on familial aggregation of AML and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) in the population. Patients and Methods Swedish population-based registry data were used to evaluate risk of AML, MDS, and other malignancies among 24,573 first-degree relatives of 6,962 patients with AML and 1,388 patients with MDS compared with 106,224 first-degree relatives of matched controls. We used a marginal survival model to calculate familial aggregation. Results AML and/or MDS did not aggregate significantly in relatives of patients with AML. There was a modest risk ratio (RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.9 to 1.8) in myeloproliferative/myeloid malignancies combined. The risks for any hematologic or any solid tumor were modestly but significantly increased. Relatives of patients with MDS did not show an increased risk for any hematologic tumors. In contrast, we found a significantly increased risk (RR, 6.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 38.0) of AML/MDS and of all myeloid malignancies combined (RR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.0 to 9.8) among relatives of patients diagnosed at younger than age 21 years. Conclusion We did not find evidence for familial aggregation of the severe end of the spectrum of myeloid malignancies (AML and MDS). The risks of myeloproliferative neoplasms were modestly increased with trends toward significance, suggesting a possible role of inheritance. In contrast, although limited in sample size, relatives of young patients with AML were at increased risk of AML/MDS, suggesting that germline genes may play a stronger role in these patients. The increased risk of all hematologic malignancies and of solid tumors among relatives of patients with AML suggests that genes for malignancy in general and/or other environmental factors may be shared. PMID:22162584

  1. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Outcomes after Near-hanging

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Sahar; Afshar, Majid; Barrett, Matthew; Smith, Gordon S.; Barr, Erik A.; Lissauer, Matthew E.; McCurdy, Michael T.; Murthi, Sarah B.; Netzer, Giora

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Assess the case rate of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) after near-hanging, and the secondary outcomes of traumatic and/or anoxic brain injury, and death. Risk factors for the outcomes were assessed. Method Single-center, state-wide retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients admitted between August, 2002, and September, 2011, with a primary diagnosis of non-judicial "hanging injury". Results Of 56 patients, 73% were male. The median age was 31 (IQR: 16–56). Upon arrival, 9% (5/56) did not have a pulse, and 23% (13/56) patients were intubated. The median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 13 (IQR: 3–15); 14% (8/56) had a GCS=3. ARDS developed in 9% (5/56) of patients. Traumatic anoxic brain injury resulted in 9% (5/56) of patients. The in-hospital case fatality was 5% (3/56). Lower median GCS [3 (IQR: 3–7) vs. 14 (IQR: 3–15), p=0.0003] and intubation in field or in trauma resuscitation unit [100% (5/5) vs. 16% (8/51), p=0.0003] were associated with ARDS development. Risk factors of death were GCS=3 [100% (3/3) vs. 9% (5/53), p=0.002]; pulselessness upon arrival of emergency medical services [100% (3/3) vs. 4% (2/53), p<0.001]; and abnormal neurologic imaging [50% (1/2) vs. zero, p=0.04]. Conclusions The ARDS case rate after near-hanging is similar to the general trauma population. Low GCS and intubation are associated with increased risk of ARDS development. The rate of traumatic and/or anoxic brain injury in this population is low. PMID:25596627

  2. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and sport: facts and fallacies.

    PubMed

    So, Raymond C H; Ko, Joshua; Yuan, Yvonne W Y; Lam, James J; Louie, Lobo

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) not only paralysed economic activities in SARS-affected cities, it also affected sporting activities. SARS was identified in Hong Kong in late February 2003 and the WHO issued a global alert on 12 March, 2003. The incubation period of SARS is usually 4-6 days and patients commonly present with high fever (temperature >38 degrees C), dry cough, chills and rigor, dyspnoea and diarrhoea. Although a specific antiviral agent and vaccines for SARS are not available at the time of writing, a standard treatment protocol for SARS has been developed. The average mortality rate is about 16% in Hong Kong.The coronavirus is a common pathogen for upper respiratory tract infection and is the most probable pathogen for SARS. Transmission methods may, therefore, be similar for both these infections. Transmission is possible when aerosolised viral particles come into contact with the susceptible host's mucous membrane, most commonly the nose, but also the mouth and eyes. With appropriate preventive measures to avoid contact with virus, the probability of infection is minimal. Isolation of those who have had close contact with confirmed or suspected SARS patients and/or who have persistent fever will be the most effective and practical method of avoiding contact. Maintaining personal hygiene and frequent hand washing can also reduce the risk of infection. Using diluted bleach (1 part bleach in 99 parts water) to cleanse training areas and equipment is also recommended. With proper event planning to conform with quarantine measures, special travel arrangements, facility sterilisation and use of venues with good ventilation and filtering systems, sport competition can still proceed.

  3. Diuretics and ultrafiltration in acute heart failure syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Qi; Liang, Jiang Chang

    2013-01-01

    The use of diuretics and ultrafiltration in acute heart failure syndrome (AHFS) has been investigated in a number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). However, the benefits have been variable. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to examine the overall effect of all-cause mortality, rehospitalization, renal function, dyspnea relief, and adverse events in patients with AHFS. We identified RCTs by a systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Register Database. Eligible RCTs were those that enrolled patients with AHFS and involved comparison of diuretic versus ultrafiltration therapy. Five RCTs with a total of nearly 500 patients were included. Overall, ultrafiltration therapy was not associated with significantly decreased risk of all-cause mortality (relative risk [RR], 0.977; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.602 to 1.587; P = 0.925; I² = 0.0%), rehospitalization (RR, 0.903; 95% CI, 0.696 to 1.170; P = 0.440; I² = 77.4%), dyspnea score (weighted mean difference [WMD], 0.168; 95% CI, -0.318 to 0.653; P = 0.498; I² = 11.4%) and creatinine (WMD, 0.055 mg/mL; 95% CI, -0.101 to 0.210; P = 0.491; I² = 48.4%). However, there was significantly more weight loss (WMD, 1.333 kg; 95% CI, 0.186 to 2.479; P = 0.023; I² = 57.7%) and net fluid removal (WMD, 1459.432 mL; 95% CI, 275.911 to 2642.953; P = 0.016; I² = 25.2%) in the ultrafiltration-therapy group. There was no significant difference in the risk of adverse events between the two groups. Compared with diuretic therapy, ultrafiltration produces greater weight loss and net fluid removal in a safe and effective manner.

  4. Evaluation of galectin-3 levels in acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gucuk Ipek, E; Akin Suljevic, S; Kafes, H; Basyigit, F; Karalok, N; Guray, Y; Dinc Asarcikli, L; Acar, B; Demirel, H

    2016-02-01

    Galectin-3 is a new biomarker that is assumed to reflect fibrogenesis and inflammation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the levels of galectin-3 in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and the relation of galectin-3 to the burden of atherosclerosis. Nineteen patients with ACS who underwent coronary angiography and 17 age-matched healthy controls were enrolled. The burden of atherosclerosis was assessed with Gensini score and with the number of involved vessels. Galectin-3 levels were measured on admission by using ELISA. The mean age of the cohort was 62.8±10.6 and 56% of the patients were male. Compared to control group, median galectin-3 levels were significantly higher in ACS patients (0.77ng/mL [0.50-1.19] vs. 0.51ng/mL [0.41-0.78], P=0.01). Patients were classified into three groups according to the number of involved vessels. Median galectin-3 levels did not differ significantly among groups (one vessel: 0.68ng/mL [0.55-0.74], two vessels: 0.67ng/mL [0.46-1.84], three vessels 0.90ng/mL [0.53-1.38], P=0.62). There was a strong correlation between galectin-3 levels and Gensini score (r=0.625, P=0.004). In conclusion, galectin-3 levels were elevated in patients with ACS and there was a strong correlation between galectin-3 levels and Gensini score.

  5. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus in tears

    PubMed Central

    Loon, S-C; Teoh, S C B; Oon, L L E; Se-Thoe, S-Y; Ling, A-E; Leo, Y-S; Leong, H-N

    2004-01-01

    Background: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a new infectious disease that caused a global outbreak in 2003. Research has shown that it is caused by a novel coronavirus. A series of cases is reported where polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing on tears had demonstrated the presence of the virus. Detection of ocular infection from tears using the PCR technique has been widely used by ophthalmologists to diagnose infections for other viruses. Methods: This is a case series report from cases classified as probable or suspect SARS cases. Tear samples were collected from 36 consecutive patients who were suspected of having SARS in Singapore over a period of 12 days (7–18 April 2003), and analysed by PCR using protocols developed by the WHO network of laboratories. Results: Three patients with probable SARS (one female and two male patients) had positive results from their tear samples. Tear samples were used to confirm SARS in the female patient, who was positive only from her tears. The positive specimens were found in cases sampled early in their course of infection. Conclusions: This is the first case series reported with the detection of the SARS coronavirus from tears, and has important implications for the practice of ophthalmology and medicine. The ability to detect and isolate the virus in the early phase of the disease may be an important diagnostic tool for future patients and tear sampling is both simple and easily repeatable. Many healthcare workers are in close proximity to the eyes of patients and this may be a source of spread among healthcare workers and inoculating patients. Ophthalmic practices may need to change as more stringent barrier methods, appropriate quarantine, and isolation measures are vital when managing patients with SARS. PMID:15205225

  6. Health utility indexes in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gencer, Baris; Rodondi, Nicolas; Auer, Reto; Nanchen, David; Räber, Lorenz; Klingenberg, Roland; Pletscher, Mark; Jüni, Peter; Windecker, Stephan; Matter, Christian M; Lüscher, Thomas F; Mach, François; Perneger, Thomas V; Girardin, François R

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) have been associated with lower health utilities (HUs) compared with the general population. Given the prognostic improvements after ACS with the implementation of coronary angiography (eg, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)), contemporary HU values derived from patient-reported outcomes are needed. Methods We analysed data of 1882 patients with ACS 1 year after coronary angiography in a Swiss prospective cohort. We used the EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D) and visual analogue scale (VAS) to derive HU indexes. We estimated the effects of clinical factors on HU using a linear regression model and compared the observed HU with the average values of individuals of the same sex and age in the general population. Results Mean EQ-5D HU 1-year after coronary angiography for ACS was 0.82 (±0.16) and mean VAS was 0.77 (±0.18); 40.9% of participants exhibited the highest utility values. Compared with population controls, the mean EQ-5D HU was similar (expected mean 0.82, p=0.58) in patients with ACS, but the mean VAS was slightly lower (expected mean 0.79, p<0.001). Patients with ACS who are younger than 60 years had lower HU than the general population (<0.001). In patients with ACS, significant differences were found according to the gender, education and employment status, diabetes, obesity, heart failure, recurrent ischaemic or incident bleeding event and participation in cardiac rehabilitation (p<0.01). Conclusions At 1 year, patients with ACS with coronary angiography had HU indexes similar to a control population. Subgroup analyses based on patients' characteristics and further disease-specific instruments could provide better sensitivity for detecting smaller variations in health-related quality of life. PMID:27252878

  7. Acute Activation of Metabolic Syndrome Components in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients Treated with Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Warris, Lidewij T.; van den Akker, Erica L. T.; Bierings, Marc B.; van den Bos, Cor; Zwaan, Christian M.; Sassen, Sebastiaan D. T.; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Veening, Margreet A.; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2016-01-01

    Although dexamethasone is highly effective in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), it can cause serious metabolic side effects. Because studies regarding the effects of dexamethasone are limited by their small scale, we prospectively studied the direct effects of treating pediatric ALL with dexamethasone administration with respect to activation of components of metabolic syndrome (MetS); in addition, we investigated whether these side effects were correlated with the level of dexamethasone. Fifty pediatric patients (3–16 years of age) with ALL were studied during a 5-day dexamethasone course during the maintenance phase of the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group ALL-10 and ALL-11 protocols. Fasting insulin, glucose, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglycerides levels were measured at baseline (before the start of dexamethasone; T1) and on the fifth day of treatment (T2). Dexamethasone trough levels were measured at T2. We found that dexamethasone treatment significantly increased the following fasting serum levels (P<0.05): HDL, LDL, total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin. In addition, dexamethasone increased insulin resistance (HOMA-IR>3.4) from 8% to 85% (P<0.01). Dexamethasone treatment also significantly increased the diastolic and systolic blood pressure. Lastly, dexamethasone trough levels (N = 24) were directly correlated with high glucose levels at T2, but not with other parameters. These results indicate that dexamethasone treatment acutely induces three components of the MetS. Together with the weight gain typically associated with dexamethasone treatment, these factors may contribute to the higher prevalence of MetS and cardiovascular risk among survivors of childhood leukemia who received dexamethasone treatment. PMID:27362350

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure from Plasmodium ovale infection with fatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium ovale is one of the causative agents of human malaria. Plasmodium ovale infection has long been thought to be non-fatal. Due to its lower morbidity, P. ovale receives little attention in malaria research. Methods Two Malaysians went to Nigeria for two weeks. After returning to Malaysia, they fell sick and were admitted to different hospitals. Plasmodium ovale parasites were identified from blood smears of these patients. The species identification was further confirmed with nested PCR. One of them was successfully treated with no incident of relapse within 12-month medical follow-up. The other patient came down with malaria-induced respiratory complication during the course of treatment. Although parasites were cleared off the circulation, the patient’s condition worsened. He succumbed to multiple complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure. Results Sequencing of the malaria parasite DNA from both cases, followed by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction suggested that the causative agent for both malaria cases was P. ovale curtisi. Discussion In this report, the differences between both cases were discussed, and the potential capability of P. ovale in causing severe complications and death as seen in this case report was highlighted. Conclusion Plasmodium ovale is potentially capable of causing severe complications, if not death. Complete travel and clinical history of malaria patient are vital for successful diagnoses and treatment. Monitoring of respiratory and renal function of malaria patients, regardless of the species of malaria parasites involved is crucial during the course of hospital admission. PMID:24180319

  9. Early Discharge and Outpatients Care in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Previously Treated With Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  11. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Acute myocardial infarction in young adults with antiphospholipid syndrome: report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Abid, Leila; Frikha, Faten; Bahloul, Zouhir; Kammoun, Samir

    2011-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is rarely associated with antiphospholipid syndrome. The treatment of these patients is a clinical challenge. We report the observations of 2 young adults (1 woman and 1 man), admitted in our acute care unit for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A coagulopathy work-up concludes the existence of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in the 2 cases. APS syndrome was considered primary in 2 cases. All patients presented an intense inflammatory syndrome (high level of CRP). Anticardiolipine was present in the 2 cases. However, anti B2 glycoprotein I antibodies were detected in only one case. Emergency percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) with direct stenting had been performed successfully only in the first case, and the follow-up was uncomplicated. Thereafter, long-term oral anticoagulant appeared to be effective. The last patient was admitted because of peripheral acute ischemia of legs. Standard electrocardiogram showed signs of previous silent anteroseptal wall myocardial infarction confirmed by echocardiography. The latter revealed an apical thrombus and a very low left ventricular ejection fraction. Amputation of the right leg was necessary because of consultation occurred too late. However, he died four weeks later. Primary antiphospholipid syndrome should be considered as a cause of acute myocardial infarction in young adults, and PTCA with anticoagulant treatment is effective for initial treatment of this complication.

  13. Cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome in childhood: clinical features and risk of seizure recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, J G; duPlessis, A J; Barnes, P D; Riviello, J J

    1998-07-01

    Cyclosporin A is associated with an acute encephalopathy including seizures and alterations in mental status, herein referred to as cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome. The clinical history, electroencephalogram (EEG), and neuroimaging findings in 19 children with cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome over a 10-year period were reviewed in order to delineate clinical characteristics, imaging features, and to determine the risk of seizure recurrence in this population. All 19 had motor seizures associated with other features of cortical and subcortical dysfunction. The acute mean cyclosporin A level was 342 microg/L, but was within the "therapeutic" range in five cases. Brain imaging by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute or subacute phase revealed lesions characteristic of cyclosporin A toxicity in 14 cases. Acute EEG abnormalities were present in all and included epileptiform discharges or focal slowing. Patients were followed for a median of 49 months (1-9 years). Follow-up imaging (n = 10) showed lesion resolution or improvement in the majority while EEG (n = 10) had normalized in only three. Seizures recurred in six patients and only in those with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities. No patient had a second episode of cyclosporin A associated neurotoxicity or seizure. It appears that a significant risk of seizure recurrence exists following cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome and primarily in those children with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities.

  14. Acute Pulmonary Edema in an Eclamptic Pregnant Patient: A Rare Case of Takotsubo Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karamchandani, Kunal; Bortz, Brandon; Vaida, Sonia

    2016-09-23

    BACKGROUND Acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Takotsubo syndrome, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is a rare cause of acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient, especially prior to delivery of the fetus. CASE REPORT We describe a case of a pregnant patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and eclampsia and was found to have Takotsubo syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, eclampsia as a precipitating factor for Takotsubo syndrome has not been described in literature. CONCLUSIONS Clinicians taking care of pregnant patients should be aware of the potential link between eclampsia and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Prompt correction of the precipitating cause along with supportive management as described is the key to a successful outcome.

  15. Acute Pulmonary Edema in an Eclamptic Pregnant Patient: A Rare Case of Takotsubo Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karamchandani, Kunal; Bortz, Brandon; Vaida, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 35 Final Diagnosis: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy Symptoms: Seizures Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cesarean section Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Takotsubo syndrome, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is a rare cause of acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient, especially prior to delivery of the fetus. Case Report: We describe a case of a pregnant patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and eclampsia and was found to have Takotsubo syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, eclampsia as a precipitating factor for Takotsubo syndrome has not been described in literature. Conclusions: Clinicians taking care of pregnant patients should be aware of the potential link between eclampsia and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Prompt correction of the precipitating cause along with supportive management as described is the key to a successful outcome. PMID:27658947

  16. Subclavian steal syndrome presenting as recurrent pulmonary oedema associated with acute left ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ballo, Piercarlo; Michelagnoli, Stefano; Ercolini, Leonardo; Barbanti, Enrico; Passuello, Franco; Abbondanti, Alessandro; Consoli, Lorenzo; Chechi, Tania; Fibbi, Veronica; Nannini, Marco; Chiodi, Leandro; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Subclavian steal syndrome typically presents as angina in patients with internal mammary artery grafts. Atypical clinical presentations have been rarely described. We report an unusual case of subclavian steal syndrome presenting as pulmonary oedema with acute left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and preserved ejection fraction in a patient with internal mammary artery graft and severe stenosis of the proximal left subclavian artery. After successful angioplasty and stenting of subclavian artery, the patient remained asymptomatic for six months, but then experienced acute diastolic dysfunction and recurrent pulmonary oedema associated with critical subclavian in-stent restenosis with stent deformation. This report points out that, in patients with internal mammary-to-LAD grafts, subclavian steal syndrome may present as acute left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and pulmonary oedema even in the presence of normal ejection fraction.

  17. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Establishing a murine model of the hematopoietic syndrome of the acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Plett, P Artur; Sampson, Carol H; Chua, Hui Lin; Joshi, Mandar; Booth, Catherine; Gough, Alec; Johnson, Cynthia S; Katz, Barry P; Farese, Ann M; Parker, Jeffrey; MacVittie, Thomas J; Orschell, Christie M

    2012-10-01

    The authors have developed a murine model of the Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome (H-ARS) for efficacy testing of medical countermeasures (MCM) against radiation according to the FDA Animal Rule. Ten- to 12-wk-old male and female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to the LD50/30-LD70/30 dose of total body irradiation (TBI, (137)Cs, 0.62-0.67 Gy min(-1)) in the morning hours when mice were determined to be most radiosensitive, and they were assessed for 30-d survival and mean survival time (MST). Antibiotics were delivered in drinking water on days 4-30 post-TBI at a concentration based on the amount of water that lethally-irradiated mice were found to consume. The fluoroquinolones, ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, as well as the tetracycline doxycycline, and aminoglycoside neomycin, all significantly increased MST of decedent mice, while ciprofloxacin (p = 0.061) and doxycycline + neomycin (p = 0.005) showed at least some efficacy to increase 30-d survival. Blood sampling (30 μL/mouse every fifth day) was found to negatively impact 30-d survival. Histopathology of tissues harvested from nonmoribund mice showed expected effects of lethal irradiation, while moribund mice were largely septicemic with a preponderance of enteric organisms. Kinetics of loss and recovery of peripheral blood cells in untreated mice and those treated with two MCM, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and Amifostine further characterized and validated this model for use in screening studies and pivotal efficacy studies of candidate MCM for licensure to treat irradiated individuals suffering from H-ARS.

  19. Establishing a murine model of the Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Plett, P. Artur; Sampson, Carol H.; Chua, Hui Lin; Joshi, Mandar; Booth, Catherine; Gough, Alec; Johnson, Cynthia S.; Katz, Barry P.; Farese, Ann M.; Parker, Jeffrey; MacVittie, Thomas J.; Orschell, Christie M.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a murine model of the Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome (H-ARS) for efficacy testing of medical countermeasures (MCM) against radiation according to the FDA Animal Rule. Ten to 12 week old male and female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to the LD50/30-LD70/30 dose of total body irradiation (TBI, 137Cs, 0.62-0.67 Gy min-1) in the morning hours when mice were determined to be most radiosensitive, and assessed for 30 day survival and mean survival time (MST). Antibiotics were delivered in the drinking water on days 4-30 post-TBI at a concentration based on the amount of water that lethally-irradiated mice were found to consume. The fluoroquinolones, ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, and the tetracycline doxycycline and aminoglycoside neomycin, all significantly increased MST of decedent mice, while ciprofloxacin (p=0.061) and doxycycline + neomycin (p=0.005) showed at least some efficacy to increase 30 day survival. Blood sampling (30uL/mouse every 5th day) was found to negatively impact 30 day survival. Histopathology of tissues harvested from non-moribund mice showed expected effects of lethal irradiation, while moribund mice were largely septicemic with a preponderance of enteric organisms. Kinetics of loss and recovery of peripheral blood cells in untreated mice and those treated with two MCM, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and Amifostine, further characterized and validated our model for use in screening studies and pivotal efficacy studies of candidate MCM for licensure to treat irradiated individuals suffering from H-ARS. PMID:22929467

  20. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Mirghani, Hyder O.; Elnour, Mohammed A.; Taha, Akasha M.; Elbadawi, Abdulateef S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. Objectives: To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. Results: A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P < 0.05). No differences were found with regard to age, hypertension, diabetes, family history of myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, and in-hospital acute coronary complications (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications. PMID:27186156

  1. Acute-on-chronic liver failure: a new syndrome in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Patients with cirrhosis who are hospitalized for an acute decompensation (AD) and also have organ failure(s) are at high risk of short-term death. These patients have a syndrome called Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure (ACLF). ACLF is now considered as a new syndrome that it is distinct from "mere" AD not only because of the presence of organ failure(s) and high short-term mortality but also because of younger age, higher prevalence of alcoholic etiology of cirrhosis, higher prevalence of some precipitants (such as bacterial infections, active alcoholism), and more intense systemic inflammatory response. ACLF is a new syndrome also because severe sepsis or severe alcoholic hepatitis do not account for 100% of the observed cases; in fact, almost 50% of the cases are of "unknown" origin. In other words, severe sepsis, severe alcoholic hepatitis and ACLF of "unknown origin" are subcategories of the syndrome.

  2. Abdominal contributions to cardiorenal dysfunction in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, Frederik H; Dupont, Matthias; Steels, Paul; Grieten, Lars; Malbrain, Manu; Tang, W H Wilson; Mullens, Wilfried

    2013-08-06

    Current pathophysiological models of congestive heart failure unsatisfactorily explain the detrimental link between congestion and cardiorenal function. Abdominal congestion (i.e., splanchnic venous and interstitial congestion) manifests in a substantial number of patients with advanced congestive heart failure, yet is poorly defined. Compromised capacitance function of the splanchnic vasculature and deficient abdominal lymph flow resulting in interstitial edema might both be implied in the occurrence of increased cardiac filling pressures and renal dysfunction. Indeed, increased intra-abdominal pressure, as an extreme marker of abdominal congestion, is correlated with renal dysfunction in advanced congestive heart failure. Intriguing findings provide preliminary evidence that alterations in the liver and spleen contribute to systemic congestion in heart failure. Finally, gut-derived hormones might influence sodium homeostasis, whereas entrance of bowel toxins into the circulatory system, as a result of impaired intestinal barrier function secondary to congestion, might further depress cardiac as well as renal function. Those toxins are mainly produced by micro-organisms in the gut lumen, with presumably important alterations in advanced heart failure, especially when renal function is depressed. Therefore, in this state-of-the-art review, we explore the crosstalk between the abdomen, heart, and kidneys in congestive heart failure. This might offer new diagnostic opportunities as well as treatment strategies to achieve decongestion in heart failure, especially when abdominal congestion is present. Among those currently under investigation are paracentesis, ultrafiltration, peritoneal dialysis, oral sodium binders, vasodilator therapy, renal sympathetic denervation and agents targeting the gut microbiota.

  3. Medical Management of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Immunoprophylaxis by Antiradiation Vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav; Jones, Jeffrey; Casey, Rachael; Kedar, Prasad

    Introduction: Traditionally, the treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) includes supportive therapy, cytokine therapy, blood component transfusions and even stem cell transplantation. Recommendations for ARS treatment are based on clinical symptoms, laboratory results, radiation exposure doses and information received from medical examinations. However, the current medical management of ARS does not include immune prophylaxis based on antiradiation vaccines or immune therapy with hyperimmune antiradiation serum. Immuneprophylaxis of ARS could result from stimulating the immune system via immunization with small doses of radiation toxins (Specific Radiation Determinants-SRD) that possess significant immuno-stimulatory properties. Methods: Principles of immuno-toxicology were used to derive this method of immune prophylaxis. An antiradiation vaccine containing a mixture of Hematotoxic, Neurotoxic and Non-bacterial (GI) radiation toxins, underwent modification into a toxoid forms of the original SRD radiation toxins. The vaccine was administered to animals at different times prior to irradiation. The animals were subjected to lethal doses of radiation that induced different forms of ARS at LD 100/30. Survival rates and clinical symptoms were observed in both control and vaccine-treated animals. Results: Vaccination with non-toxic doses of Radiation toxoids induced immunity from the elaborated Specific Radiation Determinant (SRD) toxins. Neutralization of radiation toxins by specific antiradiation antibodies resulted in significantly improved clinical symptoms in the severe forms of ARS and observed survival rates of 60-80% in animals subjected to lethal doses of radiation expected to induce different forms of ARS at LD 100/30. The most effective vaccination schedule for the antiradiation vaccine consisted of repeated injections 24 and 34 days before irradiation. The vaccine remained effective for the next two years, although the specific immune memory probably

  4. Healthcare Utilization of Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Hoer, Ariane; Behrendt, Susann; Schmidt, Torsten; Lottmann, Kathrin

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the health care utilization of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) of one German statutory health insurance. The utilization of ambulatory services as well as of inpatient rehabilitation should be regarded. Moreover, the study should reveal the prescription of drugs for secondary prevention. Here, patients showing guideline corresponding prescriptions should be compared with patients without such prescriptions. Methods A retrospective claims data analysis of one German statutory health insurance was conducted. Health care utilization was considered in the first year after an index hospitalization due to ACS. Beneficiaries for whom an ICD-10 discharge diagnosis of ACS was reported between January 1st 2007 and December 31st 2009 were included. In order to reveal differences in health care utilization depending on the type of ACS (STEMI versus NSTEMI/UA) stratified analyses were performed. Another stratification was done for patients with and without defined drug prescriptions. Results From 45,188 patients with ACS almost three quarters were assigned to the group of NSTEMI/UA. For 8.9% of all ACS patients (18.74% STEMI, 8.89% NSTEMI/UA), inpatient post-hospital rehabilitation related to ACS was recorded. Ambulatory care related to CHD diagnosis was utilized by 77.6% of patients, more often by STEMI than by NSTEMI/UA patients. For 36.7% and 45.7% of ACS patients, a prescription of aspirin or clopidogrel was recorded, respectively, 79.4% of STEMI patients received at least one prescription for antiplatelet drugs, the corresponding proportion of NSTEMI/UA was 59.8%. A considerable part of patients without prescription dropped out within the first 90 days after the index event. Conclusions A claims data analysis of one German statutory health insurance fund showed that health care utilization of ACS patients varied depending on the ACS type. It is necessary to distinguish between STEMI and NSTEMI/UA patients when

  5. Plasma Lactate Dehydrogenase Levels Predict Mortality in Acute Aortic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Fulvio; Ravetti, Anna; Nazerian, Peiman; Liedl, Giovanni; Veglio, Maria Grazia; Battista, Stefania; Vanni, Simone; Pivetta, Emanuele; Montrucchio, Giuseppe; Mengozzi, Giulio; Rinaldi, Mauro; Moiraghi, Corrado; Lupia, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In acute aortic syndromes (AAS), organ malperfusion represents a key event impacting both on diagnosis and outcome. Increased levels of plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a biomarker of malperfusion, have been reported in AAS, but the performance of LDH for the diagnosis of AAS and the relation of LDH with outcome in AAS have not been evaluated so far. This was a bi-centric prospective diagnostic accuracy study and a cohort outcome study. From 2008 to 2014, patients from 2 Emergency Departments suspected of having AAS underwent LDH assay at presentation. A final diagnosis was obtained by aortic imaging. Patients diagnosed with AAS were followed-up for in-hospital mortality. One thousand five hundred seventy-eight consecutive patients were clinically eligible, and 999 patients were included in the study. The final diagnosis was AAS in 201 (20.1%) patients. Median LDH was 424 U/L (interquartile range [IQR] 367–557) in patients with AAS and 383 U/L (IQR 331–460) in patients with alternative diagnoses (P < 0.001). Using a cutoff of 450 U/L, the sensitivity of LDH for AAS was 44% (95% confidence interval [CI] 37–51) and the specificity was 73% (95% CI 69–76). Overall in-hospital mortality for AAS was 23.8%. Mortality was 32.6% in patients with LDH ≥ 450 U/L and 16.8% in patients with LDH < 450 U/L (P = 0.006). Following stratification according to LDH quartiles, in-hospital mortality was 12% in the first (lowest) quartile, 18.4% in the second quartile, 23.5% in the third quartile, and 38% in the fourth (highest) quartile (P = 0.01). LDH ≥ 450 U/L was further identified as an independent predictor of death in AAS both in univariate and in stepwise logistic regression analyses (odds ratio 2.28, 95% CI 1.11–4.66; P = 0.025), in addition to well-established risk markers such as advanced age and hypotension. Subgroup analysis showed excess mortality in association with LDH ≥ 450 U/L in elderly, hemodynamically stable

  6. Endovascular Covered Stent Reconstruction Improved the Outcomes of Acute Carotid Blowout Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao-Liang; Wong, Ho-Fai; Ku, Yi-Kang; Mun-Ching Wong, Alex; Wai, Yau-Yau; Ng, Shu-Hang

    2008-01-01

    Summary Carotid blowout is a devastating complication in patients with head and neck cancer, commonly encountered as a delayed complication of radiation therapy. The clinical outcomes in patients with carotid blowout are discouraging; even transarterial embolization has been performed to control the acute massive bleeding. In recent years, covered stents have been reported as an alternative treatment producing favorable results. In this study, 13 consecutive patients with acute carotid blowout syndrome were treated at our institute by covered-stent reconstruction between December 2005 and December 2007. The median posthemorrhagic survival period after reconstruction (187 days) was more than that reported in patients treated only with transarterial embolization (26 days). Though the estimated mortality was about 54%, those who survived showed favorable outcomes, and only one transit complication of acute in-stent thrombosis occurred. Thus, endovascular covered-stent reconstruction is a safe and effective approach to manage acute carotid blowout syndrome. PMID:20557797

  7. A Healthy Young Woman with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: an unfamiliar face of a familiar disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheybani, Fereshte; Naderi, Hamid Reza; Moghaddam, Ahmad Bagheri; Amiri, Bezat

    2016-01-01

    The presented case features a rare manifestation of pulmonary tuberculosis in a previously healthy young woman who had acute presentation of tuberculous pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome. In developing countries, mycobacterium tuberculosis is an important cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). TB can present as an acute process and should be included in the differential diagnosis of CAP. This case is special in its manifestation from several clinical perspectives, including the lack of an underlying medical condition or immune defect and the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in non-miliary and non-disseminated tuberculosis. In conclusion, the diagnosis of TB should be considered in all patients who present with CAP in endemic regions. PMID:27957312

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome after verapamil intoxication: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Izdes, S; Altintas, N D; Soykut, C

    2014-04-01

    Verapamil intoxication is a life-threatening condition that often presents with severe hemodynamic instability and requires vasopressor support. There are also documented case reports of the development of non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema after verapamil overdose. However, the exact mechanisms responsible for pulmonary oedema remain unclear. Here, we describe a 36-year-old woman who was admitted to the intensive care unit after ingesting high-dose verapamil and subsequently developed acute respiratory distress syndrome soon after hemodynamic stabilization. Possible mechanisms are presented after taking into account findings in the current literature. Acute respiratory distress syndrome should be considered early during the evaluation of patients with verapamil intoxication.

  9. Rapid Aspirin Challenge in Patients with Aspirin Allergy and Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kevin A; White, Andrew A

    2016-02-01

    Aspirin allergy in a patient with acute coronary syndrome represents one of the more urgent challenges an allergist may face. Adverse reactions to aspirin are reported in 1.5% of patients with coronary artery disease. A history of adverse reaction to aspirin often leads to unnecessary withholding of this medication or use of alternative antiplatelet therapy which may be inferior or more costly. Aspirin therapy has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary artery disease. Rapid aspirin challenge/desensitization in the aspirin allergic patient has been consistently shown to be both safe and successful in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

  10. "Sagging heart syndrome": a cause of acute lead dislodgment in two patients.

    PubMed

    Iskos, D; Lurie, K G; Shultz, J J; Fabian, W H; Benditt, D G

    1999-02-01

    Acute passive fixation atrial lead dislodgment occurred due to an unexpected and marked postural descent of the heart after permanent pacemaker implantation in two patients. Sagging of the heart in these two individuals may have been related to a history of morbid obesity followed by weight loss of over 100 pounds. Lead replacement with active fixation leads was required in both cases. The term "sagging heart syndrome" is proposed to describe this clinical entity. In certain adult populations, such as in patients with a history of significant weight loss, the "sagging heart syndrome" may represent a previously unrecognized cause of acute lead dislodgment.

  11. Acute Cerebral Infarction as a Rare Thrombotic Event in Myelodysplastic Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by cytopenia that results in high risks of infection and bleeding. However, there are few reports of cerebral infarction in MDS. We reported a 72-year-old female with MDS who developed acute cerebral infarction. Clinical history of the patient revealed no definite risk factors for stroke except diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia that was well controlled. This case represented the rare occurrence of arterial thrombosis causing acute cerebral infarction in MDS, which may be due to complex chromosomal abnormality and inflammatory processes. PMID:28119848

  12. [Prehospital stage of medical aid to patients with acute coronary syndrome and elevated ST segment].

    PubMed

    Vertkin, A L; Morozov, S N; Fedorov, A I

    2013-01-01

    We studied effect of time on the outcome of acute coronary syndrome and elevated ST segment at the prehospital stage. Logistic regression analysis revealed two time-dependent predictors: "symptom-needle" time and total call service time. In patients undergoing prehospital thrombolysis, these indices (88 and 85 min respectively) reliably predicted the probability of fatal outcome. Their values of 71 and 77 min respectively predicted the risk of unfavourable outcome. The total call service time may serve as an indicator of the quality of work of an ambulance crew at the prehospital stage of management of acute coronary syndrome with elevated ST segment.

  13. Disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome: complete pancreas transection secondary to acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gámez-del-Castillo, Juan Manuel; Garcés-Albir, Marina; Fernández-Moreno, María Carmen; Morera-Ocón, Francisco Javier; Villagrasa, Rosana; Sabater-Ortí, Luis

    2016-03-01

    Disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome is a serious complication of acute pancreatitis which is defined by a complete discontinuity of the pancreatic duct, such that a viable side of the pancreas remains isolated from the gastrointestinal tract. This pancreatic disruption is infrequently observed in the clinical practice and its diagnostic and therapeutic management are controversial. We present an extreme case of disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome with complete duct disruption and pancreatic transection following acute pancreatitis, as well as the diagnostic and therapeutic processes carried out.

  14. Treatment of compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure after the Wenchuan earthquake.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xin; Zhang, Kaiwei; Zhong, Gang; Cen, Shiqiang; Huang, Fuguo; Lv, Jingtong; Xiang, Zhou

    2012-04-01

    Compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare emergency often treated operatively. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of nonoperative treatment for compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Nonoperative treatment, which primarily involves continuous renal replacement therapy, was performed in 6 patients (3 men and 3 women) who presented with compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure. The mean mangled extremity severity score (MESS) and laboratory data regarding renal function were analyzed before and after treatment, and the clinical outcome was evaluated at 17-month follow-up. Laboratory data regarding renal function showed improvements. All 6 patients survived with the affected lower limbs intact after nonoperative treatment. Follow-up revealed active knee range of motion and increased muscle strength, as well as a recovery of sensation. A positive linear correlation was found between MESS and the time required to achieve a reduction in swelling, as well as the time required for the recovery of sensation and knee range of motion (r>0.8; P<.05). Satisfactory clinical outcomes were obtained in patients with compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure.Urine alkalization, electrolyte and water balance, and continuous renal replacement therapy have played an important role in saving lives and extremities. Nonoperative treatment should be considered in the treatment of compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure.

  15. Acute renal failure in a patient with Sheehan syndrome and rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Parvin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Reza; Pirasteh, Shadi

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of acute renal failure related to rhabdomyolysis in a patient with Sheehan syndrome, while other diseases that could cause rhabdomyolysis were excluded. The patient's kidney function completely recovered with 3 sessions of intermittent hemodialysis. After thyroxine replacement therapy, musculoskeletal symptoms disappeared and creatine kinase concentrations decreased. Steroid replacement therapy was also administered. The present case suggests that rhabdomyolysis could occur in a patient with Sheehan syndrome without other precipitating factors.

  16. [Target Molecule for a Demyelinating Type of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is classified into demyelinating type, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and axonal form, acute axonal motor neuropathy (AMAN). It has been clearly established that the target molecule for the former is a ganglioside. In contrast, despite years of effort, the target molecule for the latter has not been identified. Recently, molecules around the nodes of Ranvier have entered the spotlight, and "moesin" was reported to be a target molecule for cytomegalovirus associated-AIDP.

  17. Cardiac computed tomography for the evaluation of the acute chest pain syndrome: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Schlett, Christopher L; Hoffmann, Udo; Geisler, Tobias; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian

    2015-03-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is recommended for the triage of acute chest pain in patients with a low-to-intermediate likelihood for acute coronary syndrome. Absence of coronary artery disease (CAD) confirmed by CCTA allows rapid emergency department discharge. This article shows that CCTA-based triage is as safe as traditional triage, reduces the hospital length of stay, and may provide cost-effective or even cost-saving care.

  18. Should Immune-Enhancing Formulations Be Used for Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Roosevelt, Hannah

    2016-08-01

    The potential for regulating immune function in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) through enteral-administered anti-inflammatory lipids has generated much interest over the past 20 years. Yet recommendations remain inconclusive regarding the utilization of ω-3 fatty acids in patients with ARDS and acute lung injury (ALI). Studies are limited in number, with differing methods, small sample sizes, and conflicting results, making recommendations difficult to interpret.

  19. Acute coronary syndrome: a rare case of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maloberti, Alessadro; Meani, Paolo; Pirola, Roberto; Varrenti, Marisa; Boniardi, Marco; De Biase, Anna Maria; Vallerio, Paola; Bonacina, Edgardo; Mancia, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Giannattasio, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor arising from neuroectodermal chromaffin tissues in the adrenal gland or extra-adrenal paraganglia (paragangliomas). The prevalence of the tumor is 0.1%-0.6% in the hypertensive population, of which 10%-20% are malignant. Pheochromocytoma produces, stores, and secretes catecholamines, as well as leads to hypertensive crisis, arrhythmia, angina, and acute myocardial infarction without coronary artery diseases. We report a case of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a final diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). PMID:26487970

  20. Acute coronary syndrome: a rare case of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maloberti, Alessadro; Meani, Paolo; Pirola, Roberto; Varrenti, Marisa; Boniardi, Marco; De Biase, Anna Maria; Vallerio, Paola; Bonacina, Edgardo; Mancia, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Giannattasio, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor arising from neuroectodermal chromaffin tissues in the adrenal gland or extra-adrenal paraganglia (paragangliomas). The prevalence of the tumor is 0.1%-0.6% in the hypertensive population, of which 10%-20% are malignant. Pheochromocytoma produces, stores, and secretes catecholamines, as well as leads to hypertensive crisis, arrhythmia, angina, and acute myocardial infarction without coronary artery diseases. We report a case of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a final diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC).

  1. Airway pressure release ventilation in morbidly obese surgical patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Testerman, George M; Breitman, Igal; Hensley, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    Morbidly obese patients with body mass index greater than 40 kg/m(2) and respiratory failure requiring critical care services are increasingly seen in trauma and acute care surgical centers. Baseline respiratory pathophysiology including decreased pulmonary compliance with dependent atelectasis and abnormal ventilation-perfusion relationships predisposes these patients to acute lung injury (ALI) and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as well as prolonged stays in the intensive care unit. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is an increasingly used alternative mode for salvage therapy in patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure that also provides lung protection from ventilator-induced lung injury. APRV provides the conceptual advantage of an "open lung" approach to ventilation that may be extended to the morbidly obese patient population with ALI and ARDS. We discuss the theoretical benefits and a recent clinical experience of APRV ventilation in the morbidly obese patient with respiratory failure at a Level I trauma, surgical critical care, and acute care surgery center.

  2. [Physical therapy for four patients with severe axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome in acute stage].

    PubMed

    Kakou, Hiroaki; Shitama, Hideo; Kimura, Yoshiko; Saeki, Satoru; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2009-03-01

    We describe four male patients suffering from quadriplegia caused by axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome. They were diagnosed with axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome based on their clinical course and electrophysiological findings. Three patients had severe pain, two had marked elevation of serum creatine kinase, one had finger contracture, and two required mechanical ventilation. Two of the patients recovered during the period from nadir to discharge in the Hughes functional grading scale and Barthel index. A physical therapist should understand the characteristics of severe axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome in an acute stage, and consider the psychological status of the patients.

  3. Partial Klüver-Bucy syndrome in a patient with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Jha, Sanjeev; Ansari, M K

    2010-11-01

    The symptoms of Klüver-Bucy syndrome (KBS) include hyperorality, hypersexuality, visual agnosia, hypermetamorphosis and decreased motor or vocal reaction to fear- or anger-provoking stimuli. This syndrome has been associated with a wide variety of neurodegenerative disorders, as well as traumatic, non-traumatic and infectious brain injuries. We report an 11-year-old boy who developed a fairly classical presentation of KBS, presumably in the setting of post-infectious acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). This patient's presentation is a reminder of this rare syndrome and extends the clinical manifestations of ADEM, which is a relatively more common condition.

  4. Bayés syndrome and acute cardioembolic ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Martí, Lucía; Dorison, Sebastien; Sánchez, María José

    2017-01-01

    Bayés syndrome is an under-recognized clinical condition characterized by advanced interatrial block. Bayés syndrome is a subclinical disease that manifests electrocardiographically as a prolonged P wave duration > 120 ms with biphasic morphology ± in the inferior leads. The clinical relevance of Bayés syndrome lies in the fact that is a clear arrhythmological syndrome and has a strong association with supraventricular arrhythmias, particularly atypical atrial flutter and atrial fibrillation. Likewise, Bayés syndrome has been recently identified as a novel risk factor for non-lacunar cardioembolic ischemic stroke and vascular dementia. Advanced interatrial block can be a risk for embolic stroke due to its known sequelae of left atrial dilation, left atrial electromechanical dysfunction or atrial tachyarrhythmia (paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation), conditions predisposing to thromboembolism. Bayés syndrome may be responsible for some of the unexplained ischemic strokes and shall be considered and investigated as a possible cause for cryptogenetic stroke. In summary, Bayés syndrome is a poorly recognized cardiac rhythm disorder with important cardiologic and neurologic implications. PMID:28352633

  5. Acute Motor-dominant Polyneuropathy as Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Multiple Mononeuropathies in a Patient with Sjögren's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichiro; Nakayasu, Hiroyuki; Suto, Yutaka; Takahashi, Shotaro; Konishi, Yoshihiro; Nishimura, Hirotake; Ueno, Rino; Kusunoki, Susumu; Nakashima, Kenji

    A patient with xerostomia and xerophthalmia due to Sjögren's syndrome presented with acute motor-dominant polyneuropathy and multiple mononeuropathy with antiganglioside antibodies. Nerve conduction studies and a sural nerve biopsy revealed the neuropathy as a mixture of segmental demyelination and axonal degeneration. Positive results were obtained for several antiganglioside antibodies. Corticosteroid treatment proved effective. The neuropathy was considered to represent a mixture of polyneuropathy as Guillain-Barré syndrome and multiple mononeuropathy via Sjögren's syndrome. We speculate that Guillain-Barré syndrome occurred in the patient and Guillain-Barré syndrome itself activated multiple mononeuropathy via Sjögren's syndrome.

  6. Acute coronary syndromes without persistent st-segment elevation: advances in surgical revascularization.

    PubMed

    Zoffoli, Giampaolo; Nicolini, Francesco; Beghi, Cesare; Budillon, Alessandro Maria; Agostinelli, Andrea; Borrello, Bruno; Cagnoni, Giovanni; Frassetto, Guido; Fragnito, Claudio; Gherli, Tiziano

    2005-09-01

    Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) still plays a fundamental role in the management of acute coronary syndromes. The aim of this study is to report the experience of our center in the treatment of patients with acute coronary sindromes without persistent ST elevation urgently operated on with CABG, and to discuss surgical problems related. Two-hundred and six patients were urgently operated on for CABG for acute coronary syndromes without persistent ST-segment elevation from January 2001 to February 2003. The majority of them had three vessel coronary disease (72%) and left main stem disease occurred in 20% of the patients. Mean LVEF (left ventricular ejection fraction) was 54 +/- 12% whereas 9% of the patients had a LVEF < 40%. Twenty-one patients (10%) received glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor inhibitors and 35 (17%) received intravenous heparin therapy before surgery. Mean interval time between the onset of symptoms and surgery was 16 +/- 10 days (range 4-50). In-hospital mortality was 2% (4 patients). Perioperative AMI (acute myocardial infarction) occurred in 4% (8 patients) and a transient low cardiac output syndrome in 27 patients (13%). Bleeding requiring surgery occurred in 1% of the patients. Transient respiratory insufficiency was present in 12 patients (6%) and acute renal failure in 8 patients (4%). Mean I.C.U. time was 2.4 days (1-17). Urgent CABG for acute coronary syndromes shows a low risk for in-hospital mortality and morbidity. In acute patients arterial grafts are not detrimental for the outcome, but are recommended in the absence of contraindications to improve long-term results. In spite of recent developments in cardioplegic cardiac arrest, optimal myocardial protection against perioperative myocardial infarction still remains a challenge.

  7. Arginine methylation dysfunction increased risk of acute coronary syndrome in coronary artery disease population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengyu; Zhang, Shuyang; Wang, Hongyun; Wu, Wei; Ye, Yicong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The plasma levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) had been proved to be an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Few studies involved the entire arginine methylation dysfunction. This study was designed to investigate whether arginine methylation dysfunction is associated with acute coronary syndrome risk in coronary artery disease population. In total 298 patients undergoing coronary angiography because of chest pain with the diagnosis of stable angina pectoris or acute coronary syndrome from February 2013 to June 2014 were included. Plasma levels of free arginine, citrulline, ornithine, and the methylated form of arginine, ADMA, and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. We examined the relationship between arginine metabolism-related amino acids or arginine methylation index (AMI, defined as ratio of [arginine + citrulline + ornithine]/[ADMA + SDMA]) and acute coronary events. We found that plasma ADMA levels were similar in the stable angina pectoris group and the acute coronary syndrome group (P = 0.88); the AMI differed significantly between 2 groups (P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that AMI was an independent risk factor of acute coronary events in patients with coronary artery disease (OR = 0.975, 95% confidence interval 0.956–0.993; P = 0.008). Our study suggested that ADMA levels were very similar in the stable angina and acute coronary syndrome patients; AMI might be an independent risk factor of acute coronary events in coronary artery disease population. PMID:28207514

  8. Acute and chronic tianeptine treatments attenuate ethanol withdrawal syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, Tayfun; Kayir, Hakan; Celik, Turgay; Yüksel, Nevzat

    2006-05-01

    Effects of acute and chronic tianeptine treatments on ethanol withdrawal syndrome were investigated in rats. Ethanol (7.2% v/v) was given to adult male Wistar rats by a liquid diet for 30 days. Acute or chronic (twice daily) tianeptine (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) and saline were administered to rats intraperitoneally. Acute and last chronic tianeptine injections and saline were done 30 min before ethanol withdrawal testing. After 2nd, 4th and 6th hours of ethanol withdrawal, rats were observed for 5 min, and withdrawal signs which included locomotor hyperactivity, agitation, tremor, wet dog shakes, stereotyped behavior and audiogenic seizures were recorded or rated. Locomotor activity in naive (no ethanol-dependent rats) was also tested after acute tianeptine treatments. Acute but not chronic tianeptine treatment attenuated locomotor hyperactivity and agitation in ethanol-dependent rats. Both acute and chronic tianeptine treatment produced some significant inhibitory effects on tremor, wet dog shakes, stereotyped behaviors and audiogenic seizures during the ethanol withdrawal. Our results suggest that acute or chronic tianeptine treatment attenuates ethanol withdrawal syndrome in ethanol-dependent rats and this drug may be useful for treatment of ethanol-type dependence.

  9. [The systemic inflammatory response syndrome correction in acute destructive pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Agapov, M A; Khoreva, M V; Gorskiĭ, V A

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a disease of variable severity. In which some patients experience mild, self-limited attacks while others manifest a severe, highly morbid, and frequently lethal attack. The exact mechanisms by which diverse etiological factors induce an attack are still unclear. Recent studies have established the role played by inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. In our research we have estimated influence of not steroid anti-inflammatory preparation on synthesis pro-and anti-inflammatory Cytokines at healthy donors and at patients with Acute pancreatitis.

  10. Side effects of using nitrates to treat heart failure and the acute coronary syndromes, unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Thadani, Udho; Ripley, Toni L

    2007-07-01

    Nitrates are potent venous dilators and anti-ischemic agents. They are widely used for the relief of chest pain and pulmonary congestion in patients with acute coronary syndromes and heart failure. Nitrates, however, do not reduce mortality in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Combination of nitrates and hydralazine when given in addition to beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce mortality and heart failure hospitalizations in patients with heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction who are of African-American origin. Side effects during nitrate therapy are common but are less well described in the literature compared with the reported side effects in patients with stable angina pectoris. The reported incidence of side effects varies highly among different studies and among various disease states. Headache is the most commonly reported side effect with an incidence of 12% in acute heart failure, 41-73% in chronic heart failure, 3-19% in unstable angina and 2-26% in acute myocardial infarction. The reported incidence of hypotension also differs: 5-10% in acute heart failure, 20% in chronic heart failure, 9% in unstable angina and < 1-48% in acute myocardial infarction, with the incidence being much higher with concomitant nitrate therapy plus angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Reported incidence of dizziness is as low as 1% in patients with acute myocardial infarction to as high as 29% in patients with heart failure. Severe headaches and/or symptomatic hypotension may necessitate discontinuation of nitrate therapy. Severe life threatening hypotension or even death may occur when nitrates are used in patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction associated with right ventricular dysfunction or infarction, or with concomitant use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors or N-acetylcysteine. Despite the disturbing observational reports in the literature that continuous and prolonged use of nitrates may lead to

  11. [The treatment of posner-schlossmann's syndrome. (acute glaucomatocyclitic crises) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Huismans, H

    1975-12-01

    In the surgery two patients with Posner-Schlossmann-Syndrome were observed for several months. The therapy of the acute attack secondary glaucoma was the combination of Diamox, Cortison - and Neosynephrine eye-drops. With Pilocarpine the I.O.P. lowering was insufficient. In one case corneal precipitates typical for Heterochromia complicata Fuchs were observed.

  12. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Isolates of Human Parvovirus 4 from Patients with Acute Encephalitis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Shantanu; Seth, Akanksha; Singh, Arvind K.; Jain, Bhawana

    2015-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (Parv4) is a relatively new virus. Association of this virus with any human disease is yet to be established. We detected human parvovirus 4 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of two patients presenting with acute encephalitis syndrome in northern India. This is the first report of the Parv4 genome sequence from northern India. PMID:25635010

  13. Exploring the Roles and Nature of Science: A Case Study of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yeung Chung

    2008-01-01

    The roles of science in society and the nature of science are the focus of many science curricula. Current views about these two aspects of science have largely been informed by the history of scientific development. This article uses the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome--a recent health scare--as a case study to explore the roles of…

  14. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH.

  15. Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome during Infliximab Therapy in a Patient with Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schoehl, Johanna; Mechie, Nicolae-Catalin; Schwoerer, Harald; Moerer, Onnen; Quintel, Michael; Buck, Cordula; Ellenrieder, Volker; Neesse, Albrecht; Amanzada, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of a noninfectious interstitial lung disease is a rare but life-threatening side effect of infliximab, an antitumor necrosis factor alpha antibody. The following case report of a patient with Crohn disease shows an extremely dramatic progression to a severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:27920644

  16. Fear of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) among Health Care Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Kwong-Lo, Rosalie S. Y.; Mak, Christine W. Y.; Wong, Joe S.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined fear related to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) among 2 samples of hospital staff in Hong Kong. Sample 1 included health care workers (n = 82) and was assessed during the peak of the SARS epidemic. Sample 2 included hospital staff who recovered from SARS (n = 97). The results show that participants in…

  17. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and the Delivery of Continuing Medical Education: Case Study from Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dave; Ryan, David; Sibbald, Gary; Rachlis, Anita; Davies, Sharon; Manchul, Lee; Parikh, Sagar

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) struck Toronto in the spring of 2003, causing many deaths, serious morbidity, forced quarantine of thousands of individuals, and the closure of all provincial hospitals for several weeks. Given the direction by public health authorities to cancel or postpone all continuing medical education…

  18. [Association between multiple myeloma and acute myeloid leukemia secondary to myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Jennane, Selim; Eddou, Hicham; Mahtat, El Mehdi; Konopacki, Johanna; Souleau, Bertrand; Malfuson, Jean Valère; Foissaud, Vincent; de Revel, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    We report a rare case of association of two distinct hematologic malignancies: refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia associated with del(5q) and symptomatic multiple myeloma associated with del(17p) and del(13q). After 16 months, the patient presented an acute leukemic transformation of the myelodysplasic syndrome.

  19. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Epidemic and Change of People's Health Behavior in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Xiaodong; Li, Shiyue; Wang, Chunhong; Chen, Xiaoqing; Wu, Xiaomin

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) has become a new worldwide epidemic whose origin was until recently unknown. It is the unpredictable nature of this epidemic that makes people want answers to some important questions about what they can do to protect themselves. This study presents an inquiry into peoples knowledge and self-reported…

  20. [Diagnostic and prognostic values of troponins in acute coronary syndromes].

    PubMed

    Smiri, Zahreddine; Haggui, Abdeddayem; Barakett, Nadia; M'Henni, Hedi; Haouala, Habib

    2004-05-01

    Coronary disease is a frequent clinical entity which, in some cases, makes a difficult diagnostic problem. However, the very big revolution realised these last decades in both diagnostics and therapeutics, improved management of these patients. Troponins which are specific and sensitive biomarkers of myocardial damage were evaluated in several domains, especially in acute coronary diseases. We purpose to clarify diagnostic and prognostic place of these markers in acute coronary disease in order to optimize their clinical use.

  1. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes That Have Relapsed or Not Responded to Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Cannabinoid hyperemesis acute renal failure: a common sequela of cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Habboushe, Joseph; Sedor, Jennifer

    2014-06-01

    We report the case of a 25-year-old man with an 8-year history of daily marijuana use diagnosed with acute renal failure secondary to cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. The patient presented with “constant” vomiting for over a day. His symptoms were completely relieved with compulsive hot showering and partially relieved by hot baths, by high ambient room temperature, and transiently after smoking marijuana. The patient was found to have a creatinine of 3.21 and admitted for acute renal failure secondary to cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) is a recently described condition affecting long-term marijuana users. We found 5 other case reports of acute renal failure secondary to CHS [1-5], and a total of 55 case reports of CHS. The unique combination of intractable vomiting and constant hot showers seems to put CHS patients at significant risk of severe dehydration and prerenal failure, a common and distinct entity we suggest be termed cannabinoid hyperemesis acute renal failure (CHARF). The characteristics of cannabinoid hyperemesis acute renal failure patients were similar to CHS patients, except a larger portion were over the age of 30 (4 of 6, vs 30%). Evaluating physicians should maintain a high degree of suspicion for this common sequela of CHS.

  3. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome of the hand following a cat bite.

    PubMed

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Dabloun, Slim; Benzarti, Sofien; Khechimi, Myriam; Jenzeri, Abdesselem; Maalla, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Cat bites at the hand are common situation in emergency departments. Neglected or poorly supported, these lesions sometimes lead to serious injuries that may compromise the function of the hand. Pasteurellamultocida is the most offending germ in these lesions, despite their sensitivity to antibiotics; it can sometimes lead to deep infections involving the skin, bones and joints. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome is exceptional after cat bite. We report a case of a 56 Year old female presenting with an acute carpal tunnel syndrome associated with compartment syndrome of the right hand 6 days after a cat bite of her right thumb. The patient was treated by surgery to relieve the median nerve. Microbiology identified PasteurellaMultocida.

  4. Isolated polio-like syndrome after tick-borne encephalitis presenting with acute hyperckemia.

    PubMed

    Zambito Marsala, Sandro; Francavilla, Ermenegildo; Gioulis, Manuela; Candeago, Rosa Maria; Mondardini, Valeria; Gentile, Manrico; Ferracci, Franco; Guzzo, Francesco; Granata, Carmela; Marchini, Corrado

    2012-06-01

    Tick borne encephalitis virus infection usually shows a biphasic course. In the first stage of illness symptoms are similar to a flu-like syndrome, then after a defervescence period, fever may represent with neurological manifestations ranging from mild meningitis to severe encephalomyelitis. We report the clinical case of an adult man presented with an acute proximal hyposthenia, severe hyperckemia, clinical and laboratoristic evidence of acute tick borne virus infection. This virus has a favourite tropism for the anterior horn cells of the cervical spine segment. Polio-like syndrome, usually affecting the upper limbs, is the clinical phenotype of an infection of the cervical motoneurons. Usually myelitis is associated to severe encephalitis and a complete diagnosis may be difficult in comatose patients. Rarely, an isolated polio-like syndrome may be the sole neurological complication of tick-borne encephalitis.

  5. Antiphospholipid syndrome and acute myocardial infarction: treatment with thrombectomy and abciximab.

    PubMed

    Martí, Vicens; Seixo, Filipe; Santaló, Miguel; Serra, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune coagulation disorder that manifests clinically as venous and arterial thrombosis, and may affect any tissue or organ. Coronary artery involvement, however, is very rare. Case reports in the literature describing patients with coronary acute syndrome and APS treated with coronary angioplasty show conflicting results. We report an adult male patient with APS who presented with an acute myocardial infarction. Given the high risk of thrombosis in these patients, he was treated percutaneously with thrombectomy and abciximab. We review the few cases of coronary angioplasty in patients with APS reported to date. To our knowledge, this is the first case in which acute myocardial infarction due to thrombotic coronary occlusion was treated with thrombectomy and abciximab without stenting the artery.

  6. Antipsychotic Medications and Risk of Acute Coronary Syndrome in Schizophrenia: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hsing-Cheng; Yang, Shu-Yu; Liao, Ya-Tang; Chen, Chiao-Chicy; Kuo, Chian-Jue

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the risk of developing acute coronary syndrome requiring hospitalization in association with the use of certain antipsychotic medications in schizophrenia patients. Methods A nationwide cohort of 31,177 inpatients with schizophrenia between the ages of 18 and 65 years whose records were enrolled in the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan from 2000 to 2008 and were studied after encrypting the identifications. Cases (n = 147) were patients with subsequent acute coronary syndrome requiring hospitalization after their first psychiatric admission. Based on a nested case-control design, each case was matched with 20 controls for age, sex and the year of first psychiatric admission using risk-set sampling. The effects of antipsychotic agents on the development of acute coronary syndrome were assessed using multiple conditional logistic regression and sensitivity analyses to confirm any association. Results We found that current use of aripiprazole (adjusted risk ratio [RR] = 3.68, 95% CI: 1.27–10.64, p<0.05) and chlorpromazine (adjusted RR = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.40–6.24, p<0.001) were associated with a dose-dependent increase in the risk of developing acute coronary syndrome. Although haloperidol was associated with an increased risk (adjusted RR = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.20–3.44, p<0.01), there was no clear dose-dependent relationship. These three antipsychotic agents were also associated with an increased risk in the first 30 days of use, and the risk decreased as the duration of therapy increased. Sensitivity analyses using propensity score-adjusted modeling showed that the results were similar to those of multiple regression analysis. Conclusions Patients with schizophrenia who received aripiprazole, chlorpromazine, or haloperidol could have a potentially elevated risk of developing acute coronary syndrome, particularly at the start of therapy. PMID:27657540

  7. Acute Sheehan's syndrome presenting as central diabetes insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Robalo, Raquel; Pedroso, Célia; Agapito, Ana; Borges, Augusta

    2012-01-01

    Sheehan's syndrome occurs as a result of ischaemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum haemorrhage. Improvements in obstetrical care have significantly reduced its incidence in developed countries, but postpartum pituitary infarction remains a common cause of hypopituitarism in developing countries. We report a case of severe postpartum haemorrhage followed by headache, central diabetes insipidus and failure to lactate, which prompted us to investigate and identify both anterior and posterior pituitary deficiency compatible with Sheehan's syndrome. A timely diagnosis allowed us to implement an adequate treatment and follow-up plan, which are known to improve clinical status and patient outcome. PMID:23131607

  8. Acute Sheehan's syndrome presenting as central diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Robalo, Raquel; Pedroso, Célia; Agapito, Ana; Borges, Augusta

    2012-11-06

    Sheehan's syndrome occurs as a result of ischaemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum haemorrhage. Improvements in obstetrical care have significantly reduced its incidence in developed countries, but postpartum pituitary infarction remains a common cause of hypopituitarism in developing countries. We report a case of severe postpartum haemorrhage followed by headache, central diabetes insipidus and failure to lactate, which prompted us to investigate and identify both anterior and posterior pituitary deficiency compatible with Sheehan's syndrome. A timely diagnosis allowed us to implement an adequate treatment and follow-up plan, which are known to improve clinical status and patient outcome.

  9. A case of Clostridium difficile infection complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with fecal microbiota transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Gweon, Tae-Geun; Yeo, Chang Dong; Cho, Young-Seok; Kim, Gi Jun; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Jong Wook; Kim, Hyunho; Lee, Hye Won; Lim, Taeseok; Ham, Hyoju; Oh, Hyun Jin; Lee, Yeongbok; Byeon, Jaeho; Park, Sung Soo

    2014-09-21

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a life-threatening disorder caused mainly by pneumonia. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common nosocomial diarrheal disease. Disruption of normal intestinal flora by antibiotics is the main risk factor for CDI. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics for serious medical conditions can make it difficult to treat CDI complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome. Fecal microbiota transplantation is a highly effective treatment in patients with refractory CDI. Here we report on a patient with refractory CDI and acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by pneumonia who was treated with fecal microbiota transplantation.

  10. Sirolimus and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia That is Recurrent or Not Eligible for Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Pellegrini-Stieda syndrome mimicking acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Scheib, J S; Quinet, R J

    1989-01-01

    This case illustrates the potential severity of an uncommon and generally benign condition of the knee--the Pellegrini-Stieda syndrome. The regional bone scan clearly showed the etiologic role of the inflamed ligamentous attachment site. Therapy should include joint rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, and possibly ice for symptomatic relief.

  12. [Acute renal failure secondary to hemolytic uremic syndrome in a pregnant woman with pre-eclampsia].

    PubMed

    García-Miguel, F J; Mirón Rodríguez, M F; Alsina Aser, M J

    2009-02-01

    Acute renal failure is a serious complication of pregnancy associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality; the incidence is currently 1 per 10,000 pregnancies. The most common causes are gestational hypertension, bleeding, sepsis, and intrinsic renal disease. Other less common pregnancy-related syndromes, such as HELLP syndrome or thrombotic microangiopathy, may also lead to kidney failure. Hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura are forms of thrombotic microangiopathy and although neither is specific to pregnancy, the incidence of these entities rises during gestation. The classic symptoms are fever, hemolytic microangiopathic anemia, thrombopenia, neurologic dysfunction, and kidney abnormalities. When renal involvement is the predominant manifestation, the diagnosis is usually hemolytic uremic syndrome.

  13. Acute brain ischemia as a complication of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, the case series.

    PubMed

    Pajak, Michal; Majos, Marcin A; Szubert, Wojciech; Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Majos, Agata

    2014-10-01

    Vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome involves many severe complications leading not only to organ-specific symptoms but often ends in a sudden death. The aim of this paper was to present a diagnostic possibilities and its efficiency rate in patients with vascular complications of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome who suffered from artery dissection resulting in acute brain or limb ischemia. We analysed three patients with diagnosed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome who were referred to radiology department for diagnostic imaging of affected vascular beds, each experienced brain ischemia. The paper also aims at offering some general recommendations for patients suffering from possible complications of type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome basing on our own experience and available literature data.

  14. Differentiation syndrome in non-M3 acute myeloid leukemia treated with the retinoid X receptor agonist bexarotene.

    PubMed

    DiNardo, Courtney D; Ky, Bonnie; Vogl, Dan T; Forfia, Paul; Loren, Alison; Luger, Selina; Mato, Anthony; Tsai, Donald E

    2008-01-01

    Differentiation Syndrome, also known as all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) syndrome, is a well-described clinical phenomenon occurring in patients with the M3 subtype of acute myeloid leukemia receiving ATRA chemotherapy. Bexarotene is a novel synthetic compound that selectively binds and activates retinoic X receptors, a subclass of retinoid receptors not targeted by ATRA. We report a patient with refractory non-M3 acute promyelocytic leukemia (AML) who developed differentiation syndrome during bexarotene monotherapy. This case emphasizes the importance of monitoring for differentiation syndrome among patients receiving retinoid therapies and demonstrates the ability of bexarotene to stimulate differentiation of leukemic blasts.

  15. Gastrointestinal acute radiation syndrome in Göttingen minipigs (Sus scrofa domestica).

    PubMed

    Elliott, Thomas B; Deutz, Nicolaas E; Gulani, Jatinder; Koch, Amory; Olsen, Cara H; Christensen, Christine; Chappell, Mark; Whitnall, Mark H; Moroni, Maria

    2014-12-01

    In the absence of supportive care, exposing Göttingen minipigs to γ-radiation doses of less than 2 Gy achieves lethality due to hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. Doses of 2 to 5 Gy are associated with an accelerated hematopoietic syndrome, characterized by villus blunting and fusion, the beginning of sepsis, and a mild transient reduction in plasma citrulline concentration. We exposed male Göttingen minipigs (age, 5 mo; weight, 9 to 11 kg) to γ-radiation doses of 5 to 12 Gy (total body; (60)Co, 0.6 Gy/min) to test whether these animals exhibit classic gastrointestinal acute radiation syndrome (GI-ARS). After exposure, the minipigs were monitored for 10 d by using clinical signs, CBC counts, and parameters associated with the development of the gastrointestinal syndrome. Göttingen minipigs exposed to γ radiation of 5 to 12 Gy demonstrate a dose-dependent occurrence of all parameters classically associated with acute GI-ARS. These results suggest that Göttingen minipigs may be a suitable model for studying GI-ARS after total body irradiation, but the use of supportive care to extend survival beyond 10 d is recommended. This study is the first step toward determining the feasibility of using Göttingen minipigs in testing the efficacy of candidate drugs for the treatment of GI-ARS after total body irradiation.

  16. Gastrointestinal Acute Radiation Syndrome in Göttingen Minipigs (Sus Scrofa Domestica)

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Thomas B; Deutz, Nicolaas E; Gulani, Jatinder; Koch, Amory; Olsen, Cara H; Christensen, Christine; Chappell, Mark; Whitnall, Mark H; Moroni, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of supportive care, exposing Göttingen minipigs to γ-radiation doses of less than 2 Gy achieves lethality due to hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. Doses of 2 to 5 Gy are associated with an accelerated hematopoietic syndrome, characterized by villus blunting and fusion, the beginning of sepsis, and a mild transient reduction in plasma citrulline concentration. We exposed male Göttingen minipigs (age, 5 mo; weight, 9 to 11 kg) to γ-radiation doses of 5 to 12 Gy (total body; 60Co, 0.6 Gy/min) to test whether these animals exhibit classic gastrointestinal acute radiation syndrome (GI-ARS). After exposure, the minipigs were monitored for 10 d by using clinical signs, CBC counts, and parameters associated with the development of the gastrointestinal syndrome. Göttingen minipigs exposed to γ radiation of 5 to 12 Gy demonstrate a dose-dependent occurrence of all parameters classically associated with acute GI-ARS. These results suggest that Göttingen minipigs may be a suitable model for studying GI-ARS after total body irradiation, but the use of supportive care to extend survival beyond 10 d is recommended. This study is the first step toward determining the feasibility of using Göttingen minipigs in testing the efficacy of candidate drugs for the treatment of GI-ARS after total body irradiation. PMID:25527026

  17. Is There Still a Role for Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa Antagonists in Acute Coronary Syndromes?

    PubMed Central

    Iannetta, Loredana; Puddu, Paolo Emilio; Cuturello, Domenico; Saladini, Angela; Pellicano, Mariano; Schiariti, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The role played by glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa inhibitors has continuously evolved from the initial introduction in mid 90 s until the most recent guidelines for treating acute coronary syndromes, and competed with a wider use of ADP inhibitors and novel anticoagulant drugs, to the extent that they stepped down from class I to class II recommendation in the routine setting of acute coronary syndromes. As a consequence, GP IIb/IIIa use was greatly narrowed. The purpose of this review is to define the roles that GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors may still have in acute ischemic settings by explaining why in high risk patients they might be preferable and/or whether they might be added to ADP inhibitors also emphasizing the underlying mechanistic actions. It is concluded that there might be a more extensive use of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes, strictly based on the definition for a high risk procedure: complexity, angiographic characteristics and patient’s risk profile, regardless whether STEMI or NSTEMI. The positive elements one should appreciate in GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors are: efficacy, rapid onset and reversibility of action, absence of pharmacogenomic variability, pharmacoeconomic considerations and the possibility of intracoronary administration.

  18. The role of levosimendan in acute heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome: A review and expert consensus opinion.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Markku S; Buerke, Michael; Cohen-Solál, Alain; Costa, Susana; Édes, István; Erlikh, Alexey; Franco, Fatima; Gibson, Charles; Gorjup, Vojka; Guarracino, Fabio; Gustafsson, Finn; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Husebye, Trygve; Karason, Kristjan; Katsytadze, Igor; Kaul, Sundeep; Kivikko, Matti; Marenzi, Giancarlo; Masip, Josep; Matskeplishvili, Simon; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Møller, Jacob E; Nessler, Jadwiga; Nessler, Bohdan; Ntalianis, Argyrios; Oliva, Fabrizio; Pichler-Cetin, Emel; Põder, Pentti; Recio-Mayoral, Alejandro; Rex, Steffen; Rokyta, Richard; Strasser, Ruth H; Zima, Endre; Pollesello, Piero

    2016-09-01

    Acute heart failure and/or cardiogenic shock are frequently triggered by ischemic coronary events. Yet, there is a paucity of randomized data on the management of patients with heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome, as acute coronary syndrome and cardiogenic shock have frequently been defined as exclusion criteria in trials and registries. As a consequence, guideline recommendations are mostly driven by observational studies, even though these patients have a particularly poor prognosis compared to heart failure patients without signs of coronary artery disease. In acute heart failure, and especially in cardiogenic shock related to ischemic conditions, vasopressors and inotropes are used. However, both pathophysiological considerations and available clinical data suggest that these treatments may have disadvantageous effects. The inodilator levosimendan offers potential benefits due to a range of distinct effects including positive inotropy, restoration of ventriculo-arterial coupling, increases in tissue perfusion, and anti-stunning and anti-inflammatory effects. In clinical trials levosimendan improves symptoms, cardiac function, hemodynamics, and end-organ function. Adverse effects are generally less common than with other inotropic and vasoactive therapies, with the notable exception of hypotension. The decision to use levosimendan, in terms of timing and dosing, is influenced by the presence of pulmonary congestion, and blood pressure measurements. Levosimendan should be preferred over adrenergic inotropes as a first line therapy for all ACS-AHF patients who are under beta-blockade and/or when urinary output is insufficient after diuretics. Levosimendan can be used alone or in combination with other inotropic or vasopressor agents, but requires monitoring due to the risk of hypotension.

  19. Evaluation of troponin T criteria for periprocedural myocardial infarction in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Shugman, Ibrahim Meloud; Diu, Patrick; Gohil, Jayesh; Kadappu, Krishna Kishor; Leung, Melissa; Lo, Sidney; Leung, Dominic Y; Hopkins, Andrew P; Juergens, Craig P; French, John K

    2011-03-15

    In patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), the diagnosis of periprocedural myocardial infarction is often problematic when the pre-PCI levels of cardiac troponin T (TnT) are elevated. Thus, we examined different TnT criteria for periprocedural myocardial infarction when the pre-PCI TnT levels were elevated and also the associations between the post-PCI cardiac marker levels and outcomes. We established the relation between the post-PCI creatine kinase-MB (CKMB) and TnT levels in 582 patients (315 with acute coronary syndromes and 272 with stable coronary heart disease). A post-PCI increase in the CKMB levels to 14.7 μg/L (3 × the upper reference limit [URL] in men) corresponded to a TnT of 0.23 μg/L. In the 85 patients with acute coronary syndromes and normal CKMB, but elevated post peak TnT levels before PCI (performed at a median of 5 days, interquartile range 3 to 7), the post-PCI cardiac marker increases were as follows: 21 (24.7%) with a ≥ 20% increase in TnT, 10 (11.8%) with an CKMB level >3 × URL, and 12 (14%) with an absolute TnT increase of >0.09 μg/L (p <0.005 for both). In the patients with stable coronary heart disease and post-PCI cardiac markers > 3× URL compared to those without markers elevations, the rate of freedom from death or nonfatal myocardial infarction was 88% for those with TnT elevations versus 99% (p <0.001, log-rank) and 84% for those with CKMB elevations versus 98% (p <0.001, log-rank). Of the patients with acute coronary syndromes, the post-PCI marker levels did not influence the outcomes. In conclusion, in patients with acute coronary syndromes and elevated TnT levels undergoing PCI several days later, ≥20% increases in TnT were more common than absolute increments in the TnT or CKMB levels of >3× URL. Also, periprocedural cardiac marker elevations in patients with acute coronary syndromes did not have prognostic significance.

  20. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in children with acute central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Raquel; Casado-Flores, Juan; Nieto, Monserrat; García-Teresa, María Angeles

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to describe the causes, clinical pattern, and treatment of cerebral salt wasting syndrome in children with acute central nervous system injury. This retrospective study focused on patientssyndrome, over a period of 7 years, in the pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital. Selection criteria included evidence of hyponatremia (serum sodium<130 mEq/L), polyuria, elevated urine sodium (>120 mEq/L), and volume depletion. Fourteen patients were identified with cerebral salt wasting syndrome, 12 after a neurosurgical procedure (8 brain tumor, 4 hydrocephalus) and 2 after severe brain trauma. In 11 patients the cerebral salt wasting syndrome was diagnosed during the first 48 hours of admission. Prevalence of cerebral salt wasting syndrome in neurosurgical children was 11.3/1000 surgical procedures. The minimum sodium was 122+/-7 mEq/L, the maximum urine osmolarity 644+/-59 mOsm/kgH2O. The maximum sodium supply was 1 mEq/kg/h (range, 0.1-2.4). The mean duration of cerebral salt wasting syndrome was 6+/-5 days (range 1-9). In conclusion, cerebral salt wasting syndrome can complicate the postoperative course of children with brain injury; it is frequently present after surgery for brain tumors and hydrocephalus and in patients with severe head trauma. Close monitoring of salt and fluid balance is essential to prevent severe neurologic and hemodynamic complications.

  1. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; CD45-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  2. A case of acute tarsal tunnel syndrome following lateralizing calcaneal osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Walls, Raymond J; Chan, Jeremy Y; Ellis, Scott J

    2015-03-01

    Surgical correction of hindfoot varus is frequently performed with a lateral displacement calcaneal osteotomy. It has rarely been associated with iatrogenic tarsal tunnel syndrome in patients with pre-existing neurological disease. We report the first case of acute postoperative tarsal tunnel syndrome in a neurologically intact patient with post-traumatic hindfoot varus. Early diagnosis and emergent operative release afforded an excellent clinical outcome. Imaging studies can help outrule a compressive hematoma and assess for possible nerve transection; however it is paramount that a high index of suspicion is utilized with judicious operative intervention to minimize long-term sequelae.

  3. McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome: a rare case report of acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Mois, Emil Ioan; Graur, Florin; Sechel, Roxana; Al-Hajjar, Nadim

    2016-01-01

    Giant tubular-villous adenoma of the rectum can determine secretory diarrhea, associated with a depleting syndrome of prerenal acute renal failure, hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypoproteinemia. These symptoms are known as the McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome, and there are about 50 cases reported in literature. We present the case of a 59-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with abdominal pain, prerenal azotemia, and electrolyte disturbances with a background of chronic diarrhea, caused by a giant rectal tumor. Conservative therapy initially improved and normalized renal function, and made surgical resection of the tumor possible.

  4. McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome: a rare case report of acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    MOIS, EMIL IOAN; GRAUR, FLORIN; SECHEL, ROXANA; AL-HAJJAR, NADIM

    2016-01-01

    Giant tubular-villous adenoma of the rectum can determine secretory diarrhea, associated with a depleting syndrome of prerenal acute renal failure, hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypoproteinemia. These symptoms are known as the McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome, and there are about 50 cases reported in literature. We present the case of a 59-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with abdominal pain, prerenal azotemia, and electrolyte disturbances with a background of chronic diarrhea, caused by a giant rectal tumor. Conservative therapy initially improved and normalized renal function, and made surgical resection of the tumor possible. PMID:27152085

  5. On the complexity of scoring acute respiratory distress syndrome: do not forget hemodynamics!

    PubMed Central

    Repessé, Xavier; Aubry, Alix

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains associated with a poor outcome despite recent major therapeutic advances. Forecasting the outcome of patients suffering from such a syndrome is of a crucial interest and many scores have been proposed, all suffering from limits responsible for important discrepancies. Authors try to elaborate simple, routine and reliable scores but most of them do not consider hemodynamics yet acknowledged as a major determinant of outcome. This article aims at reminding the approach of scoring in ARDS and at deeply describing the most recently published one in order to highlight their main pitfall, which is to forget the hemodynamics. PMID:27618840

  6. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  7. ST-elevation myocardial infarction and myelodysplastic syndrome with acute myeloid leukemia transformation.

    PubMed

    Jao, Geoffrey T; Knovich, Mary Ann; Savage, Rodney W; Sane, David C

    2014-04-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syndrome, and newly recognized acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Standard antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy were contraindicated by the patient's thrombocytopenia and by his reported ecchymosis and gingival bleeding upon admission. He declined cardiac catheterization, was provided palliative care, and died 2 hours after hospital admission. We searched the English-language medical literature, found 8 relevant reports, and determined that the prognosis for patients with concomitant STEMI and acute myeloid leukemia is clearly worse than that for either individual condition. No guidelines exist to direct the management of STEMI and concomitant acute myeloid leukemia. In 2 reports, dual antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation, and drug-eluting stent implantation were used without an increased risk of bleeding in the short term, even in the presence of thrombocytopenia. However, we think that a more conservative approach--balloon angioplasty with the provisional use of bare-metal stents--might be safer. Simultaneous chemotherapy for the acute myeloid leukemia is crucial. Older age seems to be a major risk factor: patients too frail for emergent treatment can die within hours or days.

  8. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome in childhood: Changing definition and news from the Pediatric Consensus Conference].

    PubMed

    Dauger, S; Le Bourgeois, F; Guichoux, J; Brissaud, O

    2017-03-23

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a rapidly progressive hypoxemic respiratory insufficiency induced by alveolar filling mainly caused by alveolocapillary wall disruption, following direct or indirect pulmonary injury. Much less frequent in children than in adults, pediatric intensivists had long applied adult guidelines to their daily practice. In 2015, experts from the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference (PALICC) published the first international guidelines specifically dedicated to pediatric ARDS. After a short summary of the history of the ARDS definition since its first report in 1967, we describe the main diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines for PALICC.

  9. Acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (Ogilvie's syndrome) with caecal perforation after caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Khajehnoori, Masoomeh; Nagra, Sonal

    2016-01-01

    Ogilvie syndrome or acute colonic pseudo-obstruction is characterized by acute dilatation of the colon usually involving caecum and right hemi-colon in the absence of any mechanical obstruction. It is usually associated with an underlying severe illness/infection or surgery, mostly caesarean section and rarely occurs spontaneously. Identification of this condition is important due to the increased risk of bowel ischaemia and perforation particularly with caecal diameter >9 cm. This is a case report of bowel perforation following caesarean section leading to urgent laparotomy. PMID:27554827

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after Viscum album Pleurodesis for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Dongsub; Park, Joon Suk; Lee, Doo Yun

    2017-01-01

    A 52-year-old male patient who underwent multiple wedge resections experienced postoperative acute respiratory distress syndrome in both lungs after Viscum album pleurodesis. Despite initial rapid deterioration in clinical condition and rapid progression of bilateral lung infiltration, he exhibited a relatively smooth clinical recovery with marked response to glucocorticoid treatment. Our case report suggests that care must be taken to guard against the development of acute respiratory complications in the use of Viscum album for pleurodesis. However, in view of the clinically benign course, initial aggressive management of complications can prevent suffering and sequelae. PMID:28180108

  11. Sweet's syndrome – a comprehensive review of an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2007-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome (the eponym for acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is characterized by a constellation of clinical symptoms, physical features, and pathologic findings which include fever, neutrophilia, tender erythematous skin lesions (papules, nodules, and plaques), and a diffuse infiltrate consisting predominantly of mature neutrophils that are typically located in the upper dermis. Several hundreds cases of Sweet's syndrome have been published. Sweet's syndrome presents in three clinical settings: classical (or idiopathic), malignancy-associated, and drug-induced. Classical Sweet's syndrome (CSS) usually presents in women between the age of 30 to 50 years, it is often preceded by an upper respiratory tract infection and may be associated with inflammatory bowel disease and pregnancy. Approximately one-third of patients with CSS experience recurrence of the dermatosis. The malignancy-associated Sweet's syndrome (MASS) can occur as a paraneoplastic syndrome in patients with an established cancer or individuals whose Sweet's syndrome-related hematologic dyscrasia or solid tumor was previously undiscovered; MASS is most commonly related to acute myelogenous leukemia. The dermatosis can precede, follow, or appear concurrent with the diagnosis of the patient's cancer. Hence, MASS can be the cutaneous harbinger of either an undiagnosed visceral malignancy in a previously cancer-free individual or an unsuspected cancer recurrence in an oncology patient. Drug-induced Sweet's syndrome (DISS) most commonly occurs in patients who have been treated with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, however, other medications may also be associated with DISS. The pathogenesis of Sweet's syndrome may be multifactorial and still remains to be definitively established. Clinical and laboratory evidence suggests that cytokines have an etiologic role. Systemic corticosteroids are the therapeutic gold standard for Sweet's syndrome. After initiation of treatment with systemic

  12. Targeting Neutrophils to Prevent Malaria-Associated Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo V.; Gomes, Eliane; Neto, Antonio Condino; D' Império Lima, Maria R.; Alvarez, José M.; Portugal, Silvia; Epiphanio, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Malaria remains one of the greatest burdens to global health, causing nearly 500,000 deaths in 2014. When manifesting in the lungs, severe malaria causes acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). We have previously shown that a proportion of DBA/2 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) develop ALI/ARDS and that these mice recapitulate various aspects of the human syndrome, such as pulmonary edema, hemorrhaging, pleural effusion and hypoxemia. Herein, we investigated the role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of malaria-associated ALI/ARDS. Mice developing ALI/ARDS showed greater neutrophil accumulation in the lungs compared with mice that did not develop pulmonary complications. In addition, mice with ALI/ARDS produced more neutrophil-attracting chemokines, myeloperoxidase and reactive oxygen species. We also observed that the parasites Plasmodium falciparum and PbA induced the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) ex vivo, which were associated with inflammation and tissue injury. The depletion of neutrophils, treatment with AMD3100 (a CXCR4 antagonist), Pulmozyme (human recombinant DNase) or Sivelestat (inhibitor of neutrophil elastase) decreased the development of malaria-associated ALI/ARDS and significantly increased mouse survival. This study implicates neutrophils and NETs in the genesis of experimentally induced malaria-associated ALI/ARDS and proposes a new therapeutic approach to improve the prognosis of severe malaria. PMID:27926944

  13. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV). Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift. PMID:20109187

  14. Usefulness of diastolic color kinesis imaging at rest in the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Odo, Takafumi; Muro, Takashi; Odo, Kyoko; Kikuda, Kenji; Tamimoto, Ayako; Najima, Chiyo; Sakaino, Naritsugu; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2009-04-01

    The authors report two cases of acute coronary syndrome diagnosed by diastolic color kinesis imaging (CKI), an echocardiographic technique facilitating regional left ventricular wall motion analysis. Although both patients had experienced chest pain within the previous several days, the pain had remitted prior to visiting the clinic. In addition, neither electrocardiography nor routine echocardiography revealed ischemic changes. However, diastolic CKI clearly showed regional diastolic asynchrony of the left ventricle. Coronary angiography revealed significant stenosis compatible with the region of diastolic asynchrony observed on diastolic CKI. The patients underwent successful coronary revascularization, and diastolic asynchrony disappeared after revascularization. These findings suggest that diastolic CKI is useful for the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome, even at rest and in the absence of chest pain.

  15. Transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome during intubation and mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Robert A; Guest, Cameron B; Lapinsky, Stephen E; Sibbald, William J; Louie, Marie; Tang, Patrick; Simor, Andrew E; Stewart, Thomas E

    2004-06-01

    Nosocomial transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome from critically ill patients to healthcare workers has been a prominent and worrisome feature of existing outbreaks. We have observed a greater risk of developing severe acute respiratory syndrome for physicians and nurses performing endotracheal intubation (relative risk [RR], 13.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.99 to 59.04; p = 0.003). Nurses caring for patients receiving noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation may be at an increased risk (RR, 2.33; 95% CI, 0.25 to 21.76; p = 0.5), whereas nurses caring for patients receiving high-frequency oscillatory ventilation do not appear at an increased risk (RR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.11 to 4.92; p = 0.6) compared with their respective reference cohorts. Specific infection control recommendations concerning the care of critically ill patients may help limit further nosocomial transmission.

  16. Individualized positive end-expiratory pressure application in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pintado, M C; de Pablo, R

    2014-11-01

    Current treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is based on ventilatory support with a lung protective strategy, avoiding the development of iatrogenic injury, including ventilator-induced lung injury. One of the mechanisms underlying such injury is atelectrauma, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is advocated in order to avoid it. The indicated PEEP level has not been defined, and in many cases is based on the patient oxygen requirements for maintaining adequate oxygenation. However, this strategy does not consider the mechanics of the respiratory system, which varies in each patient and depends on many factors-including particularly the duration of acute respiratory distress syndrome. A review is therefore made of the different methods for adjusting PEEP, focusing on the benefits of individualized application.

  17. Acute carotid occlusion and stroke due to antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Marques, M A; Murad, F F; Ristow, A V; Silveira, P R M; Pinto, J E Ss; Gress, M H T; Massière, B; Cury, J M; Vescovi, A

    2010-08-01

    Neurologic events associated to antiphospholipoid syndrome (APLS) are not uncommon, but ischemic stroke due to acute carotid thrombosis, is a rare presentation of this syndrome. We report a case of a 48 years old female patient, without evidence of atherothrombosis or other vascular pathology, who presented an ischemic stroke due to acute thrombosis of the left internal carotid artery. The occlusion was diagnosed by Duplex scan and magnetic resonance angiography (Ds+MRA). The patient was anticoagulated and experienced total regression of her neurologic symptoms after a week. Ds+MRA were performed again and confirmed re-establishment of normal flow of internal carotid artery. A thorough clinical investigation confirmed the diagnosis of APLS (the association of a major thombotic event and high anticardiolipoid IgG antibody titers in three blood samples). The patient has been submitted to oral anticoagulation for three years and has not experienced new neurologic or thrombotic events.

  18. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection causing acute coronary syndrome in a young patient without risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Chevli, Parag; Kelash, Fnu; Gadhvi, Pragnesh; Grandhi, Sreeram; Syed, Amer

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare cause of acute myocardial infarction that is more common in younger patients (under age 50) and in women. Although the etiology is not known, some predisposing conditions to SCAD are well known and include Marfan syndrome, pregnancy and peripartum state, drug abuse, and some anatomical abnormalities of the coronary arteries such as aneurysms and severe kinking. We describe a case of SCAD in a young woman who presented with sudden onset of chest pain and was admitted for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome. The coronary angiography showed dissection of the left anterior descending artery. The patient underwent successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and stent placement. PMID:25317268

  19. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Abnormalities in Children with Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS)

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, Thomas; Buckley, Ashura; Hommer, Rebecca; Grant, Paul; Williams, Kyle; Leckman, James F.; Swedo, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Polysomnographic investigation of sleep architecture in children presenting with pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). Methods: Fifteen consecutive subjects meeting criteria for PANS (mean age = 7.2 y; range 3–10 y) underwent single-night full polysomnography (PSG) read by a pediatric neurologist. Results: Thirteen of 15 subjects (87%) had abnormalities detected with PSG. Twelve of 15 had evidence of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep motor disinhibition, as characterized by excessive movement, laughing, hand stereotypies, moaning, or the continuation of periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) into REM sleep. Conclusions: This study shows various forms of REM sleep motor disinhibition present in a population of children with PANS. Citation: Gaughan T, Buckley A, Hommer R, Grant P; Williams K, Leckman JF, Swedo SE. Rapid eye movement sleep abnormalities in children with pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(7):1027–1032. PMID:27166296

  20. Immunological abnormalities in the syndrome of poliomyelitis-like illness associated with acute bronchial asthma (Hopkin's syndrome).

    PubMed Central

    Manson, J I; Thong, Y H

    1980-01-01

    In recent years an unusual syndrome of poliomyelitis-like illness, associated with acute bronchial asthma, has been reported from different parts of the world. A further 3 cases are described in this paper. Although the condition resembles poliomyelitis in most respects, particularly with regard to the severe permanent residual weakness usually observed, consistent evidence of a viral aetiology has not been forthcoming. Tests of immune function suggested the presence of varying degrees of nonspecific immune deficiency in our 3 patients, but evidence of viral invasion was inconclusive. It is suggested that a combination of immune deficiency with the stress of the acute asthma attack rendered the patients susceptible to invasion of the anterior horn cells by a viral agent, which may have been of external origin, or may have existed in a latent form within the host. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7377814

  1. Acute Pancreatitis and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Magno Pereira, Vítor; Marote Correia, Luís; Rodrigues, Tiago; Serrão Faria, Gorete

    2016-09-01

    The posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a neurological syndrome characterized by headache, confusion, visual disturbances and seizures associated with identifiable areas of cerebral edema on imaging studies. The authors report the case of a man, 33 years-old, leukodermic with a history of chronic alcohol and tobacco consumption, who is admitted to the emergency department for epigastric pain radiating to the back and vomiting with about six hours of evolution and an intense holocranial headache for two hours. His physical examination was remarkable for a blood pressure of 190/100 mmHg and tenderness in epigastrium. His analytical results revealed emphasis on amylase 193 U/L and lipase 934 U/L. During the observation in the emergency department,he presented a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed and suggestive of pancreatitis withoutgallstones signals. Head computed tomography showed subarachnoid haemorrhage and a small right frontal cortical haemorrhage. The brain magnetic resonance imaging done one week after admission showed areas of a bilateral and symmetrical T2 / FLAIR hyperintensities in the subcortical white matter of the parietal and superior frontal regions, suggesting a diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Abdominal computed tomography (10 days after admission) demonstrated a thickened pancreas in connection with inflammation and two small hypodense foci in the anterior part of the pancreas body, translating small foci of necrosis. The investigation of a thrombophilic defect revealed a heterozygous G20210A prothrombin gene mutation. The patient was discharged without neurological sequelae and asymptomatic. The follow-up brain magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the reversal of the lesions, confirming the diagnosis.

  2. Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Thigh in Combat Casualties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    mechanisms such as motor vehicle trauma (1), femur fracture (2, 3), blunt vascular injury (4), and contusion (5, 6); (b) compressive mechanisms of injury...anesthesia (12); (c) internal hemorrhage or fluid extravasation such as coagulopathy and intramuscular hematoma (13, 14), false aneurysm (15), hamstring...Ipsilateral Femur Fracture Bilateral Compartment Syndromes ISS ½ 25 Nonsurvivors (n D 7) 42.4 š 8.6 70.1 š 5.6 0% (0/7) 86% (6/7) 100% (7/7

  3. Surveillance for Respiratory Infections, Including Severe Acute Respiratory, Syndrome (SARS), in Cobra Gold 2003

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-10

    to be causal. Respiratory illnesses caused by viruses in the family Coronaviridae have long been recognized.2-13 Two species known to cause human ...tested positive for influenza A, 2 (13%) for coronavirus OC43, 2 (13%) for respiratory syncytial virus , 1 (6%) rhinovirus, 9 and 4 (25%) were...NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SURVEILLANCE FOR RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS , INCLUDING SEVERE ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNDROME (SARS), IN COBRA

  4. Acute Budd-Chiari syndrome: Treatment with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    SciTech Connect

    Strunk, Holger M.; Textor, Jochen; Brensing, Karl-August; Schild, Hans H.

    1997-07-15

    The case of a 28-year-old man with acute Budd-Chiari syndrome due to veno-occlusive disease is reported. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was performed after upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, duplex sonographic and abdominal computed tomographic examination, inferior cavogram with hepatic venous catheterization, and transvenous biopsy. A 10-mm parenchymal tract was created. The patient did well after the procedure; ascites resolved and liver function improved markedly. The shunt has remained patent up to now for 6 months.

  5. Acute parkinsonian syndrome with demyelinating leukoencephalopathy in bone marrow transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lockman, L A; Sung, J H; Krivit, W

    1991-01-01

    A syndrome of rigidity, bradykinesia, spasticity, and often myoclonus and dementia developed acutely in 5 patients who had undergone successful engraftment of bone marrow transplants for the treatment of various hematologic diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated widespread changes in white matter; brain biopsy disclosed mild demyelination associated with active phagocytosis of myelin. One patient, who was not treated, remains severely demented. Patients treated with very high-dose methylprednisolone had complete clinical recovery.

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Acute Radiation Syndrome: Innovative Medical Approaches in Military Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-30

    lymphoblastic leukemia: a randomized phase III trial. Blood. 1995;86(2):444–50. 36. Hu KX, Sun QY, Guo M, Ai HS. The radiation protection and therapy effects of...Literature 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome: innovative medical...MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13

  7. Unusual Pharyngeal Pain Caused by Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Anzai, Takashi; Hiroshige, Yuu; Nakamura, Masahiro; Iizuka, Takashi; Nakazato, Yuji; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2017-01-01

    Most patients complaining of pharyngeal pain have an upper respiratory tract infection or other local explanation for their pain. Here we show 3 rare cases of patients visiting our Otorhinolaryngology Department who had an initial symptom of pharyngeal pain caused by acute coronary syndrome (ACS). An electrocardiogram and a cardiac biomarker test are recommended to exclude ACS with atypical presentation in cases without pharyngolaryngeal findings comparable to pharyngeal pain. PMID:28243429

  8. Non lineal respiratory systems mechanics simulation of acute respiratory distress syndrome during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Madorno, Matias; Rodriguez, Pablo O

    2010-01-01

    Model and simulation of biological systems help to better understand these systems. In ICUs patients often reach a complex situation where supportive maneuvers require special expertise. Among them, mechanical ventilation in patients suffering from acuter respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is specially challenging. This work presents a model which can be simulated and use to help in training of physicians and respiratory therapists to analyze the respiratory mechanics in this kind of patients. We validated the model in 2 ARDS patients.

  9. Effect of Eye Mask on Sleep Quality in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Daneshmandi, Mohammad; Neiseh, Fatemeh; SadeghiShermeh, Mehdi; Ebadi, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Sleep is one of the basic human needs and sleep deprivation causes nu-merous adverse effects on the human body and mind. Due to reduced sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome, this study was carried out to determine the effect of eye mask on sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Methods: In this two-group controlled clinical trial, sixty patients with acute coronary syndrome in the coronary care units of Baqiyatallah Hospital in Tehran in 2010 were selected by purposeful sampling method and randomly allocated to two groups of case and control. In the case group, in the second night stay, the intervention of eye mask was done per night and by using the Petersburg's sleep quality index; sleep quality was evaluated during and at the end of hospitalization. Then data were analyzed by paired t-test, independent t-test, Spearman and Pearson's correlation coefficient and SPSS software version 19. Results: Total sleep quality score of the case group was significantly decreased after intervention (4.86 ± 1.88) from before intervention (10.46 ± 4.09) (p < 0.000). In addi-tion, total score of sleep quality after intervention in the case group (4.86 ± 1.88) was significant different from the control group (8.43 ± 1.97) (p < 0.005). Conclusion: Using eye mask, as an economical and uncomplicated method, can improve sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome in the coronary care units and can be used as an alternative method of treatment instead of drug therapy. PMID:25276688

  10. Microbiologic Characteristics, Serologic Responses, and Clinical Manifestations in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, Taiwan1

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Hsiao, Cheng-Hsiang; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei; Wang, Wei-Kung; Chen, Pei-Jer; Wang, Jin-Town; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2003-01-01

    The genome of one Taiwanese severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) strain (TW1) was 29,729 nt in length. Viral RNA may persist for some time in patients who seroconvert, and some patients may lack an antibody response (immunoglobulin G) to SARS-CoV >21 days after illness onset. An upsurge of antibody response was associated with the aggravation of respiratory failure. PMID:14519257

  11. Severe acute respiratory distress syndrome in a child with malaria: favorable response to prone positioning.

    PubMed

    Flores, Jose C; Imaz, Ana; López-Herce, Jesús; Seriñá, Carlota

    2004-03-01

    We present the case of a 4-year-old boy with malaria who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome with severe hypoxemia refractory to mechanical ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide. Placing the patient in prone position immediately and persistently improved oxygenation: the ratio of P(aO(2)) to fraction of inspired oxygen rose from 47 to 180 mm Hg and the oxygenation index decreased from 40 to 11. The patient survived, with no respiratory sequelae.

  12. Acute Motor Conduction Block Neuropathy: Another Distinct Variant of Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    ERDOĞMUŞ İNCE, Nilüfer; ÖZTEKİN, M. Fevzi; ÖZTEKİN, Neşe

    2014-01-01

    We describe a patient who developed progressive weakness in all limbs without sensory symptoms 4 weeks after upper respiratory system infection. Electrophysiological findings suggested a new variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome named “acute motor conduction block neuropathy”. Electrophysiological studies were performed at admission, 12th and 28th weeks. At the 28th week, the clinical examination and electrophysiological findings showed complete recovery.

  13. Safety and Efficacy of Combined Extracorporeal Co2 Removal and Renal Replacement Therapy in Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Acute Kidney Injury: The Pulmonary and Renal Support in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Study*

    PubMed Central

    Castanier, Matthias; Signouret, Thomas; Soundaravelou, Rettinavelou; Lepidi, Anne; Seghboyan, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining extracorporeal Co2 removal with continuous renal replacement therapy in patients presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury. Design: Prospective human observational study. Settings: Patients received volume-controlled mechanical ventilation according to the acute respiratory distress syndrome net protocol. Continuous venovenous hemofiltration therapy was titrated to maintain maximum blood flow and an effluent flow of 45 mL/kg/h with 33% predilution. Patients: Eleven patients presenting with both acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury required renal replacement therapy. Interventions: A membrane oxygenator (0.65 m2) was inserted within the hemofiltration circuit, either upstream (n = 7) or downstream (n = 5) of the hemofilter. Baseline corresponded to tidal volume 6 mL/kg of predicted body weight without extracorporeal Co2 removal. The primary endpoint was 20% reduction in Paco2 at 20 minutes after extracorporeal Co2 removal initiation. Tidal volume was subsequently reduced to 4 mL/kg for the remaining 72 hours. Measurements and Main Results: Twelve combined therapies were conducted in the 11 patients. Age was 70 ± 9 years, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II was 69 ± 13, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score was 14 ± 4, lung injury score was 3 ± 0.5, and Pao2/Fio2 was 135 ± 41. Adding extracorporeal Co2 removal at tidal volume 6 mL/kg decreased Paco2 by 21% (95% CI, 17–25%), from 47 ± 11 to 37 ± 8 Torr (p < 0.001). Lowering tidal volume to 4 mL/kg reduced minute ventilation from 7.8 ± 1.5 to 5.2 ± 1.1 L/min and plateau pressure from 25 ± 4 to 21 ± 3 cm H2O and raised Paco2 from 37 ± 8 to 48 ± 10 Torr (all p < 0.001). On an average of both positions, the oxygenator’s blood flow was 410 ± 30 mL/min and the Co2 removal rate was 83 ± 20 mL/min. The oxygenator blood flow (p <0.001) and the Co2 removal rate (p = 0.083) were higher when

  14. ACE2: Angiotensin II/Angiotensin-(1-7) balance in cardiorenal injury

    PubMed Central

    Varagic, Jasmina; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Nagata, Sayaka; Ferrario, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Our current recognition of the renin-angiotensin system is more convoluted than originally thought due to the discovery of multiple novel enzymes, peptides, and receptors inherent to this interactive biochemical cascade. Over the last decade angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has emerged as a key player in the pathophysiology of hypertension and cardiovascular and renal disease due to its pivotal role in metabolizing vasoconstrictive/hypertrophic/proliferative angiotensin II into favorable angiotensin-(1-7). This review addresses a considerable advancement in research on the role of tissue ACE2 in development and progression of hypertension and cardiorenal injury. We also summarize the results from recent clinical and experimental studies suggesting that serum or urine soluble ACE2 may serve as a novel biomarker or independent risk factor relevant for diagnosis and prognosis of cardiorenal disease. Recent proceedings on novel therapeutic approaches to enhance ACE2/angiotensin-(1-7) axis are also reviewed. PMID:24510672

  15. Acute coronary syndromes in young women – the scale of the problem and the associated risks

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of the cardiovascular system mainly affect elderly patients, but they are increasingly often encountered in young individuals. It is estimated that 1 in 20 patients with ischemic heart disease is under the age of 45 years. Only 20% of them are women. According to the PL-ACS register, cases of acute coronary syndromes in young women represent 0.6% of all acute coronary syndrome cases. The most common etiology is atherosclerosis (80%). Other causes include dissections and spasms of the coronary arteries as well as clotting disorders. Smoking tobacco is the most important risk factor, followed by hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes. The long-term prognosis is usually favorable, but it deteriorates significantly in the event of complications. The literature on this subject is not extensive. Most data come from non-randomized studies of young patients conducted regardless of sex. The purpose of this paper is to present the problem posed by acute coronary syndromes in young women. PMID:26336495

  16. Interleukin-10 polymorphism in position -1082 and acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gong, M.N.; Thompson, B.T.; Williams, P.L.; Zhou, W.; Wang, M.Z.; Pothier, L.; Christiani, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    The GG genotype of the interleukin (IL)-10 promoter polymorphism in position -1082 (-1082GG) has been associated with increased IL-10 production. The current authors hypothesised that the -1082GG genotype is associated with the development of, and outcomes in, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A nested case-control study was conducted in 211 Caucasian cases of ARDS and 429 controls who were admitted to an intensive care unit with sepsis, trauma, aspiration or massive transfusions. Cases were followed for organ failure and 60-day mortality. The -1082GG genotype was associated with the development of ARDS, but only in the presence of a significant interaction between the -1082GG genotype and age. Among patients with ARDS, the -1082GG genotype was associated with decreased severity of illness on admission, lower daily organ dysfunction scores and lower 60-day mortality. In conclusion, the high interleukin-10-producing -1082GG genotype may be associated with variable odds for acute respiratory distress syndrome development depending on age. Among those with acute respiratory distress syndrome, the -1082GG genotype is associated with lower mortality and organ failure. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:16585075

  17. A new view of pulmonary edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ketai, L H; Godwin, J D

    1998-07-01

    The old division of lung edema into two categories--cardiogenic (hydrostatic) and noncardiogenic (increased permeability)--is no longer adequate. For instance, it fails to distinguish between the capillary leak caused by acute respiratory distress syndrome from that caused by interleukin-2 treatment. Further, it fails to account for the capillary leak ('stress-failure') that may accompany edema. A modern view of edema must recognize the natural barriers to the formation and spread of edema. These barriers are the capillary endothelium and the alveolar epithelium. Varying degrees of damage to them can account for the varying radiographic and clinical manifestations of lung edema. Thus, interleukin-2 administration causes increased endothelial permeability without causing alveolar epithelial damage. The result is lung edema that is largely confined to the interstitium, causing little hypoxia and clearing rapidly. However, acute respiratory distress syndrome, which is characterized by extensive alveolar damage, causes air-space consolidation, severe hypoxia, and slow resolution. Thus, a reasonable classification of lung edema requires at least four categories: 1) hydrostatic edema; 2) acute respiratory distress syndrome (permeability edema caused by diffuse alveolar damage); 3) permeability edema without alveolar damage; and (4) mixed hydrostatic and permeability edema. The authors emphasize the importance of the barriers provided by the capillary endothelium and the alveolar epithelium in determining the clinical and radiographic manifestations of edema. In general, when the alveolar epithelium is intact, the radiographic manifestations are those of interstitial (not air-space) edema; this radiographic pattern predicts a mild clinical course and prompt resolution.

  18. Role of inflammatory mediators in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav; Moochhala, Shabbir

    2004-02-01

    Inflammatory response leading to organ dysfunction and failure continues to be the major problem after injury in many clinical conditions such as sepsis, severe burns, acute pancreatitis, haemorrhagic shock, and trauma. In general terms, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is an entirely normal response to injury. Systemic leukocyte activation, however, is a direct consequence of a SIRS and if excessive, can lead to distant organ damage and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). When SIRS leads to MODS and organ failure, the mortality becomes high and can be more than 50%. Acute lung injury that clinically manifests as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major component of MODS of various aetiologies. Inflammatory mediators play a key role in the pathogenesis of ARDS, which is the primary cause of death in these conditions. This review summarizes recent studies that demonstrate the critical role played by inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, platelet activating factor (PAF), IL-10, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), C5a, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, substance P, chemokines, VEGF, IGF-I, KGF, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in the pathogenesis of ARDS. It is reasonable to speculate that elucidation of the key mediators in ARDS coupled with the discovery of specific inhibitors would make it possible to develop clinically effective anti-inflammatory therapy.

  19. Early pancreatic panniculitis associated with HELLP syndrome and acute fatty liver of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Eugene B; Sachdev, Reena; Kim, Jinah; Peng, David

    2011-10-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis represents a rare cutaneous disorder most commonly associated with acute or chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic carcinoma. We describe a case of a 17-year-old woman who presented with a 2-day history of erythematous patches involving her bilateral knees and tender, scattered red-brown nodules involving her bilateral anterior shins. She was seen during a hospitalization for emergent cesarean section and her hospital course was complicated by HELLP syndrome (defined by the presence of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet count), acute fatty liver of pregnancy and pancreatitis. The characteristic histopathologic findings, including ghost cells, fat necrosis and granular basophilic material with dystrophic calcification, appear in later lesions. In early lesions, as was shown in this case, a neutrophilic subcutaneous infiltrate raises a differential diagnosis including infection, subcutaneous Sweet's syndrome or atypical erythema nodosum. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of pancreatic panniculitis in association with HELLP syndrome and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. Early recognition is critical, as skin lesions may precede the development of pancreatitis. Often, as in our case, the effects of pancreatitis may be life threatening.

  20. A Case of Acute Aortic Dissection Type B Associated with Cushing's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Petramala, Luigi; Cotesta, Dario; Sapienza, Paolo; Zinnamosca, Laura; Moroni, Enrico; di Marzio, Luca; De Toma, Giorgio; Letizia, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 63-year-old man, with a previous history of hypertension and glucose intolerance associated troncular obesity that was emergently admitted to our Institution for evaluation of a severe, constant posterior chest pain which radiated anteriorly and dyspnoea with a suspected diagnosis of acute aortic dissection. A CT scan of thorax and abdomen demonstrated a dissection starting just below left succlavian artery and extending downward to the left renal artery, involving the celiac tripod and superior mesenteric artery. The dissection was classified as Stanford B, De Bakey III. Moreover, CT scan of abdomen revealed incidentally a left adrenal tumor of 25 mm of diameter. An emergent prosthetic graft was placed just below the origin of the left succlavian artery up-to the diaphragmatic hiatus. Furthermore, a diagnostic evaluation of the mass revealed an increase of cortisol production, and a diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome was done and the patient underwent an adrenalectomy via laparotomic approach. We report an association of acute aortic dissection of acute aortic dissection type B associated to Cushing's syndrome. Keywords Cushing's syndrome; Adrenocortical adenoma; Aortic dissection type B PMID:22505966

  1. Systemic blood coagulation activation in acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Undas, Anetta; Szułdrzyński, Konstanty; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E.; Tracz, Wiesława; Zmudka, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated systemic alterations to the blood coagulation system that occur during a coronary thrombotic event. Peripheral blood coagulation in patients with acute coronary thrombosis was compared with that in people with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Blood coagulation and platelet activation at the microvascular injury site were assessed using immunochemistry in 28 non-anticoagulated patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) versus 28 stable CAD patients matched for age, sex, risk factors, and medications. AMI was associated with increased maximum rates of thrombin-antithrombin complex generation (by 93.8%; P < .001), thrombin B-chain formation (by 57.1%; P < .001), prothrombin consumption (by 27.9%; P = .012), fibrinogen consumption (by 27.0%; P = .02), factor (f) Va light chain generation (by 44.2%; P = .003), and accelerated fVa inactivation (by 76.1%; P < .001), and with enhanced release of platelet-derived soluble CD40 ligand (by 44.4%; P < .001). FVa heavy chain availability was similar in both groups because of enhanced formation and activated protein C (APC)–mediated destruction. The velocity of coagulant reactions in AMI patients showed positive correlations with interleukin-6. Heparin treatment led to dampening of coagulant reactions with profiles similar to those for stable CAD. AMI-induced systemic activation of blood coagulation markedly modifies the pattern of coagulant reactions at the site of injury in peripheral vessels compared with that in stable CAD patients. PMID:18931343

  2. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: Updates on an inflammatory CNS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Daniela; Alper, Gulay; Van Haren, Keith; Kornberg, Andrew J; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Tenembaum, Silvia; Belman, Anita L

    2016-08-30

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated demyelinating CNS disorder with predilection to early childhood. ADEM is generally considered a monophasic disease. However, recurrent ADEM has been described and defined as multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis. ADEM often occurs postinfectiously, although a causal relationship has never been established. ADEM and multiple sclerosis are currently viewed as distinct entities, generally distinguishable even at disease onset. However, pathologic studies have demonstrated transitional cases of yet unclear significance. ADEM is clinically defined by acute polyfocal neurologic deficits including encephalopathy. MRI typically demonstrates reversible, ill-defined white matter lesions of the brain and often also the spinal cord, along with frequent involvement of thalami and basal ganglia. CSF analysis may reveal a mild pleocytosis and elevated protein, but is generally negative for intrathecal oligoclonal immunoglobulin G synthesis. In the absence of a specific diagnostic test, ADEM is considered a diagnosis of exclusion, and ADEM mimics, especially those requiring a different treatment approach, have to be carefully ruled out. The role of biomarkers, including autoantibodies like anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of ADEM is currently under debate. Based on the presumed autoimmune etiology of ADEM, the current treatment approach consists of early immunotherapy. Outcome of ADEM in pediatric patients is generally favorable, but cognitive deficits have been reported even in the absence of other neurologic sequelae. This review summarizes the current knowledge on epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, neuroimaging features, CSF findings, differential diagnosis, therapy, and outcome, with a focus on recent advances and controversies.

  3. Angiopoietin-2 Is an Early Indicator of Acute Pancreatic-Renal Syndrome in Patients with Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sporek, Mateusz; Dumnicka, Paulina; Gala-Bladzinska, Agnieszka; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembinski, Artur; Stepien, Ewa; Walocha, Jerzy; Drozdz, Ryszard; Kuzniewski, Marek; Kusnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Within the first week of the disease, acute kidney injury (AKI) is among the most common causes of mortality in acute pancreatitis (AP). Recently, serum angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) has been associated with hyperdynamic state of the systemic circulation. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between Ang-2 and the clinical AP severity during the first 72 hours of the disease, and organ disfunction, including AKI. Methods. Study included patients admitted to the surgery ward, diagnosed with AP. AKI was diagnosed according to KDIGO guidelines and renal failure according to modified Marshall scoring system. Ang-2 was determined in serum with ELISA. Results. AP was classified as mild (MAP) in 71% of patients, moderately severe (MSAP) in 22%, and severe (SAP) in 8%. During the first 72 hours of AP, 11 patients developed AKI and 6 developed renal failure. Ang-2 at 24, 48, and 72 hours following the onset of AP symptoms significantly predicted SAP and MSAP, as well as AKI and renal failure. Also, Ang-2 significantly correlated with acute phase proteins as well as with the indicators of renal disfunction. Conclusions. Serum Ang-2 may be a relevant predictor of AP severity, in particular of the development of AP-renal syndrome.

  4. Angiopoietin-2 Is an Early Indicator of Acute Pancreatic-Renal Syndrome in Patients with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sporek, Mateusz; Dumnicka, Paulina; Gala-Bladzinska, Agnieszka; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembinski, Artur; Stepien, Ewa; Walocha, Jerzy; Drozdz, Ryszard; Kuzniewski, Marek; Kusnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Within the first week of the disease, acute kidney injury (AKI) is among the most common causes of mortality in acute pancreatitis (AP). Recently, serum angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) has been associated with hyperdynamic state of the systemic circulation. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between Ang-2 and the clinical AP severity during the first 72 hours of the disease, and organ disfunction, including AKI. Methods. Study included patients admitted to the surgery ward, diagnosed with AP. AKI was diagnosed according to KDIGO guidelines and renal failure according to modified Marshall scoring system. Ang-2 was determined in serum with ELISA. Results. AP was classified as mild (MAP) in 71% of patients, moderately severe (MSAP) in 22%, and severe (SAP) in 8%. During the first 72 hours of AP, 11 patients developed AKI and 6 developed renal failure. Ang-2 at 24, 48, and 72 hours following the onset of AP symptoms significantly predicted SAP and MSAP, as well as AKI and renal failure. Also, Ang-2 significantly correlated with acute phase proteins as well as with the indicators of renal disfunction. Conclusions. Serum Ang-2 may be a relevant predictor of AP severity, in particular of the development of AP-renal syndrome. PMID:27022209

  5. Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome (HHH) presenting with acute fulminant hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Mhanni, A A; Chan, A; Collison, M; Seifert, B; Lehotay, D C; Sokoro, Ah; Huynh, H Q; Greenberg, C R

    2008-03-01

    We report on two Aboriginal patients with the hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome. Both presented with acute hepatic failure with severe hypertransaminasemia and coagulopathy, prompting evaluation for emergent liver transplantation. The diagnosis of HHH syndrome was based on the presence of typical metabolic abnormalities. A protein-restricted diet and L-arginine or L-citrulline supplementation were immediately started, with rapid normalization of liver function test results and other biochemical abnormalities. Molecular analysis of the SLC25A15 gene showed that the two patients were homozygous for the common French Canadian mutation (F188Delta). The diagnosis of HHH syndrome should be considered in patients with unexplained fulminant hepatic failure. There does not appear to be a genotype-phenotype correlation for this presentation, inasmuch as the only other reported patient presenting with this picture had two different point mutations. Early identification and prompt treatment of these patients is crucial to avoid liver transplantation and can be life saving.

  6. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the treatment of acute radiation syndrome: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Komůrková, Denisa; Hoferová, Zuzana

    2014-04-16

    This article concisely summarizes data on the action of one of the principal and best known growth factors, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), in a mammalian organism exposed to radiation doses inducing acute radiation syndrome. Highlighted are the topics of its real or anticipated use in radiation accident victims, the timing of its administration, the possibilities of combining G-CSF with other drugs, the ability of other agents to stimulate endogenous G-CSF production, as well as of the capability of this growth factor to ameliorate not only the bone marrow radiation syndrome but also the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome. G-CSF is one of the pivotal drugs in the treatment of radiation accident victims and its employment in this indication can be expected to remain or even grow in the future.

  7. Acute parietal lobe infarction presenting as Gerstmann's syndrome and cognitive decline mimicking senile dementia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tien-Yu; Chen, Chun-Yen; Yen, Che-Hung; Kuo, Shin-Chang; Yeh, Yi-Wei; Chang, Serena; Huang, San-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Gerstmann's syndrome encompasses the tetrad of finger agnosia, agraphia, acalculia, and right-left confusion. An elderly man with a history of several cardiovascular diseases was initially brought to the psychiatric outpatient department by his family because of worsening of recent memory, executive function, and mixed anxious-depressive mood. Gerstmann's syndrome without obvious motor function impairment and dementia-like features could be observed at first. Emergent brain computed tomography scan revealed new left-middle cerebral artery infarction over the left posterior parietal lobe. This case reminds us that acute cerebral infarction involving the parietal lobe may present as Gerstmann's syndrome accompanied by cognitive decline mimicking dementia. As a result, emergent organic workups should be arranged, especially for elderly patients at high risk for cerebral vascular accident.

  8. Acute parietal lobe infarction presenting as Gerstmann’s syndrome and cognitive decline mimicking senile dementia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tien-Yu; Chen, Chun-Yen; Yen, Che-Hung; Kuo, Shin-Chang; Yeh, Yi-Wei; Chang, Serena; Huang, San-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Gerstmann’s syndrome encompasses the tetrad of finger agnosia, agraphia, acalculia, and right-left confusion. An elderly man with a history of several cardiovascular diseases was initially brought to the psychiatric outpatient department by his family because of worsening of recent memory, executive function, and mixed anxious-depressive mood. Gerstmann’s syndrome without obvious motor function impairment and dementia-like features could be observed at first. Emergent brain computed tomography scan revealed new left-middle cerebral artery infarction over the left posterior parietal lobe. This case reminds us that acute cerebral infarction involving the parietal lobe may present as Gerstmann’s syndrome accompanied by cognitive decline mimicking dementia. As a result, emergent organic workups should be arranged, especially for elderly patients at high risk for cerebral vascular accident. PMID:23847420

  9. Bioresorbable vascular scaffold implantation in acute coronary syndromes: clinical evidence, tips and tricks

    PubMed Central

    Giacchi, Giuseppe; Ortega-Paz, Luis; Ishida, Kohki; Sabaté, Manel

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a drug-eluting stent (DES) is routine treatment for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). However, permanent metallic caging of the vessel has several shortcomings, such as side branch jailing and impossibility of late lumen enlargement. Moreover, DES PCI is affected by vasomotion impairment. In ACS a high thrombus burden and vasospasm lead to a higher risk of acute and late acquired stent malapposition than in stable patients. This increases the risk of acute, late and very late stent thrombosis. In this challenging clinical setting, the implantation of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS) could represent an appealing therapeutic option. Temporary vessel scaffolding has proved to have several advantages over metallic stent delivery, such as framework reabsorption, late lumen enlargement, side branch patency, and recovery of physiological reactivity to vasoactive stimuli. In the thrombotic environment of ACS, BVS implantation has the benefit of capping the thrombus and the vulnerable plaque. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds also seems to reduce the incidence of angina during follow-up. Acute coronary syndromes patients may therefore benefit more from temporary polymeric caging than from permanent stent platform implantation. The aim of this review is to update the available knowledge concerning the use of BVS in ACS patients, by analyzing the potential pitfalls in this challenging clinical setting and presenting tricks to overcome these limitations. PMID:26677353

  10. Relationship between coronary artery ectasia, cocaine abuse and acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Dendramis, Gregory; Paleologo, Claudia; Piraino, Davide; Assennato, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery ectasia (CAE) often represents a coronary angiography finding casually detected or following the occurrence of an acute coronary syndrome. The pathogenetic role of cocaine abuse in the genesis of CAE is still little known and very few data are available in literature. We describe a case of a 31-year-old male cocaine user admitted to our department for typical acute chest pain. Coronary angiography showed diffuse coronary ectasia with slow flows and without hemodynamically significant stenosis. An increasing of matrix metalloproteinases values and a reduction of their tissue inhibitors was showed both during hospitalization and at one month after discharge. This case report emphasizes the close relationship between cocaine abuse, CAE and acute coronary syndromes in patients without hemodynamically significant coronary stenosis. As reported by Satran et al, cocaine abuse should be considered an important risk factor for CAE and these patients appear to be at increased risk of angina and acute myocardial infarct. Further studies that can strengthen this hypothesis would be useful to deepen and better analyze this interesting association. PMID:27231522

  11. Comprehensive scanning of somatic mitochondrial DNA alterations in acute leukemia developing from myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Linnartz, Bjoern; Anglmayer, Roswitha; Zanssen, Stefanie

    2004-03-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal myeloid disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis resulting in refractory cytopenias. Transformation resulting in acute myeloblastic leukemia is the final stage in the multistep process of MDS evolution. Functional relevant mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been related to sideroblastic anemia and MDS. To investigate the role of mtDNA in malignant transformation to acute leukemia, we used high-resolution techniques such as single-strand conformational polymorphism and fluorescence sequencing for investigation of the whole mitochondrial genome from blood cells of 10 patients with MDS. Functionally relevant point mutations in mitochondrial RNA and polypeptide-encoding genes were detected in 50% of patients with MDS. Their increasing mutation load connects MDS and the developing acute myeloid leukemias. Several point mutations of mtDNA, including secondary point mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, occur in one bone marrow and may synergically affect bone marrow stem cells by an apoptotic pathway.

  12. Duplication and loss of chromosome 21 in two children with Down syndrome and acute leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rogan, P.K.; Close, P.; Gannutz, L.

    1995-11-06

    Acute leukemia in Down syndrome (DS) is often associated with additional changes in the number of structure of chromosome 21. We present two DS patients whose leukemic karyotypes were associated with changes in chromosome 21 ploidy. Patient 1 developed acute lymphocytic leukemia (type L1); disomy for chromosome 21 was evident in all blast cells examined. Loss of the paternal chromosome in the leukemic clone produced maternal uniparental disomy with isodisomy over a 25-cM interval. The second patient had acute monoblastic leukemia (type M5) with tetrasomy 21 in all leukemic cells. DNA polymorphism analysis showed duplicate paternal chromosomes in the constitutional genotype. The maternal chromosome was subsequently duplicated in the leukemic clone. The distinct inheritance patterns of chromosome 21 in the blast cells of these patients would appear to indicate that leukemogenesis occurred by different genetic mechanisms in each individual. 57 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Inflammation and Rupture of a Congenital Pericardial Cyst Manifesting Itself as an Acute Chest Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Benjamin Y.C.; Lufschanowski, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 63-year-old woman with a remote history of supraventricular tachycardia and hyperlipidemia, who presented with recurrent episodes of acute-onset chest pain. An electrocardiogram showed no evidence of acute coronary syndrome. A chest radiograph revealed a prominent right-sided heart border. A suspected congenital pericardial cyst was identified on a computed tomographic chest scan, and stranding was noted around the cyst. The patient was treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and the pain initially abated. Another flare-up was treated similarly. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was then performed after symptoms had resolved, and no evidence of the cyst was seen. The suspected cause of the patient's chest pain was acute inflammation of a congenital pericardial cyst with subsequent rupture and resolution of symptoms. PMID:28100978

  14. Treatment-related toxicities in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia predisposition syndromes.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2016-12-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) do not harbor germline mutations that strongly predispose them to development of this malignancy, large syndrome registries and detailed mapping of exomes or whole genomes of familial leukaemia kindreds have revealed that 3-5% of all childhood ALL cases are due to such germline mutations, but the figure may be higher. Most of these syndromes are primarily characterized by their non-malignant phenotype, whereas ALL may be the dominating or even only striking manifestation of the syndrome in some families. Identification of such ALL patients is important in order to adjust therapy and offer genetic counseling and cancer surveillance to mutation carriers in the family. In the coming years large genomic screening projects are expected to reveal further hitherto unrecognised familial ALL syndromes. The treatment of ALL cases harboring cancer predisposing mutations can be challenging for both the physician and the patient due to their preexisting symptoms, their reduced tolerance to radio- and/or chemotherapy with enhanced risk of life-threatening organ toxicities, and the paucity of data from ALL patients with the same or similar syndromes being treated by contemporary protocols. Recent studies clearly indicate that many of these patients stand a good chance of cure, and that they should be offered chemotherapy with the intention to cure. Some of these syndromes are characterized by reduced tolerance to radiotherapy and/or specific anticancer agents, while others are not. This review summarises our current knowledge on the risk of acute toxicities for these ALL patients and provides guidance for treatment adjustments.

  15. Late Differentiation Syndrome in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia: A Challenging Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Renata; Caballero, Juan Carlos; Alonso, Sara; Dávila, Julio; Cabrero, Monica; Caballero, Dolores; Vázquez, Lourdes; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermin; López, Lucia; Cañizo, Maria C.; Mateos, Maria V.; González, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Detailed knowledge about differentiation syndrome (DS) has remained limited. There are 2 large studies conducted by the Spanish workgroup PETHEMA (Programa Español de Tratamientos en Hematología; Spanish Program on Hematology Treatments) and the European group trial (LPA 96-99 and APL 93) in which the incidence, characteristics, prognostic factors and outcome of patients developing DS are evaluated. Both have described the median time of DS development between 10 and 12 days. The severity of the DS has been evaluated in the study conducted by PETHEMA, and severe DS usually occurs at the beginning of the treatment (median of 6 days), as compared with moderate DS (median of 15 days). We report here in two cases of late severe DS, with late diagnosis due to both time and form of presentation. We discuss the physiopathology, clinical presentation, prophylaxis and treatment of DS. PMID:25568763

  16. [Molecular biology in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemias "smoldering"].

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Giovanni; Sartor, Chiara; Papayannidis, Cristina; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Paolini, Stefania; Clissa, Cristina; Ottaviani, Emanuela; Finelli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic disorders of the myeloid lineage characterized by peripheral cytopenias and frequent leukemic evolution. MDS differ for clinical presentation, disease behavior and progression and this is the reflection of remarkable variability at molecular level. To this moment disease diagnosis is still dependent on bone marrow morphology that, although high concordance rates among experts are reported, remains subjective. Karyotype analysis is mandatory but diagnosis may be difficult in presence of normal karyotype or non-informative cytogenetics. Standardized molecular markers are needed to better define diagnosis, prediction of disease progression and prognosis. Furthermore, a molecular biology analysis could provide an important therapeutic tool towards tailored therapy and new insights in the disease's biology.

  17. Late differentiation syndrome in acute promyelocytic leukemia: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Renata; Caballero, Juan Carlos; Alonso, Sara; Dávila, Julio; Cabrero, Monica; Caballero, Dolores; Vázquez, Lourdes; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermin; López, Lucia; Cañizo, Maria C; Mateos, Maria V; González, Marcos

    2014-11-19

    Detailed knowledge about differentiation syndrome (DS) has remained limited. There are 2 large studies conducted by the Spanish workgroup PETHEMA (Programa Español de Tratamientos en Hematología; Spanish Program on Hematology Treatments) and the European group trial (LPA 96-99 and APL 93) in which the incidence, characteristics, prognostic factors and outcome of patients developing DS are evaluated. Both have described the median time of DS development between 10 and 12 days. The severity of the DS has been evaluated in the study conducted by PETHEMA, and severe DS usually occurs at the beginning of the treatment (median of 6 days), as compared with moderate DS (median of 15 days). We report here in two cases of late severe DS, with late diagnosis due to both time and form of presentation. We discuss the physiopathology, clinical presentation, prophylaxis and treatment of DS.

  18. Cardiorenal protective effect of taurine against cyclophosphamide-induced toxicity in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Alhumaidha, Khaled A; Saleh, Dalia O; Abd El Fattah, Mai A; El-Eraky, Wafaa I; Moawad, Helmy

    2015-07-18

    Cyclophosphamide (CP) is a cytotoxic alkylating agent used in the treatment of malignant diseases and autoimmune disorders. Its clinical use is limited to its marked cardiorenal toxicity. The present study aimed to investigate the possible protective role of taurine (Tau; 200 mg·kg(-1) per day, i.p.) on CP-induced cardiorenal toxicity. CP (200 mg·kg(-1)) was administered as a single intraperitoneal injection whereas; Tau was administered for 3 weeks on a daily basis. The results showed that CP produced an elevation in serum activities of creatine kinase, creatine kinase isoenzyme, lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine as well as blood urea nitrogen. CP also induced an elevation in the oxidative stress markers viz. elevation in the serum lipid peroxides level (measured as malondialdehyde; MDA) and reduction in reduced glutathione level and superoxide dismutase activity in both heart and renal tissue. On the other hand, administration of Tau attenuated the CP-evoked disturbances in the above mentioned parameters. In addition, CP exhibited electrocardiographic (ECG) changes, which were significantly reversed by Tau treatment. Finally, the histopathological examination emphasized the obtained results. In conclusion, Tau is suggested to be a potential candidate to ameliorate CP-induced cardiorenal toxicity that may be related to its antioxidant activity.

  19. Predictive value of homocysteine for depression after acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee Ju; Stewart, Robert; Bae, Kyung Yeol; Kim, Sung Wan; Shin, Il Seon; Kang, Hyuno; Moon, Won Jin; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Yoon, Jin Sang; Kim, Jae Min

    2016-01-01

    We investigated roles of plasma homocysteine and MTHFR gene in relation to risks and treatment responses of depression in ACS. A sample of 969 patients with recent ACS were recruited and 711 followed 1 year later. In addition, of 378 baseline participants with depressive disorder, 255 were randomized to a 24-week double blind trial of escitalopram (N = 127) or placebo (N = 128). A higher homocysteine concentration was independently associated with prevalent depressive disorder at baseline irrespective of MTHFR genotype; and with both incident and persistent depressive disorder at follow-up only in the presence of TT genotype. MTHFR genotype was not itself associated with depressive disorder after ACS. No associations were found with 24-week antidepressant treatment responses. Plasma homocysteine could be a biomarker for depressive disorder particularly in the acute phase of ACS. Focused interventions for those with higher homocysteine level and MTHFR TT genotype might reduce the risk of later depressive disorder. PMID:27626182

  20. Fluid Management With a Simplified Conservative Protocol for the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Grissom, Colin K.; Hirshberg, Eliotte L.; Dickerson, Justin B.; Brown, Samuel M.; Lanspa, Michael J.; Liu, Kathleen D.; Schoenfeld, David; Tidswell, Mark; Hite, R. Duncan; Rock, Peter; Miller, Russell R.; Morris, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (FACTT) of the National Institutes of Health Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network, a conservative fluid protocol (FACTT Conservative) resulted in a lower cumulative fluid balance and better outcomes than a liberal fluid protocol (FACTT Liberal). Subsequent Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network studies used a simplified conservative fluid protocol (FACTT Lite). The objective of this study was to compare the performance of FACTT Lite, FACTT Conservative, and FACTT Liberal protocols. Design Retrospective comparison of FACTT Lite, FACTT Conservative, and FACTT Liberal. Primary outcome was cumulative fluid balance over 7 days. Secondary outcomes were 60-day adjusted mortality and ventilator-free days through day 28. Safety outcomes were prevalence of acute kidney injury and new shock. Setting ICUs of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network participating hospitals. Patients Five hundred three subjects managed with FACTT Conservative, 497 subjects managed with FACTT Liberal, and 1,124 subjects managed with FACTT Lite. Interventions Fluid management by protocol. Measurements and Main Results Cumulative fluid balance was 1,918 ± 323 mL in FACTT Lite, −136 ±491 mL in FACTT Conservative, and 6,992 ± 502 mL in FACTT Liberal (p < 0.001). Mortality was not different between groups (24% in FACTT Lite, 25% in FACTT Conservative and Liberal, p = 0.84). Ventilator-free days in FACTT Lite (14.9 ±0.3) were equivalent to FACTT Conservative (14.6±0.5) (p = 0.61) and greater than in FACTT Liberal (12.1 ±0.5, p < 0.001 vs Lite). Acute kidney injury prevalence was 58% in FACTT Lite and 57% in FACTT Conservative (p = 0.72). Prevalence of new shock in FACTT Lite (9%) was lower than in FACTT Conservative (13%) (p = 0.007 vs Lite) and similar to FACTT Liberal (11%) (p = 0.18 vs Lite). Conclusions FACTT Lite had a greater cumulative fluid balance than FACTT Conservative but had equivalent clinical and safety outcomes

  1. Antiradiation Vaccine: Immunological neutralization of Radiation Toxins at Acute Radiation Syndromes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Introduction: Current medical management of the Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) does not include immune prophylaxis based on the Antiradiation Vaccine. Existing principles for the treatment of acute radiation syndromes are based on the replacement and supportive therapy. Haemotopoietic cell transplantation is recomended as an important method of treatment of a Haemopoietic form of the ARS. Though in the different hospitals and institutions, 31 pa-tients with a haemopoietic form have previously undergone transplantation with stem cells, in all cases(100%) the transplantants were rejected. Lethality rate was 87%.(N.Daniak et al. 2005). A large amount of biological substances or antigens isolated from bacterias (flagellin and derivates), plants, different types of venom (honeybees, scorpions, snakes) have been studied. This biological active substances can produce a nonspecific stimulation of immune system of mammals and protect against of mild doses of irradiation. But their radioprotection efficacy against high doses of radiation were not sufficient. Relative radioprotection characteristics or adaptive properties of antioxidants were expressed only at mild doses of radiation. However antioxidants demonstrated a very low protective efficacy at high doses of radiation. Some ex-periments demonstrated even a harmful effect of antioxidants administered to animals that had severe forms of the ARS. Only Specific Radiation Toxins roused a specific antigenic stim-ulation of antibody synthesis. An active immunization by non-toxic doses of radiation toxins includes a complex of radiation toxins that we call the Specific Radiation Determinant (SRD). Immunization must be provided not less than 24 days before irradiation and it is effective up to three years and more. Active immunization by radiation toxins significantly reduces the mortality rate (100%) and improves survival rate up to 60% compare with the 0% sur-vival rate among the irradiated animals in control groups

  2. Immuno-therapy of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Extracorporeal Immuno-Lympho-Plasmo-Sorption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Methods Results Summary and conclusions Introduction: Existing Medical Management of the Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) does not include methods of specific immunotherapy and active detoxication. Though the Acute Radiation Syndromes were defined as an acute toxic poisonous with development of pathological processes: Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS), Toxic Multiple Organ Injury (TMOI), Toxic Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome(TMODS), Toxic Multiple Organ Failure (TMOF). Radiation Toxins of SRD Group play an important role as the trigger mechanisms in development of the ARS clinical symptoms. Methods: Immuno-Lympho-Plasmo-Sorption is a type of Immuno-therapy which includes prin-ciples of immunochromato-graphy, plasmopheresis, and hemodialysis. Specific Antiradiation Antitoxic Antibodies are the active pharmacological agents of immunotherapy . Antiradia-tion Antitoxic Antibodies bind selectively to Radiation Neurotoxins, Cytotoxins, Hematotox-ins and neutralize their toxic activity. We have developed the highly sensitive method and system for extracorporeal-immune-lypmh-plasmo-sorption with antigen-specific IgG which is clinically important for treatment of the toxic and immunologic phases of the ARS. The method of extracorporeal-immune-lypmh-plasmo-sorption includes Antiradiation Antitoxic Antibodies (AAA) immobilized on microporous polymeric membranes with a pore size that is capable to provide diffusion of blood-lymph plasma. Plasma of blood or lymph of irradiated mammals contains Radiation Toxins (RT) that have toxic and antigenic properties. Radiation Toxins are Antigen-specific to Antitoxic blocking antibodies (Immunoglobulin G). Plasma diffuses through membranes with immobilized AAA and AA-antibodies bind to the polysaccharide chain of tox-ins molecules and complexes of AAA-RT that are captured on membrane surfaces. RT were removed from plasma. Re-transfusion of plasma of blood and lymph had been provided. We show a statistical significant

  3. Canada acute coronary syndrome score was a stronger baseline predictor than age ≥75 years of in-hospital mortality in acute coronary syndrome patients in western Romania

    PubMed Central

    Pogorevici, Antoanela; Citu, Ioana Mihaela; Bordejevic, Diana Aurora; Caruntu, Florina; Tomescu, Mirela Cleopatra

    2016-01-01

    Background Several risk scores were developed for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, but their use is limited by their complexity. Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify predictors at admission for in-hospital mortality in ACS patients in western Romania, using a simple risk-assessment tool – the new Canada acute coronary syndrome (C-ACS) risk score. Patients and methods The baseline risk of patients admitted with ACS was retrospectively assessed using the C-ACS risk score. The score ranged from 0 to 4; 1 point was assigned for the presence of each of the following parameters: age ≥75 years, Killip class >1, systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg, and heart rate >100 bpm. Results A total of 960 patients with ACS were included, 409 (43%) with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 551 (57%) with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). The C-ACS score predicted in-hospital mortality in all ACS patients with a C-statistic of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93–0.96), in STEMI patients with a C-statistic of 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.89–0.94), and in NSTE-ACS patients with a C-statistic of 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95–0.98). Of the 960 patients, 218 (22.7%) were aged ≥75 years. The proportion of patients aged ≥75 years was 21.7% in the STEMI subgroup and 23.4% in the NSTE-ACS subgroup (P>0.05). Age ≥75 years was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality in ACS patients (odds ratio [OR]: 3.25, 95% CI: 1.24–8.25) and in the STEMI subgroup (OR >3.99, 95% CI: 1.28–12.44). Female sex was strongly associated with mortality in the NSTE-ACS subgroup (OR: 27.72, 95% CI: 1.83–39.99). Conclusion We conclude that C-ACS score was the strongest predictor of in-hospital mortality in all ACS patients while age ≥75 years predicted the mortality well in the STEMI subgroup. PMID:27217732

  4. [Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Skalická, Hana; Bělohlávek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical syndrome manifested by rapidly progressive respiratory distress leading, without therapy, to severe respiratory insufficiency and subsequent multiorgan failure. The pathophysiological causes are: the change in the pressure gradients in the pulmonary capillaries, the impaired membrane permeability of the alveolocapillary in the lungs, and impaired lymphatic drainage. Unlike in cardiogenic pulmonary edema, cardiac disease is not a cause, and there is no increase in wedge pressure (< 18 mm Hg). The aetiological base is diverse and includes more clinical pathological factors. The diagnosis and evaluation are usually very difficult due to the rapidly deteriorating clinical condition of the patients. A decisive, quick and comprehensive approach, using all available invasive and non-invasive methods is necessary. The basic steps of treatment are: the use of different types of ventilatory support in order to achieve adequate oxygenation, dealing with possible hemodynamic instability, and, when needed, other specific procedures. It is always important to keep in mind that this is a very serious condition with a high mortality rate. And there is a need for fast and efficient access to the best specialized clinic.

  5. Effect of diabetes on serum potassium concentrations in acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Foo, K; Sekhri, N; Deaner, A; Knight, C; Suliman, A; Ranjadayalan, K; Timmis, A D

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To compare serum potassium concentrations in diabetic and non-diabetic patients in the early phase of acute coronary syndromes. Background: Acute phase hypokalaemia occurs in response to adrenergic activation, which stimulates membrane bound sodium-potassium-ATPase and drives potassium into the cells. It is not known whether the hypokalaemia is attenuated in patients with diabetes because of the high prevalence of sympathetic nerve dysfunction. Methods: Prospective cohort study of 2428 patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes. Patients were stratified by duration of chest pain, diabetic status, and pretreatment with β blockers. Results: The mean (SD) serum potassium concentration was significantly higher in diabetic than in non-diabetic patients (4.3 (0.5) v 4.1 (0.5) mmol/l, p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified diabetes as an independent predictor of a serum potassium concentration in the upper half of the distribution (odds ratio 1.66, 95% confidence interval 1.38 to 2.00). In patients presenting within 6 hours of symptom onset, there was a progressive increase in plasma potassium concentrations from 4.08 (0.46) mmol/l in patients presenting within 2 hours, to 4.20 (0.47) mmol/l in patients presenting between 2–4 hours, to 4.24 (0.52) mmol/l in patients presenting between 4–6 hours (p = 0.0007). This pattern of increasing serum potassium concentration with duration of chest pain was attenuated in patients with diabetes, particularly those with unstable angina. Similar attenuation occurred in patients pretreated with β blockers. Conclusion: In acute coronary syndromes, patients with diabetes have significantly higher serum potassium concentrations and do not exhibit the early dip seen in non-diabetics. This may reflect sympathetic nerve dysfunction that commonly complicates diabetes. PMID:12482786

  6. Involvement of erythrocyte aggregation and erythrocyte resistance to flow in acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pfafferott, C; Moessmer, G; Ehrly, A M; Bauersachs, R M

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the study was to identify the relative importance of erythrocyte flow resistance and aggregation in acute and chronic coronary syndromes. 117 subjects in five groups were studied: (1) 34 patients shortly after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) before reperfusion therapy; (2) 27 patients with unstable and (3) 21 with stable angina pectoris (AP); (4) 14 age-matched control patients and (5) 21 healthy volunteers. Single erythrocyte transit times were measured using the Cell Transit Analyser. Shear dependent elongation and aggregation was measured by a modified computerized Myrenne aggregometer. Leukocyte count was increased in coronary artery disease (CAD), especially in acute syndromes (mean +/- SD for groups 1-5): 12.2 +/- 4.5; 10.0 +/- 5.4; 8.0 +/- 2.0; 8.0 +/- 3.7; 7.0 +/- 2.0 (pl(-1))). Platelets, hematocrit, fibrinogen, alpha2-macroglobulin did not differ between the groups. Plasma viscosity (mPas) was elevated in AMI and stable AP: 1.34 +/- 0.10; 1.30 +/- 0.09; 1.32 +/- 0.08; 1.27 +/- 0.07; 1.27 +/- 0.05. Erythrocyte filtrability was not different as was the shear dependent deformation. Aggregation parameters such as gammaTmin were elevated in CAD: 180 +/- 70; 159 +/- 60; 166 +/- 59; 115 +/- 43; 113 +/- 51 (s(-1)). Erythrocyte deformability, measured with two independent methods, does not appear to contribute to the pathophysiology of acute coronary syndromes. Erythrocyte aggregation and plasma viscosity were again found increased both in unstable and stable coronary disease. It is unlikely that increased red cell aggregation contributes to emergence of AMI.

  7. Ocular involvement in acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet syndrome): new cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Chloe C; Mishra, Aditya; Belliveau, Dan; Green, Peter; Heathcote, J Godfrey

    2008-01-01

    Sweet syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is a dermatologic disorder with accompanying features of systemic inflammation. It is commonly associated with conjunctivitis, but a variety of types of ocular inflammation have been reported. The ocular manifestations of Sweet syndrome include periorbital and orbital inflammation, dacryoadenitis, conjunctivitis, episcleritis, scleritis, limbal nodules, peripheral ulcerative keratitis, iritis, glaucoma, and choroiditis. The ocular inflammation appears concurrently with skin lesions. An overview of Sweet syndrome is presented with a review of cases in the literature describing ocular involvement. We report two additional cases of ocular involvement, one with conjunctivitis and a second with iritis, peripheral ulcerative keratitis, and episcleritis. Of the 20 cases, half were bilateral. Thirteen cases occurred in the setting of classical or idiopathic Sweet syndrome and seven in association with malignancy. Biopsies of ocular tissue were infrequent, but, in the seven cases where ocular tissue was analyzed, the histopathology was similar to that of the cutaneous lesions. The ocular complications of Sweet syndrome resolved with systemic administration of corticosteroid or cyclosporine. Topical ocular steroid treatment was frequently used in conjunction with oral steroid but may not have been valuable.

  8. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

  9. On Arrival High Blood Glucose Level is Associated With Detrimental and Fatal Hospitalization Outcomes for Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hartopo, Anggoro B.; Setianto, Budi Y.; Gharini, Putrika P.R.; Dinarti, Lucia K.

    2011-01-01

    Background High blood glucose level is frequently encountered in acute coronary syndrome. We investigated the effects of high blood glucose measured on arrival on hospitalization adverse events in acute coronary syndrome. Our study patients were Javanese in ethnicity, which constitute half of population in Indonesia. We hypothesized that elevated blood glucose has detrimental effects on hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome. Methods We designed an observasional cohort study and recruited 148 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndrome. Venous blood was collected on hospital arrival. High blood glucose level was determined as plasma glucose > 140 mg/dL. Adverse hospitalization events were recorded, i.e. mortality, acute heart failure, cardiogenic shock and heart rhythm disorders. Echocardiography examination was performed to determine left ventricular function. Results The prevalence of on arrival high blood glucose among Javanese patients with acute coronary syndrome was considerably high (36%). On arrival high blood glucose was associated with acute heart failure (P < 0.001) and shock cardiogenic (P = 0.02). Heart rhythm disorders were higher in high blood glucose patients (P = 0.004). Left ventricular dysfunction was more prevalent in high blood glucose patients (P = 0.001) and ejection fraction was lower (P = 0.001). On arrival high blood glucose was independently associated with hospitalization adverse events (adjusted odds ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.1-4.9, P = 0.03) and hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio = 6.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-38.6, P = 0.03). Conclusions Our study suggests that on arrival high blood glucose among Javanese patients with acute coronary syndrome is considerably high and is associated with detrimental and fatal hospitalization outcomes.

  10. Bile loss in the acute intestinal radiation syndrome in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Dunston, S.G.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.; Holeski, C.; Eaton, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of bile duct ligation (BDL), choledochostomy, bile acid sequestering within the intestinal lumen by cholestyramine, and fluid and electrolyte replacement on survival time and development of diarrhea after whole-body exposure to doses of ionizing radiation that result in death from acute intestinal injury were studied. BDL significantly prolonged survival and delayed the onset of diarrhea after exposure to /sup 137/Cs gamma rays, fission neutrons, or cyclotron-produced neutrons in the range of doses that produce intestinal death or death from a combination of intestinal and hematopoietic injuries. Cannulation of the bile duct with exteriorized bile flow (choledochostomy) to protect the irradiated intestine from the mucolytic action of bile salts did not duplicate the effect of BDL in increasing survival time. Choledochostomy without fluid replacement eliminated the occurrence of diarrhea in 15.4 Gy irradiated rats. Diarrhea did occur in irradiated animals with choledochostomy if they received duodenal injections of fluid and electrolytes to replace the fluid lost as a result of bile drainage. Duodenal injection of fluid and electrolytes had no significant effect on survival time in irradiated rats. Injection of fluid and electrolytes into the peritoneal cavity of irradiated rats resulted in an increase in survival time that was comparable to that observed after BDL. Addition of antibiotics to the peritoneally injected fluid and electrolytes further increased survival time (up to 9 days). This survival time approached that seen in animals receiving the same radiation dose but which had the intestine exteriorized and shielded to minimize radiation injury to the intestine. Postmortem histological examinations of the irradiated small intestine showed mucosal regeneration in these long-term survivors receiving fluid and antibiotic therapy.

  11. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  12. Acute kidney injury and post-reperfusion syndrome in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Umbro, Ilaria; Tinti, Francesca; Scalera, Irene; Evison, Felicity; Gunson, Bridget; Sharif, Adnan; Ferguson, James; Muiesan, Paolo; Mitterhofer, Anna Paola

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades liver transplantation (LT) has become the treatment of choice for patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD). The chronic shortage of cadaveric organs for transplantation led to the utilization of a greater number of marginal donors such as older donors or donors after circulatory death (DCD). The improved survival of transplanted patients has increased the frequency of long-term complications, in particular chronic kidney disease (CKD). Acute kidney injury (AKI) post-LT has been recently recognized as an important risk factor for the occurrence of de novo CKD in the long-term outcome. The onset of AKI post-LT is multifactorial, with pre-LT risk factors involved, including higher Model for End-stage Liver Disease score, more sever ESLD and pre-existing renal dysfunction, either with intra-operative conditions, in particular ischaemia reperfusion injury responsible for post-reperfusion syndrome (PRS) that can influence recipient’s morbidity and mortality. Post-reperfusion syndrome-induced AKI is an important complication post-LT that characterizes kidney involvement caused by PRS with mechanisms not clearly understood and implication on graft and patient survival. Since pre-LT risk factors may influence intra-operative events responsible for PRS-induced AKI, we aim to consider all the relevant aspects involved in PRS-induced AKI in the setting of LT and to identify all studies that better clarified the specific mechanisms linking PRS and AKI. A PubMed search was conducted using the terms liver transplantation AND acute kidney injury; liver transplantation AND post-reperfusion syndrome; acute kidney injury AND post-reperfusion syndrome; acute kidney injury AND DCD AND liver transplantation. Five hundred seventy four articles were retrieved on PubMed search. Results were limited to title/abstract of English-language articles published between 2000 and 2015. Twenty-three studies were identified that specifically evaluated incidence, risk factors

  13. Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. A mouse model for MERS coronavirus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cockrell, Adam S; Yount, Boyd L; Scobey, Trevor; Jensen, Kara; Douglas, Madeline; Beall, Anne; Tang, Xian-Chun; Marasco, Wayne A; Heise, Mark T; Baric, Ralph S

    2016-11-28

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel virus that emerged in 2012, causing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), severe pneumonia-like symptoms and multi-organ failure, with a case fatality rate of ∼36%. Limited clinical studies indicate that humans infected with MERS-CoV exhibit pathology consistent with the late stages of ARDS, which is reminiscent of the disease observed in patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Models of MERS-CoV-induced severe respiratory disease have been difficult to achieve, and small-animal models traditionally used to investigate viral pathogenesis (mouse, hamster, guinea-pig and ferret) are naturally resistant to MERS-CoV. Therefore, we used CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to modify the mouse genome to encode two amino acids (positions 288 and 330) that match the human sequence in the dipeptidyl peptidase 4 receptor, making mice susceptible to MERS-CoV infection and replication. Serial MERS-CoV passage in these engineered mice was then used to generate a mouse-adapted virus that replicated efficiently within the lungs and evoked symptoms indicative of severe ARDS, including decreased survival, extreme weight loss, decreased pulmonary function, pulmonary haemorrhage and pathological signs indicative of end-stage lung disease. Importantly, therapeutic countermeasures comprising MERS-CoV neutralizing antibody treatment or a MERS-CoV spike protein vaccine protected the engineered mice against MERS-CoV-induced ARDS.

  15. Drug-eluting stent thrombosis: the Kounis hypersensitivity-associated acute coronary syndrome revisited.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jack P; Hou, Dongming; Pendyala, Lakshmana; Goudevenos, John A; Kounis, Nicholas G

    2009-07-01

    The advent of drug-eluting stents (DES) has revolutionized the field of interventional cardiology. Their dramatic and persistent restenotic and target lesion revascularization advantages are unquestioned. However, concerns over the rare but potentially catastrophic risk of stent thrombosis (ST) have tempered universal acceptance of these devices. Although the precise mechanism of DES ST is undoubtedly multifactorial and as yet not fully elucidated, delayed or incomplete endothelial healing clearly plays a pivotal role. Detailed histopathological data have implicated a contributory allergic or hypersensitivity component, as verified by the Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Device Experience Center and the Research on Adverse Drug/device events And Reports (RADAR) project. These findings thus suggest a potential connection with the Kounis syndrome, the concurrence of acute coronary events with allergic, hypersensitivity, anaphylactic, or anaphylactoid reactions. Potential culprits responsible for this phenomenon include: arachidonic acid metabolites such as leukotrienes and thromboxane, proteolytic enzymes such as chymase and tryptase, histamine, cytokines, and chemokines. Additionally, inflammatory cells such as macrophages, T-lymphocytes, and mast cells are probably also contributory. Autopsy-confirmed infiltrates of various inflammatory cells including lymphocytes, plasma cells, macrophages, and eosinophils have been reported in all 3 vascular wall layers and are reminiscent of those associated with the Kounis syndrome. Although the concurrence of acute coronary syndromes with hypersensitivity reactions has been long established, the specific association with DES ST remains unproven. Potential incorporation of hypersensitivity suppressive agents might represent a promising paradigm shift from efficacy to safety in future DES designs.

  16. Acute Radiation Disease : Cutaneous Syndrome and Toxic properties of Radiomimetics -Radiation Neurotoxins and Hematotoxins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Cutaneous injury is an important complication of a general or local acute irradiation. A type of a skin and tissues lesions depends on a type, intensity, and period of irradiation. Also, the clinical picture, signs, and manifestations of the cutaneous syndrome depend on a type of the radiation toxins circulated in lymph and blood of irradiated mammals. Radiation Toxins were isolated from lymph of the mammals that were irradiated and developed different forms of the Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) -Cerebrovascular, Cardiovascular, Gastrointestinal, and Hematopoietic. Radiation Toxins can be divided into the two important types of toxins (Neu-rotoxins and Hematotoxins) or four groups. The effects of Radiation Neurotoxins include severe damages and cell death of brain, heart, gastrointestinal tissues and endothelial cells of blood and lymphatic vessels. The hematotoxicity of Hematotoxic Radiation Toxins includes lym-phopenia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia in the blood circulation and transitory lymphocytosis and leukocytosis in the Central Lymphatic System. In all cases, administration of the Radiomimetics (Radiation Toxins) intramuscularly or intravenously to healthy, radiation naive mammals had induced and developed the typical clinical manifestations of the ARS. In all cases, administration of Radiomimetics by subtoxic doses had demonstrated development of typical clinical signs of the cutaneous syndrome such as hair loss, erythema, swelling, desqua-mation, blistering and skin necrosis. In animal-toxic models, we have activated development of the local skin and tissue injury after injection of Radiation Toxins with cytoxic properties.

  17. A basic fibroblast growth factor analog for protection and mitigation against acute radiation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Casey-Sawicki, Kate; Zhang, Mei; Kim, Sunghee; Zhang, Amy; Zhang, Steven B; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Singh, Ravi; Yang, Shanmin; Swarts, Steven; Vidyasagar, Sadasivan; Zhang, Lurong; Zhang, Aiguo; Okunieff, Paul

    2014-06-01

    The effects of fibroblast growth factors and their potential as broad-spectrum agents to treat and mitigate radiation injury have been studied extensively over the past two decades. This report shows that a peptide mimetic of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-P) protects and mitigates against acute radiation syndromes. FGF-P attenuates both sepsis and bleeding in a radiation-induced bone marrow syndrome model and reduces the severity of gastrointestinal and cutaneous syndromes; it should also mitigate combined injuries. FGF-2 and FGF-P induce little or no deleterious inflammation or vascular leakage, which distinguishes them from most other growth factors, angiogenic factors, and cytokines. Although recombinant FGFs have proven safe in several ongoing clinical trials, they are expensive to synthesize, can only be produced in limited quantity, and have limited shelf life. FGF-P mimics the advantageous features of FGF-2 without these disadvantages. This paper shows that FGF-P not only has the potential to be a potent yet safe broad-spectrum medical countermeasure that mitigates acute radiotoxicity but also holds promise for thermal burns, ischemic wound healing, tissue engineering, and stem-cell regeneration.

  18. Indwelling catheter and conservative measures in the treatment of abdominal compartment syndrome in fulminant acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhao-Xi; Huang, Hai-Rong; Zhou, Hong

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of combined indwelling catheter, hemofiltration, respiration support and traditional Chinese medicine (e.g. Dahuang) in treating abdominal compartment syndrome of fulminant acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Patients with fulminant acute pancreatitis were divided randomly into 2 groups of combined indwelling catheter celiac drainage and intra-abdominal pressure monitoring and routine conservative measures group (group 1) and control group (group 2). Routine non-operative conservative treatments including hemofiltration, respiration support, gastrointestinal TCM ablution were also applied in control group patients. Effectiveness of the two groups was observed, and APACHE II scores were applied for analysis. RESULTS: On the second and fifth days after treatment, APACHE II scores of group 1 and 2 patients were significantly different. Comparison of effectiveness (abdominalgia and burbulence relief time, hospitalization time) between groups 1 and 2 showed significant difference, as well as incidence rates of cysts formation. Mortality rates of groups 1 and 2 were 10.0% and 20.7%, respectively. For patients in group 1, celiac drainage quantity and intra-abdominal pressure, and hospitalization time were positively correlated (r = 0.552, 0.748, 0.923, P < 0.01) with APACHE II scores. CONCLUSION: Combined indwelling catheter celiac drainage and intra-abdominal pressure monitoring, short veno-venous hemofiltration (SVVH), gastrointestinal TCM ablution, respiration support have preventive and treatment effects on abdominal compartment syndrome of fulminant acute pancreatitis. PMID:16937509

  19. Patents for Toll-like receptor ligands as radiation countermeasures for acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay K; Pollard, Harvey B

    2015-01-01

    Acute radiation exposure induces apoptosis of tissues in the hematopoietic, digestive, cutaneous, cardiovascular and nervous systems; extensive apoptosis of these tissues ultimately leads to acute radiation syndrome. A novel strategy for developing radiation countermeasures has been to imitate the genetic mechanisms acquired by radiation-resistant tumors. Two mechanisms that underlie this ability of tumor cells are the p53 and NF-κB pathways. The loss of p53 function results in the inactivation of pro-apoptotic control mechanisms, while constitutive activation of NF-κB results in the up-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes. Various Toll-like receptor ligands are capable of up regulating the NF-κB pathway, which increases radio-resistance and reduces radiation-induced apoptosis in various tissues. Several Toll-like receptor ligands have been patented and are currently under development as radiation countermeasures for acute radiation syndrome. Ongoing studies suggest that a few of these attractive agents are progressing well along the US FDA approval pathway to become radiation countermeasures.

  20. Patents for Toll-like receptor ligands as radiation countermeasures for acute radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay K; Pollard, Harvey B

    2015-01-01

    Acute radiation exposure induces apoptosis of tissues in the hematopoietic, digestive, cutaneous, cardiovascular and nervous systems; extensive apoptosis of these tissues ultimately leads to acute radiation syndrome. A novel strategy for developing radiation countermeasures has been to imitate the genetic mechanisms acquired by radiation-resistant tumors. Two mechanisms that underlie this ability of tumor cells are the p53 and NF-κB pathways. The loss of p53 function results in the inactivation of pro-apoptotic control mechanisms, while constitutive activation of NF-κB results in the up-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes. Various Toll-like receptor ligands are capable of up regulating the NF-κB pathway, which increases radio-resistance and reduces radiation-induced apoptosis in various tissues. Several Toll-like receptor ligands have been patented and are currently under development as radiation countermeasures for acute radiation syndrome. Ongoing studies suggest that a few of these attractive agents are progressing well along the US FDA approval pathway to become radiation countermeasures. PMID:26135043

  1. Acute small fibre sensory neuropathy: another variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome?

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, U; Gunasekera, S

    2002-04-01

    Six patients who presented with acute sensory neuropathy were studied. All patients underwent detailed clinical assessment along with electrophysiological tests and relevant laboratory investigations. All patients had acute onset numbness, reaching the peak deficit within 4 weeks. Four of them had associated burning dysaesthesia. An antecedent illness was reported in four; diarrhoea in three, and urinary tract infection in one. The neurological examination disclosed normal muscle strength, symmetric glove and stocking type sensory loss for pain and temperature, normal proprioception, and vibration senses with normal or brisk tendon reflexes. Analysis of CSF demonstrated albuminocytological dissociation in all. Routine motor and sensory nerve conduction studies were normal. Sympathetic skin responses were also normal except for the lower limbs in one patient. Stool cultures for Campylobacter jejuni were negative. The outcome was favourable. Burning dysaesthesia disappeared within 4 months. Numbness and objective sensory loss tended to persist longer. The clinical features and normal routine nerve conduction studies, which assess large diameter nerve fibre function, indicate small sensory fibre dysfunction in the group. Their presentation and CSF findings would fit into the diagnosis of sensory Guillain-Barré syndrome. The current study suggests that acute small fibre sensory neuropathy (ASFSN) is another clinical entity which could perhaps be included in the heterogeneous range of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  2. A single serum glucose measurement predicts adverse outcomes across the whole range of acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Foo, K; Cooper, J; Deaner, A; Knight, C; Suliman, A; Ranjadayalan, K; Timmis, A D

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To analyse the relation between serum glucose concentration and hospital outcome across the whole spectrum of acute coronary syndromes. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 2127 patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes. The patients were stratified into quartile groups (Q1 to Q4) defined by serum glucose concentrations of 5.8, 7.2, and 10.0 mmol/l. The relation between quartile group and major in-hospital complications was analysed. Results: The proportion of patients with acute myocardial infarction increased incrementally across the quartile groups, from 21.4% in Q1 to 47.9% in Q4 (p < 0.0001). The trend for frequency of in-hospital major complications was similar, particularly left ventricular failure (LVF) (Q1 6.4%, Q4 25.2%, p < 0.0001) and cardiac death (Q1 0.7%, Q4 6.1%, p < 0.0001). The relations were linear, each glucose quartile increment being associated with an odds ratio of 1.46 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.27 to 1.70) for LVF and 1.52 (95% CI 1.17 to 1.97) for cardiac death. Although complication rates were higher for a discharge diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction than for unstable angina, there was no evidence that the effects of serum glucose concentration were different for the two groups, there being no significant interaction with discharge diagnosis in the associations between glucose quartile and LVF (p = 0.69) or cardiac death (p = 0.17). Similarly there was no significant interaction with diabetic status in the associations between glucose quartile and LVF (p = 0.08) or cardiac death (p = 0.09). Conclusion: Admission glycaemia stratified patients with acute coronary syndromes according to their risk of in-hospital LVF and cardiac mortality. There was no detectable glycaemic threshold for these adverse effects. The prognostic correlates of admission glycaemia were unaffected by diabetic status and did not differ significantly between patients with acute myocardial infarction and those with unstable

  3. Severity of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in haematology patients: long-term impact and early predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Lagier, D; Platon, L; Chow-Chine, L; Sannini, A; Bisbal, M; Brun, J-P; Blache, J-L; Faucher, M; Mokart, D

    2016-09-01

    Severe forms of acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with haematological diseases expose clinicians to specific medical and ethical considerations. We prospectively followed 143 patients with haematological malignancies, and whose lungs were mechanically ventilated for more than 24 h, over a 5-y period. We sought to identify prognostic factors of long-term outcome, and in particular to evaluate the impact of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome in these patients. A secondary objective was to identify the early (first 48 h from ICU admission) predictive factors for acute respiratory distress syndrome severity. An evolutive haematological disease (HR 1.71; 95% CI 1.13-2.58), moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (HR 1.81; 95% CI 1.13-2.69) and need for renal replacement therapy (HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.52-3.31) were associated with long-term mortality. Resolution of neutropaenia during ICU stay (HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42-0.94) and early microbiological documentation (HR 0.62; 95% CI 0.42-0.91) were associated with survival. The extent of pulmonary infiltration observed on the first chest X-ray and the diagnosis of invasive fungal infection were the most relevant early predictive factors of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  4. Concurrency of Guillain-Barre syndrome and acute transverse myelitis: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Tolunay, Orkun; Çelik, Tamer; Çelik, Ümit; Kömür, Mustafa; Tanyeli, Zeynep; Sönmezler, Abdurrahman

    2016-11-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome and acute transverse myelitis manifest as demyelinating diseases of the peripheral and central nervous system. Concurrency of these two disorders is rarely documented in literature. A 4-year-old girl presenting with cough, fever, and an impaired walking ability was admitted to hospital. She had no previous complaints in her medical history. A physical examination revealed lack of muscle strength of the lower extremities and deep tendon reflexes. MRI could not be carried out due to technical problems; therefore, both Guillain-Barré syndrome and acute transverse myelitis were considered for the diagnosis. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment was started as first line therapy. Because this treatment did not relieve the patient's symptoms, spinal MRI was carried out on the fourth day of admission and demyelinating areas were identified. Based on the new findings, the patient was diagnosed with acute transverse myelitis, and high dose intravenous methylprednisolone therapy was started. Electromyography findings were consistent with acute polyneuropathy affecting both motor and sensory fibers. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed with concurrency of Guillain-Barré syndrome and acute transverse myelitis. Interestingly, while concurrency of these 2 disorders is rare, this association has been demonstrated in various recent publications. Progress in diagnostic tests (magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiological examination studies) has enabled clinicians to establish the right diagnosis. The possibility of concurrent Guillain-Barré syndrome and acute transverse myelitis should be considered if recovery takes longer than anticipated.

  5. Concurrency of Guillain-Barre syndrome and acute transverse myelitis: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Tamer; Çelik, Ümit; Kömür, Mustafa; Tanyeli, Zeynep; Sönmezler, Abdurrahman

    2016-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome and acute transverse myelitis manifest as demyelinating diseases of the peripheral and central nervous system. Concurrency of these two disorders is rarely documented in literature. A 4-year-old girl presenting with cough, fever, and an impaired walking ability was admitted to hospital. She had no previous complaints in her medical history. A physical examination revealed lack of muscle strength of the lower extremities and deep tendon reflexes. MRI could not be carried out due to technical problems; therefore, both Guillain-Barré syndrome and acute transverse myelitis were considered for the diagnosis. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment was started as first line therapy. Because this treatment did not relieve the patient's symptoms, spinal MRI was carried out on the fourth day of admission and demyelinating areas were identified. Based on the new findings, the patient was diagnosed with acute transverse myelitis, and high dose intravenous methylprednisolone therapy was started. Electromyography findings were consistent with acute polyneuropathy affecting both motor and sensory fibers. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed with concurrency of Guillain-Barré syndrome and acute transverse myelitis. Interestingly, while concurrency of these 2 disorders is rare, this association has been demonstrated in various recent publications. Progress in diagnostic tests (magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiological examination studies) has enabled clinicians to establish the right diagnosis. The possibility of concurrent Guillain-Barré syndrome and acute transverse myelitis should be considered if recovery takes longer than anticipated. PMID:28018472

  6. Mortality reduction with use of oral beta-blockers in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; de Barros e Silva, Pedro Gabriel Melo; de Castro Roque, Eduardo Alberto; Bossa, Aline Siqueira; Zullino, Cindel Nogueira; Simões, Sheila Aparecida; Okada, Mariana Yumi; de Carvalho Andreucci Torres Leal, Tatiana; de Almeida Soeiro, Maria Carolina Feres; Serrano, Carlos V.; Oliveira, Múcio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have revealed a relationship between beta-blocker use and worse prognosis in acute coronary syndrome, mainly due to a higher incidence of cardiogenic shock. However, the relevance of this relationship in the reperfusion era is unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the outcomes of patients with acute coronary syndrome that started oral beta-blockers within the first 24 hours of hospital admission (group I) compared to patients who did not use oral beta-blockers in this timeframe (group II). METHODS: This was an observational, retrospective and multicentric study with 2,553 patients (2,212 in group I and 341 in group II). Data regarding demographic characteristics, coronary treatment and medication use in the hospital were obtained. The primary endpoint was in-hospital all-cause mortality. The groups were compared by ANOVA and the chi-square test. Multivariate analysis was conducted by logistic regression and results were considered significant when p<0.05. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed between the groups in the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, enoxaparin, and statins; creatinine levels; ejection fraction; tabagism; age; and previous coronary artery bypass graft. Significant differences were also observed between the groups in mortality (2.67% vs 9.09%, OR=0.35, p=0.02) and major adverse cardiovascular events (11% vs 29.5%, OR=4.55, p=0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with acute coronary syndrome who underwent early intervention with oral beta-blockers during the first 24 hours of hospital admission had a lower in-hospital death rate and experienced fewer major adverse cardiovascular events with no increase in cardiogenic shock or sustained ventricular arrhythmias compared to patients who did not receive oral beta-blockers within this timeframe. PMID:27982163

  7. Use of medicines recommended for secondary prevention of acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gaedke, Mari Ângela; da Costa, Juvenal Soares Dias; Manenti, Euler Roberto Fernandes; Henn, Ruth Liane; Paniz, Vera Maria Vieira; Nunes, Marcelo Felipe; da Motta, Monique Adriane; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To analyze if the demographic and socioeconomic variables, as well as percutaneous coronary intervention are associated with the use of medicines for secondary prevention of acute coronary syndrome. METHODS : In this cohort study, we included 138 patients with acute coronary syndrome, aged 30 years or more and of both sexes. The data were collected at the time of hospital discharge, and after six and twelve months. The outcome of the study was the simultaneous use of medicines recommended for secondary prevention of acute coronary syndrome: platelet antiaggregant, beta-blockers, statins and angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker. The independent variables were: sex, age, education in years of attending, monthly income in tertiles and percutaneous coronary intervention. We described the prevalence of use of each group of medicines with their 95% confidence intervals, as well as the simultaneous use of the four medicines, in all analyzed periods. In the crude analysis, we verified the outcome with the independent variables for each period through the Chi-square test. The adjusted analysis was carried out using Poisson Regression. RESULTS : More than a third of patients (36.2%; 95%CI 28.2;44.3) had the four medicines prescribed at the same time, at the moment of discharge. We did not observe any differences in the prevalence of use in comparison with the two follow-up periods. The most prescribed class of medicines during discharge was platelet antiaggregant (91.3%). In the crude analysis, the demographic and socioeconomic variables were not associated to the outcome in any of the three periods. CONCLUSIONS : The prevalence of simultaneous use of medicines at discharge and in the follow-ups pointed to the under-utilization of this therapy in clinical practice. Intervention strategies are needed to improve the quality of care given to patients that extend beyond the hospital discharge, a critical point of transition

  8. Clinical characteristics and long-term progression of young patients with acute coronary syndrome in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Soeiro, Alexandre de Matos; Fernandes, Felipe Lourenço; Soeiro, Maria Carolina Feres de Almeida; Serrano, Carlos Vicente; de Oliveira, Múcio Tavares

    2015-01-01

    Objective In Brazil, there are few descriptions in the literature on the angiographic pattern and clinical characteristics of young patients with acute coronary syndrome, despite the evident number of cases in the population. The objective of this study was to evaluate which clinical characteristics are most closely related to the acute coronary syndrome in young patients, and what long-term outcomes are in this population. Methods This is a prospective observational study with 268 patients aged under 55 years with acute coronary syndrome, carried out between May 2010 and May 2013. Data were obtained on demographics, laboratory test and angiography results, and the coronary treatment adopted. Statistical analysis was presented as percentages and absolute values. Results Approximately 57% were men and the median age was 50 years (30 to 55). The main risk factors were arterial hypertension (68%), smoking (67%), and dyslipidemia (43%). Typical pain was present in 90% of patients. In young individuals, 25.7% showed ST segment elevation. Approximately 56.5% of patients presented with a single-vessel angiographic pattern. About 7.1% were submitted to coronary bypass surgery, and 42.1% to percutaneous coronary angioplasty. Intrahospital mortality was 1.5%, and the combined event rate (cerebrovascular accident/stroke, cardiogenic shock, reinfarction, and arrhythmias) was 13.8%. After a mean follow-up of 10 months, mortality was 9.8%, while 25.4% of the patients had new ischemic events, and 37.3% required readmission to hospital. Conclusion In the short-term, young patients presented with mortality rates below what was expected when compared to the rates noted in other studies. However, there was a significant increase in the number of events in the 10-month follow-up. PMID:26466059

  9. Factors associated with study completion in patients with premature acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Factors associated with study completion in younger adults are not well understood. This study sought to describe psychosocial, clinical, and demographic features associated with completion of a study of men and women with premature acute coronary syndrome. Methods As part of the GENdEr and Sex determInantS of cardiovascular disease: From bench to beyond-Premature Acute Coronary Syndrome (GENESIS-PRAXY) study, demographic, psychosocial, and clinical variables were assessed in 1213 patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome (≤ 55 years; 30% women). Patients were followed for 12 months. Dropouts withdrew from the study or were lost to follow-up after 12 months; completers were still enrolled after 12 months. Results Of 1213 patients initially enrolled, 777 (64.1%) completed 12-month follow-up. Fully adjusted models suggested that being older (OR = 1.04, 95% CI [1.01, 1.06]), higher subjective social status within one’s country (OR = 1.11, 95% CI [1.01, 1.22]), being free of type II diabetes, (OR = 0.66, 95% CI [0.45, 0.97]), non-smoking status (OR = 0.70, 95% CI [0.51, 0.95]) and being free of depression (OR = 1.52, 95% CI [1.11, 2.07]) were independently associated with study completion. Conclusions Recruitment/retention strategies targeting individuals who smoke, are younger, have low subjective social status within one’s country, have diabetes, or have depression may improve participant follow-up in cardiovascular cohort studies. PMID:28301532

  10. Biomarkers in acute respiratory distress syndrome: from pathobiology to improving patient care.

    PubMed

    Walter, James M; Wilson, Jennifer; Ware, Lorraine B

    2014-10-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by alveolar flooding with protein-rich pulmonary edema fluid. Despite an improved understanding of ARDS pathogenesis, our ability to predict the development of ARDS and risk-stratify patients with the disease remains limited. Biomarkers may help identify patients at highest risk of developing ARDS, assess response to therapy, predict outcome, and optimize enrollment in clinical trials. This review begins with a general description of biomarker use in clinical medicine. We then review evidence that supports the value of various ARDS biomarkers organized by the cellular injury processes central to ARDS development: endothelial injury, epithelial injury, disordered inflammation and coagulation, fibrosis, and apoptosis. Finally, we summarize the growing contributions of genomic and proteomic research and suggest ways in which the field may evolve in the coming years.

  11. (Acute radiation syndrome within the high-exposure group of Chernobyl)

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.

    1990-11-05

    Dr. K. F. Eckerman participated as a member of an American scientific team in meetings with Soviet scientists at the Institute of Biophysics in Moscow on October 18 and 19, 1990. The meetings were part of an agreement between the two countries under the Joint USSR-USA Coordinating Committee on Civil Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS). The meetings were part of the efforts of Working Group 7.2 on Health Effects. These discussions were limited to the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) within the highly exposed Chernobyl patients. The specific objective of this meeting was to review the clinical and laboratory data on the Chernobyl ARS patients and to see what might be done to make these data available to improve our understanding of the syndrome.

  12. Neurofeedback therapy in patients with acute and chronic pain syndromes--literature review and own experience.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Alicja; Biedroń, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    Pain management is based mainly on pharmacotherapy which has many limitations. Non-pharmacological techniques, like neurofeedback (EEG-biofeedback) are alternative methods of pain treatment. Data from literature confirm high efficacy of neurofeedback in pain syndromes treatment, chronic and acute as well. Neurofeedback plays an important role in management of post stroke, post traumatic headaches and in primary headaches like tension type headaches or migraine. Literature review and own experience indicate importance of number and frequency of performed neurofeedback trainings on treatment effectiveness. Satisfactory results have already been observed after 30 trainings however usually 40-60 training have to be performed. Effectiveness of such therapy in pain syndromes is usually good or less often acceptable (50% reduction of headaches). Children with tension type headaches (differently than adults) need reminder therapy every 6-12 months, otherwise recurrence of headaches is observed. Based on our own experience neurofeedback therapy seems to play role in neuropathic pain and cancer pain management.

  13. Acute inflammatory bowel disease complicating chronic alcoholism and mimicking carcinoid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Dattolo, Pietro; Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ferro, Giuseppe; Fusco, Francesca; Consalvo, Matteo; Chiodi, Leandro; Pizzarelli, Francesco; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-05-01

    We report the case of a woman with a history of chronic alcohol abuse who was hospitalized with diarrhea, severe hypokalemia refractory to potassium infusion, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, alternations of high blood pressure with phases of hypotension, irritability and increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and cortisol. Although carcinoid syndrome was hypothesized, abdominal computed tomography and colonoscopy showed non-specific inflammatory bowel disease with severe colic wall thickening, and multiple colic biopsies confirmed non-specific inflammation with no evidence of carcinoid cells. During the following days diarrhea slowly decreased and the patient's condition progressively improved. One year after stopping alcohol consumption, the patient was asymptomatic and serum potassium was normal. Chronic alcohol exposure is known to have several deleterious effects on the intestinal mucosa and can favor and sustain local inflammation. Chronic alcohol intake may also be associated with high blood pressure, behavior disorders, abnormalities in blood pressure regulation with episodes of hypotension during hospitalization due to impaired baroreflex sensitivity in the context of an alcohol withdrawal syndrome, increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid as a result of malabsorption syndrome, and increased urinary cortisol as a result of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. These considerations, together with the regression of symptoms and normalization of potassium levels after stopping alcohol consumption, suggest the intriguing possibility of a alcohol-related acute inflammatory bowel disease mimicking carcinoid syndrome.

  14. Acute Inflammatory Bowel Disease Complicating Chronic Alcoholism and Mimicking Carcinoid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Dattolo, Pietro; Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ferro, Giuseppe; Fusco, Francesca; Consalvo, Matteo; Chiodi, Leandro; Pizzarelli, Francesco; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a woman with a history of chronic alcohol abuse who was hospitalized with diarrhea, severe hypokalemia refractory to potassium infusion, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, alternations of high blood pressure with phases of hypotension, irritability and increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and cortisol. Although carcinoid syndrome was hypothesized, abdominal computed tomography and colonoscopy showed non-specific inflammatory bowel disease with severe colic wall thickening, and multiple colic biopsies confirmed non-specific inflammation with no evidence of carcinoid cells. During the following days diarrhea slowly decreased and the patient's condition progressively improved. One year after stopping alcohol consumption, the patient was asymptomatic and serum potassium was normal. Chronic alcohol exposure is known to have several deleterious effects on the intestinal mucosa and can favor and sustain local inflammation. Chronic alcohol intake may also be associated with high blood pressure, behavior disorders, abnormalities in blood pressure regulation with episodes of hypotension during hospitalization due to impaired baroreflex sensitivity in the context of an alcohol withdrawal syndrome, increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid as a result of malabsorption syndrome, and increased urinary cortisol as a result of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. These considerations, together with the regression of symptoms and normalization of potassium levels after stopping alcohol consumption, suggest the intriguing possibility of a alcohol-related acute inflammatory bowel disease mimicking carcinoid syndrome. PMID:22949895

  15. RAS gene mutations in acute and chronic myelocytic leukemias, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, J W; Steenvoorden, A C; Lyons, J; Anger, B; Böhlke, J U; Bos, J L; Seliger, H; Bartram, C R

    1987-01-01

    We report on investigations aimed at detecting mutated RAS genes in a variety of preleukemic disorders and leukemias of myeloid origin. DNA transfection analyses (tumorigenicity assay) and hybridization to mutation-specific oligonucleotide probes established NRAS mutations in codon 12 or 61 of 4/9 acute myelocytic leukemias (AML) and three AML lines. Leukemic cells of another AML patient showed HRAS gene activation. By using a rapid and sensitive dot-blot screening procedure based on the combination of in vitro amplification of RAS-specific sequences and oligonucleotide hybridization we additionally screened 15 myelodysplastic syndromes, 26 Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelocytic leukemias in chronic or acute phase, and 19 other chronic myeloproliferative disorders. A mutation within NRAS codon 12 could thus be demonstrated in a patient with idiopathic myelofibrosis and in another with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Moreover, mutated NRAS sequences were detected in lymphocytes, in granulocytes, as well as in monocytes/macrophages of the latter case. Images PMID:3122217

  16. RAS gene mutations in acute and chronic myelocytic leukemias, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, and myelodysplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, J.W.G.; Steenvoorden, A.C.M.; Lyons, J.; Anger, B.; Boehlke, J.U.; Bos, J.L.; Seliger, H.; Bartram, C.R.

    1987-12-01

    The authors report on investigations aimed at detecting mutated RAS genes in a variety of preleukemic disorders and leukemias of myeloid origin. DNA transfection analyses (tumorigenicity assay) and hybridization to mutation-specific oligonucleotide probes established NRAS mutations in codon 12 or 61 of 4/9 acute myelocytic leukemias (AML) and three AML lines. Leukemic cells of another AML patient showed HRAS gene activation. By using a rapid and sensitive dot-blot screening procedure based on the combination of in vitro amplification of RAS-specific sequences and oligonucleotide hybridization they additionally screened 15 myelodysplastic syndromes, 26 Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelocytic leukemias in chronic or acute phase, and 19 other chronic myeloproliferative disorders. A mutation within NRAS codon 12 could thus be demonstrated in a patient with idiopathic myelofibrosis and in another with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Moreover, mutated NRAS sequences were detected in lymphocytes, in granulocytes, as well as in monocytes/macrophages of the latter case.

  17. Acute small fiber neuropathy following Mycoplasma infection: a rare variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Makonahalli, Rohitha; Seneviratne, Janaka; Seneviratne, Udaya

    2014-06-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a well-described condition involving the peripheral nervous system. The most well-known form of this disease is acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Among the different variants of GBS described in the literature, the sensory variant is scantily recognized. There has been a recent attempt to classify the sensory variants of the GBS and bring more objectivity to this diagnostic paradigm. We report a rare sensory variant of GBS presenting with isolated small nerve fiber involvement peripherally in the limbs and associated facial nerve palsy in a patient who had clinical and serological evidence of a preceding Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. The symptoms resolved gradually with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. This case adds to the growing literature of the rare form of acute small fiber neuropathy and GBS variants.

  18. Acute hemiplegia as a rare presentation of infantile Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muthaffar, Osama Y; Mahmoud, Adel A; Al-Saman, Abdulaziz S

    2014-08-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) usually presents in a symmetrical ascending fashion of weakness. We present a 6-month-old male infant who presented to our emergency room with acute left-sided limb weakness and head lag 3 days after a febrile upper respiratory tract infection. A diagnosis of GBS was established by confirming high cerebrospinal fluid protein, motor nerve reduced amplitude, and prolonged conductions, and MRI T2 high signal intensity affecting the ventral roots of the spinal cord. He showed remarkable clinical and neurophysiological improvement after intravenous immunoglobulin and intensive physiotherapy. The occurrence of infantile acute hemiplegia as a presentation of GBS is rare. This report highlights the importance of considering GBS in the differential diagnosis so that early effective treatment may be started.

  19. All That Glitters is not Gold: Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mimicking Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanadoss, Umashankar; Kulkarni, Abhishek; Balakrishnan, Shobana; Shree, Nidhi; Harjai, Kishore; Jagasia, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is characterized by the idiopathic hypertrophy of the left ventricle (and occasionally right ventricle). HCM is an autosomal dominant disease, with variable penetration. In Asian population, apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is relatively common (25%). However, this is relatively rare in Caucasian population (0.2%). Patients with HCM, often presents with typical exertional chest pain and shortness of breath. Apical HCM patients tend to have milder symptoms. However, the clinical presentation and electrocardiographic features of Apical HCM often mimic acute coronary syndrome and high index of suspicion is warranted in differentiating this condition. Patients with apical HCM have relatively better prognosis when compare to the other varieties. Here, we are presenting a patient who presented with typical exertional chest pain whose electrocardiographic changes are concerning for acute ischemic changes.

  20. Antithrombotic therapy in acute coronary syndromes: guidelines translated for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Gharacholou, S Michael; Lopes, Renato D; Washam, Jeffrey B; Newby, L Kristin; James, Stefan K; Alexander, John H

    2010-05-01

    The use of anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy during the management of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) has been associated with improvements in short- and long-term clinical outcomes, regardless of whether patients are managed conservatively or with acute coronary revascularization. Translating the existing evidence for selection of the most appropriate antithrombotic strategy has been summarized in available guideline recommendations. Given the breadth of antithrombotic recommendations across existing U.S. and European guidelines, synthesis of these recommendations for practicing clinicians who treat patients with ACS are increasingly desired. Providing a summary of the similarities across guidelines while noting the areas where divergence exists becomes an important facet in translating optimal antithrombotic management in ACS for the treating clinician. This review highlights the important aspects of clinical practice guidelines that practicing physicians should consider when selecting antithrombotic therapies to reduce ischemic risk while minimizing hemorrhagic risk across all ACS subtypes.

  1. Estimation of dead space fraction can be simplified in the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome are characterized by a non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema responsible for a significant impairment of gas exchange. The pulmonary dead space increase, which is due primarily to an alteration in pulmonary blood flow distribution, is largely responsible for carbon dioxide retention. Previous studies, computing the pulmonary dead space by measuring the expired carbon dioxide and the Enghoff equation, found that the dead space fraction was significantly higher in the non-survivors; it was even an independent risk of death. The computation of the dead space not by measuring the expired carbon dioxide but by applying a rearranged alveolar gas equation that takes into account only the weight, age, height, and temperature of the patient could lead to widespread clinical diffusion of this measurement at the bedside. PMID:20840798

  2. Acute myeloneuropathy: An uncommon presentation of Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Lalla, Rakesh; Patil, Tushar B.; Mehta, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is associated with central and peripheral nervous system involvement. The peripheral neuropathy is usually a sensory predominant neuropathy or a cranial neuropathy. Myelopathy is usually of focal, subacute, chronic or relapsing type. Acute myeloneuropathy as the predominant manifestation has not been described in the literature. We describe a middle aged woman who presented with an acute onset motor quadriparesis and bladder dysfunction. She had dryness of eyes and mouth for 8 months. Nerve conduction studies revealed motor axonal neuropathy and magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord showed T2 hyperintensities involving entire cord. Mild perineural fibrosis, focal foamy changes in endoneurium and lymphocytic infiltration were seen in sural nerve biopsy specimen. Patient improved clinically after intravenous methylprednisolone therapy. PMID:24339613

  3. Lung Postmortem Autopsy Revealing Extramedullary Involvement in Multiple Myeloma Causing Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ravinet, Aurélie; Perbet, Sébastien; Guièze, Romain; Guérin, Renaud; Gayraud, Guillaume; Aliane, Jugurtha; Tremblay, Aymeric; Pascal, Julien; Ledoux, Albane; Chaleteix, Carine; Dechelotte, Pierre; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Constantin, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement with multiple myeloma is rare. We report the case of a 61-year-old man with past medical history of chronic respiratory failure with emphysema, and a known multiple myeloma (Durie and Salmon stage III B and t(4;14) translocation). Six months after diagnosis and first line of treatment, he presented acute dyspnea with interstitial lung disease. Computed tomography showed severe bullous emphysema and diffuse, patchy, multifocal infiltrations bilaterally with nodular character, small bilateral pleural effusions, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and a known lytic lesion of the 12th vertebra. He was treated with piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, oseltamivir, and methylprednisolone. Finally, outcome was unfavourable. Postmortem analysis revealed diffuse and nodular infracentimetric infiltration of the lung parenchyma by neoplastic plasma cells. Physicians should be aware that acute respiratory distress syndrome not responding to treatment of common causes could be a manifestation of the disease, even with negative BAL or biopsy and could be promptly treated with salvage therapy. PMID:25165587

  4. Viral Infection in the Development and Progression of Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nye, Steven; Whitley, Richard J.; Kong, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections are an important cause of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Numerous viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A (H1N1) virus, have been implicated in the progression of pneumonia to ARDS; yet the incidence of progression is unknown. Despite acute and chronic morbidity associated with respiratory viral infections, particularly in “at risk” populations, treatment options are limited. Thus, with few exceptions, care is symptomatic. In addition, mortality rates for viral-related ARDS have yet to be determined. This review outlines what is known about ARDS secondary to viral infections including the epidemiology, the pathophysiology, and diagnosis. In addition, emerging treatment options to prevent infection, and to decrease disease burden will be outlined. We focused on RSV and influenza A (H1N1) viral-induced ARDS, as these are the most common viruses leading to pediatric ARDS, and have specific prophylactic and definitive treatment options. PMID:27933286

  5. Reduced Tic Symptomatology in Tourette Syndrome After an Acute Bout of Exercise: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Elena; Glazebrook, Cris; Hollis, Chris; Jackson, Georgina M

    2014-03-01

    In light of descriptive accounts of attenuating effects of physical activity on tics, we used an experimental design to assess the impact of an acute bout of aerobic exercise on tic expression in young people (N = 18) with Tourette Syndrome (TS). We compared video-based tic frequency estimates obtained during an exercise session with tic rates obtained during pre-exercise (baseline) and post-exercise interview-based sessions. Results showed significantly reduced tic rates during the exercise session compared with baseline, suggesting that acute exercise has an attenuating effect on tics. Tic rates also remained reduced relative to baseline during the post-exercise session, likely reflecting a sustained effect of exercise on tic reduction. Parallel to the observed tic attenuation, exercise also had a beneficial impact on self-reported anxiety and mood levels. The present findings provide novel empirical evidence for the beneficial effect of exercise on TS symptomatology bearing important research and clinical implications.

  6. Clinical review: Acute respiratory distress syndrome - clinical ventilator management and adjunct therapy.

    PubMed

    Silversides, Jonathan A; Ferguson, Niall D

    2013-04-29

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially devastating form of acute inflammatory lung injury with a high short-term mortality rate and significant long-term consequences among survivors. Supportive care, principally with mechanical ventilation, remains the cornerstone of therapy - although the goals of this support have changed in recent years - from maintaining normal physiological parameters to avoiding ventilator-induced lung injury while providing adequate gas exchange. In this article we discuss the current evidence base for ventilatory support and adjunctive therapies in patients with ARDS. Key components of such a strategy include avoiding lung overdistension by limiting tidal volumes and airway pressures, and the use of positive end-expiratory pressure with or without lung recruitment manoeuvres in patients with severe ARDS. Adjunctive therapies discussed include pharmacologic techniques (for example, vasodilators, diuretics, neuromuscular blockade) and nonpharmacologic techniques (for example, prone position, alternative modes of ventilation).

  7. Acute abdomen due to torsion of the wandering spleen in a patient with Marfan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leci-Tahiri, Laura; Tahiri, Afrim; Bajrami, Rifat; Maxhuni, Mehmet

    2013-08-05

    Wandering spleen is a very rare defect characterized by the absence or weakness of one or more of the ligaments that hold the spleen in its normal position in the upper left abdomen. Patient symptomatology is variable and ranges from mere feeling of an abdominal lump to sudden abdominal pain due to infarction. Patients may have subacute to chronic abdominal or gastrointestinal complaints. Because of nonspecific symptoms, clinical diagnosis can be difficult; hence, imaging plays an important role. A major complication is splenic torsion, which is the cause of acute abdomen. We present a case of acute abdominal pain due to torsion of wandering spleen in a patient with Marfan Syndrome, valvular heart disease, and vertebral anomalies. Preoperative diagnosis was made on the basis of ultrasonography and computed tomography, which was later confirmed on surgery, and treated successfully.

  8. Viral Infection in the Development and Progression of Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nye, Steven; Whitley, Richard J; Kong, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections are an important cause of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Numerous viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A (H1N1) virus, have been implicated in the progression of pneumonia to ARDS; yet the incidence of progression is unknown. Despite acute and chronic morbidity associated with respiratory viral infections, particularly in "at risk" populations, treatment options are limited. Thus, with few exceptions, care is symptomatic. In addition, mortality rates for viral-related ARDS have yet to be determined. This review outlines what is known about ARDS secondary to viral infections including the epidemiology, the pathophysiology, and diagnosis. In addition, emerging treatment options to prevent infection, and to decrease disease burden will be outlined. We focused on RSV and influenza A (H1N1) viral-induced ARDS, as these are the most common viruses leading to pediatric ARDS, and have specific prophylactic and definitive treatment options.

  9. Acute myeloneuropathy: An uncommon presentation of Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Lalla, Rakesh; Patil, Tushar B; Mehta, Vinod

    2013-10-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is associated with central and peripheral nervous system involvement. The peripheral neuropathy is usually a sensory predominant neuropathy or a cranial neuropathy. Myelopathy is usually of focal, subacute, chronic or relapsing type. Acute myeloneuropathy as the predominant manifestation has not been described in the literature. We describe a middle aged woman who presented with an acute onset motor quadriparesis and bladder dysfunction. She had dryness of eyes and mouth for 8 months. Nerve conduction studies revealed motor axonal neuropathy and magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord showed T2 hyperintensities involving entire cord. Mild perineural fibrosis, focal foamy changes in endoneurium and lymphocytic infiltration were seen in sural nerve biopsy specimen. Patient improved clinically after intravenous methylprednisolone therapy.

  10. Chronic kidney disease and worsening renal function in acute heart failure: different phenotypes with similar prognostic impact?

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; Lombardi, Carlo; Ruocco, Gaetano; Padeletti, Margherita; Nuti, Ranuccio; Metra, Marco; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Nearly a third of patients with acute heart failure experience concomitant renal dysfunction. This condition is often associated with increased costs of care, length of hospitalisation and high mortality. Although the clinical impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been well established, the exact clinical significance of worsening renal function (WRF) during the acute and post-hospitalisation phases is not completely understood. Therefore, it is still unclear which of the common laboratory markers are able to identify WRF at an early stage. Recent studies comparing CKD with WRF showed contradictory results; this could depend on a different WRF definition, clinical characteristics, haemodynamic disorders and the presence of prior renal dysfunction in the population enrolled. The current definition of acute cardiorenal syndrome focuses on both the heart and kidney but it lacks precise laboratory marker cut-offs and a specific diagnostic approach. WRF and CKD could represent different pathophysiological mechanisms in the setting of acute heart failure; the traditional view includes reduced cardiac output with systemic and renal vasoconstriction. Nevertheless, it has become a mixed model that encompasses both forward and backward haemodynamic dysfunction. Increased central venous pressure, renal congestion with tubular obliteration, tubulo-glomerular feedback and increased abdominal pressure are all potential additional contributors. The impact of WRF on patients who experience preserved renal function and individuals affected with CKD is currently unknown. Therefore it is extremely important to understand the origins, the clinical significance and the prognostic impact of WRF on CKD.

  11. Public Health Lessons from Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome a Decade Later

    PubMed Central

    Butler-Jones, David; Tsang, Thomas; Yu, Wang

    2013-01-01

    The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in 2002–2003 exacted considerable human and economic costs from countries involved. It also exposed major weaknesses in several of these countries in coping with an outbreak of a newly emerged infectious disease. In the 10 years since the outbreak, in addition to the increase in knowledge of the biology and epidemiology of this disease, a major lesson learned is the value of having a national public health institute that is prepared to control disease outbreaks and designed to coordinate a national response and assist localities in their responses. PMID:23739634

  12. Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia with Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Corticosteroid Monotherapy Led to Successful Ventilator Weaning

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mari; Murata, Kengo; Kiriu, Takahiro; Kouzai, Yasuji; Takamori, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    A 62-year-old man with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) presented to our hospital with a high fever. Although treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics was initiated, his respiratory status worsened to the point that he required mechanical ventilation. However, he was successfully treated with a corticosteroid without immunosuppression. Sequential transbronchial lung biopsies revealed abundant fibrin exudate in the alveolar spaces, which was subsequently replaced by fibroblasts, showing that acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) gradually changes into organizing pneumonia. Our case demonstrated both the efficacy of corticosteroid-monotherapy and the histological course of AFOP. PMID:27803411

  13. Descriptive review of geographic mapping of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Boulos, Maged N Kamel

    2004-01-28

    From geographic mapping at different scales to location-based alerting services, geoinformatics plays an important role in the study and control of global outbreaks like severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This paper reviews several geographic mapping efforts of SARS on the Internet that employ a variety of techniques like choropleth rendering, graduated circles, graduated pie charts, buffering, overlay analysis and animation. The aim of these mapping services is to educate the public (especially travellers to potentially at-risk areas) and assist public health authorities in analysing the spatial and temporal trends and patterns of SARS and in assessing/revising current control measures.

  14. The pragmatics of feeding the pediatric patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verger, Judy T; Bradshaw, Darla J; Henry, Elizabeth; Roberts, Kathryn E

    2004-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represents the ultimate pulmonary response to a wide range of injuries, from septicemia to trauma. Optimal nutrition is vital to enhancing oxygen delivery, supporting adequate cardiac contractility and respiratory musculature, eliminating fluid and electrolyte imbalances, and supporting the proinflammatory response. Research is providing a better understanding of nutrients that specifically address the complex physiologic changes in ARDS. This article highlights the pathophysiology of ARDS as it relates to nutrition, relevant nutritional assessment, and important enteral and parenteral considerations for the pediatric patient who has ARDS.

  15. Copeptin in acute coronary syndromes and heart failure management: State of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Schurtz, Guillaume; Lamblin, Nicolas; Bauters, Christophe; Goldstein, Patrick; Lemesle, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the use of multiple biomarkers has changed cardiovascular disease management. Recently, several trials have assessed the diagnostic and prognostic performances of copeptin, especially in patients with heart failure or acute coronary syndromes. Primary results are interesting, with copeptin looking promising for: the management of patients who present at emergency departments early after chest pain onset and the risk stratification of patients with heart failure. The purpose of this article is to review the data on the place of copeptin in the management of patients with chest pain or heart failure.

  16. Hydrogen therapy may be an effective and specific novel treatment for acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Cui, Jianguo; Sun, Quan; Cai, Jianming

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen is the most abundant chemical element in the universe, however, it is seldom regarded as a therapeutic gas. Recent studies show that inhaled hydrogen gas (H(2)) has antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities that protect the brain against ischemia-reperfusion injury and stroke by selectively reducing hydroxyl and peroxynitrite radicals. It is also well known that more than a half of the ionizing radiation-induced cellular damage is caused by hydroxyl radicals. Studies have show that reducing hydroxyl radicals can significantly improve the protection of cells from radiation damage. In like manner, we hypothesize that hydrogen therapy may be an effective, specific and unique treatment for acute radiation syndrome.

  17. Acute Paraspinal Compartment Syndrome as a Rare Cause of Loin Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tang, V; Baker, A; Blades, R

    2015-01-01

    A significant proportion of emergency urological admissions are comprised of ureteric colic presenting as loin pain. A variety of alternative pathologies present in this manner and should be considered during systematic assessment. We report the case of a patient admitted with severe unilateral back and flank pain after strenuous deadlift exercise. Clinical examination and subsequent investigation following a significant delay demonstrated acute paraspinal compartment syndrome (PCS) after an initial misdiagnosis of ureteric colic. The patient was managed conservatively. We review the current literature surrounding the rare diagnosis of PCS and discuss the management options. PMID:25723672

  18. The modification of serum lipids after acute coronary syndrome and importance in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Balci, Bahattin

    2011-11-01

    Atherosclerosis is a pathology characterized by low-grade vascular inflammation rather than a mere accumulation of lipids. Inflammation is central at all stages of atherosclerosis. Acute coronary syndrome significantly affects the concentration and composition of the lipids and lipoproteins in plasma. Plasma triglyceride and very low density lipoprotein levels increase, while high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein and total cholesterol levels decrease. Early treatment of hyperlipidemia provides potential benefits. However, post-event changes in lipid and lipoproteins lead to delays in the choice of the treatment. This review focuses on the mechanism and the clinical importance of the relevant changes.

  19. Acute labio-scrotal pain in a patient with ovotesticular syndrome. Case report.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Nicolás; Rodriguez, Santiago; Perez, Jaime

    2013-06-01

    Ovotesticular syndrome (OTS) belongs to the group of disorders of sex development (DSD). We present a case of a patient with OTS presenting with acute labioscrotal pain. A surgical exploration was indicated, and hemorrhage was identified. A gonadectomy was performed and the final pathology report revealed an ovotestis with a bleeding follicle, normal ovarian parenchyma and atrophic testicular parenchyma. After reviewing the literature there is scarce information on this complex topic, but conservative management could be an option if the risk of a gonadal malignancy is low.

  20. Indications, algorithms, and outcomes for coronary artery bypass surgery in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Yerokun, Babatunde A.; Williams, Judson B.; Gaca, Jeffrey; Smith, Peter K.; Roe, Matthew T.

    2016-01-01

    For patients with a non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS), guideline recommendations and treatment pathways focus on revascularization for definitive treatment if the patient is an appropriate candidate. Despite the widespread use of revascularization for NSTE-ACS, most patients undergo a percutaneous coronary intervention, whereas a minority of patients undergo coronary artery bypass grafting. Focusing specifically on the USA, the contemporary utilization, preoperative and perioperative considerations, and outcomes of NSTE-ACS patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting have not been comprehensively reviewed. PMID:26945187

  1. Pneumothorax in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: pathophysiology, detection, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Woodside, Kenneth J; vanSonnenberg, Eric; Chon, Kenneth S; Loran, David B; Tocino, Irena M; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2003-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a frequent and potentially fatal complication of mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Prompt recognition and treatment of pneumothoraces is necessary to minimize morbidity and mortality. The radiologic and clinical signs of pneumothoraces in ARDS patients may have unusual and subtle features. Furthermore, small pneumothoraces in these patients can cause severe hemodynamic or pulmonary compromise. Sparse clinical literature exists on when or how to treat pneumothoraces once they develop in patients with ARDS. In this article, the authors review the pathogenesis, radiologic signs, clinical significance, and treatment of pneumothoraces in ARDS patients. Treatment options include traditional tube thoracostomy, open thoracotomy, and image-guided percutaneous catheters.

  2. Descriptive review of geographic mapping of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Boulos, Maged N Kamel

    2004-01-01

    From geographic mapping at different scales to location-based alerting services, geoinformatics plays an important role in the study and control of global outbreaks like severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This paper reviews several geographic mapping efforts of SARS on the Internet that employ a variety of techniques like choropleth rendering, graduated circles, graduated pie charts, buffering, overlay analysis and animation. The aim of these mapping services is to educate the public (especially travellers to potentially at-risk areas) and assist public health authorities in analysing the spatial and temporal trends and patterns of SARS and in assessing/revising current control measures. PMID:14748926

  3. [Myocardial infarction and acute coronary syndrome: definitions, classification, and diagnostic criteria].

    PubMed

    Zaĭrat'iants, O V; Mishnev, O D; Kakturskiĭ, L V

    2014-01-01

    The review gives the definitions and classification of and diagnostic criteria for myocardial infarction and acute coronary syndrome in accordance with the "The third universal definition of myocardial infarction" adopted in 2012 (Joint ESC/ACCF/AHA/WHF Task Force for the Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction, 2012). It also discusses the clinical and morphological comparisons of and the problems in the differential diagnosis of myocardial infarction as a nosological entity within coronary heart disease with other coronarogenic and non-coronarogenic necroses of the myocardium.

  4. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Role of Oleic Acid-Triggered Lung Injury and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; Burth, Patrícia; Castro-Faria, Mauro Velho; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire

    2015-01-01

    Lung injury especially acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be triggered by diverse stimuli, including fatty acids and microbes. ARDS affects thousands of people worldwide each year, presenting high mortality rate and having an economic impact. One of the hallmarks of lung injury is edema formation with alveoli flooding. Animal models are used to study lung injury. Oleic acid-induced lung injury is a widely used model resembling the human disease. The oleic acid has been linked to metabolic and inflammatory diseases; here we focus on lung injury. Firstly, we briefly discuss ARDS and secondly we address the mechanisms by which oleic acid triggers lung injury and inflammation. PMID:26640323

  5. Acute foot drop syndrome mimicking peroneal nerve injury: an atypical presentation of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ricarte, Irapuá Ferreira; Figueiredo, Marcelo Marinho de; Fukuda, Thiago Gonçalves; Pedroso, José Luiz; Silva, Gisele Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Foot drop syndrome is a frequent neurologic condition usually caused by peroneal nerve damage. On rare occasions, foot drop may present as the single neurologic manifestation of intracranial lesions. We presented a 43-year-old man admitted to our hospital with acute weakness in the dorsiflexion of his right foot that appeared 3 days before admission. Brain magnetic resonance imaging diffusion-weighted sequence revealed a small area of restricted diffusion in the left frontal cortex. Three months later, his motor deficit had completely improved (modified Rankin scale score = 0). To our knowledge, this is the second report of sudden isolated foot drop caused by a cortical infarction.

  6. [Preventive and cessation therapy of mental disorders in patients with the acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, V E; Epifanov, A V; Zverev, K V

    2012-01-01

    An open prospective trial of 93 inpatients divided into two main groups (61 patients) - with mental disorders (31) and without mental disorders (30) and a comparison group (32 patients) was carried out. All patients survived the acute coronary syndrome (myocardial infarction, unstable angina). The efficacy and safety of both preventive and cessation therapy with pantogam active in mean doses 1.8 and 1.2 g /daily, respectively, was demonstrated in respect of heterogeneous depressive, anxiety and somatoform disorders of the neurotic level.

  7. [Major intestinal resections and short-bowel syndrome in patients with the acute mesenterial thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Khripun, A I; Shurygin, S N; Priamikov, A D; Mironkov, A B; Urvantseva, O M; Movsesiants, M Iu; Izvekov, A A; Abashin, M V

    2012-01-01

    The study represents the retrospective analysis of major intestinal resections (the length of the left in olace bowel less then 200 sm) and non-major resections in 52 patients operated on the acute mesenterial thrombosis. Major bowel resection was performed in 30 patients (57.7%). 66.7% of those patients (20 of 30) died soon after the operation. Whereas lethality rate among patients with non-major resections was 54.5% (12 of 22). All 10 survived patients demonstrated the short-bowel syndrome during the follow-up period (the median follow-up time was 25 months).

  8. Bradycardia following retinoic acid differentiation syndrome in a patient with acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Andrew; Hurst, Erin; Lord, Stephen; Jones, Gail

    2012-07-09

    The authors describe a 28-year-old woman with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), who developed junctional bradycardia after receiving the molecular-targeted therapy all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and the anthracycline-based chemotherapeutic agent idarubicin following sepsis and the APL differentiation syndrome. The patient was asymptomatic of the bradycardia. Electrolytes and cardiac imaging were unremarkable. No other cases have been reported in this context and the mechanisms of the sinus node dysfunction are unclear. The patient achieved normal sinus rhythm after ATRA was withheld. The patient recovered and went on to achieve complete remission after re-starting ATRA and idarubicin.

  9. Recurrent differentiation syndrome or septic shock? Unresolved dilemma in a patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jeddi, Ramzi; Ghédira, Hela; Amor, Ramzi Ben; Menif, Samia; Belhadjali, Zaher; Meddeb, Balkis

    2011-03-01

    Differentiation syndrome (DS) is a life-threatening complication observed in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) receiving induction therapy with all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA). A bimodal incidence of DS has been observed, with a majority of cases occurring during the first week of ATRA treatment ("early" DS), but a substantial number of cases occurring during the third or even fourth week of ATRA treatment ("late" DS). However, to our knowledge occurrence of both early and late DS in the same patient has not been reported. We report an APL patient treated with the AIDA regimen, who experienced both early and late DS, a situation where differential diagnosis was difficult.

  10. Managing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) intellectual property rights: the possible role of patent pooling.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, James H. M.; Claassen, Eric; Correa, Carmen E.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2005-01-01

    Patent applications that incorporate the genomic sequence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus, have been filed by a number of organizations. This is likely to result in a fragmentation of intellectual property (IP) rights which in turn may adversely affect the development of products, such as vaccines, to combat SARS. Placing these patent rights into a patent pool to be licensed on a non-exclusive basis may circumvent these difficulties and set a key precedent for the use of this form of mechanism in other areas of health care, leading to benefits to public health. PMID:16211163

  11. Sympathomimetic syndrome, choreoathetosis, and acute kidney injury following "bath salts" injection.

    PubMed

    Sutamtewagul, Grerk; Sood, Vineeta; Nugent, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    "Bath salts" is a well known street drug which can cause several cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric symptoms. However, only one case of acute kidney injury has been reported in the literature. We present a case with sympathomimetic syndrome, choreoathetosis, gustatory and olfactory hallucinations, and acute kidney injury following the use of bath salts. A 37-year-old man with past medical history of hypertension and depression was brought to the emergency center with body shaking. Three days before admission he injected 3 doses of bath salts intravenously and felt eye pain with blurry vision followed by a metallic taste, strange smells, profuse sweating, and body shaking. At presentation he had a sympathomimetic syndrome including high blood pressure, tachycardia, tachypnea, and hyperhydrosis with choreoathetotic movements. Laboratory testing revealed leukocytosis and acute kidney injury with a BUN of 95 mg/ dL and a creatinine of 15.2 mg/dL. Creatine kinase was 4,457 IU/dL. Urine drug screen is negative for amphetamine, cannabinoids, and cocaine; blood alcohol level was zero. During his ICU stay he became disoriented and agitated. Supportive treatment with 7.2 liters of intravenous fluid over 3 days, haloperidol, and lorazepam gradually improved his symptoms and his renal failure. Bath salts contain 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone, a psychoactive norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor. Choreoathetosis in this patient could be explained through dopaminergic effect of bath salts or uremic encephalopathy. The mechanism for acute kidney injury from bath salts may involve direct drug effects though norepinephrine and dopamine-induced vasoconstriction (renal ischemia), rhabdomyolysis, hyperthermia, and/or volume contraction.

  12. Acute adrenal failure as the presenting feature of primary antiphospholipid syndrome in a child

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterized by recurrent arterial and venous thrombosis and detection of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs). This syndrome may be associated with connective tissue disorders, or with malignancies, but it may also appear in isolated form (primary APS). We report on a pediatric patient presenting with acute adrenal failure as the first manifestation of primary APS. Case report A previously healthy 11-year-old boy developed fever, abdominal pain, and vomiting. An abdominal computed tomography scan showed nodular lesions in the adrenal glands. He was referred to our Department and a diagnosis of APS and acute adrenal failure was considered, based on positive aPLs (IgG and IgM), elevated ACTH levels and low cortisol levels. Other features were anemia, thrombocytopenia, elevated inflammatory parameters, hypergammaglobulinemia, prolonged partial thromboplastin time, positive antinuclear, anticardiolipin, anti-platelet antibodies, with negative double-stranded DNA antibodies. Lupus anticoagulant and Coomb’s tests were positive. MRI revealed a bilateral adrenal hemorrhage. A treatment with intravenous metylprednisolone, followed by oral prednisone and anticoagulant, was started, resulting in a progressive improvement. After 2 months he also showed hyponatremia and elevated renine levels, indicating a mineralcocorticoid deficiency, requiring fludrocortisones therapy. Conclusion The development of acute adrenal failure from bilateral adrenal haemorrhage in the context of APS is a rare but life-threatening event that should be promptly recognized and treated. Moreover, this case emphasizes the importance of the assessment of aPLs in patients with acute adrenal failure in the context of an autoreaction. PMID:22995124

  13. Modeling the Early Events of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Yu-Ting; Liao, Fang; Hsiao, Cheng-Hsiang; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Yee-Chun; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A.

    2006-01-01

    The clinical picture of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is characterized by pulmonary inflammation and respiratory failure, resembling that of acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, the events that lead to the recruitment of leukocytes are poorly understood. To study the cellular response in the acute phase of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-host cell interaction, we investigated the induction of chemokines, adhesion molecules, and DC-SIGN (dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin) by SARS-CoV. Immunohistochemistry revealed neutrophil, macrophage, and CD8 T-cell infiltration in the lung autopsy of a SARS patient who died during the acute phase of illness. Additionally, pneumocytes and macrophages in the patient's lung expressed P-selectin and DC-SIGN. In in vitro study, we showed that the A549 and THP-1 cell lines were susceptible to SARS-CoV. A549 cells produced CCL2/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and CXCL8/interleukin-8 (IL-8) after interaction with SARS-CoV and expressed P-selectin and VCAM-1. Moreover, SARS-CoV induced THP-1 cells to express CCL2/MCP-1, CXCL8/IL-8, CCL3/MIP-1α, CXCL10/IP-10, CCL4/MIP-1β, and CCL5/RANTES, which attracted neutrophils, monocytes, and activated T cells in a chemotaxis assay. We also demonstrated that DC-SIGN was inducible in THP-1 as well as A549 cells after SARS-CoV infection. Our in vitro experiments modeling infection in humans together with the study of a lung biopsy of a patient who died during the early phase of infection demonstrated that SARS-CoV, through a dynamic interaction with lung epithelial cells and monocytic cells, creates an environment conducive for immune cell migration and accumulation that eventually leads to lung injury. PMID:16501078

  14. Complementary, alternative, and putative nontroponin biomarkers of acute coronary syndrome: new resources for future risk assessment calculators.

    PubMed

    Millard, Ronald W; Tranter, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Biomarkers, other than cardiac troponin, with potential sensitivity and selectivity that provide diagnostic and prognostic insights into the tissue-specific injury processes underlying acute coronary syndrome and their possible use in risk stratification algorithms are discussed. Such biomarkers may be useful as complementary or alternative to cardiac troponin (I or T) assays in early diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome, as well as for monitoring acute coronary syndrome progression and prognosis assessment. The information included in this article is based on a critical analysis of selected published biomedical literature accessible through the United States National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE-PubMed and Scopus search engines. The majority of articles cited in this review and perspective, except for a few historical publications as background, were published between January 2000 and December 2013.

  15. Non-Necrotizing Streptococcal Cellulitis as a Cause of Acute, Atraumatic Compartment Syndrome of the Foot: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Toney, James; Donovan, Stephanie; Adelman, Vanessa; Adelman, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is widely accepted as a surgical emergency. Most cases of acute compartment syndrome occur after high-energy trauma, especially crush injuries. We present a unique case of acute, atraumatic compartment syndrome of the foot associated with infectious cellulitis. A 53-year-old male, with a medical history significant for human immunodeficiency virus, presented to the emergency department secondary to an insidious onset of intense foot pain, swelling, and an inability to bear weight on the affected extremity. He had no history of recent trauma. He was admitted to the hospital because of a suspected infection and subsequently was given intravenous antibiotics. During the admission, he developed a severe infection, and blood cultures demonstrated growth of group A streptococcus. No abscess or hematoma was identified on magnetic resonance imaging or during exploratory surgery. The findings from intraoperative cultures were negative. Despite proper medical care for his infection, the lower extremity pain worsened; therefore, compartmental pressures were obtained at the bedside. Multiple compartment pressures were measured and were >40 mm Hg. Compartment syndrome was diagnosed, and the patient was taken to the operating room for emergent fasciotomies. Surgical release of the medial, lateral, interosseous, and adductor compartments revealed copious amounts of serosanguinous drainage. Again, no definitive hematoma or purulence was identified. The patient's symptoms resolved after the fasciotomies, and he healed uneventfully. Our case highlights the need to consider acute compartment syndrome in the differential diagnosis for pain out of proportion to the clinical situation, even when a traditional etiology is absent.

  16. Effectiveness of Personal Protective Equipment and Isolation Precautions in Protecting Healthcare Workers from Acquiring Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    SARS outbreak revealed that inapparent infection with SARS was uncommon. 34-37 6 In response to this new disease, SARS infection control guidelines were... pneumonia , 12 March 2003. Available at: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/ news /releases/2003/pr22/en/. Accessed June 15, 2005. 3. World Health Organization...is another area deserving of attention. 2 INTRODUCTION The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged as a new syndrome due to a novel human

  17. Venlafaxine-associated serotonin syndrome causing severe rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in a patient with idiopathic Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Abeynaike, Lakshan; Wickramarathne, Thanushi

    2010-10-01

    A 43-year-old male patient with idiopathic Parkinson disease, on dopaminergic therapy, was admitted with confusion and agitation, diaphoresis, and hyperkinesia after the commencement of the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine 2 weeks prior for depression. He was found to have severe rhabdomyolysis and developed acute renal failure. The most likely diagnosis was serotonin syndrome induced by venlafaxine, although neuroleptic malignant syndrome was also considered. The differential diagnosis, atypical features in this presentation, and possible mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia after treatment with temozolomide in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue Jung; Park, Tae Sung; Lee, Seung Tae; Song, Jaewoo; Suh, Borum; Kim, Se Hoon; Jang, Seon Jung; Lee, Chang Hoon; Choi, Jong Rak

    2009-01-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia after treatment with temozolomide have rarely been described in the literature. Only 10 cases in association with temozolomide have been documented. The cases included anaplastic astrocytoma (4 cases), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (2 cases), low grade astrocytoma (2 cases), low grade oligodendroglioma (1 case), and one case of secondary Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. Here we report a novel case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia associated with der(1;7)(q10;p10) in a glioblastoma multiforme patient treated with temozolomide. Results of bone marrow morphology, chromosome, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, as well as the clinical history, strongly suggest a treatment-related etiology in our case. In past reports, karyotypes in cases of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia mostly demonstrated abnormalities in chromosomes 5 and 7. However, we report a case of temozolomide-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with der(1;7)(q10;p10), possibly the first reported case, to the authors' knowledge.

  19. Pregnancy-related acute aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine; Gros, Bernard

    2017-04-02

    A well-established association exists between acute aortic dissection and pregnancy, particularly in women with Marfan syndrome. However, there is debate regarding appropriate management guidelines. In particular, there are differing opinions regarding when prophylactic aortic root repair should be recommended as well as the efficacy of beta blockers in this clinical scenario. The current study evaluated 10 years of published literature (2005-2015) in the PubMed/Medline database. Fifty articles, describing 72 cases of women who presented with aortic dissection in the antepartum or postpartum period were identified. Comparisons on demographic variables and clinical outcomes between cases of women with Marfan syndrome (n = 36) and without Marfan syndrome (n = 36) were conducted. There were no significant differences in demographics (age, gravidity, parity) between the Marfan and non-Marfan cases. Marfan patients presented with antepartum dissections significantly earlier in pregnancy than those without Marfan syndrome (P = .002). However, there were no significant difference between the 2 groups in maternal mortality, fetal mortality, or obstetric outcomes (mode of delivery and gestational age at delivery). Eight cases described events in Marfan women with an aortic root diameter ≤40 mm. Six events occurred in Marfan women who were managed with beta blockers. Current guidelines rely on aortic root diameter for stratification of Marfan women into risk categories, but we identified several cases that would be missed by these guidelines. Specifically, the existing literature suggest that women with Marfan syndrome should take precautions throughout pregnancy, rather than the third trimester.

  20. A case of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome, which presented an acute interstitial pneumonia-like image on chest CT scan.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohiro; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Susaki, Kentaro; Danjo, Junichi; Nakashima, Shusaku; Shimada, Hiromi; Izumikawa, Miharu; Takeuchi, Yohei; Mitsunaka, Hiroki; Bandoh, Shuji; Imataki, Osamu; Nose, Masato; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) complicated with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). A female patient was diagnosed with acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) with MCTD by chest CT scan. Corticosteroid therapy was refractory for lung involvement, and she died due to acute respiratory failure. The autopsy revealed that AIP was compatible with lung involvement of CAPS. We therefore suggest that chest CT might reveal AIP-like findings in CAPS patients whose condition is complicated with pulmonary manifestations.