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Sample records for acute care physicians

  1. [Collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians in emergency care at acute hospitals provided by generalists].

    PubMed

    Imura, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    A role of acute hospitals providing emergency care is becoming important more and more in regional comprehensive care system led by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Given few number of emergent care specialists in Japan, generalists specializing in both general internal medicine and family practice need to take part in the emergency care. In the way collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians is a key role in improving the quality of emergency care at acute hospitals. A pattern of collaborating function by generalists taking part in emergency care is categorized into four types. PMID:26915241

  2. Frequency of nurse-physician collaborative behaviors in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Nair, Dawn Marie; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; McNulty, Rita; Click, Elizabeth R; Glembocki, Margaret M

    2012-03-01

    A new culture bolstering collaborative behavior among nurses and physicians is needed to merge the unique strengths of both professions into opportunities to improve patient outcomes. To meet this challenge it is fundamental to comprehend the current uses of collaborative behaviors among nurses and physicians. The purpose of this descriptive study was to delineate frequently used from infrequently used collaborative behaviors of nurses and physicians in order to generate data to support specific interventions for improving collaborative behavior. The setting was an acute care hospital, and participants included 114 registered nurses and 33 physicians with active privileges. The Nurse-Physician Collaboration Scale was used to measure the frequency of use of nurse-physician collaborative behaviors self-reported by nurses and physicians. The background variables of gender, age, education, ethnicity, years of experience, years practiced at the current acute care hospital, practice setting and professional certification were accessed. In addition to analyzing the frequency of collaborative behaviors, this study compares levels of collaborative behavior reported by nurses and physicians. PMID:22145999

  3. Characteristics and expectations of fluid bolus therapy: a bi-national survey of acute care physicians.

    PubMed

    Glassford, N J; Jones, S L; Martensson, J; Eastwoods, G M; Bailey, M; Cross, A M; Taylor, D McD; Bellomo, R

    2015-11-01

    There is little consensus on the definition or optimal constituents of fluid bolus therapy (FBT), and there is uncertainty regarding its physiological effects. The aims of this study were to determine clinician-reported definitions of FBT and to explore the physiological responses clinicians expect from such FBT. In June and October 2014, intensive care and emergency physicians in Australia and New Zealand were asked to participate in an electronic questionnaire of the reported practice and expectations of FBT. Two hundred and fifty-one questionnaires were completed, 65.3% from intensivists. We identified the prototypical FBT given by intensivists is more than 250 ml of compound sodium lactate, saline or 4% albumin given in less than 30 minutes, while that given by emergency department physicians is a similar volume of saline delivered over a similar time frame. Intensive care and emergency physicians expected significantly different changes in mean arterial pressure (P=0.001) and heart rate (P=0.033) following FBT. Substantial variation was demonstrated in the magnitude of expected response within both specialties for each variable. Major variations exist in self-reported FBT practice, both within and between acute specialties, and wide variation can be demonstrated in the expected physiological responses to FBT. International explorations of practice and prospective quantification of the actual physiological response to FBT are warranted. PMID:26603800

  4. Is a good death possible in Australian critical and acute settings?: physician experiences with end-of-life care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Australia approximately 70% of all deaths are institutionalised but over 15% of deaths occur in intensive care settings where the ability to provide a “good death” is particularly inhibited. Yet, there is a growing trend for death and dying to be managed in the ICU and physicians are increasingly challenged to meet the new expectations of their specialty. This study examined the unexplored interface between specialised Australian palliative and intensive care and the factors influencing a physician’s ability to manage deaths well. Method A qualitative investigation was focused on palliative and critical/acute settings. A thematic analysis was conducted on semi-structured in-depth interviews with 13 specialist physicians. Attention was given to eliciting meanings and experiences in Australian end-of-life care. Results Physicians negotiated multiple influences when managing dying patients and their families in the ICU. The way they understood and experienced end-of-life care practices was affected by cultural, institutional and professional considerations, and personal values and beliefs. Interpersonal and intrapsychic aspects highlighted the emotional and psychological relationship physicians have with patients and others. Many physicians were also unaware of what their cross-disciplinary colleagues could or could not do; poor professional recognition and collaboration, and ineffective care goal transition impaired their ability to assist good deaths. Experience was subject to the efficacy of physicians in negotiating complex bedside dynamics. Conclusions Regardless of specialty, all physicians identified the problematic nature of providing expert palliation in critical and acute settings. Strategies for integrating specialised palliative and intensive care were offered with corresponding directions for future research and clinical development. PMID:25147481

  5. A clinical training unit for diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections: an intervention for primary health care physicians in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Bojalil, R.; Guiscafré, H.; Espinosa, P.; Viniegra, L.; Martínez, H.; Palafox, M.; Gutiérrez, G.

    1999-01-01

    In Tlaxcala State, Mexico, we determined that 80% of children who died from diarrhoea or acute respiratory infections (ARI) received medical care before death; in more than 70% of the cases this care was provided by a private physician. Several strategies have been developed to improve physicians' primary health care practices but private practitioners have only rarely been included. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of in-service training on the case management of diarrhoea and ARI among under-5-year-olds provided by private and public primary physicians. The training consisted of a five-day course of in-service practice during which physicians diagnosed and treated sick children attending a centre and conducted clinical discussions of cases under guidance. Each training course was limited to six physicians. Clinical performance was evaluated by observation before and after the courses. The evaluation of diarrhoea case management covered assessment of dehydration, hydration therapy, prescription of antimicrobial and other drugs, advice on diet, and counselling for mothers; that of ARI case management covered diagnosis, decisions on antimicrobial therapy, use of symptomatic drugs, and counselling for mothers. In general the performance of public physicians both before and after the intervention was better than that of private doctors. Most aspects of the case management of children with diarrhoea improved among both groups of physicians after the course; the proportion of private physicians who had five or six correct elements out of six increased from 14% to 37%: for public physicians the corresponding increase was from 53% to 73%. In ARI case management, decisions taken on antimicrobial therapy and symptomatic drug use improved in both groups; the proportion of private physicians with at least three correct elements out of four increased from 13% to 42%, while among public doctors the corresponding increase was from 43% to 78%. Hands

  6. Development of national standardized all-hazard disaster core competencies for acute care physicians, nurses, and EMS professionals.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Carl H; Koenig, Kristi L; Whiteside, Mary; Murray, Rick

    2012-03-01

    The training of medical personnel to provide care for disaster victims is a priority for the physician community, the federal government, and society as a whole. Course development for such training guided by well-accepted standardized core competencies is lacking, however. This project identified a set of core competencies and performance objectives based on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required by the specific target audience (emergency department nurses, emergency physicians, and out-of-hospital emergency medical services personnel) to ensure they can treat the injuries and illnesses experienced by victims of disasters regardless of cause. The core competencies provide a blueprint for the development or refinement of disaster training courses. This expert consensus project, supported by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, incorporated an all-hazard, comprehensive emergency management approach addressing every type of disaster to minimize the effect on the public's health. An instructional systems design process was used to guide the development of audience-appropriate competencies and performance objectives. Participants, representing multiple academic and provider organizations, used a modified Delphi approach to achieve consensus on recommendations. A framework of 19 content categories (domains), 19 core competencies, and more than 90 performance objectives was developed for acute medical care personnel to address the requirements of effective all-hazards disaster response. Creating disaster curricula and training based on the core competencies and performance objectives identified in this article will ensure that acute medical care personnel are prepared to treat patients and address associated ramifications/consequences during any catastrophic event.

  7. Primary-care physician compensation.

    PubMed

    Olson, Arik

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews existing models of physician compensation and presents information about current compensation patterns for primary-care physicians in the United States. Theories of work motivation are reviewed where they have relevance to the desired outcome of satisfied, productive physicians whose skills and expertise are retained in the workforce. Healthcare reforms that purport to bring accountability for healthcare quality and value-rather than simply volume-bring opportunities to redesign primary-care physician compensation and may allow for new compensation methodologies that increase job satisfaction. Physicians are increasingly shunning the responsibility of private practice and choosing to work as employees of a larger organization, often a hospital. Employers of physicians are seeking compensation models that reward both productivity and value. PMID:22786738

  8. Training Physicians in Palliative Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, J. Cameron; Krammer, Lisa M.; von Gunten, Charles F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the elements of a program in hospice and palliative medicine that may serve as a model of an effective system of physician education. Topics for the palliative-care curriculum include hospice medicine, breaking bad news, pain management, the process of dying, and managing personal stress. (JOW)

  9. Barriers to Primary Care Physicians Prescribing Buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Eliza; Catlin, Mary; Andrilla, C. Holly A.; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Rosenblatt, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite the efficacy of buprenorphine-naloxone for the treatment of opioid use disorders, few physicians in Washington State use this clinical tool. To address the acute need for this service, a Rural Opioid Addiction Management Project trained 120 Washington physicians in 2010–2011 to use buprenorphine. We conducted this study to determine what proportion of those trained physicians began prescribing this treatment and identify barriers to incorporating this approach into outpatient practice. METHODS We interviewed 92 of 120 physicians (77%), obtaining demographic information, current prescribing status, clinic characteristics, and barriers to prescribing buprenorphine. Residents and 7 physicians who were prescribing buprenorphine at the time of the course were excluded from the study. We analyzed the responses of the 78 remaining respondents. RESULTS Almost all respondents reported positive attitudes toward buprenorphine, but only 22 (28%) reported prescribing buprenorphine. Most (95%, n = 21) new prescribers were family physicians. Physicians who prescribed buprenorphine were more likely to have partners who had received a waiver to prescribe buprenorphine. A lack of institutional support was associated with not prescribing the medication (P = .04). A lack of mental health and psychosocial support was the most frequently cited barrier by both those who prescribe and who do not prescribe buprenorphine. CONCLUSION Interventions before and after training are needed to increase the number of physicians who offer buprenorphine for treatment of addiction. Targeting physicians in clinics that agree in advance to institute services, coupled with technical assistance after they have completed their training, their clinical teams, and their administrations is likely to help more physicians become active providers of this highly effective outpatient treatment. PMID:24615308

  10. The physician's perception of health care.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, R S

    1994-01-01

    A general malaise appears to have settled on the American medical scene; most Americans continue to trust their own physicians but do not trust the medical profession or the health system as a whole, while many physicians feel harassed by the regulatory, bureaucratic, or litigious intrusions upon the patient-doctor relationship. The strains on mutual trust among physicians, their patients, and the public are being played out against a background of contradictions. The advances of biomedicine are offset by the neglect of social and behavioural aspects of medical care. Preoccupation with specialized, hospital-based treatment is accompanied by isolation of public health and preventive interests from medical education and practice. Society remains uncertain whether health care is a right or a privilege while accepting public responsibility for financing the health care of certain groups such as the indigent sick (Medicaid), the elderly (Medicare), Native Americans, or members of the armed forces and veterans. Rising expectations about better outcomes through advances in technology are accompanied by rising anxieties about cost, appropriateness of care, access, and quality. Physicians must alter their perception of health care by adopting a population-based approach to need, a commitment to restoring equity in staffing patterns and compensation between primary care and specialty care, and adoption of a social contract that provides for full access by all Americans to basic cost-effective preventive and clinical services before spending on less cost-effective services. PMID:8064752

  11. The physician's perception of health care.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, R S

    1994-01-01

    A general malaise appears to have settled on the American medical scene; most Americans continue to trust their own physicians but do not trust the medical profession or the health system as a whole, while many physicians feel harassed by the regulatory, bureaucratic, or litigious intrusions upon the patient-doctor relationship. The strains on mutual trust among physicians, their patients, and the public are being played out against a background of contradictions. The advances of biomedicine are offset by the neglect of social and behavioural aspects of medical care. Preoccupation with specialized, hospital-based treatment is accompanied by isolation of public health and preventive interests from medical education and practice. Society remains uncertain whether health care is a right or a privilege while accepting public responsibility for financing the health care of certain groups such as the indigent sick (Medicaid), the elderly (Medicare), Native Americans, or members of the armed forces and veterans. Rising expectations about better outcomes through advances in technology are accompanied by rising anxieties about cost, appropriateness of care, access, and quality. Physicians must alter their perception of health care by adopting a population-based approach to need, a commitment to restoring equity in staffing patterns and compensation between primary care and specialty care, and adoption of a social contract that provides for full access by all Americans to basic cost-effective preventive and clinical services before spending on less cost-effective services.

  12. Ensuring Competent Care by Senior Physicians.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Richard E; Welcher, Catherine M; Stagg Elliott, Victoria; Pieters, Richard S; Puscas, Liana; Wick, Paul H

    2016-01-01

    The increasing number of senior physicians and calls for increased accountability of the medical profession by the public have led regulators and policymakers to consider implementing age-based competency screening. Some hospitals and health systems have initiated age-based screening, but there is no agreed upon assessment process. Licensing and certifying organizations generally do not require that senior physicians pass additional assessments of health, competency, or quality performance. Studies suggest that physician performance, on average, declines with increasing years in medical practice, but the effect of age on an individual physician's competence is highly variable. Many senior physicians practice effectively and should be allowed to remain in practice as long as quality and safety are not endangered. Stakeholders in the medical profession should consider the need to develop guidelines and methods for monitoring and/or screening to ensure that senior physicians provide safe and effective care for patients. Any screening process needs to achieve a balance between protecting patients from harm due to substandard practice, while at the same time ensuring fairness to physicians and avoiding unnecessary reductions in workforce. PMID:27584000

  13. [Primary health care physician in modern conditions].

    PubMed

    Cindrić, Jasna

    2007-02-01

    Some basic considerations about the role and responsibilities of primary health care physician are presented. The attitude towards the patient and other activities of general practitioners are described. Rational, multidisciplinary and multifactorial dialogues and cooperation with other colleagues is also stressed. Team work and collaboration with other segments involved in the patient health care is an imperative. Working conditions are not equal in all health care settings, however, all health care personnel, regardless of their place of work, must implement rationalization of health care expenses and keep high professional level in urban and rural settings, even those distant from large medical centers. The possible misunderstandings of professional interests that can be destructive for working atmosphere are also mentioned. Primary health care is the cheapest and economically most efficient type of health care for a particular population. In this context, primary health care physicians/family doctors find their role and responsibilities, follow organizational principles, system and methods of work. To conclude, a more positive potential of primary health care and its affirmation is stressed.

  14. Primary care physician supply, physician compensation, and Medicare fees: what is the connection?

    PubMed

    Dummit, Laura A

    2008-11-01

    Primary care, a cornerstone of several health reform efforts, is believed by many to be in a crisis because of inadequate supply to meet future demand. This belief has focused attention on the adequacy of primary care physician supply and ways to boost access to primary care. One suggested approach is to raise Medicare fees for primary care services. Whether higher Medicare fees would increase physician interest in primary care specialties by reducing compensation disparities between primary care and other specialties has not been established. Further, many questions remain about the assumptions underlying these policy concerns. Is there really a primary care physician crisis? Why does compensation across physician specialties vary so widely? Can Medicare physician fee changes affect access to primary care? These questions defy simple answers. This issue brief lays out the latest information on physician workforce, compensation differences across physician specialties, and Medicare's physician fee-setting process. PMID:19048687

  15. Primary Care Physicians' Dementia Care Practices: Evidence of Geographic Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Zlateva, Ianita; Delaney, Colleen; Kleppinger, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article explores primary care physicians' (PCPs) self-reported approaches and barriers to management of patients with dementia, with a focus on comparisons in dementia care practices between PCPs in 2 states. Design and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, questionnaires were mailed to 600 randomly selected licensed PCPs in…

  16. The Physician Assistant in Geriatric Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Robert G.

    1976-01-01

    The Physician Assistant (PA) is a new health-care professional who is trained to function as a "physician extender." The author's experience with 71 PA students and graduate PA's at the Jewish Institute for Geriatric Care is described. (Author)

  17. Physician payments under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Abe; Shapiro, Adam Hale

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the impact of major health insurance reform on payments made in the health care sector. We study the prices of services paid to physicians in the privately insured market during the Massachusetts health care reform. The reform increased the number of insured individuals as well as introduced an online marketplace where insurers compete. We estimate that, over the reform period, physician payments increased at least 11 percentage points relative to control areas. Payment increases began around the time legislation passed the House and Senate-the period in which their was a high probability of the bill eventually becoming law. This result is consistent with fixed-duration payment contracts being negotiated in anticipation of future demand and competition. PMID:25497755

  18. Physicians' Involvement with the New York State Health Care Proxy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Janna C.; Sealy, Yvette M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined physicians' attitude, involvement, and perceived barriers with the health care proxy. A cross sectional, correlational design was used to survey practicing physicians (N = 70). Physicians had positive attitudes toward the health care proxy and indicated that the most significant barriers to health care proxy completion were…

  19. Computerized Physician Order Entry: Reluctance of Physician Adoption of Technology Linked to Improving Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulinski, Don

    2013-01-01

    Physicians are the influential force in the complex field of patient care delivery. Physicians determine when and where patient healthcare is delivered and affect 80% of the money spent on it. Computerized systems used in the delivery of healthcare information have become an integral part that physicians use to provide patient care. This study…

  20. Physician, Practice, and Patient Characteristics Related to Primary Care Physician Physical and Mental Health: Results from the Physician Worklife Study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Eric S; Konrad, Thomas R; Linzer, Mark; McMurray, Julia; Pathman, Donald E; Gerrity, Martha; Schwartz, Mark D; Scheckler, William E; Douglas, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the impact that physician, practice, and patient characteristics have on physician stress, satisfaction, mental, and physical health. Data Sources Based on a survey of over 5,000 physicians nationwide. Four waves of surveys resulted in 2,325 complete responses. Elimination of ineligibles yielded a 52 percent response rate; 1,411 responses from primary care physicians were used. Study Design A conceptual model was tested by structural equation modeling. Physician job satisfaction and stress mediated the relationship between physician, practice, and patient characteristics as independent variables and physician physical and mental health as dependent variables. Principle Findings The conceptual model was generally supported. Practice and, to a lesser extent, physician characteristics influenced job satisfaction, whereas only practice characteristics influenced job stress. Patient characteristics exerted little influence. Job stress powerfully influenced job satisfaction and physical and mental health among physicians. Conclusions These findings support the notion that workplace conditions are a major determinant of physician well-being. Poor practice conditions can result in poor outcomes, which can erode quality of care and prove costly to the physician and health care organization. Fortunately, these conditions are manageable. Organizational settings that are both “physician friendly” and “family friendly” seem to result in greater well-being. These findings are particularly important as physicians are more tightly integrated into the health care system that may be less clearly under their exclusive control.

  1. Transplantation and the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    McGill, Rita L; Ko, Tina Y

    2011-11-01

    Increasing appreciation of the survival benefits of kidney transplantation, compared with chronic dialysis, has resulted in more patients with kidney disease being referred and receiving organs. The evolving disparity between a rapidly increasing pool of candidates and a smaller pool of available donors has created new issues for the physicians who care for kidney patients and their potential living donors. This article outlines current efforts to address the growing number of patients who await transplantation, including relaxation of traditional donation criteria, maximization of living donation, and donation schemas that permit incompatible donor-recipient pairs to participate through paired donation and transplantation chains. New ethical issues faced by donors and recipients are discussed. Surgical advances that reduce the morbidity of donors are also described, as is the role of the primary physician in medical issues of both donors and recipients. PMID:22098662

  2. Primary care physician use across the breast cancer care continuum

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Lofters, Aisha; Moineddin, Rahim; Decker, Kathleen; Groome, Patti; Kendell, Cynthia; Krzyzanowska, Monika; Li, Dongdong; McBride, Mary L.; Mittmann, Nicole; Porter, Geoff; Turner, Donna; Urquhart, Robin; Winget, Marcy; Zhang, Yang; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe primary care physician (PCP) use and continuity of PCP care across the breast cancer care continuum. Design Population-based, retrospective cohort study using provincial cancer registries linked to health administrative databases. Setting British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario. Participants All women with incident invasive breast cancer from 2007 to 2012 in Manitoba and Ontario and from 2007 to 2011 in British Columbia. Main outcome measures The number and proportions of visits to PCPs were determined. Continuity of care was measured using the Usual Provider of Care index calculated as the proportion of visits to the most-often-visited PCP in the 6 to 30 months before a breast cancer diagnosis (baseline) and from 1 to 3 years following a breast cancer diagnosis (survivorship). Results More than three-quarters of patients visited their PCPs 2 or more times during the breast cancer diagnostic period, and more than 80% of patients had at least 1 PCP visit during breast cancer adjuvant treatment. Contact with the PCP decreased over time during breast cancer survivorship. Of the 3 phases, women appeared to be most likely to not have PCP contact during adjuvant treatment, with 10.7% (Ontario) to 18.7% (British Columbia) of women having no PCP visits during this phase. However, a sizable minority of women had at least monthly visits during the treatment phase, particularly in Manitoba and Ontario, where approximately a quarter of women saw a PCP at least monthly. We observed higher continuity of care with PCPs in survivorship (compared with baseline) in all provinces. Conclusion Primary care physicians were generally involved throughout the breast cancer care continuum, but the level of involvement varied across care phases and by province. Future interventions will aim to further integrate primary and oncology care. PMID:27737994

  3. A model for integrating independent physicians into accountable care organizations.

    PubMed

    Shields, Mark C; Patel, Pankaj H; Manning, Martin; Sacks, Lee

    2011-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act encourages the formation of accountable care organizations as a new part of Medicare. Pending forthcoming federal regulations, though, it is unclear precisely how these ACOs will be structured. Although large integrated care systems that directly employ physicians may be most likely to evolve into ACOs, few such integrated systems exist in the United States. This paper demonstrates how Advocate Physician Partners in Illinois could serve as a model for a new kind of accountable care organization, by demonstrating how to organize physicians into partnerships with hospitals to improve care, cut costs, and be held accountable for the results. The partnership has signed its first commercial ACO contract effective January 1, 2011, with the largest insurer in Illinois, Blue Cross Blue Shield. Other commercial contracts are expected to follow. In a health care system still dominated by small, independent physician practices, this may constitute a more viable way to push the broader health care system toward accountable care. PMID:21163804

  4. Approach to traumatic hand injuries for primary care physicians

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Kevin; Hatchell, Alexandra; Thoma, Achilleas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the initial management of common traumatic hand injuries seen by primary care physicians. Sources of information Current clinical evidence and literature identified through MEDLINE electronic database searches was reviewed. Expert opinion was used to supplement recommendations for areas with little evidence. Main message Primary care physicians must routinely manage patients with acute traumatic hand injuries. In the context of a clinical case, we review the assessment, diagnosis, and initial management of common traumatic hand injuries. The presentation and management of nail bed injuries, fingertip amputations, mallet fingers, hand fractures, tendon lacerations, bite injuries, and infectious tenosynovitis will also be discussed. The principles of managing traumatic hand injuries involve the reduction and immobilization of fractures, obtaining post-reduction x-ray scans, obtaining soft tissue coverage, preventing and treating infection, and ensuring tetanus prophylaxis. Conclusion Proper assessment and management of traumatic hand injuries is essential to prevent substantial long-term morbidity in this generally otherwise healthy population. Early recognition of injuries that require urgent or emergent referral to a hand surgeon is critical. PMID:23766041

  5. Top 20 Research Studies of 2014 for Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Ebell, Mark H; Grad, Roland

    2015-09-01

    A team of primary care clinicians with expertise in evidence-based medicine performed monthly surveillance of more than 110 English-language clinical research journals during 2014, and identified 255 studies that had the potential to change how family physicians practice. Each study was critically appraised and summarized, focusing on its relevance to primary care practice, validity, and likelihood that it could change practice. A validated tool was used to obtain feedback from members of the Canadian Medical Association about the clinical relevance of each POEM (patient-oriented evidence that matters) and the benefits they expect for their practice. This article, the fourth installment in this annual series, summarizes the 20 POEMs based on original research studies judged to have the greatest impact on practice for family physicians. Key studies for this year include advice on symptomatic management and prognosis for acute respiratory infections; a novel and effective strengthening treatment for plantar fasciitis; a study showing that varenicline plus nicotine replacement is more effective than varenicline alone; a network meta-analysis concluding that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are preferred over angiotensin II receptor blockers; the clear benefits of initial therapy with metformin over other agents in patients with diabetes mellitus; and important guidance on the use of anticoagulants. PMID:26371571

  6. Physician Factors Associated with Outpatient Palliative Care Referral

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, Sangeeta C.; Fried, Terri R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Outpatient palliative care can provide significant benefits to seriously ill patients, but several barriers to appropriate referrals remain. No study has examined the physician factors associated with referral to outpatient palliative care. Objective To determine physician factors, with a focus on physician beliefs, associated with referral to palliative care. Design Cross-sectional study of 170 primary care physicians at Kaiser Permanente (KP), a large nonprofit health maintenance organization (HMO), using a self-administered questionnaire. Results Of the 145 respondents, 100 (70%) reported referring any patients to the palliative care program in the prior year, with a median of 3 referrals (interquartile range 2, 6). Factors associated with referral included working at KP between 10 and 20 years as compared to <10 years [Odds ratio [OR] 6.29 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.38, 28.6)] and having personal experience with palliative care [OR 2.13 (95% CI 0.95, 4.976)]. None of the beliefs scales was associated with referral. Conclusions Physician characteristics other than their beliefs about palliative care played a significant role in determining referral. Palliative care programs should aim to increase their visibility in the outpatient setting to increase referrals by primary care physicians. Tools that help physicians identify seriously ill patients who could benefit from palliative care may also serve to increase appropriate referrals. PMID:19460830

  7. Acute myocardial infarction: a comparison of the risk between physicians and the general population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-ting; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Lin, Hung-Jung; Su, Shih-Bin; Guo, How-Ran; Juan, Chi-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Physicians in Taiwan have a heavy workload and a stressful workplace, both of which may contribute to cardiovascular disease. However, the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in physicians is not clear. This population-based cohort study used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We identified 28,062 physicians as the case group and randomly selected 84,186 nonmedical staff patients as the control group. We used a conditional logistic regression to compare the AMI risk between physicians and controls. Subgroup analyses of physician specialty, age, gender, comorbidities, area, and hospital level were also done. Physicians have a higher prevalence of HTN (23.59% versus 19.06%, P < 0.0001) and hyperlipidemia (21.36% versus 12.93%, P < 0.0001) but a lower risk of AMI than did the controls (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 0.57; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.46-0.72) after adjusting for DM, HTN, hyperlipidemia, and area. Between medical specialty, age, and area subgroups, differences in the risk for having an AMI were nonsignificant. Medical center physicians had a lower risk (AOR: 0.42; 95% CI: 0.20-0.85) than did local clinic physicians. Taiwan's physicians had higher prevalences of HTN and hyperlipidemia, but a lower risk of AMI than did the general population. Medical center physicians had a lower risk than did local clinic physicians. Physicians are not necessary healthier than the general public, but physicians, especially in medical centers, have a greater awareness of disease and greater access to medical care, which permits timely treatment and may prevent critical conditions such as AMI induced by delayed treatment.

  8. Acute myocardial infarction: a comparison of the risk between physicians and the general population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-ting; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Lin, Hung-Jung; Su, Shih-Bin; Guo, How-Ran; Juan, Chi-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Physicians in Taiwan have a heavy workload and a stressful workplace, both of which may contribute to cardiovascular disease. However, the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in physicians is not clear. This population-based cohort study used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We identified 28,062 physicians as the case group and randomly selected 84,186 nonmedical staff patients as the control group. We used a conditional logistic regression to compare the AMI risk between physicians and controls. Subgroup analyses of physician specialty, age, gender, comorbidities, area, and hospital level were also done. Physicians have a higher prevalence of HTN (23.59% versus 19.06%, P < 0.0001) and hyperlipidemia (21.36% versus 12.93%, P < 0.0001) but a lower risk of AMI than did the controls (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 0.57; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.46-0.72) after adjusting for DM, HTN, hyperlipidemia, and area. Between medical specialty, age, and area subgroups, differences in the risk for having an AMI were nonsignificant. Medical center physicians had a lower risk (AOR: 0.42; 95% CI: 0.20-0.85) than did local clinic physicians. Taiwan's physicians had higher prevalences of HTN and hyperlipidemia, but a lower risk of AMI than did the general population. Medical center physicians had a lower risk than did local clinic physicians. Physicians are not necessary healthier than the general public, but physicians, especially in medical centers, have a greater awareness of disease and greater access to medical care, which permits timely treatment and may prevent critical conditions such as AMI induced by delayed treatment. PMID:25802869

  9. Determining Primary Care Physician Information Needs to Inform Ambulatory Visit Note Display

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, M.A.; Steege, L.M.; Moore, J.L.; Koopman, R.J.; Belden, J.L.; Kim, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background With the increase in the adoption of electronic health records (EHR) across the US, primary care physicians are experiencing information overload. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the information needs of primary care physicians (PCPs) as they review clinic visit notes to inform EHR display. Method Data collection was conducted with 15 primary care physicians during semi-structured interviews, including a third party observer to control bias. Physicians reviewed major sections of an artificial but typical acute and chronic care visit note to identify the note sections that were relevant to their information needs. Statistical methods used were McNemar-Mosteller’s and Cochran Q. Results Physicians identified History of Present Illness (HPI), Assessment, and Plan (A&P) as the most important sections of a visit note. In contrast, they largely judged the Review of Systems (ROS) to be superfluous. There was also a statistical difference in physicians’ highlighting among all seven major note sections in acute (p = 0.00) and chronic (p = 0.00) care visit notes. Conclusion A&P and HPI sections were most frequently identified as important which suggests that physicians may have to identify a few key sections out of a long, unnecessarily verbose visit note. ROS is viewed by doctors as mostly “not needed,” but can have relevant information. The ROS can contain information needed for patient care when other sections of the Visit note, such as the HPI, lack the relevant information. Future studies should include producing a display that provides only relevant information to increase physician efficiency at the point of care. Also, research on moving A&P to the top of visit notes instead of having A&P at the bottom of the page is needed, since those are usually the first sections physicians refer to and reviewing from top to bottom may cause cognitive load. PMID:24734131

  10. Association of Early Patient-Physician Care Planning Discussions and End-of-Life Care Intensity in Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tisnado, Diana M.; Walling, Anne M.; Dy, Sydney M.; Asch, Steven M.; Ettner, Susan L.; Kim, Benjamin; Pantoja, Philip; Schreibeis-Baum, Hannah C.; Lorenz, Karl A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Early patient-physician care planning discussions may influence the intensity of end-of-life (EOL) care received by veterans with advanced cancer. Objective: The study objective was to evaluate the association between medical record documentation of patient-physician care planning discussions and intensity of EOL care among veterans with advanced cancer. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study. Subjects were 665 veteran decedents diagnosed with stage IV colorectal, lung, or pancreatic cancer in 2008, and followed till death or the end of the study period in 2011. We estimated the effect of patient-physician care planning discussions documented within one month of metastatic diagnosis on the intensity of EOL care measured by receipt of acute care, intensive interventions, chemotherapy, and hospice care, using multivariate logistic regression models. Results: Veterans in our study were predominantly male (97.1%), white (74.7%), with an average age at diagnosis of 66.4 years. Approximately 31% received some acute care, 9.3% received some intensive intervention, and 6.5% had a new chemotherapy regimen initiated in the last month of life. Approximately 41% of decedents received no hospice or were admitted within three days of death. Almost half (46.8%) had documentation of a care planning discussion within the first month after diagnosis and those who did were significantly less likely to receive acute care at EOL (OR: 0.67; p=0.025). Documented discussions were not significantly associated with intensive interventions, chemotherapy, or hospice care. Conclusion: Early care planning discussions are associated with lower rates of acute care use at the EOL in a system with already low rates of intensive EOL care. PMID:26186553

  11. Potential Effects of Health Care Policy Decisions on Physician Availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Christopher; Goodrich, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Many regions in America are experiencing downward trends in the number of practicing physicians and the number of available physician hours, resulting in a worrisome decrease in the availability of health care services. Recent changes in American health care legislation may induce a rapid change in the demand for health care services, which in turn will result in a new supply-demand equilibrium . In this paper we develop a system dynamics model linking physician availability to health care demand and profitability. We use this model to explore scenarios based on different initial conditions and describe possible outcomes for a range of different policy decisions.

  12. HIV and the primary care physician in Japan.

    PubMed

    Asai, A

    1997-01-01

    Primary care physicians in Japan must provide comprehensive medical care and counseling for persons both infected with and at risk for HIV/AIDS. Despite existing activities and education programs, HIV case numbers continue to rise in Japan, and only a limited number of hospitals and physicians offer care to those with HIV/AIDS. Some doctors in Japan refuse to accept patients with HIV/AIDS because of the complex treatment often involved, prejudice regarding AIDS, and fear of transmission. Other impediments to effective treatment of HIV/AIDS in Japan include insufficient risk evaluation through outpatient services, lack of privacy, and restrictions and policies at medical facilities. If Japan's primary care physicians cannot participate in caring for those with HIV/AIDS, it will be impossible for every patient with HIV/AIDS to receive correct and adequate medical care. To enable primary care physicians to provide high-quality service and prevention counseling to those with HIV/AIDS, prejudice, fear, and logistic impediments must be eradicated. Comprehensive practice guidelines that protect patients' rights and privacy should be established immediately. The guidelines should direct primary care physicians toward a logical and proper approach to HIV/AIDS care by addressing fundamental treatment and effective prevention counseling as well as the social problems surrounding HIV/AIDS. In addition, research on the general knowledge level and prevalent attitudes among Japan's primary care physicians regarding HIV/AIDS would clarify which specific issues the guidelines should emphasize.

  13. The Affordable Care Act: Opportunities and Challenges for Physicians.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min

    2015-11-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) will affect many aspects of health care across the nation, presenting both opportunities and challenges. Physicians who have a solid understanding of the recent industry trends and the role they will be playing in the post-ACA world will be able to better adapt to the new environment. This article analyzes the implications of the health care reform for physicians and offers recommendations on how to turn challenges into opportunities. PMID:26501969

  14. The Affordable Care Act: Opportunities and Challenges for Physicians.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min

    2015-11-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) will affect many aspects of health care across the nation, presenting both opportunities and challenges. Physicians who have a solid understanding of the recent industry trends and the role they will be playing in the post-ACA world will be able to better adapt to the new environment. This article analyzes the implications of the health care reform for physicians and offers recommendations on how to turn challenges into opportunities.

  15. Clinical Workflow Observations to Identify Opportunities for Nurse, Physicians and Patients to Share a Patient-centered Plan of Care

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sarah A.; Gazarian, Priscilla; Stade, Diana; McNally, Kelly; Morrison, Conny; Ohashi, Kumiko; Lehmann, Lisa; Dalal, Anuj; Bates, David W.; Dykes, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Patient- and Family-Centered Care (PFCC) is essential for high quality care in the critical and acute-specialty care hospital setting. Effective PFCC requires clinicians to form an integrated interprofessional team to collaboratively engage with the patient/family and contribute to a shared patient-centered plan of care. We conducted observations on a critical care and specialty unit to understand the plan of care activities and workflow documentation requirements for nurses and physicians to inform the development of a shared patient-centered plan of care to support patient engagement. We identified siloed plan of care documentation, with workflow opportunities to converge the nurses plan of care with the physician planned To-do lists and quality and safety checklists. Integration of nurses and physicians plan of care activities into a shared plan of care is a feasible and valuable step toward interprofessional teams that effectively engage patients in plan of care activities. PMID:25954345

  16. How physicians can change the future of health care.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael E; Teisberg, Elizabeth Olmsted

    2007-03-14

    Today's preoccupation with cost shifting and cost reduction undermines physicians and patients. Instead, health care reform must focus on improving health and health care value for patients. We propose a strategy for reform that is market based but physician led. Physician leadership is essential. Improving the value of health care is something only medical teams can do. The right kind of competition--competition to improve results--will drive dramatic improvement. With such positive-sum competition, patients will receive better care, physicians will be rewarded for excellence, and costs will be contained. Physicians can lead this change and return the practice of medicine to its appropriate focus: enabling health and effective care. Three principles should guide this change: (1) the goal is value for patients, (2) medical practice should be organized around medical conditions and care cycles, and (3) results--risk-adjusted outcomes and costs--must be measured. Following these principles, professional satisfaction will increase and current pressures on physicians will decrease. If physicians fail to lead these changes, they will inevitably face ever-increasing administrative control of medicine. Improving health and health care value for patients is the only real solution. Value-based competition on results provides a path for reform that recognizes the role of health professionals at the heart of the system.

  17. Point-of-care ultrasonography by pediatric emergency medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jennifer R; Lewiss, Resa E

    2015-04-01

    Emergency physicians have used point-of-care ultrasonography since the 1990 s. Pediatric emergency medicine physicians have more recently adopted this technology. Point-of-care ultrasonography is used for various scenarios, particularly the evaluation of soft tissue infections or blunt abdominal trauma and procedural guidance. To date, there are no published statements from national organizations specifically for pediatric emergency physicians describing the incorporation of point-of-care ultrasonography into their practice. This document outlines how pediatric emergency departments may establish a formal point-of-care ultrasonography program. This task includes appointing leaders with expertise in point-of-care ultrasonography, effectively training and credentialing physicians in the department, and providing ongoing quality assurance reviews. PMID:25825532

  18. Point-of-care ultrasonography by pediatric emergency medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jennifer R; Lewiss, Resa E

    2015-04-01

    Emergency physicians have used point-of-care ultrasonography since the 1990 s. Pediatric emergency medicine physicians have more recently adopted this technology. Point-of-care ultrasonography is used for various scenarios, particularly the evaluation of soft tissue infections or blunt abdominal trauma and procedural guidance. To date, there are no published statements from national organizations specifically for pediatric emergency physicians describing the incorporation of point-of-care ultrasonography into their practice. This document outlines how pediatric emergency departments may establish a formal point-of-care ultrasonography program. This task includes appointing leaders with expertise in point-of-care ultrasonography, effectively training and credentialing physicians in the department, and providing ongoing quality assurance reviews.

  19. Role Expectations in Dementia Care Among Family Physicians and Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Hum, Susan; Cohen, Carole; Persaud, Malini; Lee, Joyce; Drummond, Neil; Dalziel, William; Pimlott, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Background The assessment and ongoing management of dementia falls largely on family physicians. This pilot study explored perceived roles and attitudes towards the provision of dementia care from the perspectives of family physicians and specialists. Methods Semi-structured, one-to-one interviews were conducted with six family physicians and six specialists (three geriatric psychiatrists, two geriatricians, and one neurologist) from University of Toronto-affiliated hospitals. Transcripts were subjected to thematic content analysis. Results Physicians’ clinical experience averaged 16 years. Both physician groups acknowledged that family physicians are more confident in diagnosing/treating uncomplicated dementia than a decade ago. They agreed on care management issues that warranted specialist involvement. Driving competency was contentious, and specialists willingly played the “bad cop” to resolve disputes and preserve long-standing therapeutic relationships. While patient/caregiver education and support were deemed essential, most physicians commented that community resources were fragmented and difficult to access. Improving collaboration and communication between physician groups, and clarifying the roles of other multi-disciplinary team members in dementia care were also discussed. Conclusions Future research could further explore physicians’ and other multi-disciplinary members’ perceived roles and responsibilities in dementia care, given that different health-care system-wide dementia care strategies and initiatives are being developed and implemented across Ontario. PMID:25232368

  20. Geriatric depression assessment by rural primary care physicians

    PubMed Central

    Glasser, M; Vogels, L; Gravdal, J

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Depression is the fourth leading cause of the global disease burden, and approximately one in four elderly people may suffer from depression or depressive symptoms. Depression in later life is generally regarded as highly treatable, but under-treatment is still common in this population, especially among those in rural areas where access to healthcare is often an issue. In this study rural primary care physicians’ practices, attitudes, barriers and perceived needs in the diagnosis and treatment of geriatric depression were described, and trends in care delivery examined. Methods A survey was sent to 162 rural Illinois family physicians and general internists. The survey focused on current practices, attitudes and perceptions regarding geriatric depression, barriers to and needs for improvement in depression care and physician and practice characteristics. Results Seventy-six physicians (47%) responded. The rural physicians indicated that over one-third of their patients aged 60 years and older were depressed. All reported routine screening for depression, with 24% using the Beck Depression Inventory. Overall, physicians expressed positive attitudes about their involvement in treating older depressed patients. However, 45% indicated a ‘gap’ between ideal and available care in their rural practices. Physicians with higher proportions of elderly patients in their panels were more likely to feel that more training in residency in geriatric care would be helpful in improving care, and that better availability of psychologists and counselors would be important for improvement of care for older, depressed patients. Conclusions This study responds to recent calls to better understand how primary care physicians diagnose and treat depression in older adults. Generally, primary care physicians appear comfortable and prepared in depression diagnosis and management, but factors such as availability of appropriate care remain a challenge. PMID:19929129

  1. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers…

  2. Detecting cancer: Pearls for the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Simon B; Montero, Alberto J

    2016-07-01

    Five-year survival rates have improved over the past 40 years for nearly all types of cancer, partially thanks to early detection and prevention. Since patients typically present to their primary care physician with initial symptoms, it is vital for primary care physicians to accurately diagnose common cancers and to recognize unusual presentations of highly curable cancers such as Hodgkin lymphoma and testicular cancers, for which the 5-year overall survival rates are greater than 85%. This paper reviews these cancers and provides clinically relevant pearls from an oncologic perspective for physicians who are the first point of contact.

  3. Detecting cancer: Pearls for the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Simon B; Montero, Alberto J

    2016-07-01

    Five-year survival rates have improved over the past 40 years for nearly all types of cancer, partially thanks to early detection and prevention. Since patients typically present to their primary care physician with initial symptoms, it is vital for primary care physicians to accurately diagnose common cancers and to recognize unusual presentations of highly curable cancers such as Hodgkin lymphoma and testicular cancers, for which the 5-year overall survival rates are greater than 85%. This paper reviews these cancers and provides clinically relevant pearls from an oncologic perspective for physicians who are the first point of contact. PMID:27399864

  4. Dynamic diversification: hospitals pursue physician alliances, 'seamless' care.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, J

    1992-02-01

    In the 1980s, "diversification" in health care meant creating new corporate entities to boost revenues. In the 1990s, in places like New Ulm, MN, Long Beach, CA, and Boston, hospitals and physicians are exploring diversifications that utilize their core patient care strengths. This is creating new entities that benefit patient care and help prepare for health care delivery in the future. In fact, despite predictions that RBRVS would drive physicians into competition with hospitals, the opposite is taking place, as the new "seamless" delivery systems take advantage of pooled resources and economies of scale.

  5. Corporately managed health care and the new role of physicians.

    PubMed

    Winkenwerder, W; Nash, D B

    1988-01-01

    The roles described are not all-inclusive, since a small proportion of physicians, as in times past, will continue to pursue diverse careers outside of an tangential to health care. Neither are the roles mutually exclusive, as physician-managers are also organizational employees, as independently contracting professionals may also be partly fee for service, as physician entrepreneurs may be fee for service practitioners or contracting professionals, and so forth. The point is, that as the delivery of health care becomes a more complex and formalized process, and as large organizations delivering and insuring health care become more predominant, the various roles of physicians are becoming more distinctly obvious. What are the implications of this trend toward greater internal segmentation of the medical profession? At this juncture, they are not entirely clear. It could mean that some groups of physicians will achieve higher status and more rewards than other groups, which might result in greater conflicts within the medical profession. Undoubtedly, the emergence of corporately managed health care and the development of new (and possibly divergent) roles for physicians confronts the medical profession and its members with the gnawing questions of who they really are and what do they really want to be? Ultimately, the greatest challenge may be in finding a common set of commitments and values which transcend our many different roles, and which provide physicians with a clear and continuing sense of ourselves as medical professionals. PMID:3288297

  6. A Conceptual Model for Episodes of Acute, Unscheduled Care.

    PubMed

    Pines, Jesse M; Lotrecchiano, Gaetano R; Zocchi, Mark S; Lazar, Danielle; Leedekerken, Jacob B; Margolis, Gregg S; Carr, Brendan G

    2016-10-01

    We engaged in a 1-year process to develop a conceptual model representing an episode of acute, unscheduled care. Acute, unscheduled care includes acute illnesses (eg, nausea and vomiting), injuries, or exacerbations of chronic conditions (eg, worsening dyspnea in congestive heart failure) and is delivered in emergency departments, urgent care centers, and physicians' offices, as well as through telemedicine. We began with a literature search to define an acute episode of care and to identify existing conceptual models used in health care. In accordance with this information, we then drafted a preliminary conceptual model and collected stakeholder feedback, using online focus groups and concept mapping. Two technical expert panels reviewed the draft model, examined the stakeholder feedback, and discussed ways the model could be improved. After integrating the experts' comments, we solicited public comment on the model and made final revisions. The final conceptual model includes social and individual determinants of health that influence the incidence of acute illness and injury, factors that affect care-seeking decisions, specific delivery settings where acute care is provided, and outcomes and costs associated with the acute care system. We end with recommendations for how researchers, policymakers, payers, patients, and providers can use the model to identify and prioritize ways to improve acute care delivery. PMID:27397857

  7. Physician practice patterns in acute coronary syndromes: an initial report of an individual quality improvement program.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Christopher P; Hoekstra, James W; Larson, David M; Carter, Reshma D; Cornish, Jeanne; Karcher, Rachel B; Mencia, William A; Berry, Carolyn A; Stowell, Stephanie A

    2010-03-01

    The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association guidelines are the nationally accepted standards for the treatment of patients with acute coronary syndromes. Despite this recognition, adherence to guideline recommendations remains suboptimal with 25% of opportunities to provide guideline appropriate care missed. To address performance gaps related to acute coronary syndrome care and improve patient outcomes, a performance improvement (PI) initiative was designed for cardiologists and emergency department physicians. As an American Medical Association-approved, standardized continuing medical education initiative, participating physicians can earn up to 20 American Medical Association-PRA Category 1 Credits by completing 2 phases of self-assessment in addition to developing and implementing a PI plan to address self-identified areas where improvement in patient care is needed. As the second in a series of 3 articles, this article describes the initial data submitted by 101 participating physicians and how their treatment practices compared with American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines as well as with current national standards. Overall, participating physicians meet guideline expectations with performance and documentation of a 12-lead electrocardiography, measurement of cardiac biomarkers, and administration of aspirin. Identified areas of improvement were the standardization of treatment protocols, use of risk assessment scores, appropriate dosing of anticoagulants, and improvement in patient treatment times. A noted challenge of this PI initiative is the low rate of physician participation, with fewer than 10% of registered physicians actively submitting patient data. This fact may reflect several barriers to PI, such as: (1) lack of time to collect and submit data, (2) the belief that current practices do not need to be improved, and (3) the need for system-based improvements. PMID:20215907

  8. Physician-assisted death with limited access to palliative care.

    PubMed

    Barutta, Joaquín; Vollmann, Jochen

    2015-08-01

    Even among advocates of legalising physician-assisted death, many argue that this should be done only once palliative care has become widely available. Meanwhile, according to them, physician-assisted death should be banned. Four arguments are often presented to support this claim, which we call the argument of lack of autonomy, the argument of existing alternatives, the argument of unfair inequalities and the argument of the antagonism between physician-assisted death and palliative care. We argue that although these arguments provide strong reasons to take appropriate measures to guarantee access to good quality palliative care to everyone who needs it, they do not justify a ban on physician-assisted death until we have achieved this goal. PMID:25614156

  9. Physician-assisted death with limited access to palliative care.

    PubMed

    Barutta, Joaquín; Vollmann, Jochen

    2015-08-01

    Even among advocates of legalising physician-assisted death, many argue that this should be done only once palliative care has become widely available. Meanwhile, according to them, physician-assisted death should be banned. Four arguments are often presented to support this claim, which we call the argument of lack of autonomy, the argument of existing alternatives, the argument of unfair inequalities and the argument of the antagonism between physician-assisted death and palliative care. We argue that although these arguments provide strong reasons to take appropriate measures to guarantee access to good quality palliative care to everyone who needs it, they do not justify a ban on physician-assisted death until we have achieved this goal.

  10. Coordinated care partnership: case management with physician practices.

    PubMed

    Anker-Unnever, L; Netting, F E

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the Coordinated Care Partnership Project, operated by The St. Joseph Healthcare System. Funded as one of several demonstration sites by The John A. Hartford Foundation, this project places social work and nurse care managers in selected primary care physician practices in Albuquerque, NM. Lessons learned from the first year of operation are presented, along with implications for the role of case management in primary care practice.

  11. State-of-the-art anterior cruciate ligament tears: A primer for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Salzler, Matt; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Rosas, Samuel; Nguyen, Chau; Law, Tsun Yee; Eberle, Thomas; McCormick, Frank

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide primary care physicians and other members of the medical community with an updated, general review on the subject of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. We aim to enhance awareness of these injuries and to prepare those practicing in the primary care setting to address these injuries. Because ACL injuries are quite common, it is very likely that a primary care physician will encounter these injuries and need to address them acutely. The current literature is replete with new concepts and controversies regarding ACL injuries, and this article provides a concise review for our target audience in regard to the care of a patient with an ACL injury. This article is composed of an overview with current epidemiologic data, basic anatomy and physiology, clinical presentation, physical examination findings, imaging modalities, and treatment options. After reading this short article, a medical care provider should understand ACL injuries and their appropriate management.

  12. Family physicians improve patient health care quality and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This issue exemplifies family physicians' ability to provide great care and to continuously improve. For example, beyond other specialty care, the care provided by family physicians is associated with improved melanoma diagnosis and outcomes and improved preventive services for those with a history of breast cancer. Electronic health records are providing new avenues to both assess outcomes and influence care. However, to truly reward quality care, simplistic and readily measurable items such as laboratory results or assessment of the provision of preventive services must be adjusted for risk. Health insurance influences classic preventive care services more than personal health behaviors. The care provided at federally qualified health centers throughout the nation is highly appreciated by the people they serve and is not plagued by the types of disparities in other settings.

  13. The impact of physician entrepreneurship on escalating health care costs.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    Health care costs in this country are escalating at an alarming rate. Many economists predict this rate is unsustainable due to the long-term financial burden on our citizenry. Moreover, our health care delivery is fragmented and wasteful. United States health care is ranked last among the industrialized nations. Proponents of the U.S. system of health care extoll the virtues of our "free market." This article explores the role of physician entrepreneurship in the perversion of the marketplace of health care delivery. Medicine has become overcommercialized at the expense of patients and taxpayers. The time has come to implement legislative measures to redirect our dysfunctional health care system. This article explores the role of physician entrepreneurship in rising health care costs. Under the wrong circumstances, the invisible hand of the free market can become dysfunctional.

  14. When physicians intervene in their relatives' health care.

    PubMed

    Scarff, Jonathan R; Lippmann, Steven

    2012-06-01

    Physicians often struggle with ethical issues surrounding intervention in their relatives' health care. Many editorials, letters, and surveys have been written on this topic, but there is no systematic review of its prevalence. An Ovid Medline search was conducted for articles in English, written between January 1950 and December 2010, using the key words family member, relatives, treatment, prescribing, physician, and ethics. The search identified 41 articles (editorials, letters, and surveys). Surveys were reviewed to explore demographics of these treating physicians and reasons for and against intervention. Physicians often intervene directly or indirectly in the health care of relatives. The most common reasons were convenience, cost savings, and the perception of having greater knowledge or concern than colleagues. Lost objectivity, fear of misdiagnosis, and inability to provide complete care were the main considerations against intervention. The characteristics of treating doctors were nonspecific. Most surveys recommend against this practice except for emergencies or minor ailments. This review included only a few surveys with small sample size and only assessed scientific literature written in English after 1950. Survey data may be biased by physicians' self-reporting. In conclusion, most doctors occasionally intervene in their relatives' care. The decision to do so is determined by multiple factors. Physicians should treat only short-term or minor illnesses within their scope of practice. Future research should evaluate doctors' attitudes toward their relatives, medical student feelings about treating family, and intervention frequencies of medical and nonmedical professionals. PMID:22262264

  15. Evaluation of the Arkansas Medicaid Primary Care Physician Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Andreas; Baker, John A.

    1996-01-01

    Arkansas implemented a primary-care case-management program in February 1994. This study evaluates the program during its first 17 months. Using quarterly data collected for the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), a pooled cross-sectional time series analysis (1991:4-1995:2) estimates the effect of eligibles' program enrollment on expenditure (total, inpatient hospital, outpatient hospital, physicians, prescription drugs, laboratory and X-ray) and utilization measures (outpatient visits, physician visits, prescription drugs). The Arkansas Medicaid managed care program appears to have somewhat reduced growth in total vendor payments and also appears to have improved access to primary medical services. PMID:10165704

  16. Do female primary care physicians practise preventive care differently from their male colleagues?

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, C. A.; Hutchison, B. G.; Abelson, J.; Norman, G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether female primary care physicians' reported coverage of patients eligible for certain preventive care strategies differs from male physicians' reported coverage. DESIGN: A mailed survey. SETTING: Primary care practices in southern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: All primary care physicians who graduated between 1972 and 1988 and practised in a defined geographic area of Ontario were selected from the Canadian Medical Association's physician resource database. Response rate was 50%. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Answers to questions on sociodemographic and practice characteristics, attitudes toward preventive care, and perceptions about preventive care behaviour and practices. RESULTS: In general, reported coverage for Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination's (CTFPHE) A and B class recommendations was low. However, more female than male physicians reported high coverage of women patients for female-specific preventive care measures (i.e., Pap smears, breast examinations, and mammography) and for blood pressure measurement. Female physicians appeared to question more patients about a greater number of health risks. Often, sex of physician was the most salient factor affecting whether preventive care services thought effective by the CTFPHE were offered. However, when evidence for effectiveness of preventive services was equivocal or lacking, male and female physicians reported similar levels of coverage. CONCLUSION: Female primary care physicians are more likely than their male colleagues to report that their patients eligible for preventive health measures as recommended by the CTFPHE take advantage of these measures. PMID:8969856

  17. Acute arthritis of the hip--case series describing emergency physician performed ultrasound guided hip arthrocentesis.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Joseph; Denne, Nick; Miller, Miryam; Larrabee, Hollynn; Lander, Owen

    2013-01-01

    We report two cases of acute hip arthritis where arthrocentesis was able to be performed rapidly, at the bedside by the emergency physician using ultrasound guidance, expediting diagnosis and patient care. In the first case, the patient, who was 23 weeks pregnant, was diagnosed with septic hip arthritis, taken for operative washout of the joint and did very well postoperatively with no pregnancy or other complications. In the second case, the patient was determined to have a noninfectious etiology and also did well. Skilled ultrasound guidance allows hip arthrocentesis to be performed by the treating clinician, decreasing the time to diagnosis and definitive care.

  18. Acute coronary care 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the titles are: The measurement of acute myocardial infarct size by CT; Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of myocardial ischemia and infarction; Poistron imaging in the evaluation of ischemia and myocardial infarction; and New inotropic agents.

  19. Prognostication in Acutely Admitted Older Patients by Nurses and Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Buurman, Bianca M.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Levi, Marcel; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2008-01-01

    Background The process of prognostication has not been described for acutely hospitalized older patients. Objective To investigate (1) which factors are associated with 90-day mortality risk in a group of acutely hospitalized older medical patients, and (2) whether adding a clinical impression score of nurses or physicians improves the discriminatory ability of mortality prediction. Design Prospective cohort study. Participants Four hundred and sixty-three medical patients 65 years or older acutely admitted from November 1, 2002, through July 1, 2005, to a 1024-bed tertiary university teaching hospital. Measurements At admission, the attending nurse and physician were asked to give a clinical impression score for the illness the patient was admitted for. This score ranged from 1 (high possibility of a good outcome) until 10 (high possibility of a bad outcome, including mortality). Of all patients baseline characteristics and clinical parameters were collected. Mortality was registered up to 90 days after admission. Main Results In total, 23.8% ( = 110) of patients died within 90 days of admission. Four parameters were significantly associated with mortality risk: functional impairment, diagnosis malignancy, co-morbidities and high urea nitrogen serum levels. The AUC for the baseline model which included these risk factors (model 1) was 0.76 (95% CI 0.71 to 0.82). The AUC for the model using the risk factors and the clinical impression score of the physician (model 2) was 0.77 (0.71 to 0.82). The AUC for the model using the risk factors and the clinical impression score of the nurse (model 3) was 0.76 (0.71 to 0.82) and the AUC for the model, including the baseline covariates and the clinical impression score of both nurses and physicians was 0.77 (0.72 to 0.82). Adding clinical impression scores to model 1 did not significantly improve its accuracy. Conclusion A set of four clinical variables predicted mortality risk in acutely hospitalized older patients

  20. The impact of managed care on patients' trust in medical care and their physicians.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, D; Schlesinger, M

    1996-06-01

    Social trust in health care organizations and interpersonal trust in physicians may be mutually supportive, but they also diverge in important ways. The success of medical care depends most importantly on patients' trust that their physicians are competent, take appropriate responsibility and control, and give their patients' welfare the highest priority. Utilization review and structural arrangements in managed care potentially challenge trust in physicians by restricting choice, contradicting medical decisions and control, and restricting open communication with patients. Gatekeeping and incentives to limit care also raise serious trust issues. We argue that managed care plans rather than physicians should be required to disclose financial arrangements, that limits be placed on incentives that put physicians at financial risk, and that professional norms and public policies should encourage clear separation of interests of physicians from health plan organization and finance. PMID:8637148

  1. Stoicism, the physician, and care of medical outliers

    PubMed Central

    Papadimos, Thomas J

    2004-01-01

    Background Medical outliers present a medical, psychological, social, and economic challenge to the physicians who care for them. The determinism of Stoic thought is explored as an intellectual basis for the pursuit of a correct mental attitude that will provide aid and comfort to physicians who care for medical outliers, thus fostering continued physician engagement in their care. Discussion The Stoic topics of good, the preferable, the morally indifferent, living consistently, and appropriate actions are reviewed. Furthermore, Zeno's cardinal virtues of Justice, Temperance, Bravery, and Wisdom are addressed, as are the Stoic passions of fear, lust, mental pain, and mental pleasure. These concepts must be understood by physicians if they are to comprehend and accept the Stoic view as it relates to having the proper attitude when caring for those with long-term and/or costly illnesses. Summary Practicing physicians, especially those that are hospital based, and most assuredly those practicing critical care medicine, will be emotionally challenged by the medical outlier. A Stoic approach to such a social and psychological burden may be of benefit. PMID:15588293

  2. Overutilization of acute-care beds in Veterans Affairs hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smith, C B; Goldman, R L; Martin, D C; Williamson, J; Weir, C; Beauchamp, C; Ashcraft, M

    1996-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals would have substantial overutilization of acute care beds and services because of policies that emphasize inpatient care over ambulatory care. Reviewers from 24 randomly selected VA hospitals applied the InterQual ISD* (Intensity, Severity, Discharge) criteria for appropriateness concurrently to a random sample of 2,432 admissions to acute medical, surgical, and psychiatry services. Reliability of hospital reviewers in applying the ISD* criteria was tested by comparing their reviews with those of a small group of expert reviewers. Validity of the ISD* criteria was tested by comparing the assessments of master reviewers with the implicit judgments of panels of nine physicians. The physician panels validated the ISD* admission criteria for medicine and surgery (74% agreement with master reviewers, kappa > 0.4), whereas the psychiatry criteria were not validated (66% agreement, kappa 0.29). Hospital reviewers reliably used all three criteria sets (> 83% agreement with master reviewers, kappa > 0.6). Rates of nonacute admissions to acute medical and surgical services were > 38% as determined by the hospital and master reviewers and by the physician panels. Nonacute rates of continued stay were > 32% for both medicine and surgery services. Similar rates of nonacute admissions and continued stay were found for all 24 hospitals. Reasons for nonacute admissions and continued stay included lack of an ambulatory care alternative, conservative physician practices, delays in discharge planning, and social factors such as homelessness and long travel distances to the hospital. Using criteria that the authors showed to be reliable and valid, substantial overutilization of acute medicine and surgical beds was found in a representative sample of VA hospitals. Correcting this situation will require changes in physician practice patterns, development of ambulatory care alternatives to inpatient

  3. Naturopathic physicians: holistic primary care and integrative medicine specialists.

    PubMed

    Litchy, Andrew P

    2011-12-01

    The use of Complimentary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is increasing in the United States; there is a need for physician level practitioners who possess extensive training in both CAM and conventional medicine. Naturopathic physicians possess training that allows integration of modern scientific knowledge and the age-old wisdom of natural healing techniques. Naturopathic philosophy provides a framework to implement CAM in concert with conventional therapies. The naturopathic physician's expertise in both conventional medicine and CAM allows a practice style that provides excellent care through employing conventional and CAM modalities while utilizing modern research and evidence-based medicine. PMID:22432775

  4. Naturopathic physicians: holistic primary care and integrative medicine specialists.

    PubMed

    Litchy, Andrew P

    2011-12-01

    The use of Complimentary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is increasing in the United States; there is a need for physician level practitioners who possess extensive training in both CAM and conventional medicine. Naturopathic physicians possess training that allows integration of modern scientific knowledge and the age-old wisdom of natural healing techniques. Naturopathic philosophy provides a framework to implement CAM in concert with conventional therapies. The naturopathic physician's expertise in both conventional medicine and CAM allows a practice style that provides excellent care through employing conventional and CAM modalities while utilizing modern research and evidence-based medicine.

  5. Physicians' and consumers' conflicting attitudes toward health care advertising.

    PubMed

    Krohn, F B; Flynn, C

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the conflicting attitudes held by physicians and health care consumers toward health care advertising in an attempt to resolve the question. The paper introduces the differing positions held by the two groups. The rationale behind physicians' attitudes is then presented that advertising can be unethical, misleading, deceptive, and lead to unnecessary price increases. They believe that word-of-mouth does and should play the major role in attracting new patients. The opposite view of consumers is then presented which contends that health care advertising leads to higher consumer awareness of services, better services, promotes competitive pricing, and lowers rather than raises health care costs. The final section of the paper compares the arguments presented and concludes that health care advertising clearly has a place in the health care industry. PMID:11968299

  6. Enhancing family physician capacity to deliver quality palliative home care

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Denise; Howell, Doris; Brazil, Kevin; Howard, Michelle; Taniguchi, Alan

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED Family physicians face innumerable challenges to delivering quality palliative home care to meet the complex needs of end-of-life patients and their families. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To implement a model of shared care to enhance family physicians’ ability to deliver quality palliative home care, particularly in a community-based setting. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Family physicians in 3 group practices (N = 21) in Ontario’s Niagara West region collaborated with an interprofessional palliative care team (including a palliative care advanced practice nurse, a palliative medicine physician, a bereavement counselor, a psychosocial-spiritual advisor, and a case manager) in a shared-care partnership to provide comprehensive palliative home care. Key features of the program included systematic and timely identification of end-of-life patients, needs assessments, symptom and psychosocial support interventions, regular communication between team members, and coordinated care guided by outcome-based assessment in the home. In addition, educational initiatives were provided to enhance family physicians’ knowledge and skills. CONCLUSION Because of the program, participants reported improved communication, effective interprofessional collaboration, and the capacity to deliver palliative home care, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to end-of-life patients in the community. PMID:19074714

  7. Acute retrobulbar haemorrhage: An ophthalmologic emergency for the emergency physician.

    PubMed

    Pamukcu, Can; Odabaşı, Mahmut

    2015-07-01

    Acute retrobulbar haemorrhage (ARBH) is a rare ophthalmic emergency observed following blunt eye trauma. Multiple trauma and loss of consciousness can hide symptoms of ARBH. Rapid diagnosis and immediate lateral canthotomy and cantholysis must be performed to prevent permanent visual loss in patients. Medical treatment can be added to surgical therapy. Lateral canthotomy and cantholysis are simple procedures that can be performed by emergency physicians. In this report, it was aimed to present a case with post-traumatic ARBH and provide general knowledge about the diagnosis, follow-up and treatment of ARBH.

  8. Potential of physician assistants to support primary care

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Sarah; Botting, Ingrid; Huebner, Lori-Anne; Wright, Brock; Beaupre, Beth; Permack, Sheldon; Jones, Ian; Mihlachuk, Ainslie; Edwards, Jeanette; Rhule, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine effective strategies for introducing physician assistants (PAs) in primary care settings and provide guidance to support ongoing provincial planning for PA roles in primary care. Design Time-series research design using multiple qualitative methods. Setting Manitoba. Participants Physician assistants, supervising family physicians, clinic staff, members of the Introducing Physician Assistants into Primary Care Steering Committee, and patients receiving care from PAs. Methods The PA role was evaluated at 6 health care sites between 2012 and 2014; sites varied in size, funding models, geographic locations (urban or rural), specifics of the PA role, and setting type (clinic or hospital). Semistructured interviews and focus groups were conducted; patient feedback on quality improvement was retrieved; observational methods were employed; and documents were reviewed. A baseline assessment was conducted before PA placement. In 2013, there was a series of interviews and focus groups about the introduction of PAs at the 3 initial sites; in 2014 interviews and focus groups included all 6 sites. Main findings The concerns that were expressed during baseline interviews about the introduction of PAs (eg, community and patient acceptance) informed planning. Most concerns that were identified did not materialize. Supervising family physicians, site staff, and patients were enthusiastic about the introduction of PAs. There were a few challenges experienced at the site level (eg, front-desk scheduling), but they were perceived as manageable. Unanticipated challenges at the provincial level were identified (eg, diagnostic test ordering). Increased attachment and improved access—the goals of introducing PAs to primary care—were only some of the positive effects that were reported. Conclusion This first systematic multisite evaluation of PAs in primary care in Canada demonstrated that with appropriate collaborative planning, PAs can effectively

  9. Top 20 Research Studies of 2015 for Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Ebell, Mark H; Grad, Roland

    2016-05-01

    In 2015, a group of primary care clinicians with expertise in evidence-based practice performed monthly surveillance of more than 110 English-language clinical research journals. They identified 251 studies that addressed a primary care question and had the potential to change practice if valid (patient-oriented evidence that matters, or POEMs). Each study was critically appraised and disseminated to subscribers via e-mail, including members of the Canadian Medical Association who had the option to use a validated tool to assess the clinical relevance of each POEM and the benefits they expect for their practice. This article, the fifth installment in this annual series, summarizes the 20 POEMs based on original research studies judged to have the greatest clinical relevance for family physicians. Key recommendations include questioning the need for backup throat cultures; avoiding early imaging and not adding cyclobenzaprine or oxycodone to naproxen for patients with acute low back pain; and encouraging patients with chronic or recurrent low back pain to walk. Other studies showed that using a nicotine patch for more than eight weeks has little benefit; that exercise can prevent falls that cause injury in at-risk older women; and that prostate cancer screening provides a very small benefit, which is outweighed by significant potential harms of screening and associated follow-up treatment. Additional highly rated studies found that tight glycemic control provides only a small cardiovascular benefit in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus at the expense of hypoglycemic episodes; that treating mild hypertension can provide a modest reduction in stroke and all-cause mortality; that sterile gloves are not needed for minor uncomplicated skin procedures; that vasomotor symptoms last a mean of 7.4 years; and that three regimens have been shown to provide the best eradication rates for Helicobacter pylori infection. PMID:27175953

  10. Expanding physician education in health care fraud and program integrity.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shantanu; Tarzy, Bruce; Hunt, Lauren; Taitsman, Julie; Budetti, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Program integrity (PI) spans the entire spectrum of improper payments from fraud to abuse, errors, and waste in the health care system. Few physicians will perpetrate fraud or abuse during their careers, but nearly all will contribute to the remaining spectrum of improper payments, making preventive education in this area vital. Despite the enormous impact that PI issues have on government-sponsored and private insurance programs, physicians receive little formal education in this area. Physicians' lack of awareness of PI issues not only makes them more likely to submit inappropriate claims, generate orders that other providers and suppliers will use to submit inappropriate claims, and document improperly in the medical record but also more likely to become victims of fraud schemes themselves.In this article, the authors provide an overview of the current state of PI issues in general, and fraud in particular, as well as a description of the state of formal education for practicing physicians, residents, and fellows. Building on the lessons from pilot programs conducted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and partner organizations, the authors then propose a model PI education curriculum to be implemented nationwide for physicians at all levels. They recommend that various stakeholder organizations take part in the development and implementation process to ensure that all perspectives are included. Educating physicians is an essential step in establishing a broader culture of compliance and improved integrity in the health care system, extending beyond Medicare and Medicaid.

  11. The U.S. primary care physician workforce: minimal growth 1980-1999.

    PubMed

    Biola, H; Green, L A; Phillips, R L; Guirguis-Blake, J; Fryer, G E

    2003-10-15

    Growth in the primary care physician workforce (physicians per capita) in the United States has trailed the growth of the specialist physician population in recent years. This has occurred despite calls during the same period for increased production of primary care physicians and educational reforms focusing on primary care.

  12. Impact of patient satisfaction ratings on physicians and clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Zgierska, Aleksandra; Rabago, David; Miller, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Background Although patient satisfaction ratings often drive positive changes, they may have unintended consequences. Objective The study reported here aimed to evaluate the clinician-perceived effects of patient satisfaction ratings on job satisfaction and clinical care. Methods A 26-item survey, developed by a state medical society in 2012 to assess the effects of patient satisfaction surveys, was administered online to physician members of a state-level medical society. Respondents remained anonymous. Results One hundred fifty five physicians provided responses (3.9% of the estimated 4,000 physician members of the state-level medical society, or approximately 16% of the state’s emergency department [ED] physicians). The respondents were predominantly male (85%) and practicing in solo or private practice (45%), hospital (43%), or academia (15%). The majority were ED (57%), followed by primary care (16%) physicians. Fifty-nine percent reported that their compensation was linked to patient satisfaction ratings. Seventy-eight percent reported that patient satisfaction surveys moderately or severely affected their job satisfaction; 28% had considered quitting their job or leaving the medical profession. Twenty percent reported their employment being threatened because of patient satisfaction data. Almost half believed that pressure to obtain better scores promoted inappropriate care, including unnecessary antibiotic and opioid prescriptions, tests, procedures, and hospital admissions. Among 52 qualitative responses, only three were positive. Conclusion These pilot-level data suggest that patient satisfaction survey utilization may promote, under certain circumstances, job dissatisfaction, attrition, and inappropriate clinical care among some physicians. This is concerning, especially in the context of the progressive incorporation of patient satisfaction ratings as a quality-of-care metric, and highlights the need for a rigorous evaluation of the optimal methods

  13. Expenditures for physician services under alternative models of managed care.

    PubMed

    Kapur, K; Joyce, G F; Van Vorst, K A; Escarce, J J

    2000-06-01

    This study compares expenditures for physician services in a closed panel gatekeeper health maintenance organization (HMO) and an open panel point of service HMO that share the same physician network. The study uses administrative files of the two study HMOs for 1994-1995 to assess differences in spending for primary care physicians' (PCPs') services, specialists' services, and total physician services. When the copayments for PCP visits and PCP-referred specialist visits were $0, total physician expenditures were 4 percent higher in the gatekeeper HMO than in the point of service plan (p < .05). When the copayments for PCP visits and PCP-referred specialist visits were $10, total physician expenditures ranged from equal in both HMOs to 7 percent higher in the gatekeeper HMO (p < .01), depending on the copayment for self-referred visits. Expenditures for specialists' services were not higher in the point of service plan. The authors conclude that direct patient access to specialists does not necessarily result in higher physician or specialist expenditures in HMOs. PMID:10868071

  14. [Task analysis of clinical laboratory physician in acute hospital].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Junko

    2013-06-01

    Appropriate communications between clinical divisions and clinical laboratories are required to improve the quality of health care in hospitals. In this paper, the routine work of a clinical laboratory physician is presented. 1. In order to support attentive medical practice, we have established a consultation service system for handling questions from medical staff. The main clients are doctors and clinical laboratory technologists. 2. In order to improve the quality of infectious disease analysis, we have recommended obtaining two or more blood culture sets to achieve good sensitivity. The order rate of multiple blood culture sets increased 90% or more in 2011. 3. In order to provide appropriate blood transfusion, we intervene in inappropriate transfusion plans. 4. In order to support prompt decision making, we send E-mails to physicians regarding critical values. 5. We send reports on the morphology of cells(peripheral blood and bone marrow), IEP, flow cytometry, irregular antibodies, and so on. It has been realized that doctors want to know better solutions immediately rather than the best solution tomorrow morning. We would like to contribute to improving the quality of health care in Saitama Cooperative Hospital as clinical laboratory physicians.

  15. Optimal physicians schedule in an Intensive Care Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidri, L.; Labidi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we consider a case study for the problem of physicians scheduling in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The objective is to minimize the total overtime under complex constraints. The considered ICU is composed of three buildings and the physicians are divided accordingly into six teams. The workload is assigned to each team under a set of constraints. The studied problem is composed of two simultaneous phases: composing teams and assigning the workload to each one of them. This constitutes an additional major hardness compared to the two phase's process: composing teams and after that assigning the workload. The physicians schedule in this ICU is used to be done manually each month. In this work, the studied physician scheduling problem is formulated as an integer linear program and solved optimally using state of the art software. The preliminary experimental results show that 50% of the overtime can be saved.

  16. Evolution of acute orthopaedic care.

    PubMed

    Mamczak, Christiaan N; Born, Christopher T; Obremskey, William T; Dromsky, David M

    2012-01-01

    Current combat battlefield injuries are among the most complex and challenging orthopaedic cases. These injuries carry high risks for exsanguination and global contamination of extensive soft-tissue and complicated bony injuries. Military orthopaedic surgeons must employ the latest advances in acute combat casualty care to achieve favorable outcomes. Adaptive changes over the past 10 years of war have given today's surgeons the armamentarium to optimize patient care. Innovative methods of damage control resuscitation and surgery have led to increased survival. However, the fundamentals of surgical hemostasis and decontamination remain critical to successful management. The acute treatment of combat casualties involves a continuum of care from the point of injury through transport out of theater. Future research and education are paramount to better prepare military orthopaedic surgeons to further increase survivability and enhance the outcomes of service members with complex wounds.

  17. Critical care by emergency physicians in American and English hospitals.

    PubMed

    Graff, L G; Clark, S; Radford, M J

    1993-09-01

    The object of this study was to compare emergency physician critical care services in an American (A) and an English (E) Emergency Department (ED). A prospective case comparison trial was used. The study was carried out at two university affiliated community hospitals, one in the U.S.A and one in England. Subjects were consecutive patients triaged as requiring critical care services and subsequently admitted to the hospital ward (A, n = 17; E, n = 18) or the intensive/critical care unit ([ICU] A, n = 14; E, n = 24). The study time period was randomly selected 8-h shifts occurring over a 4-week period. All patients were treated by standard guidelines for critical care services at the study hospital emergency department. For all study patients mean length of stay was significantly longer for the American (233 min, 95% CI 201, 264) than the English ED (24 min, 95% CI 23, 25). American emergency physicians spent less total time providing physician services (19.2 min, 95% CI 16.8, 21.6) vs. (23 min, 95% CI 21.6, 24.4) than English emergency physicians. American emergency physicians spent less time with the patient than English emergency physicians: 12.4 min (95% CI 10.3, 14.5) vs. 17 min (95% CI 15.8, 18.2). American emergency physicians spent more time on the telephone 1.8 min (95% CI 1.4, 2.2) vs. 1.2 min (95% CI 1.1, 1.3), and in patient care discussions/order giving 1.8 min (95% CI 1.4, 2.2) vs. 1.1 min (95% CI .8, 1.4), There was no significant difference in time charting (3.2 min, 95% CI 2.8, 3.6 vs. 3.5 min, 95% CI 3.2, 3.8). Results did not vary significantly whether analysed subgroups or the whole study group. American emergency physicians provided 81% of their service during the first hour. There were delays at the American hospital until the physician saw the patient: 4.9 min (95% CI 2.5, 7.3) for patients admitted to the ICU/CVU (Cardiovascular Unit), and 9.2 min (95% CI 4.6, 13.8) for patients admitted to the ward. At the American hospital, ICU

  18. Preparing Physicians for Practice in Managed Care Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Nicole

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of managed health care looks at its evolution and characteristics, implications for medical education, and the competencies needed by physicians in this new environment, including epidemiological thinking, understanding of human and organizational behavior, familiarity with information technology, quality control skills, knowledge of…

  19. Social Workers Training Primary Care Physicians: Essential Psychosocial Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayas, Luis H.; Dyche, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    Notes that growth of primary care medicine is opening new roles for social worker in medical education. Describes family-oriented, community-based medical residency program in which social work faculty plays prominent role in education of young physicians. Discusses relevance of core social work principles to medicine and how they are introduced…

  20. Providing primary health care with non-physicians.

    PubMed

    Chen, P C

    1984-04-01

    The definition of primary health care is basically the same, but the wide variety of concepts as to the form and type of worker required is largely due to variations in economic, demographic, socio-cultural and political factors. Whatever form it takes, in many parts of the developing world, it is increasingly clear that primary health care must be provided by non-physicians. The reasons for this trend are compelling, yet it is surprisingly opposed by the medical profession in many a developing country. Nonetheless, numerous field trials are being conducted in a variety of situations in several countries around the world. Non-physician primary health care workers vary from medical assistants and nurse practitioners to aide-level workers called village mobilizers, village volunteers, village aides and a variety of other names. The functions, limitations and training of such workers will need to be defined, so that an optimal combination of skills, knowledge and attitudes best suited to produce the desired effect on local health problems may be attained. The supervision of such workers by the physician and other health professionals will need to be developed in the spirit of the health team. An example of the use of non-physicians in providing primary health care in Sarawak is outlined.

  1. Physicians, Preventive Care, and Applied Nutrition: Selected Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanz, Karen; Golboy, Mary Neth

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-five articles on medical school curricula and physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to nutritional care, especially concerning heart disease and cholesterol control, were reviewed. It is concluded that nutrition education should occur in undergraduate clinical training and residency periods and that realistic nutrition…

  2. Preparing for accountable care organizations: a physician primer.

    PubMed

    Curnow, Randall T; Doers, Jesse T

    2013-04-01

    The concept of the accountable care organization (ACO) offers the opportunity to better integrate the health system into a value proposition aligned toward improved care, more efficient delivery, and higher patient satisfaction. As a significant component of health reform, the ACO has many implications for physicians. Physicians interested in joining ACOs have a variety of options, including forming their own, integrating (virtual or otherwise) with larger health systems, or joining multiple, existing ACOs. To succeed, fundamental changes away from the past fee-for-service model will be necessary. Clinical and financial data will become of paramount importance. The data will need to be more accessible, more accurate, and more appropriately used to align with the greater ACO value proposition. Physicians will also need to embrace the "era of persuasion" with its underlying assumption that engaging patients and other physicians are as necessary as a proper diagnosis and treatment plan. As there is a wide array of options in the marketplace, providers must have a clear understanding of patient attribution, financial incentives, and quality metrics within any ACO agreement. Finally, the health-care system must acknowledge the difficulties associated with the pace of change itself and invest in resources to aid in the adaptive reserve of all components of the health-care system.

  3. Physicians' Attitudes toward Children with AIDS: Issues of Group Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, M. Christine; Jessee, Peggy O.; Gresham, Cathy

    1998-01-01

    Examined experiences with and opinions on dealing with pediatric AIDS patients among Pediatric and Family Medicine senior residents. Found that residents were willing to certify children to attend group care activities, but differences were observed by physician specialty and child age. Most felt that program administrators should be made aware,…

  4. Learner Preferences of Primary Care Physicians in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Linda M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Primary care physicians were surveyed regarding their preference for lecture, hands-on, and problem-based learning sessions. Analyses found no significant relationship between individual learning style as determined by the instrument used and instructional preferences. The discussion examines potential reasons for these findings. (CT)

  5. Characterizing physicians' information needs at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Lauren A; Cate, Olle Ten; Moorhead, Laura L; van Stiphout, Feikje; Kramer, Bianca M R; Ter Braak, Edith; Posley, Keith; Irby, David; O'Brien, Bridget C

    2014-11-01

    Physicians have many information needs that arise at the point of care yet go unmet for a variety of reasons, including uncertainty about which information resources to select. In this study, we aimed to identify the various types of physician information needs and how these needs relate to physicians' use of the database PubMed and the evidence summary tool UpToDate. We conducted semi-structured interviews with physicians (Stanford University, United States; n = 13; and University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands; n = 9), eliciting participants' descriptions of their information needs and related use of PubMed and/or UpToDate. Using thematic analysis, we identified six information needs: refreshing, confirming, logistics, teaching, idea generating and personal learning. Participants from both institutions similarly described their information needs and selection of resources. The identification of these six information needs and their relation to PubMed and UpToDate expands upon previously identified physician information needs and may be useful to medical educators designing evidence-based practice training for physicians.

  6. Caring for LGBTQ patients: Methods for improving physician cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Klein, Elizabeth W; Nakhai, Maliheh

    2016-05-01

    This article summarizes the components of a curriculum used to teach family medicine residents and faculty about LGBTQ patients' needs in a family medicine residency program in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. This curriculum was developed to provide primary care physicians and physicians-in-training with skills to provide better health care for LGBTQ-identified patients. The curriculum covers topics that range from implicit and explicit bias and appropriate terminology to techniques for crafting patient-centered treatment plans. Additionally, focus is placed on improving the understanding of specific and unique barriers to competent health care encountered by LGBTQ patients. Through facilitated discussion, learners explore the health disparities that disproportionately affect LGBTQ individuals and develop skills that will improve their ability to care for LGBTQ patients. The goal of the curriculum is to teach family medicine faculty and physicians in training how to more effectively communicate with and treat LGBTQ patients in a safe, non-judgmental, and welcoming primary care environment. PMID:27497452

  7. Managed Medicare: an overview for the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Colenda, C C; Sherman, F T

    1998-01-01

    Medicare is looking to managed care to help solve its financial burden. Because managed care plans offer a number of advantages for Medicare enrollees, the number of plans and of enrollees are increasing dramatically. With some exceptions, the Medicare population appears to do as well or better in HMOs as in fee-for-service care, despite differences in utilization of services. For the primary care physician, the key to success in managed Medicare is finding and aggressively managing your frail or near frail patients. Basic tools for survival are the use of prevention strategies, screening of enrollees and targeting for needed services, geriatric assessment, use of alternate care settings to avoid or limit costly hospital care, and monitoring of medication use for compliance and adverse reactions.

  8. The application of the acute care nurse practitioner role in a cardiovascular patient population.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Leveille, Marygrace; Bennett, Jasmiry D; Nelson, Nicole

    2014-12-01

    This article presents an overview of the role of an acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP) in an acute care setting caring for patients with cardiovascular issues. Discussion includes the evolution of the ACNP role, the consensus model for advanced practice registered nurse regulation, and a case study highlighting the role of the ACNP while caring for a hemodynamically unstable patient. The case study articulates the ACNP's role as liaison between the patient, family members, collaborating physicians, and nurses.

  9. Physicians' Initial Management of Acute Low Back Pain Versus Evidence-Based Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Barbara S; Courtney, Theodore K; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Matz, Simon; Christiani, David C

    2005-01-01

    Background Little information is available on physician characteristics and patient presentations that may influence compliance with evidence-based guidelines for acute low back pain. Objective To assess whether physicians' management decisions are consistent with the Agency for Health Research Quality's guideline and whether responses varied with the presentation of sciatica or by physician characteristics. Design Cross-sectional study using a mailed survey. Participants Participants were randomly selected from internal medicine, family practice, general practice, emergency medicine, and occupational medicine specialties. Measurements A questionnaire asked for recommendations for 2 case scenarios, representing patients without and with sciatica, respectively. Results Seven hundred and twenty surveys were completed (response rate=25%). In cases 1 (without sciatica) and 2 (with sciatica), 26.9% and 4.3% of physicians fully complied with the guideline, respectively. For each year in practice, the odds of guideline noncompliance increased 1.03 times (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.01 to 1.05) for case 1. With occupational medicine as the referent specialty, general practice had the greatest odds of noncompliance (3.60, 95% CI=1.75 to 7.40) in case 1, followed by internal medicine and emergency medicine. Results for case 2 reflected the influence of sciatica with internal medicine having substantially higher odds (vs case 1) and the greatest odds of noncompliance of any specialty (6.93, 95% CI=1.47 to 32.78), followed by family practice and emergency medicine. Conclusions A majority of primary care physicians continue to be noncompliant with evidence-based back pain guidelines. Sciatica dramatically influenced clinical decision-making, increasing the extent of noncompliance, particularly for internal medicine and family practice. Physicians' misunderstanding of sciatica's natural history and belief that more intensive initial management is indicated may be factors

  10. Physician Religion and End-of-Life Pediatric Care: A Qualitative Examination of Physicians' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Lori Brand; Clair, Jeffrey Michael

    2015-01-01

    Physician religion/spirituality has the potential to influence the communication between physicians and parents of children at the end of life. In order to explore this relationship, the authors conducted two rounds of narrative interviews to examine pediatric physicians' perspectives (N=17) of how their religious/spiritual beliefs affect end-of-life communication and care. Grounded theory informed the design and analysis of the study. As a proxy for religiosity/spirituality, physicians were classified into the following groups based on the extent to which religious/spiritual language was infused into their responses: Religiously Rich Responders (RRR), Moderately Religious Responders (MRR), and Low Religious Responders (LRR). Twelve of the 17 participants (71%) were classified into the RRR or MRR groups. The majority of participants suggested that religion/spirituality played a role in their practice of medicine and communication with parents in a myriad of ways and to varying degrees. Participants used their religious/spiritual beliefs to support families' spirituality, uphold hope, participate in prayer, and alleviate their own emotional distress emerging from their patients' deaths.

  11. THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS IN PRIMARY CARE SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Roderick S.; Everett, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Shortages of primary care doctors are occurring globally; one means of meeting this demand has been the use of physician assistants (PAs). Introduced in the United States in the late 1960s to address doctor shortages, the PA movement has grown to over 75,000 providers in 2011 and spread to Australia, Canada, Great Britain, The Netherlands, Germany, Ghana, and South Africa. A purposeful literature review was undertaken to assess the contribution of PAs to primary care systems. Contemporary studies suggest that PAs can contribute to the successful attainment of primary care functions, particularly the provision of comprehensive care, accessibility, and accountability. Employing PAs seems a reasonable strategy for providing primary care for diverse populations. PMID:21851446

  12. Top 20 research studies of 2012 for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Ebell, Mark H; Grad, Roland

    2013-09-15

    This is the second annual summary of top research studies in primary care. In 2012, through regular surveillance of more than 100 English-language clinical research journals, seven clinicians identified 270 studies with the potential to change primary care practice, called POEMs, or patient-oriented evidence that matters. These studies were then summarized in brief, structured critical appraisals and e-mailed to subscribers, including members of the Canadian Medical Association. A validated tool was used to obtain feedback from these physicians about the clinical relevance of each POEM and the benefits the physicians expected for their practice. The 20 identified research studies rated as most relevant cover common topics such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease prevention, infectious disease, musculoskeletal disease and exercise, cancer screening, and women's health. PMID:24134045

  13. [The diabetic foot--view of the primary care physician].

    PubMed

    Fritschi, J; Suter, S

    1999-07-01

    When dealing with feet of diabetic patients, disciplined and structured action on the part of the primary care physician--general practitioner or specialist--will ward off disabling and costly consequences. The physician replaces the patient's missing neuropathic sensibility; he demonstrates leadership during visits by checking the patient's feet, their pulse, look, feel of their skin, temperature, neurologic deficits and state of care. Shoes need to be checked thoroughly. Findings include dermatologic, angiologic, neurologic, orthopedic and hygienic problems. These require rapid and expert therapy and prophylaxis even when considered of lesser importance in non-diabetic patients. Practical schemes and sound reasoning along with a treatment team (podologist, orthopedist, diabetic consultant) are the steps to success: keeping the feet free of disease, even with a progressing degree of diabetes. PMID:10444992

  14. Primary Care Physicians and Coronary Heart Disease Prevention: A Practice Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makrides, Lydia; Veinot, Paula L.; Richard, Josie; Allen, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    The role of primary care physicians in coronary heart disease prevention is explored, and a model for patient education by physicians is offered. A qualitative study in Nova Scotia examines physicians' expectations about their role in prevention, obstacles to providing preventive care, and mechanisms by which preventive care occurs. (Author/EMK)

  15. Characteristics of information resources preferred by primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M L

    1997-04-01

    Primary care physicians use patient data, medical knowledge, logistic information, and population statistics. They rely on their personal knowledge to care for their patients, their top priority. When they seek information beyond this personal knowledge base, they frequently want information in the context of the care of a specific patient. They also continually add to their personal knowledge base. Less frequently, they seek logistic information and population statistics. For patient-specific questions, physicians most often seek medical facts or medical opinions. A physician may be persistent in seeking information if the patient's problem is perceived to be urgent and the doctor believes a definitive answer exists. Information resources for answering clinical questions should be readily available, familiar, and quick to use. Lifelong learning activities should also be readily available, and they should require a minimum of time, effort, and expense. Minimal cost in time and effort is particularly important when knowledge is sought as a part of ongoing medical learning, since there is less immediate benefit to balance the time and effort invested in information seeking. PMID:9160156

  16. Recommendations for ensuring early thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction. The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians for the Emergency Cardiac Care Coalition.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To recommend practical steps to ensure early thrombolytic therapy and thereby reduce mortality and morbidity associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). OPTIONS: Various factors were considered that influence time to thrombolysis related to patients, independent practitioners and health care systems. OUTCOMES: Reduction in morbidity and mortality associated with AMI. EVIDENCE: Early initiation of thrombolytic therapy reduces morbidity and mortality associated with AMI. The ECC Coalition analysed the factors that might impede early implementation of thrombolytic therapy. VALUES: Published data were reviewed, and recommendations were based on consensus opinion of the Emergency Cardiac Care (ECC) Coalition. The ECC Coalition comprises 20 professional, nongovernment and government organizations and has a mandate to improve emergency cardiac care services through collaboration. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Early thrombolytic therapy reduces morbidity and mortality associated with AMI. Implementation of the recommendations will result in reduced time to thrombolytic therapy, streamlining of current practices and enhanced cooperation among health care professionals to expedite care. Depending on existing practices, implementation may require protocol development, and public and professional education. Although costs are associated with educating the public and health care professionals, they are outweighed by the financial and social benefits of reduced morbidity and mortality. RECOMMENDATIONS: Early recognition of AMI symptoms by the public and health care professionals, early access to the emergency medical services system and early action by emergency care providers in administering thrombolytic therapy (within 30 minutes after the patient's arrival at the emergency department). VALIDATION: No similar consensus statements or practice guidelines for thrombolytic therapy in Canada are available for comparison. PMID:8630837

  17. 42 CFR 456.604 - Physician team member inspecting care of recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Inspections of Care in Intermediate Care Facilities and Institutions for Mental Diseases § 456.604 Physician team member...

  18. 42 CFR 456.604 - Physician team member inspecting care of beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Inspections of Care in Intermediate Care Facilities and Institutions for Mental Diseases § 456.604 Physician team...

  19. 42 CFR 456.604 - Physician team member inspecting care of beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Inspections of Care in Intermediate Care Facilities and Institutions for Mental Diseases § 456.604 Physician team...

  20. 42 CFR 456.604 - Physician team member inspecting care of recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Inspections of Care in Intermediate Care Facilities and Institutions for Mental Diseases § 456.604 Physician team member...

  1. How Adults' Access to Outpatient Physician Services Relates to the Local Supply of Primary Care Physicians in the Rural Southeast

    PubMed Central

    Pathman, Donald E; Ricketts, Thomas C; Konrad, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine how access to outpatient medical care varies with local primary care physician densities across primary care service areas (PCSAs) in the rural Southeast, for adults as a whole and separately for the elderly and poor. Data Sources Access data from a 2002 to 2003 telephone survey of 4,311 adults living in 298 PCSAs within 150 rural counties in eight Southeastern states were linked geographically with physician practice location data from the American Medical and American Osteopathic Associations and population data from the U.S. Census. Study Design In a cross-sectional study design, we used a series of logistic regression models to assess how 26 measures of various aspects of access to outpatient physician services varied for subjects arranged into five groups based on the population-per-physician ratios of the PCSAs where they lived. Principal Findings Among adults as a whole, more individuals reported traveling over 30 minutes for outpatient care in PCSAs with more than 3,500 people per physician than in PCSAs with fewer than 1,500 people per physician (39.1 versus 18.5 percent, p<.001) and more reported travel difficulties. Otherwise, PCSA density of primary care physicians was unrelated to reported barriers to care, unrelated to people's satisfaction with care, and unrelated to indicators of people's use of services. Use rates of six recommended preventive health services varied in no consistent direction with physician densities. Among the elderly, only the proportion traveling over 30 minutes for care was greater in areas with lowest physician densities. Among subjects covered under Medicaid or uninsured, lower local physician densities were associated with longer travel time, difficulties with travel and reaching one's physician by phone, and two areas of dissatisfaction with care. Conclusions For adults as a whole in the rural South and for the elderly there, low local primary care physician densities are associated with travel

  2. Knowledge of preconception health care among primary care physicians in Delaware.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Ruchi; Locke, Robert G; Hack, David; Paul, David A

    2012-11-01

    Pregnancy outcomes including premature birth are influenced by multiple factors including preconception health. This study was designed to assess the knowledge of various aspects of preconception health care in clinical practice in the state of Delaware. After assuring content validity, a questionnaire was provided to primary care physicians in Delaware. A total of 94 Delaware clinicians completed the survey and 96 percent indicated they should provide preconception counseling. Physicians frequently discussed some aspects of preconception care including diabetes and weight management, while other topics including reproductive life plans, vaccinations, and HIV screening were less frequently discussed. Preconception health care has been recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to improve the health of women of childbearing age. Our data indicate a need to increase education and programs regarding preconception health to Delaware primary care physicians.

  3. Physician Impact on the Total Cost of Care

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Paul A.; Butz, David; Griffes, Louisa C.; Morlock, David R.; Greenfield, Lazar J.

    2000-01-01

    Background and Objectives Physicians’ efforts at cost containment focus on decreased resource utilization and reduced length of stay. Although these efforts appear to be appropriate, little data exist to gauge their success. As such, the goal of this study is to determine trauma service cost allocations and how this information can help physicians to contain costs. Materials and Methods The authors analyzed the costs for 696 trauma admissions at a level I trauma center for fiscal year 1997. Data were obtained from the hospital costing system. Costs analyzed were variable direct, fixed direct, and Indirect costs. Together, the fixed and indirect costs are referred to as “hospital overhead.” Total Cost equals variable direct plus fixed direct plus indirect costs. Results The mean variable, fixed, and indirect costs per patient were $7,998, $3,534, and $11,086, respectively. Mean total cost per patient was $22,618. Conclusion The 35% variable direct cost represents the percentage of total cost that is typically under the immediate influence of physicians, in contrast to the 65% of total cost over which physicians have little control. Physicians must gain a better understanding of cost drivers and must participate in the operations and allocations of institutional fixed direct and indirect costs if the overall cost of care is to be reduced. PMID:10714637

  4. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective.

    PubMed

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, I R; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, C M; Purcarea, V L

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer's perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician's perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician's perspective.

  5. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective.

    PubMed

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, I R; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, C M; Purcarea, V L

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer's perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician's perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician's perspective. PMID:27453745

  6. Critical care physician cognitive task analysis: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Fackler, James C; Watts, Charles; Grome, Anna; Miller, Thomas; Crandall, Beth; Pronovost, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Introduction For better or worse, the imposition of work-hour limitations on house-staff has imperiled continuity and/or improved decision-making. Regardless, the workflow of every physician team in every academic medical centre has been irrevocably altered. We explored the use of cognitive task analysis (CTA) techniques, most commonly used in other high-stress and time-sensitive environments, to analyse key cognitive activities in critical care medicine. The study objective was to assess the usefulness of CTA as an analytical tool in order that physician cognitive tasks may be understood and redistributed within the work-hour limited medical decision-making teams. Methods After approval from each Institutional Review Board, two intensive care units (ICUs) within major university teaching hospitals served as data collection sites for CTA observations and interviews of critical care providers. Results Five broad categories of cognitive activities were identified: pattern recognition; uncertainty management; strategic vs. tactical thinking; team coordination and maintenance of common ground; and creation and transfer of meaning through stories. Conclusions CTA within the framework of Naturalistic Decision Making is a useful tool to understand the critical care process of decision-making and communication. The separation of strategic and tactical thinking has implications for workflow redesign. Given the global push for work-hour limitations, such workflow redesign is occurring. Further work with CTA techniques will provide important insights toward rational, rather than random, workflow changes. PMID:19265517

  7. Physician obligation to provide care during disasters: should physicians have been required to go to Fukushima?

    PubMed

    Akabayashi, Akira; Takimoto, Yoshiyuki; Hayashi, Yoshinori

    2012-11-01

    On 11 March 2011, Japan experienced a major disaster brought about by a 9.0-magnitude earthquake and a massive tsunami that followed. This disaster caused extensive damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant with the release of a large amount of radiation, leading to a crisis level 7 on the International Atomic Energy Agency scale. In this report, we discuss the obligations of physicians to provide care during the initial weeks after the disaster. We appeal to the obligation of general beneficence and argue that physicians should go to disaster zones only if there is no significant risk, cost or burden associated with doing so. We conclude that physicians were not obligated to go to Fukushima given the high risk of radiation exposure and physical and psychological harm. However, we must acknowledge that there were serious epistemic difficulties in accurately assessing the risks or benefits of travelling to Fukushima at the time. The discussion that follows is highly pertinent to all countries that rely on nuclear energy.

  8. Truth Telling and Treatment Strategies in End-of-Life Care in Physician-Led Accountable Care Organizations: Discrepancies Between Patients' Preferences and Physicians' Perceptions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsien-Liang; Cheng, Shao-Yi; Yao, Chien-An; Hu, Wen-Yu; Chen, Ching-Yu; Chiu, Tai-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Providing patient-centered care from preventive medicine to end-of-life care in order to improve care quality and reduce medical cost is important for accountable care. Physicians in the accountable care organizations (ACOs) are suitable for participating in supportive end-of-life care especially when facing issues in truth telling and treatment strategy. This study aimed to investigate patients' attitudes toward truth telling and treatment preferences in end-of-life care and compare patients' attitudes with their ACOs physicians' perceptions.This nationwide study applied snowball sampling to survey physicians in physician-led ACOs and their contracted patients by questionnaire from August 2010 to July 2011 in Taiwan. The main outcome measures were beliefs about palliative care, attitudes toward truth telling, and treatment preferences.The data of 314 patients (effective response rate = 88.7%) and 177 physicians (88.5%) were analyzed. Regarding truth telling about disease prognosis, 94.3% of patients preferred to be fully informed, whereas only 80% of their physicians had that perception (P < 0.001). Significant differences were also found in attitudes toward truth telling even when encountering terminal disease status (98.1% vs 85.3%). Regarding treatment preferences in terminal illness, nearly 90% of patients preferred supportive care, but only 15.8% of physicians reported that their patients had this preference (P < 0.001).Significant discrepancies exist between patients' preferences and physicians' perceptions toward truth telling and treatment strategies in end-of-life care. It is important to enhance physician-patient communication about end-of-life care preferences in order to achieve the goal of ACOs. Continuing education on communication about end-of-life care during physicians' professional development would be helpful in the reform strategies of establishing accountable care around the world.

  9. Exodus of male physicians from primary care drives shift to specialty practice.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ha T; O'Malley, Ann S

    2007-06-01

    An exodus of male physicians from primary care is driving a marked shift in the U.S. physician workforce toward medical-specialty practice, according to a national study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Two factors have helped mask the severity of the shift--a growing proportion of female physicians, who disproportionately choose primary care, and continued reliance on international medical graduates (IMGs), who now account for nearly a quarter of all U.S. primary care physicians. Since 1996-97, a 40 percent increase in the female primary care physician supply has helped to offset a 16 percent decline in the male primary care physician supply relative to the U.S. population. At the same time, primary care physicians' incomes have lost ground to both inflation and medical and surgical specialists' incomes. And women in primary care face a 22 percent income gap relative to men, even after accounting for differing characteristics. If real incomes for primary care physicians continue to decline, there is a risk that the migration of male physicians will intensify and that female physicians may begin avoiding primary care--trends that could aggravate a predicted shortage of primary care physicians.

  10. Clinical Effectiveness of Online Training in Palliative Care of Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Agra-Varela, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary care physicians (PCPs) have a major responsibility in the management of palliative patients. Online palliative care (PC) education has not been shown to have a clinical impact on patients that is equal or different to traditional training. Objective This study tested the clinical effectiveness of online PC education of physicians through impact on symptom control, quality of life (QOL), caregiver satisfaction, and knowledge-attitude of physicians at 18 months of the intervention. Methods We conducted a randomized clinical trial. Subjects were 169 physicians randomly assigned to receive the online model or traditional training. Consecutive patients with advanced cancer requiring PC were included. Physicians and patients completed the Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS), and patients the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist (RSCL) twice, 7 to 10 days apart. Caregivers completed the SERVQUAL. Physicians' level of knowledge-attitude was measured at 18 months. Results Sixty-seven physicians enrolled 117 patients. The intervention group had reduced scores for pain, symptoms, and family anxiety. The global RSCL scale showed a difference between groups. There was no significant difference in the questionnaires used. Caregiver satisfaction was comparable between groups. Physicians in the intervention group significantly increased their knowledge without any differences in attitude. Online training was completed by 86.6% in the intervention group, whereas 13.4% in the control group accessed traditional training. Conclusions Participation in an online PC education program by PCPs improved patient scores for some symptoms and family anxiety on the POS and also showed improved global QOL. Significant differences were found in physicians' knowledge at short and long term. PMID:23987657

  11. Effectiveness of "Primary Bereavement Care" for Widows: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Involving Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, Jesus A.; Landa, Victor; Grandes, Gonzalo; Pombo, Haizea; Mauriz, Amaia

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-one family physicians, from 19 primary care teams in Biscay (Spain), were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. The 15 intervention family physicians, after training in primary bereavement care, saw 43 widows for 7 sessions, from the 4th to 13th month after their loss. The 16 control family physicians, without primary…

  12. Attitudes and Preferences of Pennsylvania Primary Care Physicians Regarding Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Phyllis; And Others

    Primary care physicians in Pennsylvania were asked to give their attitudes and preferences regarding continuing medical education (CME) in an effort to expand and develop physician-oriented CME programs for the Hershey Continuing Education department at Penn State. A 32-item questionnaire was mailed to 952 primary care physicians practicing in…

  13. 42 CFR 476.102 - Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Involvement of health care practitioners other than...) Qio Review Functions § 476.102 Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians. (a... reviews care and services delivered by health care practitioners other than physicians. (2) Assure that...

  14. 42 CFR 476.102 - Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Involvement of health care practitioners other than...) Qio Review Functions § 476.102 Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians. (a... reviews care and services delivered by health care practitioners other than physicians. (2) Assure that...

  15. 42 CFR 476.102 - Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Involvement of health care practitioners other than...) Qio Review Functions § 476.102 Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians. (a... reviews care and services delivered by health care practitioners other than physicians. (2) Assure that...

  16. 42 CFR 476.102 - Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Involvement of health care practitioners other than...) Qio Review Functions § 476.102 Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians. (a... reviews care and services delivered by health care practitioners other than physicians. (2) Assure that...

  17. Coordination of cancer care between family physicians and cancer specialists

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C.; Manca, Donna P.; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Webster, Fiona; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore health care provider (HCP) perspectives on the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Design Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Setting Canada. Participants A total of 58 HCPs, comprising 21 FPs, 15 surgeons, 12 medical oncologists, 6 radiation oncologists, and 4 GPs in oncology. Methods This qualitative study is nested within a larger mixed-methods program of research, CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum), focused on improving the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, telephone interviews were conducted with HCPs involved in cancer care. Invitations to participate were sent to a purposive sample of HCPs based on medical specialty, sex, province or territory, and geographic location (urban or rural). A coding schema was developed by 4 team members; subsequently, 1 team member coded the remaining transcripts. The resulting themes were reviewed by the entire team and a summary of results was mailed to participants for review. Main findings Communication challenges emerged as the most prominent theme. Five key related subthemes were identified around this core concept that occurred at both system and individual levels. System-level issues included delays in medical transcription, difficulties accessing patient information, and physicians not being copied on all reports. Individual-level issues included the lack of rapport between FPs and cancer specialists, and the lack of clearly defined and broadly communicated roles. Conclusion Effective and timely communication of medical information, as well as clearly defined roles for each provider, are essential to good coordination of care along the cancer care trajectory, particularly during transitions of care between cancer specialist and FP care. Despite advances in technology, substantial communication challenges still

  18. Commentary: Health care reform and primary care: training physicians for tomorrow's challenges.

    PubMed

    Caudill, T Shawn; Lofgren, Richard; Jennings, C Darrell; Karpf, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Although Congress recently passed health insurance reform legislation, the real catalyst for change in the health care delivery system, the author's argue, will be changes to the reimbursement model. To rein in increasing costs, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid aims to move Medicare from the current fee-for-service model to a reimbursement approach that shifts the risk to providers and encourages greater accountability both for the cost and the quality of care. This level of increased accountability can only be achieved by clinical integration among health care providers. Central to this reorganized delivery model are primary care providers who coordinate and organize the care of their patients, using best practices and evidence-based medicine while respecting the patient's values, wishes, and dictates. Thus, the authors ask whether primary care physicians will be available in sufficient numbers and if they will be adequately and appropriately trained to take on this role. Most workforce researchers report inadequate numbers of primary care doctors today, a shortage that will only be exacerbated in the future. Even more ominously, the authors argue that primary care physicians being trained today will not have the requisite skills to fulfill their contemplated responsibilities because of a variety of factors that encourage fragmentation of care. If this training issue is not debated vigorously to determine new and appropriate training approaches, the future workforce may eventually have the appropriate number of physicians but inadequately trained individuals, a situation that would doom any effort at system reform.

  19. Management of acute asthma in Canada: an assessment of emergency physician behaviour.

    PubMed

    Grunfeld, A; Beveridge, R C; Berkowitz, J; FitzGerald, J M

    1997-01-01

    The study objective was to assess Canadian emergency physicians for their management preferences and their compliance with recently developed guidelines for treatment of acute asthma in adults. The design was a cross-sectional survey sent to members of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) and to the emergency department (ED) directors of all Canadian hospitals with more than 25 beds in November 1992. ED directors who had not responded were sent a second survey in January 1993. The response rates for the survey were 60.1% (362/602) for ED directors and 53.4% (302/586) for CAEP members. Respondents were more likely to be from larger hospitals and to have completed some training beyond general practice level (CCFP, CCFP-EM, ABEM, FRCPC). There were wide variations among respondents in the use of objective measurements of asthma severity (forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1] and peak expiratory flow rates [PEFR]), dosing of bronchodilators, and utilization of systemic corticosteroids. Forty-six percent of respondents used the FEV1 "occasionally" (22.3%) or "never" (23.8%), and 26.7% used PEFR "occasionally" (15.8%) or "never" (10.9%) in asthma management. Ninety-seven percent used nebulized beta agonist "always" (71.3%) or "often" (25.6%), but only 48.5% used the metered dose inhaler (MDI) "always" (11%) or "often" (37.5%). More than a quarter of respondents (27.2%) used doses of beta agonists that were less than those recommended (> every 30-60 min). Oral corticosteroids were prescribed at discharge only "occasionally" (51.1%), "seldom" (18.9%), or "never" (6.5%) in 76.6% of physicians. Physicians with more training were more likely to assess and treat patients according to current asthma treatment guidelines. The survey shows that many Canadian emergency physicians did not follow published recommendations for the care of patients with acute asthma. This finding was especially so with regard to objective evaluation of airflow, aggressive use of

  20. Physician Professional Satisfaction and Area of Clinical Practice: Evidence from an Integrated Health Care Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Caloyeras, John P; Kanter, Michael; Ives, Nicole; Kim, Chong Y; Kanzaria, Hemal K; Berry, Sandra H; Brook, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Context: For health care reform to succeed, health care systems need a professionally satisfied primary care workforce. Evidence suggests that primary care physicians are less satisfied than those in other medical specialties. Objective: To assess three domains of physician satisfaction by area of clinical practice among physicians practicing in an established integrated health system. Design: Cross-sectional online survey of all Southern California Permanente Medical Group (SCPMG) partner and associate physicians (N = 1034) who were primarily providing clinic-based care in 1 of 4 geographically and operationally distinct Kaiser Permanente Southern California Medical Centers. Main Outcome Measures: Primary measure was satisfaction with one’s day-to-day professional life as a physician. Secondary measures were satisfaction with quality of care and income. Results: Of the 636 physicians responding to the survey (61.5% response rate), on average, 8 in 10 SCPMG physicians reported satisfaction with their day-to-day professional life as a physician. Primary care physicians were only minimally less likely to report being satisfied (difference of 8.2–9.5 percentage points; p < 0.05) than were other physicians. Nearly all physicians (98.2%) were satisfied with the quality of care they are able to provide. Roughly 8 in 10 physicians reported satisfaction with their income. No differences were found between primary care physicians and those in other clinical practice areas regarding satisfaction with quality of care or income. Conclusion: It is possible to create practice settings, such as SCPMG, in which most physicians, including those in primary care, experience high levels of professional satisfaction. PMID:27057819

  1. Can we close the income and wealth gap between specialists and primary care physicians?

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Bryan T; DeVrieze, Steven R; Reed, Shelby D; Schulman, Kevin A

    2010-05-01

    Over their lifetimes, primary care physicians earn lower incomes--and accumulate considerably less wealth--than their specialist counterparts. This gap influences medical students, who are choosing careers in primary care in declining numbers. We estimated career wealth accumulation across specialists, primary care physicians, physician assistants, business school graduates, and college graduates. We then compared specialists, represented by cardiologists, to primary care physicians in four scenarios. The wealth gap is substantial; narrowing it would require substantial reductions in specialists' practice income or increases in primary care physicians' practice income, or both, of more than $100,000 a year. Current proposals for increasing primary care physician supply would do little to lessen these differences.

  2. 75 FR 4655 - National Practitioner Data Bank for Adverse Information on Physicians and Other Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... Practitioner Data Bank for Adverse Information on Physicians and Other Health Care Practitioners: Reporting on... Information on Physicians and Other Health Care Practitioners: Reporting on Adverse and Negative Actions... rule revises existing regulations under sections 401 through 432 of the Health Care Quality...

  3. Physicians' Perspectives on Caring for Cognitively Impaired Elders.(author Abstract)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Wendy L.; McIlvain, Helen E.; Geske, Jenenne A.; Porter, Judy L.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to develop ah in-depth understanding of the issues important to primary care physicians in providing care to cognitively impaired elders. Design and Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 20 primary care physicians. Text coded as "cognitive impairment" was retrieved and analyzed by use of grounded theory analysis…

  4. Acute care hospitals' accountability to provincial funders.

    PubMed

    Kromm, Seija K; Ross Baker, G; Wodchis, Walter P; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used.

  5. Acute care hospitals' accountability to provincial funders.

    PubMed

    Kromm, Seija K; Ross Baker, G; Wodchis, Walter P; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used. PMID:25305386

  6. How sequestration cuts affect primary care physicians and graduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Bindiya; Coffin, Janis

    2013-01-01

    On April 1, 2013, sequestration cuts went into effect impacting Medicare physician payments, graduate medical education, and many other healthcare agencies. The cuts range from 2% to 5%, affecting various departments and organizations. There is already a shortage of primary care physicians in general, not including rural or underserved areas, with limited grants for advanced training. The sequestration cuts negatively impact the future of many primary care physicians and hinder the care many Americans will receive over time. PMID:24044191

  7. Physician Acceptance of a Physician-Pharmacist Collaborative Treatment Model for Hypertension Management in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven M; Hasan, Michaela; Huebschmann, Amy G; Penaloza, Richard; Schorr-Ratzlaff, Wagner; Sieja, Amber; Roscoe, Nicholai; Trinkley, Katy E

    2015-09-01

    Physician-pharmacist collaborative care (PPCC) is effective in improving blood pressure (BP) control, but primary care provider (PCP) engagement in such models has not been well-studied. The authors analyzed data from PPCC referrals to 108 PCPs, for patients with uncontrolled hypertension, assessing the proportion of referral requests approved, disapproved, and not responded to, and reasons for disapproval. Of 2232 persons with uncontrolled hypertension, PPCC referral requests were sent for 1516 (67.9%): 950 (62.7%) were approved, 406 (26.8%) were disapproved, and 160 (10.6%) received no response. Approval rates differed widely by PCP with a median approval rate of 75% (interquartile range, 41%-100%). The most common reasons for disapproval were: PCP prefers to manage hypertension (19%), and BP controlled per PCP (18%); 8% of cases were considered too complex for PPCC. Provider acceptance of a PPCC hypertension clinic was generally high and sustained but varied widely among PCPs. No single reason for disapproval predominated.

  8. Primary Care Physicians Practicing Preventive Medicine in the Outpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    Snipelisky, David; Carter, Kimberly; Sundsted, Karna; Burton, M. Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preventive care is an important part of primary care medicine, yet much variation in its practice exists. The aim of this study is to assess physicians’ perspectives of practicing preventive medicine and evaluate which topics are deemed most important. Methods: All primary care medicine providers at two separate academic medical centers (Mayo Clinic, MN and Mayo Clinic, FL) were surveyed via an E-mail questionnaire assessing physicians’ perception of the role of preventive medicine during both acute/routine and yearly visits, physicians’ perception of patients’ response to preventive medicine topics, and which preventive medicine topics are commonly practiced. Results: Of 445 providers meeting inclusion criteria, a total of 183 (41.1%) responded. Providers were more likely to engage patients in preventive medicine during yearly visits more so than acute visits (3.82 vs. 4.72, range 1–5 Likert Scale), yet providers were very likely to partake in such practices during both visits. Providers perceived that patients received the practice of preventive medicine very well (4.13 on 1–5 Likert Scale). No significant difference between provider practice and patient perception was noted between the two sites, although there was some variation based on clinical experience of the provider. Providers were found to most commonly practice topics recommended by the United States Preventive Services Task Force. Conclusions: Our study found a high predisposition to practicing preventive medicine. Providers seem to practice according to published evidence-based medicine recommendations. PMID:26941906

  9. Redesigning care for patients at increased hospitalization risk: the Comprehensive Care Physician model.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, David O; Ruhnke, Gregory W

    2014-05-01

    Patients who have been hospitalized often experience care coordination problems that worsen outcomes and increase costs. One reason is that hospital care and ambulatory care are often provided by different physicians. However, interventions to improve care coordination for hospitalized patients have not consistently improved outcomes and generally have not reduced costs. We describe the rationale for the Comprehensive Care Physician model, in which physicians focus their practice on patients at increased risk of hospitalization so that they can provide both inpatient and outpatient care to their patients. We also describe the design and implementation of a study supported by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to assess the model's effects on costs and outcomes. Evidence concerning the effectiveness of the program is expected by 2016. If the program is found to be effective, the next steps will be to assess the durability of its benefits and the model's potential for dissemination; evidence to the contrary will provide insights into how to alter the program to address sources of failure. PMID:24799573

  10. Redesigning Care For Patients At Increased Hospitalization Risk: The Comprehensive Care Physician Model

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, David O.; Ruhnke, Gregory W.

    2015-01-01

    Patients who have been hospitalized often experience care coordination problems that worsen outcomes and increase costs. One reason is that hospital care and ambulatory care are often provided by different physicians. However, interventions to improve care coordination for hospitalized patients have not consistently improved outcomes and generally have not reduced costs. We describe the rationale for the Comprehensive Care Physician model, in which physicians focus their practice on patients at increased risk of hospitalization so that they can provide both inpatient and outpatient care to their patients. We also describe the design and implementation of a study supported by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to assess the model’s effects on costs and outcomes. Evidence concerning the effectiveness of the program is expected by 2016. If the program is found to be effective, the next steps will be to assess the durability of its benefits and the model’s potential for dissemination; evidence to the contrary will provide insights into how to alter the program to address sources of failure. PMID:24799573

  11. Redesigning care for patients at increased hospitalization risk: the Comprehensive Care Physician model.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, David O; Ruhnke, Gregory W

    2014-05-01

    Patients who have been hospitalized often experience care coordination problems that worsen outcomes and increase costs. One reason is that hospital care and ambulatory care are often provided by different physicians. However, interventions to improve care coordination for hospitalized patients have not consistently improved outcomes and generally have not reduced costs. We describe the rationale for the Comprehensive Care Physician model, in which physicians focus their practice on patients at increased risk of hospitalization so that they can provide both inpatient and outpatient care to their patients. We also describe the design and implementation of a study supported by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to assess the model's effects on costs and outcomes. Evidence concerning the effectiveness of the program is expected by 2016. If the program is found to be effective, the next steps will be to assess the durability of its benefits and the model's potential for dissemination; evidence to the contrary will provide insights into how to alter the program to address sources of failure.

  12. Hepatitis C: a review for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tom; Lee, Samuel S

    2006-02-28

    Primary care physicians see many of the estimated 250 000 Canadians chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Of this number, about one-third are unaware they are infected, which constitutes a large hidden epidemic. They continue to spread HCV unknowingly and cannot benefit from advances in antiviral therapy that may clear them of the virus. Many HCV-infected people remain asymptomatic, which means it is important to assess for risk factors and test patients accordingly. The third-generation enzyme immunoassay for HCV antibodies is a sensitive and specific test, although the presence of the virus can be confirmed by polymerase chain reaction testing for HCV RNA in some circumstances. Pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin combination therapy clears the virus in about 45%-80% of patients, depending on viral genotype. Preventive strategies and counselling recommendations are also reviewed. PMID:16505462

  13. [Management of the esophageal candidiasis by the primary care physician].

    PubMed

    Behrens, Garance; Bocherens, Astrid; Senn, Nicolas

    2014-05-14

    Esophageal candidiasis is one of the most common opportunistic infections in patients infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This pathology is also found in patients without overt immunodeficiency. Other risk factors are known to be associated with this disease like inhaled or systemic corticosteroid treatment or proton-pump inhibitors and H2 receptor antagonists. In the absence of identified risk factors, a primary immune deficiency should be sought. Prevention of esophageal candidiasis is based primarily on the identification of risk factors, and a better control of them. This article presents a review of the physiopathology, clinical presentation and management of esophageal candidiasis by primary care physicians. We will also discuss ways of preventing esophageal candidiasis when necessary.

  14. Cardiac computed tomographic angiography and the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Mikolich, J Ronald

    2012-05-01

    Through advancements in computer processing speed and storage capacity, new cardiac imaging modalities have become clinically feasible and useful. Cardiac computed tomographic angiography, a new diagnostic imaging modality, is capable of assessing coronary artery disease and left ventricular function on a par with invasive coronary arteriography in selected patients who meet appropriate use criteria. This imaging modality is of clinical value in the assessment of patients with chest pain who have an intermediate risk of coronary atherosclerosis. The purpose of the present report is to educate primary care physicians about the basic principles of advanced cardiac imaging techniques and to convey a useful strategy for their appropriate use in the current environment of medical economics.

  15. Chronic heart failure: a review for the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Escudero, José A; Zayas-Torres, Carlos; Banchs-Pieretti, Hector

    2003-01-01

    Heart failure is a complex clinical syndrome. The pharmacological therapy for chronic heart failure has been changing in the past decade with acquired knowledge of the pathophysiology of this medical condition. Primary care physicians currently treat a significant number of patients. This article summarizes core topics of heart failure including epidemiological information, etiology, pathophysiology, clinical features and diagnostic tools. Also, we review some of the most relevant research studies that have led to the current recommendations for the pharmacological therapeutic strategies in the management of chronic heart failure. We make reference to the latest guidelines in the management of chronic heart failure submitted by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association (ACC/AHA). New technological advances, such as the biventricular-pacing devices, are an important adjuvant to the established pharmacological therapies for chronic heart failure.

  16. Primary care physician shortages could be eliminated through use of teams, nonphysicians, and electronic communication.

    PubMed

    Green, Linda V; Savin, Sergei; Lu, Yina

    2013-01-01

    Most existing estimates of the shortage of primary care physicians are based on simple ratios, such as one physician for every 2,500 patients. These estimates do not consider the impact of such ratios on patients' ability to get timely access to care. They also do not quantify the impact of changing patient demographics on the demand side and alternative methods of delivering care on the supply side. We used simulation methods to provide estimates of the number of primary care physicians needed, based on a comprehensive analysis considering access, demographics, and changing practice patterns. We show that the implementation of some increasingly popular operational changes in the ways clinicians deliver care-including the use of teams or "pods," better information technology and sharing of data, and the use of nonphysicians-have the potential to offset completely the increase in demand for physician services while improving access to care, thereby averting a primary care physician shortage.

  17. Factors associated with the use of advanced practice nurses/physician assistants in a fee-for-service nursing home practice: a comparison with primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Bakerjian, Debra; Harrington, Charlene

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine factors associated with the use of advanced practice nurse and physician assistant (APN/PA) visits to nursing home (NH) patients compared with those by primary care physicians (PCPs). This was a secondary analysis using Medicare claims data. General estimation equations were used to determine the odds of NH residents receiving APN/PA visits. Ordinary least squares analyses were used to examine factors associated with these visits. A total of 5,436 APN/PAs provided care to 27% of 129,812 residents and were responsible for 16% of the 1.1 million Medicare NH fee-for-service visits in 2004. APN/PAs made an average of 33 visits annually compared with PCPs (21 visits). Neuropsychiatric and acute diagnoses and patients with a long-stay status were associated with more APN/PA visits. APN/PAs provide a substantial amount of care, but regional variations occur, and Medicare regulations constrain the ability of APN/PAs to substitute for physician visits.

  18. Physician Burnout and Patient-Physician Communication During Primary Care Encounters

    PubMed Central

    Roter, Debra; Beach, Mary Catherine; Laird, Shivonne L.; Larson, Susan M.; Carson, Kathryn A.; Cooper, Lisa A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Although previous studies suggest an association between provider burnout and suboptimal self-reported communication, no studies relate physician burnout to observed patient-physician communication behaviors. Objective To investigate the relationship between physician burnout and observed patient-physician communication outcomes in patient-physician encounters. Design Longitudinal study of enrollment data from a trial of interventions to improve patient adherence to hypertension treatment. Setting Fifteen urban community-based clinics in Baltimore, MD. Participants Forty physicians and 235 of their adult hypertensive patients, with oversampling of ethnic minorities and poor persons. Fifty-three percent of physicians were women, and the average practice experience was 11.2 years. Among the 235 patients, 66% were women, 60% were African-American, and 90% were insured. Measurements Audiotape analysis of communication during outpatient encounters (one per patient) using the Roter Interaction Analysis System and patients’ ratings of satisfaction with and trust and confidence in the physician. Results The median time between the physician burnout assessment and the patient encounter was 15.1 months (range 5.6–30). Multivariate analyses revealed no significant differences in physician communication based on physician burnout. However, compared with patients of low-burnout physicians, patients of high-burnout physicians gave twice as many negative rapport-building statements (incident risk ratio 2.06, 95% CI 1.58 – 2.86, p < 0.001). Physician burnout was not significantly associated with physician or patient affect, patient-centeredness, verbal dominance, or length of the encounter. Physician burnout was also not significantly associated with patients’ ratings of their satisfaction, confidence, or trust. Conclusions Physician burnout was not associated with physician communication behaviors nor with most measures of patient-centered communication

  19. Physician unions--an ethical and legal issue in health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Canales, B K

    2000-12-01

    The controversial issue of physicians' unions has been revived in the past few years by the economic juggernaut of managed care. The uproar of legal and ethical dilemmas surrounding the creation of physician unions centers around self-employed physicians, their formal employment relationship to HMOs under the National Labor Relations Act, and the ramifications of exempting physicians from current antitrust laws. Will physician collective bargaining increase competition and equalize the power between physicians and HMOs so that the quality of patient care improves? This report discusses relevant laws and the history of physicians' unionization, reviews contemporary thought and present policies on physician unionization, and comments on alternatives and new policies that could be created in order to resolve this dilemma.

  20. The duty of the physician to care for the family in pediatric palliative care: context, communication, and caring.

    PubMed

    Jones, Barbara L; Contro, Nancy; Koch, Kendra D

    2014-02-01

    Pediatric palliative care physicians have an ethical duty to care for the families of children with life-threatening conditions through their illness and bereavement. This duty is predicated on 2 important factors: (1) best interest of the child and (2) nonabandonment. Children exist in the context of a family and therefore excellent care for the child must include attention to the needs of the family, including siblings. The principle of nonabandonment is an important one in pediatric palliative care, as many families report being well cared for during their child's treatment, but feel as if the physicians and team members suddenly disappear after the death of the child. Family-centered care requires frequent, kind, and accurate communication with parents that leads to shared decision-making during treatment, care of parents and siblings during end-of-life, and assistance to the family in bereavement after death. Despite the challenges to this comprehensive care, physicians can support and be supported by their transdisciplinary palliative care team members in providing compassionate, ethical, and holistic care to the entire family when a child is ill.

  1. Organizing care across the continuum: primary care, specialty services, acute and long-term care.

    PubMed

    Oelke, Nelly D; Cunning, Leslie; Andrews, Kaye; Martin, Dorothy; MacKay, Anne; Kuschminder, Katie; Congdon, Val

    2009-01-01

    Primary care networks (PCNs) facilitate integration of healthcare across the continuum. The Calgary Rural PCN implemented a community-based model where physicians and Alberta Health Services work together to deliver primary care addressing local population needs. This model is highly valued by physicians, decision-makers and providers, with early impacts on outcomes.

  2. Antibiotic prescription and knowledge about antibiotic costs of physicians in primary health care centers in Greece.

    PubMed

    Gourgoulis, Georgios-Michael; Katerelos, Panos; Maragos, Antonios; Gargalianos, Panagiotis; Lazanas, Marios; Maltezou, Helena C

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this questionnaire-based study is to investigate antibiotic prescription practices among primary health care physicians in Greece using the 2007 Hellenic Center for Diseases Control and Prevention guidelines as the gold standard. Seven case scenarios were used. A total of 527 physicians participated. The mean compliance rate with the first recommended antibiotic by the guidelines was 51%, ranging from 22.9% to 71.5% by scenario. Younger physicians and female physicians had higher scores of compliance.

  3. Elder neglect and abuse. A primer for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Levine, Jeffrey M

    2003-10-01

    Elder neglect and abuse represent a widespread, largely undiagnosed problem in the United States. Factors contributing to misdiagnosis and underreporting include denial by both the victim and the perpetrator, clinicians' reluctance to report victims, disbelief by medical providers, and clinicians' lack of awareness of warning signs. Physical abuse is most recognizable, yet neglect is most common. Psychological and financial abuse may be more easily missed. Elder neglect and abuse have many clinical presentations, ranging from the overt appearance of bruises and fractures, to the subtle appearance of dehydration, depression, and apathy. Risk factors are varied and may be categorized by victim or perpetrator. Dependency, on the part of the victim or perpetrator, and caregiver stress are frequent common denominators in abusive situations. Increasingly, Institutionalization is recognized as a risk factor for neglect and abuse. Most states require primary care providers to report suspected elder abuse. Awareness of the risk factors and clinical manifestations allows primary care physicians to provide early detection and intervention for elder neglect and abuse. PMID:14569641

  4. White coat, blue collar: physician unionization and managed care.

    PubMed

    Luepke, E L

    1999-01-01

    Ms. Luepke provides a historical review of the rise of the physician unionization movement in the United States. This article also examines the barriers faced by employed and independent physicians that prevent or limit their collective bargaining, and reviews the responses of the various organized medical societies to the physician unionization movement.

  5. Palliative care, assisted suicide and euthanasia: nationwide questionnaire to Swedish physicians.

    PubMed

    Valverius, E; Nilstun, T; Nilsson, B

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate what actually happens between physicians and adult patients in difficult end-of-life situations. We circulated an anonymous questionnaire to a randomized sample of 952 Swedish physicians registered in specialties comprising care of dying adult patients, 122 palliative care physicians, and 130 physicians from the Swedish Association for the Study of Pain. Of special interest were themes in conversations between the physicians and the patients, desires expressed by the patients, and actions performed by the physicians that might affect the patients' expected survival. The overall response rate was 79%. Of these, 63% of the randomized physicians, 95% of the palliative care physicians, and 43% of the Association for the Study of Pain physicians had more than occasionally treated dying adult patients during the past year. About half of them had discussed palliative care with all their dying patients, and more than half of the physicians had heard their patients expressing a wish to die. About one-third of all the physicians had given analgesic or other drugs in such doses that some of their patients' deaths were hastened. The same proportion had also been asked for active euthanasia, while 10% had been asked to assist suicide. No case of euthanasia and only a few cases of assisted suicide were reported. By implication, the study suggests that improving patients' awareness of the possibilities to relieve pain, anxiety and dyspnoea during the final days of life is an important way to reduce requests for active euthanasia.

  6. Medical guidelines, physician density, and quality of care: evidence from German SHARE data.

    PubMed

    Jürges, Hendrik; Pohl, Vincent

    2012-10-01

    We use German SHARE data to study the relationship between district general practitioner density and the quality of preventive care provided to older adults. We measure physician quality of care as the degree of adherence to medical guidelines (for the management of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the prevention of falls) as reported by patients. Contrary to theoretical expectations, we find only weak and insignificant effects of physician density on quality of care. Our results shed doubt on the notion that increasing physician supply will increase the quality of care provided in Germany's present health care system. PMID:22203268

  7. Do physicians have an ethical obligation to care for patients with AIDS?

    PubMed Central

    Angoff, N. R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper responds to the question: Do physicians have an ethical obligation to care for patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)? First, the social and political milieu in which this question arises is sampled. Here physicians as well as other members of the community are found declaring an unwillingness to be exposed to people with AIDS. Next, laws, regulations, ethical codes and principles, and the history of the practice of medicine are examined, and the literature as it pertains to these areas is reviewed. The obligation to care for patients with AIDS, however, cannot be located in an orientation to morality defined in rules and codes and an appeal to legalistic fairness. By turning to the orientation to morality that emerges naturally from connection and is defined in caring, the physicians' ethical obligation to care for patients with AIDS is found. Through an exploration of the writings of modern medical ethicists, it is clear that the purpose of the practice of medicine is healing, which can only be accomplished in relationship to the patient. It is in relationship to patients that the physician has the opportunity for self-realization. In fact, the physician is physician in relationship to patients and only to the extent that he or she acts virtuously by being morally responsible for and to those patients. Not to do so diminishes the physician's ethical ideal, a vision of the physician as good physician, which has consequences for the physician's capacity to care and for the practice of medicine. PMID:1788990

  8. Acute care nurses' spiritual care practices.

    PubMed

    Gallison, Barry S; Xu, Yan; Jurgens, Corrine Y; Boyle, Suzanne M

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify barriers in providing spiritual care to hospitalized patients. A convenience sample (N = 271) was recruited at an academic medical center in New York City for an exploratory, descriptive questionnaire. The Spiritual Care Practice (SCP) questionnaire assesses spiritual care practices and perceived barriers to spiritual care. The SCP determines the percentage that provides spiritual support and perceived barriers inhibiting spiritual care. The participation rate was 44.3% (N = 120). Most (61%) scored less than the ideal mean on the SCP. Although 96% (N = 114) believe addressing patients spiritual needs are within their role, nearly half (48%) report rarely participating in spiritual practices. The greatest perceived barriers were belief that patient's spirituality is private, insufficient time, difficulty distinguishing proselytizing from spiritual care, and difficulty meeting needs when spiritual beliefs were different from their own. Although nurses identify themselves as spiritual, results indicate spirituality assessments are inadequate. Addressing barriers will provide nurses opportunities to address spirituality. Education is warranted to improve nurses' awareness of the diversity of our society to better meet the spiritual needs of patients. Understanding these needs provide the nurse with opportunities to address spirituality and connect desires with actions to strengthen communication and the nurse-patient relationship.

  9. Innovative Primary Care Training: The Cambridge Health Alliance Oral Physician Program

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Brittany Anne; Swann, Brian; Jayaratne, Yasas S. N.; Outlaw, Jason; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the Oral Physician Program, a dental residency sponsored by Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and the Cambridge Health Alliance that offers an innovative model for training dentists to provide limited primary care. The didactic and clinical experiences increased residents' medical knowledge and interviewing skills, and faculty assessments supported their role as oral physicians. Oral physicians could increase patients'—especially patients from underserved groups—access to integrated oral and primary care services. PMID:22994253

  10. The Primary Care Physician Workforce in Massachusetts: Implications for the Workforce in Rural, Small Town America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenger, Joseph; Cashman, Suzanne B.; Savageau, Judith A.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Small towns across the United States struggle to maintain an adequate primary care workforce. Purpose: To examine factors contributing to physician satisfaction and retention in largely rural areas in Massachusetts, a state with rural pockets and small towns. Methods: A survey mailed in 2004-2005 to primary care physicians, practicing in…

  11. Patient Care Physician Supply and Requirements: Testing COGME Recommendations. Council on Graduate Medical Education, Eighth Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Graduate Medical Education.

    This report reassesses recommendations made by the Council on Graduate Medical Education in earlier reports which had, beginning in 1992, addressed the problems of physician oversupply. In this report physician supply and requirements are examined in the context of a health care system increasingly dominated by managed care. Patterns of physician…

  12. Small primary care physician practices have low rates of preventable hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Pesko, Michael F; Ryan, Andrew M; Mendelsohn, Jayme L; Copeland, Kennon R; Ramsay, Patricia Pamela; Sun, Xuming; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen M

    2014-09-01

    Nearly two-thirds of US office-based physicians work in practices of fewer than seven physicians. It is often assumed that larger practices provide better care, although there is little evidence for or against this assumption. What is the relationship between practice size--and other practice characteristics, such as ownership or use of medical home processes--and the quality of care? We conducted a national survey of 1,045 primary care-based practices with nineteen or fewer physicians to determine practice characteristics. We used Medicare data to calculate practices' rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions (ambulatory care-sensitive admissions). Compared to practices with 10-19 physicians, practices with 1-2 physicians had 33 percent fewer preventable admissions, and practices with 3-9 physicians had 27 percent fewer. Physician-owned practices had fewer preventable admissions than hospital-owned practices. In an era when health care reform appears to be driving physicians into larger organizations, it is important to measure the comparative performance of practices of all sizes, to learn more about how small practices provide patient care, and to learn more about the types of organizational structures--such as independent practice associations--that may make it possible for small practices to share resources that are useful for improving the quality of care. PMID:25122562

  13. The Rural Physician Workforce in Florida: A Survey of U.S.- and Foreign-Born Primary Care Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Robert G.; Mardon, Russell; Clawson, Art

    2003-01-01

    Survey responses from 1,000 primary-care physicians (PCPs) in Florida showed that nearly half of rural PCPs were foreign-born. Overall and for native-born PCPs, rural practice was related to rural upbringing and exposure to rural medical practice during training. Rural PCPs were more likely than others to be participants in the National Health…

  14. Acute dyspnea and a new murmur in a team physician.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, J D; Watson, D T; Blincoe, W A; Kauten, J R

    1998-05-01

    A 61-year-old physician for a professional sports team experienced transient palpitations and dyspnea while playing in an over-50 basketball scrimmage. He had been physically active for many years, had no known cardiopulmonary disorders, and had never been told of a heart murmur. He had not been febrile, nor had he experienced any chest pain. There was no history of recent dental work.

  15. Expectations outpace reality: physicians' use of care management tools for patients with chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Emily; Reschovsky, James

    2009-12-01

    Use of care management tools--such as group visits or patient registries--varies widely among primary care physicians whose practices care for patients with four common chronic conditions--asthma, diabetes, congestive heart failure and depression--according to a new national study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). For example, less than a third of these primary care physicians in 2008 reported their practices use nurse managers to coordinate care, and only four in 10 were in practices using registries to keep track of patients with chronic conditions. Physicians also used care management tools for patients with some chronic conditions but not others. Practice size and setting were strongly related to the likelihood that physicians used care management tools, with solo and smaller group practices least likely to use care management tools. The findings suggest that, along with experimenting with financial incentives for primary care physicians to adopt care management tools, policy makers might consider developing community-level care management resources, such as nurse managers, that could be shared among smaller physician practices.

  16. Viscosupplementation for Osteoarthritis: a Primer for Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) constitutes a growing public health burden and the most common cause of disability in the United States. Non-pharmacologic modalities and conservative pharmacologic therapies are recommended for the initial treatment of OA, including acetaminophen, and topical and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, safety concerns continue to mount regarding the use of these treatments and none have been shown to impact disease progression. Viscosupplementation with injections of hyaluronans (HAs) are indicated when non-pharmacologic and simple analgesics have failed to relieve symptoms (e.g., pain, stiffness) associated with knee OA. This review evaluates literature focusing on the efficacy and/or safety of HA injections in treating OA of the knee and in other joints, including the hip, shoulder, and ankle. Methods Relevant literature on intra-articular (IA) HA injections as a treatment for OA pain in the knee and other joints was identified through PubMed database searches from inception until January 2013. Search terms included “hyaluronic acid” or “hylan”, and “osteoarthritis”. Discussion Current evidence indicates that HA injections are beneficial and safe for patients with OA of the knee. IA injections of HAs treat the symptoms of knee OA and may also have disease-modifying properties, potentially delaying progression of OA. Although traditionally reserved for second-line treatment, evidence suggests that HAs may have value as a first-line therapy in the treatment of knee OA as they have been shown to be more effective in earlier stages and grades of disease, more recently diagnosed OA, and in less severe radiographic OA. Conclusion For primary care physicians who treat and care for patients with OA of the knee, IA injection with HAs constitutes a safe and effective treatment that can be routinely administered in the office setting. PMID:24203348

  17. Patient care information systems and physicians: the transition from technology icon to health care instrument.

    PubMed

    Bria, W F

    1993-11-01

    We have discussed several important transitions now occurring in PCIS that promise to improve the utility and availability of these systems for the average physician. Charles Babbage developed the first computers as "thinking machines" so that we may extend our ability to grapple with more and more complex problems. If current trends continue, we will finally witness the evolution of patient care computing from information icons of the few to clinical instruments improving the quality of medical decision making and care for all patients.

  18. "Sometimes I feel overwhelmed": educational needs of family physicians caring for people with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Joanne; Dreyfus, Deborah; Cerreto, Mary; Bokhour, Barbara

    2012-06-01

    Primary care physicians who care for adults with intellectual disability often lack experience with the population, and patients with intellectual disability express dissatisfaction with their care. Establishing a secure primary care relationship is particularly important for adults with intellectual disability, who experience health disparities and may rely on their physician to direct/coordinate their care. The authors conducted semistructured interviews with 22 family physicians with the goal of identifying educational needs of family physicians who care for people with intellectual disability. Interviews were transcribed and coded using tools from grounded theory. Several themes related to educational needs were identified. Physician participants identified themes of "operating without a map," discomfort with patients with intellectual disability, and a need for more exposure to/experience with people with intellectual disability as important content areas. The authors also identified physician frustration and lack of confidence, compounded by anxiety related to difficult behaviors and a lack of context or frame of reference for patients with intellectual disability. Primary care physicians request some modification of their educational experience to better equip them to care for patients with intellectual disability. Their request for experiential, not theoretical, learning fits well under the umbrella of cultural competence (a required competency in U.S. medical education). PMID:22731973

  19. Regional Supply of Chiropractic Care and Visits to Primary Care Physicians for Back and Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Matthew A.; Yakusheva, Olga; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Bynum, Julie P.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether availability of chiropractic care affects use of primary care physician (PCP) services is unknown. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 17.7 million older adults who were enrolled in Medicare from 2010 to 2011. We examined the relationship between regional supply of chiropractic care and PCP services using Spearman correlation. Generalized linear models were used to examine the association between regional supply of chiropractic care and number of annual visits to PCPs for back and/or neck pain. Results We found a positive association between regional supply of chiropractic care and PCP services (rs = 0.52; P <.001). An inverse association between supply of chiropractic care and the number of annual visits to PCPs for back and/or neck pain was apparent. The number of PCP visits for back and/or neck pain was 8% lower (rate ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.91–0.92) in the quintile with the highest supply of chiropractic care compared to the lowest quintile. We estimate chiropractic care is associated with a reduction of 0.37 million visits to PCPs nationally, at a cost of $83.5 million. Conclusions Greater availability of chiropractic care in some areas may be offsetting PCP services for back and/or neck pain among older adults. (J Am Board Fam Med 2015;28:000–000.) PMID:26152439

  20. Paying for Primary Care: The Factors Associated with Physician Self-selection into Payment Models.

    PubMed

    Rudoler, David; Deber, Raisa; Barnsley, Janet; Glazier, Richard H; Dass, Adrian Rohit; Laporte, Audrey

    2015-09-01

    To determine the factors associated with primary care physician self-selection into different payment models, we used a panel of eight waves of administrative data for all primary care physicians who practiced in Ontario between 2003/2004 and 2010/2011. We used a mixed effects logistic regression model to estimate physicians' choice of three alternative payment models: fee for service, enhanced fee for service, and blended capitation. We found that primary care physicians self-selected into payment models based on existing practice characteristics. Physicians with more complex patient populations were less likely to switch into capitation-based payment models where higher levels of effort were not financially rewarded. These findings suggested that investigations aimed at assessing the impact of different primary care reimbursement models on outcomes, including costs and access, should first account for potential selection effects.

  1. Paying for Primary Care: The Factors Associated with Physician Self-selection into Payment Models.

    PubMed

    Rudoler, David; Deber, Raisa; Barnsley, Janet; Glazier, Richard H; Dass, Adrian Rohit; Laporte, Audrey

    2015-09-01

    To determine the factors associated with primary care physician self-selection into different payment models, we used a panel of eight waves of administrative data for all primary care physicians who practiced in Ontario between 2003/2004 and 2010/2011. We used a mixed effects logistic regression model to estimate physicians' choice of three alternative payment models: fee for service, enhanced fee for service, and blended capitation. We found that primary care physicians self-selected into payment models based on existing practice characteristics. Physicians with more complex patient populations were less likely to switch into capitation-based payment models where higher levels of effort were not financially rewarded. These findings suggested that investigations aimed at assessing the impact of different primary care reimbursement models on outcomes, including costs and access, should first account for potential selection effects. PMID:26190516

  2. Physicians' perceptions of mobile technology for enhancing asthma care for youth.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Tali; Panzera, Anthony Dominic; Martinasek, Mary; McDermott, Robert; Couluris, Marisa; Lindenberger, James; Bryant, Carol

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed physicians' receptivity to using mobile technology as a strategy in patient care for adolescents with asthma. Understanding physicians' perceived barriers and benefits of integrating mobile technology in adolescents' asthma care and self-management is an initial step in enhancing overall patient and disease outcomes. We conducted in-depth interviews with second- and third-year pediatric residents and attending physicians who oversee pediatric residents in training (N = 27) at an academic medical center in the southeastern United States. We identified both benefits from and barriers to broader use of mobile technologies for improving asthma outcomes in adolescents. Resident physicians demonstrated greater readiness for integrating these technologies than did attending physicians. Prior to adoption of mobile technologies in the care of adolescent asthma patients, barriers to implementation should be understood. Prior to widespread adoption, such systems will need to be evaluated against traditional care for demonstration of patient outcomes that improve on the current situation.

  3. 78 FR 21308 - Medicare Program; Physicians' Referrals to Health Care Entities With Which They Have Financial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ...; Physicians' Referrals to Health Care Entities With Which They Have Financial Relationships: Exception for...- centered, high performance health care system where every health care provider has access to longitudinal data on patients they treat to make evidence-based decisions, coordinate care and improve...

  4. "Sometimes I Feel Overwhelmed": Educational Needs of Family Physicians Caring for People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Joanne; Dreyfus, Deborah; Cerreto, Mary; Bokhour, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Primary care physicians who care for adults with intellectual disability often lack experience with the population, and patients with intellectual disability express dissatisfaction with their care. Establishing a secure primary care relationship is particularly important for adults with intellectual disability, who experience health disparities…

  5. Preventing crises in palliative care in the home. Role of family physicians and nurses.

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, G.; Willison, K. B.

    1995-01-01

    With the current shift to community care, the need for palliative care in the home involving the family physician has increased. Potential causes of crises in the home care of the dying are identified. Strategies to prevent crises are suggested that rely on a team's providing comprehensive and anticipatory care. PMID:7539653

  6. Evaluation of an integrated intensive care unit monitoring display by critical care fellow physicians.

    PubMed

    Görges, Matthias; Westenskow, Dwayne R; Markewitz, Boaz A

    2012-12-01

    In the past two far-view displays, which showed vital signs, trends, alarms, infusion pump status, and therapy support indicators, were developed and assessed by critical care nurses (Görges et al. in Dimens Crit Care Nurs. 30(4):206-17, 2011). The aim of the current study is to assess the generalizability of these findings to physicians. The first aim is to test whether an integrated far-view display, designed to be readable from 3 to 5 m, enables critical care physicians to more rapidly and accurately (1) recognize a change in patient condition; (2) identify alarms; and (3) identify near-empty infusion pumps, than a traditional patient monitor and infusion pump. A second aim is to test if the new displays reduce the mental workload required for this decision making. Fifteen critical care fellow physicians (median age of 34 years, with 2-8 years of ICU experience) were asked to use the three displays to compare the data from two patients and decide which patient required their attention first. Each physician made 60 decisions: 20 with each of the two far-view displays and 20 decisions with a standard patient monitor next to an infusion pump. A 41 and 26 % improvement in decision accuracy was observed with the bar and clock far-view displays, respectively. Specifically, the identification of near empty infusion pumps, a task normally performed by nurses, and patients with a single alarm were better with the new displays. Using the bar display physicians made their decision 12 % faster than when using the control display, a median improvement of 2.1 s. No significant differences were observed in measured workload. Displays that present patient data in a redesigned format enables critical care clinicians to more rapidly identify changes in patient conditions and to more accurately decide which patient needs their attention. In a clinical setting, this could improve patient safety. In future work, an evaluation of the display using live patient data from an ICU

  7. Effects of physician joint ventures on health care costs, access, and quality: exploring some issues.

    PubMed

    Ahern, M; Scott, E

    1992-01-01

    Increasingly, physicians are joint-venturing with health care businesses such as physical therapy centers, diagnostic imaging centers, ambulatory surgical centers, and other services. Simultaneously, outpatient costs have been rising. Theoretical and empirical evidence, including results of an exploratory survey of experts, indicate that these two events are linked. Specifically, joint ventures between referring physicians and health care businesses often appear to increase costs, increase utilization, reduce quality of care, and reduce access.

  8. Association of primary care physician sex with cervical cancer and mammography screening

    PubMed Central

    Ince-Cushman, Daniel; Correa, José A.; Shuldiner, Jennifer; Segouin, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the sex of primary care physicians is associated with differing rates of cervical cancer and mammography screening in a contemporary multicultural context. Design Structured medical record review of a retrospectively defined cohort. Setting Academic urban primary care clinic in Montreal, Que. Participants Seven male physicians and 9 female physicians, and all female patients aged 14 to 69 years registered to one of the physicians (N = 1948). Main outcome measures Screening compliance rates as measured by the elapsed time between the last visit and cervical cancer screening for all women in the study. In addition, in women aged 50 to 69 years, elapsed time between the last visit and mammography screening. Results Crude rates of Papanicolaou tests for patients of female primary care physicians were higher than for patients of male primary care physicians in all patient age groups. The lowest rates of Pap testing were among the youngest and oldest patients. After adjustment for patient age, first language, and region of birth, as well as physician age, the odds ratio of having a Pap test was 2.24 (95% CI 1.18 to 4.28) for the patients of female physicians, relative to those of male physicians. The adjusted odds ratio for mammography screening was 1.25 (95% CI 0.97 to 1.61) for patients of female physicians. Conclusion Male primary care physician sex is associated with lower rates of cervical cancer screening in an urban multicultural context. The study did not detect a physician sex effect in the mammography cohort. PMID:23341674

  9. The algebra of managed care. Creating physician and hospital partnerships.

    PubMed

    Goodroe, J H; Murphy, D A

    1994-01-01

    As healthcare faces an economic reengineering, hospitals and physicians are faced with new challenges. It is the first time that they have had joint economic interests, and survival for both is dependent on designing new economic models. This article describes the economic interrelationship between hospitals and physicians and provides insight into opportunities to encourage new levels of collaboration between them.

  10. The Physician's Assistant; An Approach to Improved Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metropolitan Washington Regional Medical Program, Washington, DC.

    Presented are an overview of Physicians' Assistant programs in the United States and a study of their applicability to the Washington metropolitan area. The national overview includes information gathered from fourteen respondents to questionnaires sent to 30 physician assistant programs currently in operational or planning stages. Aspects…

  11. Information-Seeking Strategies and Differences among Primary Care Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruppen, Larry D.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Ninety-eight internists and 73 family physicians were asked which of six information sources they consulted when faced with difficult medical problems. Results indicate that internists prefer consulting the medical literature, whereas family physicians rely on colleagues and specialists as sources of information. (Author/CH)

  12. Burnout Among Primary Care Physicians: A Test of the Areas of Worklife Model.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Sean T; Menser, Terri

    2015-01-01

    Examinations of the current state of the physician workforce, in the United States and globally, indicate a declining overall well-being, and specifically increasing levels of burnout. The consequences of these effects include early retirements or exits from the medical profession, difficulties improving the patient experience, and low levels of provider engagement with clinic-level and system-level initiatives. Such consequences affect physicians, healthcare organizations, and patients. While most research has focused on identifying burnout, cataloging its effects, and creating a case for attending to its impact, relatively few studies have focused on exploring the antecedents of burnout for physicians. The goal of this study was to test an etiological model, the Areas of Worklife Scale (AWS), for practicing primary care physicians. Using the AWS and the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the study used a longitudinal survey research design method to query primary care physicians employed at a large integrated delivery system in the United States. Data collected successfully fit the AWS model for burnout among primary care physicians, supporting our theory that workplace drivers are responsible for burnout. Workload, control, and values congruence are the largest drivers of burnout for practicing primary care physicians. The AWS model provides key insights into the domains of work that cause stress and ultimately burnout for physicians, and these domains can guide physicians and managers to develop interventions to fight the rising incidence of burnout. PMID:26529850

  13. Where do Young Children in Speciality Care Come From?: A Preliminary Investigation of the Role of Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    McLennan, John D.; Sheehan, Debbie

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Young children with mental health and developmental problems may not receive appropriate or timely interventions. Primary care physicians are well positioned to play an important role in the early identification and referral of such children. The objective of this pilot study was to explore the role primary care physicians played for a group of such children. Methods A single mailing of 1196 self-report questionnaires were sent to parents/caregivers of children under six years of age at four specialty centers in Ontario and Alberta. Key items on the survey included the role of primary care physicians (family physicians and community paediatricians). Results Twenty percent of parents/caregivers returned questionnaires. All children saw either a family physician or a community paediatrician, while 65% saw both. Families were more likely to have come to the specialty centre via a referral from a community paediatrician than a family physician. Ten percent reportedly received no referrals from a primary care physician, while 21% did not receive a referral to a specialty centre from these providers. Conclusions The majority of children received at least one referral from a primary care physician. Further inquiry is required to determine the timeliness and appropriateness of these referrals. PMID:18392162

  14. Comparative Effectiveness Research: Alternatives to "Traditional" Computed Tomography Use in the Acute Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christopher L; Broder, Joshua; Gunn, Martin L; Bhargavan-Chatfield, Mythreyi; Cody, Dianna; Cullison, Kevin; Daniels, Brock; Gans, Bradley; Kennedy Hall, M; Gaines, Barbara A; Goldman, Sarah; Heil, John; Liu, Rachel; Marin, Jennifer R; Melnick, Edward R; Novelline, Robert A; Pare, Joseph; Repplinger, Michael D; Taylor, Richard A; Sodickson, Aaron D

    2015-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning is an essential diagnostic tool and has revolutionized care of patients in the acute care setting. However, there is widespread agreement that overutilization of CT, where benefits do not exceed possible costs or harms, is occurring. The goal was to seek consensus in identifying and prioritizing research questions and themes that involve the comparative effectiveness of "traditional" CT use versus alternative diagnostic strategies in the acute care setting. A modified Delphi technique was used that included input from emergency physicians, emergency radiologists, medical physicists, and an industry expert to achieve this.

  15. How infectious disease outbreaks affect community-based primary care physicians

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkimainen, R. Liisa; Bondy, Susan J.; Parkovnick, Meredith; Barnsley, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare how the infectious disease outbreaks H1N1 and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) affected community-based GPs and FPs. Design A mailed survey sent after the H1N1 outbreak compared with the results of similar survey completed after the SARS outbreak. Setting Greater Toronto area in Ontario. Participants A total of 183 randomly selected GPs and FPs who provided office-based care. Main outcome measures The perceptions of GPs and FPs on how serious infectious disease outbreaks affected their clinical work and personal lives; their preparedness for a serious infectious disease outbreak; and the types of information they want to receive and the sources they wanted to receive information from during a serious infectious disease outbreak. The responses from this survey were compared with the responses of GPs and FPs in the greater Toronto area who completed a similar survey in 2003 after the SARS outbreak. Results After the H1N1 outbreak, GPs and FPs still had substantial concerns about the effects of serious infectious disease outbreaks on the health of their family members. Physicians made changes to various office practices in order to manage and deal with patients with serious infectious diseases. They expressed concerns about the effects of an infectious disease on the provision of health care services. Also, physicians wanted to quickly receive accurate information from the provincial government and their medical associations. Conclusion Serious community-based infectious diseases are a personal concern for GPs and FPs, and have considerable effects on their clinical practice. Further work examining the timely flow of relevant information through different health care sectors and government agencies still needs to be undertaken. PMID:25316747

  16. The role of the physician in the emerging health care environment.

    PubMed Central

    DiMatteo, M R

    1998-01-01

    What do patients want from their physicians? This article reviews research on the role of the physician attained through surveys of the public and of physicians. The results from the two groups are surprisingly similar; communication is seen as an essential component of the physician's role. Further, we found that the public's ratings of the medical profession depend heavily on their experience with personal physicians. This paper reviews previous research on the importance of effective communication to patient satisfaction, adherence, and the outcomes of treatment, and it considers ways in which physician-patient communication is being affected by recent changes in the health care system. Suggestions for medical education and for the structure of primary and specialty patient care are offered. PMID:9614789

  17. Health care reform and job satisfaction of primary health care physicians in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Buciuniene, Ilona; Blazeviciene, Aurelija; Bliudziute, Egle

    2005-01-01

    Background The aim of this research paper is to study job satisfaction of physicians and general practitioners at primary health care institutions during the health care reform in Lithuania. Methods Self-administrated anonymous questionnaires were distributed to all physicians and general practitioners (N = 243, response rate – 78.6%), working at Kaunas primary health care level establishments, in October – December 2003. Results 15 men (7.9%) and 176 women (92.1%) participated in the research, among which 133 (69.6%) were GPs and 58 (30.4%) physicians. Respondents claimed to have chosen to become doctors, as other professions were of no interest to them. Total job satisfaction of the respondents was 4.74 point (on a 7 point scale). Besides 75.5% of the respondents said they would not recommend their children to choose a PHC level doctor's profession. The survey also showed that the respondents were most satisfied with the level of autonomy they get at work – 5.28, relationship with colleagues – 5.06, and management quality – 5.04, while compensation (2.09), social status (3.36), and workload (3.93) turned to be causing the highest dissatisfaction among the respondents. The strongest correlation (Spearmen's ratio) was observed between total job satisfaction and such factors as the level of autonomy – 0.566, workload – 0.452, and GP's social status – 0.458. Conclusion Total job satisfaction of doctors working at primary health care establishments in Lithuania is relatively low, and compensation, social status, and workload are among the key factors that condition PHC doctors' dissatisfaction with their job. PMID:15748299

  18. Caring for adult survivors of child sexual abuse. Issues for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Bala, M.

    1994-01-01

    Traditional medical education has not taught physicians about the long-term effects of child sexual abuse. Family physicians often feel poorly equipped to appreciate the effect of such a childhood history on current health or to recognize and treat survivors. This article links the experience of the sexually abused child to long-term effects and outlines the role of family physicians in screening and caring for survivors. PMID:7802772

  19. Caring for seriously mentally ill patients. Qualitative study of family physicians' experiences.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Judith Belle; Lent, Barbara; Stirling, April; Takhar, Jatinder; Bishop, Joan

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine family physicians' experiences in caring for patients with serious mental illness and their expectations of a shared mental health care (SMHC) model. DESIGN: Qualitative method of in-depth interviews. SETTING: London, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: Purposive sample of 11 full-time family physicians providing ongoing care for patients with serious mental illness. METHOD: Eleven interviews were conducted to explore family physicians' experiences. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Analysis was done using a constant comparative approach and was carried out concurrently rather than sequentially. Researchers read all interview transcripts independently before comparing and combining their analyses. Final analysis involved examining all interviews together to discover relationships between and among emerging themes. MAIN FINDINGS: Findings reflected three main themes: what family physicians perceive they bring to care of seriously mentally ill patients (i.e., whole-person approach to care); challenges family physicians face in participating in shared care of these patients (i.e., communication and access issues); and family physicians' expectations of a SMHC model (i.e., guidance and feedback). CONCLUSION: As seriously mentally ill patients are moved out of institutions, the need for an effective and efficient SMHC model becomes imperative. Our findings suggest that family physicians could be an important part of SMHC models but only if systemic barriers are removed and collaborative practice is encouraged. PMID:12053636

  20. End-of-life care beliefs among Hindu physicians in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Vijaya Sivalingam; Saeed, Fahad; Sinnakirouchenan, Ramapriya; Holley, Jean L; Srinivasan, Sinnakirouchenan

    2015-02-01

    Several studies from the United States and Europe showed that physicians' religiosity is associated with their approach to end-of-life care beliefs. No such studies have focused exclusively on Hindu physicians practicing in the United States. A 34-item questionnaire was sent to 293 Hindu physicians in the United States. Most participants believed that their religious beliefs do not influence their practice of medicine and do not interfere with withdrawal of life support. The US practice of discussing end-of-life issues with the patient, rather than primarily with the family, seems to have been adopted by Hindu physicians practicing in the United States. It is likely that the ethical, cultural, and patient-centered environment of US health care has influenced the practice of end-of-life care by Hindu physicians in this country. PMID:24052431

  1. Ambulatory care groups and the profiling of primary care physician resource use: examining the application of case mix adjustments.

    PubMed

    Greene, B R; Barlow, J; Newman, C

    1996-01-01

    A variety of profiling models and tools is utilized by payers, providers, and regulators to evaluate physician work, performance, and resource utilization. In physician profiling, the provider's pattern of practice is expressed as a rate of service or outcome. The article by Tucker, Weiner, Honigfeld, and Parton (this issue) compares the practice-based norms of primary care physicians by adjusting for case mix using ambulatory care groups (ACGs), a population-based classification method. Once the case mix is adjusted, the actual use of resources, as measured by overall charges, is compared with the expected value of resource use. In the Center for Research in Ambulatory Health Care Administration (CRAHCA) Physician Profiling Project, funded by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, physicians learn which services other physicians in their specialties perform. Physicians are able to compare their profiles with state and national level medians. The profiling project is one of the first demonstration projects in the field to profile ambulatory care practice patterns and collect patient demographics. An aspect of the project is to test the ACG classification system to data selected from 130 nonacademic practices representing over 5,000 physicians.

  2. Benchmarks for acute stroke care delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Ruth E.; Khan, Ferhana; Bayley, Mark T.; Asllani, Eriola; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D.; O'Callaghan, Christina; Silver, Frank L.; Kapral, Moira K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite widespread interest in many jurisdictions in monitoring and improving the quality of stroke care delivery, benchmarks for most stroke performance indicators have not been established. The objective of this study was to develop data-derived benchmarks for acute stroke quality indicators. Design Nine key acute stroke quality indicators were selected from the Canadian Stroke Best Practice Performance Measures Manual. Participants A population-based retrospective sample of patients discharged from 142 hospitals in Ontario, Canada, between 1 April 2008 and 31 March 2009 (N = 3191) was used to calculate hospital rates of performance and benchmarks. Intervention The Achievable Benchmark of Care (ABC™) methodology was used to create benchmarks based on the performance of the upper 15% of patients in the top-performing hospitals. Main Outcome Measures Benchmarks were calculated for rates of neuroimaging, carotid imaging, stroke unit admission, dysphasia screening and administration of stroke-related medications. Results The following benchmarks were derived: neuroimaging within 24 h, 98%; admission to a stroke unit, 77%; thrombolysis among patients arriving within 2.5 h, 59%; carotid imaging, 93%; dysphagia screening, 88%; antithrombotic therapy, 98%; anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, 94%; antihypertensive therapy, 92% and lipid-lowering therapy, 77%. ABC™ acute stroke care benchmarks achieve or exceed the consensus-based targets required by Accreditation Canada, with the exception of dysphagia screening. Conclusions Benchmarks for nine hospital-based acute stroke care quality indicators have been established. These can be used in the development of standards for quality improvement initiatives. PMID:24141011

  3. The Role of Physician Assistants in Rural Health Care: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Lisa R.; Hooker, Roderick S.; Yates, Kathryn L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A literature review was performed to assess the role of physician assistants (PAs) in rural health care. Four categories were examined: scope of practice, physician perceptions, community perceptions, and retention/recruitment. Methods: A search of the literature from 1974 to 2008 was undertaken by probing the electronic bibliographic…

  4. Caring for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities: New Roles for Physicians. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Corinne W.; Kniest, Barbara A.; Quigley, Andrea C.

    This final report discusses the activities and outcomes of a 3-year project designed to replicate a uniquely successful training model for involving physicians in community early intervention systems. The Caring for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities: New Roles for Physicians (CFIT) model includes three replicable components: state planning,…

  5. Minimizing physical restraints in acute care.

    PubMed

    Struck, Bryan D

    2005-08-01

    The use of restraints to protect patients and insure continuation of care is an accepted fact in today's medical practice. However over the last 20 years a growing body of evidence supports the idea that restraints are harmful and should be used as the last resort. Since 1987, federal law requires long term care facilities to be restraint free. This article describes the use of restraints in the acute care setting, complications of using restraints and efforts to minimize restraint use in order to compliant with national policies.

  6. 42 CFR 476.102 - Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Involvement of health care practitioners other than... Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians. (a) Basic requirement. Except as provided in... practitioners who furnish the services under review if the QIO reviews care and services delivered by...

  7. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K.; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this…

  8. Unethical business practices in U.S. health care alarm physician leaders.

    PubMed

    Weber, David O

    2005-01-01

    Learn the results of ACPE's recent survey on ethical business practices and find out why physician executives are very concerned about the impact unethical behaviors appear to be having on health care.

  9. Gender and the professional career of primary care physicians in Andalusia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the proportion of women in medicine is growing, female physicians continue to be disadvantaged in professional activities. The purpose of the study was to determine and compare the professional activities of female and male primary care physicians in Andalusia and to assess the effect of the health center on the performance of these activities. Methods Descriptive, cross-sectional, and multicenter study. Setting: Spain. Participants: Population: urban health centers and their physicians. Sample: 88 health centers and 500 physicians. Independent variable: gender. Measurements: Control variables: age, postgraduate family medicine specialty (FMS), patient quota, patients/day, hours/day housework from Monday to Friday, idem weekend, people at home with special care, and family situation. Dependent variables: 24 professional activities in management, teaching, research, and the scientific community. Self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive, bivariate, and multilevel logistic regression analyses. Results Response: 73.6%. Female physicians: 50.8%. Age: female physicians, 49.1 ± 4.3 yrs; male physicians, 51.3 ± 4.9 yrs (p < 0.001). Female physicians with FMS: 44.2%, male physicians with FMS: 33.3% (p < 0.001). Female physicians dedicated more hours to housework and more frequently lived alone versus male physicians. There were no differences in healthcare variables. Thirteen of the studied activities were less frequently performed by female physicians, indicating their lesser visibility in the production and diffusion of scientific knowledge. Performance of the majority of professional activities was independent of the health center in which the physician worked. Conclusions There are gender inequities in the development of professional activities in urban health centers in Andalusia, even after controlling for family responsibilities, work load, and the effect of the health center, which was important in only a few of the activities under study

  10. Physician Care Patterns and Adherence to Postpartum Glucose Testing after Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Hunsberger, Monica L.; Donatelle, Rebecca J.; Lindsay, Karen; Rosenberg, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study examines obstetrician/gynecologists and family medicine physicians' reported care patterns, attitudes and beliefs and predictors of adherence to postpartum testing in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Research Design and Methods In November–December 2005, a mailed survey went to a random, cross-sectional sample of 683 Oregon licensed physicians in obstetrician/gynecologists and family medicine from a population of 2171. Results Routine postpartum glucose tolerance testing by both family physicians (19.3%) and obstetrician/gynecologists physicians (35.3%) was reportedly low among the 285 respondents (42% response rate). Factors associated with high adherence to postpartum testing included physician stated priority (OR 4.39, 95% CI: 1.69–7.94) and physician beliefs about norms or typical testing practices (OR 3.66, 95% CI: 1.65–11.69). Specialty, sex of physician, years of practice, location, type of practice, other attitudes and beliefs were not associated with postpartum glucose tolerance testing. Conclusions Postpartum glucose tolerance testing following a gestational diabetes mellitus pregnancy was not routinely practiced by responders to this survey. Our findings indicate that physician knowledge, attitudes and beliefs may in part explain suboptimal postpartum testing. Although guidelines for postpartum care are established, some physicians do not prioritize these guidelines in practice and do not believe postpartum testing is the norm among their peers. PMID:23071709

  11. Perceptions of physicians about knowledge sharing barriers in Turkish health care system.

    PubMed

    Gider, Ömer; Ocak, Saffet; Top, Mehmet

    2015-05-01

    This study was based on knowledge sharing barriers about attitudes of physicians in Turkish health care system. The present study aims to determine whether the knowledge sharing barriers about attitudes of physicians vary depending on gender, position, departments at hospitals, and hospital ownership status. This study was planned and conducted on physicians at one public hospital, one university hospital, and one private hospital in Turkey. 209 physicians were reached for data collection. The study was conducted in June-September 2014. The questionnaire (developed by A. Riege, (J. Knowl. Manag. 9(3):18-35, 2005)), five point Likert-type scale including 39 items having the potential of the physicians' knowledge- sharing attitudes and behaviors, was used in the study for data collection. Descriptive statistics, reliability analysis, student t test and ANOVA were used for data analysis. According to results of this study, there was medium level of knowledge sharing barriers within hospitals. In general, physicians had perceptions about the lowest level individual barriers, intermediate level organizational barriers and the highest level technological barriers perceptions, respectively. This study revealed that some knowledge sharing barriers about attitudes of physicians were significantly difference according to hospital ownership status, gender, position and departments. Most evidence medical decisions and evidence based practice depend on experience and knowledge of existing options and knowledge sharing in health care organizations. Physicians are knowledge and information-intensive and principal professional group in health care context.

  12. African American southerners and white physicians: medical care at the turn of the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Lynn Marie

    2012-01-01

    Much of what scholars know about race and medicine in the late-nineteenth-and early-twentieth-century South relates to the racial beliefs of white physicians and the segregated and exploitative treatment of black patients in hospitals and public health programs. This article shifts scholarly attention to the ways African American patients and their families took part in medical practice in commonplace settings of the home and office. The author examines how African Americans called upon local physicians in the rural and small-town South, how white physicians responded, and how they interacted in cases of serious illness, injury, and surgery. The claims of black southerners to physicians' treatments, in combination with small-town physicians' continuing reliance on interpersonal practices of medical care, made for an erratic but potentially distinctive cross-racial encounter-one involving a greater degree of negotiated authority and personal care than what generally has been recognized for this time and place.

  13. [Calculation of the incidence of primary care visits due to acute respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Uphoff, H; Buchholz, U; Lang, A; Haas, W; Stilianakis, N

    2004-03-01

    Data collected by the German influenza sentinel of the Working Group on Influenza (AGI) do not allow calculation of the incidence of primary care visits due to acute respiratory infections (ARI). Because patients do not have to register with a particular general practitioner, the population covered by primary care physicians is unknown. Until now the incidence of primary care visits due to ARI is estimated indirectly by extrapolating the sentinel sample of physicians to the total number of primary care physicians caring for the total population. However, distortions of the estimated incidence occur in weeks with public holidays (particularly around Christmas and New Year) and when many physicians close their practice simultaneously because of vacation. We have attempted to quantify the shortage of medical services and established thresholds to correct for situations where service by medical providers is extraordinarily reduced. The suggested method avoids distortions to a large extent and makes interpretation of data during those critical periods possible. A second subject of the paper is the validation of the estimated ARI incidence in primary care practices by comparing the data to other sources such as sick leave statistics of health insurance as well as ICD-based data from a primary care network. We found that the estimated ARI incidence in primary care practices was in line with data from other sources and appears plausible.

  14. Roles of primary care physicians in managing bipolar disorders in adults.

    PubMed

    Awaluddin, A; Jali, N; Bahari, R; Jamil, Z; Haron, N

    2015-01-01

    Management of bipolar disorder (BD) is challenging due to its multiple and complex facets of presentations as well as various levels of interventions. There is also limitation of treatment accessibility especially at the primary care level. Local evidence-based clinical practice guidelines address the importance of integrated care of BD at various levels. Primary care physicians hold pertinent role in maintaining remission and preventing relapse by providing systematic monitoring of people with BD. Pharmacological treatment in particular mood stabilisers remain the most effective management with psychosocial interventions as adjunct. This paper highlights the role of primary care physicians in the management of BD.

  15. The Care Of The Aged: A Responsibility & Challenge For The Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    de Buda, Yvonne

    1979-01-01

    The population increase in the over 65 age group creates a challenge and responsibility for family physicians in the continuing and comprehensive care of the aged. Family physicians have to assess the medical, psychological and social needs of the elderly and provide them with the best care available by utilizing local facilities, community resources, health care personnel, and whenever possible, the cooperation of the patient's family. Medical students, family practice trainees and other health professionals require the appropriate training. New trends in the care of the elderly and medical education geared towards this task are discussed. PMID:20469307

  16. Assessing the Proximity Relationship of Walk-in Clinics and Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alissa; Revere, Lee; Ramphul, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    This article evaluates the spatial relationship between primary care provider clinics and walk-in clinics. Using ZIP code level data from Harris County, Texas, the results suggest that primary care physicians and walk-in clinics are similarly located at lower rates in geographic areas with populations of lower socioeconomic status. Although current clinic location choices effectively broaden the gap in primary care access for the lower income population, the growing number of newly insured individuals may make it increasingly attractive for walk-in clinics to locate in geographic areas with populations of lower socioeconomic status and less competition from primary care physicians. PMID:27576053

  17. Does Affiliation of Physician Groups with One Another Produce Higher Quality Primary Care?

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Mark W.; Coltin, Kathryn L.; Pearson, Steven D.; Kleinman, Ken P.; Zheng, Jie; Singer, Janice A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Recent reports have emphasized the importance of delivery systems in improving health care quality. However, few prior studies have assessed differences in primary care quality between physician groups that differ in size and organizational configuration. We examined whether larger physician group size and affiliation with networks of multiple groups are associated with higher quality of care. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional observational analysis of 132 physician groups (including 4,358 physicians) who delivered primary care services in Massachusetts in 2002. We compared physician groups on performance scores for 12 Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS) measures reflecting processes of adult primary care. Results Network-affiliated physician groups had higher performance scores than non-affiliated groups for 10 of the 12 HEDIS measures (p < 0.05). There was no consistent relationship between group size and performance scores. Multivariable models including group size, network affiliation, and health plan showed that network-affiliated groups had higher performance scores than non-affiliated groups on 8 of the 12 HEDIS measures (p < 0.05), and larger group size was not associated with higher performance scores. Adjusted differences in the performance scores of network-affiliated and non-affiliated groups ranged from 2% to 15%. For 4 HEDIS measures related to diabetes care, performance score differences between network-affiliated and non-affiliated groups were most apparent among the smallest groups. Conclusions Physician group affiliation with networks of multiple groups was associated with higher quality, and for measures of diabetes care the quality advantage of network-affiliation was most evident among smaller physician groups. PMID:17594130

  18. Electronic medical records and physician stress in primary care: results from the MEMO Study

    PubMed Central

    Babbott, Stewart; Manwell, Linda Baier; Brown, Roger; Montague, Enid; Williams, Eric; Schwartz, Mark; Hess, Erik; Linzer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background Little has been written about physician stress that may be associated with electronic medical records (EMR). Objective We assessed relationships between the number of EMR functions, primary care work conditions, and physician satisfaction, stress and burnout. Design and participants 379 primary care physicians and 92 managers at 92 clinics from New York City and the upper Midwest participating in the 2001–5 Minimizing Error, Maximizing Outcome (MEMO) Study. A latent class analysis identified clusters of physicians within clinics with low, medium and high EMR functions. Main measures We assessed physician-reported stress, burnout, satisfaction, and intent to leave the practice, and predictors including time pressure during visits. We used a two-level regression model to estimate the mean response for each physician cluster to each outcome, adjusting for physician age, sex, specialty, work hours and years using the EMR. Effect sizes (ES) of these relationships were considered small (0.14), moderate (0.39), and large (0.61). Key results Compared to the low EMR cluster, physicians in the moderate EMR cluster reported more stress (ES 0.35, p=0.03) and lower satisfaction (ES −0.45, p=0.006). Physicians in the high EMR cluster indicated lower satisfaction than low EMR cluster physicians (ES −0.39, p=0.01). Time pressure was associated with significantly more burnout, dissatisfaction and intent to leave only within the high EMR cluster. Conclusions Stress may rise for physicians with a moderate number of EMR functions. Time pressure was associated with poor physician outcomes mainly in the high EMR cluster. Work redesign may address these stressors. PMID:24005796

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament tears for the primary care sports physician: what to know on the field and in the office.

    PubMed

    Heard, Wendell M R; VanSice, Wade C; Savoie, Felix H

    2015-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are relatively common and can lead to knee dysfunction. The classic presentation is a non-contact twisting injury with an audible pop and the rapid onset of swelling. Prompt evaluation and diagnosis of ACL injuries are important. Acute treatment consists of cessation of the sporting activity, ice, compression, and elevation with evaluation by a physician familiar with ACL injuries and their management. The diagnosis is made with the use of patient history and physical examination as well as imaging studies. Radiographs may show evidence of a bony injury. MRI confirms the diagnosis and evaluates the knee for concomitant injuries to the cartilage, menisci and other knee ligaments. For active patients, operative treatment is often recommended while less-active patients may not require surgery. The goal of this review is to discuss the diagnosis of an ACL injury and provide clear management strategies for the primary-care sports medicine physician.

  20. Under-diagnosis of pain by primary physicians and late referral to a palliative care team

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Under-diagnosis of pain is a serious problem in cancer care. Accurate pain assessment by physicians may form the basis of effective care. The aim of this study is to examine the association between late referral to a Palliative Care Team (PCT) after admission and the under-diagnosis of pain by primary physicians. Methods This retrospective study was performed in the Teikyo University teaching-hospital for a period of 20 months. We investigated triads composed of 213 adult cancer inpatients who had coexisting moderate or severe pain at the initial PCT consultation, 77 primary physicians, and 4 palliative care physicians. The outcome of the present study was the under-diagnosis of pain by primary physicians with routinely self-completed standard format checklists. The checklists included coexisting pain documented independently by primary and palliative care physicians at the time of the initial PCT consultation. Under-diagnosis of pain was defined as existing pain diagnosed by the palliative care physicians only. Late referral to PCTs after admission was defined as a referral to the PCT at ≥20 days after admission. Because the two groups displayed significantly different regarding the distributions of the duration from admission to referral to PCTs, we used 20 days as the cut-off point for “late referral.” Results Accurate pain assessment was observed in 192 triads, whereas 21 triads displayed under-diagnosis of pain by primary physicians. Under-diagnosis of pain by primary physicians was associated with a longer duration between admission and initial PCT consultation, compared with accurate pain assessment (25 days versus 4 days, p < 0.0001). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, under-diagnosis of pain by the primary physicians was significantly associated with late (20 or more days) referral to a PCT (adjusted odds ratio, 2.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.27 − 6.71). Other factors significantly associated with

  1. Teleconferenced Educational Detailing: Diabetes Education for Primary Care Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Stewart B.; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Van, Daphne M.; O'Neill, Colleen

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Formal didactic continuing medical education (CME) is relatively ineffective for changing physician behavior. Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly prevalent disease, and interventions to improve adherence to clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are needed. Methods: A stratified, cluster-randomized, controlled trial design was used to…

  2. Do hospitals without physicians on the board deliver lower quality of care?

    PubMed

    Bai, Ge; Krishnan, Ranjani

    2015-01-01

    This study examines whether hospitals without physician participation on their boards of directors deliver lower quality of care. Using data from California nonprofit hospitals from 2004 to 2008, the authors document that the absence of physicians on the board is associated with a decrease of 3 to 5 percentage points in 3 of 4 measures of care quality. This result was obtained using regression analysis, which controls for various hospital characteristics. The authors also identify factors that influence quality of care in hospitals. Specifically, hospital size, church affiliation, urban location, and system affiliation are positively associated with quality of care; proportion of Medicaid patient revenue and poverty level of the county in which the hospital is located are negatively associated with quality of care. These results highlight the importance of physician participation in hospital governance and indicate areas for hospitals and policy makers to focus on to enhance medical quality management.

  3. Palliative care by family physicians in the 1990s. Resilience amid reform.

    PubMed Central

    Burge, F.; McIntyre, P.; Twohig, P.; Cummings, I.; Kaufman, D.; Frager, G.; Pollett, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore issues family physicians face in providing community-based palliative care to their patients in the context of a changing health care system. DESIGN: Focus groups. SETTING: Small (< 10,000 population), medium-sized (10,000 to 50,000), and large (> 50,000) communities in Nova Scotia. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-five men and women physicians with varying years of practice experience in both solo and group practices. METHOD: A semistructured approach was used, asking physicians to reflect on recent palliative care experiences in order to explore issues of care. MAIN FINDINGS: Five themes emerged from the discussions: resources needed, availability of family support, time and money supporting physicians' activities, symptom control for patients, and physicians' emotional reactions to caring for dying patients. CONCLUSION: With downsizing of hospitals and greater emphasis on community-based care, the issues identified in this study will need attention, particularly in designing an integrated service delivery model for palliative care. PMID:11723593

  4. An Evolving Identity: How Chronic Care Is Transforming What it Means to Be a Physician.

    PubMed

    Bogetz, Alyssa L; Bogetz, Jori F

    2015-12-01

    Physician identity and the professional role physicians play in health care is rapidly evolving. Over 130 million adults and children in the USA have complex and chronic diseases, each of which is shaped by aspects of the patient's social, psychological, and economic status. These patients have lifelong health care needs that require the ongoing care of multiple health care providers, access to community services, and the involvement of patients' family support networks. To date, physician professional identity formation has centered on autonomy, authority, and the ability to "heal." These notions of identity may be counterproductive in chronic disease care, which demands interdependency between physicians, their patients, and teams of multidisciplinary health care providers. Medical educators can prepare trainees for practice in the current health care environment by providing training that legitimizes and reinforces a professional identity that emphasizes this interdependency. This commentary outlines the important challenges related to this change and suggests potential strategies to reframe professional identity to better match the evolving role of physicians today.

  5. Word of mouth and physician referrals still drive health care provider choice.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ha T; Lauer, Johanna R

    2008-12-01

    Sponsors of health care price and quality transparency initiatives often identify all consumers as their target audiences, but the true audiences for these programs are much more limited. In 2007, only 11 percent of American adults looked for a new primary care physician, 28 percent needed a new specialist physician and 16 percent underwent a medical procedure at a new facility, according to a new national study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Among consumers who found a new provider, few engaged in active shopping or considered price or quality information--especially when choosing specialists or facilities for medical procedures. When selecting new primary care physicians, half of all consumers relied on word-of-mouth recommendations from friends and relatives, but many also used doctor recommendations (38%) and health plan information (35%), and nearly two in five used multiple information sources when choosing a primary care physician. However, when choosing specialists and facilities for medical procedures, most consumers relied exclusively on physician referrals. Use of online provider information was low, ranging from 3 percent for consumers undergoing procedures to 7 percent for consumers choosing new specialists to 11 percent for consumers choosing new primary care physicians PMID:19054900

  6. Physicians' career satisfaction, quality of care and patients' trust: the role of community uninsurance.

    PubMed

    Pagán, José A; Balasubramanian, Lakshmi; Pauly, Mark V

    2007-10-01

    There is evidence that health care providers located in communities with relatively large uninsured populations face financial difficulties because of low service demand and high levels of uncompensated care. Data on 4,920 physicians from the 2000-2001 Community Tracking Study Physician Survey and from 25,637 adults from the 2003 Community Tracking Study Household Survey were used to analyze whether the relative size of the local uninsured population is associated with the level of career satisfaction and the quality of care provided by physicians and to assess whether patient trust is associated with the level of community uninsurance. The results indicate that the proportion of uninsured adults in a given community is negatively related to physicians' career satisfaction and the perceived quality of health care provided. Community uninsurance is also negatively related to patient trust in their doctor and positively related to whether insured patients believed that their doctor was influenced by rules from health insurance companies. Physicians in communities with relatively large uninsured populations may have lower career satisfaction and lower perceptions of the quality of care provided due to financial difficulties. Patients in these communities are also less likely to trust their physician.

  7. Physicians' views on capitated payment for medical care: does familiarity foster acceptance?

    PubMed

    Wynia, M K; Picken, H A; Selker, H P

    1997-10-01

    Physicians' attitudes toward capitated payment have not been quantified. We sought to assess physicians' views on capitated payment and to compare the views of those who did and did not participate in such payment. A written survey was given to 200 physicians with admitting privileges at a 600-bed Ohio hospital; 82 (41%) responded and were included in this study. Among respondents, 21 (26%) were primary care physicians, 18 (22%) were medical subspecialists, and 18 (22%) were surgeons. Fifty-eight (71%) were providers for managed care plans, and 35 (43%) participated in capitated payment arrangements. Among physicians who did not participate in capitated care, 100% believed that there was a conflict of interest in capitated payment, and 77% (23 physicians) believed that participation in plans that reduce physician income in proportion to medical expenditures is not acceptable. Among those who did participate in capitated payment contracts, 95% (41 physicians) believed these plans posed a conflict of interest, and 72% (31 physicians) said this was not acceptable (P = 0.4 and 0.66 for each comparison). There was no trend toward the opinion that capitated payment arrangements are acceptable with greater levels of experience in capitated care (P = 0.5 by Spearman test). There were trends suggesting that compared with those who were not receiving capitated payments, those who received capitated payment were 50% more likely to have never discussed capitated payment with any patient (63% versus 42%, P = 0.08), were 70% more likely to very strongly oppose the use of capitation to pay their own family's physicians (49% versus 29%, P = 0.07), and were 30% more likely to believe that it is impossible to stay in the practice of medicine without participating in capitated payment plans (84% versus 65%, P = 0.06). None of the respondents reported that they had a contractual "gag clause," but 34% (27 physicians) said they would not speak publicly about any perceived risks of

  8. Educational outreach and collaborative care enhances physician's perceived knowledge about Developmental Coordination Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Robin; Missiuna, Cheryl; Egan, Mary; McLean, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Background Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is a chronic neurodevelopmental condition that affects 5–6% of children. When not recognized and properly managed during the child's development, DCD can lead to academic failure, mental health problems and poor physical fitness. Physicians, working in collaboration with rehabilitation professionals, are in an excellent position to recognize and manage DCD. This study was designed to determine the feasibility and impact of an educational outreach and collaborative care model to improve chronic disease management of children with DCD. Methods The intervention included educational outreach and collaborative care for children with suspected DCD. Physicians were educated by and worked with rehabilitation professionals from February 2005 to April 2006. Mixed methods evaluation approach documented the process and impact of the intervention. Results Physicians: 750 primary care physicians from one major urban area and outlying regions were invited to participate; 147 physicians enrolled in the project. Children: 125 children were identified and referred with suspected DCD. The main outcome was improvement in knowledge and perceived skill of physicians concerning their ability to screen, diagnose and manage DCD. At baseline 91.1% of physicians were unaware of the diagnosis of DCD, and only 1.6% could diagnose condition. Post-intervention, 91% of participating physicians reported greater knowledge about DCD and 29.2% were able to diagnose DCD compared to 0.5% of non-participating physicians. 100% of physicians who participated in collaborative care indicated they would continue to use the project materials and resources and 59.4% reported they would recommend or share the materials with medical colleagues. In addition, 17.6% of physicians not formally enrolled in the project reported an increase in knowledge of DCD. Conclusion Physicians receiving educational outreach visits significantly improved their knowledge about

  9. Variations in the management of fibromyalgia by physician specialty: rheumatology versus primary care

    PubMed Central

    Able, Stephen L; Robinson, Rebecca L; Kroenke, Kurt; Mease, Philip; Williams, David A; Chen, Yi; Wohlreich, Madelaine; McCarberg, Bill H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of physician specialty regarding diagnosis and treatment of fibromyalgia (FM) and assess the clinical status of patients initiating new treatment for FM using data from Real-World Examination of Fibromyalgia: Longitudinal Evaluation of Costs and Treatments. Patients and methods Outpatients from 58 sites in the United States were enrolled. Data were collected via in-office surveys and telephone interviews. Pairwise comparisons by specialty were made using chi-square, Fisher’s exact tests, and Student’s t-tests. Results Physician specialist cohorts included rheumatologists (n=54), primary care physicians (n=25), and a heterogeneous group of physicians practicing pain or physical medicine, psychiatry, neurology, obstetrics and gynecology, osteopathy, or an unspecified specialty (n=12). The rheumatologists expressed higher confidence diagnosing FM (4.5 on a five-point scale) than primary care physicians (4.1) (P=0.037). All cohorts strongly agreed that recognizing FM is their responsibility. They agreed that psychological aspects of FM are important, but disagreed that symptoms are psychosomatic. All physician cohorts agreed with a multidisciplinary approach including nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments, although physicians were more confident prescribing medications than alternative therapies. Most patients reported moderate to severe pain, multiple comorbidities, and treatment with several medications and nonpharmacologic therapies. Conclusion Physician practice characteristics, physician attitudes, and FM patient profiles were broadly similar across specialties. The small but significant differences reported by physicians and patients across physician cohorts suggest that despite published guidelines, treatment of FM still contains important variance across specialties. PMID:27799842

  10. Umbilical cord blood: a guide for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul L; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Hesse, Brett

    2011-09-15

    Umbilical cord blood stem cell transplants are used to treat a variety of oncologic, genetic, hematologic, and immunodeficiency disorders. Physicians have an important role in educating, counseling, and offering umbilical cord blood donation and storage options to patients. Parents may donate their infant's cord blood to a public bank, pay to store it in a private bank, or have it discarded. The federal government and many state governments have passed laws and issued regulations regarding umbilical cord blood, and some states require physicians to discuss cord blood options with pregnant women. Five prominent medical organizations have published recommendations about cord blood donation and storage. Current guidelines recommend donation of umbilical cord blood to public banks when possible, or storage through the Related Donor Cord Blood Program when a sibling has a disease that may require a stem cell transplant. Experts do not currently recommend private banking for unidentified possible future use. Step-by-step guidance and electronic resources are available to physicians whose patients are considering saving or donating their infant's umbilical cord blood. PMID:21916391

  11. Physician perceptions of pharmacist roles in a primary care setting in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Pharmacists are uniquely trained to provide guidance to patients in the selection of appropriate non-prescription therapy. Physicians in Qatar may not always recognize how pharmacists function in assuring safe medication use. Both these health professional groups come from heterogeneous training and experiences before migrating to the country and these backgrounds could influence collaborative patient care. Qatar Petroleum (QP), the largest private employer in the country, has developed a pharmacist-guided medication consulting service at their primary care clinics, but physician comfort with pharmacists recommending drug therapy is currently unknown. The objective of this study is to characterize physician perceptions of pharmacists and their roles in a primary care patient setting in Qatar. Methods This cross-sectional survey was developed following a comprehensive literature review and administered in English and Arabic. Consenting QP physicians were asked questions to assess experiences, comfort and expectations of pharmacist roles and abilities to provide medication-related advice and recommend and monitor therapies. Results The median age of the 62 (77.5%) physicians who responded was between 40 and 50 years old and almost two-third were men (64.5%). Fourteen different nationalities were represented. Physicians were more comfortable with pharmacist activities closely linked to drug products than responsibilities associated with monitoring and optimization of patient outcomes. Medication education (96.6%) and drug knowledge (90%) were practically unanimously recognized as abilities expected of pharmacists, but consultative roles, such as assisting in drug regimen design were less acknowledged. They proposed pharmacist spend more time with physicians attending joint meetings or education events to help advance acceptance of pharmacists in patient-centered care at this site. Conclusions Physicians had low comfort and expectations of patient

  12. Factors explaining the increase in cost for physician care in Quebec's elderly population.

    PubMed Central

    Demers, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine what role demographic factors and increases in physician fees and utilization played in the rise in costs of physician services provided for elderly people in Quebec between 1982 and 1992, and to investigate changes in patterns of care (type and amount of services) related to utilization. DESIGN: Retrospective study of population-based data. SETTING: Province of Quebec. SUBJECTS: Elderly people (65 years of age and over) in Quebec in 1982 (n = 589,800) and in 1992 (n = 803,600). OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of the increase in physician care costs attributable to (a) aging (defined as a shift in the age distribution) of the elderly population, (b) the increase in the size of the elderly population, (c) the increase in physician fees and (d) the increase in utilization of physician services; proportion of care provided by general practitioners (GPs) and by specialists; proportion of minor and complete examinations provided by GPs; and rates of hospital admissions and surgery. RESULTS: Aging was responsible for 0.5% of the increase in physician care costs between 1982 and 1992, population growth for 27.0% and the increase in physician fees for 25.5%. The increased utilization accounted for 47.0% of the total cost increase. Analyses of the utilization data revealed a shift toward more costly services, more visits to specialists and higher rates of hospital admissions and surgery in 1992 than in 1982. CONCLUSIONS: Aging and population growth had minor effects on the increase in physician care costs between 1982 and 1992. Increased utilization was the most important factor. The appropriateness of this trend needs to be verified. PMID:8956832

  13. From physician to consumer: the effectiveness of strategies to manage health care utilization.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Kathryn E; Smith, Maureen A; Davis, Margaret K

    2002-12-01

    Many strategies are commonly used to influence physician behavior in managed care organizations. This review examines the effectiveness of three mechanisms to influence physician behavior: financial incentives directed at providers or patients, policies/procedures for managing care, and the selection/education of both providers and patients. The authors reach three conclusions. First, all health care systems use financial incentives, but these mechanisms are shifting away from financial incentives directed at the physician to those directed at the consumer. Second, heavily procedural strategies such as utilization review and gatekeeping show some evidence of effectiveness but are highly unpopular due to their restrictions on physician and patient choice. Third, a future system built on consumer choice is contradicted by mechanisms that rely solely on narrow networks of providers or the education of physicians. If patients become the new locus of decision making in health care, provider-focused mechanisms to influence physician behavior will not disappear but are likely to decline in importance. PMID:12508705

  14. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners perform effective roles on teams caring for Medicare patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Everett, Christine; Thorpe, Carolyn; Palta, Mari; Carayon, Pascale; Bartels, Christie; Smith, Maureen A

    2013-11-01

    One approach to the patient-centered medical home, particularly for patients with chronic illnesses, is to include physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) on primary care teams. Using Medicare claims and electronic health record data from a large physician group, we compared outcomes for two groups of adult Medicare patients with diabetes whose conditions were at various levels of complexity: those whose care teams included PAs or NPs in various roles, and those who received care from physicians only. Outcomes were generally equivalent in thirteen comparisons. In four comparisons, outcomes were superior for the patients receiving care from PAs or NPs, but in three other comparisons the outcomes were superior for patients receiving care from physicians only. Specific roles performed by PAs and NPs were associated with different patterns in the measure of the quality of diabetes care and use of health care services. No role was best for all outcomes. Our findings suggest that patient characteristics, as well as patients' and organizations' goals, should be considered when determining when and how to deploy PAs and NPs on primary care teams. Accordingly, training and policy should continue to support role flexibility for these health professionals.

  15. A personal letter to an aspiring physician or nurse (or other caring professional).

    PubMed

    Savett, Laurence A

    2014-01-01

    In a letter to an aspiring physician or nurse, the author describes some of the important dimensions and timeless values of a fulfilling career in health care, the importance of the professional-patient relationship, ways to make an informed career choice, the guidance provided by sound values, and his response to some of the myths about health care careers. PMID:25252380

  16. Outcome of a Pilot Dementia Training Program for Primary Care Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sizemore, Mark T.; Vicioso, Belinda; Lothrop, Julia L.; Rubin, Craig D.

    1998-01-01

    Data from primary care physicians attending a workshop on Alzheimer's disease included 21 pretests, 14 posttests, and 17 interviews. Results showed that 41% had used workshop materials to train other health care providers; all felt better able to conduct patient education. (SK)

  17. An Approach to Training and Retaining Primary Care Physicians in Rural Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Allan; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine's success in educating and retaining primary care physicians for practice in rural Appalachia is ascribed to its focused mission; a multistate student exchange program; careful recruitment, admission, and placement; early clinical training in rural sites; and status as a state-supported institution.…

  18. Postconcussive Syndrome Following Sports-related Concussion: A Treatment Overview for Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Moran, Byron; Tadikonda, Prathima; Sneed, Kevin B; Hummel, Michelle; Guiteau, Sergio; Coris, Eric E

    2015-09-01

    Postconcussive syndrome is an increasingly recognized outcome of sports-related concussion (SRC), characterized by a constellation of poorly defined symptoms. Treatment of PCS is significantly different from that of SRC alone. Primary care physicians often are the first to evaluate these patients, but some are unfamiliar with the available therapeutic approaches. This review provides an overview of the pathophysiology of SRC and descriptions of both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment options to allow primary care physicians to provide evidence-based care to patients experiencing postconcussive syndrome. PMID:26332481

  19. Academic physicians' assessment of the effects of computers on health care.

    PubMed

    Detmer, W M; Friedman, C P

    1994-01-01

    We assessed the attitudes of academic physicians towards computers in health care at two academic medical centers that are in the early stages of clinical information-system deployment. We distributed a 4-page questionnaire to 470 subjects, and a total of 272 physicians (58%) responded. Our results show that respondents use computers frequently, primarily to perform academic-oriented tasks as opposed to clinical tasks. Overall, respondents viewed computers as being slightly beneficial to health care. They perceive self-education and access to up-to-date information as the most beneficial aspects of computers and are most concerned about privacy issues and the effect of computers on the doctor-patient relationship. Physicians with prior computer training and greater knowledge of informatics concepts had more favorable attitudes towards computers in health care. We suggest that negative attitudes towards computers can be addressed by careful system design as well as targeted educational activities.

  20. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2015 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; reasonable compensation equivalents for physician services in excluded hospitals and certain teaching hospitals; provider administrative appeals and judicial review; enforcement provisions for organ transplant centers; and electronic health record (EHR) incentive program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, and other legislation. These changes are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits are effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2014. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014. In addition, we discuss our proposals on the interruption of stay policy for LTCHs and on retiring the "5 percent" payment adjustment for collocated LTCHs. While many of the statutory mandates of the Pathway for SGR Reform Act apply to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, others will not begin to apply until 2016 and beyond. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revising requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that

  1. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2015 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; reasonable compensation equivalents for physician services in excluded hospitals and certain teaching hospitals; provider administrative appeals and judicial review; enforcement provisions for organ transplant centers; and electronic health record (EHR) incentive program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, and other legislation. These changes are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits are effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2014. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014. In addition, we discuss our proposals on the interruption of stay policy for LTCHs and on retiring the "5 percent" payment adjustment for collocated LTCHs. While many of the statutory mandates of the Pathway for SGR Reform Act apply to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, others will not begin to apply until 2016 and beyond. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revising requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that

  2. Psychiatrists' and primary care physicians' beliefs about overtreatment of depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Ryan E; Rasinski, Kenneth A; Yoon, John D; Curlin, Farr A

    2015-02-01

    Critics say that physicians overdiagnose and overtreat depression and anxiety. We surveyed 1504 primary care physicians (PCPs) and 512 psychiatrists, measuring beliefs about overtreatment of depression and anxiety and predictions of whether persons would benefit from taking medication, investing in relationships, and investing in spiritual life. A total of 63% of PCPs and 64% of psychiatrists responded. Most agreed that physicians too often treat normal sadness as a medical illness (67% of PCPs and 62% of psychiatrists) and too often treat normal worry and stress as a medical illness (59% of PCPs, 55% of psychiatrists). Physicians who agreed were less likely to believe that depressed or anxious people would benefit "a lot" from taking an antidepressant (36% vs. 58% of PCPs) or antianxiety medication (25% vs. 42% of PCPs, 42% vs. 57% of psychiatrists). Most PCPs and psychiatrists believe that physicians too often treat normal sadness and worry as a medical illness. PMID:25594787

  3. The effect of payment reform on physician practices. Part 2. Physicians and health plans prepare for health care's brave new world.

    PubMed

    Hettiger, Stacey; Natinsky, Paul; Neller, Joe

    2012-01-01

    In our last installment, we wrote globally about the nature and permanence of trends in physician payment models, particularly the shift from fee-for-service to fee-for-value. In our second communique, we will look specifically at major health plans with which physicians will be working and provide an overview of the payment methods, programs, and demonstrations affecting Michigan physicians and the health care delivery model.

  4. Using Behavioral Economics to Design Physician Incentives That Deliver High-Value Care.

    PubMed

    Emanuel, Ezekiel J; Ubel, Peter A; Kessler, Judd B; Meyer, Gregg; Muller, Ralph W; Navathe, Amol S; Patel, Pankaj; Pearl, Robert; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Sacks, Lee; Sen, Aditi P; Sherman, Paul; Volpp, Kevin G

    2016-01-19

    Behavioral economics provides insights about the development of effective incentives for physicians to deliver high-value care. It suggests that the structure and delivery of incentives can shape behavior, as can thoughtful design of the decision-making environment. This article discusses several principles of behavioral economics, including inertia, loss aversion, choice overload, and relative social ranking. Whereas these principles have been applied to motivate personal health decisions, retirement planning, and savings behavior, they have been largely ignored in the design of physician incentive programs. Applying these principles to physician incentives can improve their effectiveness through better alignment with performance goals. Anecdotal examples of successful incentive programs that apply behavioral economics principles are provided, even as the authors recognize that its application to the design of physician incentives is largely untested, and many outstanding questions exist. Application and rigorous evaluation of infrastructure changes and incentives are needed to design payment systems that incentivize high-quality, cost-conscious care.

  5. Building relationships with physicians. Internal marketing efforts help strengthen organizational bonds at a rural health care clinic.

    PubMed

    Peltier, J W; Boyt, T; Westfall, J E

    1997-01-01

    Physician turnover is costly for health care organizations, especially for rural organizations. One approach management can take to reduce turnover is to promote physician loyalty by treating them as an important customer segment. The authors develop an information--oriented framework for generating physician loyalty and illustrate how this framework has helped to eliminate physician turnover at a rural health care clinic. Rural health care organizations must develop a more internal marketing orientation in their approach to establishing strong relationship bonds with physicians. PMID:10173904

  6. Non-physician providers of obstetric care in Mexico: Perspectives of physicians, obstetric nurses and professional midwives

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Mexico 87% of births are attended by physicians. However, the decline in the national maternal mortality rate has been slower than expected. The Mexican Ministry of Health’s 2009 strategy to reduce maternal mortality gives a role to two non-physician models that meet criteria for skilled attendants: obstetric nurses and professional midwives. This study compares and contrasts these two provider types with the medical model, analyzing perspectives on their respective training, scope of practice, and also their perception and/or experiences with integration into the public system as skilled birth attendants. Methodology This paper synthesizes qualitative research that was obtained as a component of the quantitative and qualitative study that evaluated three models of obstetric care: professional midwives (PM), obstetric nurses (ON) and general physicians (GP). A total of 27 individual interviews using a semi-structured guide were carried out with PMs, ONs, GPs and specialists. Interviews were transcribed following the principles of grounded theory, codes and categories were created as they emerged from the data. We analyzed data in ATLAS.ti. Results All provider types interviewed expressed confidence in their professional training and acknowledge that both professional midwives and obstetric nurses have the necessary skills and knowledge to care for women during normal pregnancy and childbirth. The three types of providers recognize limits to their practice, namely in the area of managing complications. We found differences in how each type of practitioner perceived the concept and process of birth and their role in this process. The barriers to incorporation as a model to attend birth faced by PMs and ONs are at the individual, hospital and system level. GPs question their ability and training to handle deliveries, in particular those that become complicated, and the professional midwifery model particularly as it relates to a clinical setting, is

  7. Independent practice associations and physician-hospital organizations can improve care management for smaller practices.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Wu, Frances M; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Ramsay, Patricia P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    Pay-for-performance, public reporting, and accountable care organization programs place pressures on physicians to use health information technology and organized care management processes to improve the care they provide. But physician practices that are not large may lack the resources and size to implement such processes. We used data from a unique national survey of 1,164 practices with fewer than twenty physicians to provide the first information available on the extent to which independent practice associations (IPAs) and physician-hospital organizations (PHOs) might make it possible for these smaller practices to share resources to improve care. Nearly a quarter of the practices participated in an IPA or a PHO that accounted for a significant proportion of their patients. On average, practices participating in these organizations provided nearly three times as many care management processes for patients with chronic conditions as nonparticipating practices did (10.4 versus 3.8). Half of these processes were provided only by IPAs or PHOs. These organizations may provide a way for small and medium-size practices to systematically improve care and participate in accountable care organizations. PMID:23918481

  8. Independent practice associations and physician-hospital organizations can improve care management for smaller practices.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Wu, Frances M; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Ramsay, Patricia P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    Pay-for-performance, public reporting, and accountable care organization programs place pressures on physicians to use health information technology and organized care management processes to improve the care they provide. But physician practices that are not large may lack the resources and size to implement such processes. We used data from a unique national survey of 1,164 practices with fewer than twenty physicians to provide the first information available on the extent to which independent practice associations (IPAs) and physician-hospital organizations (PHOs) might make it possible for these smaller practices to share resources to improve care. Nearly a quarter of the practices participated in an IPA or a PHO that accounted for a significant proportion of their patients. On average, practices participating in these organizations provided nearly three times as many care management processes for patients with chronic conditions as nonparticipating practices did (10.4 versus 3.8). Half of these processes were provided only by IPAs or PHOs. These organizations may provide a way for small and medium-size practices to systematically improve care and participate in accountable care organizations.

  9. A Nonparametric Statistical Method That Improves Physician Cost of Care Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Metfessel, Brent A; Greene, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop a compositing method that demonstrates improved performance compared with commonly used tests for statistical analysis of physician cost of care data. Data Source Commercial preferred provider organization (PPO) claims data for internists from a large metropolitan area. Study Design We created a nonparametric composite performance metric that maintains risk adjustment using the Wilcoxon rank-sum (WRS) test. We compared the resulting algorithm to the parametric observed-to-expected ratio, with and without a statistical test, for stability of physician cost ratings among different outlier trimming methods and across two partially overlapping time periods. Principal Findings The WRS algorithm showed significantly greater within-physician stability among several typical outlier trimming and capping methods. The algorithm also showed significantly greater within-physician stability when the same physicians were analyzed across time periods. Conclusions The nonparametric algorithm described is a more robust and more stable methodology for evaluating physician cost of care than commonly used observed-to-expected ratio techniques. Use of such an algorithm can improve physician cost assessment for important current applications such as public reporting, pay for performance, and tiered benefit design. PMID:22524195

  10. Development of scales to assess patients' perception of physicians' cultural competence in health care interactions.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rukhsana; Bates, Benjamin R

    2012-07-01

    This study describes the development of scales to measure patients' perception of physicians' cultural competence in health care interactions and thus contributes to promoting awareness of physician-patient intercultural interaction processes. Surveys were administrated to a total of 682 participants. Exploratory factor analyses were employed to assess emergent scales and subscales to develop reliable instruments. The first two phases were devoted to formative research and pilot study. The third phase was devoted to scale development, which resulted in a five-factor solution to measure patient perception of physicians' cultural competence for patient satisfaction. PMID:22477717

  11. Primary care physician characteristics associated with cancer screening: a retrospective cohort study in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Lofters, Aisha K; Ng, Ryan; Lobb, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Primary care physicians can serve as both facilitators and barriers to cancer screening, particularly for under-screened groups such as immigrant patients. The objective of this study was to inform physician-targeted interventions by identifying primary care physician characteristics associated with cancer screening for their eligible patients, for their eligible immigrant patients, and for foreign-trained physicians, for their eligible immigrant patients from the same world region. A population-based retrospective cohort study was performed, looking back 3 years from 31 December 2010. The study was performed in urban primary care practices in Ontario, Canada's largest province. A total of 6303 physicians serving 1,156,627 women eligible for breast cancer screening, 2,730,380 women eligible for cervical screening, and 2,260,569 patients eligible for colorectal screening participated. Appropriate breast screening was defined as at least one mammogram in the previous 2 years, appropriate cervical screening was defined as at least one Pap test in the previous 3 years, and appropriate colorectal screening as at least one fecal occult blood test in the previous 2 years or at least one colonoscopy or barium enema in the previous 10 years. Just fewer than 40% of physicians were female, and 26.1% were foreign trained. In multivariable analyses, physicians who attended medical schools in the Caribbean/Latin America, the Middle East/North Africa, South Asia, and Western Europe were less likely to screen their patients than Canadian graduates. South Asian-trained physicians were significantly less likely to screen South Asian women for cervical cancer than other foreign-trained physicians who were seeing region-congruent patients (adjusted odds ratio: 0.56 [95% confidence interval 0.32–0.98] versus physicians from the USA, Australia and New Zealand). South Asian patients were the most vulnerable to under-screening, and decreasing patient income quintile was

  12. Hypoglycemia Revisited in the Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shih-Hung; Lin, Yen-Yue; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Cheng, Chien-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common finding in both daily clinical practice and acute care settings. The causes of severe hypoglycemia (SH) are multi-factorial and the major etiologies are iatrogenic, infectious diseases with sepsis and tumor or autoimmune diseases. With the advent of aggressive lowering of HbA1c values to achieve optimal glycemic control, patients are at increased risk of hypoglycemic episodes. Iatrogenic hypoglycemia can cause recurrent morbidity, sometime irreversible neurologic complications and even death, and further preclude maintenance of euglycemia over a lifetime of diabetes. Recent studies have shown that hypoglycemia is associated with adverse outcomes in many acute illnesses. In addition, hypoglycemia is associated with increased mortality among elderly and non-diabetic hospitalized patients. Clinicians should have high clinical suspicion of subtle symptoms of hypoglycemia and provide prompt treatment. Clinicians should know that hypoglycemia is associated with considerable adverse outcomes in many acute critical illnesses. In order to reduce hypoglycemia-associated morbidity and mortality, timely health education programs and close monitoring should be applied to those diabetic patients presenting to the Emergency Department with SH. ED disposition strategies should be further validated and justified to achieve balance between the benefits of euglycemia and the risks of SH. We discuss relevant issues regarding hypoglycemia in emergency and critical care settings. PMID:22028152

  13. Building a health care workforce for the future: more physicians, professional reforms, and technological advances.

    PubMed

    Grover, Atul; Niecko-Najjum, Lidia M

    2013-11-01

    Traditionally, projections of US health care demand have been based upon a combination of existing trends in usage and idealized or expected delivery system changes. For example, 1990s health care demand projections were based upon an expectation that delivery models would move toward closed, tightly managed care networks and would greatly decrease the demand for subspecialty care. Today, however, a different equation is needed on which to base such projections. Realistic workforce planning must take into account the fact that expanded access to health care, a growing and aging population, increased comorbidity, and longer life expectancy will all increase the use of health care services per capita over the next few decades--at a time when the number of physicians per capita will begin to drop. New technologies and more aggressive screening may also change the equation. Strategies to address these increasing demands on the health system must include expanded physician training.

  14. Rural physicians, rural networks, and free market health care in the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, T C; James, P; Fox, C; Wysong, J; FitzPatrick, P G

    1997-01-01

    The changes brought about by managed care in America's urban communities will have profound effects on rural physicians and hospitals. The rural health care market characterized by small, independent group practices working with community hospitals is being offered affiliations with large, often urban-based health care organizations. Health care is evolving into a free market system characterized by large networks of organizations capable of serving whole regions. Rural provider-initiated networks can assure local representation when participating in the new market and improve the rural health infrastructure. Although an extensive review of the literature from 1970 to 1996 reveals little definitive research about networks, many rural hospitals have embraced networking as one strategy to unify health care systems with minimal capitalization. These networks, now licensed in Minnesota and New York, offer rural physicians the opportunity to team up with their community hospital and enhance local health care accessibility. PMID:9225701

  15. A guide to the management of urologic dilemmas for the primary care physician (PCP).

    PubMed

    Barkin, Jack; Rosenberg, Matt T; Miner, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Patients with urologic conditions may present to a primary care physician (PCP) in the emergency department or in the PCP's office. Some conditions are true emergencies that require immediate surgical intervention. Others may require medical treatment or possibly simply reassuring the patient that there is no serious medical problem. Sometimes the diagnosis can be easily made, whereas other times the PCP needs to be able to rule out serious causes for a presenting problem and execute a guideline-recommended patient work up, to make a final diagnosis. Sometimes recommended diagnostic tests may not be readily available. When a PCP believes that a patient may have a serious urologic condition and is unsure of the appropriate patient management strategy, then he or she must quickly refer the patient to a urologist. This article describes common urology-related issues-hematuria, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test interpretation, phimosis and paraphimosis, acute scrotal pain and masses in the child and adult, urinary tract infection, renal colic, and castration-treatment-induced bone loss. It provides insights into decision-making processes for patient management of some urologic conditions, and information about managing sequelae and side effects of long term treatment. It includes practical diagnostic suggestions and patient management strategies based on the authors' years of urologic clinical practice experience. PMID:24978632

  16. When to say when: responding to a suicide attempt in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Arvind; Drori, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Attempted suicide represents a personal tragedy for the patient and their loved ones and can be a challenge for acute care physicians. Medical professionals generally view it as their obligation to aggressively treat patients who are critically ill after a suicide attempt, on the presumption that a suicidal patient lacks decision making capacity from severe psychiatric impairment. However, physicians may be confronted by deliberative patient statements, advanced directives or surrogate decision makers who urge the withholding or withdrawal of life sustaining treatments based on the patient's underlying medical condition or life experience. How acute care providers weigh these expressions of patient wishes versus their own views of beneficence, non-maleficence and professional integrity poses a significant ethical challenge. This article presents a case that exemplifies the medical and ethical tensions that can arise in treating a patient following a suicide attempt and how to approach their resolution.

  17. Managing Osteoporosis: A Survey of Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices among Primary Care Physicians in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Elena; Ish-Shalom, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder characterized by impaired bone quality and microstructural deterioration leading to an increased propensity to fractures. This is a major health problem for older adults, which comprise an increasingly greater proportion of the general population. Due to a large number of patients and the insufficient availability of specialists in Israel and worldwide, osteoporosis is treated in large part by primary care physicians. We assessed the knowledge of primary care physicians on the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis. Methods Physician's knowledge, sources of knowledge acquisition and self-evaluation of knowledge were assessed using a multiple choice questionnaire. Professional and demographic characteristics were assessed as well. Results Of 490 physicians attending a conference, 363 filled the questionnaires (74% response rate). The physicians demonstrated better expertise in diagnosis than in medications (mechanism of action, side effects or contra-indications) but less than for other treatment related decisions. Overall, 50% demonstrated adequate knowledge of calcium and vitamin D supplementation, 51% were aware of the main therapeutic purpose of osteoporosis pharmacotherapy and 3% were aware that bisphosphonates should be avoided in patients with impaired renal function. Respondents stated frontal lectures at meetings as their main source of information on the subject. Conclusion The study indicates the need to intensify efforts to improve the knowledge of primary care physicians regarding osteoporosis, in general; and osteoporosis pharmacotherapy, in particular. PMID:27494284

  18. Physician Practice Participation in Accountable Care Organizations: The Emergence of the Unicorn

    PubMed Central

    Shortell, Stephen M; McClellan, Sean R; Ramsay, Patricia P; Casalino, Lawrence P; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide the first nationally based information on physician practice involvement in ACOs. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data from the third National Survey of Physician Organizations (January 2012–May 2013). Study Design We conducted a 40-minute phone survey in a sample of physician practices. A nationally representative sample of practices was surveyed in order to provide estimates of organizational characteristics, care management processes, ACO participation, and related variables for four major chronic illnesses. Data Collection/Extraction Methods We evaluated the associations between ACO participation, organizational characteristics, and a 25-point index of patient-centered medical home processes. Principal Findings We found that 23.7 percent of physician practices (n = 280) reported joining an ACO; 15.7 percent (n = 186) were planning to become involved within the next 12 months and 60.6 percent (n = 717) reported no involvement and no plans to become involved. Larger practices, those receiving patients from an IPA and/or PHO, those that were physician-owned versus hospital/health system-owned, those located in New England, and those with greater patient-centered medical home (PCMH) care management processes were more likely to have joined an ACO. Conclusions Physician practices that are currently participating in ACOs appear to be relatively large, or to be members of an IPA or PHO, are less likely to be hospital-owned and are more likely to use more care management processes than nonparticipating practices. PMID:24628449

  19. Barriers to optimal care between physicians and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning adolescent patients.

    PubMed

    Kitts, Robert Li

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article was to identify barriers to optimal care between physicians and LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning) adolescents. To this end, 464 anonymous, self-administered surveys were distributed in 2003 to residents and attending physicians in pediatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics-gynecology, psychiatry, emergency medicine, and family practice at Upstate Medical University. The survey included questions pertaining to practice, knowledge, and attitude pertaining to lesbian, gay, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) adolescents. One hundred eight four surveys were returned. The majority of physicians would not regularly discuss sexual orientation, sexual attraction, or gender identity while taking a sexual history from a sexually active adolescent. As well, the majority of physicians would not ask patients about sexual orientation if an adolescent presented with depression, suicidal thoughts, or had attempted suicide. If an adolescent stated that he or she was not sexually active, 41% of physicians reported that they would not ask additional sexual health-related questions. Only 57% agreed to an association between being a LGBTQ adolescent and suicide. The majority of physicians did not believe that they had all the skills they needed to address issues of sexual orientation with adolescents, and that sexual orientation should be addressed more often with these patients and in the course of training. This study concludes that barriers in providing optimal care for LGBTQ adolescents can be found with regard to practice, knowledge, and attitude regardless of medical field and other demographics collected. Opportunities exist to enhance care for LGBTQ adolescents.

  20. Employed Family Physician Satisfaction and Commitment to Their Practice, Work Group, and Health Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Beasley, John W; Brown, Roger L

    2010-01-01

    Objective Test a model of family physician job satisfaction and commitment. Data Sources/Study Setting Data were collected from 1,482 family physicians in a Midwest state during 2000–2001. The sampling frame came from the membership listing of the state's family physician association, and the analyzed dataset included family physicians employed by large multispecialty group practices. Study Design and Data Collection A cross-sectional survey was used to collect data about physician working conditions, job satisfaction, commitment, and demographic variables. Principal Findings The response rate was 47 percent. Different variables predicted the different measures of satisfaction and commitment. Satisfaction with one's health care organization (HCO) was most strongly predicted by the degree to which physicians perceived that management valued and recognized them and by the extent to which physicians perceived the organization's goals to be compatible with their own. Satisfaction with one's workgroup was most strongly predicted by the social relationship with members of the workgroup; satisfaction with one's practice was most strongly predicted by relationships with patients. Commitment to one's workgroup was predicted by relationships with one's workgroup. Commitment to one's HCO was predicted by relationships with management of the HCO. Conclusions Social relationships are stronger predictors of employed family physician satisfaction and commitment than staff support, job control, income, or time pressure. PMID:20070386

  1. When race matters: disagreement in pain perception between patients and their physicians in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Staton, Lisa J.; Panda, Mukta; Chen, Ian; Genao, Inginia; Kurz, James; Pasanen, Mark; Mechaber, Alex J.; Menon, Madhusudan; O'Rorke, Jane; Wood, JoAnn; Rosenberg, Eric; Faeslis, Charles; Carey, Tim; Calleson, Diane; Cykert, Sam

    2007-01-01

    Patients and physicians often disagree in their assessment of pain intensity. This study explores the impact of patient factors on underestimation of pain intensity in chronic noncancer pain. We surveyed patients and their physicians in 12 primary care centers. To measure pain intensity, patients completed an 11-point numeric rating scale for which pain scores range from 0 (no pain) to 10 (unbearable pain). Physicians rated patients' pain on the same scale. We defined disagreement of pain intensity as underestimation or overestimation by 22 points. Of 601 patients approached, 463 (77%) completed the survey. The majority of participants were black (39%) or white (47%), 67% were female, and the mean age was 53 years. Physicians underestimated pain intensity relative to their patients 39% of the time. Forty-six percent agreed with their patients' pain perception, and 15% of physicians overestimated their patients' pain levels by > or =2 points. In both the bivariate and multivariable models, black race was a significant variable associated with underestimation of pain by physicians (p < 0.05; OR = 1.92; 95% CI: 1.31-2.81). This study finds that physicians are twice as likely to underestimate pain in blacks patients compared to all other ethnicities combined. A qualitative study exploring why physicians rate blacks patients' pain low is warranted. PMID:17534011

  2. Physician's self-perceived abilities at primary care settings in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Istiono, Wahyudi; Claramita, Mora; Ekawati, Fitriana Murriya; Gayatri, Aghnaa; Sutomo, Adi Heru; Kusnanto, Hari; Graber, Mark Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Southeast Asian countries with better-skilled primary care physicians have been shown to have better health outcomes. However, in Indonesia, there has been a large number of inappropriate referrals, leading to suboptimal health outcomes. This study aimed to examine the reasons underlying the unnecessary referrals as related to Indonesian physicians’ standard of abilities. Materials and Methods: This was a multiple-case study that explored physicians’ self-evaluation of their abilities. Self-evaluation questionnaires were constructed from the Indonesian Standards of Physicians Competences of 2006-2012 (ISPC), which is a list of 155 diseases. This study was undertaken in three cities, three towns, and one “border-less developed” area during 2011-2014. The study involved 184 physicians in those seven districts. Data were collected using one-on-one, in-depth interviews, focus group discussions (FGDs), and clinical observations. Results: This study found that primary care physicians in Indonesia felt that they were competent to handle less than one-third of “typical” primary care cases. The reasons were limited understanding of person-centered care principles and limited patient care services to diagnosis and treatment of common biomedical problems. Additionally, physical facilities in primary care settings are lacking. Discussions and Conclusions: Strengthening primary health care in Indonesia requires upscaling doctors’ abilities in managing health problems through more structured graduate education in family medicine, which emphasizes the bio-psycho-socio-cultural background of persons; secondly, standardizing primary care facilities to support physicians’ performance is critical. Finally, a strong national health policy that recognizes the essential role of primary care physicians in health outcomes is an urgent need. PMID:26985415

  3. Prescription of antibiotics and knowledge about antibiotic costs among physicians working in tertiary-care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Maltezou, Helena C; Maltezos, Efstratios; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Gourgoulis, Georgios-Michael; Katerelos, Panos; Adamis, Georgios; Petrikkos, George; Gargalianos, Panagiotis

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate antibiotic prescription practices among hospital-based physicians in Greece, using the 2007 national guidelines as the golden standard. A total of 168 physicians participated. Compliance rate with the first-line antibiotic treatment recommended by the national guidelines was 65·5% for acute bacterial sinusitis; 24% for acute uncomplicated cystitis; 36·4% for an acute febrile diarrheic syndrome; 38% for an afebrile adult with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and non-productive cough of 7 days duration; 23·2% for streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis; 55·1% for a surgically sutured, dirty wound; and 48·2% for community-acquired pneumonia. The total mean rate of compliance with the first recommended antibiotic was 41·2%.

  4. Relevance of stroke code, stroke unit and stroke networks in organization of acute stroke care--the Madrid acute stroke care program.

    PubMed

    Alonso de Leciñana-Cases, María; Gil-Núñez, Antonio; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is a neurological emergency. The early administration of specific treatment improves the prognosis of the patients. Emergency care systems with early warning for the hospital regarding patients who are candidates for this treatment (stroke code) increases the number of patients treated. Currently, reperfusion via thrombolysis for ischemic stroke and attention in stroke units are the bases of treatment. Healthcare professionals and health provision authorities need to work together to organize systems that ensure continuous quality care for the patients during the whole process of their disease. To implement this, there needs to be an appropriate analysis of the requirements and resources with the objective of their adjustment for efficient use. It is necessary to provide adequate information and continuous training for all professionals who are involved in stroke care, including primary care physicians, extrahospital emergency teams and all physicians involved in the care of stroke patients within the hospital. The neurologist has the function of coordinating the protocols of intrahospital care. These organizational plans should also take into account the process beyond the acute phase, to ensure the appropriate application of measures of secondary prevention, rehabilitation, and chronic care of the patients that remain in a dependent state. We describe here the stroke care program in the Community of Madrid (Spain).

  5. Discharging patients from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Helen

    2016-02-10

    Planning for patient discharge is an essential element of any admission to an acute setting, but may often be left until the patient is almost ready to leave hospital. This article emphasises why discharge planning is important and lists the essential principles that should be addressed to ensure that patients leave at an optimum time, feeling confident and safe to do so. Early assessment, early planning and co-ordination of all the teams involved in the patient's care are essential. Effective communication between the various teams and with the patient and their family or carer(s) is necessary. Patients should leave hospital with all the information, medications and equipment they require. Appropriate plans should have been developed and communicated to the receiving community or non-acute team. When patient discharge is effective, complications as a result of extended lengths of hospital stay are prevented, hospital beds are used efficiently and readmissions are reduced.

  6. Episode-of-care physician payment: a study of coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    PubMed

    Showstack, J A; Garnick, D W; Rosenfeld, K E; Luft, H S; Schaffarzick, R W; Tunis, S; Fowles, J

    1987-01-01

    Paying physicians for an episode of care is a possible alternative to current fee-for-service payment. We studied physician billing patterns for 512 Medicare beneficiaries who received coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in 1983. Relatively elaborate decision rules had to be created to exclude services that were not part of a routine CABG. We found that 72% of charges for an episode were associated with services provided on the day of surgery. Forty-seven percent of charges were by the primary surgeon, 15% by the assistant surgeon(s), and 9% by the anesthesiologist. Our results suggest that episode-of-care payment is a complex, and somewhat costly, alternative to other methods of prospective payment to physicians, although selective contracting by a health insurer for an episode of care for certain procedures might both reduce costs and improve quality. PMID:2961698

  7. Practicing End-of-Life Conversations: Physician Communication Training Program in Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Bronwyn; Browning, David M

    2015-01-01

    A Physician Communication Training Program (PCTP) utilizing scripts based on actual family conferences with patients, families, and the health care team was developed at one medical center in the Northeast. The program was designed, adapted, and directed by a palliative care social worker. The primary goal of the program is to help residents and attending physicians build better communication skills in establishing goals of care and in end-of-life planning. The scripts focus on improving physicians' basic skills in conducting family meetings, discussing advance directives, prognosis, brain death, and withdrawal of life support. Excerpts from the scripts utilized in the program are included. Feedback from participants has been positive, with all respondents indicating improvement in their capacity to take part in these challenging conversations.

  8. Ethical dilemmas for house staff physicians. The care of critically ill and dying patients.

    PubMed

    Winkenwerder, W

    1985-12-27

    Winkenwerder describes a disagreement about proper management of a critically ill patient that arose during his tenure as a house staff physician. Despite the attending physician's consideration of the family's wishes and the best interests of the patient, the resident was uneasy with the decision to continue life-prolonging treatment and the role he was to play in implementing such procedures. The author argues that ethical decisions within the group of physicians caring for a patient, especially one who is terminally ill, are not always resolved to everyone's satisfaction. What then are the rights and duties of residents to refuse further participation in care? Winkenwerder suggests dealing with conflicts through recognizing value differences, increasing formal ethics teaching, using consultants, and maximizing communication among members of patient care teams.

  9. Public reporting helped drive quality improvement in outpatient diabetes care among Wisconsin physician groups

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Maureen A.; Wright, Alexandra; Queram, Christopher; Lamb, Geoffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Public reporting on the quality of ambulatory health care is growing, but knowledge of how physician groups respond to such reporting has not kept pace. We examined responses to public reporting on the quality of diabetes care in 409 primary care clinics within seventeen large, multispecialty physician groups. We determined that a focus on publicly reported metrics, along with participation in large or externally sponsored projects, increased a clinic’s implementation of diabetes improvement interventions. Clinics were also more likely to implement interventions in more recent years. Public reporting helped drive both early implementation of a single intervention and ongoing implementation of multiple simultaneous interventions. To fully engage physician groups, accountability metrics should be structured to capture incremental improvements in quality, thereby rewarding both early and ongoing improvement activities. PMID:22392668

  10. Physicians cite hurdles ranging from lack of coverage to poor communication in providing high-quality care to latinos.

    PubMed

    Vargas Bustamante, Arturo; Chen, Jie

    2011-10-01

    We surveyed physicians about their ability to provide high-quality care to patients from diverse ethnic backgrounds. Primarily, we wanted to explore the challenges faced by physicians treating Latino patients compared to physicians whose patients were primarily white and non-Latino. We found that physicians treating Latinos, particularly those who worked in primary care in comparison to specialists, were less likely than physicians treating primarily white patients to believe in their ability to provide high-quality care. They cited problems of inadequate time with patients, patients' ability to pay, patients' nonadherence to recommended treatment, difficulties communicating with patients, relative lack of specialist availability, and lack of timely transmission of reports among physicians. Insurance expansions and complementary reforms mandated by the Affordable Care Act of 2010 and other recent legislation should aid physicians in closing some of these gaps in quality. PMID:21976336

  11. Secure e-mailing between physicians and patients: transformational change in ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Terhilda; Meng, Di; Wang, Jian J; Palen, Ted E; Kanter, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Secure e-mailing between Kaiser Permanente physicians and patients is widespread; primary care providers receive an average of 5 e-mails from patients each workday. However, on average, secure e-mailing with patients has not substantially impacted primary care provider workloads. Secure e-mail has been associated with increased member retention and improved quality of care. Separate studies associated patient portal and secure e-mail use with both decreased and increased use of other health care services, such as office visits, telephone encounters, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations. Directions for future research include more granular analysis of associations between patient-physician secure e-mail and health care utilization.

  12. [Shortage of physicians in anaesthesiology and intensive care medicine - Causes, consequences and solutions].

    PubMed

    Papenfuß, Tim; Roch, Carmen

    2012-05-01

    74% of all hospitals had vacant positions in 2011, also departments of anaesthesiology and intensive care medicine. More than 50% of these departments work with locums. There are couple of reasons for the shortage of physicians. The consequences in anaesthesiology and intensive care medicine can result in qualitative and financial loss. To solve the shortage of physicians one has to solve the reasons. Main reasons are increasing feminization of medical profession and part-time-work, work-life-balance and a poor specialised education.

  13. Physician-Directed Heart Failure Transitional Care Program: A Retrospective Case Review

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Ken S.; Beutler, David S.; Gerkin, Richard D.; Weiss, Jessica L.; Loli, Akil I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite a variety of national efforts to improve transitions of care for patients at risk for rehospitalization, 30-day rehospitalization rates for patients with heart failure have remained largely unchanged. Methods This is a retrospective review of 73 patients enrolled in our hospital-based, physican-directed Heart Failure Transitional Care Program (HFTCP). This study evaluated the 30- and 90- day readmission rates before and after enrollment in the program. The Transitionalist’s services focused on bedside consultation prior to hospital discharge, follow-up home visits within 72 hours of discharge, frequent follow-up phone calls, disease-specific education, outpatient intravenous diuretic therapy, and around-the-clock telephone access to the Transitionalist. Results The pre-enrollment 30-day readmission rates for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and all-cause readmission was 26.0% and 28.8%, respectively, while the post-enrollment rates for ADHF and all-cause readmission were 4.1% (P < 0.001) and 8.2% (P = 0.002), respectively. The pre-enrollment 90-day all-cause and ADHF readmission rates were 69.8%, and 58.9% respectively, while the post-enrollment rates for all-cause and ADHF were 27.3% (P < 0.001) and 16.4% (P < 0.001) respectively. Conclusions Our physician-implemented HFTCP reduced rehospitalization risk for patients enrolled in the program. This program may serve as a model to assist other hospital systems to reduce readmission rates of patients with HF. PMID:23976905

  14. Patient–Physician Communication in the Primary Care Visits of African Americans and Whites with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ghods, Bri K.; Roter, Debra L.; Ford, Daniel E.; Larson, Susan; Arbelaez, Jose J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Little research investigates the role of patient–physician communication in understanding racial disparities in depression treatment. Objective The objective of this study was to compare patient–physician communication patterns for African-American and white patients who have high levels of depressive symptoms. Design, Setting, and Participants This is a cross-sectional study of primary care visits of 108 adult patients (46 white, 62 African American) who had depressive symptoms measured by the Medical Outcomes Study–Short Form (SF-12) Mental Component Summary Score and were receiving care from one of 54 physicians in urban community-based practices. Main Outcomes Communication behaviors, obtained from coding of audiotapes, and physician perceptions of patients’ physical and emotional health status and stress levels were measured by post-visit surveys. Results African-American patients had fewer years of education and reported poorer physical health than whites. There were no racial differences in the level of depressive symptoms. Depression communication occurred in only 34% of visits. The average number of depression-related statements was much lower in the visits of African-American than white patients (10.8 vs. 38.4 statements, p = .02). African-American patients also experienced visits with less rapport building (20.7 vs. 29.7 statements, p = .009). Physicians rated a higher percentage of African-American than white patients as being in poor or fair physical health (69% vs. 40%, p = .006), and even in visits where depression communication occurred, a lower percentage of African-American than white patients were considered by their physicians to have significant emotional distress (67% vs. 93%, p = .07). Conclusions This study reveals racial disparities in communication among primary care patients with high levels of depressive symptoms. Physician communication skills training programs that emphasize recognition and rapport

  15. Attitudes towards prescribing cognitive enhancers among primary care physicians in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary care physicians are gate keepers to the medical system having a key role in giving information and prescribing drugs to their patients. In this respect they are involved in claims of patients/clients for pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement (CE). Therefore, we studied the knowledge of primary care physicians about CE and their attitudes toward prescribing CE drugs to healthy subjects. Methods A self-report paper-and-pencil questionnaire and case vignettes describing a hypothetical CE drug were sent out to all 2,753 registered primary care physicians in Rhineland Palatine, Germany. 832, i.e. 30.2% filled in the questionnaire anonymously. Results 96.0% of all participating physicians had already heard about CE. However, only 5.3% stated to be very familiar with this subject and 43.5% judged themselves as being not familiar with CE. 7.0% had been asked by their clients to prescribe a drug for CE during the last week, 19.0% during the last month, and 40.8% during the last year. The comfort level to prescribe CE drugs was very low and significantly lower than to prescribe sildenafil (Viagra®). Comfort level was mainly affected by the age of the client asking for prescription of CE drugs, followed by the availability of non-pharmacological alternatives, fear of misuse of the prescribed drug by the client and the missing indication of prescribing a drug. Conclusions Although a relatively high proportion of primary care physicians have been asked by their clients to prescribe CE drugs, only a small proportion are well informed about the possibilities of CE. Since physicians are gate keepers to the medical system and have a key role regarding a drugs’ prescription, objective information should be made available to physicians about biological, ethical and social consequences of CE use. PMID:24397728

  16. Evidence-based medicine in primary care: qualitative study of family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, C Shawn; Dantas, Guilherme Coelho; Upshur, Ross EG

    2003-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study were: a) to examine physician attitudes to and experience of the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in primary care; b) to investigate the influence of patient preferences on clinical decision-making; and c) to explore the role of intuition in family practice. Method Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews of 15 family physicians purposively selected from respondents to a national survey on EBM mailed to a random sample of Canadian family physicians. Results Participants mainly welcomed the promotion of EBM in the primary care setting. A significant number of barriers and limitations to the implementation of EBM were identified. EBM is perceived by some physicians as a devaluation of the 'art of medicine' and a threat to their professional/clinical autonomy. Issues regarding the trustworthiness and credibility of evidence were of great concern, especially with respect to the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. Attempts to become more evidence-based often result in the experience of conflicts. Patient factors exert a powerful influence on clinical decision-making and can serve as trumps to research evidence. A widespread belief that intuition plays a vital role in primary care reinforced views that research evidence must be considered alongside other factors such as patient preferences and the clinical judgement and experience of the physician. Discussion Primary care physicians are increasingly keen to consider research evidence in clinical decision-making, but there are significant concerns about the current model of EBM. Our findings support the proposed revisions to EBM wherein greater emphasis is placed on clinical expertise and patient preferences, both of which remain powerful influences on physician behaviour. PMID:12740025

  17. The adoption of the Reference Framework for diabetes care among primary care physicians in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin C.S.; Wang, Harry H.X.; Kwan, Mandy W.M.; Chan, Wai Man; Fan, Carmen K.M.; Liang, Miaoyin; Li, Shannon TS; Fung, Franklin D.H.; Yeung, Ming Sze; Chan, David K.L.; Griffiths, Sian M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has been increasing both globally and locally. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are in a privileged position to provide first contact and continuing care for diabetic patients. A territory-wide Reference Framework for Diabetes Care for Adults has been released by the Hong Kong Primary Care Office in 2010, with the aim to further enhance evidence-based and high quality care for diabetes in the primary care setting through wide adoption of the Reference Framework. A valid questionnaire survey was conducted among PCPs to evaluate the levels of, and the factors associated with, their adoption of the Reference Framework. A total of 414 completed surveys were received with the response rate of 13.0%. The average adoption score was 3.29 (SD 0.51) out of 4. Approximately 70% of PCPs highly adopted the Reference Framework in their routine practice. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that the PCPs perceptions on the inclusion of sufficient local information (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.748, 95%CI 1.597–14.115, P = 0.005) and reduction of professional autonomy of PCPs (aOR = 1.859, 95%CI 1.013–3.411, P = 0.045) were more likely to influence their adoption level of the Reference Framework for diabetes care in daily practices. The overall level of guideline adoption was found to be relatively high among PCPs for adult diabetes in primary care settings. The adoption barriers identified in this study should be addressed in the continuous updating of the Reference Framework. Strategies need to be considered to enhance the guideline adoption and implementation capacity. PMID:27495018

  18. Selecting tomorrow's physicians: the key to the future health care workforce.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Kelly E; Henderson, Mackenzie K; Kirch, Darrell G

    2013-12-01

    Recent U.S. health care reform efforts have focused on three main goals: improving health care for individuals, improving population health, and lowering costs. Physicians, who traditionally have practiced with considerable autonomy, will be required to become members of the team-based patient care models necessary to achieve these goals. In this perspective, the authors assert that medical school admissions, the selection of the future physician workforce, is a key component of health care reform. They review the historical context for medical school admission processes, which have placed a premium on grades and standardized test scores, and examine how admission practices are undergoing fundamental changes in order to select physicians with both the academic and interpersonal and intrapersonal competencies necessary to operate in the health care system of the future. The authors describe how new techniques, such as holistic review and multiple mini-interviews, are contributing to the shift toward competency-based medical education. Innovations underway at the Association of American Medical Colleges to transform medical school admissions also are explored. The authors conclude by arguing that although the admission process has great potential to transform the future health care workforce, major overhauls of the health care payment and delivery systems must be achieved alongside innovations in health professions education to truly transform the U.S. health care system. PMID:24128626

  19. Physicians' social competence in the provision of care to persons living in poverty: research protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The quality of the physician-patient therapeutic relationship is a key factor in the effectiveness of care. Unfortunately, physicians and people living in poverty inhabit very different social milieux, and this great social distance hinders the development of a therapeutic alliance. Social competence is a process based on knowledge, skills and attitudes that support effective interaction between the physician and patient despite the intervening social distance. It enables physicians to better understand their patients' living conditions and to adapt care to patients' needs and abilities. Methods/Design This qualitative research is based on a comprehensive design using in-depth semi-structured interviews with 25 general practitioners working with low-income patients in Montreal's metropolitan area (Québec, Canada). Physicians will be recruited based on two criteria: they provide care to low-income patients with at least one chronic illness, and are identified by their peers as having expertise in providing care to a poor population. For this recruitment, we will draw upon contacts we have made in another research study (Loignon et al., 2009) involving clinics located in poor neighbourhoods. That study will include in-clinic observations and interviews with physicians, both of which will help us identify physicians who have developed skills for treating low-income patients. We will also use the snowball sampling technique, asking participants to refer us to other physicians who meet our inclusion criteria. The semi-structured interviews, of 60 to 90 minutes each, will be recorded and transcribed. Our techniques for ensuring internal validity will include data analysis of transcribed interviews, indexation and reduction of data with software qualitative analysis, and development and validation of interpretations. Discussion This research project will allow us to identify the dimensions of the social competence process that helps physicians establish

  20. Cancer Risk Assessment for the Primary Care Physician

    PubMed Central

    Korde, Larissa A.; Gadalla, Shahinaz M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Cancer risk assessment can be divided into two major categories: assessment of familial or genetic risk and assessment of environmental factors that may be causally related to cancer. Identification of individuals with a suspected heritable cancer syndrome can lead to additional evaluation and to interventions that can substantially decrease cancer risk. Special attention should also be paid to potentially modifiable cancer risk factors in the course of advising primary care patients regarding a healthy lifestyle. Clinical guidelines targeting both genetic and modifiable cancer risk factors are available, and can facilitate applying these health care principles in the primary care setting. PMID:19616151

  1. Sociodemographic and geographic characteristics associated with patient visits to osteopathic physicians for primary care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Health care reform promises to dramatically increase the number of Americans covered by health insurance. Osteopathic physicians (DOs) are recognized for primary care, including a "hands-on" style with an emphasis on patient-centered care. Thus, DOs may be well positioned to deliver primary care in this emerging health care environment. Methods We used data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (2002-2006) to study sociodemographic and geographic characteristics associated with patient visits to DOs for primary care. Descriptive analyses were initially performed to derive national population estimates (NPEs) for overall patient visits, primary care patient visits, and patient visits according to specialty status. Osteopathic and allopathic physician (MD) patient visits were compared using cross-tabulations and multiple logistic regression to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for DO patient visits. The latter analyses were also conducted separately for each geographic characteristic to assess the potential for effect modification based on these factors. Results Overall, 134,369 ambulatory medical care visits were surveyed, representing 4.6 billion (NPE) ± 220 million (SE) patient visits when patient visit weights were applied. Osteopathic physicians provided 336 million ± 30 million (7%) of these patient visits. Osteopathic physicians provided 217 million ± 21 million (10%) patient visits for primary care services; including 180 million ± 17 million (12%) primary care visits for adults (21 years of age or older) and 37 million ± 5 million (5%) primary care visits for minors. Osteopathic physicians were more likely than MDs to provide primary care visits in family and general medicine (OR, 6.03; 95% CI, 4.67-7.78), but were less likely to provide visits in internal medicine (OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.24-0.58) or pediatrics (OR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.11-0.40). Overall, patients in the pediatric and geriatric ages, Blacks

  2. Anticipating clinical integration of genetically tailored tobacco dependence treatment: perspectives of primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Park, Elyse R; Kleimann, Susan; Pelan, Julie A; Shields, Alexandra E

    2007-02-01

    Emerging research will likely make it possible to tailor pharmacological treatment for individuals with tobacco dependence by genotype. This study explored primary care physicians' attitudes about the strengths of and barriers to using genetic testing to match patients to optimal nicotine replacement therapy. Four focus groups (n=27) were conducted, and data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Physicians reported how likely they would be to offer patients a genetic test to tailor smoking treatment in response to three different scenarios that described characteristics of the genetic test based on published research. Respondents were on average 36 years of age; 59% were male and 67% were white. Physicians believed genetically tailored treatment may offer new hope to smokers trying to quit, yet they also noted several potential barriers to clinical integration. Barriers included erroneous assumptions by patients regarding the meaning of genetic test results, possible misinterpretation of information regarding racial differences in the prevalence of certain risk alleles, and potential discrimination against patients undergoing testing. Concerns increased dramatically when physicians were told that the same genotypes that would be identified to tailor smoking treatment also have been associated with increased risk of becoming addicted to nicotine, as well as other addictions and psychiatric disorders. Physicians were interested in the possibility of realizing improved smoking cessation outcomes through pharmacogenetic developments, but they also raised many concerns. Primary care physicians will need additional educational inputs and system support prior to integrating genetic testing for a common trait into their routine clinical practice. PMID:17365758

  3. The Affordable Care Act's Effects On The Formation, Expansion, And Operation Of Physician-Owned Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Elizabeth; Wempe, William

    2016-08-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) imposed new restrictions on the formation and expansion of physician-owned hospitals. These restrictions provided incentives for the hospitals and their owners to take preemptive actions before the effective dates of ACA provisions and modify their operations thereafter. We studied 106 physician-owned hospitals in Texas to determine how they responded to ACA restrictions. We found that there were significant pre-ACA increases in the formation, physician ownership, and physical capacity of physician-owned hospitals, which suggests that they reacted quickly to the policy changes. After the ACA's provisions took effect, the hospitals improved the use of their assets to generate increased amounts of services, revenue, and profits. We found no evidence that existing physician-owned hospitals stopped accepting Medicare to avoid the ACA restrictions, although some investors adopted a seemingly unsuccessful strategy of not accepting Medicare at physician-owned hospitals formed after implementation of the ACA. We conclude that the ACA restrictions effectively eliminated the formation of new physician-owned hospitals, thus accomplishing what previous legislative efforts had failed to do. PMID:27503971

  4. Patients' substance abuse and the primary care physician: patterns of practice.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, N H; Mullen, P D; McAlister, A L

    1987-01-01

    The Social Learning Theory concepts of self-efficacy and outcome expectations were used to study physician practice regarding patients' smoking, alcohol problems, OTC drug problems, and illicit drug use in a random sample of Texas primary care physicians. The highest proportion of physicians took histories and counseled patients regarding the abuse of cigarettes, followed by alcohol, OTC drugs, and illicit drugs. Outside referral was most likely for illicit drugs, followed by alcohol, OTC drugs, and smoking. Multivariate discriminant analysis showed year of graduation, specialty, self-efficacy, and outcome expectation for patient compliance to be predictive of many of the behavior/practice level combinations. More recently trained physicians, internists, and family practice specialists were more likely to practice in the substance abuse areas. Self-efficacy and outcome expectation were positively related to history-taking and counseling and negatively related to outside referral. Interventions to increase physicians' self-efficacy and expectations for patient compliance and to provide more realistic expectations for treatment "success" are needed, especially for physicians who are not recently trained. Further research to clarify the process by which physicians' cognitions of self-efficacy and outcome expectations influence their practice behavior is also recommended.

  5. A Comparison of Two Approaches to Increasing Access to Care: Expanding Coverage versus Increasing Physician Fees

    PubMed Central

    White, Chapin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of a coverage expansion versus a Medicaid physician fee increase on children's utilization of physician services. Primary Data Source National Health Interview Survey (1997–2009). Study Design We use the Children's Health Insurance Program, enacted in 1997, as a natural experiment, and we performed a panel data regression analysis using the state-year as the unit of observation. Outcomes include physician visits per child per year and the following indicators of access to primary care: whether the child saw a physician, pediatrician, or visited an ER in the last year, and whether the parents reported experiencing a non-cost-related access problem. We analyzed these outcomes among all children, and separately among socioeconomic status (SES) quartiles defined based on family income and parents' education. Principal Findings Children's Health Insurance Program had a major impact on the extent and nature of children's insurance coverage. However, it is not associated with any change in the aggregate quantity of physician services, and its associations with indicators of access are mixed. Increases in physician fees are associated with broad-based improvements in indicators of access. Conclusions The findings suggest that (1) coverage expansions, even if they substantially reduce patient cost sharing, do not necessarily increase physician utilization, and (2) increasing the generosity of provider payments in public programs can improve access among low-SES children, and, through spillover effects, increase higher-SES children as well. PMID:22299763

  6. How Do Physicians Teach Empathy in the Primary Care Setting?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Johanna

    2002-01-01

    Explored how primary care clinician-teachers actually attempt to convey empathy to medical students and residents. Found that they stress the centrality of role modeling in teaching, and most used debriefing strategies as well as both learner- and patient-centered approaches in instructing learners about empathy. (EV)

  7. Access to Care: Overcoming the Rural Physician Shortage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1999-01-01

    Describes three state-initiated programs that address the challenge of providing access to health care for Appalachia's rural residents: a traveling pediatric diabetes clinic serving eastern Kentucky; a telemedicine program operated out of Knoxville, Tennessee; and a new medical school in Kentucky dedicated to training doctors from Appalachia for…

  8. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, IR; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, CM; Purcarea, VL

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer’s perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician’s perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician’s perspective. PMID:27453745

  9. Consumerism in action: how patients and physicians negotiate payment in health care.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyeyoung

    2013-03-01

    Drawing from the medical sociology literature on the patient-doctor relationship and microeconomic sociological scholarship about the role of money in personal relationships, I examined patient-physician interactions within a clinic that offered eye health and cosmetic facial services in the United States. Relying on ethnographic observations conducted in 2008, I evaluated how financial pressures shape the patient-physician relationship during the clinical encounter. To gain a financial advantage, patients attempted to reshape the relationship toward a socially intimate one, where favor and gift exchanges are more common. To ensure the rendering of services, the physician in turn allied herself with the patient, demonstrating how external parties are the barriers to affordable care. This allied relationship was tested when conflicts emerged, primarily because of the role of financial intermediaries in the clinical encounter. These conflicts resulted in the disintegration of the personal relationship, with patient and physician pitted against one another. PMID:23202480

  10. Consumerism in action: how patients and physicians negotiate payment in health care.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyeyoung

    2013-03-01

    Drawing from the medical sociology literature on the patient-doctor relationship and microeconomic sociological scholarship about the role of money in personal relationships, I examined patient-physician interactions within a clinic that offered eye health and cosmetic facial services in the United States. Relying on ethnographic observations conducted in 2008, I evaluated how financial pressures shape the patient-physician relationship during the clinical encounter. To gain a financial advantage, patients attempted to reshape the relationship toward a socially intimate one, where favor and gift exchanges are more common. To ensure the rendering of services, the physician in turn allied herself with the patient, demonstrating how external parties are the barriers to affordable care. This allied relationship was tested when conflicts emerged, primarily because of the role of financial intermediaries in the clinical encounter. These conflicts resulted in the disintegration of the personal relationship, with patient and physician pitted against one another.

  11. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-08-15

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript.

  12. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript. PMID:27524204

  13. The inner life of physicians and care of the seriously ill.

    PubMed

    Meier, D E; Back, A L; Morrison, R S

    2001-12-19

    Seriously ill persons are emotionally vulnerable during the typically protracted course of an illness. Physicians respond to such patients' needs and emotions with emotions of their own, which may reflect a need to rescue the patient, a sense of failure and frustration when the patient's illness progresses, feelings of powerlessness against illness and its associated losses, grief, fear of becoming ill oneself, or a desire to separate from and avoid patients to escape these feelings. These emotions can affect both the quality of medical care and the physician's own sense of well-being, since unexamined emotions may also lead to physician distress, disengagement, burnout, and poor judgment. In this article, which is intended for the practicing, nonpsychiatric clinician, we describe a model for increasing physician self-awareness, which includes identifying and working with emotions that may affect patient care. Our approach is based on the standard medical model of risk factors, signs and symptoms, differential diagnosis, and intervention. Although it is normal to have feelings arising from the care of patients, physicians should take an active role in identifying and controlling those emotions.

  14. Pre-exercise screening: role of the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Joy, Elizabeth A; Pescatello, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    Participation in regular physical activity is associated with a multitude of benefits including a reduction in chronic disease and premature mortality, and improved quality of life. All segments of society need to collaborate with one another in an effort to promote active lives. The Israeli "Gymnasium Law" requires pre-exercise evaluation prior to exercise participation in a health club. Recently that law was modified to allow for participant pre-screening with the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire for Everyone (PAR-Q+). This change reflects the evidence that the risk of catastrophic events (e.g. heart attack) during moderate intensity physical activity is low, and the likelihood of detecting heart disease in asymptomatic adults is low. This change will likely reduce the number of individuals who require physician evaluation. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recently updated their recommendations for pre-exercise evaluation. The ACSM guidelines have replaced risk factor assessment, with an algorithm that first stratifies based on current physical activity level, then by the presence of chronic disease, and/or signs and symptoms of chronic disease, and last by desired exercise intensity. The goal of these efforts is to reduce barriers to regular physical activity, by eliminating unnecessary medical evaluations. All adults should be encouraged to be physically active. PMID:27358724

  15. The Dynamics of Community Health Care Consolidation: Acquisition of Physician Practices

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Jon B; Carlin, Caroline S; Warrick, Louise H

    2014-01-01

    Context Health care delivery systems are becoming increasingly consolidated in urban areas of the United States. While this consolidation could increase efficiency and improve quality, it also could raise the cost of health care for payers. This article traces the consolidation trajectory in a single community, focusing on factors influencing recent acquisitions of physician practices by integrated delivery systems. Methods We used key informant interviews, supplemented by document analysis. Findings The acquisition of physician practices is a process that will be difficult to reverse in the current health care environment. Provider revenue uncertainty is a key factor driving consolidation, with public and private attempts to control health care costs contributing to that uncertainty. As these efforts will likely continue, and possibly intensify, community health care systems now are less consolidated than they will be in the future. Acquisitions of multispecialty and primary care practices by integrated delivery systems follow a common process, with relatively predictable issues relating to purchase agreements, employment contracts, and compensation. Acquisitions of single-specialty practices are less common, with motivations for acquisitions likely to vary by specialty type, group size, and market structure. Total cost of care contracting could be an important catalyst for practice acquisitions in the future. Conclusions In the past, market and regulatory forces aimed at controlling costs have both encouraged and rewarded the consolidation of providers, with important new developments likely to create momentum for further consolidation, including acquisitions of physician practices. PMID:25199899

  16. Is burnout in family physicians in Croatia related to interpersonal quality of care?

    PubMed

    Ožvačić Adžić, Zlata; Katić, Milica; Kern, Josipa; Soler, Jean Karl; Cerovečki, Venija; Polašek, Ozren

    2013-06-01

    The impact of physician burnout on the quality of patient care is unclear. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the prevalence of burnout in family physicians in Croatia and its association with physician and practice characteristics, and patient enablement as a consultation outcome measure. Hundred and twenty-five out of 350 family physicians responded to our invitation to participate in the study. They were asked to collect data from 50 consecutive consultations with their adult patients who had to provide information on patient enablement (Patient Enablement Instrument). Physicians themselves provided their demographic and professional data, including workload, job satisfaction, consultation length, and burnout [Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS)]. MBI-HSS scores were analysed in three dimensions: emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalisation (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA). Of the responding physicians, 42.4% scored high for EE burnout, 16.0% for DP, and 15.2% for PA. Multiple regression analysis showed that low job satisfaction and more patients per day predicted high EE scores. Low job satisfaction, working more years at a current workplace, and younger age predicted high DP scores. Lack of engagement in education and academic work, shorter consultations, and working more years at current workplace predicted low PA scores, respectively (P<0.05 for each). Burnout is common among family physicians in Croatia yet burnout in our physicians was not associated with patient enablement, suggesting that it did not affect the quality of interpersonal care. Job satisfaction, participation in educational or academic activities and sufficient consultation time seem to reduce the likelihood of burnout. PMID:23819934

  17. Electroconvulsive therapy: Promoting awareness among primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Sicher, Sarah; Gedzior, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    This article aims to promote awareness among primary care providers and support electroconvulsive therapy as a generally well-tolerated, effective therapeutic modality to treat specific psychiatric conditions in appropriately selected patients. There seem to be several potential barriers to treatment with electroconvulsive therapy including stigma, lack of providers who preform it, and lack of awareness among providers referring patients who may be appropriate candidates. The article provides a brief overview of electroconvulsive therapy principles and topics and includes a case report to illustrate clinical utility. The article proposes the concept that a potential way to overcome barriers to treatment with electroconvulsive therapy may be to promote education and awareness of it as a viable treatment modality among primary care providers. PMID:27284120

  18. Electroconvulsive therapy: Promoting awareness among primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Sicher, Sarah; Gedzior, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    This article aims to promote awareness among primary care providers and support electroconvulsive therapy as a generally well-tolerated, effective therapeutic modality to treat specific psychiatric conditions in appropriately selected patients. There seem to be several potential barriers to treatment with electroconvulsive therapy including stigma, lack of providers who preform it, and lack of awareness among providers referring patients who may be appropriate candidates. The article provides a brief overview of electroconvulsive therapy principles and topics and includes a case report to illustrate clinical utility. The article proposes the concept that a potential way to overcome barriers to treatment with electroconvulsive therapy may be to promote education and awareness of it as a viable treatment modality among primary care providers.

  19. Physicians in health care management: 10. Managing conflict through negotiation.

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux-Charles, L

    1994-01-01

    The recent focus on collaborative relationships in health care means that people and groups must cooperate to accomplish clinical and management tasks. This increasing interdependence may also cause increased organizational conflict. The management of conflicts is critical to the effectiveness of an organization. Negotiating strategies, based on Fisher and Ury's method of "principled negotiation," include establishing superordinate goals, separating the people from the problem, focussing on interests, inventing options, using objective criteria and defining success in terms of gains. PMID:7922944

  20. Nurses' medication administration practices at two Singaporean acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall compliance with accepted medication administration procedures, and explored the distractions they faced during medication administration at two acute care hospitals in Singapore. A total of 140 registered nurses, 70 from each hospital, participated in the study. At both hospitals, nurses were distracted by personnel, such as physicians, radiographers, patients not under their care, and telephone calls, during medication rounds. Deviations from accepted medication procedures were observed. At one hospital, the use of a vest during medication administration alone was not effective in avoiding distractions during medication administration. Environmental factors and distractions can impact on the safe administration of medications, because they not only impair nurses' level of concentration, but also add to their work pressure. Attention should be placed on eliminating distractions through the use of appropriate strategies. Strategies that could be considered include the conduct of education sessions with health professionals and patients about the importance of not interrupting nurses while they are administering medications, and changes in work design.

  1. Top 10 Tips About the Physician Quality Reporting System for Palliative Care Professionals.

    PubMed

    Bull, Janet; Kamal, Arif H; Jones, Christopher; Bonsignore, Lindsay; Acevedo, Jean

    2016-08-01

    The U.S. healthcare system is shifting from a fee-for-service (FFS) system to a valued-based reimbursement system focused on improving the quality of healthcare. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) implemented the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) as an important component of this transition. All clinicians, including physicians, nurse practitioners, or physician assistants who bill to Medicare Part B FFS, should submit quality data to the PQRS in 2015 or they will receive up to a 4% negative reimbursement penalty in 2017. As implementing and reporting PQRS measures can be a daunting task, especially for palliative care professionals, this article provides high priority tips identified by the authors for PQRS reporting in the palliative care field.

  2. Social network analysis of physician interactions: the effect of institutional boundaries on breast cancer care.

    PubMed

    Bridewell, Will; Das, Amar K

    2011-01-01

    Although comparative effectiveness trials and nationally recognized clinical guidelines offer substantial guidance about ideal patient treatment, we remain largely uninformed about the patterns of care seen in everyday clinical practice. To address this gap in knowledge, we looked at registry-based data on breast cancer care at two neighboring healthcare institutions with a specific focus on whether organizational boundaries determine the physicians that a patient will see. From an initial patient-oriented data set, we developed a social network of physicians, modeling their interactions over the course of the provided treatments. Applying a mixture of visual and quantitative analyses to this network, we found evidence for strong intra-institutional ties and poignantly weak connections to physicians operating out of other healthcare centers.

  3. [Medical care, medical education, and the job market for physicians: internship in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Frenk, J

    1984-01-01

    This article endeavors to establish a connection between the emergence and development of internship in Mexico and a series of macrosocial changes, including the extension of Government intervention in medical care, the labor market processes that have led to unemployment among physicians, and the responses of the medical education system. The author considers that this comprehensive analysis will be of use in understanding at least in part the complex dynamics of the influence exerted on each other by medical care and medical education, and particularly how changes in conditions on the labor market for physicians have led to the formulation of ideological paradigms of medical practice and to their institutionalization in the programs of study of the medical schools. The study is also important for developed and developing countries with increasing numbers of physicians and which therefore need to understand the possible causes and effects of this trend. PMID:6394274

  4. Physician payment disclosure under health care reform: will the sun shine?

    PubMed

    Mackey, Tim K; Liang, Bryan A

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical marketing has become a mainstay in U.S. health care delivery and traditionally has been directed toward physicians. In an attempt to address potential undue influence of industry and conflicts of interest that arise, states and the recently upheld health care reform act have passed transparency, or "sunshine," laws requiring disclosure of industry payments to physicians. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services recently announced the final rule for the Sunshine Provisions as part of the reform act. However, the future effectiveness of these provisions are questionable and may be limited given the changing landscape of pharmaceutical marketing away from physician detailing to other forms of promotion. To address this changing paradigm, more proactive policy solutions will be necessary to ensure adequate and ethical regulation of pharmaceutical promotion. PMID:23657702

  5. Interdependence of general surgeons and primary care physicians in rural communities.

    PubMed

    Pathman, Donald E; Ricketts, Thomas C

    2009-12-01

    This article describes the unique roles and interrelations of general surgeons and primary care physicians in rural communities. It describes the various ways in which the work and success of the rural surgeon and the rural primary care physician rely on coordinating their efforts with the other. It draws on available data, summary reports, and the authors' personal experiences in rural practice and fifty years of combined experience in research and policy analysis of rural health professions issues. Various issues are discussed, including the specific and unique roles that rural surgeon need to play in rural health systems, the ways in which rural surgeons relate to other physicians, and the likely consequences of not having proximal surgical services.

  6. Talking about money: how primary care physicians respond to a patient's question about financial incentives.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Steven D; Hyams, Tracey

    2002-01-01

    Patients sometimes express concern about the influence of "perverse" financial incentives on their care. We recruited a convenience sample of 101 primary care physicians and obtained information on their compensation. Then we audiotaped them as they role-played a response to a videotaped mock patient who asked them how they were paid and how their method of compensation affected clinical decisions. Overall, 36% of the physicians did not give enough information in their role-play response to allow an independent determination of how they were paid. Adopting a broad spectrum of attitudes and approaches, nearly every physician avoided discussing the role of incentives and stressed instead that he or she could be trusted under any circumstance.

  7. Health Care of Adolescents by Office-Based Physicians: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1980-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cypress, Beulah K.

    1984-01-01

    This report examines the nature of the conditions presented by adolescents and the health care provided by office-based physicians. The characteristics of patients are noted and the reason for the visit to the doctor and the length of the visit are summarized. Tables present information on: (1) average annual rate of office visits of adolescents…

  8. A population-based analysis of incentive payments to primary care physicians for the care of patients with complex disease

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, M. Ruth; Law, Michael R.; Peterson, Sandra; Garrison, Scott; Hurley, Jeremiah; Cheng, Lucy; McGrail, Kimberlyn

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2007, the province of British Columbia implemented incentive payments to primary care physicians for the provision of comprehensive, continuous, guideline-informed care for patients with 2 or more chronic conditions. We examined the impact of this program on primary care access and continuity, rates of hospital admission and costs. Methods: We analyzed all BC patients who qualified for the incentive based on their diagnostic profile. We tracked primary care contacts and continuity, hospital admissions (total, via the emergency department and for targeted conditions), and cost of physician services, hospital care and pharmaceuticals, for 24 months before and 24 months after the intervention. Results: Of 155 754 eligible patients, 63.7% had at least 1 incentive payment billed. Incentive payments had no impact on primary care contacts (change in contacts per patient per month: 0.016, 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.047 to 0.078) or continuity of care (mean monthly change: 0.012, 95% CI −0.001 to 0.024) and were associated with increased total rates of hospital admission (change in hospital admissions per 1000 patients per month: 1.46, 95% CI 0.04 to 2.89), relative to preintervention trends. Annual costs per patient did not decline (mean change: $455.81, 95% CI −$2.44 to $914.08). Interpretation: British Columbia’s $240-million investment in this program improved compensation for physicians doing the important work of caring for complex patients, but did not appear to improve primary care access or continuity, or constrain resource use elsewhere in the health care system. Policymakers should consider other strategies to improve care for this patient population. PMID:27527484

  9. The next phase of Title VII funding for training primary care physicians for America's health care needs.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert L; Turner, Barbara J

    2012-01-01

    Health care reform will add millions of Americans to the ranks of the insured; however, their access to health care is threatened by a deep decline in the production of primary care physicians. Poorer access to primary care risks poorer health outcomes and higher costs. Meeting this increased demand requires a major investment in primary care training. Title VII, Section 747 of the Public Health Service Act previously supported the growth of the health care workforce but has been severely cut over the past 2 decades. New and expanded Title VII initiatives are required to increase the production of primary care physicians; establish high-functioning academic, community-based training practices; increase the supply of well-trained primary care faculty; foster innovation and rigorous evaluation of these programs; and ultimately to improve the responsiveness of teaching hospitals to community needs. To accomplish these goals, Congress should act on the Council on Graduate Medical Education's recommendation to increase funding for Title VII, Section 747 roughly 14-fold to $560 million annually. This amount represents a small investment in light of the billions that Medicare currently spends to support graduate medical education, and both should be held to account for meeting physician workforce needs. Expansion of Title VII, Section 747 with the goal of improving access to primary care would be an important part of a needed, broader effort to counter the decline of primary care. Failure to launch such a national primary care workforce revitalization program will put the health and economic viability of our nation at risk.

  10. Physicians Who Treat the Elderly in Rural Florida: Trends Indicating Concerns regarding Access to Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderson, Anne; Menachemi, Nir; Brummel-Smith, Ken; Brooks, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Context: Rural elderly patients are faced with numerous challenges in accessing care. Additional strains to access may be occurring given recent market pressures, which would have significant impact on this vulnerable population. Purpose: This study focused on the practice patterns and future plans of rural Florida physicians who routinely see…

  11. Should physicians prepare for war? 1. The obligation to care for the casualties.

    PubMed

    Bisgard, J C

    1982-04-01

    This is an introduction to a set of four commentaries on the controversy that has arisen over whether physicians should cooperate in Defense Department planning for the care of military casualties, airlifted to U.S. civilian hospitals, in the event of a large-scale war. The commentaries are by Jay C. Bisgard, H. Jack Geiger, James T. Johnson, and Thomas H. Murray.

  12. Evaluation of Developmental Surveillance by Physicians at the Two-Month Preventive Care Visit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyp, Sarah S.; Barone, Vincent J.; Kruger, Tarah; Garrison, Carol B.; Robertsen, Christine; Christophersen, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of feedback and instruction on resident physician performance during developmental surveillance of infants at 2-month preventive care visits. Baseline data were obtained by videotaping 3 residents while they performed the physical and developmental exam components. Training consisted of individualized feedback and a brief…

  13. An Investigation of Nurses' Interaction Styles with Physicians and Suggested Patient Care Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redland, Alice R.

    The purpose of this study was to identify relations between nurses' interaction styles and patient care interventions (PCI) that occurred after nurse-doctor interactions. A nonparticipant observer recorded interactions of 48 female registered nurses with physicians. Transcripts were coded and assigned to one of five theoretical nurse interaction…

  14. Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners as a Usual Source of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Christine M.; Schumacher, Jessica R.; Wright, Alexandra; Smith, Maureen A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To identify characteristics and outcomes of patients who use physician assistants and nurse practitioners (PA/NPs) as a usual source of care. Methods: Cross sectional analysis using the telephone and mail surveys of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS), a prospective cohort study of Wisconsin high school graduates and selected siblings…

  15. 42 CFR 456.604 - Physician team member inspecting care of beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Physician team member inspecting care of beneficiaries. 456.604 Section 456.604 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Inspections of...

  16. The Contribution of Non-Physician Health Workers to the Delivery of Primary Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Amasa B.; Ransohoff, David F.

    Innovative solutions in training or retraining of health workers to meet the nationwide primary care deficiency are summarized. Programs described concern nurse clinicians, practitioners, and midwives; physicians' assistants; medical assistants, laboratory technicians, and secretaries; dental assistants, hygienists, and laboratory technicians;…

  17. Physician-Pharmacist Collaborative Care for Dyslipidemia Patients: Knowledge and Skills of Community Pharmacists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villeneuve, Julie; Lamarre, Diane; Lussier, Marie-Therese; Vanier, Marie-Claude; Genest, Jacques; Blais, Lucie; Hudon, Eveline; Perreault, Sylvie; Berbiche, Djamal; Lalonde, Lyne

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In a physician-pharmacist collaborative-care (PPCC) intervention, community pharmacists were responsible for initiating lipid-lowering pharmacotherapy and adjusting the medication dosage. They attended a 1-day interactive workshop supported by a treatment protocol and clinical and communication tools. Afterwards, changes in…

  18. Routine primary care management of acute low back pain: adherence to clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    González-Urzelai, Violeta; Palacio-Elua, Loreto; López-de-Munain, Josefina

    2003-12-01

    One of the major challenges for general practitioners is to manage individuals with acute low back pain appropriately to reduce the risk of chronicity. A prospective study was designed to assess the actual management of acute low back pain in one primary care setting and to determine whether existing practice patterns conform to published guidelines. Twenty-four family physicians from public primary care centers of the Basque Health Service in Bizkaia, Basque Country (Spain), participated in the study. A total of 105 patients aged 18-65 years presenting with acute low back pain over a 6-month period were included. Immediately after consultation, a research assistant performed a structured clinical interview. The patients' care provided by the general practitioner was compared with the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR) guidelines and guidelines issued by the Royal College of General Practitioners. The diagnostic process showed a low rate of appropriate use of history (27%), physical examination (32%), lumbar radiographs (31%), and referral to specialized care (33%). Although the therapeutic process showed a relatively high rate of appropriateness in earlier mobilization (77%) and educational advice (65%), only 23% of patients were taught about the benign course of back pain. The study revealed that management of acute low back pain in the primary care setting is far from being in conformance with published clinical guidelines. PMID:14605973

  19. Importance-satisfaction analysis for primary care physicians' perspective on EHRs in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Hsun; Wene, Hsyien-Chia; Chu, Chi-Ming; Wu, Yi-Syuan; Wang, Jen-Leng

    2014-06-01

    The Taiwan government has been promoting Electronic Health Records (EHRs) to primary care physicians. How to extend EHRs adoption rate by measuring physicians' perspective of importance and performance of EHRs has become one of the critical issues for healthcare organizations. We conducted a comprehensive survey in 2010 in which a total of 1034 questionnaires which were distributed to primary care physicians. The project was sponsored by the Department of Health to accelerate the adoption of EHRs. 556 valid responses were analyzed resulting in a valid response rate of 53.77%. The data were analyzed based on a data-centered analytical framework (5-point Likert scale). The mean of importance and satisfaction of four dimensions were 4.16, 3.44 (installation and maintenance), 4.12, 3.51 (product effectiveness), 4.10, 3.31 (system function) and 4.34, 3.70 (customer service) respectively. This study provided a direction to government by focusing on attributes which physicians found important but were dissatisfied with, to close the gap between actual and expected performance of the EHRs. The authorities should emphasize the potential advantages in meaningful use and provide training programs, conferences, technical assistance and incentives to enhance the national level implementation of EHRs for primary physicians. PMID:24914640

  20. Importance-satisfaction analysis for primary care physicians' perspective on EHRs in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Hsun; Wene, Hsyien-Chia; Chu, Chi-Ming; Wu, Yi-Syuan; Wang, Jen-Leng

    2014-06-01

    The Taiwan government has been promoting Electronic Health Records (EHRs) to primary care physicians. How to extend EHRs adoption rate by measuring physicians' perspective of importance and performance of EHRs has become one of the critical issues for healthcare organizations. We conducted a comprehensive survey in 2010 in which a total of 1034 questionnaires which were distributed to primary care physicians. The project was sponsored by the Department of Health to accelerate the adoption of EHRs. 556 valid responses were analyzed resulting in a valid response rate of 53.77%. The data were analyzed based on a data-centered analytical framework (5-point Likert scale). The mean of importance and satisfaction of four dimensions were 4.16, 3.44 (installation and maintenance), 4.12, 3.51 (product effectiveness), 4.10, 3.31 (system function) and 4.34, 3.70 (customer service) respectively. This study provided a direction to government by focusing on attributes which physicians found important but were dissatisfied with, to close the gap between actual and expected performance of the EHRs. The authorities should emphasize the potential advantages in meaningful use and provide training programs, conferences, technical assistance and incentives to enhance the national level implementation of EHRs for primary physicians.

  1. Caring for the forensic population: recognizing the educational needs of emergency department nurses and physicians.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Elizabeth; Harada, Nahoko; Amar, Angela

    2012-12-01

    The Emergency Department (ED) is a point of contact for victims of violence after an act of criminal activity has occurred. Hence, ED clinicians are in a key position to have a significant impact on both the medical and legal outcomes of the forensic patient population. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare forensic knowledge, practice, and experiences of ED nurses and physicians. Specific aims were to (1) describe experiences of nurses and physicians related to forensic practice; (2) compare clinical forensic knowledge and experience between nurses and physicians; and (3) describe forensic learning needs. This descriptive, correlational study utilized a survey questionnaire completed by 134 ED nurses and physicians. Results of the survey revealed no significant differences in the education, knowledge, and confidence with forensic patients between ED nurses and physicians. However, just over half of the sample reported feeling confident in managing forensic patients indicating a need for increased forensic education. Practice implications indicate that forensic education is needed and desired among ED nurses and physicians within the clinical setting. Further studies must be done to gain a more in depth understanding of existing forensic practices and protocols to elevate the level of care received by forensic patients within the ED setting. PMID:23176357

  2. The physician mentored implementation model: a promising quality improvement framework for health care change.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Hinami, Keiki; Hansen, Luke O; Maynard, Gregory; Budnitz, Tina; Williams, Mark V

    2015-03-01

    Quality improvement (QI) efforts hold great promise for improving care delivery. However, hospitals often struggle with QI implementation and fail to sustain improvement in either process changes or patient outcomes. Physician mentored implementation (PMI) is a novel approach that promotes the success and sustainability of QI initiatives at hospitals. It leverages the expertise of external physician mentors who coach QI teams to implement interventions at their local hospitals. The PMI model includes five core components: (1) a hospital self-assessment tool, (2) a face-to-face training session including direct interaction with a physician mentor, (3) a guided continuous quality improvement and systems approach, (4) yearlong individual physician mentoring, and (5) a learning community supported by a resource center, listserv, and webinars. Mentors provide content and process expertise, rather than offering "one-size-fits-all" technical assistance that might not be sustained after the mentoring year ends. Mentors support and motivate QI teams throughout the planning and implementation phases of their interventions, help to engage hospital leadership, garner local physician buy-in, and address institutional barriers. Mentors also guide hospitals to identify opportunities for the adaptation and customization of original evidence-based models of care while ensuring the fidelity of those models. More than 350 hospitals have used the PMI model to implement successful national and statewide QI initiatives. Academic medical centers are charged with improving the health of patients and reengineering care delivery; thus, they serve as the ideal source for physician mentors and can act as leaders in implementing QI projects using the PMI model.

  3. The physician mentored implementation model: a promising quality improvement framework for health care change.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Hinami, Keiki; Hansen, Luke O; Maynard, Gregory; Budnitz, Tina; Williams, Mark V

    2015-03-01

    Quality improvement (QI) efforts hold great promise for improving care delivery. However, hospitals often struggle with QI implementation and fail to sustain improvement in either process changes or patient outcomes. Physician mentored implementation (PMI) is a novel approach that promotes the success and sustainability of QI initiatives at hospitals. It leverages the expertise of external physician mentors who coach QI teams to implement interventions at their local hospitals. The PMI model includes five core components: (1) a hospital self-assessment tool, (2) a face-to-face training session including direct interaction with a physician mentor, (3) a guided continuous quality improvement and systems approach, (4) yearlong individual physician mentoring, and (5) a learning community supported by a resource center, listserv, and webinars. Mentors provide content and process expertise, rather than offering "one-size-fits-all" technical assistance that might not be sustained after the mentoring year ends. Mentors support and motivate QI teams throughout the planning and implementation phases of their interventions, help to engage hospital leadership, garner local physician buy-in, and address institutional barriers. Mentors also guide hospitals to identify opportunities for the adaptation and customization of original evidence-based models of care while ensuring the fidelity of those models. More than 350 hospitals have used the PMI model to implement successful national and statewide QI initiatives. Academic medical centers are charged with improving the health of patients and reengineering care delivery; thus, they serve as the ideal source for physician mentors and can act as leaders in implementing QI projects using the PMI model. PMID:25354069

  4. Use of humour in primary care: different perceptions among patients and physicians

    PubMed Central

    Granek-Catarivas, M; Goldstein-Ferber, S; Azuri, Y; Vinker, S; Kahan, E

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: (1) To explore the frequency with which humorous behaviour and statements occur in family medicine practice in Israel, and (2) to quantitatively assess the correlation between the subjective perceptions of humour in medical encounters between patients and physicians. Method: In a cross sectional study, two populations (doctors and patients) were surveyed with paired structured questionnaires completed immediately after primary care practice visits. Two hundred and fifty consecutive encounters from 15 practices were sampled. The physician questionnaire was self administered, and patient questionnaire was administered by a trained research assistant. Results: A mean of 16.7 questionnaires was completed per physician (range 6–20). The physicians reported having used some humour in only 95 encounters (38%), whereas almost 60% of patients agreed with the statement, "The doctor used some humour during the visit". At the same time, for specific encounters, the agreement between patients' perception and physicians' perceptions on the use of humour, although not completely by chance (p = 0.04), is low (κ = 0.115). Patient characteristics (age, education, gender, family status, mother tongue, self perceived heath status, stress, mood, and expectations) were not related to the degree of agreement between the patients' and physicians' perceptions. Conclusion: Humour was used in a large proportion of encounters, independently of patient characteristics. Patients seem to be more sensitised to humour than physicians, probably because of their high stress level during medical encounters. Cultural differences may also play a part. Physicians should be made aware of this magnifying effect, and the issue should be discussed in medical schools. PMID:15701747

  5. Dynamic Comparison of Physicians' Interaction Style with Electronic Health Records in Primary Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Asan, Onur; Xu, Jie; Montague, Enid

    2013-12-10

    Researchers have been increasingly interested in the influence of computers on physician-patient communication in consultation rooms because of the substantial growth in the use of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) in the U.S. Previous research showed that physicians have different ways of interacting with patients and EHRs; and these styles may relate to different patterns of nonverbal interaction between the physicians and patients and influence the outcomes of the clinical visit. The purpose of this study was to identify the differences of eye gaze patterns in three EHR interaction styles: the technology-centered style, the human-centered style, and the mixed interaction style. 100 primary care visits with different interaction styles were videotaped. Eye gaze behaviors were coded and described as frequencies and durations of gaze. The dynamic eye gaze patterns of the physicians and patients, in terms of how their gaze behaviors were sequentially associated, were analyzed using lag-sequential analysis. The results indicated that technology-centered group had significantly shorter amount of mutual gaze than other two groups (p=0.032; p=0.015, respectively). In addition, in technology centered style, the physicians were more likely to shift their gaze to the computer when the patients gazed at them; and when the physicians gazed at the computers, the patients were more likely to gaze somewhere else which might be an indicator of disengagement. The study implied that EHRs should be designed in a way that facilitates a positive interaction between the physicians and patients, such as maintaining mutual gaze. Training should also be provided to the physicians for establishing effective and positive interaction styles. PMID:25411656

  6. Advance Directives and Communication Skills of Prehospital Physicians Involved in the Care of Cardiovascular Patients.

    PubMed

    Gigon, Fabienne; Merlani, Paolo; Ricou, Bara

    2015-12-01

    Advance directives (AD) were developed to respect patient autonomy. However, very few patients have AD, even in cases when major cardiovascular surgery is to follow. To understand the reasons behind the low prevalence of AD and to help decision making when patients are incompetent, it is necessary to focus on the impact of prehospital practitioners, who may contribute to an increase in AD by discussing them with patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate self-rated communication skills and the attitudes of physicians potentially involved in the care of cardiovascular patients toward AD.Self-administered questionnaires were sent to general practitioners, cardiologists, internists, and intensivists, including the Quality of Communication Score, divided into a General Communication score (QOCgen 6 items) and an End-of-life Communication score (QOCeol 7 items), as well as questions regarding opinions and practices in terms of AD.One hundred sixty-four responses were received. QOCgen (mean (±SD)): 9.0/10 (1.0); QOCeol: 7.2/10 (1.7). General practitioners most frequently start discussions about AD (74/149 [47%]) and are more prone to designate their own specialty (30/49 [61%], P < 0.0001). Overall, only 57/159 (36%) physicians designated their own specialty; 130/158 (82%) physicians ask potential cardiovascular patients if they have AD and 61/118 (52%) physicians who care for cardiovascular patients talk about AD with some of them.The characteristics of physicians who do not talk about AD with patients were those who did not personally have AD and those who work in private practices.One hundred thirty-three (83%) physicians rated the systematic mention of patients' AD in the correspondence between physicians as good, while 114 (71%) at the patients' first registration in the private practice.Prehospital physicians rated their communication skills as good, whereas end-of-life communication was rated much lower. Only half of those surveyed speak about AD

  7. Health Care Austerity Measures in Times of Crisis: The Perspectives of Primary Health Care Physicians in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Heras-Mosteiro, Julio; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Otero-Garcia, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The current financial crisis has seen severe austerity measures imposed on the Spanish health care system, including reduced public spending, copayments, salary reductions, and reduced services for undocumented migrants. However, the impacts have not been well-documented. We present findings from a qualitative study that explores the perceptions of primary health care physicians in Madrid, Spain. This article discusses the effects of austerity measures implemented in the public health care system and their potential impacts on access and utilization of primary health care services. This is the first study, to our knowledge, exploring the health care experiences during the financial crisis of general practitioners in Madrid, Spain. The majority of participating physicians disapproved of austerity measures implemented in Spain. The findings of this study suggest that undocumented migrants should regain access to health care services; copayments should be minimized and removed for patients with low incomes; and health care professionals should receive additional help to avoid burnout. Failure to implement these measures could result in the quality of health care further deteriorating and could potentially have long-term negative consequences on population health.

  8. Health Care Austerity Measures in Times of Crisis: The Perspectives of Primary Health Care Physicians in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Heras-Mosteiro, Julio; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Otero-Garcia, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The current financial crisis has seen severe austerity measures imposed on the Spanish health care system, including reduced public spending, copayments, salary reductions, and reduced services for undocumented migrants. However, the impacts have not been well-documented. We present findings from a qualitative study that explores the perceptions of primary health care physicians in Madrid, Spain. This article discusses the effects of austerity measures implemented in the public health care system and their potential impacts on access and utilization of primary health care services. This is the first study, to our knowledge, exploring the health care experiences during the financial crisis of general practitioners in Madrid, Spain. The majority of participating physicians disapproved of austerity measures implemented in Spain. The findings of this study suggest that undocumented migrants should regain access to health care services; copayments should be minimized and removed for patients with low incomes; and health care professionals should receive additional help to avoid burnout. Failure to implement these measures could result in the quality of health care further deteriorating and could potentially have long-term negative consequences on population health. PMID:26825100

  9. The Leapfrog initiative for intensive care unit physician staffing and its impact on intensive care unit performance: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Gasperino, James

    2011-10-01

    The field of critical care has changed markedly in recent years to accommodate a growing population of chronically critically ill patients. New administrative structures have evolved to include divisions, departments, and sections devoted exclusively to the practice of critical care medicine. On an individual level, the ability to manage complex multisystem critical illnesses and to introduce invasive monitoring devices defines the intensivist. On a systems level, critical care services managed by an intensivist-led multidisciplinary team are now recognized by their ability to efficiently utilize hospital resources and improve patient outcomes. Due to the numerous cost and quality issues related to the delivery of critical care medicine, intensive care unit physician staffing (IPS) has become a charged subject in recent years. Although the federal government has played a large role in regulating best practices by physicians, other third parties have entered the arena. Perhaps the most influential of these has been The Leapfrog Group, a consortium representing 130 employers and 65 Fortune 500 companies that purchase health care for their employees. This group has proposed specific regulatory guidelines for IPS that are purported to result in substantial cost containment and improved quality of care. This narrative review examines the impact of The Leapfrog Group's recommendations on critical care delivery in the United States.

  10. Substitution of physicians by nurses in primary care: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries, substitution of physicians by nurses has become common due to the shortage of physicians and the need for high-quality, affordable care, especially for chronic and multi-morbid patients. We examined the evidence on the clinical effectiveness and care costs of physician-nurse substitution in primary care. Methods We systematically searched OVID Medline and Embase, The Cochrane Library and CINAHL, up to August 2012; selected and critically appraised published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared nurse-led care with care by primary care physicians on patient satisfaction, Quality of Life (QoL), hospital admission, mortality and costs of healthcare. We assessed the individual study risk of bias, calculated the study-specific and pooled relative risks (RR) or standardised mean differences (SMD); and performed fixed-effects meta-analyses. Results 24 RCTs (38,974 participants) and 2 economic studies met the inclusion criteria. Pooled analyses showed higher overall scores of patient satisfaction with nurse-led care (SMD 0.18, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.23), in RCTs of single contact or urgent care, short (less than 6 months) follow-up episodes and in small trials (N ≤ 200). Nurse-led care was effective at reducing the overall risk of hospital admission (RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.64 to 0.91), mortality (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.96), in RCTs of on-going or non-urgent care, longer (at least 12 months) follow-up episodes and in larger (N > 200) RCTs. Higher quality RCTs (with better allocation concealment and less attrition) showed higher rates of hospital admissions and mortality with nurse-led care albeit less or not significant. The results seemed more consistent across nurse practitioners than with registered or licensed nurses. The effects of nurse-led care on QoL and costs were difficult to interpret due to heterogeneous outcome reporting, valuation of resources and the small number of studies. Conclusions The available evidence

  11. Physician perspectives on care of individuals with severe mobility impairments in primary care in Southwestern Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Colleen; Lee, Joseph; Milligan, James; Hillier, Loretta M; Bauman, Craig

    2016-07-01

    Despite the high health risks associated with severe mobility impairments, individuals with physical disabilities are less likely to receive the same level of primary care as able-bodied persons. This study explores family physicians' perspectives on primary care for individuals with mobility impairments to identify and better understand the challenges that prevent equitable service delivery to this group of patients. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in the autumn of 2012 with a purposeful sample of 20 family physicians practising in Southwestern Ontario to gather their perspectives of the personal and professional barriers to healthcare delivery for individuals with mobility impairments, including perceptions of challenges, contributing reasons and possible improvements. A thematic analysis was conducted on the transcripts generated from the interviews to identify perceptions of existing barriers and gaps in care, needs and existing opportunities for improving primary care for this patient population. Eight themes emerged from the interviews that contributed to understanding the perceived challenges of providing care to patients with mobility impairments: transportation barriers, knowledge gaps and practice constraints resulting in episodic care rather than preventive care, incongruence between perceived and actual accessibility to care, emergency departments used as centres for primary care, inattention to mobility issues among specialist and community services, lack of easily accessible practice tools, low patient volumes impact decision-making regarding building decreased motivation to expand clinical capacity due to low patient volume, and lastly, remuneration issues. Despite this patient population presenting with high healthcare needs and significant barriers and care gaps in primary care, low prevalence rates negatively impact the acquisition of necessary equipment and knowledge required to optimally care for these patients in typical primary care

  12. The Physician Quality Improvement Initiative: Engaging Physicians in Quality Improvement, Patient Safety, Accountability and their Provision of High-Quality Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Wentlandt, Kirsten; Degendorfer, Niki; Clarke, Cathy; Panet, Hayley; Worthington, Jim; McLean, Richard F; Chan, Charlie K N

    2016-01-01

    University Health Network has been working to become a high-reliability organization, with a focus on safe, quality patient care. In response, the Medical Affairs Department has implemented several strategic initiatives to drive accountability, quality improvement and engagement with our physician population. One of these initiatives, the Physician Quality Improvement Initiative (PQII) is a physician-led project designed to provide active medical staff, in collaboration with their physician department chiefs, a comprehensive approach to focused and practical quality improvement in their practice. In this document, we outline the project, including its implementation strategy, logic model and outcomes, and provide discussion on how it fits into UHN's global strategy to provide safe, quality patient care. PMID:27009706

  13. Changing roles for primary-care physicians: addressing challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, C P; Kaluzny, A D; Kibbe, D C; Tredway, R

    2005-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer advertising is but one example of a process called disintermediation that is directly affecting primary-care physicians and their patients. This paper examines the trends and the actors involved in disintermediation, which threatens the traditional patient-physician relationship. The paper outlines the social forces behind these threats and illustrates the resulting challenges and opportunities. A rationale and strategies are presented to rebuild, maintain and strengthen the patient-physician relationship in an era of growing disintermediation and anticipated advancements in cost-effective office-based information systems. Primary care--as we know it--is under siege from a number of trends in healthcare delivery, resulting in loss of physician autonomy, disrupted continuity of care and potential erosion of professional values (Rastegar 2004; Future of Family Medicine Project Leadership Committee 2004). The halcyon days of medicine as a craft guild with a monopoly on (1) technical knowledge and (2) the means of implementation, reached its zenith in the mid-twentieth century and has been under pressure ever since (Starr 1982; Schlesinger 2002). While this is a trend within the US health system, it is likely to affect other delivery systems in the years ahead. PMID:15828571

  14. Pap testing among Vietnamese women: health care system and physician factors.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Victoria M; Schwartz, Stephen M; Yasui, Yutaka; Burke, Nancy; Shu, Jianfen; Lam, D Hien; Jackson, J Carey

    2004-12-01

    Cervical cancer occurs more frequently among Vietnamese Americans than women of any other race/ethnicity. In addition, previous studies in California have documented low Papanicolaou (Pap) testing rates in Vietnamese communities. This study focused on health care system factors and physician characteristics associated with recent cervical cancer screening among Vietnamese women. A population-based survey was conducted in Seattle during 2002. In-person interviews were conducted by bilingual, bicultural female survey workers. The survey response rate was 82% and 518 women were included in the analysis. Seventy-four percent of the respondents reported having been screened for cervical cancer on at least one occasion, and 64% reported a Pap smear within the previous 2 years. Women with a regular doctor were more likely to have been recently screened than those without a regular doctor (OR = 2.33, 95% CI = 1.45-3.74). Among those with a regular doctor, having a male physician, receiving care at a private doctor's office (rather than a community, hospital, or multi-specialty clinic), and concern about the cost of health care were independently associated with lower screening rates. Physician ethnicity was not associated with recent Pap smear receipt. The findings support targeted interventions for Vietnamese women without a regular physician and private doctors' offices that serve Vietnamese Americans. The availability of low cost screening services should be publicized in Vietnamese communities.

  15. A mini-fellowship in clinical nutrition for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Deen, D; Karp, R; Lowell, B

    2000-01-01

    When the Regional Nutrition Center's (RNC's) mini-fellowship was being developed, physicians teaching in medical schools and residency programs had little formal training in nutrition, so it was difficult to identify faculty to serve as role models and clinical preceptors. Using funds provided by an NIH/NCI R-25 grant, the mini-fellowship in clinical nutrition was developed as a model to meet the nutrition education needs of senior residents and junior faculty in primary care disciplines. It provided a brief but broad exposure to clinical nutrition topics, with a focus on issues relevant to the practice of primary care and teaching skills. In four weeks, fellows completed didactic course work, a clinical preceptorship, and a teaching project. Tracking of the 55 physicians who completed the program by questionnaires has shown significant improvement in their nutrition-related patient care activities. PMID:11019758

  16. Health care futures. Part 2: The future of physician executives? Panel discussion.

    PubMed

    Cejka, S; LeTourneau, B; Pfifferling, J H; Reinhardt, U; Todd, J

    1997-01-01

    What is the future of health care in America? This is Part 2 of The Physician Executive panel discussion that explores the future of health care in America. To narrow this ambitious focus somewhat, the future is defined as five to 10 years hence. In Part 1, which was published in the May/June issue, Russell C. Coile, Jr., Barbara LeTourneau, MD, MBA, FACPE, James Reinertsen, MD, Uwe Reinhardt, PhD, Marshall Ruffin, MD, MPH, MBA, FACPE, and David Vogel, MS, shared their opinions about what the future holds in managed care, information technology, and biotechnology. In Part 2, Susan Cejka, Barbara LeTourneau, MD, MBA, FACPE, John Henry Pfifferling, PhD, Uwe Reinhardt, PhD, and James Todd, MD, share their views on the future of medical education and physician executives.

  17. The military veteran to physician assistant pathway: building the primary care workforce.

    PubMed

    Brock, Douglas; Bolon, Shannon; Wick, Keren; Harbert, Kenneth; Jacques, Paul; Evans, Timothy; Abdullah, Athena; Gianola, F J

    2013-12-01

    The physician assistant (PA) profession emerged to utilize the skills of returning Vietnam-era military medics and corpsmen to fortify deficits in the health care workforce. Today, the nation again faces projected health care workforce shortages and a significant armed forces drawdown. The authors describe national efforts to address both issues by facilitating veterans' entrance into civilian PA careers and leveraging their skills.More than 50,000 service personnel with military health care training were discharged between 2006 and 2010. These veterans' health care experience and maturity make them ideal candidates for civilian training as primary care providers. They trained and practiced in teams and functioned under minimal supervision to care for a broad range of patients. Military health care personnel are experienced in emergency medicine, urgent care, primary care, public health, and disaster medicine. However, the PA profession scarcely taps this valuable resource. Fewer than 4% of veterans with health care experience may ever apply for civilian PA training.The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) implements two strategies to help prepare and graduate veterans from PA education programs. First, Primary Care Training and Enhancement (PCTE) grants help develop the primary care workforce. In 2012, HRSA introduced reserved review points for PCTE: Physician Assistant Training in Primary Care applicants with veteran-targeted activities, increasing their likelihood of receiving funding. Second, HRSA leads civilian and military stakeholder workgroups that are identifying recruitment and retention activities and curricula adaptations that maximize veterans' potential as PAs. Both strategies are described, and early outcomes are presented. PMID:24128629

  18. Potential Impact of Increased Numbers of Physicians upon Physician Behavior, Access to, and Cost of, Medical Care. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musgrave, Gerald L.

    The potential impact of the increasing supply of physicians on physician behavior, the cost of medical services, and access to services is addressed in detail in this final research report. Econometric modeling and analyses of economic activity within the health sector were undertaken. An eight equation model of the hospital and physician sectors…

  19. Attitudes to and management of fertility among primary health care physicians in Turkey: An epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Hassa, Hikmet; Ayranci, Unal; Unluoglu, Ilhami; Metintas, Selma; Unsal, Alaeddin

    2005-01-01

    Background The subject of infertility has taken its place in the health sector at the top level. Since primary health care services are insufficient, most people, especially women, keep on suffering from it all over the world, namely in underdeveloped or developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine primary care physicians' opinions about the approach to infertility cases and their place within primary health care services (PHCSs). Methods The study was conducted between October 2003 and April 2004. The study group comprised 748 physicians working in PHCSs. They were asked to fill in a questionnaire with questions pertaining to infertility support, laboratory and treatment algorithms, as well as the demographic characteristics. The data was evaluated using the chi square test, percentage rates and a logistic regression model. Results The multivariate analyses showed that having a previous interest in infertility and having worked for a postgraduate period of between 5–9 years and ≥10 years were the variables that most positively influenced them in their approach to cases of infertility (p < 0.05, each one). Just 28.7% of the physicians indicated that they believed cases of infertility could be evaluated at the primary care level. The most frequently proposed reason for indicating 'difficulty in practice' (n = 533) was inadequate provision of equipment in PHCSs (55.7%). The physicians reported that they were able to perform most of the supportive treatments and proposals (between 64.6%–87.7%). The most requested laboratory investigations were the instruction of patients in taking basal body temperatures and semen analysis (89.7% and 88.7%, respectively). The most preferential course of treatment was that of sexually transmitted diseases (95.5%). Conclusion It is clear that not enough importance is attached to the provision of care to infertile couples within PHCSs. This leads us to conclude that an integration of infertility services in primary

  20. Detecting psychological distress among patients attending secondary health care clinics. Self-report and physician rating.

    PubMed

    Feldman, D; Rabinowitz, J; Ben Yehuda, Y

    1995-11-01

    A study was conducted to determine the prevalence of psychological distress, as reported by patients and their physicians, in orthopedic, neurology, dermatology, and ophthalmology clinics; to study their accuracy in detecting psychological distress; and to determine if there is any connection among psychological distress, accuracy of detecting distress, and use of mental health and primary health care physicians' prognosis for the somatic complaints. Five hundred and fifty-six patients, ages 18-21, responded to the Psychiatric Epidemiology Research Interview Demoralization Scale (PERI-D), a measure of psychological distress, and to questions about their mental health and use of mental health and primary health services. Physicians, who were blind to patients' responses, were asked to what extent they thought the cause of patients' complaints was physical and to what extent they thought it was psychological in nature, and to prognosticate. Based on the PERI-D, about 25% of patients were distressed, this was less for females than males and varied between clinics. Based on self-reporting, about 14% of patients (males and females) were distressed. Based on physician reporting, about 17% (males less) were distressed. Physicians identified 35% of the PERI-D-distressed cases and 79% of nondistressed cases. About 66% of patients identified their distress and 83% their lack of distress. Increased use of primary health care and mental health care was related to distress. The prognosis was negatively related to distress. Based on this study, there is a need for more attention to psychological distress among secondary health care patients. Patients' ability to identify their distress suggests the importance of involving the patient in the diagnostic process. Correct detection of distress alone does not appear to decrease the use of primary medical and mental health services. PMID:8714802

  1. Older Jail Inmates and Community Acute Care Use

    PubMed Central

    Chodos, Anna H.; Ahalt, Cyrus; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Myers, Janet; Goldenson, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined older jail inmates’ predetainment acute care use (emergency department or hospitalization in the 3 months before arrest) and their plans for using acute care after release. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional study of 247 jail inmates aged 55 years or older assessing sociodemographic characteristics, health, and geriatric conditions associated with predetainment and anticipated postrelease acute care use. Results. We found that 52% of older inmates reported predetainment acute care use and 47% planned to use the emergency department after release. In modified Poisson regression, homelessness was independently associated with predetainment use (relative risk = 1.42; 95% confidence interval = 1.10, 1.83) and having a primary care provider was inversely associated with planned use (relative risk = 0.69; 95% confidence interval = 0.53, 0.89). Conclusions. The Affordable Care Act has expanded Medicaid eligibility to all persons leaving jail in an effort to decrease postrelease acute care use in this high-risk population. Jail-to-community transitional care models that address the health, geriatric, and social factors prevalent in older adults leaving jail, and that focus on linkages to housing and primary care, are needed to enhance the impact of the act on acute care use for this population. PMID:25033146

  2. Determinants of physicians' medication prescribing behaviour in primary care in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Magzoub, M A; Neyaz, Y; Khoja, T; Qureshi, N A; Haycox, A; Walley, T

    2011-02-01

    This study in Saudi Arabia explored the determinants of physicians' prescribing behaviour in primary care in Riyadh city. A self-administered questionnaire designed to explore factors influencing prescribing (sociodemographic factors; practice setting; continuing education; access to educational materials; pharmaceutical company representatives; and patient factors) was completed by 87 PHC physicians. A factor analysis of 56 variables extracted 7 factors that explained 46% of the variance. Of these, 4 components positively related to perceived good prescribing behaviour could be summarized as: clinical experience of physicians; use of educational materials for continuous updating of medical knowledge; enhanced levels of continuing medical education and willingness to involve patients in decision-making; and working as a team using pharmacists for consultation and emphasizing the role of medical education. The other 3 factors derived from the analysis were less easy to interpret and may have been statistical anomalies (or measurement errors). PMID:21735952

  3. The Conscientious Practice Policy: a futility policy for acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Mark R

    2005-08-01

    Much attention has been paid in recent years to the conflict that may occur when patients or their families insist on a therapy that the physician feels would be futile. In 1999 the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs of the American Medical Association recommended that all health-care institutions adopt a policy on medical futility that follows a fair process. Development of such a policy has proved problematic for many hospitals. The Conscientious Practice Policy at Lawrence & Memorial Hospital was developed as a response to the AMA recommendation. It outlines a specific process to be followed in the event that a physician wishes to refuse to provide a requested therapy, whether that refusal is based on perceived futility or other concerns. The policy was subsequently modified slightly and adopted by two other Connecticut acute care hospitals.

  4. Physicians' perceptions of cancer care for elderly patients: a qualitative sociological study based on a pilot geriatric oncology program.

    PubMed

    Sifer-Rivière, Lynda; Girre, Véronique; Gisselbrecht, Mathilde; Saint-Jean, Olivier

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to document physicians' perceptions of cancer care for elderly patients within an oncogeriatric coordination pilot unit (UPCOG) created in Paris, France. We focused on how physicians apply new cancer care practices, how they establish new teamwork, and their experience of oncogeriatrics in everyday practice. Qualitative methods were used, including a literature review, observation of working sessions in the oncogeriatric pilot unit, and semi-structured interviews with 28 physicians. The results show how physicians' differing perceptions of geriatric oncology can hinder routine collaboration.

  5. Attitudes towards interprofessional collaboration among primary care physicians and nurses in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ruth Mingli; Sim, Yu Fan; Koh, Gerald Choon-Huat

    2016-07-01

    Interprofessional collaboration (IPC) has been shown to improve patient outcomes, cost efficiency, and health professional satisfaction, and enhance healthy workplaces. We determined the attitudes of primary care physicians and nurses towards IPC and factors facilitating IPC using a cross-sectional study design in Singapore. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire, based on the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration (JSAPNC), was distributed to primary healthcare physicians and nurses working in National Healthcare Group Polyclinics (N = 455). We found that the mean JSAPNC score for physicians was poorer than that for nurses (50.39 [SD = 4.67] vs. 51.61 [SD = 4.19], respectively, mean difference, MD = 1.22, CI = 0.35-2.09, p = .006). Nurses with advanced education had better mean JSAPNC score than nurses with basic education (52.28 [SD = 4.22] vs. 51.12 [SD = 4.11], respectively, MD = 1.16, CI = 0.12-2.20, p = .029). Male participants had poorer mean JSAPNC score compared to females (50.27 [SD = 5.02] vs. 51.38 [SD = 4.22], respectively MD = 1.11, CI = 0.07-2.14, p = .036). With regression analysis, only educational qualification among nurses was independently and positively associated with JSAPNC scores (p = .018). In conclusion, primary care nurses in Singapore had more positive attitudes towards IPC than physicians. Among nurses, those with advanced education had more positive attitudes than those with basic education. Greater emphasis on IPC education in training of physicians and nurses could help improve attitudes further. PMID:27269233

  6. Effective Patient-Physician Communication Based on Osteopathic Philosophy in Caring for Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Noll, Donald R; Ginsberg, Terrie; Elahi, Abdul; Cavalieri, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to discuss effective communication strategies between elderly patients and their physicians from the perspective of osteopathic heritage. The patient-physician communication styles of Andrew Taylor Still, MD, DO, and early osteopathic physicians (ie, DOs) may have influenced how DOs today communicate with their patients. Historical literature describes how Still would discuss with his patients the causes of their health problems using analogies and language they would understand, and how, when caring for a patient at the end of life, he empathically provided emotional support for both patients and their families. Early DOs advocated setting clear expectations for patients regarding clinical outcomes and carefully listening to patients to build trust. The Osteopathic Oath, which calls for the DO to view the patient as a friend, may also affect patient-physician communication. Early osteopathic philosophy and culture, as modeled by Dr Still in his approach to elderly patients, should inspire today's DOs in their communication with their elderly patients. PMID:26745563

  7. End-of-Life Care in an Acute Care Hospital: Linking Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be…

  8. Impact of Burnout on Self-Reported Patient Care Among Emergency Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dave W.; Dresden, Scott; McCloskey, Colin; Branzetti, Jeremy; Gisondi, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Burnout is a syndrome of depersonalization, emotional exhaustion and sense of low personal accomplishment. Emergency physicians (EPs) experience the highest levels of burnout among all physicians. Burnout is associated with greater rates of self-reported suboptimal care among surgeons and internists. The association between burnout and suboptimal care among EPs is unknown. The objective of the study was to evaluate burnout rates among attending and resident EPs and examine their relationship with self-reported patient care practices. Methods In this cross-sectional study burnout was measured at two university-based emergency medicine residency programs with the Maslach Burnout Inventory. We also measured depression, quality of life (QOL) and career satisfaction using validated questionnaires. Six items assessed suboptimal care and the frequency with which they were performed. Results We included 77 out of 155 (49.7%) responses. The EP burnout rate was 57.1%, with no difference between attending and resident physicians. Residents were more likely to screen positive for depression (47.8% vs 18.5%, p=0.012) and report lower QOL scores (6.7 vs 7.4 out of 10, p=0.036) than attendings. Attendings and residents reported similar rates of career satisfaction (85.2% vs 87.0%, p=0.744). Burnout was associated with a positive screen for depression (38.6% vs 12.1%, p=0.011) and lower career satisfaction (77.3% vs 97.0%, p=0.02). EPs with high burnout were significantly more likely to report performing all six acts of suboptimal care. Conclusion A majority of EPs demonstrated high burnout. EP burnout was significantly associated with higher frequencies of self-reported suboptimal care. Future efforts to determine if provider burnout is associated with negative changes in actual patient care are necessary. PMID:26759643

  9. Using Discrete Event Computer Simulation to Improve Patient Flow in a Ghanaian Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Best, Allyson M.; Dixon, Cinnamon A.; Kelton, W. David; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Crowding and limited resources have increased the strain on acute care facilities and emergency departments (EDs) worldwide. These problems are particularly prevalent in developing countries. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a computer-based tool that can be used to estimate how changes to complex healthcare delivery systems, such as EDs, will affect operational performance. Using this modality, our objective was to identify operational interventions that could potentially improve patient throughput of one acute care setting in a developing country. Methods We developed a simulation model of acute care at a district level hospital in Ghana to test the effects of resource-neutral (e.g. modified staff start times and roles) and resource-additional (e.g. increased staff) operational interventions on patient throughput. Previously captured, de-identified time-and-motion data from 487 acute care patients were used to develop and test the model. The primary outcome was the modeled effect of interventions on patient length of stay (LOS). Results The base-case (no change) scenario had a mean LOS of 292 minutes (95% CI 291, 293). In isolation, neither adding staffing, changing staff roles, nor varying shift times affected overall patient LOS. Specifically, adding two registration workers, history takers, and physicians resulted in a 23.8 (95% CI 22.3, 25.3) minute LOS decrease. However, when shift start-times were coordinated with patient arrival patterns, potential mean LOS was decreased by 96 minutes (95% CI 94, 98); and with the simultaneous combination of staff roles (Registration and History-taking) there was an overall mean LOS reduction of 152 minutes (95% CI 150, 154). Conclusions Resource-neutral interventions identified through DES modeling have the potential to improve acute care throughput in this Ghanaian municipal hospital. DES offers another approach to identifying potentially effective interventions to improve patient flow in emergency and acute

  10. Does the quality of care in Medicaid MCOs vary with the form of physician compensation?

    PubMed

    Quast, Troy; Sappington, David E M; Shenkman, Elizabeth

    2008-04-01

    A growing fraction of Medicaid participants are enrolled in managed care organizations (MCOs). MCOs contract with primary care physicians (PCPs) to provide health-care services to Medicaid enrollees. The PCPs are generally compensated either via fee-for-service (FFS) or via capitated arrangements. This paper investigates whether the quality of care that Medicaid enrollees receive varies with the means by which PCPs are compensated. Using data for all Medicaid MCO enrollees in a large state, we find that enrollees in MCOs that pay their PCPs exclusively via FFS arrangements are more likely to receive services for which the PCPs receive additional compensation. These enrollees also are less likely to receive services for which the PCPs do not receive additional compensation. These findings suggest that financial incentives may influence the behavior of PCPs in Medicaid MCOs, and thus the quality of the health care received by Medicaid participants enrolled in MCOs. PMID:17620287

  11. Incorporating direct-to-consumer genomic information into patient care: attitudes and experiences of primary care physicians

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Barbara A; Zayac, Cara; Gordon, Erynn S; Wawak, Lisa; Pyeritz, Reed E; Gollust, Sarah E

    2013-01-01

    Aim Despite predictions of increased clinical applications, little is known about primary care providers’ (PCPs’) readiness to apply genomics to patient care. The aim was to assess PCPs’ current experience with genetic testing, their assessment of the understandability and clinical utility of information in sample direct-to-consumer reports for genomic assessment of disease risk and warfarin dosing and attitudes toward genomic medicine. Materials & methods A web-based survey of PCPs who are members of Knowledge Networks’ Physician Consulting Network was conducted. Results Of the 502 respondents (23.3% response rate), most ordered genetic tests infrequently. When presented with the direct-to-consumer genomic testing reports, most believed the reports were understandable, and would be willing to review results with a patient, and many believed the results would be helpful in patient management. Conclusion Despite limited experience with genetic tests, PCPs are open to helping patients understand genomic information. However, additional physician education is needed. PMID:23795206

  12. Does community health care require different competencies from physicians and nurses?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently competency approach in Health Professionals’ Education (HPE) has become quite popular and for an effective competency based HPE, it is important to design the curriculum around the health care needs of the population to be served and on the expected roles of the health care providers. Unfortunately, in community settings roles of health providers tend to be described less clearly, particularly at the Primary Health Care (PHC) level where a multidisciplinary and appropriately prepared health team is generally lacking. Moreover, to tailor the education on community needs there is no substantial evidence on what specific requirements the providers must be prepared for. Methods This study has explored specific tasks of physicians and nurses employed to work in primary or secondary health care units in a context where there is a structural scarcity of community health care providers. In-depth Interviews of 11 physicians and 06 nurses working in community settings of Pakistan were conducted along with review of their job descriptions. Results At all levels of health settings, physicians’ were mostly engaged with diagnosing and prescribing medical illness of patients coming to health center and nurses depending on their employer were either providing preventive health care activities, assisting physicians or occupied in day to day management of health center. Geographical location or level of health facility did not have major effect on the roles being expected or performed, however the factors that determined the roles performed by health providers were employer expectations, preparation of health providers for providing community based care, role clarity and availability of resources including health team at health facilities. Conclusions Exploration of specific tasks of physicians and nurses working in community settings provide a useful framework to map competencies, and can help educators revisit the curricula and instructional designs

  13. Measuring physicians' and medical students' attitudes toward caring for immigrant patients.

    PubMed

    Hudelson, Patricia; Perron, Noëlle Junod; Perneger, Thomas V

    2010-12-01

    It is generally believed that culturally competent clinical practice depends in part on the development of positive attitudes toward the care of immigrant patients. However, few tools exist to measure such attitudes in physicians. The authors operationalized ''culturally competent attitudes'' to include a high level of interest in caring for immigrant patients, an acceptance of the responsibility of doctors and hospitals to adapt to immigrant patients' needs, and the opinion that understanding the patient's psychosocial context is particularly important when caring for immigrant patients. The authors then assessed these attitudes and opinions among a sample of 619 Geneva doctors and medical students using a self-administered questionnaire and explored their association to respondents' personal characteristics and professional experience. The authors found that both personal characteristics and professional experience were associated with attitudes toward caring for immigrant patients. In particular, the perceived importance of understanding the psychosocial context when caring for migrants was higher among medical students, women, Swiss nationals, those with greater interest in caring for immigrant patients and those who had received training in cultural competence. However, it is unclear whether cultural competence training and clinical context lead to the development of more positive attitudes or whether medical students and physicians who already have positive attitudes are more likely to participate in such training.

  14. A national survey to define a new core curriculum to prepare physicians for managed care practice.

    PubMed

    Meyer, G S; Potter, A; Gary, N

    1997-08-01

    All levels of medical education will require modification to address the challenges in health care practice brought about by managed care. Because preparation for practice in a managed care environment has received insufficient attention, and because the need for change is so great, in 1995 the authors sought information from a variety of sources to serve as a basis for identifying the core curricular components and the staging of these components in the medical education process. This research effort consisted of a survey of 125 U.S. medical school curriculum deans (or equivalent school representatives); four focus groups of managed care practitioners, administrators, educators, and residents; and a survey of a national sample of physicians and medical directors. Findings indicate that almost all the 91 responding school representatives recognized the importance of revising their curricula to meet the managed care challenge and that the majority either had or were developing programs to train students for practice in managed care environments. The focus groups identified a core set of competencies for managed care practice, although numbers differed on whether the classroom or a managed care setting was the best place to teach the components of a new curriculum. Although medical directors and staff physicians differed with respect to the relative levels of importance of these competencies, the findings suggest that before medical school, training should focus on communication and interpersonal skills, information systems, and customer relations; during medical school, on clinical epidemiology, quality assurance, risk management, and decision analysis; during residency, on utilization management, managed care essentials, and multidisciplinary team building; and after residency, on a review of customer relations, communication skills, and utilization management. The authors conclude that a core curriculum and its sequencing can be identified, that the majority of

  15. The Effect of Physician Delegation to Other Health Care Providers on the Quality of Care for Geriatric Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Brian J.; Reuben, David B.; Karlamangla, Arun S.; Han, Weijuan; Roth, Carol P.; Wenger, Neil S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES to examine the effects of delegation on quality of care that patients receive for three common geriatric conditions: dementia, falls, and incontinence. DESIGN pooled analysis of 8 the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) projects from 1998 to 2010. SETTING 15 ambulatory practice sites across the United States PARTICIPANTS 4,776 patients age ≥ 65 years, of mixed demographic backgrounds who participated in ACOVE studies. INTERVENTION multivariate analysis of prior ACOVE observation and intervention studies was conducted, with in addition to two retrospectively defined variables: “intent to delegate” and “maximum delegation” for each ACOVE quality indicator (QI). MEASUREMENTS The primary outcome for the study was QI pass probability, by level of delegation, for 47 ACOVE quality indicators. RESULTS A total of 4,776 patients were evaluated, with 16,204 QIs included for analysis. Across all studies, QI pass probabilities were 0.36 for physician-performed tasks; 0.55 for nurse practitioner (NP), physician assistant (PA), and registered nurse (RN)-performed tasks; and 0.61 for medical assistant (MA), or licensed vocational nurse (LVN)-performed tasks. In multiply adjusted models, the independent pass-probability effect of delegation to NPs, PAs, or RNs was 1.37 (p = 0.055) CONCLUSIONS Delegation to non-physician providers is associated with higher quality of care for geriatric conditions in community practices and supports the value of interdisciplinary team management for common outpatient conditions among older adults. PMID:26480977

  16. Implication of the recent positive endovascular intervention trials for organizing acute stroke care: European perspective.

    PubMed

    Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2015-06-01

    Timely recanalization leads to improved patient outcomes in acute ischemic stroke. Recent trial results demonstrated a strong benefit for endovascular therapies over standard medical care in patients with acute ischemic stroke and a major intracranial artery occlusion≤6 hours or even beyond from symptom onset and independent of patients' age. Previous studies have shown the benefit of intravenous thrombolysis that had gradually, albeit slowly, reshaped acute stroke care worldwide. Now, given the superior benefits of endovascular intervention, the whole structure of acute stroke care needs to be reorganized to meet patient needs and to deliver evidence-based treatments effectively. However, a blueprint for success with novel stroke treatments should be composed of numerous elements and requires efforts from various parties. Regarding the endovascular therapies, the strengths of Europe include highly organized democratic society structures, high rate of urbanization, well-developed revenue-based healthcare systems, and high income levels, whereas the obstacles include the east-west disparity in wealth, the ongoing economic crisis hindering spread of fairly costly new treatments, and the quickly aging population putting more demands on health care in general. Regional and national plans for covering whole population with 24/7 adequate acute stroke care are necessary in close cooperation of professionals and decision-makers. Europe-wide new training programs for expert physicians in stroke care should be initiated shortly. European Stroke Organisation has a unique role in providing expertise, consultation, guidelines, and versatile training in meeting new demands in stroke care. This article discusses the current situation, prospects, and challenges in Europe offering personal views on potential solutions.

  17. Considerations for a Primary Care Physician Assistant in Treating Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Aston, Ryan; Durkin, Allison; Harris, Kristen; Mace, Amanda; Moore, Sierra; Smith, Brittany; Soult, Eric; Wright, Mara; Yothers, Dustin; Latos, Derrick L.; Horzempa, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The escalating amount of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) represents a significant dilemma for primary care providers. As the number of physician assistants (PAs) has been steadily increasing in primary care in the United States, the utilization of these healthcare professionals presents a solution for the care of post-kidney transplant recipients. A physician assistant (PA) is a state licensed healthcare professional who practices medicine under physician supervision and can alleviate some of the increasing demands for primary patient care. Here we provide an outline of the crucial components and considerations for PAs caring for kidney transplant recipients. These include renal function and routine screenings, drug monitoring (both immunosuppressive and therapeutic), pre-existing and co-existing conditions, immunizations, nutrition, physical activity, infection, cancer, and the patient’s emotional well-being. PAs should routinely monitor renal function and blood chemistry of KTRs. Drug monitoring of KTRs is a crucial responsibility of the PA because of the possible side-effects and potential drug-drug interactions. Therefore, PAs should obtain a careful and detailed patient history from KTRs. PAs should be aware of pre- and co-existing conditions of KTRs as this impacts treatment decisions. Regarding immunization, PAs should avoid administering vaccines containing live or attenuated viruses to KTRs. Because obesity following kidney transplantation is associated with decreased allograft survival, PAs should encourage KTRs to maintain a balanced diet with limited sugar. In addition, KTRs should be urged to gradually increase their levels of physical activity over subsequent years following surgery. PAs should be aware that immunosuppressive medications diminish immune defenses and make KTRs more susceptible to bacterial, viral, and fungal infections. Moreover, KTRs should be screened routinely for cancer due to the higher risk of development from

  18. One positive impact of health care reform to physicians: the computer-based patient record.

    PubMed

    England, S P

    1993-11-01

    The health care industry is an information-dependent business that will require a new generation of health information systems if successful health care reform is to occur. We critically need integrated clinical management information systems to support the physician and related clinicians at the direct care level, which in turn will have linkages with secondary users of health information such as health payors, regulators, and researchers. The economic dependence of health care industry on the CPR cannot be underestimated, says Jeffrey Ritter. He sees the U.S. health industry as about to enter a bold new age where our records are electronic, our computers are interconnected, and our money is nothing but pulses running across the telephone lines. Hence the United States is now in an age of electronic commerce. Clinical systems reform must begin with the community-based patient chart, which is located in the physician's office, the hospital, and other related health care provider offices. A community-based CPR and CPR system that integrates all providers within a managed care network is the most logical step since all health information begins with the creation of a patient record. Once a community-based CPR system is in place, the physician and his or her clinical associates will have a common patient record upon which all direct providers have access to input and record patient information. Once a community-level CPR system is in place with a community provider network, each physician will have available health information and data processing capability that will finally provide real savings in professional time and effort. Lost patient charts will no longer be a problem. Data input and storage of health information would occur electronically via transcripted text, voice, and document imaging. All electronic clinical information, voice, and graphics could be recalled at any time and transmitted to any terminal location within the health provider network. Hence

  19. Impact of non-physician health professionals’ BMI on obesity care and beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Bleich, Sara N.; Bandara, Sachini; Bennett, Wendy L.; Cooper, Lisa A.; Gudzune, Kimberly A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Examine the impact of non-physician health professional body mass index (BMI) on obesity care, self-efficacy, and perceptions of patient trust in weight loss advice. Design and Methods We analyzed a national cross-sectional internetphysician health professionals specializing in nutrition, nursing, behavioral/mental health, exercise, and pharmacy collected between January 20 and February 5, 2014. Results Normal BMI professionals were more likely than overweight/obese professionals to report success in helping patients achieve clinically significant weight loss (52% vs. 29%, p=0.01). We observed no differences by health professional BMI about the appropriate patient body weight for weight-related care (initiate weight loss discussions and success in helping patients lose weight), confidence in ability to help patients lose weight, or in perceived patient trust in their advice. Most health professionals (71%) do not feel successful in helping patients lose weight until they are morbidly obese, regardless of BMI. Conclusions Normal BMI non-physician health professionals report being more successful than overweight and obese health professionals at helping obese patients lose weight. More research is needed to understand how to improve self-efficiency for delivering obesity care, particularly among overweight and class I obese patients. PMID:25185506

  20. Medical reference databases used by Army primary care physicians in field environments.

    PubMed

    Harris, M D; Johnson, B; Patience, T; Miser, F

    1998-11-01

    A cross-sectional survey of U.S. Army primary care physicians was done to answer two questions: (1) which medical reference materials are Army primary care physicians currently using when deployed to a field environment? and (2) what would they like to have for medical reference in a field environment? Of 740 surveys delivered to their intended recipients, 445 (60%) were returned. Currently, 96% of primary care physicians use books, 37% use journals, and 11% use computer software in their medical reference database. Of those now using books, 72% were satisfied with them, compared with 61% of those using journals and 45% of those using software. The most common book used was the Merck Manual. The most important characteristics desired in a field medical database were broad coverage, ease of use, and light weight. The majority of respondents believe that a good medial reference database is important but that current medical databases limit the quality of the medicine they practice in the field. PMID:9819534

  1. Flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy training for primary care physicians: results of a 5-year experience.

    PubMed

    Schertz, R D; Baskin, W N; Frakes, J T

    1989-01-01

    The first 5 years of a flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy (FFS) training program for primary care physicians was analyzed in an attempt to assess clinical competence and develop a procedure learning curve. A total of 47 primary care physicians (26 third-year family practice residents, 15 family practitioners, and 6 internists) were successfully trained in 60-cm FFS by five gastroenterologists. Didactic teaching methods included 5 hours of videotapes, slides, endoscopic models, and the use of a photo atlas. Following a patient demonstration, each trainee completed 25 examinations supervised with a teaching attachment. Criteria used to assess trainee competence included unassisted length of scope insertion and examination duration. Mean depth of scope insertion was 35.9 cm for the first five examinations, increasing to a mean of 51.7 cm for the final five examinations. Average examination duration decreased from 19.1 min for examinations 1 through 5 to 17.0 min for examinations 21 through 25. Out of 1236 examinations, one or more polyps were found in 222 patients (18.0%). Carcinoma was found in 15 of 1236 examinations (1.4%). In summary, experienced endoscopists can teach primary care physicians to perform 60-cm FFS. Completion of 25 supervised cases appears to be adequate for achieving technical competence in flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy.

  2. Acute coronary care: Principles and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 58 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radionuclide Techniques for Diagnosing and Sizing of Myocardial Infarction; The Use of Serial Radionuclide Angiography for Monitoring Function during Acute Myocardial Infarction; Hemodynamic Monitoring in Acute Myocardial Infarction; and The Valve of Radionuclide Angiography for Risk Assessment of Patients following Acute Myocardial Infarction.

  3. Medical tourism in India: perceptions of physicians in tertiary care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Qadeer, Imrana; Reddy, Sunita

    2013-01-01

    Senior physicians of modern medicine in India play a key role in shaping policies and public opinion and institutional management. This paper explores their perceptions of medical tourism (MT) within India which is a complex process involving international demands and policy shifts from service to commercialisation of health care for trade, gross domestic profit, and foreign exchange. Through interviews of 91 physicians in tertiary care hospitals in three cities of India, this paper explores four areas of concern: their understanding of MT, their views of the hospitals they work in, perceptions of the value and place of MT in their hospital and their views on the implications of MT for medical care in the country. An overwhelming majority (90%) of physicians in the private tertiary sector and 74.3 percent in the public tertiary sector see huge scope for MT in the private tertiary sector in India. The private tertiary sector physicians were concerned about their patients alone and felt that health of the poor was the responsibility of the state. The public tertiary sector physicians' however, were sensitive to the problems of the common man and felt responsible. Even though the glamour of hi-tech associated with MT dazzled them, only 35.8 percent wanted MT in their hospitals and a total of 56 percent of them said MT cannot be a public sector priority. 10 percent in the private sector expressed reservations towards MT while the rest demanded state subsidies for MT. The disconnect between their concern for the common man and professionals views on MT was due to the lack of appreciation of the continuum between commercialisation, the denial of resources to public hospitals and shift of subsidies to the private sector. The paper highlights the differences and similarities in the perceptions and context of the two sets of physicians, presents evidence, that questions the support for MT and finally analyzes some key implications of MT on Indian health services, ethical

  4. Medical tourism in India: perceptions of physicians in tertiary care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Qadeer, Imrana; Reddy, Sunita

    2013-12-17

    Senior physicians of modern medicine in India play a key role in shaping policies and public opinion and institutional management. This paper explores their perceptions of medical tourism (MT) within India which is a complex process involving international demands and policy shifts from service to commercialisation of health care for trade, gross domestic profit, and foreign exchange. Through interviews of 91 physicians in tertiary care hospitals in three cities of India, this paper explores four areas of concern: their understanding of MT, their views of the hospitals they work in, perceptions of the value and place of MT in their hospital and their views on the implications of MT for medical care in the country. An overwhelming majority (90%) of physicians in the private tertiary sector and 74.3 percent in the public tertiary sector see huge scope for MT in the private tertiary sector in India. The private tertiary sector physicians were concerned about their patients alone and felt that health of the poor was the responsibility of the state. The public tertiary sector physicians' however, were sensitive to the problems of the common man and felt responsible. Even though the glamour of hi-tech associated with MT dazzled them, only 35.8 percent wanted MT in their hospitals and a total of 56 percent of them said MT cannot be a public sector priority. 10 percent in the private sector expressed reservations towards MT while the rest demanded state subsidies for MT. The disconnect between their concern for the common man and professionals views on MT was due to the lack of appreciation of the continuum between commercialisation, the denial of resources to public hospitals and shift of subsidies to the private sector. The paper highlights the differences and similarities in the perceptions and context of the two sets of physicians, presents evidence, that questions the support for MT and finally analyzes some key implications of MT on Indian health services, ethical

  5. Ethics of the Physician's Role in Health-Care Cost Control: AOA Critical Issues.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Joseph; Iorio, Richard; Barber, Thomas; Barron, Chloe; Caplan, Arthur

    2016-07-20

    The United States health-care expenditure is rising precipitously. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that, in 2025, at our current rate of increased spending, 25% of the gross domestic product will be allocated to health care. Our per-capita spending on health care also far exceeds that of any other industrialized country. Health-care costs must be addressed if our country is to remain competitive in the global marketplace and to maintain its financial solvency. If unchecked, the uncontrolled rise in health-care expenditures will not only affect our capacity to provide our patients with high-quality care but also threaten the ability of our nation to compete economically on the global stage. This is not hyperbole but fiscal reality.As physicians, we are becoming increasingly familiar with the economics impacting health-care policy. Thus, we are in a unique position to control the cost of health care. This includes an increased reliance on creating and adhering to evidence-based guidelines. We can do this and still continue to respect the primacy of patient welfare and the right of patients to act in their own self-interest. However, as evidenced by the use of high-volume centers of excellence, each strategy adapted to control costs must be vetted and must be monitored for its unintended ethical consequences.The solution to this complex problem must involve the input of all of the health-care stakeholders, including the patients, payers, and providers. Physicians ought to play a role in designing and executing a remedy. After all, we are the ones who best understand medicine and whose moral obligation is to the welfare of our patients. PMID:27440574

  6. Strategic Directions Within Health Care Institutions: The Role of the Physician

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Reuben R.; Ashmos, Donde P.

    1986-01-01

    The nature of the strategic problem faced by health care institutions is identified. Physicians are urged to be involved in the strategic decision-making process and are offered several alternative roles that they might play in strategy development. A set of conceptual frameworks from the generic management decision-making literature is used to organize the analysis in addition to the literature of health care management. This combination affords a different perspective into the nature of the problems and new insights into these critical issues. PMID:3746932

  7. Physician reaction to price changes: an episode-of-care analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, A J; Mitchell, J B

    1994-01-01

    Physicians may respond to fee reductions in a variety of ways. This episode-of-care analysis examines the impact of surgical fee reductions (mandated by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Acts [OBRAs] of 1986-87) on the overall pattern and cost of health care services provided in association with the surgical procedure itself. The study focuses on six procedure groups: cataract extractions; total hip replacement; total knee replacement; coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery; upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy; and prostatectomy. Only two of these procedures give significant evidence for the existence of a service volume offset to the fee reductions. PMID:10172299

  8. Physician Reaction to Price Changes: An Episode-of-Care Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A. James; Mitchell, Janet B.

    1994-01-01

    Physicians may respond to fee reductions in a variety of ways. This episode-of-care analysis examines the impact of surgical fee reductions (mandated by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Acts [OBRAs] of 1986-87) on the overall pattern and cost of health care services provided in association with the surgical procedure itself. The study focuses on six procedure groups: cataract extractions; total hip replacement; total knee replacement; coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery; upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy; and prostatectomy. Only two of these procedures give significant evidence for the existence of a service volume offset to the fee reductions. PMID:10172299

  9. What primary care physician teachers need to sustain community based education in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Community based education (CBE), defined as “a means of achieving educational relevance to community needs and, consequently, of implementing a community oriented educational program,” is reported to be useful for producing rural physicians in Western countries. However, why some physicians withdraw from their teaching roles is not well known, especially in Asian countries. The aim of this study was to clarify the requisites and obstacles for taking part in CBE. Methods We combined two steps: preliminary semi-structured interviews followed by workshop discussions. First of all, we interviewed four designated physicians (all male, mean age 48 years) working in one rural area of Japan, with less than 10,000 residents. Secondly, we held a workshop at the academic conference of the Japan Primary Care Association. Fourteen participants attending the workshop (seven male physicians, mean age 45 years, and seven medical students (one female and six male), mean age 24 years) were divided into two groups and their opinions were summarized. Results In the first stage, we extracted three common needs from interviewees; 1. Sustained significant human relationships; 2. Intrinsic motivation; and 3. Tangible rewards. In the second stage, we summarized three major problems from three different standpoints; A. Preceptors’ issues: more educational knowledge or skills, B. Learner issues: role models in rural areas, and C. System issues: supportive educational system for raising rural physicians. Conclusions Our research findings revealed that community physicians require non-monetary support or intrinsic motivation for their CBE activities, which is in accordance with previous Western studies. In addition, we found that system support, as well as personal support, is required. Complementary questionnaire surveys in other Asian countries will be needed to validate our results. PMID:24822033

  10. Physician anger: Leggo dem managed care blues--leadership beyond the era of managed cost.

    PubMed

    Kirz, H L

    1999-01-01

    While managed care has caused great disruption, it has also provided physician executives with a natural leadership raison d'être. Managed care, with all its pros and cons, is largely a response to certain unrelenting trends. The core functions of leaders comprise the stewardship of organizations and colleagues in response to these trends. Four trends are explored: (1) The demise of open-ended funding of American health care; (2) continued competition for health care resources; (3) thriving pluralism; and (4) patients continually adjusting to assure themselves of appropriate health care access, quality, and service. In the 21st century, the industry will need a new brand of leader, one capable of balancing the needs of the professionals with the business and accountability requirements of a permanently competitive and resource-constrained service industry. The keys to successful leadership in the future include: (1) Clear service differentiation and a compelling vision to match it; (2) recruiting and retaining top clinical talent, including the required return to physician self-direction and governance; (3) successful partnerships with others outside your organization; and (4) a steady focus on performance in all its dimensions. PMID:10351726

  11. Physician anger: Leggo dem managed care blues--leadership beyond the era of managed cost.

    PubMed

    Kirz, H L

    1999-01-01

    While managed care has caused great disruption, it has also provided physician executives with a natural leadership raison d'être. Managed care, with all its pros and cons, is largely a response to certain unrelenting trends. The core functions of leaders comprise the stewardship of organizations and colleagues in response to these trends. Four trends are explored: (1) The demise of open-ended funding of American health care; (2) continued competition for health care resources; (3) thriving pluralism; and (4) patients continually adjusting to assure themselves of appropriate health care access, quality, and service. In the 21st century, the industry will need a new brand of leader, one capable of balancing the needs of the professionals with the business and accountability requirements of a permanently competitive and resource-constrained service industry. The keys to successful leadership in the future include: (1) Clear service differentiation and a compelling vision to match it; (2) recruiting and retaining top clinical talent, including the required return to physician self-direction and governance; (3) successful partnerships with others outside your organization; and (4) a steady focus on performance in all its dimensions.

  12. Curing and Caring: The Work of Primary Care Physicians With Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    CarolinaApesoa-Varano, Ester; Barker, Judith C.; Hinton, Ladson

    2013-01-01

    The symbolic framework guiding primary care physicians’ (PCPs) practice is crucial in shaping the quality of care for those with degenerative dementia. Examining the relationship between the cure and care models in primary care offers a unique opportunity for exploring change toward a more holistic approach to health care. The aims of this study were to (a) explore how PCPs approach the care of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and (b) describe how this care unfolds from the physicians’ perspectives. This was a cross-sectional study of 40 PCPs who completed semistructured interviews as part of a dementia caregiving study. Findings show that PCPs recognize the limits of the cure paradigm and articulate a caring, more holistic model that addresses the psychosocial needs of dementia patients. However, caring is difficult to uphold because of time constraints, emotional burden, and jurisdictional issues. Thus, the care model remains secondary and temporary. PMID:21685311

  13. Prescribing Exercise for Older Adults: A Needs Assessment Comparing Primary Care Physicians, Nurse Practitioners, and Physician Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dauenhauer, Jason A.; Podgorski, Carol A.; Karuza, Jurgis

    2006-01-01

    To inform the development of educational programming designed to teach providers appropriate methods of exercise prescription for older adults, the authors conducted a survey of 177 physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners (39% response rate). The survey was designed to better understand the prevalence of exercise prescriptions,…

  14. Compassionate care: enhancing physician-patient communication and education in dermatology: Part II: Patient education.

    PubMed

    Hong, Judith; Nguyen, Tien V; Prose, Neil S

    2013-03-01

    Patient education is a fundamental part of caring for patients. A practice gap exists, where patients want more information, while health care providers are limited by time constraints or difficulty helping patients understand or remember. To provide patient-centered care, it is important to assess the needs and goals, health beliefs, and health literacy of each patient. This allows health care providers to individualize education for patients. The use of techniques, such as gaining attention, providing clear and memorable explanations, and assessing understanding through "teach-back," can improve patient education. Verbal education during the office visit is considered the criterion standard. However, handouts, visual aids, audiovisual media, and Internet websites are examples of teaching aids that can be used as an adjunct to verbal instruction. Part II of this 2-part series on patient-physician interaction reviews the importance and need for patient education along with specific guidelines and techniques that can be used.

  15. Payment mechanisms and the composition of physician practices: balancing cost-containment, access, and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Barham, Victoria; Milliken, Olga

    2015-07-01

    We take explicit account of the way in which the supply of physicians and patients in the economy affects the design of physician remuneration schemes, highlighting the three-way trade-off between quality of care, access, and cost. Both physicians and patients are heterogeneous. Physicians choose both the number of patients and the quality of care to provide to their patients. When determining physician payment rates, the principal must ensure access to care for all patients. When physicians can adjust the number of patients seen, there is no incentive to over-treat. In contrast, altruistic physicians always quality stint: they prefer to add an additional patient, rather than to increase the quality of service provided. A mixed payment mechanism does not increase the quality of service provided with respect to capitation. Offering a menu of compensation schemes may constitute a cost-effective strategy for inducing physicians to choose a given overall caseload but may also generate difficulties with access to care for frail patients. PMID:24990110

  16. 38 CFR 17.56 - Payment for non-VA physician and other health care professional services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...' (CMS) participating physician fee schedule for the period in which the service is provided (see 42 CFR...-VA physician and other health care professional services. (a) Except for anesthesia services, and... schedule or if the services constitute anesthesia services, payment for such non-VA health...

  17. Emergency Department Coverage by Primary Care Physicians in a Rural Practice-Based Research Network: Incentives, Confidence, and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lew, Edward; Fagnan, Lyle J.; Mattek, Nora; Mahler, Jo; Lowe, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: In rural areas of the United States, emergency departments (EDs) are often staffed by primary care physicians, as contrasted to urban and suburban hospitals where ED coverage is usually provided by physicians who are residency-trained in emergency medicine. Purpose: This study examines the reasons and incentives for rural Oregon primary…

  18. The Development of an ICF-Oriented, Adaptive Physician Assessment Instrument of Mobility, Self-care, and Domestic Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Erik; Fleitz, Annette

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was development and psychometric testing of an adaptive, International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF)-oriented questionnaire to be processed by the rehabilitation physician that aids in assessing mobility, self-care, and domestic life (Moses-Physician). The intent is to develop a physician…

  19. Role of the primary care physician in diagnosis and treatment of early renal damage.

    PubMed

    Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura; Martínez-Ramírez, Héctor R

    2009-01-01

    In spite of all the technical advances and resources dedicated to the treatment of endstage renal disease (ESRD), it is still a growing problem all over the world. To address this issue adequately, it is crucial to detect chronic kidney disease patients early and optimize their care. However, a lack of awareness and appropriate management of potential underlying kidney disease, even in high-risk patients, seems to be common in many parts of the world, even though many of the measures recognized to decrease the risk and slow the progression of kidney disease are most effective when initiated early. Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (a high-risk population) with early nephropathy treated by nephrologists have better preservation of their renal function than do patients treated only by family physicians. However, referral of patients to the nephrologist at earlier stages of disease than is recommended is not always feasible. A more plausible alternative may be that general practitioners learn to diagnose and treat these patients. We have demonstrated that an educational intervention increased family practitioners' clinical competence, which resulted in preserved renal function in diabetic patients with early renal disease. Variables not well controlled either by the nephrologist or the primary care physicians are those related to lifestyle and diet. These unhealthy habits are common in Westernized societies, and primary care physicians may be the most suitably positioned to promote health. Even so, counseling by physicians is not always effective in reducing risky habits, particularly when the health team is overworked; strategies such as community resources (including support groups) may also play a role. Preliminary results of an ongoing study based on a self-help and support group strategy that is coordinated by a multidisciplinary team (family practitioner, social worker, dietician, and physical trainer) show improvements in the lifestyle and dietary habits of

  20. The U.S. primary care physician workforce: persistently declining interest in primary care medical specialties.

    PubMed

    Biola, H; Green, L A; Phillips, R L; Guirguis-Blake, J; Fryer, G E

    2003-10-15

    A persistent, six-year trend in the choice of specialty training by U.S. medical students threatens the adequacy of the physician workforce of the United States. This pattern should be reversed and requires the attention of policy makers and medical educators.

  1. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium.

  2. The Role of Obesity Training in Medical School and Residency on Bariatric Surgery Knowledge in Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Fatima Cody; Johnson, Erica D; Claridy, Mechelle D; Earle, Rebecca L; Kaplan, Lee M

    2015-01-01

    Objective. US primary care physicians are inadequately educated on how to provide obesity treatment. We sought to assess physician training in obesity and to characterize the perceptions, beliefs, knowledge, and treatment patterns of primary care physicians. Methods. We administered a cross-sectional web-based survey from July to October 2014 to adult primary care physicians in practices affiliated with the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). We evaluated survey respondent demographics, personal health habits, obesity training, knowledge of bariatric surgery care, perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs regarding the etiology of obesity and treatment strategies. Results. Younger primary care physicians (age 20-39) were more likely to have received some obesity training than those aged 40-49 (OR: 0.08, 95% CI: 0.008-0.822) or those 50+ (OR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.004-0.321). Physicians who were young, had obesity, or received obesity education in medical school or postgraduate training were more likely to answer bariatric surgery knowledge questions correctly. Conclusions. There is a need for educational programs to improve physician knowledge and competency in treating patients with obesity. Obesity is a complex chronic disease, and it is important for clinicians to be equipped with the knowledge of the multiple treatment modalities that may be considered to help their patients achieve a healthy weight. PMID:26339506

  3. Assessment of respiratory rate and chest indrawing in children with ARI by primary care physicians in Egypt.

    PubMed Central

    Gadomski, A. M.; Khallaf, N.; el Ansary, S.; Black, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    In a baseline study for training purposes, two indicators of acute respiratory infections (the respiratory rate (RR) and chest indrawing) were assessed by Ministry of Health physicians in Egypt using a WHO test videotape. Chest indrawing, as defined by the WHO Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) programme, was not widely recognized by current health personnel. Viewing a WHO training videotape led to significantly more correct assessments of chest indrawing compared with a group that had not viewed this videotape. The accuracy of using a timer versus a watch, and a 30-second versus 60-second counting interval was also evaluated. Rates counted over 60 seconds were more accurate than 30-second counts although the difference between them was not clinically significant. Counting of rates using timers with audible cues was comparable to using watches with second hands. Careful training of primary health workers in the assessment of RR and chest indrawing is essential if these clinical findings are to be used as reliable indicators in pneumonia treatment algorithms. PMID:8261555

  4. Aligning physician decision-making with the goals of health care organizations: are there any lessons from law firms?

    PubMed

    Correia, Edward

    2012-01-01

    In order to achieve efficiency in the delivery of health care services, it is essential to align more closely the behavior of physicians with the goals of the health care organization with which they are affiliated. Achieving alignment presents a number of challenges, including legal constraints, a long tradition of physician independence, a tendency for physicians to become involved in procurement decisions, and a scarcity of comparative effectiveness data that could serve as a basis for treatment protocols and purchasing decisions. The article discusses these challenges and suggests some partial solutions. In addition, it compares the incentives that affect physicians in health care organizations and partners in law firms and suggests that there may be some lessons that health care organizations can learn from the firms.

  5. Sexual Abuse of the Mentally Retarded Patient: Medical and Legal Analysis for the Primary Care Physician

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Jamie P.

    2001-01-01

    The primary care physician has a vital role in documenting and preventing sexual abuse among the mentally retarded populations in our community. Since the current national trend is to integrate citizens with mental retardation into the community away from institutionalized care, it is essential that all physicians have a basic understanding of the unique medical and legal ramifications of their clinical diagnoses. As the legal arena is currently revising laws concerning rights of sexual consent among the mentally retarded, it is essential that determinations of mental competency follow national standards in order to delineate clearly any instance of sexual abuse. Clinical documentation of sexual abuse and sexually transmitted disease is an important part of a routine examination since many such individuals are indeed sexually active. Legal codes adjudicating sexual abuse cases of the mentally retarded often offer scant protection and vague terminology. Thus, medical documentation and physician competency rulings form a solid foundation for future work toward legal recourse for the abused. PMID:15014610

  6. Medical tourism in india: perceptions of physicians in tertiary care hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Senior physicians of modern medicine in India play a key role in shaping policies and public opinion and institutional management. This paper explores their perceptions of medical tourism (MT) within India which is a complex process involving international demands and policy shifts from service to commercialisation of health care for trade, gross domestic profit, and foreign exchange. Through interviews of 91 physicians in tertiary care hospitals in three cities of India, this paper explores four areas of concern: their understanding of MT, their views of the hospitals they work in, perceptions of the value and place of MT in their hospital and their views on the implications of MT for medical care in the country. An overwhelming majority (90%) of physicians in the private tertiary sector and 74.3 percent in the public tertiary sector see huge scope for MT in the private tertiary sector in India. The private tertiary sector physicians were concerned about their patients alone and felt that health of the poor was the responsibility of the state. The public tertiary sector physicians’ however, were sensitive to the problems of the common man and felt responsible. Even though the glamour of hi-tech associated with MT dazzled them, only 35.8 percent wanted MT in their hospitals and a total of 56 percent of them said MT cannot be a public sector priority. 10 percent in the private sector expressed reservations towards MT while the rest demanded state subsidies for MT. The disconnect between their concern for the common man and professionals views on MT was due to the lack of appreciation of the continuum between commercialisation, the denial of resources to public hospitals and shift of subsidies to the private sector. The paper highlights the differences and similarities in the perceptions and context of the two sets of physicians, presents evidence, that questions the support for MT and finally analyzes some key implications of MT on Indian health services, ethical

  7. Ethical challenges in the neonatal intensive care units: perceptions of physicians and nurses; an Iranian experience.

    PubMed

    Kadivar, Maliheh; Mosayebi, Ziba; Asghari, Fariba; Zarrini, Pari

    2015-01-01

    The challenging nature of neonatal medicine today is intensified by modern advances in intensive care and treatment of sicker neonates. These developments have caused numerous ethical issues and conflicts in ethical decision-making. The present study surveyed the challenges and dilemmas from the viewpoint of the neonatal intensive care personnel in the teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in the capital of Iran. In this comparative cross-sectional study conducted between March 2013 and February 2014, the physicians' and nurses' perceptions of the ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units were compared. The physicians and nurses of the study hospitals were requested to complete a 36-item questionnaire after initial accommodations. The study samples consisted of 284 physicians (36%) and nurses (64%). Content validity and internal consistency calculations were used to examine the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation, t-test, ANOVA, and linear regression using SPSS v. 22. Respecting patients' rights and interactions with parents were perceived as the most challenging aspects of neonatal care. There were significant differences between sexes in the domains of the perceived challenges. According to the linear regression model, the perceived score would be reduced 0.33 per each year on the job. The results of our study showed that the most challenging issues were related to patients' rights, interactions with parents, communication and cooperation, and end of life considerations respectively. It can be concluded, therefore, that more attention should be paid to these issues in educational programs and ethics committees of hospitals. PMID:26839675

  8. Ethical challenges in the neonatal intensive care units: perceptions of physicians and nurses; an Iranian experience.

    PubMed

    Kadivar, Maliheh; Mosayebi, Ziba; Asghari, Fariba; Zarrini, Pari

    2015-01-01

    The challenging nature of neonatal medicine today is intensified by modern advances in intensive care and treatment of sicker neonates. These developments have caused numerous ethical issues and conflicts in ethical decision-making. The present study surveyed the challenges and dilemmas from the viewpoint of the neonatal intensive care personnel in the teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in the capital of Iran. In this comparative cross-sectional study conducted between March 2013 and February 2014, the physicians' and nurses' perceptions of the ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units were compared. The physicians and nurses of the study hospitals were requested to complete a 36-item questionnaire after initial accommodations. The study samples consisted of 284 physicians (36%) and nurses (64%). Content validity and internal consistency calculations were used to examine the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation, t-test, ANOVA, and linear regression using SPSS v. 22. Respecting patients' rights and interactions with parents were perceived as the most challenging aspects of neonatal care. There were significant differences between sexes in the domains of the perceived challenges. According to the linear regression model, the perceived score would be reduced 0.33 per each year on the job. The results of our study showed that the most challenging issues were related to patients' rights, interactions with parents, communication and cooperation, and end of life considerations respectively. It can be concluded, therefore, that more attention should be paid to these issues in educational programs and ethics committees of hospitals.

  9. Antibiotic use and clinical outcomes in the acute setting under management by an infectious diseases acute physician versus other clinical teams: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nicola; Mistry, Vikash; Crook, Derrick; Peto, Tim; Walker, A Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the magnitude of difference in antibiotic use between clinical teams in the acute setting and assess evidence for any adverse consequences to patient safety or healthcare delivery. Design Prospective cohort study (1 week) and analysis of linked electronic health records (3 years). Setting UK tertiary care centre. Participants All patients admitted sequentially to the acute medical service under an infectious diseases acute physician (IDP) and other medical teams during 1 week in 2013 (n=297), and 3 years 2012–2014 (n=47 585). Primary outcome measure Antibiotic use in days of therapy (DOT): raw group metrics and regression analysis adjusted for case mix. Secondary outcome measures 30-day all-cause mortality, treatment failure and length of stay. Results Antibiotic use was 173 vs 282 DOT/100 admissions in the IDP versus non-IDP group. Using case mix-adjusted zero-inflated Poisson regression, IDP patients were significantly less likely to receive an antibiotic (adjusted OR=0.25 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.84), p=0.03) and received shorter courses (adjusted rate ratio (RR)=0.71 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.93), p=0.01). Clinically stable IDP patients of uncertain diagnosis were more likely to have antibiotics held (87% vs 55%; p=0.02). There was no significant difference in treatment failure or mortality (adjusted p>0.5; also in the 3-year data set), but IDP patients were more likely to be admitted overnight (adjusted OR=3.53 (95% CI 1.24 to 10.03), p=0.03) and have longer length of stay (adjusted RR=1.19 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.36), p=0.007). Conclusions The IDP-led group used 30% less antibiotic therapy with no adverse clinical outcome, suggesting antibiotic use can be reduced safely in the acute setting. This may be achieved in part by holding antibiotics and admitting the patient for observation rather than prescribing, which has implications for costs and hospital occupancy. More information is needed to indicate whether any such longer admission will

  10. A comparison of the workload of rural and urban primary care physicians in Germany: analysis of a questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many western countries are facing an existing or imminent shortage of primary care physicians especially in rural areas. In Germany, working in rural areas is often thought to be associated with more working hours, a higher number of patients and a lower income than working in urban areas. These perceptions might be key reasons for the shortage. The aim of this analysis was to explore if working time, number of treated patients per week or proportion of privately insured patients vary between rural and urban areas in Germany using two different definitions of rurality within a sample of primary care physicians including general practitioners, general internists and paediatricians. Methods This is a secondary analysis of pre-collected data raised by a questionnaire that was sent to a representative random sample of 1500 primary care physicians chosen by data of the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians from all federal states in Germany. We employed two different methods of defining rurality; firstly, level of rurality as rated by physicians themselves (urban area, small town, rural area); secondly, rurality defined according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Results This analysis was based upon questionnaire data from 715 physicians. Primary care physicians in single-handed practices in rural areas worked on average four hours more per week than their urban counterparts (p < 0.05). Physicians' gender, the number of patients treated per week and the type of practice (single/group handed) were significantly related to the number of working hours. Neither the proportion of privately insured patients nor the number of patients seen per week differed significantly between rural and urban areas when applying the self-rated classification of rurality. Conclusion Overall this analysis identified few differences between urban and rural primary care physician working conditions. To counter future misdistribution

  11. Adaptability of Physicians Offering Primary Care to the Poor: Social Competency Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Loignon, Christine; Boudreault-Fournier,, Alexandrine

    2013-01-01

    This paper attempts to go deeper into the topic of social competency of physicians who provide primary care to populations living in poverty in Montreal. Adaptability as well as the ability to tailor practices according to patient expectations, needs and capabilities were found to be important in the development of the concept of social competency. The case of paternalism is used to demonstrate how a historically and socially contested medical approach is readapted by players in certain contexts in order to better meet patient expectations. This paper presents data collected in a qualitative study comprising 25 semi-supervised interviews with physicians recognized by their peers as having developed exemplary practices in Montreal's impoverished neighbourhoods. PMID:24289940

  12. Addressing domestic violence in primary care: what the physician needs to know

    PubMed Central

    Usta, Jinan; Taleb, Rim

    2014-01-01

    Domestic violence (DV) is quite prevalent and negatively impacts the health and mental wellbeing of those affected. Victims of DV are frequent users of health service, yet they are infrequently recognized. Physicians tend to treat the presenting complaints without addressing the root cause of the problem. Lack of knowledge on adequately managing cases of DV and on appropriate ways to help survivors is commonly presented as a barrier. This article presents the magnitude of the problem of DV in the Arab world, highlights the role of the primary care physician in addressing this problem, and provides practical steps that can guide the clinician in the Arab world in giving a comprehensive and culturally sensitive service to the survivors of DV. PMID:24647277

  13. Job Satisfaction and Burnout among Intensive Care Unit Nurses and Physicians.

    PubMed

    Myhren, Hilde; Ekeberg, Oivind; Stokland, Olav

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Nurses and physicians working in the intensive care unit (ICU) may be exposed to considerable job stress. The study aim was to assess the level of and the relationship between (1) job satisfaction, (2) job stress, and (3) burnout symptoms. Methods. A cross-sectional study was performed at ICUs at Oslo University Hospital. 145 of 196 (74%) staff members (16 physicians and 129 nurses) answered the questionnaire. The following tools were used: job satisfaction scale (scores 10-70), modified Cooper's job stress questionnaire (scores 1-5), and Maslach burnout inventory (scores 1-5); high score in the dimension emotional exhaustion (EE) indicates burnout. Personality was measured with the basic character inventory. Dimensions were neuroticism (vulnerability), extroversion (intensity), and control/compulsiveness with the range 0-9. Results. Mean job satisfaction among nurses was 43.9 (42.4-45.4) versus 51.1 (45.3-56.9) among physicians, P < 0.05. The mean burnout value (EE) was 2.3 (95% CI 2.2-2.4), and mean job stress was 2.6 (2.5-2.7), not significantly different between nurses and physicians. Females scored higher than males on vulnerability, 3.3 (2.9-3.7) versus 2.0 (1.1-2.9) (P < 0.05), and experienced staff were less vulnerable, 2.7 (2.2-3.2), than inexperienced staff, 3.6 (3.0-4.2) (P < 0.05). Burnout (EE) correlated with job satisfaction (r = -0.4, P < 0.001), job stress (r = 0.6, P < 0.001), and vulnerability (r = 0.3, P = 0.003). Conclusions. The nurses were significantly less satisfied with their jobs compared to the physicians. Burnout mean scores are relatively low, but high burnout scores are correlated with vulnerable personality, low job satisfaction, and high degree of job stress.

  14. Dignity in end-of-life care: results of a national survey of US physicians

    PubMed Central

    Antiel, Ryan M.; Curlin, Farr A.; James, Katherine M.; Sulmasy, Daniel P.; Tilburt, Jon C.

    2014-01-01

    Context Debates persist about the relevance of “dignity” as an ethical concept in US healthcare, especially in end-of-life care. Objective To describe the attitudes and beliefs regarding the usefulness and meaning of the concept of dignity and to examine judgments about a clinical scenario in which dignity might be relevant. Methods 2000 practicing U.S. physicians, from all specialties, were mailed a survey. Main measures included physician’s judgments about an end-of-life clinical scenario (criterion variable), attitudes about the concept of dignity (predictors), and their religious characteristics (predictors). Results 1032 eligible physicians (54%) responded. Nine out of ten (90%) physicians reported that dignity was relevant to their practice. After controlling for age, gender, region, and specialty, physicians who judged that the case patient had either some dignity or full dignity, and who agreed that dignity is given by a creator, were all positively associated with believing that the patient’s life was worth living [OR 10.2 (5.8–17.8), OR 20.5 (11.4–36.8), OR 4.7 (3.1–7.0), respectively]. Respondents who strongly agreed that “all living humans have the same amount of dignity” were also more likely to believe that the patient’s life was worth living [OR 1.8 (1.2–2.7)]. Religious characteristics were also associated with believing that the case patient’s life was worth living [OR 4.1 (2.4–7.2), OR 3.2 (1.6–6.3), OR 9.2 (4.3–19.5), respectively]. Conclusion US physicians view the concept of dignity as useful. Those views are associated with their judgments about common end-of-life scenarios in which dignity concepts may be relevant. PMID:22762966

  15. Practical suicide-risk management for the busy primary care physician.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Anna K; Lineberry, Timothy W; Bostwick, J Michael

    2011-08-01

    Suicide is a public health problem and a leading cause of death. The number of people thinking seriously about suicide, making plans, and attempting suicide is surprisingly high. In total, primary care clinicians write more prescriptions for antidepressants than mental health clinicians and see patients more often in the month before their death by suicide. Treatment of depression by primary care physicians is improving, but opportunities remain in addressing suicide-related treatment variables. Collaborative care models for treating depression have the potential both to improve depression outcomes and decrease suicide risk. Alcohol use disorders and anxiety symptoms are important comorbid conditions to identify and treat. Management of suicide risk includes understanding the difference between risk factors and warning signs, developing a suicide risk assessment, and practically managing suicidal crises. PMID:21709131

  16. Practical Suicide-Risk Management for the Busy Primary Care Physician

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Anna K.; Lineberry, Timothy W.; Bostwick, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Suicide is a public health problem and a leading cause of death. The number of people thinking seriously about suicide, making plans, and attempting suicide is surprisingly high. In total, primary care clinicians write more prescriptions for antidepressants than mental health clinicians and see patients more often in the month before their death by suicide. Treatment of depression by primary care physicians is improving, but opportunities remain in addressing suicide-related treatment variables. Collaborative care models for treating depression have the potential both to improve depression outcomes and decrease suicide risk. Alcohol use disorders and anxiety symptoms are important comorbid conditions to identify and treat. Management of suicide risk includes understanding the difference between risk factors and warning signs, developing a suicide risk assessment, and practically managing suicidal crises. PMID:21709131

  17. Medicaid Primary Care Physician Fees and the Use of Preventive Services among Medicaid Enrollees

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Adam; Mortensen, Karoline

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) increases Medicaid physician fees for preventive care up to Medicare rates for 2013 and 2014. The purpose of this paper was to model the relationship between Medicaid preventive care payment rates and the use of U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)–recommended preventive care use among Medicaid enrollees. Data Sources/Study Session We used data from the 2003 and 2008 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), a national probability sample of the U.S. civilian, noninstitutionalized population, linked to Kaiser state Medicaid benefits data, including the state Medicaid-to-Medicare physician fee ratio in 2003 and 2008. Study Design Probit models were used to estimate the probability that eligible individuals received one of five USPSF-recommended preventive services. A difference-in-difference model was used to separate out the effect of changes in the Medicaid payment rate and other factors. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Data were linked using state identifiers. Principal Findings Although Medicaid enrollees had a lower rate of use of the five preventive services in univariate analysis, neither Medicaid enrollment nor changes in Medicaid payment rates had statistically significant effects on meeting screening recommendations for the five screenings. The results were robust to a number of different sensitivity tests. Individual and state characteristics were significant. Conclusions Our results suggest that although temporary changes in primary care provider payments for preventive services for Medicaid enrollees may have other desirable effects, they are unlikely to substantially increase the use of these selected USPSTF-recommended preventive care services among Medicaid enrollees. PMID:24628495

  18. Developing a restraint use policy for acute care.

    PubMed

    Stolley, J M; King, J; Clarke, M; Joers, A M; Hague, D; Allen, D

    1993-12-01

    Restraint use has been a recent focus of attention in long-term care facilities. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities, and the Food and Drug Administration have devoted attention to the prudent use of restraints. The authors address efforts of an acute care facility to comply with these regulations.

  19. Association between physician explanatory behaviors and substandard care in adjudicated cases in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hagihara, Akihito; Hamasaki, Tomoko; Abe, Takeru

    2011-01-01

    Background: When a physician provides an insufficient explanation to a patient, such as regarding diagnosis, treatment, drug use, or prognosis, the physician is deemed to have delivered substandard care. It is likely that the standards applied to physicians’ explanations have changed as a result of the increased importance of patients’ rights of self-determination. However, little or no research on decisions in medical malpractice cases has been conducted with respect to this issue. Methods: Based on decisions made in 366 medical malpractice cases between 1979 and 2008 focused primarily on the physician’s duty to explain relevant issues to patients, we examined the association between physicians’ explanatory behaviors and court decisions with respect to breaches of duty. Results: We found that physicians’ explanatory behaviors, including relevant and specific explanations provided before treatment or surgery, were important for fulfilling a physician’s duty to explain. The data also revealed that six of the 16 types of explanatory behaviors had improved during the past three decades. However, these improvements did not contribute to the fulfillment of the physician’s duty to explain. Conclusion: We found that there was an association between physicians’ explanatory behaviors and judicial decisions concerning substandard care, and courts were increasingly likely to consider inadequate explanatory behaviors to be a breach of the duty of care. PMID:21556315

  20. Changes in Payer Mix and Physician Reimbursement After the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid Expansion.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christine D; Scott, Serena J; Anoff, Debra L; Pierce, Read G; Glasheen, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    Although uncompensated care for hospital-based care has fallen dramatically since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion, the changes in hospital physician reimbursement are not known. We evaluated if payer mix and physician reimbursement by encounter changed between 2013 and 2014 in an academic hospitalist practice in a Medicaid expansion state. This was a retrospective cohort study of all general medicine inpatient admissions to an academic hospitalist group in 2013 and 2014. The proportion of encounters by payer and reimbursement/inpatient encounter were compared in 2013 versus 2014. A sensitivity analysis determined the relative contribution of different factors to the change in reimbursement/encounter. Among 37 540 and 40 397 general medicine inpatient encounters in 2013 and 2014, respectively, Medicaid encounters increased (17.3% to 30.0%, P < .001), uninsured encounters decreased (18.4% to 6.3%, P < 0.001), and private payer encounters also decreased (14.1% to 13.3%, P = .001). The median reimbursement/encounter increased 4.2% from $79.98/encounter in 2013 to $83.36/encounter in 2014 (P < .001). In a sensitivity analysis, changes in length of stay, proportions in encounter type by payer, payer mix, and reimbursement for encounter type by payer accounted for -0.7%, 0.8%, 2.0%, and 2.3% of the reimbursement change, respectively. From 2013 to 2014, Medicaid encounters increased, and uninsured and private payer encounters decreased within our hospitalist practice. Reimbursement/encounter also increased, much of which could be attributed to a change in payer mix. Further analyses of physician reimbursement in Medicaid expansion and non-expansion states would further delineate reimbursement changes that are directly attributable to Medicaid expansion.

  1. Racial/ethnic disparities in access to physician care and medications among US stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Neidecker, M.V.; Kiefe, C.I.; Karve, S.; Williams, L.S.; Allison, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic blacks have higher stroke recurrence rates and lower rates of secondary stroke prevention than non-Hispanic whites. As a potential explanation for this disparity, we assessed racial/ethnic differences in access to physician care and medications in a national sample of US stroke survivors. Methods: Among all 4,864 stroke survivors aged ≥45 years who responded to the National Health Interview Survey years 2000–2006, we compared access to care within the last 12 months by race/ethnicity before and after stratification by age (45–64 years vs ≥65 years). With logistic regression, we adjusted associations between access measures and race/ethnicity for sex, comorbidity, neurologic disability, health status, year, income, and health insurance. Results: Among stroke survivors aged 45–64 years, Mexican Americans, non-Hispanic blacks, and non-Hispanic whites reported similar rates of no generalist physician visit (approximately 15%) and inability to afford medications (approximately 20%). However, among stroke survivors aged ≥65 years, Mexican Americans and blacks, compared with whites, reported greater frequency of no generalist visit (15%, 12%, 8%; p = 0.02) and inability to afford medications (20%, 11%, 6%; p < 0.001). Mexican Americans and blacks more frequently reported no medical specialist visit (54%, 49%, 40%; p < 0.001) than did whites and rates did not differ by age. Full covariate adjustment did not fully explain these racial/ethnic differences. Conclusions: Among US stroke survivors at least 65 years old, Mexican Americans and blacks reported worse access to physician care and medications than whites. This reduced access may lead to inadequate risk factor modification and recurrent stroke in these high-risk minority groups. PMID:21084692

  2. Evidence-Based Care of Acute Wounds: A Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ubbink, Dirk T.; Brölmann, Fleur E.; Go, Peter M. N. Y. H.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Large variation and many controversies exist regarding the treatment of, and care for, acute wounds, especially regarding wound cleansing, pain relief, dressing choice, patient instructions, and organizational aspects. Recent Advances: A multidisciplinary team developed evidence-based guidelines for the Netherlands using the AGREE-II and GRADE instruments. A working group, consisting of 17 representatives from all professional societies involved in wound care, tackled five controversial issues in acute-wound care, as provided by any caregiver throughout the whole chain of care. Critical Issues: The guidelines contain 38 recommendations, based on best available evidence, additional expert considerations, and patient experiences. In summary, primarily closed wounds need no cleansing; acute open wounds are best cleansed with lukewarm (drinkable) water; apply the WHO pain ladder to choose analgesics against continuous wound pain; use lidocaine or prilocaine infiltration anesthesia for wound manipulations or closure; primarily closed wounds may not require coverage with a dressing; use simple dressings for open wounds; and give your patient clear instructions about how to handle the wound. Future Directions: These evidence-based guidelines on acute wound care may help achieve a more uniform policy to treat acute wounds in all settings and an improved effectiveness and quality of wound care. PMID:26005594

  3. Mass Gathering Medical Care: Resource Document for the National Association of EMS Physicians Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Brian; Nafziger, Sarah; Milsten, Andrew; Luk, Jeffrey; Yancey, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Mass gatherings are heterogeneous in terms of size, duration, type of event, crowd behavior, demographics of the participants and spectators, use of recreational substances, weather, and environment. The goals of health and medical services should be the provision of care for participants and spectators consistent with local standards of care, protection of continuing medical service to the populations surrounding the event venue, and preparation for surge to respond to extraordinary events. Pre-event planning among jurisdictional public health and EMS, acute care hospitals, and event EMS is essential, but should also include, at a minimum, event security services, public relations, facility maintenance, communications technicians, and the event planners and organizers. Previous documented experience with similar events has been shown to most accurately predict future needs. Future work in and guidance for mass gathering medical care should include the consistent use and further development of universally accepted consistent metrics, such as Patient Presentation Rate and Transfer to Hospital Rate. Only by standardizing data collection can evaluations be performed that link interventions with outcomes to enhance evidence-based EMS services at mass gatherings. Research is needed to evaluate the skills and interventions required by EMS providers to achieve desired outcomes. The event-dedicated EMS Medical Director is integral to acceptable quality medical care provided at mass gatherings; hence, he/she must be included in all aspects of mass gathering medical care planning, preparations, response, and recovery. Incorporation of jurisdictional EMS and community hospital medical leadership, and emergency practitioners into these processes will ensure that on-site care, transport, and transition to acute care at appropriate receiving facilities is consistent with, and fully integrated into the community's medical care system, while fulfilling the needs of event

  4. Mass Gathering Medical Care: Resource Document for the National Association of EMS Physicians Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Brian; Nafziger, Sarah; Milsten, Andrew; Luk, Jeffrey; Yancey, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Mass gatherings are heterogeneous in terms of size, duration, type of event, crowd behavior, demographics of the participants and spectators, use of recreational substances, weather, and environment. The goals of health and medical services should be the provision of care for participants and spectators consistent with local standards of care, protection of continuing medical service to the populations surrounding the event venue, and preparation for surge to respond to extraordinary events. Pre-event planning among jurisdictional public health and EMS, acute care hospitals, and event EMS is essential, but should also include, at a minimum, event security services, public relations, facility maintenance, communications technicians, and the event planners and organizers. Previous documented experience with similar events has been shown to most accurately predict future needs. Future work in and guidance for mass gathering medical care should include the consistent use and further development of universally accepted consistent metrics, such as Patient Presentation Rate and Transfer to Hospital Rate. Only by standardizing data collection can evaluations be performed that link interventions with outcomes to enhance evidence-based EMS services at mass gatherings. Research is needed to evaluate the skills and interventions required by EMS providers to achieve desired outcomes. The event-dedicated EMS Medical Director is integral to acceptable quality medical care provided at mass gatherings; hence, he/she must be included in all aspects of mass gathering medical care planning, preparations, response, and recovery. Incorporation of jurisdictional EMS and community hospital medical leadership, and emergency practitioners into these processes will ensure that on-site care, transport, and transition to acute care at appropriate receiving facilities is consistent with, and fully integrated into the community's medical care system, while fulfilling the needs of event

  5. Mature care and reciprocity: two cases from acute psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Tove; Hem, Marit Helene

    2011-03-01

    In this article we elaborate on the concept of mature care, in which reciprocity is crucial. Emphasizing reciprocity challenges other comprehensions where care is understood as a one-sided activity, with either the carer or the cared for considered the main source of knowledge and sole motivation for caring. We aim to demonstrate the concept of mature care's advantages with regard to conceptualizing the practice of care, such as in nursing. First, we present and discuss the concept of mature care, then we apply the concept to two real life cases taken from the field of acute psychiatry. In the first example we demonstrate how mature care can grasp tacit reciprocal aspects in caring. In the other, we elucidate a difficulty related to the concept, namely the lack of reciprocity and interaction that affects some relationships.

  6. Primary care in nursing homes revisited: survey of the experiences of primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, L E; Jennings, S; Gavin, R; McConaghy, D; Collins, D R

    2014-09-01

    The Irish Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA) published National Quality Standards for Residential Care Settings for Older People in 2009. We reported on experiences of general practitioners (GPs) in Dublin caring for nursing home patients (NHPs) in 2006. We revisit these experiences following publication of HIQA's standards. 400 GPs received an anonymous postal survey. Of 204 respondents, 145 (71%) felt NHPs required more contact time and 124 (61%) reported more complex consultations compared to other patients. Only 131 (64%) felt adequately trained in gerontology. 143 (70%) reported access to specialist advice, but only 6 (3%) reported a change in this following HIOA standards. 65 (32%) had witnessed substandard care in a NH, of which 16 (25%) made no report, similar figures to 2006. There remains similar levels of concern regarding patient complexity, substandard care, access to specialist support and training in the care of NHPs. Many GPs expressed uncertainty regarding their role in implementing HIQA standards.

  7. Colonoscopist and Primary Care Physician Supply and Disparities in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Benarroch-Gampel, Jaime; Sheffield, Kristin M; Lin, Yu-Li; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S; Riall, Taylor S

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether racial/ethnic disparities in colonoscopy use vary by physician availability. Data Source We used 100 percent Texas Medicare claims data for 2003–2007. Study Design We identified beneficiaries aged 66–79 in 2007, examined racial/ethnic differences in colonoscopy use from 2003 to 2007, and estimated the percentage of white, black, and Hispanic beneficiaries who underwent colonoscopy by level of physician availability and area income. Principal Findings For the 974,879 beneficiaries, colonoscopy use was higher in whites (40.7 percent) compared to blacks (35.0 percent) and Hispanics (28.7 percent, p < .001). For whites, increasing availability of colonoscopists and primary care physicians (PCPs) was associated with higher colonoscopy use. For blacks and Hispanics, colonoscopy use was unchanged or decreased with increases in colonoscopist and PCP availability. In multilevel models, the odds of colonoscopy were 20 percent lower for blacks (OR 0.80, 95 percent CI 0.79–0.82) and 32 percent lower for Hispanics (OR 0.68, 95 percent CI 0.66–0.69) compared to whites; adjusting for availability of colonoscopists or PCPs did not attenuate racial/ethnic disparities. We found greater racial/ethnic disparities in areas with greater colonoscopist and PCP availability. Conclusions Greater area availability of colonoscopists and PCPs is associated with increased use of colonoscopy in whites but decreased use in minorities, resulting in larger racial/ethnic disparities. PMID:22150580

  8. Hospital-based, acute care following ambulatory surgery center discharge

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Justin P.; Vashi, Anita A.; Ross, Joseph S.; Gross, Cary P.

    2014-01-01

    Background As a measure of quality, ambulatory surgery centers have begun reporting rates of hospital transfer at discharge. However, this may underestimate patient’s acute care needs after care. We conducted this study to determine rates and evaluate variation in hospital transfer and hospital-based, acute care within 7 days among patients discharged from ambulatory surgery centers. Methods Using data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we identified adult patients who underwent a medical or surgical procedure between July 2008 and September 2009 at ambulatory surgery centers in California, Florida, and Nebraska. The primary outcomes were hospital transfer at the time of discharge and hospital-based, acute care (emergency department visits or hospital admissions) within 7-days expressed as the rate per 1,000 discharges. At the ambulatory surgery center level, rates were adjusted for age, sex, and procedure-mix. Results We studied 3,821,670 patients treated at 1,295 ambulatory surgery centers. At discharge, the hospital transfer rate was 1.1/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 1.1–1.1). Among patients discharged home, the hospital-based, acute care rate was 31.8/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 31.6–32.0). Across ambulatory surgery centers, there was little variation in adjusted hospital transfer rates (median=1.0/1,000 discharges [25th–75th percentile=1.0–2.0]), while substantial variation existed in adjusted hospital-based, acute care rates (28.0/1,000 [21.0–39.0]). Conclusions Among adult patients undergoing ambulatory surgery center care, hospital transfer at discharge is a rare event. In contrast, the hospital-based, acute care rate is nearly 30-fold higher, varies across centers, and may be a more meaningful measure for discriminating quality. PMID:24787100

  9. Promoting Chinese-speaking primary care physicians' communication with immigrant patients about colorectal cancer screening: a cluster randomized trial design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Judy Huei-yu; Liang, Wenchi; Ma, Grace X; Gehan, Edmund; Wang, Haoying Echo; Ji, Cheng-Shuang; Tu, Shin-Ping; Vernon, Sally W; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2014-08-01

    Chinese Americans underutilize colorectal cancer screening. This study evaluated a physician-based intervention guided by social cognitive theory (SCT) to inform future research involving minority physicians and patients. Twenty-five Chinese-speaking primary care physicians were randomized into intervention or usual care arms. The intervention included two 45-minute in-office training sessions paired with a dual-language communication guide detailing strategies in addressing Chinese patients' screening barriers. Physicians' feedback on the intervention, their performance data during training, and pre-post intervention survey data were collected and analyzed. Most physicians (~85%) liked the intervention materials but ~84% spent less than 20 minutes reading the guide and only 46% found the length of time for in-office training acceptable. Despite this, the intervention increased physicians' perceived communication self-efficacy with patients (p<.01). This study demonstrated the feasibility of enrolling and intervening with minority physicians. Time constraints in primary care practice should be considered in the design and implementation of interventions.

  10. Screening mammography beliefs and recommendations: a web-based survey of primary care physicians

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The appropriateness and cost-effectiveness of screening mammography (SM) for women younger than 50 and older than 74 years is debated in the clinical research community, among health care providers, and by the American public. This study explored primary care physicians' (PCPs) perceptions of the influence of clinical practice guidelines for SM; the recommendations for SM in response to hypothetical case scenarios; and the factors associated with perceived SM effectiveness and recommendations in the US from June to December 2009 before the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recently revised guidelines. Methods A nationally representative sample of 11,922 PCPs was surveyed using a web-based questionnaire. The response rate was 5.7% (684); (41%) 271 family physicians (FP), (36%) 232 general internal medicine physicians (IM), (23%) 150 obstetrician-gynaecologists (OBG), and (0.2%) 31 others. Cross-sectional analysis examined PCPs perceived effectiveness of SM, and recommendation for SM in response to hypothetical case scenarios. PCPs responses were measured using 4-5 point adjectival scales. Differences in perceived effectiveness and recommendations for SM were examined after adjusting for PCPs specialty, race/ethnicity, and the US region. Results Compared to IM and FP, OBG considered SM more effective in reducing breast cancer mortality among women aged 40-49 years (p = 0.003). Physicians consistently recommended mammography to women aged 50-69 years with no differences by specialty (p = 0.11). However, 94% of OBG "always recommended" SM to younger and 86% of older women compared to 81% and 67% for IM and 84% and 59% for FP respectively (p = < .001). In ordinal regression analysis, OBG specialty was a significant predictor for perceived higher SM effectiveness and recommendations for younger and older women. In evaluating hypothetical scenarios, overall PCPs would recommend SM for the 80 year woman with CHF with a significant variation

  11. Management of the early and late presentations of rheumatoid arthritis: a survey of Ontario primary care physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Glazier, R H; Dalby, D M; Badley, E M; Hawker, G A; Bell, M J; Buchbinder, R; Lineker, S C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine primary care physicians' management of rheumatoid arthritis, ascertain the determinants of management and compare management with that recommended by a current practice panel. DESIGN: Mail survey (self-administered questionnaire). SETTING: Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: A stratified computer-generated random sample of 798 members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportions of respondents who chose various items in the management of two hypothetical patients, one with early rheumatoid arthritis and one with late rheumatoid arthritis. Scores for investigations, interventions and referrals for each scenario were generated by summing the recommended items chosen by respondents and then dividing by the total number of items recommended in that category. The scores were examined for their association with physician and practice characteristics and physician attitudes. RESULTS: The response rate was 68.3% (529/775 eligible physicians). Recommended investigations were chosen by more than two thirds of the respondents for both scenarios. Referrals to physiotherapy, occupational therapy and rheumatology, all recommended by the panel, were chosen by 206 (38.9%), 72 (13.6%) and 309 (58.4%) physicians respectively for early rheumatoid arthritis. These proportions were significantly higher for late rheumatoid arthritis (p < 0.01). In multiple regression analysis, for early rheumatoid arthritis, internship or residency training in rheumatology was associated with higher investigation and intervention scores, for late rheumatoid arthritis, older physicians had higher intervention scores and female physicians had higher referral scores. CONCLUSIONS: Primary care physicians' investigation of rheumatoid arthritis was in accord with panel recommendations. However, rates of referral to rheumatologists and other health care professionals were very low, especially for the early presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. More exposure to

  12. Barriers Facing Primary Health Care Physicians When Dealing with Emergency Cases in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Aloufi, Majed A.; Bakarman, Marwan A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of emergency cases reporting to Primary Health Care centers (PHC), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia and to explore the barriers facing PHC physicians when dealing with such emergency cases. Methods: A cross-sectional analytic study, where all physicians working in the PHC of the Ministry of Health (MOH) in Jeddah; were invited to participate (n=247). The study period was from July 2013 till December 2013. Data were collected through two sources. 1- A self-administered questionnaire used to determine the physicians’ perceived competence when dealing with emergency cases. 2- A structured observation sheet used to evaluate availability of equipment, drugs, ambulances and other supporting facilities required to deal with emergency cases. Results: The response rate was 83.4%. The physicians’ age ranged between 25 and 60 years with a mean ±SD of 34.4±7.5 years. Majority of them (83.5%) did not attend ATLS courses at all whereas 60.7% never attended ACLS courses. The majority (97.1%) had however attended BLS courses. Physicians in the age group 36-45 years, non-Saudi, those who had SBFM, those who reported experience in working in emergency departments and physicians who reported more working years in PHCCs (>5 years) had a significant higher score of perceived level of competence in performing emergency skill scale than others (P<0.05). The prevalence of emergency cases attending PHC in Jeddah (2013) was 5.2%. Conclusion: Emergency services at PHC in Jeddah are functioning reasonably well, but require fine tuning of services and an upgrade in their quality. PMID:27045411

  13. The ethical self-fashioning of physicians and health care systems in culturally appropriate health care.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Susan J; Armin, Julie

    2011-06-01

    Diverse advocacy groups have pushed for the recognition of cultural differences in health care as a means to redress inequalities in the U.S., elaborating a form of biocitizenship that draws on evidence of racial and ethnic health disparities to make claims on both the state and health care providers. These efforts led to federal regulations developed by the U.S. Office of Minority Health requiring health care organizations to provide Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services. Based on ethnographic research at workshops and conferences, in-depth interviews with cultural competence trainers, and an analysis of postings to a moderated listserv with 2,000 members, we explore cultural competence trainings as a new type of social technology in which health care providers and institutions are urged to engage in ethical self-fashioning to eliminate prejudice and embody the values of cultural relativism. Health care providers are called on to re-orient their practice (such as habits of gaze, touch, and decision-making) and to act on their own subjectivities to develop an orientation toward Others that is "culturally competent." We explore the diverse methods that cultural competence trainings use to foster a health care provider's ability to be self-reflexive, including face-to-face workshops and classes and self-guided on-line modules. We argue that the hybrid formation of culturally appropriate health care is becoming detached from its social justice origins as it becomes rationalized by and more firmly embedded in the operations of the health care marketplace.

  14. The education of physicians and other health care professionals about climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, R.L.; Hussain, S.T.

    1996-12-31

    The impact of rapidly changing local and regional environments upon the health of human populations must be appreciated by physicians as well as other public health officials. Any system of health care delivery depends upon an understanding of scientific principles. Current issues of importance include the greenhouse effect, the ozone hole, global warming, sea level rise, emerging and resurgent microbial diseases, air and water pollution, biodiversity losses, UVB-induced immunosuppression, and antibiotic resistance. These concerns must be firmly within the grasp of the health care practitioner for the 21st century. To assure transfer of information, these topics should be integrated into existing course content or should provide the basis for new course offerings during the training of the professional. Focus should be given to scientific principles as the foundation for understanding climate change.

  15. Physician, philosopher, and paediatrician: John Locke's practice of child health care

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A N

    2006-01-01

    G.F. Still's History of Paediatrics restricted the philosopher John Locke's (1632–1704) influence in paediatrics to pedagology and specifically his Some Thoughts Concerning Education (1693).1 This significantly limits Locke's immense ongoing influence on child health care and human rights. Locke was a physician and had a lifelong interest in medicine. His case records and journals relate some of his paediatric cases. His correspondence includes letters from Thomas Sydenham, the “English Hippocrates” (1624–89) when Locke has sought advice on a paediatric case as well as other correspondence from parents regarding child health care and management of learning disability. Locke assisted and influenced Thomas Sydenham with his writing, and Locke's own work, Two Treatises on Government, clearly stated the rights of children and limitation of parental authority. Furthermore, Locke's thoughts on Poor Law, making an economic case for a workhouse in every parish, were implemented from 1834. PMID:16371386

  16. Physician, philosopher, and paediatrician: John Locke's practice of child health care.

    PubMed

    Williams, A N

    2006-01-01

    G.F. Still's History of Paediatrics restricted the philosopher John Locke's (1632-1704) influence in paediatrics to pedagology and specifically his Some Thoughts Concerning Education (1693). This significantly limits Locke's immense ongoing influence on child health care and human rights. Locke was a physician and had a lifelong interest in medicine. His case records and journals relate some of his paediatric cases. His correspondence includes letters from Thomas Sydenham, the "English Hippocrates" (1624-89) when Locke has sought advice on a paediatric case as well as other correspondence from parents regarding child health care and management of learning disability. Locke assisted and influenced Thomas Sydenham with his writing, and Locke's own work, Two Treatises on Government, clearly stated the rights of children and limitation of parental authority. Furthermore, Locke's thoughts on Poor Law, making an economic case for a workhouse in every parish, were implemented from 1834.

  17. Mental health in young adults and adolescents - supporting general physicians to provide holistic care.

    PubMed

    Jurewicz, Izabela

    2015-04-01

    In the era of an ageing population, young adults on medical wards are quite rare, as only 12% of young adults report a long-term illness or disability. However, mental health problems remain prevalent in the younger population. In a recent report, mental health and obesity were listed as the most common problems in young adults. Teams set up specifically for the needs of younger adults, such as early intervention in psychosis services are shown to work better than traditional care and have also proven to be cost effective. On the medical wards, younger patients may elicit strong emotions in staff, who often feel protective and may identify strongly with the young patient's suffering. In order to provide holistic care for young adults, general physicians need to recognise common presentations of mental illness in young adults such as depression, deliberate self-harm, eating disorders and substance misuse. Apart from treating illness, health promotion is particularly important for young adults.

  18. Patients' Perceived Quality of Family Physicians' Primary Care with or without 'Family Medicine' in the Clinic Name

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ka Young; Lim, Kangjin; Choi, Eun Young; Cheong, Yoo Seock

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients' perspectives of family medicine according to the physician's identity and role as a primary-care specialist need to be investigated. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived quality of the primary care of family medicine clinics as assessed by patients in a community setting. Methods Patients (or their guardians) visiting nine community family medicine clinics were surveyed using the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool from April 2014 to June 2014. The scores of the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool domains were compared according to the clinics' designation (or not) as 'family medicine' and the patients' recognition (or not) of the physicians as board-certified family medicine specialists. Results A total of 196 subjects responded to the questionnaire. They assessed the community clinics' quality of primary care as moderate to high. Of the clinics, those that were not designated as family medicine scored higher than those that were designated as family medicine (P<0.05). The group of patients that recognized a clinic as that of a board-certified family medicine specialist awarded higher scores than the non-recognition group in the domains of coordination function and personalized care (P<0.05). Conclusion The moderate to high scores for the community family medicine clinics' quality of primary care are encouraging. It seems that patients' recognition of the family physician's role and of the physician-patient relationship has a significant influence on their assessment of the quality of primary care.

  19. Small primary care practices face four hurdles--including a physician-centric mind-set--in becoming medical homes.

    PubMed

    Nutting, Paul A; Crabtree, Benjamin F; McDaniel, Reuben R

    2012-11-01

    Transforming small independent practices to patient-centered medical homes is widely believed to be a critical step in reforming the US health care system. Our team has conducted research on improving primary care practices for more than fifteen years. We have found four characteristics of small primary care practices that seriously inhibit their ability to make the transformation to this new care model. We found that small practices were extremely physician-centric, lacked meaningful communication among physicians, were dominated by authoritarian leadership behavior, and were underserved by midlevel clinicians who had been cast into unimaginative roles. Our analysis suggests that in addition to payment reform, a shift in the mind-set of primary care physicians is needed. Unless primary care physicians can adopt new mental models and think in new ways about themselves and their practices, it will be very difficult for them and their practices to create innovative care teams, become learning organizations, and act as good citizens within the health care neighborhood.

  20. Patients' Perceived Quality of Family Physicians' Primary Care with or without 'Family Medicine' in the Clinic Name

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ka Young; Lim, Kangjin; Choi, Eun Young; Cheong, Yoo Seock

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients' perspectives of family medicine according to the physician's identity and role as a primary-care specialist need to be investigated. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived quality of the primary care of family medicine clinics as assessed by patients in a community setting. Methods Patients (or their guardians) visiting nine community family medicine clinics were surveyed using the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool from April 2014 to June 2014. The scores of the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool domains were compared according to the clinics' designation (or not) as 'family medicine' and the patients' recognition (or not) of the physicians as board-certified family medicine specialists. Results A total of 196 subjects responded to the questionnaire. They assessed the community clinics' quality of primary care as moderate to high. Of the clinics, those that were not designated as family medicine scored higher than those that were designated as family medicine (P<0.05). The group of patients that recognized a clinic as that of a board-certified family medicine specialist awarded higher scores than the non-recognition group in the domains of coordination function and personalized care (P<0.05). Conclusion The moderate to high scores for the community family medicine clinics' quality of primary care are encouraging. It seems that patients' recognition of the family physician's role and of the physician-patient relationship has a significant influence on their assessment of the quality of primary care. PMID:27688865

  1. African Female Physicians and Nurses in the Global Care Chain: Qualitative Explorations from Five Destination Countries.

    PubMed

    Wojczewski, Silvia; Pentz, Stephen; Blacklock, Claire; Hoffmann, Kathryn; Peersman, Wim; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Kutalek, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Migration of health professionals is an important policy issue for both source and destination countries around the world. The majority of migrant care workers in industrialized countries today are women. However, the dimension of mobility of highly skilled females from countries of the global south has been almost entirely neglected for many years. This paper explores the experiences of high-skilled female African migrant health-workers (MHW) utilising the framework of Global Care Chain (GCC) research. In the frame of the EU-project HURAPRIM (Human Resources for Primary Health Care in Africa), the research team conducted 88 semi-structured interviews with female and male African MHWs in five countries (Botswana, South Africa, Belgium, Austria, UK) from July 2011 until April 2012. For this paper we analysed the 34 interviews with female physicians and nurses using the qualitative framework analysis approach and the software atlas.ti. In terms of the effect of the migration on their career, almost all of the respondents experienced short-term, long-term or permanent inability to work as health-care professionals; few however also reported a positive career development post-migration. Discrimination based on a foreign nationality, race or gender was reported by many of our respondents, physicians and nurses alike, whether they worked in an African or a European country. Our study shows that in addition to the phenomenon of deskilling often reported in GCC research, many female MHW are unable to work according to their qualifications due to the fact that their diplomas are not recognized in the country of destination. Policy strategies are needed regarding integration of migrants in the labour market and working against discrimination based on race and gender.

  2. African Female Physicians and Nurses in the Global Care Chain: Qualitative Explorations from Five Destination Countries

    PubMed Central

    Wojczewski, Silvia; Pentz, Stephen; Blacklock, Claire; Hoffmann, Kathryn; Peersman, Wim; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Kutalek, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Migration of health professionals is an important policy issue for both source and destination countries around the world. The majority of migrant care workers in industrialized countries today are women. However, the dimension of mobility of highly skilled females from countries of the global south has been almost entirely neglected for many years. This paper explores the experiences of high-skilled female African migrant health-workers (MHW) utilising the framework of Global Care Chain (GCC) research. In the frame of the EU-project HURAPRIM (Human Resources for Primary Health Care in Africa), the research team conducted 88 semi-structured interviews with female and male African MHWs in five countries (Botswana, South Africa, Belgium, Austria, UK) from July 2011 until April 2012. For this paper we analysed the 34 interviews with female physicians and nurses using the qualitative framework analysis approach and the software atlas.ti. In terms of the effect of the migration on their career, almost all of the respondents experienced short-term, long-term or permanent inability to work as health-care professionals; few however also reported a positive career development post-migration. Discrimination based on a foreign nationality, race or gender was reported by many of our respondents, physicians and nurses alike, whether they worked in an African or a European country. Our study shows that in addition to the phenomenon of deskilling often reported in GCC research, many female MHW are unable to work according to their qualifications due to the fact that their diplomas are not recognized in the country of destination. Policy strategies are needed regarding integration of migrants in the labour market and working against discrimination based on race and gender. PMID:26068218

  3. Virtual patient care: an interprofessional education approach for physician assistant, physical therapy and occupational therapy students.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Michael J; Platko, Christina M; Cleghorn, Susan M; Booth, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this retrospective qualitative case report is to describe how a case-based, virtual patient interprofessional education (IPE) simulation activity was utilized to achieve physician assistant (PA), physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) student IPE learning outcomes. Following completion of a virtual patient case, 30 PA, 46 PT and 24 OT students were required to develop a comprehensive, written treatment plan and respond to reflective questions. A qualitative analysis of the submitted written assignment was used to determine whether IPE learning objectives were met. Student responses revealed three themes that supported the learning objectives of the IPE experience: benefits of collaborative care, role clarification and relevance of the IPE experience for future practice. A case-based, IPE simulation activity for physician assistant and rehabilitation students using a computerized virtual patient software program effectively facilitated achievement of the IPE learning objectives, including development of greater student awareness of other professions and ways in which collaborative patient care can be provided.

  4. Defensive medicine or economically motivated corruption? A confucian reflection on physician care in China today.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Yang

    2007-01-01

    In contemporary China, physicians tend to require more diagnostic work-ups and prescribe more expensive medications than are clearly medically indicated. These practices have been interpreted as defensive medicine in response to a rising threat of potential medical malpractice lawsuits. After outlining recent changes in Chinese malpractice law, this essay contends that the overuse of expensive diagnostic and therapeutic interventions cannot be attributed to malpractice concerns alone. These practice patterns are due as well, if not primarily, to the corruption of medical decision-making by physicians being motivated to earn supplementary income, given the constraints of an ill-structured governmental policy by the over-use of expensive diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. To respond to these difficulties of Chinese health care policy, China will need not only to reform the particular policies that encourage these behaviors, but also to nurture a moral understanding that can place the pursuit of profit within the pursuit of virtue. This can be done by drawing on Confucian moral resources that integrate the pursuit of profit within an appreciation of benevolence. It is this Confucian moral account that can formulate a medical care policy suitable to China's contemporary market economy.

  5. Primary Care Physician Panel Size and Quality of Care: A Population-Based Study in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Dahrouge, Simone; Hogg, William; Younger, Jaime; Muggah, Elizabeth; Russell, Grant; Glazier, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the number of patients under a primary care physician’s care (panel size) and primary care quality indicators. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based study of fee-for-service and capitated interprofessional and non-interprofessional primary health care practices in Ontario, Canada between April 2008 and March 2010, encompassing 4,195 physicians with panel sizes ≥1,200 serving 8.3 million patients. Data was extracted from multiple linked, health-related administrative databases and covered 16 quality indicators spanning 5 dimensions of care: access, continuity, comprehensiveness, and evidence-based indicators of cancer screening and chronic disease management. RESULTS The likelihood of being up-to-date on cervical, colorectal, and breast cancer screening showed relative decreases of 7.9% (P <.001), 5.9% (P = .01), and 4.6% (P <.001), respectively, with increasing panel size (from 1,200 to 3,900). Eight chronic care indicators (4 medication-based and 4 screening-based) showed no significant association with panel size. The likelihood of individuals with a new diagnosis of congestive heart failure having an echocardiogram, however, increased by a relative 8.1% (P <.001) with higher panel size. Increasing panel size was also associated with a 10.8% relative increase in hospitalization rates for ambulatory-care–sensitive conditions (P = .04) and a 10.8% decrease in non-urgent emergency department visits (P = .004). Continuity was highest with medium panel sizes (P <.001), and comprehensiveness had a small decrease (P = .03) with increasing panel size. CONCLUSIONS Increasing panel size was associated with small decreases in cancer screening, continuity, and comprehensiveness, but showed no consistent relationships with chronic disease management or access indicators. We found no panel size threshold above which quality of care suffered. PMID:26755780

  6. Nurses' experiences of caring for culturally diverse patients in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Jane

    2005-09-01

    Identification of nurses' experiences of caring for culturally diverse patients in acute care settings contributes to transcultural nursing knowledge. This qualitative study aims to describe nurses' experiences of caring for culturally diverse adult patients on medical and surgical wards in an acute care setting. These experiences identify current practice and associated issues for nurses caring for culturally diverse clients. A purposive sample of ten registered nurses was interviewed and transcripts analysed. Main findings were acquiring cultural knowledge, committing to and engaging with culturally diverse patients. Strategies for change developed from these findings focus on increasing cultural competency of nurses by: implementing a formal education program; developing partnerships with patients and their families to increase cultural comfort; and increasing organisational accommodation of the culturally diverse with policy review and extension of resources. Further research to explore issues for bilingual nurses and to describe the experiences of culturally diverse patients and their families in general acute care settings is recommended. PMID:16295344

  7. Policy recommendations to guide the use of telemedicine in primary care settings: an American College of Physicians position paper.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Hilary; Sulmasy, Lois Snyder

    2015-11-17

    Telemedicine-the use of technology to deliver care at a distance-is rapidly growing and can potentially expand access for patients, enhance patient-physician collaboration, improve health outcomes, and reduce medical costs. However, the potential benefits of telemedicine must be measured against the risks and challenges associated with its use, including the absence of the physical examination, variation in state practice and licensing regulations, and issues surrounding the establishment of the patient-physician relationship. This paper offers policy recommendations for the practice and use of telemedicine in primary care and reimbursement policies associated with telemedicine use. The positions put forward by the American College of Physicians highlight a meaningful approach to telemedicine policies and regulations that will have lasting positive effects for patients and physicians.

  8. The role of the primary care physician in caring for patients with type-1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, Q L

    1998-02-01

    The management of type-1 diabetic patients is a challenge. Given the natural frequency of this medical problem, most primary care providers will have such patients in their office-based practice. The push for tighter control in order to lessen long-term complications is a sensible move, but it does not inherently require that you absent yourself from the loop. Most of the hoopla from the DCCT study has been used to justify the role of the endocrine sub-specialty team in the "primary care" management of all diabetic patients so that third-party payers will continue to fund such care as routine. While such team management has clear benefits, it should not preclude your active involvement in day-to-day management for fear that you do not have the proper credentials. Hopefully, this overview will give you the confidence to jump back in the ring. PMID:9533990

  9. What Makes a Good Palliative Care Physician? A Qualitative Study about the Patient’s Expectations and Needs when Being Admitted to a Palliative Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Masel, Eva K; Kitta, Anna; Huber, Patrick; Rumpold, Tamara; Unseld, Matthias; Schur, Sophie; Porpaczy, Edit; Watzke, Herbert H

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of the study were to examine a) patients’ knowledge of palliative care, b) patients’ expectations and needs when being admitted to a palliative care unit, and c) patient’s concept of a good palliative care physician. Methods The study was based on a qualitative methodology, comprising 32 semistructured interviews with advanced cancer patients admitted to the palliative care unit of the Medical University of Vienna. Interviews were conducted with 20 patients during the first three days after admission to the unit and after one week, recorded digitally, and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using NVivo 10 software, based on thematic analysis enhanced with grounded theory techniques. Results The results revealed four themes: (1) information about palliative care, (2) supportive care needs, (3) being treated in a palliative care unit, and (4) qualities required of palliative care physicians. The data showed that patients lack information about palliative care, that help in social concerns plays a central role in palliative care, and attentiveness as well as symptom management are important to patients. Patients desire a personal patient-physician relationship. The qualities of a good palliative care physician were honesty, the ability to listen, taking time, being experienced in their field, speaking the patient’s language, being human, and being gentle. Patients experienced relief when being treated in a palliative care unit, perceived their care as an interdisciplinary activity, and felt that their burdensome symptoms were being attended to with emotional care. Negative perceptions included the overtly intense treatment. Conclusions The results of the present study offer an insight into what patients expect from palliative care teams. Being aware of patient’s needs will enable medical teams to improve professional and individualized care. PMID:27389693

  10. The language of compassion in acute mental health care.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Paul; Gilbert, Paul; Gilbert, Jean; Gale, Corinne; Harvey, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    In this article we examine the language of compassion in acute mental health care in the United Kingdom. Compassion is commonly defined as being sensitive to the suffering of others and showing a commitment to relieve it, yet we know little about how this is demonstrated in health professional language and how it is situated in the context of acute mental health care services. We report on a corpus-assisted discourse analysis of 20 acute mental health practitioner interview narratives about compassion and find a striking depletion in the use of "compassionate mentality" words, despite the topic focus. The language used by these practitioners placed more emphasis on time pressures, care processes, and organizational tensions in a way that might compromise best practice and point to the emergence of a "production-line mentality."

  11. Physician payment 2008 for interventionalists: current state of health care policy.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Giordano, James

    2007-09-01

    Physicians in the United States have been affected by significant changes in the pattern(s) of medical practice evolving over the last several decades. These changes include new measures to 1) curb increasing costs, 2) increase access to patient care, 3) improve quality of healthcare, and 4) pay for prescription drugs. Escalating healthcare costs have focused concerns about the financial solvency of Medicare and this in turn has fostered a renewed interest in the economic basis of interventional pain management practices. The provision and systemization of healthcare in North America and several European countries are difficult enterprises to manage irrespective of whether these provisions and systems are privatized (as in the United States) or nationalized or seminationalized (as in Great Britain, Canada, Australia and France). Consequently, while many management options have been put forth, none seem to be optimally geared toward affording healthcare as a maximized individual and social good, and none have been completely enacted. The current physician fee schedule (released on July 12, 2007) includes a 9.9% cut in payment rate. Since the Medicare program was created in 1965, several methods have been used to determine physicians' rate(s) for each covered service. The sustained growth rate (SGR) system, established in 1998, has evoked negative consequences on physician payment(s). Based on the current Medicare expenditure index, practice expenses are projected to increase by 34.5% from 2002 to 2016, whereas, if actual practice inflation is considered, this increase will be 90%. This is in contrast to projected physician payment cuts that are depicted to be 51%. No doubt, this scenario will be devastating to many practices and the US medical community at large. Resolutions to this problem have been offered by MedPAC, the Government Accountability Office, physician organizations, economists, and various other interested groups. In the past, temporary measures have

  12. Physician payment 2008 for interventionalists: current state of health care policy.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Giordano, James

    2007-09-01

    Physicians in the United States have been affected by significant changes in the pattern(s) of medical practice evolving over the last several decades. These changes include new measures to 1) curb increasing costs, 2) increase access to patient care, 3) improve quality of healthcare, and 4) pay for prescription drugs. Escalating healthcare costs have focused concerns about the financial solvency of Medicare and this in turn has fostered a renewed interest in the economic basis of interventional pain management practices. The provision and systemization of healthcare in North America and several European countries are difficult enterprises to manage irrespective of whether these provisions and systems are privatized (as in the United States) or nationalized or seminationalized (as in Great Britain, Canada, Australia and France). Consequently, while many management options have been put forth, none seem to be optimally geared toward affording healthcare as a maximized individual and social good, and none have been completely enacted. The current physician fee schedule (released on July 12, 2007) includes a 9.9% cut in payment rate. Since the Medicare program was created in 1965, several methods have been used to determine physicians' rate(s) for each covered service. The sustained growth rate (SGR) system, established in 1998, has evoked negative consequences on physician payment(s). Based on the current Medicare expenditure index, practice expenses are projected to increase by 34.5% from 2002 to 2016, whereas, if actual practice inflation is considered, this increase will be 90%. This is in contrast to projected physician payment cuts that are depicted to be 51%. No doubt, this scenario will be devastating to many practices and the US medical community at large. Resolutions to this problem have been offered by MedPAC, the Government Accountability Office, physician organizations, economists, and various other interested groups. In the past, temporary measures have

  13. Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about chronic noncancer pain in primary care: A Canadian survey of physicians and pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Lalonde, Lyne; Leroux-Lapointe, Vincent; Choinière, Manon; Martin, Elisabeth; Lussier, David; Berbiche, Djamal; Lamarre, Diane; Thiffault, Robert; Jouini, Ghaya; Perreault, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care providers’ knowledge, attitudes and beliefs (KAB) regarding chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) are a barrier to optimal management. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and identify the determinants of the KAB of primary care physicians and pharmacists, and to document clinician preferences regarding the content and format of a continuing education program (CEP). METHOD: Physicians and pharmacists of 486 CNCP patients participated. Physicians completed the original version of the KnowPain-50 questionnaire. Pharmacists completed a modified version. A multivariate linear regression model was developed to identify the determinants of their KAB. RESULTS: A total of 137 of 387 (35.4%) physicians and 110 of 278 (39.5%) pharmacists completed the survey. Compared with the physicians, the pharmacists surveyed included more women (64% versus 38%) and had less clinical experience (15 years versus 26 years). The mean KnowPain-50 score was 69.3% (95% CI 68.0% to 70.5%) for physicians and 63.8% (95% CI 62.5% to 65.1%) for pharmacists. Low scores were observed on all aspects of pain management: initial assessment (physicians, 68.3%; pharmacists, 65.4%); definition of treatment goals and expectations (76.1%; 61.6%); development of a treatment plan (66.4%; 59.0%); and reassessment and management of longitudinal care (64.3%; 53.1%). Ten hours of reported CEP sessions increased the KAB score by 0.3 points. All clinicians considered a CEP for CNCP to be essential. Physicians preferred an interactive format, while pharmacists had no clear preferences. CONCLUSION: A CEP to improve primary care providers’ knowledge and competency in managing CNCP, and to reduce false beliefs and inappropriate attitudes regarding CNCP is relevant and perceived as necessary by clinicians. PMID:25299473

  14. The use of medical orders in acute care oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ming; Elliott, Malcolm

    The life of every living organism is sustained by the presence of oxygen and the acute deprivation of oxygen will, therefore, result in hypoxia and ultimately death. Although oxygen is normally present in the air, higher concentrations are required to treat many disease processes. Oxygen is therefore considered to be a drug requiring a medical prescription and is subject to any law that covers its use and prescription. Administration is typically authorized by a physician following legal written instructions to a qualified nurse. This standard procedure helps prevent incidence of misuse or oxygen deprivation which could worsen the patients hypoxia and ultimate outcome. Delaying the administration of oxygen until a written medical prescription is obtained could also have the same effect. Clearly, defined protocols should exist to allow for the legal administration of oxygen by nurses without a physicians order because any delay in administering oxygen to patients can very well lead to their death. PMID:19377391

  15. Attitude of primary care physicians toward patient safety in Aseer region, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khaldi, Yahia M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the attitude of physicians at primary health-care centers (PHCC) in Aseer region toward patient safety. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted among working primary health-care physicians in Aseer region, Saudi Arabia, in August 2011. A self-administered questionnaire consisting of three parts was used; the first part was on the socio-demographic, academic and about the work profile of the participants. The attitude consisting of 26 questions was assessed on a Likert scale of 7 points using attitude to patients safety questionnaire-III items and the last part concerned training on “patient safety”, definition and factors that contribute to medical errors. Data of the questionnaire were entered and analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15. Results: The total number of participants was 228 doctors who represent about 65% of the physicians at PHCC, one-third of whom had attended a course on patient safety and only 52% of whom defined medical error correctly. The best score was given for the reduction of medical errors (6.2 points), followed by role of training and learning on patient safety (6 and 5.9 points), but undergraduate training on patient safety was given the least score. Confidence to report medical errors scored 4.6 points as did reporting the errors of other people and 5.6 points for being open with the supervisor about an error made. Participants agreed that “even the most experienced and competent doctors make errors” (5.9 points), on the other hand, they disagreed that most medical errors resulted from nurses’ carelessness (3.9 points) or doctors’ carelessness (4 points). Conclusion: This study showed that PHCC physicians in Aseer region had a positive attitude toward patient safety. Most of them need training on patient safety. Undergraduate education on patient safety which was considered a priority for making future doctors’ work effective was

  16. Managing chronic illness: physician practices increased the use of care management and medical home processes.

    PubMed

    Wiley, James A; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen M; Casalino, Lawrence P; Ramsay, Patricia P; Bibi, Salma; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon R; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    The effective management of patients with chronic illnesses is critical to bending the curve of health care spending in the United States and is a crucial test for health care reform. In this article we used data from three national surveys of physician practices between 2006 and 2013 to determine the extent to which practices of all sizes have increased their use of evidence-based care management processes associated with patient-centered medical homes for patients with asthma, congestive heart failure, depression, and diabetes. We found relatively large increases over time in the overall use of these processes for small and medium-size practices as well as for large practices. However, the large practices used fewer than half of the recommended processes, on average. We also identified the individual processes whose use increased the most and show that greater use of care management processes is positively associated with public reporting of patient experience and clinical quality and with pay-for-performance. PMID:25561647

  17. Managing chronic illness: physician practices increased the use of care management and medical home processes.

    PubMed

    Wiley, James A; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen M; Casalino, Lawrence P; Ramsay, Patricia P; Bibi, Salma; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon R; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    The effective management of patients with chronic illnesses is critical to bending the curve of health care spending in the United States and is a crucial test for health care reform. In this article we used data from three national surveys of physician practices between 2006 and 2013 to determine the extent to which practices of all sizes have increased their use of evidence-based care management processes associated with patient-centered medical homes for patients with asthma, congestive heart failure, depression, and diabetes. We found relatively large increases over time in the overall use of these processes for small and medium-size practices as well as for large practices. However, the large practices used fewer than half of the recommended processes, on average. We also identified the individual processes whose use increased the most and show that greater use of care management processes is positively associated with public reporting of patient experience and clinical quality and with pay-for-performance.

  18. Military family physicians' perceptions of a pocket point-of-care ultrasound device in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, Paul; Bornemann, Gina

    2014-12-01

    Point-of-care ultrasonography with a pocket ultrasound device, General Electric Medical Systems Vscan (Milwaukee, Wisconsin), has been shown to be effective and easy to learn. However, no studies to date have evaluated its use in the military primary care setting where its portability and value in bedside diagnosis would be especially beneficial. We tested the feasibility of the Vscan in the day-to-day care of patients by family physicians in their clinic, inpatient wards, and its potential for use in the military-deployed setting. Participants were trained and credentialed in the use of the point-of-care ultrasonography. Then, participants were provided with a pocket ultrasound device to use in their normal day-to-day practice. Additionally, participants completed surveys and provided ratings on their perceptions regarding the use of the device. According to the survey analysis, participants found the devices to be easy to use, valuable in discerning a diagnosis, and were not prohibitively time consuming. Moreover, patients were perceived by the participants to have been satisfied with the use of the device. Overall, participants had high satisfaction with the Vscan and perceived that the device would be highly valuable in the military-deployed setting.

  19. Psychosocial Care and its Association with Severe Acute Malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anurag; Agarwal, Sheesham

    2016-05-01

    This cross-sectional study compared 120 children having severe acute malnutrition with 120 healthy children for exposure to 40 behaviors, by measuring psychosocial care based on Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) inventory. The mean (SD) psychosocial care score of cases and controls significantly differed [18.2 (2.2) vs 23.5 (2.1); P<0.001]. A score of less than 14 was significantly associated with severe acute malnutrition (OR 23.2; 95% CI 8.2, 50). PMID:27254059

  20. Dual embedded agency: physicians implement integrative medicine in health-care organizations.

    PubMed

    Keshet, Yael

    2013-11-01

    The paradox of embedded agency addresses the question of how embedded agents are able to conceive of new ideas and practices and then implement them in institutionalized organizations if social structures exert so powerful an influence on behavior, and agents operate within a framework of institutional constraints. This article proposes that dual embedded agency may provide an explanation of the paradox. The article draws from an ethnographic study that examined the ways in which dual-trained physicians, namely medical doctors trained also in some modality of complementary and alternative medicine, integrate complementary and alternative medicine into the biomedical fortress of mainstream health-care organizations. Participant observations were conducted during the years 2006-2011. The observed physicians were found to be embedded in two diverse medical cultures and to have a hybrid professional identity that comprised two sets of health-care values. Seeking to introduce new ideas and practices associated with complementary and alternative medicine to medical institutions, they maneuvered among the constraints of institutional structures while using these very structures, in an isomorphic mode of action, as a platform for launching complementary and alternative medicine practices and values. They drew on the complementary and alternative medicine philosophical principle of interconnectedness and interdependency of seemingly polar opposites or contrary forces and acted to achieve change by means of nonadversarial strategies. By addressing the structure-agency dichotomy, this study contributes to the literature on change in institutionalized health-care organizations. It likewise contributes both theoretically and empirically to the study of integrative medicine and to the further development of this relatively new area of inquiry within the sociology of medicine.

  1. End-of-life care in an acute care hospital: linking policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-07-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be effective, health care professionals who provide hospital care will need to respond to its patient-centered purpose. Health services will also be called upon to train health care professionals to work with dying people in a more participatory way and to assist them to develop the clinical processes that support shared decision making. Health professionals who manage clinical workplaces become central in reshaping this practice environment by promoting patient-centered care policy objectives and restructuring health service systems to routinely incorporate patient and family preferences about care at key points in the patient's care episode.

  2. Physician strikes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stephen L; Salmon, J Warren

    2014-11-01

    Throughout medical history, physicians have rarely formed unions and/or carried out strikes. In a profession faced with the turmoil of health reform and increasing pressure to change their practices and lifestyles, will physicians resort to unionization for collective bargaining, and will a strike weapon be used to fight back against the array of corporate and government powers involved in the transformation of the American health-care system? This article examines the question of whether there could be such a thing as an ethical physician strike. Although physicians have not historically used collective bargaining or the strike weapon, the rapidly changing practice environment in the United States might push physicians and other health-care professionals toward unionization. This article considers the ethical questions that would arise if physicians started taking advantage of labor laws, and it lays out criteria for an ethical strike.

  3. Process evaluation of an educational intervention to improve end-of-life care: the Education for Physicians on End-of-Life Care (EPEC) program.

    PubMed

    VanGeest, J B

    2001-01-01

    Despite the growing importance of end-of-life care and the need to improve it, physicians receive little formal training in palliative care. The Education for Physicians on End-of-life Care (EPEC) project, developed by the American Medical Association and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, tested a train-the-trainer educational intervention to address this deficiency. This paper presents data from a process evaluation of the initial rollout of EPEC. By all accounts, EPEC provided a state-of-the-art curriculum covering important and clinically relevant topics to the care of the dying patient. It was less clear, however, if EPEC adequately prepared trainees to teach these new skills to other practicing physicians. Factors that may advance efforts to generalize EPEC to other settings and improve future applications of the program are discussed.

  4. Is health care use changing? A comparison between physician, hospital, nursing-home, and home-care use of two elderly cohorts.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, E; Tate, R B

    1989-11-01

    This study used log-linear survival analysis, and log-rank tests to compare 1) the characteristics of two elderly cohorts; 2) their use of physician, hospital, nursing-home and home-care services over 8.5 years; and 3) physician and bed supplies during the two periods. Both cohorts were similar in health status and in their use of hospital, nursing-home, and home-care resources despite a steady decrease in hospital beds during both periods and a shrinking supply of nursing-home beds for the later cohort. Although physician supply increased more rapidly for the first (1971) than for the second (1976) cohort, the later cohort used significantly more ambulatory care than the earlier cohort. Home care appears to substitute for year-to-year variations in nursing-home admissions but not for variations in hospital lengths of stay.

  5. [Gender and career paths of female primary care physicians in Andalusia, Spain, at the beginning of 21st century].

    PubMed

    Saletti-Cuesta, Lorena; Delgado, Ana; Ortiz-Gómez, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this article was to study, from a feminist perspective, the diversity and homogeneity in the career paths of female primary care physicians from Andalusia, Spain in the early 21st century, by analyzing the meanings they give to their careers and the influence of personal, family and professional factors. We conducted a qualitative study with six discussion groups. Thirty-two female primary care physicians working in urban health centers of the public health system of Andalusia participated in the study. The discourse analysis revealed that most of the female physicians did not plan for professional goals and, when they did plan for them, the goals were intertwined with family needs. Consequently, their career paths were discontinuous. In contrast, career paths oriented towards professional development and the conscious planning of goals were more common among the female doctors acting as directors of health care centers. PMID:25522101

  6. [Gender and career paths of female primary care physicians in Andalusia, Spain, at the beginning of 21st century].

    PubMed

    Saletti-Cuesta, Lorena; Delgado, Ana; Ortiz-Gómez, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this article was to study, from a feminist perspective, the diversity and homogeneity in the career paths of female primary care physicians from Andalusia, Spain in the early 21st century, by analyzing the meanings they give to their careers and the influence of personal, family and professional factors. We conducted a qualitative study with six discussion groups. Thirty-two female primary care physicians working in urban health centers of the public health system of Andalusia participated in the study. The discourse analysis revealed that most of the female physicians did not plan for professional goals and, when they did plan for them, the goals were intertwined with family needs. Consequently, their career paths were discontinuous. In contrast, career paths oriented towards professional development and the conscious planning of goals were more common among the female doctors acting as directors of health care centers.

  7. 38 CFR 52.150 - Physician services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... assistant, nurse practitioner, or clinical nurse specialist in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section... acute care when it is indicated. (d) Availability of physicians for emergency care. In case of an... clinical nurse specialist who— (A) Is acting within the scope of practice as defined by State law; and...

  8. Post-acute care and vertical integration after the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Shay, Patrick D; Mick, Stephen S

    2013-01-01

    The anticipated changes resulting from the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act-including the proposed adoption of bundled payment systems and the promotion of accountable care organizations-have generated considerable controversy as U.S. healthcare industry observers debate whether such changes will motivate vertical integration activity. Using examples of accountable care organizations and bundled payment systems in the American post-acute healthcare sector, this article applies economic and sociological perspectives from organization theory to predict that as acute care organizations vary in the degree to which they experience environmental uncertainty, asset specificity, and network embeddedness, their motivation to integrate post-acute care services will also vary, resulting in a spectrum of integrative behavior.

  9. Seamless health care for chronic diseases in a dual health care system: managed care and the role of family physicians.

    PubMed

    Lee, A

    1998-01-01

    Neither private nor state run health care systems are perfect. Although there is increasing evidence that Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) provide comparable care at lower cost, HMOs tend to select healthy patients. The dual health care system in Hong Kong spends about 3.9 per cent of GDP, with health indices among the best in the world. Hong Kong still faces the problem of escalating health care expenditure. One should take advantage of the dual health care system to evolve a new paradigm for a primary-led seamless health care service. The Diabetes Centre of a university teaching hospital together with the University of Community and Family Medicine has started a structured shared care programme in diabetes mellitus, involving general practitioners in both the private and public sectors integrating the primary and secondary care, and the private and public sectors. This programme starts to develop an infrastructure for providing quality care at an affordable cost for a large pool of patients with chronic disease. Unlike other "managed care schemes", this one is not run by profit-oriented companies, but by health professionals with an interest in providing best possible care at an affordable cost. The "disease management" approach needs a care delivery system without traditional boundaries; and a continuous improvement process which develops and refines the knowledge base, guidelines and delivery system. PMID:10351265

  10. Health Literacy, Physician Trust, and Diabetes-related Self-care Activities in Hispanics with Limited Resources

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard O.; Osborn, Chandra Y.; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Kripalani, Sunil; Rothman, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hispanics with diabetes often have deficits in health literacy (HL). We examined the association among HL, psychosocial factors, and diabetes-related self-care activities. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of 149 patients. Data included patient demographics and validated measures of HL, physician trust, self-efficacy, acculturation, self-care behaviors, and A1c. Results Participants (N=60) with limited HL were older and less educated, and had more years with diabetes compared with adequate HL participants (N=89). Limited HL participants reported greater trust in their physician, greater self-efficacy, and better diet, foot care, and medication adherence. Health literacy status was not associated with acculturation or A1c. In adjusted analyses, HL status remained associated with physician trust, and we observed a notable but nonsignificant trend between HL status and medication adherence. Discussion Lower HL was associated with greater physician trust and better medication adherence. Further research is warranted to clarify the role of HL and physician trust in optimizing self-care for Hispanics. PMID:24185168

  11. The orginization of medical practice and practice orientations among physicians in prepaid and nonprepaid primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, D

    1975-03-01

    Data are presented on office-based general practitioners and pediatricians working in varying practice settings. Fee-for-service physicians spend more time in direct patient care activities than those in prepaid practice, and devote more time to each patient. The data suggest that the patient load characteristic of general practice in prepaid groups encourages a more assembly line practice which is less responsive to patients than the pattern characteristic of fee-for-service practice. Prepaid physicians work during scheduled hours and may deal with increased load by processing patients more rapidly. Fee-for-service physicians tend to respond to increased demand by working longer hours. The responsiveness of primary care physicians to patient problems seems to reflect primarily their social orientations to medical practice and the time pressures they face. Varying practice settings result in different techniques of coping with the pressures of practice. Data are also presented on sociodemographic and professional characteristics of primary care physicians in varying settings, workload, use of diagnostic and laboratory procedures, social orientations to medical practice, satisfactions and dissatisfactions, and attitudes toward sociopolitical aspects of medical care. Suggestions are offered for improving the responsiveness of prepaid practice. PMID:1113557

  12. Risks of Treated Insomnia, Anxiety, and Depression in Health Care-Seeking Physicians: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Charles Lung-Cheng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Wu, Ming-Ping

    2015-09-01

    High occupational stress and burnout among physicians can lead to sleep problems, anxiety, depression, and even suicide. Even so, the actual risk for these behavioral health problems in health care-seeking physicians has been seldom explored. The aim of this study was to determine whether physicians have higher odds of treated insomnia, anxiety, and depression than the normal population.This is a nationwide population-based case-control study using the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan for the years 2007 to 2011. Physicians were obtained from the Registry for Medical Personnel in 2009. Hospital physicians who had at least 3 coded ambulatory care claims or 1 inpatient claim with a principal diagnosis of insomnia, anxiety, or depression were identified. A total of 15,150 physicians and 45,450 matched controls were enrolled. Odd ratios (ORs) of insomnia, anxiety, and depression between physicians and their control counterparts were measured.The adjusted ORs for treated insomnia, anxiety, and depression among all studied physicians were 2.028 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.892-2.175), 1.103 (95% CI, 1.020-1.193), and 0.716 (95% CI, 0.630-0.813), respectively. All specialties of physicians had significantly higher ORs for treated insomnia; among the highest was the emergency specialty. The adjusted ORs for treated anxiety among male and female physicians were 1.136 (95% CI, 1.039-1.242) and 0.827 (95% CI, 0.686-0.997), respectively. Among specialties, psychiatry and "others" had significantly higher risks of anxiety. Obstetrics and gynecology and surgery specialties had significantly lower risks of anxiety. The adjusted ORs for treated depression among physicians in age groups 35 to 50 years and >50 years were 0.560 (95% CI, 0.459-0.683) and 0.770 (95% CI, 0.619-0.959), respectively. Those in the psychiatry specialty had significantly higher risks of depression; internal and surgery specialties had significant lower risks of depression

  13. Nurse practitioners in primary care. VII. A cohort study of 99 nurses and 79 associated physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, K.; Fortin, F.; Spitzer, W. O.; Kergin, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Long-term surveillance of the employment experience and developing roles of 99 nurses and 79 associated physicians who participated in the first 5 years of the McMaster University educational program for family practice nurses was undertaken with a descriptive survey. Data were gathered by mailed questionnaires; a 97.8% response rate was attained. Sociodemographic profiles of both groups and characteristics of the practice setting where copractitioner teams functioned were determined. Selected noteworthy results show that 92.7% of the nurses were currently employed, and that 82.5% of the graduates continued in their original practice. Nurses' time invested in patient care activities increased by 105%; time devoted to clerical and housekeeping duties decreased by 42%. Changes in roles for both categories of copractitioners were important. The interdisciplinary arrangements resulted in appreciable financial disadvantages to physicians and only modest income incentives to nurses. A series of successes of the model of practice under assessment has been identified; offsetting ongoing difficulties and problems have also been enumerated. The data from this project and preceding studies can facilitate the solution of unresolved problems on the basis of evidence rather than opinion. PMID:856429

  14. Obamacare: what the Affordable Care Act means for patients and physicians.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark A; Lord, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act's core achievement is to make all Americans insurable, by requiring insurers to accept all applicants at rates based on population averages regardless of health status. The act also increases coverage by allowing states to expand Medicaid (the social healthcare program for families and people with low income and resources) to cover everyone near the poverty line, and by subsidizing private insurance for people who are not poor but who do not have workplace coverage. The act allows most people to keep the same kind of insurance that they currently have, and it does not change how private insurance pays physicians and hospitals. Although the act falls short of achieving truly universal coverage, nine million uninsured people have received coverage so far. Market reforms have not hurt the insurance industry's profitability, prices for individual insurance have been lower than expected, and government costs so far have been less than initially projected. The act expands several ongoing pilot programs in Medicare that reform how doctors and hospitals are paid, but it does not directly change how private insurers pay healthcare providers. Nevertheless, it has set into motion market dynamics that are affecting medical practice, such as limiting insurance networks to fewer providers and requiring patients to pay for more treatment costs out of pocket. In response, many hospitals and physicians are forming closer and larger affiliations. Further time and study are needed to learn whether these evolutionary changes will achieve their goals without harming the doctor-patient relationship.

  15. Obamacare: what the Affordable Care Act means for patients and physicians.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark A; Lord, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act's core achievement is to make all Americans insurable, by requiring insurers to accept all applicants at rates based on population averages regardless of health status. The act also increases coverage by allowing states to expand Medicaid (the social healthcare program for families and people with low income and resources) to cover everyone near the poverty line, and by subsidizing private insurance for people who are not poor but who do not have workplace coverage. The act allows most people to keep the same kind of insurance that they currently have, and it does not change how private insurance pays physicians and hospitals. Although the act falls short of achieving truly universal coverage, nine million uninsured people have received coverage so far. Market reforms have not hurt the insurance industry's profitability, prices for individual insurance have been lower than expected, and government costs so far have been less than initially projected. The act expands several ongoing pilot programs in Medicare that reform how doctors and hospitals are paid, but it does not directly change how private insurers pay healthcare providers. Nevertheless, it has set into motion market dynamics that are affecting medical practice, such as limiting insurance networks to fewer providers and requiring patients to pay for more treatment costs out of pocket. In response, many hospitals and physicians are forming closer and larger affiliations. Further time and study are needed to learn whether these evolutionary changes will achieve their goals without harming the doctor-patient relationship. PMID:25338761

  16. Paediatric emergency and acute care in resource poor settings.

    PubMed

    Duke, Trevor; Cheema, Baljit

    2016-02-01

    Acute care of seriously ill children is a global public health issue, and there is much scope for improving quality of care in hospitals at all levels in many developing countries. We describe the current state of paediatric emergency and acute care in the least developed regions of low and middle income countries and identify gaps and requirements for improving quality. Approaches are needed which span the continuum of care: from triage and emergency treatment, the diagnostic process, identification of co-morbidities, treatment, monitoring and supportive care, discharge planning and follow-up. Improvements require support and training for health workers and quality processes. Effective training is that which is ongoing, combining good technical training in under-graduate courses and continuing professional development. Quality processes combine evidence-based guidelines, essential medicines, appropriate technology, appropriate financing of services, standards and assessment tools and training resources. While initial emergency treatment is based on common clinical syndromes, early differentiation is required for specific treatment, and this can usually be carried out clinically without expensive tests. While global strategies are important, it is what happens locally that makes a difference and is too often neglected. In rural areas in the poorest countries in the world, public doctors and nurses who provide emergency and acute care for children are revered by their communities and demonstrate daily that much can be carried out with little.

  17. Paediatric emergency and acute care in resource poor settings.

    PubMed

    Duke, Trevor; Cheema, Baljit

    2016-02-01

    Acute care of seriously ill children is a global public health issue, and there is much scope for improving quality of care in hospitals at all levels in many developing countries. We describe the current state of paediatric emergency and acute care in the least developed regions of low and middle income countries and identify gaps and requirements for improving quality. Approaches are needed which span the continuum of care: from triage and emergency treatment, the diagnostic process, identification of co-morbidities, treatment, monitoring and supportive care, discharge planning and follow-up. Improvements require support and training for health workers and quality processes. Effective training is that which is ongoing, combining good technical training in under-graduate courses and continuing professional development. Quality processes combine evidence-based guidelines, essential medicines, appropriate technology, appropriate financing of services, standards and assessment tools and training resources. While initial emergency treatment is based on common clinical syndromes, early differentiation is required for specific treatment, and this can usually be carried out clinically without expensive tests. While global strategies are important, it is what happens locally that makes a difference and is too often neglected. In rural areas in the poorest countries in the world, public doctors and nurses who provide emergency and acute care for children are revered by their communities and demonstrate daily that much can be carried out with little. PMID:27062627

  18. Developing "Care Assistant": A smartphone application to support caregivers of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingting; Yao, Nengliang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Fen; Liu, Yanyan; Geng, Zhaohui; Yuan, Changrong

    2016-04-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy. Caring for children with ALL is an uncommon experience for parents without medical training. They urgently need professional assistance when their children are recovering at home. This paper documents the process of developing an Android application (app) "Care Assistant" for family caregivers of children with ALL. Key informant interviews and focus group studies were used before programming the app. The key informants and focus group members included: caregivers of children with ALL, cancer care physicians and nurses, and software engineers. We found several major challenges faced by caregivers: limited access to evidence-based clinic information, lack of financial and social assistance, deficient communications with doctors or nurses, lack of disease-related knowledge, and inconvenience of tracking treatments and testing results. This feedback was used to develop "Care Assistant". This app has eight modules: personal information, treatment tracking, family care, financial and social assistance, knowledge centre, self-assessment questionnaires, interactive platform, and reminders. We have also developed a web-based administration portal to manage the app. The usability and effectiveness of "Care Assistant" will be evaluated in future studies. PMID:26271029

  19. The primary health care physician and the cancer patient: tips and strategies for managing sexual health

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Eric S.; Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    There is a large and growing population of long-term cancer survivors. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are playing an increasingly greater role in the care of these patients across the continuum of cancer survivorship. In this role, PCPs are faced with the responsibility of managing a range of medical and psychosocial late effects of cancer treatment. In particular, the sexual side effects of treatment which are common and have significant impact on quality of life for the cancer survivor, often go unaddressed. This is an area of clinical care and research that has received increasing attention, highlighted by the presentation of this special issue on Cancer and Sexual Health. The aims of this review are 3-fold. First, we seek to overview common presentations of sexual dysfunction related to major cancer diagnoses in order to give the PCP a sense of the medical issues that the survivor may present with. Barriers to communication about sexual health issues between patient/PCPs in order are also described in order to emphasize the importance of PCPs initiating this important conversation. Next, we provide strategies and resources to help guide the PCP in the management of sexual dysfunction in cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss case examples of survivorship sexual health issues and highlight the role that a PCP can play in each of these case examples. PMID:26816826

  20. [Update of diabetic retinopathy for Primary Care physicians: Towards an improvement of telematic medicine].

    PubMed

    Muñoz de Escalona-Rojas, J E; Quereda-Castañeda, A; García-García, O

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is considered the most common cause of blindness in the working-age population in industrialised countries, with diabetic macular oedema being the most common reason of decreased visual acuity in diabetics. According to the results of large multicentre studies, blindness prevention for RD involves conducting periodic check-ups, which include examinations of the back of the eye, so they can be treated in time. The use of non-mydriatic cameras and telemedicine have been shown to be useful in this regard (sensitivity>80% and specificity>90%). If this procedure is followed, the first retinography should be performed 5 years from diagnosis in type 1 diabetics and immediately after diagnosis in type 2 diabetics. Therefore the role of the Primary Care physician is crucial to enable early diagnosis of this disease.

  1. A study of Canadian hospice palliative care volunteers' attitudes toward physician-assisted suicide.

    PubMed

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Miller, Kathryn

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of hospice palliative care (HPC) volunteers who provide in-home support (n = 47) and members of the community (n = 58) toward the issue of physician-assisted suicide (PAS). On the first part of the survey, participants responded to 15 items designed to assess their attitudes toward PAS. An examination of individual items revealed differences in opinions among members of both the groups. Responses to additional questions revealed that the majority of volunteers and community members (1) support legalizing PAS; (2) would choose HPC over PAS for themselves if they were terminally ill; and (3) think Canadians should place more priority on developing HPC rather than on legalizing PAS. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  2. Burden of acute gastroenteritis, norovirus and rotavirus in a managed care population.

    PubMed

    Karve, Sudeep; Krishnarajah, Girishanthy; Korsnes, Jennifer S; Cassidy, Adrian; Candrilli, Sean D

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed and described the episode rate, duration of illness, and health care utilization and costs associated with acute gastroenteritis (AGE), norovirus gastroenteritis (NVGE), and rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) in physician office, emergency department (ED), and inpatient care settings in the United States (US). The retrospective analysis was conducted using an administrative insurance claims database (2006-2011). AGE episode rates were assessed using medical (ICD-9-CM) codes for AGE; whereas a previously published "indirect" method was used in assessing estimated episode rates of NVGE and RVGE. We calculated per-patient, per-episode and total costs incurred in three care settings for the three diseases over five seasons. For each season, we extrapolated the total economic burden associated with the diseases to the US population. The overall AGE episode rate in the physician office care setting declined by 15% during the study period; whereas the AGE episode rate remained stable in the inpatient care setting. AGE-related total costs (inflation-adjusted) per 100 000 plan members increased by 28% during the 2010-2011 season, compared with the 2006-2007 season ($832,849 vs. $1 068 116) primarily due to increase in AGE-related inpatient costs. On average, the duration of illness for NVGE and RVGE was 1 day longer than the duration of illness for AGE (mean: 2 days). Nationally, the average AGE-related estimated total cost was $3.88 billion; NVGE and RVGE each accounted for 7% of this total. The episodes of RVGE among pediatric populations have declined; however, NVGE, RVGE and AGE continue to pose a substantial burden among managed care enrollees. In conclusion, the study further reaffirms that RVGE has continued to decline in pediatric population post-launch of the rotavirus vaccination program and provides RVGE- and NVGE-related costs and utilization estimates which can serve as a resource for researchers and policy makers to conduct cost

  3. [Principles of intensive care in severe acute pancreatitis in 2008].

    PubMed

    Darvas, Katalin; Futó, Judit; Okrös, Ilona; Gondos, Tibor; Csomós, Akos; Kupcsulik, Péter

    2008-11-23

    Acute pancreatitis is a dynamic, often progressive disease; 14-20% require intensive care in its severe form due to multiorgan dysfunction and/or failure. This review was created using systematic literature review of articles published on this subject in the last 5 years. The outcome of severe acute pancreatitis is determined by the inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction - the prognostic scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, Glasgow Prognostic Index, Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, Multi Organ Dysfunction Syndrome Scale, Ranson Scale) can be used to determine outcome. Clinical signs (age, coexisting diseases, confusion, obesity) and biochemistry values (serum amylase, lipase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, creatinine, urea, calcium) have important prognostic roles as well. Early organ failure increases the risk of late abdominal complications and mortality. Intensive care can provide appropriate multi-function patient monitoring which helps in early recognition of complications and appropriate target-controlled treatment. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis aims at reducing systemic inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction and, on the other side, at increasing the anti-inflammatory response. Oral starvation for 24-48 hours is effective in reducing the exocrine activity of the pancreas; the efficacy of protease inhibitors is questionable. Early intravascular volume resuscitation and stable haemodynamics improve microcirculation. Early oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation provide adequate oxygenation. Electrolyte and acid-base control can be as important as tight glucose control. Adequate pain relief can be achieved by thoracic epidural catheterization. Early enteral nutrition with immunonutrition should be used. There is evidence that affecting the coagulation cascade by activated protein C can play a role in reducing the inflammatory response. The complex therapy of acute pancreatitis includes appropriate

  4. [Principles of intensive care in severe acute pancreatitis in 2008].

    PubMed

    Darvas, Katalin; Futó, Judit; Okrös, Ilona; Gondos, Tibor; Csomós, Akos; Kupcsulik, Péter

    2008-11-23

    Acute pancreatitis is a dynamic, often progressive disease; 14-20% require intensive care in its severe form due to multiorgan dysfunction and/or failure. This review was created using systematic literature review of articles published on this subject in the last 5 years. The outcome of severe acute pancreatitis is determined by the inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction - the prognostic scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, Glasgow Prognostic Index, Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, Multi Organ Dysfunction Syndrome Scale, Ranson Scale) can be used to determine outcome. Clinical signs (age, coexisting diseases, confusion, obesity) and biochemistry values (serum amylase, lipase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, creatinine, urea, calcium) have important prognostic roles as well. Early organ failure increases the risk of late abdominal complications and mortality. Intensive care can provide appropriate multi-function patient monitoring which helps in early recognition of complications and appropriate target-controlled treatment. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis aims at reducing systemic inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction and, on the other side, at increasing the anti-inflammatory response. Oral starvation for 24-48 hours is effective in reducing the exocrine activity of the pancreas; the efficacy of protease inhibitors is questionable. Early intravascular volume resuscitation and stable haemodynamics improve microcirculation. Early oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation provide adequate oxygenation. Electrolyte and acid-base control can be as important as tight glucose control. Adequate pain relief can be achieved by thoracic epidural catheterization. Early enteral nutrition with immunonutrition should be used. There is evidence that affecting the coagulation cascade by activated protein C can play a role in reducing the inflammatory response. The complex therapy of acute pancreatitis includes appropriate

  5. Office visits to ophthalmologists and other physicians for eye care among the U.S. population, 1990.

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Y P; Wang, F; Javitt, J C

    1995-01-01

    Despite growth in the use of ophthalmologic care in the last decade, little is known about the use of eye care services and patterns of physician contact across population subgroups. As the U.S. population grows older, such information is crucial in planning strategies for treatment and prevention of eye disorders as well as in identifying potential problems in access and use of eye care. Using the 1990 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data, a descriptive statistical analysis was employed to profile the possible variations in eye care-related office visits to ophthalmologists and other physicians across demographic groups. In 1990, a total of 49.3 million visits that were related primarily to an ocular disorder were made to physicians' offices; 43.8 million (89 percent) of these were visits to ophthalmologists and 5.4 million (11 percent) to other physicians. Use of ambulatory eye care varied across demographic subgroups. Those ages 65 or older had a substantially higher rate of eye care related outpatient visits per 1,000 persons per year compared with the rest of the population (743.6 per 1,000 versus 118.5 per 1,000, P < 0.001). Women had a higher rate than men (216.0 per 1,000 versus 177.0 per 1,000, 0.01; P < 0.05). Blacks had a substantially lower rate than whites (143.2 per 1,000 versus 194.6 per 1,000, 0.001; P < 0.01). Those who visited ophthalmologists' offices also differed from those who visited other physicians' offices in terms of their age, sex, race, health insurance status, and disease characteristics.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7630990

  6. Money isn't everything: rural physicians identify other factors that facilitate providing prenatal care for low-income women.

    PubMed Central

    Machala, M; Miner, M W

    1994-01-01

    The problem of physicians dropping the practice of obstetrics is becoming more serious each year in the United States. Those who remain in practice are increasingly reluctant to serve women who receive Medicaid assistance. Previous research has tended to focus on low reimbursement and liability as barriers that physicians perceive to providing prenatal care to low-income clients. In a 1992 survey in rural Idaho, however, physicians who have been serving these clients for at least 4 years rated other factors equally or more important in treating low-income women. These other factors, discussed in this paper, have to do with the administrative and psychosocial support coordinated by public health nurses for their internal clients, the physicians, as well as for their external clients, pregnant women. PMID:8190869

  7. The costs and service implications of substituting intermediate care for acute hospital care.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Leslie; Lawrence, David

    2006-05-01

    Intermediate care is part of a package of initiatives introduced by the UK Government mainly to relieve pressure on acute hospital beds and reduce delayed discharge (bed blocking). Intermediate care involves caring for patients in a range of settings, such as in the home or community or in nursing and residential homes. This paper considers the scope of intermediate care and its role in relation to acute hospital services. In particular, it develops a framework that can be used to inform decisions about the most cost-effective care pathways for given clinical situations, and also for wider planning purposes. It does this by providing a model for evaluating the costs of intermediate care services provided by different agencies and techniques for calibrating the model locally. It finds that consistent application of the techniques over a period of time, coupled with sound planning and accounting, should result in savings to the health economy. PMID:16643707

  8. The costs and service implications of substituting intermediate care for acute hospital care.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Leslie; Lawrence, David

    2006-05-01

    Intermediate care is part of a package of initiatives introduced by the UK Government mainly to relieve pressure on acute hospital beds and reduce delayed discharge (bed blocking). Intermediate care involves caring for patients in a range of settings, such as in the home or community or in nursing and residential homes. This paper considers the scope of intermediate care and its role in relation to acute hospital services. In particular, it develops a framework that can be used to inform decisions about the most cost-effective care pathways for given clinical situations, and also for wider planning purposes. It does this by providing a model for evaluating the costs of intermediate care services provided by different agencies and techniques for calibrating the model locally. It finds that consistent application of the techniques over a period of time, coupled with sound planning and accounting, should result in savings to the health economy.

  9. Geriatric rehabilitation on an acute-care medical unit.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M F

    1984-09-01

    This study examined a geriatric rehabilitation pilot project on an acute-care medical unit. Over a 6-week period, using a 35-item geriatric rating scale and a mental assessment tool, changes in behaviours of 23 patients admitted to the geriatric rehabilitation module were compared to changes in behaviours of 10 elderly patients on a regular medical unit. The patients' demographic characteristics, their nursing and medical diagnoses, and discharge patterns were reviewed. Significant changes in behaviours of patients on the rehabilitation model included: increased ability to care for themselves, to maintain balance, and to communicate with others; decreased restlessness at night; decreased confusion; decreased incidence of incontinence; and improved social skills. The paper describes the geriatric rehabilitation programme and discusses implications for nursing of elderly patients in acute-care hospitals. PMID:6567647

  10. Charge Nurse Perspectives on Frontline Leadership in Acute Care Environments

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Rose O.; Schwarzkopf, Ruth; Kiger, Anna J.

    2011-01-01

    A recently issued report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in the United States on the Future of Nursing included a recommendation that nurses should receive leadership development at every level in order to transform the healthcare system. Charge nurses, at the frontline of patient care in acute care settings, are in key positions to lead this change. This paper presents findings from research conducted with nurses in the Tenet Health System. Charge nurses from ten facilities who attended a one-day work shop were surveyed to gain insight into the experience of being a frontline leader in today's acute care environment. The relationship of these findings to the IOM report and the implications for both the Tenet Health System and other healthcare organizations that are working to support nurses who assume these challenging roles are discussed. PMID:22191051

  11. Physician - nurse practitioner teams in chronic disease management: the impact on costs, clinical effectiveness, and patients' perception of care.

    PubMed

    Litaker, David; Mion, Lorraine; Planavsky, Loretta; Kippes, Christopher; Mehta, Neil; Frolkis, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    Increasing demand to deliver and document therapeutic and preventive care sharpens the need for disease management strategies that accomplish these goals efficiently while preserving quality of care. The purpose of this study was to compare selected outcomes for a new chronic disease management program involving a nurse practitioner - physician team with those of an existing model of care. One hundred fifty-seven patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus were randomly assigned to their primary care physician and a nurse practitioner or their primary care physician alone. Costs for personnel directly involved in patient management, calculated from hourly rates and encounter time with patients, and pre- and post-study glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), satisfaction with care and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were assessed. Although 1-year costs for personnel were higher in the team-treated group, participants experienced significant improvements in mean HbA(1c) ( - 0.7%, p = 0.02) and HDL-c ( + 2.6 mg dL( - 1), p = 0.02). Additionally, satisfaction with care improved significantly for team-treated subjects in several sub-scales whereas the mean change over time in HRQoL did not differ significantly between groups. This study demonstrates the value of a complementary team approach to chronic disease management in improving patient-derived and clinical outcomes at modest incremental costs.

  12. Case management in an acute-care hospital: collaborating for quality, cost-effective patient care.

    PubMed

    Grootveld, Kim; Wen, Victoria; Bather, Michelle; Park, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Case management has recently been advanced as a valuable component in achieving quality patient care that is also cost-effective. At St. Michael's Hospital, in Toronto, Ontario, case managers from a variety of professional backgrounds are central to a new care initiative--Rapid Assessment and Planning to Inform Disposition (RAPID)--in the General Internal Medicine (GIM) Unit that is designed to improve patient care and reconcile high emergency department volumes through "smart bed spacing." Involved in both planning and RAPID, GIM's case managers are the link between patient care and utilization management. These stewards of finite resources strive to make the best use of dollars spent while maintaining a commitment to quality care. Collaborating closely with physicians and others across the hospital, GIM's case managers have been instrumental in bringing about significant improvements in care coordination, utilization management and process redesign. PMID:24844723

  13. Blueprint for Implementing New Processes in Acute Care: Rescuing Adult Patients With Intraosseous Access.

    PubMed

    Chreiman, Kristen M; Kim, Patrick K; Garbovsky, Lyudmila A; Schweickert, William D

    2015-01-01

    The intraosseous (IO) access initiative at an urban university adult level 1 trauma center began from the need for a more expeditious vascular access route to rescue patients in extremis. The goal of this project was a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving to increase access of IO catheters to rescue patients in all care areas. The initiative became a collaborative effort between nursing, physicians, and pharmacy to embark on an acute care endeavor to standardize IO access. This is a descriptive analysis of processes to effectively develop collaborative strategies to navigate hospital systems and successfully implement multilayered initiatives. Administration should empower nurse to advance their practice to include IO for patient rescue. Intraosseous access may expedite resuscitative efforts in patients in extremis who lack venous access or where additional venous access is required for life-saving therapies. Limiting IO dwell time may facilitate timely definitive venous access. Continued education and training by offering IO skill laboratory refreshers and annual e-learning didactic is optimal for maintaining proficiency and knowledge. More research opportunities exist to determine medication safety and efficacy in adult patients in the acute care setting. PMID:26352658

  14. A comprehensive information technology system to support physician learning at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Cook, David A; Sorensen, Kristi J; Nishimura, Rick A; Ommen, Steve R; Lloyd, Farrell J

    2015-01-01

    MayoExpert is a multifaceted information system integrated with the electronic medical record (EMR) across Mayo Clinic's multisite health system. It was developed as a technology-based solution to manage information, standardize clinical practice, and promote and document learning in clinical contexts. Features include urgent test result notifications; models illustrating expert-approved care processes; concise, expert-approved answers to frequently asked questions (FAQs); a directory of topic-specific experts; and a portfolio for provider licensure and credentialing. The authors evaluate MayoExpert's reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance. Evaluation data sources included usage statistics, user surveys, and pilot studies.As of October 2013, MayoExpert was available at 94 clinical sites in 12 states and contained 1,368 clinical topics, answers to 7,640 FAQs, and 92 care process models. In 2012, MayoExpert was accessed at least once by 2,578/3,643 (71%) staff physicians, 900/1,374 (66%) midlevel providers, and 1,728/2,291 (75%) residents and fellows. In a 2013 survey of MayoExpert users with 536 respondents, all features were highly rated (≥67% favorable). More providers reported using MayoExpert to answer questions before/after than during patient visits (68% versus 36%). During November 2012 to April 2013, MayoExpert sent 1,660 notifications of new-onset atrial fibrillation and 1,590 notifications of prolonged QT. MayoExpert has become part of routine clinical and educational operations, and its care process models now define Mayo Clinic best practices. MayoExpert's infrastructure and content will continue to expand with improved templates and content organization, new care process models, additional notifications, better EMR integration, and improved support for credentialing activities. PMID:25374037

  15. Healing Environments: Integrative Medicine and Palliative Care in Acute Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Estores, Irene M; Frye, Joyce

    2015-09-01

    Conventional medicine is excellent at saving lives; however, it has little to offer to address the physical, mental, and emotional distress associated with life-threatening or life-limiting disease. An integrative approach to palliative care in acute care settings can meet this need by creating healing environments that support patients, families, and health care professionals. Mindful use of language enhances the innate healing response, improves communication, and invites patients and families to participate in their care. Staff should be offered access to skills training to cultivate compassion and mindful practice to enhance both patient and self-care.

  16. Concise Care Bundles In Acute Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kivlin, Jude; Altemimi, Harith

    2015-01-01

    The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King's Lynn, Norfolk is a 488 bed hospital providing services to approximately 331,000 people across 750 square miles. In 2012 a need was recognised for documentation (pathways) in a practical format to increase usage of national guidelines and facilitate adherence to best practice (gold standards of care) that could be easily version controlled, auditable and provide support in clinical decision-making by junior doctors. BMJ Action Sets[1] fulfilled the brief with expert knowledge, version control and support, though they were deemed too lengthy and unworkable in fast paced settings like the medical assessment unit; they formed the base creation of concise care bundles (CCB). CCB were introduced for 21 clinical presentations and one procedure. Outcomes were fully audited and showed significant improvement in a range of measures, including an increase in completions of CHADVASC score in atrial fibrillation, antibiotics prescribed per protocol in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and Blatchford score recorded for patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleed. PMID:26734437

  17. Use of chest sonography in acute-care radiology().

    PubMed

    De Luca, C; Valentino, M; Rimondi, M R; Branchini, M; Baleni, M Casadio; Barozzi, L

    2008-12-01

    Diagnosis of acute lung disease is a daily challenge for radiologists working in acute-care areas. It is generally based on the results of chest radiography performed under technically unfavorable conditions. Computed tomography (CT) is undoubtedly more accurate in these cases, but it cannot always be performed on critically ill patients who need continuous care.The use of thoracic ultrasonography (US) has recently been proposed for the study of acute lung disease. It can be carried out rapidly at the bedside and does not require any particularly sophisticated equipment. This report analyzes our experience with chest sonography as a supplement to chest radiography in an Emergency Radiology Unit. We performed chest sonography - as an adjunct to chest radiography - on 168 patients with acute chest pathology. Static and dynamic US signs were analyzed in light of radiographic findings and, when possible, CT. The use of chest US improved the authors' ability to provide confident diagnoses of acute disease of the chest and lungs.

  18. Integrating physiotherapists within primary health care teams: perspectives of family physicians and nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Sinéad Patricia; Brown, Judith; Deborah Lucy, S

    2014-09-01

    The international literature suggests a number of benefits related to integrating physiotherapists into primary health care (PHC) teams. Considering the mandate of PHC teams in Canada, emphasizing healthy living and chronic disease management, a broad range of providers, inclusive of physiotherapists is required. However, physiotherapists are only sparsely integrated into these teams. This study explores the perspectives of "core" PHC team members, family physicians and nurse practitioners, regarding the integration of physiotherapists within Ontario (Canada) PHC teams. Twenty individual semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted, transcribed verbatim, and then analyzed following an iterative process drawing from an interpretive phenomenological approach. Five key themes emerged which highlighted "how physiotherapists could and do contribute as team members within PHC teams particularly related to musculoskeletal health and chronic disease management". The perceived value of physiotherapists within Ontario, Canada PHC teams was a unanimous sentiment particularly in terms of musculoskeletal health, chronic disease management and maximizing health human resources efficiency to ensure the right care, is delivered by the right practitioner, at the right time.

  19. Corruption in healthcare and medicine: why should physicians and bioethicists care and what should they do?

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Subrata

    2013-01-01

    Corruption, an undeniable reality in the health sector, is arguably the most serious ethical crisis in medicine today. However, it remains poorly addressed in scholarly journals and by professional associations of physicians and bioethicists. This article provides an overview of the forms and dynamics of corruption in healthcare as well as its implications in health and medicine. Corruption traps millions of people in poverty, perpetuates the existing inequalities in income and health, drains the available resources undermines people's access to healthcare, increases the costs of patient care and, by setting up a vicious cycle, contributes to ill health and suffering. No public health programme can succeed in a setting in which scarce resources are siphoned off, depriving the disadvantaged and poor of essential healthcare. Quality care cannot be provided by a healthcare delivery system in which kickbacks and bribery are a part of life. The medical profession, historically considered a noble one, and the bioethics community cannot evade their moral responsibility in the face of this sordid reality. There is a need to engage in public discussions and take a stand - against unethical and corrupt practices in healthcare and medicine - for the sake of the individual's well-being as well as for social good.

  20. The role of primary care physicians in early diagnosis and treatment of chronic gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gikas, Aristofanis; Triantafillidis, John K

    2014-01-01

    Chronic gastrointestinal disorders are a source of substantial morbidity, mortality, and cost. They are common in general practice, and the primary care physician (PCP) has a central role in the early detection and management of these problems. The need to make cost-effective diagnostic and treatment decisions, avoid unnecessary investigation and referral, provide long-term effective control of symptoms, and minimize the risk of complications constitute the main challenges that PCPs face. The literature review shows that, although best practice standards are available, a considerable number of PCPs do not routinely follow them. Low rates of colorectal cancer screening, suboptimal testing and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection, inappropriate use of proton pump inhibitors, and the fact that most PCPs are still approaching the irritable bowel disease as a diagnosis of exclusion represent the main gaps between evidence-based guidelines and clinical practice. This manuscript points out that updating of knowledge and skills of PCPs via continuing medical education is the only way for better adherence with standards and improving quality of care for patients with gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:24648750

  1. Corruption in healthcare and medicine: why should physicians and bioethicists care and what should they do?

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Subrata

    2013-01-01

    Corruption, an undeniable reality in the health sector, is arguably the most serious ethical crisis in medicine today. However, it remains poorly addressed in scholarly journals and by professional associations of physicians and bioethicists. This article provides an overview of the forms and dynamics of corruption in healthcare as well as its implications in health and medicine. Corruption traps millions of people in poverty, perpetuates the existing inequalities in income and health, drains the available resources undermines people's access to healthcare, increases the costs of patient care and, by setting up a vicious cycle, contributes to ill health and suffering. No public health programme can succeed in a setting in which scarce resources are siphoned off, depriving the disadvantaged and poor of essential healthcare. Quality care cannot be provided by a healthcare delivery system in which kickbacks and bribery are a part of life. The medical profession, historically considered a noble one, and the bioethics community cannot evade their moral responsibility in the face of this sordid reality. There is a need to engage in public discussions and take a stand - against unethical and corrupt practices in healthcare and medicine - for the sake of the individual's well-being as well as for social good. PMID:23912727

  2. Comparing the information seeking strategies of residents, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants in critical care settings

    PubMed Central

    Kannampallil, Thomas G; Jones, Laura K; Patel, Vimla L; Buchman, Timothy G; Franklin, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Objective Critical care environments are information-intensive environments where effective decisions are predicated on successfully finding and using the ‘right information at the right time’. We characterize the differences in processes and strategies of information seeking between residents, nurse practitioners (NPs), and physician assistants (PAs). Method We conducted an exploratory study in the cardiothoracic intensive care units of two large academic hospitals within the same healthcare system. Clinicians (residents (n=5), NPs (n=5), and PAs (n=5)) were shadowed as they gathered information on patients in preparation for clinical rounds. Information seeking activities on 96 patients were collected over a period of 3 months (NRes=37, NNP=24, NPA=35 patients). The sources of information and time spent gathering the information at each source were recorded. Exploratory data analysis using probabilistic sequential approaches was used to analyze the data. Results Residents predominantly used a patient-based information seeking strategy in which all relevant information was aggregated for one patient at a time. In contrast, NPs and PAs primarily utilized a source-based information seeking strategy in which similar (or equivalent) information was aggregated for multiple patients at a time (eg, X-rays for all patients). Conclusions The differences in the information seeking strategies are potentially a result of the differences in clinical training, strategies of managing cognitive load, and the nature of the use of available health IT tools. Further research is needed to investigate the effects of these differences on clinical and process outcomes. PMID:24619926

  3. Distancing sedation in end-of-life care from physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Soh, Tze Ling Gwendoline Beatrice; Krishna, Lalit Kumar Radha; Sim, Shin Wei; Yee, Alethea Chung Peng

    2016-05-01

    Lipuma equates continuous sedation until death (CSD) to physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia (PAS/E) based on the premise that iatrogenic unconsciousness negates social function and, thus, personhood, leaving a patient effectively 'dead'. Others have extrapolated upon this position further, to suggest that any use of sedation and/or opioids at the end of life would be analogous to CSD and thus tantamount to PAS/E. These posits sit diametrically opposite to standard end-of-life care practices. This paper will refute Lipuma's position and the posits borne from it. We first show that prevailing end-of-life care guidelines require proportional and monitored use of sedatives and/or opioids to attenuate fears that the use of such treatment could hasten death. These guidelines also classify CSD as a last resort treatment, employed only when symptoms prove intractable, and not amenable to all standard treatment options. Furthermore, CSD is applied only when deemed appropriate by a multidisciplinary palliative medicine team. We also show that empirical data based on local views of personhood will discount concerns that iatrogenic unconsciousness is tantamount to a loss of personhood and death.

  4. Distancing sedation in end-of-life care from physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Tze Ling Gwendoline Beatrice; Krishna, Lalit Kumar Radha; Sim, Shin Wei; Yee, Alethea Chung Peng

    2016-01-01

    Lipuma equates continuous sedation until death (CSD) to physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia (PAS/E) based on the premise that iatrogenic unconsciousness negates social function and, thus, personhood, leaving a patient effectively ‘dead’. Others have extrapolated upon this position further, to suggest that any use of sedation and/or opioids at the end of life would be analogous to CSD and thus tantamount to PAS/E. These posits sit diametrically opposite to standard end-of-life care practices. This paper will refute Lipuma’s position and the posits borne from it. We first show that prevailing end-of-life care guidelines require proportional and monitored use of sedatives and/or opioids to attenuate fears that the use of such treatment could hasten death. These guidelines also classify CSD as a last resort treatment, employed only when symptoms prove intractable, and not amenable to all standard treatment options. Furthermore, CSD is applied only when deemed appropriate by a multidisciplinary palliative medicine team. We also show that empirical data based on local views of personhood will discount concerns that iatrogenic unconsciousness is tantamount to a loss of personhood and death. PMID:27211055

  5. Lithium and Psoriasis: What Primary Care and Family Physicians Should Know

    PubMed Central

    Jafferany, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    Objective This review focuses on the association of lithium treatment and psoriasis. The mechanism of action of lithium in causing psoriasis and the clinical presentation of psoriasis secondary to lithium treatment are considered. Data Sources A search of the literature from 1949 to 2007 was performed using MEDLINE, with the following search terms: lithium, psoriasis, skin, dermatology, and psychodermatology. Data Synthesis Lithium is involved in a variety of cutaneous reactions including psoriasis, which may present as exacerbation of preexisting psoriasis, induction of de novo psoriasis, pustular psoriasis, nail changes, and psoriatic arthropathy. The appearance of psoriatic lesions may occur at normal therapeutic serum lithium levels. The refractory period for the development of psoriatic lesions is variable and generally longer in induction and shorter in exacerbation of psoriasis. Lithium-induced psoriasis is often resistant to conventional treatment modalities, and some cases may require dose reduction or discontinuation of lithium treatment. Conclusion Lithium is the mainstay of treatment in bipolar disorder and is associated with a variety of cutaneous side effects including psoriasis. Primary care providers and family physicians should be knowledgeable about the association of lithium and its dermatologic side effects. Early recognition and management could be beneficial in avoiding the issues of noncompliance and further deterioration of mood symptoms secondary to obviously disfiguring skin appearance. Primary care, psychiatry, and dermatology liaison services will prove helpful in managing these patients. PMID:19287551

  6. Distancing sedation in end-of-life care from physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Soh, Tze Ling Gwendoline Beatrice; Krishna, Lalit Kumar Radha; Sim, Shin Wei; Yee, Alethea Chung Peng

    2016-05-01

    Lipuma equates continuous sedation until death (CSD) to physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia (PAS/E) based on the premise that iatrogenic unconsciousness negates social function and, thus, personhood, leaving a patient effectively 'dead'. Others have extrapolated upon this position further, to suggest that any use of sedation and/or opioids at the end of life would be analogous to CSD and thus tantamount to PAS/E. These posits sit diametrically opposite to standard end-of-life care practices. This paper will refute Lipuma's position and the posits borne from it. We first show that prevailing end-of-life care guidelines require proportional and monitored use of sedatives and/or opioids to attenuate fears that the use of such treatment could hasten death. These guidelines also classify CSD as a last resort treatment, employed only when symptoms prove intractable, and not amenable to all standard treatment options. Furthermore, CSD is applied only when deemed appropriate by a multidisciplinary palliative medicine team. We also show that empirical data based on local views of personhood will discount concerns that iatrogenic unconsciousness is tantamount to a loss of personhood and death. PMID:27211055

  7. Physician-Assisted Suicide and Other Forms of Euthanasia in Islamic Spiritual Care.

    PubMed

    Isgandarova, Nazila

    2015-12-01

    The muteness in the Qur'an about suicide due to intolerable pain and a firm opposition to suicide in the hadith literature formed a strong opinion among Muslims that neither repentance nor the suffering of the person can remove the sin of suicide or mercy 'killing' (al-qatl al-rahim), even if these acts are committed with the purpose of relieving suffering and pain. Some interpretations of the Islamic sources even give advantage to murderers as opposed to people who commit suicide because the murderers, at least, may have opportunity to repent for their sin. However, people who commit suicide are 'labeled' for losing faith in the afterlife without a chance to repent for their act. This paper claims that Islamic spiritual care can help people make decisions that may impact patients, family members, health care givers and the whole community by responding to questions such as 'What is the Islamic view on death?', 'What is the Islamic response to physician-assisted suicide and other forms of euthanasia?', 'What are the religious and moral underpinnings of these responses in Islam?' PMID:26631521

  8. Physician-Assisted Suicide and Other Forms of Euthanasia in Islamic Spiritual Care.

    PubMed

    Isgandarova, Nazila

    2015-12-01

    The muteness in the Qur'an about suicide due to intolerable pain and a firm opposition to suicide in the hadith literature formed a strong opinion among Muslims that neither repentance nor the suffering of the person can remove the sin of suicide or mercy 'killing' (al-qatl al-rahim), even if these acts are committed with the purpose of relieving suffering and pain. Some interpretations of the Islamic sources even give advantage to murderers as opposed to people who commit suicide because the murderers, at least, may have opportunity to repent for their sin. However, people who commit suicide are 'labeled' for losing faith in the afterlife without a chance to repent for their act. This paper claims that Islamic spiritual care can help people make decisions that may impact patients, family members, health care givers and the whole community by responding to questions such as 'What is the Islamic view on death?', 'What is the Islamic response to physician-assisted suicide and other forms of euthanasia?', 'What are the religious and moral underpinnings of these responses in Islam?'

  9. Non-response in a survey of physicians on end-of-life care for the elderly

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Physicians are quite often surveyed with the aim to investigate their opinions regarding provision and improvement of health care. However, in many cases response rates tend to be rather low. The aim of the study is to reflect methodological aspects regarding survey conduction and to analyse factors that cause physicians to take part in a study on delivering end-of-life care for the elderly. Methods N = 4,727 physicians in Lower Saxony, Germany, received a standardised questionnaire on their attitudes about end-of-life care for the elderly. Non-responders were asked to state the reasons for non-participation. Comparison of the sociodemographic characteristics between responders and non-responders, and evaluation of the reasons for non-participation were made. Results The response rate to the questionnaire on end-of-life care for the elderly was 40% (n = 1,892). Of the non-responders to the questionnaire, 12.8% (n = 364) stated the reasons for non-participation. Overall, the response rate to the questionnaire varied with specialty and location of the practice: radiotherapists answered significantly more frequently than other categories of physician (e.g. general practitioners) and physicians in rural areas significantly more frequently than their colleagues in urban areas. The reasons most frequently given for non-participation were "Not concerned with the subject" and "No time". Conclusions The varying rates of response indicate that the survey was not sufficiently relevant to all groups of physicians, or that the awareness of the topic may be partly underdeveloped. PMID:21943379

  10. Perception and Experience of Primary Care Physicians on Pap Smear Screening for Women with Intellectual Disabilities: A Preliminary Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Sung, Chang-Lin; Lin, Lan-Ping; Liu, Ta-Wen; Lin, Pei-Ying; Chen, Li-Mei; Chu, Cordia M.; Wu, Jia-Ling

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to establish evidence-based data to explore the perceptions and experience of primary care physicians in the Pap smear screening provision for women with intellectual disabilities (ID), and to analyze the associated factors in the delivery of screening services to women with ID in Taiwan. Data obtained by a cross-sectional survey…

  11. Community Physicians' Knowledge on Basic Health Care for Elderly Persons in Israel: Comparing Findings from 2006 to 1996

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubart, Emily; Segal, Refael; Mishiev, Ruth; Buchman, Ruth; Leibovitz, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Community physicians should be knowledgeable of basic geriatrics to cope with the challenges posed by the growing number of older patients and their complex needs. A survey of knowledge in basic health care for elderly persons, carried out by our team in 1996, revealed that it was insufficient. The authors repeated this survey in 2006, by using…

  12. The Changing Dynamics of Health Care: Physician Perceptions of Technology in Medical Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Jerald D.

    2012-01-01

    Political, economic, and safety concerns have militated for the adoption of electronic health records (EHR) by physicians in the United States, but current rates of adoption have failed to achieve the expected levels. This qualitative phenomenological study of practicing physicians reveals obstacles to adoption. Maintaining the physicians'…

  13. Post–Acute Care Use and Hospital Readmission after Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tiffanie K.; Fuchs, Barry D.; Small, Dylan S.; Halpern, Scott D.; Hanish, Asaf; Umscheid, Craig A.; Baillie, Charles A.; Kerlin, Meeta Prasad; Gaieski, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The epidemiology of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis remains largely unknown. Objectives: To examine the rate of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis and to examine risk factors and outcomes for hospital readmissions after sepsis. Methods: In an observational cohort study conducted in an academic health care system (2010–2012), we compared post–acute care use at discharge and hospital readmission after 3,620 sepsis hospitalizations with 108,958 nonsepsis hospitalizations. We used three validated, claims-based approaches to identify sepsis and severe sepsis. Measurements and Main Results: Post–acute care use at discharge was more likely after sepsis, driven by skilled care facility placement (35.4% after sepsis vs. 15.8%; P < 0.001), with the highest rate observed after severe sepsis. Readmission rates at 7, 30, and 90 days were higher postsepsis (P < 0.001). Compared with nonsepsis hospitalizations (15.6% readmitted within 30 d), the increased readmission risk was present regardless of sepsis severity (27.3% after sepsis and 26.0–26.2% after severe sepsis). After controlling for presepsis characteristics, the readmission risk was found to be 1.51 times greater (95% CI, 1.38–1.66) than nonsepsis hospitalizations. Readmissions after sepsis were more likely to result in death or transition to hospice care (6.1% vs. 13.3% after sepsis; P < 0.001). Independent risk factors associated with 30-day readmissions after sepsis hospitalizations included age, malignancy diagnosis, hospitalizations in the year prior to the index hospitalization, nonelective index admission type, one or more procedures during the index hospitalization, and low hemoglobin and high red cell distribution width at discharge. Conclusions: Post–acute care use and hospital readmissions were common after sepsis. The increased readmission risk after sepsis was observed regardless of sepsis severity and was associated with

  14. Family physician and endocrinologist coordination as the basis for diabetes care in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Alejandra; Runkle, Isabelle; Matía, Pilar; de Miguel, Maria P; Garrido, Sofia; Cervera, Emilio; Fernandez, Maria D; Torres, Pilar; Lillo, Tomas; Martin, Patricia; Cabrerizo, Lucio; de la Torre, Nuria Garcia; Calle, Jose R; Ibarra, Jose; Charro, Aniceto L; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso L

    2008-01-01

    Background To estimate the proportion of diabetic patients (DPts) with peripheral vascular disease treated at a primary health care site after an endocrinologist-based intervention, who meet ATP III and Steno targets of metabolic control, as well as to compare the outcome with the results of the patients treated by endocrinologists. Methods A controlled, prospective over 30-months period study was conducted in area 7 of Madrid. One hundred twenty six eligible diabetic patients diagnosed as having peripheral vascular disease between January 2003 and June 2004 were included in the study. After a treatment period of three months by the Diabetes team at St Carlos Hospital, 63 patients were randomly assigned to continue their follow up by diabetes team (Group A) and other 63 to be treated by the family physicians (FP) at primary care level with continuous diabetes team coordination (Group B). 57 DPts from Group A and 59 from Group B, completed the 30 months follow-up period. At baseline both groups were similar in age, weight, time from diagnosis and metabolic control. The main outcomes of this study were the proportion of patients meeting ATP III and Steno goals for HbA1c (%), Cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, albumine-to-creatinine excretion ratio (ACR), body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), anti-aggregation treatment and smoking status. Results At the end of the follow up, no differences were found between the groups. More than 37% of diabetic patients assigned to be treated by FP achieved a HbA1c < 6.5%, more than 50% a ACR < 30 mg/g, and more than 80% reached low risk values for cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, diastolic blood pressure and were anti-aggregated, and 12% remained smokers. In contrast, less than 45% achieved a systolic blood pressure < 130 mm Hg, less than 12% had a BMI < 25 Kg.m-2 (versus 23% in group A; p < 0.05) and 49%/30% (men/women) had a waist circumference of low risk

  15. Chiropractic physicians: toward a select conceptual understanding of bureaucratic structures and functions in the health care institution

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, Marcel; Kondellas, Bill; Hang, Lam; Fredericks, Janet; Ross, Michael WV

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to present select concepts and theories of bureaucratic structures and functions so that chiropractic physicians and other health care professionals can use them in their respective practices. The society-culture-personality model can be applied as an organizational instrument for assisting chiropractors in the diagnosis and treatment of their patients irrespective of locality. Discussion Society-culture-personality and social meaningful interaction are examined in relationship to the structural and functional aspects of bureaucracy within the health care institution of a society. Implicit in the examination of the health care bureaucratic structures and functions of a society is the focus that chiropractic physicians and chiropractic students learn how to integrate, synthesize, and actualize values and virtues such as empathy, integrity, excellence, diversity, compassion, caring, and understanding with a deep commitment to self-reflection. Conclusion It is essential that future and current chiropractic physicians be aware of the structural and functional aspects of an organization so that chiropractic and other health care professionals are able to deliver care that involves the ingredients of quality, affordability, availability, accessibility, and continuity for their patients. PMID:22693481

  16. Hiring appropriate providers for different populations: acute care nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Haut, Cathy; Madden, Maureen

    2015-06-01

    Acute care nurse practitioners, prepared as providers for a variety of populations of patients, continue to make substantial contributions to health care. Evidence indicates shorter stays, higher satisfaction among patients, increased work efficiency, and higher quality outcomes when acute care nurse practitioners are part of unit- or service-based provider teams. The Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, and Education outlines detailed guidelines for matching nurse practitioners' education with certification and practice by using a population-focused algorithm. Despite national support for the model, nurse practitioners and employers continue to struggle with finding the right fit. Nurse practitioners often use their interest and previous nursing experience to apply for an available position, and hospitals may not understand preparation or regulations related to matching the appropriate provider to the work environment. Evidence and regulatory guidelines indicate appropriate providers for population-focused positions. This article presents history and recommendations for hiring acute care nurse practitioners as providers for different populations of patients.

  17. Canadian Rural/Remote Primary Care Physicians Perspectives on Child/Adolescent Mental Health Care Service Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zayed, Richard; Davidson, Brenda; Nadeau, Lucie; Callanan, Terrence S.; Fleisher, William; Hope-Ross, Lindsay; Espinet, Stacey; Spenser, Helen R.; Lipton, Harold; Srivastava, Amresh; Lazier, Lorraine; Doey, Tamison; Khalid-Khan, Sarosh; McKerlie, Ann; Stretch, Neal; Flynn, Roberta; Abidi, Sabina; St. John, Kimberly; Auclair, Genevieve; Liashko, Vitaly; Fotti, Sarah; Quinn, Declan; Steele, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Primary Care Physicians (PCP) play a key role in the recognition and management of child/adolescent mental health struggles. In rural and under-serviced areas of Canada, there is a gap between child/adolescent mental health needs and service provision. Methods: From a Canadian national needs assessment survey, PCPs’ narrative comments were examined using quantitative and qualitative approaches. Using the phenomenological method, individual comments were drawn upon to illustrate the themes that emerged. These themes were further analyzed using chi-square to identify significant differences in the frequency in which they were reported. Results: Out of 909 PCPs completing the survey, 39.38% (n = 358) wrote comments. Major themes that emerged were: 1) psychiatrist access, including issues such as long waiting lists, no child/adolescent psychiatrists available, no direct access to child/adolescent psychiatrists; 2) poor communication/continuity, need for more systemized/transparent referral processes, and need to rely on adult psychiatrists; and, 3) referral of patients to other mental health professionals such as paediatricians, psychologists, and social workers. Conclusions: Concerns that emerged across sites primarily revolved around lack of access to care and systems issues that interfere with effective service delivery. These concerns suggest potential opportunities for future improvement of service delivery. Implications: Although the survey only had one comment box located at the end, PCPs wrote their comments throughout the survey. Further research focusing on PCPs’ expressed written concerns may give further insight into child/adolescent mental health care service delivery systems. A comparative study targeting urban versus rural regions in Canada may provide further valuable insights. PMID:27047554

  18. The care continuum in acromegaly: how patients, nurses, and physicians can collaborate for successful treatment experiences

    PubMed Central

    Plunkett, Cynthia; Barkan, Ariel L

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acromegaly (a condition of chronic growth hormone hypersecretion by a pituitary adenoma) often require pharmacological treatment. Somatostatin analogs (SSAs) such as pasireotide, lanreotide, and octreotide are frequently used as first-line medical therapy. As SSAs are delivered by regular subcutaneous or intramuscular injections, they can result in injection-related pain or anxiety and can be challenging to fit into patients’ lifestyles. When combined with the prolonged, debilitating psychological complications associated with acromegaly, these administration challenges can negatively impact compliance, adherence, and quality of life. Proactively managing patients’ expectations and providing appropriate, timely guidance are crucial for maximizing adherence, and ultimately, optimizing the treatment experience. As part of ongoing clinical research since 1997, our team at the University of Michigan has used SSAs to treat 30 patients with acromegaly. Based on our clinical experiences with multiple SSA administration regimens (long-acting intramuscular, long-acting deep subcutaneous, and twice-daily subcutaneous), we generated a dialog map that guides health care professionals through the many sensitive and complex patient communication issues surrounding this treatment process. Beginning with diagnosis, the dialog map includes discussion of treatment options, instruction on proper drug administration technique, and ensuring of appropriate follow-up care. At each step, we provide talking points that address the following: the patients’ clinical situation; their geographic, economic, and psychological concerns; and their inclination to communicate with clinicians. We have found that involving patients, nurses, and physicians as equal partners in the treatment process optimizes treatment initiation, adherence, and persistence in acromegaly. By encouraging collaboration across the care continuum, this dialog map can facilitate identification of the

  19. The care continuum in acromegaly: how patients, nurses, and physicians can collaborate for successful treatment experiences.

    PubMed

    Plunkett, Cynthia; Barkan, Ariel L

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acromegaly (a condition of chronic growth hormone hypersecretion by a pituitary adenoma) often require pharmacological treatment. Somatostatin analogs (SSAs) such as pasireotide, lanreotide, and octreotide are frequently used as first-line medical therapy. As SSAs are delivered by regular subcutaneous or intramuscular injections, they can result in injection-related pain or anxiety and can be challenging to fit into patients' lifestyles. When combined with the prolonged, debilitating psychological complications associated with acromegaly, these administration challenges can negatively impact compliance, adherence, and quality of life. Proactively managing patients' expectations and providing appropriate, timely guidance are crucial for maximizing adherence, and ultimately, optimizing the treatment experience. As part of ongoing clinical research since 1997, our team at the University of Michigan has used SSAs to treat 30 patients with acromegaly. Based on our clinical experiences with multiple SSA administration regimens (long-acting intramuscular, long-acting deep subcutaneous, and twice-daily subcutaneous), we generated a dialog map that guides health care professionals through the many sensitive and complex patient communication issues surrounding this treatment process. Beginning with diagnosis, the dialog map includes discussion of treatment options, instruction on proper drug administration technique, and ensuring of appropriate follow-up care. At each step, we provide talking points that address the following: the patients' clinical situation; their geographic, economic, and psychological concerns; and their inclination to communicate with clinicians. We have found that involving patients, nurses, and physicians as equal partners in the treatment process optimizes treatment initiation, adherence, and persistence in acromegaly. By encouraging collaboration across the care continuum, this dialog map can facilitate identification of the treatment

  20. “I just keep my antennae out” - How Rural Primary Care Physicians Respond to Intimate Partner Violence (IPV)

    PubMed Central

    McCall-Hosenfeld, Jennifer S.; Weisman, Carol S.; Perry, Amanda N.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Chuang, Cynthia H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Women in rural communities who are exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV) have fewer resources when seeking help due to limited health services, poverty and social isolation. Rural primary care physicians may be key sources of care for IPV victims. OBJECTIVES To assess the opinions and practices of primary care physicians caring for rural women with regard to IPV identification, the scope and severity of IPV as a health problem, how PCPs respond to IPV in their practices, and barriers to optimized IPV care in their communities. METHODS Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 internists, family practitioners, and obstetrician-gynecologists in rural central Pennsylvania. Interview transcripts were analyzed for major themes. RESULTS Most physicians did not practice routine screening for IPV due to competing time demands, lack of training, limited access to referral services as well as low confidence in their effectiveness, and concern that inquiry would harm the patient-doctor relationship. IPV was considered when patients presented with symptoms of mood, anxiety or somatic disorders. Responses to IPV included validation, danger assessment, safety planning, referral, and follow-up planning. Perceived barriers to rural women seeking help for IPV included traditional gender roles, lower education, economic dependence on the partner, low self-esteem, and patient reluctance to discuss IPV. To overcome barriers, physicians created a “safe sanctuary” to discuss IPV and suggested improved public health education and referral services. CONCLUSIONS Interventions to improve IPV-related care in rural communities should address barriers at multiple levels, including both physicians’ and patients’ comfort with discussing IPV. Provider training, community education, and improved access to referral services are key areas in which IPV-related care should be improved in rural communities. Our data support routine screening to better identify IPV and a

  1. Impact of electronic health record technology on the work and workflow of physicians in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Wetterneck, Tosha B.; Alyousef, Bashar; Brown, Roger L.; Cartmill, Randi S.; McGuire, Kerry; Hoonakker, Peter L.T.; Slagle, Jason; Van Roy, Kara S.; Walker, James M.; Weinger, Matthew B.; Xie, Anping; Wood, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of EHR technology on the work and workflow of ICU physicians and compare time spent by ICU resident and attending physicians on various tasks before and after EHR implementation. Design EHR technology with electronic order management (CPOE, medication administration and pharmacy system) and physician documentation was implemented in October 2007. Measurement We collected a total of 289 h of observation pre- and post-EHR implementation. We directly observed the work of residents in three ICUs (adult medical/surgical ICU, pediatric ICU and neonatal ICU) and attending physicians in one ICU (adult medical/surgical ICU). Results EHR implementation had an impact on the time distribution of tasks as well as the temporal patterns of tasks. After EHR implementation, both residents and attending physicians spent more of their time on clinical review and documentation (40% and 55% increases, respectively). EHR implementation also affected the frequency of switching between tasks, which increased for residents (from 117 to 154 tasks per hour) but decreased for attendings (from 138 to 106 tasks per hour), and the temporal flow of tasks, in particular around what tasks occurred before and after clinical review and documentation. No changes in the time spent in conversational tasks or the physical care of the patient were observed. Conclusions The use of EHR technology has a major impact on ICU physician work (e.g., increased time spent on clinical review and documentation) and workflow (e.g., clinical review and documentation becoming the focal point of many other tasks). Further studies should evaluate the impact of changes in physician work on the quality of care provided. PMID:25910685

  2. Experiences of the advanced nurse practitioner role in acute care.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Alison; Cooper, Joanne; Goldberg, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the service evaluation presented in this article was to explore the multidisciplinary team's (MDT) experiences and perception of the advanced nurse practitioner (ANP) role on an acute health care of the older person ward. A qualitative case study was carried out comprising semi-structured interviews with members of the MDT, exploring their experiences of the ANP role. An overarching theme of 'Is it a nurse? Is it a doctor? No, it's an ANP' emerged from the data, with three subthemes: the missing link; facilitating and leading holistic care; and safe, high quality care. The ANP role is valued by the MDT working with them and provides a unique skill set that has the potential to enhance care of older patients living with frailty. While there are challenges to its introduction, it is a role worth introducing to older people's wards.

  3. Experiences of the advanced nurse practitioner role in acute care.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Alison; Cooper, Joanne; Goldberg, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the service evaluation presented in this article was to explore the multidisciplinary team's (MDT) experiences and perception of the advanced nurse practitioner (ANP) role on an acute health care of the older person ward. A qualitative case study was carried out comprising semi-structured interviews with members of the MDT, exploring their experiences of the ANP role. An overarching theme of 'Is it a nurse? Is it a doctor? No, it's an ANP' emerged from the data, with three subthemes: the missing link; facilitating and leading holistic care; and safe, high quality care. The ANP role is valued by the MDT working with them and provides a unique skill set that has the potential to enhance care of older patients living with frailty. While there are challenges to its introduction, it is a role worth introducing to older people's wards. PMID:27125941

  4. Lessons learned from study of depression in cardiovascular patients in an acute-care heart and vascular hospital.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael; Brennan, J Michael; Vish, Nancy; Adams, Jenny; Muldoon, Mary; Renbarger, Tara; Garner, John

    2013-01-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in patients with cardiovascular disease, but questions about the effectiveness of screening and intervention remain unanswered. To evaluate the effects of proactive intervention at an acute-care heart and vascular hospital, patients who reported depressive symptoms on admission were randomized to an active, counseling-based depression intervention plus standard care (referral to a primary or psychiatric care physician) or to standard care alone. Despite early termination of patient enrollment because of lower-than-expected recruitment rates, the project had a positive impact. By involving and educating staff, the investigators raised awareness and improved the process of identifying and helping depressed patients. The lessons in study design and execution gained from this experience will help ensure success in future studies of this condition.

  5. Pain management in the acute care setting: Update and debates.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Greta M

    2016-02-01

    Pain management in the paediatric acute care setting is underutilised and can be improved. An awareness of the analgesic options available and their limitations is an important starting point. This article describes the evolving understanding of relevant pharmacogenomics and safety data of the various analgesic agents with a focus on agents available in Australia and New Zealand. It highlights the concerns with the use of codeine in children and discusses alternative oral opioids. Key features of oral, parenteral, inhaled and intranasal analgesic agents are discussed, as well as evidence supported use of sweet tasting solutions and non-pharmacological interventions. One of the biggest changes in acute care pain management has been the advent of intranasal fentanyl providing reliable potent analgesia without the need for intravenous access. The article will also address the issue of multimodal analgesia where a single agent is insufficient.

  6. Current concepts: management of diarrhea in acute care.

    PubMed

    Fruto, L V

    1994-09-01

    Diarrhea is common in the acute care setting, particularly among critically ill patients. Factors that cause diarrhea are usually multifactorial; some of the most common include medications, hyperosmolar or rapidly delivered tube feedings, atrophy of intestinal epithelium or ischemic bowel, short bowel syndrome, pseudomembranous colitis, infection (Salmonella and Shigella species), opportunistic infections in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and severe hypoproteinemia. This article reviews different types and mechanisms of diarrhea commonly encountered in acute care. It includes current concepts of managing diarrhea, such as calculation of stool osmotic gap, identification of medications that cause diarrhea, modification of enteral therapy, and the use of antisecretory agents. Nursing responsibilities and contributions in the collaborative assessment and clinical management of diarrhea are also explored. PMID:7704125

  7. Analyzing staffing trade-offs on acute care hospital units.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Steven; Vonderhaar, Kate; Stewart, Jennifer; Virkstis, Katherine; Terry, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Given today's resource-limited environment, nurse leaders must make judicious staffing decisions to deliver safe, cost-effective care. Investing in 1 element of staffing often requires scaling back in another. A national cross section of acute care hospital unit leaders was surveyed regarding staffing resources, including nurse workload, education, specialty certification, experience, and level of support staff. The authors report findings from the survey and discuss the trade-offs observed among units regarding nurse-to-patient ratios and the proportion of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. PMID:25208268

  8. Unnecessary Transfers for Acute Surgical Care: Who and Why?

    PubMed

    Broman, Kristy Kummerow; Poulose, Benjamin K; Phillips, Sharon E; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Sharp, Kenneth W; Pierce, Richard A; Holzman, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    Interhospital transfers for acute surgical care occur commonly, but without clear guidelines or protocols. Transfers may subject patients and delivery systems to significant burdens without clear clinical benefit. The incidence and factors associated with unnecessary transfers are not well described. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patient transfers within a regional referral network to a tertiary center for nontrauma acute surgical care from 2009 to 2013. Clinically unnecessary transfers were defined as transfers that resulted in no intervention (operation, endoscopy, or interventional radiology procedure) and discharge to home within 72 hours. We performed bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. The study population included 2177 patient transfers, 19 per cent of which were determined to be clinically unnecessary. After adjustment, clinically unnecessary transfers were more commonly performed for patient request (odds ratio = 2.52, 95% confidence interval = 1.60-3.99), continuity of care (1.87, 1.44-2.42), and care by urologic (1.50, 1.06-2.13) and vascular services (1.44, 1.03-2.01). Patients with higher comorbidity and severity of illness scores were less likely to have unnecessary transfers. The burden of unnecessary transfers could be mitigated by identifying appropriate transfer candidates through mutually developed guidelines, interfacility collaboration, and increased use of remote care to provide surgical subspecialty consultation and maintain continuity. PMID:27657580

  9. Unnecessary Antibiotics for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections: Association With Care Setting and Patient Demographics

    PubMed Central

    Barlam, Tamar F.; Soria-Saucedo, Rene; Cabral, Howard J.; Kazis, Lewis E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Up to 40% of antibiotics are prescribed unnecessarily for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs). We sought to define factors associated with antibiotic overprescribing of ARTIs to inform efforts to improve practice. Methods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of ARTI visits between 2006 and 2010 from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Those surveys provide a representative sample of US visits to community-based physicians and to hospital-based emergency departments (EDs) and outpatient practices. Patient factors (age, sex, race, underlying lung disease, tobacco use, insurance), physician specialty, practice demographics (percentage poverty, median household income, percentage with a Bachelor's Degree, urban-rural status, geographic region), and care setting (ED, hospital, or community-based practice) were evaluated as predictors of antibiotic overprescribing for ARTIs. Results. Hospital and community-practice visits had more antibiotic overprescribing than ED visits (odds ratio [OR] = 1.64 and 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27–2.12 and OR = 1.59 and 95% CI, 1.26–2.01, respectively). Care setting had significant interactions with geographic region and urban and rural location. The quartile with the lowest percentage of college-educated residents had significantly greater overprescribing (adjusted OR = 1.41; 95% CI, 1.07–1.86) than the highest quartile. Current tobacco users were overprescribed more often than nonsmokers (OR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.38–2.12). Patient age, insurance, and provider specialty were other significant predictors. Conclusions. Tobacco use and a lower grouped rate of college education were associated with overprescribing and may reflect poor health literacy. A focus on educating the patient may be an effective approach to stewardship. PMID:27006968

  10. The adoption of the Reference Framework for diabetes care among primary care physicians in primary care settings: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Wang, Harry H X; Kwan, Mandy W M; Chan, Wai Man; Fan, Carmen K M; Liang, Miaoyin; Li, Shannon Ts; Fung, Franklin D H; Yeung, Ming Sze; Chan, David K L; Griffiths, Sian M

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has been increasing both globally and locally. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are in a privileged position to provide first contact and continuing care for diabetic patients. A territory-wide Reference Framework for Diabetes Care for Adults has been released by the Hong Kong Primary Care Office in 2010, with the aim to further enhance evidence-based and high quality care for diabetes in the primary care setting through wide adoption of the Reference Framework.A valid questionnaire survey was conducted among PCPs to evaluate the levels of, and the factors associated with, their adoption of the Reference Framework.A total of 414 completed surveys were received with the response rate of 13.0%. The average adoption score was 3.29 (SD 0.51) out of 4. Approximately 70% of PCPs highly adopted the Reference Framework in their routine practice. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that the PCPs perceptions on the inclusion of sufficient local information (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.748, 95%CI 1.597-14.115, P = 0.005) and reduction of professional autonomy of PCPs (aOR = 1.859, 95%CI 1.013-3.411, P = 0.045) were more likely to influence their adoption level of the Reference Framework for diabetes care in daily practices.The overall level of guideline adoption was found to be relatively high among PCPs for adult diabetes in primary care settings. The adoption barriers identified in this study should be addressed in the continuous updating of the Reference Framework. Strategies need to be considered to enhance the guideline adoption and implementation capacity.

  11. Utilization of Morning Report by Acute Care Surgery Teams: Results from a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, Patricia L.; Collins, Courtney; Santry, Heena P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The rigor of hand-offs is increasingly scrutinized in the era of shift-based patient care. Acute Care Surgery (ACS) embraced such a model of care; however, little is known about hand-offs in ACS programs. Methods We conducted 18 open-ended interviews with ACS leaders representing diverse geographic and practice settings. Two independent reviewers analyzed interviews using an inductive approach to elucidate themes regarding use of morning report (NVivo qualitative analysis software). Results 12/18 respondents reported a morning report but only 6/12 included attending-to-attending hand-offs. 1/12 incentivized attendings to participate, 2/12 included nursing staff, and 2/12 included physician extenders. Cited benefits of morning report were safe and effective information exchange (2/12), quality improvement (2/12), multidisciplinary discussion (1/12), and resident education (2/12). 3/12 respondents cited time commitment as the main limitation of morning report. Conclusions Morning report is under-utilized among ACS programs; however, if implemented strategically, it may improve patient care and resident education. PMID:24157348

  12. Directly Observed Patient–Physician Discussions in Palliative and End-of-Life Care: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Reid, M. Carrington; Shengelia, Rouzi; Adelman, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To review studies that used direct observation (i.e., videotaping or audiotaping) methods in palliative/end-of-life care communication research. Design Descriptive thematic analysis. Setting : Multinational studies were conducted in both the outpatient and inpatient setting. Measurements Extensive bibliographic searches (January 1, 1998 to July 31, 2009) of English-language literature involving physician–patient (or physician–family) interactions were conducted and augmented by reviews of reference listings. Three investigators independently abstracted key information from each article. Results Of the 20 retained articles, most enrolled young-old participants (mean age, 60 years) who were white and had a cancer diagnosis. Patient/family participation rates ranged from 68% to 89% demonstrating feasibility of this approach when studying palliative/end-of-life care communication issues. Four common themes were identified: (1) physicians focus on medical/technical and avoid emotional/quality of life issues; (2) sensitive topics are perceived by physicians to take longer to discuss and often do take longer to discuss; (3) physicians dominate discussions; and (4) patient/family satisfaction is associated with supportive physician behaviors. Conclusions This study demonstrates that direct observation methods can be feasibly used when studying physician–patient/physician–family communication in palliative/end-of-life care, but few investigations have utilized this approach. This article highlights areas that need improvement, including physicians' ability to address patient/family emotional issues and provide what patients and families find most satisfying (participation and support). A particular focus on older patients and patients with end-stage or late-stage chronic (noncancer) illness, the adaptation/application of existing communication measurement tools to capture palliative care communication issues, and development of corresponding

  13. Predicting the Adoption of Electronic Health Records by Physicians: When Will Health Care be Paperless?

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Eric W.; Menachemi, Nir; Phillips, M. Thad

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was threefold. First, we gathered and synthesized the historic literature regarding electronic health record (EHR) adoption rates among physicians in small practices (ten or fewer members). Next, we constructed models to project estimated future EHR adoption trends and timelines. We then determined the likelihood of achieving universal EHR adoption in the near future and articulate how barriers can be overcome in the small and solo practice medical environment. Design: This study used EHR adoption data from six previous surveys of small practices to estimate historic market penetration rates. Applying technology diffusion theory, three future adoption scenarios, optimistic, best estimate, and conservative, are empirically derived. Measurement: EHR adoption parameters, external and internal coefficients of influence, are estimated using Bass diffusion models. Results: All three EHR scenarios display the characteristic diffusion S curve that is indicative that the technology is likely to achieve significant market penetration, given enough time. Under current conditions, EHR adoption will reach its maximum market share in 2024 in the small practice setting. Conclusion: The promise of improved care quality and cost control has prompted a call for universal EHR adoption by 2014. The EHR products now available are unlikely to achieve full diffusion in a critical market segment within the time frame being targeted by policy makers. PMID:16221936

  14. Globalization and health care: global justice and the role of physicians.

    PubMed

    Toumi, Rabee

    2014-02-01

    In today's globalized world, nations cannot be totally isolated from or indifferent to their neighbors, especially in regards to medicine and health. While globalization has brought prosperity to millions, disparities among nations and nationals are growing raising once again the question of justice. Similarly, while medicine has developed dramatically over the past few decades, health disparities at the global level are staggering. Seemingly, what our humanity could achieve in matters of scientific development is not justly distributed to benefit everyone. In this paper, it will be argued that a global theoretical agreement on principles of justice may prove unattainable; however, a grass-roots change is warranted to change the current situation. The UNESCO Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights will be considered as a starting point to achieve this change through extracting the main values embedded in its principles. These values, namely, respecting human dignity and tending to human vulnerability with a hospitable attitude, should then be revived in medical practice. Medical education will be one possible venue to achieve that, especially through role models. Future physicians will then become the fervent advocates for a global and just distribution of health care.

  15. Intensive care unit referring physician usage of PACS workstation functions based on disease categories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Steven C.; Kundel, Harold L.; Shile, Peter E.; Carey, Bruce; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Feingold, Eric R.

    1994-05-01

    As part of a study of the use of a PACS workstation compared to film in a Medical Intensive Care Unit, logs of workstation activity were maintained. The software for the workstation kept track of the type of user (i.e., intern, resident, fellow, or attending physician) and also of the workstation image manipulation functions used. The functions logged were: no operation, brightness/contrast adjustment, invert video, zoom, and high resolution display (this last function resulted in the display of the full 2 K X 2 K image rather than the usual subsampled 1 K X 1 K image. Associated data collection allows us to obtain the diagnostic category of the examination being viewed (e.g., location of tubes and lines, rule out: pneumonia, congestive heart failure, pneumothorax, and pleural effusion). The diagnostic categories and user type were then correlated with the use of workstation functions during viewing of images. In general, there was an inverse relationship between the level of training and the number of workstation uses. About two-thirds of the time, there was no image manipulation operation performed. Adjustment of brightness/contrast had the highest percentage of use overall, followed by zoom, video invert, and high resolution display.

  16. Process and Outcome Measures among COPD Patients with a Hospitalization Cared for by an Advance Practice Provider or Primary Care Physician

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amitesh; Zhang, Wei; Kuo, YongFang; Sharma, Gulshan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the process and outcomes of care of COPD patients by Advanced Practice Providers (APPs) and primary care physicians. Methods We conducted a cross sectional retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries with COPD who had at least one hospitalization in 2010. We examined the process measures of receipt of spirometry evaluation, influenza and pneumococcal vaccine, use of COPD medications, and referral to a pulmonary specialist visit. Outcome measures were emergency department (ER) visit, number of hospitalizations and 30-day readmission in 2010. Results A total of 7,257 Medicare beneficiaries with COPD were included. Of these, 1,999 and 5,258 received primary care from APPs and primary care physicians, respectively. Patients in the APP group were more likely to be white, younger, male, residing in non-metropolitan areas and have fewer comorbidities. In terms of process of care measures, APPs were more likely to prescribe short acting bronchodilators (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.18, 95%Confidence Interval [CI] 1.05–1.32), oxygen therapy (aOR = 1.25, 95% CI 1.12–1.40) and consult a pulmonary specialist (aOR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.23–1.56), but less likely to give influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations. Patients receiving care from APPs had lower rates of ER visits for COPD (aOR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.71–0.98) and had a higher follow-up rate with pulmonary specialist within 30 days of hospitalization for COPD (aOR = 1.25, 95%CI 1.07–1.48) than those cared for by physicians. Conclusions Compared to patients cared for by physicians, patients cared for by APPs were more likely to receive short acting bronchodilator, oxygen therapy and been referred to pulmonologist, however they had lower rates of vaccination probably due to lower age group. Patients cared for by APPs were less like to visit an ER for COPD compared to patients care for by physicians, conversely there was no differences in hospitalization or readmission for COPD between MDs and

  17. The professional structure of Soviet medical care: the relationship between personal characteristics, medical education, and occupational setting for Estonian physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, D A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Using the Estonian example, this study provides data to describe the ways in which personal, educational, and occupational factors interacted to determine the professional structure of the Soviet health care system. METHODS. The study analyzes data gathered from a survey of 20% of the physicians in Estonia. It measures the frequencies of pertinent personal and occupational factors, and uses multivariate analysis to explore relationships between these factors. RESULTS. Most physicians in Estonia are women and work in urban settings. About half of the physicians work in hospitals, and one third work in large outpatient clinics called polyclinics. About one third work in primary care. Gender affects education, specialty, type of workplace, and administrative duties; nationality affects education and administrative duties. CONCLUSIONS. The Soviet system of health care derived its professional structure from a combination of personal and occupational factors. Those considering options for reform of the health care systems of the newly independent states that once constituted the Soviet Union should appreciate the nature of these structural forces. PMID:7892922

  18. Not If, But When: Impact of a Driving and Dementia Awareness and Education Campaign for Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Moorhouse, Paige; Hamilton, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Canadian physicians are responsible for assessing medical fitness to drive; however, national data indicate that physicians lack confidence in performing such assessments and face numerous barriers to addressing driving in patients with dementia. We report on the impact of a provincial Web-based resource (www.notifbutwhen.ca) regarding driving cessation in dementia aimed towards primary care physicians (PCPs). Methods A pre/post cross-sectional survey (n = 134 baseline and n = 113 follow-up) of English-speaking, Nova Scotian PCPs. Descriptive statistics, chi-square, Pearson correlation, and multivariable logistic regression (controlling for sex, years of practice, and practice type) are reported. Results Most PCPs consider discussions regarding driving cessation to be routine part of dementia care; however, report multiple barriers to such discussions. Although the Web-based resource and awareness campaign were not associated with improvement in physician comfort in assessing driving risk in dementia, after completion of the campaign, fewer PCPs reported avoiding the topic of driving. Additionally, family resistance and lack of resources were less often reported as barriers. Conclusions Despite a lack of confidence, Nova Scotian PCPs routinely discuss driving cessation, and perform driving assessments for individuals with dementia. The Web-based resource and awareness campaign have shown moderate effectiveness in addressing specific barriers to assessment (e.g., caregiver resistance, lack of resources). Future efforts will address additional barriers, such as lack of comfort in decision-making. PMID:24883165

  19. Long-term acute care hospitals and Georgia Medicaid: Utilization, outcomes, and cost

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Evan S.; Willis, Carla; Rencher, William C; Zhou, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Because most research on long-term acute care hospitals has focused on Medicare, the objective of this research is to describe the Georgia Medicaid population who received care at a long-term acute care hospital, the type and volume of services provided by these long-term acute care hospitals, and the costs and outcomes of these services. For those with select respiratory condi