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Sample records for acute care physicians

  1. Impact of Advanced Health Care Directives on Treatment Decisions by Physicians in Patients with Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Chaudhry, Saqib A.; Connelly, Bo; Abott, Emily; Janjua, Tariq; Kim, Stanley H.; Miley, Jefferson T.; Rodriguez, Gustavo J.; Uzun, Guven; Watanabe, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    of directives). Intravenous medication and defibrillation for cardiac arrest was withheld in 29% (compared with 19%) of the treatment decisions in the presence of advance health care directives. The two attorney raters found the description of acceptable outcome inadequate in 14 and 21 of 28 advance health care directives reviewed, respectively. The overall mean kappa for agreement regarding adequacy of documentation was modest (43%) for “does the advance health care directive specify which treatments the patient would choose, or refuse to receive if they were diagnosed with an acute, terminal condition?” and lowest (3%) for “description of acceptable outcome”. Conclusions We did not find any prominent differences in most “routine complexity,” “moderate complexity,” or “high complexity” treatment decisions in patient management in the presence of advance health care directives. Presence of advance health care directives also did not reduce the prominent variance among physicians in treatment decisions. PMID:23552508

  2. A clinical training unit for diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections: an intervention for primary health care physicians in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bojalil, R; Guiscafré, H; Espinosa, P; Viniegra, L; Martínez, H; Palafox, M; Gutiérrez, G

    1999-01-01

    In Tlaxcala State, Mexico, we determined that 80% of children who died from diarrhoea or acute respiratory infections (ARI) received medical care before death; in more than 70% of the cases this care was provided by a private physician. Several strategies have been developed to improve physicians' primary health care practices but private practitioners have only rarely been included. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of in-service training on the case management of diarrhoea and ARI among under-5-year-olds provided by private and public primary physicians. The training consisted of a five-day course of in-service practice during which physicians diagnosed and treated sick children attending a centre and conducted clinical discussions of cases under guidance. Each training course was limited to six physicians. Clinical performance was evaluated by observation before and after the courses. The evaluation of diarrhoea case management covered assessment of dehydration, hydration therapy, prescription of antimicrobial and other drugs, advice on diet, and counselling for mothers; that of ARI case management covered diagnosis, decisions on antimicrobial therapy, use of symptomatic drugs, and counselling for mothers. In general the performance of public physicians both before and after the intervention was better than that of private doctors. Most aspects of the case management of children with diarrhoea improved among both groups of physicians after the course; the proportion of private physicians who had five or six correct elements out of six increased from 14% to 37%: for public physicians the corresponding increase was from 53% to 73%. In ARI case management, decisions taken on antimicrobial therapy and symptomatic drug use improved in both groups; the proportion of private physicians with at least three correct elements out of four increased from 13% to 42%, while among public doctors the corresponding increase was from 43% to 78%. Hands

  3. A clinical training unit for diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections: an intervention for primary health care physicians in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Bojalil, R.; Guiscafré, H.; Espinosa, P.; Viniegra, L.; Martínez, H.; Palafox, M.; Gutiérrez, G.

    1999-01-01

    In Tlaxcala State, Mexico, we determined that 80% of children who died from diarrhoea or acute respiratory infections (ARI) received medical care before death; in more than 70% of the cases this care was provided by a private physician. Several strategies have been developed to improve physicians' primary health care practices but private practitioners have only rarely been included. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of in-service training on the case management of diarrhoea and ARI among under-5-year-olds provided by private and public primary physicians. The training consisted of a five-day course of in-service practice during which physicians diagnosed and treated sick children attending a centre and conducted clinical discussions of cases under guidance. Each training course was limited to six physicians. Clinical performance was evaluated by observation before and after the courses. The evaluation of diarrhoea case management covered assessment of dehydration, hydration therapy, prescription of antimicrobial and other drugs, advice on diet, and counselling for mothers; that of ARI case management covered diagnosis, decisions on antimicrobial therapy, use of symptomatic drugs, and counselling for mothers. In general the performance of public physicians both before and after the intervention was better than that of private doctors. Most aspects of the case management of children with diarrhoea improved among both groups of physicians after the course; the proportion of private physicians who had five or six correct elements out of six increased from 14% to 37%: for public physicians the corresponding increase was from 53% to 73%. In ARI case management, decisions taken on antimicrobial therapy and symptomatic drug use improved in both groups; the proportion of private physicians with at least three correct elements out of four increased from 13% to 42%, while among public doctors the corresponding increase was from 43% to 78%. Hands

  4. Development of national standardized all-hazard disaster core competencies for acute care physicians, nurses, and EMS professionals.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Carl H; Koenig, Kristi L; Whiteside, Mary; Murray, Rick

    2012-03-01

    The training of medical personnel to provide care for disaster victims is a priority for the physician community, the federal government, and society as a whole. Course development for such training guided by well-accepted standardized core competencies is lacking, however. This project identified a set of core competencies and performance objectives based on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required by the specific target audience (emergency department nurses, emergency physicians, and out-of-hospital emergency medical services personnel) to ensure they can treat the injuries and illnesses experienced by victims of disasters regardless of cause. The core competencies provide a blueprint for the development or refinement of disaster training courses. This expert consensus project, supported by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, incorporated an all-hazard, comprehensive emergency management approach addressing every type of disaster to minimize the effect on the public's health. An instructional systems design process was used to guide the development of audience-appropriate competencies and performance objectives. Participants, representing multiple academic and provider organizations, used a modified Delphi approach to achieve consensus on recommendations. A framework of 19 content categories (domains), 19 core competencies, and more than 90 performance objectives was developed for acute medical care personnel to address the requirements of effective all-hazards disaster response. Creating disaster curricula and training based on the core competencies and performance objectives identified in this article will ensure that acute medical care personnel are prepared to treat patients and address associated ramifications/consequences during any catastrophic event.

  5. Managed care and physician disability.

    PubMed

    Fraunfelder, F T; Fraunfelder, N

    1999-07-01

    The number of disability claims by physicians has skyrocketed during the last decade. One of the primary reasons for this escalation is decreased job satisfaction brought about by managed care. Certain physician groups are more vulnerable to the stress of advanced managed care: solo practitioners, specialists and subspecialists, certain generalists, doctors with independent personalities, middle-aged or near-retirement physicians, impaired physicians, and those whose practices are almost solely contract driven. Based on analysis of physician disability claims, certain protective measures are recommended to relieve stress and promote survival in today's health care market.

  6. The acute hospital setting as a place of death and final care: a qualitative study on perspectives of family physicians, nurses and family carers.

    PubMed

    Reyniers, Thijs; Houttekier, Dirk; Cohen, Joachim; Pasman, H Roeline; Deliens, Luc

    2014-05-01

    While the focus of end-of-life care research and policy has predominantly been on 'death in a homelike environment', little is known about perceptions of the acute hospital setting as a place of final care or death. Using a qualitative design and constant comparative analysis, the perspectives of family physicians, nurses and family carers were explored. Participants generally perceived the acute hospital setting to be inadequate for terminally ill patients, although they indicated that in some circumstances it might be a 'safe haven'. This implies that a higher quality of end-of-life care provision in the acute hospital setting needs to be ensured, preferably by improving communication skills. At the same time alternatives to the acute hospital setting need to be developed or expanded.

  7. Training Physicians in Palliative Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, J. Cameron; Krammer, Lisa M.; von Gunten, Charles F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the elements of a program in hospice and palliative medicine that may serve as a model of an effective system of physician education. Topics for the palliative-care curriculum include hospice medicine, breaking bad news, pain management, the process of dying, and managing personal stress. (JOW)

  8. No exodus: physicians and managed care networks.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Ann S; Reschovsky, James D

    2006-05-01

    After remaining stable since 1996-97, the percentage of U.S. physicians who do not contract with managed care plans rose from 9.2 percent in 2000-01 to 11.5 percent in 2004-05, according to a national study from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). While physicians have not left managed care networks in large numbers, this small but statistically significant increase could signal a trend toward greater out-of-pocket costs for patients and a decline in patient access to physicians. The increase in physicians without managed care contracts was broad-based across specialties and other physician and practice characteristics. Compared with physicians who have one or more managed care contracts, physicians without managed care contracts are more likely to have practiced for more than 20 years, work part time, lack board certification, practice solo or in two-physician groups, and live in the western United States. The study also found substantial variation in the proportion of physicians without managed care contracts across communities, suggesting that local market conditions influence decisions to contract with managed care plans.

  9. Physician Migration, Education, and Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norcini, John J.; Mazmanian, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    Physician migration is a complex and multifaceted phenomenon that is intimately intertwined with medical education. Imbalances in the production of physicians lead to workforce shortages and surpluses that compromise the ability to deliver adequate and equitable health care to large parts of the world's population. In this overview, we address a…

  10. Access to care: the physician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Tice, Alan; Ruckle, Janessa E; Sultan, Omar S; Kemble, Stephen

    2011-02-01

    Private practice physicians in Hawaii were surveyed to better understand their impressions of different insurance plans and their willingness to care for patients with those plans. Physician experiences and perspectives were investigated in regard to reimbursement, formulary limitations, pre-authorizations, specialty referrals, responsiveness to problems, and patient knowledge of their plans. The willingness of physicians to accept new patients from specific insurance company programs clearly correlated with the difficulties and limitations physicians perceive in working with the companies (p<0.0012). Survey results indicate that providers in private practice were much more likely to accept University Health Alliance (UHA) and Hawaii Medical Services Association (HMSA) Commercial insurance than Aloha Care Advantage and Aloha Quest. This was likely related to the more favorable impressions of the services, payments, and lower administrative burden offered by those companies compared with others.

  11. Learing Disabilities and the Primary Care Physician

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, William J.

    1989-01-01

    Approximately 10% of the population has learning disabilities (LD). Although the main manifestations occur in childhood, many of the primary and secondary manifestations of LD can continue into adult life. The high prevalence of LD and the current economic climate in Canada imply that the primary care physician must have a role in the identification, diagnosis, and management services for persons with LD. Information about the specific aspects of a particular person's LD should be incorporated into the evaluation and management of other health matters with which the primary care physician deals. PMID:21248890

  12. [Allergy diagnosis by primary care physicians].

    PubMed

    Eigenmann, Philippe A

    2010-04-21

    Primary care physicians will conduct allergy diagnosis based on the history provided by the patient. In case of a possible IgE type allergy, investigations will be made by skin tests or measurement of specific IgE antibodies in the serum. Interpretation of positive tests will have to consider possible sensitizations in absence of allergic symptoms that should not lead to inadequate therapeutic measures or diet. This review will provide to primary care physicians guidance to choose the best method in the appropriate situations for allergy diagnosis.

  13. Primary care physician supply, physician compensation, and Medicare fees: what is the connection?

    PubMed

    Dummit, Laura A

    2008-11-03

    Primary care, a cornerstone of several health reform efforts, is believed by many to be in a crisis because of inadequate supply to meet future demand. This belief has focused attention on the adequacy of primary care physician supply and ways to boost access to primary care. One suggested approach is to raise Medicare fees for primary care services. Whether higher Medicare fees would increase physician interest in primary care specialties by reducing compensation disparities between primary care and other specialties has not been established. Further, many questions remain about the assumptions underlying these policy concerns. Is there really a primary care physician crisis? Why does compensation across physician specialties vary so widely? Can Medicare physician fee changes affect access to primary care? These questions defy simple answers. This issue brief lays out the latest information on physician workforce, compensation differences across physician specialties, and Medicare's physician fee-setting process.

  14. Primary Care Physicians' Dementia Care Practices: Evidence of Geographic Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Zlateva, Ianita; Delaney, Colleen; Kleppinger, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article explores primary care physicians' (PCPs) self-reported approaches and barriers to management of patients with dementia, with a focus on comparisons in dementia care practices between PCPs in 2 states. Design and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, questionnaires were mailed to 600 randomly selected licensed PCPs in…

  15. Physician payments under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Abe; Shapiro, Adam Hale

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the impact of major health insurance reform on payments made in the health care sector. We study the prices of services paid to physicians in the privately insured market during the Massachusetts health care reform. The reform increased the number of insured individuals as well as introduced an online marketplace where insurers compete. We estimate that, over the reform period, physician payments increased at least 11 percentage points relative to control areas. Payment increases began around the time legislation passed the House and Senate-the period in which their was a high probability of the bill eventually becoming law. This result is consistent with fixed-duration payment contracts being negotiated in anticipation of future demand and competition.

  16. Physicians' attitudes and behaviors toward home health care services.

    PubMed

    Javalgi, R; Joseph, W B

    1991-12-01

    The authors investigate physicians' attitudes, information-seeking behaviors, and behavioral intentions toward home health care programs. Survey results show that physicians favor the concept, but knowledge and awareness levels about available programs vary with the physicians' specialties. Evidence also is reported on specific problems encountered, sources of information used to make home care referrals, and physicians' perceptions of the impact of home care programs on their practice. Finally, policy implications are drawn for marketers of home health care programs.

  17. [Short course for primary physicians care].

    PubMed

    Eshet, I; Van Relta, R; Margalit, A; Baharir, Z

    1995-11-15

    This department of family medicine has been challenged with helping a group of Russian immigrant physicians find places in primary care clinics, quickly and at minimal expense. A 3-month course was set up based on the Family Practice Residency Syllabus and the SFATAM approach, led by teachers and tutors from our department. 30 newly immigrated Russian physicians participated. The course included: lectures and exercises in treatment and communication with patients with a variety of common medical problems in the primary care setting; improvement of fluency in Hebrew relevant to the work setting; and information on the function of primary care and professional clinics. Before-and-after questionnaires evaluating optimal use of a 10- minute meeting with a client presenting with headache were administered. The data showed that the physicians had learned to use more psychosocial diagnostic question and more psychosocial interventions. There was a cleared trend toward greater awareness of the patient's environment, his family, social connections and work. There was no change in biomedical inquiry and interventions but a clear trend to a decrease in recommendations for tests and in referrals. The authors recommend the following didactic tools: adopting a biopsychosocial attitude, active participation of students in the learning situation, working in small groups, use of simulations and video clips, and acquiring basic communication experience.

  18. Physicians' Involvement with the New York State Health Care Proxy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Janna C.; Sealy, Yvette M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined physicians' attitude, involvement, and perceived barriers with the health care proxy. A cross sectional, correlational design was used to survey practicing physicians (N = 70). Physicians had positive attitudes toward the health care proxy and indicated that the most significant barriers to health care proxy completion were…

  19. Division of primary care services between physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners for older patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Everett, Christine M; Thorpe, Carolyn T; Palta, Mari; Carayon, Pascale; Gilchrist, Valerie J; Smith, Maureen A

    2013-10-01

    Team-based care involving physician assistants and/or nurse practitioners (PA/NPs) in the patient-centered medical home is one approach to improving care quality. However, little is known about how to incorporate PA/NPs into primary care teams. Using data from a large physician group, we describe the division of patients and services (e.g., acute, chronic, preventive, other) between primary care providers for older diabetes patients on panels with varying levels of PA/NP involvement (i.e., no role, supplemental provider, or usual provider of care). Panels with PA/NP usual providers had higher proportions of patients with Medicaid, disability, and depression. Patients with physician usual providers had similar probabilities of visits with supplemental PA/NPs and physicians for all service types. However, patients with PA/NP usual providers had higher probabilities of visits with a supplemental physician. Understanding how patients and services are divided between PA/NPs and physicians will assist in defining provider roles on primary care teams.

  20. Computerized Physician Order Entry: Reluctance of Physician Adoption of Technology Linked to Improving Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulinski, Don

    2013-01-01

    Physicians are the influential force in the complex field of patient care delivery. Physicians determine when and where patient healthcare is delivered and affect 80% of the money spent on it. Computerized systems used in the delivery of healthcare information have become an integral part that physicians use to provide patient care. This study…

  1. Profiling primary care physicians for a new managed care network.

    PubMed

    Ozminkowski, R J; Noether, M; Nathanson, P; Smith, K M; Raney, B E; Mickey, D; Hawley, P M

    1997-08-01

    We developed methods for comparing physicians who would be selected to participate in a major employer's self-insurance program. These methods used insurance claims data to identify and profile physicians according to deviations from prevailing practice and outcome patterns, after considering differences in case-mix and severity of illness among the patients treated by those providers. The discussion notes the usefulness and limitations of claims data for this and other purposes. We also comment on policy implications and the relationships between our methods and health care reform strategies designed to influence overall health care costs.

  2. How managed care growth affects where physicians locate their practices.

    PubMed

    Polsky, D; Escarce, J J

    2000-11-01

    Managed care has had a profound effect on physician practice. It has altered patterns in the use of physician services, and consequently, the practice and employment options available to physicians. But managed care growth has not been uniform across the United States, and has spawned wide geographic disparities in earning opportunities for generalists and specialists. This Issue Brief summarizes new information on how managed care has affected physicians' labor market decisions and the impact of managed care on the number and distribution of physicians across the country.

  3. Appropriate spiritual care by physicians: a theological perspective.

    PubMed

    Pembroke, Neil Francis

    2008-12-01

    It is argued that when spiritual care by physicians is linked to the empirical research indicating the salutary effect on health of religious beliefs and practices an unintended degradation of religion is involved. It is contended that it is much more desirable to see support for the patient's spirituality as part of holistic care. A proposal for appropriate spiritual care by physicians is offered.

  4. Health-care reform's great expectations and physician reality.

    PubMed

    Van Mol, Andre

    2010-09-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will not prove to be the reform for which physicians were long hoping. Private insurance rates will climb sharply, forcing people onto government programs; physician reimbursement will plummet; the physician shortage will worsen; rationing in the form of waiting lists is certain; health care as a whole will worsen; and once fully engaged, nationalization of health care will be irreversible.

  5. Primary care physician use across the breast cancer care continuum

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Lofters, Aisha; Moineddin, Rahim; Decker, Kathleen; Groome, Patti; Kendell, Cynthia; Krzyzanowska, Monika; Li, Dongdong; McBride, Mary L.; Mittmann, Nicole; Porter, Geoff; Turner, Donna; Urquhart, Robin; Winget, Marcy; Zhang, Yang; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe primary care physician (PCP) use and continuity of PCP care across the breast cancer care continuum. Design Population-based, retrospective cohort study using provincial cancer registries linked to health administrative databases. Setting British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario. Participants All women with incident invasive breast cancer from 2007 to 2012 in Manitoba and Ontario and from 2007 to 2011 in British Columbia. Main outcome measures The number and proportions of visits to PCPs were determined. Continuity of care was measured using the Usual Provider of Care index calculated as the proportion of visits to the most-often-visited PCP in the 6 to 30 months before a breast cancer diagnosis (baseline) and from 1 to 3 years following a breast cancer diagnosis (survivorship). Results More than three-quarters of patients visited their PCPs 2 or more times during the breast cancer diagnostic period, and more than 80% of patients had at least 1 PCP visit during breast cancer adjuvant treatment. Contact with the PCP decreased over time during breast cancer survivorship. Of the 3 phases, women appeared to be most likely to not have PCP contact during adjuvant treatment, with 10.7% (Ontario) to 18.7% (British Columbia) of women having no PCP visits during this phase. However, a sizable minority of women had at least monthly visits during the treatment phase, particularly in Manitoba and Ontario, where approximately a quarter of women saw a PCP at least monthly. We observed higher continuity of care with PCPs in survivorship (compared with baseline) in all provinces. Conclusion Primary care physicians were generally involved throughout the breast cancer care continuum, but the level of involvement varied across care phases and by province. Future interventions will aim to further integrate primary and oncology care. PMID:27737994

  6. Preparing Emergency Physicians for Acute Disaster Response: A Review of Current Training Opportunities in the US.

    PubMed

    Hansoti, Bhakti; Kellogg, Dylan S; Aberle, Sara J; Broccoli, Morgan C; Feden, Jeffrey; French, Arthur; Little, Charles M; Moore, Brooks; Sabato, Joseph; Sheets, Tara; Weinberg, R; Elmes, Pat; Kang, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    Study Objective This study aimed to review available disaster training options for health care providers, and to provide specific recommendations for developing and delivering a disaster-response-training program for non-disaster-trained emergency physicians, residents, and trainees prior to acute deployment.

  7. Acute care surgery in evolution.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kimberly A; Rozycki, Grace S

    2010-09-01

    At the center of the development of acute care surgery is the growing difficulty in caring for patients with acute surgical conditions. Care demands continue to grow in the face of an escalating crisis in emergency care access and the decreasing availability of surgeons to cover emergency calls. To compound this problem, there is an ever-growing shortage of general surgeons as technological advances have encouraged subspecialization. Developed by the leadership of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, the specialty of acute care surgery offers a training model that would produce a new breed of specialist with expertise in trauma surgery, surgical critical care, and elective and emergency general surgery. This article highlights the evolution of the specialty in hope that these acute care surgeons, along with practicing general surgeons, will bring us closer to providing superb and timely care for patients with acute surgical conditions.

  8. Physicians' interactions with health care teams and systems in the care of dying patients: perspectives of dying patients, family members, and health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Carline, Jan D; Curtis, J Randall; Wenrich, Marjorie D; Shannon, Sarah E; Ambrozy, Donna M; Ramsey, Paul G

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the specific physician skills required to interact with health care systems in order to provide high quality care at the end of life. We used focus groups of patients with terminal diseases, family members, nurses and social workers from hospice or acute care settings, and physicians. We performed content analysis based on grounded theory. Groups were interviewed. Two domains were found related to physician interactions with health care systems: 1) access and continuity, and 2) team communication and coordination. Components of these domains most frequently mentioned included taking as much time as needed with the patient, accessibility, and respect shown in working with health team members. This study highlights the need for both physicians and health care systems to improve accessibility for patients and families and increase coordination of efforts between health care team members when working with dying patients and their families.

  9. Determining Primary Care Physician Information Needs to Inform Ambulatory Visit Note Display

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, M.A.; Steege, L.M.; Moore, J.L.; Koopman, R.J.; Belden, J.L.; Kim, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background With the increase in the adoption of electronic health records (EHR) across the US, primary care physicians are experiencing information overload. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the information needs of primary care physicians (PCPs) as they review clinic visit notes to inform EHR display. Method Data collection was conducted with 15 primary care physicians during semi-structured interviews, including a third party observer to control bias. Physicians reviewed major sections of an artificial but typical acute and chronic care visit note to identify the note sections that were relevant to their information needs. Statistical methods used were McNemar-Mosteller’s and Cochran Q. Results Physicians identified History of Present Illness (HPI), Assessment, and Plan (A&P) as the most important sections of a visit note. In contrast, they largely judged the Review of Systems (ROS) to be superfluous. There was also a statistical difference in physicians’ highlighting among all seven major note sections in acute (p = 0.00) and chronic (p = 0.00) care visit notes. Conclusion A&P and HPI sections were most frequently identified as important which suggests that physicians may have to identify a few key sections out of a long, unnecessarily verbose visit note. ROS is viewed by doctors as mostly “not needed,” but can have relevant information. The ROS can contain information needed for patient care when other sections of the Visit note, such as the HPI, lack the relevant information. Future studies should include producing a display that provides only relevant information to increase physician efficiency at the point of care. Also, research on moving A&P to the top of visit notes instead of having A&P at the bottom of the page is needed, since those are usually the first sections physicians refer to and reviewing from top to bottom may cause cognitive load. PMID:24734131

  10. Potential Effects of Health Care Policy Decisions on Physician Availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Christopher; Goodrich, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Many regions in America are experiencing downward trends in the number of practicing physicians and the number of available physician hours, resulting in a worrisome decrease in the availability of health care services. Recent changes in American health care legislation may induce a rapid change in the demand for health care services, which in turn will result in a new supply-demand equilibrium . In this paper we develop a system dynamics model linking physician availability to health care demand and profitability. We use this model to explore scenarios based on different initial conditions and describe possible outcomes for a range of different policy decisions.

  11. Commentary: improving the supply and distribution of primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, E Ray; Nicholson, Sean; Frist, William H

    2011-05-01

    The current medical education system and reimbursement policies in the United States have contributed to a maldistribution of physicians by specialty and geography. The causes of this maldistribution include financial barriers that prevent the individuals who would be the most likely to serve in primary care and underserved areas from entering the profession, large taxpayer subsidies to teaching hospitals that provide incentives to act in ways that are not in the best interest of society, and reimbursement policies that discourage physicians from providing primary care. The authors propose that the maldistribution of physicians can be addressed successfully by reducing the financial barriers to becoming a primary care physician, aligning subsidies with societal interests, and providing financial incentives that target primary care. They suggest that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 takes steps in the right direction but that more financially prudent measures should be taken as politicians revisit health care reform with heightened financial scrutiny.

  12. Physician Satisfaction With Integrated Behavioral Health in Pediatric Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Hine, Jeffrey F; Grennan, Allison Q; Menousek, Kathryn M; Robertson, Gail; Valleley, Rachel J; Evans, Joseph H

    2017-04-01

    As the benefits of integrated behavioral health care services are becoming more widely recognized, this study investigated physician satisfaction with ongoing integrated psychology services in pediatric primary care clinics. Data were collected across 5 urban and 6 rural clinics and demonstrated the specific factors that physicians view as assets to having efficient access to a pediatric behavioral health practitioner. Results indicated significant satisfaction related to quality and continuity of care and improved access to services. Such models of care may increase access to care and reduce other service barriers encountered by individuals and their families with behavioral health concerns (ie, those who otherwise would seek services through referrals to traditional tertiary care facilities).

  13. Clinical Workflow Observations to Identify Opportunities for Nurse, Physicians and Patients to Share a Patient-centered Plan of Care.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sarah A; Gazarian, Priscilla; Stade, Diana; McNally, Kelly; Morrison, Conny; Ohashi, Kumiko; Lehmann, Lisa; Dalal, Anuj; Bates, David W; Dykes, Patricia C

    2014-01-01

    Patient- and Family-Centered Care (PFCC) is essential for high quality care in the critical and acute-specialty care hospital setting. Effective PFCC requires clinicians to form an integrated interprofessional team to collaboratively engage with the patient/family and contribute to a shared patient-centered plan of care. We conducted observations on a critical care and specialty unit to understand the plan of care activities and workflow documentation requirements for nurses and physicians to inform the development of a shared patient-centered plan of care to support patient engagement. We identified siloed plan of care documentation, with workflow opportunities to converge the nurses plan of care with the physician planned To-do lists and quality and safety checklists. Integration of nurses and physicians plan of care activities into a shared plan of care is a feasible and valuable step toward interprofessional teams that effectively engage patients in plan of care activities.

  14. Point-of-care ultrasonography by pediatric emergency medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jennifer R; Lewiss, Resa E

    2015-04-01

    Emergency physicians have used point-of-care ultrasonography since the 1990 s. Pediatric emergency medicine physicians have more recently adopted this technology. Point-of-care ultrasonography is used for various scenarios, particularly the evaluation of soft tissue infections or blunt abdominal trauma and procedural guidance. To date, there are no published statements from national organizations specifically for pediatric emergency physicians describing the incorporation of point-of-care ultrasonography into their practice. This document outlines how pediatric emergency departments may establish a formal point-of-care ultrasonography program. This task includes appointing leaders with expertise in point-of-care ultrasonography, effectively training and credentialing physicians in the department, and providing ongoing quality assurance reviews.

  15. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers were…

  16. Factors influencing palliative care. Qualitative study of family physicians' practices.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. B.; Sangster, M.; Swift, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine factors that influence family physicians' decisions to practise palliative care. DESIGN: Qualitative method of in-depth interviews. SETTING: Southwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Family physicians who practise palliative care on a full-time basis, who practise on a part-time basis, or who have retired from active involvement in palliative care. METHOD: Eleven in-depth interviews were conducted to explore factors that influence family physicians' decisions to practise palliative care and factors that sustain their interest in palliative care. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The analysis strategy used a phenomenological approach and occurred concurrently rather than sequentially. All interview transcriptions were read independently by the researchers, who then compared and combined their analyses. Final analysis involved examining all interviews collectively, thus permitting relationships between and among central themes to emerge. MAIN OUTCOME FINDINGS: The overriding theme was a common philosophy of palliative care focusing on acceptance of death, whole person care, compassion, communication, and teamwork. Participants' philosophies were shaped by their education and by professional and personal experiences. In addition, participants articulated personal and systemic factors currently affecting their practice of palliative care. CONCLUSIONS: Participants observed that primary care physicians should be responsible for their patients' palliative care within the context of interdisciplinary teams. For medical students to be knowledgeable and sensitive to the needs of dying patients, palliative care should be given higher priority in the curriculum. Finally, participants argued compellingly for transferring the philosophy of palliative care to the overall practice of medicine. PMID:9612588

  17. Effects of managed care contracting on physician labor supply.

    PubMed

    Libby, A M; Thurston, N K

    2001-06-01

    We examine the effect of managed care contracting on physician labor supply for office-based medical practices. We extend the standard labor supply model to incorporate choices regarding the patient base. Empirical tests use data from the 1985 and 1988 national HCFA Physician Practice Costs and Income Surveys and InterStudy Managed Care Surveys. We use physician-level information on participation in managed care contracting to estimate changes in work hours. Managed care contracting is generally associated with lower physician work hours. However, accounting for motivations to participate in contracts and the extent of contracting, the effect on hours is reduced in magnitude and significance. We conclude that relying on broad aggregate measures for policy analysis will likely be misleading as underlying motivations and contracting incentives change over time.

  18. What's a Primary Care Physician (PCP)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... care for babies, kids, and teens. Internists , or internal medicine doctors, care for adults, but some see patients ... have additional training in caring for teens. Combined internal medicine and pediatric specialists have training in both pediatrics ...

  19. Physician-assisted death with limited access to palliative care.

    PubMed

    Barutta, Joaquín; Vollmann, Jochen

    2015-08-01

    Even among advocates of legalising physician-assisted death, many argue that this should be done only once palliative care has become widely available. Meanwhile, according to them, physician-assisted death should be banned. Four arguments are often presented to support this claim, which we call the argument of lack of autonomy, the argument of existing alternatives, the argument of unfair inequalities and the argument of the antagonism between physician-assisted death and palliative care. We argue that although these arguments provide strong reasons to take appropriate measures to guarantee access to good quality palliative care to everyone who needs it, they do not justify a ban on physician-assisted death until we have achieved this goal.

  20. Will new care delivery solve the primary care physician shortage?: A call for more rigorous evaluation.

    PubMed

    Erikson, Clese E

    2013-06-01

    Transformations in care delivery and payment models that make care more efficient are leading some to question whether there will really be a shortage of primary care physicians. While it is encouraging to see numerous federal and state policy levers in place to support greater accountability and coordination of care, it is too early to know whether these efforts will change current and future primary care physician workforce needs. More research is needed to inform whether efforts to reduce cost and improve quality of care and population health will help alleviate or further exacerbate expected primary care physician shortages.

  1. Focused Acute Medicine Ultrasound (FAMUS) - point of care ultrasound for the Acute Medical Unit.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Nicholas; Dachsel, Martin; Matsa, Ramprasad; Tabiowo, Eugene; Walden, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Point of care ultrasound (POCU) is becoming increasingly popular as an extension to clinical examination techniques. Specific POCU training pathways have been developed in specialties such as Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine (CORE Emergency Ultrasound and Core UltraSound Intensive Care, for example), but until this time there has not been a curriculum for the acutely unwell medical patient outside of Critical Care. We describe the development of Focused Acute Medicine Ultrasound (FAMUS), a curriculum designed specifically for the Acute Physician to learn ultrasound techniques to aid in the management of the unwell adult patient. We detail both the outline of the curriculum and the process involved for a candidate to achieve FAMUS accreditation. It is anticipated this will appeal to both Acute Medical Unit (AMU) clinicians and general physicians who deal with the unwell or deteriorating medical or surgical patient. In time, the aspiration is for FAMUS to become a core part of the AIM curriculum.

  2. Why do rural primary care physicians sell their practices?

    PubMed

    Stensland, Jeffrey; Brasure, Michelle; Moscovice, Ira

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluates why rural primary care physicians sell their practices. A random sample of rural primary care practices in California, Utah, Ohio, Texas, and Virginia were surveyed to investigate changes in ownership of the practices during the period 1995-1998. These five states were selected because they represent areas with different experiences with physician-hospital integration and varied rates of managed care penetration. A series of logistic regressions were conducted to examine the factors that led independent physicians to sell their practices to either nonlocal buyers, local hospitals, or local physicians. Findings suggest that sales to nonlocal buyers represent the majority of practice ownership changes. The motivations for ceding control to nonlocal buyers center on managed care concerns, recruitment concerns, and administrative burdens. Sellers were also concerned about their level of net income prior to being acquired. However, the preacquisition financial concerns of sellers were not significantly stronger than the financial concerns of practices that remained independent. The environmental conditions that motivate rural physicians to sell their practices are not expected to improve. Therefore, additional sales of rural primary care practices to nonlocal buyers are expected. Further research is necessary to determine whether this shift in control will lead to changes in the quality or accessibility of care.

  3. Physicians in health care management: 1. Physicians as managers: roles and future challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Leatt, P

    1994-01-01

    Physicians are increasingly expected to assume responsibility for the management of human and financial resources in health care, particularly in hospitals. Juggling their new management responsibilities with clinical care, teaching and research can lead to conflicting roles. However, their presence in management is crucial to shaping the future health care system. They bring to management positions important skills and values such as observation, problem-solving, analysis and ethical judgement. To improve their management skills physicians can benefit from management education programs such as those offered by the Physician-Manager Institute and several Canadian universities. To manage in the future environment they must increase their knowledge and skills in policy and political processes, financial strategies and management, human resources management, systems and program quality improvement and organizational design. PMID:8287339

  4. The impact of physician entrepreneurship on escalating health care costs.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    Health care costs in this country are escalating at an alarming rate. Many economists predict this rate is unsustainable due to the long-term financial burden on our citizenry. Moreover, our health care delivery is fragmented and wasteful. United States health care is ranked last among the industrialized nations. Proponents of the U.S. system of health care extoll the virtues of our "free market." This article explores the role of physician entrepreneurship in the perversion of the marketplace of health care delivery. Medicine has become overcommercialized at the expense of patients and taxpayers. The time has come to implement legislative measures to redirect our dysfunctional health care system. This article explores the role of physician entrepreneurship in rising health care costs. Under the wrong circumstances, the invisible hand of the free market can become dysfunctional.

  5. How to select and motivate physicians in managed care.

    PubMed

    Couvillon, J

    1999-01-01

    Recruiting a physician can be an extremely beneficial or an extremely costly move for any health care organization. The emotional matching of the person is always important but the ability of the new health care provider to operate efficiently and effectively is paramount to their success. This selection process begins even before the recruitment process and includes monthly meetings with physicians to provide feedback and discuss performance while they are practicing. This article addresses the needs of the several different managed care environments and offers insights to setting up effective utilization management.

  6. Do female primary care physicians practise preventive care differently from their male colleagues?

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, C. A.; Hutchison, B. G.; Abelson, J.; Norman, G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether female primary care physicians' reported coverage of patients eligible for certain preventive care strategies differs from male physicians' reported coverage. DESIGN: A mailed survey. SETTING: Primary care practices in southern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: All primary care physicians who graduated between 1972 and 1988 and practised in a defined geographic area of Ontario were selected from the Canadian Medical Association's physician resource database. Response rate was 50%. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Answers to questions on sociodemographic and practice characteristics, attitudes toward preventive care, and perceptions about preventive care behaviour and practices. RESULTS: In general, reported coverage for Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination's (CTFPHE) A and B class recommendations was low. However, more female than male physicians reported high coverage of women patients for female-specific preventive care measures (i.e., Pap smears, breast examinations, and mammography) and for blood pressure measurement. Female physicians appeared to question more patients about a greater number of health risks. Often, sex of physician was the most salient factor affecting whether preventive care services thought effective by the CTFPHE were offered. However, when evidence for effectiveness of preventive services was equivocal or lacking, male and female physicians reported similar levels of coverage. CONCLUSION: Female primary care physicians are more likely than their male colleagues to report that their patients eligible for preventive health measures as recommended by the CTFPHE take advantage of these measures. PMID:8969856

  7. Physician clinical information technology and health care disparities.

    PubMed

    Ketcham, Jonathan D; Lutfey, Karen E; Gerstenberger, Eric; Link, Carol L; McKinlay, John B

    2009-12-01

    The authors develop a conceptual framework regarding how information technology (IT) can alter within-physician disparities, and they empirically test some of its implications in the context of coronary heart disease. Using a random experiment on 256 primary care physicians, the authors analyze the relationships between three IT functions (feedback and two types of clinical decision support) and five process-of-care measures. Endogeneity is addressed by eliminating unobserved patient characteristics with vignettes and by proxying for omitted physician characteristics. The results indicate that IT has no effects on physicians' diagnostic certainty and treatment of vignette patients overall. The authors find that treatment and certainty differ by patient age, gender, and race. Consistent with the framework, IT's effects on these disparities are complex. Feedback eliminated the gender disparities, but the relationships differed for other IT functions and process measures. Current policies to reduce disparities and increase IT adoption may be in discord.

  8. Stoicism, the physician, and care of medical outliers

    PubMed Central

    Papadimos, Thomas J

    2004-01-01

    Background Medical outliers present a medical, psychological, social, and economic challenge to the physicians who care for them. The determinism of Stoic thought is explored as an intellectual basis for the pursuit of a correct mental attitude that will provide aid and comfort to physicians who care for medical outliers, thus fostering continued physician engagement in their care. Discussion The Stoic topics of good, the preferable, the morally indifferent, living consistently, and appropriate actions are reviewed. Furthermore, Zeno's cardinal virtues of Justice, Temperance, Bravery, and Wisdom are addressed, as are the Stoic passions of fear, lust, mental pain, and mental pleasure. These concepts must be understood by physicians if they are to comprehend and accept the Stoic view as it relates to having the proper attitude when caring for those with long-term and/or costly illnesses. Summary Practicing physicians, especially those that are hospital based, and most assuredly those practicing critical care medicine, will be emotionally challenged by the medical outlier. A Stoic approach to such a social and psychological burden may be of benefit. PMID:15588293

  9. What's a Primary Care Physician (PCP)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to ... care. The best preventive care means forming a relationship with a PCP you like and trust, taking your child for scheduled checkups and vaccines , and following the ...

  10. Management of childhood "hyperactivity" by primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Bennett, F C; Sherman, R

    1983-06-01

    A questionnaire assessing current clinical approach to the problem of childhood hyperactivity was mailed to 910 primary care physicians in the state of Washington. A response of 462 (50.8%) was obtained. Pediatricians assess and manage hyperactivity in a manner significantly different from that of family physicians or general practitioners. Age of physician also accounted for significant differences, although to a lesser degree than type of training. Few differences were determined by size of community. An overall high prevalence of the problem of hyperactivity was apparent. Combined use of stimulant medications, behavioral programs, and special diets was common.

  11. Physicians' and consumers' conflicting attitudes toward health care advertising.

    PubMed

    Krohn, F B; Flynn, C

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the conflicting attitudes held by physicians and health care consumers toward health care advertising in an attempt to resolve the question. The paper introduces the differing positions held by the two groups. The rationale behind physicians' attitudes is then presented that advertising can be unethical, misleading, deceptive, and lead to unnecessary price increases. They believe that word-of-mouth does and should play the major role in attracting new patients. The opposite view of consumers is then presented which contends that health care advertising leads to higher consumer awareness of services, better services, promotes competitive pricing, and lowers rather than raises health care costs. The final section of the paper compares the arguments presented and concludes that health care advertising clearly has a place in the health care industry.

  12. A Conceptual Model for Episodes of Acute, Unscheduled Care.

    PubMed

    Pines, Jesse M; Lotrecchiano, Gaetano R; Zocchi, Mark S; Lazar, Danielle; Leedekerken, Jacob B; Margolis, Gregg S; Carr, Brendan G

    2016-10-01

    We engaged in a 1-year process to develop a conceptual model representing an episode of acute, unscheduled care. Acute, unscheduled care includes acute illnesses (eg, nausea and vomiting), injuries, or exacerbations of chronic conditions (eg, worsening dyspnea in congestive heart failure) and is delivered in emergency departments, urgent care centers, and physicians' offices, as well as through telemedicine. We began with a literature search to define an acute episode of care and to identify existing conceptual models used in health care. In accordance with this information, we then drafted a preliminary conceptual model and collected stakeholder feedback, using online focus groups and concept mapping. Two technical expert panels reviewed the draft model, examined the stakeholder feedback, and discussed ways the model could be improved. After integrating the experts' comments, we solicited public comment on the model and made final revisions. The final conceptual model includes social and individual determinants of health that influence the incidence of acute illness and injury, factors that affect care-seeking decisions, specific delivery settings where acute care is provided, and outcomes and costs associated with the acute care system. We end with recommendations for how researchers, policymakers, payers, patients, and providers can use the model to identify and prioritize ways to improve acute care delivery.

  13. Potential of physician assistants to support primary care

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Sarah; Botting, Ingrid; Huebner, Lori-Anne; Wright, Brock; Beaupre, Beth; Permack, Sheldon; Jones, Ian; Mihlachuk, Ainslie; Edwards, Jeanette; Rhule, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine effective strategies for introducing physician assistants (PAs) in primary care settings and provide guidance to support ongoing provincial planning for PA roles in primary care. Design Time-series research design using multiple qualitative methods. Setting Manitoba. Participants Physician assistants, supervising family physicians, clinic staff, members of the Introducing Physician Assistants into Primary Care Steering Committee, and patients receiving care from PAs. Methods The PA role was evaluated at 6 health care sites between 2012 and 2014; sites varied in size, funding models, geographic locations (urban or rural), specifics of the PA role, and setting type (clinic or hospital). Semistructured interviews and focus groups were conducted; patient feedback on quality improvement was retrieved; observational methods were employed; and documents were reviewed. A baseline assessment was conducted before PA placement. In 2013, there was a series of interviews and focus groups about the introduction of PAs at the 3 initial sites; in 2014 interviews and focus groups included all 6 sites. Main findings The concerns that were expressed during baseline interviews about the introduction of PAs (eg, community and patient acceptance) informed planning. Most concerns that were identified did not materialize. Supervising family physicians, site staff, and patients were enthusiastic about the introduction of PAs. There were a few challenges experienced at the site level (eg, front-desk scheduling), but they were perceived as manageable. Unanticipated challenges at the provincial level were identified (eg, diagnostic test ordering). Increased attachment and improved access—the goals of introducing PAs to primary care—were only some of the positive effects that were reported. Conclusion This first systematic multisite evaluation of PAs in primary care in Canada demonstrated that with appropriate collaborative planning, PAs can effectively

  14. Medicaid policy and the substitution of hospital outpatient care for physician care.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J W

    1989-01-01

    This article explores the effects of reimbursement and utilization control policies on utilization patterns and spending for physician and hospital outpatient services under state Medicaid programs. The empirical work shows a negative relationship between the level of Medicaid physician fees relative to Medicare and private fees, and the numbers of outpatient care recipients, suggesting that outpatient care substitutes for physician care in states with low fee levels. In addition, it shows a positive relationship between Medicaid physician fees and outpatient spending per recipient, suggesting that in low-fee states outpatient departments are providing some types of care that could be provided in a physician's office. Finally, the analysis demonstrates that reimbursement and utilization control policies have significant effects in the expected directions on aggregate Medicaid spending for physician and outpatient services. PMID:2497086

  15. The physician office laboratory: profitability under managed care.

    PubMed

    Bachman, M A

    1997-01-01

    CLIA has forced many physician offices to close their labs because the costs of operating them have been out-weighed by the revenues they generated. Managed care has imposed even further restrictions because managed care organizations (MCO) limit reimbursement to a very few in-house procedures. To reverse this trend, physician offices must make their labs attractive to MCOs by emphasizing quality, promoting customer satisfaction, discussing cost effectiveness and discounting laboratory fees. Once these are set, the next step is negotiating with the MCOs.

  16. Marketing home health care medical services: the physician's view.

    PubMed

    Ryan, E J; Phelps, R A

    1993-01-01

    The authors surveyed physicians serving the Jackson, Mississippi home health care market. They identified problems and studied physician perceptions regarding services provided by home health care agencies, private duty nursing agencies, and durable medical equipment suppliers. Respondents perceived home health care as providing: (1) increased patient satisfaction, (2) greater patient convenience, (3) earlier discharge, and (4) lowered patient costs. They least liked: (1) lack of control and involvement in the patient caring process, (2) paperwork, (3) quality control potential, and the possibility that patient costs could increase. Two sets of implications for health care marketers are presented that involve both national and regional levels. Overall results indicate that a growing and profitable market segment exists and is being served in an effective and socially responsible manner.

  17. Building a transdisciplinary approach to palliative care in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Daly, Donnelle; Matzel, Stephen Chavez

    2013-01-01

    A transdisciplinary team is an essential component of palliative and end-of-life care. This article will demonstrate how to develop a transdisciplinary approach to palliative care, incorporating nursing, social work, spiritual care, and pharmacy in an acute care setting. Objectives included: identifying transdisciplinary roles contributing to care in the acute care setting; defining the palliative care model and mission; identifying patient/family and institutional needs; and developing palliative care tools. Methods included a needs assessment and the development of assessment tools, an education program, community resources, and a patient satisfaction survey. After 1 year of implementation, the transdisciplinary palliative care team consisted of seven palliative care physicians, two social workers, two chaplains, a pharmacist, and End-of-Life Nursing Consortium (ELNEC) trained nurses. Palomar Health now has a palliative care service with a consistent process for transdisciplinary communication and intervention for adult critical care patients with advanced, chronic illness.

  18. Impact of provider coordination on nurse and physician perceptions of patient care quality.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Nathalie; Burgess, James F; Meterko, Mark; Restuccia, Joseph D; Alt-White, Anna C; Kaboli, Peter; Charns, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the role of provider coordination on nurse manager and physician perceptions of care quality, while controlling for organizational factors. Findings indicated that nurse-nurse coordination was positively associated with nurse manager perceptions of care quality; neither physician-physician nor physician-nurse coordination was associated with physician perceptions. Organizational factors associated with positive perceptions of care quality included facility support of education for nurses and physicians, and the use of multidisciplinary rounding.

  19. Expanding physician education in health care fraud and program integrity.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shantanu; Tarzy, Bruce; Hunt, Lauren; Taitsman, Julie; Budetti, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Program integrity (PI) spans the entire spectrum of improper payments from fraud to abuse, errors, and waste in the health care system. Few physicians will perpetrate fraud or abuse during their careers, but nearly all will contribute to the remaining spectrum of improper payments, making preventive education in this area vital. Despite the enormous impact that PI issues have on government-sponsored and private insurance programs, physicians receive little formal education in this area. Physicians' lack of awareness of PI issues not only makes them more likely to submit inappropriate claims, generate orders that other providers and suppliers will use to submit inappropriate claims, and document improperly in the medical record but also more likely to become victims of fraud schemes themselves.In this article, the authors provide an overview of the current state of PI issues in general, and fraud in particular, as well as a description of the state of formal education for practicing physicians, residents, and fellows. Building on the lessons from pilot programs conducted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and partner organizations, the authors then propose a model PI education curriculum to be implemented nationwide for physicians at all levels. They recommend that various stakeholder organizations take part in the development and implementation process to ensure that all perspectives are included. Educating physicians is an essential step in establishing a broader culture of compliance and improved integrity in the health care system, extending beyond Medicare and Medicaid.

  20. How Can Physicians Educate Patients About Health Care Policy Issues?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Paul R

    2016-10-01

    Complicated health care policy decisions are generally made by elected officials. The officials making these complicated decisions are elected by the people, and citizens' participation in the voting process is one of the basic tenets of democracy. Voters in the United States, who are also patients in the health care system, receive enormous amounts of information throughout election cycles. This information is generally delivered in sound bites often intended to elicit an emotional reaction rather than simply inform. From April through July 2016, the author-an academic physician-rode a bicycle across the United States and met with people in small rural towns to ask them their understanding of the Affordable Care Act and the impact it has had on their lives. In this Commentary the author shares some of those stories, which are often informed by sound bites and misinformation. The author argues that it is the role of academic physicians to educate not only students and residents but also patients. In addition to providing information about patients' medical problems, physicians can educate them about the health care policy issues that are decided by elected officials.A doctor can help educate patients about these issues to facilitate their making informed decisions in elections. Physicians have a role and responsibility in society as a knowledgeable person to make the health care system be the best it can be for the most people.

  1. Impact of patient satisfaction ratings on physicians and clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Zgierska, Aleksandra; Rabago, David; Miller, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Background Although patient satisfaction ratings often drive positive changes, they may have unintended consequences. Objective The study reported here aimed to evaluate the clinician-perceived effects of patient satisfaction ratings on job satisfaction and clinical care. Methods A 26-item survey, developed by a state medical society in 2012 to assess the effects of patient satisfaction surveys, was administered online to physician members of a state-level medical society. Respondents remained anonymous. Results One hundred fifty five physicians provided responses (3.9% of the estimated 4,000 physician members of the state-level medical society, or approximately 16% of the state’s emergency department [ED] physicians). The respondents were predominantly male (85%) and practicing in solo or private practice (45%), hospital (43%), or academia (15%). The majority were ED (57%), followed by primary care (16%) physicians. Fifty-nine percent reported that their compensation was linked to patient satisfaction ratings. Seventy-eight percent reported that patient satisfaction surveys moderately or severely affected their job satisfaction; 28% had considered quitting their job or leaving the medical profession. Twenty percent reported their employment being threatened because of patient satisfaction data. Almost half believed that pressure to obtain better scores promoted inappropriate care, including unnecessary antibiotic and opioid prescriptions, tests, procedures, and hospital admissions. Among 52 qualitative responses, only three were positive. Conclusion These pilot-level data suggest that patient satisfaction survey utilization may promote, under certain circumstances, job dissatisfaction, attrition, and inappropriate clinical care among some physicians. This is concerning, especially in the context of the progressive incorporation of patient satisfaction ratings as a quality-of-care metric, and highlights the need for a rigorous evaluation of the optimal methods

  2. Optimal physicians schedule in an Intensive Care Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidri, L.; Labidi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we consider a case study for the problem of physicians scheduling in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The objective is to minimize the total overtime under complex constraints. The considered ICU is composed of three buildings and the physicians are divided accordingly into six teams. The workload is assigned to each team under a set of constraints. The studied problem is composed of two simultaneous phases: composing teams and assigning the workload to each one of them. This constitutes an additional major hardness compared to the two phase's process: composing teams and after that assigning the workload. The physicians schedule in this ICU is used to be done manually each month. In this work, the studied physician scheduling problem is formulated as an integer linear program and solved optimally using state of the art software. The preliminary experimental results show that 50% of the overtime can be saved.

  3. Critical care by emergency physicians in American and English hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Graff, L G; Clark, S; Radford, M J

    1993-01-01

    The object of this study was to compare emergency physician critical care services in an American (A) and an English (E) Emergency Department (ED). A prospective case comparison trial was used. The study was carried out at two university affiliated community hospitals, one in the U.S.A and one in England. Subjects were consecutive patients triaged as requiring critical care services and subsequently admitted to the hospital ward (A, n = 17; E, n = 18) or the intensive/critical care unit ([ICU] A, n = 14; E, n = 24). The study time period was randomly selected 8-h shifts occurring over a 4-week period. All patients were treated by standard guidelines for critical care services at the study hospital emergency department. For all study patients mean length of stay was significantly longer for the American (233 min, 95% CI 201, 264) than the English ED (24 min, 95% CI 23, 25). American emergency physicians spent less total time providing physician services (19.2 min, 95% CI 16.8, 21.6) vs. (23 min, 95% CI 21.6, 24.4) than English emergency physicians. American emergency physicians spent less time with the patient than English emergency physicians: 12.4 min (95% CI 10.3, 14.5) vs. 17 min (95% CI 15.8, 18.2). American emergency physicians spent more time on the telephone 1.8 min (95% CI 1.4, 2.2) vs. 1.2 min (95% CI 1.1, 1.3), and in patient care discussions/order giving 1.8 min (95% CI 1.4, 2.2) vs. 1.1 min (95% CI .8, 1.4), There was no significant difference in time charting (3.2 min, 95% CI 2.8, 3.6 vs. 3.5 min, 95% CI 3.2, 3.8). Results did not vary significantly whether analysed subgroups or the whole study group. American emergency physicians provided 81% of their service during the first hour. There were delays at the American hospital until the physician saw the patient: 4.9 min (95% CI 2.5, 7.3) for patients admitted to the ICU/CVU (Cardiovascular Unit), and 9.2 min (95% CI 4.6, 13.8) for patients admitted to the ward. At the American hospital, ICU

  4. Acute coronary care 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the titles are: The measurement of acute myocardial infarct size by CT; Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of myocardial ischemia and infarction; Poistron imaging in the evaluation of ischemia and myocardial infarction; and New inotropic agents.

  5. Online PTSD Diagnosis and Treatment Training for Primary Care Physicians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    day retention in knowledge and comfort with PTSD-related skills, we did not assess for long - term impact of the training, nor did we audit 13...SUBJECT TERMS Posttraumatic stress disorder, primary care, web-based training, medical education 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...Eligible participants were English -speaking PCPs, including licensed physicians (internists, family practitioners, pediatricians), nurse practitioners

  6. Physicians, Preventive Care, and Applied Nutrition: Selected Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanz, Karen; Golboy, Mary Neth

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-five articles on medical school curricula and physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to nutritional care, especially concerning heart disease and cholesterol control, were reviewed. It is concluded that nutrition education should occur in undergraduate clinical training and residency periods and that realistic nutrition…

  7. A Bibliography on the Education of Physicians for Primary Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clare, F. Lawrence, Comp.; And Others

    A bibliography on education of physicians for primary care is presented, based on a search of the "Index Medicus" primarily for the period 1971-1983. Selected articles from 1984 are also included. The approximately 60 references are listed alphabetically by the lead author's surname. A major feature of the bibliography is the keywording of each…

  8. [Task analysis of clinical laboratory physician in acute hospital].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Junko

    2013-06-01

    Appropriate communications between clinical divisions and clinical laboratories are required to improve the quality of health care in hospitals. In this paper, the routine work of a clinical laboratory physician is presented. 1. In order to support attentive medical practice, we have established a consultation service system for handling questions from medical staff. The main clients are doctors and clinical laboratory technologists. 2. In order to improve the quality of infectious disease analysis, we have recommended obtaining two or more blood culture sets to achieve good sensitivity. The order rate of multiple blood culture sets increased 90% or more in 2011. 3. In order to provide appropriate blood transfusion, we intervene in inappropriate transfusion plans. 4. In order to support prompt decision making, we send E-mails to physicians regarding critical values. 5. We send reports on the morphology of cells(peripheral blood and bone marrow), IEP, flow cytometry, irregular antibodies, and so on. It has been realized that doctors want to know better solutions immediately rather than the best solution tomorrow morning. We would like to contribute to improving the quality of health care in Saitama Cooperative Hospital as clinical laboratory physicians.

  9. Asian-American Patient Ratings of Physician Primary Care Performance

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Deborah A; Safran, Dana Gelb; Seto, Todd B; Rogers, William H; Kosinski, Mark; Ware, John E; Lieberman, Naomi; Tarlov, Alvin R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine how Asian-American patients’ ratings of primary care performance differ from those of whites, Latinos, and African-Americans. DESIGN Retrospective analyses of data collected in a cross-sectional study using patient questionnaires. SETTING University hospital primary care group practice. PARTICIPANTS In phase 1, successive patients who visited the study site for appointments were asked to complete the survey. In phase 2, successive patients were selected who had most recently visited each physician, going back as far as necessary to obtain 20 patients for each physician. In total, 502 patients were surveyed, 5% of whom were Asian-American. MAIN RESULTS After adjusting for potential confounders, Asian-Americans rated overall satisfaction and 10 of 11 scales assessing primary care significantly lower than whites did. Dimensions of primary care that were assessed include access, comprehensiveness of care, integration, continuity, clinical quality, interpersonal treatment, and trust. There were no differences for the scale of longitudinal continuity. On average, the rating scale scores of Asian-Americans were 12 points lower than those of whites (on 100-point scales). CONCLUSIONS We conclude that Asian-American patients rate physician primary care performance lower than do whites, African-Americans, and Latinos. Future research needs to focus on Asian-Americans to determine the generalizability of these findings and the extent to which they reflect differences in survey response tendencies or actual quality differences. PMID:9127228

  10. Part III. Performance measurements of primary care physicians in managed care.

    PubMed

    Dent, T

    1998-08-01

    A fundamental change occurring for physicians is that there are increasingly organized efforts to comprehensively assess physician performance. Managed care is the factor most instrumental in leading to an enhanced focus on physician measurements. Another major factor that has prompted increased attention to the measurement of physicians' performance is that patients are beginning to act more as consumers of health care. Efforts to measure physician performance in geographically dispersed primary care practices is inherently more difficult than measuring hospital care. However, according to some studies that have attempted to do this, the delivery in primary care offices of basic preventive services and the care given to patients with chronic illnesses is surprisingly poor. If primary care physicians don't address these issues, managed care companies will make it policy to refer some patients with chronic disease to specialists, who are comprehensively achieving higher measurement scores. What is being measured is at present quite variable in different primary care offices. Most of the initial measurements have been from claims data or from other data that might be obtained and aggregated outside of the primary care physician's office. As this data is not very rich in clinical information, significant misinterpretation is possible. In order to augment these shortcomings, office records are increasingly being reviewed. A standardization of primary care physicians' office medical records is rapidly occurring and is being driven by the measurable items reviewed by managed care organizations. Measurement of patient complaints and patient surveys is another means that managed care organizations presently use to assess primary care physicians' performance. Extreme caution should be used when interpreting this data, as often the small numbers of patients, multifactorial issues, and ambiguity about responsible parties may skew the results. Measurement processes are

  11. Characterizing physicians' information needs at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Lauren A; Cate, Olle Ten; Moorhead, Laura L; van Stiphout, Feikje; Kramer, Bianca M R; Ter Braak, Edith; Posley, Keith; Irby, David; O'Brien, Bridget C

    2014-11-01

    Physicians have many information needs that arise at the point of care yet go unmet for a variety of reasons, including uncertainty about which information resources to select. In this study, we aimed to identify the various types of physician information needs and how these needs relate to physicians' use of the database PubMed and the evidence summary tool UpToDate. We conducted semi-structured interviews with physicians (Stanford University, United States; n = 13; and University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands; n = 9), eliciting participants' descriptions of their information needs and related use of PubMed and/or UpToDate. Using thematic analysis, we identified six information needs: refreshing, confirming, logistics, teaching, idea generating and personal learning. Participants from both institutions similarly described their information needs and selection of resources. The identification of these six information needs and their relation to PubMed and UpToDate expands upon previously identified physician information needs and may be useful to medical educators designing evidence-based practice training for physicians.

  12. Family-physician interactions in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Azoulay, Elie; Sprung, Charles L

    2004-11-01

    Surrogate designation has the potential to represent the patient's wishes and promote successful family involvement in decision making when options exist as to the patient's medical management. In recent years, intensive care unit physicians and nurses have promoted family-centered care on the basis that adequate and effective communication with family members is the key to substitute decision making, thereby protecting patient autonomy. The two-step model for the family-physician relationship in the intensive care unit including early and effective provision of information to the family followed by family input into decision making is described as well as specific needs of the family members of dying patients. A research agenda is outlined for further investigating the family-physician relationship in the intensive care unit. This agenda includes a) improvement of communication skills for health care workers; b) research in the area of information and communication; c) interventions in non-intensive care unit areas to promote programs for teaching communication skills to all members of the medical profession; d) research on potential conflict between medical best interest and the ethics of autonomy; and e) publicity to enhance society's interest in advance care planning and surrogate designation amplified by debate in the media and other sounding boards. These studies should focus both on families and on intensive care unit workers. Assessments of postintervention outcomes in family members would provide insights into how well family-centered care matches family expectations and protects families from distress, not only during the intensive care unit stay but also during the ensuing weeks and months.

  13. Caring for LGBTQ patients: Methods for improving physician cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Klein, Elizabeth W; Nakhai, Maliheh

    2016-05-01

    This article summarizes the components of a curriculum used to teach family medicine residents and faculty about LGBTQ patients' needs in a family medicine residency program in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. This curriculum was developed to provide primary care physicians and physicians-in-training with skills to provide better health care for LGBTQ-identified patients. The curriculum covers topics that range from implicit and explicit bias and appropriate terminology to techniques for crafting patient-centered treatment plans. Additionally, focus is placed on improving the understanding of specific and unique barriers to competent health care encountered by LGBTQ patients. Through facilitated discussion, learners explore the health disparities that disproportionately affect LGBTQ individuals and develop skills that will improve their ability to care for LGBTQ patients. The goal of the curriculum is to teach family medicine faculty and physicians in training how to more effectively communicate with and treat LGBTQ patients in a safe, non-judgmental, and welcoming primary care environment.

  14. Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health

    PubMed Central

    Park, Grace; Miller, Diane; Tien, George; Sheppard, Irene; Bernard, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions. Description of integrated practice An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues. Early results The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients’ health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased). Conclusion Fraser Health's case manager–general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients. PMID:24648834

  15. The knowledge of Polish primary care physicians about bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stefura, Tomasz; Jezierska-Kazberuk, Monika; Wysocki, Michał; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Pisarska, Magdalena; Małczak, Piotr; Kacprzyk, Artur; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The general practitioner (GP) can play a key role in this multi-disciplinary team, coordinating care provided by dietitians and surgeons, maximizing the potential benefits of surgery. Therefore, it seems important to verify changes in GPs’ knowledge about surgical treatment of obesity. Aim To reassess knowledge of obesity surgical treatment among Polish primary care physicians and their willingness to improve it in the future. Material and methods To assess the knowledge of Polish primary care physicians about surgical treatment of obesity, a prospective study, which included an anonymous online questionnaire, was conducted in the years 2015–2016. Results Two hundred and six physicians answered the invitation. One hundred and sixty-six (81.8%) respondents were familiar with the indications for bariatric operation. The great majority of respondents, 198 (96.6%), were aware that bariatric surgery is efficient in the treatment of the metabolic syndrome. The study revealed a disproportion between the number of patients who would be potential candidates for bariatric treatment, who are currently under care of participating physicians, and the number of patients who are referred to a bariatric surgeon. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that nowadays bariatric surgery is a recognized method of treatment, but physicians remain reluctant to refer their patients for surgical treatment of obesity. It was found that there is a large disproportion between the number of patients who are referred to a bariatric surgeon and the number of patients who require this treatment. It may be a result of lack of knowledge in the field of bariatric surgery. PMID:27829939

  16. The effect of managed care on the incomes of primary care and specialty physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, C J; Dranove, D; White, W D

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of managed care growth on the incomes of primary care and specialist physicians. DATA SOURCES: Data on physician income and managed care penetration from the American Medical Association, Socioeconomic Monitoring System (SMS) Surveys for 1985 and 1993. We use secondary data from the Area Resource File and U.S. Census publications to construct geographical socioeconomic control variables, and we examine data from the National Residency Matching Program. STUDY DESIGN: Two-stage least squares regressions are estimated to determine the effect of local managed care penetration on specialty-specific physician incomes, while controlling for factors associated with local variation in supply and demand and accounting for the potential endogeneity of managed care penetration. DATA COLLECTION: The SMS survey is an annual telephone survey conducted by the American Medical Association of approximately one percent of nonfederal, post-residency U.S. physicians. Response rates average 60-70 percent, and analysis is weighted to account for nonresponse bias. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The incomes of primary care physicians rose most rapidly in states with higher managed care growth, while the income growth of hospital-based specialists was negatively associated with managed care growth. Incomes of medical subspecialists were not significantly affected by managed care growth over this period. These findings are consistent with trends in postgraduate training choices of new physicians. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence is consistent with a relative increase in the demand for primary care physicians and a decline in the demand for some specialists under managed care. Market adjustments have important implications for health policy and physician workforce planning. PMID:9685122

  17. Relation between primary care physician supply and diabetes care and outcomes: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, Tara; Glazier, Richard H.; Campitelli, Michael A.; Calzavara, Andrew; Stukel, Therese A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Higher primary care physician supply is associated with lower mortality due to heart disease, cancer and stroke, but its relation to diabetes care and outcomes is unknown. We examined the association between primary care physician supply and evidence-based testing and hospital visits for people with diabetes in naturally occurring multispecialty physician networks in Ontario, Canada. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis between Apr. 1, 2009, and Mar. 31, 2011, using linked administrative data. We included all Ontario residents over 40 years of age with a diagnosis of diabetes before Apr. 1, 2007, who were alive on Apr. 1, 2009 (N = 712 681). We tested the association between physician supply and outcomes at the network level using separate Poisson regression models for urban and nonurban physician networks. We accounted for clustering at the physician and network level and adjusted for patient characteristics. Results: Patients in physician networks with a high supply of primary care physicians were more likely to receive the optimal number of evidence-based tests for diabetes than patients in networks with low primary care physician supply (urban relative risk [RR] 1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.07; nonurban RR 1.17, 95% CI 1.14-1.21) but were no different regarding emergency department visits (urban RR 1.05, 95% CI 0.94-1.17; nonurban RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.85-1.08) or hospital admissions for diabetes complications (urban RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.89-1.14; nonurban RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.77-1.07). Interpretation: Having more primary care physicians per capita is associated with better diabetes care but not with reduced hospital visits in this setting. Further research to understand this relation and how it varies by setting is important for resource planning. PMID:27280118

  18. Understanding patient satisfaction, trust, and loyalty to primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Platonova, Elena A; Kennedy, Karen Norman; Shewchuk, Richard M

    2008-12-01

    The authors developed and empirically tested a model reflecting a system of interrelations among patient loyalty, trust, and satisfaction as they are related to patients' intentions to stay with a primary care physician (PCP) and recommend the doctor to other people. They used a structural equation modeling approach. The fit statistics indicate a well-fitting model: root mean square error of approximation = .022, goodness-of-fit index = .99, adjusted goodness-of-fit index = .96, and comparative fit index = 1.00. The authors found that patient trust and good interpersonal relationships with the PCP are major predictors of patient satisfaction and loyalty to the physician. Patients need to trust the PCP to be satisfied and loyal to the physician. The authors also found that patient trust, satisfaction, and loyalty are strong and significant predictors of patients' intentions to stay with the doctor and to recommend the PCP to others.

  19. Evaluating Topic Model Interpretability from a Primary Care Physician Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Corey W.; Oh, Andrea; Chen, Shawn; Speier, William

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Probabilistic topic models provide an unsupervised method for analyzing unstructured text. These models discover semantically coherent combinations of words (topics) that could be integrated in a clinical automatic summarization system for primary care physicians performing chart review. However, the human interpretability of topics discovered from clinical reports is unknown. Our objective is to assess the coherence of topics and their ability to represent the contents of clinical reports from a primary care physician’s point of view. Methods Three latent Dirichlet allocation models (50 topics, 100 topics, and 150 topics) were fit to a large collection of clinical reports. Topics were manually evaluated by primary care physicians and graduate students. Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Tests for Paired Samples were used to evaluate differences between different topic models, while differences in performance between students and primary care physicians (PCPs) were tested using Mann-Whitney U tests for each of the tasks. Results While the 150-topic model produced the best log likelihood, participants were most accurate at identifying words that did not belong in topics learned by the 100-topic model, suggesting that 100 topics provides better relative granularity of discovered semantic themes for the data set used in this study. Models were comparable in their ability to represent the contents of documents. Primary care physicians significantly outperformed students in both tasks. Conclusion This work establishes a baseline of interpretability for topic models trained with clinical reports, and provides insights on the appropriateness of using topic models for informatics applications. Our results indicate that PCPs find discovered topics more coherent and representative of clinical reports relative to students, warranting further research into their use for automatic summarization. PMID:26614020

  20. Managing acute care.

    PubMed

    Russell, J S

    1993-02-01

    In the last few years, much medical-facility construction has been driven by what insurers want. Hospitals have built facilities for well-reimbursed procedures and closed money-losing ones. Health-maintenance organizations increasingly expect to hold down costs by making prepayment arrangements with doctors and their hospitals. President Clinton has pledged early action on health-care reform, which will likely change planners' priorities. Whether the nation goes to Clintonian "managed competition" or a Canadian-style nationwide single-payer system (the two most likely options), the projects on these pages reflect two large-scale trends that are likely to continue: the movement of more procedures from inpatient to outpatient facilities and the separation of treatment functions from ordinary office and administrative tasks so that the latter are not performed in the same high-cost buildings as technology-intensive procedures. Various schemes that make care more "patient-centered" have been tried and been shown to speed healing, even for outpatients, but such hard-to-quantify issues get short shrift in an era of knee-jerk cost containment. The challenge in tomorrow's healthcare universe--whatever it becomes--will be to keep these issues on the table.

  1. Top 20 research studies of 2012 for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Ebell, Mark H; Grad, Roland

    2013-09-15

    This is the second annual summary of top research studies in primary care. In 2012, through regular surveillance of more than 100 English-language clinical research journals, seven clinicians identified 270 studies with the potential to change primary care practice, called POEMs, or patient-oriented evidence that matters. These studies were then summarized in brief, structured critical appraisals and e-mailed to subscribers, including members of the Canadian Medical Association. A validated tool was used to obtain feedback from these physicians about the clinical relevance of each POEM and the benefits the physicians expected for their practice. The 20 identified research studies rated as most relevant cover common topics such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease prevention, infectious disease, musculoskeletal disease and exercise, cancer screening, and women's health.

  2. [Survey of the attitude of primary care physicians towards AIDS].

    PubMed

    Huguet, M; Bou, M; Argimon, J M; Escarrabill, J

    1990-01-01

    A representative group of primary care physicians from Areas 4 and 5 of the Institut Català de la Salut were surveyed in orden to know their opinion about the spreading of HIV infection, the value of serological tests and the methods to prevent the infection of health care providers. More than half of the physicians (58.5%) had never been in contact with an HIV infected patient. Of the surveyed physicians, 47.2% believe that it is necessary to spread out more information on preventive measures amongst health professionals. 48.4% believe that confidentiality is important but only 16.9% consider it is important to obtain an informed consent to perform serological testing and another 22.5% mainly trust systematic serological testing. Primary care can play an important role avoiding the spread of HIV infection and, in fact, the importance of preventive measures and confidentiality are assumed by an elevated percentage of health professionals. The usefulness of serological testing, however, is not properly assessed valued and little importance is granted to the patient's consent for their performance.

  3. Primary Care Physicians and Coronary Heart Disease Prevention: A Practice Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makrides, Lydia; Veinot, Paula L.; Richard, Josie; Allen, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    The role of primary care physicians in coronary heart disease prevention is explored, and a model for patient education by physicians is offered. A qualitative study in Nova Scotia examines physicians' expectations about their role in prevention, obstacles to providing preventive care, and mechanisms by which preventive care occurs. (Author/EMK)

  4. From the inside out: the engagement of physicians as leaders in health care settings.

    PubMed

    Snell, Anita J; Briscoe, Don; Dickson, Graham

    2011-07-01

    Health care delivery must be transformed to manage spiraling costs and preserve quality care. Transforming complex health systems will require the engagement of physicians as leaders in their health care settings, in both formal and informal roles. In this article we explore the experience of physician leader engagement and identify factors operating at the individual, team, and organizational levels related to increased or decreased physician leader engagement. Using an inductive approach, our analysis of the transcribed interviews yielded a rich understanding of what motivates physicians to be engaged as leaders, how they experience engagement, the role of the physician leader, how physicians understand other physicians' engagement, what encourages and discourages their engagement efforts, and the role that education and training has in physician engagement. We conclude by offering strategies that physicians, health care organizations, and educational institutions can implement to increase the engagement of physician leaders.

  5. 42 CFR 456.604 - Physician team member inspecting care of recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Inspections of Care in Intermediate Care Facilities and Institutions for Mental Diseases § 456.604 Physician team member...

  6. 42 CFR 456.604 - Physician team member inspecting care of recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Inspections of Care in Intermediate Care Facilities and Institutions for Mental Diseases § 456.604 Physician team member...

  7. Physician obligation to provide care during disasters: should physicians have been required to go to Fukushima?

    PubMed

    Akabayashi, Akira; Takimoto, Yoshiyuki; Hayashi, Yoshinori

    2012-11-01

    On 11 March 2011, Japan experienced a major disaster brought about by a 9.0-magnitude earthquake and a massive tsunami that followed. This disaster caused extensive damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant with the release of a large amount of radiation, leading to a crisis level 7 on the International Atomic Energy Agency scale. In this report, we discuss the obligations of physicians to provide care during the initial weeks after the disaster. We appeal to the obligation of general beneficence and argue that physicians should go to disaster zones only if there is no significant risk, cost or burden associated with doing so. We conclude that physicians were not obligated to go to Fukushima given the high risk of radiation exposure and physical and psychological harm. However, we must acknowledge that there were serious epistemic difficulties in accurately assessing the risks or benefits of travelling to Fukushima at the time. The discussion that follows is highly pertinent to all countries that rely on nuclear energy.

  8. Top 20 research studies of 2013 for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Ebell, Mark H; Grad, Roland

    2014-09-15

    In 2013, we performed monthly surveillance of more than 110 English-language clinical research journals, and identified approximately 250 studies that had the potential to change the practice of family physicians. Each study was critically appraised and summarized by a group of primary care clinicians with expertise in evidence-based medicine. Studies were evaluated based on their relevance to primary care practice, validity, and likelihood that they could change practice. These summaries, called POEMs (patient-oriented evidence that matters), are e-mailed to subscribers, including members of the Canadian Medical Association. A validated tool was used to obtain feedback from these physicians about the clinical relevance of each POEM and the benefits the physicians expected for their practice. This article, the third installment in this annual series, summarizes the 20 POEMs judged to have the greatest clinical relevance. The included POEMs address questions such as whether patients must fast before measurement of lipids (no), whether a Mediterranean diet reduces mortality (yes), and the likelihood of clinically important bleeding in older patients taking warfarin (3.8% per year).

  9. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective.

    PubMed

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, I R; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, C M; Purcarea, V L

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer's perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician's perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician's perspective.

  10. Veterans’ Health Care: Improved Oversight of Community Care Physicians Credentials Needed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Administration QASP quality assurance surveillance plan This is a work of the U.S. government and is not subject to copyright protection in the...Community Care Credentials important means by which health care organizations gain assurance that patients receive safe, high quality care.2 VA... quality of health care. URAC has over 30 accreditation and certification programs, some of which are related to physician credentialing. URAC was

  11. Truth Telling and Treatment Strategies in End-of-Life Care in Physician-Led Accountable Care Organizations: Discrepancies Between Patients' Preferences and Physicians' Perceptions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsien-Liang; Cheng, Shao-Yi; Yao, Chien-An; Hu, Wen-Yu; Chen, Ching-Yu; Chiu, Tai-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Providing patient-centered care from preventive medicine to end-of-life care in order to improve care quality and reduce medical cost is important for accountable care. Physicians in the accountable care organizations (ACOs) are suitable for participating in supportive end-of-life care especially when facing issues in truth telling and treatment strategy. This study aimed to investigate patients' attitudes toward truth telling and treatment preferences in end-of-life care and compare patients' attitudes with their ACOs physicians' perceptions.This nationwide study applied snowball sampling to survey physicians in physician-led ACOs and their contracted patients by questionnaire from August 2010 to July 2011 in Taiwan. The main outcome measures were beliefs about palliative care, attitudes toward truth telling, and treatment preferences.The data of 314 patients (effective response rate = 88.7%) and 177 physicians (88.5%) were analyzed. Regarding truth telling about disease prognosis, 94.3% of patients preferred to be fully informed, whereas only 80% of their physicians had that perception (P < 0.001). Significant differences were also found in attitudes toward truth telling even when encountering terminal disease status (98.1% vs 85.3%). Regarding treatment preferences in terminal illness, nearly 90% of patients preferred supportive care, but only 15.8% of physicians reported that their patients had this preference (P < 0.001).Significant discrepancies exist between patients' preferences and physicians' perceptions toward truth telling and treatment strategies in end-of-life care. It is important to enhance physician-patient communication about end-of-life care preferences in order to achieve the goal of ACOs. Continuing education on communication about end-of-life care during physicians' professional development would be helpful in the reform strategies of establishing accountable care around the world.

  12. Does having regular care by a family physician improve preventive care?

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, W. J.; Fuller-Thomson, E.; Talbot, Y.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether regular care from a family physician is associated with receiving preventive services. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of the 1994 National Population Health Survey. SETTING: Cross-sectional sample of the Canadian population. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 15,731 non-institutionalized adults. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Reported visits to general practitioners and specialists in the previous year and reports of having had blood pressure measurements, mammography, and Pap smears. RESULTS: A graded relationship was observed between level of regular care by a family physician in the previous year (none, some, regular) and receiving preventive services. Those without regular doctors and those reporting only some care by a family physician were less likely to have ever had their blood pressure checked than adults receiving ongoing care from a regular family physician. Women reporting some or no care were less likely to have had mammography within 2 years or to have ever had Pap smears. CONCLUSION: Adults who receive regular care from a family physician are more likely to receive recommended preventive services. PMID:11212436

  13. Using claims data to select primary care physicians for a managed care network.

    PubMed

    Nathanson, P; Noether, M; Ozminkowski, R J; Smith, K M; Raney, B E; Mickey, D; Hawley, P M

    1994-01-01

    An insurance claims databased profiling system was developed to help select new primary care physicians (PCPs) for a managed care network. PCPs (family practitioners, internists, and pediatricians) were ranked based on how closely their actual use of outpatient services conformed to the predictions of a mathematical model that adjusted for differences in age, sex, and case mix.

  14. Commentary: "Who was caring for Mary?" revisited: a call for all academic physicians caring for patients to focus on systems and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Southwick, Frederick S; Spear, Steven J

    2009-12-01

    Over 15 years have passed since Mary's near death (Annals of Internal Medicine. 1993;118:146-148). Disappointment in the care by fellow academic physicians persists; however, a reanalysis of her case through the lens of complex systems design and performance yields a more accurate and actionable perspective. Mary's suffering was not due to human failure alone. Human failure was provoked and exacerbated by broken processes including ambiguous assignments of responsibility; inadequate transfers of information and authority; unreliable or unavailable protocols for providing safe, effective treatment; and a failure to integrate the deep but narrow perspectives of individual specialists into a complete picture of Mary's condition. Her case exemplifies, in personal terms, many of the system challenges academic medical centers face: Faculty have other missions that can conflict with patient care; disease complexity is high, requiring input from multiple subspecialists; clinical departments serve as roadblocks to communication; and novice physicians, requiring close supervision, have primary responsibility for the day-to-day care of acutely ill patients. The academic physicians who first cared for Mary unwittingly accepted flawed systems, and they failed to work around them. At great monetary and emotional expense, last-minute heroics saved Mary. In a dysfunctional system, even the most conscientious physician may be viewed as uncaring. As Mary's case so clearly illustrates, patients and their families see the system and the physician as one. Only by working to improve the systems of delivery will academic physicians again be consistently viewed as caring.

  15. Exodus of male physicians from primary care drives shift to specialty practice.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ha T; O'Malley, Ann S

    2007-06-01

    An exodus of male physicians from primary care is driving a marked shift in the U.S. physician workforce toward medical-specialty practice, according to a national study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Two factors have helped mask the severity of the shift--a growing proportion of female physicians, who disproportionately choose primary care, and continued reliance on international medical graduates (IMGs), who now account for nearly a quarter of all U.S. primary care physicians. Since 1996-97, a 40 percent increase in the female primary care physician supply has helped to offset a 16 percent decline in the male primary care physician supply relative to the U.S. population. At the same time, primary care physicians' incomes have lost ground to both inflation and medical and surgical specialists' incomes. And women in primary care face a 22 percent income gap relative to men, even after accounting for differing characteristics. If real incomes for primary care physicians continue to decline, there is a risk that the migration of male physicians will intensify and that female physicians may begin avoiding primary care--trends that could aggravate a predicted shortage of primary care physicians.

  16. Physician preference for criteria mapping in medical care evaluation.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, S; Kaplan, S H; Goldberg, G A; Nadler, M A; Deigh-Hewertson, R

    1978-05-01

    This study was designed to determine which of three quality assessment methods most validly identifies deficient care. Process criteria were developed to assess outpatient care for urinary tract infection using each of three methods: a limited "list" of seven criteria, an extensive "list" of 40 criteria, and a criteria map (CM) which uses branching logic to identify applicable criteria according to the specific needs of each case. Defining deficiency as compliance with less than 60 percent of criteria, the extensive list found all 66 cases deficient; the limited list, 27 (41.0 percent); and the CM system, 15 (22.7 percent). After excluding the extensive list because of its nondiscrimination, 23 discrepancies in rating remained between the limited list and the CM. Ten physicians unaware of the results reviewed all 23 cases. In 12 of these 23 cases, at least seven of the ten physicians preferred the rating of one method over another; the CM assessment was preferred in 11 of the 12 cases (P less than .01). Criteria maps, providing a patient-specific approach, offer a more valid assessment of medical care than either the extensive or limited list.

  17. Attitudes and Preferences of Pennsylvania Primary Care Physicians Regarding Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Phyllis; And Others

    Primary care physicians in Pennsylvania were asked to give their attitudes and preferences regarding continuing medical education (CME) in an effort to expand and develop physician-oriented CME programs for the Hershey Continuing Education department at Penn State. A 32-item questionnaire was mailed to 952 primary care physicians practicing in…

  18. Clinical Effectiveness of Online Training in Palliative Care of Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Agra-Varela, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary care physicians (PCPs) have a major responsibility in the management of palliative patients. Online palliative care (PC) education has not been shown to have a clinical impact on patients that is equal or different to traditional training. Objective This study tested the clinical effectiveness of online PC education of physicians through impact on symptom control, quality of life (QOL), caregiver satisfaction, and knowledge-attitude of physicians at 18 months of the intervention. Methods We conducted a randomized clinical trial. Subjects were 169 physicians randomly assigned to receive the online model or traditional training. Consecutive patients with advanced cancer requiring PC were included. Physicians and patients completed the Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS), and patients the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist (RSCL) twice, 7 to 10 days apart. Caregivers completed the SERVQUAL. Physicians' level of knowledge-attitude was measured at 18 months. Results Sixty-seven physicians enrolled 117 patients. The intervention group had reduced scores for pain, symptoms, and family anxiety. The global RSCL scale showed a difference between groups. There was no significant difference in the questionnaires used. Caregiver satisfaction was comparable between groups. Physicians in the intervention group significantly increased their knowledge without any differences in attitude. Online training was completed by 86.6% in the intervention group, whereas 13.4% in the control group accessed traditional training. Conclusions Participation in an online PC education program by PCPs improved patient scores for some symptoms and family anxiety on the POS and also showed improved global QOL. Significant differences were found in physicians' knowledge at short and long term. PMID:23987657

  19. Hematuria: etiology and evaluation for the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jitesh V; Chambers, Christopher V; Gomella, Leonard G

    2008-08-01

    Asymptomatic microscopic and gross hematuria are common problems for the primary care physician. The exact definition of microscopic hematuria is debated, but is defined by one group as > 3 red blood cells/high power microscopic field. While the causes of hematuria are extensive, the most common differential diagnosis for both microscopic and gross hematuria in adults includes infection, malignancy, and urolithiasis. Clinical evaluation of these patients often involves urological consultation with urine cytology, urine culture, imaging studies, and cystoscopy. Patients who have no identifiable cause after an extensive workup should be monitored for early detection of malignancy or occult renal disease.

  20. Comprehensive care in Huntington's disease: a physician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Nance, Martha A

    2007-04-30

    Huntington's disease is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disorder with wide-ranging effects on affected individuals and their families. Until a cure is found for the disease, patients and their families will continue to need care over years, even generations. The ideal care for HD is provided by a team, led by a physician, with input from rehabilitation therapists, nurses, psychologists, genetic counselors, social workers, and other health care providers. The goals of care are to maximize the quality of life at all points through the course of the disease, in part by anticipating problems that are likely to arise at the next stage of the illness. We describe below an approach to comprehensive care, and introduce the concept of the "Huntington disease molecule", in which the patient, in the center, is surrounded by a shell of immediate and extended family members, with bonds extended in multiple directions to provider who can give appropriate medical care, education, crisis management, research opportunities, address family issues, maximize function, and prepare for the future.

  1. Coordination of cancer care between family physicians and cancer specialists

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C.; Manca, Donna P.; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Webster, Fiona; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore health care provider (HCP) perspectives on the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Design Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Setting Canada. Participants A total of 58 HCPs, comprising 21 FPs, 15 surgeons, 12 medical oncologists, 6 radiation oncologists, and 4 GPs in oncology. Methods This qualitative study is nested within a larger mixed-methods program of research, CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum), focused on improving the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, telephone interviews were conducted with HCPs involved in cancer care. Invitations to participate were sent to a purposive sample of HCPs based on medical specialty, sex, province or territory, and geographic location (urban or rural). A coding schema was developed by 4 team members; subsequently, 1 team member coded the remaining transcripts. The resulting themes were reviewed by the entire team and a summary of results was mailed to participants for review. Main findings Communication challenges emerged as the most prominent theme. Five key related subthemes were identified around this core concept that occurred at both system and individual levels. System-level issues included delays in medical transcription, difficulties accessing patient information, and physicians not being copied on all reports. Individual-level issues included the lack of rapport between FPs and cancer specialists, and the lack of clearly defined and broadly communicated roles. Conclusion Effective and timely communication of medical information, as well as clearly defined roles for each provider, are essential to good coordination of care along the cancer care trajectory, particularly during transitions of care between cancer specialist and FP care. Despite advances in technology, substantial communication challenges still

  2. Access, quality, and costs of care at physician owned hospitals in the United States: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Orav, E John; Jena, Anupam B; Dudzinski, David M; Le, Sidney T; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare physician owned hospitals (POHs) with non-POHs on metrics around patient populations, quality of care, costs, and payments. Design Observational study. Setting Acute care hospitals in 95 hospital referral regions in the United States, 2010. Participants 2186 US acute care hospitals (219 POHs and 1967 non-POHs). Main outcome measures Proportions of patients using Medicaid and those from ethnic and racial minority groups; hospital performance on patient experience metrics, care processes, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, and readmission rates; costs of care; care payments; and Medicare market share. Results The 219 POHs were more often small (<100 beds), for profit, and in urban areas. 120 of these POHs were general (non-specialty) hospitals. Compared with patients from non-POHs, those from POHs were younger (77.4 v 78.4 years, P<0.001), less likely to be admitted through an emergency department (23.2% v. 29.0%, P<0.001), equally likely to be black (5.1% v 5.5%, P=0.85) or to use Medicaid (14.9% v 15.4%, P=0.75), and had similar numbers of chronic diseases and predicted mortality scores. POHs and non-POHs performed similarly on patient experience scores, processes of care, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, 30 day readmission rates, costs, and payments for acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and pneumonia. Conclusion Although POHs may treat slightly healthier patients, they do not seem to systematically select more profitable or less disadvantaged patients or to provide lower value care. PMID:26333819

  3. Perceived role of primary care physicians in Nova Scotia's reformed health care system. Qualitative study.

    PubMed Central

    Sangster, L. M.; McGuire, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine primary care physicians' perceptions of their role in a reformed health system. DESIGN: Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. SETTING: Province of Nova Scotia. PARTICIPANTS: Purposefully selected sample of 14 practising primary care physicians. MAIN OUTCOME FINDINGS: Participants identified seven aspects of their role: primarily, diagnosis and treatment of patient's medical problems; then coordination, counseling, education, advocacy, disease prevention, and gatekeeping. The range of activities and degree of responsibility assumed by participants, however, varied. Factors affecting role perception fell into three categories: philosophical view of health and medicine, willingness to collaborate, and practical realities. Participants differed in their understanding of primary health care and their overall vision of the health system. Remuneration policies and concerns about sharing accountability were factors preventing an integrated, collaborative approach to care. Personal, patient, and structural realities also limited physicians' roles. CONCLUSIONS: This sample of primary care physicians had diverse perceptions of their role. Results of this study could provide information for identifying issues that need to be addressed to facilitate changes taking place in the health care system. PMID:10889862

  4. Physician Professional Satisfaction and Area of Clinical Practice: Evidence from an Integrated Health Care Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Caloyeras, John P; Kanter, Michael; Ives, Nicole; Kim, Chong Y; Kanzaria, Hemal K; Berry, Sandra H; Brook, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Context: For health care reform to succeed, health care systems need a professionally satisfied primary care workforce. Evidence suggests that primary care physicians are less satisfied than those in other medical specialties. Objective: To assess three domains of physician satisfaction by area of clinical practice among physicians practicing in an established integrated health system. Design: Cross-sectional online survey of all Southern California Permanente Medical Group (SCPMG) partner and associate physicians (N = 1034) who were primarily providing clinic-based care in 1 of 4 geographically and operationally distinct Kaiser Permanente Southern California Medical Centers. Main Outcome Measures: Primary measure was satisfaction with one’s day-to-day professional life as a physician. Secondary measures were satisfaction with quality of care and income. Results: Of the 636 physicians responding to the survey (61.5% response rate), on average, 8 in 10 SCPMG physicians reported satisfaction with their day-to-day professional life as a physician. Primary care physicians were only minimally less likely to report being satisfied (difference of 8.2–9.5 percentage points; p < 0.05) than were other physicians. Nearly all physicians (98.2%) were satisfied with the quality of care they are able to provide. Roughly 8 in 10 physicians reported satisfaction with their income. No differences were found between primary care physicians and those in other clinical practice areas regarding satisfaction with quality of care or income. Conclusion: It is possible to create practice settings, such as SCPMG, in which most physicians, including those in primary care, experience high levels of professional satisfaction. PMID:27057819

  5. Work stress of primary care physicians in the US, UK and German health care systems.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Johannes; Shackelton, Rebecca; Link, Carol; Marceau, Lisa; von dem Knesebeck, Olaf; McKinlay, John

    2010-07-01

    Work-related stress among physicians has been an issue of growing concern in recent years. How and why this may vary between different health care systems remains poorly understood. Using an established theoretical model (effort-reward imbalance), this study analyses levels of work stress among primary care physicians (PCPs) in three different health care systems, the United States, the United Kingdom and Germany. Whether professional autonomy and specific features of the work environment are associated with work stress and account for possible country differences are examined. Data are derived from self-administered questionnaires obtained from 640 randomly sampled physicians recruited for an international comparative study of medical decision making conducted from 2005 to 2007. Results demonstrate country-specific differences in work stress with the highest level in Germany, intermediate level in the US and lowest level among UK physicians. A negative correlation between professional autonomy and work stress is observed in all three countries, but neither this association nor features of the work environment account for the observed country differences. Whether there will be adequate numbers of PCPs, or even a field of primary care in the future, is of increasing concern in several countries. To the extent that work-related stress contributes to this, identification of its organizational correlates in different health care systems may offer opportunities for remedial interventions.

  6. Communication in acute ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Dean, Marleah; Oetzel, John; Sklar, David P

    2014-12-01

    Effective communication has been linked to better health outcomes, higher patient satisfaction, and treatment adherence. Communication in ambulatory care contexts is even more crucial, as providers typically do not know patients' medical histories or have established relationships, conversations are time constrained, interruptions are frequent, and the seriousness of patients' medical conditions may create additional tension during interactions. Yet, health communication often unduly emphasizes information exchange-the transmission and receipt of messages leading to a mutual understanding of a patient's condition, needs, and treatments. This approach does not take into account the importance of rapport building and contextual issues, and may ultimately limit the amount of information exchanged.The authors share the perspective of communication scientists to enrich the current approach to medical communication in ambulatory health care contexts, broadening the under standing of medical communication beyond information exchange to a more holistic, multilayered viewpoint, which includes rapport and contextual issues. The authors propose a socio-ecological model for understanding communication in acute ambulatory care. This model recognizes the relationship of individuals to their environment and emphasizes the importance of individual and contextual factors that influence patient-provider interactions. Its key elements include message exchange and individual, organizational, societal, and cultural factors. Using this model, and following the authors' recommendations, providers and medical educators can treat communication as a holistic process shaped by multiple layers. This is a step toward being able to negotiate conflicting demands, resolve tensions, and create encounters that lead to positive health outcomes.

  7. Sexual minorities and selection of a primary care physician in a midwestern U.S. city.

    PubMed

    Labig, Chalmer E; Peterson, Tim O

    2006-01-01

    How and why sexual minorities select a primary care physician is critical to the development of methods for attracting these clients to a physician's practice. Data obtained from a sample of sexual minorities in a mid-size city in our nation's heartland would indicate that these patients are loyal when the primary care physician has a positive attitude toward their sexual orientation. The data also confirms that most sexual minorities select same sex physicians but not necessarily same sexual orientation physicians because of lack of knowledge of physicians' sexual orientation. Family practice physicians and other primary care physicians can reach out to this population by encouraging word of mouth advertising and by displaying literature on health issues for all sexual orientations in their offices.

  8. Effects of online palliative care training on knowledge, attitude and satisfaction of primary care physicians

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Spanish Palliative Care Strategy recommends an intermediate level of training for primary care physicians in order to provide them with knowledge and skills. Most of the training involves face-to-face courses but increasing pressures on physicians have resulted in fewer opportunities for provision of and attendance to this type of training. The effectiveness of on-line continuing medical education in terms of its impact on clinical practice has been scarcely studied. Its effect in relation to palliative care for primary care physicians is currently unknown, in terms of improvement in patient's quality of life and main caregiver's satisfaction. There is uncertainty too in terms of any potential benefits of asynchronous communication and interaction among on-line education participants, as well as of the effect of the learning process. The authors have developed an on-line educational model for palliative care which has been applied to primary care physicians in order to measure its effectiveness regarding knowledge, attitude towards palliative care, and physician's satisfaction in comparison with a control group. The effectiveness evaluation at 18 months and the impact on the quality of life of patients managed by the physicians, and the main caregiver's satisfaction will be addressed in a different paper. Methods Randomized controlled educational trial to compared, on a first stage, the knowledge and attitude of primary care physicians regarding palliative care for advanced cancer patients, as well as satisfaction in those who followed an on-line palliative care training program with tutorship, using a Moodle Platform vs. traditional education. Results 169 physicians were included, 85 in the intervention group and 84 in the control group, of which five were excluded. Finally 82 participants per group were analyzed. There were significant differences in favor of the intervention group, in terms of knowledge (mean 4.6; CI 95%: 2.8 to 6.5 (p = 0

  9. 75 FR 4655 - National Practitioner Data Bank for Adverse Information on Physicians and Other Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... Practitioner Data Bank for Adverse Information on Physicians and Other Health Care Practitioners: Reporting on... Information on Physicians and Other Health Care Practitioners: Reporting on Adverse and Negative Actions... rule revises existing regulations under sections 401 through 432 of the Health Care Quality...

  10. Physicians' Perspectives on Caring for Cognitively Impaired Elders.(author Abstract)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Wendy L.; McIlvain, Helen E.; Geske, Jenenne A.; Porter, Judy L.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to develop ah in-depth understanding of the issues important to primary care physicians in providing care to cognitively impaired elders. Design and Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 20 primary care physicians. Text coded as "cognitive impairment" was retrieved and analyzed by use of grounded theory analysis…

  11. Social anxiety disorder. A guide for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Elliott, H W; Reifler, B

    2000-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder is prevalent, potentially disabling, but quite treatable. A thorough and directed history can distinguish social phobia from depression, panic disorder, and OCD. It can also screen for and identify possible substance abuse. Once the diagnosis is made, a combination of pharmacologic and psychotherapy is indicated. The SSRIs, MAOIs, benzodiazepines, and beta-blockers--as well as CBT--can effectively treat social anxiety symptoms. Primary care physicians may well want to begin by prescribing an SSRI like paroxetine, along with a high potency benzodiazepine to be taken on a regular or an as-needed basis, and a beta-blocker to take as needed in anticipation of stressful social situations. A referral for CBT should be considered. If the patient has marked side effects from drug treatment or a lack of adequate response to medication, psychiatric referral is definitely indicated.

  12. [Management of the esophageal candidiasis by the primary care physician].

    PubMed

    Behrens, Garance; Bocherens, Astrid; Senn, Nicolas

    2014-05-14

    Esophageal candidiasis is one of the most common opportunistic infections in patients infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This pathology is also found in patients without overt immunodeficiency. Other risk factors are known to be associated with this disease like inhaled or systemic corticosteroid treatment or proton-pump inhibitors and H2 receptor antagonists. In the absence of identified risk factors, a primary immune deficiency should be sought. Prevention of esophageal candidiasis is based primarily on the identification of risk factors, and a better control of them. This article presents a review of the physiopathology, clinical presentation and management of esophageal candidiasis by primary care physicians. We will also discuss ways of preventing esophageal candidiasis when necessary.

  13. Redesigning Care For Patients At Increased Hospitalization Risk: The Comprehensive Care Physician Model

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, David O.; Ruhnke, Gregory W.

    2015-01-01

    Patients who have been hospitalized often experience care coordination problems that worsen outcomes and increase costs. One reason is that hospital care and ambulatory care are often provided by different physicians. However, interventions to improve care coordination for hospitalized patients have not consistently improved outcomes and generally have not reduced costs. We describe the rationale for the Comprehensive Care Physician model, in which physicians focus their practice on patients at increased risk of hospitalization so that they can provide both inpatient and outpatient care to their patients. We also describe the design and implementation of a study supported by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to assess the model’s effects on costs and outcomes. Evidence concerning the effectiveness of the program is expected by 2016. If the program is found to be effective, the next steps will be to assess the durability of its benefits and the model’s potential for dissemination; evidence to the contrary will provide insights into how to alter the program to address sources of failure. PMID:24799573

  14. Primary care physician shortages could be eliminated through use of teams, nonphysicians, and electronic communication.

    PubMed

    Green, Linda V; Savin, Sergei; Lu, Yina

    2013-01-01

    Most existing estimates of the shortage of primary care physicians are based on simple ratios, such as one physician for every 2,500 patients. These estimates do not consider the impact of such ratios on patients' ability to get timely access to care. They also do not quantify the impact of changing patient demographics on the demand side and alternative methods of delivering care on the supply side. We used simulation methods to provide estimates of the number of primary care physicians needed, based on a comprehensive analysis considering access, demographics, and changing practice patterns. We show that the implementation of some increasingly popular operational changes in the ways clinicians deliver care-including the use of teams or "pods," better information technology and sharing of data, and the use of nonphysicians-have the potential to offset completely the increase in demand for physician services while improving access to care, thereby averting a primary care physician shortage.

  15. Factors associated with the use of advanced practice nurses/physician assistants in a fee-for-service nursing home practice: a comparison with primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Bakerjian, Debra; Harrington, Charlene

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine factors associated with the use of advanced practice nurse and physician assistant (APN/PA) visits to nursing home (NH) patients compared with those by primary care physicians (PCPs). This was a secondary analysis using Medicare claims data. General estimation equations were used to determine the odds of NH residents receiving APN/PA visits. Ordinary least squares analyses were used to examine factors associated with these visits. A total of 5,436 APN/PAs provided care to 27% of 129,812 residents and were responsible for 16% of the 1.1 million Medicare NH fee-for-service visits in 2004. APN/PAs made an average of 33 visits annually compared with PCPs (21 visits). Neuropsychiatric and acute diagnoses and patients with a long-stay status were associated with more APN/PA visits. APN/PAs provide a substantial amount of care, but regional variations occur, and Medicare regulations constrain the ability of APN/PAs to substitute for physician visits.

  16. Patients Who Choose Primary Care Physicians Based On Low Office Visit Price Can Realize Broader Savings.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Ateev; Huckfeldt, Peter J; Haviland, Amelia M; Gascue, Laura; Sood, Neeraj

    2016-12-01

    Price transparency initiatives encourage patients to save money by choosing physicians with a relatively low price per office visit. Given that the price of such visits represents a small fraction of total spending, the extent of the savings from choosing such physicians has not been clear. Using a national sample of commercial claims data, we compared the care received by patients of high- and low-price primary care physicians. The median price for an established patient's office visit was $60 among low-price physicians and $86 among high-price physicians (price was calculated as reimbursement plus out-of-pocket spending). Patients of low-price physicians also received, on average, relatively low-price lab tests, imaging, and other procedures. Total spending per year among patients cared for by low-price physicians was $690 less than spending among patients cared for by high-price physicians. There were no consistent differences in patients' use of services between high- and low-price physicians. Despite modest differences in physicians' office visit prices, patients of low-price physicians had substantively lower overall spending, compared to patients of high-price physicians.

  17. Acute stroke initiative involving an acute care team.

    PubMed

    Roth, Sean M; Keyser, Gabrielle; Winfield, Michelle; McNeil, Julie; Simko, Leslie; Price, Karen; Moffa, Donald; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Peacock, W Frank; Katzan, Irene L

    2012-06-01

    The Acute Care Team Educational Initiative (ACTEI) was developed as a quality improvement initiative for the recognition and initial management of time-sensitive medical conditions. For our first time-sensitive disease process, we focused on acute stroke [acute stroke initiative (ASI)]. As part of the larger ACTEI, the ASI included creating an ACT that responds to all suspected emergency department stroke patients. In this article, we describe the planning, process, and development of the ACTEI/ASI as well as how we created an acute response team for the diagnosis and management of suspected acute stroke.

  18. Physician reactions to the health care revolution. A grief model approach.

    PubMed

    Daugird, A; Spencer, D

    1996-10-01

    The American health care reform revolution has brought about major changes in the practice of medicine. As integral components of the health care system, physicians have felt the full impact of most of these changes. Change often involves losses for those affected, and, in this case, physicians are no exception. Many physicians have experienced losses of financial security, social status, independent clinical decision making and resource utilization, the practice option of independent private practice, hospital governance power, freedom of choice in specialty selection and geographic practice location, physician collegiality, continuity of patient relationships, and autonomy. We use Kübler-Ross' grieving model to help understand physician responses to their losses inherent in health care system reform. The grieving stages of denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance are applied to these physician responses and suggestions given to help physicians through this grieving process.

  19. The duty of the physician to care for the family in pediatric palliative care: context, communication, and caring.

    PubMed

    Jones, Barbara L; Contro, Nancy; Koch, Kendra D

    2014-02-01

    Pediatric palliative care physicians have an ethical duty to care for the families of children with life-threatening conditions through their illness and bereavement. This duty is predicated on 2 important factors: (1) best interest of the child and (2) nonabandonment. Children exist in the context of a family and therefore excellent care for the child must include attention to the needs of the family, including siblings. The principle of nonabandonment is an important one in pediatric palliative care, as many families report being well cared for during their child's treatment, but feel as if the physicians and team members suddenly disappear after the death of the child. Family-centered care requires frequent, kind, and accurate communication with parents that leads to shared decision-making during treatment, care of parents and siblings during end-of-life, and assistance to the family in bereavement after death. Despite the challenges to this comprehensive care, physicians can support and be supported by their transdisciplinary palliative care team members in providing compassionate, ethical, and holistic care to the entire family when a child is ill.

  20. The role of physician assistants in improving renal care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Garrett O

    2004-04-01

    Currently, nephrology PAs remain a small group. According to 2003 census data from The American Academy of Nephrology Physician Assistants, only 98 of 20,646 survey respondents identified themselves as practicing in nephrology. The future of PAs or nurse practitioners in nephrology is not only very bright, but is also an absolute necessity. We have known for many years that the number of individuals with kidney disease in the United States is increasing at a rate that outpaces our ability to develop and train nephrologists. This has resulted in an ever-increasing ratio of patients to clinical nephrologists. The workload for management of dialysis patients on a daily basis is becoming exhaustive and will not improve. The fastest growing segment of dialysis patients is now people in their 70s and 80s, and they bring with them multiple chronic health problems that are affected by dialysis and the treatment of their renal disease. The result is the need for closer monitoring, not less. The role of physician extenders can have a very positive impact for this patient population. Being the eyes, ears, nose, and fingers of our nephrologists can help in avoiding potential major problems in the outpatient arena. There is not a magic formula in caring for this patient population; it is a matter of spending time and becoming familiar with our patients, a premium most nephrologists do not have at present. It is not a matter of willingness; it is a matter of capability, of being in more than one place, and of having time to make the patient assessments. I think there is a great opportunity for nephrologists to create a new segment of providers to assist them in these endeavors. They can sponsor PAs as preceptors before graduation so that the students can have the opportunity to see what it takes to care for this population, the level of medicine they need to learn, and the responsibility they will need to accept. The nephrologist will benefit from working with a PA that has a

  1. Democratic and Republican physicians provide different care on politicized health issues.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Eitan D; Goldenberg, Matthew N

    2016-10-18

    Physicians frequently interact with patients about politically salient health issues, such as drug use, firearm safety, and sexual behavior. We investigate whether physicians' own political views affect their treatment decisions on these issues. We linked the records of over 20,000 primary care physicians in 29 US states to a voter registration database, obtaining the physicians' political party affiliations. We then surveyed a sample of Democratic and Republican primary care physicians. Respondents evaluated nine patient vignettes, three of which addressed especially politicized health issues (marijuana, abortion, and firearm storage). Physicians rated the seriousness of the issue presented in each vignette and their likelihood of engaging in specific management options. On the politicized health issues-and only on such issues-Democratic and Republican physicians differed substantially in their expressed concern and their recommended treatment plan. We control for physician demographics (like age, gender, and religiosity), patient population, and geography. Physician partisan bias can lead to unwarranted variation in patient care. Awareness of how a physician's political attitudes might affect patient care is important to physicians and patients alike.

  2. The Role of the Primary Care Physician in the Management of Bladder Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Khaled A

    2004-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a major health challenge for primary care physicians. Unfortunately, the majority of incontinent patients remain untreated. Primary care physicians are ideally positioned to screen for and manage urinary incontinence. A knowledge of basic micturition physiology is important for the physician to accurately identify the cause of incontinence and arrive at the correct treatment course. To this end, this article reviews the physiology of the lower urinary tract, describes the clinical types of urinary incontinence, and outlines a stepwise approach for the primary care physician to the basic evaluation and management of patients with this condition. PMID:16985854

  3. Do physicians have an ethical obligation to care for patients with AIDS?

    PubMed Central

    Angoff, N. R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper responds to the question: Do physicians have an ethical obligation to care for patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)? First, the social and political milieu in which this question arises is sampled. Here physicians as well as other members of the community are found declaring an unwillingness to be exposed to people with AIDS. Next, laws, regulations, ethical codes and principles, and the history of the practice of medicine are examined, and the literature as it pertains to these areas is reviewed. The obligation to care for patients with AIDS, however, cannot be located in an orientation to morality defined in rules and codes and an appeal to legalistic fairness. By turning to the orientation to morality that emerges naturally from connection and is defined in caring, the physicians' ethical obligation to care for patients with AIDS is found. Through an exploration of the writings of modern medical ethicists, it is clear that the purpose of the practice of medicine is healing, which can only be accomplished in relationship to the patient. It is in relationship to patients that the physician has the opportunity for self-realization. In fact, the physician is physician in relationship to patients and only to the extent that he or she acts virtuously by being morally responsible for and to those patients. Not to do so diminishes the physician's ethical ideal, a vision of the physician as good physician, which has consequences for the physician's capacity to care and for the practice of medicine. PMID:1788990

  4. The Primary Care Physician Workforce in Massachusetts: Implications for the Workforce in Rural, Small Town America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenger, Joseph; Cashman, Suzanne B.; Savageau, Judith A.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Small towns across the United States struggle to maintain an adequate primary care workforce. Purpose: To examine factors contributing to physician satisfaction and retention in largely rural areas in Massachusetts, a state with rural pockets and small towns. Methods: A survey mailed in 2004-2005 to primary care physicians, practicing in…

  5. Patient Care Physician Supply and Requirements: Testing COGME Recommendations. Council on Graduate Medical Education, Eighth Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Graduate Medical Education.

    This report reassesses recommendations made by the Council on Graduate Medical Education in earlier reports which had, beginning in 1992, addressed the problems of physician oversupply. In this report physician supply and requirements are examined in the context of a health care system increasingly dominated by managed care. Patterns of physician…

  6. Oncologists' perspectives on post-cancer treatment communication and care coordination with primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, C N; Haggstrom, D; Kahn, K L; Gray, S W; Kim, B; Liu, B; Eisenstein, J; Keating, N L

    2017-01-10

    Post-treatment cancer care is often fragmented and of suboptimal quality. We explored factors that may affect cancer survivors' post-treatment care coordination, including oncologists' use of electronic technologies such as e-mail and integrated electronic health records (EHRs) to communicate with primary care physicians (PCPs). We used data from a survey (357 respondents; participation rate 52.9%) conducted in 2012-2013 among medical oncologists caring for patients in a large US study of cancer care delivery and outcomes. Oncologists reported their frequency and mode of communication with PCPs, and role in providing post-treatment care. Seventy-five per cent said that they directly communicated with PCPs about post-treatment status and care recommendations for all/most patients. Among those directly communicating with PCPs, 70% always/usually used written correspondence, while 36% always/usually used integrated EHRs; telephone and e-mail were less used. Eighty per cent reported co-managing with PCPs at least one post-treatment general medical care need. In multivariate-adjusted analyses, neither communication mode nor intensity were associated with co-managing survivors' care. Oncologists' reliance on written correspondence to communicate with PCPs may be a barrier to care coordination. We discuss new research directions for enhancing communication and care coordination between oncologists and PCPs, and to better meet the needs of cancer survivors post-treatment.

  7. Small primary care physician practices have low rates of preventable hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Pesko, Michael F; Ryan, Andrew M; Mendelsohn, Jayme L; Copeland, Kennon R; Ramsay, Patricia Pamela; Sun, Xuming; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen M

    2014-09-01

    Nearly two-thirds of US office-based physicians work in practices of fewer than seven physicians. It is often assumed that larger practices provide better care, although there is little evidence for or against this assumption. What is the relationship between practice size--and other practice characteristics, such as ownership or use of medical home processes--and the quality of care? We conducted a national survey of 1,045 primary care-based practices with nineteen or fewer physicians to determine practice characteristics. We used Medicare data to calculate practices' rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions (ambulatory care-sensitive admissions). Compared to practices with 10-19 physicians, practices with 1-2 physicians had 33 percent fewer preventable admissions, and practices with 3-9 physicians had 27 percent fewer. Physician-owned practices had fewer preventable admissions than hospital-owned practices. In an era when health care reform appears to be driving physicians into larger organizations, it is important to measure the comparative performance of practices of all sizes, to learn more about how small practices provide patient care, and to learn more about the types of organizational structures--such as independent practice associations--that may make it possible for small practices to share resources that are useful for improving the quality of care.

  8. Improving care for British Columbians: the critical role of physician engagement.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Julian; van Dijk, Marlies; Doris, Peter; Krause, Christina; Cochrane, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Canadian provinces are addressing quality of care and patient safety in a systemic way, but obtaining physician involvement in system improvement continues to be a challenge. To address this issue, individual physicians, physician groups, the British Columbia Medical Association, the health authorities, the BC Patient Safety & Quality Council (BCPSQC) and the Ministry of Health have come together to support physician involvement and foster physician satisfaction. Building on earlier work on patient safety, in 2010 the ministry developed a comprehensive strategy for system-wide improvement, focusing on achieving critical population, patient and sustainability outcomes. Central to this plan is the acknowledged need to involve healthcare providers of all disciplines, in particular physicians. Today, BC physicians are leading large-scale provincial clinical improvement in three interdependent areas: Clinical Care Management, Integrated Primary and Community Care, and the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. To further physicians' key contributions to BC's healthcare system, the BCPSQC, physician-ministry committees, health authorities and the Ministry will continue to engage physicians through practice support, feedback, financial recognition and information exchange, and by supporting improvements in the care provided to patients.

  9. Exploring Differences in Patient-Centered Practices among Healthcare Professionals in Acute Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Sidani, Souraya; Reeves, Scott; Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; van Soeren, Mary; Fox, Mary; Collins, Laura

    2017-04-12

    There is limited evidence of the extent to which Healthcare professionals implement patient-centered care (PCC) and of the factors influencing their PCC practices in acute care organizations. This study aimed to (1) examine the practices reported by health professionals (physicians, nurses, social workers, other healthcare providers) in relation to three PCC components (holistic, collaborative, and responsive care), and (2) explore the association of professionals' characteristics (gender, work experience) and a contextual factor (caseload), with the professionals' PCC practices. Data were obtained from a large scale cross-sectional study, conducted in 18 hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Consenting professionals (n = 382) completed a self-report instrument assessing the three PCC components and responded to standard questions inquiring about their characteristics and workload. Small differences were found in the PCC practices across professional groups: (1) physicians reported higher levels of enacting the holistic care component; (2) physicians, other healthcare providers, and social workers reported implementing higher levels of the collaborative care component; and (3) physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers reported higher levels of providing responsive care. Caseload influenced holistic care practices. Interprofessional education and training strategies are needed to clarify and address professional differences in valuing and practicing PCC components. Clinical guidelines can be revised to enable professionals to engage patients in care-related decisions, customize patient care, and promote interprofessional collaboration in planning and implementing PCC. Additional research is warranted to determine the influence of professional, patient, and other contextual factors on professionals' PCC practices in acute care hospitals.

  10. Estimating the Residency Expansion Required to Avoid Projected Primary Care Physician Shortages by 2035

    PubMed Central

    Petterson, Stephen M.; Liaw, Winston R.; Tran, Carol; Bazemore, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to calculate the projected primary care physician shortage, determine the amount and composition of residency growth needed, and estimate the impact of retirement age and panel size changes. METHODS We used the 2010 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey to calculate utilization of ambulatory primary care services and the US Census Bureau to project demographic changes. To determine the baseline number of primary care physicians and the number retiring at 66 years, we used the 2014 American Medical Association Masterfile. Using specialty board and American Osteopathic Association figures, we estimated the annual production of primary care residents. To calculate shortages, we subtracted the accumulated primary care physician production from the accumulated number of primary care physicians needed for each year from 2015 to 2035. RESULTS More than 44,000 primary care physicians will be needed by 2035. Current primary care production rates will be unable to meet demand, resulting in a shortage in excess of 33,000 primary care physicians. Given current production, an additional 1,700 primary care residency slots will be necessary by 2035. A 10% reduction in the ratio of population per primary care physician would require more than 3,000 additional slots by 2035, whereas changing the expected retirement age from 66 years to 64 years would require more than 2,400 additional slots. CONCLUSIONS To eliminate projected shortages in 2035, primary care residency production must increase by 21% compared with current production. Delivery models that shift toward smaller ratios of population to primary care physicians may substantially increase the shortage. PMID:25755031

  11. Expectations outpace reality: physicians' use of care management tools for patients with chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Emily; Reschovsky, James

    2009-12-01

    Use of care management tools--such as group visits or patient registries--varies widely among primary care physicians whose practices care for patients with four common chronic conditions--asthma, diabetes, congestive heart failure and depression--according to a new national study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). For example, less than a third of these primary care physicians in 2008 reported their practices use nurse managers to coordinate care, and only four in 10 were in practices using registries to keep track of patients with chronic conditions. Physicians also used care management tools for patients with some chronic conditions but not others. Practice size and setting were strongly related to the likelihood that physicians used care management tools, with solo and smaller group practices least likely to use care management tools. The findings suggest that, along with experimenting with financial incentives for primary care physicians to adopt care management tools, policy makers might consider developing community-level care management resources, such as nurse managers, that could be shared among smaller physician practices.

  12. Building relationships with physicians. Internal marketing efforts help strengthen organizational bonds at a rural health care clinic.

    PubMed

    Peltier, J W; Boyt, T; Westfall, J E

    1997-01-01

    Physician turnover is costly for health care organizations, especially for rural organizations. One approach management can take to reduce turnover is to promote physician loyalty by treating them as an important customer segment. The authors develop an information--oriented framework for generating physician loyalty and illustrate how this framework has helped to eliminate physician turnover at a rural health care clinic. Rural health care organizations must develop a more internal marketing orientation in their approach to establishing strong relationship bonds with physicians.

  13. Viscosupplementation for Osteoarthritis: a Primer for Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) constitutes a growing public health burden and the most common cause of disability in the United States. Non-pharmacologic modalities and conservative pharmacologic therapies are recommended for the initial treatment of OA, including acetaminophen, and topical and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, safety concerns continue to mount regarding the use of these treatments and none have been shown to impact disease progression. Viscosupplementation with injections of hyaluronans (HAs) are indicated when non-pharmacologic and simple analgesics have failed to relieve symptoms (e.g., pain, stiffness) associated with knee OA. This review evaluates literature focusing on the efficacy and/or safety of HA injections in treating OA of the knee and in other joints, including the hip, shoulder, and ankle. Methods Relevant literature on intra-articular (IA) HA injections as a treatment for OA pain in the knee and other joints was identified through PubMed database searches from inception until January 2013. Search terms included “hyaluronic acid” or “hylan”, and “osteoarthritis”. Discussion Current evidence indicates that HA injections are beneficial and safe for patients with OA of the knee. IA injections of HAs treat the symptoms of knee OA and may also have disease-modifying properties, potentially delaying progression of OA. Although traditionally reserved for second-line treatment, evidence suggests that HAs may have value as a first-line therapy in the treatment of knee OA as they have been shown to be more effective in earlier stages and grades of disease, more recently diagnosed OA, and in less severe radiographic OA. Conclusion For primary care physicians who treat and care for patients with OA of the knee, IA injection with HAs constitutes a safe and effective treatment that can be routinely administered in the office setting. PMID:24203348

  14. Physician Use of Outpatient Electronic Health Records to Improve Care

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Adam; Bowes, Watson A.; Thornton, Sidney N.; Narus, Scott P.

    2008-01-01

    We applied a model of usage categories of electronic health records for outpatient physicians to a large population of physicians, using an established electronic health record. This model categorizes physician users according to how extensively they adopt the various capabilities of electronic health records. We identified representative indicators from usage statistics for outpatient physician use of the HELP-2 outpatient electronic medical record, in use at Intermountain Healthcare. Using these indicators, we calculated the relative proportion of users in each category. These proportions are useful for predicting the expected benefits of electronic health record adoption. PMID:18999307

  15. Nurses versus physicians' knowledge, attitude, and performance on care for the family members of dying patients

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahimohammad, Abdolghani; Firouzkouhi, Mohammadreza; Amrollahimishvan, Fatemeh; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Nurses and physicians must be competent enough to provide care for the clients. As a lack of knowledge and a poor attitude result in a low performance of delivering care, this study aimed to explore the nurses versus physicians’ knowledge, attitude, and performance on care for the family members of dying patients (FMDPs). Methods: This descriptive study was conducted at the educational hospitals in Isfahan, Iran. The samples were 110 nurses and 110 physicians. The data were collected through a convenience sampling method and using a valid and reliable questionnaire. Results: The average knowledge, attitude, and performance on care for the FMDPs were not significantly different between nurses and physicians (p>0.05). The majority of nurses (55.4%) and physician (63.6%) were at a moderate and a fair level of knowledge of care for the FMDPs. Most of the nurses (81%) and physicians (87.3%) had a positive attitude towards caring the FMDPs. Most of the nurses (70%) and physicians (86.3%) had a moderate and fair performance. Conclusion: Having enough knowledge and skills, and a positive attitude are necessary for caring the FMDPs. Nurses’ and physicians' competencies must be improved through continuing educational programs and holding international and national conferences with a focus on the palliative care. PMID:26838571

  16. Physicians' perceptions of mobile technology for enhancing asthma care for youth.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Tali; Panzera, Anthony Dominic; Martinasek, Mary; McDermott, Robert; Couluris, Marisa; Lindenberger, James; Bryant, Carol

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed physicians' receptivity to using mobile technology as a strategy in patient care for adolescents with asthma. Understanding physicians' perceived barriers and benefits of integrating mobile technology in adolescents' asthma care and self-management is an initial step in enhancing overall patient and disease outcomes. We conducted in-depth interviews with second- and third-year pediatric residents and attending physicians who oversee pediatric residents in training (N = 27) at an academic medical center in the southeastern United States. We identified both benefits from and barriers to broader use of mobile technologies for improving asthma outcomes in adolescents. Resident physicians demonstrated greater readiness for integrating these technologies than did attending physicians. Prior to adoption of mobile technologies in the care of adolescent asthma patients, barriers to implementation should be understood. Prior to widespread adoption, such systems will need to be evaluated against traditional care for demonstration of patient outcomes that improve on the current situation.

  17. Physician associates and GPs in primary care: a comparison

    PubMed Central

    Drennan, Vari M; Halter, Mary; Joly, Louise; Gage, Heather; Grant, Robert L; Gabe, Jonathan; Brearley, Sally; Carneiro, Wilfred; de Lusignan, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Background Physician associates [PAs] (also known as physician assistants) are new to the NHS and there is little evidence concerning their contribution in general practice. Aim This study aimed to compare outcomes and costs of same-day requested consultations by PAs with those of GPs. Design and setting An observational study of 2086 patient records presenting at same-day appointments in 12 general practices in England. Method PA consultations were compared with those of GPs. Primary outcome was re-consultation within 14 days for the same or linked problem. Secondary outcomes were processes of care. Results There were no significant differences in the rates of re-consultation (rate ratio 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.86 to 1.79, P = 0.25). There were no differences in rates of diagnostic tests ordered (1.08, 95% CI = 0.89 to 1.30, P = 0.44), referrals (0.95, 95% CI = 0.63 to 1.43, P = 0.80), prescriptions issued (1.16, 95% CI = 0.87 to 1.53, P = 0.31), or patient satisfaction (1.00, 95% CI = 0.42 to 2.36, P = 0.99). Records of initial consultations of 79.2% (n = 145) of PAs and 48.3% (n = 99) of GPs were judged appropriate by independent GPs (P<0.001). The adjusted average PA consultation was 5.8 minutes longer than the GP consultation (95% CI = 2.46 to 7.1; P<0.001); cost per consultation was GBP £6.22, (US$ 10.15) lower (95% CI = −7.61 to −2.46, P<0.001). Conclusion The processes and outcomes of PA and GP consultations for same-day appointment patients are similar at a lower consultation cost. PAs offer a potentially acceptable and efficient addition to the general practice workforce. PMID:25918339

  18. Preventing crises in palliative care in the home. Role of family physicians and nurses.

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, G.; Willison, K. B.

    1995-01-01

    With the current shift to community care, the need for palliative care in the home involving the family physician has increased. Potential causes of crises in the home care of the dying are identified. Strategies to prevent crises are suggested that rely on a team's providing comprehensive and anticipatory care. PMID:7539653

  19. "Sometimes I Feel Overwhelmed": Educational Needs of Family Physicians Caring for People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Joanne; Dreyfus, Deborah; Cerreto, Mary; Bokhour, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Primary care physicians who care for adults with intellectual disability often lack experience with the population, and patients with intellectual disability express dissatisfaction with their care. Establishing a secure primary care relationship is particularly important for adults with intellectual disability, who experience health disparities…

  20. 78 FR 78751 - Medicare Program; Physicians' Referrals to Health Care Entities With Which They Have Financial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ...; Physicians' Referrals to Health Care Entities With Which They Have Financial Relationships: Exception for... information through interoperable systems in support of care coordination across health care settings.'' The..., it is now a necessity for the creation of new health care delivery and payment models....

  1. Regional Supply of Chiropractic Care and Visits to Primary Care Physicians for Back and Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Matthew A.; Yakusheva, Olga; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Bynum, Julie P.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether availability of chiropractic care affects use of primary care physician (PCP) services is unknown. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 17.7 million older adults who were enrolled in Medicare from 2010 to 2011. We examined the relationship between regional supply of chiropractic care and PCP services using Spearman correlation. Generalized linear models were used to examine the association between regional supply of chiropractic care and number of annual visits to PCPs for back and/or neck pain. Results We found a positive association between regional supply of chiropractic care and PCP services (rs = 0.52; P <.001). An inverse association between supply of chiropractic care and the number of annual visits to PCPs for back and/or neck pain was apparent. The number of PCP visits for back and/or neck pain was 8% lower (rate ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.91–0.92) in the quintile with the highest supply of chiropractic care compared to the lowest quintile. We estimate chiropractic care is associated with a reduction of 0.37 million visits to PCPs nationally, at a cost of $83.5 million. Conclusions Greater availability of chiropractic care in some areas may be offsetting PCP services for back and/or neck pain among older adults. (J Am Board Fam Med 2015;28:000–000.) PMID:26152439

  2. Foreign Physicians: Their Impact on U.S. Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dublin, Thomas D.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses problems caused by the migration of physicians and, to some degree, dentists and nurses from developing countries to more developed nations having market economics. Issues of quality are raised as are problems caused by the trend of practicing physicians toward greater and greater specialization at the expense of general practice and the…

  3. A qualitative study of the experience of CenteringPregnancy group prenatal care for physicians

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study sought to understand the central meaning of the experience of group prenatal care for physicians who were involved in providing CenteringPregnancy through a maternity clinic in Calgary, Canada. Method The study followed the phenomenological qualitative tradition. Three physicians involved in group prenatal care participated in a one-on-one interview between November and December 2009. Two physicians participated in verification sessions. Interviews followed an open ended general guide and were audio recorded and transcribed. The purpose of the analysis was to identify meaning themes and the core meaning experienced by the physicians. Results Six themes emerged: (1) having a greater exchange of information, (2) getting to knowing, (3) seeing women get to know and support each other, (4) sharing ownership of care, (5) having more time, and (6) experiencing enjoyment and satisfaction in providing care. These themes contributed to the core meaning for physicians of “providing richer care.” Conclusions Physicians perceived providing better care and a better professional experience through CenteringPregnancy compared to their experience of individual prenatal care. Thus, CenteringPregnancy could improve work place satisfaction, increase retention of providers in maternity care, and improve health care for women. PMID:23445867

  4. Patient-physician concordance in problem identification in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Freidin, R B; Goldman, L; Cecil, R R

    1980-09-01

    We analyzed how often patients and physicians identified the same principal problem for 439 return primary care visits. Agreement between the patient and physician, called concordance, was scored as complete when both cited a problem in the same organ-system (208 visits; 47%); as partial when the patient cited a problem that was anywhere but first on the physician's problem list but both parties agreed on the biological or psychosocial nature of the principal problem (114 visits; 26%); or as absent (117 visits; 27%). Concordance scores were significantly lower when physicians identified a principal psychosocial problem or when patients identified a principal problem related to psychosocial issues, preventive medicine, the musculoskeletal system, or accidents. Because physicians in the Primary Care Internal Medicine Training Program were significantly more likely to identify principal psychosocial problems, their concordance scores were significantly lower than those of standard internal medicine track physicians.

  5. The role of the physician in the emerging health care environment.

    PubMed Central

    DiMatteo, M R

    1998-01-01

    What do patients want from their physicians? This article reviews research on the role of the physician attained through surveys of the public and of physicians. The results from the two groups are surprisingly similar; communication is seen as an essential component of the physician's role. Further, we found that the public's ratings of the medical profession depend heavily on their experience with personal physicians. This paper reviews previous research on the importance of effective communication to patient satisfaction, adherence, and the outcomes of treatment, and it considers ways in which physician-patient communication is being affected by recent changes in the health care system. Suggestions for medical education and for the structure of primary and specialty patient care are offered. PMID:9614789

  6. Caring for adult survivors of child sexual abuse. Issues for family physicians.

    PubMed

    Bala, M

    1994-05-01

    Traditional medical education has not taught physicians about the long-term effects of child sexual abuse. Family physicians often feel poorly equipped to appreciate the effect of such a childhood history on current health or to recognize and treat survivors. This article links the experience of the sexually abused child to long-term effects and outlines the role of family physicians in screening and caring for survivors.

  7. Use of spirometry among chest physicians and primary care physicians in India

    PubMed Central

    Vanjare, Nitin; Chhowala, Sushmeeta; Madas, Sapna; Kodgule, Rahul; Gogtay, Jaideep; Salvi, Sundeep

    2016-01-01

    Although spirometry is the gold-standard diagnostic test for obstructive airways diseases, it remains poorly utilised in clinical practice. We aimed to investigate the use of spirometry across India, the change in its usage over a period of time and to understand the reasons for its under-utilisation. Two nationwide surveys were conducted in the years 2005 and 2013, among four groups of doctors: chest physicians (CPs), general physicians (GenPs), general practitioners (GPs) and paediatricians (Ps). A total of 1,000 physicians from each of the four groups were randomly selected from our database in the years 2005 and 2013. These surveys were conducted in 52 cities and towns across 15 states in India. A questionnaire was administered to the physicians, which captured information about their demographic details, type of practice and use of spirometry. The overall response rates of the physicians in 2005 and 2013 were 42.8% and 54.9%, respectively. Spirometry was reported to be used by 55% CPs, 20% GenPs, 10% GPs and 5% Ps in 2005, and this increased by 30.9% among CPs (P value <0.01), 18% among GenPs (P value=0.01), 20% among GPs (P value: not significant) and 224% among Ps (P value <0.01). The reasons for not using spirometry varied between 2005 and 2013. In all, 32.2% of physicians were unaware of which predicted equation they were using. The use of spirometry in India is low, although it seems to have improved over the years. The reasons identified in this study for under-utilisation should be used to address initiatives to improve the use of spirometry in clinical practice. PMID:27385406

  8. Race of physician and satisfaction with care among African-American patients.

    PubMed Central

    LaVeist, Thomas A.; Carroll, Tamyra

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine predictors of physician-patient race concordance and the effect of race concordance on patients' satisfaction with their primary physicians among African American patients. The specific research question is, do African American patients express greater satisfaction with their care when they have an African American physician? Using the Commonwealth Fund, Minority Health Survey, we conduct multivariate analysis of African American respondents who have a usual source of care (n = 745). More than 21% of African American patients reported having an African American physician. Patient income and having a choice in the selection of the physician were significant predictors of race concordance. And, patients who were race concordant reported higher levels of satisfaction with care compared with African American patients that were not race concordant. PMID:12442996

  9. [Medicine is not gender-neutral: influence of physician sex on medical care].

    PubMed

    Lagro-Janssen, A L M

    2008-05-17

    Many studies have shown that men and women differ in communication styles. The question is whether these differences also play a role during medical consultation. Potential differences between male and female physicians that have been investigated, are differences in doctor-patient communication, the diagnostic process and treatment. The communication style of female physicians is more patient-oriented than that of male physicians. Male and female physicians differ in their use of additional tests; notably, intimate examinations, such as prostatic or vaginal examinations, are performed less frequently for patients of the opposite sex. Male physicians prescribe medication more frequently; notably sedatives are prescribed more often by male physicians to female patients. Therefore, whether medical care is provided by a male or a female physician makes a difference: the professional role of the physician is not gender-neutral. Within the medical profession, male and female medical students are socialised differently, and professional socialisation does not overcome differences in gender roles. Patients are generally more satisfied with female physicians than male physicians. Knowledge of and insight into these processes is essential for improving the quality of care.

  10. Accountable Care Units: A Disruptive Innovation in Acute Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Castle, Bryan W; Shapiro, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Accountable Care Units are a disruptive innovation that has moved care on acute care units from a traditional silo model, in which each discipline works separately from all others, to one in which multiple disciplines work together with patients and their families to move patients safely through their hospital stay. This article describes the "what," "how," and "why" of the Accountable Care Units model as it has evolved in different locations across a single health system and includes the lessons learned as different units and hospitals continue working to implement the model in their complex care environments.

  11. Factors influencing the frequency of visits by hypertensive patients to primary care physicians in Winnipeg

    PubMed Central

    Roos, N P; Carrière, K C; Friesen, D

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As part of a recent project focused on needs-based planning for generalist physicians, the authors documented the variety of practice styles of primary care physicians for managing patients with hypertension. They investigated the validity of various explanations for these different styles and the relative contributions of physician and patient characteristics to the rates at which hypertensive patients contact physicians. METHODS: Retrospective descriptive study using regression analyses to simultaneously adjust for the influence of key patient and physician characteristics. Hypertensive patients in Winnipeg were identified using Manitoba physician claims data for fiscal years 1993/94 and 1994/95. Patients were included if they were 25 years of age or more and had at least one physician contact in both 1993/94 and 1994/95 during which hypertension was diagnosed. In addition, the primary care physician had to be the physician that the patient contacted most frequently in 1993/94 and 1994/95 and with whom she or he had at least 2 visits during this period. Only patients of family practitioners whose practice included at least 50 hypertensive patients were included. RESULTS: To control for the effects of large samples and to validate the results, the authors conducted all analyses for half (6282) the sample of hypertensive patients who met the study criteria (12,563). A total of 132 primary care physicians who met the study criteria were identified. The patients made on average 9.3 ambulatory visits to physicians (both general practitioners and specialists) in 1994/95. Those who had more complex medical conditions (i.e., were formally referred to a specialist), those who had 3 or more serious medical problems and those who had been admitted to hospital made more visits to their primary care physician than those without these characteristics. After these and other key patient characteristics were controlled for, a primary care physician's patient recall

  12. Missed Opportunity: National Survey of Primary Care Physicians and Patients on Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    A national representative survey of primary care physicians (N=648) was conducted to determine how they deal with patients who have substance abuse problems. The survey revealed how physicians identify substance abuse in their patients, what efforts they make to help these patients, and what barriers they find to effective diagnosis and treatment.…

  13. The Role of Physician Assistants in Rural Health Care: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Lisa R.; Hooker, Roderick S.; Yates, Kathryn L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A literature review was performed to assess the role of physician assistants (PAs) in rural health care. Four categories were examined: scope of practice, physician perceptions, community perceptions, and retention/recruitment. Methods: A search of the literature from 1974 to 2008 was undertaken by probing the electronic bibliographic…

  14. Caring for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities: New Roles for Physicians. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Corinne W.; Kniest, Barbara A.; Quigley, Andrea C.

    This final report discusses the activities and outcomes of a 3-year project designed to replicate a uniquely successful training model for involving physicians in community early intervention systems. The Caring for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities: New Roles for Physicians (CFIT) model includes three replicable components: state planning,…

  15. Caring for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities: New Roles for Physicians. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Corinne W.; Kniest, Barbara A.; Quigley, Andrea C.

    This report discusses the activities of the Caring for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities: New Roles for Physicians Outreach Project (CFIT Outreach), a program designed to increase physician participation in the early intervention system through replication of a proven model of inservice training. The model, which provides continuing medical…

  16. Primary care physicians' knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and practices regarding childhood obesity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Gerwen, M; Franc, C; Rosman, S; Le Vaillant, M; Pelletier-Fleury, N

    2009-03-01

    Obesity is an important public health issue with an epidemic spread in adolescents and children, which needs to be tackled. This systematic review of primary care physicians' knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and practices (KABP) regarding childhood obesity will help to implement or adjust the actions necessary to counteract obesity. Eligible studies were identified through a systematic database search for all available years to 2007. Articles were selected if they included data on primary care physicians' KABP regarding childhood obesity: 130 articles were assessed and eventually 11 articles covering the period 1987-2007 and responding to the inclusion criteria were analyzed. The included studies showed that almost all physicians agreed on the necessity to treat childhood obesity but they believed to have a low self-efficacy in the treatment and experienced a negative feeling regarding obesity management. There was a large heterogeneity in the assessment of childhood obesity between the different studies but the awareness of the importance of using body mass index increased over the years among physicians. Almost all studies noted that physicians recommended dietary advice, exercise or referral to a dietician. From this review, it is obvious that there is a need for education of primary care physicians to increase the uniformity of the assessment and to improve physicians' self-efficacy in managing childhood obesity. Multidisciplinary treatment including general practitioners, paediatricians and specialized dieticians appears to be the way to counteract the growing obesity epidemic and thus, primary care physicians have to initiate, coordinate and obviously participate in obesity prevention initiatives.

  17. 42 CFR 485.711 - Condition of participation: Plan of care and physician involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... reviewed by a physician, or by a physical therapist or speech pathologist respectively. (a) Standard... therapist or speech-language pathologist who furnishes the services. (2) The plan of care for physical... in the clinical record. If the patient has an attending physician, the therapist or...

  18. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K.; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this…

  19. 20 CFR 725.707 - Reports of physicians and supervision of medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... medical care. 725.707 Section 725.707 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Rehabilitation § 725.707 Reports of physicians and supervision of medical care. (a) Within 30 days following the... permit continuing supervision of the medical care provided to the miner with respect to the...

  20. Impact of patient care appraisal on physician behaviour in the office setting

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, R. Wayne; Curry, Lynn

    1985-01-01

    The effect of patient care appraisal on physicians' management of patients' problems was assessed. Sixteen family physicians were involved. The eight in the experimental group helped in the selection of two of the five disease conditions to be audited and in the generation of optimal criteria of care for two of the conditions. Participation in the generation of optimal criteria was followed by a significant improvement in the physicians' behaviour, but involvement in the selection of the conditions to be audited caused no change. The patient care appraisal did not lead to significant improvement of physicians' management of the conditions. In a second analysis, in which only essential criteria of care were considered, the physicians who participated in the patient care appraisal significantly improved their management of patients' problems. However, participation in the selection of the conditions and in the generation of the criteria of care had no effect on their performance. Patient care appraisal is an effective tool in continuing medical education and leads to improvement in the quality of care, provided the process focuses on essential criteria of care. PMID:3986727

  1. Gender and the professional career of primary care physicians in Andalusia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the proportion of women in medicine is growing, female physicians continue to be disadvantaged in professional activities. The purpose of the study was to determine and compare the professional activities of female and male primary care physicians in Andalusia and to assess the effect of the health center on the performance of these activities. Methods Descriptive, cross-sectional, and multicenter study. Setting: Spain. Participants: Population: urban health centers and their physicians. Sample: 88 health centers and 500 physicians. Independent variable: gender. Measurements: Control variables: age, postgraduate family medicine specialty (FMS), patient quota, patients/day, hours/day housework from Monday to Friday, idem weekend, people at home with special care, and family situation. Dependent variables: 24 professional activities in management, teaching, research, and the scientific community. Self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive, bivariate, and multilevel logistic regression analyses. Results Response: 73.6%. Female physicians: 50.8%. Age: female physicians, 49.1 ± 4.3 yrs; male physicians, 51.3 ± 4.9 yrs (p < 0.001). Female physicians with FMS: 44.2%, male physicians with FMS: 33.3% (p < 0.001). Female physicians dedicated more hours to housework and more frequently lived alone versus male physicians. There were no differences in healthcare variables. Thirteen of the studied activities were less frequently performed by female physicians, indicating their lesser visibility in the production and diffusion of scientific knowledge. Performance of the majority of professional activities was independent of the health center in which the physician worked. Conclusions There are gender inequities in the development of professional activities in urban health centers in Andalusia, even after controlling for family responsibilities, work load, and the effect of the health center, which was important in only a few of the activities under study

  2. The Acute Care Theater Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwitz, Rany J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The University of Illinois' medical school has a third-year program of weekly role-playing exercises focusing on management of acute medical problems. Students are responsible for creating the cases, complete with scenarios and treatment teams, simulating them, and successfully treating or reaching an impasse. Little teacher preparation time is…

  3. Nystagmus Assessments Documented by Emergency Physicians in Acute Dizziness Presentations: A Target for Decision Support?

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, Kevin A.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Meurer, William J.; McLaughlin, Thomas; Hall, Pamela A.; Forman, Jane; Fendrick, A. Mark; Newman-Toker, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Dizziness is a common presenting complaint to the emergency department (ED), and emergency physicians (EPs) consider these presentations a priority for decision support. Assessing for nystagmus and defining its features are important steps for any acute dizziness decision algorithm. The authors sought to describe nystagmus documentation in routine ED care to determine if nystagmus assessments might be an important target in decision support efforts. Methods Medical records from ED visits for dizziness were captured as part of a surveillance study embedded within an ongoing population-based cohort study. Visits with documentation of a nystagmus assessment were reviewed and coded for presence or absence of nystagmus, ability to draw a meaningful inference from the description, and coherence with the final EP diagnosis when a peripheral vestibular diagnosis was made. Results Of 1,091 visits for dizziness, 887 (81.3%) documented a nystagmus assessment. Nystagmus was present in 185 out of 887 (20.9%) visits. When nystagmus was present, no further characteristics were recorded in 48 of the 185 visits (26%). The documentation of nystagmus (including all descriptors recorded) enabled a meaningful inference about the localization or cause in only 10 of the 185 (5.4%) visits. The nystagmus description conflicted with the EP diagnosis in 113 (80.7%) of the 140 visits that received a peripheral vestibular diagnosis. Conclusions Nystagmus assessments are frequently documented in acute dizziness presentations, but details do not generally enable a meaningful inference. Recorded descriptions usually conflict with the diagnosis when a peripheral vestibular diagnosis is rendered. Nystagmus assessments might be an important target in developing decision support for dizziness presentations. PMID:21676060

  4. Procedures in ambulatory care. Which family physicians do what in southwestern Ontario?

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, S. J.; Agbayani, R.; Bass, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine how often family physicians perform 12 ambulatory care procedures and factors associated with procedure performance. DESIGN: Mailed, self-administered survey. The survey was conducted according to the Dillman Total Design method. SETTING: Family physicians' offices in London, Ont, and in surrounding communities. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 395 family physicians practising within the London area were mailed surveys, 237 in London and 158 outside London. Response rates were 80.6% and 75.9%, respectively. Nonresponders did not differ significantly from responders in sex but included more solo practitioners. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Performance of ambulatory care procedures, sex, and practice characteristics of participant family physicians. RESULTS: For all responders, activities significantly associated with procedure performance were delivering babies, managing psychological problems, working emergency, and teaching. Mean total procedure scores ranged from 6.55 for managing psychological problems to 7.68 for working emergency. Sex-specific analysis showed that practice location and years in practice were significant factors for female but not for male family physicians. Mean total procedure scores for female physicians were 7.06 (outside London) and 4.74 (in London). CONCLUSIONS: Factors associated with procedure performance for family physicians in and around London included delivering babies, working in emergency, managing psychological problems, and teaching. Practice location was a significant factor for only female family physicians; those practising outside London performed procedures more than their urban counterparts and at similar rates to male physicians. PMID:9559192

  5. Perceptions of physicians about knowledge sharing barriers in Turkish health care system.

    PubMed

    Gider, Ömer; Ocak, Saffet; Top, Mehmet

    2015-05-01

    This study was based on knowledge sharing barriers about attitudes of physicians in Turkish health care system. The present study aims to determine whether the knowledge sharing barriers about attitudes of physicians vary depending on gender, position, departments at hospitals, and hospital ownership status. This study was planned and conducted on physicians at one public hospital, one university hospital, and one private hospital in Turkey. 209 physicians were reached for data collection. The study was conducted in June-September 2014. The questionnaire (developed by A. Riege, (J. Knowl. Manag. 9(3):18-35, 2005)), five point Likert-type scale including 39 items having the potential of the physicians' knowledge- sharing attitudes and behaviors, was used in the study for data collection. Descriptive statistics, reliability analysis, student t test and ANOVA were used for data analysis. According to results of this study, there was medium level of knowledge sharing barriers within hospitals. In general, physicians had perceptions about the lowest level individual barriers, intermediate level organizational barriers and the highest level technological barriers perceptions, respectively. This study revealed that some knowledge sharing barriers about attitudes of physicians were significantly difference according to hospital ownership status, gender, position and departments. Most evidence medical decisions and evidence based practice depend on experience and knowledge of existing options and knowledge sharing in health care organizations. Physicians are knowledge and information-intensive and principal professional group in health care context.

  6. The Top 10 Things Nephrologists Wish Every Primary Care Physician Knew

    PubMed Central

    Paige, Neil M.; Nagami, Glenn T.

    2009-01-01

    Renal disease is commonly encountered by primary care physicians during their day-to-day visits with patients. Common renal disorders include hypertension, proteinuria, kidney stones, and chronic kidney disease. Despite their prevalence, many physicians may be unfamiliar with the diagnosis and initial treatment of these common renal disorders. Early recognition and intervention are important in slowing the progression of chronic kidney disease and preventing its complications. The evidence-based pearls in this article will help primary care physicians avoid common pitfalls in the recognition and treatment of such disorders and guide their decision to refer their patients to a specialist. PMID:19181652

  7. Barriers to providing nutrition counseling cited by physicians: a survey of primary care practitioners.

    PubMed

    Kolasa, Kathryn M; Rickett, Katherine

    2010-10-01

    In a 1995 pivotal study, Kushner described the attitudes, practice behaviors, and barriers to the delivery of nutrition counseling by primary care physicians. This article recognized nutrition and dietary counseling as key components in the delivery of preventive services by primary care physicians. Kushner called for a multifaceted approach to change physicians' counseling practices. The prevailing belief today is that little has changed. Healthy People 2010 and the U.S. Preventive Task Force identify the need for physicians to address nutrition with patients. The 2010 objective was to increase to 75% the proportion of office visits that included ordering or providing diet counseling for patients with a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or hypertension. At the midcourse review, the proportion actually declined from 42% to 40%. Primary care physicians continue to believe that providing nutrition counseling is within their realm of responsibility. Yet the gap remains between the proportion of patients who physicians believe would benefit from nutrition counseling and those who receive it from their primary care physician or are referred to dietitians and other healthcare professionals. The barriers cited in recent years continue to be those listed by Kushner: lack of time and compensation and, to a lesser extent, lack of knowledge and resources. The 2010 Surgeon General's Vision for a Healthy and Fit Nation and First Lady Obama's "Let's Move Campaign" spotlight the need for counseling adults and children on diet and physical activity.

  8. Assessing the Proximity Relationship of Walk-in Clinics and Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alissa; Revere, Lee; Ramphul, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    This article evaluates the spatial relationship between primary care provider clinics and walk-in clinics. Using ZIP code level data from Harris County, Texas, the results suggest that primary care physicians and walk-in clinics are similarly located at lower rates in geographic areas with populations of lower socioeconomic status. Although current clinic location choices effectively broaden the gap in primary care access for the lower income population, the growing number of newly insured individuals may make it increasingly attractive for walk-in clinics to locate in geographic areas with populations of lower socioeconomic status and less competition from primary care physicians.

  9. More Comprehensive Care Among Family Physicians is Associated with Lower Costs and Fewer Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Bazemore, Andrew; Petterson, Stephen; Peterson, Lars E.; Phillips, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Comprehensiveness is lauded as 1 of the 5 core virtues of primary care, but its relationship with outcomes is unclear. We measured associations between variations in comprehensiveness of practice among family physicians and healthcare utilization and costs for their Medicare beneficiaries. METHODS We merged data from 2011 Medicare Part A and B claims files for a complex random sample of family physicians engaged in direct patient care, including 100% of their claimed care of Medicare beneficiaries, with data reported by the same physicians during their participation in Maintenance of Certification for Family Physicians (MC-FP) between the years 2007 and 2011. We created a measure of comprehensiveness from mandatory self-reported survey items as part of MC-FP examination registration. We compared this measure to another derived from Medicare’s Berenson-Eggers Type of Service (BETOS) codes. We then examined the association between the 2 measures of comprehensiveness and hospitalizations, Part B payments, and combined Part A and B payments. RESULTS Our full family physician sample consists of 3,652 physicians providing the plurality of care to 555,165 Medicare beneficiaries. Of these, 1,133 recertified between 2007 and 2011 and cared for 185,044 beneficiaries. There was a modest correlation (0.30) between the BETOS and self-reported comprehensiveness measures. After adjusting for beneficiary and physician characteristics, increasing comprehensiveness was associated with lower total Medicare Part A and B costs and Part B costs alone, but not with hospitalizations; the association with spending was stronger for the BETOS measure than for the self-reported measure; higher BETOS scores significantly reduced the likelihood of a hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS Increasing family physician comprehensiveness of care, especially as measured by claims measures, is associated with decreasing Medicare costs and hospitalizations. Payment and practice policies that enhance

  10. Physician Service Attribution Methods for Examining Provision of Low-Value Care

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eva; Buist, Diana SM; Handley, Matthew; Pardee, Roy; Gundersen, Gabrielle; Reid, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: There has been significant research on provider attribution for quality and cost. Low-value care is an area of heightened focus, with little of the focus being on measurement; a key methodological decision is how to attribute delivered services and procedures. We illustrate the difference in relative and absolute physician- and panel-attributed services and procedures using overuse in cervical cancer screening. Study Design: A retrospective, cross-sectional study in an integrated health care system. Methods: We used 2013 physician-level data from Group Health Cooperative to calculate two utilization attributions: (1) panel attribution with the procedure assigned to the physician’s predetermined panel, regardless of who performed the procedure; and (2) physician attribution with the procedure assigned to the performing physician. We calculated the percentage of low-value cervical cancer screening tests and ranked physicians within the clinic using the two utilization attribution methods. Results: The percentage of low-value cervical cancer screening varied substantially between physician and panel attributions. Across the whole delivery system, median panel- and physician-attributed percentages were 15 percent and 10 percent, respectively. Among sampled clinics, panel-attributed percentages ranged between 10 percent and 17 percent, and physician-attributed percentages ranged between 9 percent and 13 percent. Within a clinic, median panel-attributed screening percentage was 17 percent (range 0 percent–27 percent) and physician-attributed percentage was 11 percent (range 0 percent–24 percent); physician rank varied by attribution method. Conclusions: The attribution method is an important methodological decision when developing low-value care measures since measures may ultimately have an impact on national benchmarking and quality scores. Cross-organizational dialogue and transparency in low-value care measurement will become increasingly important

  11. Electronic medical records and physician stress in primary care: results from the MEMO Study

    PubMed Central

    Babbott, Stewart; Manwell, Linda Baier; Brown, Roger; Montague, Enid; Williams, Eric; Schwartz, Mark; Hess, Erik; Linzer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background Little has been written about physician stress that may be associated with electronic medical records (EMR). Objective We assessed relationships between the number of EMR functions, primary care work conditions, and physician satisfaction, stress and burnout. Design and participants 379 primary care physicians and 92 managers at 92 clinics from New York City and the upper Midwest participating in the 2001–5 Minimizing Error, Maximizing Outcome (MEMO) Study. A latent class analysis identified clusters of physicians within clinics with low, medium and high EMR functions. Main measures We assessed physician-reported stress, burnout, satisfaction, and intent to leave the practice, and predictors including time pressure during visits. We used a two-level regression model to estimate the mean response for each physician cluster to each outcome, adjusting for physician age, sex, specialty, work hours and years using the EMR. Effect sizes (ES) of these relationships were considered small (0.14), moderate (0.39), and large (0.61). Key results Compared to the low EMR cluster, physicians in the moderate EMR cluster reported more stress (ES 0.35, p=0.03) and lower satisfaction (ES −0.45, p=0.006). Physicians in the high EMR cluster indicated lower satisfaction than low EMR cluster physicians (ES −0.39, p=0.01). Time pressure was associated with significantly more burnout, dissatisfaction and intent to leave only within the high EMR cluster. Conclusions Stress may rise for physicians with a moderate number of EMR functions. Time pressure was associated with poor physician outcomes mainly in the high EMR cluster. Work redesign may address these stressors. PMID:24005796

  12. Gout - a guide for the general and acute physicians.

    PubMed

    Abhishek, Abhishek; Roddy, Edward; Doherty, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Gout is the most prevalent inflammatory arthritis and affects 2.5% of the general population in the UK. It is also the only arthritis that has the potential to be cured with safe, inexpensive and well tolerated urate-lowering treatments, which reduce serum uric acid by either inhibiting xanthine oxidase - eg allopurinol, febuxostat - or by increasing the renal excretion of uric acid. Of these, xanthine oxidase inhibitors are used first line and are effective in 'curing' gout in the vast majority of patients. Gout can be diagnosed on clinical grounds in those with typical podagra. However, in those with involvement of other joints, joint aspiration is recommended to demonstrate monosodium urate crystals and exclude other causes of acute arthritis, such as septic arthritis. However, a clinical diagnosis of gout can be made if joint aspiration is not feasible. This review summarises the current understanding of the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, investigations and treatment of gout.

  13. Physician-patient relationship in the intensive care unit: erosion of the sacred trust?

    PubMed

    Chaitin, Elizabeth; Stiller, Ronald; Jacobs, Samuel; Hershl, Joyce; Grogen, Tracy; Weinberg, Joel

    2003-05-01

    With the advent of the increasing technology and multispecialty medicine, the strong relationship or "sacred trust" between patient and family physician has gradually eroded. Various subspecialists are now entrusted with patient care at different phases of evaluation and treatment. Because of the transient nature of these physician-patient interactions, a strong bond is often not established before critical decisions must be made concerning ongoing patient care. As a result, multiple members of the different healthcare teams (the care cooperative) may be confronted with addressing end-of-life discussions, which in the past was the responsibility of the primary physician. Because of this need to move into a previously viewed private territory, communication conflicts may arise between members of the healthcare team. In an effort to understand and deal with observed recurrent problems that occurred when patient care was transferred between specialty care teams, our institution has addressed communication conflicts that arise in the care of oncology patients transferred to the intensive care unit. Our goal has been to initiate and maintain a dialog to avoid misunderstandings and to reduce anxiety between members of the intensivist and oncology services. To this end, we have addressed the various pitfalls that come with the transition from the traditional physician-patient relationship to the more fluid and comprehensive care-cooperative mode. We believe this approach to be useful in improving communication between healthcare providers in the multispecialty care setting, which will ultimately enhance the quality of patient care.

  14. The Role of Training Environment Care Intensity in US Physician Cost Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Ryskina, Kira L.; Halpern, Scott D.; Minyanou, Nancy S.; Goold, Susan D.; Tilburt, Jon C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine a potential relationship between training environment and physician views about cost consciousness. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional study of US physicians who responded to the “Physicians, Health Care Costs, and Society” survey conducted between May 30, 2012 and September 30, 2012 for whom information was available about the care intensity environment of their residency training hospital. The exposure of interest was a measure of healthcare utilization environment during residency from Dartmouth Atlas’ Hospital Care Intensity (HCI) index of primary training hospital. Main outcome measure was agreement with an 11-point cost-consciousness scale. Generalized estimating equations method was used to measure the association between exposure and outcome. Results Of the 2,556 physicians who responded to the survey 2,424 had a valid HCI index (95%), representing 649 residency programs. The mean cost-consciousness score among physicians trained at hospitals in the lowest quartile of care intensity (mean 31.8, SD 5.0) was higher than for physicians trained at hospitals in the top quartile of care intensity (mean 30.7, SD 5.1, P<.001). Adjusting for other physician and practice characteristics, a population of physicians trained in hospitals with a 1.0 point higher HCI index would score about 0.83 points lower on the cost-consciousness scale (beta coefficient = −0.83, 95% CI −1.60 to −0.05, P=.04). Conclusion The intensity of healthcare utilization environment during training may play a role in shaping physician cost-consciousness later in their careers. PMID:25633153

  15. Teleconferenced Educational Detailing: Diabetes Education for Primary Care Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Stewart B.; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Van, Daphne M.; O'Neill, Colleen

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Formal didactic continuing medical education (CME) is relatively ineffective for changing physician behavior. Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly prevalent disease, and interventions to improve adherence to clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are needed. Methods: A stratified, cluster-randomized, controlled trial design was used to…

  16. Primary care physicians' cancer screening recommendation practices and perceptions of cancer risk of Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Harry T; Ma, Grace X; Gold, Robert S; Atkinson, Nancy L; Wang, Min Qi

    2013-01-01

    Asian Americans experience disproportionate incidence and mortality rates of certain cancers, compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Primary care physicians are a critical source for cancer screening recommendations and play a significant role in increasing cancer screening of their patients. This study assessed primary care physicians' perceptions of cancer risk in Asians and screening recommendation practices. Primary care physicians practicing in New Jersey and New York City (n=100) completed a 30-question survey on medical practice characteristics, Asian patient communication, cancer screening guidelines, and Asian cancer risk. Liver cancer and stomach cancer were perceived as higher cancer risks among Asian Americans than among the general population, and breast and prostate cancer were perceived as lower risks. Physicians are integral public health liaisons who can be both influential and resourceful toward educating Asian Americans about specific cancer awareness and screening information.

  17. Alabama Physicians and Accountable Care Organizations: Will What We Don't Know Hurt Us?

    PubMed

    Powell, M Paige; Post, Lindsey R; Bishop, Blake A

    2016-01-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) were designed to improve the quality of care delivered to Medicare beneficiaries while also halting the growth in Medicare spending. Many existing health systems in the Northeast, Midwest, and West have formed ACOs, whereas implementation in Southern states has been slower. The study team conducted a survey of all physician members of the Medical Association of the State of Alabama to determine the likelihood of their participation in an ACO and their attitudes toward some of the characteristics, such as quality measures, regulations, and risks versus rewards. The team found that many physicians reported a lack of knowledge about these areas. Physicians who reported that they were either likely or not likely to participate overwhelmingly held unfavorable attitudes about ACOs. It would be advantageous for Alabama physicians to become more knowledgeable about ACOs in the case that they become a more predominant form of care delivery in the future.

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament tears for the primary care sports physician: what to know on the field and in the office.

    PubMed

    Heard, Wendell M R; VanSice, Wade C; Savoie, Felix H

    2015-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are relatively common and can lead to knee dysfunction. The classic presentation is a non-contact twisting injury with an audible pop and the rapid onset of swelling. Prompt evaluation and diagnosis of ACL injuries are important. Acute treatment consists of cessation of the sporting activity, ice, compression, and elevation with evaluation by a physician familiar with ACL injuries and their management. The diagnosis is made with the use of patient history and physical examination as well as imaging studies. Radiographs may show evidence of a bony injury. MRI confirms the diagnosis and evaluates the knee for concomitant injuries to the cartilage, menisci and other knee ligaments. For active patients, operative treatment is often recommended while less-active patients may not require surgery. The goal of this review is to discuss the diagnosis of an ACL injury and provide clear management strategies for the primary-care sports medicine physician.

  19. Word of mouth and physician referrals still drive health care provider choice.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ha T; Lauer, Johanna R

    2008-12-01

    Sponsors of health care price and quality transparency initiatives often identify all consumers as their target audiences, but the true audiences for these programs are much more limited. In 2007, only 11 percent of American adults looked for a new primary care physician, 28 percent needed a new specialist physician and 16 percent underwent a medical procedure at a new facility, according to a new national study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Among consumers who found a new provider, few engaged in active shopping or considered price or quality information--especially when choosing specialists or facilities for medical procedures. When selecting new primary care physicians, half of all consumers relied on word-of-mouth recommendations from friends and relatives, but many also used doctor recommendations (38%) and health plan information (35%), and nearly two in five used multiple information sources when choosing a primary care physician. However, when choosing specialists and facilities for medical procedures, most consumers relied exclusively on physician referrals. Use of online provider information was low, ranging from 3 percent for consumers undergoing procedures to 7 percent for consumers choosing new specialists to 11 percent for consumers choosing new primary care physicians

  20. Michigan Health Care Education and Research Foundation: sharing a vision of the future with Michigan physicians.

    PubMed

    Maloy, N

    1994-02-01

    The aim of the Michigan Health Care Education and Research Foundation (MHCERF) is to support the development and analysis of ideas so that the citizens of Michigan may benefit ... MHCERF is proud of its efforts to support health and medical care research, as well as service in our state. In striving to improve medical care and health policy in Michigan, the aims, objectives and activities of the Michigan Health Care Education and Research Foundation (MHCERF) effectively complement the goals of Michigan physicians. MHCERF attempts to improve health and medical care primarily through the support of research. Moreover, MHCERF's success is in large part attributed to the physicians of Michigan. Receiving grants through MHCERF, physicians have conducted a substantial amount of high quality research for the Foundation. Since 1985, physicians and medical students in the state of Michigan have received 61 grants from MHCERF totaling approximately $1.8 million dollars, nearly half of all funded grants. The purpose of this article is two fold: (1) to communicate the purpose and mission of MHCERF to an important audience-Michigan physicians, and (2) to demonstrate the contribution Michigan physicians have made to the goals of MHCERF through the grants they've received, research they've conducted, and consultation they've provided.

  1. Does continuous care from a physician make a difference?

    PubMed

    Dietrich, A J; Marton, K I

    1982-11-01

    Continuity of care with a personal health care provider is both an honored and controversial concept. This paper reviews the literature regarding the effect of a continuous relationship with a personal health care provider (longitudinal care) on quality of care using specific selection criteria and methodological standards. Sixteen studies were found of which four provided most of the valid information. Among the studies reviewed, the most common serious methodological problem was inconsistent definitions of continuity. Longitudinal care from a provider has been shown in certain settings to improve patient and staff satisfaction, compliance with medication and with appointments, and patient disclosure of behavioral problems. No ill effects have yet been demonstrated. There is some evidence that having an ongoing provider could reduce the costs of care. From available information, any evolution of the medical care delivery system away from reliance on an ongoing relationship between provider and patient may sacrifice important benefits.

  2. Influenza vaccination of pregnant women: attitudes and behaviors of Oregon physician prenatal care providers.

    PubMed

    Arao, Robert F; Rosenberg, Kenneth D; McWeeney, Shannon; Hedberg, Katrina

    2015-04-01

    In spite of increased risk of influenza complications during pregnancy, only half of US pregnant women get influenza vaccination. We surveyed physician prenatal care providers in Oregon to assess their knowledge and behaviors regarding vaccination of pregnant women. From September through November 2011, a state-wide survey was mailed to a simple random sample (n = 1,114) of Oregon obstetricians and family physicians. The response rate was 44.5 %. Of 496 survey respondents, 187 (37.7 %) had provided prenatal care within the last 12 months. Of these, 88.5 % reported that they routinely recommended influenza vaccine to healthy pregnant patients. No significant differences in vaccine recommendation were found by specialty, practice location, number of providers in their practice, physician gender or years in practice. In multivariable regression analysis, routinely recommending influenza vaccine was significantly associated with younger physician age [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.01, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.29-3.13] and greater number of pregnant patients seen per week (AOR 1.95, 95 % CI 1.25-3.06). Among rural physicians, fewer obstetricians (90.3 %) than family physicians (98.5 %) had vaccine-appropriate storage units (p = 0.001). Most physician prenatal care providers understand the importance of influenza vaccination during pregnancy. To increase influenza vaccine coverage among pregnant women, it will be necessary to identify and address patient barriers to receiving influenza vaccination during pregnancy.

  3. Variations in the management of fibromyalgia by physician specialty: rheumatology versus primary care

    PubMed Central

    Able, Stephen L; Robinson, Rebecca L; Kroenke, Kurt; Mease, Philip; Williams, David A; Chen, Yi; Wohlreich, Madelaine; McCarberg, Bill H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of physician specialty regarding diagnosis and treatment of fibromyalgia (FM) and assess the clinical status of patients initiating new treatment for FM using data from Real-World Examination of Fibromyalgia: Longitudinal Evaluation of Costs and Treatments. Patients and methods Outpatients from 58 sites in the United States were enrolled. Data were collected via in-office surveys and telephone interviews. Pairwise comparisons by specialty were made using chi-square, Fisher’s exact tests, and Student’s t-tests. Results Physician specialist cohorts included rheumatologists (n=54), primary care physicians (n=25), and a heterogeneous group of physicians practicing pain or physical medicine, psychiatry, neurology, obstetrics and gynecology, osteopathy, or an unspecified specialty (n=12). The rheumatologists expressed higher confidence diagnosing FM (4.5 on a five-point scale) than primary care physicians (4.1) (P=0.037). All cohorts strongly agreed that recognizing FM is their responsibility. They agreed that psychological aspects of FM are important, but disagreed that symptoms are psychosomatic. All physician cohorts agreed with a multidisciplinary approach including nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments, although physicians were more confident prescribing medications than alternative therapies. Most patients reported moderate to severe pain, multiple comorbidities, and treatment with several medications and nonpharmacologic therapies. Conclusion Physician practice characteristics, physician attitudes, and FM patient profiles were broadly similar across specialties. The small but significant differences reported by physicians and patients across physician cohorts suggest that despite published guidelines, treatment of FM still contains important variance across specialties. PMID:27799842

  4. Factors associated with the decision of family physicians to provide intrapartum care.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L F; Reynolds, J L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate which characteristics and beliefs of family physicians determine their decision to provide intrapartum care. DESIGN: Confidential survey questionnaire mailed in spring 1993. SETTING: Alberta and Ontario. SUBJECTS: Random selection of 207 physicians who had graduated from medical school between 1953 and 1990 and were thought to be in family or general practice. Of 178 eligible physicians, usable replies were received from 104 (58.4%). OUTCOME MEASURES: Beliefs (measured on a 7-point Likert scale) about the relevance of 16 primary factors to the type of obstetric care provided; demographic, training and practice characteristics. RESULTS: The respondents who provided intrapartum care differed from those who did not in their beliefs about the availability of a local hospital suitable for intrapartum care (p < 0.001), their practice partners' views on the role of family physicians in providing obstetric care (p < 0.002), their own concept of the role of family physicians in providing obstetric care (p < 0.001) and women's views on the type of obstetric care they want (p < 0.002). They also differed, although less significantly, in their beliefs about the adequacy of their obstetric training before entering family practice (p < 0.04), the expected effects of providing obstetric care on their free time (p < 0.006), their fear of malpractice litigation (p < 0.028) and their perceived competence in performing practical obstetric procedures (p < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that certain secondary factors were particularly relevant to the respondents' provision of intrapartum care at present. These included the physician's perceived competence at managing postpartum maternal hemorrhage (odds ratio [OR] 48.90, 90% confidence interval [CI] 4.70 to 509), the belief that medical insurance premiums should not be affected by the type of obstetric care provided (OR 3.55, 90% CI 1.67 to 7.57]) and the number of practice partners who provided

  5. Physician incentives to improve quality and the delivery of high quality ambulatory medical care

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Tara F.; Federman, Alex D.; Ross, Joseph S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of physician incentives for quality and to test the hypothesis that quality of ambulatory medical care is better by physicians with these incentives. Study Design Cross-sectional study using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Method We examined the association between physician compensation based on quality, physician compensation based on satisfaction, and public reporting of practice measures and twelve measures of high quality ambulatory care. Results Overall, 20.8% of visits were to physicians whose compensation was partially based on quality, 17.7% of visits were to physicians whose compensation was partially based on patient satisfaction, and 10.0% of visits were to physicians who publicly reported performance measures. Quality of ambulatory care varied: weight reduction counseling occurred in 12.0% of preventative care visits by obese patients whereas urinalysis was not performed in 93.0% of preventative care visits. In multivariable analyses, there were no statistically significant associations between compensation for quality and delivery of any of the 12 measures, nor between compensation for satisfaction and 11 of the 12 measures; the exception was BMI screening in preventative visits (47.8% vs. 56.2%, adjusted p=0.004). There was also no statistically significant association between public reporting and delivery of 11 of 12 measures; the exception was weight reduction counseling for overweight patients (10.0% vs. 25.5%, adjusted p=0.01). Conclusions We found no consistent association between incentives for quality and 12 measures of high quality ambulatory care. PMID:22554038

  6. Effect of communication style and physician-family relationships on satisfaction with pediatric chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Swedlund, Matthew P; Schumacher, Jayna B; Young, Henry N; Cox, Elizabeth D

    2012-01-01

    Over 8% of children have a chronic disease and many are unable to adhere to treatment. Satisfaction with chronic disease care can impact adherence. We examine how visit satisfaction is associated with physician communication style and ongoing physician-family relationships. We collected surveys and visit videos for 75 children ages 9-16 years visiting for asthma, diabetes, or sickle cell disease management. Raters assessed physician communication style (friendliness, interest, responsiveness, and dominance) from visit videos. Quality of the ongoing relationship was measured with four survey items (parent-physician relationship, child-physician relationship, comfort asking questions, and trust in the physician), while a single item assessed satisfaction. Correlations and chi square were used to assess association of satisfaction with communication style or quality of the ongoing relationship. Satisfaction was positively associated with physician to parent (p < 0.05) friendliness. Satisfaction was also associated with the quality of the ongoing parent-physician (p < 0.001) and child-physician relationships (p < 0.05), comfort asking questions (p < 0.001), and trust (p < 0.01). This shows that both the communication style and the quality of the ongoing relationship contribute to pediatric chronic disease visit satisfaction.

  7. [Improving communication skills of physicians caring for adolescents by simulation].

    PubMed

    Reister, Gad; Stoffman, Nava

    2011-04-01

    Although the unique characteristics and abilities of youths were noted in ancient ages, it was only later that the process of adolescence was studied and understood. Adolescents are considered a healthy population when compared to younger kids and adults. However, unlike other age groups, the morbidity and mortality of adolescents has not decreased in the last decades, probably due to risk-taking behaviors. Since the 1950s, the need for a special medical and health approach in treating adolescents was established. Yet, only a few countries incorporate such approaches when educating and training students, residents and fellows in physicians programs. Youths are treated by physicians of many disciplines, despite the fact that only a minority were trained in adolescent medicine. Simulation of medical situations with standard patients has become a significant tool for improving the communication skills of healthcare providers. The article in this edition of Harefuah describes the use of a simulated-patient-based education system in improving the communication skills of physicians of different fields. The authors presented the positive feedback of the participants in the program and demonstrated that following the program there was a positive influence on their practice when dealing with adolescents. We call to incorporate the teaching of adolescent medicine in all Levels, starting at medical school. Using the simulation tool is very helpful in improving the communication skills of medical personnel.

  8. Religion, spirituality, health and medicine: why should Indian physicians care?

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, S

    2007-01-01

    Religion, spirituality, health and medicine have common roots in the conceptual framework of relationship amongst human beings, nature and God. Of late, there has been a surge in interest in understanding the interplay of religion, spirituality, health and medicine, both in popular and scientific literature. A number of published empirical studies suggest that religious involvement is associated with better outcomes in physical and mental health. Despite some methodological limitations, these studies do point towards a positive association between religious involvement and better health. When faced with disease, disability and death, many patients would like physicians to address their emotional and spiritual needs, as well. The renewed interest in the interaction of religion and spirituality with health and medicine has significant implications in the Indian context. Although religion is translated as dharma in major Indian languages, dharma and religion are etymologically different and dharma is closer to spirituality than religion as an organized institution. Religion and spirituality play important roles in the lives of millions of Indians and therefore, Indian physicians need to respectfully acknowledge religious issues and address the spiritual needs of their patients. Incorporating religion and spirituality into health and medicine may also go a long way in making the practice of medicine more holistic, ethical and compassionate. It may also offer new opportunities to learn more about Ayurveda and other traditional systems of medicine and have more enriched understanding and collaborative interaction between different systems of medicine. Indian physicians may also find religion and spirituality significant and fulfilling in their own lives.

  9. Physician perceptions of pharmacist roles in a primary care setting in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Pharmacists are uniquely trained to provide guidance to patients in the selection of appropriate non-prescription therapy. Physicians in Qatar may not always recognize how pharmacists function in assuring safe medication use. Both these health professional groups come from heterogeneous training and experiences before migrating to the country and these backgrounds could influence collaborative patient care. Qatar Petroleum (QP), the largest private employer in the country, has developed a pharmacist-guided medication consulting service at their primary care clinics, but physician comfort with pharmacists recommending drug therapy is currently unknown. The objective of this study is to characterize physician perceptions of pharmacists and their roles in a primary care patient setting in Qatar. Methods This cross-sectional survey was developed following a comprehensive literature review and administered in English and Arabic. Consenting QP physicians were asked questions to assess experiences, comfort and expectations of pharmacist roles and abilities to provide medication-related advice and recommend and monitor therapies. Results The median age of the 62 (77.5%) physicians who responded was between 40 and 50 years old and almost two-third were men (64.5%). Fourteen different nationalities were represented. Physicians were more comfortable with pharmacist activities closely linked to drug products than responsibilities associated with monitoring and optimization of patient outcomes. Medication education (96.6%) and drug knowledge (90%) were practically unanimously recognized as abilities expected of pharmacists, but consultative roles, such as assisting in drug regimen design were less acknowledged. They proposed pharmacist spend more time with physicians attending joint meetings or education events to help advance acceptance of pharmacists in patient-centered care at this site. Conclusions Physicians had low comfort and expectations of patient

  10. An Approach to Training and Retaining Primary Care Physicians in Rural Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Allan; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine's success in educating and retaining primary care physicians for practice in rural Appalachia is ascribed to its focused mission; a multistate student exchange program; careful recruitment, admission, and placement; early clinical training in rural sites; and status as a state-supported institution.…

  11. A personal letter to an aspiring physician or nurse (or other caring professional).

    PubMed

    Savett, Laurence A

    2014-01-01

    In a letter to an aspiring physician or nurse, the author describes some of the important dimensions and timeless values of a fulfilling career in health care, the importance of the professional-patient relationship, ways to make an informed career choice, the guidance provided by sound values, and his response to some of the myths about health care careers.

  12. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners perform effective roles on teams caring for Medicare patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Everett, Christine; Thorpe, Carolyn; Palta, Mari; Carayon, Pascale; Bartels, Christie; Smith, Maureen A

    2013-11-01

    One approach to the patient-centered medical home, particularly for patients with chronic illnesses, is to include physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) on primary care teams. Using Medicare claims and electronic health record data from a large physician group, we compared outcomes for two groups of adult Medicare patients with diabetes whose conditions were at various levels of complexity: those whose care teams included PAs or NPs in various roles, and those who received care from physicians only. Outcomes were generally equivalent in thirteen comparisons. In four comparisons, outcomes were superior for the patients receiving care from PAs or NPs, but in three other comparisons the outcomes were superior for patients receiving care from physicians only. Specific roles performed by PAs and NPs were associated with different patterns in the measure of the quality of diabetes care and use of health care services. No role was best for all outcomes. Our findings suggest that patient characteristics, as well as patients' and organizations' goals, should be considered when determining when and how to deploy PAs and NPs on primary care teams. Accordingly, training and policy should continue to support role flexibility for these health professionals.

  13. Cardiovascular genomics: implications for acute and critical care nurses.

    PubMed

    Quinn Griffin, Mary T; Klein, Deborah; Winkelman, Chris

    2013-01-01

    As genomic health care becomes commonplace, nurses will be asked to provide genomic care in all health care settings including acute care and critical care. Three common cardiac conditions are reviewed, Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, to provide acute care and critical care nurses with an overview of these pathologies through the lens of genomics and relevant case studies. This information will help critical care nursing leaders become familiar with genetics related to common cardiac conditions and prepare acute care and critical care nurses for a new phase in patient diagnostics, with greater emphasis on early diagnosis and recognition of conditions before sudden cardiac death.

  14. The top 10 things foot and ankle specialists wish every primary care physician knew.

    PubMed

    Paige, Neil M; Nouvong, Aksone

    2006-06-01

    Foot and ankle problems are common complaints of patients presenting to primary care physicians. These problems range from minor disorders, such as ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis, bunions, and iIngrown toenails, to more serious conditions such as Charcot arthropathy and Achilles tendon rupture. Early recognition and treatment of foot and ankle problems are imperative to avoid associated morbidities. Primary care physicians can address many of these complaints successfully but should be cognizant of which patients should be referred to a foot and ankle specialist to prevent common short-term and long-term complications. This article provides evidence-based pearls to assist primary care physicians in providing optimal care for their patients with foot and ankle complaints.

  15. Academic physicians' assessment of the effects of computers on health care.

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, W. M.; Friedman, C. P.

    1994-01-01

    We assessed the attitudes of academic physicians towards computers in health care at two academic medical centers that are in the early stages of clinical information-system deployment. We distributed a 4-page questionnaire to 470 subjects, and a total of 272 physicians (58%) responded. Our results show that respondents use computers frequently, primarily to perform academic-oriented tasks as opposed to clinical tasks. Overall, respondents viewed computers as being slightly beneficial to health care. They perceive self-education and access to up-to-date information as the most beneficial aspects of computers and are most concerned about privacy issues and the effect of computers on the doctor-patient relationship. Physicians with prior computer training and greater knowledge of informatics concepts had more favorable attitudes towards computers in health care. We suggest that negative attitudes towards computers can be addressed by careful system design as well as targeted educational activities. PMID:7949990

  16. Cutting out the middleman: physicians can contract directly with employers--a viable alternative to adversarial managed care agreements.

    PubMed

    Lester, Howard

    2002-01-01

    HMOs, PPOs, and other managed care "middlemen" control the means by which most physicians do business with employers. As physicians face dwindling reimbursements, greater practice restrictions, and increased pressure to sign adversarial middleman contracts, interest in direct contracting has grown. This article introduces direct contracting as an important alternative to commercial managed care agreements; cites the key advantages and process of direct contracting; and offers practical recommendations for helping physician practices successfully negotiate direct physician/employer agreements.

  17. D Dimer in acute care

    PubMed Central

    Sathe, Prachee M.; Patwa, Urvil D.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) and Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) are important sources of mortality and morbidity in intensive care unit (ICU). And every time D-dimer remains the the commonest investigation. Many times D-dimer is erroneously considered as a diagnostic test in above mentioned conditions. Its interpretation requires cautions. To circumvent this source of error it is necessary to understand D-dimer test and its significance in various disorder. This article review some basic details of D-dimer, condition associated with its increased level and some prognostic value in intracranial hemorrhage and gastrointestinal (GI) bleed. PMID:25337485

  18. What physician executives and health care organizations should expect from each other.

    PubMed

    Dolan, T C

    1999-01-01

    Today, interest in defining the role of the physician executive and ensuring this individual is effectively integrated into the organization is high for good reason--the ranks of physician executives are growing. What attributes should health care organizations look for when hiring physician executives and what should they should expect of them once they are on the job? Physician executives should: (1) have demonstrated clinical and management skills; (2) have a comfort level with participatory decision-making; (3) have superb interpersonal skills; and (4) be a champion of the patient. Physician executives should expect the following support from their organizations: (1) varied roles and responsibilities; (2) mentoring by other senior executives; (3) lifelong learning opportunities; and (4) complete support of the management team.

  19. Using Behavioral Economics to Design Physician Incentives That Deliver High-Value Care.

    PubMed

    Emanuel, Ezekiel J; Ubel, Peter A; Kessler, Judd B; Meyer, Gregg; Muller, Ralph W; Navathe, Amol S; Patel, Pankaj; Pearl, Robert; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Sacks, Lee; Sen, Aditi P; Sherman, Paul; Volpp, Kevin G

    2016-01-19

    Behavioral economics provides insights about the development of effective incentives for physicians to deliver high-value care. It suggests that the structure and delivery of incentives can shape behavior, as can thoughtful design of the decision-making environment. This article discusses several principles of behavioral economics, including inertia, loss aversion, choice overload, and relative social ranking. Whereas these principles have been applied to motivate personal health decisions, retirement planning, and savings behavior, they have been largely ignored in the design of physician incentive programs. Applying these principles to physician incentives can improve their effectiveness through better alignment with performance goals. Anecdotal examples of successful incentive programs that apply behavioral economics principles are provided, even as the authors recognize that its application to the design of physician incentives is largely untested, and many outstanding questions exist. Application and rigorous evaluation of infrastructure changes and incentives are needed to design payment systems that incentivize high-quality, cost-conscious care.

  20. Job satisfaction among primary health care physicians and nurses in Al-madinah Al-munawwara.

    PubMed

    Al Juhani, Abdullah M; Kishk, Nahla A

    2006-01-01

    Job satisfaction is the affective orientation that an employee has towards his work. Greater physician satisfaction is associated with greater patient adherence and satisfaction. Nurses' job satisfaction, have great impact on the organizational success. Knowing parts of job dissatisfaction among physicians and nurses is important in forming strategies for retaining them in primary health care (PHC) centers. Therefore, this study aimed at assessing the level of job satisfaction among PHC physicians and nurses in Al- Madina Al- Munawwara. Also, to explore the relationship of their personal and job characteristics with job satisfaction. A descriptive cross- sectional epidemiological approach was adopted. A self completion questionnaire was distributed to physicians and nurses at PHC centers. A multi-dimensional job scale adopted by Traynor and Wade (1993) was modified and used. The studied sample included 445 health care providers, 23.6% were physicians and 76.4% were nurses. Job dissatisfaction was highly encountered where 67.1% of the nurses & 52.4% of physicians were dissatisfied. Professional opportunities, patient care and financial reward were the most frequently encountered domains with which physicians were dissatisfied. The dissatisfying domains for majority of nurses were professional opportunities, workload and appreciation reward. Exploring the relation between demographic and job characteristics with job satisfaction revealed that older, male, non-Saudi, specialists physicians had insignificantly higher mean score of job satisfaction than their counterparts. While older, female, non-Saudi, senior nurses had significantly higher mean score than their counterparts. It is highly recommended to reduce workload for nurses and provision of better opportunities promotional for PHC physicians and nurses.

  1. Physicians and implicit bias: how doctors may unwittingly perpetuate health care disparities.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Elizabeth N; Kaatz, Anna; Carnes, Molly

    2013-11-01

    Although the medical profession strives for equal treatment of all patients, disparities in health care are prevalent. Cultural stereotypes may not be consciously endorsed, but their mere existence influences how information about an individual is processed and leads to unintended biases in decision-making, so called "implicit bias". All of society is susceptible to these biases, including physicians. Research suggests that implicit bias may contribute to health care disparities by shaping physician behavior and producing differences in medical treatment along the lines of race, ethnicity, gender or other characteristics. We review the origins of implicit bias, cite research documenting the existence of implicit bias among physicians, and describe studies that demonstrate implicit bias in clinical decision-making. We then present the bias-reducing strategies of consciously taking patients' perspectives and intentionally focusing on individual patients' information apart from their social group. We conclude that the contribution of implicit bias to health care disparities could decrease if all physicians acknowledged their susceptibility to it, and deliberately practiced perspective-taking and individuation when providing patient care. We further conclude that increasing the number of African American/Black physicians could reduce the impact of implicit bias on health care disparities because they exhibit significantly less implicit race bias.

  2. Team-based innovations in primary care delivery in Quebec and timely physician follow-up after hospital discharge: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Riverin, Bruno D.; Li, Patricia; Naimi, Ashley I.; Diop, Mamadou; Provost, Sylvie; Strumpf, Erin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Outpatient follow-up has been a key intervention point in addressing gaps in care after hospital discharge. We sought to estimate the association between enrolment in new team-based primary care practices and 30-day postdischarge physician follow-up among older patients and patients with chronic illnesses who were admitted to hospital in Quebec, Canada. Methods: Patients were selected into this cohort if a primary care physician enrolled them as a "vulnerable patient" between November 2002 and January 2005. Data for this analysis included province-wide health insurance claims for inpatient and outpatient services delivered between November 2002 and January 2009 in Quebec. The primary analysis examined time to the first outpatient postdischarge follow-up service provided by either a primary care physician or a medical specialist. We used marginal structural models to estimate adjusted rates of follow-up with a primary care physician or with a medical specialist by primary care delivery models. Results: We extracted billing data for 312 377 patients that represented 620 656 index admissions for any cause from 2002 to 2009. Rates of 30-day follow-up were 374 visits to primary care physicians and 422 visits to medical specialists per 1000 discharges. Rates of primary care physician follow-up were similar across primary care delivery models, except for patients with very high morbidity; these patients had significantly higher rates of follow-up with a primary care physician if they were enrolled in team-based primary care practices (30-d rate difference [RD] 13.3 more follow-up visits per 1000 discharges, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.8 to 19.8). Rates of follow-up with a medical specialist were lower among patients enrolled in team-based practices, particularly within 15 days of hospital discharge (15-d RD 25.1 fewer follow-up visits per 1000 discharges, 95% CI 21.1 to 29.1). Interpretation: Our study found lower rates of postdischarge follow-up with a

  3. Physician Acceptance of Gateway to Care at Irwin Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-27

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF T~iS PAGE A D -A 261 5083 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PA’ Ii’ii ii111~~ IS. REPORT SECURITY CI.ASSIFiCATION lb RESTRICTIVE MAMI ... Clarke (1987) view physicians as "intermediaries" for the purposes of marketing to the public. This philosophy is changing. Both the military and civilian...research (3rd ed.). New York: Holt. Physician Acceptance 32 Kotler, P., & Clarke , R. (1987). Marketing for health care organizations. Englewood Cliffs

  4. Does trust of patients in their physician predict loyalty to the health care insurer? The Israeli case study.

    PubMed

    Gabay, Gillie

    2016-01-01

    This pioneer study tests the relationship between patients' trust in their physicians and patients' loyalty to their health care insurers. This is a cross-sectional study using a representative sample of patients from all health care insurers with identical health care plans. Regression analyses and Baron and Kenny's model were used to test the study model. Patient trust in the physician did not predict loyalty to the insurer. Loyalty to the physician did not mediate the relationship between trust in the physician and loyalty to the insurer. Satisfaction with the physician was the only predictor of loyalty to the insurer.

  5. Physician Specialization and Women's Primary Care Services in an Urban HIV Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Richard D.; Wagner, Krystn R.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract To compare adherence to published primary care guidelines by general internal medicine and infectious diseases (ID) specialist physicians treating HIV-positive women we conducted a retrospective patient record review of 148 female HIV-positive patients seen at the Nathan Smith Clinic in New Haven, Connecticut, in 2001 and 2002. Four quality measures were defined to evaluate physician practices: annual cervical cancer screening, influenza vaccination and hyperlipidemia screening, and biennial mammography. Main outcome was the frequency of meeting each measure by generalist and ID-specialist physicians, and the two physician types were compared after controlling for patient clustering, age, and CD4 cell count. Among all measures, the rates of cervical cancer screening in 2001 were lowest among generalists (55%) and ID-specialists (47%) but not significantly different (odds ratio [OR] 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78 to 1.90), and the rates of hyperlipidemia screening in 2002 were highest for both generalists (98%) and ID-specialists (93%), but again not significant (OR 2.86, CI 0.30 to 27.6). No statistically significant differences were found between physician types for any quality measure, nor were significant differences found in the CD4 cell counts of patients of each physician type who received each service. Our results show potential for improvements in care among both generalist and ID-specialist physicians treating HIV-positive women. PMID:18373414

  6. Independent practice associations and physician-hospital organizations can improve care management for smaller practices.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Wu, Frances M; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Ramsay, Patricia P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    Pay-for-performance, public reporting, and accountable care organization programs place pressures on physicians to use health information technology and organized care management processes to improve the care they provide. But physician practices that are not large may lack the resources and size to implement such processes. We used data from a unique national survey of 1,164 practices with fewer than twenty physicians to provide the first information available on the extent to which independent practice associations (IPAs) and physician-hospital organizations (PHOs) might make it possible for these smaller practices to share resources to improve care. Nearly a quarter of the practices participated in an IPA or a PHO that accounted for a significant proportion of their patients. On average, practices participating in these organizations provided nearly three times as many care management processes for patients with chronic conditions as nonparticipating practices did (10.4 versus 3.8). Half of these processes were provided only by IPAs or PHOs. These organizations may provide a way for small and medium-size practices to systematically improve care and participate in accountable care organizations.

  7. Diabetes Mellitus Care Provided by Nurse Practitioners vs Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S.; Chen, Nai-Wei; Lwin, Kyaw K.; Baillargeon, Jacques; Raji, Mukaila A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare processes and cost of care of older adults with diabetes mellitus cared for by nurse practitioners (NPs) with processes and cost of those cared for by primary care physicians (PCPs). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Primary care in communities. Participants Individuals with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in 2009 who received all their primary care from NPs or PCPs were selected from a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries (N = 64,354). Measurements Propensity score matching within each state was used to compare these two cohorts with regard to rate of eye examinations, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) testing, nephropathy monitoring, specialist consultation, and Medicare costs. The two groups were also compared regarding medication adherence and use of statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (for individuals with a diagnosis of hypertension), and potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs). Results Nurse practitioners and PCPs had similar rates of LDL-C testing (odds ratio (OR) = 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.94–1.09) and nephropathy monitoring (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.98–1.03), but NPs had lower rates of eye examinations (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.84– 0.93) and HbA1C testing (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.79– 0.98). NPs were more likely to have consulted cardiologists (OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.21–1.37), endocrinologists (OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.48–1.82), and nephrologists (OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.67–2.17) and more likely to have prescribed PIMs (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.01–1.12). There was no statistically significant difference in adjusted Medicare spending between the two groups (P = .56). Conclusion Nurse practitioners were similar to PCPs or slightly lower in their rates of diabetes mellitus guideline–concordant care. NPs used specialist consultations more often but had similar overall costs of care to PCPs. PMID:26480967

  8. Quality of care in hospital emergency departments and family physicians' offices.

    PubMed Central

    Spasoff, R. A.; Lane, P.; Steele, R.

    1977-01-01

    Indicator conditions were used to evaluate the quality of 686 episodes of care provided in two emergency departments and in five family physicians' offices. Overall, the care was considered adequate in 53% of the emergency department cases and in 40% of the cases dealt with in family physicians' offices, the difference being significant (P less than 0.01). Referrals were very common in both settings, and when quality was assessed solely on the basis of the care actually given by the primary-care providers the difference between the two settings disappeared. Half the observed deficiencies in care related to failure to document the findings from history-taking and physical examination. From these and earlier findings we conclude that the emergency department can be an appropriate setting for the care of nontraumatic illness. PMID:880525

  9. Synergizing acute care and palliative care to optimise nursing care in end-stage cardiorespiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia M; Introna, Kate; Cockburn, Jill; Daly, John; Dunford, Mary; Paull, Glenn; Dracup, Kathleen

    2002-05-01

    Advances in the practice of medicine and nursing science have increased survival for patients with chronic cardiorespiratory disease. Parallel to this positive outcome is a societal expectation of longevity and cure of disease. Chronic disease and the inevitability of death creates a dilemma, more than ever before, for the health care professional, who is committed to the delivery of quality care to patients and their families. The appropriate time for broaching the issue of dying and determining when palliative care is required is problematic. Dilemmas occur with a perceived dissonance between acute and palliative care and difficulties in determining prognosis. Palliative care must be integrated within the health care continuum, rather than being a discrete entity at the end of life, in order to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Anecdotally, acute and critical care nurses experience frustration from the tensions that arise between acute and palliative care philosophies. Many clinicians are concerned that patients are denied a good death and yet the moment when care should be oriented toward palliation rather than aggressive management is usually unclear. Clearly this has implications for the type and quality of care that patients receive. This paper provides a review of the extant literature and identifies issues in the end of life care for patients with chronic cardiorespiratory diseases within acute and critical care environments. Issues for refinement of acute and critical care nursing practice and research priorities are identified to create a synergy between these philosophical perspectives.

  10. Managing Osteoporosis: A Survey of Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices among Primary Care Physicians in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Elena; Ish-Shalom, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder characterized by impaired bone quality and microstructural deterioration leading to an increased propensity to fractures. This is a major health problem for older adults, which comprise an increasingly greater proportion of the general population. Due to a large number of patients and the insufficient availability of specialists in Israel and worldwide, osteoporosis is treated in large part by primary care physicians. We assessed the knowledge of primary care physicians on the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis. Methods Physician's knowledge, sources of knowledge acquisition and self-evaluation of knowledge were assessed using a multiple choice questionnaire. Professional and demographic characteristics were assessed as well. Results Of 490 physicians attending a conference, 363 filled the questionnaires (74% response rate). The physicians demonstrated better expertise in diagnosis than in medications (mechanism of action, side effects or contra-indications) but less than for other treatment related decisions. Overall, 50% demonstrated adequate knowledge of calcium and vitamin D supplementation, 51% were aware of the main therapeutic purpose of osteoporosis pharmacotherapy and 3% were aware that bisphosphonates should be avoided in patients with impaired renal function. Respondents stated frontal lectures at meetings as their main source of information on the subject. Conclusion The study indicates the need to intensify efforts to improve the knowledge of primary care physicians regarding osteoporosis, in general; and osteoporosis pharmacotherapy, in particular. PMID:27494284

  11. The Accuracy of Emergency Physicians in Ultrasonographic Screening of Acute Appendicitis; a Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Ebrahim; Aminianfar, Mohammad; Zarafshani, Keivan; Safaie, Arash

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Diagnostic values reported for ultrasonographic screening of acute appendicitis vary widely and are dependent on the operator’s skill, patient’s gender, weight, etc. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of operator skill on the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in detection of appendicitis by comparing the results of ultrasonography done by radiologists and emergency physicians. Methods: This prospective diagnostic accuracy was carried out on patients suspected to acute appendicitis presenting to EDs of 2 hospitals. After the initial clinical examinations, all the patients underwent ultrasonography for appendicitis by emergency physician and radiologist, respectively. The final diagnosis of appendicitis was based on either pathology report or 48-hour follow-up. Screening performance characteristics of appendix ultrasonography by emergency physician and radiologist were compared using STATA 11.0 software. Results: 108 patients with the mean age of 23.91 ± 7.46 years were studied (61.1% male). Appendicitis was confirmed for 37 (34.26%) cases. Cohen's kappa coefficient between ultrasonography by the radiologist and emergency physician in diagnosis of acute appendicitis was 0.51 (95% CI: 0.35 – 0.76). Area under the ROC curve of ultrasonography in appendicitis diagnosis was 0.78 (95% CI: 0.69 – 0.86) for emergency physician and 0.88 (95% CI: 0.81 – 0.94) for radiologist (p = 0.052). Sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography by radiologist and emergency physician in appendicitis diagnosis were 83.87% (95% CI: 67.32 – 93.23), 91.5% (95% CI: 81.89 – 96.52), 72.97% (95% CI: 55.61 – 85.63), and 83.10% (95% CI: 71.94 – 90.59), respectively. Conclusion: Findings of the present study showed that the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography carried out by radiologist (89%) is a little better compared to that of emergency physician (80%) in diagnosis of appendicitis, but none are excellent. PMID:28286829

  12. Employed Family Physician Satisfaction and Commitment to Their Practice, Work Group, and Health Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Beasley, John W; Brown, Roger L

    2010-01-01

    Objective Test a model of family physician job satisfaction and commitment. Data Sources/Study Setting Data were collected from 1,482 family physicians in a Midwest state during 2000–2001. The sampling frame came from the membership listing of the state's family physician association, and the analyzed dataset included family physicians employed by large multispecialty group practices. Study Design and Data Collection A cross-sectional survey was used to collect data about physician working conditions, job satisfaction, commitment, and demographic variables. Principal Findings The response rate was 47 percent. Different variables predicted the different measures of satisfaction and commitment. Satisfaction with one's health care organization (HCO) was most strongly predicted by the degree to which physicians perceived that management valued and recognized them and by the extent to which physicians perceived the organization's goals to be compatible with their own. Satisfaction with one's workgroup was most strongly predicted by the social relationship with members of the workgroup; satisfaction with one's practice was most strongly predicted by relationships with patients. Commitment to one's workgroup was predicted by relationships with one's workgroup. Commitment to one's HCO was predicted by relationships with management of the HCO. Conclusions Social relationships are stronger predictors of employed family physician satisfaction and commitment than staff support, job control, income, or time pressure. PMID:20070386

  13. The goals of communicating bad news in health care: do physicians and patients agree?

    PubMed Central

    Sweeny, Kate; Shepperd, James A.; Han, Paul K. J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background  Communicating bad news serves different goals in health care, and the extent to which physicians and patients agree on the goals of these conversations may influence their process and outcomes. However, we know little about what goals physicians and patients perceive as important and how the perceptions of physicians and patients compare. Objective  To compare physicians’ and patients’ perceptions of the importance of different communication goals in bad news conversations. Design  Survey‐based descriptive study. Participants  Physicians in California recruited via a medical board mailing list (n = 67) and patients (n = 77) recruited via mailing lists and snowball recruitment methods. Measurements  Physicians reported their experience communicating bad news, the extent to which they strive for various goals in this task and their perceptions of the goals important to patients. Patients reported their experience receiving bad news, the goals important to them and their perceptions of the goals important to physicians. Main results  Physicians and patients were quite similar in how important they personally rated each goal. However, the two groups perceived differences between their values and the values of the other group. Conclusions  Physicians and patients have similar perceptions of the importance of various goals of communicating bad news, but inaccurate perceptions of the importance of particular goals to the other party. These findings raise important questions for future research and clinical practice. PMID:21771225

  14. Physicians in health care management: 9. Strategic alliances and relationships between organizations.

    PubMed Central

    Leatt, P; Barnsley, J

    1994-01-01

    Health care organizations must increasingly develop strategic alliances with other groups and organizations. A variety of interorganizational relationships are possible: shared services, joint programs, umbrella organizations, health agency networks and mergers. As governments try to control health care costs, physicians will play an important role in developing and implementing these alliances. They will be expected to advocate on behalf of patients and communities to ensure that these new organizational arrangements facilitate coordinated care. PMID:8087752

  15. Physician's self-perceived abilities at primary care settings in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Istiono, Wahyudi; Claramita, Mora; Ekawati, Fitriana Murriya; Gayatri, Aghnaa; Sutomo, Adi Heru; Kusnanto, Hari; Graber, Mark Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Southeast Asian countries with better-skilled primary care physicians have been shown to have better health outcomes. However, in Indonesia, there has been a large number of inappropriate referrals, leading to suboptimal health outcomes. This study aimed to examine the reasons underlying the unnecessary referrals as related to Indonesian physicians’ standard of abilities. Materials and Methods: This was a multiple-case study that explored physicians’ self-evaluation of their abilities. Self-evaluation questionnaires were constructed from the Indonesian Standards of Physicians Competences of 2006-2012 (ISPC), which is a list of 155 diseases. This study was undertaken in three cities, three towns, and one “border-less developed” area during 2011-2014. The study involved 184 physicians in those seven districts. Data were collected using one-on-one, in-depth interviews, focus group discussions (FGDs), and clinical observations. Results: This study found that primary care physicians in Indonesia felt that they were competent to handle less than one-third of “typical” primary care cases. The reasons were limited understanding of person-centered care principles and limited patient care services to diagnosis and treatment of common biomedical problems. Additionally, physical facilities in primary care settings are lacking. Discussions and Conclusions: Strengthening primary health care in Indonesia requires upscaling doctors’ abilities in managing health problems through more structured graduate education in family medicine, which emphasizes the bio-psycho-socio-cultural background of persons; secondly, standardizing primary care facilities to support physicians’ performance is critical. Finally, a strong national health policy that recognizes the essential role of primary care physicians in health outcomes is an urgent need. PMID:26985415

  16. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2015 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; reasonable compensation equivalents for physician services in excluded hospitals and certain teaching hospitals; provider administrative appeals and judicial review; enforcement provisions for organ transplant centers; and electronic health record (EHR) incentive program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, and other legislation. These changes are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits are effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2014. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014. In addition, we discuss our proposals on the interruption of stay policy for LTCHs and on retiring the "5 percent" payment adjustment for collocated LTCHs. While many of the statutory mandates of the Pathway for SGR Reform Act apply to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, others will not begin to apply until 2016 and beyond. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revising requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that

  17. Engaging primary care physicians in quality improvement: lessons from a payer-provider partnership.

    PubMed

    Lemak, Christy Harris; Cohen, Genna R; Erb, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    A health insurer in Michigan, through its Physician Group Incentive Program, engaged providers across the state in a collection of financially incentivized initiatives to transform primary care and improve quality. We investigated physicians' and other program stakeholders' perceptions of the program through semistructured interviews with more than 80 individuals. We found that activities across five areas contributed to successful provider engagement: (1) developing a vision of improving primary care, (2) deliberately fostering practice-practice partnerships, (3) using existing infrastructure, (4) leveraging resources and market share, and (5) managing program trade-offs. Our research highlights effective strategies for engaging primary care physicians in program design and implementation processes and creating learning communities to support quality improvement and practice change.

  18. Practicing End-of-Life Conversations: Physician Communication Training Program in Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Bronwyn; Browning, David M

    2015-01-01

    A Physician Communication Training Program (PCTP) utilizing scripts based on actual family conferences with patients, families, and the health care team was developed at one medical center in the Northeast. The program was designed, adapted, and directed by a palliative care social worker. The primary goal of the program is to help residents and attending physicians build better communication skills in establishing goals of care and in end-of-life planning. The scripts focus on improving physicians' basic skills in conducting family meetings, discussing advance directives, prognosis, brain death, and withdrawal of life support. Excerpts from the scripts utilized in the program are included. Feedback from participants has been positive, with all respondents indicating improvement in their capacity to take part in these challenging conversations.

  19. Criminal prosecutions of physicians providing palliative or end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Kollas, Chad D; Boyer-Kollas, Beth; Kollas, James W

    2008-03-01

    Although medical malpractice suits commonly occur in medical practice, few physicians experienced criminal prosecution related to adverse clinical outcomes before 1990. Criminal prosecutions of physicians increased in frequency early in that decade, however, including a handful of cases involving palliative or end-of-life care. Reviews published around the end of the 1990s examined those prosecutions, listing causative factors and offering recommendations to prevent further cases. In this paper, we provide an updated review of criminal prosecutions of physicians providing palliative or end-of-life care, presenting three cases that occurred after 1998. We summarize these newer cases' chronologies and outcomes, comparing them to cases described in past reviews. Our analysis suggests that important factors not described in earlier reviews, especially conflicting views of the standard of care in hospice and palliative medicine, contributed to the development of these prosecutions.

  20. Barriers to good end-of-life care: a physician survey.

    PubMed

    Kayashima, R; Braun, K L

    2001-02-01

    Surveyed about barriers to good end-of-life care were 804 Hawaii physicians in specialties most likely to care for dying patients. Responses were received by 367 (46%). The majority attended terminally ill patients within the past year and felt that the physician should be the first to tell a patient that he/she is dying. Yet 86% identified barriers to talking about end-of-life preferences and 94% identified barriers to providing good end-of-life care. Perceived as major barriers were family conflict about the best course of action, patient/family discomfort with or fear of death, and cultural/religious beliefs of the patient or family. Since relatively few respondents supported the concepts of physician-assisted suicide (32%) or physician-assisted death (18%), the alternative is for physicians to join with other concerned entities to help overcome the attitudinal, behavioral, educational, and economic barriers to providing appropriate, humane, and compassionate care for the dying.

  1. Physicians as leaders in improving health care: a new series in Annals of Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Berwick, D M; Nolan, T W

    1998-02-15

    Searching for one word to describe the state of mind of the physician in the United States today, we might choose beleaguered. Threats appear from all sides--from payers, would-be managers of care, the growth of technology, and even patients. The rhetoric is one of siege and battle, and the dynamic seems to be a clash of values from which only one winner can emerge. But scientific and health services research suggest otherwise. Science suggests that health care could, indeed, perform a great deal better than it does today and that a shared aim of improving health outcomes for patients at a cost that society can afford is sensible and within reach. However, achievement of these improvements will require of physicians not handwringing and resistance to change but concerted, positive, capable leadership. The goal of this series in Annals is to describe a new knowledge base that will help physicians participate effectively in the redesign of the health care system. The series is intended to raise the curiosity of physicians about the skills they will need to become more active and influential citizens of the health care community in accomplishing improvements. These skills will help physicians better deploy their clinical expertise and professional purpose in a debate that has heretofore been informed primarily by economics.

  2. What Physicians from Diverse Specialties Know and Support in Health Care Reform

    PubMed Central

    Ganjian, Sheila; Dowling, Patrick T.; Hove, Jason; Moreno, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Background The US is in an unprecedented era of health care reform that is pushing medical professionals and medical educators to evaluate the future of their patients, careers, and the field of medicine. Objectives To describe physician familiarity and knowledge with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), and to determine if knowledge is associated with support and endorsement of the ACA. Methods Cross-sectional internet-based survey of 559 physicians practicing in California. Primary outcomes were physician support and endorsement of ACA: 1) overall impact on the country (1 item), and 2) perceived impact on physician’s medical practice (1 item). The primary predictor was knowledge of the ACA as measured with 10 questions. Other measures included age, gender, race-ethnicity, specialty, political views, provision of direct care, satisfaction with the practice of medicine, and compensation type. Descriptive statistics and multiple variable regression models were calculated. Results Respondents were 65% females, and the mean age was 54 years (+/− 9.7). Seventy-seven percent of physicians understood the ACA somewhat well/very well, and 59% endorsed the ACA, but 36% of physicians believed that health care reform will most likely hurt their practice. Primary care physicians were more likely to perceive that the new law will help their practice, compared to procedural specialties. Satisfaction with the practice of medicine, political affiliation, compensation type, and more knowledge of the health care law were independently associated with endorsement of the ACA. Conclusions Endorsement of the ACA varied by specialty, knowledge, and satisfaction with the practice of medicine. PMID:25853599

  3. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units.

  4. "I Just Keep My Antennae Out": How Rural Primary Care Physicians Respond to Intimate Partner Violence.

    PubMed

    McCall-Hosenfeld, Jennifer S; Weisman, Carol S; Perry, Amanda N; Hillemeier, Marianne M; Chuang, Cynthia H

    2014-09-01

    Women in rural communities who are exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV) have fewer resources when seeking help due to limited health services, poverty, and social isolation. Rural primary care physicians may be key sources of care for IPV victims. The objective of this study was to assess the opinions and practices of primary care physicians caring for rural women with regard to IPV identification, the scope and severity of IPV as a health problem, how primary care providers respond to IPV in their practices, and barriers to optimized IPV care in their communities. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 19 internists, family practitioners, and obstetrician-gynecologists in rural central Pennsylvania. Interview transcripts were analyzed for major themes. Most physicians did not practice routine screening for IPV due to competing time demands, lack of training, limited access to referral services as well as low confidence in their effectiveness, and concern that inquiry would harm the patient-doctor relationship. IPV was considered when patients presented with symptoms of mood, anxiety, or somatic disorders. Responses to IPV included validation, danger assessment, safety planning, referral, and follow-up planning. Perceived barriers to rural women seeking help for IPV included traditional gender roles, lower education, economic dependence on the partner, low self-esteem, and patient reluctance to discuss IPV. To overcome barriers, physicians created a "safe sanctuary" to discuss IPV and suggested improved public health education and referral services. Interventions to improve IPV-related care in rural communities should address barriers at multiple levels, including both physicians' and patients' comfort with discussing IPV. Provider training, community education, and improved access to referral services are key areas in which IPV-related care should be improved in rural communities. Our data support routine screening to better identify IPV and a more

  5. [Shortage of physicians in anaesthesiology and intensive care medicine - Causes, consequences and solutions].

    PubMed

    Papenfuß, Tim; Roch, Carmen

    2012-05-01

    74% of all hospitals had vacant positions in 2011, also departments of anaesthesiology and intensive care medicine. More than 50% of these departments work with locums. There are couple of reasons for the shortage of physicians. The consequences in anaesthesiology and intensive care medicine can result in qualitative and financial loss. To solve the shortage of physicians one has to solve the reasons. Main reasons are increasing feminization of medical profession and part-time-work, work-life-balance and a poor specialised education.

  6. Evidence-based medicine in primary care: qualitative study of family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, C Shawn; Dantas, Guilherme Coelho; Upshur, Ross EG

    2003-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study were: a) to examine physician attitudes to and experience of the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in primary care; b) to investigate the influence of patient preferences on clinical decision-making; and c) to explore the role of intuition in family practice. Method Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews of 15 family physicians purposively selected from respondents to a national survey on EBM mailed to a random sample of Canadian family physicians. Results Participants mainly welcomed the promotion of EBM in the primary care setting. A significant number of barriers and limitations to the implementation of EBM were identified. EBM is perceived by some physicians as a devaluation of the 'art of medicine' and a threat to their professional/clinical autonomy. Issues regarding the trustworthiness and credibility of evidence were of great concern, especially with respect to the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. Attempts to become more evidence-based often result in the experience of conflicts. Patient factors exert a powerful influence on clinical decision-making and can serve as trumps to research evidence. A widespread belief that intuition plays a vital role in primary care reinforced views that research evidence must be considered alongside other factors such as patient preferences and the clinical judgement and experience of the physician. Discussion Primary care physicians are increasingly keen to consider research evidence in clinical decision-making, but there are significant concerns about the current model of EBM. Our findings support the proposed revisions to EBM wherein greater emphasis is placed on clinical expertise and patient preferences, both of which remain powerful influences on physician behaviour. PMID:12740025

  7. Attitudes towards prescribing cognitive enhancers among primary care physicians in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary care physicians are gate keepers to the medical system having a key role in giving information and prescribing drugs to their patients. In this respect they are involved in claims of patients/clients for pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement (CE). Therefore, we studied the knowledge of primary care physicians about CE and their attitudes toward prescribing CE drugs to healthy subjects. Methods A self-report paper-and-pencil questionnaire and case vignettes describing a hypothetical CE drug were sent out to all 2,753 registered primary care physicians in Rhineland Palatine, Germany. 832, i.e. 30.2% filled in the questionnaire anonymously. Results 96.0% of all participating physicians had already heard about CE. However, only 5.3% stated to be very familiar with this subject and 43.5% judged themselves as being not familiar with CE. 7.0% had been asked by their clients to prescribe a drug for CE during the last week, 19.0% during the last month, and 40.8% during the last year. The comfort level to prescribe CE drugs was very low and significantly lower than to prescribe sildenafil (Viagra®). Comfort level was mainly affected by the age of the client asking for prescription of CE drugs, followed by the availability of non-pharmacological alternatives, fear of misuse of the prescribed drug by the client and the missing indication of prescribing a drug. Conclusions Although a relatively high proportion of primary care physicians have been asked by their clients to prescribe CE drugs, only a small proportion are well informed about the possibilities of CE. Since physicians are gate keepers to the medical system and have a key role regarding a drugs’ prescription, objective information should be made available to physicians about biological, ethical and social consequences of CE use. PMID:24397728

  8. Reducing the Frequency of Acute Otitis Media by Individualized Care

    PubMed Central

    Pichichero, Michael E.; Casey, Janet R.; Almudevar, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Objective We sought to determine if use of more stringent diagnostic criteria for acute otitis media (AOM) than currently advocated by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), tympanocentesis and pathogen-specific antibiotic treatment (individualized care) would result in reducing the incidence of recurrent AOM and consequent tympanostomy tube surgery. Methods A 5 year longitudinal, prospective study in Rochester NY was conducted from July 2006 – July 2011 involving 254 individualized care children. When this individualized care group developed symptoms of AOM, strict diagnostic criteria were applied and a tympanocentesis was performed. Pathogen resistance to empiric high dose amoxicillin/clavulanate (80mg/kg of amoxicillin component) caused a change in antibiotic to an optimized choice. Legacy controls (n=208) were diagnosed with the same diagnostic criteria by the same physicians as the individualized care group and received the same empiric amoxicillin/clavulanate (80mg/kg of Amoxicillin component) but no tympanocentesis or change in antibiotic. Community control children (n=1020) were diagnosed according to current AAP guidelines and treated with high dose amoxicillin (80 mg/kg) without tympanocentesis as guideline recommended. Results 5.9% of children of the individualized care group compared to 14.4% of Legacy controls and 27.3% of community controls became otitis prone (OP), defined as 3 episodes of AOM within a 6-month time span or 4 AOM episodes within a 12-month time span (p<0.0001). 2.4% of the individualized care group compared to 6.3% of Legacy controls, and 14.8% of community controls received tympanostomy tubes (p<0.0001). Conclusions Individualized care of AOM significantly reduces the frequency of AOM and tympanostomy tube surgery. Use of strict diagnostic criteria for AOM and empiric antibiotic treatment using evidence-based knowledge of circulating otopathogens and their antimicrobial susceptibility profile also produces improved outcomes

  9. Physician Practice Patterns Within an Acute Care Facility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    d) suckling pigs, (e) mermaids, (f) fabulous ones, (g) stray dogs , (h) those that are included in this classification, (i) those that tremble as if...incentives was viewed as one of the major reasons for rising hospital expenditures. During 1982, costs in the hospital sector increased three times faster than...term solutions for an immediate problem. A second possible response is for the institution to assure that it is maximizing its allowable revenues by

  10. Physician-Directed Heart Failure Transitional Care Program: A Retrospective Case Review

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Ken S.; Beutler, David S.; Gerkin, Richard D.; Weiss, Jessica L.; Loli, Akil I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite a variety of national efforts to improve transitions of care for patients at risk for rehospitalization, 30-day rehospitalization rates for patients with heart failure have remained largely unchanged. Methods This is a retrospective review of 73 patients enrolled in our hospital-based, physican-directed Heart Failure Transitional Care Program (HFTCP). This study evaluated the 30- and 90- day readmission rates before and after enrollment in the program. The Transitionalist’s services focused on bedside consultation prior to hospital discharge, follow-up home visits within 72 hours of discharge, frequent follow-up phone calls, disease-specific education, outpatient intravenous diuretic therapy, and around-the-clock telephone access to the Transitionalist. Results The pre-enrollment 30-day readmission rates for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and all-cause readmission was 26.0% and 28.8%, respectively, while the post-enrollment rates for ADHF and all-cause readmission were 4.1% (P < 0.001) and 8.2% (P = 0.002), respectively. The pre-enrollment 90-day all-cause and ADHF readmission rates were 69.8%, and 58.9% respectively, while the post-enrollment rates for all-cause and ADHF were 27.3% (P < 0.001) and 16.4% (P < 0.001) respectively. Conclusions Our physician-implemented HFTCP reduced rehospitalization risk for patients enrolled in the program. This program may serve as a model to assist other hospital systems to reduce readmission rates of patients with HF. PMID:23976905

  11. Increasing Military Physician Productivity in a Managed Care Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-13

    allows us to obtain to a common denominator, or one single rating even though the services are dissimilar and the input units are not "weighted." Serway ...Productivity 34 Riley, J. (1992, May). Quality Improvement Means Better Productivity. Health care Executive. 7, 19-22. Serway , G. (1987). Alternative

  12. Access to Care: Overcoming the Rural Physician Shortage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1999-01-01

    Describes three state-initiated programs that address the challenge of providing access to health care for Appalachia's rural residents: a traveling pediatric diabetes clinic serving eastern Kentucky; a telemedicine program operated out of Knoxville, Tennessee; and a new medical school in Kentucky dedicated to training doctors from Appalachia for…

  13. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, IR; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, CM; Purcarea, VL

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer’s perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician’s perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician’s perspective. PMID:27453745

  14. Advanced general dentistry program directors' attitudes on physician involvement in pediatric oral health care.

    PubMed

    Raybould, Ted P; Wrightson, A Stevens; Massey, Christi Sporl; Smith, Tim A; Skelton, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Childhood oral disease is a significant health problem, particularly for vulnerable populations. Since a major focus of General Dentistry Program directors is the management of vulnerable populations, we wanted to assess their attitudes regarding the inclusion of physicians in the prevention, assessment, and treatment of childhood oral disease. A survey was mailed to all General Practice Residency and Advanced Education in General Dentistry program directors (accessed through the ADA website) to gather data. Spearman's rho was used to determine correlation among variables due to nonnormal distributions. Overall, Advanced General Dentistry directors were supportive of physicians' involvement in basic aspects of oral health care for children, with the exception of applying fluoride varnish. The large majority of directors agreed with physicians' assessing children's oral health and counseling patients on the prevention of dental problems. Directors who treated larger numbers of children from vulnerable populations tended to strongly support physician assistance with early assessment and preventive counseling.

  15. Consumerism in action: how patients and physicians negotiate payment in health care.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyeyoung

    2013-03-01

    Drawing from the medical sociology literature on the patient-doctor relationship and microeconomic sociological scholarship about the role of money in personal relationships, I examined patient-physician interactions within a clinic that offered eye health and cosmetic facial services in the United States. Relying on ethnographic observations conducted in 2008, I evaluated how financial pressures shape the patient-physician relationship during the clinical encounter. To gain a financial advantage, patients attempted to reshape the relationship toward a socially intimate one, where favor and gift exchanges are more common. To ensure the rendering of services, the physician in turn allied herself with the patient, demonstrating how external parties are the barriers to affordable care. This allied relationship was tested when conflicts emerged, primarily because of the role of financial intermediaries in the clinical encounter. These conflicts resulted in the disintegration of the personal relationship, with patient and physician pitted against one another.

  16. Nurse and Physician Barriers to Spiritual Care Provision at the End of Life

    PubMed Central

    Balboni, Michael J.; Sullivan, Adam; Enzinger, Andrea C.; Epstein-Peterson, Zachary D.; Tseng, Yolanda D.; Mitchell, Christine; Niska, Joshua; Zollfrank, Angelika; VanderWeele, Tyler J.; Balboni, Tracy A.

    2015-01-01

    Context Spiritual care (SC) from medical practitioners is infrequent at the end of life (EOL) despite national standards. Objectives The study aimed to describe nurses' and physicians' desire to provide SC to terminally ill patients and assess 11 potential SC barriers. Methods This was a survey-based, multisite study conducted from October 2008 through January 2009. All eligible oncology nurses and physicians at four Boston academic centers were approached for study participation; 339 nurses and physicians participated (response rate = 63%). Results Most nurses and physicians desire to provide SC within the setting of terminal illness (74% vs. 60%, respectively; P = 0.002); however, 40% of nurses/physicians provide SC less often than they desire. The most highly endorsed barriers were “lack of private space” for nurses and “lack of time” for physicians, but neither was associated with actual SC provision. Barriers that predicted less frequent SC for all medical professionals included inadequate training (nurses: odds ratio [OR] = 0.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.12–0.73, P = 0.01; physicians: OR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.25–0.95, P = 0.04), “not my professional role” (nurses: OR = 0.21, 95% CI = 0.07–0.61, P = 0.004; physicians: OR = 0.35, 95% CI = 0.17–0.72, P = 0.004), and “power inequity with patient” (nurses: OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.12–0.87, P = 0.03; physicians: OR = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.21–0.78, P = 0.007). A minority of nurses and physicians (21% and 49%, P = 0.003, respectively) did not desire SC training. Those less likely to desire SC training reported lower self-ratings of spirituality (nurses: OR = 5.00, 95% CI = 1.82–12.50, P = 0.002; physicians: OR = 3.33, 95% CI = 1.82–5.88, P < 0.001) and male gender (physicians: OR = 3.03, 95% CI = 1.67–5.56, P < 0.001). Conclusion SC training is suggested to be critical to the provision of SC in accordance with national care quality standards. PMID:24480531

  17. Financial and Work Satisfaction: Impacts of Participation in Primary Care Reform on Physicians in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Green, Michael E.; Hogg, William; Gray, David; Manuel, Doug; Koller, Michelle; Maaten, Sarah; Zhang, Yan; Shortt, Samuel E.D.

    2009-01-01

    Governments in Ontario have promised family physicians (FPs) that participation in primary care reform would be financially as well as professionally rewarding. We compared work satisfaction, incomes and work patterns of FPs practising in different models to determine whether the predicted benefits to physicians really materialized. Study participants included 332 FPs in Ontario practising in five models of care. The study combined self-reported survey data with administrative data from ICES and income data from the Canada Revenue Agency. FPs working in non–fee-for-service (FFS) models had higher levels of work satisfaction than those in FFS models. Incomes were similar across groups prior to the advent of primary care reform. Incomes of family health network FPs rose by about 30%, while family health group FPs saw increases of about 10% and those in FFS experienced minimal changes or decreases. Self-reported change in income was not reliable, with only 47% of physicians correctly identifying whether their income remained stable, increased or decreased. The availability of a variety of FFS- and non–FFS-based payment options, each designed to accommodate physicians with different types or styles of practice, may be a useful tool for governments as they grapple with issues of physician recruitment and retention. PMID:21037819

  18. Design and Implementation of a Physician Coaching Pilot to Promote Value-Based Referrals to Specialty Care

    PubMed Central

    Tuzzio, Leah; Ludman, Evette J; Chang, Eva; Palazzo, Lorella; Abbott, Travis; Wagner, Edward H; Reid, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Referral rates to specialty care from primary care physicians vary widely. To address this variability, we developed and pilot tested a peer-to-peer coaching program for primary care physicians. Objectives To assess the feasibility and acceptability of the coaching program, which gave physicians access to their individual-level referral data, strategies, and a forum to discuss referral decisions. Methods The team designed the program using physician input and a synthesis of the literature on the determinants of referral. We conducted a single-arm observational pilot with eight physicians which made up four dyads, and conducted a qualitative evaluation. Results Primary reasons for making referrals were clinical uncertainty and patient request. Physicians perceived doctor-to-doctor dialogue enabled mutual learning and a pathway to return joy to the practice of primary care medicine. The program helped physicians become aware of their own referral data, reasons for making referrals, and new strategies to use in their practice. Time constraints caused by large workloads were cited as a barrier both to participating in the pilot and to practicing in ways that optimize referrals. Physicians reported that the program could be sustained and spread if time for mentoring conversations was provided and/or nonfinancial incentives or compensation was offered. Conclusion This physician mentoring program aimed at reducing specialty referral rates is feasible and acceptable in primary care settings. Increasing the appropriateness of referrals has the potential to provide patient-centered care, reduce costs for the system, and improve physician satisfaction. PMID:28368789

  19. The Dynamics of Community Health Care Consolidation: Acquisition of Physician Practices

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Jon B; Carlin, Caroline S; Warrick, Louise H

    2014-01-01

    Context Health care delivery systems are becoming increasingly consolidated in urban areas of the United States. While this consolidation could increase efficiency and improve quality, it also could raise the cost of health care for payers. This article traces the consolidation trajectory in a single community, focusing on factors influencing recent acquisitions of physician practices by integrated delivery systems. Methods We used key informant interviews, supplemented by document analysis. Findings The acquisition of physician practices is a process that will be difficult to reverse in the current health care environment. Provider revenue uncertainty is a key factor driving consolidation, with public and private attempts to control health care costs contributing to that uncertainty. As these efforts will likely continue, and possibly intensify, community health care systems now are less consolidated than they will be in the future. Acquisitions of multispecialty and primary care practices by integrated delivery systems follow a common process, with relatively predictable issues relating to purchase agreements, employment contracts, and compensation. Acquisitions of single-specialty practices are less common, with motivations for acquisitions likely to vary by specialty type, group size, and market structure. Total cost of care contracting could be an important catalyst for practice acquisitions in the future. Conclusions In the past, market and regulatory forces aimed at controlling costs have both encouraged and rewarded the consolidation of providers, with important new developments likely to create momentum for further consolidation, including acquisitions of physician practices. PMID:25199899

  20. Electroconvulsive therapy: Promoting awareness among primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Sicher, Sarah; Gedzior, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    This article aims to promote awareness among primary care providers and support electroconvulsive therapy as a generally well-tolerated, effective therapeutic modality to treat specific psychiatric conditions in appropriately selected patients. There seem to be several potential barriers to treatment with electroconvulsive therapy including stigma, lack of providers who preform it, and lack of awareness among providers referring patients who may be appropriate candidates. The article provides a brief overview of electroconvulsive therapy principles and topics and includes a case report to illustrate clinical utility. The article proposes the concept that a potential way to overcome barriers to treatment with electroconvulsive therapy may be to promote education and awareness of it as a viable treatment modality among primary care providers.

  1. Tumor Board Participation Among Physicians Caring for Patients With Lung or Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kehl, Kenneth L.; Landrum, Mary Beth; Kahn, Katherine L.; Gray, Stacy W.; Chen, Aileen B.; Keating, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Multidisciplinary tumor board meetings are common in cancer care, but limited evidence is available about their benefits. We assessed the associations of tumor board participation and structure with care delivery and patient outcomes. Methods: As part of the CanCORS study, we surveyed 1,601 oncologists and surgeons about participation in tumor boards and specific tumor board features. Among 4,620 patients with lung or colorectal cancer diagnosed from 2003 to 2005 and seen by 1,198 of these physicians, we assessed associations of tumor board participation with patient survival, clinical trial enrollment, guideline-recommended care, and patient-reported quality, adjusting for patient and physician characteristics. Results: Weekly physician tumor board participation (v participation less often or never) was not associated with patient survival, although in exploratory subgroup analyses, weekly participation was associated with lower mortality for extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer and stage IV colorectal cancer. Patients treated by the 54% of physicians participating in tumor boards weekly (v less often or never) were more likely to enroll onto clinical trials (odds ratio [OR], 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.2). Patients with stage I to II non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose physicians participated in tumor boards weekly were more likely to undergo curative-intent surgery (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3 to 6.8), although those with stage I to II NSCLC whose physicians' meetings reviewed > one cancer site were less likely to undergo curative-intent surgery (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.4). Conclusion: Among patients with lung or colorectal cancer, frequent physician tumor board engagement was associated with patient clinical trial participation and higher rates of curative-intent surgery for stage I to II NSCLC but not with overall survival. PMID:25922221

  2. Common anorectal disorders for the intensive care physician.

    PubMed

    Bach, Harold H; Wang, Norby; Eberhardt, Joshua M

    2014-01-01

    Although anorectal disorders such as abscess, fissure, and hemorrhoids are typically outpatient problems, they also occur in the critically ill patient population, where their presentation and management are more difficult. This article will provide a brief review of anorectal anatomy, explain the proper anorectal examination, and discuss the current understanding and treatment concepts with regard to the most common anorectal disorders that the intensive care unit clinician is likely to face.

  3. Principles supporting dynamic clinical care teams: an American College of Physicians position paper.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Robert B; Crowley, Ryan A

    2013-11-05

    The U.S. health care system is undergoing a shift from individual clinical practice toward team-based care. This move toward team-based care requires fresh thinking about clinical leadership and responsibilities to ensure that the unique skills of each clinician are used to provide the best care for the patient as the patient's needs dictate, while the team as a whole must work together to ensure that all aspects of a patient's care are coordinated for the benefit of the patient. In this position paper, the American College of Physicians offers principles, definitions, and examples to dissolve barriers that prevent movement toward dynamic clinical care teams. These principles offer a framework for an evolving, updated approach to health care delivery, providing policy guidance that can be useful to clinical teams in organizing the care processes and clinician responsibilities consistent with professionalism.

  4. Physicians' and patients' valuation of pharmaceutical care implementation in Poznan (Poland) community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Waszyk-Nowaczyk, Magdalena; Nowaczyk, Piotr; Simon, Marek

    2014-12-01

    Implementation of pharmaceutical care (PC) in Poland is of great importance to patients, who, on the one hand, often follow complex pharmacological treatment regimens recommended by several physicians of different specialties, and, on the other, take up the decision on self-treatment due to availability of OTC medications. The aim of the present study was to assess the opinion of both patients and physicians about implementation of PC service in Polish community pharmacies. A cross sectional study was carried out from September 2009 to September 2010 by a pharmacist (author of the study) on the basis of an anonymous questionnaire, where demand of physicians (n = 104) and patients (n = 202) for implementation of PC in a community pharmacy was assessed. The study was planned to determine the relationship between implementation of PC, cost and time of this service and patients' and physicians' socio-economic information. Responding patients (85.64%) and physicians (76.92%) unanimously confirmed the need for implementation of PC. Most people convinced of the service implementation were 88.89% of physicians under the age of 35 and all the respondents were over 65 years of age (p = 0.027), just as 93.33% with service lesser than 5 years and 73.68% of respondents working a maximum of 20 years (p = 0.023). Mainly according to 90.00% of physicians with specialty in internal medicine and 92.59% of physicians of the group "Others" (p = 0.012), PC should be implemented in pharmacies. Women more frequently than men reckoned that appointments with a pharmacist should last up to 15 min (p = 0.012). According to 77.78% of the youngest physicians and 83.33% of the oldest ones, appointments should last from 5 to 15 min (p = 0.049), and a similar opinion was shared by 80.77% of physicians without specialty and 77.78% of physicians of the group "Others" (p = 0.0009). According to patients, the mean cost of the visit should be USD 7. Physicians most often assessed

  5. Talking about money: how primary care physicians respond to a patient's question about financial incentives.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Steven D; Hyams, Tracey

    2002-01-01

    Patients sometimes express concern about the influence of "perverse" financial incentives on their care. We recruited a convenience sample of 101 primary care physicians and obtained information on their compensation. Then we audiotaped them as they role-played a response to a videotaped mock patient who asked them how they were paid and how their method of compensation affected clinical decisions. Overall, 36% of the physicians did not give enough information in their role-play response to allow an independent determination of how they were paid. Adopting a broad spectrum of attitudes and approaches, nearly every physician avoided discussing the role of incentives and stressed instead that he or she could be trusted under any circumstance.

  6. Relevance of stroke code, stroke unit and stroke networks in organization of acute stroke care--the Madrid acute stroke care program.

    PubMed

    Alonso de Leciñana-Cases, María; Gil-Núñez, Antonio; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is a neurological emergency. The early administration of specific treatment improves the prognosis of the patients. Emergency care systems with early warning for the hospital regarding patients who are candidates for this treatment (stroke code) increases the number of patients treated. Currently, reperfusion via thrombolysis for ischemic stroke and attention in stroke units are the bases of treatment. Healthcare professionals and health provision authorities need to work together to organize systems that ensure continuous quality care for the patients during the whole process of their disease. To implement this, there needs to be an appropriate analysis of the requirements and resources with the objective of their adjustment for efficient use. It is necessary to provide adequate information and continuous training for all professionals who are involved in stroke care, including primary care physicians, extrahospital emergency teams and all physicians involved in the care of stroke patients within the hospital. The neurologist has the function of coordinating the protocols of intrahospital care. These organizational plans should also take into account the process beyond the acute phase, to ensure the appropriate application of measures of secondary prevention, rehabilitation, and chronic care of the patients that remain in a dependent state. We describe here the stroke care program in the Community of Madrid (Spain).

  7. [Conflicts of interest in physician-industry relationships in innovative care].

    PubMed

    de Mol, Bas

    2010-01-01

    Innovation of care is characterized by close working relationships with all parties involved, including industry. These relationships may jeopardize patient safety and result in incremental health care costs. On the other hand, the system of close collaboration is beneficial for government, health insurance institutions, hospital boards, professional associations of physicians, health care providers as well as patients. The Inspectorate of Health Care has the task to monitor, within the framework of the law, the negative consequences of potential or actual conflicts of interest and to ensure that the system is trustworthy and reliable. It should not only report but also act as watchdog in order to question and eventually sanction undisclosed and unacceptable forms of physician-industry relationship.

  8. Current therapy for HIV infection and its infectious complications. A practical summary for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Falloon, J

    1992-06-01

    Primary care physicians can play a crucial role in the care of patients with HIV infection. Treatment often requires orchestration of many complex drug regimens. In addition, the patient must make informed decisions about a broad range of care-related issues. Steps in the care of such patients include (1) staging of HIV infection, (2) instituting antiretroviral therapy, and (3) preventing opportunistic infections plus treating opportunistic infections when present. A wide range of established and investigational agents are available for these purposes, and new ones are continually being discovered.

  9. Physicians' conceptualization of "closure" as a benefit of physician-parent follow-up meetings after a child's death in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Eggly, Susan; Meert, Kathleen L; Berger, John; Zimmerman, Jerry; Anand, K J S; Newth, Christopher J L; Harrison, Rick; Carcillo, Joseph; Dean, J Michael; Willson, Douglas F

    2013-01-01

    We examined physicians' conceptualization of closure as a benefit of follow-up meetings with bereaved parents. The frequency of use and the meaning of the word "closure" were analyzed in transcripts of interviews with 67 critical care physicians affiliated with the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network. In all, 38 physicians (57 percent) used the word "closure" at least once (median: 2; range: 1 to 7), for a total of 86 times. Physicians indicated that closure is a process or trajectory rather than an achievable goal. They also indicated that parents and physicians can move toward closure by gaining a better understanding of the causes and circumstances of the death and by reconnecting with, or resolving relationships between, parents and health professionals. Physicians suggested that a primary reason to conduct follow-up meetings is that such meetings offer parents and physicians an opportunity to move toward closure. Future research should attempt to determine whether followup meetings reduce the negative effects of bereavement for parents and physicians.

  10. Physician-Pharmacist Collaborative Care for Dyslipidemia Patients: Knowledge and Skills of Community Pharmacists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villeneuve, Julie; Lamarre, Diane; Lussier, Marie-Therese; Vanier, Marie-Claude; Genest, Jacques; Blais, Lucie; Hudon, Eveline; Perreault, Sylvie; Berbiche, Djamal; Lalonde, Lyne

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In a physician-pharmacist collaborative-care (PPCC) intervention, community pharmacists were responsible for initiating lipid-lowering pharmacotherapy and adjusting the medication dosage. They attended a 1-day interactive workshop supported by a treatment protocol and clinical and communication tools. Afterwards, changes in…

  11. Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners as a Usual Source of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Christine M.; Schumacher, Jessica R.; Wright, Alexandra; Smith, Maureen A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To identify characteristics and outcomes of patients who use physician assistants and nurse practitioners (PA/NPs) as a usual source of care. Methods: Cross sectional analysis using the telephone and mail surveys of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS), a prospective cohort study of Wisconsin high school graduates and selected siblings…

  12. Need for Comprehensive Women's Health Continuing Medical Education among Primary Care Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwolek, Deborah S.; Donnelly, Michael B.; Carr, Ellen; Sloan, David A.; Haist, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Women's health topics of interest for continuing medical education were identified by 91 primary care physicians. Most felt that more knowledge of these topics would reduce the number of referrals to specialists. A more comprehensive, rather than reproductive, perspective of women's health was called for. (SK)

  13. Michigan's fee-for-value physician incentive program reduces spending and improves quality in primary care.

    PubMed

    Lemak, Christy Harris; Nahra, Tammie A; Cohen, Genna R; Erb, Natalie D; Paustian, Michael L; Share, David; Hirth, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    As policy makers and others seek to reduce health care cost growth while improving health care quality, one approach gaining momentum is fee-for-value reimbursement. This payment strategy maintains the traditional fee-for-service arrangement but includes quality and spending incentives. We examined Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan's Physician Group Incentive Program, which uses a fee-for-value approach focused on primary care physicians. We analyzed the program's impact on quality and spending from 2008 to 2011 for over three million beneficiaries in over 11,000 physician practices. Participation in the incentive program was associated with approximately 1.1 percent lower total spending for adults (5.1 percent lower for children) and the same or improved performance on eleven of fourteen quality measures over time. Our findings contribute to the growing body of evidence about the potential effectiveness of models that align payment with cost and quality performance, and they demonstrate that it is possible to transform reimbursement within a fee-for-service framework to encourage and incentivize physicians to provide high-quality care, while also reducing costs.

  14. Should physicians prepare for war? 1. The obligation to care for the casualties.

    PubMed

    Bisgard, J C

    1982-04-01

    This is an introduction to a set of four commentaries on the controversy that has arisen over whether physicians should cooperate in Defense Department planning for the care of military casualties, airlifted to U.S. civilian hospitals, in the event of a large-scale war. The commentaries are by Jay C. Bisgard, H. Jack Geiger, James T. Johnson, and Thomas H. Murray.

  15. Primary care physician's attitude towards the German e-health card project--determinants and implications.

    PubMed

    Ernstmann, Nicole; Ommen, Oliver; Neumann, Melanie; Hammer, Antje; Voltz, Raymond; Pfaff, Holger

    2009-06-01

    In Germany e-health cards will be distributed nationwide to over 80 million patients. Given the impending mandatory introduction of the e-health technology, the objective of this study was to examine the determinants of primary care physicians' acceptance of the technological innovation. The study was conducted prior to the introduction of the e-health cards. A questionnaire survey was carried out addressing primary care physicians from different fields. The reduction of medication error rates and the improvement of communication between medical caregivers are central aspects of the perceived usefulness. Primary care physicians rate their involvement in the process of the development of the technology and their own IT expertise concerning the technological innovation as rather low. User involvement and IT expertise can explain 46 % of the variance of perceived usefulness of the e-health card. User involvement plays a crucial role in the adoption of the German e-health card. Primary care physician's perspective should be represented in the process of developing and designing the technology.

  16. The Contribution of Non-Physician Health Workers to the Delivery of Primary Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Amasa B.; Ransohoff, David F.

    Innovative solutions in training or retraining of health workers to meet the nationwide primary care deficiency are summarized. Programs described concern nurse clinicians, practitioners, and midwives; physicians' assistants; medical assistants, laboratory technicians, and secretaries; dental assistants, hygienists, and laboratory technicians;…

  17. Physicians Who Treat the Elderly in Rural Florida: Trends Indicating Concerns regarding Access to Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderson, Anne; Menachemi, Nir; Brummel-Smith, Ken; Brooks, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Context: Rural elderly patients are faced with numerous challenges in accessing care. Additional strains to access may be occurring given recent market pressures, which would have significant impact on this vulnerable population. Purpose: This study focused on the practice patterns and future plans of rural Florida physicians who routinely see…

  18. Attitudes of Physicians, Housestaff, and Nurses on Care for the Terminally Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincade, Jean E.

    1982-01-01

    Compared attitudes of physicians, housestaff, and nurses (N=483) on care of the dying. Overall, health professionals responding to the survey felt comfortable talking to dying patients and supported the belief that patients should be informed of their prognosis. Substantial differences were found in beliefs about analgesic administration.…

  19. Evaluation of Developmental Surveillance by Physicians at the Two-Month Preventive Care Visit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyp, Sarah S.; Barone, Vincent J.; Kruger, Tarah; Garrison, Carol B.; Robertsen, Christine; Christophersen, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of feedback and instruction on resident physician performance during developmental surveillance of infants at 2-month preventive care visits. Baseline data were obtained by videotaping 3 residents while they performed the physical and developmental exam components. Training consisted of individualized feedback and a brief…

  20. Molecular biology for the critical care physician part I: terminology and technology.

    PubMed

    Santis, G; Evans, T W

    1999-04-01

    The past few years have seen a profound revolution in biological sciences. The enormous advances in molecular biology are providing novel insights into the etiology and treatment of human disease. These insights will undoubtedly have implications for intensive care research and practice. In this first of two articles, the basic principles and techniques of molecular biology are discussed to provide the intensive care physician with background information on the subject.

  1. Changes to physician and nurse time burdens when caring for patients under contact precautions.

    PubMed

    Barker, Anna K; Codella, James; Ewers, Tola; Dundon, Adam; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Safdar, Nasia

    2017-03-13

    Contact precautions are complex behavioral interventions. To better understand barriers to compliance, we conducted a prospective study that compared the time burden for health care workers caring for contact precautions patients versus other patients. We found that nurses spent significantly more time in the rooms of contact precautions patients. There was no significant change in physician timing. Future studies need to evaluate workflow changes so that barriers to contact precaution implementation can be fully understood and addressed.

  2. Emerging Role of the Army Family Physician in Primary Health Care Delivery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-13

    IN PRI1Y~?f IfALTh CARE DELIVERY BY COLONEL DAVID G. LbANE VEDICAL CORPs ~~~ CORRESPONDING COURSE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ~ AR...Physician in Primary Health Care Delivery. Research Project 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHORft ) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(.) Doane, David G...influence of specialists of all kinds. Emphasis was placed on research , medical education, government grants, publishing H and training of super

  3. A population-based analysis of incentive payments to primary care physicians for the care of patients with complex disease

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, M. Ruth; Law, Michael R.; Peterson, Sandra; Garrison, Scott; Hurley, Jeremiah; Cheng, Lucy; McGrail, Kimberlyn

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2007, the province of British Columbia implemented incentive payments to primary care physicians for the provision of comprehensive, continuous, guideline-informed care for patients with 2 or more chronic conditions. We examined the impact of this program on primary care access and continuity, rates of hospital admission and costs. Methods: We analyzed all BC patients who qualified for the incentive based on their diagnostic profile. We tracked primary care contacts and continuity, hospital admissions (total, via the emergency department and for targeted conditions), and cost of physician services, hospital care and pharmaceuticals, for 24 months before and 24 months after the intervention. Results: Of 155 754 eligible patients, 63.7% had at least 1 incentive payment billed. Incentive payments had no impact on primary care contacts (change in contacts per patient per month: 0.016, 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.047 to 0.078) or continuity of care (mean monthly change: 0.012, 95% CI −0.001 to 0.024) and were associated with increased total rates of hospital admission (change in hospital admissions per 1000 patients per month: 1.46, 95% CI 0.04 to 2.89), relative to preintervention trends. Annual costs per patient did not decline (mean change: $455.81, 95% CI −$2.44 to $914.08). Interpretation: British Columbia’s $240-million investment in this program improved compensation for physicians doing the important work of caring for complex patients, but did not appear to improve primary care access or continuity, or constrain resource use elsewhere in the health care system. Policymakers should consider other strategies to improve care for this patient population. PMID:27527484

  4. Discharging patients from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Helen

    2016-02-10

    Planning for patient discharge is an essential element of any admission to an acute setting, but may often be left until the patient is almost ready to leave hospital. This article emphasises why discharge planning is important and lists the essential principles that should be addressed to ensure that patients leave at an optimum time, feeling confident and safe to do so. Early assessment, early planning and co-ordination of all the teams involved in the patient's care are essential. Effective communication between the various teams and with the patient and their family or carer(s) is necessary. Patients should leave hospital with all the information, medications and equipment they require. Appropriate plans should have been developed and communicated to the receiving community or non-acute team. When patient discharge is effective, complications as a result of extended lengths of hospital stay are prevented, hospital beds are used efficiently and readmissions are reduced.

  5. A Systematic Literature Review of Self-Reported Smoking Cessation Counseling by Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Anna-Lena; Härter, Martin; Niedrich, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco consumption is a risk factor for chronic diseases and worldwide around six million people die from long-term exposure to first- or second-hand smoke annually. One effective approach to tobacco control is smoking cessation counseling by primary care physicians. However, research suggests that smoking cessation counseling is not sufficiently implemented in primary care. In order to understand and address the discrepancy between evidence and practice, an overview of counseling practices is needed. Therefore, the aim of this systematic literature review is to assess the frequency of smoking cessation counseling in primary care. Self-reported counseling behavior by physicians is categorized according to the 5A’s strategy (ask, advise, assess, assist, arrange). An electronic database search was performed in Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library and overall, 3491 records were identified. After duplicates were removed, the title and abstracts of 2468 articles were screened for eligibility according to inclusion/exclusion criteria. The remaining 97 full-text articles reporting smoking cessation counseling by primary care physicians were assessed for eligibility. Eligible studies were those that measured physicians’ self-reported smoking cessation counseling activities via questionnaire. Thirty-five articles were included in the final review (1 intervention and 34 cross-sectional studies). On average, behavior corresponding to the 5A’s was reported by 65% of physicians for “Ask”, 63% for “Advise”, 36% for “Assess”, 44% for “Assist”, and 22% of physicians for “Arrange”, although the measurement and reporting of each of these counseling practices varied across studies. Overall, the results indicate that the first strategies (ask, advise) were more frequently reported than the subsequent strategies (assess, assist, arrange). Moreover, there was considerable variation in the items used to assess counseling behaviour and

  6. Physician characteristics and the recognition of depression and anxiety in primary care.

    PubMed

    Robbins, J M; Kirmayer, L J; Cathébras, P; Yaffe, M J; Dworkind, M

    1994-08-01

    We examined physician characteristics associated with the recognition of depression and anxiety in primary care. Fifty-five physicians treating a total of 600 patients completed measures of psychosocial orientation, psychological mindedness, self-rating of sensitivity to hidden emotions, and a video test of sensitivity to nonverbal communication. Patients were classified as cases of psychiatric distress based on the CES-D scale and the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. Physician recognition was determined by notation of any psychosocial diagnosis in the medical charts over the ensuing 12 months. Of 192 patients scoring 16 or above on the CES-D, 44% (83) were recognized as psychiatrically distressed. Three findings were central to this study: 1) Physicians who are more sensitive to nonverbal expressions of emotion made more psychiatric or psychosocial assessment of their patients and appeared to be over-inclusive in their judgments of psychosocial problems; 2) Physicians who tended to blame depressed patients for causing, exaggerating, or prolonging their depression made fewer psychosocial assessments and were less accurate in detecting psychiatric distress; 3) False positive labeling of patients who had no evidence of psychiatric distress was rare. Surprisingly, more severe medical illness increased the likelihood of labeling and accurate recognition. Physician factors that increased recognition may indicate a greater willingness to formulate a psychiatric diagnosis and an ability notice nonverbal signs of distress.

  7. The Influence of Trust in Physicians and Trust in the Healthcare System on Linkage, Retention, and Adherence to HIV Care.

    PubMed

    Graham, James L; Shahani, Lokesh; Grimes, Richard M; Hartman, Christine; Giordano, Thomas P

    2015-12-01

    Lack of trust by the patient in the physicians or the healthcare system has been associated with poorer health outcomes. The present study was designed to determine if trust in physicians and the healthcare system among persons newly diagnosed with HIV infection was predictive of patients' subsequent linkage, retention, and adherence to HIV care. 178 newly diagnosed HIV infected patients were administered the trust-in-physicians and trust-in-healthcare system scales. Median trust-in-physicians and trust-in-healthcare system scores were compared for all the mentioned subsequent linkage, retention, and adherence to HIV care. Univariate logistic regression using the trust-in-physician scale confirmed significant association with retention in care (p = 0.04), which persisted in multivariate analyses (p = 0.04). No significant association was found between trust-in-physicians and linkage to care or adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Trust in the healthcare system was not associated with any of the outcomes. Patients with higher trust in physicians were more likely to be retained in HIV care. Trust at diagnosis may not be a barrier to better clinical outcomes, either because trust changes based on subsequent interactions, or because trust is not a determining feature. Interventions to improve retention in care could include improving trust in physicians or target persons with low trust in physicians.

  8. The physician mentored implementation model: a promising quality improvement framework for health care change.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Hinami, Keiki; Hansen, Luke O; Maynard, Gregory; Budnitz, Tina; Williams, Mark V

    2015-03-01

    Quality improvement (QI) efforts hold great promise for improving care delivery. However, hospitals often struggle with QI implementation and fail to sustain improvement in either process changes or patient outcomes. Physician mentored implementation (PMI) is a novel approach that promotes the success and sustainability of QI initiatives at hospitals. It leverages the expertise of external physician mentors who coach QI teams to implement interventions at their local hospitals. The PMI model includes five core components: (1) a hospital self-assessment tool, (2) a face-to-face training session including direct interaction with a physician mentor, (3) a guided continuous quality improvement and systems approach, (4) yearlong individual physician mentoring, and (5) a learning community supported by a resource center, listserv, and webinars. Mentors provide content and process expertise, rather than offering "one-size-fits-all" technical assistance that might not be sustained after the mentoring year ends. Mentors support and motivate QI teams throughout the planning and implementation phases of their interventions, help to engage hospital leadership, garner local physician buy-in, and address institutional barriers. Mentors also guide hospitals to identify opportunities for the adaptation and customization of original evidence-based models of care while ensuring the fidelity of those models. More than 350 hospitals have used the PMI model to implement successful national and statewide QI initiatives. Academic medical centers are charged with improving the health of patients and reengineering care delivery; thus, they serve as the ideal source for physician mentors and can act as leaders in implementing QI projects using the PMI model.

  9. Alternative models of hospital-physician affiliation as the United States moves away from tight managed care.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence; Robinson, James C

    2003-01-01

    Using concepts from organizational economics and sociology, this article compares the medical staff, hospital-owned physician practice, and hybrid models of hospital-physician coordination, as well as the pressures for affiliation during the premanaged care, tight managed care, and loose managed care eras. Case studies of two hospital systems in New York City and two in San Diego illustrate the concepts. Although pressures for tighter hospital-physician affiliation now are weaker than during the era of tight managed care, they are greater than they were before managed care. Hospitals are not reverting to exclusive use of the medical staff model of affiliation but rather are maintaining a mix of medical staff, owned physician practice, and hybrid models. Hospitals probably will continue to seek tighter affiliations with physicians to increase coordination, enhance negotiating leverage with health plans, and gain admissions.

  10. Physician reimbursement perception for outpatient procedures and procedures among managed care patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Tierney, Edward F.; Herman, William H.; Mangione, Carol M.; Venkat Narayan, K.M.; Gerzoff, Robert B.; Bilik, Dori; Ettner, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between physicians’ reimbursement perceptions and outpatient test performance. Previous studies have documented an association between reimbursement perceptions and electrocardiogram performance, but not for other common outpatient procedures. STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional analysis. METHODS Participants were physicians (n = 766) and their managed care patients with diabetes mellitus (n = 2758) enrolled in 6 plans in 2003. Procedures measured included electrocardiograms, radiographs or x-rays, urine microalbumin measures, hemoglobin A1cs, and Pap smears for women. Hierarchical logistic regression models were adjusted for health plan and physician level clustering and for physician and patient covariates. To minimize confounding by unmeasured health plan variables, we adjusted for plan as a fixed effect. Thus, we estimated variation between physicians using only the variance within health plans. RESULTS Patients of physicians who reported reimbursement for electrocardiograms were more likely to receive electrocardiograms than patients of physicians who did not perceive reimbursement (unadjusted mean difference 4.9% (95% confidence interval, 1.1% to 8.9%)) and adjusted mean difference 3.9% (95% confidence interval, 0.21% to 7.8%)). For the other tests examined, no significant differences in procedure performance were found between patients of physicians who perceived reimbursement and patients of physicians who did not perceive reimbursement. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that reimbursement perception was associated with electrocardiograms, but not with other commonly performed outpatient procedures. Future research should investigate how associations change with perceived amount of reimbursement and interactions with other influences upon test-ordering behavior such as perceived appropriateness. PMID:19146362

  11. Advance Directives and Communication Skills of Prehospital Physicians Involved in the Care of Cardiovascular Patients.

    PubMed

    Gigon, Fabienne; Merlani, Paolo; Ricou, Bara

    2015-12-01

    Advance directives (AD) were developed to respect patient autonomy. However, very few patients have AD, even in cases when major cardiovascular surgery is to follow. To understand the reasons behind the low prevalence of AD and to help decision making when patients are incompetent, it is necessary to focus on the impact of prehospital practitioners, who may contribute to an increase in AD by discussing them with patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate self-rated communication skills and the attitudes of physicians potentially involved in the care of cardiovascular patients toward AD.Self-administered questionnaires were sent to general practitioners, cardiologists, internists, and intensivists, including the Quality of Communication Score, divided into a General Communication score (QOCgen 6 items) and an End-of-life Communication score (QOCeol 7 items), as well as questions regarding opinions and practices in terms of AD.One hundred sixty-four responses were received. QOCgen (mean (±SD)): 9.0/10 (1.0); QOCeol: 7.2/10 (1.7). General practitioners most frequently start discussions about AD (74/149 [47%]) and are more prone to designate their own specialty (30/49 [61%], P < 0.0001). Overall, only 57/159 (36%) physicians designated their own specialty; 130/158 (82%) physicians ask potential cardiovascular patients if they have AD and 61/118 (52%) physicians who care for cardiovascular patients talk about AD with some of them.The characteristics of physicians who do not talk about AD with patients were those who did not personally have AD and those who work in private practices.One hundred thirty-three (83%) physicians rated the systematic mention of patients' AD in the correspondence between physicians as good, while 114 (71%) at the patients' first registration in the private practice.Prehospital physicians rated their communication skills as good, whereas end-of-life communication was rated much lower. Only half of those surveyed speak about AD

  12. Potential Impact of Increased Numbers of Physicians upon Physician Behavior, Access to, and Cost of, Medical Care. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musgrave, Gerald L.

    A study that forecast the consequences of the projected growth in the number of practicing U.S. physicians during the 1980s and beyond is summarized. Attention was directed to the potential impact of the increasing supply of physicians on physician behavior, the cost of medical services, and access to services. Econometric modeling and analysis of…

  13. Potential Impact of Increased Numbers of Physicians upon Physician Behavior, Access to, and Cost of, Medical Care. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musgrave, Gerald L.

    The potential impact of the increasing supply of physicians on physician behavior, the cost of medical services, and access to services is addressed in detail in this final research report. Econometric modeling and analyses of economic activity within the health sector were undertaken. An eight equation model of the hospital and physician sectors…

  14. Changing roles for primary-care physicians: addressing challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, C P; Kaluzny, A D; Kibbe, D C; Tredway, R

    2005-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer advertising is but one example of a process called disintermediation that is directly affecting primary-care physicians and their patients. This paper examines the trends and the actors involved in disintermediation, which threatens the traditional patient-physician relationship. The paper outlines the social forces behind these threats and illustrates the resulting challenges and opportunities. A rationale and strategies are presented to rebuild, maintain and strengthen the patient-physician relationship in an era of growing disintermediation and anticipated advancements in cost-effective office-based information systems. Primary care--as we know it--is under siege from a number of trends in healthcare delivery, resulting in loss of physician autonomy, disrupted continuity of care and potential erosion of professional values (Rastegar 2004; Future of Family Medicine Project Leadership Committee 2004). The halcyon days of medicine as a craft guild with a monopoly on (1) technical knowledge and (2) the means of implementation, reached its zenith in the mid-twentieth century and has been under pressure ever since (Starr 1982; Schlesinger 2002). While this is a trend within the US health system, it is likely to affect other delivery systems in the years ahead.

  15. Practice patterns of rural family physicians based on the American Diabetes Association standards of care.

    PubMed

    Zoorob, R J; Mainous, A G

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine practice patterns of rural family physicians in the care of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus based on the standards of care of the American Diabetes Association (ADA). One hundred patient charts were randomly chosen, twenty for each physician, from the practices of five family physicians in rural Ohio. A standardized collection protocol was used, based upon the ADA recommendations. The charts were reviewed for compliance with the ADA parameters. The patients' records demonstrated 66% compliance with dietary counseling and 33% with counseling about exercise. Moreover, there was low compliance with physical examination guidelines. Specifically, 66% of the patients had fundoscopic examination and 64% had a complete foot examination done. With respect to the laboratory guidelines, 70% of the charts reviewed had a urinalysis ordered and 45% annual lipids measured. However, glycosylated hemoglobin was performed in only 15% of the patients. The results suggest that rural family physicians do not consistently follow the ADA standards of care.

  16. Effects of Health Care Payment Models on Physician Practice in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Mark W.; Chen, Peggy G.; White, Chapin; Jung, Olivia; Raaen, Laura; Hirshman, Samuel; Hoch, Emily; Stevens, Clare; Ginsburg, Paul B.; Casalino, Lawrence P; Tutty, Michael; Vargo, Carol; Lipinski, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The project reported here, sponsored by the American Medical Association (AMA), aimed to describe the effects that alternative health care payment models (i.e., models other than fee-for-service payment) have on physicians and physician practices in the United States. These payment models included capitation, episode-based and bundled payment, shared savings, pay for performance, and retainer-based practice. Accountable care organizations and medical homes, which are two recently expanding practice and organizational models that frequently participate in one or more of these alternative payment models, were also included. Project findings are intended to help guide efforts by the AMA and other stakeholders to make improvements to current and future alternative payment programs and help physician practices succeed in these new payment models—i.e., to help practices simultaneously improve patient care, preserve or enhance physician professional satisfaction, satisfy multiple external stakeholders, and maintain economic viability as businesses. The article provides both findings and recommendations. PMID:28083361

  17. Adoption of information technology enabled innovations by primary care physicians: model and questionnaire development.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, D. R.; Dixon, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    A survey instrument was developed based on a model of the substantive factors influencing the adoption of Information Technology (IT) enabled innovations by physicians. The survey was given to all faculty and residents in a Primary Care teaching institution. Computerized literature searching was the IT innovation studied. The results support the role of the perceived ease of use and the perceived usefulness of an innovation as well as the intent to use an innovation as factors important for implementation. The model and survey instruments developed show significant potential to enhance our understanding of the process of implementing IT innovations such that Physicians will adopt them. PMID:7950004

  18. Renal scintigraphy in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Sfakianaki, Efrosyni; Sfakianakis, George N; Georgiou, Mike; Hsiao, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Renal scintigraphy is a powerful imaging method that provides both functional and anatomic information, which is particularly useful in the acute care setting. In our institution, for the past 2 decades, we have used a 25-minute renal diuretic protocol, technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) mercaptoacetyltriglycine with simultaneous intravenous injection of furosemide, for all ages and indications, including both native and transplant kidneys. As such, this protocol has been widely used in the workup of acutely ill patients. In this setting, there are common clinical entities which affect patients with native and transplant kidneys. In adult patients with native kidneys one of the most frequent reasons for emergency room visits is renal colic due to urolithiasis. Although unenhanced computed tomography is useful to assess the anatomy in cases of renal colic, it does not provide functional information. Time zero furosemide renal scintigraphy can do both and we have shown that it can effectively stratify patients with renal colic. To this end, 4 characteristic patterns of scintirenography have been identified, standardized, and consistently applied: no obstruction, partial obstruction (mild vs high grade), complete obstruction, and stunned (postdecompressed) kidney. With the extensive use of this protocol over the past 2 decades, a pattern of "regional parenchymal dysfunction" indicative of acute pyelonephritis has also been delineated. This information has proved to be useful for patients presenting with urinary tract infection and suspected pyelonephritis, as well as for patients who were referred for workup of renal colic but were found to have acute pyelonephritis instead. In instances of abdominal trauma, renal scintigraphy is uniquely suited to identify urine leaks. This is also true in cases of suspected leak following renal transplant or from other iatrogenic/postsurgical causes. Patients presenting with acute renal failure can be evaluated with renal scintigraphy. A

  19. Health Care Austerity Measures in Times of Crisis: The Perspectives of Primary Health Care Physicians in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Heras-Mosteiro, Julio; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Otero-Garcia, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The current financial crisis has seen severe austerity measures imposed on the Spanish health care system, including reduced public spending, copayments, salary reductions, and reduced services for undocumented migrants. However, the impacts have not been well-documented. We present findings from a qualitative study that explores the perceptions of primary health care physicians in Madrid, Spain. This article discusses the effects of austerity measures implemented in the public health care system and their potential impacts on access and utilization of primary health care services. This is the first study, to our knowledge, exploring the health care experiences during the financial crisis of general practitioners in Madrid, Spain. The majority of participating physicians disapproved of austerity measures implemented in Spain. The findings of this study suggest that undocumented migrants should regain access to health care services; copayments should be minimized and removed for patients with low incomes; and health care professionals should receive additional help to avoid burnout. Failure to implement these measures could result in the quality of health care further deteriorating and could potentially have long-term negative consequences on population health.

  20. The physician's role in patients' nursing home care: "She's a very courageous and lovely woman. I enjoy caring for her".

    PubMed

    Zweig, Steven C; Popejoy, Lori L; Parker-Oliver, Debra; Meadows, Susan E

    2011-10-05

    More than 1.5 million adults live in US nursing homes, and approximately 30% of individuals in the United States will die with a nursing home as their last place of residence. Physicians play a pivotal role in the rehabilitation, complex medical care, and end-of-life care of this frail and vulnerable population. The reasons for admission are multifactorial and a comprehensive care plan based on the Minimum Data Set guides the multidisciplinary nursing home team in the care of the patient and provides assessments of the quality of care provided. Using the cases of 2 patients with different experiences, we describe the physician's role in planning for admission, participating as a team member in the ongoing assessment and care in the nursing home, and guiding care at the end of life. The increasing population of older adults has also promoted community-based and residential alternatives to traditional nursing homes. The future of long-term care will include additional challenges and rich innovations in services and options for older adults.

  1. Effect of Interviews Done by Intensive Care Physicians on Organ Donation.

    PubMed

    Birtan, D; Arslantas, M K; Dincer, P C; Altun, G T; Bilgili, B; Ucar, F B; Bozoklar, C A; Ayanoglu, H O

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we examined the correspondence between intensive care unit physicians and the relatives of potential brain-dead donors regarding the decision to donate or the reasons for refusing organ donation. A total of 12 consecutive cases of potential brain-dead patients treated in intensive care units of Marmara University Pendik Education and Research Hospital in 2013 were evaluated. For each of the cases, the Potential Donor Questionnaire, and Family Notification, Brain Death Criteria Fulfilment and Organ Donation Conversation Questionnaires were used to collect the required data. Statistically, descriptive analyses were performed. We concluded that honestly, regularly, and sufficiently informed relatives of the potential brain-dead donor more readily donate organs, with a positive contribution from the intensive care physician.

  2. The use of governance tools in promotion of health care information technology adoption by physicians.

    PubMed

    Noblin, Alice M; Cortelyou-Ward, Kendall; Liu, Darren

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health records are important technology for health care with promises of streamlining and improving care. However, physicians have been slow to adopt the technology usually because of financial constraints. Third-party payers, including Medicare and Medicaid, are coming forward with solutions and funding. While payers have the most to gain in terms of cost savings, they have been slow to provide a solution to the financial dilemmas posed by the new technology. This article details some governance tools that are frequently used to alleviate the financial concerns. Grants, loans, and tax expenditures are some of the options available to physicians to purchase electronic health records and other types of health care information technology.

  3. Physician perspectives on care of individuals with severe mobility impairments in primary care in Southwestern Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Colleen; Lee, Joseph; Milligan, James; Hillier, Loretta M; Bauman, Craig

    2016-07-01

    Despite the high health risks associated with severe mobility impairments, individuals with physical disabilities are less likely to receive the same level of primary care as able-bodied persons. This study explores family physicians' perspectives on primary care for individuals with mobility impairments to identify and better understand the challenges that prevent equitable service delivery to this group of patients. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in the autumn of 2012 with a purposeful sample of 20 family physicians practising in Southwestern Ontario to gather their perspectives of the personal and professional barriers to healthcare delivery for individuals with mobility impairments, including perceptions of challenges, contributing reasons and possible improvements. A thematic analysis was conducted on the transcripts generated from the interviews to identify perceptions of existing barriers and gaps in care, needs and existing opportunities for improving primary care for this patient population. Eight themes emerged from the interviews that contributed to understanding the perceived challenges of providing care to patients with mobility impairments: transportation barriers, knowledge gaps and practice constraints resulting in episodic care rather than preventive care, incongruence between perceived and actual accessibility to care, emergency departments used as centres for primary care, inattention to mobility issues among specialist and community services, lack of easily accessible practice tools, low patient volumes impact decision-making regarding building decreased motivation to expand clinical capacity due to low patient volume, and lastly, remuneration issues. Despite this patient population presenting with high healthcare needs and significant barriers and care gaps in primary care, low prevalence rates negatively impact the acquisition of necessary equipment and knowledge required to optimally care for these patients in typical primary care

  4. The military veteran to physician assistant pathway: building the primary care workforce.

    PubMed

    Brock, Douglas; Bolon, Shannon; Wick, Keren; Harbert, Kenneth; Jacques, Paul; Evans, Timothy; Abdullah, Athena; Gianola, F J

    2013-12-01

    The physician assistant (PA) profession emerged to utilize the skills of returning Vietnam-era military medics and corpsmen to fortify deficits in the health care workforce. Today, the nation again faces projected health care workforce shortages and a significant armed forces drawdown. The authors describe national efforts to address both issues by facilitating veterans' entrance into civilian PA careers and leveraging their skills.More than 50,000 service personnel with military health care training were discharged between 2006 and 2010. These veterans' health care experience and maturity make them ideal candidates for civilian training as primary care providers. They trained and practiced in teams and functioned under minimal supervision to care for a broad range of patients. Military health care personnel are experienced in emergency medicine, urgent care, primary care, public health, and disaster medicine. However, the PA profession scarcely taps this valuable resource. Fewer than 4% of veterans with health care experience may ever apply for civilian PA training.The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) implements two strategies to help prepare and graduate veterans from PA education programs. First, Primary Care Training and Enhancement (PCTE) grants help develop the primary care workforce. In 2012, HRSA introduced reserved review points for PCTE: Physician Assistant Training in Primary Care applicants with veteran-targeted activities, increasing their likelihood of receiving funding. Second, HRSA leads civilian and military stakeholder workgroups that are identifying recruitment and retention activities and curricula adaptations that maximize veterans' potential as PAs. Both strategies are described, and early outcomes are presented.

  5. Nurses' medication administration practices at two Singaporean acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall compliance with accepted medication administration procedures, and explored the distractions they faced during medication administration at two acute care hospitals in Singapore. A total of 140 registered nurses, 70 from each hospital, participated in the study. At both hospitals, nurses were distracted by personnel, such as physicians, radiographers, patients not under their care, and telephone calls, during medication rounds. Deviations from accepted medication procedures were observed. At one hospital, the use of a vest during medication administration alone was not effective in avoiding distractions during medication administration. Environmental factors and distractions can impact on the safe administration of medications, because they not only impair nurses' level of concentration, but also add to their work pressure. Attention should be placed on eliminating distractions through the use of appropriate strategies. Strategies that could be considered include the conduct of education sessions with health professionals and patients about the importance of not interrupting nurses while they are administering medications, and changes in work design.

  6. How patients understand physicians' solicitations of additional concerns: implications for up-front agenda setting in primary care.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jeffrey D; Heritage, John

    2016-01-01

    In the more than 1 billion primary-care visits each year in the United States, the majority of patients bring more than one distinct concern, yet many leave with "unmet" concerns (i.e., ones not addressed during visits). Unmet concerns have potentially negative consequences for patients' health, and may pose utilization-based financial burdens to health care systems if patients return to deal with such concerns. One solution to the problem of unmet concerns is the communication skill known as up-front agenda setting, where physicians (after soliciting patients' chief concerns) continue to solicit patients' concerns to "exhaustion" with questions such as "Are there some other issues you'd like to address?" Although this skill is trainable and efficacious, it is not yet a panacea. This article uses conversation analysis to demonstrate that patients understand up-front agenda-setting questions in ways that hamper their effectiveness. Specifically, we demonstrate that up-front agenda-setting questions are understood as making relevant "new problems" (i.e., concerns that are either totally new or "new since last visit," and in need of diagnosis), and consequently bias answers away from "non-new problems" (i.e., issues related to previously diagnosed concerns, including much of chronic care). Suggestions are made for why this might be so, and for improving up-front agenda setting. Data are 144 videotapes of community-based, acute, primary-care, outpatient visits collected in the United States between adult patients and 20 family-practice physicians.

  7. Physician and consumer attitudes and behaviors regarding self-help health support groups as an adjunct to traditional medical care.

    PubMed

    Fridinger, F; Goodwin, G; Chng, C L

    1992-01-01

    This study assessed the creditability of self-help health support groups as an adjunct to traditional medical care among a sampling of physicians (N = 120) and group members (N = 73) located in the Dallas/Ft. Worth Metropolitan area. Findings suggest a general lack of awareness of local groups among physicians, referral to only a few select groups, as well as little communication between health care professionals and their patients. Physicians in group practice, surgical specialties, and having never referred patients to support groups responded less favorably. Several benefits were reported by the group members, although for a majority their patient-physician relationship remained relatively unchanged.

  8. The Latino Physician Shortage: How the Affordable Care Act Increases the Value of Latino Spanish-Speaking Physicians and What Efforts Can Increase Their Supply.

    PubMed

    Daar, David A; Alvarez-Estrada, Miguel; Alpert, Abigail E

    2017-03-31

    The United States Latino population is growing at a rapid pace and is set to reach nearly 30% by 2050. The demand for culturally and linguistically competent health care is increasing in lockstep with this growth; however, the supply of doctors with skills and experience suited for this care is lagging. In particular, there is a major shortage of Latino Spanish-speaking physicians, and the gap between demand and supply is widening. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has increased the capacity of the US healthcare system to care for the growing Latino Spanish-speaking population, through health insurance exchanges, increased funding for safety net institutions, and efforts to improve efficiency and coordination of care, particularly with Accountable Care Organizations and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. With these policies in mind, the authors discuss how the value of Latino Spanish-speaking physicians to the healthcare system has increased under the environment of the ACA. In addition, the authors highlight key efforts to increase the supply of this physician population, including the implementation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Act, premedical pipeline programs, and academic medicine and medical school education initiatives to increase Latino representation among physicians.

  9. A pilot study of quality of life in German prehospital emergency care physicians

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Michael; Hessam, Schapoor; Bechara, Falk G.; Sand, Daniel; Vorstius, Christian; Bromba, Michael; Stockfleth, Eggert; Shiue, Ivy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Quality of life in patients represents an important area of assessment. However, attention to health professionals should be equally important. The literature on the quality of life (QOL) of emergency physicians is scarce. This pilot study investigated QOL in emergency physicians in Germany. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study from January to June in 2015. We approached the German Association of Emergency Medicine Physicians and two of the largest recruitment agencies for emergency physicians in Germany and invited their members to participate. We used the WHO Q-BREF to obtain QOL scores in four domains that included physical, mental, social, and environmental health. Results: The 478 German emergency physicians included in the study held board certifications in general medicine (n = 40; 8.4%), anesthesiology (n = 243; 50.8%), surgery (n = 63; 13.2%), internal medicine (n = 81; 17.0%), or others (n = 51; 10.7%). The women surveyed tended to report a better QOL but worse general health than the men. Regarding specific domains, women scored worse in physical health, particularly energy during everyday work (relative risk ratio [RRR]: 1.98 [1.21–3.24]). Both men and women scored worse in psychological health than general health, particularly young women. Women were also more likely to view their safety (RRR: 1.87 [1.07–3.28]) and living place (RRR: 2.51 [1.10–5.73]) as being poor than their male counterparts. Conclusion: QOL in German prehospital emergency care physicians is satisfactory for the included participants; however, there were some negative effects in the psychological health domain. This is particularly obvious in young female emergency physicians. PMID:28331519

  10. Impact of Burnout on Self-Reported Patient Care Among Emergency Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dave W.; Dresden, Scott; McCloskey, Colin; Branzetti, Jeremy; Gisondi, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Burnout is a syndrome of depersonalization, emotional exhaustion and sense of low personal accomplishment. Emergency physicians (EPs) experience the highest levels of burnout among all physicians. Burnout is associated with greater rates of self-reported suboptimal care among surgeons and internists. The association between burnout and suboptimal care among EPs is unknown. The objective of the study was to evaluate burnout rates among attending and resident EPs and examine their relationship with self-reported patient care practices. Methods In this cross-sectional study burnout was measured at two university-based emergency medicine residency programs with the Maslach Burnout Inventory. We also measured depression, quality of life (QOL) and career satisfaction using validated questionnaires. Six items assessed suboptimal care and the frequency with which they were performed. Results We included 77 out of 155 (49.7%) responses. The EP burnout rate was 57.1%, with no difference between attending and resident physicians. Residents were more likely to screen positive for depression (47.8% vs 18.5%, p=0.012) and report lower QOL scores (6.7 vs 7.4 out of 10, p=0.036) than attendings. Attendings and residents reported similar rates of career satisfaction (85.2% vs 87.0%, p=0.744). Burnout was associated with a positive screen for depression (38.6% vs 12.1%, p=0.011) and lower career satisfaction (77.3% vs 97.0%, p=0.02). EPs with high burnout were significantly more likely to report performing all six acts of suboptimal care. Conclusion A majority of EPs demonstrated high burnout. EP burnout was significantly associated with higher frequencies of self-reported suboptimal care. Future efforts to determine if provider burnout is associated with negative changes in actual patient care are necessary. PMID:26759643

  11. Physicians in health care management: 3. Case Mix Groups and Resource Intensity Weights: an overview for physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Pink, G H; Bolley, H B

    1994-01-01

    In the first of two articles on the subject, the authors explain what Case Mix Groups (CMGs) and Resource Intensity Weights (RIWs) are and how they are used. The former categorize hospital patients into groups. The latter are ratios showing the relative use of hospital resources for a typical case (successful course of treatment in an acute care hospital and discharge when the patient no longer requires the hospital's services) and atypical cases (death, transfer, sign-out and substantially longer than average stay) in each CMG. As such, CMGs and RIWs define the relation between the medical and financial dimensions of hospital cases for use in planning and management. Ontario and Alberta are the first provinces to use them to adjust hospital funding. CMGs are limited by the number of diagnoses contained in each category, and RIWs are limited by the use of New York cost data due to the lack of Canadian data. PMID:8131122

  12. Computerized physician order entry in the critical care environment: a review of current literature.

    PubMed

    Maslove, David M; Rizk, Norman; Lowe, Henry J

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of health information technology (HIT) is accelerating, driven in part by a growing interest in computerized physician order entry (CPOE) as a tool for improving the quality and safety of patient care. Computerized physician order entry could have a substantial impact on patients in intensive care, where the potential for medical error is high, and the clinical workflow is complex. In 2009, only 17% of hospitals had functional CPOE systems in place. In intensive care unit (ICU) settings, CPOE has been shown to reduce the occurrence of some medication errors, but evidence of a beneficial effect on clinical outcomes remains limited. In some cases, new error types have arisen with the use of CPOE. Intensive care unit workflow and staff relationships have been affected by CPOE, often in unanticipated ways. The design of CPOE software has a strong impact on user acceptance. Intensive care unit-specific order sets lessen the cognitive workload associated with the use of CPOE and improve user acceptance. The diffusion of new technological innovations in the ICU can have unintended consequences, including changes in workflow, staff roles, and patient outcomes. When implementing CPOE in critical care areas, both organizational and technical factors should be considered. Further research is needed to inform the design and management of CPOE systems in the ICU and to better assess their impact on clinical end points, cost-effectiveness, and user satisfaction.

  13. Relationship between nurses' and physicians' perceptions of organizational health and quality of patient care.

    PubMed

    Hussein, A H M

    2014-10-20

    This study investigated the relationship between nurses' and physicians' perceptions of the organizational health of a hospital and the quality of patient care. Data were collected using 2 self-report questionnaires from 75 nurses and 49 physicians working in 4 intensive care units in a university-affiliated hospital in Saudi Arabia. Among the determinants of hospital health in the modified Quality Work Competence questionnaire (12 domains), teamwork was the highest scoring determinant [mean percentage score 70.5 (SD 11.8)]; however it was not significantly correlated with any of the predictors of quality of patient care. In the Quality of Patient Care questionnaire (7 domains) quality results was the highest scoring predictor [69.7 (SD 14.3)]. There was a significant positive correlation between participants' perception of overall mean percentage scores on the determinants of organizational hospital health and the predictors of the quality of patient care (r = 0.26). In contrast, patient-centred care had no significant positive correlation with any of the studied hospital health determinants.

  14. Physicians in health care management: 2. Managing performance: who, what, how and when?

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux-Charles, L

    1994-01-01

    Physicians are becoming more involved in performance management as hospitals restructure to increase effectiveness. Although physicians are not hospital employees, they are subject to performance appraisals because the hospitals are accountable to patients and the community for the quality of hospital services. The performance of a health care professional may be appraised by the appropriate departmental manager, by other professionals in a team or program or by peers, based on prior agreement on expectations. Appraisal approaches vary. They include behavioural approaches such as rating scales, peer rating, ranking or nomination and outcome approaches such as management by objectives and goal setting. Professionals should give and receive timely feedback on a flexible schedule. Feedback can be provided one-on-one, by a group assessing quality of care or through an anonymous survey. PMID:8313260

  15. Attitudes of primary health care physician managers toward research: a pre-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Saulat; Henary, Basem

    2013-01-01

    Research in primary health care (PHC) is underdeveloped and scarce, especially in developing countries. It is important to understand the attitudes and aspirations of PHC physicians for the promotion of research. The aim of this study was to determine the attitudes of PHC physician managers toward research in Qassim province and to identify barriers that impede performing research in the PHC system. The study was based on social cognitive theory framework, and was pre-experimental with a 'one-group pre-test-post-test' design. The study participants were physician managers in PHC administration, Qassim. The participants' attitudes were measured by adapting statements from the Attitude Towards Research scale. The intervention was the 1-day training program 'Introduction to Research in Primary Health Care'. A total of 23 PHC physicians participated in the study. The mean age of the participants was 45.4 (±1.6) years, and the mean years of work experience was 16.2 (±2.2) years. Only one participant had an article published in a peer-reviewed journal. The results of the study showed that PHC physicians had a baseline positive attitude toward research that was further enhanced after participating in an introductory research-training program. During the pre-test, out of the total score of 63, the mean score on attitude toward research was 48.35 (±6.8) while the mean total attitude score in the post-test was 49.7 (±6.6). However, the difference was not statistically significant at P<0.05. The item with the highest score regarded the role of research in the improvement of health care services, while the lowest-scoring item was about support from administration to conduct research. The participants recognised lack of skills, lack of training and inadequate resources as major barriers in conducting research. Our study results suggest that the PHC physicians' positive attitudes toward research can be further improved through in-service training. To promote research in PHC

  16. Mammography screening: views from women and primary care physicians in Crete

    PubMed Central

    Trigoni, Maria; Griffiths, Frances; Tsiftsis, Dimitris; Koumantakis, Eugenios; Green, Eileen; Lionis, Christos

    2008-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women and a leading cause of death from cancer in women in Europe. Although breast cancer incidence is on the rise worldwide, breast cancer mortality over the past 25 years has been stable or decreasing in some countries and a fall in breast cancer mortality rates in most European countries in the 1990s was reported by several studies, in contrast, in Greece have not reported these favourable trends. In Greece, the age-standardised incidence and mortality rate for breast cancer per 100.000 in 2006 was 81,8 and 21,7 and although it is lower than most other countries in Europe, the fall in breast cancer mortality that observed has not been as great as in other European countries. There is no national strategy for screening in this country. This study reports on the use of mammography among middle-aged women in rural Crete and investigates barriers to mammography screening encountered by women and their primary care physicians. Methods Design: Semi-structured individual interviews. Setting and participants: Thirty women between 45–65 years of age, with a mean age of 54,6 years, and standard deviation 6,8 from rural areas of Crete and 28 qualified primary care physicians, with a mean age of 44,7 years and standard deviation 7,0 serving this rural population. Main outcome measure: Qualitative thematic analysis. Results Most women identified several reasons for not using mammography. These included poor knowledge of the benefits and indications for mammography screening, fear of pain during the procedure, fear of a serious diagnosis, embarrassment, stress while anticipating the results, cost and lack of physician recommendation. Physicians identified difficulties in scheduling an appointment as one reason women did not use mammography and both women and physicians identified distance from the screening site, transportation problems and the absence of symptoms as reasons for non-use. Conclusion Women

  17. Impact of military physician rank and appearance on patient perceptions of clinical competency in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Trowbridge, Richard E; Pearson, Ryan

    2013-09-01

    The patient-physician interaction is an important aspect of primary care medicine. Few studies have investigated the military specific factors that influence these interactions. Using a cross-sectional survey, we evaluated the impact of physician rank and attire on a patient's confidence in their physician's medical abilities and willingness to disclose personal information. Patient perception was assessed in the domains of (1) confidence in physician's medical abilities and (2) comfort discussing sexual, psychological, and personal problems with a physician. Our results found physicians of higher rank showing a higher positive impact on patient's confidence compared to lower ranks (p < 0.0001). Patients were less comfortable discussing sexual (p = 0.001), psychological (p < 0.0001), and personal (p = 0.005) problems with an O-3 (Air Force Captain) than higher ranked physicians. Casual business attire negatively affected patient's confidence in their physician's abilities and in their comfort discussing sexual, psychological, and personal problems (p < 0.0001). Removing resident physician data did not significantly alter results. This pilot study on military rank and appearance shows a statistically significant impact to patient-physician interactions. Lower rank and casual attire is statistically detrimental to the patient's perception of their physician's abilities irrespective of resident physician involvement.

  18. Implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings: a qualitative analysis of clinical staff.

    PubMed

    Langhan, Melissa L; Riera, Antonio; Kurtz, Jordan C; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G

    2015-01-01

    Technologies are not always successfully implemented into practice. This study elicited experiences of acute care providers with the introduction of technology and identified barriers and facilitators in the implementation process. A qualitative study using one-on-one interviews among a purposeful sample of 19 physicians and nurses within 10 emergency departments and intensive care units was performed. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Five major categories emerged: decision-making factors, the impact on practice, technology's perceived value, facilitators and barriers to implementation. Barriers included negative experiences, age, infrequent use and access difficulties. A positive outlook, sufficient training, support staff and user friendliness were facilitators. This study describes strategies implicated in the successful implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings. Improved implementation methods and evaluation of implementation processes are necessary for successful adoption of new technology.

  19. Multispecialty physician networks in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Stukel, Therese A; Glazier, Richard H; Schultz, Susan E; Guan, Jun; Zagorski, Brandon M; Gozdyra, Peter; Henry, David A

    2013-01-01

    Background Large multispecialty physician group practices, with a central role for primary care practitioners, have been shown to achieve high-quality, low-cost care for patients with chronic disease. We assessed the extent to which informal multispecialty physician networks in Ontario could be identified by using health administrative data to exploit natural linkages among patients, physicians, and hospitals based on existing patient flow. Methods We linked each Ontario resident to his or her usual provider of primary care over the period from fiscal year 2008/2009 to fiscal year 2010/2011. We linked each specialist to the hospital where he or she performed the most inpatient services. We linked each primary care physician to the hospital where most of his or her ambulatory patients were admitted for non-maternal medical care. Each resident was then linked to the same hospital as his or her usual provider of primary care. We computed “loyalty” as the proportion of care to network residents provided by physicians and hospitals within their network. Smaller clusters were aggregated to create networks based on a minimum population size, distance, and loyalty. Networks were not constrained geographically. Results We identified 78 multispecialty physician networks, comprising 12 410 primary care physicians, 14 687 specialists, and 175 acute care hospitals serving a total of 12 917 178 people. Median network size was 134 723 residents, 125 primary care physicians, and 143 specialists. Virtually all eligible residents were linked to a usual provider of primary care and to a network. Most specialists (93.5%) and primary care physicians (98.2%) were linked to a hospital. Median network physician loyalty was 68.4% for all physician visits and 81.1% for primary care visits. Median non-maternal admission loyalty was 67.4%. Urban networks had lower loyalties and were less self-contained but had more health care resources. Interpretation We demonstrated the feasibility

  20. One positive impact of health care reform to physicians: the computer-based patient record.

    PubMed

    England, S P

    1993-11-01

    The health care industry is an information-dependent business that will require a new generation of health information systems if successful health care reform is to occur. We critically need integrated clinical management information systems to support the physician and related clinicians at the direct care level, which in turn will have linkages with secondary users of health information such as health payors, regulators, and researchers. The economic dependence of health care industry on the CPR cannot be underestimated, says Jeffrey Ritter. He sees the U.S. health industry as about to enter a bold new age where our records are electronic, our computers are interconnected, and our money is nothing but pulses running across the telephone lines. Hence the United States is now in an age of electronic commerce. Clinical systems reform must begin with the community-based patient chart, which is located in the physician's office, the hospital, and other related health care provider offices. A community-based CPR and CPR system that integrates all providers within a managed care network is the most logical step since all health information begins with the creation of a patient record. Once a community-based CPR system is in place, the physician and his or her clinical associates will have a common patient record upon which all direct providers have access to input and record patient information. Once a community-level CPR system is in place with a community provider network, each physician will have available health information and data processing capability that will finally provide real savings in professional time and effort. Lost patient charts will no longer be a problem. Data input and storage of health information would occur electronically via transcripted text, voice, and document imaging. All electronic clinical information, voice, and graphics could be recalled at any time and transmitted to any terminal location within the health provider network. Hence

  1. Medical reference databases used by Army primary care physicians in field environments.

    PubMed

    Harris, M D; Johnson, B; Patience, T; Miser, F

    1998-11-01

    A cross-sectional survey of U.S. Army primary care physicians was done to answer two questions: (1) which medical reference materials are Army primary care physicians currently using when deployed to a field environment? and (2) what would they like to have for medical reference in a field environment? Of 740 surveys delivered to their intended recipients, 445 (60%) were returned. Currently, 96% of primary care physicians use books, 37% use journals, and 11% use computer software in their medical reference database. Of those now using books, 72% were satisfied with them, compared with 61% of those using journals and 45% of those using software. The most common book used was the Merck Manual. The most important characteristics desired in a field medical database were broad coverage, ease of use, and light weight. The majority of respondents believe that a good medial reference database is important but that current medical databases limit the quality of the medicine they practice in the field.

  2. Medical tourism in India: perceptions of physicians in tertiary care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Qadeer, Imrana; Reddy, Sunita

    2013-12-17

    Senior physicians of modern medicine in India play a key role in shaping policies and public opinion and institutional management. This paper explores their perceptions of medical tourism (MT) within India which is a complex process involving international demands and policy shifts from service to commercialisation of health care for trade, gross domestic profit, and foreign exchange. Through interviews of 91 physicians in tertiary care hospitals in three cities of India, this paper explores four areas of concern: their understanding of MT, their views of the hospitals they work in, perceptions of the value and place of MT in their hospital and their views on the implications of MT for medical care in the country. An overwhelming majority (90%) of physicians in the private tertiary sector and 74.3 percent in the public tertiary sector see huge scope for MT in the private tertiary sector in India. The private tertiary sector physicians were concerned about their patients alone and felt that health of the poor was the responsibility of the state. The public tertiary sector physicians' however, were sensitive to the problems of the common man and felt responsible. Even though the glamour of hi-tech associated with MT dazzled them, only 35.8 percent wanted MT in their hospitals and a total of 56 percent of them said MT cannot be a public sector priority. 10 percent in the private sector expressed reservations towards MT while the rest demanded state subsidies for MT. The disconnect between their concern for the common man and professionals views on MT was due to the lack of appreciation of the continuum between commercialisation, the denial of resources to public hospitals and shift of subsidies to the private sector. The paper highlights the differences and similarities in the perceptions and context of the two sets of physicians, presents evidence, that questions the support for MT and finally analyzes some key implications of MT on Indian health services, ethical

  3. Ethics of the Physician's Role in Health-Care Cost Control: AOA Critical Issues.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Joseph; Iorio, Richard; Barber, Thomas; Barron, Chloe; Caplan, Arthur

    2016-07-20

    The United States health-care expenditure is rising precipitously. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that, in 2025, at our current rate of increased spending, 25% of the gross domestic product will be allocated to health care. Our per-capita spending on health care also far exceeds that of any other industrialized country. Health-care costs must be addressed if our country is to remain competitive in the global marketplace and to maintain its financial solvency. If unchecked, the uncontrolled rise in health-care expenditures will not only affect our capacity to provide our patients with high-quality care but also threaten the ability of our nation to compete economically on the global stage. This is not hyperbole but fiscal reality.As physicians, we are becoming increasingly familiar with the economics impacting health-care policy. Thus, we are in a unique position to control the cost of health care. This includes an increased reliance on creating and adhering to evidence-based guidelines. We can do this and still continue to respect the primacy of patient welfare and the right of patients to act in their own self-interest. However, as evidenced by the use of high-volume centers of excellence, each strategy adapted to control costs must be vetted and must be monitored for its unintended ethical consequences.The solution to this complex problem must involve the input of all of the health-care stakeholders, including the patients, payers, and providers. Physicians ought to play a role in designing and executing a remedy. After all, we are the ones who best understand medicine and whose moral obligation is to the welfare of our patients.

  4. Strategic Directions Within Health Care Institutions: The Role of the Physician

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Reuben R.; Ashmos, Donde P.

    1986-01-01

    The nature of the strategic problem faced by health care institutions is identified. Physicians are urged to be involved in the strategic decision-making process and are offered several alternative roles that they might play in strategy development. A set of conceptual frameworks from the generic management decision-making literature is used to organize the analysis in addition to the literature of health care management. This combination affords a different perspective into the nature of the problems and new insights into these critical issues. PMID:3746932

  5. The patient-physician relationship. Ensuring competency in end-of-life care: communication and relational skills.

    PubMed

    von Gunten, C F; Ferris, F D; Emanuel, L L

    2000-12-20

    Physician competence in end-of-life care requires skill in communication, decision making, and building relationships, yet these skills were not taught to the majority of physicians during their training. This article presents a 7-step approach for physicians for structuring communication regarding care at the end of life. Physicians should prepare for discussions by confirming medical facts and establishing an appropriate environment; establish what the patient (and family) knows by using open-ended questions; determine how information is to be handled at the beginning of the patient-physician relationship; deliver the information in a sensitive but straightforward manner; respond to emotions of the patients, parents, and families; establish goals for care and treatment priorities when possible; and establish an overall plan. These 7 steps can be used in situations such as breaking bad news, setting treatment goals, advance care planning, withholding or withdrawing therapy, making decisions in sudden life-threatening illness, resolving conflict around medical futility, responding to a request for physician-assisted suicide, and guiding patients and families through the last hours of living and early stages after death. Effective application as part of core end-of-life care competencies is likely to improve patients' and families' experiences of care. It may also enhance physicians' professional fulfillment from satisfactory relationships with their patients and patients' families.

  6. Physicians' reported needs of drug information at point of care in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Rahmner, Pia Bastholm; Eiermann, Birgit; Korkmaz, Seher; Gustafsson, Lars L; Gruvén, Magnus; Maxwell, Simon; Eichle, Hans-Georg; Vég, Anikó

    2012-01-01

    AIMS Relevant and easily accessible drug information at point-of-care is essential for physicians' decision making when prescribing. However, the information available by using Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSSs) often does not meet physicians' requirements. The Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC) is statutory information about drugs. However, the current structure, content and format of SmPCs make it difficult to incorporate them into CDSSs and link them to relevant patient information from the Electronic Health Records. The aim of the study was to evaluate the perceived needs for drug information among physicians in Sweden. METHODS We recruited three focus group discussions with 18 physicians covering different specialities. The information from the groups was combined with a questionnaire administered at the beginning of the group discussions. RESULTS Physicians reported their needs for knowledge databases at the point of drug prescribing. This included more consistent information about existing and new drugs. They also wished to receive automatically generated alerts for severe drug–drug interactions and adverse effects, and to have functions for calculating glomerular filtration rate to enable appropriate dose adjustments to be made for elderly patients and those with impaired renal function. Additionally, features enhancing electronic communication with colleagues and making drug information more searchable were suggested. CONCLUSIONS The results from the current study showed the need for knowledge databases which provide consistent information about new and existing drugs. Most of the required information from physicians appeared to be possible to transfer from current SmPCs to CDSSs. However, inconsistencies in the SmPC information have to be reduced to enhance their utility. PMID:21714807

  7. Acute stroke care in a neurologically underserved state: lessons learned from the Iowa Stroke Survey.

    PubMed

    Albright, Karen C; Schott, Todd C; Boland, Debbie F; George, Leslie; Boland, Kevin P; Wohlford-Wessels, Mary Pat; Finnerty, Edward P; Jacoby, Michael R K

    2009-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested that stroke care is more fragmented in rural or neurologically underserved areas. The purpose of this study was to determine the availability of diagnostic and treatment services for acute stroke care in Iowa and to identify factors influencing care. Each of the 118 facilities in Iowa with emergency departments was surveyed by telephone. This survey consisted of 10 questions, focusing on the existence of pre-hospital and emergency room acute stroke protocols and the availability of essential personnel and diagnostic and treatment modalities essential for acute stroke care. Of the 118 hospitals with emergency departments, 109 (92.4%) had CT available. Within the subset having CT capabilities, 89.9% (98/109) had intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV t-PA) available. Of those facilities with both CT and IV t-PA, 46% (45/98) had around-the-clock in-house physician coverage. Further, 31% (14/45) of sites with CT, t-PA, and an in-house physician had a radiology technician on site. Only 12% (14/118) of centers could offer all essential components. Despite 88% of Iowa hospitals not providing all of these components, only 31% of these hospitals reported protocols for stabilization and immediate transfer of acute stroke patients. These findings indicate that the development of a stroke system is still in its infancy in Iowa. Collaborative efforts are needed to address barriers in rural Iowa and to assist facilities in providing the best possible care. Creativity will be paramount in establishing a functional statewide system to ensure optimum care for all Iowans.

  8. Physician cooperation in outpatient cancer care. An amplified secondary analysis of qualitative interview data.

    PubMed

    Engler, J; Güthlin, C; Dahlhaus, A; Kojima, E; Müller-Nordhorn, J; Weißbach, L; Holmberg, C

    2017-03-14

    The importance of outpatient cancer care services is increasing due to the growing number of patients having or having had cancer. However, little is known about cooperation among physicians in outpatient settings. To understand what inter- and multidisciplinary care means in community settings, we conducted an amplified secondary analysis that combined qualitative interview data with 42 general practitioners (GPs), 21 oncologists and 21 urologists that mainly worked in medical practices in Germany. We compared their perspectives on cooperation relationships in cancer care. Our results indicate that all participants regarded cooperation as a prerequisite for good cancer care. Oncologists and urologists mainly reported cooperating for tumour-specific treatment tasks, while GPs' reasoning for cooperation was more patient-centred. While oncologists and urologists reported experiencing reciprocal communication with other physicians, GPs had to gather the information they needed. GPs seldom reported engaging in formal cooperation structures, while for specialists, participation in formal spaces of cooperation, such as tumour boards, facilitated a more frequent and informal discussion of patients, for instance on the phone. Further research should focus on ways to foster GPs' integration in cancer care and evaluate if this can be reached by incorporating GPs in formal cooperation structures such as tumour boards.

  9. Patterns of Multiple Emergency Department Visits: Do Primary Care Physicians Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Daniel D; Hao, Jing; Bulger, John B

    2017-01-01

    Context: Overutilization and overreliance on Emergency Departments (EDs) as a usual source of care can lead to unnecessarily high costs and undesirable consequences, such as a gap in care coordination and inadequate provision of preventive care. Objective: To identify factors associated with multiple ED visits by patients, in particular, the impact of primary care physicians (PCPs) on their patients’ multiple ED visit rates. Design: Geisinger Health Plan claims data among adult patients who averaged more than 1 ED visit within a 12-month period between 2013 and 2014 were obtained (N = 20,351). Main Outcome Measures: Rate of ED visits. Three linear regression models using patient characteristics and utilization patterns as covariates along with PCP fixed effects were estimated to explain the variation in the multiple ED visit rates. Results: Multiple ED visits were significantly associated with younger age (18–39 years), having Medicaid insurance, and greater comorbidity. Higher rates of physician office visits and inpatient admissions were also associated with higher rates of multiple ED visits. Accounting for PCP characteristics only marginally improved the explained variation (R2 increased from 0.14 to 0.16). Conclusions: Multiple ED visit patterns are likely driven by patients’ health conditions and care needs rather than by their PCPs. Multiple ED visits also appear to be complementary, rather than substitutionary, to PCP visits, suggesting that PCP-focused interventions aimed at reducing ED use are unlikely to have a major impact. PMID:28333606

  10. The Conscientious Practice Policy: a futility policy for acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Mark R

    2005-08-01

    Much attention has been paid in recent years to the conflict that may occur when patients or their families insist on a therapy that the physician feels would be futile. In 1999 the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs of the American Medical Association recommended that all health-care institutions adopt a policy on medical futility that follows a fair process. Development of such a policy has proved problematic for many hospitals. The Conscientious Practice Policy at Lawrence & Memorial Hospital was developed as a response to the AMA recommendation. It outlines a specific process to be followed in the event that a physician wishes to refuse to provide a requested therapy, whether that refusal is based on perceived futility or other concerns. The policy was subsequently modified slightly and adopted by two other Connecticut acute care hospitals.

  11. Hispanic-Asian Immigrant Inequality in Perceived Medical Need and Access to Regular Physician Care.

    PubMed

    Howe Hasanali, Stephanie; De Jong, Gordon F; Roempke Graefe, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    In the face of continuing large immigrant streams, Hispanic and Asian immigrants' human and social capital inequalities will heighten U.S. race/ethnic health and health care disparities. Using data from the 2004 and 2008 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, this study assessed Hispanic-Asian immigrant disparity in access to health care, measured by perceived medical need and regular access to a physician. Logistic regression results indicated that Hispanics had lower perceived met medical need and were less likely to see a doctor regularly. These disparities were significantly attenuated by education and health insurance. Assimilation-related characteristics were significantly associated with a regular doctor visit and were not fully mediated by socioeconomic variables. Findings indicate the importance of education above and beyond insurance coverage for access to health care and suggest the potential for public health efforts to improve preventive care among immigrants.

  12. Hispanic-Asian Immigrant Inequality in Perceived Medical Need and Access to Regular Physician Care

    PubMed Central

    De Jong, Gordon F.; Graefe, Deborah Roempke

    2014-01-01

    In the face of continuing large immigrant streams, Hispanic and Asian immigrants’ human and social capital inequalities will heighten U.S. race/ethnic health and health care disparities. Using data from the 2004 and 2008 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, this study assessed Hispanic-Asian immigrant disparity in access to health care, measured by perceived medical need and regular access to a physician. Logistic regression results indicated that Hispanics had lower perceived met medical need and were less likely to see a doctor regularly. These disparities were significantly attenuated by education and health insurance. Assimilation-related characteristics were significantly associated with a regular doctor visit and were not fully mediated by socioeconomic variables. Findings indicate the importance of education above and beyond insurance coverage for access to health care and suggest the potential for public health efforts to improve preventive care among immigrants. PMID:25420782

  13. Compassionate care: enhancing physician-patient communication and education in dermatology: Part II: Patient education.

    PubMed

    Hong, Judith; Nguyen, Tien V; Prose, Neil S

    2013-03-01

    Patient education is a fundamental part of caring for patients. A practice gap exists, where patients want more information, while health care providers are limited by time constraints or difficulty helping patients understand or remember. To provide patient-centered care, it is important to assess the needs and goals, health beliefs, and health literacy of each patient. This allows health care providers to individualize education for patients. The use of techniques, such as gaining attention, providing clear and memorable explanations, and assessing understanding through "teach-back," can improve patient education. Verbal education during the office visit is considered the criterion standard. However, handouts, visual aids, audiovisual media, and Internet websites are examples of teaching aids that can be used as an adjunct to verbal instruction. Part II of this 2-part series on patient-physician interaction reviews the importance and need for patient education along with specific guidelines and techniques that can be used.

  14. Curing and Caring: The Work of Primary Care Physicians With Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    CarolinaApesoa-Varano, Ester; Barker, Judith C.; Hinton, Ladson

    2013-01-01

    The symbolic framework guiding primary care physicians’ (PCPs) practice is crucial in shaping the quality of care for those with degenerative dementia. Examining the relationship between the cure and care models in primary care offers a unique opportunity for exploring change toward a more holistic approach to health care. The aims of this study were to (a) explore how PCPs approach the care of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and (b) describe how this care unfolds from the physicians’ perspectives. This was a cross-sectional study of 40 PCPs who completed semistructured interviews as part of a dementia caregiving study. Findings show that PCPs recognize the limits of the cure paradigm and articulate a caring, more holistic model that addresses the psychosocial needs of dementia patients. However, caring is difficult to uphold because of time constraints, emotional burden, and jurisdictional issues. Thus, the care model remains secondary and temporary. PMID:21685311

  15. Payment mechanisms and the composition of physician practices: balancing cost-containment, access, and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Barham, Victoria; Milliken, Olga

    2015-07-01

    We take explicit account of the way in which the supply of physicians and patients in the economy affects the design of physician remuneration schemes, highlighting the three-way trade-off between quality of care, access, and cost. Both physicians and patients are heterogeneous. Physicians choose both the number of patients and the quality of care to provide to their patients. When determining physician payment rates, the principal must ensure access to care for all patients. When physicians can adjust the number of patients seen, there is no incentive to over-treat. In contrast, altruistic physicians always quality stint: they prefer to add an additional patient, rather than to increase the quality of service provided. A mixed payment mechanism does not increase the quality of service provided with respect to capitation. Offering a menu of compensation schemes may constitute a cost-effective strategy for inducing physicians to choose a given overall caseload but may also generate difficulties with access to care for frail patients.

  16. Adults with ADHD: use and misuse of stimulant medication as reported by patients and their primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Lensing, Michael B; Zeiner, Pål; Sandvik, Leiv; Opjordsmoen, Stein

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the agreement on treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) between adults with ADHD and the primary care physicians responsible for their treatment. Adults with ADHD and the primary care physicians responsible for their ADHD treatment completed a survey. The κ-statistic assessed physician-patient agreement on ADHD treatment variables. The eligible sample consisted of 274 patients with confirmed current or previous psychopharmacological treatment for ADHD and the physicians responsible for their treatment. We received 159 questionnaires (58.0 %) with sufficient information from both sources. There were no significant differences between participants and nonparticipants (N = 115) on ADHD sample characteristics. Participants' mean age was 37.6 years, and 75 (47.2 %) were females. There was high agreement for current pharmacological treatment for ADHD, current and last ADHD drug prescription, treatment for substance use, and misuse of stimulant medication. Agreement for nonpharmacological treatment for ADHD and treatment termination because of the side effects was low. A minority of participants from both sources reported misuse of stimulant medication. There was a moderate correlation between the physicians' clinical judgment and patients' self-report on current functioning. The study showed that primary care physicians and their patients agreed on the pharmacological but not the nonpharmacological, treatments given. They also agreed on patients' current functioning. Physicians and patients reported low levels of misuse of stimulant medication. The results show that pharmacological treatment for adults with ADHD can be safely undertaken by primary care physicians.

  17. The Development of an ICF-Oriented, Adaptive Physician Assessment Instrument of Mobility, Self-care, and Domestic Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Erik; Fleitz, Annette

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was development and psychometric testing of an adaptive, International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF)-oriented questionnaire to be processed by the rehabilitation physician that aids in assessing mobility, self-care, and domestic life (Moses-Physician). The intent is to develop a physician…

  18. ICU nurses and physicians dialogue regarding patients clinical status and care options—a focus group study

    PubMed Central

    Kvande, Monica; Lykkeslet, Else; Storli, Sissel Lisa

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nurses and physicians work side-by-side in the intensive care unit (ICU). Effective exchanges of patient information are essential to safe patient care in the ICU. Nurses often rate nurse-physician communication lower than physicians and report that it is difficult to speak up, that disagreements are not resolved and that their input is not well received. Therefore, this study explored nurses’ dialogue with physicians regarding patients’ clinical status and the prerequisites for effective and accurate exchanges of information. We adopted a qualitative approach, conducting three focus group discussions with five to six nurses and physicians each (14 total). Two themes emerged. The first theme highlighted nurses’ contributions to dialogues with physicians; nurses’ ongoing observations of patients were essential to patient care discussions. The second theme addressed the prerequisites of accurate and effective dialogue regarding care options, comprising three subthemes: nurses’ ability to speak up and present clinical changes, establishment of shared goal and clinical understanding, and open dialogue and willingness to listen to each other. Nurses should understand their essential role in conducting ongoing observations of patients and their right to be included in care-related decision-making processes. Physicians should be willing to listen to and include nurses’ clinical observations and concerns.

  19. Training community-based primary care physicians in the screeningand management of mental health disorders among Latino primary care patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapana R.; Gorritz, Magdaliz; Olfson, Mark; Bell, Michelle A.; Jackson, Elizabeth; Sánchez-Lacay, J. Arturo; Alfonso, César; Leeman, Eve; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective Toevaluate a quality improvementintervention to improve thescreening and management (e.g., referral to psychiatric care) of common mental disorders in small independent Latino primary care practices serving patient populations of predominantly low-income Latino immigrants. Methods In 7 practices, academic detailing and consultation/liaison psychiatry were first implemented (Stage 1) and then supplemented withappointment scheduling and reminders to primary care physicians (PCP’s) by clinic staff (Stage 2).Acceptability and feasibility were assessed with independent patient samples during each stage. Results Participating PCP found the interventions acceptable and noted that referrals to language-matched specialty care and case-by-case consultation on medication management were particularly beneficial. The academic detailing and consultation/liaison intervention (Stage 1) did not significantly affect PCP screening, management or patient satisfaction with care. When support for appointment scheduling and reminders (Stage 2) was added, however, PCP referral to psychiatric services increased (p=.04) and referred patients were significantly more likely to follow through and have more visits to mental health professionals (p=.04). Conclusion Improving the quality of mental health care in low-resourced primary care settings may require academic detailing and consultation/liaison psychiatric intervention supplemented with staff outreach to achieve meaningful improvement in the processes of care. PMID:26598287

  20. End-of-Life Care in an Acute Care Hospital: Linking Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be…

  1. Using Discrete Event Computer Simulation to Improve Patient Flow in a Ghanaian Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Best, Allyson M.; Dixon, Cinnamon A.; Kelton, W. David; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Crowding and limited resources have increased the strain on acute care facilities and emergency departments (EDs) worldwide. These problems are particularly prevalent in developing countries. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a computer-based tool that can be used to estimate how changes to complex healthcare delivery systems, such as EDs, will affect operational performance. Using this modality, our objective was to identify operational interventions that could potentially improve patient throughput of one acute care setting in a developing country. Methods We developed a simulation model of acute care at a district level hospital in Ghana to test the effects of resource-neutral (e.g. modified staff start times and roles) and resource-additional (e.g. increased staff) operational interventions on patient throughput. Previously captured, de-identified time-and-motion data from 487 acute care patients were used to develop and test the model. The primary outcome was the modeled effect of interventions on patient length of stay (LOS). Results The base-case (no change) scenario had a mean LOS of 292 minutes (95% CI 291, 293). In isolation, neither adding staffing, changing staff roles, nor varying shift times affected overall patient LOS. Specifically, adding two registration workers, history takers, and physicians resulted in a 23.8 (95% CI 22.3, 25.3) minute LOS decrease. However, when shift start-times were coordinated with patient arrival patterns, potential mean LOS was decreased by 96 minutes (95% CI 94, 98); and with the simultaneous combination of staff roles (Registration and History-taking) there was an overall mean LOS reduction of 152 minutes (95% CI 150, 154). Conclusions Resource-neutral interventions identified through DES modeling have the potential to improve acute care throughput in this Ghanaian municipal hospital. DES offers another approach to identifying potentially effective interventions to improve patient flow in emergency and acute

  2. Medical tourism in india: perceptions of physicians in tertiary care hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Senior physicians of modern medicine in India play a key role in shaping policies and public opinion and institutional management. This paper explores their perceptions of medical tourism (MT) within India which is a complex process involving international demands and policy shifts from service to commercialisation of health care for trade, gross domestic profit, and foreign exchange. Through interviews of 91 physicians in tertiary care hospitals in three cities of India, this paper explores four areas of concern: their understanding of MT, their views of the hospitals they work in, perceptions of the value and place of MT in their hospital and their views on the implications of MT for medical care in the country. An overwhelming majority (90%) of physicians in the private tertiary sector and 74.3 percent in the public tertiary sector see huge scope for MT in the private tertiary sector in India. The private tertiary sector physicians were concerned about their patients alone and felt that health of the poor was the responsibility of the state. The public tertiary sector physicians’ however, were sensitive to the problems of the common man and felt responsible. Even though the glamour of hi-tech associated with MT dazzled them, only 35.8 percent wanted MT in their hospitals and a total of 56 percent of them said MT cannot be a public sector priority. 10 percent in the private sector expressed reservations towards MT while the rest demanded state subsidies for MT. The disconnect between their concern for the common man and professionals views on MT was due to the lack of appreciation of the continuum between commercialisation, the denial of resources to public hospitals and shift of subsidies to the private sector. The paper highlights the differences and similarities in the perceptions and context of the two sets of physicians, presents evidence, that questions the support for MT and finally analyzes some key implications of MT on Indian health services, ethical

  3. Use of a questionnaire to improve occupational and environmental history taking in primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J N; Brodkin, C A; Kyes, K; Neighbor, W; Evanoff, B

    2000-12-01

    New patient charts were reviewed before and after the introduction of a self-administered questionnaire, designed to elicit occupational and environmental (OE) information from patients. The Occupational Health Risk Assessment questionnaire (OHRA) was expected to prompt primary care physicians to make further inquiries into OE health issues. Chart reviews determined the amount and type of information detailed in the primary care physicians' notes. Twenty-three percent of completed OHRAs indicated a job-related health problem. Despite a high prevalence of self-reported work-related symptoms and exposures, the mean number of notations regarding OE exposures was less than one item per patient chart. A comparison of mean OE notations per chart before versus after introduction of the OHRA indicated a decline in notations after introduction of the OHRA (1.03 vs 0.72, P = 0.02). We detail the type of OE issues that patients presented to a primary care practice and the resulting information contained in primary care providers' notes. Suggestions are made to improve a self-administered patient questionnaire to better diagnose, prioritize, and formulate treatment plans related to OE issues.

  4. Assessment of respiratory rate and chest indrawing in children with ARI by primary care physicians in Egypt.

    PubMed Central

    Gadomski, A. M.; Khallaf, N.; el Ansary, S.; Black, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    In a baseline study for training purposes, two indicators of acute respiratory infections (the respiratory rate (RR) and chest indrawing) were assessed by Ministry of Health physicians in Egypt using a WHO test videotape. Chest indrawing, as defined by the WHO Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) programme, was not widely recognized by current health personnel. Viewing a WHO training videotape led to significantly more correct assessments of chest indrawing compared with a group that had not viewed this videotape. The accuracy of using a timer versus a watch, and a 30-second versus 60-second counting interval was also evaluated. Rates counted over 60 seconds were more accurate than 30-second counts although the difference between them was not clinically significant. Counting of rates using timers with audible cues was comparable to using watches with second hands. Careful training of primary health workers in the assessment of RR and chest indrawing is essential if these clinical findings are to be used as reliable indicators in pneumonia treatment algorithms. PMID:8261555

  5. A Comparative Study of Models of Geriatric Assessment and the Implementation of Recommendations by Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Ella; Freud, Tamar; Punchik, Boris; Barzak, Alex; Peleg, Roni; Press, Yan

    2017-03-20

    The aim of the present study was to compare implementation rates by primary care physicians of geriatric assessment recommendations given in various assessment settings. We compared Model "OCGAU", an outpatient comprehensive geriatric assessment unit where there was no direct contact between the geriatrician and the primary care physician with three "Clinic" models of in-clinic geriatric assessment: Model "Clinic A-2007" in which the primary care physician participated in the assessment, Model "Clinic A-2013" where there was no contact with the primary care physician, and Model "Clinics B-2013" where the primary care physician participated in a staff meeting with the geriatrician in the clinic. Subgroups of "OCGAU" model were composed of patients referred to the geriatric unit by primary care physicians of patients included in three "Clinic" models. Model "OCGAU" included 240 patients, Model "Clinic A-2007" 107, Model "Clinic A-2013" 127, and Model "Clinics B-2013" 133. The patients in Model "OCGAU" were older (mean age 83.2 ± 6.2 years) than in "Clinic" models where the mean age was 79.7 ± 6.5, 81.5 ± 6.1, and 80.7 ± 6.5, p < 0.001. More recommendations were given per patient (6.4) in the Model OCGAU than in the "Clinic" models (range 1.9-3.9, p < 0.05), but the implementation of recommendations by primary care physicians was lower in Model OCGAU (48.9%) than in "Clinic" models (range 56.9%-71.8%, p < 0.005). Although more recommendations were made in the geriatric unit, the implementation rate was lower. This indicates the need for organizational changes, in particular, improving communication between the geriatric staff and primary care physicians.

  6. Swedish physicians' perspectives on work and the medical care system--III: Private practitioners on the public system.

    PubMed

    Twaddle, A C

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports the results of focused interviews in 1978-1979 with Swedish physicians in private practice about the public system of medical care in Sweden. They were asked about the system as a work environment for physicians and as a system of care for patients. Respondents, who were outside the public system (although financed mainly by public mechanisms) said the public system as a place to work had advantages in its high technical quality, facilities for research and training, and the capacity to treat complicated disease; its disadvantages were said to be inefficiency, lack of communication, poor patient care, and blocked mobility for physicians without doctorates. As a system of care, its one advantage was said to be that it provided care at less out-of-pocket cost to patients; its reported disadvantages were poor quality care and a tendency to be overly comprehensive. These perspectives are discussed with respect to their structural and historical contexts.

  7. Integrated Management of Physician-delivered Alcohol Care for Tuberculosis Patients (IMPACT): Design and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Shelly F.; Shields, Alan; Connery, Hilary Smith; Livchits, Viktoria; Yanov, Sergey A.; Lastimoso, Charmaine S.; Strelis, Aivar K.; Mishustin, Sergey P.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett; Mathew, Trini; Shin, Sonya

    2010-01-01

    Background While the integration of alcohol screening, treatment and referral in primary care and other medical settings in the U.S. and world-wide has been recognized as a key health care priority, it is not routinely done. In spite of the high co-occurrence and excess mortality associated with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) among individuals with tuberculosis (TB), there are no studies evaluating effectiveness of integrating alcohol care into routine treatment for this disorder. Methods We designed and implemented a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to determine the effectiveness of integrating pharmacotherapy and behavioral treatments for AUDs into routine medical care for TB in the Tomsk Oblast Tuberculosis Service (TOTBS) in Tomsk, Russia. Eligible patients are diagnosed with alcohol abuse or dependence, are newly diagnosed with TB and initiating treatment in the TOTBS with Directly Observed Therapy-Short Course (DOTS) for TB. Utilizing a factorial design, the Integrated Management of Physician-delivered Alcohol Care for Tuberculosis Patients (IMPACT) study randomizes eligible patients who sign informed consent into one of four study arms: (1) Oral Naltrexone + Brief Behavioral Compliance Enhancement Therapy (BBCET) + treatment as usual (TAU), (2) Brief Counseling Intervention (BCI) + TAU, (3) Naltrexone + BBCET + BCI + TAU, or (4) TAU alone. Results Utilizing an iterative, collaborative approach, a multi-disciplinary U.S. and Russian team has implemented a model of alcohol management that is culturally appropriate to the patient and TB physician community in Russia. Implementation to date has achieved the integration of routine alcohol screening into TB care in Tomsk; an ethnographic assessment of knowledge, attitudes and practices of AUD management among TB physicians in Tomsk; translation and cultural adaptation of the BCI to Russia and the TB setting; and training and certification of TB physicians to deliver oral naltrexone and brief counseling

  8. Assessment of medical care by elderly people: general satisfaction and physician quality.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y; Kasper, J D

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify personal characteristics and factors related to health and patterns of healthcare utilization associated with the elderly people's satisfaction with medical care. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Data from the 1991 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) on 8,859 persons age 65 and over living in the community. STUDY DESIGN: Items reflecting general satisfaction with care and views of physician quality are examined and, based on factor analysis, grouped in dimensions of two (global quality, access) and three (technical skills, interpersonal manner, information-giving), respectively. The relationship of high levels of satisfaction in each dimension to personal characteristics of elderly people, and to measures of access and utilization, is assessed using logistic regression. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While satisfaction is high, with over 90 percent surveyed expressing some satisfaction, there is substantial variation with less likelihood of high satisfaction among those 80 or older, with less education and income and in poorer health. Longer waiting time at visits and less frequent visits are factors in lower satisfaction as well. A favorable perception of physician quality, especially regarding technical skills, appears to play a significant role in satisfaction with global quality of care. CONCLUSIONS: Studies of patient satisfaction in elderly people are rare. Some factors expected to be related to positive assessment based on earlier studies, were, e.g., better health and shorter waiting time, while others were not, e.g., increasing age. Elderly people appear to place greater importance on physician technical skills, as opposed to interpersonal dimensions, in assessing global quality. These findings suggest the need for a better understanding of how elderly people evaluate care and what they value in interactions with the healthcare system. Images Figure 1 PMID:9460484

  9. Effect of closure of a local safety-net hospital on primary care physicians' perceptions of their role in patient care.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kara Odom; Clarke, Robin; Ryan, Gery; Brown, Arleen F

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE We examined how the closure of a large safety-net hospital in Los Angeles County, California, affected local primary care physicians. METHODS We conducted semistructured interviews with 42 primary care physicians who practiced in both underserved and nonunderserved settings in Los Angeles County. Two investigators independently reviewed and coded transcripts. Three investigators used pile-sorting to sort the codes into themes. RESULTS Overall, 28 of 42 physicians (67%) described some effect of the hospital closure on their practices. Three major themes emerged regarding the impact of the closure on the affected physicians: (1) reduced local access to specialist consultations, direct hospital admissions, and timely emergency department evaluation; (2) more patient delays in care and worse health outcomes because of poor patient understanding of the health care system changes; and (3) loss of colleagues and opportunities to teach residents and medical students. CONCLUSIONS Physicians in close proximity to the closed hospital-even those practicing in nonunderserved settings-reported difficulty getting their patients needed care that extended beyond the anticipated loss of inpatient services. There is a need for greater recognition of and support for the role primary care physicians play in coordinating care; promoting continuity of care; and informing patients, clinic administrators and policy makers about system changes during such transitions.

  10. Adaptability of Physicians Offering Primary Care to the Poor: Social Competency Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Loignon, Christine; Boudreault-Fournier,, Alexandrine

    2013-01-01

    This paper attempts to go deeper into the topic of social competency of physicians who provide primary care to populations living in poverty in Montreal. Adaptability as well as the ability to tailor practices according to patient expectations, needs and capabilities were found to be important in the development of the concept of social competency. The case of paternalism is used to demonstrate how a historically and socially contested medical approach is readapted by players in certain contexts in order to better meet patient expectations. This paper presents data collected in a qualitative study comprising 25 semi-supervised interviews with physicians recognized by their peers as having developed exemplary practices in Montreal's impoverished neighbourhoods. PMID:24289940

  11. Addressing domestic violence in primary care: what the physician needs to know

    PubMed Central

    Usta, Jinan; Taleb, Rim

    2014-01-01

    Domestic violence (DV) is quite prevalent and negatively impacts the health and mental wellbeing of those affected. Victims of DV are frequent users of health service, yet they are infrequently recognized. Physicians tend to treat the presenting complaints without addressing the root cause of the problem. Lack of knowledge on adequately managing cases of DV and on appropriate ways to help survivors is commonly presented as a barrier. This article presents the magnitude of the problem of DV in the Arab world, highlights the role of the primary care physician in addressing this problem, and provides practical steps that can guide the clinician in the Arab world in giving a comprehensive and culturally sensitive service to the survivors of DV. PMID:24647277

  12. Interconception Care for Mothers During Well-Child Visits With Family Physicians: An IMPLICIT Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Rosener, Stephanie E.; Barr, Wendy B.; Frayne, Daniel J.; Barash, Joshua H.; Gross, Megan E.; Bennett, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Interconception care (ICC) is recommended to improve birth outcomes by targeting maternal risk factors, but little is known about its implementation. We evaluated the frequency and nature of ICC delivered to mothers at well-child visits and maternal receptivity to these practices. METHODS We surveyed a convenience sample of mothers accompanying their child to well-child visits at family medicine academic practices in the IMPLICIT (Interventions to Minimize Preterm and Low Birth Weight Infants Through Continuous Improvement Techniques) Network. Health history, behaviors, and the frequency of the child’s physician addressing maternal depression, tobacco use, family planning, and folic acid supplementation were assessed, along with maternal receptivity to advice. RESULTS Three-quarters of the 658 respondents shared a medical home with their child. Overall, 17% of respondents reported a previous preterm birth, 19% reported a history of depression, 25% were smoking, 26% were not using contraception, and 58% were not taking folic acid. Regarding advice, 80% of mothers who smoked were counseled to quit, 59% reported depression screening, 71% discussed contraception, and 44% discussed folic acid. Screening for depression and family planning was more likely when the mother and child shared a medical home (P <.05). Most mothers, nearly 95%, were willing to accept health advice from their child’s physician regardless of whether a medical home was shared (P >.05). CONCLUSIONS Family physicians provide key elements of ICC at well-child visits, and mothers are highly receptive to advice from their child’s physician even if they receive primary care elsewhere. Routine integration of ICC at these visits may provide an opportunity to reduce maternal risk factors for adverse subsequent birth outcomes. PMID:27401423

  13. Care Transitions in Long-term Care and Acute Care: Health Information Exchange and Readmission Rates.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Brian; Ko, Kelly J; Alvarez del Castillo, Rodolfo

    2015-09-30

    Care transitions between settings are a well-known cause of medical errors. A key component of transition is information exchange, especially in long-term care (LTC). However, LTC is behind other settings in adoption of health information technologies (HIT). In this article, we provide some brief background information about care transitions in LTC and concerns related to technology. We describe a pilot project using HIT and secure messaging in LTC to facilitate electronic information exchange during care transitions. Five LTC facilities were included, all located within Oklahoma and serviced by the same regional health system. The study duration was 20 months. Both inpatient readmission and return emergency department (ED) visit rates were lower than baseline following implementation. We provide discussion of positive outcomes, lessons learned, and limitations. Finally, we offer implications for practice and research for implementation of HIT and information exchange across care settings that may contribute to reduction in readmission rates in acute care and ED settings.

  14. Effect of a medical care evaluation program on physician knowledge and performance.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, J A; Sandlow, L J; Bashook, P G

    1984-01-01

    A model program designed to increase the educational value of medical care evaluation committee meetings was studied to determine its effect on the knowledge and clinical performance of participating physicians. The members of hospital committees in which the program was successfully implemented showed a statistically significant gain in knowledge of the topics discussed by their committees. In addition, several members made substantial changes in their patient care practices. These changes resulted not so much from the acquisition of new medical information as from a rethinking of patient management strategies, stimulated by peer discussion during committee meetings. A structure that encourages such discussions can be incorporated in other types of patient-care-oriented committee activities as well.

  15. Association of Communication Between Hospital-based Physicians and Primary Care Providers with Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schnipper, Jeffrey L.; Auerbach, Andrew D.; Kaboli, Peter J.; Wetterneck, Tosha B.; Gonzales, David V.; Arora, Vineet M.; Zhang, James X.; Meltzer, David O.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Patients admitted to general medicine inpatient services are increasingly cared for by hospital-based physicians rather than their primary care providers (PCPs). This separation of hospital and ambulatory care may result in important care discontinuities after discharge. We sought to determine whether communication between hospital-based physicians and PCPs influences patient outcomes. METHODS We approached consecutive patients admitted to general medicine services at six US academic centers from July 2001 to June 2003. A random sample of the PCPs for consented patients was contacted 2 weeks after patient discharge and surveyed about communication with the hospital medical team. Responses were linked with the 30-day composite patient outcomes of mortality, hospital readmission, and emergency department (ED) visits obtained through follow-up telephone survey and National Death Index search. We used hierarchical multi-variable logistic regression to model whether communication with the patient’s PCP was associated with the 30-day composite outcome. RESULTS A total of 1,772 PCPs for 2,336 patients were surveyed with 908 PCPs responses and complete patient follow-up available for 1,078 patients. The PCPs for 834 patients (77%) were aware that their patient had been admitted to the hospital. Of these, direct communication between PCPs and inpatient physicians took place for 194 patients (23%), and a discharge summary was available within 2 weeks of discharge for 347 patients (42%). Within 30 days of discharge, 233 (22%) patients died, were readmitted to the hospital, or visited an ED. In adjusted analyses, no relationship was seen between the composite outcome and direct physician communication (adjusted odds ratio 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.56 – 1.34), the presence of a discharge summary (0.84, 95% CI 0.57–1.22), or PCP awareness of the index hospitalization (1.08, 95% CI 0.73–1.59). CONCLUSION Analysis of communication between PCPs

  16. The Case for Improved Interprofessional Care: Fatal Analgesic Overdose Secondary to Acute Dental Pain during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Alice; Munz, Stephanie M.; Dabiri, Darya

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal oral health extends beyond the oral cavity, impacting the general well-being of the pregnant patient and her fetus. This case report follows a 19-year-old pregnant female presenting with acute liver failure secondary to acetaminophen overdose for management of dental pain following extensive dental procedures. Through the course of her illness, the patient suffered adverse outcomes including fetal demise, acute kidney injury, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and septic shock before eventual death from multiple organ failure. In managing the pregnant patient, healthcare providers, including physicians and dentists, must recognize and optimize the interconnected relationships shared by the health disciplines. An interdisciplinary approach of collaborative and coordinated care, the timing, sequence, and treatment for the pregnant patient can be improved and thereby maximize overall quality of health. Continued efforts toward integrating oral health into general healthcare education through interprofessional education and practice are necessary to enhance the quality of care that will benefit all patients. PMID:27847654

  17. The Case for Improved Interprofessional Care: Fatal Analgesic Overdose Secondary to Acute Dental Pain during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sarah K Y; Quinonez, Rocio B; Chuang, Alice; Munz, Stephanie M; Dabiri, Darya

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal oral health extends beyond the oral cavity, impacting the general well-being of the pregnant patient and her fetus. This case report follows a 19-year-old pregnant female presenting with acute liver failure secondary to acetaminophen overdose for management of dental pain following extensive dental procedures. Through the course of her illness, the patient suffered adverse outcomes including fetal demise, acute kidney injury, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and septic shock before eventual death from multiple organ failure. In managing the pregnant patient, healthcare providers, including physicians and dentists, must recognize and optimize the interconnected relationships shared by the health disciplines. An interdisciplinary approach of collaborative and coordinated care, the timing, sequence, and treatment for the pregnant patient can be improved and thereby maximize overall quality of health. Continued efforts toward integrating oral health into general healthcare education through interprofessional education and practice are necessary to enhance the quality of care that will benefit all patients.

  18. Acute coronary care: Principles and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 58 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radionuclide Techniques for Diagnosing and Sizing of Myocardial Infarction; The Use of Serial Radionuclide Angiography for Monitoring Function during Acute Myocardial Infarction; Hemodynamic Monitoring in Acute Myocardial Infarction; and The Valve of Radionuclide Angiography for Risk Assessment of Patients following Acute Myocardial Infarction.

  19. Availability of on-site acute vascular interventional radiology techniques performed by trained acute care specialists: A single–emergency center experience

    PubMed Central

    Tsurukiri, Junya; Ohta, Shoichi; Mishima, Shiro; Homma, Hiroshi; Okumura, Eitaro; Akamine, Itsuro; Ueno, Masahito; Oda, Jun; Yukioka, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Comprehensive treatment of a patient in acute medicine and surgery requires the use of both surgical techniques and other treatment methods. Recently, acute vascular interventional radiology techniques (AVIRTs) have become increasingly popular, enabling adequately trained in-house experts to improve the quality of on-site care. METHODS After obtaining approval from our institutional ethics committee, we conducted a retrospective study of AVIRT procedures performed by acute care specialists trained in acute medicine and surgery over a 1-year period, including those conducted out of hours. Trained acute care specialists were required to be certified by the Japanese Association of Acute Medicine and to have completed at least 1 year of training as a member of the endovascular team in the radiology department of another university hospital. The study was designed to ensure that at least one of the physicians was available to perform AVIRT within 1 h of a request at any time. Femoral sheath insertion was usually performed by the resident physicians under the guidance of trained acute care specialists. RESULTS The study sample comprised 77 endovascular procedures for therapeutic AVIRT (trauma, n = 29, and nontrauma, n = 48) among 62 patients (mean age, 64 years; range, 9–88 years), of which 55% were male. Of the procedures, 47% were performed out of hours (trauma, 52%; and nontrauma, 44%). Three patients underwent resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta in the emergency room. No major device-related complications were encountered, and the overall mortality rate within 60 days was 8%. The recorded causes of death included exsanguination (n = 2), pneumonia (n = 2), sepsis (n = 1), and brain death (n = 1). CONCLUSION When performed by trained acute care specialists, AVIRT seems to be advantageous for acute on-site care and provides good technical success. Therefore, a standard training program should be established for acute care specialists

  20. Communication Between Acute Care Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities During Care Transitions: A Retrospective Chart Review.

    PubMed

    Jusela, Cheryl; Struble, Laura; Gallagher, Nancy Ambrose; Redman, Richard W; Ziemba, Rosemary A

    2017-03-01

    . 2. Describe the significance of interprofessional collaboration in the delivery of quality health care. DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Neither the planners nor the author have any conflicts of interest to disclose. The purpose of the current project was to (a) examine the type of information accompanying patients on transfer from acute care to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), (b) discuss how these findings meet existing standards, and (c) make recommendations to improve transfer of essential information. The study was a retrospective convenience sample chart audit in one SNF. All patients admitted from an acute care hospital to the SNF were examined. The audit checklist was developed based on recommendations by local and national standards. One hundred fifty-five charts were reviewed. Transferring of physician contact information was missing in 65% of charts. The following information was also missing from charts: medication lists (1%), steroid tapering instructions (42%), antiarrhythmic instructions (38%), duration/indication of anticoagulant medications (25%), and antibiotic medications (22%). Findings support the need for improved transitional care models and better communication of information between care settings. Recommendations include designating accountability and chart audits comparing timeliness, completeness, and accuracy. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(3), 19-28.].

  1. Effect of primary care physicians' use of estimated glomerular filtration rate on the timing of their subspecialty referral decisions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Primary care providers' suboptimal recognition of the severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD) may contribute to untimely referrals of patients with CKD to subspecialty care. It is unknown whether U.S. primary care physicians' use of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) rather than serum creatinine to estimate CKD severity could improve the timeliness of their subspecialty referral decisions. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of 154 United States primary care physicians to assess the effect of use of eGFR (versus creatinine) on the timing of their subspecialty referrals. Primary care physicians completed a questionnaire featuring questions regarding a hypothetical White or African American patient with progressing CKD. We asked primary care physicians to identify the serum creatinine and eGFR levels at which they would recommend patients like the hypothetical patient be referred for subspecialty evaluation. We assessed significant improvement in the timing [from eGFR < 30 to ≥ 30 mL/min/1.73m2) of their recommended referrals based on their use of creatinine versus eGFR. Results Primary care physicians recommended subspecialty referrals later (CKD more advanced) when using creatinine versus eGFR to assess kidney function [median eGFR 32 versus 55 mL/min/1.73m2, p < 0.001]. Forty percent of primary care physicians significantly improved the timing of their referrals when basing their recommendations on eGFR. Improved timing occurred more frequently among primary care physicians practicing in academic (versus non-academic) practices or presented with White (versus African American) hypothetical patients [adjusted percentage(95% CI): 70% (45-87) versus 37% (reference) and 57% (39-73) versus 25% (reference), respectively, both p ≤ 0.01). Conclusions Primary care physicians recommended subspecialty referrals earlier when using eGFR (versus creatinine) to assess kidney function. Enhanced use of eGFR by primary care physicians' could lead

  2. Health Care Cost Containment Education for Physicians in the Military Health Services System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    34 OQuoted in-Fuchs 1974, p. 583. Victor Fuchs (1974, pp. 56-58) brings forth the idea of the physician as captain of the health team and identifies... Toledo . It began as a program in quality assurance with the introduction of cost components as a natural outgrowth of the examination of quality of care...1238. Friedman, Emily "Changing the Oourse of Things Costs Enter ’Medical. Education." Hospitala 53 (0 May 1979), pp. 82-85. Fuchs, Victor . "The

  3. Importance of telemedicine in diabetes care: Relationships between family physicians and ophthalmologists

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Aroca, Pedro; Sagarra-Alamo, Ramon; Pareja-Rios, Alicia; López, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the worldwide leading cause of legal blindness. In 2010, 1.9% of diabetes mellitus (DM) patients were legally blind and 10.2% had visual impairment. The control of DM parameters (glycemia, arterial tension and lipids) is the gold standard for preventing DR complications, although, unfortunately, DR still appeared in a 25% to 35% of patients. The stages of severe vision threading DR, include proliferative DR (6.96%) and diabetic macular edema (6.81%). This review aims to update our knowledge on DR screening using telemedicine, the different techniques, the problems, and the inclusion of different professionals such as family physicians in care programs. PMID:26240697

  4. Invited article: Managing disruptive physician behavior: impact on staff relationships and patient care.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Alan H; O'Daniel, Michelle

    2008-04-22

    Disruptive behavior can have a significant impact on care delivery, which can adversely affect patient safety and quality outcomes of care. Disruptive behavior occurs across all disciplines but is of particular concern when it involves physicians and nurses who have primary responsibility for patient care. There is a higher frequency of disruptive behavior in neurologists compared to most other nonsurgical specialties. Disruptive behavior causes stress, anxiety, frustration, and anger, which can impede communication and collaboration, which can result in avoidable medical errors, adverse events, and other compromises in quality care. Health care organizations need to be aware of the significance of disruptive behaviors and develop appropriate policies, standards, and procedures to effectively deal with this serious issue and reinforce appropriate standards of behavior. Having a better understanding of what contributes to, incites, or provokes disruptive behaviors will help organizations provide appropriate educational and training programs that can lessen the likelihood of occurrence and improve the overall effectiveness of communication among the health care team.

  5. Mass Gathering Medical Care: Resource Document for the National Association of EMS Physicians Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Brian; Nafziger, Sarah; Milsten, Andrew; Luk, Jeffrey; Yancey, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Mass gatherings are heterogeneous in terms of size, duration, type of event, crowd behavior, demographics of the participants and spectators, use of recreational substances, weather, and environment. The goals of health and medical services should be the provision of care for participants and spectators consistent with local standards of care, protection of continuing medical service to the populations surrounding the event venue, and preparation for surge to respond to extraordinary events. Pre-event planning among jurisdictional public health and EMS, acute care hospitals, and event EMS is essential, but should also include, at a minimum, event security services, public relations, facility maintenance, communications technicians, and the event planners and organizers. Previous documented experience with similar events has been shown to most accurately predict future needs. Future work in and guidance for mass gathering medical care should include the consistent use and further development of universally accepted consistent metrics, such as Patient Presentation Rate and Transfer to Hospital Rate. Only by standardizing data collection can evaluations be performed that link interventions with outcomes to enhance evidence-based EMS services at mass gatherings. Research is needed to evaluate the skills and interventions required by EMS providers to achieve desired outcomes. The event-dedicated EMS Medical Director is integral to acceptable quality medical care provided at mass gatherings; hence, he/she must be included in all aspects of mass gathering medical care planning, preparations, response, and recovery. Incorporation of jurisdictional EMS and community hospital medical leadership, and emergency practitioners into these processes will ensure that on-site care, transport, and transition to acute care at appropriate receiving facilities is consistent with, and fully integrated into the community's medical care system, while fulfilling the needs of event

  6. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium.

  7. 'Designer drugs': update on the management of novel psychoactive substance misuse in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher D; Robert, Stefanie

    2014-08-01

    The use of novel psychoactive substances ('legal highs' or 'designer drugs') is increasing worldwide. Patients misusing such substances have been reported to experience severe or prolonged side effects requiring admission to acute or critical care wards. These complications can be life threatening if misdiagnosed or mismanaged. As physicians have traditionally had less involvement with the management of such patients compared with their colleagues in emergency departments an update in the management of such patients is indicated. Here we present a summary of the management of those novel substances with the potential for serious complications based on a review of current literature.

  8. Relationship between patient race and survival following admission to intensive care among patients of primary care physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, R D; Lawler, F H; Hainer, B L

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the existence of racial differences in the survival of patients admitted to intensive care by family physicians and general internists for circulatory illnesses. The study population consisted of 249 consecutive patients admitted by these specialists to an ICU in a tertiary care hospital in Pitt County, North Carolina, during the June 1985 to June 1986 period. Logistic regression was used to specify the unique effect of race on ICU patient survival in-hospital, controlling for potential confounding factors such as disease severity, type of health insurance, and case mix. Black patients were almost three times more likely than white patients to die in-hospital following admission to the ICU (RR = 2.9, 95 percent I = 1.5, 5.6). Most of this difference in survival was explained by racial differences in disease severity. PMID:1917504

  9. Health care politics and policy: the business of medicine: a course for physician leaders.

    PubMed

    Marmor, Theodore Richard

    2013-09-01

    This article is a condensed and edited version of a speech delivered to the business of medicine: A Course for Physician Leaders symposium presented by Yale-New Haven Hospital and the Medical Directors Leadership Council at Yale University in November 2012 and drawn from Politics, Health, and Health Care: Selected Essays by Theodore R. Marmor and Rudolf Klein [1]. It faithfully reflects the major argument delivered, but it does not include the typical range of citations in a journal article. The material presented here reflects more than 40 years of teaching a course variously described as Political Analysis and Management, Policy and Political Analysis, and The Politics of Policy. The aim of all of these efforts is to inform audiences about the necessity of understanding political conflict in any arena, not least of which is the complex and costly world of medical care.

  10. Physician, philosopher, and paediatrician: John Locke's practice of child health care.

    PubMed

    Williams, A N

    2006-01-01

    G.F. Still's History of Paediatrics restricted the philosopher John Locke's (1632-1704) influence in paediatrics to pedagology and specifically his Some Thoughts Concerning Education (1693). This significantly limits Locke's immense ongoing influence on child health care and human rights. Locke was a physician and had a lifelong interest in medicine. His case records and journals relate some of his paediatric cases. His correspondence includes letters from Thomas Sydenham, the "English Hippocrates" (1624-89) when Locke has sought advice on a paediatric case as well as other correspondence from parents regarding child health care and management of learning disability. Locke assisted and influenced Thomas Sydenham with his writing, and Locke's own work, Two Treatises on Government, clearly stated the rights of children and limitation of parental authority. Furthermore, Locke's thoughts on Poor Law, making an economic case for a workhouse in every parish, were implemented from 1834.

  11. The education of physicians and other health care professionals about climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, R.L.; Hussain, S.T.

    1996-12-31

    The impact of rapidly changing local and regional environments upon the health of human populations must be appreciated by physicians as well as other public health officials. Any system of health care delivery depends upon an understanding of scientific principles. Current issues of importance include the greenhouse effect, the ozone hole, global warming, sea level rise, emerging and resurgent microbial diseases, air and water pollution, biodiversity losses, UVB-induced immunosuppression, and antibiotic resistance. These concerns must be firmly within the grasp of the health care practitioner for the 21st century. To assure transfer of information, these topics should be integrated into existing course content or should provide the basis for new course offerings during the training of the professional. Focus should be given to scientific principles as the foundation for understanding climate change.

  12. Mental health in young adults and adolescents - supporting general physicians to provide holistic care.

    PubMed

    Jurewicz, Izabela

    2015-04-01

    In the era of an ageing population, young adults on medical wards are quite rare, as only 12% of young adults report a long-term illness or disability. However, mental health problems remain prevalent in the younger population. In a recent report, mental health and obesity were listed as the most common problems in young adults. Teams set up specifically for the needs of younger adults, such as early intervention in psychosis services are shown to work better than traditional care and have also proven to be cost effective. On the medical wards, younger patients may elicit strong emotions in staff, who often feel protective and may identify strongly with the young patient's suffering. In order to provide holistic care for young adults, general physicians need to recognise common presentations of mental illness in young adults such as depression, deliberate self-harm, eating disorders and substance misuse. Apart from treating illness, health promotion is particularly important for young adults.

  13. Physician, philosopher, and paediatrician: John Locke's practice of child health care

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A N

    2006-01-01

    G.F. Still's History of Paediatrics restricted the philosopher John Locke's (1632–1704) influence in paediatrics to pedagology and specifically his Some Thoughts Concerning Education (1693).1 This significantly limits Locke's immense ongoing influence on child health care and human rights. Locke was a physician and had a lifelong interest in medicine. His case records and journals relate some of his paediatric cases. His correspondence includes letters from Thomas Sydenham, the “English Hippocrates” (1624–89) when Locke has sought advice on a paediatric case as well as other correspondence from parents regarding child health care and management of learning disability. Locke assisted and influenced Thomas Sydenham with his writing, and Locke's own work, Two Treatises on Government, clearly stated the rights of children and limitation of parental authority. Furthermore, Locke's thoughts on Poor Law, making an economic case for a workhouse in every parish, were implemented from 1834. PMID:16371386

  14. The ethical self-fashioning of physicians and health care systems in culturally appropriate health care.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Susan J; Armin, Julie

    2011-06-01

    Diverse advocacy groups have pushed for the recognition of cultural differences in health care as a means to redress inequalities in the U.S., elaborating a form of biocitizenship that draws on evidence of racial and ethnic health disparities to make claims on both the state and health care providers. These efforts led to federal regulations developed by the U.S. Office of Minority Health requiring health care organizations to provide Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services. Based on ethnographic research at workshops and conferences, in-depth interviews with cultural competence trainers, and an analysis of postings to a moderated listserv with 2,000 members, we explore cultural competence trainings as a new type of social technology in which health care providers and institutions are urged to engage in ethical self-fashioning to eliminate prejudice and embody the values of cultural relativism. Health care providers are called on to re-orient their practice (such as habits of gaze, touch, and decision-making) and to act on their own subjectivities to develop an orientation toward Others that is "culturally competent." We explore the diverse methods that cultural competence trainings use to foster a health care provider's ability to be self-reflexive, including face-to-face workshops and classes and self-guided on-line modules. We argue that the hybrid formation of culturally appropriate health care is becoming detached from its social justice origins as it becomes rationalized by and more firmly embedded in the operations of the health care marketplace.

  15. Bumps on the managed care road: the search for an alternative model to reduce collisions between HMOs, physicians, and patients.

    PubMed

    Reece, R L

    2000-01-01

    Managed care is experiencing political, litigious, and financial bumps on the road. There are various reasons for this bumpy ride: out-of-control costs, prescription drug expense, negative media reports, public revolt at denials of care or limited access to specialists, bad physician relations, patients' rights legislation, dropping health maintenance organization (HMO) stock prices, the ripple effect of the Harvard Pilgrim bankruptcy, and threat of massive litigation against HMOs. Two reasons not often mentioned, but explored in this article, are the orthodox managed care's flawed market model and lack of enough understanding of physician culture and emerging consumer trends to effectively address these two key constituencies.

  16. African Female Physicians and Nurses in the Global Care Chain: Qualitative Explorations from Five Destination Countries

    PubMed Central

    Wojczewski, Silvia; Pentz, Stephen; Blacklock, Claire; Hoffmann, Kathryn; Peersman, Wim; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Kutalek, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Migration of health professionals is an important policy issue for both source and destination countries around the world. The majority of migrant care workers in industrialized countries today are women. However, the dimension of mobility of highly skilled females from countries of the global south has been almost entirely neglected for many years. This paper explores the experiences of high-skilled female African migrant health-workers (MHW) utilising the framework of Global Care Chain (GCC) research. In the frame of the EU-project HURAPRIM (Human Resources for Primary Health Care in Africa), the research team conducted 88 semi-structured interviews with female and male African MHWs in five countries (Botswana, South Africa, Belgium, Austria, UK) from July 2011 until April 2012. For this paper we analysed the 34 interviews with female physicians and nurses using the qualitative framework analysis approach and the software atlas.ti. In terms of the effect of the migration on their career, almost all of the respondents experienced short-term, long-term or permanent inability to work as health-care professionals; few however also reported a positive career development post-migration. Discrimination based on a foreign nationality, race or gender was reported by many of our respondents, physicians and nurses alike, whether they worked in an African or a European country. Our study shows that in addition to the phenomenon of deskilling often reported in GCC research, many female MHW are unable to work according to their qualifications due to the fact that their diplomas are not recognized in the country of destination. Policy strategies are needed regarding integration of migrants in the labour market and working against discrimination based on race and gender. PMID:26068218

  17. Ethical challenges in the neonatal intensive care units: perceptions of physicians and nurses; an Iranian experience

    PubMed Central

    Kadivar, Maliheh; Mosayebi, Ziba; Asghari, Fariba; Zarrini, Pari

    2015-01-01

    The challenging nature of neonatal medicine today is intensified by modern advances in intensive care and treatment of sicker neonates. These developments have caused numerous ethical issues and conflicts in ethical decision-making. The present study surveyed the challenges and dilemmas from the viewpoint of the neonatal intensive care personnel in the teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in the capital of Iran. In this comparative cross-sectional study conducted between March 2013 and February 2014, the physicians’ and nurses’ perceptions of the ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units were compared. The physicians and nurses of the study hospitals were requested to complete a 36-item questionnaire after initial accommodations. The study samples consisted of 284 physicians (36%) and nurses (64%). Content validity and internal consistency calculations were used to examine the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation, t-test, ANOVA, and linear regression using SPSS v. 22. Respecting patients’ rights and interactions with parents were perceived as the most challenging aspects of neonatal care. There were significant differences between sexes in the domains of the perceived challenges. According to the linear regression model, the perceived score would be reduced 0.33 per each year on the job. The results of our study showed that the most challenging issues were related to patients’ rights, interactions with parents, communication and cooperation, and end of life considerations respectively. It can be concluded, therefore, that more attention should be paid to these issues in educational programs and ethics committees of hospitals. PMID:26839675

  18. Medical care of asylum seekers: a descriptive study of the appropriateness of nurse practitioners' care compared to traditional physician-based care in a gatekeeping system

    PubMed Central

    Bodenmann, Patrick; Althaus, Fabrice; Burnand, Bernard; Vaucher, Paul; Pécoud, Alain; Genton, Blaise

    2007-01-01

    Background Medical care for asylum seekers is a complex and critical issue worldwide. It is influenced by social, political, and economic pressures, as well as premigration conditions, the process of migration, and postmigration conditions in the host country. Increasing needs and healthcare costs have led public health authorities to put nurse practitioners in charge of the management of a gatekeeping system for asylum seekers. The quality of this system has never been evaluated. We assessed the competencies of nurses and physicians in identifying the medical needs of asylum seekers and providing them with appropriate treatment that reflects good clinical practice. Methods This cross-sectional descriptive study evaluated the appropriateness of care provided to asylum seekers by trained nurse practitioners in nursing healthcare centers and by physicians in private practices, an academic medical outpatient clinic, and the emergency unit of the university hospital in Lausanne, Switzerland. From 1687 asylum seeking patients who had consulted each setting between June and December 2003, 450 were randomly selected to participate. A panel of experts reviewed their medical records and assessed the appropriateness of medical care received according to three parameters: 1) use of appropriate procedures to identify medical needs (medical history, clinical examination, complementary investigations, and referral), 2) provision of access to treatment meeting medical needs, and 3) absence of unnecessary medical procedures. Results In the nurse practitioner group, the procedures used to identify medical needs were less often appropriate (79% of reports vs. 92.4% of reports; p < 0.001). Nevertheless, access to treatment was judged satisfactory and was similar (p = 0.264) between nurse practitioners and physicians (99% and 97.6% of patients, respectively, received adequate care). Excessive care was observed in only 2 physician reports (0.8%) and 3 nurse reports (1.5%) (p = 0

  19. Primary Care Physician Panel Size and Quality of Care: A Population-Based Study in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Dahrouge, Simone; Hogg, William; Younger, Jaime; Muggah, Elizabeth; Russell, Grant; Glazier, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the number of patients under a primary care physician’s care (panel size) and primary care quality indicators. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based study of fee-for-service and capitated interprofessional and non-interprofessional primary health care practices in Ontario, Canada between April 2008 and March 2010, encompassing 4,195 physicians with panel sizes ≥1,200 serving 8.3 million patients. Data was extracted from multiple linked, health-related administrative databases and covered 16 quality indicators spanning 5 dimensions of care: access, continuity, comprehensiveness, and evidence-based indicators of cancer screening and chronic disease management. RESULTS The likelihood of being up-to-date on cervical, colorectal, and breast cancer screening showed relative decreases of 7.9% (P <.001), 5.9% (P = .01), and 4.6% (P <.001), respectively, with increasing panel size (from 1,200 to 3,900). Eight chronic care indicators (4 medication-based and 4 screening-based) showed no significant association with panel size. The likelihood of individuals with a new diagnosis of congestive heart failure having an echocardiogram, however, increased by a relative 8.1% (P <.001) with higher panel size. Increasing panel size was also associated with a 10.8% relative increase in hospitalization rates for ambulatory-care–sensitive conditions (P = .04) and a 10.8% decrease in non-urgent emergency department visits (P = .004). Continuity was highest with medium panel sizes (P <.001), and comprehensiveness had a small decrease (P = .03) with increasing panel size. CONCLUSIONS Increasing panel size was associated with small decreases in cancer screening, continuity, and comprehensiveness, but showed no consistent relationships with chronic disease management or access indicators. We found no panel size threshold above which quality of care suffered. PMID:26755780

  20. What Makes a Good Palliative Care Physician? A Qualitative Study about the Patient’s Expectations and Needs when Being Admitted to a Palliative Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Masel, Eva K; Kitta, Anna; Huber, Patrick; Rumpold, Tamara; Unseld, Matthias; Schur, Sophie; Porpaczy, Edit; Watzke, Herbert H

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of the study were to examine a) patients’ knowledge of palliative care, b) patients’ expectations and needs when being admitted to a palliative care unit, and c) patient’s concept of a good palliative care physician. Methods The study was based on a qualitative methodology, comprising 32 semistructured interviews with advanced cancer patients admitted to the palliative care unit of the Medical University of Vienna. Interviews were conducted with 20 patients during the first three days after admission to the unit and after one week, recorded digitally, and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using NVivo 10 software, based on thematic analysis enhanced with grounded theory techniques. Results The results revealed four themes: (1) information about palliative care, (2) supportive care needs, (3) being treated in a palliative care unit, and (4) qualities required of palliative care physicians. The data showed that patients lack information about palliative care, that help in social concerns plays a central role in palliative care, and attentiveness as well as symptom management are important to patients. Patients desire a personal patient-physician relationship. The qualities of a good palliative care physician were honesty, the ability to listen, taking time, being experienced in their field, speaking the patient’s language, being human, and being gentle. Patients experienced relief when being treated in a palliative care unit, perceived their care as an interdisciplinary activity, and felt that their burdensome symptoms were being attended to with emotional care. Negative perceptions included the overtly intense treatment. Conclusions The results of the present study offer an insight into what patients expect from palliative care teams. Being aware of patient’s needs will enable medical teams to improve professional and individualized care. PMID:27389693

  1. Attitude of primary care physicians toward patient safety in Aseer region, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khaldi, Yahia M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the attitude of physicians at primary health-care centers (PHCC) in Aseer region toward patient safety. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted among working primary health-care physicians in Aseer region, Saudi Arabia, in August 2011. A self-administered questionnaire consisting of three parts was used; the first part was on the socio-demographic, academic and about the work profile of the participants. The attitude consisting of 26 questions was assessed on a Likert scale of 7 points using attitude to patients safety questionnaire-III items and the last part concerned training on “patient safety”, definition and factors that contribute to medical errors. Data of the questionnaire were entered and analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15. Results: The total number of participants was 228 doctors who represent about 65% of the physicians at PHCC, one-third of whom had attended a course on patient safety and only 52% of whom defined medical error correctly. The best score was given for the reduction of medical errors (6.2 points), followed by role of training and learning on patient safety (6 and 5.9 points), but undergraduate training on patient safety was given the least score. Confidence to report medical errors scored 4.6 points as did reporting the errors of other people and 5.6 points for being open with the supervisor about an error made. Participants agreed that “even the most experienced and competent doctors make errors” (5.9 points), on the other hand, they disagreed that most medical errors resulted from nurses’ carelessness (3.9 points) or doctors’ carelessness (4 points). Conclusion: This study showed that PHCC physicians in Aseer region had a positive attitude toward patient safety. Most of them need training on patient safety. Undergraduate education on patient safety which was considered a priority for making future doctors’ work effective was

  2. Medicare's bundling pilot: including post-acute care services.

    PubMed

    Dummit, Laura A

    2011-03-28

    Fee-for-service Medicare, in which a separate payment is made for each service, rewards health care providers for delivering more services, but not necessarily coordinating those services over time or across settings. To help address these concerns, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 requires Medicare to experiment with making a bundled payment for a hospitalization plus post-acute care, that is, the recuperative or rehabilitative care following a hospital discharge. This bundled payment approach is intended to promote more efficient care across the acute/post-acute episode because the entity that receives the payment has financial incentives to keep episode costs below the payment. Although the entity is expected to control costs through improved care coordination and efficiency, it could stint on care or avoid expensive patients instead. This issue brief focuses on the unique challenges posed by the inclusion of post-acute care services in a payment bundle and special considerations in implementing and evaluating the episode payment approach.

  3. Managing chronic illness: physician practices increased the use of care management and medical home processes.

    PubMed

    Wiley, James A; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen M; Casalino, Lawrence P; Ramsay, Patricia P; Bibi, Salma; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon R; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    The effective management of patients with chronic illnesses is critical to bending the curve of health care spending in the United States and is a crucial test for health care reform. In this article we used data from three national surveys of physician practices between 2006 and 2013 to determine the extent to which practices of all sizes have increased their use of evidence-based care management processes associated with patient-centered medical homes for patients with asthma, congestive heart failure, depression, and diabetes. We found relatively large increases over time in the overall use of these processes for small and medium-size practices as well as for large practices. However, the large practices used fewer than half of the recommended processes, on average. We also identified the individual processes whose use increased the most and show that greater use of care management processes is positively associated with public reporting of patient experience and clinical quality and with pay-for-performance.

  4. Dual embedded agency: physicians implement integrative medicine in health-care organizations.

    PubMed

    Keshet, Yael

    2013-11-01

    The paradox of embedded agency addresses the question of how embedded agents are able to conceive of new ideas and practices and then implement them in institutionalized organizations if social structures exert so powerful an influence on behavior, and agents operate within a framework of institutional constraints. This article proposes that dual embedded agency may provide an explanation of the paradox. The article draws from an ethnographic study that examined the ways in which dual-trained physicians, namely medical doctors trained also in some modality of complementary and alternative medicine, integrate complementary and alternative medicine into the biomedical fortress of mainstream health-care organizations. Participant observations were conducted during the years 2006-2011. The observed physicians were found to be embedded in two diverse medical cultures and to have a hybrid professional identity that comprised two sets of health-care values. Seeking to introduce new ideas and practices associated with complementary and alternative medicine to medical institutions, they maneuvered among the constraints of institutional structures while using these very structures, in an isomorphic mode of action, as a platform for launching complementary and alternative medicine practices and values. They drew on the complementary and alternative medicine philosophical principle of interconnectedness and interdependency of seemingly polar opposites or contrary forces and acted to achieve change by means of nonadversarial strategies. By addressing the structure-agency dichotomy, this study contributes to the literature on change in institutionalized health-care organizations. It likewise contributes both theoretically and empirically to the study of integrative medicine and to the further development of this relatively new area of inquiry within the sociology of medicine.

  5. Community pharmacy-based point-of-care testing: A case study of pharmacist-physician collaborative working relationships.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Jennifer L; Klepser, Donald; Tilley, Heather; Smith, Jaclyn K; Klepser, Michael E

    2017-01-03

    Building collaborative working relationships (CWRs) with physicians or other prescribers is an important step for community pharmacists in establishing a collaborative practice agreement (CPA). This case study describes the individual, context, and exchange factors that drive pharmacist-physician CWR development for community pharmacy-based point-of-care (POC) testing. Two physicians who had entered in a CPA with community pharmacists to provide POC testing were surveyed and interviewed. High scores on the pharmacist-physician collaborative index indicated a high level of collaboration between the physicians and the pharmacist who initiated the relationship. Trust was established through the physicians' personal relationships with the pharmacist or due to the community pharmacy organization's strong reputation. The physicians' individual perceptions of community pharmacy-based POC testing affected their CWRs and willingness to establish a CPA. These findings suggest that exchange characteristics remain significant factors in CWR development. Individual factors may also contribute to physicians' willingness to advance their CWR to include a CPA for POC testing.

  6. Family Physician Involvement in Cancer Care Follow-up: The Experience of a Cohort of Patients With Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aubin, Michèle; Vézina, Lucie; Verreault, René; Fillion, Lise; Hudon, Éveline; Lehmann, François; Leduc, Yvan; Bergeron, Rénald; Reinharz, Daniel; Morin, Diane

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE There has been little research describing the involvement of family physicians in the follow-up of patients with cancer, especially during the primary treatment phase. We undertook a prospective longitudinal study of patients with lung cancer to assess their family physician’s involvement in their follow-up at the different phases of cancer. METHODS In 5 hospitals in the province of Quebec, Canada, patients with a recent diagnosis of lung cancer were surveyed every 3 to 6 months, whether they had metastasis or not, for a maximum of 18 months, to assess aspects of their family physician’s involvement in cancer care. RESULTS Of the 395 participating patients, 92% had a regular family physician but only 60% had been referred to a specialist by him/her or a colleague for the diagnosis of their lung cancer. A majority of patients identified the oncology team or oncologists as mainly responsible for their cancer care throughout their cancer journey, except at the advanced phase, where a majority attributed this role to their family physician. At baseline, only 16% of patients perceived a shared care pattern between their family physician and oncologists, but this proportion increased with cancer progression. Most patients would have liked their family physician to be more involved in all aspects of cancer care. CONCLUSIONS Although patients perceive that the oncology team is the main party responsible for the follow-up of their lung cancer, they also wish their family physicians to be involved. Better communication and collaboration between family physicians and the oncology team are needed to facilitate shared care in cancer follow-up. PMID:21060123

  7. Promoting patient-centred fundamental care in acute healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Feo, Rebecca; Kitson, Alison

    2016-05-01

    Meeting patients' fundamental care needs is essential for optimal safety and recovery and positive experiences within any healthcare setting. There is growing international evidence, however, that these fundamentals are often poorly executed in acute care settings, resulting in patient safety threats, poorer and costly care outcomes, and dehumanising experiences for patients and families. Whilst care standards and policy initiatives are attempting to address these issues, their impact has been limited. This discussion paper explores, through a series of propositions, why fundamental care can be overlooked in sophisticated, high technology acute care settings. We argue that the central problem lies in the invisibility and subsequent devaluing of fundamental care. Such care is perceived to involve simple tasks that require little skill to execute and have minimal impact on patient outcomes. The propositions explore the potential origins of this prevailing perception, focusing upon the impact of the biomedical model, the consequences of managerial approaches that drive healthcare cultures, and the devaluing of fundamental care by nurses themselves. These multiple sources of invisibility and devaluing surrounding fundamental care have rendered the concept underdeveloped and misunderstood both conceptually and theoretically. Likewise, there remains minimal role clarification around who should be responsible for and deliver such care, and a dearth of empirical evidence and evidence-based metrics. In explicating these propositions, we argue that key to transforming the delivery of acute healthcare is a substantial shift in the conceptualisation of fundamental care. The propositions present a cogent argument that counters the prevailing perception that fundamental care is basic and does not require systematic investigation. We conclude by calling for the explicit valuing and embedding of fundamental care in healthcare education, research, practice and policy. Without this

  8. Relationship between Early Physician Follow-Up and 30-Day Readmission after Acute Myocardial Infarction and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Yu-Chi; Chang, Guann-Ming; Chang, Hsien-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Background Thirty-day readmission rates after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and heart failure are important patient outcome metrics. Early post-discharge physician follow-up has been promoted as a method of reducing 30-day readmission rates. However, the relationships between early post-discharge follow-up and 30-day readmission for AMI and heart failure are inconclusive. We used nationwide population-based data to examine associations between 7-day physician follow-up and 30-day readmission, and further associations of 7-day same physician (during the index hospitalization and at follow-up) and cardiologist follow-up with 30-day readmission for non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or heart failure. Methods We analyzed all patients 18 years or older with NSTEMI and heart failure and discharged from hospitals in 2010 in Taiwan through Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. Cox proportional hazard models with robust sandwich variance estimates and propensity score weighting were performed after adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics to test associations between 7-day physician follow-up and 30-day readmission. Results The study population for NSTEMI and heart failure included 5,008 and 13,577 patients, respectively. Early physician follow-up was associated with a lower hazard ratio of readmission compared with no early physician follow-up for patients with NSTEMI (hazard ratio [HR], 0.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39–0.57), and for patients with heart failure (HR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.48–0.60). Same physician follow-up was associated with a reduced hazard ratio of readmission compared with different physician follow-up for patients with NSTEMI (HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.48–0.65), and for patients with heart failure (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.62–0.76). Conclusions For each condition, patients who have an outpatient visit with a physician within 7 days of discharge have a lower risk of 30-day readmission. Moreover

  9. [Gender and career paths of female primary care physicians in Andalusia, Spain, at the beginning of 21st century].

    PubMed

    Saletti-Cuesta, Lorena; Delgado, Ana; Ortiz-Gómez, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this article was to study, from a feminist perspective, the diversity and homogeneity in the career paths of female primary care physicians from Andalusia, Spain in the early 21st century, by analyzing the meanings they give to their careers and the influence of personal, family and professional factors. We conducted a qualitative study with six discussion groups. Thirty-two female primary care physicians working in urban health centers of the public health system of Andalusia participated in the study. The discourse analysis revealed that most of the female physicians did not plan for professional goals and, when they did plan for them, the goals were intertwined with family needs. Consequently, their career paths were discontinuous. In contrast, career paths oriented towards professional development and the conscious planning of goals were more common among the female doctors acting as directors of health care centers.

  10. Process evaluation of an educational intervention to improve end-of-life care: the Education for Physicians on End-of-Life Care (EPEC) program.

    PubMed

    VanGeest, J B

    2001-01-01

    Despite the growing importance of end-of-life care and the need to improve it, physicians receive little formal training in palliative care. The Education for Physicians on End-of-life Care (EPEC) project, developed by the American Medical Association and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, tested a train-the-trainer educational intervention to address this deficiency. This paper presents data from a process evaluation of the initial rollout of EPEC. By all accounts, EPEC provided a state-of-the-art curriculum covering important and clinically relevant topics to the care of the dying patient. It was less clear, however, if EPEC adequately prepared trainees to teach these new skills to other practicing physicians. Factors that may advance efforts to generalize EPEC to other settings and improve future applications of the program are discussed.

  11. The emerging role of physician assistants in the delivery of dermatologic health care.

    PubMed

    Clark, A R; Monroe, J R; Feldman, S R; Fleischer, A B; Hauser, D A; Hinds, M A

    2000-04-01

    with new conditions without the physician being on site, opening up the possibility for satellite offices in remote areas. Just as dermatologists may move toward specialization in surgery, cosmetics, or medical dermatology, PAs may do the same, filling a niche in a particular practice. As in other specialties, patient acceptance of seeing dermatology PAs has not been a significant problem. Continued access to the dermatologist remains unfettered, but, over time, many patients become willing to see either. Are PAs likely to become future competitors of dermatologists? Genuinely concerned dermatologists worry that a dermatology-trained PA will become part of a gatekeeper system that impedes patient access to dermatologists. This is not happening and is not at all likely to become a trend, for a number of reasons. First, primary care cannot compete with dermatology practices in remuneration for PAs. Just as financial benefits in high-production specialty practices entice physicians, the same benefits entice PAs as well. Second, according to member surveys of the SDPA, virtually 100% of fellow members work with dermatologists. Although PAs can work in any type of practice and evaluate dermatologic symptoms just as a general practitioner would, PAs who specialize in dermatology primarily practice with dermatologists, a collegial association most PAs seek out. PAs have steadfastly maintained their dependent, noncompetitive relationship with physicians and would not have it any other way. Although PAs see a good number of patients (2.8 million) with dermatologic symptoms, the NAMCS data indicate that most (72%) of these patients are also seen by a physician. Third, physicians are ultimately responsible for the actions of their PA employee. A general practitioner not trained to perform excisions or manage certain dermatologic conditions should not allow a PA to perform such duties. Similar to much of medicine, the PA profession continues to evolve, with many members moving awa

  12. National audit of acute severe asthma in adults admitted to hospital. Standards of Care Committee, British Thoracic Society.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, M G; Ryland, I; Harrison, B D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To ascertain the standard of care for hospital management of acute severe asthma in adults. DESIGN--Questionnaire based retrospective multicentre survey of case records. SETTING--36 hospitals (12 teaching and 24 district general hospitals) across England, Wales, and Scotland. PATIENTS--All patients admitted with acute severe asthma between 1 August and 30 September 1990 immediately before publication of national guidelines for asthma management. MAIN MEASURES--Main recommendations of guidelines for hospital management of acute severe asthma as performed by respiratory and non-respiratory physicians. RESULTS--766 patients (median age 41 (range 16-94) years) were studied; 465 (63%) were female and 448 (61%) had had previous admissions for asthma. Deficiencies were evident for each aspect of care studied, and respiratory physicians performed better than non-respiratory physicians. 429 (56%) patients had had their treatment increased in the two weeks preceding the admission but only 237 (31%) were prescribed oral steroids. Initially 661/766 (86%) patients had peak expiratory flow measured and recorded but only 534 (70%) ever had arterial blood gas tensions assessed. 65 (8%) patients received no steroid treatment in the first 24 hours after admission. Variability of peak expiratory flow was measured before discharge in 597/759 (78%) patients, of whom 334 (56%) achieved good control (variability < 25%). 47 (6%) patients were discharged without oral or inhaled steroids; 182/743 (24%) had no planned outpatient follow up and 114 failed to attend, leaving 447 (60%) seen in clinic within two months. Only 57/629 (8%) patients were recorded as having a written management plan. CONCLUSIONS--The hospital management of a significant minority of patients deviates from recommended national standards and some deviations are potentially serious. Overall, respiratory physicians provide significantly better care than non-respiratory physicians. PMID:10142032

  13. Health Literacy, Physician Trust, and Diabetes-related Self-care Activities in Hispanics with Limited Resources

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard O.; Osborn, Chandra Y.; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Kripalani, Sunil; Rothman, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hispanics with diabetes often have deficits in health literacy (HL). We examined the association among HL, psychosocial factors, and diabetes-related self-care activities. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of 149 patients. Data included patient demographics and validated measures of HL, physician trust, self-efficacy, acculturation, self-care behaviors, and A1c. Results Participants (N=60) with limited HL were older and less educated, and had more years with diabetes compared with adequate HL participants (N=89). Limited HL participants reported greater trust in their physician, greater self-efficacy, and better diet, foot care, and medication adherence. Health literacy status was not associated with acculturation or A1c. In adjusted analyses, HL status remained associated with physician trust, and we observed a notable but nonsignificant trend between HL status and medication adherence. Discussion Lower HL was associated with greater physician trust and better medication adherence. Further research is warranted to clarify the role of HL and physician trust in optimizing self-care for Hispanics. PMID:24185168

  14. [Survey report on end-of-life care for ALS patients of ALS physicians in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Mieko

    2010-11-01

    In March 2009 we sent out the questionnaire to the 4,478 board certified neurologist to ask about the palliative care in ALS. 1,495 anonymous responses (33%) have been returned. 21% of the respondents prescribe morphine, which shows a drastic increase from the 14% in the 2007 survey. However, 77% of them had only less than 5 patients, 47% of them studied and trained themselves. It illustrates that most of the neurologists are not well experienced with morphine, and that they are isolated in practice. However, 47% of the respondents answer that they would prescribe morphine whether or not the national insurance pays. As for the withdrawal of the permanent ventilation, 21% of the respondents were asked by their patients to turn off the ventilation. While 24% of the respondents believe that the withdrawal right not should be promoted, 46% believe that such right should be granted if the decision made by the patient and/or his/her family members can explicitly be recognized. The result illustrates that the physicians are also divided. It may be the time to lay the foundation for the Japanese ALS physicians to discuss openly and candidly together to deal with the wants and wishes of their patients.

  15. [New oral anticoagulants: emerging clinical data and role of the primary care physician].

    PubMed

    Motte, S

    2011-09-01

    New oral anticoagulants offer several potential advantages including oral administration, fixed doses, no regular coagulation monitoring and dose adjustment and wide therapeutic index. The results from clinical studies for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation show that these agents are at least as effective as or superior to currently available therapies depending on the molecules and dose regimen. Physicians will have to make choices among available new agents taking into account their pharmacokinetic properties, half-life, route of elimination and patient comorbidities. But the use of these new agents in daily practice raises some issues such as temporary discontinuation in patients undergoing invasive procedures and management of patients with bleeding in the absence of specific antidote. New oral anticoagulants should be used with caution in daily practice in special populations such as elderly patients, patients with renal impairment and patients with cancer. Primary care physicians will have to play a role in monitoring and evaluating the long-term efficacy and safety of these agents in daily practice.

  16. Obamacare: what the Affordable Care Act means for patients and physicians.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark A; Lord, Richard

    2014-10-22

    The Affordable Care Act's core achievement is to make all Americans insurable, by requiring insurers to accept all applicants at rates based on population averages regardless of health status. The act also increases coverage by allowing states to expand Medicaid (the social healthcare program for families and people with low income and resources) to cover everyone near the poverty line, and by subsidizing private insurance for people who are not poor but who do not have workplace coverage. The act allows most people to keep the same kind of insurance that they currently have, and it does not change how private insurance pays physicians and hospitals. Although the act falls short of achieving truly universal coverage, nine million uninsured people have received coverage so far. Market reforms have not hurt the insurance industry's profitability, prices for individual insurance have been lower than expected, and government costs so far have been less than initially projected. The act expands several ongoing pilot programs in Medicare that reform how doctors and hospitals are paid, but it does not directly change how private insurers pay healthcare providers. Nevertheless, it has set into motion market dynamics that are affecting medical practice, such as limiting insurance networks to fewer providers and requiring patients to pay for more treatment costs out of pocket. In response, many hospitals and physicians are forming closer and larger affiliations. Further time and study are needed to learn whether these evolutionary changes will achieve their goals without harming the doctor-patient relationship.

  17. Nurse practitioners in primary care. VII. A cohort study of 99 nurses and 79 associated physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, K.; Fortin, F.; Spitzer, W. O.; Kergin, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Long-term surveillance of the employment experience and developing roles of 99 nurses and 79 associated physicians who participated in the first 5 years of the McMaster University educational program for family practice nurses was undertaken with a descriptive survey. Data were gathered by mailed questionnaires; a 97.8% response rate was attained. Sociodemographic profiles of both groups and characteristics of the practice setting where copractitioner teams functioned were determined. Selected noteworthy results show that 92.7% of the nurses were currently employed, and that 82.5% of the graduates continued in their original practice. Nurses' time invested in patient care activities increased by 105%; time devoted to clerical and housekeeping duties decreased by 42%. Changes in roles for both categories of copractitioners were important. The interdisciplinary arrangements resulted in appreciable financial disadvantages to physicians and only modest income incentives to nurses. A series of successes of the model of practice under assessment has been identified; offsetting ongoing difficulties and problems have also been enumerated. The data from this project and preceding studies can facilitate the solution of unresolved problems on the basis of evidence rather than opinion. PMID:856429

  18. Increasing adolescent immunization rates in primary care: strategies physicians use and would consider implementing.

    PubMed

    Humiston, Sharon G; Serwint, Janet R; Szilagyi, Peter G; Vincelli, Phyllis A; Dhepyasuwan, Nui; Rand, Cynthia M; Schaffer, Stanley J; Blumkin, Aaron K; Curtis, C Robinette

    2013-08-01

    Strategies to increase adolescent immunization rates have been suggested, but little is documented about which strategies clinicians actually use or would consider. In spring 2010, we surveyed primary care physicians from 2 practice-based research networks (PBRNs): Greater Rochester PBRN (GR-PBRN) and national pediatric COntinuity Research NETwork (CORNET). Network clinicians received mailed or online surveys (response rate 76%, n=148). The GR-PBRN patient population (51% suburban, 33% rural, and 16% urban) differed from that served by CORNET (85% urban). For nonseasonal vaccines recommended for adolescents, many GR-PBRN and CORNET practices reported using nurse prompts to providers at preventive visits (61% and 52%, respectively), physician education (53% and 53%), and scheduled vaccine-only visits (91% and 82%). Strategies not used that clinicians frequently indicated they would consider included patient reminder/recall and prompts to providers via nurses or electronic health records. As preventive visits and immunization recommendations grow more complex, using technology to support immunization delivery to adolescents might be effective.

  19. Risks of Treated Insomnia, Anxiety, and Depression in Health Care-Seeking Physicians: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Charles Lung-Cheng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Wu, Ming-Ping

    2015-09-01

    High occupational stress and burnout among physicians can lead to sleep problems, anxiety, depression, and even suicide. Even so, the actual risk for these behavioral health problems in health care-seeking physicians has been seldom explored. The aim of this study was to determine whether physicians have higher odds of treated insomnia, anxiety, and depression than the normal population.This is a nationwide population-based case-control study using the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan for the years 2007 to 2011. Physicians were obtained from the Registry for Medical Personnel in 2009. Hospital physicians who had at least 3 coded ambulatory care claims or 1 inpatient claim with a principal diagnosis of insomnia, anxiety, or depression were identified. A total of 15,150 physicians and 45,450 matched controls were enrolled. Odd ratios (ORs) of insomnia, anxiety, and depression between physicians and their control counterparts were measured.The adjusted ORs for treated insomnia, anxiety, and depression among all studied physicians were 2.028 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.892-2.175), 1.103 (95% CI, 1.020-1.193), and 0.716 (95% CI, 0.630-0.813), respectively. All specialties of physicians had significantly higher ORs for treated insomnia; among the highest was the emergency specialty. The adjusted ORs for treated anxiety among male and female physicians were 1.136 (95% CI, 1.039-1.242) and 0.827 (95% CI, 0.686-0.997), respectively. Among specialties, psychiatry and "others" had significantly higher risks of anxiety. Obstetrics and gynecology and surgery specialties had significantly lower risks of anxiety. The adjusted ORs for treated depression among physicians in age groups 35 to 50 years and >50 years were 0.560 (95% CI, 0.459-0.683) and 0.770 (95% CI, 0.619-0.959), respectively. Those in the psychiatry specialty had significantly higher risks of depression; internal and surgery specialties had significant lower risks of depression

  20. Care of Older Adults: Role of Primary Care Physicians in the Treatment of Cataracts and Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marra, Kyle V; Wagley, Sushant; Kuperwaser, Mark C; Campo, Rafael; Arroyo, Jorge G

    2016-02-01

    This article aims to facilitate optimal management of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by providing information on indications, risk factors, referral guidelines, and treatments and to describe techniques to maximize quality of life (QOL) for people with irreversible vision loss. A review of PubMed and other online databases was performed for peer-reviewed English-language articles from 1980 through August 2012 on visual impairment in elderly adults. Search terms included vision loss, visual impairment, blind, low vision, QOL combined with age-related, elderly, and aging. Articles were selected that discussed vision loss in elderly adults, effects of vision impairment on QOL, and care strategies to manage vision loss in older adults. The ability of primary care physicians (PCPs) to identify early signs of cataracts and AMD in individuals at risk of vision loss is critical to early diagnosis and management of these common age-related eye diseases. PCPs can help preserve vision by issuing aptly timed referrals and encouraging behavioral modifications that reduce risk factors. With knowledge of referral guidelines for soliciting low-vision rehabilitation services, visual aids, and community support resources, PCPs can considerably increase the QOL of individuals with uncorrectable vision loss. By offering appropriately timed referrals, promoting behavioral modifications, and allocating low-vision care resources, PCPs may play a critical role in preserving visual health and enhancing the QOL for the elderly population.

  1. Health insurance does not guarantee access to primary care: a national study of physicians' acceptance of publicly insured patients.

    PubMed

    Cykert, S; Kissling, G; Layson, R; Hansen, C

    1995-06-01

    The roles of reimbursement and other predictors that affect physicians' willingness to accept publicly insured continuing care patients were examined in a national survey. The response rate was 47%. Eighty-eight percent of the respondents were accepting new patients. Forty-two percent of these physicians were willing to accept new continuing care patients insured by Medicaid, 70% reported accepting those paying by Medicare assignment, and 85% said they accept patients covered by Medicare plus balance-billing payments. Low reimbursement was the strongest predictor for lack of acceptance. The results suggest that systems of multitiered reimbursement are associated with diminished access for patients insured in the lower tiers.

  2. The primary health care physician and the cancer patient: tips and strategies for managing sexual health

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Eric S.; Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    There is a large and growing population of long-term cancer survivors. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are playing an increasingly greater role in the care of these patients across the continuum of cancer survivorship. In this role, PCPs are faced with the responsibility of managing a range of medical and psychosocial late effects of cancer treatment. In particular, the sexual side effects of treatment which are common and have significant impact on quality of life for the cancer survivor, often go unaddressed. This is an area of clinical care and research that has received increasing attention, highlighted by the presentation of this special issue on Cancer and Sexual Health. The aims of this review are 3-fold. First, we seek to overview common presentations of sexual dysfunction related to major cancer diagnoses in order to give the PCP a sense of the medical issues that the survivor may present with. Barriers to communication about sexual health issues between patient/PCPs in order are also described in order to emphasize the importance of PCPs initiating this important conversation. Next, we provide strategies and resources to help guide the PCP in the management of sexual dysfunction in cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss case examples of survivorship sexual health issues and highlight the role that a PCP can play in each of these case examples. PMID:26816826

  3. A study of Canadian hospice palliative care volunteers' attitudes toward physician-assisted suicide.

    PubMed

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Miller, Kathryn

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of hospice palliative care (HPC) volunteers who provide in-home support (n = 47) and members of the community (n = 58) toward the issue of physician-assisted suicide (PAS). On the first part of the survey, participants responded to 15 items designed to assess their attitudes toward PAS. An examination of individual items revealed differences in opinions among members of both the groups. Responses to additional questions revealed that the majority of volunteers and community members (1) support legalizing PAS; (2) would choose HPC over PAS for themselves if they were terminally ill; and (3) think Canadians should place more priority on developing HPC rather than on legalizing PAS. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. EHR acceptance factors in ambulatory care: a survey of physician perceptions.

    PubMed

    Morton, Mary E; Wiedenbeck, Susan

    2010-01-01

    With the U.S. government calling for electronic health records (EHRs) for all Americans by the year 2014, adoption of an interoperable EHR is imminent in America's future. However, recent estimates for EHR implementation in the ambulatory care environment are just over 10 percent. This second part of a two-part study examines EHR acceptance factors in an academic-based healthcare system. Innovation diffusion theory and the Technology Acceptance Model provide a combined theoretical framework for this case study. An online questionnaire was administered to 802 faculty, fellow, and resident physicians to explore the factors affecting attitudes toward EHR adoption. In this study, age, years in practice, clinical specialty, health system relationship, and prior computer experience were not predictors of EHR acceptance. In order to facilitate successful adoption of health information systems, social and behavioral factors must be addressed during the EHR planning phase.

  5. Screening for colorectal cancer: the role of the primary care physician

    PubMed Central

    Triantafillidis, John K.; Vagianos, Constantine; Gikas, Aristofanis; Korontzi, Maria

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the role of primary care physicians (PCPs) in the diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal disorders, including screening for colorectal cancer (CRC), has been recognized as very important. The available data indicate that PCPs are not adequately following CRC screening guidelines because a number of factors have been identified as significant barriers to the proper application of CRC screening guidelines. These factors include lack of time, patient reluctance, and challenges related to scheduling colonoscopy. Further positive engagement of PCPs with CRC screening is required to overcome these barriers and reach acceptable levels in screening rates. To meet the expectations of modern medicine, PCPs should not only be able to recommend occult blood testing or colonoscopy but also, under certain conditions, able to perform colonoscopy. In this review, the authors aim to provide the current knowledge of the role of PCPs in increasing the rate and successfully implementing a screening program for CRC by applying the relevant international guidelines. PMID:27676092

  6. [Update of diabetic retinopathy for Primary Care physicians: Towards an improvement of telematic medicine].

    PubMed

    Muñoz de Escalona-Rojas, J E; Quereda-Castañeda, A; García-García, O

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is considered the most common cause of blindness in the working-age population in industrialised countries, with diabetic macular oedema being the most common reason of decreased visual acuity in diabetics. According to the results of large multicentre studies, blindness prevention for RD involves conducting periodic check-ups, which include examinations of the back of the eye, so they can be treated in time. The use of non-mydriatic cameras and telemedicine have been shown to be useful in this regard (sensitivity>80% and specificity>90%). If this procedure is followed, the first retinography should be performed 5 years from diagnosis in type 1 diabetics and immediately after diagnosis in type 2 diabetics. Therefore the role of the Primary Care physician is crucial to enable early diagnosis of this disease.

  7. Reducing unnecessary hospital days to improve quality of care through physician accountability: a cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over 20% of hospital bed use is inappropriate, implying a waste of resources and the increase of patient iatrogenic risk. Methods This is a cluster, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial, carried out in a large University Hospital of Northern Italy, aiming to evaluate the effect of a strategy to reduce unnecessary hospital days. The primary outcome was the percentage of patient-days compatible with discharge. Among secondary objectives, to describe the strategy’s effect in the long-term, as well as on hospital readmissions, considered to be a marker of the quality of hospital care. The 12 medical wards with the longest length of stay participated. Effectiveness was measured at the individual level on 3498 eligible patients during monthly index days. Patients admitted or discharged on index days, or with stay >90 days, were excluded. All ward staff was blinded to the index days, while staff in the control arm and data analysts were blinded to the trial’s objectives and interventions. The strategy comprised the distribution to physicians of the list of their patients whose hospital stay was compatible with discharge according to a validated Delay Tool, and of physician length of stay profiles, followed by audits managed autonomously by the physicians of the ward. Results During the 12 months of data collection, over 50% of patient-days were judged to be compatible with discharge. Delays were mainly due to problems with activities under medical staff control. Multivariate analysis considering clustering showed that the strategy reduced patient-days compatible with discharge by 16% in the intervention vs control group, (OR=0.841; 95% CI, 0.735 to 0.963; P=0.012). Follow-up at 1 year did not yield a statistically significant difference between the percentages of patient-days judged to be compatible with discharge between the two arms (OR=0.818; 95% CI, 0.476 to 1.405; P=0.47). There was no significant difference in 30-day readmission and mortality rates

  8. Using telephone focus groups methodology to examine the prostate cancer screening practices of African-American primary care physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Louie E.; Stroud, Leonardo A.; Rose, Shyanika W.; Jorgensen, Cynthia M.

    2006-01-01

    African-American men have a greater burden from prostate cancer than do white men and men of other races/ethnicities in the United States. To date, there have been no studies of how African-American primary care physicians screen their patients for prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of telephone focus groups as a methodology and to learn about this practice among a group of African-American primary care physicians. A total of 41 physicians participated in eight telephone focus groups. Results from the study are found in a separate article. Regarding telephone focus group methodology, we found that a majority of the physicians in this study preferred telephone focus groups over the conventional face-to-face focus groups. We also discuss some of the advantages (e.g., no travel, high acceptance rates, more flexibility than in-person groups, and general cost efficiency) as well as disadvantages (e.g., nonverbal communication limits and reduction of group interaction) of this methodology. This methodology may prove useful in studies involving African-American physicians, physicians in general and other difficult-to-reach healthcare professionals. PMID:16916127

  9. Is physician supervision of the capsaicin 8% patch administration procedure really necessary? An opinion from health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Kern, Kai-Uwe; England, Janice; Roth-Daniek, Andrea; Wagner, Till

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat and can have a severe effect on quality of life. The capsaicin 8% patch is a novel treatment option that directly targets the source of peripheral neuropathic pain. It can provide pain relief for up to 12 weeks in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain. Treatment with the capsaicin 8% patch follows a clearly defined procedure, and patch application must be carried out by a physician or a health care professional under the supervision of a physician. Nonetheless, in our experience, nurses often take the lead role in capsaicin 8% patch application without the involvement of a physician. We believe that the nurse's key role is of benefit to the patients, as he or she may be better placed, because of time constraints and patient relationships, to support the patient through the application procedure than a physician. Moreover, a number of frequently prescribed drugs, including botulinum toxin and infliximab, can be administered by health care professionals without the requirement for physician supervision. Here we argue that current guidance should be amended to remove the requirement for physician supervision during application of the capsaicin 8% patch.

  10. Factors Associated With Adoption of the Electronic Health Record System Among Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Clement SK; Tong, Ellen LH; Cheung, Ngai Tseung; Chan, Wai Man; Wang, Harry HX; Kwan, Mandy WM; Fan, Carmen KM; Liu, Kirin QL

    2013-01-01

    Background A territory-wide Internet-based electronic patient record allows better patient care in different sectors. The engagement of private physicians is one of the major facilitators for implementation, but there is limited information about the current adoption level of electronic medical record (eMR) among private primary care physicians. Objective This survey measured the adoption level, enabling factors, and hindering factors of eMR, among private physicians in Hong Kong. It also evaluated the key functions and the popularity of electronic systems and vendors used by these private practitioners. Methods A central registry consisting of 4324 private practitioners was set up. Invitations for self-administered surveys and the completed questionnaires were sent and returned via fax, email, postal mail, and on-site clinic visits. Current users and non-users of eMR system were compared according to their demographic and practice characteristics. Student’s t tests and chi-square tests were used for continuous and categorical variables, respectively. Results A total of 524 completed surveys (response rate 524/4405 11.90%) were collected. The proportion of using eMR in private clinics was 79.6% (417/524). When compared with non-users, the eMR users were younger (users: 48.4 years SD 10.6 years vs non-users: 61.7 years SD 10.2 years, P<.001); more were female physicians (users: 80/417, 19.2% vs non-users: 14/107, 13.1%, P=.013); possessed less clinical experience (with more than20 years of practice: users: 261/417, 62.6% vs non-user: 93/107, 86.9%, P<.001); fewer worked under a Health Maintenance Organization (users: 347/417, 83.2% vs non-users: 97/107, 90.7%, P<.001) and more worked with practice partners (users: 126/417, 30.2% vs non-users: 4/107, 3.7%, P<.001). Efficiency (379/417, 90.9%) and reduction of medical errors (229/417, 54.9%) were the major enabling factors, while patient-unfriendliness (58/107, 54.2%) and limited consultation time (54/107, 50

  11. Are primary-care physician practices related to health behaviors likely to reduce social inequalities in health?

    PubMed

    Thebault, Jean-Laurent; Ringa, Virginie; Bloy, Géraldine; Pendola-Luchel, Isabelle; Paquet, Sylvain; Panjo, Henri; Delpech, Raphaëlle; Bucher, Sophie; Casanova, Fanny; Falcoff, Hector; Rigal, Laurent

    2017-02-09

    Our objective was to examine patients' health behaviors and the related practices of their primary-care physicians to determine whether physicians' actions might help to reduce the social inequalities in health behaviors among their patients. Fifty-two general practitioners, who were also medical school instructors in the Parisian area, volunteered to participate. A sample of 70 patients (stratified by sex) aged 40-70years was randomly chosen from each physician's patient panel and asked to complete a questionnaire about their social position and health behaviors: tobacco and alcohol use, diet, physical activity, and participation in breast and cervical cancer screening. Each physician reported their practices related to each such behavior of each patient. Mixed models were used to test for social differences. Questionnaires were collected in 2008-2009 from both patient and physician for 71% of the 3640 patients. Our results showed social inequalities disfavored those at the bottom of the social scale for all but one of the health behaviors studied among both men and women (exception: excessive alcohol consumption among women). Physicians' practices related to these health behaviors also appeared to be socially differentiated. Among men, this differentiation favored those with the lowest social position for all behaviors except physical activity. Among women, however, practices favored the most disadvantaged only for breast cancer screening. In all other cases, they were either socially neutral or unfavorable to the most disadvantaged. Physicians' practices related to their patients' health behaviors should focus more on those lowest in the social hierarchy, especially among women.

  12. Money isn't everything: rural physicians identify other factors that facilitate providing prenatal care for low-income women.

    PubMed Central

    Machala, M; Miner, M W

    1994-01-01

    The problem of physicians dropping the practice of obstetrics is becoming more serious each year in the United States. Those who remain in practice are increasingly reluctant to serve women who receive Medicaid assistance. Previous research has tended to focus on low reimbursement and liability as barriers that physicians perceive to providing prenatal care to low-income clients. In a 1992 survey in rural Idaho, however, physicians who have been serving these clients for at least 4 years rated other factors equally or more important in treating low-income women. These other factors, discussed in this paper, have to do with the administrative and psychosocial support coordinated by public health nurses for their internal clients, the physicians, as well as for their external clients, pregnant women. PMID:8190869

  13. Patients' and physicians' characteristics associated with the purchase of benzodiazepines by older primary care patients in Israel.

    PubMed

    Ayalon, Liat; Gross, Revital; Yaari, Aviv; Feldhamer, Elan; Balicer, Ran D; Goldfracht, Margalit

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated patients' and physicians' characteristics associated with the purchase of benzodiazepines by older primary care patients in Israel. The analytic sample consists of those 6,421 patients age 65 and older. We used multi-level analysis with whether or not benzodiazepines were purchased at least once between June 2005 and 2007 as an outcome. We also evaluated patients' and physicians' characteristics associated with the purchase of benzodiazepines for 6 months or longer. Almost half the sample (41.5%) purchased benzodiazepines at least once during the study period and more than half (54.5%) of those purchasing benzodiazepines had a continued purchase for 6 months or longer. Physicians' characteristics explained only a small portion of the variance associated with purchasing, whereas patients' demographic and clinical characteristics were associated with purchasing. Any intervention to improve the use of benzodiazepines should be directed at both patients and physicians.

  14. Recruiting and Retaining Primary Care Physicians in Urban Underserved Communities: The Importance of Having a Mission to Serve

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Gery; Ramey, Robin; Nunez, Felix L.; Beltran, Robert; Splawn, Robert G.; Brown, Arleen F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We examined factors influencing physician practice decisions that may increase primary care supply in underserved areas. Methods. We conducted in-depth interviews with 42 primary care physicians from Los Angeles County, California, stratified by race/ethnicity (African American, Latino, and non-Latino White) and practice location (underserved vs nonunderserved area). We reviewed transcriptions and coded them into themes by using standard qualitative methods. Results. Three major themes emerged in relation to selecting geographic- and population-based practice decisions: (1) personal motivators, (2) career motivators, and (3) clinic support. We found that subthemes describing personal motivators (e.g., personal mission and self-identity) for choosing a practice were more common in responses among physicians who worked in underserved areas than among those who did not. By contrast, physicians in nonunderserved areas were more likely to cite work hours and lifestyle as reasons for selecting their current practice location or for leaving an underserved area. Conclusions. Medical schools and shortage-area clinical practices may enhance strategies for recruiting primary care physicians to underserved areas by identifying key personal motivators and may promote long-term retention through work–life balance. PMID:20935263

  15. Physician - nurse practitioner teams in chronic disease management: the impact on costs, clinical effectiveness, and patients' perception of care.

    PubMed

    Litaker, David; Mion, Lorraine; Planavsky, Loretta; Kippes, Christopher; Mehta, Neil; Frolkis, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    Increasing demand to deliver and document therapeutic and preventive care sharpens the need for disease management strategies that accomplish these goals efficiently while preserving quality of care. The purpose of this study was to compare selected outcomes for a new chronic disease management program involving a nurse practitioner - physician team with those of an existing model of care. One hundred fifty-seven patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus were randomly assigned to their primary care physician and a nurse practitioner or their primary care physician alone. Costs for personnel directly involved in patient management, calculated from hourly rates and encounter time with patients, and pre- and post-study glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), satisfaction with care and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were assessed. Although 1-year costs for personnel were higher in the team-treated group, participants experienced significant improvements in mean HbA(1c) ( - 0.7%, p = 0.02) and HDL-c ( + 2.6 mg dL( - 1), p = 0.02). Additionally, satisfaction with care improved significantly for team-treated subjects in several sub-scales whereas the mean change over time in HRQoL did not differ significantly between groups. This study demonstrates the value of a complementary team approach to chronic disease management in improving patient-derived and clinical outcomes at modest incremental costs.

  16. A comprehensive information technology system to support physician learning at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Cook, David A; Sorensen, Kristi J; Nishimura, Rick A; Ommen, Steve R; Lloyd, Farrell J

    2015-01-01

    MayoExpert is a multifaceted information system integrated with the electronic medical record (EMR) across Mayo Clinic's multisite health system. It was developed as a technology-based solution to manage information, standardize clinical practice, and promote and document learning in clinical contexts. Features include urgent test result notifications; models illustrating expert-approved care processes; concise, expert-approved answers to frequently asked questions (FAQs); a directory of topic-specific experts; and a portfolio for provider licensure and credentialing. The authors evaluate MayoExpert's reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance. Evaluation data sources included usage statistics, user surveys, and pilot studies.As of October 2013, MayoExpert was available at 94 clinical sites in 12 states and contained 1,368 clinical topics, answers to 7,640 FAQs, and 92 care process models. In 2012, MayoExpert was accessed at least once by 2,578/3,643 (71%) staff physicians, 900/1,374 (66%) midlevel providers, and 1,728/2,291 (75%) residents and fellows. In a 2013 survey of MayoExpert users with 536 respondents, all features were highly rated (≥67% favorable). More providers reported using MayoExpert to answer questions before/after than during patient visits (68% versus 36%). During November 2012 to April 2013, MayoExpert sent 1,660 notifications of new-onset atrial fibrillation and 1,590 notifications of prolonged QT. MayoExpert has become part of routine clinical and educational operations, and its care process models now define Mayo Clinic best practices. MayoExpert's infrastructure and content will continue to expand with improved templates and content organization, new care process models, additional notifications, better EMR integration, and improved support for credentialing activities.

  17. Continuity of Care Evaluation: The View of Patients and Professionals about Urban Family Physician Program

    PubMed Central

    Jahromi, Vahid Kohpeima; Mehrolhassani, Mohammad Hossein; Dehnavieh, Reza; Anari, Hosein Saberi

    2017-01-01

    Background: A responsibility of the family physician (FP) and one of the four aspects of the delivery of primary care services is continuity of care (COC). This study aimed to determine the COC of health care in urban health centers. Methods: Between September 2015 and March 2016, we conducted a cross-sectional study using Primary Care Evaluation Tool questionnaires with multistage stratified cluster sample of FPs (n = 141) and patients (n = 710) in two provinces in Iran, Fars and Mazandaran. The questionnaires contained essential dimensions of COC: Informational, interpersonal, and longitudinal COC. Results: Almost all FPs had a computer. The FPs hadn’t kept their patients’ medical records routinely. The software had some problems, so the FPs couldn’t produce lists of patients based on their health risk and they couldn’t monitor their population. Almost 88% of FPs have written referral letters for all referred patients but 57% of them got medical feedback from specialists. About 80% of patients’ consultation times were up to 10 min. 29% of FPs knew the past problems and illnesses of the patients. From 40% to 50% of the patients stated that their FPs asked them for their desire about prescribed medicine and gave clear explanation about their illnesses. On average, patients visited their doctor 5.5 times during the previous year. Generally, patients and FPs in Mazandaran could summarize their experiences better than Fars in most topics of COC. Conclusions: It seems that after 3 years of using urban FP program in two pilot provinces, there were still some problems in COC. Strengthen software program, introducing incentives for FPs, and promoting patients’ responsibility can be used by policy-makers when they seek to enhance COC. PMID:28299031

  18. mHealth App for iOS to Help in Diagnostic Decision in Ophthalmology to Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    López, Marta Manovel; López, Miguel Maldonado; de la Torre Díez, Isabel; Jimeno, José Carlos Pastor; López-Coronado, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Decision support systems (DSS) are increasingly demanded due that diagnosis is one of the main activities that physicians accomplish every day. This fact seems critical when primary care physicians deal with uncommon problems belonging to specialized areas. The main objective of this paper is the development and user evaluation of a mobile DSS for iOS named OphthalDSS. This app has as purpose helping in anterior segment ocular diseases' diagnosis, besides offering educative content about ophthalmic diseases to users. For the deployment of this work, firstly it has been used the Apple IDE, Xcode, to develop the OphthalDSS mobile application using Objective-C as programming language. The core of the decision support system implemented by OphthalDSS is a decision tree developed by expert ophthalmologists. In order to evaluate the Quality of Experience (QoE) of primary care physicians after having tried the OphthalDSS app, a written inquiry based on the Likert scale was used. A total of 50 physicians answered to it, after trying the app during 1 month in their medical consultation. OphthalDSS is capable of helping to make diagnoses of diseases related to the anterior segment of the eye. Other features of OphthalDSS are a guide of each disease and an educational section. A 70% of the physicians answered in the survey that OphthalDSS performs in the way that they expected, and a 95% assures their trust in the reliability of the clinical information. Moreover, a 75% of them think that the decision system has a proper performance. Most of the primary care physicians agree with that OphthalDSS does the function that they expected, it is a user-friendly and the contents and structure are adequate. We can conclude that OphthalDSS is a practical tool but physicians require extra content that makes it a really useful one.

  19. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): knowledge, attitudes, practices and sources of information among physicians answering a SARS fever hotline service.

    PubMed

    Deng, J-F; Olowokure, B; Kaydos-Daniels, S C; Chang, H-J; Barwick, R S; Lee, M-L; Deng, C-Y; Factor, S H; Chiang, C-E; Maloney, S A

    2006-01-01

    In June 2003, Taiwan introduced a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) telephone hotline service to provide concerned callers with rapid access to information, advice and appropriate referral where necessary. This paper reports an evaluation of the knowledge, attitude, practices and sources of information relating to SARS among physicians who staffed the SARS fever hotline service. A retrospective survey was conducted using a self-administered postal questionnaire. Participants were physicians who staffed a SARS hotline during the SARS epidemic in Taipei, Taiwan from June 1 to 10, 2003. A response rate of 83% was obtained. All respondents knew the causative agent of SARS, and knowledge regarding SARS features and preventive practices was good. However, only 54% of respondents knew the incubation period of SARS. Hospital guidelines and news media were the major information sources. In responding to two case scenarios most physicians were likely to triage callers at high risk of SARS appropriately, but not callers at low risk. Less than half of all respondents answered both scenarios correctly. The results obtained suggest that knowledge of SARS was generally good although obtained from both medical and non-medical sources. Specific knowledge was however lacking in certain areas and this affected the ability to appropriately triage callers. Standardized education and assessment of prior knowledge of SARS could improve the ability of physicians to triage callers in future outbreaks.

  20. The use of mobile phones for acute wound care: attitudes and opinions of emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Sikka, Neal; Carlin, Katrina N; Pines, Jesse; Pirri, Michael; Strauss, Ryan; Rahimi, Faisil

    2012-01-01

    There are a significant number of emergency department (ED) visits for lacerations each year. When individuals experience skin, soft tissue, or laceration symptoms, the decision to go to the ED is not always easy on the basis of the level of severity. For such cases, it may be feasible to use a mobile phone camera to submit images of their wound to a remote medical provider who can review and help guide their care choice decisions. The authors aimed to assess patient attitudes toward the use of mobile phone technology for laceration management. Patients presenting to an urban ED for initial care and follow-up visits for lacerations were prospectively enrolled. A total of 194 patients were enrolled over 8 months. Enrolled patients answered a series of questions about their injury and a survey on attitudes about the acceptability of making management decisions using mobile phone images only. A majority of those surveyed agreed that it was acceptable to send a mobile phone picture to a physician for a recommendation and diagnosis. Patients also reported few concerns regarding privacy and security and believe that this technology could be cost effective and convenient. In this study, the majority of patients had favorable opinions of using mobile phones for laceration care. Mobile phone camera images (a) may provide a useful modality for assessment of some acute wound care needs and (b) may decrease ED visits for a high-volume complaint such as acute wounds.

  1. Mentoring: a key strategy to prepare the next generation of physicians to care for an aging America.

    PubMed

    White, Heidi K; Buhr, Gwendolen T; Pinheiro, Sandro O

    2009-07-01

    Mentoring is an important instructional strategy that should be maximally used to develop the next generation of physicians who will care for a growing population of frail older adults. Mentoring can fulfill three specific purposes: (1) help learners choose an area of specialty, (2) help fellows and new faculty navigate advancement in the academic environment, and (3) help new physicians enter a local medical community and develop a high-quality, professionally rewarding, financially viable practice that meets the needs of older adults. The components and process of mentoring are reviewed. Current and potential mechanisms to promote mentoring for the specific purpose of increasing the quality and quantity of physicians available to care for the older adult population are discussed.

  2. States' implementation of the Affordable Care Act and the supply of physicians waivered to prescribe buprenorphine for opioid dependence

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Hannah K.; Lofwall, Michelle R.; Havens, Jennifer R.; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is anticipated to affect substance use disorder (SUD) treatment, its impact on the supply of physicians waivered to treat opioid dependence with buprenorphine has not been considered. This study examined whether states more supportive of ACA, meaning those that had opted to expand Medicaid and establish a state-based health insurance exchange, experienced greater growth in physician supply than less supportive states. Methods Buprenorphine physician supply, including total physician supply, supply of 30-patient physicians, and supply of 100-patient physicians per 100,000 state residents, was measured from June 2013 to May 2015. State characteristics were drawn from multiple secondary sources, with states categorized as ACA-supportive, ACA-hybrid (where states either expanded Medicaid or established a state-based exchange), or ACA-resistant (where states took neither action). Mixed effects regression was used to estimate state-level growth curves to test whether rates of growth varied by states' approaches to implementing ACA. Results The supply of waivered physicians grew significantly over the two-year period. Rates of growth were significantly lower in ACA-hybrid and ACA-resistant states relative to growth in ACA-supportive states. Average buprenorphine physician supply at baseline varied by region, the percentage of residents covered by Medicaid, and the supply of specialty SUD treatment programs. Conclusions This study found a positive impact of the ACA on growth in the supply of buprenorphine-waivered physicians in US states. Future research should address whether the ACA affects the number of patients receiving buprenorphine, Medicaid spending, and the quality of treatment services delivered. PMID:26483356

  3. Emerging opportunities for physician-attorneys in the purchaser-driven health care industry of the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Couch, J B

    1989-01-01

    The litigation explosion of the past decade-and-a-half has provided physician-attorneys with a seemingly endless source of opportunities for full- and part-time employment. For this and other reasons, physician-attorneys in the late 1980s still devote a substantial part of their professional time to activities directly or indirectly related to medical litigation. Nevertheless, the winds of change are blowing and soon will reach hurricane force. The excesses of the medical and legal systems (best exemplified by the litigation explosion) have sown the seeds of their own ultimate destruction during the 1990s. As a result of the substantial provider glut, the purchasers of health care are now in charge. To the extent that purchasers determine that professional liability premiums, legal costs, and defensive medical practices increase their health benefit costs, they will redesign benefit programs to provide appropriate financial incentives to channel subscribers to both the high quality, cost-effective providers and alternative medical dispute resolution options other than litigation. As the percentage of lawyers' and law firms' revenues attributable to medical litigation diminishes, one of the first expenses to be cut will be that previously allocable to physician-attorneys for expert medicolegal review and case evaluation. Medical care value purchasing is rapidly becoming the centerpiece of the emerging purchaser-driven health care industry of the 1990s. This should give way to an unprecedented demand by purchasers and providers alike for medical care evaluation, health data analysis, and the implementation of systems to measure and monitor the quality and cost-effectiveness of health care delivery. Providers, especially physician-leaders, can and should play critically important roles in helping purchasers and themselves to evaluate and improve the overall quality and cost-effectiveness of health care services. It is this increasingly important area of expert

  4. Physician-Assisted Suicide and Other Forms of Euthanasia in Islamic Spiritual Care.

    PubMed

    Isgandarova, Nazila

    2015-12-01

    The muteness in the Qur'an about suicide due to intolerable pain and a firm opposition to suicide in the hadith literature formed a strong opinion among Muslims that neither repentance nor the suffering of the person can remove the sin of suicide or mercy 'killing' (al-qatl al-rahim), even if these acts are committed with the purpose of relieving suffering and pain. Some interpretations of the Islamic sources even give advantage to murderers as opposed to people who commit suicide because the murderers, at least, may have opportunity to repent for their sin. However, people who commit suicide are 'labeled' for losing faith in the afterlife without a chance to repent for their act. This paper claims that Islamic spiritual care can help people make decisions that may impact patients, family members, health care givers and the whole community by responding to questions such as 'What is the Islamic view on death?', 'What is the Islamic response to physician-assisted suicide and other forms of euthanasia?', 'What are the religious and moral underpinnings of these responses in Islam?'

  5. Distancing sedation in end-of-life care from physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Soh, Tze Ling Gwendoline Beatrice; Krishna, Lalit Kumar Radha; Sim, Shin Wei; Yee, Alethea Chung Peng

    2016-05-01

    Lipuma equates continuous sedation until death (CSD) to physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia (PAS/E) based on the premise that iatrogenic unconsciousness negates social function and, thus, personhood, leaving a patient effectively 'dead'. Others have extrapolated upon this position further, to suggest that any use of sedation and/or opioids at the end of life would be analogous to CSD and thus tantamount to PAS/E. These posits sit diametrically opposite to standard end-of-life care practices. This paper will refute Lipuma's position and the posits borne from it. We first show that prevailing end-of-life care guidelines require proportional and monitored use of sedatives and/or opioids to attenuate fears that the use of such treatment could hasten death. These guidelines also classify CSD as a last resort treatment, employed only when symptoms prove intractable, and not amenable to all standard treatment options. Furthermore, CSD is applied only when deemed appropriate by a multidisciplinary palliative medicine team. We also show that empirical data based on local views of personhood will discount concerns that iatrogenic unconsciousness is tantamount to a loss of personhood and death.

  6. Distancing sedation in end-of-life care from physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Tze Ling Gwendoline Beatrice; Krishna, Lalit Kumar Radha; Sim, Shin Wei; Yee, Alethea Chung Peng

    2016-01-01

    Lipuma equates continuous sedation until death (CSD) to physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia (PAS/E) based on the premise that iatrogenic unconsciousness negates social function and, thus, personhood, leaving a patient effectively ‘dead’. Others have extrapolated upon this position further, to suggest that any use of sedation and/or opioids at the end of life would be analogous to CSD and thus tantamount to PAS/E. These posits sit diametrically opposite to standard end-of-life care practices. This paper will refute Lipuma’s position and the posits borne from it. We first show that prevailing end-of-life care guidelines require proportional and monitored use of sedatives and/or opioids to attenuate fears that the use of such treatment could hasten death. These guidelines also classify CSD as a last resort treatment, employed only when symptoms prove intractable, and not amenable to all standard treatment options. Furthermore, CSD is applied only when deemed appropriate by a multidisciplinary palliative medicine team. We also show that empirical data based on local views of personhood will discount concerns that iatrogenic unconsciousness is tantamount to a loss of personhood and death. PMID:27211055

  7. Corruption in healthcare and medicine: why should physicians and bioethicists care and what should they do?

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Subrata

    2013-01-01

    Corruption, an undeniable reality in the health sector, is arguably the most serious ethical crisis in medicine today. However, it remains poorly addressed in scholarly journals and by professional associations of physicians and bioethicists. This article provides an overview of the forms and dynamics of corruption in healthcare as well as its implications in health and medicine. Corruption traps millions of people in poverty, perpetuates the existing inequalities in income and health, drains the available resources undermines people's access to healthcare, increases the costs of patient care and, by setting up a vicious cycle, contributes to ill health and suffering. No public health programme can succeed in a setting in which scarce resources are siphoned off, depriving the disadvantaged and poor of essential healthcare. Quality care cannot be provided by a healthcare delivery system in which kickbacks and bribery are a part of life. The medical profession, historically considered a noble one, and the bioethics community cannot evade their moral responsibility in the face of this sordid reality. There is a need to engage in public discussions and take a stand - against unethical and corrupt practices in healthcare and medicine - for the sake of the individual's well-being as well as for social good.

  8. The Changing Dynamics of Health Care: Physician Perceptions of Technology in Medical Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Jerald D.

    2012-01-01

    Political, economic, and safety concerns have militated for the adoption of electronic health records (EHR) by physicians in the United States, but current rates of adoption have failed to achieve the expected levels. This qualitative phenomenological study of practicing physicians reveals obstacles to adoption. Maintaining the physicians'…

  9. 42 CFR 447.400 - Primary care services furnished by physicians with a specified specialty or subspecialty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Primary care services furnished by physicians with a specified specialty or subspecialty. 447.400 Section 447.400 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS...

  10. Perception and Experience of Primary Care Physicians on Pap Smear Screening for Women with Intellectual Disabilities: A Preliminary Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Sung, Chang-Lin; Lin, Lan-Ping; Liu, Ta-Wen; Lin, Pei-Ying; Chen, Li-Mei; Chu, Cordia M.; Wu, Jia-Ling

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to establish evidence-based data to explore the perceptions and experience of primary care physicians in the Pap smear screening provision for women with intellectual disabilities (ID), and to analyze the associated factors in the delivery of screening services to women with ID in Taiwan. Data obtained by a cross-sectional survey…

  11. Community Physicians' Knowledge on Basic Health Care for Elderly Persons in Israel: Comparing Findings from 2006 to 1996

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubart, Emily; Segal, Refael; Mishiev, Ruth; Buchman, Ruth; Leibovitz, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Community physicians should be knowledgeable of basic geriatrics to cope with the challenges posed by the growing number of older patients and their complex needs. A survey of knowledge in basic health care for elderly persons, carried out by our team in 1996, revealed that it was insufficient. The authors repeated this survey in 2006, by using…

  12. Family physician and endocrinologist coordination as the basis for diabetes care in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Alejandra; Runkle, Isabelle; Matía, Pilar; de Miguel, Maria P; Garrido, Sofia; Cervera, Emilio; Fernandez, Maria D; Torres, Pilar; Lillo, Tomas; Martin, Patricia; Cabrerizo, Lucio; de la Torre, Nuria Garcia; Calle, Jose R; Ibarra, Jose; Charro, Aniceto L; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso L

    2008-01-01

    Background To estimate the proportion of diabetic patients (DPts) with peripheral vascular disease treated at a primary health care site after an endocrinologist-based intervention, who meet ATP III and Steno targets of metabolic control, as well as to compare the outcome with the results of the patients treated by endocrinologists. Methods A controlled, prospective over 30-months period study was conducted in area 7 of Madrid. One hundred twenty six eligible diabetic patients diagnosed as having peripheral vascular disease between January 2003 and June 2004 were included in the study. After a treatment period of three months by the Diabetes team at St Carlos Hospital, 63 patients were randomly assigned to continue their follow up by diabetes team (Group A) and other 63 to be treated by the family physicians (FP) at primary care level with continuous diabetes team coordination (Group B). 57 DPts from Group A and 59 from Group B, completed the 30 months follow-up period. At baseline both groups were similar in age, weight, time from diagnosis and metabolic control. The main outcomes of this study were the proportion of patients meeting ATP III and Steno goals for HbA1c (%), Cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, albumine-to-creatinine excretion ratio (ACR), body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), anti-aggregation treatment and smoking status. Results At the end of the follow up, no differences were found between the groups. More than 37% of diabetic patients assigned to be treated by FP achieved a HbA1c < 6.5%, more than 50% a ACR < 30 mg/g, and more than 80% reached low risk values for cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, diastolic blood pressure and were anti-aggregated, and 12% remained smokers. In contrast, less than 45% achieved a systolic blood pressure < 130 mm Hg, less than 12% had a BMI < 25 Kg.m-2 (versus 23% in group A; p < 0.05) and 49%/30% (men/women) had a waist circumference of low risk

  13. Echocardiography for patients undergoing extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a primer for intensive care physicians.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongheng

    2017-01-01

    cannot be determined in observational studies and requires randomized controlled trials in the future. The contents in this review are well known to echocardiography specialists; thus, it should be used as an educational material for emergency or intensive care physicians. There is a trend that focused echocardiography is performed by intensivists and emergency physicians.

  14. Chiropractic physicians: toward a select conceptual understanding of bureaucratic structures and functions in the health care institution

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, Marcel; Kondellas, Bill; Hang, Lam; Fredericks, Janet; Ross, Michael WV

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to present select concepts and theories of bureaucratic structures and functions so that chiropractic physicians and other health care professionals can use them in their respective practices. The society-culture-personality model can be applied as an organizational instrument for assisting chiropractors in the diagnosis and treatment of their patients irrespective of locality. Discussion Society-culture-personality and social meaningful interaction are examined in relationship to the structural and functional aspects of bureaucracy within the health care institution of a society. Implicit in the examination of the health care bureaucratic structures and functions of a society is the focus that chiropractic physicians and chiropractic students learn how to integrate, synthesize, and actualize values and virtues such as empathy, integrity, excellence, diversity, compassion, caring, and understanding with a deep commitment to self-reflection. Conclusion It is essential that future and current chiropractic physicians be aware of the structural and functional aspects of an organization so that chiropractic and other health care professionals are able to deliver care that involves the ingredients of quality, affordability, availability, accessibility, and continuity for their patients. PMID:22693481

  15. The care continuum in acromegaly: how patients, nurses, and physicians can collaborate for successful treatment experiences

    PubMed Central

    Plunkett, Cynthia; Barkan, Ariel L

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acromegaly (a condition of chronic growth hormone hypersecretion by a pituitary adenoma) often require pharmacological treatment. Somatostatin analogs (SSAs) such as pasireotide, lanreotide, and octreotide are frequently used as first-line medical therapy. As SSAs are delivered by regular subcutaneous or intramuscular injections, they can result in injection-related pain or anxiety and can be challenging to fit into patients’ lifestyles. When combined with the prolonged, debilitating psychological complications associated with acromegaly, these administration challenges can negatively impact compliance, adherence, and quality of life. Proactively managing patients’ expectations and providing appropriate, timely guidance are crucial for maximizing adherence, and ultimately, optimizing the treatment experience. As part of ongoing clinical research since 1997, our team at the University of Michigan has used SSAs to treat 30 patients with acromegaly. Based on our clinical experiences with multiple SSA administration regimens (long-acting intramuscular, long-acting deep subcutaneous, and twice-daily subcutaneous), we generated a dialog map that guides health care professionals through the many sensitive and complex patient communication issues surrounding this treatment process. Beginning with diagnosis, the dialog map includes discussion of treatment options, instruction on proper drug administration technique, and ensuring of appropriate follow-up care. At each step, we provide talking points that address the following: the patients’ clinical situation; their geographic, economic, and psychological concerns; and their inclination to communicate with clinicians. We have found that involving patients, nurses, and physicians as equal partners in the treatment process optimizes treatment initiation, adherence, and persistence in acromegaly. By encouraging collaboration across the care continuum, this dialog map can facilitate identification of the

  16. Addressing a state's physician workforce priorities through the funding of graduate medical education: the TennCare model.

    PubMed

    Summitt, R L; Herrick, R R; Martins, M

    1998-03-11

    TennCare is Tennessee's innovative program that replaces the state's Medicaid program with a health care system based on managed care and designed to cover the vast majority of the state's poor and uninsured. The program provides health care benefits not only to those eligible for Medicaid, but also to the uninsured poor who do not qualify for Medicaid and those who are uninsurable because of existing medical conditions. This article describes the allocation of TennCare graduate medical education funding, which is designed to address the state's physician workforce priorities regarding specialty mix and practice location. Under the new TennCare graduate medical education funding design, funds flow to the state's 4 medical schools and then to the sites of the residents' training. Allocation to the medical schools is based primarily on the number of primary care residents in residency programs under sponsorship of each.

  17. Noninvasive ventilation practice patterns for acute respiratory failure in Canadian tertiary care centres: A descriptive analysis

    PubMed Central

    Digby, Geneviève C; Keenan, Sean P; Parker, Christopher M; Sinuff, Tasnim; Burns, Karen E; Mehta, Sangeeta; Ronco, Juan J; Kutsogiannis, Demetrios J; Rose, Louise; Ayas, Najib T; Berthiaume, Luc R; D’Arsigny, Christine L; Stollery, Daniel E; Muscedere, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) use for patients with acute respiratory failure in Canadian hospitals, indications for use and associated outcomes are unknown. OBJECTIVE: To describe NIV practice variation in the acute setting. METHODS: A prospective observational study involving 11 Canadian tertiary care centres was performed. Data regarding NIV indication, mode and outcomes were collected for all adults (>16 years of age) treated with NIV for acute respiratory failure during a four-week period (between February and August 2011). Logistic regression with site as a random effect was used to examine the association between preselected predictors and mortality or intubation. RESULTS: A total of 330 patients (mean [± SD] 30±12 per centre) were included. The most common indications for NIV initiation were pulmonary edema (104 [31.5%]) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (99 [30.0%]). Significant differences in indications for NIV use across sites, specialty of ordering physician and location of NIV initiation were noted. Although intubation rates were not statistically different among sites (range 10.3% to 45.4%), mortality varied significantly (range 6.7% to 54.5%; P=0.006). In multivariate analysis, the most significant independent predictor of avoiding intubation was do-not-resuscitate status (OR 0.11 [95% CI 0.03 to 0.37]). CONCLUSION: Significant variability existed in NIV use and associated outcomes among Canadian tertiary care centres. Assignment of do-not-resuscitate status prevented intubation. PMID:26469155

  18. All patient refined-diagnostic related group and case mix index in acute care palliative medicine.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth L; Walsh, Declan; Davis, Mellar P; Young, Brett

    2007-03-01

    The All Patient Refined-Diagnostic Related Group (APR-DRG) is a modification of the traditional DRG that adds four classes of illness severity and four classes of mortality risk. The APR-DRG is a more accurate assessment of the complexity of care. When individuals with advanced illness are admitted to an acute inpatient palliative medicine unit, there may be a perception that they receive less intense acute care. Most of these patients, however, are multisymptomatic, have several comorbidities, and are older. For all patients admitted to the unit, a guide was followed by staff physicians to document clinical information that included the site(s) of malignancy, site(s) of metastases, disease complications, disease-related symptoms, and comorbidities. We then prospectively compared DRGs, APR-DRGs, and case mix index (CMI) from January 1-June 30, 2003, and February 1-July 31,2004, before and after the use of the guide. The overall mean severity of illness (ASOI) increased by 25% (P < 0.05). The mean CMI increased by 12% (P < 0.05). The average length of stay over the same period increased slightly from 8.97 to 9.56 days. Systematic documentation of clinical findings using a specific tool for patients admitted to an acute inpatient palliative medicine unit based on APR-DRG classifications captured a higher severity of illness and may better reflect resource utilization.

  19. Impact of electronic health record technology on the work and workflow of physicians in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Wetterneck, Tosha B.; Alyousef, Bashar; Brown, Roger L.; Cartmill, Randi S.; McGuire, Kerry; Hoonakker, Peter L.T.; Slagle, Jason; Van Roy, Kara S.; Walker, James M.; Weinger, Matthew B.; Xie, Anping; Wood, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of EHR technology on the work and workflow of ICU physicians and compare time spent by ICU resident and attending physicians on various tasks before and after EHR implementation. Design EHR technology with electronic order management (CPOE, medication administration and pharmacy system) and physician documentation was implemented in October 2007. Measurement We collected a total of 289 h of observation pre- and post-EHR implementation. We directly observed the work of residents in three ICUs (adult medical/surgical ICU, pediatric ICU and neonatal ICU) and attending physicians in one ICU (adult medical/surgical ICU). Results EHR implementation had an impact on the time distribution of tasks as well as the temporal patterns of tasks. After EHR implementation, both residents and attending physicians spent more of their time on clinical review and documentation (40% and 55% increases, respectively). EHR implementation also affected the frequency of switching between tasks, which increased for residents (from 117 to 154 tasks per hour) but decreased for attendings (from 138 to 106 tasks per hour), and the temporal flow of tasks, in particular around what tasks occurred before and after clinical review and documentation. No changes in the time spent in conversational tasks or the physical care of the patient were observed. Conclusions The use of EHR technology has a major impact on ICU physician work (e.g., increased time spent on clinical review and documentation) and workflow (e.g., clinical review and documentation becoming the focal point of many other tasks). Further studies should evaluate the impact of changes in physician work on the quality of care provided. PMID:25910685

  20. Virtual Visits for Acute, Nonurgent Care: A Claims Analysis of Episode-Level Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Wallace C; DeVries, Andrea R

    2017-01-01

    Background Expansion of virtual health care—real-time video consultation with a physician via the Internet—will continue as use of mobile devices and patient demand for immediate, convenient access to care grow. Objective The objective of the study is to analyze the care provided and the cost of virtual visits over a 3-week episode compared with in-person visits to retail health clinics (RHC), urgent care centers (UCC), emergency departments (ED), or primary care physicians (PCP) for acute, nonurgent conditions. Methods A cross-sectional, retrospective analysis of claims from a large commercial health insurer was performed to compare care and cost of patients receiving care via virtual visits for a condition of interest (sinusitis, upper respiratory infection, urinary tract infection, conjunctivitis, bronchitis, pharyngitis, influenza, cough, dermatitis, digestive symptom, or ear pain) matched to those receiving care for similar conditions in other settings. An episode was defined as the index visit plus 3 weeks following. Patients were children and adults younger than 65 years of age without serious chronic conditions. Visits were classified according to the setting where the visit occurred. Care provided was assessed by follow-up outpatient visits, ED visits, or hospitalizations; laboratory tests or imaging performed; and antibiotic use after the initial visit. Episode costs included the cost of the initial visit, subsequent medical care, and pharmacy. Results A total of 59,945 visits were included in the analysis (4635 virtual visits and 55,310 nonvirtual visits). Virtual visit episodes had similar follow-up outpatient visit rates (28.09%) as PCP (28.10%, P=.99) and RHC visits (28.59%, P=.51). During the episode, lab rates for virtual visits (12.56%) were lower than in-person locations (RHC: 36.79%, P<.001; UCC: 39.01%, P<.001; ED: 53.15%, P<.001; PCP: 37.40%, P<.001), and imaging rates for virtual visits (6.62%) were typically lower than in-person locations

  1. International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care Position Statement: Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Roger; Pettus, Katherine; Downing, Julia; Buitrago, Rosa; Munyoro, Esther; Venkateswaran, Chitra; Bhatnagar, Sushma; Radbruch, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Reports about regulations and laws on Euthanasia and Physician Assisted Suicide (PAS) are becoming increasingly common in the media. Many groups have expressed opposition to euthanasia and PAS while those in favor argue that severely chronically ill and debilitated patients have a right to control the timing and manner of their death. Others argue that both PAS and euthanasia are ethically legitimate in rare and exceptional cases. Given that these discussions as well as the new and proposed laws and regulations may have a powerful impact on patients, caregivers, and health care providers, the International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care (IAHPC) has prepared this statement. Purpose: To describe the position of the IAHPC regarding Euthanasia and PAS. Method: The IAHPC formed a working group (WG) of seven board members and two staff officers who volunteered to participate in this process. An online search was performed using the terms “position statement”, “euthanasia” “assisted suicide” “PAS” to identify existing position statements from health professional organizations. Only statements from national or pan-national associations were included. Statements from seven general medical and nursing associations and statements from seven palliative care organizations were identified. A working document including a summary of the different position statements was prepared and based on these, an initial draft was prepared. Online discussions among the members of the WG took place for a period of three months. The differences were reconciled by email discussions. The resulting draft was shared with the full board. Additional comments and suggestions were incorporated. This document represents the final version approved by the IAHPC Board of Directors. Result: IAHPC believes that no country or state should consider the legalization of euthanasia or PAS until it ensures universal access to palliative care services and to

  2. Communication between physicians and nurses as a target for improving end-of-life care in the intensive care unit: challenges and opportunities for moving forward.

    PubMed

    Puntillo, Kathleen A; McAdam, Jennifer L

    2006-11-01

    Our objective was to discuss obstacles and barriers to effective communication and collaboration regarding end-of-life issues between intensive care unit nurses and physicians. To evaluate practical interventions for improving communication and collaboration, we undertook a systematic literature review. An increase in shared decision making can result from a better understanding and respect for the perspectives and burdens felt by other caregivers. Intensive care unit nurses value their contributions to end-of-life decision making and want to have a more active role. Increased collaboration and communication can result in more appropriate care and increased physician/nurse, patient, and family satisfaction. Recommendations for improvement in communication between intensive care unit physicians and nurses include use of joint grand rounds, patient care seminars, and interprofessional dialogues. Communication interventions such as use of daily rounds forms, communication training, and a collaborative practice model have shown positive results. When communication is clear and constructive and practice is truly collaborative, the end-of-life care provided to intensive care unit patients and families by satisfied and engaged professionals will improve markedly.

  3. [Principles of intensive care in severe acute pancreatitis in 2008].

    PubMed

    Darvas, Katalin; Futó, Judit; Okrös, Ilona; Gondos, Tibor; Csomós, Akos; Kupcsulik, Péter

    2008-11-23

    Acute pancreatitis is a dynamic, often progressive disease; 14-20% require intensive care in its severe form due to multiorgan dysfunction and/or failure. This review was created using systematic literature review of articles published on this subject in the last 5 years. The outcome of severe acute pancreatitis is determined by the inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction - the prognostic scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, Glasgow Prognostic Index, Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, Multi Organ Dysfunction Syndrome Scale, Ranson Scale) can be used to determine outcome. Clinical signs (age, coexisting diseases, confusion, obesity) and biochemistry values (serum amylase, lipase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, creatinine, urea, calcium) have important prognostic roles as well. Early organ failure increases the risk of late abdominal complications and mortality. Intensive care can provide appropriate multi-function patient monitoring which helps in early recognition of complications and appropriate target-controlled treatment. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis aims at reducing systemic inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction and, on the other side, at increasing the anti-inflammatory response. Oral starvation for 24-48 hours is effective in reducing the exocrine activity of the pancreas; the efficacy of protease inhibitors is questionable. Early intravascular volume resuscitation and stable haemodynamics improve microcirculation. Early oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation provide adequate oxygenation. Electrolyte and acid-base control can be as important as tight glucose control. Adequate pain relief can be achieved by thoracic epidural catheterization. Early enteral nutrition with immunonutrition should be used. There is evidence that affecting the coagulation cascade by activated protein C can play a role in reducing the inflammatory response. The complex therapy of acute pancreatitis includes appropriate

  4. Fever Phobia as a Reason for Pediatric Emergency Department Visits: Does the Primary Care Physician Make a Difference?

    PubMed Central

    Elkon-Tamir, Erella; Rimon, Ayelet; Scolnik, Dennis; Glatstein, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Background Fever is a source of considerable parental anxiety. Numerous studies have also confirmed similar anxiety among health care workers. This study analyzed caregiver knowledge of fever, and beliefs concerning children with a febrile illness, with an emphasis on the referring physician. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 100 caregivers of children 3 months to 12 years old, treated at an urban tertiary care pediatric emergency department for fever. Caregiver knowledge was assessed with a questionnaire. Results Most caregivers correctly defined the threshold for fever as >38.0–38.3°C. Caregivers commonly believed that fever can cause brain damage and epilepsy; the frequency of this belief was not affected by whether they were referred to the emergency department by their pediatrician/family physician or by another physician or arrived without a referral. For a comfortable-appearing child with a temperature not above 38.0°C, both groups reported that they would give antipyretics in similar proportions (mean 31%). The majority of parents in both groups believed that teething could cause fever (mean 74%). Conclusion Caregivers in this study had limited knowledge of fever and its management in children, even if referred by their primary care physician. We suggest that there is a need for aggressive educational interventions to reduce parents’ fever phobia, in clinics as well as in pediatric emergency departments, and that this need may extend to the education of medical personnel as well. PMID:28178434

  5. Nurse-managed health centers and patient-centered medical homes could mitigate expected primary care physician shortage.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, David I; Chen, Peggy G; Friedberg, Mark W; Reid, Rachel; Lau, Christopher; Buerhaus, Peter I; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2013-11-01

    Numerous forecasts have predicted shortages of primary care providers, particularly in light of an expected increase in patient demand resulting from the Affordable Care Act. Yet these forecasts could be inaccurate because they generally do not allow for changes in the way primary care is delivered. We analyzed the impact of two emerging models of care--the patient-centered medical home and the nurse-managed health center--both of which use a provider mix that is richer in nurse practitioners and physician assistants than today's predominant models of care delivery. We found that projected physician shortages were substantially reduced in plausible scenarios that envisioned greater reliance on these new models, even without increases in the supply of physicians. Some less plausible scenarios even eliminated the shortage. All of these scenarios, however, may require additional changes, such as liberalized scope-of-practice laws; a larger supply of medical assistants, licensed practical nurses, and aides; and payment changes that reward providers for population health management.

  6. Lactate and lactate clearance in acute cardiac care patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Picariello, Claudio; Dini, Carlotta Sorini; Gensini, Gian Franco; Valente, Serafina

    2012-01-01

    Hyperlactataemia is commonly used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in intensive care settings. Recent studies documented that serial lactate measurements over time (or lactate clearance), may be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value for risk stratification in different pathological conditions. While the negative prognostic role of hyperlactataemia in several critical ill diseases (such as sepsis and trauma) is well established, data in patients with acute cardiac conditions (i.e. acute coronary syndromes) are scarce and controversial. The present paper provides an overview of the current available evidence on the clinical role of lactic acid levels and lactate clearance in acute cardiac settings (acute coronary syndromes, cardiogenic shock, cardiac surgery), focusing on its prognostic role. PMID:24062898

  7. Blueprint for Implementing New Processes in Acute Care: Rescuing Adult Patients With Intraosseous Access.

    PubMed

    Chreiman, Kristen M; Kim, Patrick K; Garbovsky, Lyudmila A; Schweickert, William D

    2015-01-01

    The intraosseous (IO) access initiative at an urban university adult level 1 trauma center began from the need for a more expeditious vascular access route to rescue patients in extremis. The goal of this project was a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving to increase access of IO catheters to rescue patients in all care areas. The initiative became a collaborative effort between nursing, physicians, and pharmacy to embark on an acute care endeavor to standardize IO access. This is a descriptive analysis of processes to effectively develop collaborative strategies to navigate hospital systems and successfully implement multilayered initiatives. Administration should empower nurse to advance their practice to include IO for patient rescue. Intraosseous access may expedite resuscitative efforts in patients in extremis who lack venous access or where additional venous access is required for life-saving therapies. Limiting IO dwell time may facilitate timely definitive venous access. Continued education and training by offering IO skill laboratory refreshers and annual e-learning didactic is optimal for maintaining proficiency and knowledge. More research opportunities exist to determine medication safety and efficacy in adult patients in the acute care setting.

  8. Training Latin American primary care physicians in the WPA module on depression: results of a multicenter trial

    PubMed Central

    LEVAV, ITZHAK; KOHN, ROBERT; MONTOYA, IVAN; PALACIO, CARLOS; ROZIC, PABLO; SOLANO, IDA; VALENTINI, WILLIANS; VICENTE, BENJAMIN; MORALES, JORGE CASTRO; EIGUETA, FRANCISCO ESPEJO; SARAVANAN, YAMINI; MIRANDA, CLAUDIO T.; SARTORIUS, NORMAN

    2008-01-01

    Background In order to improve care for people with depressive disorders and to reduce the increasing burden of depression, the American Regional Office of the World Health Organization has launched a major region-wide initiative. A central part of this effort was directed to the primary care system where the diagnosis and treatment of depression are deficient in many countries. This study evaluated the materials developed by the World Psychiatric Association in a training program on depression among primary care physicians by measuring changes in their knowledge, attitudes, and practice (KAP). Method One hundred and seven physicians and 6174 patients from five Latin American countries participated in the trial. KAP were assessed 1 month before and 1 month following the training program. In addition, the presence of depressive symptoms was measured in patients who visited the clinic during a typical week at both times using the Zung Depression Scale and a DSM-IV/ICD-10 major depression checklist. Results The program slightly improved knowledge about depression and modified some attitudes, but had limited impact on actual practice. There was no evidence that the diagnosis of depression was made more frequently, nor was there an improvement in psychopharmacological management. The post-training agreement between physician diagnosis and that based on patient self-report remained low. The physicians, however, seemed more confident in treating depressed patients after training, and referred fewer patients to psychiatrists. Conclusions Traditional means of training primary care physicians in depression have little impact on clinical practice regardless of the quality of the teaching materials. PMID:15842027

  9. Physician attitudes toward palliative care for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: results of a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Fenstad, Eric R.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Novotny, Paul J.; Durst, Louise A.; Frantz, Robert P.; McGoon, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic, symptomatic, life-threatening illness; however, it is complex, with variable expression regarding impact on quality of life (QOL). This study investigated attitudes and comfort of physicians regarding palliative care (PC) for patients with PAH and explored potential barriers to PC in PAH. An internet-based, mixed-methods survey was distributed to Pulmonary Hypertension Clinicians and Researchers, a professional organization within the Pulmonary Hypertension Association. Only responses from physicians involved in clinical care of patients with PAH were analyzed. Of 355 clinicians/researchers, 79 (22%) returned surveys, including 76 (21%) providers involved in clinical care. Responding physicians were mainly pulmonologists (67%), practiced in university/academic medical centers (89%), had been in practice a mean of 12 ± 7 years, cared for a median of 100 PAH patients per year, and reported a high level of confidence in managing PAH (87%), advanced PAH-specific pharmacologic interventions (95%), and end-of-life care (88%). Smaller proportions were comfortable managing pain (62%) and QOL issues (78%). Most physicians (91%) reported utilizing PC consultation at least once in the prior year, primarily in the setting of end-of-life/active dying (59%), hospice referral (46%), or symptomatic dyspnea/impaired QOL (40%). The most frequent reasons for not referring patients to PC included nonapproval by the patient/family (51%) and concern that PC is “giving up hope” (43%). PAH may result in symptoms that impair QOL despite optimal PAH therapy; however, PC awareness and utilization for PAH providers is low. Opportunities may exist to integrate PC into care for PAH patients. PMID:25621164

  10. Innovative use of tele-ICU in long-term acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mullen-Fortino, Margaret; Sites, Frank D; Soisson, Michael; Galen, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Tele-intensive care units (ICUs) typically provide remote monitoring for ICUs of acute care, short-stay hospitals. As part of a joint venture project to establish a long-term acute level of care, Good Shepherd Penn Partners became the first facility to use tele-ICU technology in a nontraditional setting. Long-term acute care hospitals care for patients with complex medical problems. We describe describes the benefits and challenges of integrating a tele-ICU program into a long-term acute care setting and the impact this model of care has on patient care outcomes.

  11. [Acute care nursing pathology: case report of odynophagia].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Fabà, Eva; Sanfeliu-Julià, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Since 2008, the Institut Catala de la Salut (ICS) introduced the nurses management plan for acute pathology, in primary care centres. In the implementation of this system of organization, the ICS introduced various diseases protocols with performance algorithms. To raise awareness of the the practice of acute pathology, we present a clinical case. An urgent consultation of a 30 year-old male, with fever, sore throat and cough, which was managed and resolved by a nurse. The aim of this new management plan is that nursing is the first health professional to take care of patient coming to primary care centre without a scheduled visit, to avoid saturating the general clinic or hospital emergencies. This new organisational system involves an increase in the responsibilities of nursing in the diagnosis and treatment of patients.

  12. Intensive care unit referring physician usage of PACS workstation functions based on disease categories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Steven C.; Kundel, Harold L.; Shile, Peter E.; Carey, Bruce; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Feingold, Eric R.

    1994-05-01

    As part of a study of the use of a PACS workstation compared to film in a Medical Intensive Care Unit, logs of workstation activity were maintained. The software for the workstation kept track of the type of user (i.e., intern, resident, fellow, or attending physician) and also of the workstation image manipulation functions used. The functions logged were: no operation, brightness/contrast adjustment, invert video, zoom, and high resolution display (this last function resulted in the display of the full 2 K X 2 K image rather than the usual subsampled 1 K X 1 K image. Associated data collection allows us to obtain the diagnostic category of the examination being viewed (e.g., location of tubes and lines, rule out: pneumonia, congestive heart failure, pneumothorax, and pleural effusion). The diagnostic categories and user type were then correlated with the use of workstation functions during viewing of images. In general, there was an inverse relationship between the level of training and the number of workstation uses. About two-thirds of the time, there was no image manipulation operation performed. Adjustment of brightness/contrast had the highest percentage of use overall, followed by zoom, video invert, and high resolution display.

  13. Globalization and health care: global justice and the role of physicians.

    PubMed

    Toumi, Rabee

    2014-02-01

    In today's globalized world, nations cannot be totally isolated from or indifferent to their neighbors, especially in regards to medicine and health. While globalization has brought prosperity to millions, disparities among nations and nationals are growing raising once again the question of justice. Similarly, while medicine has developed dramatically over the past few decades, health disparities at the global level are staggering. Seemingly, what our humanity could achieve in matters of scientific development is not justly distributed to benefit everyone. In this paper, it will be argued that a global theoretical agreement on principles of justice may prove unattainable; however, a grass-roots change is warranted to change the current situation. The UNESCO Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights will be considered as a starting point to achieve this change through extracting the main values embedded in its principles. These values, namely, respecting human dignity and tending to human vulnerability with a hospitable attitude, should then be revived in medical practice. Medical education will be one possible venue to achieve that, especially through role models. Future physicians will then become the fervent advocates for a global and just distribution of health care.

  14. [Computer usage among primary health care physicians in the Vukovar-Srijem County].

    PubMed

    Iveković, Hrvoje

    2002-01-01

    A survey was carried out, aiming at identification of the current usage of computers among primary health care physicians of the Vukovar-Srijem County. The results indicated poor knowledge and practice concerning the computer usage among examinees: 58% of the responders are not aware of the possibilities of computer usage in a GP office and 82% have not had an opportunity to see the software specialised for usage at GP offices. The results obtained from this survey indicate that none of the examinees use computer during daily routine work at the GP office. Only 26% of the examinees have got a computer, and use it at home, mostly for text processing. The Internet is used actively by 8% of examinees. Lack of education and equipment have been identified as main obstacles in the process of introducing computers to GP offices. Positive attitude towards computer usage has been identified, representing an important stimulus towards a more active role of the health centres management in solving this problem.

  15. Importance of Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder to the Primary Care Physician.

    PubMed

    McCarter, Stuart J; Howell, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Sleep disorders and neurodegenerative diseases are commonly encountered in primary care. A common, but underdiagnosed sleep disorder, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD), is highly associated with Parkinson disease and related disorders. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is common. It is estimated to affect 0.5% of the general population and more than 7% of individuals older than 60 years; however, most cases go unrecognized. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder presents as dream enactment, often with patients thrashing, punching, and kicking while they are sleeping. Physicians can quickly assess for the presence of RBD with high sensitivity and specificity by asking patients the question "Have you ever been told that you act out your dreams, for example by punching or flailing your arms in the air or screaming and shouting in your sleep?" Patients with RBD exhibit subtle signs of neurodegenerative disease, such as mild motor slowing, constipation, or changes in sense of smell. These signs and symptoms may predict development of a neurodegenerative disease within 3 years. Ultimately, most patients with RBD develop a neurodegenerative disease, highlighting the importance of serial neurological examinations to assess for the presence of parkinsonism and/or cognitive impairment and prognostic counseling for these patients. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is treatable with melatonin (3-6 mg before bed) or clonazepam (0.5-1 mg before bed) and may be the most common, reversible cause of sleep-related injury. Thus, it is important to identify patients at risk of RBD in a primary care setting so that bedroom safety can be addressed and treatment may be initiated.

  16. Using Simulation Technology to Teach Diabetes Care Management Skills to Resident Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Sperl-Hillen, John; O’Connor, Patrick; Ekstrom, Heidi; Rush, William; Asche, Stephen; Fernandes, Omar; Appana, Deepika; Amundson, Gerald; Johnson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background Simulation is widely used to teach medical procedures. Our goal was to develop and implement an innovative virtual model to teach resident physicians the cognitive skills of type 1 and type 2 diabetes management. Methods A diabetes educational activity was developed consisting of (a) a curriculum using 18 explicit virtual cases, (b) a web-based interactive interface, (c) a simulation model to calculate physiologic outcomes of resident actions, and (d) a library of programmed feedback to critique and guide resident actions between virtual encounters. Primary care residents in 10 U.S. residency programs received the educational activity. Satisfaction and changes in knowledge and confidence in managing diabetes were analyzed with mixed quantitative and qualitative methods. Results Pre- and post-education surveys were completed by 92/142 (65%) of residents. Likert scale (five-point) responses were favorably higher than neutral for general satisfaction (94%), recommending to colleagues (91%), training adequacy (91%), and navigation ease (92%). Finding time to complete cases was difficult for 50% of residents. Mean ratings of knowledge (on a five-point scale) posteducational activity improved by +0.5 (p < .01) for use of all available drug classes, +0.9 (p < .01) for how to start and adjust insulin, +0.8 (p < .01) for interpreting blood glucose values, +0.8 (p < .01) for individualizing treatment goals, and +0.7 (p < .01) for confidence in managing diabetes patients. Conclusions A virtual diabetes educational activity to teach cognitive skills to manage diabetes to primary care residents was successfully developed, implemented, and well liked. It significantly improved self-assessed knowledge and confidence in diabetes management. PMID:24124951

  17. Concise Care Bundles In Acute Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kivlin, Jude; Altemimi, Harith

    2015-01-01

    The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King's Lynn, Norfolk is a 488 bed hospital providing services to approximately 331,000 people across 750 square miles. In 2012 a need was recognised for documentation (pathways) in a practical format to increase usage of national guidelines and facilitate adherence to best practice (gold standards of care) that could be easily version controlled, auditable and provide support in clinical decision-making by junior doctors. BMJ Action Sets[1] fulfilled the brief with expert knowledge, version control and support, though they were deemed too lengthy and unworkable in fast paced settings like the medical assessment unit; they formed the base creation of concise care bundles (CCB). CCB were introduced for 21 clinical presentations and one procedure. Outcomes were fully audited and showed significant improvement in a range of measures, including an increase in completions of CHADVASC score in atrial fibrillation, antibiotics prescribed per protocol in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and Blatchford score recorded for patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleed. PMID:26734437

  18. Determinants of customer satisfaction with the health care system, with the possibility to choose a personal physician and with a family doctor in a transition country.

    PubMed

    Kersnik, J

    2001-08-01

    Many Eastern and Central European counties are reforming their health care systems. The aim of this study was to determine customer satisfaction with a reformed health care system, with the possibility of free choice of a family physician and patient satisfaction with the family physician in Slovenia and their major determinants. We used a postal survey of the patients who attended their family physician's offices during the study period. We obtained an 84% response rate. Some 72.9% of the respondents were satisfied with the current organisation of health care services, 95.5% of the respondents were satisfied with the possibility of choosing their own family physician and 58% of participants were very satisfied with the level of care received from their personal family practitioners. It was shown that higher patient satisfaction with the family physician was the most powerful predictor of patients' satisfaction with the health care system. The results show that health care reform in Slovenia has a positive impact on the consumers' perceptions of health care quality, measured in terms of consumer satisfaction with the health care system, the possibility to choose a family physician and the overall satisfaction with the family physician.

  19. Use of chest sonography in acute-care radiology().

    PubMed

    De Luca, C; Valentino, M; Rimondi, M R; Branchini, M; Baleni, M Casadio; Barozzi, L

    2008-12-01

    Diagnosis of acute lung disease is a daily challenge for radiologists working in acute-care areas. It is generally based on the results of chest radiography performed under technically unfavorable conditions. Computed tomography (CT) is undoubtedly more accurate in these cases, but it cannot always be performed on critically ill patients who need continuous care.The use of thoracic ultrasonography (US) has recently been proposed for the study of acute lung disease. It can be carried out rapidly at the bedside and does not require any particularly sophisticated equipment. This report analyzes our experience with chest sonography as a supplement to chest radiography in an Emergency Radiology Unit. We performed chest sonography - as an adjunct to chest radiography - on 168 patients with acute chest pathology. Static and dynamic US signs were analyzed in light of radiographic findings and, when possible, CT. The use of chest US improved the authors' ability to provide confident diagnoses of acute disease of the chest and lungs.

  20. Emergency department waiting room: many requests, many insured and many primary care physician referrals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Increase in waiting time often results in patients leaving the emergency department (ED) without being seen, ultimately decreasing patient satisfaction. We surveyed low-acuity patients in the ED waiting room to understand their preferences and expectations. Methods An IRB approved, 42-item survey was administered to 400 adult patients waiting in the ED waiting room for >15 min from April to August 2010. Demographics, visit reasons, triage and waiting room facility preferences were collected. Results The mean age of patients was 38.9 years (SD = 14.8), and 52.5% were females. About 53.8% of patients were employed, 79.4% had access to a primary care physician (PCP), and 17% did not have any medical insurance. The most common complaint was pain. A total of 44.4% respondents reported that they believed their problems were urgent and required immediate attention, prompting them to come to the ED, while 14.6% reported that they could not get a timely PCP appointment, and 42.9% were actually referred by their PCP to come to the ED. About 57.7% of patients considered leaving the ED if the waiting times were too long. The mean acceptable waiting time before leaving ED was 221 min (SD = 194; median 180 min, IQR 120–270). A total of 39.1% survey respondents reported being most comfortable being triaged by a physician. Respondents were least comfortable being triaged by residents. On analyzing waiting room expectations for the survey respondents, we found that 70% of the subjects wanted a better estimate of waiting time and 43.5% wanted better information on reasons for the long wait. Conclusion Contrary to popular belief, at our ED a large proportion of low-acuity patients has a PCP and is medically insured. Providing patients with appropriate reasons for the wait, an accurate estimate of waiting time and creating separate areas to examine minor illness/injuries would increase patient satisfaction within our population subset. PMID:24083339

  1. Surveillance of Physicians Causing Potential Drug-Drug Interactions in Ambulatory Care: A Pilot Study in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Heiner C.; Achermann, Rita; Stohler, Nadja; Meier, Christoph R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We analysed potential drug-drug interactions (DDI) in ambulatory care in Switzerland based on claims data from three large health insurers in 2010 to identify physicians with peculiar prescription behaviour differing from peers of the same specialty. Methods We analysed contraindicated or potentially contraindicated DDI from the national drug formulary and calculated for each physician the ratios of the number of patients with a potential DDI divided by the number of patients at risk and used a zero inflated binomial distribution to correct for the inflated number of observations with no DDI. We then calculated the probability that the number of caused potential DDI of physicians was unlikely (p-value < 0.05 and ≥0.01) and very unlikely (p-value <0.01) to be due to chance. Results Of 1'607'233 females and 1'525'307 males 1.3% and 1.2% were exposed to at least one potential DDI during 12 months. When analysing the 40 most common DDI, 598 and 416 of 18,297 physicians (3.3% and 2.3%) were causing potential DDI in a frequency unlikely (p<0.05 and p≥0.01) and very unlikely (p<0.01) to be explained by chance. Patients cared by general practitioners and cardiologists had the lowest probability (0.20 and 0.26) for not being exposed to DDI. Conclusions Contraindicated or potentially contraindicated DDI are frequent in ambulatory care in Switzerland, with a small proportion of physicians causing potential DDI in a frequency that is very unlikely to be explained by chance when compared to peers of the same specialty. PMID:26808430

  2. Is the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment unit superior to conventional acute medical care?

    PubMed Central

    Ekerstad, Niklas; Karlson, Björn W; Dahlin Ivanoff, Synneve; Landahl, Sten; Andersson, David; Heintz, Emelie; Husberg, Magnus; Alwin, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) unit is superior to the care in a conventional acute medical care unit. Design This is a clinical, prospective, randomized, controlled, one-center intervention study. Setting This study was conducted in a large county hospital in western Sweden. Participants The study included 408 frail elderly patients, aged ≥75 years, in need of acute in-hospital treatment. The patients were allocated to the intervention group (n=206) or control group (n=202). Mean age of the patients was 85.7 years, and 56% were female. Intervention This organizational form of care is characterized by a structured, systematic interdisciplinary CGA-based care at an acute elderly care unit. Measurements The primary outcome was the change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 3 months after discharge from hospital, measured by the Health Utilities Index-3 (HUI-3). Secondary outcomes were all-cause mortality, rehospitalizations, and hospital care costs. Results After adjustment by regression analysis, patients in the intervention group were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months for the following dimensions: vision (odds ratio [OR] =0.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.14–0.79), ambulation (OR =0.19, 95% CI =0.1–0.37), dexterity (OR =0.38, 95% CI =0.19–0.75), emotion (OR =0.43, 95% CI =0.22–0.84), cognition (OR = 0.076, 95% CI =0.033–0.18) and pain (OR =0.28, 95% CI =0.15–0.50). Treatment in a CGA unit was independently associated with lower 3-month mortality adjusted by Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio [HR] =0.55, 95% CI =0.32–0.96), and the two groups did not differ significantly in terms of hospital care costs (P>0.05). Conclusion Patients in an acute CGA unit were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months, and the care in a CGA unit was also independently associated with lower mortality

  3. Computerized physician order entry with clinical decision support in long-term care facilities: costs and benefits to stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sujha; Hoover, Sonja; Gilman, Boyd; Field, Terry S; Mutter, Ryan; Gurwitz, Jerry H

    2007-09-01

    Nursing homes are the setting of care for growing numbers of our nation's older people, and adverse drug events are an increasingly recognized safety and quality concern in this population. Health information technology, including computerized physician/provider order entry (CPOE) with clinical decision support (CDS), has been proposed as an important systems-based approach for reducing medication errors and preventable drug-related injuries. This article describes the costs and benefits of CPOE with CDS for the various stakeholders involved in long-term care (LTC), including nurses, physicians, the pharmacy, the laboratory, the payer (e.g., the insurer), nursing home residents, and the LTC facility. Critical barriers to adoption of these systems are discussed, primarily from an economic perspective. The analysis suggests that multiple stakeholders will incur the costs related to implementation of CPOE with CDS in the LTC setting, but the costs incurred by each may not be aligned with the benefits, which may present a major barrier to broad adoption. Physicians and LTC facilities are likely to bear a large burden of the costs, whereas residents and payers will enjoy a large portion of the benefits. Consideration of these costs and benefits suggests that financial incentives to physicians and facilities may be necessary to encourage and accelerate widespread use of these systems in the LTC setting.

  4. Projected Image and Observed Behavior of Physicians in Terminal Cancer Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Family, Gilla

    1993-01-01

    Reports on abandoned study examining potential benefits of psychotherapy to terminal cancer patients. Preliminary feasibility study found physicians' attitudes toward their dying patients as reformed and progressive. Interest shown by physicians did not translate into tangible research effort in spite of active pursuit by investigator over period…

  5. Dying patients' need for emotional support and personalized care from physicians: perspectives of patients with terminal illness, families, and health care providers.

    PubMed

    Wenrich, Marjorie D; Curtis, J Randall; Ambrozy, Donna A; Carline, Jan D; Shannon, Sarah E; Ramsey, Paul G

    2003-03-01

    This study addressed the emotional and personal needs of dying patients and the ways physicians help or hinder these needs. Twenty focus groups were held with 137 individuals, including patients with chronic and terminal illnesses, family members, health care workers, and physicians. Content analyses were performed based on grounded theory. Emotional support and personalization were 2 of the 12 domains identified as important in end-of-life care. Components of emotional support were compassion, responsiveness to emotional needs, maintaining hope and a positive attitude, and providing comfort through touch. Components of personalization were treating the whole person and not just the disease, making the patient feel unique and special, and considering the patient's social situation. Although the levels of emotional support and personalization varied, there was a minimal level, defined by compassion and treating the whole person and not just the disease, that physicians should strive to meet in caring for all dying patients. Participants also identified intermediate and advanced levels of physician behavior that provide emotional and personal support.

  6. How do people with dementia utilise primary care physicians and specialists within dementia networks? Results of the Dementia Networks in Germany (DemNet-D) study.

    PubMed

    Wübbeler, Markus; Thyrian, Jochen René; Michalowsky, Bernhard; Erdmann, Pia; Hertel, Johannes; Holle, Bernhard; Gräske, Johannes; Schäfer-Walkmann, Susanne; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Outpatient dementia healthcare is predominantly fragmented, and dementia networks (DNs) represent an integrated care concept to overcome this problem. Little is known about the patients of these networks with regard to utilisation of physicians and associated factors. We interviewed 560 caregivers of people with dementia in 13 different DNs in Germany in 2013 and assessed socio-demographics, clinical data and physician utilisation. Networks were categorised in predominantly medical DNs and community-oriented DNs. Descriptive and multivariate statistical models were used to identify associated factors between DNs and users' data. Overall, the users of networks received high rates of physician care; 93% of the sample stated at least one contact with a primary care physician within the last 6 months, and 74% had been treated by a specialist (neurology/psychiatry physician). Only 5% of the sample had no contact with a physician in the 6 months preceding the interview. Females showed a lower odds for physician specialist consultations (OR = 0.641). Users of medical DNs receive greater specialist consultations overall (OR = 8.370). Compared to the German general population and people with dementia in other settings, users of DNs receive physician care more regularly, especially with regard to the consultations of neurologist/psychiatrists. Therefore, DNs seem to perform a supportive role within the integration of physician healthcare. More research is needed on the appropriate relationship between the needs of the people with dementia and utilisation behaviour.

  7. Deciding to Seek Emergency Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Noureddine, Samar; Dumit, Nuhad Y; Saab, Mohammad

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore how patients who experience acute myocardial infarction (AMI) decide to seek emergency care. Fifty patients with AMI were interviewed at two hospitals in Lebanon. The perspective of 22 witnesses of the attack was also sought about the cardiac event. The themes that transpired from the data were as follows: making sense of the symptoms, waiting to see what happens, deciding to come to the hospital, and the family influenced the decision to seek care. The witnesses of the cardiac event, mostly family members, supported the decision to seek emergency care. Deciding to seek emergency care for AMI is complex. Nurses must solicit their patients' perception of the cardiac event to provide them with tailored education and counseling about heart attack symptoms and how to respond to them in case they recur. Family members must be included in the education process.

  8. European Society of Cardiology-Acute Cardiovascular Care Association Position paper on acute heart failure: A call for interdisciplinary care.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Christian; Christ, Michael; Cowie, Martin; Cullen, Louise; Maisel, Alan S; Masip, Josep; Miro, Oscar; McMurray, John; Peacock, Frank W; Price, Susanna; DiSomma, Salvatore; Bueno, Hector; Zeymer, Uwe; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2017-02-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) continues to have unacceptably high rates of mortality and morbidity. This position paper highlights the need for more intense interdisciplinary cooperation as one key element to overcome the challenges associated with fragmentation in the care of AHF patients. Additional aspects discussed include the importance of early diagnosis and treatment, options for initial treatment, referral bias as a potential cause for treatment preferences among experts, considerable uncertainty regarding patient disposition, the diagnosis of accompanying acute myocardial infarction, the need for antibiotic therapy, as well as assessment of intravascular volume status.

  9. European course on HPV associated pathology: guidelines for primary care physicians for the diagnosis and management of anogenital warts

    PubMed Central

    von Krogh, G; Lacey, C; Gross, G; Barrasso, R; Schneider, A

    2000-01-01

    The European Course on HPV Associated Pathology (ECHPV) was founded in 1990 by a group of clinicians, pathologists, and virologists to teach important principles for the practice and management of human papillomavirus (HPV) disease to gynaecologists, dermatologists, and other medical disciplines. These guidelines are intended to assist the practice of primary care physicians for diagnosis and treatment of anogenital warts. Key Words: anogenital warts; human papillomavirus; condylomata acuminata; guidelines PMID:10961190

  10. Management of Gastrointestinal Disorders in Central and Eastern Europe: Self-Reported Practice of Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    PALKA, Małgorzata; KRZTOŃ-KRÓLEWIECKA, Anna; TOMASIK, Tomasz; SEIFERT, Bohumil; WÓJTOWICZ, Ewa; WINDAK, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal disorders account for 7–10% of all consultations in primary care. General practitioners’ management of digestive disorders in Central and Eastern European countries is largely unknown. Aims To identify and compare variations in the self-perceived responsibilities of general practitioners in the management of digestive disorders in Central and Eastern Europe. Methods A cross-sectional survey of a randomized sample of primary care physicians from 9 countries was conducted. An anonymous questionnaire was sent via post to primary care doctors. Results We received 867 responses; the response rate was 28.9%. Over 70% of respondents reported familiarity with available guidelines for gastrointestinal diseases. For uninvestigated dyspepsia in patients under 45 years, the “test and treat” strategy was twice as popular as “test and scope”. The majority (59.8%) of family physicians would refer patients with rectal bleeding without alarm symptoms to a specialist (from 7.6% of doctors in Slovenia to 85.1% of doctors in Bulgaria; p<0.001). 93.4% of respondents declared their involvement in colorectal cancer screening. In the majority of countries, responding doctors most often reported that they order fecal occult blood tests. The exceptions were Estonia and Hungary, where the majority of family physicians referred patients to a specialist (p<0.001). Conclusions Physicians from Central and Eastern European countries understood the need for the use of guidelines for the care of patients with gastrointestinal problems, but there is broad variation between countries in their management. Numerous efforts should be undertaken to establish and implement international standards for digestive disorders’ management in general practice. PMID:27669515

  11. Outpatient care of patients with acute myeloid leukemia: Benefits, barriers, and future considerations

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Jennifer E.; Buckley, Sarah A.; Walter, Roland B.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who receive intensive induction or re-induction chemotherapy with curative intent typically experience prolonged cytopenias upon completion of treatment. Due to concerns regarding infection and bleeding risk as well as significant transfusion and supportive care requirements, patients have historically remained in the hospital until blood count recovery—a period of approximately 30 days. The rising cost of AML care has prompted physicians to reconsider this practice, and a number of small studies have suggested the safety and feasibility of providing outpatient supportive care to patients following intensive AML (re-) induction therapy. Potential benefits include a significant reduction of healthcare costs, improvement in quality of life, and decreased risk of hospital-acquired infections. In this article, we will review the currently available literature regarding this practice and discuss questions to be addressed in future studies. In addition, we will consider some of the barriers that must be overcome by institutions interested in implementing an “early discharge” policy. While outpatient management of selected AML patients appears safe, careful planning is required in order to provide the necessary support, education and rapid management of serious complications that occur among this very vulnerable patient population. PMID:27101148

  12. Planning for subacute care: predicting demand using acute activity data.

    PubMed

    Green, Janette P; McNamee, Jennifer P; Kobel, Conrad; Seraji, Md Habibur R; Lawrence, Suanne J

    2016-04-07

    Objective The aim of the present study was to develop a robust model that uses the concept of 'rehabilitation-sensitive' Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs) in predicting demand for rehabilitation and geriatric evaluation and management (GEM) care following acute in-patient episodes provided in Australian hospitals.Methods The model was developed using statistical analyses of national datasets, informed by a panel of expert clinicians and jurisdictional advice. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken using acute in-patient data, published national hospital statistics and data from the Australasian Rehabilitation Outcomes Centre.Results The predictive model comprises tables of probabilities that patients will require rehabilitation or GEM care after an acute episode, with columns defined by age group and rows defined by grouped Australian Refined (AR)-DRGs.Conclusions The existing concept of rehabilitation-sensitive DRGs was revised and extended. When applied to national data, the model provided a conservative estimate of 83% of the activity actually provided. An example demonstrates the application of the model for service planning.What is known about the topic? Health service planning is core business for jurisdictions and local areas. With populations ageing and an acknowledgement of the underservicing of subacute care, it is timely to find improved methods of estimating demand for this type of care. Traditionally, age-sex standardised utilisation rates for individual DRGs have been applied to Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) population projections to predict the future need for subacute services. Improved predictions became possible when some AR-DRGs were designated 'rehabilitation-sensitive'. This improved methodology has been used in several Australian jurisdictions.What does this paper add? This paper presents a new tool, or model, to predict demand for rehabilitation and GEM services based on in-patient acute activity. In this model, the methodology

  13. [Multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma].

    PubMed

    Ltaief, Z; Ben-Hamouda, N; Suys, T; Daniel, R T; Rossetti, A O; Oddo, M

    2014-12-10

    Management of neurocritical care patients is focused on the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury, i.e. the number of pathophysiological intracerebral (edema, ischemia, energy dysfunction, seizures) and systemic (hyperthermia, disorders of glucose homeostasis) events that occur following the initial insult (stroke, hemorrhage, head trauma, brain anoxia) that may aggravate patient outcome. The current therapeutic paradigm is based on multimodal neuromonitoring, including invasive (intracranial pressure, brain oxygen, cerebral microdialysis) and non-invasive (transcranial doppler, near-infrared spectroscopy, EEG) tools that allows targeted individualized management of acute coma in the early phase. The aim of this review is to describe the utility of multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma.

  14. [Guidelines for the early diagnosis of lung cancer for primary care physicians].

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a serious/medical and social problem. It belongs to the most common cancers. In the past decades, lung cancer has steadily held a leading place in the structure of cancer morbidity and mortality in our country and in the majority of European countries. Cigarette smoking remains to be the major if not only risk factor for lung cancer. Many attempts were previously made to set up systems for the early (timely) lung cancerdetection in risk groups through cytological and radiological examinations. Prophylactic fluorography and X-ray study have long been an important screening procedure in Russia and foreign countries. Recently this procedure has transformed into digital lung radiography. However, there have been no conclusive proofs for its efficiency in the early detection of lung cancer for a few decades. In the past decade, large-scale prospective randomized trials of low-dose computed tomography (CT) have been performed to screen lung cancer. These have shown that this technology can potentially reduce mortality from this disease. This encouraging result has caused a substantial change in the tactics of examining people at high risk for lung cancer. CT has fully replaced linear tomography and all others special X-ray procedures in the verified diagnosis of lung cancer. The indications for pre-examination CT have been considerably expanded in patients with X-ray detected pathology. The tactics for estimating the small lung tissue foci found at CT has been changed. Availability of CT, clear clinical indications for the study, and observance of the standard procedure have become important elements of the entire system for the early identification of lung cancer. These clinical recommendations largely deal just with organizational and methodological issues. The authors hope that the recommendations will serve as a guide for primary care physicians (therapists, pulmonologists,and radiologists) in the early diagnosis of lung cancer and in the optimization

  15. Update of acute kidney injury: intensive care nephrology

    PubMed Central

    Tsagalis, G

    2011-01-01

    Albeit the considerable progress that has been made both in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute renal failure (ARF) and in its treatment (continuous renal replacement therapies), the morbidity of this complex syndrome remains unacceptably high. The current review focuses on recent developments concerning the definition of ARF, new strategies for the prevention and pharmacological treatment of specific causes of ARF, dialysis treatment in the intensive care setting and provides an update on critical care issues relevant to the clinical nephrologist. PMID:21897760

  16. How do high cost-sharing policies for physician care affect inpatient care use and costs among people with chronic disease?

    PubMed

    Xin, Haichang

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly rising health care costs continue to be a significant concern in the United States. High cost-sharing strategies thus have been widely used to address rising health care costs. Since high cost-sharing policies can reduce needed care as well as unneeded care use, it raises the concern whether these policies for physician care are a good strategy for controlling costs among chronically ill patients, especially whether utilization and costs in inpatient care will increase in response. This study examined whether high cost sharing in physician care affects inpatient care utilization and costs differently between individuals with and without chronic conditions. Findings from this study will contribute to the insurance benefit design that can control care utilization and save costs of chronically ill individuals. Prior studies suffered from gaps that limit both internal validity and external validity of their findings. This study has its unique contributions by filling these gaps jointly. The study used data from the 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative sample, with a cross-sectional study design. Instrumental variable technique was used to address the endogeneity between health care utilization and cost-sharing levels. We used negative binomial regression to analyze the count data and generalized linear models for costs data. To account for national survey sampling design, weight and variance were adjusted. The study compared the effects of high cost-sharing policies on inpatient care utilization and costs between individuals with and without chronic conditions to answer the research question. The final study sample consisted of 4523 individuals; among them, 752 had hospitalizations. The multivariate analysis demonstrated consistent patterns. Compared with low cost-sharing policies, high cost-sharing policies for physician care were not associated with a greater increase in inpatient care utilization (P = .86 for chronically ill

  17. Factors Associated with Women's Chronic Disease Management: Associations of Healthcare Frustrations, Physician Support, and Self-Care Needs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Ory, Marcia G; Ahn, Sangnam; Miles, Toni P

    2013-01-01

    Previous research emphasizes the importance of reducing healthcare frustrations and enhancing physician supports to help patients engage in recommended healthcare regimens. However, less is known about how these factors are associated with aging women's knowledge about self-care behavior. This study examined the sociodemographics, health indicators, healthcare-related frustrations, and perceptions of physician support associated with middle-aged and older adult females' self-reported need for help to learn how to take better care of their health. Data were analyzed from 287 females with one or more chronic conditions who completed The National Council on Aging (NCOA) Chronic Care Survey. A logistic regression model was developed. Women who were non-White (OR = 2.26, P = 0.049) were more likely to need help learning how to better manage their health. Those who had some college education or more (OR = 0.55, P = 0.044) and lower healthcare-related frustrations (OR = 0.44, P = 0.017) and perceived to have more physician support (OR = 0.49, P = 0.033) were less likely to need help learning how to better manage their health. Findings can inform the planning, implementation, assessment, and dissemination of evidence-based self-management programs for middle-aged and older women within and outside of clinical settings.

  18. Decreasing Falls in Acute Care Medical Patients: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Leslie; Veenema, Tener Goodwin

    2017-02-06

    Falls in acute care medical patients are a complex problem impacted by the constantly changing risk factors affecting this population. This integrative literature review analyzes current evidence to determine factors that continue to make falls a top patient safety problem within the medical unit microsystem. The goal of this review is to develop an evidence-based structure to guide process improvement and effective use of organization resources.

  19. Patients’ Interactions With Physicians and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Practitioners: Older Women With Breast Cancer and Self-Managed Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Shelley R.; Wrubel, Judith; Hughes, Ellen; Beinfield, Harriet

    2009-01-01

    Older patients are more likely than ever to be under the care of both physicians and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners, yet there is little research on older patients’ experience of these different relationships. This article addresses older breast cancer patients’ seeking of concurrent care and examines patients’ understandings of interactions with physicians and CAM practitioners. This is a qualitative study of a random, population-based sample of 44 older women with breast cancer who are simultaneously under the care of at least 1 physician and 1 CAM practitioner. PMID:19147647

  20. The association between hypertension-specific care management processes and blood pressure outcomes in US-based physician organizations.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ken; Smalarz, Amy; Wu, Ning; Boulanger, Luke; Wogen, Jenifer

    2011-01-01

    Care management processes (CMP) may be implemented in health systems to improve chronic disease quality of care. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between the presence of hypertension-specific CMP and blood pressure (BP) control among hypertensive patients within selected physician organizations in the USA-modified version of the Physician Practice Connection Readiness Survey (PPC-RS), developed by The National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), was administered to chief medical officers at 28 US-based physician organizations in 2010. Hypertension-specific survey items were added to the PPC-RS and focused on medication fill compliance, chronic disease management, and patient self-management. Demographic and clinical cross-sectional data from a random sample of 300 hypertensive patients age 18 years or older were collected at each site. Physician site and patient characteristics were reported. Regression models were used to assess the relationship between hypertension-specific physician practices and patient BP control. Eligible patients had at least a 1-year history of care with the physician organization and had an encounter within the past year of data collection. Of the 28 participating sites, most had electronic medical records that handle total functionality (71.4%) and had more than 50 staff members (78.6%). Across all sites, approximately 61% of patients had controlled BP. Regression analyses found that practices that used physician education as an effort to improve medication fill compliance demonstrated improvement in BP control (changes in systolic BP: beta coefficient = -1.366, P = .034; changes in diastolic BP: beta coefficient = -0.859, P = .056). The use of a systematic process to screen or assess patients for hypertension as a risk factor was also found to be associated with improvements in BP control (changes in diastolic BP: beta coefficient = -0.860, P = .006). In addition, physician practices that maintained a list

  1. Quality indicators for acute myocardial infarction: A position paper of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Francois; Gale, Chris P; Bonnefoy, Eric; Capuano, Frederic; Claeys, Marc J; Danchin, Nicolas; Fox, Keith Aa; Huber, Kurt; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Lettino, Maddalena; Quinn, Tom; Rubini Gimenez, Maria; Bøtker, Hans E; Swahn, Eva; Timmis, Adam; Tubaro, Marco; Vrints, Christiaan; Walker, David; Zahger, Doron; Zeymer, Uwe; Bueno, Hector

    2017-02-01

    Evaluation of quality of care is an integral part of modern healthcare, and has become an indispensable tool for health authorities, the public, the press and patients. However, measuring quality of care is difficult, because it is a multifactorial and multidimensional concept that cannot be estimated solely on the basis of patients' clinical outcomes. Thus, measuring the process of care through quality indicators (QIs) has become a widely used practice in this context. Other professional societies have published QIs for the evaluation of quality of care in the context of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but no such indicators exist in Europe. In this context, the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACCA) has reflected on the measurement of quality of care in the context of AMI (ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI)) and created a set of QIs, with a view to developing programmes to improve quality of care for the management of AMI across Europe. We present here the list of QIs defined by the ACCA, with explanations of the methodology used, scientific justification and reasons for the choice for each measure.

  2. The Impact of Single-Payer Health Care on Physician Income in Canada, 1850–2005

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study traces the average net income of Canadian physicians over 150 years to determine the impact of medicare. It also compares medical income in Canada to that in the United States. Sources include academic studies, government reports, Census data, taxation statistics, and surveys. The results show that Canadian doctors enjoyed a windfall in earnings during the early years of medicare and that, after a period of adjustment, medicare enhanced physician income. Except during the windfall boom, Canadian physicians have earned less than their American counterparts. Until at least 2005, however, the medical profession was the top-earning trade in Canada relative to all other professions. PMID:21566029

  3. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY... Rehabilitation and Respiratory Care Services; Medicaid Program: Accreditation for Providers of Inpatient... ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

  4. Barriers and facilitators to recruitment of physicians and practices for primary care health services research at one centre

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While some research has been conducted examining recruitment methods to engage physicians and practices in primary care research, further research is needed on recruitment methodology as it remains a recurrent challenge and plays a crucial role in primary care research. This paper reviews recruitment strategies, common challenges, and innovative practices from five recent primary care health services research studies in Ontario, Canada. Methods We used mixed qualitative and quantitative methods to gather data from investigators and/or project staff from five research teams. Team members were interviewed and asked to fill out a brief survey on recruitment methods, results, and challenges encountered during a recent or ongoing project involving primary care practices or physicians. Data analysis included qualitative analysis of interview notes and descriptive statistics generated for each study. Results Recruitment rates varied markedly across the projects despite similar initial strategies. Common challenges and creative solutions were reported by many of the research teams, including building a sampling frame, developing front-office rapport, adapting recruitment strategies, promoting buy-in and interest in the research question, and training a staff recruiter. Conclusions Investigators must continue to find effective ways of reaching and involving diverse and representative samples of primary care providers and practices by building personal connections with, and buy-in from, potential participants. Flexible recruitment strategies and an understanding of the needs and interests of potential participants may also facilitate recruitment. PMID:21144048

  5. HIV Risk Assessment Practices of Primary Care Physicians: A National Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Lesbian Medical Association and LGBT health experts. Healthy People 2010 Companion Document for Lesbian , Gay , Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Health. 2001...asked about condom use, 50% sexual preference, 29% anal or oral sex and 27% number of sex partners. Furthermore, physicians regularly asked homosexual men...time. Lastly, 43% of physicians routinely omit questions regarding homosexuality and 59% omit questions regarding IV drug use. 14 Boekeloo, Rabin

  6. Whose responsibility is medication reconciliation: Physicians, pharmacists or nurses? A survey in an academic tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Al-Hashar, Amna; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Eriksson, Tommy; Al Za'abi, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medication errors occur frequently at transitions in care and can result in morbidity and mortality. Medication reconciliation is a recognized hospital accreditation requirement and designed to limit errors in transitions in care. Objectives: To identify beliefs, perceived roles and responsibilities of physicians, pharmacists and nurses prior to the implementation of a standardized medication reconciliation process. Methods: A survey was distributed to the three professions: pharmacists in the pharmacy and physicians and nurses in hospital in-patient units. It contained questions about the current level of medication reconciliation practices, as well as perceived roles and responsibilities of each profession when a standardized process is implemented. Value, barriers to implementing medication reconciliation and the role of information technology were also assessed. Analyses were performed using univariate statistics. Results: There was a lack of clarity of current medication reconciliation practices as well as lack of agreement between the three professions. Physicians and pharmacists considered their professions as the main providers while nurses considered physicians followed by themselves as the main providers with limited roles for pharmacists. The three professions recognize the values and benefits of medication reconciliation yet pharmacists, more than others, stated limited time to implement reconciliation is a major barrier. Obstacles such as unreliable sources of medication history, patient knowledge and lack of coordination and communication between the three professions were expressed. Conclusions: The three health care professions recognize the value of medication reconciliation and want to see it implemented in the hospital, yet there is a lack of agreement with regard to roles and responsibilities of each profession within the process. This needs to be addressed by the hospital administration to design clear procedures and defined roles

  7. Physicians' psychosocial barriers to different modes of withdrawal of life support in critical care: A qualitative study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Aita, Kaoruko; Kai, Ichiro

    2010-02-01

    Despite a number of guidelines issued in Anglo-American countries over the past few decades for forgoing treatment stating that there is no ethically relevant difference between withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatments (LST), it is recognized that many healthcare professionals in Japan as well as some of their western counterparts do not agree with this statement. This research was conducted to investigate the barriers that prevent physicians from withdrawing specific LST in critical care settings, focusing mainly on the modes of withdrawal of LST, in what the authors believe was the first study of its kind anywhere in the world. In 2006-2007, in-depth, face-to-face, semistructured interviews were conducted with 35 physicians working at emergency and critical care facilities across Japan. We elicited their experiences, attitudes, and perceptions regarding withdrawal of mechanical ventilation and other LST. The process of data analysis followed the grounded theory approach. We found that the psychosocial resistance of physicians to withdrawal of artificial devices varied according to the modes of withdrawal, showing a strong resistance to withdrawal of mechanical ventilation that requires physicians to halt the treatment when continuation of its mechanical operation is possible. However, there was little resistance to the withdrawal of percutaneous cardiopulmonary support and artificial liver support when their continuation was mechanically or physiologically impossible. The physicians shared a desire for a "soft landing" of the patient, that is, a slow and gradual death without drastic and immediate changes, which serves the psychosocial needs of the people surrounding the patient. For that purpose, vasopressors were often withheld and withdrawn. The findings suggest what the Japanese physicians avoid is not what they call a life-shortening act but an act that would not lead to a soft landing, or a slow death that looks 'natural' in the eyes of those

  8. The bulldozer and the ballet dancer: aspects of nurses' caring approaches in acute psychiatric intensive care.

    PubMed

    Björkdahl, A; Palmstierna, T; Hansebo, G

    2010-08-01

    Demanding conditions in acute psychiatric wards inhibit provision of safe, therapeutic care and leave nurses torn between humanistic ideals and the harsh reality of their daily work. The aim of this study was to describe nurses' caring approaches within this context. Data were collected from interviews with nurses working in acute psychiatric intensive care. Data were analysed using qualitative analysis, based on interpretive description. Results revealed a caring-approach continuum on which two approaches formed the main themes: the bulldozer and the ballet dancer. The bulldozer approach functioned as a shield of power that protected the ward from chaos. The ballet dancer approach functioned as a means of initiating relationships with patients. When examining the data from a theoretical perspective of caring and uncaring encounters in nursing, the ballet dancer approach was consistent with a caring approach, while the bulldozer approach was more complex and somewhat aligned with uncaring approaches. Conclusions drawn from the study are that although the bulldozer approach involves a risk for uncaring and harming actions, it also brings a potential for caring. This potential needs to be further explored and nurses should be encouraged to reflect on how they integrate paternalistic nursing styles with person-centred care.

  9. Prolonging life and delaying death: The role of physicians in the context of limited intensive care resources

    PubMed Central

    McDermid, Robert C; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2009-01-01

    Critical care is in an emerging crisis of conflict between what individuals expect and the economic burden society and government are prepared to provide. The goal of critical care support is to prevent suffering and premature death by intensive therapy of reversible illnesses within a reasonable timeframe. Recently, it has become apparent that early support in an intensive care environment can improve patient outcomes. However, life support technology has advanced, allowing physicians to prolong life (and postpone death) in circumstances that were not possible in the recent past. This has been recognized by not only the medical community, but also by society at large. One corollary may be that expectations for recovery from critical illness have also become extremely high. In addition, greater numbers of patients are dying in intensive care units after having receiving prolonged durations of life-sustaining therapy. Herein lies the emerging crisis – critical care therapy must be available in a timely fashion for those who require it urgently, yet its provision is largely dependent on a finite availability of both capital and human resources. Physicians are often placed in a troubling conflict of interest by pressures to use health resources prudently while also promoting the equitable and timely access to critical care therapy. In this commentary, these issues are broadly discussed from the perspective of the individual clinician as well as that of society as a whole. The intent is to generate dialogue on the dynamic between individual clinicians navigating the complexities of how and when to use critical care support in the context of end-of-life issues, the increasing demands placed on finite critical care capacity, and the reasonable expectations of society. PMID:19216749

  10. Prolonging life and delaying death: the role of physicians in the context of limited intensive care resources.

    PubMed

    McDermid, Robert C; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2009-02-12

    Critical care is in an emerging crisis of conflict between what individuals expect and the economic burden society and government are prepared to provide. The goal of critical care support is to prevent suffering and premature death by intensive therapy of reversible illnesses within a reasonable timeframe. Recently, it has become apparent that early support in an intensive care environment can improve patient outcomes. However, life support technology has advanced, allowing physicians to prolong life (and postpone death) in circumstances that were not possible in the recent past. This has been recognized by not only the medical community, but also by society at large. One corollary may be that expectations for recovery from critical illness have also become extremely high. In addition, greater numbers of patients are dying in intensive care units after having receiving prolonged durations of life-sustaining therapy. Herein lies the emerging crisis -- critical care therapy must be available in a timely fashion for those who require it urgently, yet its provision is largely dependent on a finite availability of both capital and human resources. Physicians are often placed in a troubling conflict of interest by pressures to use health resources prudently while also promoting the equitable and timely access to critical care therapy. In this commentary, these issues are broadly discussed from the perspective of the individual clinician as well as that of society as a whole. The intent is to generate dialogue on the dynamic between individual clinicians navigating the complexities of how and when to use critical care support in the context of end-of-life issues, the increasing demands placed on finite critical care capacity, and the reasonable expectations of society.

  11. Primary care physician time utilization before and after implementation of an electronic health record: a time-motion study.

    PubMed

    Pizziferri, Lisa; Kittler, Anne F; Volk, Lynn A; Honour, Melissa M; Gupta, Sameer; Wang, Samuel; Wang, Tiffany; Lippincott, Margaret; Li, Qi; Bates, David W

    2005-06-01

    Despite benefits associated with the use of electronic health records (EHRs), one major barrier to adoption is the concern that EHRs may take longer for physicians to use than paper-based systems. To address this issue, we performed a time-motion study in five primary care clinics. Twenty physicians were observed and specific activities were timed during a clinic session before and after EHR implementation. Surveys evaluated physicians' perceptions regarding the EHR. Post-implementation, the adjusted mean overall time spent per patient during clinic sessions decreased by 0.5 min (p=0.86; 95% confidence interval [-5.05, 6.04]) from a pre-intervention adjusted average of 27.55 min (SE=2.1) to a post-intervention adjusted average of 27.05 min (SE=1.6). A majority of survey respondents believed EHR use results in quality improvement, yet only 29% reported that EHR documentation takes the same amount of time or less compared to the paper-based system. While the EHR did not require more time for physicians during a clinic session, further studies should assess the EHR's potential impact on non-clinic time.

  12. Inflows of foreign-born physicians and their access to employment and work experiences in health care in Finland: qualitative and quantitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In many developed countries, including Finland, health care authorities customarily consider the international mobility of physicians as a means for addressing the shortage of general practitioners (GPs). This study i) examined, based on register information, the numbers of foreign-born physicians migrating to Finland and their employment sector, ii) examined, based on qualitative interviews, the foreign-born GPs’ experiences of accessing employment and work in primary care in Finland, and iii) compared experiences based on a survey of the psychosocial work environment among foreign-born physicians working in different health sectors (primary care, hospitals and private sectors). Methods Three different data sets were used: registers, theme interviews among foreign-born GPs (n = 12), and a survey for all (n = 1,292; response rate 42%) foreign-born physicians living in Finland. Methods used in the analyses were qualitative content analysis, analysis of covariance, and logistic regression analysis. Results The number of foreign-born physicians has increased dramatically in Finland since the year 2000. In 2000, a total of 980 foreign-born physicians held a Finnish licence and lived in Finland, accounting for less than 4% of the total number of practising physicians. In 2009, their proportion of all physicians was 8%, and a total of 1,750 foreign-born practising physicians held a Finnish licence and lived in Finland. Non-EU/EEA physicians experienced the difficult licensing process as the main obstacle to accessing work as a physician. Most licensed foreign-born physicians worked in specialist care. Half of the foreign-born GPs could be classified as having an ‘active’ job profile (high job demands and high levels of job control combined) according to Karasek’s demand-control model. In qualitative interviews, work in the Finnish primary health centres was described as multifaceted and challenging, but also stressful. Conclusions Primary care may not

  13. The Influence of Language Discordance Between Patient and Physician on Time-to-Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Stillman, Joshua; Williams, Olajide; Marshall, Randolph S.; Yaghi, Shadi; Willey, Joshua Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reducing door-to-imaging (DIT) time is a major focus of acute stroke quality improvement initiatives to promote rapid thrombolysis. However, recent data suggest that the imaging-to-needle (ITN) time is a greater source of treatment delay. We hypothesized that language discordance between physician and patient would contribute to prolonged ITN time, as rapidly taking a history and confirming last known well require facile communication between physician and patient. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of all patients who received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in our emergency department between July 2011 and December 2014. Baseline characteristics and relevant time intervals were compared between encounters where the treating neurologist and patient spoke the same language (concordant cases) and where they did not (discordant cases). Results: A total of 279 patients received tPA during the study period. English was the primary language for 51%, Spanish for 46%, and other languages for 3%; 59% of cases were classified as language concordant and 41% as discordant. We found no differences in median DIT (24 vs 25, P = .5), ITN time (33 vs 30, P = .3), or door-to-needle time (DTN; 58 vs 55, P = .1) between concordant and discordant groups. Similarly, among patients with the fastest and slowest ITN times, there were no differences. Conclusion: In a high-volume stroke center with a large proportion of Spanish speakers, language discordance was not associated with changes in DIT, ITN time, or DTN time. PMID:27366293

  14. Knowledge of and attitudes to influenza in unvaccinated primary care physicians and nurses

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Angela; Godoy, Pere; Castilla, Jesús; María Mayoral, José; Soldevila, Núria; Torner, Núria; Toledo, Diana; Astray, Jenaro; Tamames, Sonia; García-Gutiérrez, Susana; González-Candelas, Fernando; Martín, Vicente; Díaz, José; Working Group, the CIBERESP; in Primary Health Care Workers, for the Survey on Influenza Vaccination

    2014-01-01

    Primary healthcare workers, especially nurses, are exposed to the vast majority of patients with influenza and play an important role in vaccinating patients. Healthcare workers’ misconceptions about influenza and influenza vaccination have been reported as possible factors associated with lack of vaccination. The objective of this study was to compare the characteristics of unvaccinated physicians and unvaccinated nurses in the 2011–2012 influenza season. We performed an anonymous web survey of Spanish primary healthcare workers in 2012. Information was collected on vaccination and knowledge of and attitudes to the influenza vaccine. Multivariate analysis was performed using unconditional logistic regression. We included 461 unvaccinated physicians and 402 unvaccinated nurses. Compared with unvaccinated nurses, unvaccinated physicians had more frequently received seasonal influenza vaccination in the preceding seasons (aOR 1.58; 95% CI 1.11–2.25), and more frequently believed that vaccination of high risk individuals is effective in reducing complications (aOR 2.53; 95% CI 1.30–4.95) and that influenza can be a serious illness (aOR 1.65; 95% CI 1.17–2.32). In contrast, unvaccinated physicians were less concerned about infecting patients (aOR 0.62; 95% CI 0.40–0.96). Unvaccinated nurses had more misconceptions than physicians about influenza and the influenza vaccine and more doubts about the severity of annual infl