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Sample records for acute care unit

  1. Geriatric rehabilitation on an acute-care medical unit.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M F

    1984-09-01

    This study examined a geriatric rehabilitation pilot project on an acute-care medical unit. Over a 6-week period, using a 35-item geriatric rating scale and a mental assessment tool, changes in behaviours of 23 patients admitted to the geriatric rehabilitation module were compared to changes in behaviours of 10 elderly patients on a regular medical unit. The patients' demographic characteristics, their nursing and medical diagnoses, and discharge patterns were reviewed. Significant changes in behaviours of patients on the rehabilitation model included: increased ability to care for themselves, to maintain balance, and to communicate with others; decreased restlessness at night; decreased confusion; decreased incidence of incontinence; and improved social skills. The paper describes the geriatric rehabilitation programme and discusses implications for nursing of elderly patients in acute-care hospitals. PMID:6567647

  2. Analyzing staffing trade-offs on acute care hospital units.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Steven; Vonderhaar, Kate; Stewart, Jennifer; Virkstis, Katherine; Terry, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Given today's resource-limited environment, nurse leaders must make judicious staffing decisions to deliver safe, cost-effective care. Investing in 1 element of staffing often requires scaling back in another. A national cross section of acute care hospital unit leaders was surveyed regarding staffing resources, including nurse workload, education, specialty certification, experience, and level of support staff. The authors report findings from the survey and discuss the trade-offs observed among units regarding nurse-to-patient ratios and the proportion of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. PMID:25208268

  3. The Evolving Role of the Acute Assessment Unit - from inpatient to outpatient care.

    PubMed

    Connolly, V; Hamad, M; Scott, Y; Bramble, M

    2005-01-01

    Acute Assessment Units (AAUs) have been developed to meet the demand for emergency care. Traditionally, AAUs have been an admission route to secondary care but the role is now evolving to assessment. AAUs are complex and have many interactions both in hospitals and the community. The effective functioning of an AAU requires excellent clinical leadership, appropriate facilities, timely access to diagnostics and input from the multi-disciplinary team. Increasingly, AAUs will have to develop services which are not dependent on using hospital beds. A variety of emergency medical presentations can, with the appropriate resources, be delivered in an out-patient setting. PMID:21655513

  4. Leadership-organizational culture relationship in nursing units of acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Casida, Jesus; Pinto-Zipp, Genevieve

    2008-01-01

    The phenomena of leadership and organizational culture (OC) has been defined as the driving forces in the success or failure of an organization. Today, nurse managers must demonstrate leadership behaviors or styles that are appropriate for the constantly changing, complex, and turbulent health care delivery system. In this study, researchers explored the relationship between nurse managers' leadership styles and OC of nursing units within an acute care hospital that had achieved excellent organizational performance as demonstrated by a consistent increase in patient satisfaction ratings. The data from this study support that transformational and transactional contingent reward leaderships as nurse manager leadership styles that are associated with nursing unit OC that have the ability to balance the dynamics of flexibility and stability within their nursing units and are essential for maintaining organizational effectiveness. It is essential for first-line nursing leaders to acquire knowledge and skills on organizational cultural competence. PMID:18389837

  5. Prolonged stays in hospital acute geriatric care units: identification and analysis of causes.

    PubMed

    Parent, Vivien; Ludwig-Béal, Stéphanie; Sordet-Guépet, Hélène; Popitéan, Laura; Camus, Agnès; Da Silva, Sofia; Lubrano, Anne; Laissus, Frederick; Vaillard, Laurence; Manckoundia, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    In France, the population of very old frail patients, who require appropriate high-quality care, is increasing. Given the current economic climate, the mean duration of hospitalization (MDH) needs to be optimized. This prospective study analyzed the causes of prolonged hospitalization in an acute geriatric care unit. Over 6 months, all patients admitted to the target acute geriatric care unit were included and distributed into two groups according to a threshold stay of 14 days: long MDH group (LMDHG) and short MDH group (SMDHG). These two groups were compared. 757 patients were included. The LMDHG comprised 442 with a mean age of 86.7 years, of whom 67.65% were women and the SMDHG comprised 315 with a mean age of 86.6 years, of whom 63.2% were women. The two groups were statistically similar for age, sex, living conditions at home (alone or not, help), medical history and number of drugs. Patients in the LMDHG were more dependent (p=0.005), and were more likely to be hospitalized for social reasons (p=0.024) and to have come from their homes (p=0.011) than those in the SMDHG. The reasons for the prolonged stay, more frequent in the LMDHG than the SMDHG (p<0.05), were principally: waiting for imaging examinations, medical complications, and waiting for discharge solutions, assistance from social workers and/or specialist consultations. In order to reduce the MDH in acute geriatric care unit, it is necessary to consider the particularities of the patients who are admitted, their medico-socio-psychological management, access to technical facilities/consultations and post-discharge accommodation. PMID:27277146

  6. Establishing an acute care nursing bed unit size: employing a decision matrix framework.

    PubMed

    Ritchey, Terry; Pati, Debajyoti

    2008-01-01

    Determining the number of patient rooms for an acute care (medical-surgical) patient unit is a challenge for both healthcare architects and hospital administrators when renovating or designing a new patient tower or wing. Discussions on unit bed size and its impact on hospital operations in healthcare design literature are isolated, and clearly there is opportunity for more extensive research. Finding the optimal solution for unit bed size involves many factors, including the dynamics of the site and existing structures. This opinion paper was developed using a "balanced scorecard" concept to provide decision makers a framework for assessing and choosing a customized solution during the early planning and conceptual design phases. The context of a healthcare balanced scorecard with the quadrants of quality, finance, provider outcomes, and patient outcomes is used to compare the impact of these variables on unit bed size. PMID:22973617

  7. The evolution of an acute care hospital unit to a DRG-exempt rehabilitation unit. A preliminary communication.

    PubMed

    Parfenchuck, T A; Parziale, J R; Liberman, J R; Butcher, R P; Ahern, D K

    1990-02-01

    The Health Care Financing Administration's decision to adopt a prospective based payment system has caused many institutions to implement new policies and practices. A recent area of interest for many hospitals has been the creation of diagnosis-related group (DRG) exempt units to maximize reimbursement practices. We analyzed changes which occurred when an eight bed acute care stroke unit (SU) was converted to a DRG exempt eight bed rehabilitation unit (RU). The time period involved was 1 1/2 months before and 1 1/2 months after the transition occurred. Analysis of data from the pre- and posttransition periods revealed that: (1) length of stay increased significantly from 11.7 to 15.3 days (P less than 0.001); (2) functional independence measure (FIM) score improvement was significantly greater (P less than 0.05) for RU patients (0.84/day) than for SU patients (0.39/day); (3) disposition to home v other facilities increased significantly from 50 to 81% (P less than 0.05); (4) the overall occupancy increased from 94 to 100% and all beds were filled with rehabilitation patients; (5) the proportion of patients with Medicare as their primary insurer was comparable before (64%) and after (67%) unit conversion; (6) gross income from rehabilitation patients increased by 43%. Indirect savings via reduction of acute hospital length of stay for Medicare patients increased total income from operation of this unit. We conclude that patients on the RU stayed longer, had greater daily improvements in functional status, and were more likely to be discharged to home. This appears to be due to a more efficient use of rehabilitation beds and a concomitant overall improvement in reimbursement to the hospital.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2105736

  8. Frequency and Factors Associated with Unexpected Death in an Acute Palliative Care Unit: Expect the Unexpected

    PubMed Central

    Bruera, Sebastian; Chisholm, Gary; Santos, Renata Dos; Bruera, Eduardo; Hui, David

    2015-01-01

    Context Few studies have examined the frequency of unexpected death and its associated factors in a palliative care setting. Objectives To determine the frequency of unexpected death in two acute palliative care units (APCUs); to compare the frequency of signs of impending death between expected and unexpected deaths; and to determine the predictors associated with unexpected death. Methods In this prospective, longitudinal, observational study, consecutive patients admitted to two APCUs were enrolled and physical signs of impending death were documented twice daily until discharge or death. Physicians were asked to complete a survey within 24 hours of APCU death. The death was considered unexpected if the physician answered “yes” to the question “Were you surprised by the timing of the death?” Results In total, 193 of 203 after-death assessments (95%) were collected for analysis. Nineteen of 193 patients died unexpectedly (10%). Signs of impending death, including nonreactive pupils, inability to close eyelids, decreased response to verbal stimuli, drooping of nasolabial folds, peripheral cyanosis, pulselessness of the radial artery, and respiration with mandibular movement, were documented more frequently in expected deaths than unexpected deaths (P < 0.05). Longer disease duration was associated with unexpected death (33 months vs. 12 months, P=0.009). Conclusion Unexpected death occurred in an unexpectedly high proportion of patients in the APCU setting, and was associated with fewer signs of impending death. Our findings highlight the need for palliative care teams to be prepared for the unexpected. PMID:25499421

  9. Acute kidney injury among HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Randall, D W; Brima, N; Walker, D; Connolly, J; Laing, C; Copas, A J; Edwards, S G; Batson, S; Miller, R F

    2015-11-01

    We describe the incidence, associations and outcomes of acute kidney injury (AKI) among HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). We retrospectively analysed 223 admissions to an inner-London, University-affiliated ICU between 1999 and 2012, and identified those with AKI and performed multivariate analysis to determine associations with AKI. Of all admissions, 66% were affected by AKI of any severity and 35% developed stage 3 AKI. In multivariate analysis, AKI was associated with chronic kidney disease (odds ratio [OR] = 3.19; p = 0.014), a previous AIDS-defining illness (OR = 1.93; p = 0.039) and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, (OR = 3.49; p = 0.018, if > 30). No associations were demonstrated with use of anti-retroviral medication (including tenofovir), or an individual's HIV viral load or CD4 count. AKI was associated with higher inpatient mortality and longer duration of ICU admission. Among patients with stage 3 AKI, only 41% were alive 90 days after ICU admission. Among survivors, 74% regained good renal function, the remainder were dependent on renal replacement therapy or were left with significant ongoing renal dysfunction. Of note, many patients had baseline serum creatinine concentrations well below published reference ranges. AKI among HIV-infected patients admitted to ICU carries a poor prognosis. PMID:25411349

  10. Acute Transfusion Reactions (ATRs) in Intensive Care Unit (ICU): A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Gupta, Manvi; Gupta, Varun; Kaur, Amarjit; Gupta, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood transfusion is a frequent and integral part of critical care. Although life saving, it can occasionally be unsafe and result in a spectrum of adverse events. Acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) are probably under diagnosed in critically ill patients due to confusion of the symptoms with the underlying disease. Aim: To analyze the incidence and spectrum of ATRs occuring in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective review conducted from 1st April 2011 till 31st March 2013. The ATRs related to the administration of blood components in the patients admitted in various Intensive Care Units (ICUs) were recorded, analyzed and classified on the basis of their clinical features and laboratory tests. Results: During the study period 98651 blood components were issued. Out of these 21971 were issued to various ICUs. A total of 225 transfusion reactions were reported from the various critical care departments during this period. The most frequent were Febrile Non Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions (FNHTR) 136 (60.4%), allergic reactions 70 (31.2%), hemolytic reactions 1(0.4%) and non specific reactions 18 (8%). The incidence of ATRs in our study was found to be 1.09% in adult ICUs and 0.36% in pediatric ICUs. Conclusions: Blood transfusion is a vital therapeutic procedure with a potential risk to already critical patients. So a strict vigilance has to be kept and each transfusion has to be monitored carefully with prompt recognition and treatment of ATRs. A rational use of these products considering their deleterious effects can decrease transfusion related morbidity and mortality in the critically ill patients. PMID:24701502

  11. Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Admitted to Intensive Care Units: Outcome Analysis and Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Braess, Jan; Thudium, Johannes; Schmid, Christoph; Kochanek, Matthias; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Lebiedz, Pia; Görlich, Dennis; Gerth, Hans U.; Rohde, Christian; Kessler, Torsten; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Stelljes, Matthias; Büchner, Thomas; Schlimok, Günter; Hallek, Michael; Waltenberger, Johannes; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Heilmeier, Bernhard; Krug, Utz

    2016-01-01

    Background This retrospective, multicenter study aimed to reveal risk predictors for mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) as well as survival after ICU discharge in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) requiring treatment in the ICU. Methods and Results Multivariate analysis of data for 187 adults with AML treated in the ICU in one institution revealed the following as independent prognostic factors for death in the ICU: arterial oxygen partial pressure below 72 mmHg, active AML and systemic inflammatory response syndrome upon ICU admission, and need for hemodialysis and mechanical ventilation in the ICU. Based on these variables, we developed an ICU mortality score and validated the score in an independent cohort of 264 patients treated in the ICU in three additional tertiary hospitals. Compared with the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II, the Logistic Organ Dysfunction (LOD) score, and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, our score yielded a better prediction of ICU mortality in the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis (AUC = 0.913 vs. AUC = 0.710 [SAPS II], AUC = 0.708 [LOD], and 0.770 [SOFA] in the training cohort; AUC = 0.841 for the developed score vs. AUC = 0.730 [SAPSII], AUC = 0.773 [LOD], and 0.783 [SOFA] in the validation cohort). Factors predicting decreased survival after ICU discharge were as follows: relapse or refractory disease, previous allogeneic stem cell transplantation, time between hospital admission and ICU admission, time spent in ICU, impaired diuresis, Glasgow Coma Scale <8 and hematocrit of ≥25% at ICU admission. Based on these factors, an ICU survival score was created and used for risk stratification into three risk groups. This stratification discriminated distinct survival rates after ICU discharge. Conclusions Our data emphasize that although individual risks differ widely depending on the patient and disease status, a substantial portion of critically ill patients with AML benefit

  12. Urinary Biomarkers Improve the Diagnosis of Intrinsic Acute Kidney Injury in Coronary Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Yang, Chia-Hung; Yang, Huang-Yu; Chen, Tien-Hsing; Lin, Chan-Yu; Chang, Su-Wei; Chen, Yi-Ting; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Yang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Yung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and is frequently encountered in coronary care units (CCUs). Its clinical presentation differs considerably from that of prerenal or intrinsic AKI. We used the biomarkers calprotectin and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and compared their utility in predicting and differentiating intrinsic AKI. This was a prospective observational study conducted in a CCU of a tertiary care university hospital. Patients who exhibited any comorbidity and a kidney stressor were enrolled. Urinary samples of the enrolled patients collected between September 2012 and August 2013 were tested for calprotectin and NGAL. The definition of AKI was based on Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes classification. All prospective demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were evaluated as predictors of AKI. A total of 147 adult patients with a mean age of 67 years were investigated. AKI was diagnosed in 71 (50.3%) patients, whereas intrinsic AKI was diagnosed in 43 (60.5%) of them. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed urinary calprotectin and serum albumin as independent risk factors for intrinsic AKI. For predicting intrinsic AKI, both urinary NGAL and calprotectin displayed excellent areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) (0.918 and 0.946, respectively). A combination of these markers revealed an AUROC of 0.946. Our result revealed that calprotectin and NGAL had considerable discriminative powers for predicting intrinsic AKI in CCU patients. Accordingly, careful inspection for medication, choice of therapy, and early intervention in patients exhibiting increased biomarker levels might improve the outcomes of kidney injury. PMID:26448023

  13. Regional anesthesia for management of acute pain in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    De Pinto, Mario; Dagal, Armagan; O’Donnell, Brendan; Stogicza, Agnes; Chiu, Sheila; Edwards, William Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a major problem for Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Despite numerous improvements it is estimated that as many as 70% of the patients experience moderate-to-severe postoperative pain during their stay in the ICU. Effective pain management means not only decreasing pain intensity, but also reducing the opioids’ side effects. Minimizing nausea, vomiting, urinary retention, and sedation may indeed facilitate patient recovery and it is likely to shorten the ICU and hospital stay. Adequate postoperative and post-trauma pain management is also crucial for the achievement of effective rehabilitation. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that effective acute pain management may be helpful in reducing the development of chronic pain. When used appropriately, and in combination with other treatment modalities, regional analgesia techniques (neuraxial and peripheral nerve blocks) have the potential to reduce or eliminate the physiological stress response to surgery and trauma, decreasing the possibility of surgical complications and improving the outcomes. Also they may reduce the total amount of opioid analgesics necessary to achieve adequate pain control and the development of potentially dangerous side effects. PMID:26557482

  14. Regional anesthesia for management of acute pain in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, Mario; Dagal, Armagan; O'Donnell, Brendan; Stogicza, Agnes; Chiu, Sheila; Edwards, William Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a major problem for Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Despite numerous improvements it is estimated that as many as 70% of the patients experience moderate-to-severe postoperative pain during their stay in the ICU. Effective pain management means not only decreasing pain intensity, but also reducing the opioids' side effects. Minimizing nausea, vomiting, urinary retention, and sedation may indeed facilitate patient recovery and it is likely to shorten the ICU and hospital stay. Adequate postoperative and post-trauma pain management is also crucial for the achievement of effective rehabilitation. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that effective acute pain management may be helpful in reducing the development of chronic pain. When used appropriately, and in combination with other treatment modalities, regional analgesia techniques (neuraxial and peripheral nerve blocks) have the potential to reduce or eliminate the physiological stress response to surgery and trauma, decreasing the possibility of surgical complications and improving the outcomes. Also they may reduce the total amount of opioid analgesics necessary to achieve adequate pain control and the development of potentially dangerous side effects. PMID:26557482

  15. Impact of dialysis practice patterns on outcomes in acute kidney injury in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Annigeri, Rajeev A.; Nandeesh, Venkatappa; Karuniya, Ramanathan; Rajalakshmi, Sasikumar; Venkataraman, Ramesh; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Recent advances in dialysis therapy have made an impact on the clinical practice of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in acute kidney injury (AKI) in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). We studied the impact of RRT practice changes on outcomes in AKI in ICU over a period of 8 years. Subjects and Methods: AKI patients requiring RRT in ICU referred to a nephrologist during two different periods (period-1: Between May 2004 and May 2007, n = 69; period-2: Between August 2008 and May 2011, n = 93) were studied. The major changes in the dialysis practice during the period-2, compared to period-1 were introduction of prolonged intermittent RRT (PIRRT), early dialysis for metabolic acidosis, early initiation of RRT for anuria and positive fluid balance and use of bicarbonate-based fluids for continuous RRT (CRRT) instead of lactate buffer. The primary study outcome was 28-day hospital mortality. Results: The mean age was 53.8 ± 16.1 years and 72.6% were male. Introduction of PIRRT resulted in 37% reduction in utilization of CRRT during period-2 (from 85.5% to 53.7%). The overall mortality was high (68%) but was significantly reduced during period-2 compared to period-1 (59% vs. 79.7%, P = 0.006). Metabolic acidosis but not the mode of RRT, was the significant factor which influenced mortality. Conclusions: Adaption of PIRRT resulted in 37% reduction of utilization of CRRT. The mortality rate was significantly reduced during the period of adaption of PIRRT, possibly due to early initiation of RRT in the latter period for indications such as anuria and metabolic acidosis. PMID:26955212

  16. Psychiatric Symptoms and Acute Care Service Utilization over the Course of the Year Following Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Unit Admission: A Longitudinal Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Davydow, Dimitry S.; Hough, Catherine L.; Zatzick, Douglas; Katon, Wayne J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if the presence of in-hospital substantial acute stress symptoms, as well as substantial depressive or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms at 3-months post-intensive care unit (ICU), are associated with increased acute care service utilization over the course of the year following medical-surgical ICU admission. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Setting Academic medical center. Patients 150 patients ≥ 18 years old admitted to medical-surgical ICUs for over 24 hours. Measurements and Main Results Participants were interviewed in-hospital to ascertain substantial acute stress symptoms using the PTSD Checklist-civilian version (PCL-C). Substantial depressive and PTSD symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the PCL-C respectively at 3 months post-ICU. The number of rehospitalizations and emergency room (ER) visits were ascertained at 3 and 12 months post-ICU using the Cornell Services Index. After adjusting for participant and clinical characteristics, in-hospital substantial acute stress symptoms were independently associated with greater risk of an additional hospitalization (Relative Risk [RR]: 3.00, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.80, 4.99) over the year post-ICU. Substantial PTSD symptoms at 3 months post-ICU were independently associated with greater risk of an additional ER visit during the subsequent 9 months (RR: 2.29, 95%CI: 1.09, 4.84) even after adjusting for both rehospitalizations and ER visits between the index hospitalization and 3 months post-ICU. Conclusions Post-ICU psychiatric morbidity is associated with increased acute care service utilization during the year after a medical-surgical ICU admission. Early interventions for at-risk ICU survivors may improve longer-term outcomes and reduce subsequent acute care utilization. PMID:25083985

  17. Burden and viral aetiology of influenza-like illness and acute respiratory infection in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Tramuto, Fabio; Maida, Carmelo Massimo; Napoli, Giuseppe; Mammina, Caterina; Casuccio, Alessandra; Cala', Cinzia; Amodio, Emanuele; Vitale, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the viral aetiology of influenza-like illness (ILI) and acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) among patients requiring intensive care unit admission. A cross-sectional retrospective study was carried out in Sicily over a 4-year period. A total of 233 respiratory samples of patients with ILI/ARTI admitted to intensive care units were molecularly analyzed for the detection of a comprehensive panel of aetiologic agents of viral respiratory infections. About 45% of patients was positive for at least one pathogen. Single aetiology occurred in 75.2% of infected patients, while polymicrobial infection was found in 24.8% of positive subjects. Influenza was the most common aetiologic agent (55.7%), especially among adults. Most of patients with multiple aetiology (76.9%) were adults and elderly. Mortality rates among patients with negative or positive aetiology did not significantly differ (52.4% and 47.6%, respectively). Highly transmissible respiratory pathogens are frequently detected among patients with ILI/ARTI admitted in intensive care units, showing the occurrence of concurrent infections by different viruses. The knowledge of the circulation of several types of microorganisms is of crucial importance in terms of appropriateness of therapies, but also for the implication in prevention strategies and hospital epidemiology. PMID:26706819

  18. In Emergency Department Patients with Acute Chest Pain, Stress Cardiac MRI Observation Unit Care Reduces 1- year Cardiac-Related Health Care Expenditures: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chadwick D.; Hwang, Wenke; Case, Doug; Hoekstra, James W.; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hamilton, Craig A.; Harper, Erin N.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the direct cost of medical care and clinical events during the first year after patients with intermediate risk acute chest pain were randomized to stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) observation unit (OU) testing, versus inpatient care. Background In a recent study, randomization to OU-CMR reduced median index hospitalization cost compared to inpatient care in patients presenting to the emergency department with intermediate risk acute chest pain. Methods Emergency department patients with intermediate risk chest pain were randomized to OU-CMR (OU care, cardiac markers, stress CMR) or inpatient care (admission, care per admitting provider). This analysis reports the direct cost of cardiac-related care and clinical outcomes (MI, revascularization, cardiovascular death) during the first year of follow-up subsequent to discharge. Consistent with health economics literature, provider cost was calculated from work-related relative value units using the Medicare conversion factor; facility charges were converted to cost using departmental specific cost-to-charge ratios. Linear models were used to compare cost accumulation among study groups. Results One-hundred nine (109) randomized subjects were included in this analysis (52 OU-CMR, 57 inpatient care). The median age was 56 years; baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. At 1 year, 6% of OU-CMR and 9% of inpatient care participants experienced a major cardiac event (p=0.72) with 1 patient in each group experiencing a cardiac event after discharge. First-year cardiac-related costs were significantly lower for participants randomized to OU-CMR compared to participants receiving inpatient care (geometric mean = $3101 vs $4742 including the index visit (p = .004) and $29 vs $152 following discharge (p = .012)). During the year following randomization, 6% of OU-CMR and 9% of inpatient care participants experienced a major cardiac event (p=0.72). Conclusions An OU-CMR strategy

  19. Emergency room referral to internal medicine wards or to coronary care units of patients with first acute myocardial infarction. Israel Study Group on First Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Drory, Y; Shapira, I; Goldbourt, U; Fisman, E Z; Villa, Y; Tenenbaum, A; Pines, A

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess factors associated with ward assignment in the emergency room for patients < or = 65 years old with first acute myocardial infarction. We analysed uni- and multivariate predictors for ward assignment (coronary care unit versus internal ward). Eight major centrally located Israeli hospitals provided data during one year. The study population included 1252 patients, of whom 83% were men, 37% were hypertensives, 22% were diabetics, and 14% had previous anginal syndrome. Most patients (83%) were admitted to the coronary care unit. Internal medicine ward assignment was significantly associated with advanced age, history of hypertension or diabetes, a longer time from appearance of symptoms to arrival at the hospital, and myocardial infarction type (non-Q-wave or non-anterior). The likelihood of medical ward referral increased stepwise with the increasing number of a patient's predictive factors: those with > or = 4 factors had a > 30% chance of being assigned to a medical ward compared to a < 10% chance when there were 0-3 risk factors. Exclusion of patients with thrombolysis had no effect on the results. The shortage of cardiac care unit beds apparently leads to emergency room selection acting in detriment of patients with poorest prognoses. Clear guidelines for decision making in the emergency room are needed to resolve this paradoxical situation. PMID:10998758

  20. [The RUTA project (Registro UTIC Triveneto ANMCO). An e-network for the coronary care units for acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Di Chiara, Antonio; Zonzin, Pietro; Pavoni, Daisy; Fioretti, Paolo Maria

    2003-06-01

    In the era of evidence-based medicine, the monitoring of the adherence to the guidelines is fundamental, in order to verify the diagnostic and therapeutic processes. Informatic paperless databases allow a higher data quality, lower costs and timely analysis with overall advantages over the traditional surveys. The RUTA project (acronym of Triveneto Registry of ANMCO CCUs) was designed in 1999, aiming at creating an informatic network among the coronary care units of a large Italian region, for a permanent survey of patients admitted for acute myocardial infarction. Information ranges from the pre-hospital phase to discharge, including all relevant clinical and management variables. The database uses DBMS Personal Oracle and Power-Builder as user interface, on Windows platform. Anonymous data are sent to a central server. PMID:19400054

  1. Scrub Typhus with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and its Management in Intensive Care Unit: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sankuratri, Srinivas; Kalagara, Pavani; Samala, Kartika Balaji; Veledandi, Prabhakar Krishna; Atiketi, Srinadh Babu

    2015-05-01

    Scrub typhus is zoonotic disease caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi (O tsutsugamushi). It is transmitted to humans by the bite of trombiculid mite larvae (chiggers). It is a re-emerging infectious disease in India. Clinical manifestations include fever, headache, anorexia, myalgia, eschar, adenopathy and maculopapular rash. Complications of Scrub typhus develop after first week of illness. Complications include meningoencephalitis, jaundice, myocarditis, ARDS and renal failure. Eschar and rash may be unnoticed or absent. Thorough physical examination, identification of eschar/rash throws light in thinking about scrub typhus, treating and preventing further complications. Here, we report a case of scrub typhus with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and its management with non invasive ventilation in the intensive care unit. PMID:26155511

  2. Community-acquired pneumonia and survival of critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD patients in respiratory intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhiwei; Cheng, Yusheng; Tu, Xiongwen; Chen, Liang; Chen, Hu; Yang, Jian; Wang, Jinyan; Zhang, Liqin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to appraise the effect of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) on inhospital mortality in critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit. Patients and methods A retrospective observational study was performed. Consecutive critically ill AECOPD patients receiving treatment in a respiratory intensive care unit were reviewed from September 1, 2012, to August 31, 2015. Categorical variables were analyzed using chi-square tests, and continuous variables were analyzed by Mann–Whitney U-test. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to assess the association of CAP with survival of critically ill AECOPD patients for univariate analysis. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was performed to identify risk factors for multivariate analysis. Results A total of 80 consecutive eligible individuals were reviewed. These included 38 patients with CAP and 42 patients without CAP. Patients with CAP had a higher inhospital rate of mortality than patients without CAP (42% vs 33.3%, P<0.05). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that patients with CAP had a worse survival rate than patients without CAP (P<0.05). Clinical characteristics, including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score, C-reactive protein, and CAP, were found to be closely associated with survival of AECOPD individuals. Further multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed that CAP and APACHE II were independent risk factors for inhospital mortality in critically ill AECOPD patients (CAP: hazard ratio, 5.29; 95% CI, 1.50–18.47, P<0.01 and APACHE II: hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.06–1.37, P<0.01). Conclusion CAP may be an independent risk factor for higher inhospital mortality in critically ill AECOPD patients. PMID:27563239

  3. Development and Pilot of a Checklist for Management of Acute Liver Failure in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Iris; Karvellas, Constantine J.; Ganger, Daniel R.; Forde, Kimberly A.; Subramanian, Ram M.; Boylan, Alice; Hanje, James; Stravitz, R. Todd; Lee, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute liver failure (ALF) is an ideal condition for use of a checklist. Our aims were to develop a checklist for the management of ALF in the intensive care unit (ICU) and assess the usability of the checklist among multiple providers. Methods The initial checklist was developed from published guidelines and expert opinion. The checklist underwent pilot testing at 11 academic liver transplant centers in the US and Canada. An anonymous, written survey was used to assess the usability and quality of the checklist. Written comments were used to improve the checklist following the pilot testing period. Results We received 81 surveys involving the management of 116 patients during the pilot testing period. The overall quality of the checklist was judged to be above average to excellent by 94% of users. On a 5-point Likert scale, the majority of survey respondents agreed or agreed strongly with the following checklist characteristics: the checklist was easy to read (99% agreed/agreed strongly), easy to use (97%), items are categorized logically (98%), time to complete the checklist did not interfere with delivery of appropriate and safe patient care (94%) and was not excessively burdensome (92%), the checklist allowed the user the freedom to use his or her clinical judgment (80%), it is a useful tool in the management of acute liver failure (98%). Web-based and mobile apps were developed for use of the checklist at the point of care. Conclusion The checklist for the management of ALF in the ICU was shown in this pilot study to be easy to use, helpful and accepted by a wide variety of practitioners at multiple sites in the US and Canada. PMID:27176033

  4. Acute Poisonings Admitted to a Tertiary Level Intensive Care Unit in Northern India: Patient Profile and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Ashu Sara; Pannu, Aman; Arora, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Background Poisoning is becoming a real health care burden for developing countries like India. An improved knowledge of the patterns of poisonings, as well as the clinical course and outcomes of these cases can help to formulate better preventive and management strategies. Aim To study the demographic and clinical profiles of patients admitted to the ICU with acute poisoning and to study the factors that predict their mortality. Materials and Methods Retrospective two years (September 1, 2010 to August 31, 2012) study of all consecutive patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with acute poisoning at a tertiary care hospital in Northern India. Results Out of the 67 patients admitted to the ICU during the study period, the majority were young (median age 29 years) males (69%) who had consumed poison intentionally. Pesticides were the most commonly employed poison, notably organophosphorus compounds (22 patients, 32.8%) and aluminium phosphide (14 patients, 20.9%). While the overall mortality from all poisonings was low (18%), aluminium phosphide was highly toxic, with a mortality rate of 35%. The factors at ICU admission that were found to be associated with a significant risk of death were, high APACHE II and SOFA scores (p =0.0001 and p=0.006, respectively), as well as the need for mechanical ventilation and drugs for vasoactive support (p=0.012 and p= 0.0001, respectively). Conclusion Use of pesticides for intentional poisoning continues to be rampant in Northern India, with many patients presenting in a critical condition to tertiary level hospitals. Pesticide regulations laws, educational awareness, counseling and poison information centers will help to curtail this public health problem. PMID:26557594

  5. Prognostic value of plasma neuropeptide-Y in coronary care unit patients with and without acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ullman, B; Hulting, J; Lundberg, J M

    1994-04-01

    Plasma neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI) is elevated in patients with acute myocardial ischaemia and congestive heart failure (CHF) owing to increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system. The prognostic value of plasma NPY-LI with regard to mortality was studied in 324 random patients admitted to a coronary care unit. The one-year mortality was 37% in 113 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and 18% in those without AMI. Several factors were tested by multiple logistical regression analysis to predict the one-year mortality. Plasma NPY-LI > 60 pmol.l-1, advanced age and previous CHF were independent prognostic factors for an increased risk of mortality in patients without AMI. The mortality rate after one year in non-AMI patients with plasma NPY-LI < or = 60 pmol.l-1 was 14% compared to 69% in those with plasma NPY-LI > 60 pmol.l-1. Increased heart rate was the only independent prognostic factor for increased mortality in AMI patients. Plasma NPY-LI on admission was an independent predictor of mortality in CCU patients without AMI and thus resembles plasma noradrenaline. PMID:8070470

  6. Lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration is associated with poorer outcomes in intensive care unit admitted patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuan-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Background Accumulated studies have shown that hematological parameters [e.g., red blood cell distribution width (RDW), hemoglobin, platelet count] and serum potassium level can impact the prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, no previous study has evaluated the prognostic values of these laboratory tests simultaneously. Methods This study is based on an intensive care unit (ICU) database named Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC II). Adult patients with AMI were included, and their hematological parameters and serum ion levels on admission were extracted. The relationships between these laboratory tests and hospital mortality were evaluated using a logistic regression model and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The effects of these laboratory tests on 1-year mortality were evaluated using a Cox hazard regression model and Kaplan-Meier curve analysis. Results In univariable analysis, increased white blood cell (WBC), neutrophil percentage, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), RDW, potassium and decreased red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), hematocrit and percentage of lymphocyte, monocyte, basophil and eosinophil were significantly associated with hospital mortality. In multivariable analyses, basophil percentage, potassium, WBC and MCHC were independently associated with hospital morality, while WBC, RDW, MCHC, potassium and percentages of neutrophil and lymphocyte were associated with 1-year mortality. Conclusions Hematological parameters and serum potassium can provide prognostic information in AMI patients. MCHC is an independent prognostic factor for both short and long term outcomes of AMI. PMID:27294086

  7. Perceptions on the development of a care pathway for people diagnosed with schizophrenia on acute psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Jones, A

    2003-12-01

    Policy development and practice for hospital mental health care has shifted towards a user-focused and evidence-based direction. Important within this policy development has been a guideline for inpatient care, particularly the establishment of an inpatient Acute Care Forum. A vehicle to both commission and develop this agenda is the Implementation of a care pathway. A research study was designed to explore how a care pathway could be developed for inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Interviews with a range of health care professionals and observation of the process of care pathway development were the data-collection tools. Analysis was driven by emergent themes across the data set. Themes were then presented as one possible interpretation of the factors to be considered for the development of a care pathway for people diagnosed with schizophrenia. Clinicians experienced many difficulties in finding and including evidence-based practice (EBP) within a care pathway. Professions on the whole felt that there was a certain futility to psychiatric care given the paucity of evidence to support practice. This may contribute towards the poor use of hospital care as a therapeutic intervention as part of the wider spectrum of care. Difficulties arise when trying to develop a care pathway with EBP, given the paucity of knowledge on why certain interventions are only partially effective. The development of a care pathway may inform the priorities of the inpatient Acute Care Forum for people diagnosed with schizophrenia. A care pathway should not be constrained, however, to EBP and should incorporate therapeutic activities to improve the overall experience of service users. Limitations on the study and the collection of evidence supporting these conclusions conclude the paper. PMID:15005479

  8. Comparison of Unit-Level Patient Turnover Measures in Acute Care Hospital Settings.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin Hye; Dunton, Nancy; Blegen, Mary A

    2016-06-01

    High patient turnover is a critical factor increasing nursing workload. Despite the growing number of studies on patient turnover, no consensus about how to measure turnover has been achieved. This study was designed to assess the correlation among patient turnover measures commonly used in recent studies and to examine the degree of agreement among the measures for classifying units with different levels of patient turnover. Using unit-level data collected for this study from 292 units in 88 hospitals participating in the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators®, we compared four patient turnover measures: the inverse of length of stay (1/LOS), admissions, discharges, and transfers per daily census (ADTC), ADTC with short-stay adjustment, and the number of ADTs and short-stay patients divided by the total number of treated patients, or Unit Activity Index (UAI). We assessed the measures' agreement on turnover quartile classifications, using percent agreement and Cohen's kappa statistic (weighted and unweighted). Pearson correlation coefficients also were calculated. ADTC with or without adjustment for short-stay patients had high correlations and substantial agreement with the measure of 1/LOS (κ = .62 to .91; r = .90 to .95). The UAI measure required data less commonly collected by participating hospital units and showed only moderate correlations and fair agreement with the other measures (κ = .23 to .39; r = .41 to .45). The UAI may not be comparable and interchangeable with other patient turnover measures when data are obtained from multiple units and hospitals. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26998744

  9. Predicting 1-Year Mortality Rate for Patients Admitted With an Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease to an Intensive Care Unit: An Opportunity for Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Batzlaff, Cassandra M.; Karpman, Craig; Afessa, Bekele; Benzo, Roberto P.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a model to aid clinicians in better predicting 1-year mortality rate for patients with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to the medical intensive care unit (ICU) with the goal of earlier initiation of palliative care and end-of-life communications in this patient population. This retrospective cohort study included patients from a medical ICU from April 1, 1995, to November 30, 2009. Data collected from the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III database included demographic characteristics; severity of illness scores; noninvasive and invasive mechanical ventilation time; ICU and hospital length of stay; and ICU, hospital, and 1-year mortality. Statistically significant univariate variables for 1-year mortality were entered into a multivariate model, and the independent variables were used to generate a scoring system to predict 1-year mortality rate. At 1-year follow-up, 295 of 591 patients died (50%). Age and hospital length of stay were identified as independent determinants of mortality at 1 year by using multivariate analysis, and the predictive model developed had an area under the operating curve of 0.68. Bootstrap analysis with 1000 iterations validated the model, age, and hospital length of stay, entered the model 100% of the time (area under the operating curve=0.687; 95% CI, 0.686–0.688). A simple model using age and hospital length of stay may be informative for providers willing to identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with high 1-year mortality rate who may benefit from end-of-life communications and from palliative care. PMID:24656805

  10. [Analysis of patients with acute exogenous poisoning at an intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Thiele, R; Meier, F; Penk, I; Striehn, E

    1987-02-01

    Over a period of 2 years patients with exogenic intoxications take 16% in the total number of patients of the department for internal intensive care. The cases in question were 43.3% males and 56.7% females. The average age of the patients with 31 years was low. The mortality was 2.4%. In the first place of the exogenic intoxications were intoxications with the groups of medicaments sedatives, hypnotics, tranquilizers, analgetics and antipyretics followed by intoxications with neuroleptics, beta-receptor blockers, antidepressives, antiepileptics and glycosides. The rate of complications was greatest in the mixed intoxications. PMID:3590879

  11. Early Clinical Outcome of Acute Poisoning Cases Treated in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sulaj, Zihni; Prifti, Edvin; Demiraj, Aurel; Strakosha, Arjana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A variety of factors have influenced the significant incidence of morbidity and mortality of acute poisoning and the timely recognition and properly management of critically ill poisoned patients is a key component. The aim of this study is to reveal the reasons for ICU admission of acutely poisoned patients, the main factors influencing the course and outcome of patients in relation with clinical approaches applied, available resources and infrastructure of treatment. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study based on most reachable variables extracted from patients’ medical records and ED registers of patients admitted at the medical ICU of “Mother Teresa” University Hospital in Tirana over two (2012-2013) years. Demography, time of exposure, etiology and circumstances of poisonings, assessment and treatment, reasons for ICU admission, course and outcome were duly obtained. Results: The number of ICU treated patients was 118, consisting in 47.4% (56) males and 52.5% (62) females which represented 10.2% of poisoned patients admitted during this two-year-period in ED and 9.2% of other etiology ICU admitted patients. Mean was 42.6 years for males, and 38 years for females. About 55.9% were urban residents and 44% rural ones. The elapsed time from toxic exposure to treatment initiation had varied between 2-6 hours, 44% arrived in the hospital <4 hours. The toxic exposures were intentional in 87.2% of cases, with a male:female ratio was 0.8:1. Agrochemicals such as Aluminum phosphide and organophosphates were involved in 77.1% of cases. Cardiovascular collapse and respiratory failure were the main clinical syndromes encountered. Mechanical ventilation was required in 31.4% of patients. The length of ICU stay was 2.73 (0.96) days and the mortality was 54.2%. Conclusion: This study evidenced that highly lethal toxicants used in poisoning acts such as agrochemicals, high rate of suicide, notwithstanding the infrastructure and resources

  12. Outcomes and Predictors of Mortality for Patients with Acute Leukemia Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Danielle; Christian, Michael; Ibrahimova, Narmin; Kumar, Vikram; Jacob, Gabriella; Kiss, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objectives were to describe the management and outcomes of acute leukemia (AL) patients admitted to the ICU and to identify predictors of ICU mortality. Methods. Data was retrospectively collected from the medical records of all patients with AML or ALL admitted to the Mount Sinai Hospital ICU from August 2009 to December 2012. Results. 151 AL patients (117 AML, 34 ALL) were admitted to the ICU. Mean age was 54 (SD 15) years, median APACHE II score was 27 (IQR 22–33), and 50% were female. While in ICU, 128 (85%) patients had sepsis and 56 (37%) had ARDS. The majority of patients required invasive organ support: 94 (62%) required mechanical ventilation while 23 (15%) received renal replacement therapy. Multivariable analysis identified SOFA score (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01–1.38) and invasive ventilation (OR 9.64, 95% CI 3.39–27.4) as independent predictors of ICU mortality. Ninety-four (62%) patients survived to ICU discharge. Only 39% of these 94 patients discharged were alive 12 months after ICU admission. Conclusions. AL patients admitted to the ICU had a 62% ICU survival rate; yet only 25% of cohort patients were alive 12 months after ICU admission. Higher admission SOFA scores and invasive ventilation are independently associated with a greater risk of dying in the ICU. PMID:27445524

  13. Acute kidney injury in the perioperative period and in intensive care units (excluding renal replacement therapies).

    PubMed

    Ichai, Carole; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Souweine, Bertrand; Armando, Fabien; Canet, Emmanuel; Clec'h, Christophe; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Darmon, Michaël; Duranteau, Jacques; Gaillot, Théophille; Garnier, Arnaud; Jacob, Laurent; Joannes-Boyau, Olivier; Juillard, Laurent; Journois, Didier; Lautrette, Alexandre; Muller, Laurent; Legrand, Matthieu; Lerolle, Nicolas; Rimmelé, Thomas; Rondeau, Eric; Tamion, Fabienne; Walrave, Yannick; Velly, Lionel

    2016-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a syndrome that has progressed a great deal over the last 20 years. The decrease in urine output and the increase in classical renal biomarkers, such as blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, have largely been used as surrogate markers for decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR), which defines AKI. However, using such markers of GFR as criteria for diagnosing AKI has several limits including the difficult diagnosis of non-organic AKI, also called "functional renal insufficiency" or "pre-renal insufficiency". This situation is characterized by an oliguria and an increase in creatininemia as a consequence of a reduction in renal blood flow related to systemic haemodynamic abnormalities. In this situation, "renal insufficiency" seems rather inappropriate as kidney function is not impaired. On the contrary, the kidney delivers an appropriate response aiming to recover optimal systemic physiological haemodynamic conditions. Considering the kidney as insufficient is erroneous because this suggests that it does not work correctly, whereas the opposite is occurring, because the kidney is healthy even in a threatening situation. With current definitions of AKI, normalization of volaemia is needed before defining AKI in order to avoid this pitfall. PMID:27230984

  14. Exploring the Influence of Environment on the Spatial Behavior of Older Adults in a Purpose-Built Acute Care Dementia Unit.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Francesco; Gillan, Roslyn; Cloutier, Denise

    2014-06-01

    Limited research explores the experience of individuals with dementia in acute care geriatric psychiatry units. This observational case study examines the influence of the physical environment on behavior (wandering, pacing, door testing, congregation and seclusions) among residents in a traditional geriatric psychiatry unit who were then relocated to a purpose-built acute care unit. Purpose-built environments should be well suited to the needs of residents with dementia. Observed trends revealed differences in spatial behaviors in the pre- and post- environments attributable to the physical environment. Person-centred modifications to the current environment including concerted efforts to know residents are meaningful in fostering quality of life. Color coded environments (rooms vs dining areas etc.) to improve wayfinding and opportunities to personalize rooms that address the `hominess' of the setting also have potential. Future research could also seek the opinions of staff about the impact of the environment on them as well as residents. PMID:24381136

  15. Clinical Characteristics and 30-Day Outcomes of Intermittent Hemodialysis for Acute Kidney Injury in an African Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Tumukunde, Janat; Ssemogerere, Lameck; Ayebale, Emmanuel; Agaba, Peter; Yakubu, Jamali; Lubikire, Aggrey; Nabukenya, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common occurrence in the intensive care unit (ICU). Studies have looked at outcomes of renal replacement therapy using intermittent haemodialysis (IHD) in ICUs with varying results. Little is known about the outcomes of using IHD in resource-limited settings where continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is limited. We sought to determine outcomes of IHD among critically ill patients admitted to a low-income country ICU. Methods. A retrospective review of patient records was conducted. Patients admitted to the ICU who underwent IHD for AKI were included in the study. Patients' demographic and clinical characteristics, cause of AKI, laboratory parameters, haemodialysis characteristics, and survival were interpreted and analyzed. Primary outcome was mortality. Results. Of 62 patients, 40 had complete records. Median age of patients was 38.5 years. Etiologic diagnoses associated with AKI included sepsis, malaria, and ARDS. Mortality was 52.5%. APACHE II (OR 4.550; 95% CI 1.2–17.5, p = 0.028), mechanical ventilation (OR 13.063; 95% CI 2.3–72, p = 0.003), and need for vasopressors (OR 16.8; 95% CI 3.4–82.6, p = 0.001) had statistically significant association with mortality. Conclusion. IHD may be a feasible alternative for RRT in critically ill haemodynamically stable patients in low resource settings where CRRT may not be available. PMID:27042657

  16. Surveillance: A strategy for improving patient safety in acute and critical care units.

    PubMed

    Henneman, Elizabeth A; Gawlinski, Anna; Giuliano, Karen K

    2012-04-01

    Surveillance is a nursing intervention that has been identified as an important strategy in preventing and identifying medical errors and adverse events. The definition of surveillance proposed by the Nursing Intervention Classification is the purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of patient data for clinical decision making. The term surveillance is often used interchangeably with the term monitoring, yet surveillance differs significantly from monitoring both in purpose and scope. Monitoring is a key activity in the surveillance process, but monitoring alone is insufficient for conducting effective surveillance. Much of the attention in the bedside patient safety movement has been focused on efforts to implement processes that ultimately improve the surveillance process. These include checklists, interdisciplinary rounds, clinical information systems, and clinical decision support systems. To identify optimal surveillance patterns and to develop and test technologies that assist critical care nurses in performing effective surveillance, more research is needed, particularly with innovative approaches to describe and evaluate the best surveillance practices of bedside nurses. PMID:22467622

  17. Time Interval from Symptom Onset to Hospital Care in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: A Report from the Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Emergency Medical Service Database

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Kohsaka, Shun; Harada, Kazumasa; Sakai, Tetsuro; Takagi, Atsutoshi; Miyamoto, Takamichi; Iida, Kiyoshi; Tanimoto, Shuzou; Fukuda, Keiichi; Nagao, Ken; Sato, Naoki; Takayama, Morimasa

    2015-01-01

    Aims There seems to be two distinct patterns in the presentation of acute heart failure (AHF) patients; early- vs. gradual-onset. However, whether time-dependent relationship exists in outcomes of patients with AHF remains unclear. Methods The Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Database prospectively collects information of emergency admissions via EMS service to acute cardiac care facilities from 67 participating hospitals in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Between 2009 and 2011, a total of 3811 AHF patients were registered. The documentation of symptom onset time was mandated by the on-site ambulance team. We divided the patients into two groups according to the median onset-to-hospitalization (OH) time for those patients (2h); early- (presenting ≤2h after symptom onset) vs. gradual-onset (late) group (>2h). The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Results The early OH group had more urgent presentation, as demonstrated by a higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate, and higher incidence of pulmonary congestion (48.6% vs. 41.6%; P<0.001); whereas medical comorbidities such as stroke (10.8% vs. 7.9%; P<0.001) and atrial fibrillation (30.0% vs. 26.0%; P<0.001) were more frequently seen in the late OH group. Overall, 242 (6.5%) patients died during hospitalization. Notably, a shorter OH time was associated with a better in-hospital mortality rate (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.51−0.99; P = 0.043). Conclusions Early-onset patients had rather typical AHF presentations (e.g., higher SBP or pulmonary congestion) but had a better in-hospital outcome compared to gradual-onset patients. PMID:26562780

  18. Early Acute Kidney Injury based on Serum Creatinine or Cystatin C in Intensive Care Unit after Major Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zand, Farid; Sabetian, Golnar; Abbasi, Ghasem; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Salehi, Alireza; Khosravi, Abbas; Geramizadeh, Bita; Taregh, Shuja Ulhaq; Javadpour, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common problem in critically ill patients and is independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recently, serum cystatin C has been shown to be superior to creatinine in early detection of renal function impairment. We compared estimated GFR based on serum cystatin C with estimated GFR based on serum creatinine for early detection of renal dysfunction according to the RIFLE criteria. Methods: During 9 months, three hundred post trauma patients that were referred to the intensive care unit of a referral trauma hospital were recruited. Serum creatinine and serum cystatin C were measured and the estimated GFR within 24 hours of ICU admission was calculated. The primary outcome was the incidence of AKI according to the RIFLE criteria within 2nd to 7th day of admission. Results: During the first week of ICU admission, 21% of patients experienced AKI. After adjusting for major confounders, only the patients with first day’s serum cystatin level higher than 0.78 mg/l were at higher risk of first week AKI (OR=6.14, 95% CI: 2.5-14.7, P<0.001). First day’s serum cystatin C and injury severity score were the major risk factors for ICU mortality (OR=3.54, 95% CI: 1.7-7.4, P=0.001) and (OR=4.6, 95% CI: 1.5-14, P=0.007), respectively. Conclusion: Within 24 hours after admission in ICU due to multiple trauma, high serum cystatin C level may have prognostic value in predicting early AKI and mortality during ICU admission. However, such correlation was not seen neither with creatinine nor cystatin C based GFR. PMID:26538776

  19. Frequency, Etiology and Several Sociodemographic Characteristics of Acute Poisoning in Children Treated in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Kolgeci, Selim; Bejiqi, Ramush

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this work has been to present the frequency, etiology and several other socio-demographic characteristics of acute poisoning in children. The treated patients and methods of work: The treated patients were children of all age groups hospitalized in the Pediatric Clinic of Prishtina during year 2009. The study was done retrospectively. The diagnosis was done on the basis of heteroanamnesis and in several cases on the basis of the anamnesis data of a child, routine laboratory tests and toxicologic analysis. Results: 66 (9.4%) poisoned children were treated in the Intensive Care Unit. The biggest number of patients, 37 (56.06%) of them, were male, and out of that number 36 (54.55%) cases were coming from rural areas. The biggest number of them 49 (74.98%) were over 2-6 years old. The poisoning was mostly caused through the digestive tract (ingestion), it happened with 55 cases (83.33%), 56 cases (84,80%) suffered from severe poisoning, whereas 59 cases (89,50%) suffered from accidental poisoning. Regarding the type of the substances that caused poisoning, the most frequent were drugs in 34 (51.50%) cases and pesticides in 20 (30.30%) cases. Among drugs, the most dominant were those belonging to a group of benzodiazepines (10 cases) and metoclopramide (4 cases). Among pesticides the most dominant one that caused poisoning was malation (5 cases), then paration and cipermetrina appeared in 3 cases each. The biggest number of cases, 64 (96.96%) of them, were treated, whereas 2 cases (3.40%) passed away. Conclusion: The practice proved that that our people are not well informed about the poisoning in general, therefore it is necessary that they be educated by the use of all media, written and electronic, as well as other methods of medical education. PMID:23678312

  20. The Main Etiologies of Acute Kidney Injury in the Newborns Hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Momtaz, Hossein Emad; Sabzehei, Mohammad Kazem; Rasuli, Bahman; Torabian, Saadat

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most common diseases among the newborns hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), which is usually resulted from predisposing factors including sepsis, hypovolemia, asphyxia, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and heart failure. The goal of this study was to assess main etiologies, relevant risk factors, and early outcome of neonatal AKI. Materials and Methods: In a cross- sectional study, 49 consecutive neonates hospitalized in NICU of Besat hospital with diagnosis of AKI from October 2009 to October 2011 were investigated through census sampling method. AKI was diagnosed based on urine output and serum creatinine levels. Results: The prevalence of AKI was 1.54% (49 out of 3166 newborns hospitalized in NICU) with the female: male was 7:1. Thirty-nine patients (79.5%) were full-term neonates. Oliguria was observed in 38 (77.5%) patients. Sepsis was the most common predisposing factor for AKI in 77.5% of patients (n = 38) accompanied with the highest mortality rate among other factors (30.5%). Other leading causes of AKI included hypovolemia secondary to dehydration, followed by hypoxia secondary to RDS, patent ductus arteriosus, posterior urethral valve, asphyxia, and renal venous thrombosis. A positive relationship was observed between neonates' age, sex, urine output, and also between serum creatinine levels with initiation of dialysis. The mortality rate among the newborns hospitalized with AKI was 36.7%. Eighteen (36.7%) newborns were treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD) of whom 10 patients (55.6%) died, 31 patients were managed conservatively of whom five neonate died (25.9%). Discussion: Prognosis of AKI in the oliguric neonates requiring PD is very poor. It is thus recommended to prevent AKI by predicting and rapid diagnosis of AKI in patients with potential risk factors and also by early and effective treatment of such factors in individuals with AKI. PMID:25024976

  1. Acute care management of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Mitcho, K; Yanko, J R

    1999-08-01

    Meeting the health care needs of the spinal cord-injured patient is an immense challenge for the acute care multidisciplinary team. The critical care nurse clinician, as well as other members of the team, needs to maintain a comprehensive knowledge base to provide the care management that is essential to the care of the spinal cord-injured patient. With the active participation of the patient and family in care delivery decisions, the health care professionals can help to meet the psychosocial and physical needs of the patient/family unit. This article provides an evidence-based, comprehensive review of the needs of the spinal cord-injured patient in the acute care setting including optimal patient outcomes, methods to prevent complications, and a plan that provides an expeditious transition to rehabilitation. PMID:10646444

  2. Comparison of acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation IV to predict intensive care unit mortality

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Bashu Dev; Shrestha, Gentle S.; Pradhan, Bishwas; Amatya, Roshana

    2015-01-01

    Context: Clinical assessment of severity of illness is an essential component of medical practice to predict the outcome of critically ill-patient. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) model is one of the widely used scoring systems. Aims: This study was designed to evaluate the Performance of APACHE II and IV scoring systems in our Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Settings and Design: A prospective study in 6 bedded ICU, including 76 patients all above 15 years. Subjects and Methods: APACHE II and APACHE IV scores were calculated based on the worst values in the first 24 h of admission. All enrolled patients were followed, and outcome was recorded as survivors or nonsurvivors. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS version 17. Results: The mean APACHE score was significantly higher among nonsurvivors than survivors (P < 0.005). Discrimination for APACHE II and APACHE IV was fair with area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.73 and 0.79 respectively. The cut-off point with best Youden index for APACHE II was 17 and for APACHE IV was 85. Above cut-off point, mortality was higher for both models (P < 0.005). Hosmer–Lemeshow Chi-square coefficient test showed better calibration for APACHE II than APACHE IV. A positive correlation was seen between the models with Spearman's correlation coefficient of 0.748 (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Discrimination was better for APACHE IV than APACHE II model however Calibration was better for APACHE II than APACHE IV model in our study. There was good correlation between the two models observed in our study. PMID:25722550

  3. Delivering dementia care differently—evaluating the differences and similarities between a specialist medical and mental health unit and standard acute care wards: a qualitative study of family carers’ perceptions of quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Karen; Foster, Pippa; Whittamore, Kathy H; Goldberg, Sarah E; Harwood, Rowan H

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine in depth carers’ views and experiences of the delivery of patient care for people with dementia or delirium in an acute general hospital, in order to evaluate a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit (MMHU) compared with standard hospital wards. This qualitative study complemented the quantitative findings of a randomised controlled trial. Design Qualitative semistructured interviews were conducted with carers of patients with cognitive impairment admitted to hospital over a 4-month period. Setting A specialist MMHU was developed in an English National Health Service acute hospital aiming to deliver the best-practice care. Specialist mental health staff were integrated with the ward team. All staff received enhanced training in dementia, delirium and person-centred care. A programme of purposeful therapeutic and leisure activities was introduced. The ward environment was optimised to improve patient orientation and independence. A proactive and inclusive approach to family carers was encouraged. Participants 40 carers who had been recruited to a randomised controlled trial comparing the MMHU with standard wards. Results The main themes identified related closely to family carers’ met or unmet expectations and included activities and boredom, staff knowledge, dignity and fundamental care, the ward environment and communication between staff and carers. Carers from MMHU were aware of, and appreciated, improvements relating to activities, the ward environment and staff knowledge and skill in the appropriate management of dementia and delirium. However, communication and engagement of family carers were still perceived as insufficient. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the extent to which the MMHU succeeded in its goal of providing the best-practice care and improving carer experience, and where deficiencies remained. Neither setting was perceived as neither wholly good nor wholly bad; however, greater satisfaction (and less dissatisfaction

  4. A predictive instrument to improve coronary-care-unit admission practices in acute ischemic heart disease. A prospective multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pozen, M W; D'Agostino, R B; Selker, H P; Sytkowski, P A; Hood, W B

    1984-05-17

    Each year 1.5 million patients are admitted to coronary-care units (CCUs) for suspected acute ischemic heart disease; for half of these, the diagnosis is ultimately "ruled out." In this study, conducted in the emergency rooms of six New England hospitals ranging in type from urban teaching centers to rural nonteaching hospitals, we sought to develop a diagnostic aid to help emergency room physicians reduce the number of their CCU admissions of patients without acute cardiac ischemia. From data on 2801 patients, we developed a predictive instrument for use in a hand-held programmable calculator, which requires only 20 seconds to compute a patient's probability of having acute cardiac ischemia. In a prospective trial that included 2320 patients in the six hospitals, physicians' diagnostic specificity for acute ischemia increased when the probability value determined by the instrument was made available to them. Rates of false-positive diagnosis decreased without any increase in rates of false-negative diagnosis. Among study patients with a final diagnosis of "not acute ischemia," the number of CCU admissions decreased 30 per cent, without any increase in missed diagnoses of ischemia. The proportion of CCU admissions that represented patients without acute ischemia dropped from 44 to 33 per cent. Widespread use of this predictive instrument could reduce the number of CCU admissions in this country by more than 250,000 per year. PMID:6371525

  5. Assessments of urine cofilin-1 in patients hospitalized in the intensive care units with acute kidney injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yi-Jang; Chao, Cheng-Han; Chang, Ying-Feng; Chou, Chien

    2013-02-01

    The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family has been reported to be associated with ischemia induced renal disorders. Here we examine if cofilin-1 is associated with acute kidney injury (AKI). We exploited a 96-well based fiber-optic biosensor that uses conjugated gold nanoparticles and a sandwich immunoassay to detect the urine cofilin-1 level of AKI patients. The mean urine cofilin-1 level of the AKI patients was two-fold higher than that of healthy adults. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed that cofilin-1 is a potential biomarker for discriminating AKI patients from healthy adults for intensive care patients.

  6. [Interest of ambulatory simplified acute physiology score (ASAPS) applied to patients admitted in an intensive care unit of an infectious diseases unit in Dakar].

    PubMed

    Dia, N M; Diallo, I; Manga, N M; Diop, S A; Fortes-Deguenonvo, L; Lakhe, N A; Ka, D; Seydi, M; Diop, B M; Sow, P S

    2015-08-01

    The evaluation of patients by a scale of gravity allows a better categorization of patients admitted in intensive care unit (ICU). Our study had for objective to estimate interest of Ambulatory Simplified Acute Physiologic Score (ASAPS) applied to patients admitted in ICU of infectious diseases department of FANN hospital. It was about a descriptive and analytical retrospective study, made from the data found in patients' files admitted into the USI infectious diseases department of FANN hospital in Dakar, from January 1(st), 2009 till December 31st, 2009.The data of 354 patients' files were analyzed. The sex-ratio was 1.77 with an average age of 37.6 years ± 19.4 years old [5-94 years]. The majority of the patients were unemployed paid (39.6%). The most frequent failures were the following ones: neurological (80.5%), cardio-respiratory (16.7%). The average duration of stay was 6.2 days ± 8.2 days going of less than 24 hours to more than 10 weeks. The deaths arose much more at night (53.1%) than in the daytime (46.9%) and the strongest rate of death was recorded in January (61.5%), most low in October (26.7%). The global mortality was 48.3%. The rate of lethality according to the highest main diagnosis was allocated to the AIDS (80.5%). The average ambulatory simplified acute physiology score was 5.3 ± 3.6 with extremes of 0 and 18. The deaths in our series increased with this index (p = 0.000005). The female patients had a rate of lethality higher than that of the men people, 55.5% against 44.2% (p = 0.03). In spite of a predictive score of a high survival (ASAPS < 8), certain number of patients died (n = 105) that is 61.4% of the deaths. The metabolic disturbances, hyperleukocytosis or leukopenia when realised, the presence of a chronic disease, seemed also to influence this lethality. ASAPS only, although interesting, would not good estimate the gravity of patients, where from the necessity thus of a minimum biological balance sheet. It seems better adapted

  7. A predictive instrument for acute ischemic heart disease to improve coronary care unit admission practices: a potential on-line tool in a computerized electrocardiograph.

    PubMed

    Selker, H P; D'Agostino, R B; Laks, M M

    1988-01-01

    Each year, 1.5 million patients are admitted to coronary care units (CCUs) for suspected acute ischemic heart disease, but for half of these, the diagnosis is ultimately ruled out. In this study, conducted in the emergency rooms (ERs) of six New England hospitals, the authors sought to develop a diagnostic aid to help ER physicians reduce the numbers of CCU admissions for patients without true acute cardiac ischemia. In phase 1, from data on 2,801 patients, they developed a predictive instrument for use in a handheld programmable calculator, which, based on a mathematical logistic regression formula, computes a patient's probability of having acute cardiac ischemia. In phase 2, a 1-year prospective trial including 2,320 ER patients at the six hospitals, physicians' diagnostic specificity for acute ischemia increased when the probability value determined by the instrument was made available to them (p = 0.002), without a drop in sensitivity. Among patients without acute ischemia, the number of CCU admissions decreased 30% (p = 0.003), without an increase in missed diagnoses of ischemia. The proportion of patients in the CCU without acute ischemia dropped from 44% to 33%. If similar findings were widespread, the use of this predictive instrument could reduce the number of CCU admissions in the United States by more than 250,000 per year. As originally envisioned, the physician could use a pocket-sized programmable calculator to allow quick access to the instrument's probability value, or an ER triage nurse might compute the probability value and write it on the clinical record for the physician's use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3063767

  8. Patients treated in a coronary care unit without acute myocardial infarction: identification of high risk subgroup for subsequent myocardial infarction and/or cardiovascular death.

    PubMed Central

    Nordlander, R; Nyquist, O

    1979-01-01

    Consecutive patients admitted to a coronary care unit (CCU) during one year were studied. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was not substantiated by our criteria in 206 of the patients discharged from the CCU. Of these, 193 were retrospectively followed up during one year. Seventeen of the patients (9%) died from cardiovascular causes during the 1-year period. Another 14 patients (7%) had a subsequent non-fatal acute myocardial infarction during the same period. The majority of the patients had coronary artery disease. Only 32 (17%) could be classified as non-coronary cases, and these had an excellent prognosis without any subsequent acute myocardial infarctions or deaths. The occurrence of transient ST-T shifts in serial electrocardiograms obtained during the first 3 days in hospital selected a subgroup of patients who had a high risk for subsequent non-fatal acute myocardial infarction and/or cardiovascular death. This high risk subgroup provides a basis for more aggressive diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. Images PMID:465239

  9. Intensive care unit nurses' perceptions of patient participation in the acute phase of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation: an interview study

    PubMed Central

    Kvangarsnes, Marit; Torheim, Henny; Hole, Torstein; Öhlund, Lennart S

    2013-01-01

    Aim To report a study conducted to explore intensive care unit nurses’ perceptions of patient participation in the acute phase of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. Background An acute exacerbation is a life-threatening situation, which patients often consider to be extremely frightening. Healthcare personnel exercise considerable power in this situation, which challenges general professional notions of patient participation. Design Critical discourse analysis. Methods In the autumn of 2009, three focus group interviews with experienced intensive care nurses were conducted at two hospitals in western Norway. Two groups had six participants each, and one group had five (N = 17). The transcribed interviews were analysed by means of critical discourse analysis. Findings The intensive care nurses said that an exacerbation is often an extreme situation in which healthcare personnel are exercising a high degree of control and power over patients. Patient participation during exacerbation often takes the form of non-involvement. The participating nurses attached great importance to taking a sensitive approach when meeting patients. The nurses experienced challenging ethical dilemmas. Conclusion This study shows that patient participation should not be understood in universal terms, but rather in relation to a specific setting and the interactions that occur in this setting. Healthcare personnel must develop skill, understanding, and competence to meet these challenging ethical dilemmas. A collaborative inter-professional approach between physicians and nurses is needed to meet the patients’ demand for involvement. PMID:22512673

  10. Severe Acute Asthma Exacerbation in Children: A Stepwise Approach for Escalating Therapy in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Nievas, I. Federico Fernandez; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES An increasing prevalence of pediatric asthma has led to increasing burdens of critical illness in children with severe acute asthma exacerbations, often leading to respiratory distress, progressive hypoxia, and respiratory failure. We review the definitions, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestations of severe acute asthma, with a view to developing an evidence-based, stepwise approach for escalating therapy in these patients. METHODS Subject headings related to asthma, status asthmaticus, critical asthma, and drug therapy were used in a MEDLINE search (1980–2012), supplemented by a manual search of personal files, references cited in the reviewed articles, and treatment algorithms developed within Le Bonheur Children's Hospital. RESULTS Patients with asthma require continuous monitoring of their cardiorespiratory status via noninvasive or invasive devices, with serial clinical examinations, objective scoring of asthma severity (using an objective pediatric asthma score), and appropriate diagnostic tests. All patients are treated with β-agonists, ipratropium, and steroids (intravenous preferable over oral preparations). Patients with worsening clinical status should be progressively treated with continuous β-agonists, intravenous magnesium, helium-oxygen mixtures, intravenous terbutaline and/or aminophylline, coupled with high-flow oxygen and non-invasive ventilation to limit the work of breathing, hypoxemia, and possibly hypercarbia. Sedation with low-dose ketamine (with or without benzodiazepines) infusions may allow better toleration of non-invasive ventilation and may also prepare the patient for tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation, if indicated by a worsening clinical status. CONCLUSIONS Severe asthma can be a devastating illness in children, but most patients can be managed by using serial objective assessments and the stepwise clinical approach outlined herein. Following multidisciplinary education and training, this

  11. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units. PMID:26560255

  12. Acute coronary care 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the titles are: The measurement of acute myocardial infarct size by CT; Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of myocardial ischemia and infarction; Poistron imaging in the evaluation of ischemia and myocardial infarction; and New inotropic agents.

  13. Benchmarks for acute stroke care delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Ruth E.; Khan, Ferhana; Bayley, Mark T.; Asllani, Eriola; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D.; O'Callaghan, Christina; Silver, Frank L.; Kapral, Moira K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite widespread interest in many jurisdictions in monitoring and improving the quality of stroke care delivery, benchmarks for most stroke performance indicators have not been established. The objective of this study was to develop data-derived benchmarks for acute stroke quality indicators. Design Nine key acute stroke quality indicators were selected from the Canadian Stroke Best Practice Performance Measures Manual. Participants A population-based retrospective sample of patients discharged from 142 hospitals in Ontario, Canada, between 1 April 2008 and 31 March 2009 (N = 3191) was used to calculate hospital rates of performance and benchmarks. Intervention The Achievable Benchmark of Care (ABC™) methodology was used to create benchmarks based on the performance of the upper 15% of patients in the top-performing hospitals. Main Outcome Measures Benchmarks were calculated for rates of neuroimaging, carotid imaging, stroke unit admission, dysphasia screening and administration of stroke-related medications. Results The following benchmarks were derived: neuroimaging within 24 h, 98%; admission to a stroke unit, 77%; thrombolysis among patients arriving within 2.5 h, 59%; carotid imaging, 93%; dysphagia screening, 88%; antithrombotic therapy, 98%; anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, 94%; antihypertensive therapy, 92% and lipid-lowering therapy, 77%. ABC™ acute stroke care benchmarks achieve or exceed the consensus-based targets required by Accreditation Canada, with the exception of dysphagia screening. Conclusions Benchmarks for nine hospital-based acute stroke care quality indicators have been established. These can be used in the development of standards for quality improvement initiatives. PMID:24141011

  14. Emergency department triage of acute heart failure triggered by pneumonia; when an intensive care unit is needed?

    PubMed

    Siniorakis, Eftychios E; Arapi, Sophia M; Panta, Stamatia G; Pyrgakis, Vlassios N; Ntanos, Ioannis Th; Limberi, Sotiria J

    2016-10-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a frequent triggering factor for decompensation of a chronic cardiac dysfunction, leading to acute heart failure (AHF). Patients with AHF exacerbated by CAP, are often admitted through the emergency department for ICU hospitalization, even though more than half the cases do not warrant any intensive care treatment. Emergency department physicians are forced to make disposition decisions based on subjective criteria, due to lack of evidence-based risk scores for AHF combined with CAP. Currently, the available risk models refer distinctly to either AHF or CAP patients. Extrapolation of data by arbitrarily combining these models, is not validated and can be treacherous. Examples of attempts to apply acuity scales provenient from different disciplines and the resulting discrepancies, are given in this review. There is a need for severity classification tools especially elaborated for use in the emergency department, applicable to patients with mixed AHF and CAP, in order to rationalize the ICU dispositions. This is bound to facilitate the efforts to save both lives and resources. PMID:27390973

  15. A clinical training unit for diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections: an intervention for primary health care physicians in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Bojalil, R.; Guiscafré, H.; Espinosa, P.; Viniegra, L.; Martínez, H.; Palafox, M.; Gutiérrez, G.

    1999-01-01

    In Tlaxcala State, Mexico, we determined that 80% of children who died from diarrhoea or acute respiratory infections (ARI) received medical care before death; in more than 70% of the cases this care was provided by a private physician. Several strategies have been developed to improve physicians' primary health care practices but private practitioners have only rarely been included. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of in-service training on the case management of diarrhoea and ARI among under-5-year-olds provided by private and public primary physicians. The training consisted of a five-day course of in-service practice during which physicians diagnosed and treated sick children attending a centre and conducted clinical discussions of cases under guidance. Each training course was limited to six physicians. Clinical performance was evaluated by observation before and after the courses. The evaluation of diarrhoea case management covered assessment of dehydration, hydration therapy, prescription of antimicrobial and other drugs, advice on diet, and counselling for mothers; that of ARI case management covered diagnosis, decisions on antimicrobial therapy, use of symptomatic drugs, and counselling for mothers. In general the performance of public physicians both before and after the intervention was better than that of private doctors. Most aspects of the case management of children with diarrhoea improved among both groups of physicians after the course; the proportion of private physicians who had five or six correct elements out of six increased from 14% to 37%: for public physicians the corresponding increase was from 53% to 73%. In ARI case management, decisions taken on antimicrobial therapy and symptomatic drug use improved in both groups; the proportion of private physicians with at least three correct elements out of four increased from 13% to 42%, while among public doctors the corresponding increase was from 43% to 78%. Hands

  16. The devil is in the detail: Acute Guillain-Barré syndrome camouflaged as neurosarcoidosis in a critically ill patient admitted to an Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Sarada, Pooja Prathapan; Sundararajan, Krishnaswamy

    2016-04-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute demyelinating polyneuropathy, usually evoked by antecedent infection. Sarcoidosis is a multisystem chronic granulomatous disorder with neurological involvement occurring in a minority. We present a case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man who presented with acute ascending polyradiculoneuropathy with a recent diagnosis of pulmonary sarcoidosis. The absence of acute flaccid paralysis excluded a clinical diagnosis of GBS in the first instance. Subsequently, a rapid onset of proximal weakness with multi-organ failure led to the diagnosis of GBS, which necessitated intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis to which the patient responded adequately, and he was subsequently discharged home. Neurosarcoidosis often masquerades as other disorders, leading to a diagnostic dilemma; also, the occurrence of a GBS-like clinical phenotype secondary to neurosarcoidosis may make diagnosing coexisting GBS a therapeutic challenge. This article not only serves to exemplify the rare association of neurosarcoidosis with GBS but also highlights the need for a high index of clinical suspicion for GBS and accurate history taking in any patient who may present with rapidly progressing weakness to an Intensive Care Unit. PMID:27303139

  17. The devil is in the detail: Acute Guillain–Barré syndrome camouflaged as neurosarcoidosis in a critically ill patient admitted to an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sarada, Pooja Prathapan; Sundararajan, Krishnaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute demyelinating polyneuropathy, usually evoked by antecedent infection. Sarcoidosis is a multisystem chronic granulomatous disorder with neurological involvement occurring in a minority. We present a case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man who presented with acute ascending polyradiculoneuropathy with a recent diagnosis of pulmonary sarcoidosis. The absence of acute flaccid paralysis excluded a clinical diagnosis of GBS in the first instance. Subsequently, a rapid onset of proximal weakness with multi-organ failure led to the diagnosis of GBS, which necessitated intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis to which the patient responded adequately, and he was subsequently discharged home. Neurosarcoidosis often masquerades as other disorders, leading to a diagnostic dilemma; also, the occurrence of a GBS-like clinical phenotype secondary to neurosarcoidosis may make diagnosing coexisting GBS a therapeutic challenge. This article not only serves to exemplify the rare association of neurosarcoidosis with GBS but also highlights the need for a high index of clinical suspicion for GBS and accurate history taking in any patient who may present with rapidly progressing weakness to an Intensive Care Unit. PMID:27303139

  18. Intensive Care Unit Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Monks, Richard C.

    1984-01-01

    Patients who become psychotic in intensive care units are usually suffering from delirium. Underlying causes of delirium such as anxiety, sleep deprivation, sensory deprivation and overload, immobilization, an unfamiliar environment and pain, are often preventable or correctable. Early detection, investigation and treatment may prevent significant mortality and morbidity. The patient/physician relationship is one of the keystones of therapy. More severe cases may require psychopharmacological measures. The psychotic episode is quite distressing to the patient and family; an educative and supportive approach by the family physician may be quite helpful in patient rehabilitation. PMID:21279016

  19. Alberta's Acute Care Funding Project.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Hall, E M; Lave, J R; Glendining, M

    1992-01-01

    Alberta initiated the Acute Care Funding Project (ACFP) in 1988, a new hospital funding system that institutes case mix budgeting adjustments to the global budget so that hospitals can be treated more equitably. The initiative is a significant departure in principle from the former method of funding. The ACFP is summarized and critiqued, and focuses on the inpatient side of the picture. The various elements of the project are discussed, such as the hospital performance index, the hospital performance measure, the Refined Diagnostic Related Group, case weights, typical and outlier cases, and the costing mechanisms. Since its implementation, the ACFP has undergone substantial changes; these are discussed, as well as some of the problems that still need to be addressed. Overall, the system offers incentives to reduce length of stay and to increase the efficiency with which inpatient care is provided. PMID:10121446

  20. Acute kidney injury-incidence, prognostic factors, and outcome of patients in an Intensive Care Unit in a tertiary center: A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Korula, Sara; Balakrishnan, Sindhu; Sundar, Shyam; Paul, Vergis; Balagopal, Anuroop

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The information regarding the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in medical Intensive Care Units (ICUs) in South India is limited. The aim of the study was to find the incidence, prognostic factors, and outcome of patients with AKI. We also assessed whether only urine output criteria of risk, injury, failure, loss, end (RIFLE) classification can be used to look at the outcome of AKI. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective, cross-sectional study of 6 months duration in a 28 bedded medical ICU of a tertiary center. AKI was defined as an absolute creatinine value of>1.6 mg/dl or a 25% increase from baseline creatinine values. Results: The incidence of AKI was 16.1%, and mortality was 7.8% in our study population. Among patients with AKI 87 (75.7%) patients had sepsis. 71.3% patients had metabolic acidosis on admission, and 47.8% patients were in shock. 57.4% of patient's required mechanical ventilation (MV). 39.1% of AKI patients required renal replacement therapy (RRT). Requirement of RRT was significantly affected by increasing age, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and sequential organ failure assessment scores on admission, serum creatinine, and use of vasopressors. 49.5% of patients with AKI died within 28 days. Increasing age, MV, hemodialysis (HD), hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and requirement of noradrenaline support were associated with increasing 28 days mortality. The maximum RIFLE score with urine output criteria showed association to the requirement of HD in univariate analysis but did not show relation to mortality. Conclusion: The incidence of AKI was 16.1% in critically ill patients. In patients with AKI, 39.1% patients required HD and 28 days mortality was 49.5%. The study also showed good univariate association of urine output criteria of RIFLE classification to the requirement of HD in AKI patients. PMID:27390456

  1. Differential Time Trends of Outcomes and Costs of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospitalizations by ST Elevation and Type of Intervention in the United States, 2001–2011

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Takehiro; Hasegawa, Kohei; Kobayashi, Yasuki; Takahashi, Osamu; Fukui, Tsuguya; Tsugawa, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known whether time trends of in‐hospital mortality and costs of care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) differ by type of AMI (ST‐elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI] vs. non‐ST‐elevation [NSTEMI]) and by the intervention received (percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI], coronary artery bypass grafting [CABG], or no intervention) in the United States. Methods and Results We conducted a serial cross‐sectional study of all hospitalizations for AMI aged 30 years or older using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 2001–2011 (1 456 154 discharges; a weighted estimate of 7 135 592 discharges). Hospitalizations were stratified by type of AMI and intervention, and the time trends of in‐hospital mortality and hospital costs were examined for each combination of the AMI type and intervention, after adjusting for both patient‐ and hospital‐level characteristics. Compared with 2001, adjusted in‐hospital mortality improved significantly for NSTEMI patients in 2011, regardless of the intervention received (PCI odds ratio [OR] 0.68, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.83; CABG OR 0.57, 0.45 to 0.72; without intervention OR 0.61, 0.57 to 0.65). As for STEMI, a decline in adjusted in‐hospital mortality was significant for those who underwent PCI (OR 0.83; 0.73 to 0.94); however, no significant improvement was observed for those who received CABG or without intervention. Hospital costs per hospitalization increased significantly for patients who underwent intervention, but not for those without intervention. Conclusions In the United States, the decrease in in‐hospital mortality and the increase in costs differed by the AMI type and the intervention received. These non‐uniform trends may be informative for designing effective health policies to reduce the health and economic burdens of AMI. PMID:25801759

  2. Innovative use of tele-ICU in long-term acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mullen-Fortino, Margaret; Sites, Frank D; Soisson, Michael; Galen, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Tele-intensive care units (ICUs) typically provide remote monitoring for ICUs of acute care, short-stay hospitals. As part of a joint venture project to establish a long-term acute level of care, Good Shepherd Penn Partners became the first facility to use tele-ICU technology in a nontraditional setting. Long-term acute care hospitals care for patients with complex medical problems. We describe describes the benefits and challenges of integrating a tele-ICU program into a long-term acute care setting and the impact this model of care has on patient care outcomes. PMID:22828067

  3. Initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score versus Simplified Acute Physiology score to analyze multiple organ dysfunction in infectious diseases in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Remyasri; Bhandary, Nithish M.; D’Souza, Ashton D.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To investigate initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score of patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), who were diagnosed with infectious disease, as an indicator of multiple organ dysfunction and to examine if initial SOFA score is a better mortality predictor compared to Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS). Materials and Methods: Hospital-based study done in medical ICU, from June to September 2014 with a sample size of 48. Patients aged 18 years and above, diagnosed with infectious disease were included. Patients with history of chronic illness (renal/hepatic/pulmonary/  cardiovascular), diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart disease, those on immunosuppressive therapy/chemoradiotherapy for malignancy and patients in immunocompromised state were excluded. Blood investigations were obtained. Six organ dysfunctions were assessed using initial SOFA score and graded from 0 to 4. SAPS was calculated as the sum of points assigned to each of the 17 variables (12 physiological, age, type of admission, and three underlying diseases). The outcome measure was survival status at ICU discharge. Results: We categorized infectious diseases into dengue fever, leptospirosis, malaria, respiratory tract infections, and others which included undiagnosed febrile illness, meningitis, urinary tract infection and gastroenteritis. Initial SOFA score was both sensitive and specific; SAPS lacked sensitivity. We found no significant association between age and survival status. Both SAPS and initial SOFA score were found to be statistically significant as mortality predictors. There is significant association of initial SOFA score in analyzing organ dysfunction in infectious diseases (P < 0.001). SAPS showed no statistical significance. There was statistically significant (P = 0.015) percentage of nonsurvivors with moderate and severe dysfunction, based on SOFA score. Nonsurvivors had higher SAPS but was not statistically significant (P

  4. The delay in transfer between the emergency department and the critical care unit for patients with an acute cardiac event--in hospital factors.

    PubMed

    Grech, C; Pannell, D; Smith-Sparrow, T

    2001-11-01

    The Lyell McEwin Health Service (LMHS) is a major public hospital located in the northern suburbs of Adelaide, a region where the death rate from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is higher than the expected death rate in the population. A retrospective case note study conducted at this hospital investigated the duration that patients with unstable angina pectoris (UA) or acute myocardial infarction (AMI) spent in the emergency department (ED) before admission to the critical care unit (CCU) and the factors that contributed to delays of greater than 70 minutes. All patients admitted to the LMHS over an 18 month period with a discharge diagnosis related group (DRG) for AMI and UA were included in the study. A total of 667 case notes were examined; 403 of these cases met the inclusion criteria for the study. The mean duration between arrival in the ED and subsequent admission to the CCU was found to be 161 minutes. DRG was a major factor in the length of time spent in the ED. The mean duration for patients with AMI was 124 minutes, whilst for UA the duration was 190 minutes (difference = 66 minutes, p<0.001). Other factors that were significant were gender (females = mean duration 29 minutes > males, p=0.015), and mode of transport to the ED (arrival by ambulance mean duration 30 minutes < private transport, Recommendations arising from this study included that a system be established to enable the rapid assessment of all patients suspected of suffering AMI and UA, inclusive of their expeditious transfer to the CCU. In addition, a staff development programme was proposed to ensure medical and nursing staff became aware of a bias in this hospital toward transferring male patients in a shorter timeframe than females with the same DRG. PMID:11806510

  5. Components of nurse innovation: a model from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Neidlinger, S H; Drews, N; Hukari, D; Bartleson, B J; Abbott, F K; Harper, R; Lyon, J

    1992-12-01

    Components that promote nurse innovation in acute care hospitals are explicated in the Acute Care Nursing Innovation Model. Grounded in nursing care delivery systems and excellent management-organizations perspectives, nurse executives and 30 nurse "intrapreneurs" from 10 innovative hospitals spanning the United States shared their experiences and insights through semistructured, tape-recorded telephone interviews. Guided by interpretive interactionist strategies, the essential components, characteristics, and interrelationships are conceptualized and described so that others may be successful in their innovative endeavors. Successful innovation is dependent on the fit between and among the components; the better the fit, the more likely the innovation will succeed. PMID:1444282

  6. Acute care hospitals' accountability to provincial funders.

    PubMed

    Kromm, Seija K; Ross Baker, G; Wodchis, Walter P; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used. PMID:25305386

  7. Acute Care Hospitals' Accountability to Provincial Funders

    PubMed Central

    Kromm, Seija K.; Ross Baker, G.; Wodchis, Walter P.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used. PMID:25305386

  8. Managing malaria in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Marks, M.; Gupta-Wright, A.; Doherty, J. F.; Singer, M.; Walker, D.

    2014-01-01

    The number of people travelling to malaria-endemic countries continues to increase, and malaria remains the commonest cause of serious imported infection in non-endemic areas. Severe malaria, mostly caused by Plasmodium falciparum, often requires intensive care unit (ICU) admission and can be complicated by cerebral malaria, respiratory distress, acute kidney injury, bleeding complications, and co-infection. The mortality from imported malaria remains significant. This article reviews the manifestations, complications and principles of management of severe malaria as relevant to critical care clinicians, incorporating recent studies of anti-malarial and adjunctive treatment. Effective management of severe malaria includes prompt diagnosis and early institution of effective anti-malarial therapy, recognition of complications, and appropriate supportive management in an ICU. All cases should be discussed with a specialist unit and transfer of the patient considered. PMID:24946778

  9. Different characteristics associated with intensive care unit transfer from the medical ward between patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with and without pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong-Joon; Park, Cheol-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Ok; Ban, Hee-Jung; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Yu-Il; Kwon, Yong-Soo; Kim, Young-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background The rate of hospitalization due to acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is increasing. Few studies have examined the clinical, laboratory and treatment differences between patients in general wards and those who need transfer to an intensive care unit (ICU). Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical, laboratory, and treatment characteristics of 374 patients who were initially admitted to the general ward at Chonnam National University Hospital in South Korea due to AECOPD (pneumonic, 194; non-pneumonic, 180) between January 2008 and March 2015. Of these patients, 325 were managed at the medical ward during their hospitalization period (ward group), and 49 required ICU transfer (ICU group). We compared the clinical, laboratory, and treatment characteristics associated with ICU transfer between patients with AECOPD with and without pneumonia. Results Male patients were 86.5% in the ward group and 79.6% in the ICU group. High glucose levels [median 154.5 mg/dL, interquartile range (IQR) 126.8–218.3 in ICU group vs. median 133.0, IQR 109.8–160.3 in ward group], high pneumonia severity index scores (median 100.5, IQR 85.5–118.5 vs. median 86.0, IQR 75.0–103.5), low albumin levels (median 2.9 g/dL, IQR 2.6–3.6 vs. median 3.4, IQR 3.0–3.7), and anemia (73.3% vs. 43.3%) independently increased the risk of ICU transfer in the pneumonic AECOPD group. High PaCO2 levels (median 53.1 mmHg in ICU group, IQR 38.5–84.6 vs. median 39.7, IQR 34.2–48.6 in ward group) independently increased the risk of ICU transfer in the non-pneumonic AECOPD group. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids (≥30 mg of daily prednisolone) during hospitalization in the medical ward independently reduced the risk of ICU transfer in both groups. Conclusions The characteristics associated with ICU transfer differed between the pneumonic and non-pneumonic AECOPD groups, and systemic corticosteroids use was associated with lower rate of ICU

  10. Effect of acupressure with valerian oil 2.5% on the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with acute coronary syndrome in a cardiac intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Gorji, Mohammad Ali Heidari; Rezaie, Somayeh; Pouresmail, Zahra; Cherati, Jamshid Yazdani

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this three-group double-blind clinical trial study was to investigate the effect of acupressure (指壓 zhǐ yā) with valerian (纈草 xié cǎo) oil 2.5% on the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in a coronary intensive care unit (CCU). This study was conducted on 90 patients with ACS in Mazandaran Heart Center (Sari, Iran) during 2013. The patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Patients in the acupressure with valerian oil 2.5% group (i.e., valerian acupressure group) received bilateral acupoint (穴位 xué wèi) massage with two drops of valerian oil for 2 minutes for three nights; including every point this treatment lasted in total 18 minutes. Patients in the acupressure group received massage at the same points with the same technique but without valerian oil. Patients in the control group received massage at points that were 1–1.5 cm from the main points using the same technique and for the same length of time. The quality and quantity of the patients' sleep was measured by the St. Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire (SMHSQ). After the intervention, there was a significant difference between sleep quality and sleep quantity in the patients in the valerian acupressure group and the acupressure group, compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Patients that received acupressure with valerian oil experienced improved sleep quality; however, this difference was not statistically significant in comparison to the acupressure only group. Acupressure at the ear spirit gate (神門 shén mén), hand Shenmen, glabella (印堂 yìn táng), Wind Pool (風池 fēng chí), and Gushing Spring (湧泉 yǒng quán) acupoints can have therapeutic effects and may improve the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with ACS. Using these techniques in combination with herbal medicines such valerian oil can have a greater impact on improving sleep and reducing waking during the night. PMID:26587395

  11. Effect of acupressure with valerian oil 2.5% on the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with acute coronary syndrome in a cardiac intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Gorji, Mohammad Ali Heidari; Rezaie, Somayeh; Pouresmail, Zahra; Cherati, Jamshid Yazdani

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this three-group double-blind clinical trial study was to investigate the effect of acupressure ( zhǐ yā) with valerian ( xié cǎo) oil 2.5% on the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in a coronary intensive care unit (CCU). This study was conducted on 90 patients with ACS in Mazandaran Heart Center (Sari, Iran) during 2013. The patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Patients in the acupressure with valerian oil 2.5% group (i.e., valerian acupressure group) received bilateral acupoint ( xué wèi) massage with two drops of valerian oil for 2 minutes for three nights; including every point this treatment lasted in total 18 minutes. Patients in the acupressure group received massage at the same points with the same technique but without valerian oil. Patients in the control group received massage at points that were 1-1.5 cm from the main points using the same technique and for the same length of time. The quality and quantity of the patients' sleep was measured by the St. Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire (SMHSQ). After the intervention, there was a significant difference between sleep quality and sleep quantity in the patients in the valerian acupressure group and the acupressure group, compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Patients that received acupressure with valerian oil experienced improved sleep quality; however, this difference was not statistically significant in comparison to the acupressure only group. Acupressure at the ear spirit gate ( shén mén), hand Shenmen, glabella ( yìn táng), Wind Pool ( fēng chí), and Gushing Spring ( yǒng quán) acupoints can have therapeutic effects and may improve the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with ACS. Using these techniques in combination with herbal medicines such valerian oil can have a greater impact on improving sleep and reducing waking during the night. PMID:26587395

  12. Fluid accumulation threshold measured by acute body weight change after admission in general surgical intensive care units: how much should be concerning?

    PubMed Central

    Chittawatanarat, Kaweesak; Pichaiya, Todsaporn; Chandacham, Kamtone; Jirapongchareonlap, Tidarat; Chotirosniramit, Narain

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01351506) was to identify the threshold level of fluid accumulation measured by acute body weight (BW) change during the first week in a general surgical intensive care unit (ICU), which is associated with ICU mortality and other adverse outcomes. Methods Four hundred sixty-five patients were prospectively followed for a 28-day period. The maximum BW change threshold during the first week was evaluated by the maximum percentage change in BW from the ICU admission weight (Max%ΔBW). Daily screening of adverse events in the ICU were recorded. The cutoff point of Max%ΔBW on ICU mortality was defined by considering the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, intersection of the sensitivity and specificity, and the Youden Index. Univariable and multivariable regression analyses were used to demonstrate the associations. Statistical significance was defined as P<0.05. Results The appropriate cutoff value of Max%ΔBW threshold was 5%. Regarding the multivariable regression model, in overall patients, the occurrence of the following adverse events (expressed as adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval]) were significantly associated with a Max%ΔBW of >5%: ICU mortality (2.38 [1.25–4.54]) (P=0.008), ICU mortality in patients without renal replacement therapy (RRT) (2.47 [1.21–5.06]) (P=0.013), reintubation within 72 hours (2.51 [1.04–6.00]) (P=0.039), RRT requirement (2.67 [1.13–6.33]) (P=0.026), and delirium (1.97 [1.08–3.57]) (P=0.025). Regarding the postoperative subgroup, a Max%ΔBW value of more than 5% was significantly associated with: ICU mortality (3.87 [1.38–10.85]) (P=0.010), ICU mortality in patients without RRT (6.32 [1.85–21.64]) (P=0.003), reintubation within 72 hours (4.44 [1.30–15.16]) (P=0.017), and vasopressor requirement (2.04 [1.04–4.01]) (P=0.037). Conclusion Fluid accumulation, measured as acute BW change of more than the threshold of 5% during

  13. Acute and critical care in neurology.

    PubMed

    Bertram, M; Schwarz, S; Hacke, W

    1997-01-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic management of selected neurological diseases requiring intensive treatment is summarized with special regard for current standards and new developments in therapy. Ischemic stroke is an emergency since the outcome can be improved by immediate and adequate general supporting as well as specific (thrombolytic) therapy in specialized stroke units. Surgical evacuation of supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage is still controversial. We give an overview of conditions in which surgical therapy such as cerebellar hemorrhage and large, nondominant ganglionic hemorrhage might be advisable. Cerebral venous thrombosis is treated with full-dose intravenous heparin even if hemorrhage is present. In acute bacterial meningitis, early treatment of foci and empiric antibiotic therapy is crucial in order to prevent complications. The outcome of herpes simplex encephalitis can be favorably influenced by treatment with aciclovir and aggressive therapy of elevated ICP and seizures. Acute Guillain-Barré syndrome requires daily monitoring of vital functions in order to recognize the need for intensive care; intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis are equally recommended for clinical and financial reasons. PMID:9363827

  14. Care zoning. A pragmatic approach to enhance the understanding of clinical needs as it relates to clinical risks in acute in-patient unit settings.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kris; Guy, Stuart; Stewart, Linda; Ayling, Mark; Miller, Graham; Anthony, Anne; Bajuk, Anne; Brun, Jo Le; Shearer, Dianne; Gregory, Rebecca; Thomas, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The process of risk assessment which should inform and help identify clinical needs is often seen as a tick box and task-focussed approach. While on the surface this provides a sense of security that forms have been completed, we often fail to communicate in a meaningful manner about the clinical needs identified, which would assist in supporting the care planning delivery processes. A clinical practice improvement (CPI) project implemented a care zoning framework as an evidenced-based process that provides pragmatic support to nurses who are required to continually assess, implement, and evaluate plans to address clinical need across three acute mental health inpatient settings. Risk descriptors informed by the New South Wales (NSW) Mental Health Assessment & Outcome Tools (MHAOT) criteria were developed and described in behavioural contexts in order to improve the project's reliability and translation. A pragmatic traffic light tool was used to share clinical information across three agreed care zones, red (high clinical need), amber (medium clinical need), and green (low clinical need). Additionally nurses were asked to utilise a shift review form in the context of supporting the recording of care zoning and promoting action-orientated note writing. The introduction of care zoning has enthused the nursing teams and the mental health service to adopt care zoning as a supervisory framework that increases their capacity to communicate clinical needs, share information, and gain invaluable support from one another in addressing clinical needs. This includes increased opportunities for staff to feel supported in asking for assistance in understanding and addressing complex clinical presentations. PMID:21574845

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Madden, Kevin; Wolfe, Joanne; Collura, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    The chronicity of illness that afflicts children in Pediatric Palliative Care and the medical technology that has improved their lifespan and quality of life make prognostication extremely difficult. The uncertainty of prognostication and the available medical technologies make both the neonatal intensive care unit and the pediatric intensive care unit locations where many children will receive Pediatric Palliative Care. Health care providers in the neonatal intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care unit should integrate fundamental Pediatric Palliative Care principles into their everyday practice. PMID:26333755

  16. Setting up terminal care units *

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Bridget

    1980-01-01

    From my experience the main problems found by developing terminal care units have been: initial acceptance from existing medical disciplines; communication difficulties and misunderstandings because of them; mistakes in planning and design, possibly due to lack of experience or attention to detail; occasionally, the appointment of staff that have proved unsuitable; problems in the siting of a unit, usually due to shortage of available land. The ideal site is centrally placed in the community it serves and easily accessible to public transport. PMID:7452580

  17. Effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in patients on an acute care psychiatric unit: a randomized three group effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Stigma is a major social barrier that can restrict access to and willingness to seek psychiatric care. Psychiatric consumers may use secrecy and withdrawal in an attempt to cope with stigma. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in acute care psychiatric inpatients using a randomized design with wait-list control. Participants (N=83) were randomly assigned by cluster to one of three single-session group-based conditions: music therapy, education, or wait-list control. Participants in the music therapy and education conditions completed only posttests while participants in the wait-list control condition completed only pretests. The music therapy condition was a group songwriting intervention wherein participants composed lyrics for "the stigma blues." Results indicated significant differences in measures of discrimination (experienced stigma), disclosure (self-stigma), and total stigma between participants in the music therapy condition and participants in the wait-list control condition. From the results of this randomized controlled investigation, music therapy may be an engaging and effective psychosocial technique to treat stigma. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for clinical practice and psychiatric music therapy research are provided. PMID:24070990

  18. Supportive care utilization and treatment toxicity in children with Down syndrome and acute lymphoid leukaemia at free-standing paediatric hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Elizabeth G; Li, Yimei; Fisher, Brian T; Rheingold, Susan R; Fitzgerald, Julie; Seif, Alix E; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Bagatell, Rochelle; Aplenc, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Although inferior outcomes of children with Down syndrome (DS) and acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL) are established, national supportive care patterns for these patients are unknown. A validated retrospective cohort of paediatric patients diagnosed with ALL from 1999 to 2011 was assembled from the US Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) database to examine organ toxicity, sepsis, and resource utilization in children with and without DS. Among 10699 ALL patients, 298 had DS-ALL (2·8%). In a multivariate model, DS was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular (odds ratio [OR] 2·0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1·6-2·7), respiratory (OR 2·1, 95% CI: 1·6-2·9), neurologic (OR 3·4, 95% CI 1·9-6·2), and hepatic (OR 1·4, 95% CI 1·0-1·9) dysfunction and sepsis (OR 1·8, 95% CI: 1·4-2·4). Children with DS-ALL used significantly more respiratory support, insulin, and anti-infectives, including broad-spectrum Gram-positive agents, quinolones, and azoles. They used significantly fewer analgesics and antiemetics compared to non-DS-ALL children. Ultimately, this study confirms the increased risk of infectious and end-organ toxicity in children with DS-ALL and quantifies important differences in resource utilization between children with DS and non-DS ALL. These findings highlight the importance of investigating the impact of these care variations and developing specific supportive care guidelines for this population. PMID:27161549

  19. Change in cognitive performance is associated with functional recovery during post-acute stroke rehabilitation: a multi-centric study from intermediate care geriatric rehabilitation units of Catalonia.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Laura Mónica; Inzitari, Marco; Roqué, Marta; Duarte, Esther; Vallés, Elisabeth; Rodó, Montserrat; Gallofré, Miquel

    2015-10-01

    Recovery after a stroke is determined by a broad range of neurological, functional and psychosocial factors. Evidence regarding these factors is not well established, in particular influence of cognition changes during rehabilitation. We aimed to investigate whether selective characteristics, including cognitive performance and its change over time, modulate functional recovery with home discharge in stroke survivors admitted to post-acute rehabilitation units. We undertook a multicenter cohort study, including all patients discharged from acute wards to any geriatric rehabilitation unit in Catalonia-Spain during 2008. Patients were assessed for demographics, clinical and functional variables using Conjunt Mínim Bàsic de Dades dels Recursos Sociosanitaris (CMBD-RSS), which adapts the Minimum Data Set tool used in America's nursing homes. Baseline-to-discharge change in cognition was calculated on repeated assessments using the Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS, range 0-6, best-worst cognition). The multivariable effect of these factors was analyzed in relation to the outcome. 879 post-stroke patients were included (mean age 77.48 ± 10.18 years, 52.6% women). A worse initial CPS [OR (95% CI) = 0.851 (0.774-0.935)] and prevalent fecal incontinence [OR (95% CI) = 0.560 (0.454-0.691)] reduced the likelihood of returning home with functional improvement; whereas improvement of CPS, baseline to discharge, [OR (95% CI) = 1.348 (1.144-1.588)], more rehabilitation days within the first 2 weeks [OR (95% CI) = 1.011 (1.006-1.015)] and a longer hospital stay [OR (95% CI) = 1.011 (1.006-1.015)] were associated with the outcome. In our sample, different clinical characteristics, including cognitive function and its improvement over time, are associated with functional improvement in stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation. Our results might provide information to further studies aimed at exploring the influence of cognition changes during rehabilitation. PMID:26050232

  20. Acute care of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, M. B.; Lee, T. F.; Gin, K.; Ho, K.

    1996-01-01

    Patients with acute myocardial infarct (AMI) need rapid diagnosis and prompt initiation of thrombolytic therapy. Patients with suspected cardiac ischemia must receive a coordinated team response by the emergency room staff including rapid electrocardiographic analysis and a quick but thorough history and physical examination to diagnose AMI. Thrombolysis and adjunct therapies should be administered promptly when indicated. The choice of thrombolytics is predicated by the location of the infarct. PMID:8754702

  1. A Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial of 6-Step vs 3-Step Hand Hygiene Technique in Acute Hospital Care in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Jacqui S; Price, Lesley; Lang, Sue; Robertson, Chris; Cheater, Francine; Skinner, Kirsty; Chow, Angela

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the microbiologic effectiveness of the World Health Organization's 6-step and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 3-step hand hygiene techniques using alcohol-based handrub. DESIGN A parallel group randomized controlled trial. SETTING An acute care inner-city teaching hospital (Glasgow). PARTICIPANTS Doctors (n=42) and nurses (n=78) undertaking direct patient care. INTERVENTION Random 1:1 allocation of the 6-step (n=60) or the 3-step (n=60) technique. RESULTS The 6-step technique was microbiologically more effective at reducing the median log10 bacterial count. The 6-step technique reduced the count from 3.28 CFU/mL (95% CI, 3.11-3.38 CFU/mL) to 2.58 CFU/mL (2.08-2.93 CFU/mL), whereas the 3-step reduced it from 3.08 CFU/mL (2.977-3.27 CFU/mL) to 2.88 CFU/mL (-2.58 to 3.15 CFU/mL) (P=.02). However, the 6-step technique did not increase the total hand coverage area (98.8% vs 99.0%, P=.15) and required 15% (95% CI, 6%-24%) more time (42.50 seconds vs 35.0 seconds, P=.002). Total hand coverage was not related to the reduction in bacterial count. CONCLUSIONS Two techniques for hand hygiene using alcohol-based handrub are promoted in international guidance, the 6-step by the World Health Organization and 3-step by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study provides the first evidence in a randomized controlled trial that the 6-step technique is superior, thus these international guidance documents should consider this evidence, as should healthcare organizations using the 3-step technique in practice. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:661-666. PMID:27050843

  2. Charge Nurse Perspectives on Frontline Leadership in Acute Care Environments

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Rose O.; Schwarzkopf, Ruth; Kiger, Anna J.

    2011-01-01

    A recently issued report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in the United States on the Future of Nursing included a recommendation that nurses should receive leadership development at every level in order to transform the healthcare system. Charge nurses, at the frontline of patient care in acute care settings, are in key positions to lead this change. This paper presents findings from research conducted with nurses in the Tenet Health System. Charge nurses from ten facilities who attended a one-day work shop were surveyed to gain insight into the experience of being a frontline leader in today's acute care environment. The relationship of these findings to the IOM report and the implications for both the Tenet Health System and other healthcare organizations that are working to support nurses who assume these challenging roles are discussed. PMID:22191051

  3. Large-system acute care transformation.

    PubMed

    Tatman, Judy; Zauner, Janiece

    2014-01-01

    All organizations are steeped in making delivery model changes to address the changing health care landscape specific to the expectations of health care reform. Too often, these changes focus solely on improving processes rather than developing creative and innovative work processes that decrease waste and increase quality. The Providence Health and Services system has embraced the challenge to transform health care services from a large-system perspective, beginning with 1 region. The authors share the beginning stages of this innovative work, the unique contributions to health care processes, and the early outcomes on 2 patient care units. PMID:24317032

  4. Redesigning nurse staffing plans for acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Niday, Patricia; Inman, Yolanda Otero; Smithgall, Lisa; Hilton, Shane; Grindstaff, Sharon; McInturff, Debbie

    2012-06-01

    Johnson City Medical Center's approach to maximizing staffing in nursing units, particularly in acute care settings, had four primary goals: Identify opportunities to maximize the effectiveness of nurse staffing based on a review of core staffing schedules. Reduce cost duplication and improve workflow. Decrease the use of contract labor (with the goal of eliminating the use of contract labor). Develop financial dashboards for staffing that could be used by nursing managers. PMID:22734326

  5. Hepatorenal syndrome in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wadei, Hani M; Gonwa, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a functional form of acute kidney injury (AKI) associated with advanced liver cirrhosis or fulminant hepatic failure. Various new concepts have emerged since the initial diagnostic criteria and definition of HRS was initially published. These include better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in HRS, identification of bacterial infection (especially spontaneous bacterial peritonitis) as the most important HRS-precipitating event, recognition that insufficient cardiac output plays a role in the occurrence of HRS, and evidence that renal failure reverses with pharmacotherapy. Patients with HRS are often critically ill and, by definition, have multiorgan failure. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on novel advances in HRS, with emphasis on the different aspects of management of these patients in the intensive care unit. PMID:21859679

  6. Management of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Intensive Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Andrew J; Altemeier, William A; Johnston, Christine; Gernsheimer, Terry; Becker, Pamela S

    2015-10-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are newly diagnosed or relapsed and those who are receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy are predisposed to conditions such as sepsis due to bacterial and fungal infections, coagulopathies, hemorrhage, metabolic abnormalities, and respiratory and renal failure. These conditions are common reasons for patients with AML to be managed in the intensive care unit (ICU). For patients with AML in the ICU, providers need to be aware of common problems and how to manage them. Understanding the pathophysiology of complications and the recent advances in risk stratification as well as newer therapy for AML are relevant to the critical care provider. PMID:24756309

  7. Ten years of asthma admissions to adult critical care units in England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Gibbison, Ben; Griggs, Kathryn; Mukherjee, Mome; Sheikh, Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the patient demographics, outcomes and trends of admissions with acute severe asthma admitted to adult critical care units in England and Wales. Design 10-year, retrospective analysis of a national audit database. Setting Secondary care: adult, general critical care units in the UK. Participants 830 808 admissions to adult, general critical care units. Primary and secondary outcome measures Demographic data including age and sex, whether the patient was invasively ventilated or not, length of stay (LOS; both in the critical care unit and acute hospital), survival (both critical care unit and acute hospital) and time trends across the 10-year period. Results Over the 10-year period, there were 11 948 (1.4% of total) admissions with asthma to adult critical care units in England and Wales. Among them 67.5% were female and 32.5% were male (RR F:M 2.1; 95% CI 2.0 to 2.1). Median LOS in the critical care unit was 1.8 days (IQR 0.9–3.8). Median LOS in the acute hospital was 7 days (IQR 4–14). Critical care unit survival rate was 95.5%. Survival at discharge from hospital was 93.3%. There was an increase in admissions to adult critical care units by an average of 4.7% (95% CI 2.8 to 6.7)/year. Conclusions Acute asthma represents a modest burden of work for adult critical care units in England and Wales. Demographic patterns for admission to critical care unit mirror those of severe asthma in the general adult community. The number of critical care admissions with asthma are rising, although we were unable to discern whether this represents a true increase in the incidence of acute asthma or asthma severity. PMID:24056484

  8. Use of chest sonography in acute-care radiology☆

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, C.; Valentino, M.; Rimondi, M.R.; Branchini, M.; Baleni, M. Casadio; Barozzi, L.

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis of acute lung disease is a daily challenge for radiologists working in acute-care areas. It is generally based on the results of chest radiography performed under technically unfavorable conditions. Computed tomography (CT) is undoubtedly more accurate in these cases, but it cannot always be performed on critically ill patients who need continuous care. The use of thoracic ultrasonography (US) has recently been proposed for the study of acute lung disease. It can be carried out rapidly at the bedside and does not require any particularly sophisticated equipment. This report analyzes our experience with chest sonography as a supplement to chest radiography in an Emergency Radiology Unit. We performed chest sonography – as an adjunct to chest radiography – on 168 patients with acute chest pathology. Static and dynamic US signs were analyzed in light of radiographic findings and, when possible, CT. The use of chest US improved the authors' ability to provide confident diagnoses of acute disease of the chest and lungs. PMID:23397048

  9. Hiring appropriate providers for different populations: acute care nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Haut, Cathy; Madden, Maureen

    2015-06-01

    Acute care nurse practitioners, prepared as providers for a variety of populations of patients, continue to make substantial contributions to health care. Evidence indicates shorter stays, higher satisfaction among patients, increased work efficiency, and higher quality outcomes when acute care nurse practitioners are part of unit- or service-based provider teams. The Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, and Education outlines detailed guidelines for matching nurse practitioners' education with certification and practice by using a population-focused algorithm. Despite national support for the model, nurse practitioners and employers continue to struggle with finding the right fit. Nurse practitioners often use their interest and previous nursing experience to apply for an available position, and hospitals may not understand preparation or regulations related to matching the appropriate provider to the work environment. Evidence and regulatory guidelines indicate appropriate providers for population-focused positions. This article presents history and recommendations for hiring acute care nurse practitioners as providers for different populations of patients. PMID:26033108

  10. Burn unit care of Stevens Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis: A survey.

    PubMed

    Le, Hong-Gam; Saeed, Hajirah; Mantagos, Iason S; Mitchell, Caroline M; Goverman, Jeremy; Chodosh, James

    2016-06-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) is a systemic disease that can be associated with debilitating acute and chronic complications across multiple organ systems. As patients with acute SJS/TEN are often treated in a burn intensive care unit (BICU), we surveyed burn centers across the United States to determine their approach to the care of these patients. The goal of our study was to identify best practices and possible variations in the care of patients with acute SJS/TEN. We demonstrate that the method of diagnosis, use of systemic therapies, and involvement of subspecialists varied significantly between burn centers. Beyond supportive care provided to every patient, our data highlights a lack of standardization in the acute care of patients with SJS/TEN. A comprehensive guideline for the care of patients with acute SJS/TEN is indicated. PMID:26810444

  11. Despite Federal Legislation, Shortages Of Drugs Used In Acute Care Settings Remain Persistent And Prolonged.

    PubMed

    Chen, Serene I; Fox, Erin R; Hall, M Kennedy; Ross, Joseph S; Bucholz, Emily M; Krumholz, Harlan M; Venkatesh, Arjun K

    2016-05-01

    Early evidence suggests that provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act of 2012 are associated with reductions in the total number of new national drug shortages. However, drugs frequently used in acute unscheduled care such as the care delivered in emergency departments may be increasingly affected by shortages. Our estimates, based on reported national drug shortages from 2001 to 2014 collected by the University of Utah's Drug Information Service, show that although the number of new annual shortages has decreased since the act's passage, half of all drug shortages in the study period involved acute care drugs. Shortages affecting acute care drugs became increasingly frequent and prolonged compared with non-acute care drugs (median duration of 242 versus 173 days, respectively). These results suggest that the drug supply for many acutely and critically ill patients in the United States remains vulnerable despite federal efforts. PMID:27140985

  12. Arterial pulmonary hypertension in noncardiac intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Tsapenko, Mykola V; Tsapenko, Arseniy V; Comfere, Thomas BO; Mour, Girish K; Mankad, Sunil V; Gajic, Ognjen

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary artery pressure elevation complicates the course of many complex disorders treated in a noncardiac intensive care unit. Acute pulmonary hypertension, however, remains underdiagnosed and its treatment frequently begins only after serious complications have developed. Significant pathophysiologic differences between acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension make current classification and treatment recommendations for chronic pulmonary hypertension barely applicable to acute pulmonary hypertension. In order to clarify the terminology of acute pulmonary hypertension and distinguish it from chronic pulmonary hypertension, we provide a classification of acute pulmonary hypertension according to underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical features, natural history, and response to treatment. Based on available data, therapy of acute arterial pulmonary hypertension should generally be aimed at acutely relieving right ventricular (RV) pressure overload and preventing RV dysfunction. Cases of severe acute pulmonary hypertension complicated by RV failure and systemic arterial hypotension are real clinical challenges requiring tight hemodynamic monitoring and aggressive treatment including combinations of pulmonary vasodilators, inotropic agents and systemic arterial vasoconstrictors. The choice of vasopressor and inotropes in patients with acute pulmonary hypertension should take into consideration their effects on vascular resistance and cardiac output when used alone or in combinations with other agents, and must be individualized based on patient response. PMID:19183752

  13. Dementia Special Care Units in Residential Care Communities: United States, 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... special care units offered dementia-specific activities and programming (91%) and had doors with alarms (90%) ( Figure ... special care units had dementia-specific activities and programming, while only 19% had closed circuit TV monitoring. ...

  14. Hypoglycemia Revisited in the Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shih-Hung; Lin, Yen-Yue; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Cheng, Chien-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common finding in both daily clinical practice and acute care settings. The causes of severe hypoglycemia (SH) are multi-factorial and the major etiologies are iatrogenic, infectious diseases with sepsis and tumor or autoimmune diseases. With the advent of aggressive lowering of HbA1c values to achieve optimal glycemic control, patients are at increased risk of hypoglycemic episodes. Iatrogenic hypoglycemia can cause recurrent morbidity, sometime irreversible neurologic complications and even death, and further preclude maintenance of euglycemia over a lifetime of diabetes. Recent studies have shown that hypoglycemia is associated with adverse outcomes in many acute illnesses. In addition, hypoglycemia is associated with increased mortality among elderly and non-diabetic hospitalized patients. Clinicians should have high clinical suspicion of subtle symptoms of hypoglycemia and provide prompt treatment. Clinicians should know that hypoglycemia is associated with considerable adverse outcomes in many acute critical illnesses. In order to reduce hypoglycemia-associated morbidity and mortality, timely health education programs and close monitoring should be applied to those diabetic patients presenting to the Emergency Department with SH. ED disposition strategies should be further validated and justified to achieve balance between the benefits of euglycemia and the risks of SH. We discuss relevant issues regarding hypoglycemia in emergency and critical care settings. PMID:22028152

  15. How do patients with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease experience care in the intensive care unit?

    PubMed Central

    Torheim, Henny; Kvangarsnes, Marit

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to gain insight into how patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience care in the acute phase. The study has a qualitative design with a phenomenological approach. The empirics consist of qualitative in-depth interviews with ten patients admitted to the intensive care units in two Norwegian hospitals. The interviews were carried out from November 2009 to June 2011. The data have been analysed through meaning condensation, in accordance with Amadeo Giorgi's four-step method. Kari Martinsen's phenomenological philosophy of nursing has inspired the study. An essential structure of the patients' experiences of care in the intensive care unit by acute COPD-exacerbation may be described as: Feelings of being trapped in a life-threatening situation in which the care system assumes control over their lives. This experience is conditioned not only by the medical treatment, but also by the entire interaction with the caregivers. The essence of the phenomenon is presented through three themes which describe the patient's lived experience: preserving the breath of life, vulnerable interactions and opportunities for better health. Acute COPD-exacerbation is a traumatic experience and the patients become particularly vulnerable when they depend on others for breathing support. The phenomenological analysis shows that the patients experience good care during breath of life preservation when the care is performed in a way that gives patients more insight into their illness and gives new opportunities for the future. PMID:24313779

  16. Acute Myocardial Infarction Quality of Care: The Strong Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Best, Lyle G.; Butt, Amir; Conroy, Britt; Devereux, Richard B.; Galloway, James M.; Jolly, Stacey; Lee, Elisa T.; Silverman, Angela; Yeh, Jeun-Liang; Welty, Thomas K.; Kedan, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate the quality of care provided patients with acute myocardial infarction and compare with similar national and regional data. Design Case series. Setting The Strong Heart Study has extensive population-based data related to cardiovascular events among American Indians living in three rural regions of the United States. Participants Acute myocardial infarction cases (72) occurring between 1/1/2001 and 12/31/2006 were identified from a cohort of 4549 participants. Outcome measures The proportion of cases that were provided standard quality of care therapy, as defined by the Healthcare Financing Administration and other national organizations. Results The provision of quality services, such as administration of aspirin on admission and at discharge, reperfusion therapy within 24 hours, prescription of beta blocker medication at discharge, and smoking cessation counseling were found to be 94%, 91%, 92%, 86% and 71%, respectively. The unadjusted, 30 day mortality rate was 17%. Conclusion Despite considerable challenges posed by geographic isolation and small facilities, process measures of the quality of acute myocardial infarction care for participants in this American Indian cohort were comparable to that reported for Medicare beneficiaries nationally and within the resident states of this cohort. PMID:21942161

  17. [Care grading in Intensive Medicine: Intermediate Care Units].

    PubMed

    Castillo, F; López, J M; Marco, R; González, J A; Puppo, A M; Murillo, F

    2007-01-01

    Intermediate Care Units are created for patients who predictably have low risk of requiring therapeutic life support measures but who require more monitoring and nursing cares than those received in the conventional hospitalization wards. Previous studies have demonstrated that Intermediate Care Units may promote hospital care grading, allowing for better classification in critical patients, improving efficacy and efficiency of the ICUs and thus decreasing costs and above all mortality in the conventional hospitalization wards. This document attempts to group the currently existing knowledge that served as a base for the consensus meeting on the application of them in the establishment of future ICUs in our hospital setting. PMID:17306139

  18. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript. PMID:27524204

  19. Creating learning momentum through overt teaching interactions during real acute care episodes.

    PubMed

    Piquette, Dominique; Moulton, Carol-Anne; LeBlanc, Vicki R

    2015-10-01

    Clinical supervisors fulfill a dual responsibility towards patient care and learning during clinical activities. Assuming such roles in today's clinical environments may be challenging. Acute care environments present unique learning opportunities for medical trainees, as well as specific challenges. The goal of this paper was to better understand the specific contexts in which overt teaching interactions occurred in acute care environments. We conducted a naturalistic observational study based on constructivist grounded theory methodology. Using participant observation, we collected data on the teaching interactions occurring between clinical supervisors and medical trainees during 74 acute care episodes in the critical care unit of two academic centers, in Toronto, Canada. Three themes contributed to a better understanding of the conditions in which overt teaching interactions among trainees and clinical supervisors occurred during acute care episodes: seizing emergent learning opportunities, coming up against challenging conditions, and creating learning momentum. Our findings illustrate how overt learning opportunities emerged from certain clinical situations and how clinical supervisors and trainees could purposefully modify unfavorable learning conditions. None of the acute care episodes encountered in the critical care environment represented ideal conditions for learning. Yet, clinical supervisors and trainees succeeded in engaging in overt teaching interactions during many episodes. The educational value of these overt teaching interactions should be further explored, as well as the impact of interventions aimed at increasing their use in acute care environments. PMID:25476262

  20. Patterns of research utilization on patient care units

    PubMed Central

    Estabrooks, Carole A; Scott, Shannon; Squires, Janet E; Stevens, Bonnie; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Watt-Watson, Judy; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne; McGilton, Kathy; Golden-Biddle, Karen; Lander, Janice; Donner, Gail; Boschma, Geertje; Humphrey, Charles K; Williams, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Background Organizational context plays a central role in shaping the use of research by healthcare professionals. The largest group of professionals employed in healthcare organizations is nurses, putting them in a position to influence patient and system outcomes significantly. However, investigators have often limited their study on the determinants of research use to individual factors over organizational or contextual factors. Methods The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of research use among nurses working in acute care hospitals, with an emphasis on identifying contextual determinants of research use. A comparative ethnographic case study design was used to examine seven patient care units (two adult and five pediatric units) in four hospitals in two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Alberta). Data were collected over a six-month period by means of quantitative and qualitative approaches using an array of instruments and extensive fieldwork. The patient care unit was the unit of analysis. Drawing on the quantitative data and using correspondence analysis, relationships between various factors were mapped using the coefficient of variation. Results Units with the highest mean research utilization scores clustered together on factors such as nurse critical thinking dispositions, unit culture (as measured by work creativity, work efficiency, questioning behavior, co-worker support, and the importance nurses place on access to continuing education), environmental complexity (as measured by changing patient acuity and re-sequencing of work), and nurses' attitudes towards research. Units with moderate research utilization clustered on organizational support, belief suspension, and intent to use research. Higher nursing workloads and lack of people support clustered more closely to units with the lowest research utilization scores. Conclusion Modifiable characteristics of organizational context at the patient care unit level influences research

  1. Reframing tobacco dependency management in acute care: A case study.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Annette S H; Guzman, Randolph; Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V; Thurmeier, Rick; Fedorowicz, Anna; Fulmore, Kaitlin

    2016-08-01

    Effective tobacco dependence treatment within acute care tends to be inadequate. The purpose of the Utilizing best practices to Manage Acute care patients Tobacco Dependency (UMAT) was to implement and evaluate an evidence-based intervention to support healthcare staff to effectively manage nicotine withdrawal symptoms of acute surgical patients. Data collection for this one-year longitudinal case study included: relevant patient experiences and staff reported practice, medication usage, and chart review. Over the year each data source suggested changes in tobacco dependence treatment. Key changes in patient survey responses (N=55) included a decrease in daily smoking and cigarette cravings. Of patients who used nicotine replacement therapy, they reported an increase in symptom relief. Staff (N=45) were surveyed at baseline, mid-point and end of study. Reported rates of assessing smoking status did not change over the year, but assessment of withdrawal symptoms emerged as daily practice and questions about cessation diminished. Also delivery of nicotine replacement therapy products increased over the year. Chart reviews showed a shift in content from documenting smoking behavior to withdrawal symptoms and administration of nicotine replacements; also frequency of comments increased. In summary, the evidence-based intervention influenced unit norms and reframed the culture related to tobacco dependence treatment. PMID:27392584

  2. Intensive Care Unit death and factors influencing family satisfaction of Intensive Care Unit care

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Naveen; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Family satisfaction of Intensive Care Unit (FS-ICU) care is believed to be associated with ICU survival and ICU outcomes. A review of literature was done to determine factors influencing FS-ICU care in ICU deaths. Results: Factors that positively influenced FS-ICU care were (a) communication: Honesty, accuracy, active listening, emphatic statements, consistency, and clarity; (b) family support: Respect, compassion, courtesy, considering family needs and wishes, and emotional and spiritual support; (c) family meetings: Meaningful explanation and frequency of meetings; (d) decision-making: Shared decision-making; (e) end of life care support: Support during foregoing life-sustaining interventions and staggered withdrawal of life support; (f) ICU environment: Flexibility of visiting hours and safe hospital environment; and (g) other factors: Control of pain and physical symptoms, palliative care consultation, and family-centered care. Factors that negatively influenced FS-ICU care were (a) communication: Incomplete information and unable to interpret information provided; (b) family support: Lack of emotional and spiritual support; (c) family meetings: Conflicts and short family meetings; (d) end of life care support: Resuscitation at end of life, mechanical ventilation on day of death, ICU death of an elderly, prolonged use of life-sustaining treatment, and unfamiliar technology; and (e) ICU environment: Restrictive visitation policies and families denied access to see the dying loved ones. Conclusion: Families of the patients admitted to ICU value respect, compassion, empathy, communication, involvement in decision-making, pain and symptom relief, avoiding futile medical interventions, and dignified end of life care. PMID:27076710

  3. On the palliative care unit.

    PubMed

    Selwyn, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    As a physician working in palliative care, the author is often privileged to share special moments with patients and their families at the end of life. This haiku poem recalls one such moment in that precious space between life and death, as an elderly woman, surrounded by her adult daughters, takes her last breath. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27270255

  4. [Telemedicine in acute stroke care--a health economics view].

    PubMed

    Günzel, F; Theiss, S; Knüppel, P; Halberstadt, S; Rose, G; Raith, M

    2010-05-01

    Specialized stroke units offer optimal treatment of patients with an acute stroke. Unfortunately, their installation is limited by an acute lack of experienced neurologists and the small number of stroke patients in sparsely populated rural areas. This problem is increasingly being solved by the use of telemedicine, so that neurological expertise is made available to basic and regular care. It has been demonstrated by national and international pilot studies that solidly based and rapid decisions can be made by telemedicine regrading the use of thrombolysis, as the most important acute treatment, but also of other interventions. So far studies have only evaluated improvement in the quality of care achieved by networking, but not of any lasting effect on any economic benefit. Complementary to a medical evaluation, the qualitative economic assessment presented here of German and American concepts of telemetric care indicate no difference in efficacy between various ways of networking. Most noteworthy, when comparing two large American and German studies, is the difference in their priorities. While the American networks achieved targeted improvements in efficacy of care that go beyond the immediate wishes of the doctors involved, this was of only secondary importance in the German studies. Also, in contrast to several American networks, the German telemetry networks have not tended to be organized for future growth. In terms of economic benefits, decentralized organized networks offer a greater potential of efficacy than purely local ones. Furthermore, the integration of inducements into the design of business models is a fundamental factor for achieving successful and lasting existence, especially within a highly competitive market. PMID:20077382

  5. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  6. Decision support systems for robotic surgery and acute care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanzides, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Doctors must frequently make decisions during medical treatment, whether in an acute care facility, such as an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), or in an operating room. These decisions rely on a various information sources, such as the patient's medical history, preoperative images, and general medical knowledge. Decision support systems can assist by facilitating access to this information when and where it is needed. This paper presents some research eorts that address the integration of information with clinical practice. The example systems include a clinical decision support system (CDSS) for pediatric traumatic brain injury, an augmented reality head- mounted display for neurosurgery, and an augmented reality telerobotic system for minimally-invasive surgery. While these are dierent systems and applications, they share the common theme of providing information to support clinical decisions and actions, whether the actions are performed with the surgeon's own hands or with robotic assistance.

  7. Issues experienced while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals: A study based on focus group interviews

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Risa; Shimizu, Yasuko

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dementia is a major public health problem. More and more patients with dementia are being admitted to acute care hospitals for treatment of comorbidities. Issues associated with care of patients with dementia in acute care hospitals have not been adequately clarified. This study aimed to explore the challenges nurses face in providing care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals in Japan. Methods This was a qualitative study using focus group interviews (FGIs). The setting was six acute hospitals with surgical and medical wards in the western region of Japan. Participants were nurses in surgical and internal medicine wards, excluding intensive care units. Nurses with less than 3 years working experience, those without experience in dementia patient care in their currently assigned ward, and head nurses were excluded from participation. FGIs were used to collect data from February to December 2008. Interviews were scheduled for 1–1.5 h. The qualitative synthesis method was used for data analysis. Results In total, 50 nurses with an average experience of 9.8 years participated. Eight focus groups were formed. Issues in administering care to patients with dementia at acute care hospitals were divided into seven groups. Three of these groups, that is, problematic patient behaviors, recurrent problem, and problems affecting many people equally, interact to result in a burdensome cycle. This cycle is exacerbated by lack of nursing experience and lack of organization in hospitals. In coping with this cycle, the nurses develop protection plans for themselves and for the hospital. Conclusions The two main issues experienced by nurses while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals were as follows: (a) the various problems and difficulties faced by nurses were interactive and caused a burdensome cycle, and (b) nurses do their best to adapt to these conditions despite feeling conflicted. PMID:25716983

  8. Implementation of an electronic logbook for intensive care units.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Carrie J.; Stansfield, Dennis; Gibb Ellis, Kathryn A.; Clemmer, Terry P.

    2002-01-01

    Logbooks of patients treated in acute care units are commonly maintained; the data may be used to justify resource use, analyze patient outcomes, and encourage clinical research. We report herein the conversion of a paper-based logbook to an electronic logbook in three hospital intensive care units. The major difference between the paper logbook and electronic logbook data was the addition of clinician-entered data to the electronic logbook. Despite extensive computerization of patient information extant in the participating units, there was considerable reluctance to replace the paper-based logbook. The project's success can be attributed to the use of feedback from the clinical users in the development and implementation process to create accessible, high quality data. These data provide clinicians with the capability to monitor trends in a variety of patient groups. Advantages of the electronic logbook include more efficient data access, higher data quality and increased ability to conduct quality improvement and clinical research activities. PMID:12463943

  9. Older patients in the acute care setting: rural and metropolitan nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practices.

    PubMed

    Courtney, M; Tong, S; Walsh, A

    2000-04-01

    Many studies reporting nurses' knowledge of and attitudes toward older patients in long-term care settings have used instruments designed for older people. However, nurses' attitudes toward older patients are not as positive as their attitudes toward older people. Few studies investigate acute care nurses' knowledge of and attitudes toward older patients. In order to address these shortcomings, a self-report questionnaire was developed to determine nurses' knowledge of, and attitudes and practices toward, older patients in both rural and metropolitan acute care settings. Rural nurses were more knowledgeable about older patients' activities during hospitalisation, the likelihood of them developing postoperative complications and the improbability of their reporting incontinence. Rural nurses also reported more positive practices regarding pain management and restraint usage. However, metropolitan nurses reported more positive attitudes toward sleeping medications, decision making, discharge planning and the benefits of acute gerontological units, and were more knowledgeable about older patients' bowel changes in the acute care setting. PMID:11111426

  10. Patient stress in intensive care: comparison between a coronary care unit and a general postoperative unit

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Douglas de Sá; Resende, Mariane Vanessa; Diniz, Gisele do Carmo Leite Machado

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare stressors identified by patients of a coronary intensive care unit with those perceived by patients of a general postoperative intensive care unit. Methods This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted in the coronary intensive care and general postoperative intensive care units of a private hospital. In total, 60 patients participated in the study, 30 in each intensive care unit. The stressor scale was used in the intensive care units to identify the stressors. The mean score of each item of the scale was calculated followed by the total stress score. The differences between groups were considered significant when p < 0.05. Results The mean ages of patients were 55.63 ± 13.58 years in the coronary intensive care unit and 53.60 ± 17.47 years in the general postoperative intensive care unit. For patients in the coronary intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “being bored”. For patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “not being able to communicate”. The mean total stress scores were 104.20 ± 30.95 in the coronary intensive care unit and 116.66 ± 23.72 (p = 0.085) in the general postoperative intensive care unit. When each stressor was compared separately, significant differences were noted only between three items. “Having nurses constantly doing things around your bed” was more stressful to the patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit than to those in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.013). Conversely, “hearing unfamiliar sounds and noises” and “hearing people talk about you” were the most stressful items for the patients in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.046 and 0.005, respectively). Conclusion The perception of major stressors and the total stress score were similar between patients

  11. International Adaptation: Psychosocial and parenting experiences of caregivers who travel to the United States to obtain acute medical care for their seriously ill child

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Rachel; Ludi, Erica; Pao, Maryland; Wiener, Lori

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increasing trend of travel for medical purposes, little is known about the experience of parents and other caregivers who come to the United States specifically to obtain medical treatment for their seriously ill child. In this exploratory, descriptive qualitative study, we used a semi-structured narrative guide to conduct in-depth interviews with 22 Spanish or English-speaking caregivers about the challenges encountered and adaptation required when entering a new medical and cultural environment. Caregivers identified the language barrier and transnational parenting as challenges while reporting hospital staff and their own families as major sources of support. Using the results of the study as a guide, clinical and program implications are provided and recommendations for social work practice discussed. PMID:23947542

  12. Older Jail Inmates and Community Acute Care Use

    PubMed Central

    Chodos, Anna H.; Ahalt, Cyrus; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Myers, Janet; Goldenson, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined older jail inmates’ predetainment acute care use (emergency department or hospitalization in the 3 months before arrest) and their plans for using acute care after release. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional study of 247 jail inmates aged 55 years or older assessing sociodemographic characteristics, health, and geriatric conditions associated with predetainment and anticipated postrelease acute care use. Results. We found that 52% of older inmates reported predetainment acute care use and 47% planned to use the emergency department after release. In modified Poisson regression, homelessness was independently associated with predetainment use (relative risk = 1.42; 95% confidence interval = 1.10, 1.83) and having a primary care provider was inversely associated with planned use (relative risk = 0.69; 95% confidence interval = 0.53, 0.89). Conclusions. The Affordable Care Act has expanded Medicaid eligibility to all persons leaving jail in an effort to decrease postrelease acute care use in this high-risk population. Jail-to-community transitional care models that address the health, geriatric, and social factors prevalent in older adults leaving jail, and that focus on linkages to housing and primary care, are needed to enhance the impact of the act on acute care use for this population. PMID:25033146

  13. Making post-acute care assets viable: a system's approach to continuing care.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Jeffery S; Oberst, Larry; Griffin, Kathleen M

    2013-04-01

    To build a strong continuing care network, leaders at Spectrum Health: Recruited industry veterans in post-acute care, Increased the visibility of the parent brand, Gained greater alignment throughout the system, Filled gaps in the health system's post-acute care portfolio. PMID:23596835

  14. End-of-Life Care in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Engelberg, Ruth A.; Bensink, Mark E.; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence and costs of critical illness are increasing in the United States at a time when there is a focus both on limiting the rising costs of healthcare and improving the quality of end-of-life care. More than 25% of healthcare costs are spent in the last year of life, and approximately 20% of deaths occur in the intensive care unit (ICU). Consequently, there has been speculation that end-of-life care in the ICU represents an important target for cost savings. It is unclear whether efforts to improve end-of-life care in the ICU could significantly reduce healthcare costs. Here, we summarize recent studies suggesting that important opportunities may exist to improve quality and reduce costs through two mechanisms: advance care planning for patients with life-limiting illness and use of time-limited trials of ICU care for critically ill patients. The goal of these approaches is to ensure patients receive the intensity of care that they would choose at the end of life, given the opportunity to make an informed decision. Although these mechanisms hold promise for increasing quality and reducing costs, there are few clearly described, effective methods to implement these mechanisms in routine clinical practice. We believe basic science in communication and decision making, implementation research, and demonstration projects are critically important if we are to translate these approaches into practice and, in so doing, provide high-quality and patient-centered care while limiting rising healthcare costs. PMID:22859524

  15. [Impact of a public-directed media campaign on emergency call to a mobile intensive care units center for acute chest pain].

    PubMed

    Chevalier, V; Alauze, C; Soland, V; Cuny, J; Goldstein, P

    2003-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent the second highest cause of mortality among the 25-65 age group in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region. The Monica study clearly showed that in 1996 the average length of time between a casualty showing the first signs of a coronary and the commencement of treatment was 3 h 30 in northern region of France compared with an average of 2 hours for the rest of the country. Many factors play a part: lack of knowledge of the symptoms, ignorance of the benefits of making an early call to the ambulance, lack of awareness of the french emergency services- centre 15 and its role, absence of any structured network for coronary emergencies. Given these observations, an extensive regional informative campaign is being launched for the first time in France, which will involve all relevant health professionals. The 2 aims of this campaign are to encourage people to call centre 15 directly and as quickly as possible after noticing the first coronary symptoms, and to encourage general practitioners (GPs) to "prescribe calling centre 15". The impact of this campaign has been estimated using the descriptive analysis of the relationship between the number of calls made to centre 15 by the general public and doctors and the number of successful prehospital interventions by the mobile emergency unit of Lille in cases of coronaries and thrombosis. The results of 3 telephone surveys of 1200 people carried out by the emergency services and 2 surveys carried out by a private company were also used for this evaluation. The analysis of this data provides a wealth of arguments in favour of the effectiveness of the campaign. On one hand this is due to the quality of its contents, which we compared to a similar campaign and on the other hand it is due to its lengthy duration. PMID:12938566

  16. End-of-Life Care in an Acute Care Hospital: Linking Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be…

  17. Retrospective study on prognostic importance of serum procalcitonin and amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels as compared to Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV Score on Intensive Care Unit admission, in a mixed Intensive Care Unit population

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Chitra; Dara, Babita; Mehta, Yatin; Tariq, Ali M.; Joby, George V.; Singh, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Timely decision making in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is very essential to improve the outcome of critically sick patients. Conventional scores like Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE IV) are quite cumbersome with calculations and take minimum 24 hours. Procalcitonin has shown to have prognostic value in ICU/Emergency department (ED) in disease states like pneumonia, sepsis etc. NTproBNP has demonstrated excellent diagnostic and prognostic importance in cardiac diseases. It has also been found elevated in non-cardiac diseases. We chose to study the prognostic utility of these markers on ICU admission. Settings and Design: Retrospective observational study. Materials and Methods: A Retrospective analysis of 100 eligible patients was done who had undergone PCT and NTproBNP measurements on ICU admission. Their correlations with all cause mortality, length of hospital stay, need for ventilator support, need for vasopressors were performed. Results: Among 100 randomly selected ICU patients, 28 were non-survivors. NTproBNP values on admission significantly correlated with all cause mortality (P = 0.036, AUC = 0.643) and morbidity (P = 0.000, AUC = 0.763), comparable to that of APACHE-IV score. PCT values on admission did not show significant association with mortality, but correlated well with morbidity and prolonged hospital length of stay (AUC = 0.616, P = 0.045). Conclusion: The current study demonstrated a good predictive value of NTproBNP, in terms of mortality and morbidity comparable to that of APACHE-IV score. Procalcitonin, however, was found to have doubtful prognostic importance. These findings need to be confirmed in a prospective larger study. PMID:27052066

  18. [Delirium and intensive care unit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Muhl, E

    2006-05-01

    Delirium and intensive care unit (ICU) syndrome are frequently seen postoperatively, especially in intensive care. Hospital mortality and complication rates are higher in patients with these disorders. Delirium is characterized by disturbance of consciousness and cognition and short development time. Drugs, drug withdrawal, and manifold metabolic syndromes may be causative. Knowledge of differential diagnosis and causality is essential for curative therapy. Drug therapy is recommended for the treatment of psychotic symptoms and vegetative disorders. PMID:16521003

  19. Ethics in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) is the most common place to die. Also, ethical conflicts among stakeholders occur frequently in the ICU. Thus, ICU clinicians should be competent in all aspects for ethical decision-making. Major sources of conflicts are behavioral issues, such as verbal abuse or poor communication between physicians and nurses, and end-of-life care issues including a lack of respect for the patient's autonomy. The ethical conflicts are significantly associated with the job strain and burn-out syndrome of healthcare workers, and consequently, may threaten the quality of care. To improve the quality of care, handling ethical conflicts properly is emerging as a vital and more comprehensive area. The ICU physicians themselves need to be more sensitive to behavioral conflicts and enable shared decision making in end-of-life care. At the same time, the institutions and administrators should develop their processes to find and resolve common ethical problems in their ICUs. PMID:26175769

  20. Environmental sustainability in the intensive care unit: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Huffling, Katie; Schenk, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In acute care practice sites, the intensive care unit (ICU) is one of the most resource-intense environments. Replete with energy-intensive equipment, significant waste production, and multiple toxic chemicals, ICUs contribute to environmental harm and may inadvertently have a negative impact on the health of patients, staff, and visitors. This article evaluates the ICU on four areas of environmental sustainability: energy, waste, toxic chemicals, and healing environment and provides concrete actions ICU nurses can take to decrease environmental health risks in the ICU. Case studies of nurses making changes within their hospital practice are also highlighted, as well as resources for nurses starting to make changes at their health care institutions. PMID:24896556

  1. Acute coronary care: Principles and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 58 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radionuclide Techniques for Diagnosing and Sizing of Myocardial Infarction; The Use of Serial Radionuclide Angiography for Monitoring Function during Acute Myocardial Infarction; Hemodynamic Monitoring in Acute Myocardial Infarction; and The Valve of Radionuclide Angiography for Risk Assessment of Patients following Acute Myocardial Infarction.

  2. New method of preoxygenation for orotracheal intubation in patients with hypoxaemic acute respiratory failure in the intensive care unit, non-invasive ventilation combined with apnoeic oxygenation by high flow nasal oxygen: the randomised OPTINIV study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Samir; Molinari, Nicolas; De Jong, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tracheal intubation in the intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with severe life-threatening complications including severe hypoxaemia. Preoxygenation before intubation has been recommended in order to decrease such complications. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV)-assisted preoxygenation allows increased oxygen saturation during the intubation procedure, by applying a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to prevent alveolar derecruitment. However, the NIV mask has to be taken off after preoxygenation to allow the passage of the tube through the mouth. The patient with hypoxaemia does not receive oxygen during this period, at risk of major hypoxaemia. High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) has a potential for apnoeic oxygenation during the apnoea period following the preoxygenation with NIV. Whether application of HFNC combined with NIV is more effective at reducing oxygen desaturation during the intubation procedure compared with NIV alone for preoxygenation in patients with hypoxaemia in the ICU with acute respiratory failure remains to be established. Methods and analysis The HFNC combined to NIV for decreasing oxygen desaturation during the intubation procedure in patients with hypoxaemia in the ICU (OPTINIV) trial is an investigator-initiated monocentre randomised controlled two-arm trial with assessor-blinded outcome assessment. The OPTINIV trial randomises 50 patients with hypoxaemia requiring orotracheal intubation for acute respiratory failure to receive NIV (pressure support=10, PEEP=5, fractional inspired oxygen (FiO2)=100%) combined with HFNC (flow=60 L/min, FiO2=100%, interventional group) or NIV alone (reference group) for preoxygenation. The primary outcome is lowest oxygen saturation during the intubation procedure. Secondary outcomes are intubation-related complications, quality of preoxygenation and ICU mortality. Ethics and dissemination The study project has been approved by the appropriate ethics committee (CPP Sud

  3. Outcomes of patients with acute kidney injury with regard to time of initiation and modality of renal replacement therapy – first data from the Silesian Registry of Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Cieśla, Daniel; Knapik, Piotr; Krzych, Łukasz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains a serious clinical problem in the intensive care unit (ICU). It constitutes an independent risk factor for mortality, especially when renal replacement therapy (RRT) is required. Aim Due to limited evidence pertaining to timing, choice of RRT modality and lack of studies investigating AKI in Polish ICUs, we sought to analyse outcomes of adult AKI-RRT ICU patients in the Silesian Voivodeship. Material and methods We analysed data regarding 1,380 patients with AKI who required RRT (AKI-RRT) (9.2% of all subjects in the registry) hospitalized between October 2011 and December 2014 in Silesian ICUs. The primary outcome was crude ICU mortality. Length of ICU stay (LOS) was considered the secondary outcome. Results Of 15,030 patients 1,380 (9.2%) individuals developed AKI requiring RRT. The overall mortality in the registry was 43.9%, but it was significantly higher (69.1%) in AKI-RRT patients (p < 0.01). Mortality with regard to timing of institution of RRT was 67.1% in the group with RRT instituted prior to ICU admission (RRT-prior-ICU) and 69.4% in patients with RRT instituted during ICU hospitalization (RRT-in-ICU) (p = 0.58). Conclusions Multiple patient- and hospitalization-related factors determine mortality in this specific cohort. There are no differences in mortality with regard to RRT being initiated before or during hospitalization in the ICU. Due to multiple confounders, differences in mortality in terms of modality of RRT should be interpreted with caution. PMID:27516784

  4. Point of Care Cardiac Ultrasound Applications in the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Arntfield, Robert T; Millington, Scott J

    2012-01-01

    The use of point of care echocardiography by non-cardiologist in acute care settings such as the emergency department (ED) or the intensive care unit (ICU) is very common. Unlike diagnostic echocardiography, the scope of such point of care exams is often restricted to address the clinical questions raised by the patient’s differential diagnosis or chief complaint in order to inform immediate management decisions. In this article, an overview of the most common applications of this focused echocardiography in the ED and ICU is provided. This includes but is not limited to the evaluation of patients experiencing hypotension, cardiac arrest, cardiac trauma, chest pain and patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:22894759

  5. Concise Care Bundles In Acute Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kivlin, Jude; Altemimi, Harith

    2015-01-01

    The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King's Lynn, Norfolk is a 488 bed hospital providing services to approximately 331,000 people across 750 square miles. In 2012 a need was recognised for documentation (pathways) in a practical format to increase usage of national guidelines and facilitate adherence to best practice (gold standards of care) that could be easily version controlled, auditable and provide support in clinical decision-making by junior doctors. BMJ Action Sets[1] fulfilled the brief with expert knowledge, version control and support, though they were deemed too lengthy and unworkable in fast paced settings like the medical assessment unit; they formed the base creation of concise care bundles (CCB). CCB were introduced for 21 clinical presentations and one procedure. Outcomes were fully audited and showed significant improvement in a range of measures, including an increase in completions of CHADVASC score in atrial fibrillation, antibiotics prescribed per protocol in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and Blatchford score recorded for patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleed. PMID:26734437

  6. Demographic diversity, value congruence, and workplace outcomes in acute care.

    PubMed

    Gates, Michael G; Mark, Barbara A

    2012-06-01

    Nursing scholars and healthcare administrators often assume that a more diverse nursing workforce will lead to better patient and nurse outcomes, but this assumption has not been subject to rigorous empirical testing. In a study of nursing units in acute care hospitals, the influence of age, gender, education, race/ethnicity, and perceived value diversity on nurse job satisfaction, nurse intent to stay, and patient satisfaction were examined. Support was found for a negative relationship between perceived value diversity and all outcomes and for a negative relationship between education diversity and intent to stay. Additionally, positive relationships were found between race/ethnicity diversity and nurse job satisfaction as well as between age diversity and intent to stay. From a practice perspective, the findings suggest that implementing retention, recruitment, and management practices that foster a strong shared value system among nurses may lead to better workplace outcomes. PMID:22377771

  7. Ethnographic research into nursing in acute adult mental health units: a review.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Hunt, Glenn E; Horsfall, Jan; Deacon, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Acute inpatient mental health units are busy and sometimes chaotic settings, with high bed occupancy rates. These settings include acutely unwell patients, busy staff, and a milieu characterised by unpredictable interactions and events. This paper is a report of a literature review conducted to identify, analyse, and synthesize ethnographic research in adult acute inpatient mental health units. Several electronic databases were searched using relevant keywords to identify studies published from 1990-present. Additional searches were conducted using reference lists. Ethnographic studies published in English were included if they investigated acute inpatient care in adult settings. Papers were excluded if the unit under study was not exclusively for patients in the acute phase of their mental illness, or where the original study was not fully ethnographic. Ten research studies meeting our criteria were found (21 papers). Findings were grouped into the following overarching categories: (1) Micro-skills; (2) Collectivity; (3) Pragmatism; and (4) Reframing of nursing activities. The results of this ethnographic review reveal the complexity, patient-orientation, and productivity of some nursing interventions that may not have been observed or understood without the use of this research method. Additional quality research should focus on redefining clinical priorities and philosophies to ensure everyday care is aligned constructively with the expectations of stakeholders and is consistent with policy and the realities of the organisational setting. We have more to learn from each other with regard to the effective nursing care of inpatients who are acutely disturbed. PMID:21736465

  8. [Primary care in the United Kingdom].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-03-01

    The inadequate planning of health professionals in Spain has boosted the way out of doctors overseas. The United Kingdom is one of the countries chosen by Spanish doctors to develop their job. The National Health Service is a health system similar to the Spanish one. Health care services are financing mainly through taxes. The right to health care is linked to the citizen condition. The provision of health care is a mix-up of public and private enterprises. Primary Care is much closed to Spanish Primary Care. Doctors are "self-employed like" professionals. They can set their surgeries in a free area previously designed by the government. They have the right to make their own team and to manage their own budget. Medical salary is linked to professional capability and curriculum vitae. The main role of a General Practitioner is the prevention. Team work and coordination within primary and specialised care is more developed than in Spain. The access to diagnostic tests and to the specialist is controlled through waiting lists. General Practitioners work as gate-keepers. Patients may choose freely their doctor and consultations and hospital care are free at the point of use. Within the United Kingdom there are also health regions with problems due to inequalities to access and to treatment. There is a training path and the access to it is by Curricula. The number of training jobs is regulated by the local needs. Continuing education is compulsory and strictly regulated local and nationally. The National Health Service was the example for the Spanish health reform in 1986. While Spanish Primary health care is of quality, the efficiency of the health system would improve if staff in Primary Care settings were managed in a similar way to the British's. PMID:26412408

  9. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium. PMID:26511424

  10. Building a transdisciplinary approach to palliative care in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Daly, Donnelle; Matzel, Stephen Chavez

    2013-01-01

    A transdisciplinary team is an essential component of palliative and end-of-life care. This article will demonstrate how to develop a transdisciplinary approach to palliative care, incorporating nursing, social work, spiritual care, and pharmacy in an acute care setting. Objectives included: identifying transdisciplinary roles contributing to care in the acute care setting; defining the palliative care model and mission; identifying patient/family and institutional needs; and developing palliative care tools. Methods included a needs assessment and the development of assessment tools, an education program, community resources, and a patient satisfaction survey. After 1 year of implementation, the transdisciplinary palliative care team consisted of seven palliative care physicians, two social workers, two chaplains, a pharmacist, and End-of-Life Nursing Consortium (ELNEC) trained nurses. Palomar Health now has a palliative care service with a consistent process for transdisciplinary communication and intervention for adult critical care patients with advanced, chronic illness. PMID:23977778

  11. Improving Alcohol Withdrawal Outcomes in Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Melson, Jo; Kane, Michelle; Mooney, Ruth; McWilliams, James; Horton, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Context Excessive alcohol consumption is the nation’s third leading cause of preventable deaths. If untreated, 6% of alcohol-dependent patients experience alcohol withdrawal, with up to 10% of those experiencing delirium tremens (DT), when they stop drinking. Without routine screening, patients often experience DT without warning. Objective: Reduce the incidence of alcohol withdrawal advancing to DT, restraint use, and transfers to the intensive care unit (ICU) in patients with DT. Design: In October 2009, the alcohol withdrawal team instituted a care management guideline used by all disciplines, which included tools for screening, assessment, and symptom management. Data were obtained from existing datasets for three quarters before and four quarters after implementation. Follow-up data were analyzed and showed a great deal of variability in transfers to the ICU and restraint use. Percentage of patients who developed DT showed a downward trend. Main Outcome Measures: Incidence of alcohol withdrawal advancing to DT and, in patients with DT, restraint use and transfers to the ICU. Results: Initial data revealed a decrease in percentage of patients with alcohol withdrawal who experienced DT (16.4%–12.9%). In patients with DT, restraint use decreased (60.4%–44.4%) and transfers to the ICU decreased (21.6%–15%). Follow-up data indicated a continued downward trend in patients with DT. Changes were not statistically significant. Restraint use and ICU transfers maintained postimplementation levels initially but returned to preimplementation levels by third quarter 2012. Conclusion: Early identification of patients for potential alcohol withdrawal followed by a standardized treatment protocol using symptom-triggered dosing improved alcohol withdrawal management and outcomes. PMID:24867561

  12. Sedation in neurological intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Birinder S.; Paul, Gunchan

    2013-01-01

    Analgesia and sedation has been widely used in intensive care units where iatrogenic discomfort often complicates patient management. In neurological patients maximal comfort without diminishing patient responsiveness is desirable. In these patients successful management of sedation and analgesia incorporates a patient based approach that includes detection and management of predisposing and causative factors, including delirium, monitoring using sedation scales, proper medication selection, emphasis on analgesia based drugs and incorporation of protocols or algorithms. So, to optimize care clinician should be familiar with the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variables that can affect the safety and efficacy of analgesics and sedatives. PMID:23956563

  13. [Management of decompensated liver cirrhosis in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Lerschmacher, O; Koch, A; Streetz, K; Trautwein, C; Tacke, F

    2013-11-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the end-stage of long-standing chronic liver diseases. The occurrence of complications from liver cirrhosis increases the mortality risk, but the prognosis can be improved by optimal management in the intensive care unit (ICU). Defined diagnostic algorithms allow the etiology and presence of typical complications upon presentation to the ICU to be identified. Acute variceal bleeding requires endoscopic intervention, vasoactive drugs, antibiotics, supportive intensive care measures and, where necessary, urgent transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis needs to be diagnosed and immediately treated in patients with ascites. Hepatorenal syndrome should be treated by albumin and terlipressin. In case of respiratory failure, differential diagnosis should not only consider pneumonia, pulmonary embolism and cardiac failure, but also hepatic hydrothorax, portopulmonary hypertension and hepatopulmonary syndrome. The feasibility of liver transplantation should be always discussed in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Artificial liver support devices may only serve as a bridging procedure until transplant. PMID:24030843

  14. From the coronary care unit to the cardiovascular intensive care unit: the evolution of cardiac critical care.

    PubMed

    Gidwani, Umesh K; Kini, Annapoorna S

    2013-11-01

    This article presents an overview of the evolution of cardiac critical care in the past half century. It tracks the rapid advances in the management of cardiovascular disease and how the intensive care area has kept pace, improving outcomes and incorporating successive innovations. The current multidisciplinary, evidence based unit is vastly different from the early days and is expected to evolve further in keeping with the concept of 'hybrid' care areas where care is delivered by the 'heart team'. PMID:24188215

  15. Promoting patient-centred fundamental care in acute healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Feo, Rebecca; Kitson, Alison

    2016-05-01

    Meeting patients' fundamental care needs is essential for optimal safety and recovery and positive experiences within any healthcare setting. There is growing international evidence, however, that these fundamentals are often poorly executed in acute care settings, resulting in patient safety threats, poorer and costly care outcomes, and dehumanising experiences for patients and families. Whilst care standards and policy initiatives are attempting to address these issues, their impact has been limited. This discussion paper explores, through a series of propositions, why fundamental care can be overlooked in sophisticated, high technology acute care settings. We argue that the central problem lies in the invisibility and subsequent devaluing of fundamental care. Such care is perceived to involve simple tasks that require little skill to execute and have minimal impact on patient outcomes. The propositions explore the potential origins of this prevailing perception, focusing upon the impact of the biomedical model, the consequences of managerial approaches that drive healthcare cultures, and the devaluing of fundamental care by nurses themselves. These multiple sources of invisibility and devaluing surrounding fundamental care have rendered the concept underdeveloped and misunderstood both conceptually and theoretically. Likewise, there remains minimal role clarification around who should be responsible for and deliver such care, and a dearth of empirical evidence and evidence-based metrics. In explicating these propositions, we argue that key to transforming the delivery of acute healthcare is a substantial shift in the conceptualisation of fundamental care. The propositions present a cogent argument that counters the prevailing perception that fundamental care is basic and does not require systematic investigation. We conclude by calling for the explicit valuing and embedding of fundamental care in healthcare education, research, practice and policy. Without this

  16. Sudden Death in Hospital after Discharge from Coronary Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Peter; Sloman, Graeme

    1971-01-01

    In a group of 339 patients with acute myocardial infarction treated in a coronary care unit, 273 left the unit while improving and were expected to leave hospital alive; 23 had a cardiac arrest or died suddenly while still in hospital—17 died immediately or after temporary resuscitation and six were resuscitated to leave hospital alive. Ventricular fibrillation was found in 13 of the 20 patients attended by the cardiac arrest team. The incidents were scattered from the 4th to the 24th day after the onset of infarction. Risk factors in these “late sudden death” patients were compared with the 250 patients who left the unit while improving and did not die or suffer cardiac arrest. The patients susceptible to late sudden death were characterized early in their hospital course by the findings of severe, predominantly anterior infarction, left ventricular failure, persistent sinus tachycardia, and frequent ventricular arrhythmias. It is suggested that such patients be chosen for prolonged observation in a second-stage coronary care unit. PMID:5113015

  17. Improving acute care for patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kate

    People with dementia are more likely to experience a decline in function, fall or fracture when admitted to hospital than the general hospital population. Informal carers' views were sought on the care their relative with dementia received in hospital. Participants were concerned about a lack of essential nursing care, harmful incidents, a decline in patient function, poor staff communication and carers' needs not being acknowledged. Care can be improved through further training, more effective communication, consideration of the appropriate place to care for people and more use of carers' knowledge. PMID:27017677

  18. Geographic Access to High Capability Severe Acute Respiratory Failure Centers in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David J.; Angus, Derek C.; Seymour, Christopher W.; Yealy, Donald M.; Carr, Brendan G.; Kurland, Kristen; Boujoukos, Arthur; Kahn, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Optimal care of adults with severe acute respiratory failure requires specific resources and expertise. We sought to measure geographic access to these centers in the United States. Design Cross-sectional analysis of geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers in the United States. We defined high capability centers using two criteria: (1) provision of adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), based on either 2008–2013 Extracorporeal Life Support Organization reporting or provision of ECMO to 2010 Medicare beneficiaries; or (2) high annual hospital mechanical ventilation volume, based 2010 Medicare claims. Setting Nonfederal acute care hospitals in the United States. Measurements and Main Results We defined geographic access as the percentage of the state, region and national population with either direct or hospital-transferred access within one or two hours by air or ground transport. Of 4,822 acute care hospitals, 148 hospitals met our ECMO criteria and 447 hospitals met our mechanical ventilation criteria. Geographic access varied substantially across states and regions in the United States, depending on center criteria. Without interhospital transfer, an estimated 58.5% of the national adult population had geographic access to hospitals performing ECMO and 79.0% had geographic access to hospitals performing a high annual volume of mechanical ventilation. With interhospital transfer and under ideal circumstances, an estimated 96.4% of the national adult population had geographic access to hospitals performing ECMO and 98.6% had geographic access to hospitals performing a high annual volume of mechanical ventilation. However, this degree of geographic access required substantial interhospital transfer of patients, including up to two hours by air. Conclusions Geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers varies widely across states and regions in the United States. Adequate

  19. Experiences with Capnography in Acute Care Settings: A Mixed-Methods Analysis of Clinical Staff

    PubMed Central

    Langhan, Melissa L.; Kurtz, Jordan C.; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G.; Riera, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While capnography is being incorporated into clinical guidelines, it is not used to it's full potential. We investigated reasons for limited implementation of capnography in acute care areas and explored facilitators and barriers to its implementation. Methods A purposeful sample of physicians and nurses in emergency departments (ED) and intensive care units (ICU) participated in semistructured interviews. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to analyze the data to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Results Nineteen providers were interviewed from five hospitals. Six themes were identified: variability in use of capnography among acute care units, availability and accessibility of capnography equipment, the evidence behind capnography use, the impact of capnography on patient care, personal experiences impacting use of capnography, and variable knowledge about capnography. Barriers and facilitators to use were found within each theme. Conclusions We observed varied responsiveness to capnography and identified factors that work to foster or discourage its use. This data can guide future implementation strategies. A deliberate strategy to foster utilization, mitigate barriers and broadly accelerate implementation has the potential to profoundly impact use of capnography in acute care areas with the goal of improving patient care. PMID:25129575

  20. Obesity in the intensive care unit: risks and complications.

    PubMed

    Selim, Bernardo J; Ramar, Kannan; Surani, Salim

    2016-08-01

    The steady growing prevalence of critically ill obese patients is posing diagnostic and management challenges across medical and surgical intensive care units. The impact of obesity in the critically ill patients may vary by type of critical illness, obesity severity (obesity distribution) and obesity-associated co-morbidities. Based on pathophysiological changes associated with obesity, predominately in pulmonary reserve and cardiac function, critically ill obese patients may be at higher risk for acute cardiovascular, pulmonary and renal complications in comparison to non-obese patients. Obesity also represents a dilemma in the management of other critical care areas such as invasive mechanical ventilation, mechanical ventilation liberation, hemodynamic monitoring and pharmacokinetics dose adjustments. However, despite higher morbidity associated with obesity in the intensive care unit (ICU), a paradoxical lower ICU mortality ("obesity paradox") is demonstrated in comparison to non-obese ICU patients. This review article will focus on the unique pathophysiology, challenges in management, and outcomes associated with obesity in the ICU. PMID:27098774

  1. Ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Xin-Xin; Wang, Xin-Ling

    2016-07-01

    On one hand, advances in neonatal care and rescue technology allow for the healthy survival or prolonged survival time of critically ill newborns who, in the past, would have been non-viable. On the other hand, many of the surviving critically ill infants have serious long-term disabilities. If an infant eventually cannot survive or is likely to suffer severe disability after surviving, ethical issues in the treatment process are inevitable, and this problem arises not only in developed countries but is also becoming increasingly prominent in developing countries. In addition, ethical concerns cannot be avoided in medical research. This review article introduces basic ethical guidelines that should be followed in clinical practice, including respecting the autonomy of the parents, giving priority to the best interests of the infant, the principle of doing no harm, and consent and the right to be informed. Furthermore, the major ethical concerns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in China are briefly introduced. PMID:26382713

  2. Hospital readmission from a transitional care unit.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mary Ann; Tyler, Denice; Helms, Lelia B; Hanson, Kathleen S; Sparbel, Kathleen J H

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to characterize patients readmitted to the hospital during a stay in a transitional care unit (TCUT). Typically, readmitted patients were females, widowed, with 8 medical diagnoses, and taking 12 different medications. Readmission from the TCU occurred within 7 days as a result of a newly developed problem. Most patients did not return home after readmission from the TCU. Understanding high-risk patients' characteristics that lead to costly hospital readmission during a stay in the TCU can assist clinicians and healthcare providers to plan and implement timely and effective interventions, and help facility personnel in fiscal and resource management issues. PMID:15686074

  3. Neurologic Complications in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Rubinos, Clio; Ruland, Sean

    2016-06-01

    Complications involving the central and peripheral nervous system are frequently encountered in critically ill patients. All components of the neuraxis can be involved including the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, neuromuscular junction, and muscles. Neurologic complications adversely impact outcome and length of stay. These complications can be related to underlying critical illness, pre-existing comorbid conditions, and commonly used and life-saving procedures and medications. Familiarity with the myriad neurologic complications that occur in the intensive care unit can facilitate their timely recognition and treatment. Additionally, awareness of treatment-related neurologic complications may inform decision-making, mitigate risk, and improve outcomes. PMID:27098953

  4. Psychosocial Care and its Association with Severe Acute Malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anurag; Agarwal, Sheesham

    2016-05-01

    This cross-sectional study compared 120 children having severe acute malnutrition with 120 healthy children for exposure to 40 behaviors, by measuring psychosocial care based on Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) inventory. The mean (SD) psychosocial care score of cases and controls significantly differed [18.2 (2.2) vs 23.5 (2.1); P<0.001]. A score of less than 14 was significantly associated with severe acute malnutrition (OR 23.2; 95% CI 8.2, 50). PMID:27254059

  5. Improved outcomes for elderly patients who received care on a transitional care unit

    PubMed Central

    Manville, Margaret; Klein, Michael C.; Bainbridge, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether providing elderly alternate level of care (ALC) patients with interdisciplinary care on a transitional care unit (TCU) achieves better clinical outcomes and lowers costs compared with providing them with standard hospital care. Design Before-and-after structured retrospective chart audit. Setting St Joseph’s Hospital in Comox, BC. Participants One hundred thirty-five consecutively admitted patients aged 70 years and older with ALC designation during 5-month periods before (n = 49) and after (n = 86) the opening of an on-site TCU. Main outcome measures Length of stay, discharge disposition, complications of the acute and ALC portions of the patients’ hospital stays, activities of daily living (mobility, transfers, and urinary continence), psychotropic medications and vitamin D prescriptions, and ALC patient care costs, as well as annual hospital savings, were examined. Results Among the 86 ALC patients receiving care during the postintervention period, 57 (66%) were admitted to the TCU; 29 of the 86 (34%) patients in the postintervention group received standard care (SC). All 86 ALC patients in the postintervention group were compared with the 49 preintervention ALC patients who received SC. Length of stay reduction occurred among the postintervention group during the acute portion of the hospital stay (14.0 days postintervention group vs 22.5 days preintervention group; P < .01). Discharge home or to an assisted-living facility increased among the postintervention group (30% postintervention group vs 12% preintervention group; P < .01). Patients’ ability to transfer improved among the postintervention group (55% postintervention group vs 14% preintervention group; P < .01). At discharge, 48% of ALC patients in the postintervention group were able to transfer independently compared with 17% of ALC patients in the preintervention group. Hospital-acquired infections among the postintervention group decreased during the

  6. Adoption of intensive care unit telemedicine in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Jeremy M.; Cicero, Brandon D.; Wallace, David J.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Intensive care unit (ICU) telemedicine is a novel approach for providing critical care services from a distance. We sought to study the extent of use and patterns of adoption of this technology in United States ICUs. Design Retrospective study combining a systematic listing of ICU telemedicine installations with hospital characteristic data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. We examined adoption over time and compared hospital characteristics between facilities that have adopted ICU telemedicine and those that have not. Setting United States hospitals from 2003 to 2010. Measurements and main results The number of hospitals using ICU telemedicine increased from 16 (0.4% of total) to 213 (4.6% of total) between 2003 and 2010. The number of ICU beds covered by telemedicine increased from 598 (0.9% of total) to 5,799 (7.9% of total). The average annual rate of ICU bed coverage growth was 101% per year in the first four study years but slowed to 8.1% per year over the last four study years (p<0.001 for difference in linear trend). Compared to non-adopting hospitals, hospitals adopting ICU telemedicine were more likely to be large (percentage with >400 beds: 11.1% vs. 3.7%, p<0.001), teaching (percentage with resident coverage: 31.4% vs. 21.9%, p=0.003) and urban (percentage located in metropolitan statistical areas with over one million residents: 45.3% vs. 30.1%, p<0.001). Conclusions ICU telemedicine adoption was initially rapid but recently slowed. Efforts are needed to uncover the barriers to future growth, particularly regarding the optimal strategy for using this technology most effectively and efficiently. PMID:24145839

  7. Improving patients' and staff's experiences of acute care.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Rob; Crawshaw, Jacob; Hood, Chloe

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this audit was to assess the effect of the Quality Mark programme on the quality of acute care received by older patients by comparing the experiences of staff and older adults before and after the programme. Data from 31 wards in 12 acute hospitals were collected over two stages. Patients and staff completed questionnaires on the perceived quality of care on the ward. Patients rated improved experiences of nutrition, staff availability and dignity. Staff received an increase in training and reported better access to support, increased time and skill to deliver care and improved morale, leadership and teamwork. Problems remained with ward comfort and mealtimes. Overall, results indicated an improvement in ratings of care quality in most domains during Quality Mark data collection. Further audits need to explore ways of improving ward comfort and mealtime experience. PMID:25727634

  8. Paediatric emergency and acute care in resource poor settings.

    PubMed

    Duke, Trevor; Cheema, Baljit

    2016-02-01

    Acute care of seriously ill children is a global public health issue, and there is much scope for improving quality of care in hospitals at all levels in many developing countries. We describe the current state of paediatric emergency and acute care in the least developed regions of low and middle income countries and identify gaps and requirements for improving quality. Approaches are needed which span the continuum of care: from triage and emergency treatment, the diagnostic process, identification of co-morbidities, treatment, monitoring and supportive care, discharge planning and follow-up. Improvements require support and training for health workers and quality processes. Effective training is that which is ongoing, combining good technical training in under-graduate courses and continuing professional development. Quality processes combine evidence-based guidelines, essential medicines, appropriate technology, appropriate financing of services, standards and assessment tools and training resources. While initial emergency treatment is based on common clinical syndromes, early differentiation is required for specific treatment, and this can usually be carried out clinically without expensive tests. While global strategies are important, it is what happens locally that makes a difference and is too often neglected. In rural areas in the poorest countries in the world, public doctors and nurses who provide emergency and acute care for children are revered by their communities and demonstrate daily that much can be carried out with little. PMID:27062627

  9. Prehospital care of the acute stroke patient.

    PubMed

    Rajajee, Venkatakrishna; Saver, Jeffrey

    2005-06-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) is the first medical contact for most acute stroke patients, thereby playing a pivotal role in the identification and treatment of acute cerebrovascular brain injury. The benefit of thrombolysis and interventional therapies for acute ischemic stroke is highly time dependent, making rapid and effective EMS response of critical importance. In addition, the general public has suboptimal knowledge about stroke warning signs and the importance of activating the EMS system. In the past, the ability of EMS dispatchers to recognize stroke calls has been documented to be poor. Reliable stroke identification in the field enables appropriate treatment to be initiated in the field and potentially inappropriate treatment avoided; the receiving hospital to be prenotified of a stroke patient's imminent arrival, rapid transport to be initiated; and stroke patients to be diverted to stroke-capable receiving hospitals. In this article we discuss research studies and educational programs aimed at improving stroke recognition by EMS dispatchers, prehospital personnel, and emergency department (ED) physicians and how this has impacted stroke treatment. In addition public educational programs and importance of community awareness of stroke symptoms will be discussed. For example, general public's utilization of 911 system for stroke victims has been limited in the past. However, it has been repeatedly shown that utilization of the 911 system is associated with accelerated arrival times to the ED, crucial to timely treatment of stroke patients. Finally, improved stroke recognition in the field has led investigators to study in the field treatment of stroke patients with neuroprotective agents. The potential impact of this on future of stroke treatment will be discussed. PMID:16194754

  10. Intelligence Care: A Nursing Care Strategy in Respiratory Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian-Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Saadat, Soheil; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Working in respiratory intensive care unit (RICU) is multidimensional that requires nurses with special attributes to involve with the accountability of the critically ill patients. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the appropriate nursing care strategy in the RICU in order to unify and coordinate the nursing care in special atmosphere of the RICU. Materials and Methods: This conventional content analysis study was conducted on 23 health care providers working in the RICU of Sina and Shariati hospitals affiliated to Tehran university of medical sciences and the RICU of Baqiyatallah university of medical sciences from August 2012 to the end of July 2013. In addition to in-depth semistructured interviews, uninterrupted observations, field notes, logs, patient’s reports and documents were used. Information saturation was determined as an interview termination criterion. Results: Intelligence care emerged as a main theme, has a broad spectrum of categories and subcategories with bridges and barriers, including equality of bridges and barriers (contingency care, forced oriented task); bridges are more than barriers (human-center care, innovative care, cultural care, participatory care, feedback of nursing services, therapeutic-professional communication, specialized and independent care, and independent nurse practice), and barriers are higher than bridges (personalized care, neglecting to provide proper care, ineffectiveness of supportive caring wards, futility care, nurse burnout, and nonethical-nonprofessional communications). Conclusions: Intelligence care is a comprehensive strategy that in addition to recognizing barriers and bridges of nursing care, with predisposing and precipitating forces it can convert barriers to bridges. PMID:26734480

  11. Standardization of pain management in the postanesthesia care unit.

    PubMed

    Knowles, R

    1996-12-01

    A project is described in which a standard in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) for managing patients with acute pain was implemented. The nurses' documentation and their perceptions concerning pain management were assessed. The data collected from the pre-questionnaires showed misconceptions about pain medication, lack of knowledge about measurement tools, and value systems that were inconsistent with recognizing a comfortable and safe "comfort level" of pain for patients. The pre-audit of PACU nursing documents showed that the assessment of pain was noted in terms of presence or absence but not quantified by the use of a measurement standard. After the implementation of a pain standard, results of the post-questionnaires showed changes in behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge that showed significant increases in the use of a numerical or visual pain tool, and an increase in documented evaluation of pain. PMID:9069862

  12. Does the presence of oral care guidelines affect oral care delivery by intensive care unit nurses? A survey of Saudi intensive care unit nurses.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Ahmed K; Alshayiqi, Mohammed; Ramalingam, Sundar

    2014-08-01

    Mechanically ventilated patients rely on nurses for their oral care needs, signifying the importance of nurses in intensive care units (ICUs). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of oral care guidelines on the oral care delivered to mechanically ventilated patients by ICU nurses. A total of 215 nurses were enrolled. Demographic data and oral care practices were recorded through a self-administered survey. Participants governed by oral care guidelines had significantly higher oral care practice scores than their counterparts from ICUs without similar guidelines (P = .034; t = 2.13). Oral care guidelines in ICUs can contribute to reduction of morbidity and mortality caused by ventilator-associated pneumonia. PMID:25087146

  13. Lactate and lactate clearance in acute cardiac care patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Picariello, Claudio; Dini, Carlotta Sorini; Gensini, Gian Franco; Valente, Serafina

    2012-01-01

    Hyperlactataemia is commonly used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in intensive care settings. Recent studies documented that serial lactate measurements over time (or lactate clearance), may be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value for risk stratification in different pathological conditions. While the negative prognostic role of hyperlactataemia in several critical ill diseases (such as sepsis and trauma) is well established, data in patients with acute cardiac conditions (i.e. acute coronary syndromes) are scarce and controversial. The present paper provides an overview of the current available evidence on the clinical role of lactic acid levels and lactate clearance in acute cardiac settings (acute coronary syndromes, cardiogenic shock, cardiac surgery), focusing on its prognostic role. PMID:24062898

  14. Implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings: a qualitative analysis of clinical staff

    PubMed Central

    Langhan, Melissa L.; Riera, Antonio; Kurtz, Jordan C.; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Technologies are not always successfully implemented into practise. We elicited experiences of acute care providers with the introduction of technology and identified barriers and facilitators in the implementation process. Methods A qualitative study using one-on-one interviews among a purposeful sample of 19 physicians and nurses within ten emergency departments and intensive care units was performed. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Results Five major categories emerged: decision-making factors, the impact on practise, technology's perceived value, facilitators and barriers to implementation. Barriers included negative experiences, age, infrequent use, and access difficulties. A positive outlook, sufficient training, support staff, and user friendliness were facilitators. Conclusions This study describes strategies implicated in the successful implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings. Improved implementation methods and evaluation of implementation processes are necessary for successful adoption of new technology. PMID:25367721

  15. Implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings: a qualitative analysis of clinical staff.

    PubMed

    Langhan, Melissa L; Riera, Antonio; Kurtz, Jordan C; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G

    2015-01-01

    Technologies are not always successfully implemented into practice. This study elicited experiences of acute care providers with the introduction of technology and identified barriers and facilitators in the implementation process. A qualitative study using one-on-one interviews among a purposeful sample of 19 physicians and nurses within 10 emergency departments and intensive care units was performed. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Five major categories emerged: decision-making factors, the impact on practice, technology's perceived value, facilitators and barriers to implementation. Barriers included negative experiences, age, infrequent use and access difficulties. A positive outlook, sufficient training, support staff and user friendliness were facilitators. This study describes strategies implicated in the successful implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings. Improved implementation methods and evaluation of implementation processes are necessary for successful adoption of new technology. PMID:25367721

  16. Patients in acute care settings. Which health-care services are provided?

    PubMed

    Dugan, J; Mosel, L

    1992-07-01

    Studies have shown that early discharge planning, multidisciplinary care, and a focus on functional abilities for older adults do reduce acute care hospital readmissions. Of the 101 records reviewed of acute care admissions 75 years of age and older, 36 had no multidisciplinary service documented and 75 had no discharge planning documented within 48 hours of admission. Eleven functional activities were assessed and documented in one record with a range of 4 to 11 activities assessed in the remaining 100 documents. Identifying and filling gaps in care provided to this age group might provide substantial cost savings, improve care, and decrease complications. Advocacy, coordination of care, and greater knowledge may be keys to narrowing these service gaps. PMID:1629531

  17. Improving Sepsis Management in the Acute Admissions Unit

    PubMed Central

    Adcroft, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a common condition with a major impact on healthcare resources and expenditure. We therefore wanted to investigate and improve how the acute admission unit (AAU) at the Great Western Hospital (GWH) is managing patients who present directly to the unit with sepsis. In order to obtain this information, an audit was undertaken against the College of Emergency Medicine standards used by the emergency department within GWH and across the UK. Data was retrospectively collected for 30 patients with a diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock. The notes were scrutinized with regard to the implementation of College of Emergency Medicine standards for the management of sepsis. This meant that performance in the AAU was compared against the emergency department at GWH and national figures. The data collected shows performance is below national standards with regard to documentation of high flow oxygen use (AAU: 24%, ED 100%; national median: 50%; CEM standard 95%), crystalloid fluid boluses (AAU: 52%; ED: 90%; national median: 83%; CEM standard 100%), lactate measurements (AAU: 66%, ED: 93%; national median: 80%; CEM standard 95%), and obtainment of blood cultures (AAU: 52%; ED 73%; national median: 77%; CEM standard: 95%). Only 3% of patients received all six parts of the sepsis bundle. Since auditing in 2012/2013 we have introduced a sepsis proforma based on a current proforma being used within Severn Deanery. This proforma uses the ‘Sepsis Six’ bundle appropriate to ward based care. We have raised awareness of sepsis implications and management through the creation of a ‘sepsis working group’ to educate both junior doctors and nurses. In turn, this has led to education through the use of posters, pocket reference cards, and teaching sessions. Re-audit shows significant improvement in administering all parts of the Sepsis Six bundle and an 8% improvement in patients receiving all six of the bundle. PMID:26734269

  18. A qualitative analysis of acute care surgery in the United States: It’s more than just “a competent surgeon with a sharp knife and a willing attitude”

    PubMed Central

    Santry, Heena P.; Pringle, Patricia L.; Collins, Courtney E.; Kiefe, Catarina I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Since acute care surgery (ACS) was conceptualized a decade ago, the specialty has been adopted widely; however, little is known about the structure and function of ACS teams. Methods We conducted 18 open-ended interviews with ACS leaders (representing geographic [New England, Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, South, West, Midwest] and practice [Public/Charity, Community, University] diversity). Two independent reviewers analyzed transcribed interviews using an inductive approach (NVivo qualitative analysis software). Results All respondents described ACS as a specialty treating “time-sensitive surgical disease” including trauma, emergency general surgery (EGS), and surgical critical care (SCC); 11 of 18 combined trauma and EGS into a single clinical team; 9 of 18 included elective general surgery. Emergency orthopedics, emergency neurosurgery, and surgical subspecialty triage were rare (1/18 each). Eight of 18 ACS teams had scheduled EGS operating room time. All had a core group of trauma and SCC surgeons; 13 of 18 shared EGS due to volume, human resources, or competition for revenue. Only 12 of 18 had formal signout rounds; only 2 of 18 had prospective EGS data registries. Streamlined access to EGS, evidence-based protocols, and improved education were considered strengths of ACS. ACS was described as the “last great surgical service” reinvigorated to provide “timely,” cost-effective EGS by experts in “resuscitation and critical care” and to attract “young, talented, eager surgeons” to trauma/SCC; however, there was concern that ACS might become the “wastebasket for everything that happens at inconvenient times.” Conclusion Despite rapid adoption of ACS, its implementation varies widely. Standardization of scope of practice, continuity of care, and registry development may improve EGS outcomes and allow the specialty to thrive. (Surgery 2014;155:809-25.) PMID:24787108

  19. Experiences of parenting a child with medical complexity in need of acute hospital care.

    PubMed

    Hagvall, Monica; Ehnfors, Margareta; Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta

    2016-03-01

    Parents of children with medical complexity have described being responsible for providing advanced care for the child. When the child is acutely ill, they must rely on the health-care services during short or long periods of hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to describe parental experiences of caring for their child with medical complexity during hospitalization for acute deterioration, specifically focussing on parental needs and their experiences of the attitudes of staff. Data were gathered through individual interviews and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The care period can be interpreted as a balancing act between acting as a caregiver and being in need of care. The parents needed skilled staff who could relieve them of medical responsibility, but they wanted to be involved in the care and in the decisions taken. They needed support, including relief, in order to meet their own needs and to be able to take care of their children. It was important that the child was treated with respect in order for the parent to trust the staff. An approach where staff view parents and children as a single unit, as recipients of care, would probably make the situation easier for these parents and children. PMID:25352538

  20. Continuous haemofiltration in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Bellomo, Rinaldo; Ronco, Claudio

    2000-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) was first described in 1977 for the treatment of diuretic-unresponsive fluid overload in the intensive care unit (ICU). Since that time this treatment has undergone a remarkable technical and conceptual evolution. It is now available in most tertiary ICUs around the world and has almost completely replaced intermittent haemodialysis (IHD) in some countries. Specially made machines are now available, and venovenous therapies that use blood pumps have replaced simpler techniques. Although, it remains controversial whether CRRT decreases mortality when compared with IHD, much evidence suggests that it is physiologically superior. The use of CRRT has also spurred renewed interest in the broader concept of blood purification, particularly in septic states. Experimental evidence suggests that this is a promising approach to the management of septic shock in critically ill patients. The evolution and use of CRRT is likely to continue and grow over the next decade. PMID:11123877

  1. Intensive care unit syndrome: a dangerous misnomer.

    PubMed

    McGuire, B E; Basten, C J; Ryan, C J; Gallagher, J

    2000-04-10

    The terms intensive care unit (ICU) syndrome and ICU psychosis have been used interchangeably to describe a cluster of psychiatric symptoms that are unique to the ICU environment. It is often postulated that aspects of the ICU, such as sleep deprivation and sensory overload or monotony, are causes of the syndrome. This article reviews the empirical support for these propositions. We conclude that ICU syndrome does not differ from delirium and that ICU syndrome is caused exclusively by organic stressors on the central nervous system. We argue further that the term ICU syndrome is dangerous because it impedes standardized communication and research and may reduce the vigilance necessary to promptly investigate and reverse the medical cause of the delirium. Directions for future research are suggested. PMID:10761954

  2. Healing Environments: Integrative Medicine and Palliative Care in Acute Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Estores, Irene M; Frye, Joyce

    2015-09-01

    Conventional medicine is excellent at saving lives; however, it has little to offer to address the physical, mental, and emotional distress associated with life-threatening or life-limiting disease. An integrative approach to palliative care in acute care settings can meet this need by creating healing environments that support patients, families, and health care professionals. Mindful use of language enhances the innate healing response, improves communication, and invites patients and families to participate in their care. Staff should be offered access to skills training to cultivate compassion and mindful practice to enhance both patient and self-care. PMID:26333757

  3. [Delirium in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    von Haken, R; Gruss, M; Plaschke, K; Scholz, M; Engelhardt, R; Brobeil, A; Martin, E; Weigand, M A

    2010-03-01

    In recent years delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) has internationally become a matter of rising concern for intensive care physicians. Due to the design of highly sophisticated ventilators the practice of deep sedation is nowadays mostly obsolete. To assess a ventilated ICU patient for delirium easy to handle bedside tests have been developed which permit a psychiatric scoring. The significance of ICU delirium is equivalent to organ failure and has been proven to be an independent prognostic factor for mortality and length of ICU and hospital stay. The pathophysiology and risk factors of ICU delirium are still insufficiently understood in detail. A certain constellation of pre-existing patient-related conditions, the current diagnosis and surgical procedure and administered medication entail a higher risk for the occurrence of ICU delirium. A favored hypothesis is that an imbalance of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine and dopamine serotonin results in an unpredictable neurotransmission. Currently, the administration of neuroleptics, enforced physiotherapy, re-orientation measures and appropriate pain treatment are the basis of the therapeutic approach. PMID:20127059

  4. Antibiotic stewardship in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Heather M; Micek, Scott T; Skrupky, Lee P; Kollef, Marin H

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship encompasses the optimization of agent selection, dose, and duration leading to the best clinical outcome in the treatment or prevention of infection. Ideally, these goals are met while producing the fewest side effects and lowest risk for subsequent resistance. The concept of antimicrobial stewardship can be directly applied to the prescription of empirical antibiotic therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU) because it is well described that inappropriate initial regimens lead to increased mortality. As such, care should be taken to identify factors that place patients at risk for infection with pathogens demonstrating reduced susceptibility or multidrug resistance. Research efforts have concentrated on molecular diagnostic techniques to aid in more rapid organism detection and thus potential for earlier therapy appropriateness and deescalation, although limitations prohibiting widespread implementation of this technology exist. Also of great importance with regard to stewardship efforts is infection prevention. Effective prophylactic strategies reduce the occurrence of nosocomial infections and may therefore improve patient outcomes while obviating the need for otherwise necessary antimicrobial exposure. PMID:21506058

  5. Post–Acute Care Use and Hospital Readmission after Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tiffanie K.; Fuchs, Barry D.; Small, Dylan S.; Halpern, Scott D.; Hanish, Asaf; Umscheid, Craig A.; Baillie, Charles A.; Kerlin, Meeta Prasad; Gaieski, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The epidemiology of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis remains largely unknown. Objectives: To examine the rate of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis and to examine risk factors and outcomes for hospital readmissions after sepsis. Methods: In an observational cohort study conducted in an academic health care system (2010–2012), we compared post–acute care use at discharge and hospital readmission after 3,620 sepsis hospitalizations with 108,958 nonsepsis hospitalizations. We used three validated, claims-based approaches to identify sepsis and severe sepsis. Measurements and Main Results: Post–acute care use at discharge was more likely after sepsis, driven by skilled care facility placement (35.4% after sepsis vs. 15.8%; P < 0.001), with the highest rate observed after severe sepsis. Readmission rates at 7, 30, and 90 days were higher postsepsis (P < 0.001). Compared with nonsepsis hospitalizations (15.6% readmitted within 30 d), the increased readmission risk was present regardless of sepsis severity (27.3% after sepsis and 26.0–26.2% after severe sepsis). After controlling for presepsis characteristics, the readmission risk was found to be 1.51 times greater (95% CI, 1.38–1.66) than nonsepsis hospitalizations. Readmissions after sepsis were more likely to result in death or transition to hospice care (6.1% vs. 13.3% after sepsis; P < 0.001). Independent risk factors associated with 30-day readmissions after sepsis hospitalizations included age, malignancy diagnosis, hospitalizations in the year prior to the index hospitalization, nonelective index admission type, one or more procedures during the index hospitalization, and low hemoglobin and high red cell distribution width at discharge. Conclusions: Post–acute care use and hospital readmissions were common after sepsis. The increased readmission risk after sepsis was observed regardless of sepsis severity and was associated with

  6. Anemia in Intensive Cardiac Care Unit patients - An underestimated problem.

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Idzkowska, Ewelina; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2015-09-01

    The heterogeneous group of patients admitted to Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU) as well as nonspecific complaints associated with anemia might be the reason for underdiagnosing or minimization of this problem. Because of this heterogeneity, there are no clear guidelines to follow. It is known that anemia is impairing the outcome. Thus, it is crucial to keep alert in the diagnosis and treatment of anemia, especially in critically ill cardiac patients. The greatest groups of patients admitted to ICCU are those with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), severe arrhythmias as well as individuals after cardiac operations. However, patients suffering other critical cardiac illnesses quite often become anemic during hospitalization in ICCU. It is because anemia is typed in the clinical features of heavy diseases or may be the consequence of treatment. The current review focuses on the incidence, complex etiology and predictive role of anemia in a diverse group of ICCU patients. It discusses clinical aspects of anemia treatment in particular groups of critically ill cardiac patients because proper treatment increases chances for recovery and improves the outcome in this severe group of patients. PMID:26149915

  7. [Quality of coding in acute inpatient care].

    PubMed

    Stausberg, J

    2007-08-01

    Routine data in the electronic patient record are frequently used for secondary purposes. Core elements of the electronic patient record are diagnoses and procedures, coded with the mandatory classifications. Despite the important role of routine data for reimbursement, quality management and health care statistics, there is currently no systematic analysis of coding quality in Germany. Respective concepts and investigations share the difficulty to decide what's right and what's wrong, being at the end of the long process of medical decision making. Therefore, a relevant amount of disagreement has to be accepted. In case of the principal diagnosis, this could be the fact in half of the patients. Plausibility of coding looks much better. After optimization time in hospitals, regular and complete coding can be expected. Whether coding matches reality, as a prerequisite for further use of the data in medicine and health politics, should be investigated in controlled trials in the future. PMID:17676418

  8. Factors Affecting Intensive Care Units Nursing Workload

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ravangard, Ramin; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Mosavi, Seyed Masod; Gholami Fesharaki, Mohammad; Mehrabian, Fardin

    2014-01-01

    Background: The nursing workload has a close and strong association with the quality of services provided for the patients. Therefore, paying careful attention to the factors affecting nursing workload, especially those working in the intensive care units (ICUs), is very important. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the factors affecting nursing workload in the ICUs of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional and analytical-descriptive study that has done in Iran. All nurses (n = 400) who was working in the ICUs of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2014 were selected and studied using census method. The required data were collected using a researcher–made questionnaire which its validity and reliability were confirmed through getting the opinions of experts and using composite reliability and internal consistency (α = 0.89). The collected data were analyzed through exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and using SPSS 18.0 and AMOS 18.0. Results: Twenty-five factors were divided into three major categories through EFA, including structure, process, and activity. The following factors among the structure, process and activity components had the greatest importance: lack of clear responsibilities and authorities and performing unnecessary tasks (by a coefficient of 0.709), mismatch between the capacity of wards and the number of patients (by a coefficient of 0.639), and helping the students and newly employed staff (by a coefficient of 0.589). Conclusions: The nursing workload is influenced by many factors. The clear responsibilities and authorities of nurses, patients' admission according to the capacity of wards, use of the new technologies and equipment, and providing basic training for new nurses can decrease the workload of nurses. PMID:25389493

  9. Considerations for emergencies & disasters in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Ronni; Pouletsos, Cheryl; Combs, Adriann

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines outside principles of emergency and disaster planning for neonatal intensive care units and includes resources available to organizations to support planning and education, and considerations for nurses developing hospital-specific neonatal intensive care unit disaster plans. Hospital disaster preparedness programs and unit-specific policies and procedures are essential in facilitating an effective response to major incidents or disasters, whether they are man-made or natural. All disasters place extraordinary stress on existing resources, systems, and personnel. If nurses in neonatal intensive care units work collaboratively to identify essential services in disasters, the result could be safer care for vulnerable patients. PMID:18664900

  10. Experiences of the advanced nurse practitioner role in acute care.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Alison; Cooper, Joanne; Goldberg, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the service evaluation presented in this article was to explore the multidisciplinary team's (MDT) experiences and perception of the advanced nurse practitioner (ANP) role on an acute health care of the older person ward. A qualitative case study was carried out comprising semi-structured interviews with members of the MDT, exploring their experiences of the ANP role. An overarching theme of 'Is it a nurse? Is it a doctor? No, it's an ANP' emerged from the data, with three subthemes: the missing link; facilitating and leading holistic care; and safe, high quality care. The ANP role is valued by the MDT working with them and provides a unique skill set that has the potential to enhance care of older patients living with frailty. While there are challenges to its introduction, it is a role worth introducing to older people's wards. PMID:27125941

  11. Improving nutrition in older people in acute care.

    PubMed

    Best, Carolyn; Hitchings, Helen

    2015-07-22

    Older people have an increased risk of becoming malnourished when they are ill. Admission to hospital may affect their nutritional intake and nutritional status. Nutrition screening and implementation of nutrition care plans can help minimise the risk of malnutrition in acute care settings, if used effectively. The nutritional care provided to older inpatients should be timely, co-ordinated, reviewed regularly and communicated effectively between healthcare professionals and across shifts. This article explores what malnutrition means, why older people in hospital might be at risk of malnutrition and the effect hospital admission might have on nutrition and fluid intake. It makes suggestions for addressing these issues, encourages nurses to look at the nutritional care provided in their clinical area, to reflect on what they do well and consider what can be done to improve patients' experiences. PMID:26198529

  12. Gaps in Drug Dosing for Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Commonly Prescribed Acute Care Medications

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Stevie; Siegel, David; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 1 out of 6 children in the United States is obese. This has important implications for drug dosing and safety, as pharmacokinetic (PK) changes are known to occur in obesity due to altered body composition and physiology. Inappropriate drug dosing can limit therapeutic efficacy and increase drug-related toxicity for obese children. Few systematic reviews examining PK and drug dosing in obese children have been performed. Methods We identified 25 acute care drugs from the Strategic National Stockpile and Acute Care Supportive Drugs List and performed a systematic review for each drug in 3 study populations: obese children (2–18 years of age), normal weight children, and obese adults. For each study population, we first reviewed a drug’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label, followed by a systematic literature review. From the literature, we extracted drug PK data, biochemical properties, and dosing information. We then reviewed data in 3 age subpopulations (2–7 years, 8–12 years, and 13–18 years) for obese and normal weight children and by route of drug administration (intramuscular, intravenous, by mouth, and inhaled). If sufficient PK data were not available by age/route of administration, a data gap was identified. Findings Only 2/25 acute care drugs (8%) contained dosing information on the FDA label for each obese children and adults compared with 22/25 (88%) for normal weight children. We found no sufficient PK data in the literature for any of the acute care drugs in obese children. Sufficient PK data were found for 7/25 acute care drugs (28%) in normal weight children and 3/25 (12%) in obese adults. Implications Insufficient information exists to guide dosing in obese children for any of the acute care drugs reviewed. This knowledge gap is alarming, given the known PK changes that occur in the setting of obesity. Future clinical trials examining the PK of acute care medications in obese children should be prioritized. PMID

  13. Ethics of drug research in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kleiber, Niina; Tromp, Krista; Mooij, Miriam G; van de Vathorst, Suzanne; Tibboel, Dick; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2015-02-01

    Critical illness and treatment modalities change pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of medications used in critically ill children, in addition to age-related changes in drug disposition and effect. Hence, to ensure effective and safe drug therapy, research in this population is urgently needed. However, conducting research in the vulnerable population of the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) presents with ethical challenges. This article addresses the main ethical issues specific to drug research in these critically ill children and proposes several solutions. The extraordinary environment of the PICU raises specific challenges to the design and conduct of research. The need for proxy consent of parents (or legal guardians) and the stress-inducing physical environment may threaten informed consent. The informed consent process is challenging because emergency research reduces or even eliminates the time to seek consent. Moreover, parental anxiety may impede adequate understanding and generate misconceptions. Alternative forms of consent have been developed taking into account the unpredictable reality of the acute critical care environment. As with any research in children, the burden and risk should be minimized. Recent developments in sample collection and analysis as well as pharmacokinetic analysis should be considered in the design of studies. Despite the difficulties inherent to drug research in critically ill children, methods are available to conduct ethically sound research resulting in relevant and generalizable data. This should motivate the PICU community to commit to drug research to ultimately provide the right drug at the right dose for every individual child. PMID:25354987

  14. Pain management in the acute care setting: Update and debates.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Greta M

    2016-02-01

    Pain management in the paediatric acute care setting is underutilised and can be improved. An awareness of the analgesic options available and their limitations is an important starting point. This article describes the evolving understanding of relevant pharmacogenomics and safety data of the various analgesic agents with a focus on agents available in Australia and New Zealand. It highlights the concerns with the use of codeine in children and discusses alternative oral opioids. Key features of oral, parenteral, inhaled and intranasal analgesic agents are discussed, as well as evidence supported use of sweet tasting solutions and non-pharmacological interventions. One of the biggest changes in acute care pain management has been the advent of intranasal fentanyl providing reliable potent analgesia without the need for intravenous access. The article will also address the issue of multimodal analgesia where a single agent is insufficient. PMID:27062626

  15. United States Air Force Child Care Center Infant Care Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Ardyn; And Others

    Intended to guide Air Force infant caregivers in providing high quality group care for infants 6 weeks to 6 months of age, this infant care guide must be used in conjunction with other Air Force regulations on day care, such as AFR 215-1, Volume VI (to be renumbered AFR 215-27). After a brief introductory chapter (Chapter I), Chapter II indicates…

  16. New care model targets high-utilizing, complex patients, frees up emergency providers to focus on acute care concerns.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis, MN, has developed a new model of care, designed to meet the needs of high-utilizing hospital and ED patients with complex medical, social, and behavioral needs.The Coordinated Care Center (CCC) provides easy access to patients with a history of high utilization, and delivers multidisciplinary care in a one-stop-shop format. In one year, the approach has slashed ED visits by 37%, freeing up emergency providers to focus on patients with acute needs. In-patient care stays are down by 25%. The CCC focuses on patients with diagnoses that are primarily medical, such as CHF [congestive heart failure], COPD [chronic obstructive pulmonary disease], or diabetes. ED-based clinical coordinators keep an eye out for patients who world be good candidates for the CCC, and facilitate quick transitions when their needs would be better served in that setting. Administrators describe CCC as an ambulatory intensive care unit, with an on-site pharmacist, social worker, psychologist, and chemical health counselor as well as physicians, nurse practitioners, LPNs, and patient navigators--enough personnel to comprise two full care teams. While the model does not pay for itself under current payment models, administrators anticipate that the approach will work well under future payment reforms that focus on total cost of care. PMID:24195142

  17. Antimicrobial therapy in neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Tzialla, Chryssoula; Borghesi, Alessandro; Serra, Gregorio; Stronati, Mauro; Corsello, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Severe infections represent the main cause of neonatal mortality accounting for more than one million neonatal deaths worldwide every year. Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed medications in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and in industrialized countries about 1% of neonates are exposed to antibiotic therapy. Sepsis has often nonspecific signs and symptoms and empiric antimicrobial therapy is promptly initiated in high risk of sepsis or symptomatic infants. However continued use of empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment in the setting of negative cultures especially in preterm infants may not be harmless.The benefits of antibiotic therapy when indicated are clearly enormous, but the continued use of antibiotics without any microbiological justification is dangerous and only leads to adverse events. The purpose of this review is to highlight the inappropriate use of antibiotics in the NICUs, to exam the impact of antibiotic treatment in preterm infants with negative cultures and to summarize existing knowledge regarding the appropriate choice of antimicrobial agents and optimal duration of therapy in neonates with suspected or culture-proven sepsis in order to prevent serious consequences. PMID:25887621

  18. Conflicts in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wujtewicz, Maria; Wujtewicz, Magdalena Anna; Owczuk, Radosław

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts in intensive care units (ICUs) are common and concern all professional groups, patients and their families. Both intra- and inter-team conflicts occur. The most common conflicts occur between nurses and physicians, followed by those within nursing teams and between ICU personnel and family members. The main causes of conflicts are considered to be unsatisfactory quality of the information provided, inappropriate ways of communication and improper approach towards treatment of patients. ICU conflicts can have serious consequences not only for families but also for patients, physicians, nurses and wider society. Lack of communication among ICU teams is likely to impair cooperation and ICU team-family contacts. From the point of view of patients and their families, communication skills, as one of the factors affecting the satisfaction of families with treatment, are essential to ensure high quality of ICU treatment. While conflicts are generally unfavourable, they can also have positive implications for the parties involved, depending on their prevalence and management, as well as the community they concern. PMID:26401743

  19. [The end of life in a long-term care unit].

    PubMed

    Roche, Pauline; Bailly, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Following the principles of Leonetti's Law and to improve practices in long-term care units, caregivers decided to create a decision aid to help in the process to determine whether to limit care, adapted to the profile of the unit's residents. The aid is the fruit of a collective and ethical approach which helps caregivers decide on the action to take in the event of an acute crisis and enables the patient to express their wishes concerning the end of life. PMID:25597066

  20. Small subdural hemorrhages: is routine intensive care unit admission necessary?

    PubMed

    Albertine, Paul; Borofsky, Samuel; Brown, Derek; Patel, Smita; Lee, Woojin; Caputy, Anthony; Taheri, M Reza

    2016-03-01

    With advancing technology, the sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) for the detection of subdural hematoma (SDH) continues to improve. In some cases, the finding is limited to one or 2 images of the CT examination. At our institution, all patients with an SDH require intensive care unit (ICU) admission, regardless of size. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that patients with a small traumatic SDH on their presenting CT examination do not require the intensive monitoring offered in the ICU and can instead be managed on a hospital unit with a lower level of monitoring. This is a retrospective study of patients evaluated and treated at a level I trauma center for acute traumatic intracranial hemorrhage between 2011 and 2014. The clinical and imaging profile of 87 patients with traumatic SDH were studied. Patients with small isolated traumatic subdural hemorrhage (tSDH) (<10cm(3) blood volume) spent less time in the ICU, demonstrated neurologic and medical stability during hospitalization, and did not require any neurosurgical intervention. It is our recommendation that patients with isolated tSDH (<10cm(3)) do not require ICU monitoring. Patients with small tSDH and additional intracranial hemorrhages overall show low rates of medical decline (4%) and neurologic decline (4%) but may still benefit from ICU observation. Patients with tSDH greater than 10cm(3) overall demonstrated poor clinical courses and outcome and would benefit ICU monitoring. PMID:26795895

  1. Toxic leukoencephalopathy in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Holyoak, A L; Trout, M J; White, R P; Prematuranga, S; Senthuran, S

    2014-11-01

    In this article, we report two cases of acute toxic leukoencephalopathy to highlight this acute clinicoradiological syndrome as an important, although uncommon, consideration in the undifferentiated comatose patient who fails to wake following drug overdose or has unexplained neurology with a history of drug exposure. We then review the current literature and discuss potential differential diagnoses in this setting, along with proposed treatments for this condition. The cases presented demonstrate a more fulminant onset than previously well-defined acute toxic leukoencephalopathy subtypes and highlight the prognostic importance of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing a condition from which significant functional recovery seems possible. PMID:25342412

  2. Pregame Sore Throat, Postgame Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Stork, Natalie C; Smoot, M Kyle

    2016-05-01

    A collegiate football athlete presented, on game day, with an acute onset of sore throat. He was afebrile, speaking in full sentences, without signs of respiratory distress. His examination was negative for lymphadenopathy or tonsillar enlargement or exudate. Twelve hours after initial presentation, he developed acute epiglottitis. He underwent urgent fiberoptic intubation and was empirically treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics and corticosteroids. Currently, there are no published reports of acute epiglottitis in athletes. Consequently, there is no evidence to guide return to play decisions. Return to play, following acute epiglottitis, should include resolution of symptoms and a graded return to play, taking into consideration the level of deconditioning the athlete experienced from hospitalization. PMID:26247550

  3. Insulin therapy in the pediatric intensive care unit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in the intensive care unit. Insulin therapy has emerged in adult intensive care units, and several pediatric studies are currently being conducted. This review discusses hyperglycemia and the effects of insulin on metabolic a...

  4. Nosocomial infections in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Baltimore, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Nosocomial (hospital-acquired) infections are a major complication of serious illnesses. Severely ill patients have a greater risk of acquiring nosocomial infections, so this problem is greatest in intensive care units. Studies have demonstrated that nosocomial infections are largely preventable. Adherence to recommended techniques for patient care will have the greatest benefit in the intensive care unit. In this paper the background epidemiology of nosocomial infections is reviewed and related to pediatrics and intensive care units. Types of diseases, assistance equipment, and monitoring devices which are associated with a high risk of nosocomial infections are emphasized and specific steps for lowering this risk are listed. PMID:6382835

  5. [The coma awakening unit, between intensive care and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Mimouni, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    After intensive care and before classic neurological rehabilitation is possible, patients in an altered state of consciousness are cared for at early stages in so-called coma awakening units. The care involves, on the one hand, the complex support of the patient's awakening from coma as a neurological and existential process, and on the other, support for their families. PMID:26365640

  6. Inpatient Transfers to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael P; Gooder, Valerie J; McBride, Karen; James, Brent; Fisher, Elliott S

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine if delayed transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU) after physiologic deterioration is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. DESIGN Inception cohort. SETTING Community hospital in Ogden, Utah. PATIENTS Ninety-one consecutive inpatients with noncardiac diagnoses at the time of emergent transfer to the ICU. We determined the time when each patient first met any of 11 pre-specified physiologic criteria. We classified patients as “slow transfer” when patients met a physiologic criterion 4 or more hours before transfer to the ICU. Patients were followed until discharge. INTERVENTIONS None. MEASUREMENTS In-hospital mortality, functional status at hospital discharge, hospital resources. MAIN RESULTS At the time when the first physiologic criterion was met on the ward, slow- and rapid-transfer patients were similar in terms of age, gender, diagnosis, number of days in hospital prior to ICU transfer, prehospital functional status, and APACHE II scores. By the time slow-transfer patients were admitted to the ICU, they had significantly higher APACHE II scores (21.7 vs 16.2; P = .002) and were more likely to die in-hospital (41% vs 11%; relative risk [RR], 3.5; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.4 to 9.5). Slow-transfer patients were less likely to have had their physician notified of deterioration within 2 hours of meeting physiologic criteria (59% vs 31%; P = .001) and less likely to have had a bedside physician evaluation within the first 3 hours after meeting criteria (23% vs 83%; P = .001). CONCLUSIONS Slow transfer to the ICU of physiologically defined high-risk hospitalized patients was associated with increased risk of death. Slow response to physiologic deterioration may explain these findings. PMID:12542581

  7. Is managed care closing substance abuse treatment units?

    PubMed

    Wells, Rebecca; Harris Lemak, Christy; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Roddy, Brian L; Nahra, Tammie A

    2007-03-01

    Despite high levels of unmet need for outpatient substance abuse treatment, a significant percentage of outpatient units have closed over the past several years. This study drew on 1999-2000 and 2005 national surveys to determine if managed care was associated with outpatient substance abuse treatment units' likelihood of surviving. Each substance abuse unit director was asked about the presence of any managed care contracts, percentage revenues from managed care, percentage of clients for whom prior authorization was required, and percentage of clients for whom concurrent review was required. A multiple logistic regression revealed that none of these factors was associated with substance abuse treatment unit survival. At this point, neither the presence nor the structure of managed care appears to affect the survival of outpatient substance abuse treatment units. Given the need for these facilities, however, and their vulnerability to closure, continued attention to managed care's potential influence is warranted. PMID:17458479

  8. Respect in the care of older patients in acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Koskenniemi, Jaana; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Suhonen, Riitta

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of older patients and their next of kin with regards to respect in the care given in an acute hospital. The data were collected using tape-recorded interviews (10 patients and 10 next of kin) and analysed via inductive content analysis. Based on the analysis, the concept of respect can be defined by the actions taken by nurses (polite behaviour, the patience to listen, reassurance, response to information needs, assistance in basic needs, provision of pain relief, response to wishes and time management) and next of kin (support, assistance and advocacy) and by factors related to the environment (appreciation of older people in society, management of health-care organizations, the nursing culture, the flow of information and patient placement). The information will be used to develop an instrument for assessing how well respect is maintained in the care of older patients. PMID:23131699

  9. Nursing workload in public and private intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Lilia de Souza; Koike, Karina Mitie; Sardinha, Débora Souza; Padilha, Katia Grillo; de Sousa, Regina Marcia Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study sought to compare patients at public and private intensive care units according to the nursing workload and interventions provided. Methods This retrospective, comparative cohort study included 600 patients admitted to 4 intensive care units in São Paulo. The nursing workload and interventions were assessed using the Nursing Activities Score during the first and last 24 hours of the patient's stay at the intensive care unit. Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, the Mann-Whitney test, and Student's t test were used to compare the patient groups. Results The average Nursing Activities Score upon admission to the intensive care unit was 61.9, with a score of 52.8 upon discharge. Significant differences were found among the patients at public and private intensive care units relative to the average Nursing Activities Score upon admission, as well as for 12 out of 23 nursing interventions performed during the first 24 hours of stay at the intensive care units. The patients at the public intensive care units exhibited a higher average score and overall more frequent nursing interventions, with the exception of those involved in the "care of drains", "mobilization and positioning", and "intravenous hyperalimentation". The groups also differed with regard to the evolution of the Nursing Activities Score among the total case series as well as the groups of survivors from the time of admission to discharge from the intensive care unit. Conclusion Patients admitted to public and private intensive care units exhibit differences in their nursing care demands, which may help managers with nursing manpower planning. PMID:24213086

  10. [Collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians in emergency care at acute hospitals provided by generalists].

    PubMed

    Imura, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    A role of acute hospitals providing emergency care is becoming important more and more in regional comprehensive care system led by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Given few number of emergent care specialists in Japan, generalists specializing in both general internal medicine and family practice need to take part in the emergency care. In the way collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians is a key role in improving the quality of emergency care at acute hospitals. A pattern of collaborating function by generalists taking part in emergency care is categorized into four types. PMID:26915241

  11. Intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Heller, Axel R

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids contained in fish oils have shown efficacy in the treatment of chronic and acute inflammatory diseases due to their pleiotropic effects on inflammatory cell signalling pathways. In a variety of experimental and clinical studies, omega-3 fatty acids attenuated hyperinflammatory conditions and induced faster recovery. This chapter will shed light on the effects of intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients and will discuss clinical data and recent meta-analyses on the topic. While significant beneficial effects on infection rates and the lengths of ICU and hospital stays have concordantly been identified in three recent meta-analyses on non-ICU surgical patients, the level of evidence is not so clear for critically ill patients. Three meta-analyses published in 2012 or 2013 explored data on the ICU population. Although the present data suggest the consideration of enteral nutrition enriched with fish oil, borage oil and antioxidants in mild to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, only one of the three meta-analyses found a trend (p = 0.08) of lower mortality in ICU patients receiving intravenous omega-3 fatty acids. Two of the meta-analyses indicated a significantly shorter hospital stay (5.17-9.49 days), and one meta-analysis found a significant reduction in ICU days (1.92). As a result of these effects, cost savings were postulated. Unlike in surgical patients, the effects of fish oil on infection rates were not found to be statistically significant in ICU patients, and dose-effect relationships were not established for any cohort. Thus, obvious positive secondary outcome effects with intravenous fish oil have not yet been shown to transfer to lower mortality in critically ill patients. There is a need for adequately powered, well-planned and well-conducted randomized trials to give clear recommendations on the individual utility and dosage of intravenous omega-3 fatty acids in critical illness. PMID:25471809

  12. [ASSESSMENT OF PULMONARY VENTILATION FUNCTION AT INTENSIVE CARE UNIT PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Mustafin, R; Bakirov, A

    2015-09-01

    The article presents the functional characteristics of lung tissue in reanimation profile patients with different pathologies with forced ventilation and auxiliary support on the background. The aim of this study was to analyze the dynamics properties of lung tissue in intensive care unit patients with symptoms of severe violations of restrictive lung tissue being on ventilatory support. Results were subjected to analysis of acid-base status and dynamics of the main indicators of the biomechanical properties of the lung in 32 patients with severe concomitant injury (n=21), acute bilateral community-acquired pneumonia (n=7), septic shock (n=4) during the entire period of the respiratory "prosthetics "(before and after the beginning of mechanical ventilation). Using during ventilatory support of patients with initial symptoms of the syndrome of acute lung damage and reduced lung function restrictive positive end-expiratory pressure of 6-10 cm of water column when the conventional (1:2; 1:2.5 at p≤0.05) and invert (2:1 at p≤0,1) ratio inhale/exhale, relatively low tidal volume (6-8 ml/kg) allows increase the compliance of the lung tissue to 11-29%. Increased expiratory time constant has a direct correlation with the value of airway resistance was due not only to the maintenance of optimal parameters for MVV (mechanical voluntary ventilation), but regular lavage of the tracheobronchial tree, which allows to maintain patency of the lower respiratory tract. The main areas during mechanical ventilation of lungs in patients with a sharp decline in restrictive lung function (ARDS, pneumonia), regardless of the reason it was summoned, optimal value is the observance of the positive end-expiratory pressure, the ratio of inhale/exhale (depending on the degree of hypoxemia), to maintain sufficient blood oxygen saturation and partial pressure of oxygen in the blood plasma. PMID:26355312

  13. [Extracorporeal therapy of patients with liver disease in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, V; Horvatits, T; Drolz, A; Rutter, K

    2014-05-01

    Acute and acute-on-chronic liver failure are often associated with development of organ failure. Its occurrence is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Extracorporeal replacement therapies are frequently necessary in these patient populations. Replacement therapies can be divided into renal replacement therapies and liver support therapies. These therapies consist of artificial liver support systems (i.e., MARS(®) system, Prometheus(®)), which are able to remove water-soluble and albumin-bound toxins, and of bioartifical liver support systems. This manuscript provides a review of current practice in the extracorporeal support of patients with liver diseases in the intensive care unit. PMID:24770889

  14. Improving acute care through use of medical device data.

    PubMed

    Kennelly, R J

    1998-02-01

    The Medical Information Bus (MIB) is a data communications standard for bedside patient connected medical devices. It is formally titled IEEE 1073 Standard for Medical Device Communications. MIB defines a complete seven layer communications stack for devices in acute care settings. All of the design trade-offs in writing the standard were taken to optimize performance in acute care settings. The key clinician based constraints on network performance are: (1) the network must be able to withstand multiple daily reconfigurations due to patient movement and condition changes; (2) the network must be 'plug-and-play' to allow clinicians to set up the network by simply plugging in a connector, taking no other actions; (3) the network must allow for unambiguous associations of devices with specific patients. A network of this type will be used by clinicians, thus giving complete, accurate, real time data from patient connected devices. This capability leads to many possible improvements in patient care and hospital cost reduction. The possible uses for comprehensive automatic data capture are only limited by imagination and creativity of clinicians adapting to the new hospital business paradigm. PMID:9600414

  15. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth. PMID:17242604

  16. Acute Gastroenteritis on Cruise Ships - United States, 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Freeland, Amy L; Vaughan, George H; Banerjee, Shailendra N

    2016-01-01

    From 1990 to 2004, the reported rates of diarrheal disease (three or more loose stools or a greater than normal frequency in a 24-hour period) on cruise ships decreased 2.4%, from 29.2 cases per 100,000 travel days to 28.5 cases (1,2). Increased rates of acute gastroenteritis illness (diarrhea or vomiting that is associated with loose stools, bloody stools, abdominal cramps, headache, muscle aches, or fever) occurred in years that novel strains of norovirus, the most common etiologic agent in cruise ship outbreaks, emerged (3). To determine recent rates of acute gastroenteritis on cruise ships, CDC analyzed combined data for the period 2008-2014 that were submitted by cruise ships sailing in U.S. jurisdiction (defined as passenger vessels carrying ≥13 passengers and within 15 days of arriving in the United States) (4). CDC also reviewed laboratory data to ascertain the causes of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks and examined trends over time. During the study period, the rates of acute gastroenteritis per 100,000 travel days decreased among passengers from 27.2 cases in 2008 to 22.3 in 2014. Rates for crew members remained essentially unchanged (21.3 cases in 2008 and 21.6 in 2014). However, the rate of acute gastroenteritis was significantly higher in 2012 than in 2011 or 2013 for both passengers and crew members, likely related to the emergence of a novel strain of norovirus, GII.4 Sydney (5). During 2008-2014, a total of 133 cruise ship acute gastroenteritis outbreaks were reported, 95 (71%) of which had specimens available for testing. Among these, 92 (97%) were caused by norovirus, and among 80 norovirus specimens for which a genotype was identified, 59 (73.8%) were GII.4 strains. Cruise ship travelers experiencing diarrhea or vomiting should report to the ship medical center promptly so that symptoms can be assessed, proper treatment provided, and control measures implemented. PMID:26766396

  17. Long term prognosis of acute coronary syndrome with chronic renal dysfunction treated in different therapy units at department of cardiology: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Cong; Sheng, Zulong; Yao, Yuyu; Wang, Xin; Yu, Chaojun; Ma, Genshan

    2015-01-01

    Coronary care unit is common in hospitals and clinical centers which offer intensive care and therapy for severe coronary artery disease patients. However, if coronary care unit could improve the long term prognosis of acute coronary syndrome patients with renal dysfunction remain unknown. Accordingly, we designed this study to evaluate the differences of incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events for acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction who treated in coronary care unit or normal unit. The primary end point was all cause mortality. A total of 414 acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction involved in the study. The results showed that during 12-48 months follow-up, death of any cause occurred in 1.8% patients (4 of 247) in coronary care unit group, as compared with 1.8% in the normal group (3 of 167) (hazard ratio, 1.098; 95% confidence interval, 0.246 to 4.904; P=0.903). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that there were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the risk of death (P=0.903), revascularization (P=0.948), stroke (P=0.542), heart failure (P=0.198). This trial firstly revealed that acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction treated in coronary care unit and normal units. Our study showed that acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction treated in coronary care unit obtained no significant benefits compared with patients in normal units, although there was a declining tendency of the risk of major adverse cardiovascular effectswith patients in coronary care unit. PMID:26770436

  18. Demographics of acute admissions to a National Spinal Injuries Unit

    PubMed Central

    Boran, S.; Street, J.; Higgins, T.; McCormack, D.; Poynton, A. R.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective demographic study was undertaken to review the epidemiology and demographics of all acute admissions to the National Spinal Injuries Unit in Ireland for the 5 years to 2003. The study was conducted at the National Spinal Injuries Unit, Mater Miscericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Records of all patients admitted to our unit from 1999 to 2003 were compiled from a prospective computerized spinal database. In this 5-year period, 942 patients were acutely hospitalized at the National Spinal Injuries Unit. There were 686 (73%) males and 256 (27%) females, with an average age of 32 years (range 16–84 years). The leading cause of admission with a spinal injury was road traffic accidents (42%), followed by falls (35%), sport (11%), neoplasia (7.5%) and miscellaneous (4.5%). The cervical spine was most commonly affected (51%), followed by lumbar (28%) and thoracic (21%). On admission 38% of patients were ASIA D or worse, of which one-third were AISA A. Understanding of the demographics of spinal column injuries in unique populations can help us to develop preventative and treatment strategies at both national and international levels. PMID:19283414

  19. Value of positive myocardial infarction imaging in coronary care units.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, S P; Pereira-Prestes, A V; Ell, P J; Donaldson, R; Somerville, W; Emanuel, R W

    1979-01-01

    Positive myocardial imaging was undertaken on 120 unselected patients admitted to a coronary care unit with clinical suspicion of acute myocardial infarction. Multipurpose mobile gamma-cameras were used for serial imaging after administration of 99mtechnetium-labelled imidodiphosphonate, a low-cost radiopharmaceutical that is 97% specific for myocardial necrosis, with myocardial uptake and blood clearance most suitable for myocardial imaging. The sensitivty of detection was 94% for patients whose infarction was unequivocal on the ECG; when the presence of raised enzyme concentrations was also used as a criterion for myocardial necrosis, the overall sensitivity for all 120 patients remained 94%. In 73 patients (61%), whose ECGs were unhelpful or difficult to interpret, scintigraphy allowed infarction to be diagnosed in 11 (15%) and to be excluded in five (7%). In 32 (44%) of this group whose ECGs were totally uninterpretable due to previous myocardial damage or disorders of electrical activation, scintigraphy provided confirmation of a diagnosis that otherwise rested only on whether enzyme concentrations were raised. Myocardial imaging is thus a useful technique that permits more definite diagnosis in patients for whom ECG and enzyme data are uncertain. PMID:761017

  20. Healthcare assistants in the children's intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    King, Peter; Crawford, Doreen

    2009-02-01

    Recruiting and retaining qualified nurses for children's intensive care units is becoming more difficult because of falling numbers of recruits into the child branch and inadequate educational planning and provision. Meeting the staffing challenge and maintaining the quality of children's intensive care services requires flexible and creative approaches, including considered evolution of the role of healthcare assistants. Evidence from adult services indicates that the addition of healthcare assistants to the intensive care team can benefit patient care. The evolution of the healthcare assistant role to support provision of safe, effective care in the children's intensive care setting requires a comprehensive strategy to ensure that appropriate education, training and supervision are in place. Career development pathways need to be in place and role accountability clearly defined at the different stages of the pathway. Experience in one unit in Glasgow suggests that healthcare assistants make a valuable contribution to the care of critically ill children and young people. PMID:19266786

  1. Rural Implications of Medicare's Post-Acute-Care Transfer Payment Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenman, Julie A.; Mueller, Curt D.

    2005-01-01

    Under the Medicare post-acute-care (PAC) transfer policy, acute-care hospitals are reimbursed under a per-diem formula whenever beneficiaries are discharged from selected diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) to a skilled nursing facility, home health care, or a prospective payment system (PPS)-excluded facility. Total per-diem payments are below the…

  2. The Living, Dynamic and Complex Environment Care in Intensive Care Unit1

    PubMed Central

    Backes, Marli Terezinha Stein; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Büscher, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to understand the meaning of the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care, experienced by professionals working in this unit, managers, patients, families and professional support services, as well as build a theoretical model about the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care. METHOD: Grounded Theory, both for the collection and for data analysis. Based on theoretical sampling, we carried out 39 in-depth interviews semi-structured from three different Adult Intensive Care Units. RESULTS: built up the so-called substantive theory "Sustaining life in the complex environment of care in the Intensive Care Unit". It was bounded by eight categories: "caring and continuously monitoring the patient" and "using appropriate and differentiated technology" (causal conditions); "Providing a suitable environment" and "having relatives with concern" (context); "Mediating facilities and difficulties" (intervenienting conditions); "Organizing the environment and managing the dynamics of the unit" (strategy) and "finding it difficult to accept and deal with death" (consequences). CONCLUSION: confirmed the thesis that "the care environment in the Intensive Care Unit is a living environment, dynamic and complex that sustains the life of her hospitalized patients". PMID:26155009

  3. Risk factors for early readmission to acute care for persons with schizophrenia taking antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Boaz, Timothy L; Becker, Marion Ann; Andel, Ross; Van Dorn, Richard A; Choi, Jiyoon; Sikirica, Mirko

    2013-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The study examined risk factors for readmission to acute care among Florida Medicaid enrollees with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotics. METHODS Medicaid and service use data for 2004 to 2008 were used to identify adults with schizophrenia discharged from hospitals and crisis units who were taking antipsychotics. Data were extracted on demographic characteristics, service use before admission, psychopharmacologic treatment after discharge, and readmission to acute behavioral health care. Cox proportional hazards regression estimated readmission risk in the 30 days after discharge and in the period after 30 days for participants not readmitted in the first 30 days. RESULTS The mean±SD age of the 3,563 participants was 43.4±11.1; 61% were male, and 38% were white. Participants had 6,633 inpatient episodes; duration of hospitalization was 10.6±7.0 days. Readmission occurred for 84% of episodes, 23% within 30 days. Variables associated with an increased readmission risk in the first 30 days were shorter hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR]=1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.10-1.27, p<.001), shorter time on medication before discharge (HR=1.19, CI=1.06-1.35, p=.003), greater prehospitalization use of acute care (HR=2.64, CI=2.29-3.05, p<.001), serious general medical comorbidity (HR=1.21, CI=1.06-1.38, p=.005), and prior substance abuse treatment (HR=1.58, CI=1.37-1.83, p<.001). After 30 days, hospitalization duration and time on medication were not significant risk factors. CONCLUSIONS Short hospital stays for persons with schizophrenia may be associated with risk of early readmission, possibly because the person is insufficiently stabilized. More chronic risk factors include prior acute care, general medical comorbidity, and substance abuse. PMID:23945797

  4. Rationale, Design, Methodology and Hospital Characteristics of the First Gulf Acute Heart Failure Registry (Gulf CARE)

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Kadhim J.; Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi; Al-Habib, Khalid; Al-Suwaidi, Jassim; Al-Mahmeed, Wael; Al-Faleh, Husam; El-Asfar, Abdelfatah; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Ridha, Mustafa; Bulbanat, Bassam; Al-Jarallah, Mohammed; Bazargani, Nooshin; Asaad, Nidal; Amin, Haitham

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is paucity of data on heart failure (HF) in the Gulf Middle East. The present paper describes the rationale, design, methodology and hospital characteristics of the first Gulf acute heart failure registry (Gulf CARE). Materials and Methods: Gulf CARE is a prospective, multicenter, multinational registry of patients >18 year of age admitted with diagnosis of acute HF (AHF). The data collected included demographics, clinical characteristics, etiology, precipitating factors, management and outcomes of patients admitted with AHF. In addition, data about hospital readmission rates, procedures and mortality at 3 months and 1-year follow-up were recorded. Hospital characteristics and care provider details were collected. Data were entered in a dedicated website using an electronic case record form. Results: A total of 5005 consecutive patients were enrolled from February 14, 2012 to November 13, 2012. Forty-seven hospitals in 7 Gulf States (Oman, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Kuwait, United Gulf Emirates, Qatar and Bahrain) participated in the project. The majority of hospitals were community hospitals (46%; 22/47) followed by non-University teaching (32%; 15/47 and University hospitals (17%). Most of the hospitals had intensive or coronary care unit facilities (93%; 44/47) with 59% (28/47) having catheterization laboratory facilities. However, only 29% (14/47) had a dedicated HF clinic facility. Most patients (71%) were cared for by a cardiologist. Conclusions: Gulf CARE is the first prospective registry of AHF in the Middle East, intending to provide a unique insight into the demographics, etiology, management and outcomes of AHF in the Middle East. HF management in the Middle East is predominantly provided by cardiologists. The data obtained from this registry will help the local clinicians to identify the deficiencies in HF management as well as provide a platform to implement evidence based preventive and treatment strategies to reduce the burden of HF in

  5. Impact of administrative technology on acute care bed need.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J B; Dahlstrom, G A; Johnston, C M

    1985-01-01

    This article reports an evaluation of the impact of three administrative technologies--Admission Scheduling (AS) Systems, Outpatient Surgery (OPS) Programs, and Preadmission Testing (PAT) Programs--on the number of acute care beds required by a hospital. The evaluation mechanism reported here is called the ADTECH Computerized Planning Model. ADTECH uses parameters of each technology, identified from previous literature and discussions with health care professionals, to predict the changes in bed requirements resulting from implementation of these programs. Data from eight hospitals of various characteristics and sizes were run to test the ADTECH model. The results from these test runs indicate that the proper implementation of AS, OPS, and PAT can significantly influence a hospital's required bed complement. PMID:3988530

  6. Patient Preferences for Information on Post-Acute Care Services.

    PubMed

    Sefcik, Justine S; Nock, Rebecca H; Flores, Emilia J; Chase, Jo-Ana D; Bradway, Christine; Potashnik, Sheryl; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore what hospitalized patients would like to know about post-acute care (PAC) services to ultimately help them make an informed decision when offered PAC options. Thirty hospitalized adults 55 and older in a Northeastern U.S. academic medical center participated in a qualitative descriptive study with conventional content analysis as the analytical technique. Three themes emerged: (a) receiving practical information about the services, (b) understanding "how it relates to me," and (c) having opportunities to understand PAC options. Study findings inform clinicians what information should be included when discussing PAC options with older adults. Improving the quality of discharge planning discussions may better inform patient decision making and, as a result, increase the numbers of patients who accept a plan of care that supports recovery, meets their needs, and results in improved quality of life and fewer readmissions. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(4):175-182.]. PMID:26815304

  7. Less Is More: Low-dose Prothrombin Complex Concentrate Effective in Acute Care Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Quick, Jacob A; Meyer, Jennifer M; Coughenour, Jeffrey P; Barnes, Stephen L

    2015-06-01

    Optimal dosing of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) has yet to be defined and varies widely due to concerns of efficacy and thrombosis. We hypothesized a dose of 15 IU/kg actual body weight of a three-factor PCC would effectively correct coagulopathy in acute care surgery patients. Retrospective review of 41 acute care surgery patients who received 15 IU/kg (± 10%) actual body weight PCC for correction of coagulopathy. Demographics, laboratory results, PCC dose, blood and plasma transfusions, and thrombotic complications were analyzed. We performed subset analyses of trauma patients and those taking warfarin. Mean age was 69 years (18-94 years). Thirty (73%) trauma patients, 8 (20%) emergency surgery patients, 2 (5%) burns, and 1 (2%) nontrauma neurosurgical patient were included. Mean PCC dose was 1305.4 IU (14.2 IU/kg actual body weight). Mean change in INR was 2.52 to 1.42 (p 0.00004). Successful correction (INR <1.5) was seen in 78 per cent. Treatment failures had a higher initial INR (4.3 vs 2.03, p 0.01). Mean plasma transfusion was 1.46 units. Mean blood transfusion was 1.61 units. Patients taking prehospital warfarin (n = 29, 71%) had higher initial INR (2.78 vs 1.92, p 0.05) and received more units of plasma (1.93 vs 0.33, p 0.01) than those not taking warfarin. No statistical differences were seen between trauma and nontrauma patients. One thrombotic event occurred. Administration of low-dose PCC, 15 IU/kg actual body weight, effectively corrects coagulopathy in acute care surgery patients regardless of warfarin use, diagnosis or plasma transfusion. PMID:26031281

  8. Health care data in the United States.

    PubMed

    Rice, D P

    1983-06-01

    This article serves as an introduction to the following article, An Inventory of U.S. Health Care Data Bases. As an introduction, this article-reviews the characteristics of U.lS. Health Care Data. These characteristics include a lack of common definition and uniformity of reporting of observations, systems that are sometimes duplicative, and a resistance to data sharing on the part of collecting agencies, arising from the pluralistic American health care economy. Yet federal, state, and local governments as well as private organizations need health data to operate and evaluate their programs. Moreover, recent shifts to block grants and cutbacks in federal funding without accountability requirements will adversely affect our ability to adequately monitor the impact of these programs on the nation's health. The article discusses these data issues, but also emphasizes the need for coordination between the government and private sectors. PMID:10261971

  9. [Asthma in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Bautista Bautista, Edgar Gildardo

    2009-01-01

    All asthma patients are at risk of suffering an asthma attack in the course of their life, which can eventually be fatal. Hospitalizations and attention at critical care services are a fundamental aspect of patient care in asthma, which invests a significant percentage of economic contributions to society as a whole does, therefore it is particularly important establish plans for prevention, treatment education and rationalization in the primary care level to stabilize the disease and reduce exacerbations. The severity of exacerbations can range from mild to crisis fatal or potentially fatal asthma; there is a fundamental link between mortality and inadequate assessment of the severity of the patient, which results in inadequate treatment for their condition. PMID:20873061

  10. Building on a national health information technology strategic plan for long-term and post-acute care: comments by the Long Term Post Acute Care Health Information Technology Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gregory L; Alwan, Majd; Batshon, Lynne; Bloom, Shawn M; Brennan, Richard D; Derr, John F; Dougherty, Michelle; Gruhn, Peter; Kirby, Annessa; Manard, Barbara; Raiford, Robin; Serio, Ingrid Johnson

    2011-07-01

    The LTPAC (Long Term Post Acute Care) Health Information Technology (HIT) Collaborative consists of an alliance of long-term services and post-acute care stakeholders. Members of the collaborative are actively promoting HIT innovations in long-term care settings because IT adoption for health care institutions in the United States has become a high priority. One method used to actively promote HIT is providing expert comments on important documents addressing HIT adoption. Recently, the Office of the National Coordinator for HIT released a draft of the Federal Health Information Technology Strategic Plan 2011-2015 for public comment. The following brief is intended to inform about recommendations and comments made by the Collaborative on the strategic plan. PMID:21667892

  11. Supporting families of dying patients in the intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mohammad Reza; Norouzadeh, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Family support in the intensive care units is a challenge for nurses who take care of dying patients. This article aimed to determine the Iranian nurses' experience of supporting families in end-of-life care. Using grounded theory methodology, 23 critical care nurses were interviewed. The theme of family support was extracted and divided into 5 categories: death with dignity; facilitate visitation; value orientation; preparing; and distress. With implementation of family support approaches, family-centered care plans will be realized in the standard framework. PMID:25099985

  12. Care in specialist medical and mental health unit compared with standard care for older people with cognitive impairment admitted to general hospital: randomised controlled trial (NIHR TEAM trial)

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Sarah E; Bradshaw, Lucy E; Kearney, Fiona C; Russell, Catherine; Whittamore, Kathy H; Foster, Pippa E R; Mamza, Jil; Gladman, John R F; Jones, Rob G; Lewis, Sarah A; Porock, Davina

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate a best practice model of general hospital acute medical care for older people with cognitive impairment. Design Randomised controlled trial, adapted to take account of constraints imposed by a busy acute medical admission system. Setting Large acute general hospital in the United Kingdom. Participants 600 patients aged over 65 admitted for acute medical care, identified as “confused” on admission. Interventions Participants were randomised to a specialist medical and mental health unit, designed to deliver best practice care for people with delirium or dementia, or to standard care (acute geriatric or general medical wards). Features of the specialist unit included joint staffing by medical and mental health professionals; enhanced staff training in delirium, dementia, and person centred dementia care; provision of organised purposeful activity; environmental modification to meet the needs of those with cognitive impairment; delirium prevention; and a proactive and inclusive approach to family carers. Main outcome measures Primary outcome: number of days spent at home over the 90 days after randomisation. Secondary outcomes: structured non-participant observations to ascertain patients’ experiences; satisfaction of family carers with hospital care. When possible, outcome assessment was blind to allocation. Results There was no significant difference in days spent at home between the specialist unit and standard care groups (median 51 v 45 days, 95% confidence interval for difference −12 to 24; P=0.3). Median index hospital stay was 11 versus 11 days, mortality 22% versus 25% (−9% to 4%), readmission 32% versus 35% (−10% to 5%), and new admission to care home 20% versus 28% (−16% to 0) for the specialist unit and standard care groups, respectively. Patients returning home spent a median of 70.5 versus 71.0 days at home (−6.0 to 6.5). Patients on the specialist unit spent significantly more time with positive mood or

  13. Inequalities in care in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Shabnam; Simms, Alexander; Batin, Phillip; Kurian, John; Gale, Chris P

    2015-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the single largest cause of death in developed countries. Guidelines exist for the management of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), yet despite these, significant inequalities exist in the care of these patients. The elderly, deprived socioeconomic groups, females and non-caucasians are the patient populations where practice tends to deviate more frequently from the evidence base. Elderly patients often had higher mortality rates after having an AMI compared to younger patients. They also tended to present with symptoms that were not entirely consistent with an AMI, thus partially contributing to the inequalities in care that is seen between younger and older patients. Furthermore the lack of guidelines in the elderly age group presenting with AMI can often make decision making challenging and may account for the discrepancies in care that are prevalent between younger and older patients. Other patients such as those from a lower socioeconomic group, i.e., low income and less than high school education often had poorer health and reduced life expectancy compared to patients from a higher socioeconomic group after an AMI. Lower socioeconomic status was also seen to be contributing to racial and geographical variation is the care in AMI patients. Females with an AMI were treated less aggressively and had poorer outcomes when compared to males. However even when females were treated in the same way they continued to have higher in hospital mortality which suggests that gender may well account for differences in outcomes. The purpose of this review is to identify the inequalities in care for patients who present with an AMI and explore potential reasons for why these occur. Greater attention to the management and a better understanding of the root causes of these inequalities in care may help to reduce morbidity and mortality rates associated with AMI. PMID:26730295

  14. Neuromuscular Disease in the Neurointensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Veronica; James, Michael L Luke

    2016-09-01

    Neuromuscular diseases are syndromic disorders that affect nerve, muscle, and/or neuromuscular junction. Knowledge about the management of these diseases is required for anesthesiologists, because these may frequently be encountered in the intensive care unit, operating room, and other settings. The challenges and advances in management for some of the neuromuscular diseases most commonly encountered in the operating room and neurointensive care unit are reviewed. PMID:27521200

  15. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A; Gupta, A; Singh, TK; Saxsena, A

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP. PMID:26955317

  16. Survey of Oxygen Delivery Practices in UK Paediatric Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Administration of supplemental oxygen is common in paediatric intensive care. We explored the current practice of oxygen administration using a case vignette in paediatric intensive care units (PICU) in the united kingdom. Methods. We conducted an online survey of Paediatric Intensive Care Society members in the UK. The survey outlined a clinical scenario followed by questions on oxygenation targets for 5 common diagnoses seen in critically ill children. Results. Fifty-three paediatric intensive care unit members from 10 institutions completed the survey. In a child with moderate ventilatory requirements, 21 respondents (42%) did not follow arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) targets. In acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis, there was a trend to aim for lower PaO2 as the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) increased. Conversely, in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension, respondents aimed for normal PaO2 even as the FiO2 increased. Conclusions. In this sample of clinicians PaO2 targets were not commonly used. Clinicians target lower PaO2 as FiO2 increases in acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis whilst targeting normal range irrespective of FiO2 in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27516901

  17. [The difficulties of staff retention in neonatal intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Deparis, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care units attract nurses due to the technical and highly specific nature of the work. However, there is a high turnover in these departments. Work-related distress and the lack of team cohesion are the two main causes of this problem. Support from the health care manager is essential in this context. PMID:26183101

  18. Physical Therapy Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Eilish; Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these interventions is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  19. [The organization of a post-intensive care rehabilitation unit].

    PubMed

    Barnay, Claire; Luauté, Jacques; Tell, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    When a patient is admitted to a post-intensive care rehabilitation unit, the functional outcome is the main objective of the care. The motivation of the team relies on strong cohesion between professionals. Personalised support provides a heightened observation of the patient's progress. Listening and sharing favour a relationship of trust between the patient, the team and the families. PMID:26365639

  20. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness in the burn population.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Davies, Menna; Lye, George; Evans, Janine; Combellack, Tom; Dickson, William; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2016-05-01

    Intensive care unit-acquired weakness is an evolving problem in the burn population. As patients are surviving injuries that previously would have been fatal, the focus of treatment is shifting from survival to long-term outcome. The rehabilitation of burn patients can be challenging; however, a certain subgroup of patients have worse outcomes than others. These patients may suffer from intensive care unit-acquired weakness, and their treatment, physiotherapy and expectations need to be adjusted accordingly. This study investigates the condition of intensive care unit-acquired weakness in our burn centre. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all the admissions to our burn centre between 2008 and 2012 and identified 22 patients who suffered from intensive care unit-acquired weakness. These patients were significantly younger with significantly larger burns than those without intensive care unit-acquired weakness. The known risk factors for intensive care unit-acquired weakness are commonplace in the burn population. The recovery of these patients is significantly affected by their weakness. PMID:26975787

  1. Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Tahereh; Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sabet Sarvestani, Raheleh; Moattari, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The concept of family- centered care in neonatal intensive care unit has changed drastically in protracted years and has been used in various contexts differently. Since we require clarity in our understanding, we aimed to analyze this concept. Methods: This study was done on the basis of developmental approach of Rodgers’s concept analysis. We reviewed the existing literature in Science direct, PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Iran Medex databases from 1980 to 2012. The keywords were family-centered care, family-oriented care, and neonatal intensive care unit. After all, 59 out of 244 English and Persian articles and books (more than 20%) were selected. Results: The attributes of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit were recognized as care taking of family (assessment of family and its needs, providing family needs), equal family participation (participation in care planning, decision making, and providing care from routine to special ones), collaboration (inter-professional collaboration with family, family involvement in regulating and implementing care plans), regarding family’s respect and dignity (importance of families’ differences, recognizing families’ tendencies), and knowledge transformation (information sharing between healthcare workers and family, complete information sharing according to family learning style). Besides, the recognized antecedents were professional and management-organizational factors. Finally, the consequences included benefits related to neonate, family, and organization. Conclusion: The findings revealed that family centered-care was a comprehensive and holistic caring approach in neonatal intensive care. Therefore, it is highly recommended to change the current care approach and philosophy and provide facilities for conducting family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit.  PMID:25349870

  2. Role of the acute care nurse in managing patients with heart failure using evidence-based care.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sara; Hice, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Acute heart failure is a major US public health problem, accounting for more than 1 million hospitalizations each year. As part of the health care team, nurses play an important role in the evaluation and management of patients presenting to the emergency department with acute decompensated heart failure. Once acute decompensation is controlled, nurses also play a critical role in preparing patients for hospital discharge and educating patients and caregivers about strategies to improve long-term outcomes and prevent future decompensation and rehospitalization. Nurses' assessment skills and comprehensive knowledge of acute and chronic heart failure are important to optimize patient care and improve outcomes from initial emergency department presentation through discharge and follow-up. This review presents an overview of current heart failure guidelines, with the goal of providing acute care cardiac nurses with information that will allow them to better use their knowledge of heart failure to facilitate diagnosis, management, and education of patients with acute heart failure. PMID:25185764

  3. Mead Johnson Critical Care Symposium for the Practising Surgeon. 4. Abdominal crisis in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Gregor, P; Prodger, J D

    1988-09-01

    Abdominal crises are common in critically ill patients who are admitted to the intensive care unit for problems unrelated to the abdomen. General surgeons may be asked to assess these patients for such reasons as pain, distension, possible sepsis, radiologic or laboratory abnormalities. Since many of the diagnostic signs and symptoms of acute abdomen are blunted or absent in critically ill patients who may be comatose or have been given analgesics or steroids, frequent thorough physical examination and close cooperation with the service admitting the patient are necessary to ensure early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of the abdominal crisis. PMID:3046730

  4. Electronic Medical Record-Based Predictive Model for Acute Kidney Injury in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Laszczyńska, Olga; Severo, Milton; Azevedo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) are at risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Lack of specific treatment has meant that efforts have focused on early diagnosis and timely treatment. Advanced algorithms for clinical assistance including AKI prediction models have potential to provide accurate risk estimates. In this project, we aim to provide a clinical decision supporting system (CDSS) based on a self-learning predictive model for AKI in patients of an acute care hospital. Data of all in-patient episodes in adults admitted will be analysed using "data mining" techniques to build a prediction model. The subsequent machine-learning process including two algorithms for data stream and concept drift will refine the predictive ability of the model. Simulation studies on the model will be used to quantify the expected impact of several scenarios of change in factors that influence AKI incidence. The proposed dynamic CDSS will apply to future in-hospital AKI surveillance in clinical practice. PMID:27577501

  5. Year in review 2007: Critical Care – intensive care unit management

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Clayton; Carson, Shannon S; Amaral, André Carlos

    2008-01-01

    With the development of new technologies and drugs, health care is becoming increasisngly complex and expensive. Governments and health care providers around the world devote a large proportion of their budgets to maintaining quality of care. During 2007, Critical Care published several papers that highlight important aspects of critical care management, which can be subdivided into structure, processes and outcomes, including costs. Great emphasis was given to quality of life after intensive care unit stay, especially the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder. Significant attention was also given to staffing level, optimization of intensive care unit capacity, and drug cost-effectiveness, particularly that of recombinant human activated protein C. Managing costs and providing high-quality care simultaneously are emerging challenges that we must understand and meet. PMID:18983704

  6. Clinical Risk Assessment in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Asefzadeh, Saeed; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Nikpey, Ahmad; Atighechian, Golrokh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin's Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital) through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA). Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG) performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN) was in respiratory care “Ventilator's alarm malfunction (no alarm)” with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal “not washing the NG-Tube” with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care. PMID:23930171

  7. Access, quality, and costs of care at physician owned hospitals in the United States: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Orav, E John; Jena, Anupam B; Dudzinski, David M; Le, Sidney T; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare physician owned hospitals (POHs) with non-POHs on metrics around patient populations, quality of care, costs, and payments. Design Observational study. Setting Acute care hospitals in 95 hospital referral regions in the United States, 2010. Participants 2186 US acute care hospitals (219 POHs and 1967 non-POHs). Main outcome measures Proportions of patients using Medicaid and those from ethnic and racial minority groups; hospital performance on patient experience metrics, care processes, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, and readmission rates; costs of care; care payments; and Medicare market share. Results The 219 POHs were more often small (<100 beds), for profit, and in urban areas. 120 of these POHs were general (non-specialty) hospitals. Compared with patients from non-POHs, those from POHs were younger (77.4 v 78.4 years, P<0.001), less likely to be admitted through an emergency department (23.2% v. 29.0%, P<0.001), equally likely to be black (5.1% v 5.5%, P=0.85) or to use Medicaid (14.9% v 15.4%, P=0.75), and had similar numbers of chronic diseases and predicted mortality scores. POHs and non-POHs performed similarly on patient experience scores, processes of care, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, 30 day readmission rates, costs, and payments for acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and pneumonia. Conclusion Although POHs may treat slightly healthier patients, they do not seem to systematically select more profitable or less disadvantaged patients or to provide lower value care. PMID:26333819

  8. [Decubitus ulcers in intensive care units. Analysis and care].

    PubMed

    Arrondo Díez, I; Huizi Egileor, X; Gala de Andrés, M; Gil Alvarez, G; Apaolaza Garayalde, C; Berridi Puy, K; Sarasola Lujambio, M J

    1995-01-01

    The fact that intensive care patients suffer from ulcera is a daily evidence which has a negative repercussion. We have analysed prospectively a sample of 215 patients to know the incidence, prevalence, levels, and placement of the decubit ulceras to observe whether there is an association between the variables age, sex, staying end, diagnosis, diabetes, risk level and postural changes and ulceration incidence. To do so, we have created a nursing care protocol for decubit ulceras to unify criteria and norm the performances. One out of every five I.C.U. patients suffers from ulcera and 30% of them show four or more ulceras, being the sacro and the heels the most usual places. There is an association between the patient's age, number of days staying in I.C.U. and diabetes and a higher incidence of ulceration. On the other hand, patients with politraumatisms diagnosis, infections and respiratory pathologies suffer from ulcera more than others. There is a clear association between the time of staying without postural changes and the incidence of ulceration. The same thing happens with the high risk stay. Our population is over 61% of I.C.U. stay in high risk, and its incidence of ulceration is 21%. Comparing both parametres we obtain an idea of the prevention which nursing professionals perform. PMID:8715359

  9. Emergency care for children in the United States.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, James M; Krug, Steven; Shaw, Kathy N

    2013-12-01

    A formal emergency care system for children in the United States began in the 1980s with the establishment of specialized training programs in academic children's hospitals. The ensuing three decades have witnessed the establishment of informal regional networks for clinical care and a federally funded research consortium that allows for multisite research on evidence-based practices. However, pediatric emergency care suffers from problems common to emergency departments (EDs) in general, which include misaligned incentives for care, overcrowding, and wide variation in the quality of care. In pediatric emergency care specifically, there are problems with low-volume EDs that have neither the experience nor the equipment to treat children, poor adherence to clinical guidelines, lack of resources for mental health patients, and a lack of widely accepted performance metrics. We call for policies to address these issues, including providing after-hours care in other settings and restructuring payment and reimbursement policies to better address patients' needs. PMID:24301393

  10. Switching between thienopyridines in patients with acute myocardial infarction and quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Schiele, Francois; Puymirat, Etienne; Bonello, Laurent; Meneveau, Nicolas; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Motreff, Pascal; Ravan, Ramin; Leclercq, Florence; Ennezat, Pierre-Vladimir; Ferrières, Jean; Simon, Tabassome; Danchin, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Objective In acute coronary syndromes, switching between thienopyridines is frequent. The aims of the study were to assess the association between switching practices and quality of care. Methods Registry study performed in 213 French public university, public non-academic and private hospitals. All consecutive patients admitted for acute myocardial infarction (MI; <48 hours) between 1/10/2010 and 30/11/2010 were eligible. Clinical and biological data were recorded up to 12 months follow-up. Results Among 4101 patients receiving thienopyridines, a switch was performed in 868 (21.2%): 678 (16.5%) from clopidogrel to prasugrel and 190 (4.6%) from prasugrel to clopidogrel. Predictors of switch were ST segment elevation MI presentation, admission to a cardiology unit, previous percutaneous coronary intervention, younger age, body weight >60 kg, no history of stroke, cardiac arrest, anaemia or renal dysfunction. In patients with a switch, eligibility for prasugrel was >82% and appropriate use of a switch was 86% from clopidogrel to prasugrel and 20% from prasugrel to clopidogrel. Quality indicators scored higher in the group with a switch and also in centres where the switch rate was higher. Conclusions As applied in the French Registry on Acute ST-elevation and non ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction (FAST-MI) registry, switching from one P2Y12 inhibitor to another led to a more appropriate prescription and was associated with higher scores on indicators of quality of care. PMID:27252877

  11. Health and Medical Care: A Functional Content Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memory, David; Lamarre, Marilyn

    The functional content unit on health and medical care is part of a system developed for tutor training and support for adult literacy programs. A key component of the system is the Tutor Support Library, consisting of Instructional Concept Guides (designed as training and reference aids for tutors) and Functional Content Units (intended to help…

  12. Computerized Management of Patient Care in a Complex, Controlled Clinical Trial in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Dean F.

    1987-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is often not responsive to conventional supportive therapy and the mortality rate may exceed 90%. A new form of supportive care, Extracorporeal Carbon Dioxide Removal (ECCO2R), has shown a dramatic increase in survival (48%). A controlled clinical trial of the new ECCO2R therapy versus conventional Continuous Positive Pressure Ventilation (CPPV) is being initiated. Detailed care protocols have been developed by “expert” critical care physicians for the management of patients. Using a blackboard control architecture, the protocols have been implemented on an existing hospital information system and will direct patient care and help manage the controlled clinical trial. Therapeutic instructions are automatically generated by the computer from data input by physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and the laboratory. Preliminary results show that the computerized protocol system can direct therapy for acutely ill patients.

  13. Intensive care unit telemedicine: review and consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Joseph; Krsek, Cathleen; Vermoch, Kathy; Matuszewski, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Intensive care unit telemedicine involves nurses and physicians located at a remote command center providing care to patients in multiple, scattered intensive care units via computer and telecommunication technology. The command center is equipped with a workstation that has multiple monitors displaying real-time patient vital signs, a complete electronic medical record, a clinical decision support tool, a high-resolution radiographic image viewer, and teleconferencing for every patient and intensive care unit room. In addition to communication functions, the video system can be used to view parameters on ventilator screens, infusion pumps, and other bedside equipment, as well as to visually assess patient conditions. The intensivist can conduct virtual rounds, communicate with on-site caregivers, and be alerted to important patient conditions automatically via software-monitored parameters. This article reviews the technology's background, status, significance, clinical literature, financial effect, implementation issues, and future developments. Recommendations from a University HealthSystem Consortium task force are also presented. PMID:17656728

  14. Sleep in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Beltrami, Flávia Gabe; Nguyen, Xuân-Lan; Pichereau, Claire; Maury, Eric; Fleury, Bernard; Fagondes, Simone

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poor sleep quality is a consistently reported by patients in the ICU. In such a potentially hostile environment, sleep is extremely fragmented and sleep architecture is unconventional, with a predominance of superficial sleep stages and a limited amount of time spent in the restorative stages. Among the causes of sleep disruption in the ICU are factors intrinsic to the patients and the acute nature of their condition, as well as factors related to the ICU environment and the treatments administered, such as mechanical ventilation and drug therapy. Although the consequences of poor sleep quality for the recovery of ICU patients remain unknown, it seems to influence the immune, metabolic, cardiovascular, respiratory, and neurological systems. There is evidence that multifaceted interventions focused on minimizing nocturnal sleep disruptions improve sleep quality in ICU patients. In this article, we review the literature regarding normal sleep and sleep in the ICU. We also analyze sleep assessment methods; the causes of poor sleep quality and its potential implications for the recovery process of critically ill patients; and strategies for sleep promotion. PMID:26785964

  15. Acute clinical care and care coordination for traumatic brain injury within Department of Defense.

    PubMed

    Jaffee, Michael S; Helmick, Kathy M; Girard, Philip D; Meyer, Kim S; Dinegar, Kathy; George, Karyn

    2009-01-01

    The nature of current combat situations that U.S. military forces encounter and the use of unconventional weaponry have dramatically increased service personnel's risks of sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Although the true incidence and prevalence of combat-related TBI are unknown, service personnel returning from deployment have reported rates of concussion between 10% and 20%. The Department of Defense has recently released statistics on TBI dating back to before the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to better elucidate the impact and burden of TBI on America's warriors and veterans. Patients with severe TBI move through a well-established trauma system of care, beginning with triage of initial injury by first-responders in the war zone to acute care to rehabilitation and then returning home and to the community. Mild and moderate TBIs may pose different clinical challenges, especially when initially undetected or if treatment is delayed because more serious injuries are present. To ensure identification and prompt treatment of mild and moderate TBI, the U.S. Congress has mandated that military and Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals screen all service personnel returning from combat. Military health professionals must evaluate them for concussion and then treat the physical, emotional, and cognitive problems that may surface. A new approach to health management and care coordination is needed that will allow medical transitions between networks of care to become more centralized and allow for optimal recovery at all severity levels. This article summarizes the care systems available for the acute management of TBI from point of injury to stateside military treatment facilities. We describe TBI assessment, treatment, and overall coordination of care, including innovative clinical initiatives now used. PMID:20104395

  16. Factors Related to Successful Transition to Practice for Acute Care Nurse Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Deborah L; Dolansky, Mary A; Casey, Kathy; Kelley, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The transition from student to acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP) has been recognized as a time of stress. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational-comparative design pilot study was to examine: (1) the relationships among personal resources, community resources, successful transition, and job retention; (2) the difference between ACNPs with 0 to 4 years and ACNPs with more than 4 years of prior experience as a registered nurse in an intensive care unit or emergency department; and (3) the skills/procedures that ACNPs found difficult to perform independently. Thirty-four participants were recruited from a social media site for nurse practitioners. Organizational support, communication, and leadership were the most important elements of successful transition into the ACNP role. This information can help ACNP faculty and hospital orientation/fellowship program educators to help ACNPs transition into their first position after graduation. PMID:27153306

  17. A creative alternative for providing constant observation on an acute-brain-injury unit.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Marci; Amato, Shelly; Mouhlas, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    A performance improvement project to explore creative alternatives to improve the efficiency of constant observation was performed on an acute-brain-injury rehabilitation unit. The goals of the project were to increase opportunities for therapeutic cognitive stimulation among patients, increase nursing satisfaction regarding efficient use of resources to deliver rehabilitative care, decrease constant-observation salary costs, and maintain fall and restraint rates within 10% of baseline. Implementing the project involved developing a new job description (rehabilitation patient companion) and creating a day room where patients receiving constant observation could go between therapies to receive therapeutic cognitive stimulation. The program benefited patients, staff and the hospital. This project illustrates how a creative alternative to constant observation proves beneficial on many levels and improves the delivery of rehabilitative care to patients with traumatic brain injury. PMID:19160919

  18. Alberta's acute care funding plan: update to December 1994.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Hall, E M; Plain, R H

    1995-01-01

    From 1990 until 1994 Alberta Health adjusted the acute care portion of hospital budgets based on a case mix index, initially called the Hospital Performance Index (HPI). The HPI formula method was a temporary measure; in November 1993, Alberta Health announced that, commencing in 1994, hospitals would be funded on a prospective basis, although they would still use the core of the HPI in the setting of funding rates. The creation of 17 health regions in June 1994 created the need for a new system of funding which would supplant the modified prospective system. In this paper we review the evolution of the HPI plan and its individual components-patient data, patient classification, funding weights, inpatient costs and adjustment factors. PMID:10144217

  19. Innovation or rebranding, acute care surgery diffusion will continue

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Courtney E.; Pringle, Patricia L.; Santry, Heena P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patterns of adoption of acute care surgery (ACS) as a strategy for emergency general surgery (EGS) care are unknown. Methods We conducted a qualitative study comprising face-to-face interviews with senior surgeons responsible for ACS at 18 teaching hospitals chosen to ensure diversity of opinions and practice environment (three practice types [community, public/charity, university] in each of six geographic regions [Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, New England, Northeast, South, West]). Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using NVivo (QSR International, Melbourne, Australia). We applied the methods of investigator triangulation using an inductive approach to develop a final taxonomy of codes organized by themes related to respondents’ views on the future of ACS as a strategy for EGS. We applied our findings to a conceptual model on diffusion of innovation. Results We found a paradox between ACS viewed as a healthcare delivery innovation versus a rebranding of comprehensive general surgery. Optimism for the future of ACS due to increased desirability for trauma/critical care careers and improved outcomes for EGS was tempered by fear over lack of continuity, poor institutional resources and uncertainty regarding financial viability. Our analysis suggests that the implementation of ACS, whether a true healthcare delivery innovation or an innovative rebranding, fits into the Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovation Theory. Conclusions Despite concerns over resource allocation and the definition of the specialty, from the perspective of senior surgeons deeply entrenched in executing this care-delivery model, ACS represents the new face of general surgery that will likely continue to diffuse from these early adopters. PMID:25891673

  20. Global monitoring in the neurocritical care unit.

    PubMed

    Olson, DaiWai M; Andrew Kofke, W; O'Phelan, Kristine; Gupta, Puneet K; Figueroa, Stephen A; Smirnakis, Stelios M; Leroux, Peter D; Suarez, Jose I

    2015-06-01

    Effective methods of monitoring the status of patients with neurological injuries began with non-invasive observations and evolved during the past several decades to include more invasive monitoring tools and physiologic measures. The monitoring paradigm continues to evolve, this time back toward the use of less invasive tools. In parallel, the science of monitoring began with the global assessment of the patient's neurological condition, evolved to focus on regional monitoring techniques, and with the advent of enhanced computing capabilities is now moving back to focus on global monitoring. The purpose of this session of the Second Neurocritical Care Research Conference was to collaboratively develop a comprehensive understanding of the state of the science for global brain monitoring and to identify research priorities for intracranial pressure monitoring, neuroimaging, and neuro-electrophysiology monitoring. PMID:25846709

  1. Modeling Safety Outcomes on Patient Care Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Anita; Effken, Judith; Carley, Kathleen; Lee, Ju-Sung

    In its groundbreaking report, "To Err is Human," the Institute of Medicine reported that as many as 98,000 hospitalized patients die each year due to medical errors (IOM, 2001). Although not all errors are attributable to nurses, nursing staff (registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and technicians) comprise 54% of the caregivers. Therefore, it is not surprising, that AHRQ commissioned the Institute of Medicine to do a follow-up study on nursing, particularly focusing on the context in which care is provided. The intent was to identify characteristics of the workplace, such as staff per patient ratios, hours on duty, education, and other environmental characteristics. That report, "Keeping Patients Safe: Transforming the Work Environment of Nurses" was published this spring (IOM, 2004).

  2. Candida Pneumonia in Intensive Care Unit?

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Ronny M.; Linssen, Catharina F.; Guion, Nele; van Mook, Walther N.; Bergmans, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    It has been questioned if Candida pneumonia exists as a clinical entity. Only histopathology can establish the definite diagnosis. Less invasive diagnostic strategies lack specificity and have been insufficiently validated. Scarcity of this pathomechanism and nonspecific clinical presentation make validation and the development of a clinical algorithm difficult. In the present study, we analyze whether Candida pneumonia exists in our critical care population. We used a bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimen database that we have built in a structural diagnostic approach to ventilator-associated pneumonia for more than a decade consisting of 832 samples. Microbiological data were linked to clinical information and available autopsy data. We searched for critically ill patients with respiratory failure with no other microbiological or clinical explanation than exclusive presence of Candida species in BAL fluid. Five cases could be identified with Candida as the likely cause of pneumonia. PMID:25734099

  3. Vital Signs Directed Therapy: Improving Care in an Intensive Care Unit in a Low-Income Country

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Tim; Schell, Carl Otto; Lugazia, Edwin; Blixt, Jonas; Mulungu, Moses; Castegren, Markus; Eriksen, Jaran; Konrad, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Global Critical Care is attracting increasing attention. At several million deaths per year, the worldwide burden of critical illness is greater than generally appreciated. Low income countries (LICs) have a disproportionally greater share of critical illness, and yet critical care facilities are scarce in such settings. Routines utilizing abnormal vital signs to identify critical illness and trigger medical interventions have become common in high-income countries but have not been investigated in LICs. The aim of the study was to assess whether the introduction of a vital signs directed therapy protocol improved acute care and reduced mortality in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in Tanzania. Methods and Findings Prospective, before-and-after interventional study in the ICU of a university hospital in Tanzania. A context-appropriate protocol that defined danger levels of severely abnormal vital signs and stipulated acute treatment responses was implemented in a four week period using sensitisation, training, job aids, supervision and feedback. Acute treatment of danger signs at admission and during care in the ICU and in-hospital mortality were compared pre and post-implementation using regression models. Danger signs from 447 patients were included: 269 pre-implementation and 178 post-implementation. Acute treatment of danger signs was higher post-implementation (at admission: 72.9% vs 23.1%, p<0.001; in ICU: 16.6% vs 2.9%, p<0.001). A danger sign was five times more likely to be treated post-implementation (Prevalence Ratio (PR) 4.9 (2.9–8.3)). Intravenous fluids were given in response to 35.0% of hypotensive episodes post-implementation, as compared to 4.1% pre-implementation (PR 6.4 (2.5–16.2)). In patients admitted with hypotension, mortality was lower post-implementation (69.2% vs 92.3% p = 0.02) giving a numbers-needed-to-treat of 4.3. Overall in-hospital mortality rates were unchanged (49.4% vs 49.8%, p = 0.94). Conclusion The introduction of a

  4. The Experience of Witnessing Patients' Trauma and Suffering among Acute Care Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Mary E.; Buchanan, Marla J.

    2011-01-01

    A large body of research provides evidence of workplace injuries to those in the nursing profession. Research on workplace stress and burnout among medical professionals is also well known; however, the profession of acute care nursing has not been examined with regards to work-related stress. This qualitative study focused on acute care nurses'…

  5. Method for Assigning Priority Levels in Acute Care (MAPLe-AC) predicts outcomes of acute hospital care of older persons - a cross-national validation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although numerous risk factors for adverse outcomes for older persons after an acute hospital stay have been identified, a decision making tool combining all available information in a clinically meaningful way would be helpful for daily hospital practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Method for Assigning Priority Levels for Acute Care (MAPLe-AC) to predict adverse outcomes in acute care for older people and to assess its usability as a decision making tool for discharge planning. Methods Data from a prospective multicenter study in five Nordic acute care hospitals with information from admission to a one year follow-up of older acute care patients were compared with a prospective study of acute care patients from admission to discharge in eight hospitals in Canada. The interRAI Acute Care assessment instrument (v1.1) was used for data collection. Data were collected during the first 24 hours in hospital, including pre-morbid and admission information, and at day 7 or at discharge, whichever came first. Based on this information a crosswalk was developed from the original MAPLe algorithm for home care settings to acute care (MAPLe-AC). The sample included persons 75 years or older who were admitted to acute internal medical services in one hospital in each of the five Nordic countries (n = 763) or to acute hospital care either internal medical or combined medical-surgical services in eight hospitals in Ontario, Canada (n = 393). The outcome measures considered were discharge to home, discharge to institution or death. Outcomes in a 1-year follow-up in the Nordic hospitals were: living at home, living in an institution or death, and survival. Logistic regression with ROC curves and Cox regression analyses were used in the analyses. Results Low and mild priority levels of MAPLe-AC predicted discharge home and high and very high priority levels predicted adverse outcome at discharge both in the Nordic and Canadian data sets

  6. Effect of Public Reporting on Intensive Care Unit Discharge Destination and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Reineck, Lora A.; Le, Tri Q.; Seymour, Christopher W.; Barnato, Amber E.; Angus, Derek C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Public reporting of hospital performance is designed to improve healthcare outcomes by promoting quality improvement and informing consumer choice, but these programs may carry unintended consequences. Objective: To determine whether publicly reporting in-hospital mortality rates for intensive care unit (ICU) patients influenced discharge patterns or mortality. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study taking advantage of a natural experiment in which California, but not other states, publicly reported hospital-specific severity-adjusted ICU mortality rates between 2007 and 2012. We used multivariable logistic regression adjusted for patient, hospital, and regional characteristics to compare mortality rates and discharge patterns between California and states without public reporting for Medicare fee-for-service ICU admissions from 2005 through 2009 using a difference-in-differences approach. Measurements and Main Results: We assessed discharge patterns using post-acute care use and acute care hospital transfer rates and mortality using in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates. The study cohort included 936,063 patients admitted to 646 hospitals. Compared with control subjects, admission to a California ICU after the introduction of public reporting was associated with a reduced odds of post-acute care use in post-reform year 2 (ratio of odds ratios [ORs], 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91–0.96) and increased odds of transfer to another acute care hospital in both post-reform years (year 1: ratio of ORs, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01–1.16; year 2: ratio of ORs, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.33–1.53). There were no significant differences in in-hospital or 30-day mortality. Conclusions: Public reporting of ICU in-hospital mortality rates was associated with changes in discharge patterns but no change in risk-adjusted mortality. PMID:25521696

  7. Compliance with processes of care in intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand--a point prevalence study.

    PubMed

    Hewson-Conroy, K M; Burrell, A R; Elliott, D; Webb, S A R; Seppelt, I M; Taylor, C; Glass, P

    2011-09-01

    There are indications that compliance with routine clinical practices in intensive care units (ICU) varies widely internationally, but it is currently unknown whether this is the case throughout Australia and New Zealand. A one-day point prevalence study measured the prevalence of routine care processes being delivered in Australian and New Zealand ICUs including the assessment and/or management of: nutrition, pain, sedation, weaning from mechanical ventilation, head of bed elevation, deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis, stress ulcer prophylaxis, blood glucose, pressure areas and bowel action. Using a sample of 50 adult ICUs, prevalence data were collected for 662 patients with a median age of 65 years and a median Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 18. Wide variations in compliance were evident in several care components including: assessment of nutritional goals (74%, interquartile range [IQR] 51 to 89%), pain score (35%, IQR 17 to 62%), sedation score (89%, IQR 50 to 100%); care of ventilated patients e.g. head of bed elevation > 30 degrees (33%, IQR 7 to 62%) and setting weaning plans (50%, IQR 28 to 78%); pressure area risk assessment (78%, IQR 18 to 100%) and constipation management plan (43%, IQR 6 to 87%). Care components that were delivered more consistently included nutrition delivery (100%, IQR 100 to 100%), deep venous thrombosis (96%, IQR 89 to 100%) and stress ulcer (90%, IQR 78 to 100%) prophylaxis, and checking blood sugar levels (93%, IQR 88 to 100%). This point prevalence study demonstrated variability in the delivery of 'routine' cares in Australian and New Zealand ICUs. This may be driven in part by lack of consensus on what is best practice in intensive care units, prompting the need for further research in this area. PMID:21970141

  8. Autologous blood donation in a small general acute-care hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Mott, L. S.; Jones, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Increased public concerns about infectious risk associated with homologous blood transfusions have led to a significant increase in autologous blood collections. In response, blood banks and large hospitals have implemented autologous blood donation programs (ABDPs). Small hospitals lack the technical resources and patient case loads to effectively institute ABDPs. A preoperative ABDP designed to increase availability and patient convenience--and, therefore, utilization--is described. The program created in a rural 90-bed general acute-care hospital processed 105 donors and collected 197 units over a 38-month period. The percentage of the collected units that were transfused was 44.7%, and only 6.1% of participating patients required homologous transfusions. Comparisons of hematological and clinical data with previously published results indicate that small-scale preoperative ABDPs are clinically effective, safe, and provide cost-efficient utilization of the safest blood supply available. PMID:7674344

  9. 76 FR 35017 - United States et al. v. United Regional Health Care System; Public Comments and Response on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Antitrust Division United States et al. v. United Regional Health Care System; Public Comments and Response... States and State of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System, Civil Action No. 7:11-cv- 00030-0, which.... United Regional Health Care System, Defendant. Case No.: 7:11-cv-00030 Response Of Plaintiff...

  10. Capacity for care: meta-ethnography of acute care nurses' experiences of the nurse-patient relationship

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Jackie; Nicholson, Caroline; Maben, Jill; Pope, Catherine; Flatley, Mary; Wilkinson, Charlotte; Meyer, Julienne; Tziggili, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Aims To synthesize evidence and knowledge from published research about nurses' experiences of nurse-patient relationships with adult patients in general, acute inpatient hospital settings. Background While primary research on nurses' experiences has been reported, it has not been previously synthesized. Design Meta-ethnography. Data sources Published literature from Australia, Europe, and North America, written in English between January 1999–October 2009 was identified from databases: CINAHL, Medline, British Nursing Index and PsycINFO. Review methods Qualitative studies describing nurses' experiences of the nurse-patient relationship in acute hospital settings were reviewed and synthesized using the meta-ethnographic method. Results Sixteen primary studies (18 papers) were appraised as high quality and met the inclusion criteria. The findings show that while nurses aspire to develop therapeutic relationships with patients, the organizational setting at a unit level is strongly associated with nurses' capacity to build and sustain these relationships. The organizational conditions of critical care settings appear best suited to forming therapeutic relationships, while nurses working on general wards are more likely to report moral distress resulting from delivering unsatisfactory care. General ward nurses can then withdraw from attempting to emotionally engage with patients. Conclusion The findings of this meta-ethnography draw together the evidence from several qualitative studies and articulate how the organizational setting at a unit level can strongly influence nurses' capacity to build and sustain therapeutic relationships with patients. Service improvements need to focus on how to optimize the organizational conditions that support nurses in their relational work with patients. PMID:23163719

  11. Cultural differences with end-of-life care in the critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Doolen, Jessica; York, Nancy L

    2007-01-01

    Critical care nurses are providing healthcare for an increasingly multicultural population. This ever-increasing diversity in cultures and subcultures presents a challenge to nurses who want to provide culturally competent care. It is common for patients and families to face difficult decisions about end-of-life care in critical care units, and minority cultures do not always believe in the Westerner's core values of patient autonomy and self-determination. Knowledge of these cultural differences is fundamental if critical care nurses wish to provide appropriate and culturally competent information regarding end-of-life decisions. PMID:17704674

  12. Ethical issues and palliative care in the cardiovascular intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Swetz, Keith M; Mansel, J Keith

    2013-11-01

    Medical advances over the past 50 years have helped countless patients with advanced cardiac disease or who are critically ill in the intensive care unit (ICU), but have added to the ethical complexity of the care provided by clinicians, particularly at the end of life. Palliative care has the primary aim of improving symptom burden, quality of life, and the congruence of the medical plan with a patient's goals of care. This article explores ethical issues encountered in the cardiac ICU, discusses key analyses of these issues, and addresses how palliative care might assist medical teams in approaching these challenges. PMID:24188227

  13. Structured nursing communication on interdisciplinary acute care teams improves perceptions of safety, efficiency, understanding of care plan and teamwork as well as job satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Gausvik, Christian; Lautar, Ashley; Miller, Lisa; Pallerla, Harini; Schlaudecker, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Efficient, accurate, and timely communication is required for quality health care and is strongly linked to health care staff job satisfaction. Developing ways to improve communication is key to increasing quality of care, and interdisciplinary care teams allow for improved communication among health care professionals. This study examines the patient- and family-centered use of structured interdisciplinary bedside rounds (SIBR) on an acute care for the elderly (ACE) unit in a 555-bed metropolitan community hospital. This mixed methods study surveyed 24 nurses, therapists, patient care assistants, and social workers to measure perceptions of teamwork, communication, understanding of the plan for the day, safety, efficiency, and job satisfaction. A similar survey was administered to a control group of 38 of the same staff categories on different units in the same hospital. The control group units utilized traditional physician-centric rounding. Significant differences were found in each category between the SIBR staff on the ACE unit and the control staff. Nurse job satisfaction is an important marker of retention and recruitment, and improved communication may be an important aspect of increasing this satisfaction. Furthermore, improved communication is key to maintaining a safe hospital environment with quality patient care. Interdisciplinary team rounds that take place at the bedside improve both nursing satisfaction and related communication markers of quality and safety, and may help to achieve higher nurse retention and safer patient care. These results point to the interconnectedness and dual benefit to both job satisfaction and patient quality of care that can come from enhancements to team communication. PMID:25609978

  14. Experience with a Simplified Computer Based Intensive Care Monitoring System in the Management of Acutely Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, H. Roger; Rutherford, Harold G.; Smith, Louis L.; Briggs, Burton A.; Neilsen, Ivan R.; Rau, Richard

    1979-01-01

    The need exists for a simplified and ecomonical computer based monitoring system for critically ill surgical patients. Such a system would enjoy widespread use in surgical intensive care units in regional, as well as larger community hospitals. We have assembled such a system which provides digital readout of the usual physiologic parameters, and also provide computer storage of accumulated data for review and evaluation of patient care. The computer provides graphic and digital display and digital printout for subsequent inclusion in the patient records. Most frequent indications for this system include the development of acute respiratory insufficiency or acute circulatory failure due to invasive sepsis and/or severe arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Information most beneficial in patient care included measurement of cardiac output;alveolar arterial oxygen gradient. ImagesFigure 1Figure 5Figure 9Figure 11

  15. Neonatal intensive care unit lighting: update and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Roberto G; Pattini, Andrea E

    2016-08-01

    Achieving adequate lighting in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge: in addition to the usual considerations of visual performance, cost, energy and aesthetics, there appear different biological needs of patients, health care providers and family members. Communicational aspects of light, its role as a facilitator of the visual function of doctors and nurses, and its effects on the newborn infant physiology and development were addressed in order to review the effects of light (natural and artificial) within neonatal care with a focus on development. The role of light in regulating the newborn infant circadian cycle in particular and the therapeutic use of light in general were also reviewed. For each aspect, practical recommendations were specified for a proper well-lit environment in neonatal intensive care units. PMID:27399015

  16. Measuring technical efficiency of output quality in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Junoy, J P

    1997-01-01

    Presents some examples of the implications derived from imposing the objective of maximizing social welfare, subject to limited resources, on ethical care patients management in respect of quality performance of health services. Conventional knowledge of health economics points out that critically ill patients are responsible for increased use of technological resources and that they receive a high proportion of health care resources. Attempts to answer, from the point of view of microeconomics, the question: how do we measure comparative efficiency in the management of intensive care units? Analyses this question through data from an international empirical study using micro-economic measures of productive efficiency in public services (data envelopment analysis). Results show a 28.8 per cent level of technical inefficiency processing data from 25 intensive care units in the USA. PMID:10169231

  17. Perspectives on the value of biomarkers in acute cardiac care and implications for strategic management.

    PubMed

    Kossaify, Antoine; Garcia, Annie; Succar, Sami; Ibrahim, Antoine; Moussallem, Nicolas; Kossaify, Mikhael; Grollier, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Biomarkers in acute cardiac care are gaining increasing interest given their clinical benefits. This study is a review of the major conditions in acute cardiac care, with a focus on biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic assessment. Through a PubMed search, 110 relevant articles were selected. The most commonly used cardiac biomarkers (cardiac troponin, natriuretic peptides, and C-reactive protein) are presented first, followed by a description of variable acute cardiac conditions with their relevant biomarkers. In addition to the conventional use of natriuretic peptides, cardiac troponin, and C-reactive protein, other biomarkers are outlined in variable critical conditions that may be related to acute cardiac illness. These include ST2 and chromogranin A in acute dyspnea and acute heart failure, matrix metalloproteinase in acute chest pain, heart-type fatty acid binding protein in acute coronary syndrome, CD40 ligand and interleukin-6 in acute myocardial infarction, blood ammonia and lactate in cardiac arrest, as well as tumor necrosis factor-alpha in atrial fibrillation. Endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation are involved in the physiopathology of most cardiac diseases, whether acute or chronic. In summary, natriuretic peptides, cardiac troponin, C-reactive protein are currently the most relevant biomarkers in acute cardiac care. Point-of-care testing and multi-markers use are essential for prompt diagnostic approach and tailored strategic management. PMID:24046510

  18. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Fang-I; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010-2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006-08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, p<0.001). The quarterly composite measures also improved significantly during the BTS-Stroke activity. In conclusion, a BTS collaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States. PMID:27487190

  19. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A.; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010–2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006–08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, p<0.001). The quarterly composite measures also improved significantly during the BTS-Stroke activity. In conclusion, a BTS collaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States. PMID:27487190

  20. [Pain, delirium and sedation in intensive unit care].

    PubMed

    Mazul-Sunko, Branka; Brozović, Gordana; Goranović, Tatjana

    2012-03-01

    Delirium is a complication of intensive care treatment associated with permanent cognitive decline and increased mortality after hospital discharge. In several studies, postoperative pain was found as a possible precipitating factor. Aggressive pain treatment is part of current multicompartment protocols for delirium prevention after hip fracture. Protocol based sedation, pain and delirium management in intensive care units have been shown to have clinical and economic advantages. PMID:23088085

  1. Stress Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Observation Unit Care Reduces Cost for Patients With Emergent Chest Pain: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chadwick D.; Hwang, Wenke; Hoekstra, James W.; Case, Doug; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hiestand, Brian; Diercks, Deborah B.; Hamilton, Craig A.; Harper, Erin N.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Study objective We determine whether imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an observation unit would reduce medical costs among patients with emergent non-low-risk chest pain who otherwise would be managed with an inpatient care strategy. Methods Emergency department patients (n=110) at intermediate or high probability for acute coronary syndrome without electrocardiographic or biomarker evidence of a myocardial infarction provided consent and were randomized to stress cardiac MRI in an observation unit versus standard inpatient care. The primary outcome was direct hospital cost calculated as the sum of hospital and provider costs. Estimated median cost differences (Hodges-Lehmann) and distribution-free 95% confidence intervals (Moses) were used to compare groups. Results There were 110 participants with 53 randomized to cardiac MRI and 57 to inpatient care; 8 of 110 (7%) experienced acute coronary syndrome. In the MRI pathway, 49 of 53 underwent stress cardiac MRI, 11 of 53 were admitted, 1 left against medical advice, 41 were discharged, and 2 had acute coronary syndrome. In the inpatient care pathway, 39 of 57 patients initially received stress testing, 54 of 57 were admitted, 3 left against medical advice, and 6 had acute coronary syndrome. At 30 days, no subjects in either group experienced acute coronary syndrome after discharge. The cardiac MRI group had a reduced median hospitalization cost (Hodges-Lehmann estimate $588; 95% confidence interval $336 to $811); 79% were managed without hospital admission. Conclusion Compared with inpatient care, an observation unit strategy involving stress cardiac MRI reduced incident cost without any cases of missed acute coronary syndrome in patients with emergent chest pain. PMID:20554078

  2. A Review of Visiting Policies in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghparast, Shiva; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Ghanbari, Behrooz; Maleki, Majid; Peyrovi, Hamid; Bahrani, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Admission to intensive care units is potentially stressful and usually goes together with disruption in physiological and emotional function of the patient. The role of the families in improving ill patients’ conditions is important. So this study investigates the strategies, potential challenges and also the different dimensions of visiting hours’ policies with a narrative review. The search was carried out in scientific information databases using keywords “visiting policy”, “visiting hours” and “intensive care unit” with no time limitation on accessing the published studies in English or Farsi. Of a total of 42 articles, 22 conformed to our study objectives from 1997 to 2013. The trajectory of current research shows that visiting in intensive care units has, since their inception in the 1960s, always considered the nurses’ perspectives, patients’ preferences and physiological responses, and the outlook for families. However, little research has been carried out and most of that originates from the United States, Europe and since 2010, a few from Iran. It seems that the need to use the research findings and emerging theories and practices is necessary to discover and challenge the beliefs and views of nurses about family-oriented care and visiting in intensive care units. PMID:26755480

  3. Controversies and Misconceptions in Intensive Care Unit Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Michael H; Marik, Paul E

    2015-09-01

    The early initiation of enteral nutrition remains a fundamental component of the management of critically ill and injured patients in the intensive care unit. Trophic feeding is equivalent, if not superior, to full-dose feeding. Parenteral nutrition has no proved benefit over enteral nutrition, which is the preferred route of nutritional support in intensive care unit patients with a functional gastrointestinal tract. Continuous enteral and parental nutrition inhibits the release of important enterohormones. These changes are reversed with intermittent bolus feeding. Whey protein, which is high in leucine, has a greater effect on insulin release and protein synthesis than does a soy- or casein-based enteral formula. PMID:26304278

  4. Nurses in Action: A Response to Cultural Care Challenges in a Pediatric Acute Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Mixer, Sandra J; Carson, Emily; McArthur, Polly M; Abraham, Cynthia; Silva, Krystle; Davidson, Rebecca; Sharp, Debra; Chadwick, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Culturally congruent care is satisfying, meaningful, fits with people's daily lives, and promotes their health and wellbeing. A group of staff nurses identified specific clinical challenges they faced in providing such care for Hispanic and underserved Caucasian children and families in the pediatric medical-surgical unit of an urban regional children's hospital in the southeastern U.S. To address these challenges, an academic-practice partnership was formed between a group of nurse managers and staff nurses at the children's hospital and nursing faculty and graduate students at a local, research-intensive public university. Using the culture care theory, the partners collaborated on a research study to discover knowledge that would help the nursing staff resolve the identified clinical challenges. Twelve families and 12 healthcare providers participated. Data analysis revealed five care factors that participants identified as most valuable: family, faith, communication, care integration, and meeting basic needs. These themes were used to formulate nursing actions that, when applied in daily practice, could facilitate the provision of culturally congruent care for these children and their families. The knowledge generated by this study also has implications for healthcare organizations, nursing educators, and academic-practice partnerships that seek to ensure the delivery of equitable care for all patients. PMID:26072213

  5. Collegial relationship breakdown: a qualitative exploration of nurses in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Cowin, Leanne S

    2013-01-01

    Poor collegial relations can cause communication breakdown, staff attrition and difficulties attracting new nursing staff. Underestimating the potential power of nursing team relationships means that opportunities to create better working environments and increase the quality of nursing care can be missed. Previous research on improving collegiality indicates that professionalism and work satisfaction increases and that staff attrition decreases. This study explores challenges, strengths and strategies used in nursing team communication in order to build collegial relationships. A qualitative approach was employed to gather nurses experiences and discussion of communication within their nursing teams and a constant comparison method was utilised for data analysis. A convenience sampling technique was employed to access both Registered Nurses and Enrolled Nurses to partake in six focus groups. Thirty mostly female nurses (ratio of 5:1) participated in the study. Inclusion criteria consisted of being a nurse currently working in acute care settings and the exclusion criteria included nursing staff currently working in closed specialty units (i.e. intensive care units). Results revealed three main themes: (1) externalisation and internalisation of nursing team communication breakdown, (2) the importance of collegiality for retention of nurses and (3) loss of respect, and civility across the healthcare workplace. A clear division between hierarchies of nurses was apparent in how nursing team communication was delivered and managed. Open, respectful and collegial communication is essential in today's dynamic and complex health environments. The nurses in this study highlighted how important nursing communication can be to work motivation and how leadership fosters teamwork. PMID:23898600

  6. The Leapfrog initiative for intensive care unit physician staffing and its impact on intensive care unit performance: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Gasperino, James

    2011-10-01

    The field of critical care has changed markedly in recent years to accommodate a growing population of chronically critically ill patients. New administrative structures have evolved to include divisions, departments, and sections devoted exclusively to the practice of critical care medicine. On an individual level, the ability to manage complex multisystem critical illnesses and to introduce invasive monitoring devices defines the intensivist. On a systems level, critical care services managed by an intensivist-led multidisciplinary team are now recognized by their ability to efficiently utilize hospital resources and improve patient outcomes. Due to the numerous cost and quality issues related to the delivery of critical care medicine, intensive care unit physician staffing (IPS) has become a charged subject in recent years. Although the federal government has played a large role in regulating best practices by physicians, other third parties have entered the arena. Perhaps the most influential of these has been The Leapfrog Group, a consortium representing 130 employers and 65 Fortune 500 companies that purchase health care for their employees. This group has proposed specific regulatory guidelines for IPS that are purported to result in substantial cost containment and improved quality of care. This narrative review examines the impact of The Leapfrog Group's recommendations on critical care delivery in the United States. PMID:21439669

  7. Family experience survey in the surgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Twohig, Bridget; Manasia, Anthony; Bassily-Marcus, Adel; Oropello, John; Gayton, Matthew; Gaffney, Christine; Kohli-Seth, Roopa

    2015-11-01

    The experience of critical care is stressful for both patients and their families. This is especially true when patients are not able to make their own care decisions. This article details the creation of a Family Experience Survey in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) to capture and improve overall experience. Kolcaba's "Enhanced Comfort Theory" provided the theoretical basis for question formation, specifically in regards to the four aspects of comfort: "physical," "psycho-spiritual," "sociocultural" and "environmental." Survey results were analyzed in real-time to identify and implement interventions needed for issues raised. Overall, there was a high level of satisfaction reported especially with quality of care provided to patients, communication and availability of nurses and doctors, explanations from staff, inclusion in decision making, the needs of patients being met, quality of care provided to patients and cleanliness of the unit. It was noted that 'N/A' was indicated for cultural needs and spiritual needs, a chaplain now rounds on all patients daily to ensure these services are more consistently offered. In addition, protocols for doctor communication with families, palliative care consults, daily bleach cleaning of high touch areas in patient rooms and nurse-led progressive mobility have been implemented. Enhanced comfort theory enabled the opportunity to identify and provide a more 'broad' approach to care for patients and families. PMID:26608426

  8. The impact of a clinical training unit on integrated child health care in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Guiscafré, H.; Martínez, H.; Palafox, M.; Villa, S.; Espinosa, P.; Bojalil, R.; Gutiérrez, G.

    2001-01-01

    This study had two aims: to describe the activities of a clinical training unit set up for the integrated management of sick children, and to evaluate the impact of the unit after its first four years of operation. The training unit was set up in the outpatient ward of a government hospital and was staffed by a paediatrician, a family medicine physician, two nurses and a nutritionist. The staff kept a computerized database for all patients seen and they were supervised once a month. During the first three years, the demand for first-time medical consultation increased by 477% for acute respiratory infections (ARI) and 134% for acute diarrhoea (AD), with an average annual increase of demand for medical care of 125%. Eighty-nine per cent of mothers who took their child for consultation and 85% of mothers who lived in the catchment area and had a deceased child received training on how to recognize alarming signs in a sick child. Fifty-eight per cent of these mothers were evaluated as being properly trained. Eighty-five per cent of primary care physicians who worked for government institutions (n = 350) and 45% of private physicians (n = 90) were also trained in the recognition and proper management of AD and ARI. ARI mortality in children under 1 year of age in the catchment area (which included about 25,000 children under 5 years of age) decreased by 43.2% in three years, while mortality in children under 5 years of age decreased by 38.8%. The corresponding figures for AD mortality reduction were 36.3% and 33.6%. In this same period, 11 clinical research protocols were written. In summary, we learned that a clinical training unit for integrated child care management was an excellent way to offer in-service training for primary health care physicians. PMID:11417039

  9. Lean and Six Sigma in acute care: a systematic review of reviews.

    PubMed

    Deblois, Simon; Lepanto, Luigi

    2016-03-14

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to present a systematic review of literature reviews, summarizing how Lean and Six Sigma management techniques have been implemented in acute care settings to date, and assessing their impact. To aid decision makers who wish to use these techniques by identifying the sectors of activity most often targeted, the main results of the interventions, as well as barriers and facilitators involved. To identify areas of future research. Design/methodology/approach - A literature search was conducted, using eight databases. The methodological quality of the selected reviews was appraised with AMSTAR. A narrative synthesis was performed according to the guidelines proposed by Popay et al. (2006). Data were reported according to PRISMA. Findings - The literature search identified 149 publications published from 1999 to January 2015. Seven literature reviews were included into the systematic review, upon appraisal. The overall quality of the evidence was poor to fair. The clinical settings most described were specialized health care services, including operating suites, intensive care units and emergency departments. The outcomes most often appraised related to processes and quality. The evidence suggests that Lean and Six Sigma are better adapted to settings where processes involve a linear sequence of events. Research limitations/implications - There is a need for more studies of high methodological quality to better understand the effects of these approaches as well as the factors of success and barriers to their implementation. Field studies comparing the effects of Lean and Six Sigma to those of other process redesign or quality improvement efforts would bring a significant contribution to the body of knowledge. Practical implications - Lean and Six Sigma can be considered valuable process optimization approaches in acute health care settings. The success of their implementation requires significant participation of clinical

  10. Clinical Frailty Scale in an Acute Medicine Unit: a Simple Tool That Predicts Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Juma, Salina; Taabazuing, Mary-Margaret; Montero-Odasso, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Frailty is characterized by increased vulnerability to external stressors. When frail older adults are admitted to hospital, they are at increased risk of adverse events including falls, delirium, and disability. The Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) is a practical and efficient tool for assessing frailty; however, its ability to predict outcomes has not been well studied within the acute medical service. Objective To examine the CFS in elderly patients admitted to the acute medical ward and its association with length of stay. Design Prospective cohort study in an acute care university hospital in London, Ontario, Canada, involving 75 patients over age 65, admitted to the general internal medicine clinical teaching units (CTU). Measurements Patient demographics were collected through chart review, and CFS score was assigned to each patient after brief clinician assessment. The CFS ranges from 1 (very fit) to 9 (terminally ill) based on descriptors and pictographs of activity and functional status. The CFS was collapsed into three categories: non-frail (CFS 1–4), mild-to-moderately frail (CFS 5–6), and severely frail (CFS 7–8). Outcomes of length of stay and 90-day readmission were gathered through the LHSC electronic patient record. Results Severe frailty was associated with longer lengths of stay (Mean = 12.6 ± 12.7 days) compared to mild-to-moderate frailty (mean = 11.2 ± 10.8 days), and non-frailty (mean = 4.1 ± 2.1 days, p = .014). This finding was significant after adjusting for age, sex, and number of medications. Participants with higher frailty scores showed higher readmission rates when compared with those with no frailty (31.2% for severely frail, vs. 34.2% for mild-to-moderately frail vs. 19% for non-frail) although there was no significant difference in the adjusted analysis. Conclusion The CFS helped identify patients that are more likely to have prolonged hospital stays on the acute medical ward. The CFS is an easy to use tool which

  11. Integrating palliative care in the surgical and trauma intensive care unit: A report from the Improving Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit (IPAL-ICU) Project Advisory Board and the Center to Advance Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Mosenthal, Anne C.; Weissman, David E.; Curtis, J. Randall; Hays, Ross M.; Lustbader, Dana R.; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A.; Ray, Daniel E.; Bassett, Rick; Boss, Renee D.; Brasel, Karen J.; Campbell, Margaret; Nelson, Judith E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although successful models for palliative care delivery and quality improvement in the intensive care unit have been described, their applicability in surgical intensive care unit settings has not been fully addressed. We undertook to define specific challenges, strategies, and solutions for integration of palliative care in the surgical intensive care unit. Data Sources We searched the MEDLINE database from inception to May 2011 for all English language articles using the term “surgical palliative care” or the terms “surgical critical care,” “surgical ICU,” “surgeon,” “trauma” or “transplant,” and “palliative care” or “end-of- life care” and hand-searched our personal files for additional articles. Based on review of these articles and the experiences of our interdisciplinary expert Advisory Board, we prepared this report. Data Extraction and Synthesis We critically reviewed the existing literature on delivery of palliative care in the surgical intensive care unit setting focusing on challenges, strategies, models, and interventions to promote effective integration of palliative care for patients receiving surgical critical care and their families. Conclusions Characteristics of patients with surgical disease and practices, attitudes, and interactions of different disciplines on the surgical critical care team present distinctive issues for intensive care unit palliative care integration and improvement. Physicians, nurses, and other team members in surgery, critical care and palliative care (if available) should be engaged collaboratively to identify challenges and develop strategies. “Consultative,” “integrative,” and combined models can be used to improve intensive care unit palliative care, although optimal use of trigger criteria for palliative care consultation has not yet been demonstrated. Important components of an improvement effort include attention to efficient work systems and practical tools and to

  12. Hospital Mortality in the United States following Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Michael E.; Marshall, Emily J.; Matheny, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common reason for hospital admission and complication of many inpatient procedures. The temporal incidence of AKI and the association of AKI admissions with in-hospital mortality are a growing problem in the world today. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of AKI and its association with in-hospital mortality in the United States. AKI has been growing at a rate of 14% per year since 2001. However, the in-hospital mortality associated with AKI has been on the decline starting with 21.9% in 2001 to 9.1 in 2011, even though the number of AKI-related in-hospital deaths increased almost twofold from 147,943 to 285,768 deaths. We discuss the importance of the 71% reduction in AKI-related mortality among hospitalized patients in the United States and draw on the discussion of whether or not this is a phenomenon of hospital billing (coding) or improvements to the management of AKI. PMID:27376083

  13. Relocating care: negotiating nursing skillmix in a mental health unit for older adults.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Julie; Curren, David; Walter, Bonnie; Toffoli, Luisa; O'Kane, Debra

    2011-03-01

    Mental health care in Australia in the last 20 years has moved from stand-alone psychiatric hospitals to general hospitals and the community. This paper reports an action research project exploring the experiences of nurses on an acute mental health unit for older adults staffed with a skillmix of mental health and general nurses, which recently transitioned from a psychiatric to a general hospital. The new service provides comprehensive health care, including the management of physical co-morbidity and a recovery orientation. Recovery acknowledges the role and rights of consumers and carers in planning and management of care, choice and individual strengths (Shepherd). The new ward received additional resources to establish the model of care, including a broader skillmix. The paper explores the dynamics of development of a new model of care and of bringing together staff with different professional orientations, cultures and priorities. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with 18 staff. Analysis resulted in three themes relating to the impact of competing goals and foci of care upon professional boundaries; competing organisational cultures and the impact of service change upon work practices. The findings are explored in relation to ideas about health care delivery associated with neoliberalism. PMID:21281396

  14. Strategies for integrating cost-consciousness into acute care should focus on rewarding high-value care.

    PubMed

    Pines, Jesse M; Newman, David; Pilgrim, Randy; Schuur, Jeremiah D

    2013-12-01

    The acute care system reflects the best and worst in American medicine. The system, which includes urgent care and retail clinics, emergency departments, hospitals, and doctors' offices, delivers 24/7 care for life-threatening conditions and is a key part of the safety net for the under- and uninsured. At the same time, it is fragmented, disconnected, and costly. We describe strategies to contain acute care costs. Reducing demands for acute care may be achieved through public health measures and educational initiatives; in contrast, delivery system reform has shown mixed results. Changing providers' behavior will require the development of care pathways, assessments of goals of care, and practice feedback. Creating alternatives to hospitalization and enhancing the interoperability of electronic health records will be key levers in cost containment. Finally, we contend that fee-for-service with modified payments based on quality and resource measures is the only feasible acute care payment model; others might be so disruptive that they could threaten the system's effectiveness and the safety net. PMID:24301400

  15. Acute care in stroke: the importance of early intervention to achieve better brain protection.

    PubMed

    Díez-Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B

    2004-01-01

    It is known that 'time is brain', and only early therapies in acute stroke have been effective, like thrombolysis within the first 3 h, and useful neuroprotective drugs are searched for that probably would be effective only with their very early administration. General care (respiratory and cardiac care, fluid and metabolic management, especially blood glucose and blood pressure control, early treatment of hyperthermia, and prevention and treatment of neurological and systemic complications) in acute stroke patients is essential and must already start in the prehospital setting and continue at the patient's arrival to hospital in the emergency room and in the stroke unit. A review of published studies analyzing the influence of general care on stroke outcome and the personal experience from observational studies was performed. Glucose levels >8 mmol/l have been found to be predictive of a poor prognosis after correcting for age, stroke severity, and stroke subtype. Although a clinical trial of glucose-insulin-potassium infusions is ongoing, increased plasma glucose levels should be treated. Moreover, insulin therapy in critically ill patients, including stroke patients, is safe and determines lower mortality and complication rates. Both high and low blood pressure levels have been related to a poor prognosis in acute stroke, although the target levels have not been defined yet in clinical trials. The body temperature has been shown to have a negative effect on stroke outcome, and its control and early treatment of hyperthermia are important. Hypoxemia also worsens the stroke prognosis, and oxygen therapy in case of <92% O(2) saturation is recommended. Besides, blood pressure stabilization avoiding falls of the diastolic pressure and the lowering of glycemia and temperature have been related to a better prognosis in stroke units patients, and homeostasis maintenance is associated with a better outcome. General care has become an emergent and first-line brain

  16. Primary care and the maelstrom of health care reform in the United States of America.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, P

    1995-01-01

    Recent reform in the National Health Service has moved general practice towards a more intense market and competition structure. Meanwhile in the United States of America there has been an attempt to modify the free enterprise approach to medical care towards a more socially responsive system. This discussion paper provides a family doctor's perspective of primary care and the maelstrom of health care reform in the USA. The cultural, economic and organizational issues underlying the need for reform are considered in turn, and the current situation with regard to health care provision, medical research, medical education and primary care are outlined. General practitioners in the United Kingdom would do well to pay attention to the effects of market reform occurring in general practice among their American counterparts. PMID:7576850

  17. Pet Care Teaching Unit: 1st-3rd Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peninsula Humane Society, San Mateo, CA.

    Activities in this unit are designed to familiarize primary grade students with the responsibilities involved in pet ownership. Teaching plans are provided for a total of 12 lessons involving social studies, language arts, math, and health sciences. Activities adaptable for readers and non-readers focus on pet overpopulation, care of pets when…

  18. [Benefits of aromatherapy in dementia special care units].

    PubMed

    Bilien, Corinne; Depas, Nathalie; Delaporte, Ghislaine; Baptiste, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Aromatherapy is classed as a non-pharmacological treatment, recognised as a therapy for certain disorders. This practice was the subject of a study in a special care unit for patients with dementia. The objective was to demonstrate the benefit of aromatherapy diffusion on major behavioural disorders. PMID:27173630

  19. Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Nursing 205.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varton, Deborah M.

    A description is provided of a course, "Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit," offered for senior-level baccalaureate degree nursing students. The first section provides information on the place of the course within the curriculum, the allotment of class time, and target student populations. The next section looks at course content in…

  20. Advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mandrioli, Matteo; Inaba, Kenji; Piccinini, Alice; Biscardi, Andrea; Sartelli, Massimo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Catena, Fausto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Jovine, Elio; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2016-01-01

    The greatest advantages of laparoscopy when compared to open surgery include the faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to work and resumption of normal daily activity as well as cosmetic benefits. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of cholecystitis and appendicitis worldwide. Laparoscopy has even been adopted in colorectal surgery with good results. The technological improvements in this surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Further progress in laparoscopy has included single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery. Nevertheless, laparoscopy for emergency surgery is still considered challenging and is usually not recommended due to the lack of adequate experience in this area. The technical difficulties of operating in the presence of diffuse peritonitis or large purulent collections and diffuse adhesions are also given as reasons. However, the potential advantages of laparoscopy, both in terms of diagnosis and therapy, are clear. Major advantages may be observed in cases with diffuse peritonitis secondary to perforated peptic ulcers, for example, where laparoscopy allows the confirmation of the diagnosis, the identification of the position of the ulcer and a laparoscopic repair with effective peritoneal washout. Laparoscopy has also revolutionized the approach to complicated diverticulitis even when intestinal perforation is present. Many other emergency conditions can be effectively managed laparoscopically, including trauma in select hemodynamically-stable patients. We have therefore reviewed the most recent scientific literature on advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma in order to demonstrate the current indications and outcomes associated with a

  1. Advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma.

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, Matteo; Inaba, Kenji; Piccinini, Alice; Biscardi, Andrea; Sartelli, Massimo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Catena, Fausto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Jovine, Elio; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2016-01-14

    The greatest advantages of laparoscopy when compared to open surgery include the faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to work and resumption of normal daily activity as well as cosmetic benefits. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of cholecystitis and appendicitis worldwide. Laparoscopy has even been adopted in colorectal surgery with good results. The technological improvements in this surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Further progress in laparoscopy has included single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery. Nevertheless, laparoscopy for emergency surgery is still considered challenging and is usually not recommended due to the lack of adequate experience in this area. The technical difficulties of operating in the presence of diffuse peritonitis or large purulent collections and diffuse adhesions are also given as reasons. However, the potential advantages of laparoscopy, both in terms of diagnosis and therapy, are clear. Major advantages may be observed in cases with diffuse peritonitis secondary to perforated peptic ulcers, for example, where laparoscopy allows the confirmation of the diagnosis, the identification of the position of the ulcer and a laparoscopic repair with effective peritoneal washout. Laparoscopy has also revolutionized the approach to complicated diverticulitis even when intestinal perforation is present. Many other emergency conditions can be effectively managed laparoscopically, including trauma in select hemodynamically-stable patients. We have therefore reviewed the most recent scientific literature on advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma in order to demonstrate the current indications and outcomes associated with a

  2. Review of noise in neonatal intensive care units regional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Abril, A.; Terrón, A.; Boschi, C.; Gómez, M.

    2007-11-01

    This work is about the problem of noise in neonatal incubators and in the environment in the neonatal intensive care units. Its main objective is to analyse the impact of noise in hospitals of Mendoza and La Rioja. Methodology: The measures were taken in different moments in front of higher or lower severity level in the working environment. It is shown that noise produces severe damages and changes in the behaviour and the psychological status of the new born babies. Results: The noise recorded inside the incubators and the neonatal intensive care units together have many components but the noise of motors, opening and closing of access gates have been considered the most important ones. Values above 60 db and and up to 120 db in some cases were recorded, so the need to train the health staff in order to manage the new born babies, the equipment and the instruments associated with them very carefully is revealed.

  3. Optimizing patient care in the pediatric epilepsy monitoring unit.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Amy M; Buchhalter, Jeffrey R

    2006-12-01

    In the pediatric epilepsy monitoring unit (PEMU) of a large midwestern hospital, patient care is optimized through the design of the unit, nurse and family education, communication, and medication administration. Four years after the PEMU was developed, the hospital held multidisciplinary discussions and surveyed nurses working in the PEMU to identify areas of nursing confidence. On the basis of the findings, the hospital refined some aspects of patient care, implemented an educational program for nurses who work in the PEMU, and established of a core group of PEMU nurses. Descriptions of the education and communication procedures and of the design features introduced to provide optimal patient care may be useful to other facilities seeking to design and implement PEMUs. PMID:17233511

  4. 78 FR 43055 - Accelerating Improvements in HIV Prevention and Care in the United States Through the HIV Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ....) THE WHITE HOUSE, July 15, 2013. [FR Doc. 2013-17478 Filed 7-17-13; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F3 ... and Care in the United States Through the HIV Care Continuum Initiative #0; #0; #0; Presidential... Improvements in HIV Prevention and Care in the United States Through the HIV Care Continuum Initiative By...

  5. Symptom control in end-of-life care: pain, eating, acute illnesses, panic attacks, and aggressive care.

    PubMed

    Lamers, William M

    2005-01-01

    This feature is based on actual questions and answers adapted from a service provided by the Hospice Foundation of America. Queries addressing the propriety of managing acute medical conditions in patients enrolled in a terminal care program and the mistaken belief that death from cancer is always painful are provided. Questions included in this set address management of acute medical conditions during end-of-life care, the lack of inevitability of pain with cancer, nutrition in advanced disease, managing panic attacks, and appropriate care for a dying 90 year old gentleman. PMID:16431836

  6. Changing model of nursing care from individual patient allocation to team nursing in the acute inpatient environment.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Greg; Jones, Aaron; Rivas, Ketty

    2010-06-01

    Agreement was reached with 12 acute medical and surgical wards/units at Sydney's Prince of Wales Hospital to participate in a trial of team nursing (TN). Six units employed action research principles to undertake a change to a team nursing model and six remained with the pre-existing individual patient allocation (IPA) model. Task-based teaming was widely discarded by the team nursing units in favour of allocating patients within the team and introducing more supportive and communicative processes aimed at fostering responsibility sharing. Localised team-based models of care arose in the change wards and were outlined, implemented and refined using social action research principles. A 12-month prospective experimental comparison of job satisfaction and staff retention between the TN and IPA groups indicated statistically significant job satisfaction benefits and practically important staff retention benefits associated with moving away from an IPA model of nursing care delivery towards a team-based model of care delivery. Perhaps not surprisingly, job satisfaction gains were most marked among new graduate nurses, who reported real benefits from a teaming inspired shift in model of care in the acute inpatient environment. PMID:20950201

  7. [Accreditation model for acute hospital care in Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    López-Viñas, M Luisa; Costa, Núria; Tirvió, Carmen; Davins, Josep; Manzanera, Rafael; Ribera, Jaume; Constante, Carles; Vallès, Roser

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of an accreditation model for healthcare centres in Catalonia which was launched for acute care hospitals, leaving open the possibility of implementing it in the rest of lines of service (mental health and addiction, social health, and primary healthcare centres) is described. The model is based on the experience acquired over more tan 31 years of hospital accreditation and quality assessment linked to management. In January 2006 a model with accreditation methodology adapted to the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model was launched. 83 hospitals are accredited, with an average of 82.6% compliance with the standards required for accreditation. The number of active assessment bodies is 5, and the accreditation period is 3 years. A higher degree of compliance of the so-called "agent" criteria with respect to "outcome" criteria is obtained. Qualitative aspects for implementation to be stressed are: a strong commitment both from managers and staff in the centres, as well as a direct and fluent communication between the accreditation body (Ministry of Health of the Government of Catalonia) and accredited centres. Professionalism of audit bodies and an optimal communication between audit bodies and accredited centres is also added. PMID:25128363

  8. Practical considerations for the dosing and adjustment of continuous renal replacement therapy in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Galvagno, Samuel M; Hong, Caron M; Lissauer, Matthew E; Baker, Andrew K; Murthi, Sarah B; Herr, Daniel L; Stein, Deborah M

    2013-12-01

    Familiarity with the initiation, dosing, adjustment, and termination of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is a core skill for contemporary intensivists. Guidelines for how to administer CRRT in the intensive care unit are not well documented. The purpose of this review is to discuss the modalities, terminology, and components of CRRT, with an emphasis on the practical aspects of dosing, adjustments, and termination. Management of electrolyte and acid-base derangements commonly encountered with acute renal failure is emphasized. Knowledge regarding the practical aspects of managing CRRT in the intensive care unit is a prerequisite for achieving desired physiological end points. PMID:23890937

  9. Meaning of caring in pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Janet Yvonne; Arman, Maria; Castren, Maaret; Forsner, Maria

    2014-12-01

    When children are critically ill, parents still strive to be present and participate in the care of their child. Pediatric intensive care differs from other realms of pediatric care as the nature of care is technically advanced and rather obstructing than encouraging parental involvement or closeness, either physically or emotionally, with the critically ill child. The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of caring in the pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents. The design of this study followed Benner's interpretive phenomenological method. Eleven parents of seven children participated in observations and interviews. The following aspects of caring were illustrated in the themes arising from the findings: being a bridge to the child on the edge, building a sheltered atmosphere, meeting the child's needs, and adapting the environment for family life. The overall impression is that the phenomenon of caring is experienced exclusively when it is directed toward the exposed child. The conclusion drawn is that caring is present when providing expert physical care combined with fulfilling emotional needs and supporting continuing daily parental care for the child in an inviting environment. PMID:23939721

  10. Assessment of acute trauma care training in Kenya.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Jana B A; Gravelin, Sara; Jones, Tait; Gololov, Alex; Thomas, Michelle; Omondi, Benson; Bukusi, E

    2009-11-01

    An Acute Trauma Care (ATC) course was adapted for resource-limited healthcare systems based on the American model of initial care for injured patients. The course was taught to interested medical personnel in Kenya. This study undertook a survey of the participants' healthcare facilities to maximize the applicability of ATC across healthcare settings. The ATC course was conducted three times in Kenya in 2006. A World Health Organization (WHO) Needs Assessment survey was administered to 128 participants. The data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Ninety-two per cent had a physician available in the emergency department and 63 per cent had a clinical officer. A total of 71.7 per cent reported having a designated trauma room. A total of 96.7 per cent reported running water, but access was uninterrupted more often in private hospitals as opposed to public facilities (92.5 vs 63.6%, P = 0.0005). Private and public employees equally had an oxygen cylinder (95.6 vs 98.5%, P > 0.05), oxygen concentrator (69.2 vs 54.2%, P = 0.12), and oxygen administration equipment (95.7 vs 91.4%, P > 0.05) at their facilities. However, private employees were more likely to report that "all" of their equipment was in working order (53 vs 7.9%, P < 0.0001). Private employees were also more likely to report that they had access to information on emergency procedures and equipment (64.4 vs 33.3%, P = 0.001) and that they had learned new procedures (54.8 vs 25.4%, P = 0.002). Despite a perception of public facility lack, this survey showed that public institutions and private institutions have similar basic equipment availability. Yet, problems with equipment malfunction, lack of repair, and availability of required information and training are far greater in the public sector. The content of the ATC course is valid for both private and public sector institutions, but refinements of the course should focus on varying facets of inexpensive and alternative equipment resources

  11. Caring for Aging Chinese: Lessons Learned From the United States

    PubMed Central

    WAN, HONGWEI; YU, FANG; KOLANOWSKI, ANN

    2009-01-01

    After two birth peaks and the “one child per family” policy, China is facing unprecedented challenges with regard to its aging population. This article analyzes the problems associated with three traditional ways of caring for older Chinese, the current health care system, and social supports available to older Chinese. The “4-2-1” family structure and the “empty nest” undermine family support, the prevalence of chronic illnesses and lack of money reduce older adults’selfcare abilities, and insufficient care facilities threaten social support. Lessons learned from the United States show that community-based nursing models, nursing curriculum reforms with a gerontology focus, and reformed health care systems are pivotal for addressing China’s crisis. PMID:18239066

  12. Implementation of an Acute Care Surgery Service in a Community Hospital: Impact on Hospital Efficiency and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A service led by acute care surgeons managing trauma, critically ill surgical, and emergency general surgery patients via an acute care surgery model of patient care improves hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at university-affiliated hospitals and American College of Surgeons-verified trauma centers. Our goal was to determine whether an acute care surgeon led service, entitled the Surgical Trauma and Acute Resuscitative Service (STARS) that implemented an acute care surgery model of patient care, could improve hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at a community hospital. A total of 492 patient charts were reviewed, which included 230 before the implementation of the STARS [pre-STARS (control)] and 262 after the implementation of the STARS [post-STARS (study)]. Demographics included age, gender, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score, and medical comorbidities. Efficiency data included length of stay in emergency department (ED-LOS), length of stay in surgical intensive care unit (SICU-LOS), and length of stay in hospital (H-LOS), and total in hospital charges. Average age was 64.1 + 16.4 years, 255 males (51.83%) and 237 females (48.17%). Average Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score was 11.9 + 5.8. No significant differences in demographics were observed. Average decreases in ED-LOS (9.7 + 9.6 hours, pre-STARS versus 6.6 + 4.5 hours, post-STARS), SICU-LOS (5.3 + 9.6 days, pre-STARS versus 3.5 + 4.8 days, post-STARS), H-LOS (12.4 + 12.7 days, pre-STARS versus 11.4 + 11.3 days, post-STARS), and total in hospital charges ($419,602.6 + $519,523.0 pre-STARS to $374,816.7 + $411,935.8 post-STARS) post-STARS. Regression analysis revealed decreased ED-LOS-2.9 hours [P = 0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI): -7.0, 1.2], SICU-LOS-6.3 days (P < 0.001; 95% CI: -9.3, -3.2), H-LOS-7.6 days (P = 0.001; 95% CI: -12.1, -3.1), and 3.4 times greater odds of survival (P = 0.04; 95% CI: 1.1, 10.7) post-STARS. In conclusion, implementation of

  13. Breaking bad news and discussing goals of care in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hollyday, Sheryl L; Buonocore, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The intensive care unit is a high-stakes environment in which nurses, including advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), often assist patients and families to navigate life and death situations. These high-stakes situations often require discussions that include bad news and discussions about goals of care or limiting aggressive care, and APRNs must develop expertise and techniques to be skilled communicators for conducting these crucial conversations. This article explores the art of communication, the learned skill of delivering bad news in the health care setting, and the incorporation of this news into a discussion about goals of care for patients. As APRNs learn to incorporate effective communication skills into practice, patient care and communication will ultimately be enhanced. PMID:25898881

  14. Competence of nurses in the intensive cardiac care unit

    PubMed Central

    Nobahar, Monir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Competence of nurses is a complex combination of knowledge, function, skills, attitudes, and values. Delivering care for patients in the Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU) requires nurses’ competences. This study aimed to explain nurses’ competence in the ICCU. Methods This was a qualitative study in which purposive sampling with maximum variation was used. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 23 participants during 2012–2013. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by using the content-analysis method. Results The main categories were “clinical competence,” comprising subcategories of ‘routine care,’ ‘emergency care,’ ‘care according to patients’ needs,’ ‘care of non-coronary patients’, as well as “professional competence,” comprising ‘personal development,’ ‘teamwork,’ ‘professional ethics,’ and ‘efficacy of nursing education.’ Conclusion The finding of this study revealed dimensions of nursing competence in ICCU. Benefiting from competence leads to improved quality of patient care and satisfaction of patients and nurses and helps elevate nursing profession, improve nursing education, and clinical nursing. PMID:27382450

  15. Characteristics of acute care utilization of a Delaware adult sickle cell disease patient population.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nina; Bellot, Jennifer; Senu-Oke, Oluseyi; Ballas, Samir K

    2014-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder that is chronic in nature and manifests itself through many facets of the patient's life. Comprehensive specialty centers have the potential to reduce health care costs and improve the quality of care for patients who have chronic medical conditions such as heart failure and SCD. The purpose of this practice inquiry was to analyze de-identified data for acute care episodes involving SCD in order to create a detailed picture of acute care utilization for adult patients in Delaware with SCD from 2007 to 2009. Gaining a better understanding of acute care utilization for adults with SCD may provide evidence to improve access to high-quality health care services for this vulnerable patient population in the state of Delaware. PMID:23965046

  16. Delirium in Prolonged Hospitalized Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Saadat, Soheil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged hospitalization in the intensive care unit (ICU) can impose long-term psychological effects on patients. One of the most significant psychological effects from prolonged hospitalization is delirium. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prolonged hospitalization of patients and subsequent delirium in the intensive care unit. Patients and Methods: This conventional content analysis study was conducted in the General Intensive Care Unit of the Shariati Hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, from the beginning of 2013 to 2014. All prolonged hospitalized patients and their families were eligible participants. From the 34 eligible patients and 63 family members, the final numbers of actual patients and family members were 9 and 16, respectively. Several semi-structured interviews were conducted face-to-face with patients and their families in a private room and data were gathered. Results: Two main themes from two different perspectives emerged, 'patients' perspectives' (experiences during ICU hospitalization) and 'family members' perspectives' (supportive-communicational experiences). The main results of this study focused on delirium, Patients' findings were described as pleasant and unpleasant, factual and delusional experiences. Conclusions: Family members are valuable components in the therapeutic process of delirium. Effective use of family members in the delirium caring process can be considered to be one of the key non-medical nursing components in the therapeutic process. PMID:26290854

  17. Praxis and the role development of the acute care nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley

    2008-06-01

    Acute care nurse practitioner roles have been introduced in many countries. The acute care nurse practitioner provides nursing and medical care to meet the complex needs of patients and their families using a holistic, health-centred approach. There are many pressures to adopt a performance framework and execute activities and tasks. Little time may be left to explore domains of advanced practice nursing and develop other forms of knowledge. The primary objective of praxis is to integrate theory, practice and art, and facilitate the recognition and valuing of different types of knowledge through reflection. With this framework, the acute care nurse practitioner assumes the role of clinician and researcher. Praxis can be used to develop the acute care nurse practitioner role as an advanced practice nursing role. A praxis framework permeates all aspects of the acute care nurse practitioner's practice. Praxis influences how relationships are structured with patients, families and colleagues in the work setting. Decision-makers at different levels need to recognize the contribution of praxis in the full development of the acute care nurse practitioner role. Different strategies can be used by educators to assist students and practitioners to develop a praxis framework. PMID:18476854

  18. Storage Media Profiles and Health Record Retention Practice Patterns in Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Rinehart-Thompson, Laurie A

    2008-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the health record retention practices among health information management professionals in acute care general hospitals in the United States. A descriptive research design was used, and data were collected using a self-reporting survey. Respondents answered questions about the relationship between researcher-assigned storage media profiles (descriptions of the type or types of media on which facilities maintain health records); retention periods and factors affecting record retention periods; retention of secondary data; vendor usage; and continued reliance on paper in environments where electronic health records exist. Storage media profiles were found to be significantly related to facility operational and research needs and to the convenience of not purging records. These findings have implications for federal policy promoting the implementation of electronic health records by 2014. PMID:18574517

  19. Storage media profiles and health record retention practice patterns in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rinehart-Thompson, Laurie A

    2008-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the health record retention practices among health information management professionals in acute care general hospitals in the United States. A descriptive research design was used, and data were collected using a self-reporting survey. Respondents answered questions about the relationship between researcher-assigned storage media profiles (descriptions of the type or types of media on which facilities maintain health records); retention periods and factors affecting record retention periods; retention of secondary data; vendor usage; and continued reliance on paper in environments where electronic health records exist. Storage media profiles were found to be significantly related to facility operational and research needs and to the convenience of not purging records. These findings have implications for federal policy promoting the implementation of electronic health records by 2014. PMID:18574517

  20. Development of an obstetric vital sign alert to improve outcomes in acute care obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Behling, Diana J; Renaud, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Maternal morbidity and mortality is a national health problem. Causal analysis of near-miss and actual serious patient safety events, including those resulting in maternal death, within obstetric units often highlights a failure to promptly recognize and treat women who were exhibiting signs of decompensation/deterioration. The Obstetric Vital Sign Alert (OBVSA) is an early warning tool that leverages discrete data points in the electronic health record, calculating a risk score that is displayed as a visual cue for acute care obstetric staff. When studied in a cohort of women with postpartum hemorrhage, use of the OBVSA reduced symptom-to-response time and intervention time, as well as key process and outcome measures. PMID:25900584

  1. Effects of stress management program on the quality of nursing care and intensive care unit nurses

    PubMed Central

    Pahlavanzadeh, Saied; Asgari, Zohreh; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: High level of stress in intensive care unit nurses affects the quality of their nursing care. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of a stress management program on the quality of nursing care of intensive care unit nurses. Materials and Methods: This study is a randomized clinical trial that was conducted on 65 nurses. The samples were selected by stratified sampling of the nurses working in intensive care units 1, 2, 3 in Al-Zahra Hospital in Isfahan, Iran and were randomly assigned to two groups. The intervention group underwent an intervention, including 10 sessions of stress management that was held twice a week. In the control group, placebo sessions were held simultaneously. Data were gathered by demographic checklist and Quality Patient Care Scale before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention in both groups. Then, the data were analyzed by Student's t-test, Mann–Whitney, Chi-square, Fisher's exact test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) through SPSS software version 18. Results: Mean scores of overall and dimensions of quality of care in the intervention group were significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to pre-intervention (P < 0.001). The results showed that the quality of care in the intervention group was significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: As stress management is an effective method to improve the quality of care, the staffs are recommended to consider it in improvement of the quality of nursing care. PMID:27186196

  2. The hostile environment of the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Donchin, Yoel; Seagull, F Jacob

    2002-08-01

    Intensive care units (ICUs) were developed for patients with special needs and include an array of technology to support medical care. However, basic lessons in ergonomics, human factors, and human performance fail to propagate in this complex medical environment. Complicated, error-prone devices are commonly used. There are too many patient data for one person to process effectively. Lighting, ambient noise, and scheduling all result in provider and patient stress. These difficult working conditions make errors more probable and are risk factors for provider burnout and negative outcomes for patients. Auditory alarms on ICU equipment, ICU syndrome, and needle sticks are discussed as examples of such problems. PMID:12386492

  3. Giving a nutritional fast hug in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Monares Zepeda, Enrique; Galindo Martín, Carlos Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Implementing a nutrition support protocol in critical care is a complex and dynamic process that involves the use of evidence, education programs and constant monitoring. To facilitate this task we developed a mnemonic tool called the Nutritional FAST HUG (F: feeding, A: analgesia, S: stools, T: trace elements, H: head of bed, U: ulcers, G: glucose control) with a process also internally developed (both modified from the mnemonic proposed by Jean Louis Vincent) called MIAR (M: measure, I: interpret, A: act, R: reanalysis) showing an easy form to perform medical rounds at the intensive care unit using a systematic process. PMID:25929396

  4. Columbia University's Competency and Evidence-based Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Christine R.; Roberts, W. Dan

    2002-01-01

    Columbia University's acute care nurse practitioner curriculum incorporates evaluation strategies and standards to assess clinical competence and foster evidence-based practice. The curriculum consists of four core courses, supporting sciences, and specialty courses. (Contains 17 references.) (SK)

  5. Challenges in the Anesthetic and Intensive Care Management of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kirkman, Matthew A; Lambden, Simon; Smith, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is a devastating condition with high morbidity and mortality. In the past 2 decades, the treatment of AIS has been revolutionized by the introduction of several interventions supported by class I evidence-care on a stroke unit, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator within 4.5 hours of stroke onset, aspirin commenced within 48 hours of stroke onset, and decompressive craniectomy for supratentorial malignant hemispheric cerebral infarction. There is new class I evidence also demonstrating benefits of endovascular therapy on functional outcomes in those with anterior circulation stroke. In addition, the importance of the careful management of key systemic physiological variables, including oxygenation, blood pressure, temperature, and serum glucose, has been appreciated. In line with this, the role of anesthesiologists and intensivists in managing AIS has increased. This review highlights the main challenges in the endovascular and intensive care management of AIS that, in part, result from the paucity of research focused on these areas. It also provides guidelines for the management of AIS based upon current evidence, and identifies areas for further research. PMID:26368664

  6. Study protocol: The Improving Care of Acute Lung Injury Patients (ICAP) study

    PubMed Central

    Needham, Dale M; Dennison, Cheryl R; Dowdy, David W; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Ciesla, Nancy; Desai, Sanjay V; Sevransky, Jonathan; Shanholtz, Carl; Scharfstein, Daniel; Herridge, Margaret S; Pronovost, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The short-term mortality benefit of lower tidal volume ventilation (LTVV) for patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) has been demonstrated in a large, multi-center randomized trial. However, the impact of LTVV and other critical care therapies on the longer-term outcomes of ALI/ARDS survivors remains uncertain. The Improving Care of ALI Patients (ICAP) study is a multi-site, prospective cohort study that aims to evaluate the longer-term outcomes of ALI/ARDS survivors with a particular focus on the effect of LTVV and other critical care therapies. Methods Consecutive mechanically ventilated ALI/ARDS patients from 11 intensive care units (ICUs) at four hospitals in the city of Baltimore, MD, USA, will be enrolled in a prospective cohort study. Exposures (patient-based, clinical management, and ICU organizational) will be comprehensively collected both at baseline and throughout patients' ICU stay. Outcomes, including mortality, organ impairment, functional status, and quality of life, will be assessed with the use of standardized surveys and testing at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI/ARDS diagnosis. A multi-faceted retention strategy will be used to minimize participant loss to follow-up. Results On the basis of the historical incidence of ALI/ARDS at the study sites, we expect to enroll 520 patients over two years. This projected sample size is more than double that of any published study of long-term outcomes in ALI/ARDS survivors, providing 86% power to detect a relative mortality hazard of 0.70 in patients receiving higher versus lower exposure to LTVV. The projected sample size also provides sufficient power to evaluate the association between a variety of other exposure and outcome variables, including quality of life. Conclusion The ICAP study is a novel, prospective cohort study that will build on previous critical care research to improve our understanding of the longer-term impact of ALI/ARDS, LTVV and

  7. Determinants of Burnout in Acute and Critical Care Military Nursing Personnel: A Cross-Sectional Study from Peru

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Elizabeth; Carnero, Andrés M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence on the prevalence and determinants of burnout among military acute and critical care nursing personnel from developing countries is minimal, precluding the development of effective preventive measures for this high-risk occupational group. In this context, we aimed to examine the association between the dimensions of burnout and selected socio-demographic and occupational factors in military acute/critical care nursing personnel from Lima, Peru. Methods and Findings We conducted a cross-sectional study in 93 nurses/nurse assistants from the acute and critical care departments of a large, national reference, military hospital in Lima, Peru, using a socio-demographic/occupational questionnaire and a validated Spanish translation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Total scores for each of the burnout dimensions were calculated for each participant. Higher emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation scores, and lower personal achievement scores, implied a higher degree of burnout. We used linear regression to evaluate the association between each of the burnout dimensions and selected socio-demographic and occupational characteristics, after adjusting for potential confounders. The associations of the burnout dimensions were heterogeneous for the different socio-demographic and occupational factors. Higher emotional exhaustion scores were independently associated with having children (p<0.05) and inversely associated with the time working in the current department (p<0.05). Higher depersonalization scores were independently associated with being single compared with being divorced, separated or widowed (p<0.01), working in the emergency room/intensive care unit compared with the recovery room (p<0.01), and inversely associated with age (p<0.05). Finally, higher personal achievement scores were independently associated with having children (p<0.05). Conclusion Among Peruvian military acute and critical care nursing personnel, potential screening and

  8. Main characteristics observed in patients with hematologic diseases admitted to an intensive care unit of a Brazilian university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Lídia Miranda; Torga, Júlia Pereira; Coelho, Samuel Viana; Nobre, Vandack

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical characteristics of patients with hematological disease admitted to the intensive care unit and the use of noninvasive mechanical ventilation in a subgroup with respiratory dysfunction. Methods A retrospective observational study from September 2011 to January 2014. Results Overall, 157 patients were included. The mean age was 45.13 (± 17.2) years and 46.5% of the patients were female. Sixty-seven (48.4%) patients had sepsis, and 90 (57.3%) patients required vasoactive vasopressors. The main cause for admission to the intensive care unit was acute respiratory failure (94.3%). Among the 157 studied patients, 47 (29.9%) were intubated within the first 24 hours, and 38 (24.2%) underwent noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Among the 38 patients who initially received noninvasive mechanical ventilation, 26 (68.4%) were subsequently intubated, and 12 (31.6%) responded to this mode of ventilation. Patients who failed to respond to noninvasive mechanical ventilation had higher intensive care unit mortality (66.7% versus 16.7%; p = 0.004) and a longer stay in the intensive care unit (9.6 days versus 4.6 days, p = 0.02) compared with the successful cases. Baseline severity scores (SOFA and SAPS 3) and the total leukocyte count were not significantly different between these two subgroups. In a multivariate logistic regression model including the 157 patients, intubation at any time during the stay in the intensive care unit and SAPS 3 were independently associated with intensive care unit mortality, while using noninvasive mechanical ventilation was not. Conclusion In this retrospective study with severely ill hematologic patients, those who underwent noninvasive mechanical ventilation at admission and failed to respond to it presented elevated intensive care unit mortality. However, only intubation during the intensive care unit stay was independently associated with a poor outcome. Further studies are needed to define predictors of

  9. The changing face of critical care medicine: nurse practitioners in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Molitor-Kirsch, Shirley; Thompson, Lisa; Milonovich, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, healthcare has undergone countless changes. Some of the important changes in recent years have been budget cuts, decreased resident work hours, and increased patient acuity. The need for additional clinical expertise at the bedside has resulted in nurse practitioners becoming an integral part of the healthcare delivery team. To date, little has been published regarding the role of the nurse practitioners in intensive care units. This article outlines how one pediatric hospital has successfully utilized nurse practitioners in the intensive care unit. PMID:15876885

  10. Incidence and impact of infection in a nursing home care unit.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, C; Strausbaugh, L J

    1990-06-01

    In this study we examined the frequency of infection and its consequences in a Veterans Administration medical center nursing home care unit during its first 9 months of operation. A total of 231 patients were enrolled and were followed up for an average stay of 115 days. Sixty-nine infections occurred in 50 patients and yielded a period prevalence rate of 22% and an infection incidence rate of 2.6 infections per 1000 days of patient care. Symptomatic urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and skin and soft tissue infections accounted for 41%, 32%, and 17% of the infections, respectively. Staphylococci, streptococci, and aerobic gram-negative bacilli were the most common bacterial isolates. Thirty-four episodes of infection (49%) required administration of parenteral antibiotics in the nursing home care unit, and 21 episodes (30%) necessitated transfer to the acute care hospital for management. Infection caused one death and contributed to the death of 4 of the 55 other patients who died during the study period. PMID:2363537

  11. Changing personnel behavior to promote quality care practices in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Dominic; Farmery, Keith; Johnson, Martin; Harper, Christine; Clarke, Fiona L; Holton, Phillip; Wilson, Susan; Rayson, Paul; Bence, Hugh

    2005-01-01

    The delivery of safe high quality patient care is a major issue in clinical settings. However, the implementation of evidence-based practice and educational interventions are not always effective at improving performance. A staff-led behavioral management process was implemented in a large single-site acute (secondary and tertiary) hospital in the North of England for 26 weeks. A quasi-experimental, repeated-measures, within-groups design was used. Measurement focused on quality care behaviors (ie, documentation, charting, hand washing). The results demonstrate the efficacy of a staff-led behavioral management approach for improving quality-care practices. Significant behavioral change (F [6, 19] = 5.37, p < 0.01) was observed. Correspondingly, statistically significant (t-test [t] = 3.49, df = 25, p < 0.01) reductions in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were obtained. Discussion focuses on implementation issues. PMID:18360574

  12. The acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives

    PubMed Central

    Turner-Cobb, J.M.; Smith, P.C.; Ramchandani, P.; Begen, F.M.; Padkin, A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing awareness amongst critical care practitioners that the impact of intensive care medicine extends beyond the patient to include the psychological impact on close family members. Several studies have addressed the needs of relatives within the intensive care context but the psychobiological impact of the experience has largely been ignored. Such impact is important in respect to health and well-being of the relative, with potential to influence patient recovery. The current feasibility study aimed to examine the acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives. Using a mixed methods approach, quantitative and qualitative data were collected simultaneously. Six relatives of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a District General Hospital, were assessed within 48 h of admission. Qualitative data were provided from semi-structured interviews analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Quantitative data were collected using a range of standardised self-report questionnaires measuring coping responses, emotion, trauma symptoms and social support, and through sampling of diurnal salivary cortisol as a biomarker of stress. Four themes were identified from interview: the ICU environment, emotional responses, family relationships and support. Questionnaires identified high levels of anxiety, depression and trauma symptoms; the most commonly utilised coping techniques were acceptance, seeking support through advice and information, and substance use. Social support emerged as a key factor with focused inner circle support relating to family and ICU staff. Depressed mood and avoidance were linked to greater mean cortisol levels across the day. Greater social network and coping via self-distraction were related to lower evening cortisol, indicating them as protective factors in the ICU context. The experience of ICU has a psychological and physiological impact on relatives, suggesting the importance of

  13. The acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives.

    PubMed

    Turner-Cobb, J M; Smith, P C; Ramchandani, P; Begen, F M; Padkin, A

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing awareness amongst critical care practitioners that the impact of intensive care medicine extends beyond the patient to include the psychological impact on close family members. Several studies have addressed the needs of relatives within the intensive care context but the psychobiological impact of the experience has largely been ignored. Such impact is important in respect to health and well-being of the relative, with potential to influence patient recovery. The current feasibility study aimed to examine the acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives. Using a mixed methods approach, quantitative and qualitative data were collected simultaneously. Six relatives of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a District General Hospital, were assessed within 48 h of admission. Qualitative data were provided from semi-structured interviews analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Quantitative data were collected using a range of standardised self-report questionnaires measuring coping responses, emotion, trauma symptoms and social support, and through sampling of diurnal salivary cortisol as a biomarker of stress. Four themes were identified from interview: the ICU environment, emotional responses, family relationships and support. Questionnaires identified high levels of anxiety, depression and trauma symptoms; the most commonly utilised coping techniques were acceptance, seeking support through advice and information, and substance use. Social support emerged as a key factor with focused inner circle support relating to family and ICU staff. Depressed mood and avoidance were linked to greater mean cortisol levels across the day. Greater social network and coping via self-distraction were related to lower evening cortisol, indicating them as protective factors in the ICU context. The experience of ICU has a psychological and physiological impact on relatives, suggesting the importance of

  14. Pioneering early Intensive Care Medicine by the 'Scandinavian Method' of treatment for severe acute barbiturate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Trubuhovich, R V

    2015-07-01

    Between the 1920s and the mid-1950s, barbiturates were the sedative-hypnotic agents most used in clinical practice. Their ready availability and narrow therapeutic margin accounted for disturbingly high rates of acute poisoning, whether suicidal or accidental. Until the late 1940s, medical treatment was relatively ineffective, with mortality subsequently high - not only from the effects of coma, respiratory depression and cardiovascular shock with renal impairment, but also from complications of the heavy use in the 1930s and 1940s of analeptic stimulating agents. Incidence of barbiturate intoxication increased substantially following World War II and this paper details development of what became known as the 'Scandinavian Method' of treatment, which contributed substantially to the earliest establishment of intensive care units and to the practice and methods of intensive care medicine. Three names stand out for the pioneering of this treatment. Successively, psychiatrist, Aage Kirkegaard, for introducing effective anti-shock fluid therapy; anaesthetist, Eric Nilsson, for introducing anaesthesiologic principles, including manual intermittent positive pressure ventilation into management; and, psychiatrist, Carl Clemmesen, for introducing centralisation of seriously poisoned patients in a dedicated unit. Clemmesen's Intoxication Unit opened at the Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, on 1 October 1949. ICU pioneer Bjørn Ibsen suggested it was the initial ICU, while noting that it supplied Intensive Therapy for one type of disorder only (as had HCA Lassen's Blegdam Hospital unit for Denmark's 1952 to 1953 polio epidemic). Treatment for barbiturate poisoning during the 1950s in some other Scandinavian hospitals will also be considered briefly. PMID:26126074

  15. The obese child in the Intensive Care Unit. Update.

    PubMed

    Donoso Fuentes, Alejandro; Córdova L, Pablo; Hevia J, Pilar; Arriagada S, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Given that childhood obesity is an epidemic, the frequency of critically-ill patients who are overweight or obese seen at intensive care units has increased rapidly. Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ that secretes a number of protein hormones, including leptin, which stands out because it regulates adipose tissue mass. The presence of arterial hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, respiratory disease and chronic kidney disease may become apparent and complicate the course of obese pediatric patients in the Intensive Care Unit. Obesity management is complex and should involve patients, their families and the medical community. It should be coordinated with comprehensive government health policies and implemented in conjunction with a change in cultural context. PMID:27164340

  16. Workflow: a new modeling concept in critical care units.

    PubMed

    Yousfi, F; Beuscart, R; Geib, J M

    1995-01-01

    The term Groupware concerns computer-based systems that support groups of people engaged in a common task (goal) and that provide an interface to a shared environment [1]. The absence of a common tool for exchanges between physicians and nurses causes a multiplication of paper supports for the recording of information. Our objective is to study software architectures in particular medical units that allow task coordination and managing conflicts between participants within a distributed environment. The final goal of this research is to propose a computer solution that could answer the user requirements in Critical Care Units (CCUs). This paper describes the Workflow management approach [5] for supporting group work in health care field. The emphasis is especially on asynchronous cooperation. This approach was applied to CCUs through the analysis and the proposal of a new architecture [6]. We shall limit ourselves to explaining control board and analyzing the message management we support. PMID:8591248

  17. [Phthalate exposure in the neonatal intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Fischer Fumeaux, C J; Stadelmann Diaw, C; Palmero, D; M'Madi, F; Tolsa, J-F

    2015-02-01

    There are growing concerns on long-term health consequences, notably on fertility rates, of plasticizers such as phthalates. While di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is currently used in several medical devices, newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit are both more exposed and more vulnerable to DEHP. The objectives of this study were to identify, count, and describe possible sources of DEHP in a neonatal care unit. Our method consisted in the listing and the inspection of the information on packaging, complemented by contact with manufacturers when necessary. According to the results, 6% of all products and 10% of plastic products contained some DEHP; 71% of these involved respiratory support devices. A vast majority of the items showed no information on the content of DEHP. Further research is needed, particularly to determine the effects of such an early exposure and to study and develop safer alternatives. PMID:25554670

  18. Optimizing antibiotic therapy in the intensive care unit setting

    PubMed Central

    Kollef, Marin H

    2001-01-01

    Antibiotics are one of the most common therapies administered in the intensive care unit setting. In addition to treating infections, antibiotic use contributes to the emergence of resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. Therefore, avoiding unnecessary antibiotic use and optimizing the administration of antimicrobial agents will help to improve patient outcomes while minimizing further pressures for resistance. This review will present several strategies aimed at achieving optimal use of antimicrobial agents. It is important to note that each intensive care unit should have a program in place which monitors antibiotic utilization and its effectiveness. Only in this way can the impact of interventions aimed at improving antibiotic use (e.g. antibiotic rotation, de-escalation therapy) be evaluated at the local level. PMID:11511331

  19. The perinatal: special care unit: expert care for high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    MacMullen, Nancy J; Meagher, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Labor and delivery units are often used to provide care for nonlaboring patients requiring intensive medical and nursing care. The utilization of labor beds in this manner, however, can result in a shortage of beds for those patients who are truly in labor. Unfortunately, patient dissatisfaction, use of supplemental staffing, and ill-prepared, overworked nurses can then become the result of this practice. Clearly, an improved, innovative model of providing care for high-risk perinatal patients is needed. The purpose of this article is to describe how one hospital and its interdisciplinary team met the challenge of providing expert care for complex perinatal patients by creating a unique model of patient care delivery, the perinatal special care unit (PSCU). An advanced practice nursing role, the perinatal nurse practitioner (PNNP) was implemented to provide collaborative care for these patients. This article includes a discussion of positive and negative outcomes that occurred after the PSCU became a reality. Overall, housing patients on the PSCU has eliminated inappropriate use of labor and delivery beds and has led to a more satisfying childbearing experience for all involved. PMID:15867684

  20. The Integration of Adult Acute Care Surgeons into Pediatric Surgical Care Models Supplements the Workforce without Compromising Quality of Care.

    PubMed

    Judhan, Rudy J; Silhy, Raquel; Statler, Kristen; Khan, Mija; Dyer, Benjamin; Thompson, Stephanie; Richmond, Bryan

    2015-09-01

    Acute care of children remains a challenge due to a shortage of pediatric surgeons, particularly in rural areas. In our institutional norm, all cases in patients age six and older are managed by dedicated general surgeons. The provision of care to these children by these surgeons alleviates the impact of such shortages. We conducted a five-year retrospective analysis of all acute care pediatric surgical cases performed in patients aged 6 to 17 years by a dedicated group of adult general surgeons in a rural tertiary care hospital. Demographics, procedure, complications, outcomes, length of stay, and time of consultation/operation were obtained via chart review. Elective, trauma related, or procedures performed by a pediatric surgeon were excluded. Descriptive statistics are reported. A total of 397 cases were performed by six dedicated general surgeons during the study period. Mean age was 11.5 ± 3.1 years. In all, 100 (25.2%) were transferred from outlying facilities and 52.6 per cent of consultations/operations occurred at night (7P-7A), of which 33.2 per cent occurred during late night hours (11P-7A). On weekends, 34.0 per cent occurred. Appendectomy was the most commonly performed operation (n = 357,89.9%), of which 311 were laparoscopic (87.1%). Others included incision/drainage (4.5%), laparoscopic cholecystectomy (2.0%), bowel resection (1.5%), incarcerated hernia (0.5%), small bowel obstruction (0.5%), intra-abdominal abscess drainage (0.3%), resection of intussusception (0.3%), Graham patch (0.3%), and resection omental torsion (0.3%). Median length of stay was two days. Complications occurred in 23 patients (5.8%), of which 22(5.5%) were the result of the disease process. These results parallel those published by pediatric surgeons in this age group and for the diagnoses treated. Models integrating dedicated general surgeons into pediatric call rotations can be designed such that quality of pediatric care is maintained while providing relief to an

  1. Dynamic workflow model for complex activity in intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bricon-Souf, N; Renard, J M; Beuscart, R

    1998-01-01

    Cooperation is very important in Medical care, especially in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) where the difficulties increase which is due to the urgency of the work. Workflow systems are considered as well adapted to modelize productive work in business process. We aim at introducing this approach in the Health Care domain. We have proposed a conversation-based Workflow in order to modelize the therapeutics plan in the ICU [1]. But in such a complex field, the flexibility of the workflow system is essential for the system to be usable. In this paper, we focus on the main points used to increase the dynamicity. We report on affecting roles, highlighting information, and controlling the system We propose some solutions and describe our prototype in the ICU. PMID:10384452

  2. Markets and Medical Care: The United States, 1993–2005

    PubMed Central

    White, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Many studies arguing for or against markets to finance medical care investigate “market-oriented” measures such as cost sharing. This article looks at the experience in the American medical marketplace over more than a decade, showing how markets function as institutions in which participants who are self-seeking, but not perfectly rational, exercise power over other participants in the market. Cost experience here was driven more by market power over prices than by management of utilization. Instead of following any logic of efficiency or equity, system transformations were driven by beliefs about investment strategies. At least in the United States' labor and capital markets, competition has shown little ability to rationalize health care systems because its goals do not resemble those of the health care system most people want. PMID:17718663

  3. Postpartum depression on the neonatal intensive care unit: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tahirkheli, Noor N; Cherry, Amanda S; Tackett, Alayna P; McCaffree, Mary Anne; Gillaspy, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    As the most common complication of childbirth affecting 10%–15% of women, postpartum depression (PPD) goes vastly undetected and untreated, inflicting long-term consequences on both mother and child. Studies consistently show that mothers of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) experience PPD at higher rates with more elevated symptomatology than mothers of healthy infants. Although there has been increased awareness regarding the overall prevalence of PPD and recognition of the need for health care providers to address this health issue, there has not been adequate attention to PPD in the context of the NICU. This review will focus on an overview of PPD and psychological morbidities, the prevalence of PPD in mothers of infants admitted to NICU, associated risk factors, potential PPD screening measures, promising intervention programs, the role of NICU health care providers in addressing PPD in the NICU, and suggested future research directions. PMID:25473317

  4. Markets and medical care: the United States, 1993-2005.

    PubMed

    White, Joseph

    2007-09-01

    Many studies arguing for or against markets to finance medical care investigate "market-oriented" measures such as cost sharing. This article looks at the experience in the American medical marketplace over more than a decade, showing how markets function as institutions in which participants who are self-seeking, but not perfectly rational, exercise power over other participants in the market. Cost experience here was driven more by market power over prices than by management of utilization. Instead of following any logic of efficiency or equity, system transformations were driven by beliefs about investment strategies. At least in the United States' labor and capital markets, competition has shown little ability to rationalize health care systems because its goals do not resemble those of the health care system most people want. PMID:17718663

  5. Mobility decline in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Fábio Santos; Paim, Daniel de Macedo; Brito, Juliana de Oliveira; Barros, Idiel de Araujo; Nogueira, Thiago Barbosa; Martinez, Bruno Prata; Pires, Thiago Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the variation in mobility during hospitalization in an intensive care unit and its association with hospital mortality. Methods This prospective study was conducted in an intensive care unit. The inclusion criteria included patients admitted with an independence score of ≥ 4 for both bed-chair transfer and locomotion, with the score based on the Functional Independence Measure. Patients with cardiac arrest and/or those who died during hospitalization were excluded. To measure the loss of mobility, the value obtained at discharge was calculated and subtracted from the value obtained on admission, which was then divided by the admission score and recorded as a percentage. Results The comparison of these two variables indicated that the loss of mobility during hospitalization was 14.3% (p < 0.001). Loss of mobility was greater in patients hospitalized for more than 48 hours in the intensive care unit (p < 0.02) and in patients who used vasopressor drugs (p = 0.041). However, the comparison between subjects aged 60 years or older and those younger than 60 years indicated no significant differences in the loss of mobility (p = 0.332), reason for hospitalization (p = 0.265), SAPS 3 score (p = 0.224), use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.117), or hospital mortality (p = 0.063). Conclusion There was loss of mobility during hospitalization in the intensive care unit. This loss was greater in patients who were hospitalized for more than 48 hours and in those who used vasopressors; however, the causal and prognostic factors associated with this decline need to be elucidated. PMID:27410406

  6. Clinical observation units help manage costs and care.

    PubMed

    Lenox, A C; New, H

    1997-04-01

    Clinical observation units were created to avoid questionable admissions and short inpatient stays that were likely to result in Medicare payment denials. With the rise of managed care, these units also can contribute to ensuring optimal reimbursement by helping manage patient flow. Hermann Hospital, a facility affiliated with the University of Texas, Houston, initially opened an improved observation unit in 1992, but recorded a 13 percent Medicare payment denial rate and operating losses of as much as $20,000 per month during the first five months of the unit's operation. A multidisciplinary team was formed to address the observation unit's low utilization and payment denial problems. The problems identified included missed opportunities for admissions, inappropriate admissions, and extended stays. The facility took corrective measures based on the quality team's assessment and corrective measures developed by the utilization management committee and quality teams. The clinical observation unit now sustains a zero denial rate and steady revenue increases resulting from improved utilization of the unit. PMID:10166283

  7. [Creating baby-friendly neonatal intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Fang; Gau, Meei-Ling

    2013-02-01

    Most expectant parents anticipate giving birth to a healthy newborn. Admission of a neonate to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is thus nearly always a significant and negative shock to parents and family members. We derived core concepts for this article from the World Health Organization/United Nations Children's Fund (WHO/UNICEF)'s Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative: Revised, updated, and expanded for integrated care (2009). This framework document advocates expanding to NICUs guidelines that were originally developed for maternity units. This paper reviews the importance of breastfeeding to the mother-baby dyad and family integration. We suggest how to build a breastfeeding-friendly environment within the NICU using 10 steps that adhere to the NEO-BFHI's three "Guiding Principles". The proposed environment gives special emphasis to providing continued and unlimited kangaroo care, creating a family-centered NICU design, implementing an effective milk expression and monitoring plan, and respecting mothers' individual needs. Suggestions are provided as a reference to government policymakers and medical centers to facilitate the creation of breastfeeding-friendly environments in NICUs. PMID:23386520

  8. Working as a doctor when acutely ill: comments made by doctors responding to United Kingdom surveys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives We undertook multi-purpose surveys of doctors who qualified in the United Kingdom between 1993 and 2012. Doctors were asked specific questions about their careers and were asked to comment about any aspect of their training or work. We report doctors’ comments about working whilst acutely ill. Design Self-completed questionnaire surveys. Setting United Kingdom. Participants Nine cohorts of doctors, comprising all United Kingdom medical qualifiers of 1993, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2005, 2008, 2009 and 2012. Main outcome measures Comments made by doctors about working when ill, in surveys one, five and 10 years after graduation. Results The response rate, overall, was 57.4% (38,613/67,224 doctors). Free-text comments were provided by 30.7% (11,859/38,613). Three-hundred and twenty one doctors (2.7% of those who wrote comments) wrote about working when feeling acutely ill. Working with Exhaustion/fatigue was the most frequent topic raised (195 doctors), followed by problems with Taking time off for illness (112), and general comments on Physical/mental health problems (66). Other topics raised included Support from others, Leaving or adapting/coping with the situation, Bullying, the Doctor’s ability to care for patients and Death/bereavement. Arrangements for cover due to illness were regarded as insufficient by some respondents; some wrote that doctors were expected to work harder and longer to cover for colleagues absent because of illness. Conclusions We recommend that employers ensure that it is not unduly difficult for doctors to take time off work when ill, and that employers review their strategies for covering ill doctors who are off work. PMID:27066264

  9. Ethical Issues in Surgical Critical Care: The Complexity of Interpersonal Relationships in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Sur, Malini D; Angelos, Peter

    2016-08-01

    A major challenge in the era of shared medical decision making is the navigation of complex relationships between the physicians, patients, and surrogates who guide treatment plans for critically ill patients. This review of ethical issues in adult surgical critical care explores factors influencing interactions among the characters most prominently involved in health care decisions in the surgical intensive care unit: the patient, the surrogate, the surgeon, and the intensivist. Ethical tensions in the surgeon-patient relationship in the elective setting may arise from the preoperative surgical covenant and the development of surgical complications. Unlike that of the surgeon, the intensivist's relationship with the individual patient must be balanced with the need to serve other acutely ill patients. Due to their unique perspectives, surgeons and intensivists may disagree about decisions to pursue life-sustaining therapies for critically ill postoperative patients. Finally, although surrogates are asked to make decisions for patients on the basis of the substituted judgment or best interest standards, these models may underestimate the nuances of postoperative surrogate decision making. Strategies to minimize conflicts regarding treatment decisions are centered on early, honest, and consistent communication between all parties. PMID:25990272

  10. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient.

    PubMed

    Wald, Heidi L; Leykum, Luci K; Mattison, Melissa L P; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Meltzer, David O

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalists and others acute-care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through 4 steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of 10 research questions in the following areas: advanced-care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  11. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Heidi L.; Leykum, Luci K.; Mattison, Melissa L. P.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Meltzer, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalists and others acute care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients (ACOP) Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through four steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a Partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of ten research questions in the following areas: advanced care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision-making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  12. Differences in Hospital Managers', Unit Managers', and Health Care Workers' Perceptions of the Safety Climate for Respiratory Protection.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kristina; Rogers, Bonnie M E; Brosseau, Lisa M; Payne, Julianne; Cooney, Jennifer; Joe, Lauren; Novak, Debra

    2016-07-01

    This article compares hospital managers' (HM), unit managers' (UM), and health care workers' (HCW) perceptions of respiratory protection safety climate in acute care hospitals. The article is based on survey responses from 215 HMs, 245 UMs, and 1,105 HCWs employed by 98 acute care hospitals in six states. Ten survey questions assessed five of the key dimensions of safety climate commonly identified in the literature: managerial commitment to safety, management feedback on safety procedures, coworkers' safety norms, worker involvement, and worker safety training. Clinically and statistically significant differences were found across the three respondent types. HCWs had less positive perceptions of management commitment, worker involvement, and safety training aspects of safety climate than HMs and UMs. UMs had more positive perceptions of management's supervision of HCWs' respiratory protection practices. Implications for practice improvements indicate the need for frontline HCWs' inclusion in efforts to reduce safety climate barriers and better support effective respiratory protection programs and daily health protection practices. PMID:27056750

  13. Utilization of Acute Care among Patients with ESRD Discharged Home from Skilled Nursing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Toles, Mark; Massing, Mark; Jackson, Eric; Peacock-Hinton, Sharon; O’Hare, Ann M.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Older adults with ESRD often receive care in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) after an acute hospitalization; however, little is known about acute care use after SNF discharge to home. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study used Medicare claims for North and South Carolina to identify patients with ESRD who were discharged home from a SNF between January 1, 2010 and August 31, 2011. Nursing Home Compare data were used to ascertain SNF characteristics. The primary outcome was time from SNF discharge to first acute care use (hospitalization or emergency department visit) within 30 days. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify patient and facility characteristics associated with the outcome. Results Among 1223 patients with ESRD discharged home from a SNF after an acute hospitalization, 531 (43%) had at least one rehospitalization or emergency department visit within 30 days. The median time to first acute care use was 37 days. Characteristics associated with a shorter time to acute care use were black race (hazard ratio [HR], 1.25; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.04 to 1.51), dual Medicare-Medicaid coverage (HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.50), higher Charlson comorbidity score (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.12), number of hospitalizations during the 90 days before SNF admission (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.22), and index hospital discharge diagnoses of cellulitis, abscess, and/or skin ulcer (HR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.36 to 4.45). Home health use after SNF discharge was associated with a lower rate of acute care use (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.87). There were no statistically significant associations between SNF characteristics and time to first acute care use. Conclusions Almost one in every two older adults with ESRD discharged home after a post–acute SNF stay used acute care services within 30 days of discharge. Strategies to reduce acute care utilization in these patients are needed. PMID:25649158

  14. Does HIV status influence the outcome of patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit? A prospective double blind study.

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwanjee, S.; Muckart, D. J.; Jeena, P. M.; Moodley, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (a) To assess the impact of HIV status (HIV negative, HIV positive, AIDS) on the outcome of patients admitted to intensive care units for diseases unrelated to HIV; (b) to decide whether a positive test result for HIV should be a criterion for excluding patients from intensive care for diseases unrelated to HIV. DESIGN: A prospective double blind study of all admissions over six months. HIV status was determined in all patients by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunofluorescence assay, western blotting, and flow cytometry. The ethics committee considered the clinical implications of the study important enough to waive patients' right to informed consent. Staff and patients were blinded to HIV results. On discharge patients could be advised of their HIV status if they wished. SETTING: A 16 bed surgical intensive care unit. SUBJECTS: All 267 men and 135 women admitted to the unit during the study period. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: APACHE II score (acute physiological, age, and chronic health evaluation), organ failure, septic shock, durations of intensive care unit and hospital stay, and intensive care unit and hospital mortality. RESULTS: No patient had AIDS. 52 patients were tested positive for HIV and 350 patients were tested negative. The two groups were similar in sex distribution but differed significantly in age, incidence of organ failure (37 (71%) v 171 (49%) patients), and incidence of septic shock (20 (38%) v 54 (15%)). After adjustment for age there were no differences in intensive care unit or hospital mortality or in the durations of stay in the intensive care unit or hospital. CONCLUSIONS: Morbidity was higher in HIV positive patients but there was no difference in mortality. In this patient population a positive HIV test result should not be a criterion for excluding a patient from intensive care. PMID:9133887

  15. Benchmarking and audit of breast units improves quality of care.

    PubMed

    van Dam, P A; Verkinderen, L; Hauspy, J; Vermeulen, P; Dirix, L; Huizing, M; Altintas, S; Papadimitriou, K; Peeters, M; Tjalma, W

    2013-01-01

    Quality Indicators (QIs) are measures of health care quality that make use of readily available hospital inpatient administrative data. Assessment quality of care can be performed on different levels: national, regional, on a hospital basis or on an individual basis. It can be a mandatory or voluntary system. In all cases development of an adequate database for data extraction, and feedback of the findings is of paramount importance. In the present paper we performed a Medline search on "QIs and breast cancer" and "benchmarking and breast cancer care", and we have added some data from personal experience. The current data clearly show that the use of QIs for breast cancer care, regular internal and external audit of performance of breast units, and benchmarking are effective to improve quality of care. Adherence to guidelines improves markedly (particularly regarding adjuvant treatment) and there are data emerging showing that this results in a better outcome. As quality assurance benefits patients, it will be a challenge for the medical and hospital community to develop affordable quality control systems, which are not leading to excessive workload. PMID:24753926

  16. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws. PMID:27030084

  17. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws. PMID:27030084

  18. Nurses’ Experiences of Futile Care at Intensive Care Units: A Phenomenological Study

    PubMed Central

    Yekefallah, Leili; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Manoochehri, Houman; Hamid, Alavi Majd

    2015-01-01

    The concept and meaning of futile care depends on the existing culture, values, religion, beliefs, medical achievements and emotional status of a country. We aimed to define the concept of futile care in the viewpoints of nurses working in intensive care units (ICUs). In this phenomenological study, the experiences of 25 nurses were explored in 11 teaching hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization in Ghazvin province in the northwest of Iran. Personal interviews and observations were used for data collection. All interviews were recorded as well as transcribed and codes, subthemes and themes were extracted using Van Manen’s analysis method. Initially, 191 codes were extracted. During data analysis and comparison, the codes were reduced to 178. Ultimately, 9 sub-themes and four themes emerged: uselessness, waste of resources, torment, and aspects of futility. Nurses defined futile care as “useless, ineffective care giving with wastage of resources and torment of both patients and nurses having nursing and medical aspects” As nurses play a key role in managing futile care, being aware of their experiences in this regard could be the initial operational step for providing useful care as well as educational programs in ICUs. Moreover, the results of this study could help nursing managers adopt supportive approaches to reduce the amount of futile care which could in turn resolve some of the complications nurses face at these wards such as burnout, ethical conflicts, and leave. PMID:25946928

  19. Nurses' experiences of futile care at intensive care units: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Yekefallah, Leili; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Manoochehri, Houman; Hamid, Alavi Majd

    2015-01-01

    The concept and meaning of futile care depends on the existing culture, values, religion, beliefs, medical achievements and emotional status of a country. We aimed to define the concept of futile care in the viewpoints of nurses working in intensive care units (ICUs). In this phenomenological study, the experiences of 25 nurses were explored in 11 teaching hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization in Ghazvin province in the northwest of Iran. Personal interviews and observations were used for data collection. All interviews were recorded as well as transcribed and codes, subthemes and themes were extracted using Van Manen's analysis method. Initially, 191 codes were extracted. During data analysis and comparison, the codes were reduced to 178. Ultimately, 9 sub-themes and four themes emerged: uselessness, waste of resources, torment, and aspects of futility.Nurses defined futile care as "useless, ineffective care giving with wastage of resources and torment of both patients and nurses having nursing and medical aspects" As nurses play a key role in managing futile care, being aware of their experiences in this regard could be the initial operational step for providing useful care as well as educational programs in ICUs. Moreover, the results of this study could help nursing managers adopt supportive approaches to reduce the amount of futile care which could in turn resolve some of the complications nurses face at these wards such as burnout, ethical conflicts, and leave. PMID:25946928

  20. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... line FQHC Federally qualified health center FR Federal Register FTE Full-time equivalent FUH Follow-up... 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 414, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care; Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal...

  1. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ..., phone 1-800-743-3951. Electronic Access This Federal Register document is also available from the... CFR Parts 412, 413, 415, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY2011...

  2. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Printing Office Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free... 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal...

  3. The use of oral nutritional supplements in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Omorogieva

    2016-06-23

    Oral nutritional supplements offer support to patients in acute care who are undernourished or at risk of malnutrition. Yet doubts remain over cost and compliance. Omorogieva Ojo, Senior Lecturer in Primary Care at University of Greenwich weighs up the evidence. PMID:27345066

  4. Organization of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban Hospitals in Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Bhimaraj, Arvind; Perpich, Denise

    2004-01-01

    One in 4 Americans lives in a rural community and relies on rural hospitals and medical systems for emergent care of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI). The infrastructure and organization of AMI care in rural and urban Kansas hospitals was examined. Using a nominal group process, key elements within hospitals that might influence quality of AMI…

  5. Quality of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban US Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; MacLehose, Richard F.; Hart, L. Gary; Beaver, Shelli K.; Every,Nathan; Chan,Leighton

    2004-01-01

    Context: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a common and important cause of admission to US rural hospitals, as transport of patients with AMI to urban settings can result in unacceptable delays in care. Purpose: To examine the quality of care for patients with AMI in rural hospitals with differing degrees of remoteness from urban centers.…

  6. A Summary of the October 2009 Forum on the Future of Nursing: Acute Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing, at the IOM, seeks to transform nursing as part of larger efforts to reform the health care system. The first of the Initiative's three forums was held on October 19, 2009, and focused on safety, technology, and interdisciplinary collaboration in acute care. Appended are: (1)…

  7. Creating Learning Momentum through Overt Teaching Interactions during Real Acute Care Episodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquette, Dominique; Moulton, Carol-Anne; LeBlanc, Vicki R.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical supervisors fulfill a dual responsibility towards patient care and learning during clinical activities. Assuming such roles in today's clinical environments may be challenging. Acute care environments present unique learning opportunities for medical trainees, as well as specific challenges. The goal of this paper was to better understand…

  8. Confronting youth gangs in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    Youth gang violence has continued its upward trend nationwide. It was once thought that gangs convened only in selected areas, which left churches, schools, and hospitals as "neutral" territory. Unfortunately, this is a fallacy. The results of gang violence pour into hospitals and into intensive care units regularly. The media portrays California as having a gang violence problem; however, throughout the United States, gang violence has risen more than 35% in the past year. Youth gang violence continues to rise dramatically with more and more of our youth deciding to join gangs each day. Sadly, every state has gangs, and the problem is getting much worse in areas that would never have thought about gangs a year ago. These "new generation" of gang members is younger, much more violent, and staying in the gang longer. Gangs are not just an urban problem. Gang activity is a suburban and rural problem too. There are more than 25 500 gangs in the United States, with a total gang membership of 850 000. Ninety-four percent of gang members are male and 6% are female. The ethnic composition nationwide includes 47% Latino, 31% African American, 13% White, 7% Asian, and 2% "mixed," according to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention of the U.S. Department of Justice. As a result of the ongoing proliferation of youth street gangs in our communities, it is imperative that critical care nurses and others involved with the direct care become educated about how to identify gang members, their activities, and understand their motivations. Such education and knowledge will help provide solutions to families and the youth themselves, help eradicate the problem of gang violence, and keep health care professionals safe. PMID:25463004

  9. [Evaluation of respiratory intensive care units at pneumology services].

    PubMed

    Vergnenègre, A

    2001-10-01

    Audits should be conducted in respiratory intensive care units (ICU) as in all other ICU using patient-specific indicators to assess medical activity and quality of care. However, other criteria, such as those developed by the SRLF ("Société de Réanimation de Langue Française"), should also be used. These criteria include the description of the patients previous health status, prognosis of underlying diseases, the SAPS I or SAPS II severity score at admission, the omega or TISS therapeutic scores, and the PRN index of health care burden. Medial and administrative audits are conducted using diagnosis-related groups (DRG) and case mix classification. The DRGs are used to establish an aggregate index of activity (ISA points) which contribute to the complex mechanism of budget allowance. Unfortunately, the French DRG case mix system does not provide an appropriate description of the costs of ICU stays. One of the special features of respiratory ICUs is related to patient flow. Patients are referred from a respiratory unit and discharged to a respiratory unit or a respiratory rehabilitation center. Readmissions are frequent. Many patients are also admitted only for diagnosis or a respiratory procedure requiring close surveillance. The SRLF criteria, which take into consideration all of these features, should always be used for the evaluation of quality of care. The French Society of Lung Disease (SPLF) has proposed specific standards of quality for respiratory ICU. We present here examples issuing for the ICU of the Hôtel-Dieu Hospital in Paris. The results show that non-specific national indicators, in combination with other indicators specific for respiratory ICU, provide appropriate audit data. PMID:11887768

  10. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  11. Noise Pollution in Intensive Care Units and Emergency Wards

    PubMed Central

    Khademi, Gholamreza; Roudi, Masoumeh; Shah Farhat, Ahmad; Shahabian, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The improvement of technology has increased noise levels in hospital Wards to higher than international standard levels (35-45 dB). Higher noise levels than the maximum level result in patient’s instability and dissatisfaction. Moreover, it will have serious negative effects on the staff’s health and the quality of their services. The purpose of this survey is to analyze the level of noise in intensive care units and emergency wards of the Imam Reza Teaching Hospital, Mashhad. Procedure: This research was carried out in November 2009 during morning shifts between 7:30 to 12:00. Noise levels were measured 10 times at 30-minute intervals in the nursing stations of 10 wards of the emergency, the intensive care units, and the Nephrology and Kidney Transplant Departments of Imam Reza University Hospital, Mashhad. The noise level in the nursing stations was tested for both the maximum level (Lmax) and the equalizing level (Leq). The research was based on the comparison of equalizing levels (Leq) because maximum levels were unstable. Results: In our survey the average level (Leq) in all wards was much higher than the standard level. The maximum level (Lmax) in most wards was 85-86 dB and just in one measurement in the Internal ICU reached 94 dB. The average level of Leq in all wards was 60.2 dB. In emergency units, it was 62.2 dB, but it was not time related. The highest average level (Leq) was measured at 11:30 AM and the peak was measured in the Nephrology nursing station. Conclusion: The average levels of noise in intensive care units and also emergency wards were more than the standard levels and as it is known these wards have vital roles in treatment procedures, so more attention is needed in this area. PMID:24303374

  12. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC). The goal of this paper is to evaluate and report on the appropriateness, efficiency, and effectiveness of the C-AKIC through healthcare utilization and costs associated with acute knee injuries. Methods This quasi-experimental study measured and evaluated cost and utilization associated with specific healthcare services for patients presenting with acute knee injuries. The goal was to compare patients receiving care from two clinical care pathways: the existing pathway (i.e. comparison group) and a new model, the C-AKIC (i.e. experimental group). This was accomplished through the use of a Healthcare Access and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (HAPSQ). Results Data from 138 questionnaires were analyzed in the experimental group and 136 in the comparison group. A post-hoc analysis determined that both groups were statistically similar in socio-demographic characteristics. With respect to utilization, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC used significantly less resources. Overall, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC incurred 37% of the cost of patients with knee injuries in the comparison group and significantly incurred less costs when compared to the comparison group. The total aggregate average cost for the C-AKIC group was $2,549.59 compared to $6,954.33 for the comparison group (p <.001). Conclusions The Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic was able to manage and treat knee injured patients for less cost than the existing state of healthcare delivery. The combined results from

  13. Comparative Effectiveness Research: Alternatives to "Traditional" Computed Tomography Use in the Acute Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christopher L; Broder, Joshua; Gunn, Martin L; Bhargavan-Chatfield, Mythreyi; Cody, Dianna; Cullison, Kevin; Daniels, Brock; Gans, Bradley; Kennedy Hall, M; Gaines, Barbara A; Goldman, Sarah; Heil, John; Liu, Rachel; Marin, Jennifer R; Melnick, Edward R; Novelline, Robert A; Pare, Joseph; Repplinger, Michael D; Taylor, Richard A; Sodickson, Aaron D

    2015-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning is an essential diagnostic tool and has revolutionized care of patients in the acute care setting. However, there is widespread agreement that overutilization of CT, where benefits do not exceed possible costs or harms, is occurring. The goal was to seek consensus in identifying and prioritizing research questions and themes that involve the comparative effectiveness of "traditional" CT use versus alternative diagnostic strategies in the acute care setting. A modified Delphi technique was used that included input from emergency physicians, emergency radiologists, medical physicists, and an industry expert to achieve this. PMID:26576033

  14. Enhancing critical thinking in clinical practice: implications for critical and acute care nurses.

    PubMed

    Shoulders, Bridget; Follett, Corrinne; Eason, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of patients in the critical and acute care settings requires that nurses be skilled in early recognition and management of rapid changes in patient condition. The interpretation and response to these events can greatly impact patient outcomes. Nurses caring for these complex patients are expected to use astute critical thinking in their decision making. The purposes of this article were to explore the concept of critical thinking and provide practical strategies to enhance critical thinking in the critical and acute care environment. PMID:24895950

  15. Staff training and turnover in Alzheimer special care units: comparisons with non-special care units.

    PubMed

    Grant, L A; Kane, R A; Potthoff, S J; Ryden, M

    1996-01-01

    Nursing facility staff may not be properly trained to deal with behavioral symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. We collected data about specialized dementia training and turnover among licensed nurses and nursing assistants in 400 nursing units in 124 Minnesota nursing facilities. Staff training may affect the retention of paraprofessional and professional nursing staff. A diversity of training methods, including workshops or seminars, films or videos, outside consultants, reading materials, training manuals, in-house experts, role playing techniques, or an orientation program for new staff, might be used to develop more effective training programs and reduce rates of nursing assistant turnover. PMID:9060276

  16. FloTrac/Vigileo system monitoring in acute-care surgery: current and future trends.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yung-Fong; Liu, Fu-Chao; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2013-11-01

    As acute critical-care surgery evolves, it is imperative to introduce reliable devices that can intraoperatively assess a patient's cardiovascular functions. Owing to the fact that traditional methods are usually invasive, non- or less-invasive innovations have attracted the attention of clinicians in recent decades. The FloTrac system monitors cardiovascular performance by analyzing peripheral arterial waveforms and a preset database, and it decreases the invasiveness by using a pulmonary arterial catheter. The reliability of cardiac output measurements was confirmed in many critically ill subjects in cardiac surgeries and intensive care units. Moreover, the FloTrac system is easy to set up, and interpreting the information is simple. The FloTrac system also provides a useful preload predictor, that is, stroke volume variation (SVV), for fluid management, which has been proven to enhance surgical safety in the treatment of critically ill patients. Goal-directed therapy guided by SVV and other hemodynamic variables was advocated for peri-operative fluid optimization. Although the evolution of each updated algorithm of the FloTrac system has demonstrated improved accuracy and limited shortcomings, the latest third-generation algorithm is still not equal to the gold standard reference. The accuracy of the latest third-generation algorithm is controversial in septic conditions, and its use is still unacceptable in liver transplantation. Due to vasoactive challenges, especially in the administration of norepinephrine, a conclusion could not be reached. Clinicians should recognize the appropriate uses and limitations when using the algorithm during acute critical surgeries. PMID:24147549

  17. [Introduction of Hemodynamic Monitoring in Critical Care Units].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen-Wei; Wang, Shiao-Pei

    2016-02-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is a very important treatment in intensive care units. Measurements taken during monitoring include pulmonary artery catheter (PAC), pulse-induced contour output (PiCCO), and non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring. PAC measures cardiopulmonary parameters using the thermodilution principle. PiCCO uses transpulmonary thermodilution and pulse contour analysis to measure cardiopulmonary parameters and extra-vascular lung water, to predict lung edema, and to differentiate between cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic respiratory failure. Non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring uses the thoracic electrical bioimpedance principle to measure electrical conductivity and then calculates stroke volume and cardiopulmonary parameters using the arrangement of red blood cells. The author is a nurse in an intensive care unit who is familiar with the various methods used in hemodynamic monitoring, with preparing the related devices, with briefing patients and family members prior to procedures, with related aseptic skills, with preventing complications during the insertion procedure, and with analyzing and interpreting those parameters accurately. The issues addressed in this paper are provided as a reference for nurses and other medical personnel to choose appropriate treatments when caring for critical patients. PMID:26813070

  18. The Use of Modafinil in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Michal; Weinhouse, Gerald

    2016-02-01

    As patients recover from their critical illness, the focus of intensive care unit (ICU) care becomes rehabilitation. Fatigue, excessive daytime somnolence (EDS), and depression can delay their recovery and potentially worsen outcomes. Psychostimulants, particularly modafinil (Provigil), have been shown to alleviate some of these symptoms in various patient populations, and as clinical trials are underway exploring this novel use of the drug, we present a case series of 3 patients in our institution's Thoracic Surgery Intensive Care Unit. Our 3 patients were chosen as a result of their fatigue, EDS, and/or depression, which prolonged their ICU stay and precluded them from participating in physical therapy, an integral component of the rehabilitative process. The patients were given 200 mg of modafinil each morning to increase patient wakefulness, encourage their participation, and enable a more restful sleep during the night. Although the drug was undoubtedly not the sole reason why our patients became more active, the temporal relationship between starting the drug and our patients' clinical improvement makes it likely that it contributed. Based on our observations with these patients, the known effects of modafinil, its safety profile, and the published experiences of others, we believe that modafinil has potential benefits when utilized in some critically ill patients and that the consequences of delayed patient recovery and a prolonged ICU stay may outweigh the risks of potential modafinil side effects. PMID:25716122

  19. Costing of consumables: use in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Mann, S A

    1999-08-01

    In 1991, the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at Middlemore Hospital manually costed the treatment and care of asthmatic patients. This was long-winded and labour-intensive, but provided hard data to support anecdotal beliefs that intensive care patients are more expensive than was currently believed or accepted. It is a known problem that funder and provider organizations see a huge disparity on the funding issue. With additional accurate information on the actual cost of individual patients, which can be grouped into disease categories, funding applications can be backed with accurate, up-to-date quantitative data. After a long preparation time, we are now costing individual patient stays in the ICU. Each individual resource was established, costed and entered into an MS ACCESS computerized database. Schedules have been prepared for updating prices, as these change. The final report available gives a detailed list of resource use within certain categories. Some items proved to be impractical to cost on an individual patient basis, and these have been grouped together, costed, and divided by the number of patient days for the last year, and assigned to each individual patient as an hourly unit cost. Believed to be a world-first, this information now forms the basis for variance reporting and pricing. PMID:10786509

  20. End-of-life care in the intensive care unit: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Nelson, J E; Danis, M

    2001-02-01

    A growing body of evidence and experience has effaced what were once thought to be clear distinctions between "critical illness" and "terminal illness" and has exposed the problems of postponing palliative care for intensive care patients until death is obviously imminent. Integration of palliative care as a component of comprehensive intensive care is now seen as more appropriate for all critically ill patients, including those pursuing aggressive treatments to prolong life. At present, however, data on which to base practice in this integrated model remain insufficient, and forces of the healthcare economy and other factors may constrain its application. The purpose of this article is to map where we are now in seeking to improve palliative care in the intensive care unit. We review existing evidence, which suggests that both symptom management and communication about preferences and goals of care warrant improvement and that prevailing practices for limitation of life-sustaining treatments are inconsistent and possibly irrational. We also address the need for assessment tools for research and quality improvement. We discuss recent initiatives and ongoing obstacles. Finally, we identify areas for further exploration and suggest guiding principles. PMID:11228566

  1. Hyponatremia in the intensive care unit: How to avoid a Zugzwang situation?

    PubMed

    Rafat, Cédric; Flamant, Martin; Gaudry, Stéphane; Vidal-Petiot, Emmanuelle; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Dreyfuss, Didier

    2015-12-01

    Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte derangement in the setting of the intensive care unit. Life-threatening neurological complications may arise not only in case of a severe (<120 mmol/L) and acute fall of plasma sodium levels, but may also stem from overly rapid correction of hyponatremia. Additionally, even mild hyponatremia carries a poor short-term and long-term prognosis across a wide range of conditions. Its multifaceted and intricate physiopathology may seem deterring at first glance, yet a careful multi-step diagnostic approach may easily unravel the underlying mechanisms and enable physicians to adopt the adequate measures at the patient's bedside. Unless hyponatremia is associated with obvious extracellular fluid volume increase such as in heart failure or cirrhosis, hypertonic saline therapy is the cornerstone of the therapeutic of profound or severely symptomatic hyponatremia. When overcorrection of hyponatremia occurs, recent data indicate that re-lowering of plasma sodium levels through the infusion of hypotonic fluids and the cautious use of desmopressin acetate represent a reasonable strategy. New therapeutic options have recently emerged, foremost among these being vaptans, but their use in the setting of the intensive care unit remains to be clarified. PMID:26553121

  2. The anatomy of health care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Moses, Hamilton; Matheson, David H M; Dorsey, E Ray; George, Benjamin P; Sadoff, David; Yoshimura, Satoshi

    2013-11-13

    Health care in the United States includes a vast array of complex interrelationships among those who receive, provide, and finance care. In this article, publicly available data were used to identify trends in health care, principally from 1980 to 2011, in the source and use of funds ("economic anatomy"), the people receiving and organizations providing care, and the resulting value created and health outcomes. In 2011, US health care employed 15.7% of the workforce, with expenditures of $2.7 trillion, doubling since 1980 as a percentage of US gross domestic product (GDP) to 17.9%. Yearly growth has decreased since 1970, especially since 2002, but, at 3% per year, exceeds any other industry and GDP overall. Government funding increased from 31.1% in 1980 to 42.3% in 2011. Despite the increases in resources devoted to health care, multiple health metrics, including life expectancy at birth and survival with many diseases, shows the United States trailing peer nations. The findings from this analysis contradict several common assumptions. Since 2000, (1) price (especially of hospital charges [+4.2%/y], professional services [3.6%/y], drugs and devices [+4.0%/y], and administrative costs [+5.6%/y]), not demand for services or aging of the population, produced 91% of cost increases; (2) personal out-of-pocket spending on insurance premiums and co-payments have declined from 23% to 11%; and (3) chronic illnesses account for 84% of costs overall among the entire population, not only of the elderly. Three factors have produced the most change: (1) consolidation, with fewer general hospitals and more single-specialty hospitals and physician groups, producing financial concentration in health systems, insurers, pharmacies, and benefit managers; (2) information technology, in which investment has occurred but value is elusive; and (3) the patient as consumer, whereby influence is sought outside traditional channels, using social media, informal networks, new public sources

  3. Perihepatic nodes detected by point-of-care ultrasound in acute hepatitis and acute-on-chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Feng, I Che; Wang, Szu Jen; Sheu, Ming Jen; Koay, Lok-Beng; Lin, Ching Yih; Ho, Chung Han; Sun, Chi Shu; Kuo, Hsing Tao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the manifestations of perihepatic lymph nodes during the episode of acute hepatitis flare by point-of-care ultrasonography. METHODS: One hundred and seventy-six patients with an episode of acute hepatitis flare (ALT value > 5 × upper normal limit) were enrolled retrospectively. Diagnosis of etiology of the acute hepatitis flare was based on chart records and serological and virological assays. The patients were categorized into two groups (viral origin and non-viral origin) and further defined into ten subgroups according to the etiologies. An ultrasonograpy was performed within 2 h to 72 h (median, 8 h). The maximum size of each noticeable lymph node was measured. Correlation between clinical parameters and nodal manifestations was analyzed RESULTS: Enlarged lymph nodes (width ≥ 5mm) were noticeable in 110 (62.5%) patients, mostly in acute on chronic hepatitis B (54.5%). The viral group had a higher prevalence rate (89/110 = 80.9%) and larger nodal size (median, 7 mm) than those of the non-viral group (21/66 = 31.8%; median, 0 mm) (P < 0.001 for both). Meanwhile, there were significant differences in the nodal size between acute and chronic viral groups (P < 0.01), and between acute hepatitis A and non-hepatitis A viral groups (P < 0.001). In logistical regression analysis, the nodal width still showed strong significance in multivariate analysis (P < 0.0001) to stratify the two groups. The area under the curve of ROC was 0.805, with a sensitivity of 80.9%, a specificity of 68.2%, positive predictive value of 80.92%, negative predictive value of 68.18%, and an accuracy of 76.14%. CONCLUSION: Point-of-care ultrasonography to detect perihepatic nodal change is valuable for clarifying the etiologies in an episode of acute hepatitis flare. PMID:26640338

  4. How Healthcare Provider Talk with Parents of Children Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury is Perceived in Early Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Teresa A.; Grant, Gerald; Philipsen, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare provider talk with parents in early acute care following children’s severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects parents’ orientations to these locales, but this connection has been minimally studied. This lack of attention to this topic in previous research may reflect providers’ and researchers’ views that these locales are generally neutral or supportive to parents’ subsequent needs. This secondary analysis used data from a larger descriptive phenomenological study (2005 – 2007) with parents of children following moderate to severe TBI recruited from across the United States. Parents of children with severe TBI consistently had strong negative responses to the early acute care talk processes they experienced with providers, while parents of children with moderate TBI did not. Transcript data were independently coded using discourse analysis in the framework of ethnography of speaking. The purpose was to understand the linguistic and paralinguistic talk factors parents used in their meta-communications that could give a preliminary understanding of their cultural expectations for early acute care talk in these settings. Final participants included 27 parents of children with severe TBI from 23 families. We found the human constructed talk factors that parents reacted to were: a) access to the child, which is where information was; b) regular discussions with key personnel; c) updated information that is explained; d) differing expectations for talk in this context; and, e) perceived parental involvement in decisions. We found that the organization and nature of providers’ talk with parents was perceived by parents to positively or negatively shape their early acute care identities in these locales, which influenced how they viewed these locales as places that either supported them and decreased their workload or discounted them and increased their workload for getting what they needed. PMID:23746606

  5. Benchmarking and audit of breast units improves quality of care

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, P.A.; Verkinderen, L.; Hauspy, J.; Vermeulen, P.; Dirix, L.; Huizing, M.; Altintas, S.; Papadimitriou, K.; Peeters, M.; Tjalma, W.

    2013-01-01

    Quality Indicators (QIs) are measures of health care quality that make use of readily available hospital inpatient administrative data. Assessment quality of care can be performed on different levels: national, regional, on a hospital basis or on an individual basis. It can be a mandatory or voluntary system. In all cases development of an adequate database for data extraction, and feedback of the findings is of paramount importance. In the present paper we performed a Medline search on “QIs and breast cancer” and “benchmarking and breast cancer care”, and we have added some data from personal experience. The current data clearly show that the use of QIs for breast cancer care, regular internal and external audit of performance of breast units, and benchmarking are effective to improve quality of care. Adherence to guidelines improves markedly (particularly regarding adjuvant treatment) and there are data emerging showing that this results in a better outcome. As quality assurance benefits patients, it will be a challenge for the medical and hospital community to develop affordable quality control systems, which are not leading to excessive workload. PMID:24753926

  6. Intermittent Demand Forecasting in a Tertiary Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chen-Yang; Chiang, Kuo-Liang; Chen, Meng-Yin

    2016-10-01

    Forecasts of the demand for medical supplies both directly and indirectly affect the operating costs and the quality of the care provided by health care institutions. Specifically, overestimating demand induces an inventory surplus, whereas underestimating demand possibly compromises patient safety. Uncertainty in forecasting the consumption of medical supplies generates intermittent demand events. The intermittent demand patterns for medical supplies are generally classified as lumpy, erratic, smooth, and slow-moving demand. This study was conducted with the purpose of advancing a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit's efforts to achieve a high level of accuracy in its forecasting of the demand for medical supplies. On this point, several demand forecasting methods were compared in terms of the forecast accuracy of each. The results confirm that applying Croston's method combined with a single exponential smoothing method yields the most accurate results for forecasting lumpy, erratic, and slow-moving demand, whereas the Simple Moving Average (SMA) method is the most suitable for forecasting smooth demand. In addition, when the classification of demand consumption patterns were combined with the demand forecasting models, the forecasting errors were minimized, indicating that this classification framework can play a role in improving patient safety and reducing inventory management costs in health care institutions. PMID:27562485

  7. Acute care inpatients with long-term delayed-discharge: evidence from a Canadian health region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute hospital discharge delays are a pressing concern for many health care administrators. In Canada, a delayed discharge is defined by the alternate level of care (ALC) construct and has been the target of many provincial health care strategies. Little is known on the patient characteristics that influence acute ALC length of stay. This study examines which characteristics drive acute ALC length of stay for those awaiting nursing home admission. Methods Population-level administrative and assessment data were used to examine 17,111 acute hospital admissions designated as alternate level of care (ALC) from a large Canadian health region. Case level hospital records were linked to home care administrative and assessment records to identify and characterize those ALC patients that account for the greatest proportion of acute hospital ALC days. Results ALC patients waiting for nursing home admission accounted for 41.5% of acute hospital ALC bed days while only accounting for 8.8% of acute hospital ALC patients. Characteristics that were significantly associated with greater ALC lengths of stay were morbid obesity (27 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±14.6), psychiatric diagnosis (13 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±6.2), abusive behaviours (12 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±10.7), and stroke (7 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±5.0). Overall, persons with morbid obesity, a psychiatric diagnosis, abusive behaviours, or stroke accounted for 4.3% of all ALC patients and 23% of all acute hospital ALC days between April 1st 2009 and April 1st, 2011. ALC patients with the identified characteristics had unique clinical profiles. Conclusions A small number of patients with non-medical days waiting for nursing home admission contribute to a substantial proportion of total non-medical days in acute hospitals. Increases in nursing home capacity or changes to existing funding arrangements should target the sub-populations identified in this

  8. The influence of care interventions on the continuity of sleep of intensive care unit patients1

    PubMed Central

    Hamze, Fernanda Luiza; de Souza, Cristiane Chaves; Chianca, Tânia Couto Machado

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to identify care interventions, performed by the health team, and their influence on the continuity of sleep of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit. Method: descriptive study with a sample of 12 patients. A filming technique was used for the data collection. The awakenings from sleep were measured using the actigraphy method. The analysis of the data was descriptive, processed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Results: 529 care interventions were identified, grouped into 28 different types, of which 12 (42.8%) caused awakening from sleep for the patients. A mean of 44.1 interventions/patient/day was observed, with 1.8 interventions/patient/hour. The administration of oral medicine and food were the interventions that caused higher frequencies of awakenings in the patients. Conclusion: it was identified that the health care interventions can harm the sleep of ICU patients. It is recommended that health professionals rethink the planning of interventions according to the individual demand of the patients, with the diversification of schedules and introduction of new practices to improve the quality of sleep of Intensive Care Unit patients. PMID:26487127

  9. Antimicrobial stewardship: application in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Owens, Robert C

    2009-09-01

    Critical-care units can be barometers for appropriate antimicrobial use. There, life and death hang on empirical antimicrobial therapy for treatment of infectious diseases. With increasing therapeutic empiricism, triple-drug, broad-spectrum regimens are often necessary, but cannot be continued without fear of the double-edged sword: a life-saving intervention or loss of life following Clostridium difficile infection, infection from a resistant organism, nephrotoxicity, cardiac toxicity, and so on. While broadened initial empirical therapy is considered a standard, it must be necessary, dosed according to pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic principles, and stopped when no longer needed. Antimicrobial stewardship interventions shepherd these considerations in antimicrobial therapy. With pharmacists and physicians trained in infectious disease and critical care, clear-cut interventions can be focused on beginning or growing a stewardship program, or proposing future studies. PMID:19665090

  10. Psycho-affective disorder in intensive care units: a review.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Jeanette

    2002-09-01

    This paper reviews the literature related to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Syndrome. The intention of the paper is to explore the range of psychotic and affective phenomena that may be observed in practice, together with the management of contributory stressors. Patients experience a range of psycho-affective disturbances that may be triggered by drugs, the environment, dehumanizing practices and sleep deprivation. Symptoms do not always disappear following discharge and further research is required to determine the long-term psychological effects of an ICU. Comprehensive assessment of the patient's psychological state, using an appropriate tool, is necessary and should form an integral part of ongoing care. Interventions identified include eradication of dehumanizing behaviour, modification of environmental stimuli, effective communication and therapeutic touch. Where possible, communication needs should be addressed prior to admission, and patients and their families prepared for the unfamiliar world of the ICU. PMID:12201884

  11. Financing health care in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Taha, Nabila Fahed; Sharif, Amer Ahmad; Blair, Iain

    2013-01-01

    Newcomers to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) health care system often enquire about the way in which UAE health services are financed particularly when funding issues affect eligibility for treatment. The UAE ranks alongside many western counties on measures of life expectancy and child mortality but because of the unique population structure spends less of its national income on health. In the past as a wealthy country the UAE had no difficulty ensuring universal access to a comprehensive range of services but the health needs of the UAE population are becoming more complex and like many countries the UAE health system is facing the twin challenges of quality and cost. To meet these challenges new models of health care financing are being introduced. In this brief article we will describe the evolution of UAE health financing, its current state and likely future developments. PMID:24228347

  12. Intensive chemotherapy, azacitidine, or supportive care in older acute myeloid leukemia patients: an analysis from a regional healthcare network.

    PubMed

    Bories, Pierre; Bertoli, Sarah; Bérard, Emilie; Laurent, Julie; Duchayne, Eliane; Sarry, Audrey; Delabesse, Eric; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Huguet, Françoise; Récher, Christian

    2014-12-01

    We assessed in a French regional healthcare network the distribution of treatments, prognostic factors, and outcome of 334 newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients aged 60 years or older over a 4-year period of time (2007-2010). Patients were selected in daily practice for intensive chemotherapy (n = 115), azacitidine (n = 95), or best supportive care (n = 124). In these three groups, median overall survival was 18.9, 11.3, and 1.8 months, respectively. In the azacitidine group, multivariate analysis showed that overall survival was negatively impacted by higher age (P = 0.010 for one unit increase), unfavorable cytogenetics (P = 0.001), lymphocyte count <0.5 G/L (P = 0.015), and higher lactate dehydrogenase level (P = 0.005 for one unit increase). We compared the survival of patients treated by azacitidine versus intensive chemotherapy and best supportive care using time-dependent analysis and propensity score matching. Patients treated by intensive chemotherapy had a better overall survival compared with those treated by azacitidine from 6 months after diagnosis, whereas patients treated by azacitidine had a better overall survival compared with those treated by best supportive care from 1 day after diagnosis. This study of "real life" practice shows that there is a room for low intensive therapies such as azacitidine in selected elderly acute myeloid leukemia patients. PMID:25195872

  13. Beyond the Intensive Care Unit (ICU): Countywide Impact of Universal ICU Staphylococcus aureus Decolonization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bruce Y; Bartsch, Sarah M; Wong, Kim F; McKinnell, James A; Cui, Eric; Cao, Chenghua; Kim, Diane S; Miller, Loren G; Huang, Susan S

    2016-03-01

    A recent trial showed that universal decolonization in adult intensive care units (ICUs) resulted in greater reductions in all bloodstream infections and clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) than either targeted decolonization or screening and isolation. Since regional health-care facilities are highly interconnected through patient-sharing, focusing on individual ICUs may miss the broader impact of decolonization. Using our Regional Healthcare Ecosystem Analyst simulation model of all health-care facilities in Orange County, California, we evaluated the impact of chlorhexidine baths and mupirocin on all ICU admissions when universal decolonization was implemented for 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of ICU beds countywide (compared with screening and contact precautions). Direct benefits were substantial in ICUs implementing decolonization (a median 60% relative reduction in MRSA prevalence). When 100% of countywide ICU beds were decolonized, there were spillover effects in general wards, long-term acute-care facilities, and nursing homes resulting in median 8.0%, 3.0%, and 1.9% relative MRSA reductions at 1 year, respectively. MRSA prevalence decreased by a relative 3.2% countywide, with similar effects for methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. We showed that a large proportion of decolonization's benefits are missed when accounting only for ICU impact. Approximately 70% of the countywide cases of MRSA carriage averted after 1 year of universal ICU decolonization were outside the ICU. PMID:26872710

  14. Beyond the Intensive Care Unit (ICU): Countywide Impact of Universal ICU Staphylococcus aureus Decolonization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Bartsch, Sarah M.; Wong, Kim F.; McKinnell, James A.; Cui, Eric; Cao, Chenghua; Kim, Diane S.; Miller, Loren G.; Huang, Susan S.

    2016-01-01

    A recent trial showed that universal decolonization in adult intensive care units (ICUs) resulted in greater reductions in all bloodstream infections and clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) than either targeted decolonization or screening and isolation. Since regional health-care facilities are highly interconnected through patient-sharing, focusing on individual ICUs may miss the broader impact of decolonization. Using our Regional Healthcare Ecosystem Analyst simulation model of all health-care facilities in Orange County, California, we evaluated the impact of chlorhexidine baths and mupirocin on all ICU admissions when universal decolonization was implemented for 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of ICU beds countywide (compared with screening and contact precautions). Direct benefits were substantial in ICUs implementing decolonization (a median 60% relative reduction in MRSA prevalence). When 100% of countywide ICU beds were decolonized, there were spillover effects in general wards, long-term acute-care facilities, and nursing homes resulting in median 8.0%, 3.0%, and 1.9% relative MRSA reductions at 1 year, respectively. MRSA prevalence decreased by a relative 3.2% countywide, with similar effects for methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. We showed that a large proportion of decolonization's benefits are missed when accounting only for ICU impact. Approximately 70% of the countywide cases of MRSA carriage averted after 1 year of universal ICU decolonization were outside the ICU. PMID:26872710

  15. Principles of ethics: in managing a critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Dan R

    2007-02-01

    Managing a critical care unit can present many challenges for those whose roles have been only as clinicians. The administrative position presents many new ethical issues that challenge both traditional medical and nursing ethics. The use of the basic ethical principles in these administrative issues may be less familiar. Ethical principles that guide the practice of professionals and their new position are explored and their use described in both positions. Traditional ethical issues include: utilitarianism, natural law, autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, paternalism, justice, duty, rationing, informed consent, and withdrawing treatment. Conflicts in ethical issues are a natural consequence of the dual role of the professional. PMID:17242602

  16. [Occurrence and prevention of errors in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Valentin, A

    2012-05-01

    Recognition and analysis of error constitutes an essential tool for quality improvement in intensive care units (ICUs). The potential for the occurrence of error is considerably high in ICUs. Although errors will never be completely preventable, it is necessary to reduce frequency and consequences of error. A system approach needs to consider human limitations and to design working conditions, workplace, and processes in ICUs in a way that promotes reduction of error. The development of a preventive safety culture must be seen as an essential task for ICUs. PMID:22476763

  17. Mobile intensive care unit. Present conception and realisation.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, H; Hanegreefs, G; Hanquet, M; Rolly, G; de Temmerman, P; Van De Walle, J; Delooz, H

    1976-01-01

    A new Mobile Intensive Care Unit has been put in use at the "Service 900" of the Ministry of Health in Belgium. Its size was decided to enable efficient treatment of one patient. The type of suspension was chosen to give the patient adequate protection against untoward effects of travelling sickness. Radio-communication with the control center and hospital is ensured. The O2 supply-system provides an autonomy of 11 hours. Besides an electric distribution of 12 V. DC, a 220 V. AC is also available. PMID:1070899

  18. Centralized vs. Distributed PACS for Intensive Care Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Paul S.; Huang, H. K.; Tillisch, Jan

    1989-05-01

    One clinical environment which can immediately benefit from the implementation of a radiologic PACS is the intensive care unit (ICU). Our previous study has demonstrated the feasibility and timeliness of routine image transmission to an ICU. In anticipation of future expansion of this service, we have investigated two different models for a hospital-wide ICU PACS. These models included a centralized and a distributed processing PACS configuration. Their comparison indicated that although the distributed model offers some major advantages over the centralized model, the latter may hold a rightful place in the inter-departmental service, especially if the cost issue is a critical factor.

  19. Improving Congestive Heart Failure Care with a Clinical Decision Unit.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Jo Ellen; Short, Nancy; Williams, Tracy E; Yandell, Ben; Bowers, Margaret T

    2015-01-01

    Evidence supporting the development of Clinical Decision Units (CDUs) to impact congestive heart failure readmission rates comes from several categories of the literature. In this study, a pre-post design with comparison group was used to evaluate the impact of the CDU. Early changes in clinical and financial outcome indicators are encouraging. Nurse leaders seek ways to improve clinical outcomes while managing the current financially challenging environment. Implementation of a CDU provides many opportunities for nurse leaders to positively impact clinical care and financial performance within their institutions. PMID:26625578

  20. Electroconvulsive therapy in a psychiatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hafner, R J; Holme, G

    1994-06-01

    This study reviewed all patients (N = 37) treated with ECT in a psychiatric intensive care unit during 1989-91. Diagnoses were: psychotic depression (8); bipolar disorder, manic phase (13); schizoaffective disorder (14); and schizophrenia (2). All patients were very severely disturbed and had failed to respond to medication given at highest levels judged to be safe, usually over 3-4 weeks. Response to ECT was generally rapid and marked, allowing substantial reductions in medication. To achieve the same clinical outcome for each course of ECT, 50% more unilateral than bilateral treatments were required, suggesting that bilateral ECT has a more rapid effect in this highly disturbed population. PMID:7993281

  1. Assessment of brain death in the neurocritical care unit.

    PubMed

    Hwang, David Y; Gilmore, Emily J; Greer, David M

    2013-07-01

    This article reviews current guidelines for death by neurologic criteria and addresses topics relevant to the determination of brain death in the intensive care unit. The history of brain death as a concept leads into a discussion of the evolution of practice parameters, focusing on the most recent 2010 update from the American Academy of Neurology and the practice variability that exists worldwide. Proper transition from brain death determination to possible organ donation is reviewed. This review concludes with a discussion regarding ethical and religious concerns and suggestions on how families of patients who may be brain dead might be optimally approached. PMID:23809039

  2. Environment of care: vertical evacuation concerns for acutely ill patients and others with restricted mobility.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2014-01-01

    This perspective paper was intended to raise awareness and the urgency of needing additional evacuation-related, hospital building design policies. We addressed the challenges to maintain the integrity of exits and inadequate hospital design considerations for individuals with restricted mobility. Hospitals are occupied by people who may have restricted mobility and visitors who are likely unfamiliar with their surroundings. A hospital fire threatens all people in the building, but especially patients in the intensive care unit who are frail and have limited mobility. Evacuating immobile patients is complex, involving horizontal and vertical evacuation approaches. Hospital design must consider the needs of individuals with restricted mobility, who are the most vulnerable in case of a hospital fire. Consequently, we urge that acutely ill patients and others with restricted mobility should occupy units located on the ground floor or Level 2. In addition, when configuring the physical environment of hospitals, providing step-free ground floor access (indoor or outdoor ramps) and evacuation aids for vertical evacuation is crucial. Step-free ground floor access between Level 2 and the ground floor should be wide enough to allow transporting patients on their beds. A standard revision to include these recommendations is desperately needed. PMID:24404945

  3. How do psychiatrists address delusions in first meetings in acute care? A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Communicating about delusions can be challenging, particularly when a therapeutic relationship needs to be established in acute care. So far, no systematic research has explored how psychiatrists address patients’ delusional beliefs in first meetings in acute care. The aim of this study was to describe how psychiatrists address patients’ delusional experiences in acute in-patient care. Methods First meetings between five psychiatrists and 14 patients in acute care were audio-recorded and analysed using thematic content analysis. Results 296 psychiatrist statements about delusions were identified and coded. Three commonly used approaches (with a total of 6 subthemes) were identified. The most common approaches were eliciting the content (1 subtheme: eliciting content and evidence) and understanding the impact (3 subthemes: identifying emotions, exploring links with dysfunctional behaviour and discussing reasons for hospital admission) while questioning the validity of the beliefs (2 subthemes: challenging content and exploring alternative explanations) was less common. The last approach sometimes put patients in a defensive position. Conclusions Psychiatrists commonly use three approaches to address patients’ delusions in the first meeting in acute in-patient care. Questioning the patients’ beliefs can lead to disagreement which might hinder establishing a positive therapeutic relationship. Future research should explore the impact of such an approach on outcomes and specify to what extent questioning the validity of delusional beliefs is appropriate in the first meeting. PMID:24935678

  4. Target value design: applications to newborn intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Rybkowski, Zofia K; Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Ballard, H Glenn

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for greater understanding of the health impact of various design elements in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) as well as cost-benefit information to make informed decisions about the long-term value of design decisions. This is particularly evident when design teams are considering the transition from open-bay NICUs to single-family-room (SFR) units. This paper introduces the guiding principles behind target value design (TVD)-a price-led design methodology that is gaining acceptance in healthcare facility design within the Lean construction methodology. The paper also discusses the role that set-based design plays in TVD and its application to NICUs. PMID:23224803

  5. Predictors for Delayed Emergency Department Care in Medical Patients with Acute Infections – An International Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hausfater, Pierre; Amin, Devendra; Amin, Adina; Haubitz, Sebastian; Conca, Antoinette; Reutlinger, Barbara; Canavaggio, Pauline; Sauvin, Gabrielle; Bernard, Maguy; Huber, Andreas; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In overcrowded emergency department (ED) care, short time to start effective antibiotic treatment has been evidenced to improve infection-related clinical outcomes. Our objective was to study factors associated with delays in initial ED care within an international prospective medical ED patient population presenting with acute infections. Methods We report data from an international prospective observational cohort study including patients with a main diagnosis of infection from three tertiary care hospitals in Switzerland, France and the United States (US). We studied predictors for delays in starting antibiotic treatment by using multivariate regression analyses. Results Overall, 544 medical ED patients with a main diagnosis of acute infection and antibiotic treatment were included, mainly pneumonia (n = 218; 40.1%), urinary tract (n = 141; 25.9%), and gastrointestinal infections (n = 58; 10.7%). The overall median time to start antibiotic therapy was 214 minutes (95% CI: 199, 228), with a median length of ED stay (ED LOS) of 322 minutes (95% CI: 308, 335). We found large variations of time to start antibiotic treatment depending on hospital centre and type of infection. The diagnosis of a gastrointestinal infection was the most significant predictor for delay in antibiotic treatment (+119 minutes compared to patients with pneumonia; 95% CI: 58, 181; p<0.001). Conclusions We found high variations in hospital ED performance in regard to start antibiotic treatment. The implementation of measures to reduce treatment times has the potential to improve patient care. PMID:27171476

  6. APACHE II scoring system on a general intensive care unit: audit of daily APACHE II scores and 6-month survival of 691 patients admitted to a general intensive care unit between May 1990 and December 1991.

    PubMed

    Campbell, N N; Tooley, M A; Willatts, S M

    1994-02-01

    In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the use of the APACHE II (acute physiological and chronic health evaluation) scoring system on all of the patients admitted to the general intensive care unit at the Bristol Royal Infirmary over a 20-month period. The 6-month survival of 691 adult medical and surgical patients following intensive care was recorded and this data was analysed with admission and daily APACHE II scores using a relational database. Our data confirms the relationship between admission APACHE II scores and outcome, with mean scores decreasing as duration of survival increases. We also demonstrate that the best day one scores are approximately 50% less than the admission score, irrespective of outcome, indicating the benefit of intensive care. By contrast, however, the scores on day one have either not improved or have worsened since admission, reflecting the importance of the pre-morbid health status of the patient in determining outcome from intensive care. PMID:8196033

  7. APACHE II scoring system on a general intensive care unit: audit of daily APACHE II scores and 6-month survival of 691 patients admitted to a general intensive care unit between May 1990 and December 1991.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, N N; Tooley, M A; Willatts, S M

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the use of the APACHE II (acute physiological and chronic health evaluation) scoring system on all of the patients admitted to the general intensive care unit at the Bristol Royal Infirmary over a 20-month period. The 6-month survival of 691 adult medical and surgical patients following intensive care was recorded and this data was analysed with admission and daily APACHE II scores using a relational database. Our data confirms the relationship between admission APACHE II scores and outcome, with mean scores decreasing as duration of survival increases. We also demonstrate that the best day one scores are approximately 50% less than the admission score, irrespective of outcome, indicating the benefit of intensive care. By contrast, however, the scores on day one have either not improved or have worsened since admission, reflecting the importance of the pre-morbid health status of the patient in determining outcome from intensive care. PMID:8196033

  8. Acute Pain Medicine in the United States: A Status Report

    PubMed Central

    Tighe, Patrick; Buckenmaier, Chester C.; Boezaart, Andre P.; Carr, Daniel B.; Clark, Laura L.; Herring, Andrew A.; Kent, Michael; Mackey, Sean; Mariano, Edward R.; Polomano, Rosemary C.; Reisfield, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Consensus indicates that a comprehensive, multimodal, holistic approach is foundational to the practice of acute pain medicine (APM), but lack of uniform, evidence-based clinical pathways leads to undesirable variability throughout U. S. healthcare systems. Acute pain studies are inconsistently synthesized to guide educational programs. Advanced practice techniques involving regional anesthesia assume the presence of a physician-led, multidisciplinary acute pain service, which is often unavailable or inconsistently applied. This heterogeneity of educational and organizational standards may result in unnecessary patient pain and escalation of healthcare costs. Methods A multidisciplinary panel was nominated through the Acute Pain Medicine Shared Interest Group (APMSIG) of the American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM). The panel met in Chicago, Illinois, in July 2014, to identify gaps and set priorities in APM research and education. Results The panel identified 3 areas of critical need: 1) an open-source acute pain data registry and clinical support tool to inform clinical decision making and resource allocation and to enhance research efforts; 2) a strong professional APM identity as an accredited subspecialty; and 3) educational goals targeted toward third-party payers, hospital administrators, and other key stakeholders to convey the importance of APM. Conclusion This report is the first step in a 3-year initiative aimed at creating conditions and incentives for the optimal provision of APM services to facilitate and enhance the quality of patient recovery after surgery, illness, or trauma. The ultimate goal is to reduce the conversion of acute pain to the debilitating disease of chronic pain. PMID:26535424

  9. General surgery 2.0: the emergence of acute care surgery in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, S. Morad; Brenneman, Frederick D.; Ball, Chad G.; Pagliarello, Joe; Razek, Tarek; Parry, Neil; Widder, Sandy; Minor, Sam; Buczkowski, Andrzej; MacPherson, Cailan; Johner, Amanda; Jenkin, Dan; Wood, Leanne; McLoughlin, Karen; Anderson, Ian; Davey, Doug; Zabolotny, Brent; Saadia, Roger; Bracken, John; Nathens, Avery; Ahmed, Najma; Panton, Ormond; Warnock, Garth L.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, there has been a groundswell of support in Canada for the development of organized, focused and multidisciplinary approaches to caring for acutely ill general surgical patients. Newly forged acute care surgery (ACS) services are beginning to provide prompt, evidence-based and goal-directed care to acutely ill general surgical patients who often present with a diverse range of complex pathologies and little or no pre- or postoperative planning. Through a team-based structure with attention to processes of care and information sharing, ACS services are well positioned to improve outcomes, while finding and developing efficiencies and reducing costs of surgical and emergency health care delivery. The ACS model also offers enhanced opportunities for surgical education for students, residents and practicing surgeons, and it will provide avenues to strengthen clinical and academic bonds between the community and academic surgical centres. In the near future, cooperation of ACS services from community and academic hospitals across the country will lead to the formation of systems of acute surgical care whose development will be informed by rigorous data collection and research and evidence-based quality-improvement initiatives. In an era of increasing subspecialization, ACS is a strong unifying force in general surgery and a platform for collective advocacy for an important patient population. PMID:20334738

  10. How can clinicians measure safety and quality in acute care?

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter J; Nolan, Thomas; Zeger, Scott; Miller, Marlene; Rubin, Haya

    2011-03-01

    The demand for high quality care is increasing and warranted. Evidence suggests that the quality of care in hospitals can be improved. The greatest opportunity to improve outcomes for patients over the next quarter century will probably come not from discovering new treatments but from learning how to deliver existing effective therapies. To improve, caregivers need to know what to do, how they are doing, and be able to improve the processes of care. The ability to monitor performance, though challenging in healthcare, is essential to improving quality of care. We present a practical method to assess and learn from routine practice. Methods to evaluate performance from industrial engineering can be broadly applied to efforts to improve the quality of healthcare. One method that may help to provide caregivers frequent feedback is time series data--ie, results are graphically correlated with time. Broad use of these tools might lead to the necessary improvements in quality of care. PMID:23451357

  11. Critical care in the emergency department: acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Nee, Patrick A; Bailey, David J; Todd, Victoria; Lewington, Andrew J; Wootten, Andrea E; Sim, Kevin J

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common among emergency department patients admitted to hospital. There is evidence of inadequate management of the condition leading to adverse outcomes. We present an illustrative case of AKI complicating a gastrointestinal disorder in an older adult. We discuss the clinical presentation, assessment and management of AKI with reference to recent consensus guidelines on classification and treatment. PMID:25969433

  12. Different Nursing Care Methods for Prevention of Keratopathy Among Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kalhori, Reza Pourmirza; Ehsani, Sohrab; Daneshgar, Farid; Ashtarian, Hossein; Rezaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with reduced consciousness level suffer from eye protection disorder and Keratopathy. This study was conducted to compare effect of three eye care techniques in prevention of keratopathy in the patients hospitalized in intensive care unit of Kermanshah. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted in 2013 with sample size of 96 persons in three random groups. Routine care included washing of eyes with normal saline and three eye care methods were conducted with poly ethylene cover, liposic ointment, and artificial tear drop randomly on one eye of each sample and a comparison was made with the opposite eye as the control. Eyes were controlled for 5 days in terms of keratopathy. Data collection instrument was keratopathy severity index. Data statistical analysis was performed with SPSS-16 software and chi-squared test, Fisher’s exact test, ANOVA and Kruskal–Wallis one-way analysis of variance. Findings: The use of poly ethylene cover (0.59±0.665) was significantly more effective in prevention of keratopathy than other methods (P=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between two care interventions of liposic ointment and artificial tear drop (P=0.844) but the results indicated the more effective liposic ointment (1.13±0.751) than the artificial tear drop (1.59±0.875) in prevention of corneal abrasion (P<0.001). Conclusion: Results of the study suggest the use of poly ethylene cover as a non-aggressive and non-pharmaceutical nursing and therapeutic method for prevention of keratopathy in the patient hospitalized in intensive care unit.

  13. Dynamic workflow model for complex activity in intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bricon-Souf, N; Renard, J M; Beuscart, R

    1999-01-01

    Co-operation is very important in Medical care, especially in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) where the difficulties increase which is due to the urgency of the work. Workflow systems are considered as well adapted to modelize productive work in business process. We aim at introducing this approach in the Health Care domain. We have proposed a conversation-based workflow in order to modelize the therapeutics plan in the ICU [1]. But in such a complex field, the flexibility of the workflow system is essential for the system to be usable. We have concentrated on three main points usually proposed in the workflow models, suffering from a lack of dynamicity: static links between roles and actors, global notification of information changes, lack of human control on the system. In this paper, we focus on the main points used to increase the dynamicity. We report on affecting roles, highlighting information, and controlling the system. We propose some solutions and describe our prototype in the ICU. PMID:10193884

  14. [Factors causing stress in patients in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Pérez de Ciriza, A; Otamendi, S; Ezenarro, A; Asiain, M C

    1996-01-01

    Intensive care units have been considered stress generating areas. Knowing the causes why this happens will allow us to take specific measures to prevent or minimize it. This study has been performed with the aim to identify stress raising factors, as they are perceived by intensive care patients. The study has been performed in 49 patients most of whom were being attended in postoperatory control. The valuation of the degree of stress was performed using the "Scale of Environmental Stressors in Intensive Care" by Ballard in 1981, modified and adapted to our environment, with a result of 43 items distributed in six groups; Immobilization, Isolation, Deprivation of sleep, Time-spacial disorientation, Sensorial deprivation and overestimulation, and depersonalization and loss of autocontrol. The level of stress perceived by patients was low. The factors considered as most stressing were those related to physical aspects; presence of tubes in nose and mouth, impossibility to sleep and presence of noise, whereas those less stressing referred to Nursing attention. We conclude that patients perceive ICU as a little stressing place in spite of the excessive noise, remark the presence of invasive tubes and the difficulty to sleep as the most stressing factors, and in the same way, express a high degree of satisfaction about the attention received. PMID:8997954

  15. Let Them In: Family Presence during Intensive Care Unit Procedures.

    PubMed

    Beesley, Sarah J; Hopkins, Ramona O; Francis, Leslie; Chapman, Diane; Johnson, Joclynn; Johnson, Nathanael; Brown, Samuel M

    2016-07-01

    Families have for decades advocated for full access to intensive care units (ICUs) and meaningful partnership with clinicians, resulting in gradual improvements in family access and collaboration with ICU clinicians. Despite such advances, family members in adult ICUs are still commonly asked to leave the patient's room during invasive bedside procedures, regardless of whether the patient would prefer family to be present. Physicians may be resistant to having family members at the bedside due to concerns about trainee education, medicolegal implications, possible effects on the technical quality of procedures due to distractions, and procedural sterility. Limited evidence from parallel settings does not support these concerns. Family presence during ICU procedures, when the patient and family member both desire it, fulfills the mandates of patient-centered care. We anticipate that such inclusion will increase family engagement, improve patient and family satisfaction, and may, on the basis of studies of open visitation, pediatric ICU experience, and family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, decrease psychological distress in patients and family members. We believe these goals can be achieved without compromising the quality of patient care, increasing provider burden significantly, or increasing risks of litigation. In this article, we weigh current evidence, consider historical objections to family presence at ICU procedures, and report our clinical experience with the practice. An outline for implementing family procedural presence in the ICU is also presented. PMID:27104301

  16. Postanesthesia care unit visitation decreases family member anxiety.

    PubMed

    Carter, Amy J; Deselms, JoAnn; Ruyle, Shelley; Morrissey-Lucas, Marcella; Kollar, Suzie; Cannon, Shelly; Schick, Lois

    2012-02-01

    Despite advocacy by professional nursing organizations, no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have evaluated the response of family members to a visit with an adult patient during a postanesthesia care unit (PACU) stay. Therefore, the purpose of this RCT was to evaluate the impact of a brief PACU visitation on the anxiety of family members. The study was conducted in a phase I PACU of a large community-based hospital. Subjects were designated adult family members or significant others of an adult PACU patient who had undergone general anesthesia. A pretest-posttest RCT design was used. The dependent variable was the change in anxiety scores of the visitor after seeing his or her family member in the PACU. Student t test (unpaired, two tailed) was used to determine if changes in anxiety scores (posttest score-pretest score) were different for the PACU visit and no visit groups. A total of 45 participants were studied over a 3-month period, with N=24 randomly assigned to a PACU visit and N=21 assigned to usual care (no PACU visit). Participants in the PACU visit group had a statistically significant (P=.0001) decrease in anxiety after the visitation period (-4.11±6.4); participants in the usual care group (no PACU visit) had an increase in anxiety (+4.47±6.6). The results from this study support the value and importance of PACU visitation for family members. PMID:22264615

  17. [Treatment in the Intensive Care Unit: continue or withdraw?].

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, Claudia; de Graeff, Nienke; Kompanje, Erwin J O; Tjan, Dave H T

    2016-01-01

    End-of-life decision-making in the Intensive Care Unit is a common and complex process. The step-by-step process of decision-making leading to withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment is illustrated in this paper by a clinical case. A variety of factors influences the decision to adjust the initial curative treatment policy towards withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy and the pursuit of comfort care. For a smooth decision-making process, it is necessary to make a prognosis and obtain consensus amongst the healthcare team. Withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment is ultimately a medical decision and a consensual decision should be reached by all medical staff and nurses, and preferably also by the patient and family. Timely involvement of a legal representative of the patient is essential for an uncomplicated decision-making process. Advance care planning and advance directives provide opportunities for patients to express their preferences beforehand. It is important to realise that end-of-life decisions are significantly influenced by personal and cultural values. PMID:27050494

  18. Radiologic assessment in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, R. I.

    1984-01-01

    The severely ill infant or child who requires admission to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) often presents with a complex set of problems necessitating multiple and frequent management decisions. Diagnostic imaging plays an important role, not only in the initial assessment of the patient's condition and establishing a diagnosis, but also in monitoring the patient's progress and the effects of interventional therapeutic measures. Bedside studies obtained using portable equipment are often limited but can provide much useful information when a careful and detailed approach is utilized in producing the radiograph and interpreting the examination. This article reviews some of the basic principles of radiographic interpretation and details some of the diagnostic points which, when promptly recognized, can lead to a better understanding of the patient's condition and thus to improved patient care and management. While chest radiography is stressed, studies of other regions including the upper airway, abdomen, skull, and extremities are discussed. A brief consideration of the expanding role of new modality imaging (i.e., ultrasound, CT) is also included. Multiple illustrative examples of common and uncommon problems are shown. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 FIG. 9 FIG. 10 FIG. 11 FIG. 12 FIG. 13 FIG. 14 FIG. 15 FIG. 16 FIG. 17 FIG. 18 FIG. 19 FIG. 20 FIG. 21 FIG. 22 FIG. 23 FIG. 24 FIG. 25 FIG. 26 FIG. 27 FIG. 28 FIG. 29 FIG. 30 FIG. 31 FIG. 32 FIG. 33 PMID:6375164

  19. Developing and validating a risk prediction model for acute care based on frailty syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Soong, J; Poots, A J; Scott, S; Donald, K; Bell, D

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Population ageing may result in increased comorbidity, functional dependence and poor quality of life. Mechanisms and pathophysiology underlying frailty have not been fully elucidated, thus absolute consensus on an operational definition for frailty is lacking. Frailty scores in the acute medical care setting have poor predictive power for clinically relevant outcomes. We explore the utility of frailty syndromes (as recommended by national guidelines) as a risk prediction model for the elderly in the acute care setting. Setting English Secondary Care emergency admissions to National Health Service (NHS) acute providers. Participants There were N=2 099 252 patients over 65 years with emergency admission to NHS acute providers from 01/01/2012 to 31/12/2012 included in the analysis. Primary and secondary outcome measures Outcomes investigated include inpatient mortality, 30-day emergency readmission and institutionalisation. We used pseudorandom numbers to split patients into train (60%) and test (40%). Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and ordering the patients by deciles of predicted risk was used to assess model performance. Using English Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data, we built multivariable logistic regression models with independent variables based on frailty syndromes (10th revision International Statistical Classification of Diseases, Injuries and Causes of Death (ICD-10) coding), demographics and previous hospital utilisation. Patients included were those >65 years with emergency admission to acute provider in England (2012). Results Frailty syndrome models exhibited ROC scores of 0.624–0.659 for inpatient mortality, 0.63–0.654 for institutionalisation and 0.57–0.63 for 30-day emergency readmission. Conclusions Frailty syndromes are a valid predictor of outcomes relevant to acute care. The models predictive power is in keeping with other scores in the literature, but is a simple, clinically relevant and potentially

  20. Exploring Real-time Patient Decision-making for Acute Care: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Adam L.; Chang, Tammy; Cobb, Enesha; Gossa, Weyinshet; Rowe, Zachary; Kohatsu, Lauren; Heisler, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Research has described emergency department (ED) use patterns in detail. However, evidence is lacking on how, at the time a decision is made, patients decide if healthcare is required or where to seek care. Methods Using community-based participatory research methods, we conducted a mixed-methods descriptive pilot study. Due to the exploratory, hypothesis-generating nature of this research, we did not perform power calculations, and financial constraints only allowed for 20 participants. Hypothetical vignettes for the 10 most common low acuity primary care complaints (cough, sore throat, back pain, etc.) were texted to patients twice daily over six weeks, none designed to influence the patient’s decision to seek care. We conducted focus groups to gain contextual information about participant decision-making. Descriptive statistics summarized responses to texts for each scenario. Qualitative analysis of open-ended text message responses and focus group discussions identified themes associated with decision-making for acute care needs. Results We received text survey responses from 18/20 recruited participants who responded to 72% (1092/1512) of the texted vignettes. In 48% of the vignettes, participants reported they would do nothing, for 34% of the vignettes participants reported they would seek care with a primary care provider, and 18% of responses reported they would seek ED care. Participants were not more likely to visit an ED during “off-hours.” Our qualitative findings showed: 1) patients don’t understand when care is needed; 2) patients don’t understand where they should seek care. Conclusion Participants were unclear when or where to seek care for common acute health problems, suggesting a need for patient education. Similar research is necessary in different populations and regarding the role of urgent care in acute care delivery. PMID:25247042

  1. Using Discrete Event Computer Simulation to Improve Patient Flow in a Ghanaian Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Best, Allyson M.; Dixon, Cinnamon A.; Kelton, W. David; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Crowding and limited resources have increased the strain on acute care facilities and emergency departments (EDs) worldwide. These problems are particularly prevalent in developing countries. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a computer-based tool that can be used to estimate how changes to complex healthcare delivery systems, such as EDs, will affect operational performance. Using this modality, our objective was to identify operational interventions that could potentially improve patient throughput of one acute care setting in a developing country. Methods We developed a simulation model of acute care at a district level hospital in Ghana to test the effects of resource-neutral (e.g. modified staff start times and roles) and resource-additional (e.g. increased staff) operational interventions on patient throughput. Previously captured, de-identified time-and-motion data from 487 acute care patients were used to develop and test the model. The primary outcome was the modeled effect of interventions on patient length of stay (LOS). Results The base-case (no change) scenario had a mean LOS of 292 minutes (95% CI 291, 293). In isolation, neither adding staffing, changing staff roles, nor varying shift times affected overall patient LOS. Specifically, adding two registration workers, history takers, and physicians resulted in a 23.8 (95% CI 22.3, 25.3) minute LOS decrease. However, when shift start-times were coordinated with patient arrival patterns, potential mean LOS was decreased by 96 minutes (95% CI 94, 98); and with the simultaneous combination of staff roles (Registration and History-taking) there was an overall mean LOS reduction of 152 minutes (95% CI 150, 154). Conclusions Resource-neutral interventions identified through DES modeling have the potential to improve acute care throughput in this Ghanaian municipal hospital. DES offers another approach to identifying potentially effective interventions to improve patient flow in emergency and acute

  2. A qualitative exploration of discharge destination as an outcome or a driver of acute stroke care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many patients with acute stroke do not receive recommended care in tertiary hospital settings. Allied health professionals have important roles within multidisciplinary stroke teams and influence the quality of care patients receive. Studies examining the role of allied health professionals in acute stroke management are scarce, and very little is known about the clinical decision making of these stroke clinicians. In this study we aimed to describe factors that influence the complex clinical decision making of these professionals as they prioritise acute stroke patients for recommended care. This qualitative study was part of a larger mixed methods study. Methods The qualitative methodology applied was a constructivist grounded theory approach. Fifteen allied health professionals working with acute stroke patients at three metropolitan tertiary care hospitals in South Australia were purposively sampled. Semi-structured interviews were conducted face to face using a question guide, and digital recording. Interviews were transcribed and analysed by two researchers using rigorous grounded theory processes. Results Our analysis highlighted ‘predicted discharge destination’ as a powerful driver of care decisions and clinical prioritisation for this professional group. We found that complex clinical decision making to predict discharge destination required professionals to concurrently consider patient’s pre-stroke status, the nature and severity of their stroke, the course of their recovery and multiple factors from within the healthcare system. The consequences of these decisions had potentially profound consequences for patients and sometimes led to professionals experiencing considerable uncertainty and stress. Conclusions Our qualitative enquiry provided new insights into the way allied health professionals make important clinical decisions for patients with acute stroke. This is the first known study to demonstrate that the subjective prediction

  3. Rapid Deployment of International Tele-Intensive Care Unit Services in War-Torn Syria.

    PubMed

    Moughrabieh, Anas; Weinert, Craig

    2016-02-01

    The conflict in Syria has created the largest humanitarian emergency of the twenty-first century. The 4-year Syrian conflict has destroyed hospitals and severely reduced the capacity of intensive care units (ICUs) and on-site intensivists. The crisis has triggered attempts from abroad to support the medical care of severely injured and acutely ill civilians inside Syria, including application of telemedicine. Within the United States, tele-ICU programs have been operating for more than a decade, albeit with high start-up costs and generally long development times. With the benefit of lessons drawn from those domestic models, the Syria Tele-ICU program was launched in December 2012 to manage the care of ICU patients in parts of Syria by using inexpensive, off-the-shelf video cameras, free social media applications, and a volunteer network of Arabic-speaking intensivists in North America and Europe. Within 1 year, 90 patients per month in three ICUs were receiving tele-ICU services. At the end of 2015, a network of approximately 20 participating intensivists was providing clinical decision support 24 hours per day to five civilian ICUs in Syria. The volunteer clinicians manage patients at a distance of more than 6,000 miles, separated by seven or eight time zones between North America and Syria. The program is implementing a cloud-based electronic medical record for physician documentation and a medication administration record for nurses. There are virtual chat rooms for patient rounds, radiology review, and trainee teaching. The early success of the program shows how a small number of committed physicians can use inexpensive equipment spawned by the Internet revolution to support from afar civilian health care delivery in a high-conflict country. PMID:26788827

  4. MULTIDISCIPLINARY ACUTE CARE RESEARCH ORGANIZATION (MACRO): IF YOU BUILD IT THEY WILL COME

    PubMed Central

    Early, Barbara J.; Huang, David T.; Callaway, Clifton; Zenati, Mazen; Angus, Derek C.; Gunn, Scott; Yealy, Donald M.; Unikel, Daniel; Billiar, Timothy R.; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Sperry, Jason L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical research will increasingly play a core role in the evolution and growth of acute care surgery (ACS) program development across the country. What constitutes an efficient and effective clinical research infrastructure in the current fiscal and academic environment remains obscure. We sought to characterize the effects of implementation of a multidisciplinary acute care research organization (MACRO) at a busy tertiary referral university setting. Methods In 2008, to minimize redundancy, cost, and maximize existing resources promoting acute care research, MACRO was created unifying clinical research infrastructure between the Departments of Critical Care Medicine, Emergency Medicine and Surgery. Over the time periods 2008–2012 we performed a retrospective analysis and determined volume of clinical studies, patient enrollment for both observational (OBS) and interventional (INTV) trials, and staff growth since MACROs origination and characterized changes over time. Results From 2008 to 2011, the volume of patients enrolled in clinical studies which MACRO facilitates has significantly increased over 300%. The % of INTV/OBS trials has remained stable over the same time period (50–60%). Staff has increased from 6 coordinators to 10 with an additional 15 research associates allowing 24/7 service. With this significant growth, MACRO has become financially self-sufficient and additional outside departments now seek MACROs services. Conclusions Appropriate organization of acute care clinical research infrastructure minimizes redundancy and can promote sustainable, efficient growth in the current academic environment. Further studies are required to determine if similar models can be successful at other ACS programs. PMID:23778448

  5. Monitoring and evaluation in the special care unit: the JCAHO ten-step process.

    PubMed

    Claflin, N

    1991-02-01

    Monitoring and evaluating the quality and appropriateness of patient care in the special care unit is the basis for quality assurance activities. To make the monitoring and evaluation process helpful, health care professionals in special care units must be involved in each step of the process. The focus must be on patient care, specifically on clinical aspects of care rather than on structural specifications or technical processes. In addition to assisting the special care unit to meet accreditation requirements, ongoing monitoring and evaluation assist that unit to assure high-quality care. Monitoring and evaluation activities also assist the special care unit manager in responding to demands of state and federal regulators by providing an objective assessment of the care provided to Medicare and Medicaid patients. These activities also can provide assistance in responding to concerns about lawsuits involving alleged negligence in provision of special care; and in meeting pressures from third-party payers to reduce costs associated with unnecessary treatment in special care units. This chapter describes how the ten-step monitoring and evaluation process can be used to help assure high-quality patient care in the special care unit. PMID:1995014

  6. Patient-care time allocation by nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Use of nurse practitioners and physician assistants ("affiliates") is increasing significantly in the intensive care unit (ICU). Despite this, few data exist on how affiliates allocate their time in the ICU. The purpose of this study was to understand the allocation of affiliate time into patient-care and non-patient-care activity, further dividing the time devoted to patient care into billable service and equally important but nonbillable care. Methods We conducted a quasi experimental study in seven ICUs in an academic hospital and a hybrid academic/community hospital. After a period of self-reporting, a one-time monetary incentive of $2,500 was offered to 39 affiliates in each ICU in which every affiliate documented greater than 75% of their time devoted to patient care over a 6-month period in an effort to understand how affiliates allocated their time throughout a shift. Documentation included billable time (critical care, evaluation and management, procedures) and a new category ("zero charge time"), which facilitated record keeping of other patient-care activities. Results At baseline, no ICUs had documentation of 75% patient-care time by all of its affiliates. In the 6 months in which reporting was tied to a group incentive, six of seven ICUs had every affiliate document greater than 75% of their time. Individual time documentation increased from 53% to 84%. Zero-charge time accounted for an average of 21% of each shift. The most common reason was rounding, which accounted for nearly half of all zero-charge time. Sign out, chart review, and teaching were the next most common zero-charge activities. Documentation of time spent on billable activities also increased from 53% of an affiliate's shift to 63%. Time documentation was similar regardless of during which shift an affiliate worked. Conclusions Approximately two thirds of an affiliate's shift is spent providing billable services to patients. Greater than 20% of each shift is spent providing

  7. Five pitfalls of work redesign in acute care.

    PubMed

    Seago, J A

    1997-10-01

    During work redesign in nursing units, five common pitfalls can emerge: moving too fast, failing to involve major stakeholders, discounting bargaining unit contracts, separating training classes and not defining desired outcomes. Suggestions on how to avoid these problems are given. PMID:9369723

  8. Meeting ethical challenges in acute care work as narrated by enrolled nurses.

    PubMed

    Sørlie, Venke; Kihlgren, Annica Larsson; Kihlgren, Mona

    2004-03-01

    Five enrolled nurses (ENs) were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of registered nurses, ENs and patients about their experiences in an acute care ward. The ward opened in 1997 and provides patient care for a period of up to three days, during which time a decision has to be made regarding further care elsewhere or a return home. The ENs were interviewed concerning their experience of being in ethically difficult care situations and of acute care work. The method of phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur was used. The most prominent feature was the focus on relationships, as expressed in concern for society's and administrators' responsibility for health care and the care of older people. Other themes focus on how nurse managers respond to the ENs' work as well as their relationships with fellow ENs, in both work situations and shared social and sports activities. Their reflections seem to show an expectation of care as expressed in their lived experiences and their desire for a particular level and quality of care for their own family members. A lack of time could lead to a bad conscience over the 'little bit extra' being omitted. This lack of time could also lead to tiredness and even burnout, but the system did not allow for more time. PMID:15030025

  9. The Role of Emergency Medical Services in Geriatrics: Bridging the Gap between Primary and Acute Care.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Judah; McVey, Jennifer; Ackroyd-Stolarz, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Caring for older adults is a major function of emergency medical services (EMS). Traditional EMS systems were designed to treat single acute conditions; this approach contrasts with best practices for the care of frail older adults. Care might be improved by the early identification of those who are frail and at highest risk for adverse outcomes. Paramedics are well positioned to play an important role via a more thorough evaluation of frailty (or vulnerability). These findings may inform both pre-hospital and subsequent emergency department (ED) based decisions. Innovative programs involving EMS, the ED, and primary care could reduce the workload on EDs while improving patient access to care, and ultimately patient outcomes. Some frail older adults will benefit from the resources and specialized knowledge provided by the ED, while others may be better helped in alternative ways, usually in coordination with primary care. Discerning between these groups is a challenge worthy of further inquiry. In either case, care should be timely, with a focus on identifying emergent or acute care needs, frailty evaluation, mobility assessments, identifying appropriate goals for treatment, promoting functional independence, and striving to have the patient return to their usual place of residence if this can be done safely. Paramedics are uniquely positioned to play a larger role in the care of our aging population. Improving paramedic education as it pertains to geriatrics is a critical next step. PMID:26282932

  10. Acute HIV-1 infection in the Southeastern United States: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    McKellar, Mehri S; Cope, Anna B; Gay, Cynthia L; McGee, Kara S; Kuruc, Joann D; Kerkau, Melissa G; Hurt, Christopher B; Fiscus, Susan A; Ferrari, Guido; Margolis, David M; Eron, Joseph J; Hicks, Charles B

    2013-01-01

    In 1998 a collaboration between Duke University and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (UNC) was founded to enhance identification of persons with acute HIV-1 infection (AHI). The Duke-UNC AHI Research Consortium Cohort consists of patients ≥18 years old with a positive nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) and either a negative enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test or a positive EIA with a negative/indeterminate Western blot. Patients were referred to the cohort from acute care settings and state-funded HIV testing sites that use NAAT testing on pooled HIV-1 antibody-negative samples. Between 1998 and 2010, 155 patients with AHI were enrolled: 81 (52%) African-Americans, 63 (41%) white, non-Hispanics, 137 (88%) males, 108 (70%) men who have sex with men (MSM), and 18 (12%) females. The median age was 27 years (IQR 22-38). Most (n=138/155) reported symptoms with a median duration of 17.5 days. The median nadir CD4 count was 408 cells/mm(3) (IQR 289-563); the median observed peak HIV-1 level was 726,859 copies/ml (IQR 167,585-3,565,728). The emergency department was the most frequent site of initial presentation (n=55/152; 3 missing data). AHI diagnosis was made at time of first contact in 62/137 (45%; 18 missing data) patients. This prospectively enrolled cohort is the largest group of patients with AHI reported from the Southeastern United States. The demographics reflect the epidemic of this geographic area with a high proportion of African-Americans, including young black MSM. Highlighting the challenges of diagnosing AHI, less than half of the patients were diagnosed at the first healthcare visit. Women made up a small proportion despite increasing numbers in our clinics. PMID:22839749

  11. Supportive medical care for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, Francesco; Antillon, Federico; Pacheco, Carlos; Sullivan, Courtney E; Lam, Catherine G; Howard, Scott C; Conter, Valentino

    2015-10-01

    In the last two decades, remarkable progress in the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia has been achieved in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), but survival rates remain significantly lower than those in high-income countries. Inadequate supportive care and consequent excess mortality from toxicity are important causes of treatment failure for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in LMIC. This article summarizes practical supportive care recommendations for healthcare providers practicing in LMIC, starting with core approaches in oncology nursing care, management of tumor lysis syndrome and mediastinal masses, nutritional support, use of blood products for anemia and thrombocytopenia, and palliative care. Prevention and treatment of infectious diseases are described in a parallel paper. PMID:26013005

  12. Implications of the New Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Pressure Ulcer Policy in Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Fleck, Cynthia A.

    2009-01-01

    One of the leading questions on clinicians' minds is, What are the implications of the new ruling of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in acute care, and how will it affect the wound care clinician? The CMS recently unveiled its plans for reimbursement and nonpayment for facility-acquired pressure ulcers, among other issues, in acute care. Change is coming, and this time prevention and intervention underlie the CMS payment reform ruling, which includes payment incentive for prevention and quality patient care. Intensive and comprehensive patient screenings at the outset of admission, as well as diligent prevention during patient stay, are the mainstays of this initiative. Anyone who works in a hospital will play a major role. PMID:24527115

  13. Whole body massage for reducing anxiety and stabilizing vital signs of patients in cardiac care unit

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Abasi, Ali; Rajabi-Beheshtabad, Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients admitted in coronary care units face various stressors. Ambiguity of future life conditions and unawareness of caring methods intensifies the patients’ anxiety and stress. This study was conducted to assess the effects of whole body massage on anxiety and vital signs of patients with acute coronary disorders. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 120 patients. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups. The intervention group received a session of whole body massage and the control group received routine care. The levels of State, Trait and overall anxiety and vital signs were assessed in both groups before and after intervention. Independent sample t-test, paired t-test, Chi-square and Fischer exact tests were used for data analysis. Results: The baseline overall mean score of anxiety was 79.43±29.34 in the intervention group and was decreased to 50.38±20.35 after massage therapy (p=0.001). However, no significant changes were occurred in the overall mean anxiety in the control group during the study. The baseline diastolic blood pressure was 77.05±8.12 mmHg and was decreased to 72.18±9.19 mmHg after the intervention (p=0.004). Also, significant decreases were occurred in heart rate and respiration rate of intervention group after massage therapy (p=0.001). However, no significant changes were occurred in vital signs of the control group during the study. Conclusion: The results suggest that whole body massage was effective in reducing anxiety and stabilizing vital signs of patients with acute coronary disorders. PMID:25405113

  14. Transitions of care in the management of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Verastegui, Jaime E; Hamada, Yukihiro; Nicolau, David P

    2016-08-01

    Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) have evolved over a relatively short period of time to become one of the most challenging medical problems encountered in clinical practice. Notably the high incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) across the continuum of care has coincided with increased outpatient failures and higher rates of hospital admissions for parental antibiotic therapy. Consequently the management of ABSSSI constitutes a tremendous burden to the healthcare system in terms of cost of care and consumption of institutional and clinical resources. This perspective piece discusses current and new approaches to the management of ABSSSI in a hospital setting and the need for a multifaceted approach. Treatment strategies for the management through the utilization of observation units (OU), Outpatient Parental Antibiotic Therapy (OPAT), and newly developed antibiotics for the use against skin infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria will be discussed in the context of ABSSSI. PMID:27248789

  15. Managing patients with behavioral health problems in acute care: balancing safety and financial viability.

    PubMed

    Rape, Cyndy; Mann, Tammy; Schooley, John; Ramey, Jana

    2015-01-01

    With a recent decrease in community resources for the mental health population, acute care facilities must seek creative, cost-effective ways to protect and care for these vulnerable individuals. This article describes 1 facility's journey to maintaining patient and staff safety while reducing cost. Success factors of this program include staff engagement, environmental modifications, and a nurse-driven, sitter-reduction process. PMID:25479169

  16. Acute nursing care and management of patients with sickle cell.

    PubMed

    De, Diana

    The information provided in this article has been developed to coincide with the recent findings from a National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (2008) report, 'A Sickle Cell Crisis', which calls for nurses to learn more about the disorder in order to better support patients in their care. This article reiterates much of the previous written literature, which has made reference to compromised patient care due to the ongoing unfamiliarity surrounding sickle cell disorders among healthcare professionals in Western societies. Readers will be given an overview of the condition and general clinical guidance on the management of care for patients when they are experiencing a state of'crisis'. Readers should note that the term 'painful episodes' is sometimes used in preference to sickle cell 'crises'. PMID:18856142

  17. Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control in Acute-Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sydnor, Emily R. M.; Perl, Trish M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) have become more common as medical care has grown more complex and patients have become more complicated. HAIs are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Growing rates of HAIs alongside evidence suggesting that active surveillance and infection control practices can prevent HAIs led to the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control programs. The role for infection control programs has grown and continues to grow as rates of antimicrobial resistance rise and HAIs lead to increasing risks to patients and expanding health care costs. In this review, we summarize the history of the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control, common HAIs and the pathogens causing them, and the structure and role of a hospital epidemiology and infection control program. PMID:21233510

  18. Traumatic brain injury in children: acute care management.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Kristen; Meller, Karen; Kulpan, Carol; Mowery, Bernice D

    2013-01-01

    The care of the pediatric patient with a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an all-encompassing nursing challenge. Nursing vigilance is required to maintain a physiological balance that protects the injured brain. From the time a child and family first enter the hospital, they are met with the risk of potential death and an uncertain future. The family is subjected to an influx of complex medical and nursing terminology and interventions. Nurses need to understand the complexities of TBI and the modalities of treatment, as well as provide patients and families with support throughout all phases of care. PMID:24640314

  19. Supporting Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Parents Through Social Media.

    PubMed

    Dzubaty, Dolores R

    2016-01-01

    Parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit may often find themselves seeking healthcare information from online and social media sources. Social media applications are available to healthcare consumers and their families, as well as healthcare providers, in a variety of formats. Information that parents gather on their own, and information that is explained by providers, is then used when parents make healthcare decisions regarding their infants. Parents also seek support from peers and family while making healthcare decisions. The combination of knowledge obtained and social support given may empower the parent to feel more confident in their decision making. Healthcare professionals can guide parents to credible resources. The exchange of information between providers and parents can occur using a variety of communication methods. Misperceptions can be corrected, support given, open sharing of information occurs, and parent empowerment may result. PMID:27465452

  20. Optimal physicians schedule in an Intensive Care Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidri, L.; Labidi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we consider a case study for the problem of physicians scheduling in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The objective is to minimize the total overtime under complex constraints. The considered ICU is composed of three buildings and the physicians are divided accordingly into six teams. The workload is assigned to each team under a set of constraints. The studied problem is composed of two simultaneous phases: composing teams and assigning the workload to each one of them. This constitutes an additional major hardness compared to the two phase's process: composing teams and after that assigning the workload. The physicians schedule in this ICU is used to be done manually each month. In this work, the studied physician scheduling problem is formulated as an integer linear program and solved optimally using state of the art software. The preliminary experimental results show that 50% of the overtime can be saved.

  1. Strategies for appropriate antibiotic use in intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Camila Delfino Ribeiro; Silva, Moacyr

    2015-01-01

    The comsumption of antibiotics is high, mainly in intensive care units. Unfortunately, most are inappropriately used leading to increased multi-resistant bacteria. It is well known that initial empirical therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce mortality rates. However the prolonged and irrational use of antimicrobials may also increase the risk of toxicity, drug interactions and diarrhea due to Clostridium difficile. Some strategies to rational use of antimicrobial agents include avoiding colonization treatment, de-escalation, monitoring serum levels of the agents, appropriate duration of therapy and use of biological markers. This review discusses the effectiveness of these strategies, the importance of microbiology knowledge, considering there are agents resistant to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae, and reducing antibiotic use and bacterial resistance, with no impact on mortality. PMID:26132360

  2. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy in Intensive Care Unit: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Dinic, Vesna; Markovic, Danica; Savic, Nenad; Kutlesic, Marija; Jankovic, Radmilo J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a systolic heart failure that occurs during the last month of pregnancy or within 5 months after delivery. It is an uncommon disease of unknown etiopathogenesis and has a very high rate of maternal mortality. Because of similarity between symptoms of PPCM and physiological discomforts during pregnancy, the early diagnosis of PPCM presents a major challenge. Since hemodynamic changes during PPCM can vitally jeopardize the mother and the fetus, patients with severe forms of PPCM require a multidisciplinary approach in intensive care units. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the diagnosis, monitoring, and the treatment of PPCM. Having reviewed the recent researches, it gives insight into the new treatment strategies of this rare disease. PMID:26636086

  3. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Haddadin, A; Fappiano, S; Lipsett, P

    2002-01-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major nosocomial pathogen that causes severe morbidity and mortality worldwide. MRSA strains are endemic in many American and European hospitals and account for 29%–35% of all clinical isolates. Recent studies have documented the increased costs associated with MRSA infection, as well as the importance of colonisation pressure. Surveillance strategies have been proposed especially in high risk areas such as the intensive care unit. Pneumonia and bacteraemia account for the majority of MRSA serious clinical infections, but intra-abdominal infections, osteomyelitis, toxic shock syndrome, food poisoning, and deep tissue infections are also important clinical diseases. The traditional antibiotic therapy for MRSA is a glycopeptide, vancomycin. New antibiotics have been recently released that add to the armamentarium for therapy against MRSA and include linezolid, and quinupristin/dalfopristin, but cost, side effects, and resistance may limit their long term usefulness. PMID:12151652

  4. Nutritional support of children in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Seashore, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Nutritional support is an integral and essential part of the management of 5-10 percent of hospitalized children. Children in the intensive care unit are particularly likely to develop malnutrition because of the nature and duration of their illness, and their inability to eat by mouth. This article reviews the physiology of starvation and the development of malnutrition in children. A method of estimating the nutritional requirements of children is presented. The techniques of nutritional support, including enteral, peripheral, and central parenteral nutrition are discussed in detail. Appropriate formulas are given for different age groups. Electrolyte, vitamin, and mineral supplements are discussed. Guidelines are provided for choosing between peripheral and central total parenteral nutrition. A monitoring protocol is suggested and complications of nutritional therapy are reviewed. Safe and effective nutritional support requires considerable investment of time and effort by members of the nutrition team. PMID:6433586

  5. Heart rate dynamics preceding hemorrhage in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Moss, Travis J; Clark, Matthew T; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall; Calland, J Forrest

    2015-01-01

    Occult hemorrhage in surgical/trauma intensive care unit (STICU) patients is common and may lead to circulatory collapse. Continuous electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring may allow for early identification and treatment, and could improve outcomes. We studied 4,259 consecutive admissions to the STICU at the University of Virginia Health System. We collected ECG waveform data captured by bedside monitors and calculated linear and non-linear measures of the RR interbeat intervals. We tested the hypothesis that a transfusion requirement of 3 or more PRBC transfusions in a 24 hour period is preceded by dynamical changes in these heart rate measures and performed logistic regression modeling. We identified 308 hemorrhage events. A multivariate model including heart rate, standard deviation of the RR intervals, detrended fluctuation analysis, and local dynamics density had a C-statistic of 0.62. Earlier detection of hemorrhage might improve outcomes by allowing earlier resuscitation in STICU patients. PMID:26342251

  6. A Tale of 2 Units: Lessons in Changing the Care Delivery Model.

    PubMed

    Wharton, Glenda; Berger, Jill; Williams, Tracy

    2016-04-01

    In response to patient care quality and satisfaction concerns, a hospital determined the need to change the care delivery model on some inpatient units. Two pilot units adopted 2 different models of care. The authors describe the change project, successful outcomes, and lessons learned. PMID:26963441

  7. Pilot Study of Behavioral Treatment in Dementia Care Units.(practice Concepts)(author Abstract)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberg, Peter A.; Kemp-Havican, Julie; MacNeill, Susan E.; Johnson, Amanda Schafer

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on the development and use of behavioral treatment as a well-being intervention for individuals with dementia residing at special care units in a nursing home. Design and Methods: The project took place upon the construction and opening of two new homelike units for dementia care in a rural community-care center.…

  8. Associations of Special Care Units and Outcomes of Residents with Dementia: 2004 National Nursing Home Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Huabin; Fang, Xiangming; Liao, Youlian; Elliott, Amanda; Zhang, Xinzhi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We compared the rates of specialized care for residents with Alzheimer's disease or dementia in special care units (SCUs) and other nursing home (NH) units and examined the associations of SCU residence with process of care and resident outcomes. Design and Methods: Data came from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. The indicators of…

  9. Compilation of the neonatal palliative care clinical guideline in neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali; Zoafa, Aniyehsadat; Marofi, Maryam; Badiee, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clinical guidelines are important instruments for increasing the quality of clinical practice in the treatment team. Compilation of clinical guidelines is important due to special condition of the neonates and the nurses facing critical conditions in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). With 98% of neonatal deaths occurring in NICUs in the hospitals, it is important to pay attention to this issue. This study aimed at compilation of the neonatal palliative care clinical guidelines in NICU. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with multistage comparative strategies with localization in Isfahan in 2013. In the first step, the components of the neonatal palliative care clinical guidelines were determined by searching in different databases. In the second stage, the level of expert group's consensus with each component of neonatal palliative care in the nominal group and focus group was investigated, and the clinical guideline was written based on that. In the third stage, the quality and applicability were determined with the positive viewpoints of medical experts, nurses, and members of the science board of five cities in Iran. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics through SPSS. Results: In the first stage, the draft of neonatal palliative care was designed based on neonates’, their parents’, and the related staff's requirements. In the second stage, its rank and applicability were determined and after analyzing the responses, with agreement of the focus group, the clinical guideline was written. In the third stage, the means of indication scores obtained were 75%, 69%, 72%, 72%, and 68% by Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) instrument. Conclusions: The compilation of the guideline can play an effective role in provision of neonatal care in nursing. PMID:26120329

  10. Communication of mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Martinho, Carina Isabel Ferreira; Rodrigues, Inês Tello Rato Milheiras

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to translate and culturally and linguistically adapt the Ease of Communication Scale and to assess the level of communication difficulties for patients undergoing mechanical ventilation with orotracheal intubation, relating these difficulties to clinical and sociodemographic variables. Methods This study had three stages: (1) cultural and linguistic adaptation of the Ease of Communication Scale; (2) preliminary assessment of its psychometric properties; and (3) observational, descriptive-correlational and cross-sectional study, conducted from March to August 2015, based on the Ease of Communication Scale - after extubation answers and clinical and sociodemographic variables of 31 adult patients who were extubated, clinically stable and admitted to five Portuguese intensive care units. Results Expert analysis showed high agreement on content (100%) and relevance (75%). The pretest scores showed a high acceptability regarding the completion of the instrument and its usefulness. The Ease of Communication Scale showed excellent internal consistency (0.951 Cronbach's alpha). The factor analysis explained approximately 81% of the total variance with two scale components. On average, the patients considered the communication experiences during intubation to be "quite hard" (2.99). No significant correlation was observed between the communication difficulties reported and the studied sociodemographic and clinical variables, except for the clinical variable "number of hours after extubation" (p < 0.05). Conclusion This study translated and adapted the first assessment instrument of communication difficulties for mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care units into European Portuguese. The preliminary scale validation suggested high reliability. Patients undergoing mechanical ventilation reported that communication during intubation was "quite hard", and these communication difficulties apparently existed regardless of the

  11. Six-month survival and quality of life of intensive care patients with acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) has high incidence among the critically ill and associates with dismal outcome. Not only the long-term survival, but also the quality of life (QOL) of patients with AKI is relevant due to substantial burden of care regarding these patients. We aimed to study the long-term outcome and QOL of patients with AKI treated in intensive care units. Methods We conducted a predefined six-month follow-up of adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients from the prospective, observational, multi-centre FINNAKI study. We evaluated the QOL of survivors with the EuroQol (EQ-5D) questionnaire. We included all participating sites with at least 70% rate of QOL measurements in the analysis. Results Of the 1,568 study patients, 635 (40.5%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 38.0-43.0%) had AKI according to the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. Of the 635 AKI patients, 224 (35.3%), as compared to 154/933 (16.5%) patients without AKI, died within six months. Of the 1,190 survivors, 959 (80.6%) answered the EQ-5D questionnaire at six months. The QOL (median with Interquartile range, IQR) measured with the EQ-5D index and compared to age- and sex-matched general population was: 0.676 (0.520-1.00) versus 0.826 (0.812-0.859) for AKI patients, and 0.690 (0.533-1.00) versus 0.845 (0.812-0.882) for patients without AKI (P <0.001 in both). The EQ-5D at the time of ICU admission was available for 774 (80.7%) of the six-month respondents. We detected a mean increase of 0.017 for non-AKI and of 0.024 for AKI patients in the EQ-5D index (P = 0.728). The EQ-5D visual analogue scores (median with IQR) of patients with AKI (70 (50–83)) and patients without AKI (75 (60–87)) were not different from the age- and sex-matched general population (69 (68–73) and 70 (68–77)). Conclusions The health-related quality of life of patients with and without AKI was already lower on ICU admission than that of the age- and sex-matched general

  12. Community-acquired pneumonia in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Marques, M Raquel; Nunes, António; Sousa, Cristina; Moura, Fausto; Gouveia, João; Ramos, Armindo

    2010-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading cause of sepsis in adult critical care. We present a retrospective study of patients admitted to a polyvalent intensive care unit with CAP from 1st June 2004 - 31st December 2006. We analysed 76 patients with a mean age of 62.88 (18.75) years. Mean APACHE II score was 24.88 (9.75). Mean SAPS II was 51.18 (18.05), with a predicted mortality of 47.27%. Aetiology was identified in 42.1% of the patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequent aetiological agent, but the group of aetiological agents more frequently identified was Gram-negative enteric bacilli. Levofloxacine was the most frequently previously used antibio tic. The most frequently used antibiotherapy scheme was the association ceftriaxone - azithromicine. It was possible to evaluate suitability of treatment in 32 patients; 27 were on suitable antibiotherapy regimes. 66 patients (86.8%) were on respirators, with a median length of 4 days. The median length of stay was 5.3 days. ICU mortality was 36.8% and hospital mortality 55.26%. SAPS II, CRP (C-reactive protein), potassium and initial unsuitable antibiotherapy were related to mortality. After multivariate analysis, only SAPS II maintained statistical significance. Use of antibiotics should be judicious, taking the most frequent agents and their susceptibility into consideration. PMID:20437001

  13. Cognitive Workload of Computerized Nursing Process in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Dal Sasso, Grace Marcon; Barra, Daniela Couto Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was to measure the cognitive workload to complete printed nursing process versus computerized nursing process from International Classification Practice of Nursing in intensive care units. It is a quantitative, before-and-after quasi-experimental design, with a sample of 30 participants. Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index. Six cognitive categories were measured. The "temporal demand" was the largest contributor to the cognitive workload, and the role of the nursing process in the "performance" category has excelled that of computerized nursing process. It was concluded that computerized nursing process contributes to lower cognitive workload of nurses for being a support system for decision making based on the International Classification Practice of Nursing. The computerized nursing process as a logical structure of the data, information, diagnoses, interventions and results become a reliable option for health improvement of healthcare, because it can enhance nurse safe decision making, with the intent to reduce damage and adverse events to patients in intensive care. PMID:26061562

  14. Medical staffing in Ontario neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Paes, B; Mitchell, A; Hunsberger, M; Blatz, S; Watts, J; Dent, P; Sinclair, J; Southwell, D

    1989-06-01

    Advances in technology have improved the survival rates of infants of low birth weight. Increasing service commitments together with cutbacks in Canadian training positions have caused concerns about medical staffing in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Ontario. To determine whether an imbalance exists between the supply of medical personnel and the demand for health care services, in July 1985 we surveyed the medical directors, head nurses and staff physicians of nine tertiary level NICUs and the directors of five postgraduate pediatric residency programs. On the basis of current guidelines recommending an ideal neonatologist:patient ratio of 1:6 (assuming an adequate number of support personnel) most of the NICUs were understaffed. Concern about the heavy work pattern and resulting lifestyle implications has made Canadian graduates reluctant to enter this subspecialty. We propose strategies to correct staffing shortages in the context of rapidly increasing workloads resulting from a continuing cutback of pediatric residency positions and restrictions on immigration of foreign trainees. PMID:2720515

  15. The intensive care unit psychosocial care scale: Development and initial validation.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Meena; Chivukula, Usha; Rana, Suvashisa

    2015-12-01

    The main objective of the current study was to construct a new self-report scale - ICU-PC Scale - to measure the psychosocial care (PC) of patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and examine different psychometric issues in the development and initial validation of this scale. The findings indicate that the ICU-PC Scale has established high internal consistency. A three-factor structure - protection of human dignity and rights, transparency for decision making and care continuity and sustained patient, family orientation - has been identified with a substantial number of subjects (N=250) in hospital settings. The three oblique factor solutions are found to be interrelated and interdependent with good indices of internal consistency and content validity. This new instrument is the first of its kind to measure the psychosocial care to be provided to patients in the ICU. The present findings indicate that the ICU-PC scale, with additional factor analytic research, could become an established and clinical tool. PMID:26321092

  16. Factors Contributing to Readmission of Seniors into Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, Vaughn; Ehlman, Katie; Conners, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Medicare spending is expected to increase by 79% between the years 2010 and 2020, caused, in-part, by hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. This study identified factors contributing to hospital readmissions in a midwest heath service area (HSA), using Coleman's Transition Care Model as the theoretical framework. The researchers…

  17. Acute coronary syndrome registry from four large centres in United Arab Emirates (UAE-ACS Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Yusufali, Afzalhussein M; AlMahmeed, Wael; Tabatabai, Sadeq; Rao, Kabad; Binbrek, Azan

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify the characteristics, treatments and hospital outcomes of patients diagnosed as having acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Design A 3-year prospective registry. Setting Four tertiary care hospitals in three major cities of UAE from December 2003 to December 2006. Patients 1842 eligible consecutive patients with suspected ACS. Interventions None. Main outcome measures Characteristics, treatments and in-hospital outcomes were recorded. Results The mean age was 50.8±10.0 years, and 93.1% were male. More than half (51%) had ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The smoking rate was 46.4%, and diabetes was present in 38.9%. Only a minority (17.3%) used the ambulance services. For patients with STEMI, the median symptom to hospital time was 127 (IQR 60–256) min, and the median diagnostic ECG to thrombolysis time was 28 (IQR 16–50) min. Reperfusion in STEMI was in 81.4% (64.8% thrombolysis and 16.6% primary percutaneous coronary intervention). During hospitalisation, only a minority of the patients did not receive antiplatelets, anticoagulants, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors and statin therapy. In-hospital complications were not common in our registry cohort. In-hospital mortality was 1.68%. Conclusions ACS patients in UAE are young but have higher risk factors such as smoking and diabetes. Almost half present as STEMI. Only a minority use ambulance services.

  18. Management of Port-a-Cath devices in long-term acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bonczek, Rita; Nurse, Brenda A

    2012-01-01

    A reliable means of maintaining an intravascular access device (IVAD) is an important aspect of care for a patient in a long-term acute care (LTAC) setting. Overall, various authors have confirmed that complication rates are lower with use of an IVAD. The key to this success in low complication rates appears to be a team approach to catheter care and management. In our unique practice setting, LTAC, we have over 20 years of experience with IVAD care and management. In an extensive 15-year retrospective review of the IVAD care, we found very low rates of complications, including infections. This is directly related to a team approach to catheter care, protocol development, employee education, and postoperative management. PMID:23212956

  19. Dying in two acute hospitals: would usual care meet Australian national clinical standards?

    PubMed

    Clark, Katherine; Byfieldt, Naomi; Green, Malcolm; Saul, Peter; Lack, Jill; Philips, Jane L

    2014-05-01

    The Australian Commission for Quality and Safety in Health Care (ACQSHC) has articulated 10 clinical standards with the aim of improving the consistency of quality healthcare delivery. Currently, the majority of Australians die in acute hospitals. But despite this, no agreed standard of care exists to define the minimum standard of care that people should accept in the final hours to days of life. As a result, there is limited capacity to conduct audits that focus on the gap between current care and recommended care. There is, however, accumulating evidence in the end of life literature to define which aspects of care are likely to be considered most important to those people facing imminent death. These themes offer standards against which to conduct audits. This is very apt given the national recommendation that healthcare should be delivered in the context of considering people's wishes while always treating people with dignity and respect. PMID:24589365

  20. Impact on mortality of the timing of renal replacement therapy in patients with severe acute kidney injury in septic shock: the IDEAL-ICU study (initiation of dialysis early versus delayed in the intensive care unit): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the most dreaded complications of septic shock is acute kidney injury. It occurs in around 50% of patients, with a mortality rate of about 60% at 3 months. There is no consensus on the optimal time to initiate renal replacement therapy. Retrospective and observational studies suggest that early implementation of renal replacement therapy could improve the prognosis for these patients. Methods/design This protocol summarizes the rationale and design of a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial investigating the effect of early versus delayed renal replacement therapy in patients with severe acute kidney injury in early septic shock. In total, 864 critically ill adults with septic shock and evidence of acute kidney injury, defined as the failure stage of the RIFLE classification, will be enrolled. The primary outcome is mortality at 90 days. Secondary outcomes include safety, number of days free of mechanical ventilation, number of days free of renal replacement therapy, intensive care length of stay, in-hospital length of stay, quality of life as evaluated by the EQ-5D and renal replacement therapy dependence at hospital discharge. The primary analysis will be intention to treat. Recruitment started in March 2012 and will be completed by March 2015. Discussion This protocol for a randomized controlled study investigating the impact of the timing of renal replacement therapy initiation should provide an answer to a key question for the management of patients with acute kidney injury in the context of septic shock, for whom the mortality rate remains close to 60% despite improved understanding of physiopathology and recent therapeutic advances. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01682590, registered on 10 September 2012. PMID:24998258

  1. An exploration of the leadership attributes and methods associated with successful lean system deployments in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Steed, Airica

    2012-01-01

    The lean system has been shown to be a viable and sustainable solution for the growing number of cost, quality, and efficiency issues in the health care industry. While there is a growing body of evidence to support the outcomes that can be achieved as a result of the successful application of the lean system in hospital organizations, there is not a complete understanding of the leadership attributes and methods that are necessary to achieve successful widespread mobilization and sustainment. This study was an exploration of leadership and its relevant association with successful lean system deployments in acute care hospitals. This research employed an exploratory qualitative research design encompassing a research questionnaire and telephonic interviews of 25 health care leaders in 8 hospital organizations across the United States. The results from this study identified the need to have a strong combination of personal characteristics, learned behaviors, strategies, tools, and tactics that evolved into a starting adaptable framework for health care leaders to leverage when starting their own transformational change journeys using the lean system. Health care leaders could utilize the outcomes reported in this study as a conduit to enhance the effective deployment, widespread adoption, and sustainment of the lean system in practice. PMID:22207019

  2. Characteristics and mortality of elderly patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of a district hospital

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José Carlos Llamas; Alonso, Joaquín Valle; Fonseca, Javier; Santos, Margarita Luque; Jiménez, María de los Ángeles Ruiz-Cabello; Braniff, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study all the elderly patients (≥75 years) who were admitted in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a Spanish hospital and identify factors associated with mortality. Patients and Methods: A retrospective, observational data collected prospectively in patients ≥75 years recruited from the ICU in the period of January 2004 to December 2010. Results: During the study period, 1661 patients were admitted to our unit, of whom 553 (33.3%) were older than 75 years. The mean age was 79.9 years, 317 (57.3%) were male, and the overall in-hospital mortality was 94 patients (17% confidence interval 14–20.3%). When comparing patients who survived to those who died, we found significant differences in mean age (P = 0.001), Acute Physiologic Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Simplified Acute Physiology Scoring II (SAPS II) on admission (P < 0.0001, postoperative patients (P = 0.001), and need for mechanical ventilation (P < 0.0001). Comparing age groups, we found statistically significant differences in SAPS II (P = 0.007), diagnosis of non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (P = 0.014), complicated postoperative period (P = 0.001), and pacemaker (P = 0.034). Mortality between the groups was statistically significant (P = 0.004). The survival between the group of 65 and 74 years and patients >75 years was not significant (P = 0.1390). Conclusions: The percentage of elderly patients in our unit is high, with low mortality rates. The age itself is not the sole determinant for admission to the ICU and other factors should be taken into account. PMID:27555692

  3. Improving Diagnostic Accuracy of Anaphylaxis in the Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Bjornsson, Hjalti M.; Graffeo, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    The identification and appropriate management of those at highest risk for life-threatening anaphylaxis remains a clinical enigma. The most widely used criteria for such patients were developed in a symposium convened by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease/Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network. In this paper we review the current literature on the diagnosis of acute allergic reactions as well as atypical presentations that clinicians should recognize. Review of case series reveals significant variability in definition and approach to this common and potentially life-threatening condition. Series on fatal cases of anaphylaxis indicate that mucocutaneous signs and symptoms occur less frequently than in milder cases. Of biomarkers studied to aid in the work-up of possible anaphylaxis, drawing blood during the initial six hours of an acute reaction for analysis of serum tryptase has been recommended in atypical cases. This can provide valuable information when a definitive diagnosis cannot be made by history and physical exam. PMID:21293765

  4. [Special challenges in the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe].

    PubMed

    Marugg, Donat

    2015-04-22

    Oberengadin Hospital in Samedan is faced with particular challenges, as the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe (1750 m = 5,740 ft above sea level). The factors responsible for this are elevation-related and meteorological/climatic influences, as well as seasonal variations in Südbünden's demographic structure due to tourism. PMID:26072605

  5. The effects of telemedicine on racial and ethnic disparities in access to acute stroke care

    PubMed Central

    Lyerly, Michael J; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Mullen, Michael T; Albright, Karen C; Wolff, Catherine; Boehme, Amelia K; Branas, Charles C; Grotta, James C; Savitz, Sean I; Carr, Brendan G

    2016-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities have been previously reported in acute stroke care. We sought to determine the effect of telemedicine (TM) on access to acute stroke care for racial and ethnic minorities in the state of Texas. Data were collected from the US Census Bureau, The Joint Commission and the American Hospital Association. Access for racial and ethnic minorities was determined by summing the population that could reach a primary stroke centre (PSC) or telemedicine spoke within specified time intervals using validated models. TM extended access to stroke expertise by 1.5 million residents. The odds of providing 60-minute access via TM were similar in Blacks and Whites (prevalence odds ratios (POR) 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.001). The odds of providing access via TM were also similar for Hispanics and non-Hispanics (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000). We found that telemedicine increased access to acute stroke care for 1.5 million Texans. While racial and ethnic disparities exist in other components of stroke care, we did not find evidence of disparities in access to the acute stroke expertise afforded by telemedicine. PMID:26116854

  6. Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Services Planned and Levels of Implementation and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auslander, Gail K.; Soskolne, Varda; Stanger, Varda; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Kaplan, Giora

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the implementation, adequacy, and outcomes of discharge planning. The authors carried out a prospective study of 1,426 adult patients discharged from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel. Social workers provided detailed discharge plans on each patient. Telephone interviews were conducted two weeks post-discharge. Findings…

  7. Fear of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) among Health Care Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Kwong-Lo, Rosalie S. Y.; Mak, Christine W. Y.; Wong, Joe S.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined fear related to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) among 2 samples of hospital staff in Hong Kong. Sample 1 included health care workers (n = 82) and was assessed during the peak of the SARS epidemic. Sample 2 included hospital staff who recovered from SARS (n = 97). The results show that participants in…

  8. Effect of a Clostridium difficile Infection Prevention Initiative in Veterans Affairs Acute Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Evans, Martin E; Kralovic, Stephen M; Simbartl, Loretta A; Jain, Rajiv; Roselle, Gary A

    2016-06-01

    Rates of clinically confirmed hospital-onset healthcare facility-associated Clostridium difficile infections from July 1, 2012, through March 31, 2015, in 127 acute care Veterans Affairs facilities were evaluated. Quarterly pooled national standardized infection ratios decreased 15% from baseline by the final quarter of the analysis period (P=.01, linear regression). Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:720-722. PMID:26864803

  9. Post-Acute Home Care and Hospital Readmission of Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2004-01-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce…

  10. Integrated Clinical Geriatric Pharmacy Clerkship in Long Term, Acute and Ambulatory Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polo, Isabel; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A clinical geriatric pharmacy clerkship containing three separate practice areas (long-term, acute, and ambulatory care) is described. The program follows the medical education clerkship protocol, with a clinical pharmacy specialist, pharmacy practice resident, and student. Participation in medical rounds, interdisciplinary conferences, and…

  11. Temporal Trends in Hospitalization for Acute Decompensated Heart Failure in the United States, 1998-2011.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sunil K; Wruck, Lisa; Quibrera, Miguel; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Loehr, Laura R; Chang, Patricia P; Rosamond, Wayne D; Wright, Jacqueline; Heiss, Gerardo; Coresh, Josef

    2016-03-01

    Estimates of the numbers and rates of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) hospitalization are central to understanding health-care utilization and efforts to improve patient care. We comprehensively estimated the frequency, rate, and trends of ADHF hospitalization in the United States. Based on Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study surveillance adjudicating 12,450 eligible hospitalizations during 2005-2010, we developed prediction models for ADHF separately for 3 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code 428 discharge diagnosis groups: 428 primary, 428 nonprimary, or 428 absent. We applied the models to data from the National Inpatient Sample (11.5 million hospitalizations of persons aged ≥55 years with eligible ICD-9-CM codes), an all-payer, 20% probability sample of US community hospitals. The average estimated number of ADHF hospitalizations per year was 1.76 million (428 primary, 0.80 million; 428 nonprimary, 0.83 million; 428 absent, 0.13 million). During 1998-2004, the rate of ADHF hospitalization increased by 2.0%/year (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.8, 2.5) versus a 1.4%/year (95% CI: 0.8, 2.1) increase in code 428 primary hospitalizations (P < 0.001). In contrast, during 2005-2011, numbers of ADHF hospitalizations were stable (-0.5%/year; 95% CI: -1.4, 0.3), while the numbers of 428-primary hospitalizations decreased by -1.5%/year (95% CI: -2.2, -0.8) (P for contrast = 0.03). In conclusion, the estimated number of hospitalizations with ADHF is approximately 2 times higher than the number of hospitalizations with ICD-9-CM code 428 in the primary position. The trend increased more steeply prior to 2005 and was relatively flat after 2005. PMID:26895710

  12. 29 CFR 103.30 - Appropriate bargaining units in the health care industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appropriate bargaining units in the health care industry. 103.30 Section 103.30 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD OTHER RULES Appropriate Bargaining Units § 103.30 Appropriate bargaining units in the health care industry. (a)...

  13. The Evolving Practice of Developmental Care in the Neonatal Unit: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legendre, Valerie; Burtner, Patricia A.; Martinez, Katrina L.; Crowe, Terry K.

    2011-01-01

    Many neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are experiencing changes in their approaches to preterm infant care as they consider and incorporate the philosophy of individualized developmental care. The aim of this systematic review is to research current literature documenting the short-term effects of developmental care and the Newborn…

  14. Summary of prospective quantification of reimbursement recovery from inpatient acute care outliers.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Gerald S; Paulson, Albert S

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and quantify inpatient acute care hospital cases that are eligible for additional financial reimbursement. Acute care hospitals are reimbursed by third-party payers on behalf of their patients. Reimbursement is a fixed amount dependent primarily upon the diagnostic related group (DRG) of the case and the service intensity weight of the individual hospital. This method is used by nearly all third-party payers. For a given case, reimbursement is fixed (all else being equal) until a certain threshold level of charges, the cost outlier threshold, is reached. Above this amount the hospital is partially reimbursed for additional charges above the cost outlier threshold. Hospital discharge information has been described as having an error rate of between 7 and 22 percent in attribution of basic case characteristics. It can be expected that there is a significant error rate in the attribution of charges as well. This could be due to miscategorization of the case, misapplication of charges, or other causes. Identification of likely cases eligible for additional reimbursement would alleviate financial pressure where hospitals would have to absorb high expenses for outlier cases. Determining predicted values for total charges for each case was accomplished by exploring associative relationships between charges and case-specific variables. These variables were clinical, demographic, and administrative. Year-by-year comparisons show that these relationships appear stable throughout the five-year period under study. Beta coefficients developed in Year 1 are applied to develop predictions for Year 3 cases. This was also done for year pairs 2 and 4, and 3 and 5. Based on the predicted and actual value of charges, recovery amounts were calculated for each case in the second year of the year pairs. The year gap is necessary to allow for collection and analysis of the data of the first year of each pair. The analysis was performed in two parts

  15. Closed-loop control for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation using digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Behnood

    This dissertation introduces a new problem in the delivery of healthcare, which could result in lower cost and a higher quality of medical care as compared to the current healthcare practice. In particular, a framework is developed for sedation and cardiopulmonary management for patients in the intensive care unit. A method is introduced to automatically detect pain and agitation in nonverbal patients, specifically in sedated patients in the intensive care unit, using their facial expressions. Furthermore, deterministic as well as probabilistic expert systems are developed to suggest the appropriate drug dose based on patient sedation level. Patients in the intensive care unit who require mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure also frequently require the administration of sedative agents. The need for sedation arises both from patient anxiety due to the loss of personal control and the unfamiliar and intrusive environment of the intensive care unit, and also due to pain or other variants of noxious stimuli. In this dissertation, we develop a rule-based expert system for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation. Furthermore, we use probability theory to quantify uncertainty and to extend the proposed rule-based expert system to deal with more realistic situations. Pain assessment in patients who are unable to verbally communicate is a challenging problem. The fundamental limitations in pain assessment stem from subjective assessment criteria, rather than quantifiable, measurable data. The relevance vector machine (RVM) classification technique is a Bayesian extension of the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm which achieves comparable performance to SVM while providing posterior probabilities for class memberships and a sparser model. In this dissertation, we use the RVM classification technique to distinguish pain from non-pain as well as assess pain intensity levels. We also correlate our results with the pain intensity

  16. Evaluating the transition from dexmedetomidine to clonidine for agitation management in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Kimberly; Blum, Rachel; Szumita, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Limited literature exists examining the use of enteral clonidine to transition patients from dexmedetomidine for management of agitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate dexmedetomidine discontinuation within 8 h of enteral clonidine administration in addition to the rates of dexmedetomidine re-initiation in patients who failed clonidine transition. Methods: A single-center, retrospective analysis evaluated critically ill adult patients from 1 February 2013 to 28 February 2014, who used dexmedetomidine and clonidine for sedation management. Patients were excluded if they received enteral clonidine for reasons other than sedation management. Secondary aims of the study observed time to dexmedetomidine discontinuation, agitation (Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale) and delirium ratings (Confusion Assessment Method for the intensive care unit), clonidine dose, and enteral clonidine discontinuation. Results: In all, 26 patients were evaluated. Demographics included a mean age of 54.4 (±16.7) years, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 18 (interquartile range = 14–22), and 80.7% of admissions to the cardiac surgery intensive care unit. Dexmedetomidine discontinuation occurred in 17 (65.4%) patients within 8 h of receiving clonidine. The total median clonidine exposure per intensive care unit day was 0.35 mg/ICU day (interquartile range = 0.2–0.5) in patients who discontinued dexmedetomidine within 8 h and 0.5 mg/ICU day (interquartile range = 0.4–1.0) (p = 0.036) in patients who did not. We observed similar Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale and Confusion Assessment Method for the intensive care unit scores and rates of hypotension. Unintentional use of clonidine beyond ICU and hospital stay was observed in 54% and 23% of patients, respectively. Conclusion: Enteral clonidine may be an effective and safe alternative to transition patients off of dexmedetomidine for ongoing sedation management

  17. Four-year experience with bronchial asthma in a pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Osundwa, V M; Dawod, S

    1992-12-01

    Charts of all children with severe acute asthma admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care unit (PICU) of this hospital between January 1987 and December 1990 were reviewed retrospectively. There were 47 admissions for life threatening asthma to the PICU over this period, representing about 2% of all acute asthma admissions to our hospital. The mean duration of symptoms in these patients before admission was 54 hours. Only 55% of the PICU admissions had received bronchodilators before coming to our hospital emergency room from where they were admitted. From arterial blood gas analysis, 57% of the patients had hypercapnia (PaCO2 > 45 mmHg). All the patients received nebulized salbutamol frequently as well as intravenous aminophylline and hydrocortisone. Mechanical ventilation was used in only 8.5% of the patients. Only two patients developed pneumothorax, neither of whom had been mechanically ventilated, but they did not require surgical intervention for drainage. There was only one death in a patient who was known to have sickle cell anemia and developed sagittal sinus thrombosis. We conclude from our series that the mortality for children with life threatening asthma admitted to PICU is very low if bronchodilators and steroids are used optimally in their management, along with judicious selection of those requiring mechanical ventilation. PMID:1471785

  18. Oral care practices for patients in Intensive Care Units: A pilot survey

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Alexandre Franco; de Paula, Renata Monteiro; de Castro Piau, Cinthia Gonçalves Barbosa; Costa, Priscila Paganini; Bezerra, Ana Cristina Barreto

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the level of knowledge and difficulties concerning hospitalized patients regarding preventive oral health measures among professionals working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Study Population and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 71 health professionals working in the ICU. A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine the methods used, frequency, and attitude toward oral care provided to patients in Brazilian ICUs. The variables were analyzed using descriptive statistics (percentages). A one-sample t-test between proportions was used to assess significant differences between percentages. t-statistics were considered statistically significant for P < 0.05. Bonferroni correction was applied to account for multiple testing. Results: Most participants were nursing professionals (80.3%) working 12-h shifts in the ICU (70.4%); about 87.3% and 66.2% reported having knowledge about coated tongue and nosocomial pneumonia, respectively (P < 0.05). Most reported using spatulas, gauze, and toothbrushes (49.3%) or only toothbrushes (28.2%) with 0.12% chlorhexidine (49.3%) to sanitize the oral cavity of ICU patients (P < 0.01). Most professionals felt that adequate time was available to provide oral care to ICU patients and that oral care was a priority for mechanically ventilated patients (80.3% and 83.1%, respectively, P < 0.05). However, most professionals (56.4%) reported feeling that the oral cavity was difficult to clean (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The survey results suggest that additional education is necessary to increase awareness among ICU professionals of the association between dental plaque and systemic conditions of patients, to standardize oral care protocols, and to promote the oral health of patients in ICUs. PMID:27275074

  19. ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in acute care settings: dispensing and administration--1999.

    PubMed

    Ringold, D J; Santell, J P; Schneider, P J

    2000-10-01

    Results of the 1999 ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in acute care settings that pertain to drug dispensing and administration practices are presented. Pharmacy directors at 1050 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals in the United States were surveyed by mail. The response rate was 51%. About three-fourths of respondents described their inpatient pharmacy's distribution system as centralized. Of those with centralized distribution, 77.4% indicated that their system was not automated. Decentralized pharmacists were used in 29.4% of the hospitals surveyed; an average of 58.9% of their time was spent on clinical, as opposed to distributive, activities. About 67% of directors reported pharmacy computer access to hospital laboratory data, 38% reported access to automated medication-dispensing-unit data, and 19% reported computer access to hospital outpatient affiliates. Only 13% of hospitals had an electronic medication order-entry system; another 27% reported they were in the process of developing such a system. Decentralized medication storage and distribution devices were used in 49.2% of hospitals, while 7.3% used bedside information systems for medication management. Machine-readable coding was used for inpatient pharmacy dispensing by 8.2% of hospitals. Ninety percent reported a formal, systemwide committee responsible for data collection, review, and evaluation of medication errors. Virtually all respondents (98.7%) reported that their staff initiated manual reports. Only two thirds tracked these reports and reported trends to the staff. Fewer than 15% reported that staff were penalized for making or contributing to an error. Pharmacists are making a significant contribution to the safety of medication distribution and administration. The increased use of technology to improve efficiency and reduce costs will require that pharmacists continue to focus on the impact of changes on the safety of the medication-use system. PMID:11030028

  20. Effects of Centralizing Acute Stroke Services on Stroke Care Provision in Two Large Metropolitan Areas in England

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Stephen; Hoffman, Alex; Hunter, Rachael M.; Boaden, Ruth; McKevitt, Christopher; Perry, Catherine; Pursani, Nanik; Rudd, Anthony G.; Turner, Simon J.; Tyrrell, Pippa J.; Wolfe, Charles D.A.; Fulop, Naomi J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— In 2010, Greater Manchester and London centralized acute stroke care into hyperacute units (Greater Manchester=3, London=8), with additional units providing ongoing specialist stroke care nearer patients’ homes. Greater Manchester patients presenting within 4 hours of symptom onset were eligible for hyperacute unit admission; all London patients were eligible. Research indicates that postcentralization, only London’s stroke mortality fell significantly more than elsewhere in England. This article attempts to explain this difference by analyzing how centralization affects provision of evidence-based clinical interventions. Methods— Controlled before and after analysis was conducted, using national audit data covering Greater Manchester, London, and a noncentralized urban comparator (38 623 adult stroke patients, April 2008 to December 2012). Likelihood of receiving all interventions measured reliably in pre- and postcentralization audits (brain scan; stroke unit admission; receiving antiplatelet; physiotherapist, nutrition, and swallow assessments) was calculated, adjusting for age, sex, stroke-type, consciousness, and whether stroke occurred in-hospital. Results— Postcentralization, likelihood of receiving interventions increased in all areas. London patients were overall significantly more likely to receive interventions, for example, brain scan within 3 hours: Greater Manchester=65.2% (95% confidence interval=64.3–66.2); London=72.1% (71.4–72.8); comparator=55.5% (54.8–56.3). Hyperacute units were significantly more likely to provide interventions, but fewer Greater Manchester patients were admitted to these (Greater Manchester=39%; London=93%). Differences resulted from contrasting hyperacute unit referral criteria and how reliably they were followed. Conclusions— Centralized systems admitting all stroke patients to hyperacute units, as in London, are significantly more likely to provide evidence-based clinical

  1. [Normobaric oxygen therapy in acute medical care: myths versus reality].

    PubMed

    von Düring, Stephan; Bruchez, Stéphanie; Suppan, Laurent; Niquille, Marc

    2015-08-12

    Oxygen adiministration for both medical and traumatic emergencies is regarded as an essential component of resuscitation. However, many recent studies suggest that the use of oxygen should be more restrictive. Detrimental effects of normobaric oxygen therapy in patients suffering from hypercapnic respiratory diseases have been demonstrated, especially because of the suppression of the hypoxic drive. Apart from this particular situation, correction of hypoxemia is still a widely accepted treatment target, although there is growing evidence that hyperoxemia could be harmful in acute coronary syndromes and cardio-respiratory arrests. In other pathologies, such as stroke or hemorragic shock, the situation is still unclear, and further studies are needed to clarify the situation. Generally speaking, oxygen therapy should from now on be goal-directed, and early monitoring of both pulse oximetry and arterial blood gases is advised. PMID:26449100

  2. Practice Patterns in the Care of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Ujash; Wasserstein, David; Moineddin, Rahim; Jenkinson, Richard; Kreder, Hans; Jaglal, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Over the last decade, there has been a growing body of level I evidence supporting non-operative management (focused on early range of motion and weight bearing) of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Despite this emerging evidence, there have been very few studies evaluating its uptake. Our primary objective was to determine whether the findings from a landmark trial assessing the optimal management strategy for acute Achilles tendon ruptures influenced the practice patterns of orthopaedic surgeons in Ontario, Canada over a 12-year time period. As a second objective we examined whether patient and provider predictors of surgical repair utilization differed before and after dissemination of the landmark trial results. Methods: Using provincial health administrative databases, we identified Ontario residents ≥ 18 years of age with an acute Achilles tendon rupture from April 2002 to March 2014. The proportion of surgically repaired ruptures was calculated for each calendar quarter and year. A time series analysis using an interventional autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model was used to determine whether changes in the proportion of surgically repaired ruptures were chronologically related to the dissemination of results from a landmark trial by Willits et al. (first quarter, 2009). Spline regression was then used to independently identify critical time-points of change in the surgical repair rate to confirm our findings. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess for differences in patient (baseline demographics) and provider (hospital type) predictors of surgical repair utilization before and after the landmark trial. Results: In 2002, ˜19% of acute Achilles tendon ruptures in Ontario were surgically repaired, however, by 2014 only 6.5% were treated operatively. A statistically significant decrease in the rate of surgical repair (p < 0.001) was observed after the results from a landmark trial were presented at a major

  3. State-mandated reporting of health care-associated infections in the United States: trends over time.

    PubMed

    Herzig, Carolyn T A; Reagan, Julie; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Srinath, Divya; Stone, Patricia W

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, most US states and territories began mandating that acute care hospitals report health care-associated infections (HAIs) to their departments of health. Trends in state HAI law enactment and data submission requirements were determined through systematic legal review; state HAI coordinators were contacted to confirm collected data. As of January 31, 2013, 37 US states and territories (71%) had adopted laws requiring HAI data submission, most of which were enacted and became effective in 2006 and 2007. Most states with HAI laws required reporting of central line-associated bloodstream infections in adult intensive care units (92%), and about half required reporting of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile infections (54% and 51%, respectively). Overall, data submission requirements were found to vary across states. Considering the facility and state resources needed to comply with HAI reporting mandates, future studies should focus on whether these laws have had the desired impact of reducing infection rates. PMID:24951104

  4. Impact of Thromboprophylaxis across the US Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Anderson, Frederick A.; Rushton-Smith, Sophie K.; Cohen, Alexander T.

    2015-01-01

    Background The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) can be reduced by appropriate use of anticoagulant prophylaxis. VTE prophylaxis does, however, remain substantially underused, particularly among acutely ill medical inpatients. We sought to evaluate the clinical and economic impact of increasing use of American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP)-recommended VTE prophylaxis among medical inpatients from a US healthcare system perspective. Methods and Findings In this retrospective database cost-effectiveness evaluation, a decision-tree model was developed to estimate deaths within 30 days of admission and outcomes attributable to VTE that might have been averted by use of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) or unfractionated heparin (UFH). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated using “no prophylaxis” as the comparator. Data from the ENDORSE US medical inpatients and the US nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) were used to estimate the annual number of eligible inpatients who failed to receive ACCP-recommended VTE prophylaxis. The cost-effectiveness analysis indicated that VTE-prevention strategies would reduce deaths by 0.5% and 0.3%, comparing LMWH and UFH strategies with no prophylaxis, translating into savings of $50,637 and $25,714, respectively, per death averted. The ENDORSE findings indicated that 51.1% of US medical inpatients were at ACCP-defined VTE risk, 47.5% of whom received ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. By extrapolating these findings to the NIS and applying cost-effectives analysis results, the full implementation of ACCP guidelines would reduce number of deaths (by 15,875 if using LMWH or 10,201 if using UFH), and was extrapolated to calculate the cost reduction of $803M for LMWH and $262M for UFH. Conclusions Efforts to improve VTE prophylaxis use in acutely ill inpatients are warranted due to the potential for reducing VTE-attributable deaths, with net cost savings to healthcare systems. PMID:25816146

  5. Is accounting for acute care beds enough? A proposal for measuring infection prevention personnel resources.

    PubMed

    Gase, Kathleen A; Babcock, Hilary M

    2015-02-01

    There is still little known about how infection prevention (IP) staffing affects patient outcomes across the country. Current evaluations mainly focus on the ratio of IP resources to acute care beds (ACBs) and have not strongly correlated with patient outcomes. The scope of IP and the role of the infection preventionist in health care have expanded and changed dramatically since the Study on the Efficacy of Nosocomial Infection Control (SENIC Project) recommended a 1 IP resource to 250 ACB ration in the 1980s. Without a universally accepted model for accounting for additional IP responsibilities, it is difficult to truly assess IP staffing needs. A previously suggested alternative staffing model was applied to acute care hospitals in our organization to determine its utility. PMID:25480447

  6. Characteristics and Acute Care Use Patterns of Patients in a Senior Living Community Medical Practice

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Ryan; Gillespie, Suzanne M.; Nelson, Dallas; Newman, Calvin; Shah, Manish N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Primary care medical practices dedicated to the needs of older adults who dwell in independent and assisted living residences in senior living communities (SLCs) have been developed. To date, the demographic and acute medical care use patterns of patients in these practices have not been described. Design A descriptive study using a six-month retrospective record review of adults enrolled in a medical primary care practice that provides on-site primary medical care in SLCs. Setting Greater Rochester, New York. Participants 681 patients residing in 19 SLCs. Measurements Demographic and clinical data were collected. Use of acute medical care by patients in the SLC program including phone consultation, provider emergent/urgent in-home visit, emergency department (ED) visit, and hospital admissions were recorded. ED visit and hospital admissions at the two primary referral hospitals for the practice were reviewed for chief complaint and discharge plan. Results 635/681 (93%) of records were available. The median age was 85 years (interquartile range (IQR) 77, 89). Patients were predominantly female (447, 70%) and white (465, 73%). Selected chronic medical diseases included: dementia/cognitive impairment (367, 58%); cardiac disease (271, 43%); depression (246, 39%); diabetes (173, 27%); pulmonary disease (146, 23%); renal disease (118, 19%); cancer (115, 18%); stroke/TIA (93,15%). The median MMSE score was 25 (IQR 19, 28; n=446). Patients took a median of 10 medications (IQR 7, 12). Important medication classes included: cardiovascular (512 (81%); hypoglycemics (117, 18%); benzodiazepines (71, 11%); dementia (194, 31%); and anticoagulants (51, 8%). Patients received acute care 1,876 times (median frequency 3, IQR 2, 6) for 1,504 unique medical issues. Falls were the most common complaint (399, 20%). Of these 1,876 episodes, patients accessed acute care via telephone (1071, 57%), provider visit at the SLC (417, 22%), and ED visit (388, 21%). Of the cases

  7. The role of memories on health-related quality of life after intensive care unit care: an unforgettable controversy?

    PubMed Central

    Orwelius, Lotti; Teixeira-Pinto, Armando; Lobo, Cristina; Costa-Pereira, Altamiro; Granja, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Background Decreased health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is a significant problem after an intensive care stay and is affected by several known factors such as age, sex, and previous health-state. The objective of this study was to assess the association between memory and self-reported perceived HRQoL of patients discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods A prospective, multicenter study involving nine general ICUs in Portugal. All adult patients with a length of stay >48 hours were invited to participate in a 6-month follow-up after ICU discharge by answering a set of structured questionnaires, including EuroQol 5-Dimensions and ICU memory tool. Results A total of 313 (52% of the eligible) patients agreed to enter the study. The median age of patients was 60 years old, 58% were males, the median Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) was 38, and the median length of stay was 8 days for ICU and 21 days for total hospital stay. Eighty-nine percent (n=276) of the admissions were emergencies. Seventy-eight percent (n=234) of the patients had memories associated with the ICU stay. Patients with no memories had 2.1 higher chances (P=0.011) of being in the bottom half of the HRQoL score (<0.5 Euro-Qol 5-Dimensions index score). Even after adjusting for pre-admission characteristics, having memories was associated with higher perceived HRQoL (adjusted odds ratio =2.1, P=0.022). Conclusion This study suggests that most of the ICU survivors have memories of their ICU stay. For the ICU survivors, having memories of the ICU stay is associated with a higher perceived HRQoL 6 months after ICU discharge. PMID:27350762

  8. Interprofessional care co-ordinators: the benefits and tensions associated with a new role in UK acute health care.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Jackie; Meyer, Julienne; Glynn, Michael; Bentley, Jane; Reeves, Scott

    2003-08-01

    While more flexible models of service delivery are being introduced in UK health and social care, little is known about the impact of new roles, particularly support worker roles, on the work of existing practitioners. This action research study aimed to explore the impact of one such new role, that of interprofessional care co-ordinators (IPCCs). The general (internal) medical service of a UK hospital uses IPCCs to provide support to the interprofessional team and, in doing so, promote efficiency of acute bed use. Using a range of methods, mainly qualitative, this action research study sought to explore the characteristics and impact of the role on interprofessional team working. While the role's flexibility, autonomy and informality contributed to success in meeting its intended objectives, these characteristics also caused some tensions with interprofessional colleagues. These benefits and tensions mirror wider issues associated with the current modernisation agenda in UK health care. PMID:12834925

  9. Impact of clinical pharmacist in an Indian Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Hisham, Mohamed; Sivakumar, Mudalipalayam N.; Veerasekar, Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: A critically ill patient is treated and reviewed by physicians from different specialties; hence, polypharmacy is a very common. This study was conducted to assess the impact and effectiveness of having a clinical pharmacist in an Indian Intensive Care Unit (ICU). It also evaluates the clinical pharmacist interventions with a focus on optimizing the quality of pharmacotherapy and patient safety. Materials and Methods: The prospective, observational study was carried out in medical and surgical/trauma ICU over a period of 1 year. All detected drug-related problems and interventions were categorized based on the Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe system. Results: During the study period, average monthly census of 1032 patients got treated in the ICUs. A total of 986 pharmaceutical interventions due to drug-related problems were documented, whereof medication errors accounted for 42.6% (n = 420), drug of choice problem 15.4% (n = 152), drug-drug interactions were 15.1% (n = 149), Y-site drug incompatibility was 13.7% (n = 135), drug dosing problems were 4.8% (n = 47), drug duplications reported were 4.6% (n = 45), and adverse drug reactions documented were 3.8% (n = 38). Drug dosing adjustment done by the clinical pharmacist included 140 (11.9%) renal dose, 62 (5.2%) hepatic dose, 17 (1.4%) pediatric dose, and 104 (8.8%) insulin dosing modifications. A total of 577 drug and poison information queries were answered by the clinical pharmacist. Conclusion: Clinical pharmacist as a part of multidisciplinary team in our study was associated with a substantially lower rate of adverse drug event caused by medication errors, drug interactions, and drug incompatibilities. PMID:27076707

  10. Developing a Simulation to Study Conflict in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Chiarchiaro, Jared; Schuster, Rachel A.; Ernecoff, Natalie C.; Barnato, Amber E.; Arnold, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Although medical simulation is increasingly being used in healthcare education, there are few examples of how to rigorously design a simulation to evaluate and study important communication skills of intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians. Objectives: To use existing best practice recommendations to develop a medical simulation to study conflict management in ICUs, then assess the feasibility, acceptability, and realism of the simulation among ICU clinicians. Methods: The setting was a medical ICU of a tertiary care, university hospital. Participants were 36 physicians who treat critically ill patients: intensivists, palliative medicine specialists, and trainees. Using best-practice guidelines and an iterative, multidisciplinary approach, we developed and refined a simulation involving a critically ill patient, in which the patient had a clear advance directive specifying no use of life support, and a surrogate who was unwilling to follow the patient’s preferences. ICU clinicians participated in the simulation and completed surveys and semistructured interviews to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and realism of the simulation. Measurements and Main Results: All participants successfully completed the simulation, and all perceived conflict with the surrogate (mean conflict score, 4.2 on a 0–10 scale [SD, 2.5; range, 1–10]). Participants reported high realism of the simulation across a range of criteria, with mean ratings of greater than 8 on a 0 to 10 scale for all domains assessed. During semistructured interviews, participants confirmed a high degree of realism and offered several suggestions for improvements. Conclusions: We used existing best practice recommendations to develop a simulation model to study physician–family conflict in ICUs that is feasible, acceptable, and realistic. PMID:25643166

  11. Hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit: a Brazilian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Fernando Suparregui; Rezende, Ederlon Alves de Carvalho; Mendes, Ciro Leite; Silva Jr., João Manoel; Sanches, Joel Lyra

    2014-01-01

    Objective In Brazil, there are no data on the preferences of intensivists regarding hemodynamic monitoring methods. The present study aimed to identify the methods used by national intensivists, the hemodynamic variables they consider important, the regional differences, the reasons for choosing a particular method, and the use of protocols and continued training. Methods National intensivists were invited to answer an electronic questionnaire during three intensive care events and later, through the Associação de Medicina Intensiva Brasileira portal, between March and October 2009. Demographic data and aspects related to the respondent preferences regarding hemodynamic monitoring were researched. Results In total, 211 professionals answered the questionnaire. Private hospitals showed higher availability of resources for hemodynamic monitoring than did public institutions. The pulmonary artery catheter was considered the most trusted by 56.9% of the respondents, followed by echocardiograms, at 22.3%. Cardiac output was considered the most important variable. Other variables also considered relevant were mixed/central venous oxygen saturation, pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, and right ventricular end-diastolic volume. Echocardiography was the most used method (64.5%), followed by pulmonary artery catheter (49.3%). Only half of respondents used treatment protocols, and 25% worked in continuing education programs in hemodynamic monitoring. Conclusion Hemodynamic monitoring has a greater availability in intensive care units of private institutions in Brazil. Echocardiography was the most used monitoring method, but the pulmonary artery catheter remains the most reliable. The implementation of treatment protocols and continuing education programs in hemodynamic monitoring in Brazil is still insufficient. PMID:25607264

  12. Evaluation of forensic cases admitted to pediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Duramaz, Burcu Bursal; Yıldırım, Hamdi Murat; Kıhtır, Hasan Serdar; Yeşilbaş, Osman; Şevketoğlu, Esra

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to determine the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of pediatric forensic cases to contribute to the literature and to preventive health care services. Material and Methods: Pediatric forensic cases hospitalized in our pediatric intensive care unit below the age of 17 years were reviewed retrospectively (January 2009–June 2014) . The patients were evaluated in two groups as physical traumas (Group A) and poisonings (Group B). The patients’ age, gender, complaints at presentation, time of presentation and referral (season, time) and, mortality rates were determined. Cases of physical trauma (Group A) were classified as traffic accidents, falling down from height, falling of device, drowning, electric shock, burns and child abuse. Poisonings (Group B) were classified as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, other chemicals and unknown drug poisonings. Results: Two hundred twenthy cases were included. The mean age was 5.1+3.1 years. One hundred fifteen (%52.5) of the cases were male and 105 (%47.5) were female. Group A consisted of 62 patients and Group B consisted of 158 patients. The patients presented most frequently in summer months. The most common reason for presentation was falling down from height (12.7%) in Group A and accidental drug poisoning (most frequently antidepressants) in Group B. The mortality rate was 5%. Conclusion: Forensic cases in the pediatric population (physical trauma and poisoning) are preventable health problems. Especially, preventive approach to improve the environment for falling down from height must be a priority. Increasing the awareness of families and the community on this issue, in summer months during which forensic cases are observed most frequently can contribute to a reduction in the number of cases. PMID:26568689

  13. Predictors of Long-Term Mortality in Patients Hospitalized in an Intensive Cardiac Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Sobkowicz, Bożena; Lisowska, Anna; Sawicki, Robert; Dabrowska, Milena; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2016-01-01

    Patients admitted to an intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU) are a heterogeneous population with a high mortality rate. The aim of our study was to investigate which clinical, biochemical, and echocardiographic parameters routinely assessed may affect long-term mortality in a non-selected ICCU population.A total of 392 patients hospitalized between 2008-2011 (mean age, 70 ± 13.8 years, 43% women) were consecutively and prospectively assessed with the following admission diagnoses: 168 with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), 122 with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), and 102 with other acute cardiac disorders. Patients were treated according to the current European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines.During a mean 29.3 (± 18.9) months of observation, 152 (38.8%) patients died and 7.9% of the patients needed a red blood cell transfusion (RBC Tx). Patients who died were significantly older and had lower baseline levels of hemoglobin (Hb), serum iron concentration (SIC), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), cholesterol, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), as well as lower eGFR values, and higher white blood cell (WBC) counts and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (P < 0.05). Predictors of death in multivariate regression analysis were age, Hb, LVEF, WBC, and CRP. The most powerful factor was hospitalization for non-ACS. The risk of long-term mortality increased with decreasing levels of Hb (P < 0.001), SIC (P = 0.001), TIBC (P = 0.009), and the need for RBC Tx (P < 0.001), as well as the diagnosis of ADHF (P < 0.001) and the absence of ACS (P = 0.007).In ICCU patients, age, Hb, parameters of iron status, and LVEF are strong predictors of long-term mortality. Among the ICCU population, patients with ACS diagnosis have better survival. PMID:26673443

  14. Capability of Using Clinical Care Classification System to Represent Nursing Practice in Acute Setting in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Rung-Chuang; Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Yan, Hsiu-Fang; Huang, Hsiu-Ya; Chang, Polun

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the capability of the Clinical Care Classification (CCC) system to represent nursing record data in a medical center in Taiwan. Nursing care records were analyzed using the process of knowledge discovery in data sets. The study data set included all the nursing care plan records from December 1998 to October 2008, totaling 2,060,214 care plan documentation entries. Results show that 75.42% of the documented diagnosis terms could be mapped using the CCC system. A total of 21 established nursing diagnoses were recommended to be added into the CCC system. Results show that one-third of the assessment and care tasks were provided by nursing professionals. This study shows that the CCC system is useful for identifying patterns in nursing practices and can be used to construct a nursing database in the acute setting. PMID:24199066

  15. Intensive care unit management of fever following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Hilaire J; Kirkness, Catherine J; Mitchell, Pamela H

    2007-04-01

    Fever, in the presence of traumatic brain injury (TBI), is associated with worsened neurologic outcomes. Studies prior to the publication of management guidelines revealed an undertreatment of fever in patients with neurologic insults. Presently the adult TBI guidelines state that maintenance of normothermia should be a standard of care therefore improvement in management of fever in these patients would be expected. The specific aims of the study were to: (1) determine the incidence of fever (T>or=38.5 degrees C) in a population of critically ill patients with TBI; (2) describe what interventions were recorded by intensive care unit (ICU) nurses in managing fever; (3) ascertain the rate of adherence with published normothermia guidelines. Medical record review of available hospital records was conducted on patients admitted to a level I trauma center following severe TBI (N=108) from the parent study. Temperature data was abstracted and contemporaneous nursing documentation was examined for evidence of intervention for fever and adherence with published standards. Data analyses were performed that included descriptive statistics. Seventy-nine percent of TBI patients (85/108) had at least one recorded fever event while in the ICU. However in only 31% of events did the patient receive any documented intervention by nursing staff for the elevated temperature. The most frequently documented intervention was pharmacologic (358/1166 elevations). Other nursing actions (e.g. use of fan) accounted for a minority (<1%) of nursing interventions documented. Patients were more likely to have a high temperature that exceeded 40 degrees C (13%) than a temperature that was normothermic (5%). There continues to be an under treatment of fever in patients with TBI by critical care nurses despite our knowledge of its negative effects on outcomes. There remains a gap in translation between patient outcomes research and bedside practice that needs to be overcome, thus research efforts

  16. Framing the issue of ageing and health care spending in Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States.

    PubMed

    Gusmano, Michael K; Allin, Sara

    2014-07-01

    Political debates about the affordability of health care programmes in high-income countries often point to population ageing as a threat to sustainability. Debates in the United States, in particular, highlight concerns about intergenerational equity, whereby spending on older people is perceived as a threat to spending on the young. This paper compares how the problem of health spending is defined in Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States by presenting the results of a content analysis of print media during the period 2005-2010. We found that population ageing was cited as an important source of health care cost increases in all three countries but was cited less frequently in Canadian newspapers than in the UK or US papers. Direct claims about intergenerational equity are infrequent among the articles we coded, but newspaper articles in the United States were more likely than those in Canada and the United Kingdom to claim that of high health care spending on older people takes resources away from younger people. In Canada a much larger percentage of articles in our sample either claimed that high health care spending is crowding out other types of government expenditure. Finally, we found that almost no articles in the United States challenged the view that population ageing causes health care spending, whereas in both Canada and the United Kingdom a small, but steady stream of articles challenged the idea that population ageing is to blame for health care spending increases. PMID:24759155

  17. Antimicrobial use over a four-year period using days of therapy measurement at a Canadian pediatric acute care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Bruce R; MacTavish, Sandra J; Bresee, Lauren C; Rajapakse, Nipunie; Vanderkooi, Otto; Vayalumkal, Joseph; Conly, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial resistance is a concern that is challenging the ability to treat common infections. Surveillance of antimicrobial use in pediatric acute care institutions is complicated because the common metric unit, the defined daily dose, is problematic for this population. OBJECTIVE: During a four-year period in which no specific antimicrobial stewardship initiatives were conducted, pediatric antimicrobial use was quantified using days of therapy (DOT) per 100 patient days (PD) (DOT/100 PD) at the Alberta Children’s Hospital (Calgary, Alberta) for benchmarking purposes. METHODS: Drug use data for systemic antimicrobials administered on wards at the Alberta Children’s Hospital were collected from electronic medication administration records. DOT were calculated and rates were determined using 100 PD as the denominator. Changes over the surveillance period and subgroup proportions were represented graphically and assessed using linear regression. RESULTS: Total antimicrobial use decreased from 93.6 DOT/100 PD to 75.7 DOT/100 PD (19.1%) over the 2010/2011 through to the 2013/2014 fiscal years. During this period, a 20.0% increase in PD and an essentially stable absolute count of DOT (2.9% decrease) were observed. Overall, antimicrobial use was highest in the pediatric intensive care and oncology units. DISCUSSION: The exact changes in prescribing patterns that led to the observed reduction in DOT/100 PD with associated increased PD are unclear, but may be a topic for future investigations. CONCLUSION: Antimicrobial use data from a Canadian acute care pediatric hospital reported in DOT/100 PD were compiled for a four-year time period. These data may be useful for benchmarking purposes. PMID:26600813

  18. Detection of decreased glomerular filtration rate in intensive care units: serum cystatin C versus serum creatinine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Detecting impaired glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is important in intensive care units (ICU) in order to diagnose acute kidney injuries and adjust the dose of renally excreted drugs. Whether serum Cystatin C (SCysC) may better reflect glomerular filtration rate than serum creatinine (SCr) in the context of intensive care medicine is uncertain. Methods We compared the performance of SCysC and SCr as biomarkers of GFR in 47 critically ill patients (median SOFA (Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment) score of 5) for whom GFR was measured by a reference method (urinary clearance of iohexol). Results Mean Iohexol clearance averaged 96 ± 54 mL/min and was under 60 mL/min in 28% of patients. Mean SCr and SCysC concentrations were 0.70 ± 0.33 mg/dL and 1.26 ± 0.61 mg/L, respectively. Area under the ROC curve for a GFR threshold of 60 mL/min was 0.799 and 0.942 for SCr and SCysC, respectively (p = 0.014). Conclusions We conclude that ScysC significantly outperfoms SCr for the detection of an impaired GFR in critically ill patients. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: B7072006347 PMID:24410757

  19. Critical Illness Outcome Study: An Observational Study on Protocols and Mortality in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naeem A.; Gutteridge, David; Shahul, Sajid; Checkley, William; Sevransky, Jonathan; Martin, Greg S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many individual Intensive Care Unit (ICU) characteristics have been associated with patient outcomes, including staffing, expertise, continuity and team structure. Separately, many aspects of clinical care in ICUs have been operationalized through the development of complex treatment protocols. The United State Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group-Critical Illness Outcomes Study (USCIITG-CIOS) was designed to determine whether the extent of protocol availability and use in ICUs is associated with hospital survival in a large cohort of United States ICUs. Here, we describe the study protocol and analysis plan approved by the USCIITG-CIOS Steering Committee. Methods USCIITG-CIOS is a prospective, observational, ecological multi-centered “cohort” study of mixed ICUs in the U.S. The data collected include organizational information for the ICU (e.g., protocol availability and utilization, multi-disciplinary staffing assessment) and patient level information (e.g. demographics, acute and chronic medical conditions). The primary outcome is all-cause hospital mortality, with the objective being to determine whether there is an association between protocol number and hospital mortality for ICU patients. USCIITG-CIOS is powered to detect a 3% difference in crude hospital mortality between high and low protocol use ICUs, dichotomized according to protocol number at the median. The analysis will utilize regression modeling to adjust for outcome clustering by ICU, with secondary linear analysis of protocol number and mortality and a variety of a priori planned ancillary studies. There are presently 60 ICUs participating in USCIITG-CIOS to enroll approximately 6,000 study subjects. Conclusions USCIITG-CIOS is a large multicentric study examining the effect of ICU protocol use on patient outcomes. The primary results of this study will inform our understanding of the relationship between protocol availability, use, and patient outcomes in the ICU. Moreover

  20. Acute and Perioperative Care of the Burn-Injured Patient

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Edward A.; Shank, Erik; Woodson, Lee; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2016-01-01

    Care of burn-injured patients requires knowledge of the pathophysiologic changes affecting virtually all organs from the onset of injury until wounds are healed. Massive airway and/or lung edema can occur rapidly and unpredictably after burn and/or inhalation injury. Hemodynamics in the early phase of severe burn injury are characterized by a reduction in cardiac output, increased systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance. Approximately 2–5 days after major burn injury, a hyperdynamic and hypermetabolic state develops. Electrical burns result in morbidity much higher than expected based on burn size alone. Formulae for fluid resuscitation should serve only as guideline; fluids should be titrated to physiologic end points. Burn injury is associated basal and procedural pain requiring higher than normal opioid and sedative doses. Operating room concerns for the burn-injured patient include airway abnormalities, impaired lung function, vascular access, deceptively large and rapid blood loss, hypothermia and altered pharmacology. PMID:25485468

  1. Delivering Perinatal Psychiatric Services in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Susan Hatters; Kessler, Ann; Yang, Sarah Nagle; Parsons, Sarah; Friedman, Harriet; Martin, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To describe characteristics of mothers who would likely benefit from on-site short-term psychiatric services while their infant is in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Methods For 150 consecutive mothers who were referred for psychiatric evaluation and psychotherapeutic intervention in an innovative NICU mental health program, baseline information was collected. Data regarding their referrals, diagnosis, treatments, and their infants was analyzed. Results Most mothers were referred because of depression (43%), anxiety (44%), and/ or difficulty coping with their infant's medical problems and hospitalization (60%). Mothers of VLBW infants were disproportionately more likely to be referred. A majority of mothers accepted the referral and were treated; most only required short-term psychotherapy. A minority resisted or refused psychiatric assessment; a quarter of these had more difficult interactions with staff or inappropriate behaviors. In these cases the role of the psychiatrist was to work with staff to promote healthy interactions and to foster maternal-infant bonding. Conclusion Overall, on-site psychiatric services have been accepted by a majority of referred NICU mothers, and most did not require long-term treatment. A considerable need exists for psychiatric services in the NICU to promote optimal parenting and interactions. PMID:23772977

  2. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    PubMed

    Suh, Robert D; Genshaft, Scott J; Kirsch, Jacobo; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Chung, Jonathan H; Donnelly, Edwin F; Ginsburg, Mark E; Heitkamp, Darel E; Henry, Travis S; Kazerooni, Ella A; Ketai, Loren H; McComb, Barbara L; Ravenel, James G; Saleh, Anthony G; Shah, Rakesh D; Steiner, Robert M; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H

    2015-11-01

    Portable chest radiography is a fundamental and frequently utilized examination in the critically ill patient population. The chest radiograph often represents a timely investigation of new or rapidly evolving clinical findings and an evaluation of proper positioning of support tubes and catheters. Thoughtful consideration of the use of this simple yet valuable resource is crucial as medical cost containment becomes even more mandatory. This review addresses the role of chest radiography in the intensive care unit on the basis of the existing literature and as formed by a consensus of an expert panel on thoracic imaging through the American College of Radiology. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:26439890

  3. Oxygen therapy in neonatal intensive care units in Khartoum State

    PubMed Central

    Omer, Ilham M; Ibrahim, Nada G; Nasr, Abdalhalim M A

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is a drug that is essential in the treatment and prevention of neonatal hypoxia. The goal of oxygen therapy is to deliver sufficient oxygen to tissues while minimizing oxygen toxicity and oxidative stress. Improvement in monitoring technology of oxygen therapy has helped to improve clinicians’ ability to appropriately apply and deliver oxygen. The objectives of this prospective observational descriptive hospital based study were: to evaluate the practice of oxygen therapy in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Khartoum State, to identify guidelines of oxygen therapy in NICUs, to determine the mode of oxygen delivery to the neonates, and to assess the practice of long term follow up of patients who used oxygen. During the period January – June 2014, 139 neonates were included. Oxygen was delivered to the neonates in the study depending on the clinical assessment. Saturation was not measured at the time of oxygen administration in 119 (85.6%) neonates. Oxygen was delivered by central device in 135 neonates (97.1%). The majority of the staff did not know the practice of long-term follow up. Hundred and sixteen (83.5%) of the nursing staff knew that oxygen has complications but the majority didn’t know the nature of the complications and what causes them. The study showed that there is lack of guidelines of oxygen therapy in the NICUs and lack of monitoring procedures, which is important to be highlighted to overcome the complications and to improve the practice of oxygen therapy.

  4. Prevention of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Paolo; De Luca, Daniele; Stronati, Mauro; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Ruffinazzi, Giulia; Luparia, Martina; Tavella, Elena; Boano, Elena; Castagnola, Elio; Mostert, Michael; Farina, Daniele

    2013-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis causes a huge burden of morbidity and mortality and includes bloodstream, urine, cerebrospinal, peritoneal, and lung infections as well as infections starting from burns and wounds, or from any other usually sterile sites. It is associated with cytokine - and biomediator-induced disorders of respiratory, hemodynamic, and metabolic processes. Neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit feature many specific risk factors for bacterial and fungal sepsis. Loss of gut commensals such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli spp., as occurs with prolonged antibiotic treatments, delayed enteral feeding, or nursing in incubators, translates into proliferation of pathogenic microflora and abnormal gut colonization. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment do not protect septic neonates form the risk of late neurodevelopmental impairment in the survivors. Thus prevention of bacterial and fungal infection is crucial in these settings of unique patients. In this view, improving neonatal management is a key step, and this includes promotion of breast-feeding and hygiene measures, adoption of a cautious central venous catheter policy, enhancement of the enteric microbiota composition with the supplementation of probiotics, and medical stewardship concerning H2 blockers with restriction of their use. Additional measures may include the use of lactoferrin, fluconazole, and nystatin and specific measures to prevent ventilator associated pneumonia. PMID:23292914

  5. Antibiotic Stewardship Challenges in a Referral Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Shipp, Kimberly D; Chiang, Tracy; Karasick, Stephanie; Quick, Kayla; Nguyen, Sean T; Cantey, Joseph B

    2016-04-01

    Background Antibiotic overuse in neonates is associated with adverse outcomes. Data are limited to guide antibiotic stewardship in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Our objective was to identify areas for antibiotic stewardship improvement in a referral NICU. Methods Retrospective review of antibiotic use administered to infants admitted to a referral NICU compared with an inborn NICU. Antibiotic use was quantified by days of therapy (DOT) per 1,000 patient-days (PD). Results A total of 78% of referral NICU infants received ≥ 1 course of antibiotics. Infants in the referral NICU received more antibiotic DOT/1,000 PD than in the inborn NICU (558.9 vs. 343.2, p < 0.001), with a higher proportion of broad-spectrum therapy. For infants in the referral NICU, 39% of antibiotic courses were started at the transferring hospital; these were broader in spectrum (28 vs. 20%, p < 0.001) and less likely to be de-escalated or discontinued at 48 to 72 hours (58 vs. 87%, p < 0.001) than courses started after transfer. Conclusions Compared with the inborn NICU, suspected sepsis in the referral NICU accounted for more antibiotic utilization, which was broad-spectrum and less likely to be de-escalated. Stewardship interventions should include reserving broad-spectrum therapy for infants with risk factors and de-escalating promptly once culture results become available. PMID:26683603

  6. Sexual incidents in an extended care unit for aged men.

    PubMed

    Szasz, G

    1983-07-01

    A survey was conducted among the nursing staff of a 400-bed extended-care unit for aged men by questionnaire to find out what patient behaviors were identified as sexual by the staff and how they reacted to these behaviors. Three types of behavior were identified as sexual and as "causing problems": sex talk (e.g., using foul language); sexual acts (e.g., touching or grabbing, exposing genitalia); and implied sexual behavior (e.g., openly reading pornographic magazines). As many as 25 per cent of the residents were thought to create such incidents. Acceptable sexual behavior identified by the staff were limited to hugging and kissing on the cheek, although their answers implied that residents could need more intimate touching and affection. The survey raised questions about the nature and causes of different types of sexual behavior in the institutionalized elderly and about the roles nursing staff, physicians, and administrators can play in recognizing individual needs while safeguarding both the residents and the staff from the consequences of unacceptable incidents. PMID:6863791

  7. Short acting insulin analogues in intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilotta, Federico; Guerra, Carolina; Badenes, Rafael; Lolli, Simona; Rosa, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Blood glucose control in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, addressed to actively maintain blood glucose concentration within defined thresholds, is based on two major therapeutic interventions: to supply an adequate calories load and, when necessary, to continuously infuse insulin titrated to patients needs: intensive insulin therapy (IIT). Short acting insulin analogues (SAIA) have been synthesized to improve the chronic treatment of patients with diabetes but, because of the pharmacokinetic characteristics that include shorter on-set and off-set, they can be effectively used also in ICU patients and have the potential to be associated with a more limited risk of inducing episodes of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. Medical therapies carry an intrinsic risk for collateral effects; this can be more harmful in patients with unstable clinical conditions like ICU patients. To minimize these risks, the use of short acting drugs in ICU patients have gained a progressively larger room in ICU and now pharmaceutical companies and researchers design drugs dedicated to this subset of medical practice. In this article we report the rationale of using short acting drugs in ICU patients (i.e., sedation and treatment of arterial hypertension) and we also describe SAIA and their therapeutic use in ICU with the potential to minimize iatrogenic hypoglycemia related to IIT. The pharmacodynamic and pharmachokinetic characteristics of SAIA will be also discussed. PMID:24936244

  8. Computer assisted management of information in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Cereijo, E

    1992-10-01

    In order to use the capability of computers for handling large amounts of information, we developed a program for the acquisition, handling, storage and retrieval of administrative and clinical information generated in the 20 bedded multidisciplinary critical care unit of a University Hospital. At an initial phase a personal computer (PC) was used to collect information from 4362 patients, that included registration data, coded admission problems, techniques and special treatments, and final diagnosis. This information combined with free text provided a discharge report. Complementary programs allowed calculation and storage of hemodynamic and gas exchange parameters. This experience led to a second phase in which a computer with microprocessor Intel 80386 at 25 MHz, 8 MB RAM, 310 MB hard disk and a streamer for 150 MB cartridge tape back up, using UNIX operating system, permitted multiple users working simultaneously through 1 central console and 7 ASCII terminals. Data input included demographic data, previous and admission problems in coded form, present history and physical examination in free text, list of present problems in coded form, comments on evolution, record of special techniques and treatments, laboratory data, treatment, final diagnosis and facility for using all the information to elaborate the final report. Side modules provide help for drugs dosing, protocols for specific conditions and clerical routines. The system is open for connection to other areas of the Hospital. Data from more than 2000 patients have been included so far.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1447538

  9. [Update on current care guidelines. Current care guideline: Acute lower respiratory tract infection in adults].

    PubMed

    Honkanen, Pekka; Broas, Markku; Hedman, Jouni; Jartti, Airi; Järvinen, Asko; Koskela, Markku; Meinander, Tuula; Puolijoki, Hannu; Rautakorpi, Ulla; Syrjälä, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is recognised in patients suffering from acute cough or deteriorated general condition. Patients with acute cough without pneumonia-related symptoms or clinical findings do not benefit from antimicrobial treatment. Those with suspected or confirmed pneumonia are treated with antibiotics, amoxicillin being the first choice. Most patients with pneumonia can be treated at home. Those with severe symptoms are referred to hospital. Patients are always encouraged to contact his/her physician if the symptoms worsen or do not ameliorate within 2-3 days. Patients aged 50 years or older and smokers are controlled by thoracic radiography in 6-8 weeks. PMID:26237912

  10. Review of nucleic acid amplification tests and clinical prediction rules for diagnosis of tuberculosis in acute care facilities.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Amit S; Davis, J Lucian; Schecter, Gisela F; Barry, Pennan M; Flood, Jennifer M

    2015-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains an important cause of hospitalization and mortality in the United States. Prevention of TB transmission in acute care facilities relies on prompt identification and implementation of airborne isolation, rapid diagnosis, and treatment of presumptive pulmonary TB patients. In areas with low TB burden, this strategy may result in inefficient utilization of airborne infection isolation rooms (AIIRs). We reviewed TB epidemiology and diagnostic approaches to inform optimal TB detection in low-burden settings. Published clinical prediction rules for individual studies have a sensitivity ranging from 81% to 100% and specificity ranging from 14% to 63% for detection of culture-positive pulmonary TB patients admitted to acute care facilities. Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) have a specificity of >98%, and the sensitivity of NAATs varies by acid-fast bacilli sputum smear status (positive smear, ≥95%; negative smear, 50%-70%). We propose an infection prevention strategy using a clinical prediction rule to identify patients who warrant diagnostic evaluation for TB in an AIIR with an NAAT. Future studies a